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Sample records for low-temperature gas discharge

  1. Aspects of the practical application of titanium alloys after low temperature nitriding glow discharge in hydrogen- free -gas media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mashovets, N. S.; Pastukh, I. M.; Voloshko, S. M.

    2017-01-01

    X-ray diffraction analysis, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and Electron Auger-spectroscopy investigation of phase transformation on the surface of the VT8 titanium alloy after a low temperature hydrogen-free nitriding in a glow discharge. Operational characteristics of titanium alloys defined physical-mechanical characteristics of the surface and their phase composition, which depend on the process parameters of nitriding. Surface modification of titanium alloys were carried out by low-temperature nitriding in a glow discharge in hydrogen-free environment. The main advantage of this method lies in the absence of hydrogen embrittlement and complete environmental safety process. Application of the glow discharge can not only speed up the process by the order of the diffusion surface saturation with nitrogen, but also significantly alters the kinetics of the process and quality of the nitrided layer, in particular its physio-mechanical properties and phase composition. For research purposes, the standards from an α + β alloy Ti-Al6-Cr2-Mo2,5 (VT8) were used. Research into the phase composition was performed by X-ray diffraction, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Stratified analysis by AES was conducted by etching the surface of the samples' argon ion beam with diameters of 1.5 mm with an energy of 3000 eV and a current density of 400 mA/cm2. The above material shows the promise of the technology of low-temperature hydrogen-nitriding by glow discharge. This greatly expands the range of practical applications of titanium alloys. In addition, changing the technological mode allows you to manage a wide range of modified phase composition of the surface layer and as a result - to form the surface of titanium parts, taking into account the conditions of the subsequent operation.

  2. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 μg C1–C5/g rock) than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 μg C1–C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  3. Low-temperature gas from marine shales.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-02-23

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C in the subsurface and generally above 300 degrees C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100 degrees C, robust gas generation below 100 degrees C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50 degrees C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1-C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (approximately 1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50 degrees C (57.4 microg C1-C5/g rock) than at 350 degrees C by thermal cracking (12 microg C1-C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300 degrees below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible.

  4. Low temperature discharge characteristics of lithium-manganese dioxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampartzumian, K.; Iltchev, N.

    Lithium—manganese dioxide cells have not only excellent specific energy and shelf life characteristics, but they are also capable of very promising performance at temperatures as low as -40 °C (-40 °F). The polarization and discharge curves of cylindrical and button cells at -40 °C are compared in an effort to evaluate the useful low temperature operation range. The cathode design, and type of MnO 2 strongly affect the low temperature behaviour. Although the excellent low temperature performance of the Li/SO 2 system can probably never be equalled, due to some diffusion shortcomings inherent in the Li/MnO 2 cells, for low and moderate current drains covering many meteorological, military, and consumer applications, Li/MnO 2 batteries are very competitive in terms of simple technology, increased safety, and price, offering satisfactory operation within the range -40 to +71 °C (-40 °F to +160 °F).

  5. Investigation of NOx Reduction by Low Temperature Oxidation Using Ozone Produced by Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stamate, Eugen; Irimiea, Cornelia; Salewski, Mirko

    2013-05-01

    NOx reduction by low temperature oxidation using ozone produced by a dielectric barrier discharge generator is investigated for different process parameters in a 6 m long reactor in serpentine arrangement using synthetic dry flue gas with NOx levels below 500 ppm, flows up to 50 slm and temperatures up to 80 °C. The role of different mixing schemes and the impact of a steep temperature gradient are also taken into consideration. The process chemistry is monitored by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, chemiluminescence and absorption spectroscopy. The kinetic mechanism during the mixing in a cross flow configuration is investigated using three-dimensional simulations.

  6. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Arrol, W.J.; Jefferson, S.

    1957-08-27

    The construction of gas discharge devices where the object is to provide a gas discharge device having a high dark current and stabilized striking voltage is described. The inventors have discovered that the introduction of tritium gas into a discharge device with a subsequent electrical discharge in the device will deposit tritium on the inside of the chamber. The tritium acts to emit beta rays amd is an effective and non-hazardous way of improving the abovementioned discharge tube characteristics

  7. Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hakki, A.; Fayrushin, I.; Kashapov, N.

    2016-01-01

    The paper describes Low temperature plasma RF capacitive discharge in helium at atmospheric pressure. The circuit has been done, to obtain output currentabout 90mA,and the maximum power was 100W, The frequency of the discharging was f = 40MHz.Twolamps (DУ-50) were used in power supply. Helium consumption was about 1.5l/m.

  8. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300° below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100°C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1) to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5), the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins. PMID:19900271

  9. Low-temperature gas from marine shales: wet gas to dry gas over experimental time.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-11-09

    Marine shales exhibit unusual behavior at low temperatures under anoxic gas flow. They generate catalytic gas 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures, discontinuously in aperiodic episodes, and lose these properties on exposure to trace amounts of oxygen. Here we report a surprising reversal in hydrocarbon generation. Heavy hydrocarbons are formed before light hydrocarbons resulting in wet gas at the onset of generation grading to dryer gas over time. The effect is moderate under gas flow and substantial in closed reactions. In sequential closed reactions at 100 degrees C, gas from a Cretaceous Mowry shale progresses from predominately heavy hydrocarbons (66% C5, 2% C1) to predominantly light hydrocarbons (56% C1, 8% C5), the opposite of that expected from desorption of preexisting hydrocarbons. Differences in catalyst substrate composition explain these dynamics. Gas flow should carry heavier hydrocarbons to catalytic sites, in contrast to static conditions where catalytic sites are limited to in-place hydrocarbons. In-place hydrocarbons and their products should become lighter with conversion thus generating lighter hydrocarbon over time, consistent with our experimental results. We recognize the similarities between low-temperature gas generation reported here and the natural progression of wet gas to dry gas over geologic time. There is now substantial evidence for natural catalytic activity in source rocks. Natural gas at thermodynamic equilibrium and the results reported here add to that evidence. Natural catalysis provides a plausible and unique explanation for the origin and evolution of gas in sedimentary basins.

  10. Inactivation of Microcystis aeruginosa using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Pu, Sichuan; Chen, Jierong; Wang, Gang; Li, Xiaoyong; Ma, Yun

    2013-05-13

    The efficiency of Microcystis aeruginosa plasma inactivation was investigated using dielectric barrier discharge low-temperature plasma. The inactivation efficiency was characterized in terms of optical density. The influence of electrical and physicochemical parameters on M. aeruginosa inactivation was studied to determine the optimal experimental conditions. The influence of active species was studied. The proliferation of the M. aeruginosa cells was significantly decreased under plasma exposure. The morphologic changes in M. aeruginosa were characterized under scanning electron microscopy. These results suggest that the low-temperature plasma technology is a promising method for water pollution control.

  11. Low-temperature NOx reduction processes using combined systems of pulsed corona discharge and catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Takashima, K.; Katsura, S.; Mizuno, A.

    2001-02-01

    In this paper, we will report NOx removal via reduction processes using two types of combined system of pulse corona discharge and catalysts: the single-stage plasma-driven catalyst (PDC) system, and the two-stage plasma-enhanced selective catalytic reduction (PE-SCR) system. Several catalysts, such as γ-alumina catalysts, mechanically mixed catalysts of γ-alumina with BaTiO3 or TiO2, and Co-ZSM-5 were tested. In the PDC system, which is directly activated by the discharge plasma, it was found that the use of additives was necessary to achieve NOx removal by reduction. Removal rates of NO and NOx were linearly increased as the molar ratio of additive to NOx increased. The dependence of NO and NOx removal on the gas hourly space velocity (GHSV) at a fixed specific input energy (SIE) indicates that plasma-induced surface reaction on the catalyst plays an important role in the PDC system. It was found that the optimal GHSV of the PDC system with the γ-alumina catalyst was smaller than 6000 h-1. Mechanical mixing of γ-alumina with BaTiO3 or TiO2 did not enhance NO and NOx removal and γ-alumina alone was found to be the most suitable catalyst. The dielectric constant of the catalyst only influenced the plasma intensity, not the NOx removal. In the PE-SCR system, plasma-treated NOx (mostly NO2) was reduced effectively with NH3 over the Co-ZSM-5 catalyst at a relatively low temperature of 150 °C. Under optimal conditions the energy cost and energy yield were 25 eV/molecule and 21 g-N (kWh)-1, respectively.

  12. INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGE

    DOEpatents

    Luce, J.S.

    1960-03-01

    A method and apparatus for initiating and sustaining an energetic gas arc discharge are described. A hollow cathode and a hollow anode are provided. By regulating the rate of gas flow into the interior of the cathode, the arc discharge is caused to run from the inner surface of the cathode with the result that adequate space-charge neutralization is provided inside the cathode but not in the main arc volume. Thus, the gas fed to the cathode is substantially completely ionized before it leaves the cathode, with the result that an energetic arc discharge can be maintained at lower operating pressures.

  13. GAS DISCHARGE DEVICES

    DOEpatents

    Jefferson, S.

    1958-11-11

    An apparatus utilized in introducing tritium gas into envelope of a gas discharge device for the purpose f maintaining the discharge path in ionized condition is described. ln addition to the cathode and anode, the ischarge device contains a zirconium or tantalum ilament arranged for external excitation and a metallic seed containing tritium, and also arranged to have a current passed through it. Initially, the zirconium or tantalum filament is vaporized to deposit its material adjacent the main discharge region. Then the tritium gas is released and, due to its affinity for the first released material, it deposits in the region of the main discharge where it is most effective in maintaining the discharge path in an ionized condition.

  14. Destruction of Gaseous Styrene with a Low-Temperature Plasma Induced by a Tubular Multilayer Dielectric Barrier Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jiahui; Liu, Juanjuan; Zhang, Renxi; Hou, Huiqi; Chen, Shanping; Zhang, Yi

    2015-01-01

    The destruction of gaseous styrene was studied using a low-temperature plasma induced by tubular multilayer dielectric barrier discharge (DBD). The results indicate that the applied voltage, gas flow rate, inlet styrene concentration and reactor configuration play important roles in styrene removal efficiency (ηstyrene) and energy yield (EY). Values of ηstyrene and EY reached 96% and 15567 mg/kWh when the applied voltage, gas flow rate, inlet styrene concentration and layers of quartz tubes were set at 10.8 kV, 5.0 m/s, 229 mg/m3 and 5 layers, respectively. A qualitative analysis of the byproducts and a detailed discussion of the reaction mechanism are also presented. The results could facilitate industrial applications of the new DBD reactor for waste gas treatment.

  15. Gyrocenter shift of low-temperature plasmas and the retrograde motion of cathode spots in arc discharges.

    PubMed

    Lee, K C

    2007-08-10

    The gyrocenter shift phenomenon explained the mechanism of radial electric field formation at the high confinement mode transition in fusion devices. This Letter reports that the theory of gyrocenter shift is also applicable to low temperature high collisional plasmas such as arc discharges by the generalization of the theory resulting from a short mean free path compared with the gyroradius. The retrograde motion of cathode spots in the arc discharge is investigated through a model with the expanded formula of gyrocenter shift. It is found that a reversed electric field is formed in front of the cathode spots when they are under a magnetic field, and this reversed electric field generates a rotation of cathode spots opposite to the Amperian direction. The ion drift velocity profiles calculated from the model are in agreement with the experimental results as functions of magnetic flux density and gas pressure.

  16. Experimental study of low-temperature plasma of electrical discharges with liquid electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheltukhin, Viktor; Gaisin, Almaz

    2016-09-01

    Results of the experimental research of discharge between the liquid jet cathode (LJC) and the metal anode are presented. The discharge was studied over the voltage range U = 100 - 600 V, discharge current range I = 0 . 1 - 0 . 25 A, external pressure range P =105 Pa, discharge power Pd = 10 - 150 W. We used the techniques of infrared thermography and spectral measurements. Schlieren's photography is applied for describing the processes in liquid and gas phase. Results of the experimental researches of discharge current-voltage characteristic (CVC), the surface temperature distribution both on the LJC and the metal anode, a spectral measurements are showed. Effects of action both of breakdown and discharge on the jet flow as well as on the air flow near the discharge are described. It is found that the discharge CVC has an ascending behavior due to increase of plasma current density. The discharge is generated on the borders between the LJC and the metal anode as well as along the LJC misshaping this one. It is established that both the convection streams and an electrolyte drops are formed during the discharge burn. It is found that the discharge temperature in the vicinity of electrode surface reaches T 348 K. The work was funded by RFBR, according to the research projects No.,14-01-0755.

  17. Decontamination effects of low-temperature plasma generated by corona discharge. Part II: new insights.

    PubMed

    Scholtz, V; Julák, J; Kríha, V; Mosinger, J; Kopecká, S

    2007-01-01

    The second part of our paper presents the results of experiments with the decontamination of surfaces by low-temperature plasma generated by corona discharge in air at atmospheric pressure. A simple device is described and the effects of the corona discharge on model microorganisms, viz. the yeast Candida albicans, Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coli, Enterobacter aerogenes, Neisseria sicca, Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, Gram-positive bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans, Enterococcus faecium, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus sanguinis, and vegetative and spore forms of Geobacillus stearothermophilus are discussed. A similar microbicidal effect after about one-minute exposure was observed in all vegetative forms of the microorganisms. Measurement in growth inhibition zones on a semisolid medium was used to determine the dependence of the microbicidal effect on exposure time and the distance between electrodes. Counting of colonies served to assess the microbicidal effect of the discharge on contaminated inert surfaces observable after more than 1 min exposure. Geobacillus stearothermophilus spores were found to have several times lower susceptibility to the action of the discharge and the microbicidal effect was observed only after an 8 min exposure. Reaction with the iodide reagent did not unambiguously demonstrate the difference between ozone and singlet oxygen as presumed active components of the corona. The area distribution of reactive oxygen species was determined; it was found to differ from the Wartburg law depending on exposure time. Qualitative evidence was obtained on the penetration of the reactive oxygen species into the semisolid medium.

  18. Detection of free radicals in low-temperature gas-grain reactions of astrophysical interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhitnikov, R. A.; Dmitriev, Yu. A.

    2002-05-01

    For laboratory detection and investigation of free radicals which often appear in chemical reactions of astrophysical interest either as important intermediate or as final products, we pioneered the use of the electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) technique, which is very effective in observing these substances. This has allowed both formyl (HCO and DCO) and methyl (CH3 and CD3) free radicals to be detected in a sequence of low-temperature gas-grain reactions of H and D atom addition in solid CO. The solid samples subjected to the EPR study were obtained by simultaneous independent deposition of CO molecules and either H or D atoms on the substrate cooled to liquid helium temperatures. The sequence of the H-atom addition gas-grain reactions in solid CO is acknowledged to be among the fundamental processes responsible for the synthesis of organic molecules in interstellar cloud dust grains. The present observation of the above free radicals confirms that the solid-state gas-grain sequence of the reactions is efficient at low temperatures; it also suggests that there should be considerable concentrations of formyl and methyl radicals in the ISM. Another study concentrated on the formation of ethyl free radicals (C2H5) in a low-temperature gas-grain reaction of H-atom abstraction from a C2H6 molecule by free H-atom in solid CH4. These experiments were carried out by deposition onto a substrate, cooled by liquid helium, of a flow of CH4 molecules containing a small amount of impurities such as ethane molecules (C2H6), free H-atoms and CH3 radicals formed in a discharge in a pure gaseous methane. EPR spectra of CH3 radicals, H-atoms, and C2H5 radicals matrix-isolated in solid CH4 were detected. The relative concentrations of the radicals were found to depend on the experimental conditions. The abstraction reaction, C2H6 + H -> C2H5 + H2, took place in CH4-ice.

  19. Acetamiprid removal in wastewater by the low-temperature plasma using dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, Shanping; Ma, Xiaolong; Jiang, Yanyan; Cao, Xiaohong

    2014-08-01

    Degradation of acetamiprid in wastewater was studied in a dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. This reactor produces ultraviolet light and reactive species like ozone (O₃) can be used for the treatment of wastewater. We examined the factors that could affect the degradation process, including the discharge power, and the initial concentrations of acetamiprid, and O₃ which is generated by the DBD reactor. We also investigated the effect of adding Na₂B₄O₇ as a radical scavenger to probe the role of hydroxyl radical in the reaction. The results indicated that acetamiprid could be removed from aqueous solution effectively and hydroxyl radicals played an important role during the degradation by the low temperature plasma. The degradation process of acetamiprid fits the first-order kinetics. The degradation efficiency was 83.48 percent at 200 min when the discharge power was 170 W and the initial acetamiprid concentration was 50 mg/L. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid decreased with the increasing concentration of Na₂B₄O₇ because B₄O₇(2-) is an excellent radical scavenger that inhibited the generation of OH during the DBD process. The removal efficiency of acetamiprid improved in the presence of O₃. The main reason was that O₃ can oxidize certain organic compounds directly or indirectly by generating hydroxyl radicals. The degradation products of acetamiprid were characterized qualitatively and quantitatively using high performance liquid chromatography, mass spectrometry and UV-vis spectroscopy.

  20. TOPICAL REVIEW: Particle and fluid simulations of low-temperature plasma discharges: benchmarks and kinetic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. C.; Iza, F.; Yang, S. S.; Radmilovic-Radjenovic, M.; Lee, J. K.

    2005-10-01

    Fluid, particle-in-cell and hybrid models are the numerical simulation techniques commonly used for simulating low-temperature plasma discharges. Despite the complexity of plasma systems and the challenges in describing and modelling them, well-organized simulation methods can provide physical information often difficult to obtain from experiments. Simulation results can also be used to identify research guidelines, find optimum operating conditions or propose novel designs for performance improvements. In this paper, we present an overview of the principles, strengths and limitations of the three simulation models, including a brief history and the recent status of their development. The three modelling techniques are benchmarked by comparing simulation results in different plasma systems (plasma display panels, capacitively coupled plasmas and inductively coupled plasmas) with experimentally measured data. In addition, different aspects of the electron and ion kinetics in these systems are discussed based upon simulation results.

  1. Bacterial inactivation using a low-temperature atmospheric plasma brush sustained with argon gas.

    PubMed

    Yu, Q S; Huang, C; Hsieh, F-H; Huff, H; Duan, Yixiang

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the bacterial inactivation/sterilization effects of a new atmospheric plasma source, which is a brush-shaped argon glow discharge created under 1 atm pressure. Such an atmospheric plasma brush requires extremely low power of less than 20 W to operate; and therefore is essentially a low-temperature discharge as confirmed by gas-phase temperature measurements. Two bacteria, Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Micrococcus luteus (M. luteus), seeded in various media were subjected to plasma treatment and their survivability was examined. It was found that such argon atmospheric plasma brush is very effective in destruction of the bacteria cells. With nutrient broth and standard methods agar as supporting media, a cell reduction in a level of 6 orders of magnitude was observed for E. coli within 3-4 min plasma treatment. A similar level of cell reduction was also observed for M. luteus in the two media with 2 or 3 min plasma treatment. The plasma treatment effects on the bacteria cell structures were also examined using scanning electron microscopy and the cell structure damages due to the plasma exposure were observed on both bacteria. The possible sterilization mechanism of the argon plasmas is also discussed in this article.

  2. Treatment of Candida albicans biofilms with low-temperature plasma induced by dielectric barrier discharge and atmospheric pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koban, Ina; Matthes, Rutger; Hübner, Nils-Olaf; Welk, Alexander; Meisel, Peter; Holtfreter, Birte; Sietmann, Rabea; Kindel, Eckhard; Weltmann, Klaus-Dieter; Kramer, Axel; Kocher, Thomas

    2010-07-01

    Because of some disadvantages of chemical disinfection in dental practice (especially denture cleaning), we investigated the effects of physical methods on Candida albicans biofilms. For this purpose, the antifungal efficacy of three different low-temperature plasma devices (an atmospheric pressure plasma jet and two different dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs)) on Candida albicans biofilms grown on titanium discs in vitro was investigated. As positive treatment controls, we used 0.1% chlorhexidine digluconate (CHX) and 0.6% sodium hypochlorite (NaOCl). The corresponding gas streams without plasma ignition served as negative treatment controls. The efficacy of the plasma treatment was determined evaluating the number of colony-forming units (CFU) recovered from titanium discs. The plasma treatment reduced the CFU significantly compared to chemical disinfectants. While 10 min CHX or NaOCl exposure led to a CFU log10 reduction factor of 1.5, the log10 reduction factor of DBD plasma was up to 5. In conclusion, the use of low-temperature plasma is a promising physical alternative to chemical antiseptics for dental practice.

  3. On the discharge capability and its limiting factors of commercial 18650 Li-ion cell at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jiang

    We here study the discharge capability of commercial 18650 cylindrical lithium-ion cells at low temperatures. The discharge capacity at -20 °C ranges from 67 to 88% of the rated capacity at 0.2 C rate, which is good. However, the cell discharge capacity varies substantially at -30 and -40 °C among the studied cells. It ranges from 2 to 70% of the rated capacity at -30 °C, and 0 to 30% at -40 °C at 0.2 C rate. The cell impedance at 1 kHz increases very little from room temperature down to -20 or -30 °C in general, which does not correlate with the cell discharge capability. However, the dc impedance is increased by a factor of about ten at -30 °C and about twenty at -40 °C from room temperature. The discharge capability at low temperature correlates well with the dc resistance at both room and low temperatures. The limiting factors in the discharge capability at low temperatures and the direction for the future improvement are discussed according to the cell discharge capability, the electrode geometric area, the cell impedance at 1 kHz, and the dc impedance at various temperatures. It appears that the ionic conductivity of the electrolyte and lithium solid diffusion in the electrode do not limit the cell discharge capability, while the lithium diffusion in the SEI layer on the positive surface may be the limiting factor. Cell discharge capability at low temperature does not correlate with cycle life at room temperature.

  4. A low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor prepared on plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hsueh, Ting-Jen

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was prepared on plastic substrate. The operating temperature of the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was reduced to room temperature using ultraviolet illumination. The experimental results indicate a favorable sensor response at low temperature, with the best response at 60 °C. The results also reveal that the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor can be easily integrated into portable products, whose waste heat can improve sensor response and achieve energy savings, while energy consumption can be further reduced by solar irradiation.

  5. Model for cw laser collisionally induced fluorescence in low-temperature discharges

    PubMed

    Stewart; Smith; Borthwick; Paterson

    2000-08-01

    A perturbed steady-state rate-equation model has been developed for the cw laser collisionally induced fluorescence (LCIF) produced by excitation on one of the 1s-2p noble gas transitions. This work is one part of a wider complementary modeling program which includes cw optogalvanic spectroscopy, optical emission spectroscopy, and optical absorption spectroscopy, with the overall aim of testing all of these models with the same stringently assembled atomic and discharge data set. Our aim here is to demonstrate the principal features of our cw LCIF model by using it to describe our experimental observations produced by pumping transitions originating on the 1s(5) metastable and 1s(4) resonance states of neon atoms in the positive column of a normal glow discharge at 2.0 Torr and a discharge current of 5 mA. The model shows that these cw LCIF spectra are dominated by 1s-2p excitation and electron collisional coupling among the 2p states. We show that the model allows us to quantify explicitly the various individual contributions to each line in the cw LCIF spectra. The theory and analyses presented here apply equally well to other noble gases and we believe can be modified appropriately for trace noble gases in atomic-molecular mixtures.

  6. Alkali-Stabilized Pt-OHx Species Catalyze Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhai, Y.; Pierre, D; Si, R; Deng, W; Ferrin, P; Nilekar, A; Peng, G; Herron, J; Bell, D; et. al.

    2010-01-01

    We report that alkali ions (sodium or potassium) added in small amounts activate platinum adsorbed on alumina or silica for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS) reaction (H{sub 2}O + CO {yields} H{sub 2} + CO{sub 2}) used for producing H{sub 2}. The alkali ion-associated surface OH groups are activated by CO at low temperatures ({approx}100 C) in the presence of atomically dispersed platinum. Both experimental evidence and density functional theory calculations suggest that a partially oxidized Pt-alkali-O{sub x}(OH){sub y} species is the active site for the low-temperature Pt-catalyzed WGS reaction. These findings are useful for the design of highly active and stable WGS catalysts that contain only trace amounts of a precious metal without the need for a reducible oxide support such as ceria.

  7. Infrared Action Spectroscopy of Low-Temperature Neutral Gas-Phase Molecules of Arbitrary Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatsyna, Vasyl; Bakker, Daniël J.; Salén, Peter; Feifel, Raimund; Rijs, Anouk M.; Zhaunerchyk, Vitali

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate a technique for IR action spectroscopy that enables measuring IR spectra in a background-free fashion for low-temperature neutral gas-phase molecules of arbitrary structure. The method is exemplified experimentally for N -methylacetamide molecules in the mid-IR spectral range of 1000 - 1800 cm-1 , utilizing the free electron laser FELIX. The technique involves the resonant absorption of multiple mid-IR photons, which induces molecular dissociation. The dissociation products are probed with 10.49 eV vacuum ultraviolet photons and analyzed with a mass spectrometer. We also demonstrate the capability of this method to record, with unprecedented ease, mid-IR spectra for the molecular associates, such as clusters and oligomers, present in a molecular beam. In this way the mass-selected spectra of low-temperature gas-phase dimers and trimers of N -methylacetamide are measured in the full amide I-III range.

  8. Demonstration of organic volatile decomposition and bacterial sterilization by miniature dielectric barrier discharges on low-temperature cofired ceramic electrodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Duk-jae; Shim, Yeun-keun; Park, Jeongwon; Kim, Hyung-jun; Han, Jeon-geon

    2016-04-01

    Nonthermal atmospheric-pressure plasma discharge is designed with low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) electrodes to achieve dielectric barrier surface discharge (DBSD). The environmental requirement (below 0.05 ppm) of the amount of byproducts (ozone and NO x ) produced during the process was met by optimizing the electrode design to produce a high dielectric barrier discharge for low-voltage (∼700 V) operation and minimizing the distance between electrodes to improve the plasma discharging efficiency. The concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) within interior cabins of commercial vehicles were significantly reduced after 1-h treatment to improve air quality cost-effectively. This atmospheric-pressure plasma process was demonstrated for the sterilization of Escherichia coli to prevent food poisoning during the preservation of food in refrigerators.

  9. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  10. Gas Hydrate Stability at Low Temperatures and High Pressures with Applications to Mars and Europa

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.

    2004-01-01

    Gas hydrates are implicated in the geochemical evolution of both Mars and Europa [1- 3]. Most models developed for gas hydrate chemistry are based on the statistical thermodynamic model of van der Waals and Platteeuw [4] with subsequent modifications [5-8]. None of these models are, however, state-of-the-art with respect to gas hydrate/electrolyte interactions, which is particularly important for planetary applications where solution chemistry may be very different from terrestrial seawater. The objectives of this work were to add gas (carbon dioxide and methane) hydrate chemistries into an electrolyte model parameterized for low temperatures and high pressures (the FREZCHEM model) and use the model to examine controls on gas hydrate chemistries for Mars and Europa.

  11. Metathesis in the generation of low-temperature gas in marine shales

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The recent report of low-temperature catalytic gas from marine shales took on additional significance with the subsequent disclosure of natural gas and low-temperature gas at or near thermodynamic equilibrium in methane, ethane, and propane. It is important because thermal cracking, the presumed source of natural gas, cannot generate these hydrocarbons at equilibrium nor can it bring them to equilibrium over geologic time. The source of equilibrium and the source of natural gas are either the same (generation under equilibrium control) or closely associated. Here we report the catalytic interconversion of hydrocarbons (metathesis) as the source of equilibrium in experiments with Cretaceous Mowry shale at 100°C. Focus was on two metathetic equilibria: methane, ethane, and propane, reported earlier, Q (K = [(C1)*(C3)]/[(C2)2]), and between these hydrocarbons and n-butane, Q* (K = [(C1)*(n-C4)]/[(C2)*(C3)]), reported here for the first time. Two observations stand out. Initial hydrocarbon products are near equilibrium and have maximum average molecular weights (AMW). Over time, products fall from equilibrium and AMW in concert. It is consistent with metathesis splitting olefin intermediates [Cn] to smaller intermediates (fission) as gas generation creates open catalytic sites ([ ]): [Cn] + [ ] → [Cn-m] + [Cm]. Fission rates increasing exponentially with olefin molecular weight could contribute to these effects. AMW would fall over time, and selective fission of [C3] and [n-C4] would draw Q and Q* from equilibrium. The results support metathesis as the source of thermodynamic equilibrium in natural gas. PMID:20142998

  12. Metathesis in the generation of low-temperature gas in marine shales.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2010-01-20

    The recent report of low-temperature catalytic gas from marine shales took on additional significance with the subsequent disclosure of natural gas and low-temperature gas at or near thermodynamic equilibrium in methane, ethane, and propane. It is important because thermal cracking, the presumed source of natural gas, cannot generate these hydrocarbons at equilibrium nor can it bring them to equilibrium over geologic time. The source of equilibrium and the source of natural gas are either the same (generation under equilibrium control) or closely associated. Here we report the catalytic interconversion of hydrocarbons (metathesis) as the source of equilibrium in experiments with Cretaceous Mowry shale at 100 degrees C. Focus was on two metathetic equilibria: methane, ethane, and propane, reported earlier, Q (K = [(C(1))*(C(3))]/[(C(2))(2)]), and between these hydrocarbons and n-butane, Q* (K = [(C(1))*(n-C(4))]/[(C(2))*(C(3))]), reported here for the first time. Two observations stand out. Initial hydrocarbon products are near equilibrium and have maximum average molecular weights (AMW). Over time, products fall from equilibrium and AMW in concert. It is consistent with metathesis splitting olefin intermediates [C(n)] to smaller intermediates (fission) as gas generation creates open catalytic sites ([ ]): [C(n)] + [ ] --> [C(n-m)] + [C(m)]. Fission rates increasing exponentially with olefin molecular weight could contribute to these effects. AMW would fall over time, and selective fission of [C(3)] and [n-C(4)] would draw Q and Q* from equilibrium. The results support metathesis as the source of thermodynamic equilibrium in natural gas.

  13. Gas counter for low temperature Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sougrati, Moulay Tahar; Jean, Malick; Jouen, Samuel; Vaudolon, Charly; Hannoyer, Béatrice

    2012-05-01

    The operation of a gas counter, designed for Conversion Electron Mössbauer Spectroscopy measurement at low temperature, has been investigated. The experimental setup is described and tested with two pure gases, He and Ne, and two mixtures, He-5%CH4 and He-5%N2. The impacts on the counter performances of the applied voltage, the gas composition and pressure as well as the gas renewing are investigated between 41 K and 300 K. This investigation is made using 119Sn Mössbauer source and metallic tin absorber. The appropriate operating conditions of the present counter have been established for temperatures down to 41 K for both pure gases, and 61 and 85 K for He-5%N2 and He-5%CH4 respectively.

  14. Low-temperature thermodynamics of the unitary Fermi gas: Superfluid fraction, first sound, and second sound

    SciTech Connect

    Salasnich, Luca

    2010-12-15

    We investigate the low-temperature thermodynamics of the unitary Fermi gas by introducing a model based on the zero-temperature spectra of both bosonic collective modes and fermonic single-particle excitations. We calculate the Helmholtz free energy and from it we obtain the entropy, the internal energy, and the chemical potential as a function of the temperature. By using these quantities and the Landau's expression for the superfluid density we determine analytically the superfluid fraction, the critical temperature, the first sound velocity, and the second sound velocity. We compare our analytical results with other theoretical predictions and experimental data of ultracold atoms and dilute neutron matter.

  15. Liquid phase low temperature method for production of methanol from synthesis gas and catalyst formulations therefor

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder

    2005-07-26

    The invention provides a homogenous catalyst for the production of methanol from purified synthesis gas at low temperature and low pressure which includes a transition metal capable of forming transition metal complexes with coordinating ligands and an alkoxide, the catalyst dissolved in a methanol solvent system, provided the transition metal complex is not transition metal carbonyl. The coordinating ligands can be selected from the group consisting of N-donor ligands, P-donor ligands, O-donor ligands, C-donor ligands, halogens and mixtures thereof.

  16. Streptococci biofilm decontamination on teeth by low-temperature air plasma of dc corona discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalóvá, Z.; Zahoran, M.; Zahoranová, A.; Machala, Z.

    2014-06-01

    Non-thermal plasmas of atmospheric pressure air direct current corona discharges were investigated for potential applications in dental medicine. The objective of this ex vivo study was to apply cold plasmas for the decontamination of Streptococci biofilm grown on extracted human teeth, and to estimate their antimicrobial efficiency and the plasma's impact on the enamel and dentine of the treated tooth surfaces. The results show that both positive streamer and negative Trichel pulse coronas can reduce bacterial population in the biofilm by up to 3 logs in a 10 min exposure time. This bactericidal effect can be reached faster (within 5 min) by electrostatic spraying of water through the discharge onto the treated tooth surface. Examination of the tooth surface after plasma exposure by infrared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy did not show any significant alteration in the tooth material composition or the tooth surface structures.

  17. Nitric Oxide Studies in Low Temperature Plasmas Generated with a Nanosecond Pulse Sphere Gap Electrical Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnette, David Dean

    This dissertation presents studies of NO kinetics in a plasma afterglow using various nanosecond pulse discharges across a sphere gap. The discharge platform is developed to produce a diffuse plasma volume large enough to allow for laser diagnostics in a plasma that is rich in vibrationally-excited molecules. This plasma is characterized by current and voltage traces as well as ICCD and NO PLIF images that are used to monitor the plasma dimensions and uniformity. Temperature and vibrational loading measurements are performed via coherent anti-Stokes Raman spectroscopy (CARS). Absolute NO concentrations are obtained by laser-induce fluorescence (LIF) measurements, and N and O densities are found using two photon absorption laser-induced fluorescence (TALIF). For all dry air conditions studied, the NO behavior is characterized by a rapid rate of formation consistent with an enhanced Zeldovich process involving electronically-excited nitrogen species that are generated within the plasma. After several microseconds, the NO evolution is entirely controlled by the reverse Zeldovich process. These results show that under the chosen range of conditions and even in extreme instances of vibrational loading, there is no formation channel beyond ~2 musec. Both the NO formation and consumption mechanisms are strongly affected by the addition of fuel species, producing much greater NO concentrations in the afterglow.

  18. Low temperatures shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with unequal population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darsheshdar, E.; Yavari, H.; Zangeneh, Z.

    2016-07-01

    By using the Green's functions method and linear response theory we calculate the shear viscosity of a two-component dipolar Fermi gas with population imbalance (spin polarized) in the low temperatures limit. In the strong-coupling Bose-Einstein condensation (BEC) region where a Feshbach resonance gives rise to tightly bound dimer molecules, a spin-polarized Fermi superfluid reduces to a simple Bose-Fermi mixture of Bose-condensed dimers and the leftover unpaired fermions (atoms). The interactions between dimer-atom, dimer-dimer, and atom-atom take into account to the viscous relaxation time (τη) . By evaluating the self-energies in the ladder approximation we determine the relaxation times due to dimer-atom (τDA) , dimer-dimer (τcDD ,τdDD) , and atom-atom (τAA) interactions. We will show that relaxation rates due to these interactions τDA-1 ,τcDD-1, τdDD-1, and τAA-1 have T2, T4, e - E /kB T (E is the spectrum of the dimer atoms), and T 3 / 2 behavior respectively in the low temperature limit (T → 0) and consequently, the atom-atom interaction plays the dominant role in the shear viscosity in this rang of temperatures. For small polarization (τDA ,τAA ≫τcDD ,τdDD), the low temperatures shear viscosity is determined by contact interaction between dimers and the shear viscosity varies as T-5 which has the same behavior as the viscosity of other superfluid systems such as superfluid neutron stars, and liquid helium.

  19. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes-zinc oxide nanocomposites as low temperature toluene gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Septiani, Ni Luh Wulan; Yuliarto, Brian; Nugraha; Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno

    2017-03-01

    The performance of nanocomposite MWCNT-ZnO thin films was investigated as toluene gas sensor. The nanocomposites MWCNT-ZnO thin films were synthesized by reflux method with the variation of MWCNT:ZnO ratio on 1:0, 3:1, 1:1, 1:3, and 0:1. Crystallinity and morphology characterization show that the crystal structure was not influenced by the presence of MWCNT, and the presence of MWCNTs could prevent the agglomeration of ZnO nanostructure. The dynamic response curve of nanocomposites MWCNT-ZnO thin films shows two different patterns at low temperature region and high temperature region. At low temperature region, the sensor response decreases as the increasing operating temperature and increasing the concentration of ZnO. On the other hand, at high temperature region, the sensor response increases as the increasing operating temperature and increasing the concentration of ZnO. Moreover, the variation concentration of MWCNT and ZnO can decrease the operating temperature of the sensors. The sensor with the ratio of MWCNT:ZnO at 1:3 show highest sensor response that reaches 17% at 150 °C of operating temperature, while the pure MWCNTs and pure ZnO show no response at that temperature.

  20. One-Dimensional Ceria as Catalyst for the Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Han, W.; Wen, W; Hanson, J; Teng, X; Marinkovic, N; Rodriguez, J

    2009-01-01

    Synchrotron-based in situ time-resolved X-ray diffraction and X-ray absorption spectroscopy were used to study pure ceria and Pd-loaded ceria nanotubes and nanorods (1D-ceria) as catalysts for the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction. While bulk ceria is very poor as WGS catalysts, pure 1D-ceria displayed catalytic activity at a temperature as low as 300 C. The reduction of the pure 1D-ceria in pure hydrogen started at 150 C, which is a much lower temperature than those previously reported for the reduction of 3D ceria nanoparticles. This low reduction temperature reflects the novel morphology of the oxide systems and may be responsible for the low-temperature WGS catalytic activity seen for the 1D-ceria. Pd-loaded 1D ceria displayed significant WGS activity starting at 200 C. During pretreatment in H{sub 2}, the ceria lattice parameter increased significantly around 60 C, which indicates that Pd-oxygen interactions may facilitate the reduction of Pd-loaded 1D-ceria. Pd and ceria both participate in the formation of the active sites for the catalytic reactions. The low-temperature hydrogen pretreatment results in higher WGS activity for Pd-loaded 1D-ceria.

  1. Assessment of the efficacy of a low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization system.

    PubMed

    Kyi, M S; Holton, J; Ridgway, G L

    1995-12-01

    The STERRAD 100 sterilization system (Johnson & Johnson Medical Ltd) uses low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma for sterilization of heat labile equipment. The efficacy of the machine was tested by contaminating a standard set of instruments with different organisms and using a filtration method to assess recovery of organisms from the wash fluids of instruments post-sterilization. Experiments were performed under clean (the organism only) and dirty (organism mixed with egg protein) conditions. A parallel study conducted using a 3M STERIVAC ethylene oxide sterilizer could not be completed owing to closure of the ethylene oxide plant. For sterilization of instruments with long and narrow lumens, hydrogen peroxide adaptors are necessary. The STERRAD 100 sterilizer can achieve effective sterilization of heat labile instruments with a reduction of 6 log10 cfu/mL of organisms tested. This method has the advantages over ethylene oxide sterilization of safety, ease of maintenance and no requirement for aeration time.

  2. Ignition of a coal particle at the low temperature of gas flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glushkov, Dmitrii O.; Sharypov, Oleg V.

    2015-01-01

    Regularities of physical and chemical processes occurring during the heating of the coal dust particles by low-temperature air flow are investigated by means of thermogravimetric analyzer TA SDT Q600 and experimental setup of optical diagnostics of multiphase flows based on PIV method. Qualitative and quantitative characteristics were established for the processes of the coal particle inert heating, moisture evaporation, thermal decomposition, combustible gas mixture formation, oxidation of volatiles and carbon. It was revealed that the temperature of the oxidizer required for the coal particle ignition is higher than 500 ∘C. The experimental data can be used to develop predictive mathematical models of technological processes fire hazard in pulverized coal systems of thermal power plants.

  3. Spectroscopic measurements in low temperature inductively coupled RF discharges in hydrogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebschman, Michael Lee

    1999-10-01

    Noninvasive spectroscopic measurements of density and temperature which are characteristic of plasma processing tools have been obtained on inductively driven low- density hydrogen plasma sources. These measurements allow full radial and axial profiles of electron density and temperature to be estimated from absolutely calibrated multichannel spectroscopic measurements of upper state densities and a collisional radiative model that accounts for both collisional and radiative processes. The electron temperature and density were estimated by minimizing the least square deviation of measured population of upper state densities and the prediction of the collisional radiative model. Profiles were obtained over a range of powers from 50 to 200 Watts and pressures from 5 to 50 mTorr in hydrogen in a small cylindrical source. Typical density and temperature measurement profiles have been plotted to characterize the apparatus. An elementary sensitivity analysis, which includes plasma opacity and non- Maxwellian electron distributions, showed that, for hydrogen at processing pressures, the accuracy of the technique is relatively unaffected by these perturbations. The molecular dissociation processes were found to be important in determining the steady state densities of atomic hydrogen but had little affect in populating the upper state hydrogen levels for the plasma conditions measured. A hydrogen working gas and simple geometry were chosen to simplify detailed comparisons with a 2D computational model (INDUCT95) which uses a fluid approximation for the plasma and neutral gas. The code calculates the inductive coupling of the 13.5MHz RIF source and collisional, radiative, and wall losses as well as a complete chemistry model for H2, H, H+, H 3+. Good qualitative agreement between the initial model calculations and experimental data have been obtained over part of the operational range. Lastly, to characterize the apparatus for use in wafer cleaning, radial profiles of the

  4. Thermodynamic behavior of a one-dimensional Bose gas at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Rosi, Giulia; Astrakharchik, Grigori E.; Stringari, Sandro

    2017-07-01

    We show that the chemical potential of a one-dimensional (1D) interacting Bose gas exhibits a nonmonotonic temperature dependence which is peculiar of superfluids. The effect is a direct consequence of the phononic nature of the excitation spectrum at large wavelengths exhibited by 1D Bose gases. For low temperatures T , we demonstrate that the coefficient in T2 expansion of the chemical potential is entirely defined by the zero-temperature density dependence of the sound velocity. We calculate that coefficient along the crossover between the Bogoliubov weakly interacting gas and the Tonks-Girardeau gas of impenetrable bosons. Analytic expansions are provided in the asymptotic regimes. The theoretical predictions along the crossover are confirmed by comparison with the exactly solvable Yang-Yang model in which the finite-temperature equation of state is obtained numerically by solving Bethe-ansatz equations. A 1D ring geometry is equivalent to imposing periodic boundary conditions and arising finite-size effects are studied in detail. At T =0 we calculated various thermodynamic functions, including the inelastic structure factor, as a function of the number of atoms, pointing out the occurrence of important deviations from the thermodynamic limit.

  5. Improving the low temperature dyeability of polyethylene terephthalate fabric with dispersive dyes by atmospheric pressure plasma discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elabid, Amel E. A.; Zhang, Jie; Shi, Jianjun; Guo, Ying; Ding, Ke; Zhang, Jing

    2016-07-01

    Polyethylene terephthalate (PET) fiber and textile is one of the largest synthetic polymer commodity in the world. The great energy consumption and pollution caused by the high temperature and pressure dyeing of PET fibers and fabrics with disperse dyes has been caused concern these years. In this study, an atmospheric pressure plasma with fine and uniform filament discharge operated at 20 kHz has been used to improve the low temperature dyeability of PET fabric at 95 °C with three cation disperse dyes: Red 73, Blue 183 and Yellow 211. The dyes uptake percentage of the treated PET fabrics was observed to increase as twice as much of untreated fabric. The color strength rate was increased more than 20%. The reducing of the water contact angle and the raising of the capillary height of treated PET fabric strip indicate its hydrophilicity improvement. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) results display nano to micro size of etching pits appeared uniformly on the fiber surface of the treated PET. Simultaneously, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis indicates an increase of the oxygen content in the surface caused by the introduction of polar groups such as Cdbnd O and COOH. The rough surface with improved polar oxygen groups showed hydrophilicity and affinity to C.I. dispersive dyes and is believed to be caused by the strong and very fine filament discharge appearing randomly at one place at an instant but evenly at many places at a longer period. This increases the diffusion and absorption of the C.I. disperse dyes on the PET fiber surface, which improve its low temperature dyeability.

  6. (Gas discharges and their applications)

    SciTech Connect

    Christophorou, L. G.

    1988-10-06

    The traveler attended the IX International Conference on Gas Discharges and Their Applications held in Venice, Italy, September 19--23, 1988. He was a member of the International Organizing Committee of the conference, chaired a scientific session, presented a paper, and participated in scientific discussions and the planning of the next conference. Also, he exchanged research information and ideas on electron, ion, and laser interactions in fluid media with many participants.

  7. Testing marine shales' ability to generate catalytic gas at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, L.; Schimmelmann, A.; Drobniak, A.; Sauer, P. E.; Mastalerz, M.

    2013-12-01

    Hydrocarbon gases are generally thought to originatevia low-temperature microbial or high-temperature thermogenicpathways (Whiticar, 1996) that can be distinguished by compound-specific hydrogen and carbon stable isotope ratios. An alternative low-temperature catalytic pathway for hydrocarbon generation from sedimentary organic matter has been proposed to be active at temperatures as low as 50oC (e.g.,Mango and Jarvie,2009,2010; Mango et al., 2010; Bartholomew et al., 1999). This hypothesis, however, still requires rigoroustesting by independent laboratory experiments.The possibility of catalytic generation of hydrocarbons in some source rocks (most likely in relatively impermeable and organic-rich shales where reduced catalytic centers can be best preserved) would offer an explanation for the finding of gas of non-microbial origin in formations that lack the thermal maturity for generating thermogenic gas.It is unknown whether catalytically generated methane would be isotopically different from thermogenicmethane (δ13CCH4>-50‰, δ2HCH4from -275‰ to -100‰) ormicrobially generated methane (δ13CCH4from -40‰ to -110‰, δ2HCH4from -400‰to -150‰) (Whiticar, 1998). In order to test for catalytic gas generationin water-wet shales and coals, we are conductinglaboratory experiments at three temperatures (60°C, 100°C, 200°C)and three pressures (ambient pressure, 107 Pa, 3x107 Pa)over periods of six months to several years. So far, our longest running experiments have reached one year. We sealed different types of thermally immature, pre-evacuatedshales (Mowry, New Albany, and Mahoganyshales) and coals (SpringfieldCoal and Wilcoxlignite)with isotopically defined waters in gold cells in the absence of elemental oxygen.Preliminary results show that these samples, depending on conditions, can generate light hydrocarbon gases (methane, ethane and propane) and CO2. Methane, CO2, and traces of H2havebeen generated at 60°C, whereas experiments at 100°C and 200

  8. Surface modification of superaustenitic and maraging stainless steels by low-temperature gas-phase carburization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gentil, Johannes

    Low-temperature gas-phase carburization of 316L austenitic stainless steel was developed in recent years by the Swagelok company. This process generates great mechanical and electrochemical surface properties. Hardness, wear resistance, fatigue behavior, and corrosion resistance are dramatically improved, while the formation of carbides is effectively suppressed. This new technique is of technical, economical, but especially of scientific interest because the surface properties of common stainless steel can be enhanced to a level of more sophisticated and more expensive superalloys. The consequential continuation of previous research is the application of the carburization process to other steel grades. Differences in chemical composition, microstructure, and passivity between the various alloys may cause technical problems and it is expected that the initial process needs to be optimized for every specific material. This study presents results of low-temperature carburization of AL-6XN (superaustenitic stainless steel) and PH13-8Mo (precipitation-hardened martensitic stainless steel). Both alloys have been treated successfully in terms of creating a hardened surface by introducing high amounts of interstitially dissolved carbon. The surface hardness of AL-6XN was increased to 12GPa and is correlated with a colossal carbon supersaturation at the surface of up to 20 at.%. The hardened case develops a carburization time-dependent thickness between 10mum after one carburization cycle and up to 35mum after four treatments and remains highly ductile. Substantial broadening of X-ray diffraction peaks in low-temperature carburized superaustenitic stainless steels are attributed to the generation of very large compressive biaxial residual stresses. Those large stresses presumably cause relaxations of the surface, so-called undulations. Heavily expanded regions of carburized AL-6XN turn ferromagnetic. Non-carburized AL-6XN is known for its outstanding corrosion resistance

  9. High-pressure/low-temperature neutron scattering of gas inclusion compounds: Progress and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yusheng; Xu, Hongwu; Daemen, Luke L.; Lokshin, Konstantin; Tait, Kimberly T.; Mao, Wendy L.; Luo, Junhua; Currier, Robert P.; Hickmott, Donald D.

    2007-01-01

    Alternative energy resources such as hydrogen and methane gases are becoming increasingly important for the future economy. A major challenge for using hydrogen is to develop suitable materials to store it under a variety of conditions, which requires systematic studies of the structures, stability, and kinetics of various hydrogen-storing compounds. Neutron scattering is particularly useful for these studies. We have developed high-pressure/low-temperature gas/fluid cells in conjunction with neutron diffraction and inelastic neutron scattering instruments allowing in situ and real-time examination of gas uptake/release processes. We studied the formation of methane and hydrogen clathrates, a group of inclusion compounds consisting of frameworks of hydrogen-bonded H2O molecules with gas molecules trapped inside the cages. Our results reveal that clathrate can store up to four hydrogen molecules in each of its large cages with an intermolecular H2–H2 distance of only 2.93 Å. This distance is much shorter than that in the solid/metallic hydrogen (3.78 Å), suggesting a strong densification effect of the clathrate framework on the enclosed hydrogen molecules. The framework-pressurizing effect is striking and may exist in other inclusion compounds such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Owing to the enormous variety and flexibility of their frameworks, inclusion compounds may offer superior properties for storage of hydrogen and/or hydrogen-rich molecules, relative to other types of compounds. We have investigated the hydrogen storage properties of two MOFs, Cu3[Co(CN)6]2 and Cu3(BTC)2 (BTC = benzenetricarboxylate), and our preliminary results demonstrate that the developed neutron-scattering techniques are equally well suited for studying MOFs and other inclusion compounds. PMID:17389387

  10. A comparative study of ethylene oxide gas, hydrogen peroxide gas plasma, and low-temperature steam formaldehyde sterilization.

    PubMed

    Kanemitsu, Keiji; Imasaka, Takayuki; Ishikawa, Shiho; Kunishima, Hiroyuki; Harigae, Hideo; Ueno, Kumi; Takemura, Hiromu; Hirayama, Yoshihiro; Kaku, Mitsuo

    2005-05-01

    To compare the efficacies of ethylene oxide gas (EOG), hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (PLASMA), and low-temperature steam formaldehyde (LTSF) sterilization methods. The efficacies of EOG, PLASMA, and LTSF sterilization were tested using metal and plastic plates, common medical instruments, and three process challenge devices with narrow lumens. All items were contaminated with Bacillus stearothermophilus spores or used a standard biological indicator. EOG and LTSF demonstrated effective killing of B. stearothermophilus spores, with or without serum, on plates, on instruments, and in process challenge devices. PLASMA failed to adequately sterilize materials on multiple trials in several experiments, including two of three plates, two of three instruments, and all process challenge devices. Our results suggest that PLASMA sterilization may be unsuccessful under certain conditions, particularly when used for items with complex shapes and narrow lumens. Alternatively, LTSF sterilization demonstrates excellent efficacy and is comparable to EOG sterilization. LTSF could potentially act as a substitute if EOG becomes unavailable due to environmental concerns.

  11. Low-temperature dynamics and spectroscopy in exohedral rare-gas C60 fullerene complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz, A.; Hernández-Rojas, J.; Bretón, J.; Gomez Llorente, J. M.

    2001-03-01

    The adatom dynamics in exohedral C60 fullerene complexes of rare-gas atoms are studied with a three degrees of freedom model. The eigenvalue problem of the corresponding quantum Hamiltonian is solved and the electric-dipole spectra for ArC60, NeC60, and HeC60 in the low-temperature range from 5 to 40 K are simulated. The most important spectral features are related to the degree of angular anisotropy in the adatom-C60 interaction. The ArC60 and NeC60 complexes present very simple spectra which can be assigned in terms of three-mode oscillators; the corresponding motion takes place in the deep hexagon wells (also in the pentagon wells for NeC60) of the interaction potential. On the contrary, the HeC60 complex shows more complicated spectra with important tunneling effects due to the smaller angular anisotropy of the interaction. The onset of almost free internal rotation takes place in this complex at rather low energies, and this gives rise to a low-frequency rotational band in the spectra at temperatures above T˜15 K.

  12. Gas-phase elemental mercury removal from flue gas by cobalt-modified fly ash at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yalin; Zhong, Qin; Xing, Lili

    2014-01-01

    Co modified fly ash (FA) prepared by the wet impregnation method was investigated for gas-phase elemental mercury capture under air at 80°C in this paper. X-ray fluorescence spectrometry, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller, scanning electron micrographs, X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetric (TG) analysis and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to characterize the samples. Experimental results showed that the optimal Co loading was 9 wt%, which gave a Hg(0) removal efficiency of 76% in a laboratory packed-bed reactor at low temperatures in the presence of O₂. The high removal efficiency was mainly attributed to oxidation of Hg(0) by the enrichment of well-dispersed Co₃O₄on the surface of FA. However, higher Co loading resulted in the decrease of removal efficiency due to the decline of surface area and Co₃O₄agglomeration. TG and XPS characterization indicated that Hg(0) was oxidized by Co₃O₄and some of the oxidized mercury formed recombination mercury oxide with Co₃O₄, which could either exist stably at low temperature or be desorbed from the adsorbents at higher temperature. Finally, the possible adsorption mechanisms were proposed according to the observed phenomena.

  13. Characterization of low-temperature cofired ceramic tiles as platforms for gas chromatographic separations.

    PubMed

    Darko, Ernest; Thurbide, Kevin B; Gerhardt, Geoff C; Michienzi, Joseph

    2013-06-04

    A gas chromatography (GC) column is fabricated within a low-temperature cofired ceramic (LTCC) tile, and its analytical properties are characterized. By using a dual-spiral design, a 100 μm wide square channel up to 15 m in length is produced within an 11 cm × 5.5 cm LTCC tile. The channel is dynamically coated with an OV-101 stationary phase that is cross-linked with dicumyl peroxide. While the uncoated LTCC tiles were able to separate a mixture of n-alkanes, the peak shapes were broad (base width of ~2 min) and tailing. In contrast to this, the coated LTCC tiles produced sharp (base width of ~8-10 s), symmetrical, well-resolved peaks for the same analytes. By using a 7.5 m long channel, about 15,000 plates were obtained for a dodecane test analyte. Further, the coated LTCC tiles were found to produce plate heights that were about 3-fold smaller than those obtained from a conventional capillary GC column of similar length, dimension, and coating operated under the same conditions. As a result, test analyte separations were slightly improved in the LTCC tiles, and their overall performance fared well. In terms of temperature programming, it was found that a series of n-alkanes separated on the LTCC tile provided a cumulative peak capacity of around 54 peaks when using C₈ to C₁₃ as analyte markers. Results indicate that LTCC tiles provide a viable and useful alternative platform for performing good quality GC separations.

  14. Pulse circuit apparatus for gas discharge laser

    DOEpatents

    Bradley, Laird P.

    1980-01-01

    Apparatus and method using a unique pulse circuit for a known gas discharge laser apparatus to provide an electric field for preconditioning the gas below gas breakdown and thereafter to place a maximum voltage across the gas which maximum voltage is higher than that previously available before the breakdown voltage of that gas laser medium thereby providing greatly increased pumping of the laser.

  15. Greenhouse gas emissions from Australian open-cut coal mines: contribution from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation.

    PubMed

    Day, Stuart J; Carras, John N; Fry, Robyn; Williams, David J

    2010-07-01

    Spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation of waste coal and other carbonaceous material at open-cut coal mines are potentially significant sources of greenhouse gas emissions. However, the magnitude of these emissions is largely unknown. In this study, emissions from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation were estimated for six Australian open-cut coal mines with annual coal production ranging from 1.7 to more than 16 Mt. Greenhouse emissions from all other sources at these mines were also estimated and compared to those from spontaneous combustion and low-temperature oxidation. In all cases, fugitive emission of methane was the largest source of greenhouse gas; however, in some mines, spontaneous combustion accounted for almost a third of all emissions. For one mine, it was estimated that emissions from spontaneous combustion were around 250,000 t CO(2)-e per annum. The contribution from low-temperature oxidation was generally less than about 1% of the total for all six mines. Estimating areas of spoil affected by spontaneous combustion by ground-based surveys was prone to under-report the area. Airborne infrared imaging appears to be a more reliable method.

  16. Diffusive Thermal Conductivity of Superfluid Fermi Gas in p-Wave State at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Khademi, Dehkordi; Nasirimoghadam, S.; Nabipoor, F.; M. A., Shahzamanian

    2012-12-01

    The diffusive thermal conductivity tensor of p-wave superfluid at low temperatures is calculated by using the Boltzmann equation approach. We use the Sykes and Brooker procedure and show that Kxx is equal to Kyy and these are related to T-1, also Kzz is proporated to T-3.

  17. Ternary gas mixture for diffuse discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1988-01-01

    A new diffuse discharge gas switch wherein a mixture of gases is used to take advantage of desirable properties of the respective gases. There is a conducting gas, an insulating gas, and a third gas that has low ionization energy resulting in a net increase in the number of electrons available to produce a current.

  18. Low-Temperature Photochemically Activated Amorphous Indium-Gallium-Zinc Oxide for Highly Stable Room-Temperature Gas Sensors.

    PubMed

    Jaisutti, Rawat; Kim, Jaeyoung; Park, Sung Kyu; Kim, Yong-Hoon

    2016-08-10

    We report on highly stable amorphous indium-gallium-zinc oxide (IGZO) gas sensors for ultraviolet (UV)-activated room-temperature detection of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The IGZO sensors fabricated by a low-temperature photochemical activation process and exhibiting two orders higher photocurrent compared to conventional zinc oxide sensors, allowed high gas sensitivity against various VOCs even at room temperature. From a systematic analysis, it was found that by increasing the UV intensity, the gas sensitivity, response time, and recovery behavior of an IGZO sensor were strongly enhanced. In particular, under an UV intensity of 30 mW cm(-2), the IGZO sensor exhibited gas sensitivity, response time and recovery time of 37%, 37 and 53 s, respectively, against 750 ppm concentration of acetone gas. Moreover, the IGZO gas sensor had an excellent long-term stability showing around 6% variation in gas sensitivity over 70 days. These results strongly support a conclusion that a low-temperature solution-processed amorphous IGZO film can serve as a good candidate for room-temperature VOCs sensors for emerging wearable electronics.

  19. On the prediction of thermal conductivity of gas mixtures at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheng, W.; Lu, B. C.-Y.

    Thermal conductivity of pure gases were correlated by means of an extended form of the modified Enskog theory together with a modified volume-translated Peng-Robinson equation of state at low temperatures and at pressures up to 370 bar. Two different approaches were used in the correlation. A substance and temperature dependent parameter was introduced in both correlations. The pure-component parameters thus obtained were used to predict the thermal conductivity of five binary mixtures (Ar-He, Ar-N2, Ar-Ne, He-N2 and N2-Ne) without using any binary adjustable parameters with various degrees of success.

  20. Low-temperature fabrication of alkali metal-organic charge transfer complexes on cotton textile for optoelectronics and gas sensing.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Rajesh; Walia, Sumeet; Kandjani, Ahmad Esmaielzadeh; Balendran, Sivacarendran; Mohammadtaheri, Mahsa; Bhargava, Suresh Kumar; Kalantar-zadeh, Kourosh; Bansal, Vipul

    2015-02-03

    A generalized low-temperature approach for fabricating high aspect ratio nanorod arrays of alkali metal-TCNQ (7,7,8,8-tetracyanoquinodimethane) charge transfer complexes at 140 °C is demonstrated. This facile approach overcomes the current limitation associated with fabrication of alkali metal-TCNQ complexes that are based on physical vapor deposition processes and typically require an excess of 800 °C. The compatibility of soft substrates with the proposed low-temperature route allows direct fabrication of NaTCNQ and LiTCNQ nanoarrays on individual cotton threads interwoven within the 3D matrix of textiles. The applicability of these textile-supported TCNQ-based organic charge transfer complexes toward optoelectronics and gas sensing applications is established.

  1. Inactivation of microorganisms and endotoxins by low temperature nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

    PubMed

    Shintani, Hideharu; Shimizu, Naohiro; Imanishi, Yuichiro; Sekiya, Takayuki; Tamazawa, Kahoru; Taniguchi, Akira; Kido, Nobuo

    2007-12-01

    The plasma of several different gases has shown a sporicidal activity. From these gases, nitrogen gas was most difficult to produce atomic nitrogen radicals. However, these radicals have a high energy, indicating that nitrogen gas plasma could be used to sterilize microorganisms and inactivate endotoxins. The sterilization mechanism of nitrogen gas plasma is the synergistic effect of a high rising-up voltage pulse, UV irradiation and atomic nitrogen radicals. Thus, the target cells were damaged by degradation, which resulted in death. The biological indicator (BI) used in this study was Geobacillus stearothermophilus ATCC 7953 at a population of 1 x 10(6) CFU/sheet. Sterility assurance was confirmed by using the BI. Moreover, endotoxins were successfully inactivated. More than 5 log reduction of endotoxins could be attained with 30 minutes of nitrogen gas plasma exposure. Material functionality influenced by nitrogen gas plasma presented a satisfactory result. No deterioration of polymers could be observed by nitrogen gas plasma exposure.

  2. Passive Gas-Gap Heat Switches for Use in Low-Temperature Cryogenic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimball, M. O.; Shirron, P. J.; Canavan, E. R.; Tuttle, J. G.; Jahromi, A. E.; Dipirro, M. J.; James, B. L.; Sampson, M. A.; Letmate, R. V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the current state of development in passive gas-gap heat switches. This type of switch does not require a separate heater to activate heat transfer but, instead, relies upon the warming of one end due to an intrinsic step in a thermodynamic cycle to raise a getter above a threshold temperature. Above this temperature sequestered gas is released to couple both sides of the switch. This enhances the thermodynamic efficiency of the system and reduces the complexity of the control system. Various gas mixtures and getter configurations will be presented.

  3. Plasma Assisted Ignition at High Pressures and Low Temperatures. PAI Kinetics and Fast Gas Heating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-06

    investigated for decades. Interest in this phenomenon comes from the optimiza- tion of laser systems and chemical reactors: this type of energy release is...sccm was used so that the gas was recycled between subsequent high voltage pulses. Gas pressure was varied from 1 to 15 mbar in order to check the...18U-03 ICCD camera (spectral range 115−900 nm). The spectrograph was calibrated using an Ocean Optics Hg–Ar lamp. In order to capture the entirety of

  4. Stability and photochemistry of ClO dimers formed at low temperature in the gas phase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, R. A.; Hayman, G. D.

    1988-01-01

    The recent observations of elevated concentrations of the ClO radical in the austral spring over Antarctica have implicated catalytic destruction by chlorine in the large depletions seen in the total ozone column. One of the chemical theories consistent with an elevated concentration of the ClO is a cycle involving the formation of the ClO dimer through the association reaction: ClO + ClO = Cl2O2 and the photolysis of the dimer to give the active Cl species necessary for O3 depletion. Here, researchers report experimental studies designed to characterize the dimer of ClO formed by the association reaction at low temperatures. ClO was produced by static photolysis of several different precursor systems: Cl sub 2 + O sub 3; Cl sub 2 O sub 2; OClO + Cl sub 2 O spectroscopy in the U.V. region, which allowed the time dependence of Cl sub 2, Cl sub 2 O, ClO, OClO, O sub 3 and other absorbing molecules to be determined.

  5. Low temperature gamma ray irradiation effects on polymer materials (4)-gas analysis of GFRP and CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, H.; Kasai, N.; Sasuga, T.; Seguchi, T.

    1996-11-01

    Gas analysis was carried out at RT after gamma-irradiation at room temperature and 77K for glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) having the same epoxy resin matrix. Gas yield from CFRP was less than that from GFRP at RT, but comparable at 77 K. The yields of CO and CO 2 showed a large dependence on the irradiation temperature, i.e. they were much less at 77 K. Radiation resistance of GFRP and CFRP towards 77 K irrdiation is expected to be higher than that towards RT irradiation.

  6. Low-temperature gas-barrier films by atomic layer deposition for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Ming-Hung; Yu, Hui-Huan; Chou, Kun-Yi; Jou, Jwo-Huei; Lin, Kung-Liang; Wang, Chin-Chiun; Tsai, Feng-Yu

    2016-07-01

    Dependences of gas-barrier performance on the deposition temperature of atomic-layer-deposited (ALD) Al2O3, HfO2, and ZnO films were studied to establish low-temperature ALD processes for encapsulating organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). By identifying and controlling the key factors, i.e. using H2O2 as an oxidant, laminating Al2O3 with HfO2 or ZnO layers into AHO or AZO nanolaminates, and extending purge steps, OLED-acceptable gas-barrier performance (water vapor transmission rates ˜ 10-6 g m-2 d-1) was achieved for the first time at a low deposition temperature of 50 °C in a thermal ALD mode. The compatibility of the low-temperature ALD process with OLEDs was confirmed by applying the process to encapsulate different types of OLED devices, which were degradation-free upon encapsulation and showed adequate lifetime during accelerated aging tests (pixel shrinkage <5% after 240 h at 60 °C/90% RH).

  7. Low temperature operated NiO-SnO2 heterostructured SO2 gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Punit; Sharma, Anjali; Tomar, Monika; Gupta, Vinay

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) is among the most toxic gas released by the industries which is extremely dangerous for human health. In the present communication, an attempt has been made for the detection of SO2 gas (500 ppm) with the help of SnO2 thin film based gas sensor. A low sensing response of 1.3 is obtained for sputtered SnO2 thin films based sensors at a high operating temperature of 220 °C. To improve the sensing response, different heterostructured sensors are developed by incorporating other metal oxide thin films (PdO, MgO, NiO, V2O5) over SnO2 thin film surface. Sensing response studies of different sensors towards SO2 gas (500 ppm) are presented in the present report. Among all the prepared sensors NiO-SnO2 hetero-structure sensor is showing highest sensing response (˜8) at a comparatively lower operating temperature (140 °C). Possible sensing mechanism for NiO-SnO2 heterostructured sensor has also been discussed in the present report.

  8. Micromechanical cohesion force between gas hydrate particles measured under high pressure and low temperature conditions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bo Ram; Sum, Amadeu K

    2015-04-07

    To prevent hydrate plugging conditions in the transportation of oil/gas in multiphase flowlines, one of the key processes to control is the agglomeration/deposition of hydrate particles, which are determined by the cohesive/adhesive forces. Previous studies reporting measurements of the cohesive/adhesive force between hydrate particles used cyclopentane hydrate particles in a low-pressure micromechanical force apparatus. In this study, we report the cohesive forces of particles measured in a new high-pressure micromechanical force (MMF) apparatus for ice particles, mixed (methane/ethane, 74.7:25.3) hydrate particles (Structure II), and carbon dioxide hydrate particles (Structure I). The cohesive forces are measured as a function of the contact time, contact force, temperature, and pressure, and determined from pull-off measurements. For the measurements performed of the gas hydrate particles in the gas phase, the determined cohesive force is about 30-35 mN/m, about 8 times higher than the cohesive force of CyC5 hydrates in the liquid CyC5, which is about 4.3 mN/m. We show from our results that the hydrate structure (sI with CO2 hydrates and sII with CH4/C2H6 hydrates) has no influence on the cohesive force. These results are important in the deposition of a gas-dominated system, where the hydrate particles formed in the liquid phase can then stick to the hydrate deposited in the wall exposed to the gas phase.

  9. Investigation of poly(o-anisidine)-SnO2 nanocomposites for fabrication of low temperature operative liquefied petroleum gas sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patil, Dewyani; Kolhe, Kishor; Potdar, Hari S.; Patil, Pradip

    2011-12-01

    Poly(o-anisidine)-tin oxide (POA-SnO2) nanocomposites has been investigated for the fabrication of low temperature operative (100 °C) liquefied petroleum gas (LPG) sensor. The POA-SnO2 nanocomposites have been synthesized through an in situ chemical polymerization of o-anisidine in presence of SnO2 nanoparticles. The POA-SnO2 nanocomposite shows better LPG sensing properties than that of pure POA. The nanocomposite with 50 wt. % SnO2 exhibits an excellent LPG sensing characteristics at the operating temperature of 100 °C such as higher relative gas response (˜23.47% to 3.4% of LPG), extremely rapid response (˜6 s), fast recovery (˜33 s), good reproducibility, and remarkable selectivity. The application of POA-SnO2 nanocomposites for fabrication of the LPG sensor was demonstrated.

  10. Emerging applications of low temperature gas plasmas in the food industry.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Alex; Shama, Gilbert; Iza, Felipe

    2015-06-16

    The global burden of foodborne disease due to the presence of contaminating micro-organisms remains high, despite some notable examples of their successful reduction in some instances. Globally, the number of species of micro-organisms responsible for foodborne diseases has increased over the past decades and as a result of the continued centralization of the food processing industry, outbreaks now have far reaching consequences. Gas plasmas offer a broad range of microbicidal capabilities that could be exploited in the food industry and against which microbial resistance would be unlikely to occur. In addition to reducing the incidence of disease by acting on the micro-organisms responsible for food spoilage, gas plasmas could also play a role in increasing the shelf-life of perishable foods and thereby reduce food wastage with positive financial and environmental implications. Treatment need not be confined to the food itself but could include food processing equipment and also the environment in which commercial food processing occurs. Moreover, gas plasmas could also be used to bring about the degradation of undesirable chemical compounds, such as allergens, toxins, and pesticide residues, often encountered on foods and food-processing equipment. The literature on the application of gas plasmas to food treatment is beginning to reveal an appreciation that attention needs also to be paid to ensuring that the key quality attributes of foods are not significantly impaired as a result of treatment. A greater understanding of both the mechanisms by which micro-organisms and chemical compounds are inactivated, and of the plasma species responsible for this is forming. This is significant, as this knowledge can then be used to design plasma systems with tailored compositions that will achieve maximum efficacy. Better understanding of the underlying interactions will also enable the design and implementation of control strategies capable of minimizing variations in

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis and NH3 gas sensing property of WO3 nanorods at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dien Nguyen, Dac; Vuong Dang, Duc; Chien Nguyen, Duc

    2015-09-01

    One-dimensional self-assembled single-crystalline hexagonal tungsten trioxide (WO3) nanostructures were synthesized by wet chemical-assisted hydrothermal processing at 120 °C for 24 h using sodium tungstate and hydrochloric acid. Urchin-like hierarchical nanorods (petal size: ∼16 nm diameter and 110 nm length) were obtained. The samples were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Sensors based on WO3 nanorods were fabricated by coating them on SiO2/Si substrate attached with Pt interdigitated electrodes. NH3 gas-sensing properties of WO3 nanorods were measured at different temperatures ranging from 50 °C to 350 °C and the response was evaluated as a function of ammonia gas concentration. The gas-sensing results reveal that WO3 nanorods sensor exhibits high sensitivity and selectivity to NH3 at low operating temperature (50 °C). The maximum response reached at 50 °C was 192 for 250 ppm NH3, with response and recovery times of 10 min and 2 min, respectively.

  12. Generation of uniform low-temperature plasma in a pulsed non-self-sustained glow discharge with a large-area hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadeev, Yu. H.; Denisov, V. V.; Koval, N. N.; Kovalsky, S. S.; Lopatin, I. V.; Schanin, P. M.; Yakovlev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    Generation of plasma in a pulsed non-self-sustained glow discharge with a hollow cathode with an area of ≥2 m2 at gas pressures of 0.4-1 Pa was studied experimentally. At an auxiliary arc-discharge current of 100 A and a main discharge voltage of 240 V, a pulse-periodic glow discharge with a current amplitude of 370 A, pulse duration of 340 μs, and repetition rate of 1 kHz was obtained. The possibility of creating a uniform gas-discharge plasma with a density of up to 1012 cm-3 and an electron temperature of 1 eV in a volume of >0.2 m3 was demonstrated. Such plasma can be efficiently used to treat material surfaces and generate pulsed ion beams with a current density of up to 15 mA/cm2.

  13. Interface engineering: broadband light and low temperature gas detection abilities using a nano-heterojunction device.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chien-Min; Hsu, Ching-Han; Liu, Yi-Wei; Chien, Tzu-Chiao; Sung, Chun-Han; Yeh, Ping-Hung

    2015-12-21

    Herein, we have designed a nano-heterojunction device using interface defects and band bending effects, which can have broadband light detection (from 365-940 nm) and low operating temperature (50 °C) gas detection abilities. The broadband light detection mechanism occurs because of the defects and band bending between the heterojunction interface. We have demonstrated this mechanism using CoSi2/SnO2, CoSi2/TiO2, Ge/SnO2 and Ge/TiO2 nano-heterojunction devices, and all these devices show broadband light detection ability. Furthermore, the nano-heterojunction of the nano-device has a local Joule-heating effect. For gas detection, the results show that the nano-heterojunction device presents a high detection ability. The reset time and sensitivity of the nano-heterojunction device are an order faster and larger than Schottky-contacted devices (previous works), which is due to the local Joule-heating effect between the interface of the nano-heterojunction. Based on the abovementioned idea, we can design diverse nano-devices for widespread use.

  14. Perchlorate induced low temperature carbonate decomposition in the Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, K. M.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Boynton, W. V.; Quinn, R.

    2012-07-01

    Simulated Thermal Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) analyses have shown that a CO2 release detected between 400°C and 680°C by the Phoenix Lander's TEGA instrument may have been caused by a reaction between calcium carbonate and hydrated magnesium perchlorate. In our experiments a CO2 release beginning at 385 ± 12°C was attributed to calcite reacting with water vapor and HCl gas from the dehydration and thermal decomposition of Mg-perchlorate. The release of CO2 is consistent with the TEGA detection of CO2 released between 400 and 680°C, with the amount of CO2 increasing linearly with added perchlorate. X-ray diffraction (XRD) experiments confirmed CaCl2 formation from the reaction between calcite and HCl. These results have important implications for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) Curiosity rover. Heating soils may cause inorganic release of CO2; therefore, detection of organic fragments, not CO2 alone, should be used as definitive evidence for organics in Martian soils.

  15. Solid sorbents for removal of carbon dioxide from gas streams at low temperatures

    DOEpatents

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO.sub.2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO.sub.2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35.degree. C.

  16. Solid Sorbents for Removal of Carbon Dioxide from Gas Streams at Low Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Sirwardane, Ranjani V.

    2005-06-21

    New low-cost CO2 sorbents are provided that can be used in large-scale gas-solid processes. A new method is provided for making these sorbents that involves treating substrates with an amine and/or an ether so that the amine and/or ether comprise at least 50 wt. percent of the sorbent. The sorbent acts by capturing compounds contained in gaseous fluids via chemisorption and/or physisorption between the unit layers of the substrate's lattice where the polar amine liquids and solids and/or polar ether liquids and solids are located. The method eliminates the need for high surface area supports and polymeric materials for the preparation of CO2 capture systems, and provides sorbents with absorption capabilities that are independent of the sorbents' surface areas. The sorbents can be regenerated by heating at temperatures in excess of 35 degrees C.

  17. Acoustic Measurements in a Hexamethyldisiloxane-Loaded Low-Temperature Direct Barrier Discharge (DBD) Plasma Effluent: Nozzle Cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, A.; Müller, D.; Paa, W.

    2015-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) measurements as well as laser light scattering experiments were performed during SiO2 layer deposition. SiO2 was generated in low-temperature atmospheric plasma torches (≤500 W), which were seeded with hexamethyldisiloxane. These AE measurements can be used to detect the necessity for nozzle cleaning online. The plasma torches were used to obtain high-quality SiO2 coatings. For electrical power of less than 350 W, we observed parasitic SiO2 deposition in the burner nozzle, which decreases the nozzle aperture within several hours of operation time. No parasitic SiO2 deposition inside the burner nozzle was observed when the plasma source was operated at more than 350 W. The reduced nozzle aperture causes increased plasma velocities and acoustic noise. Especially burst-like increases of this acoustic emission were assumed to be correlated to the ejection of particles. This hypothesis could be confirmed by measurements of scattered light from a sheet of laser light at 248 nm. The obtained correlations suggest using a microphone as a low-cost monitor for the degree of parasitic deposition inside the plasma burner nozzle. The threshold for acoustic noise detection has to be chosen low enough to avoid burst-like emission of particles.

  18. On the Mechanism of Low-Temperature Water Gas Shift Reaction on Copper

    SciTech Connect

    Gokhale, Amit A.; Dumesic, James A.; Mavrikakis, Manos

    2008-01-30

    The research described in this product was performed in part in the Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and Environmental Research and located at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory. Periodic, self-consistent density functional theory (DFT-GGA) calculations are used to investigate the water gas shift reaction (WGSR) mechanism on Cu(111). The thermochemistry and activation energy barriers for all the elementary steps of the commonly accepted redox mechanism, involving complete water activation to atomic oxygen, are presented. Through our calculations, we identify carboxyl, a new reactive intermediate, which plays a central role in WGSR on Cu(111). The thermochemistry and activation energy barriers of the elementary steps of a new reaction path, involving carboxyl, are studied. A detailed DFTbased microkinetic model of experimental reaction rates, accounting for both the previous and the new WGSR mechanism show that, under relevant experimental conditions, (1) the carboxyl-mediated route is the dominant path, and (2) the initial hydrogen abstraction from water is the rate-limiting step. Formate is a stable “spectator” species, formed predominantly through CO₂ hydrogenation. In addition, the microkinetic model allows for predictions of (i) surface coverage of intermediates, (ii) WGSR apparent activation energy, and (iii) reaction orders with respect to CO, H₂O, CO₂, and H₂.

  19. Reduced graphene oxide and graphene composite materials for improved gas sensing at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Zöpfl, Alexander; Lemberger, Michael-Maximilian; König, Matthias; Ruhl, Guenther; Matysik, Frank-Michael; Hirsch, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    Reduced graphene oxide (rGO) was investigated as a material for use in chemiresistive gas sensors. The carbon nanomaterial was transferred onto a silicon wafer with interdigital gold electrodes. Spin coating turned out to be the most reliable transfer technique, resulting in consistent rGO layers of reproducible quality. Fast changes in the electrical resistance at a low operating temperature of 85 °C could be detected for the gases NO(2), CH(4) and H(2). Especially upon adsorption of NO(2) the high signal changes allowed a minimum detection of 0.3 ppm (S/N = 3). To overcome the poor selectivity, rGO was chemically functionalized with octadecylamine, or modified by doping with metal nanoparticles such as Pd and Pt, and also metal oxides such as MnO(2), and TiO(2). The different response patterns for six different materials allowed the discrimination of all of the test gases by pattern recognition based on principal component analysis.

  20. Non-Thermal Plasma Activation of Gold-Based Catalysts for Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Stere, Cristina E; Anderson, James A; Chansai, Sarayute; Delgado, Juan Jose; Goguet, Alexandre; Graham, Willam G; Hardacre, C; Taylor, S F Rebecca; Tu, Xin; Wang, Ziyun; Yang, Hui

    2017-05-08

    Non-thermal plasma activation has been used to enable low-temperature water-gas shift over a Au/CeZrO4 catalyst. The activity obtained was comparable with that attained by heating the catalyst to 180 °C providing an opportunity for the hydrogen production to be obtained under conditions where the thermodynamic limitations are minimal. Using in situ diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy (DRIFTS), structural changes associated with the gold nanoparticles in the catalyst have been observed which are not found under thermal activation indicating a weakening of the Au-CO bond and a change in the mechanism of deactivation. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Computation of the properties of liquid neon, methane, and gas helium at low temperature by the Feynman-Hibbs approach.

    PubMed

    Tchouar, N; Ould-Kaddour, F; Levesque, D

    2004-10-15

    The properties of liquid methane, liquid neon, and gas helium are calculated at low temperatures over a large range of pressure from the classical molecular-dynamics simulations. The molecular interactions are represented by the Lennard-Jones pair potentials supplemented by quantum corrections following the Feynman-Hibbs approach. The equations of state, diffusion, and shear viscosity coefficients are determined for neon at 45 K, helium at 80 K, and methane at 110 K. A comparison is made with the existing experimental data and for thermodynamical quantities, with results computed from quantum numerical simulations when they are available. The theoretical variation of the viscosity coefficient with pressure is in good agreement with the experimental data when the quantum corrections are taken into account, thus reducing considerably the 60% discrepancy between the simulations and experiments in the absence of these corrections.

  2. Multiplex electric discharge gas laser system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laudenslager, James B. (Inventor); Pacala, Thomas J. (Inventor)

    1987-01-01

    A multiple pulse electric discharge gas laser system is described in which a plurality of pulsed electric discharge gas lasers are supported in a common housing. Each laser is supplied with excitation pulses from a separate power supply. A controller, which may be a microprocessor, is connected to each power supply for controlling the application of excitation pulses to each laser so that the lasers can be fired simultaneously or in any desired sequence. The output light beams from the individual lasers may be combined or utilized independently, depending on the desired application. The individual lasers may include multiple pairs of discharge electrodes with a separate power supply connected across each electrode pair so that multiple light output beams can be generated from a single laser tube and combined or utilized separately.

  3. Metal hydrides studied in gas discharge tube

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhinova, I.; Kolev, S.; Popov, Tsv.; Pashov, A.; Dimitrova, M.

    2016-05-01

    A novel construction of gas discharge tube has been tested for production of high densities of metal hydrydes. Its performance turned out to be comparable with the existing sources of the same type and even better. First results of the tests on NiH are reported and critically analysed. Plans for future modifiaction of the construction and application of the tube are discussed.

  4. Low-temperature, highly selective, gas-phase oxidation of benzyl alcohol over mesoporous K-Cu-TiO2 with stable copper(I) oxidation state.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jie; Dai, Yihu; Li, Yunlong; Zheng, Nanfeng; Guo, Junfang; Yan, Xiaoqing; Stucky, Galen D

    2009-11-04

    A newly developed mesoporous mixed metal oxide (K-Cu-TiO(2)) catalyst is capable of highly selective, gas-phase benzyl alcoholbenzaldehyde transformation at excellent yields (>99%) under surprisingly low temperatures (203 degrees C, bp of benzyl alcohol). The low-temperature reaction conditions and integration of K and Cu(I) components into the TiO(2) matrix are of vital importance for the stabilization of an active Cu(I) oxidation state and resultant stable, excellent catalytic performance.

  5. Direct observation of frozen gallium gas on wurtzite gallium nitride (0001) using low-temperature scanning tunneling microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alam, Khan; Foley, Andrew; Lin, Wenzhi; Corbett, Joseph; Ma, Yingqiao; Pak, Jeongihm; Smith, Arthur

    2014-03-01

    Gallium nitride layers are ordinarily grown under gallium-rich growth conditions by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) to obtain the highest material quality. In 1997, Smith et al. reported the family of reconstructions existing on the growth surface at room temperature, the highest-order being the c(6x12). Additional gallium deposition does not lead to new reconstructions. Instead, excess gallium atoms are presumed to exist in a 2-dimensional gas state. Using a custom-built MBE/low-temperature (4.2 K) STM system, we have imaged this gallium gas for the first time by freezing out the motion. The frozen-out gallium atoms are visualized as asymmetric `L-shaped' features, with left-handed and right-handed L's scattered randomly across the surface. Interestingly, on any given atomic terrace we observe a 4x greater probability of left-handed versus right-handed L's (or vice versa), which inverts across bilayer-height steps. The cause of this asymmetry is explored by zooming in with atomic resolution, revealing two inequivalent adsorption sites.

  6. Structure Sensitivity of the Low-temperature Water-gas Shift Reaction on Cu–CeO2 catalysts

    SciTech Connect

    Si, R.; Zhang, L.; Raitano, J.; Yi, N.; Chan, S.-W.; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, M.

    2012-01-17

    We have investigated the structure sensitivity of the water-gas shift (WGS) reaction on Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts prepared at the nanoscale by different techniques. On the surface of ceria, different CuO{sub x} structures exist. We show here that only the strongly bound Cu-[O{sub x}]-Ce species, probably associated with the surface oxygen vacancies of ceria, are active for catalyzing the low-temperature WGS reaction. Weakly bound CuO{sub x} clusters and CuO nanoparticles are spectator species in the reaction. Isolated Cu{sup 2+} ions doping the ceria surface are not active themselves, but they are important in that they create oxygen vacancies and can be used as a reservoir of copper to replenish surface Cu removed by leaching or sintering. Accordingly, synthesis techniques such as coprecipitation that allow for extensive solubility of Cu in ceria should be preferred over impregnation, deposition-precipitation, ion exchange or another two-step method whereby the copper precursor is added to already made ceria nanocrystals. For the synthesis of different structures, we have used two methods: a homogeneous coprecipitation (CP), involving hexamethylenetetramine as the precipitating agent and the pH buffer; and a deposition-precipitation (DP) technique. In the latter case, the ceria supports were first synthesized at the nanoscale with different shapes (rods, cubes) to investigate any potential shape effect on the reaction. Cu-CeO{sub 2} catalysts with different copper contents up to ca. 20 at.% were prepared. An indirect shape effect of CeO{sub 2}, manifested by the propensity to form oxygen vacancies and strongly bind copper in the active form, was established; i.e. the water-gas shift reaction is not structure-sensitive. The apparent activation energy of the reaction on all samples was similar, 50 {+-} 10 kJ/mol, in a product-free (2% CO-10% H{sub 2}O) gas mixture.

  7. Research on Modern Gas Discharge Light Sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Born, M.; Markus, T.

    This article gives an overview of today's gas discharge light sources and their application fields with focus on research aspects. In Sect. 15.1 of this chapter, an introduction to electric light sources, the lighting market and related research topics is outlined. Due to the complexity of the subject, we have focused on selected topics in the field of high intensity discharge (HID) lamps since these represent an essential part of modern lamp research. The working principle and light technical properties of HID lamps are described in Sect. 15.2. Physical and thermochemical modelling procedures and tools as well as experimental analysis are discussed in Sects. 15.3 and 15.4, respectively. These tools result in a detailed scientific insight into the complexity of real discharge lamps. In particular, analysis and modelling are the keys for further improvement and development of existing and new products.

  8. Central peaking of magnetized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Francis F.; Curreli, Davide

    2013-05-15

    Partially ionized gas discharges used in industry are often driven by radiofrequency (rf) power applied at the periphery of a cylinder. It is found that the plasma density n is usually flat or peaked on axis even if the skin depth of the rf field is thin compared with the chamber radius a. Previous attempts at explaining this did not account for the finite length of the discharge and the boundary conditions at the endplates. A simple 1D model is used to focus on the basic mechanism: the short-circuit effect. It is found that a strong electric field (E-field) scaled to electron temperature T{sub e}, drives the ions inward. The resulting density profile is peaked on axis and has a shape independent of pressure or discharge radius. This “universal” profile is not affected by a dc magnetic field (B-field) as long as the ion Larmor radius is larger than a.

  9. Numerical study of a helicon gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batishchev, Oleg; Molvig, Kim

    2001-06-01

    Plasma sources based on the helicon gas discharge are widely used in industry [1] due to their high efficiency. We investigate performance of a particular helicon plasma sources designed for the VASIMR [2] plasma thruster. Specifically we are interested in the VX-10 configuration [3] operating with hydrogen or helium plasmas. Firstly, we use our zero-dimensional model to characterize plasma condition and composition [4]. Next we couple it to one-dimensional hybrid model [5] for a rarified gas flow in the system feeding pipe - quartz tube of the helicon. We perform numerical analysis of plasma source operation in different regimes. Results are compared and used to explain experimental data [3]. Finally, we'll discuss more detailed fully kinetic models for the gas and plasma species evolution in the helicon discharge with parameters typical to that of the VASIMR plasma thruster. [1] M.A. Lieberman and A.J.Lihtenberg, , 'Principles of plasma discharges and materials processing', Wiley, NY, 1994; [2] F.Chang-Diaz et al, Bull. APS 45 (7) 129, 2000; [3] J. Squire et al., Bull. APS 45 (7) 130, 2000; [4] O.Batishchev and Kim Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2000-3754, 2000; [5] O.Batishchev and Kim Molvig, AIAA technical paper 2001-0963, 2001.

  10. Low-temperature Fabrication Process for Integrated High-Aspect Ratio Metal Oxide Nanostructure Semiconductor Gas Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clavijo, William P.

    This work presents a new low-temperature fabrication process of metal oxide nanostructures that allows high-aspect ratio zinc oxide (ZnO) and titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanowires and nanotubes to be readily integrated with microelectronic devices for sensor applications. This process relies on a new method of forming a close-packed array of self-assembled high-aspect-ratio nanopores in an anodized aluminum oxide (AAO) template in a thin (2.5 microm) aluminum film deposited on a silicon and lithium niobate substrate (LiNbO3). This technique is in sharp contrast to traditional free-standing thick film methods and the use of an integrated thin aluminum film greatly enhances the utility of such methods. We have demonstrated the method by integrating ZnO nanowires, TiO2 nanowires, and multiwall TiO2 nanotubes onto the metal gate of a MOSFET (Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor Field-Effect Transistor), and the delay line of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device to form an integrated ChemFET (Chemical Field-Effect Transistor) and a orthogonal frequency coded (OFC) SAW gas sensor. The resulting metal oxide nanostructures of 1-1.7 microm in height and 40-100 nm in diameter offer an increase of up to 220X the surface area over a standard flat metal oxide film for sensing applications.

  11. Low Temperature Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy of Amorphous Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles doped with Erbium, synthesized using Inert Gas Condensation Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandya, Sneha; Wang, Jingzhou; Wojciech, Jadwisienczak; Kordesch, Martin

    2015-03-01

    Free standing Aluminum Nitride Nanoparticles (NPs) doped in situwith Erbium (AlN:Er), ranging from 3-30nm in size, were synthesized using a vapor phase deposition technique known as Inert Gas Condensation (IGC). Amorphous behavior of these NPs was inferred from the wide-angle X-ray spectroscopy studies. Raman spectra analysis for these AlN:Er NPs showed characteristic peaks for A1(TO) and E2(high) phonon modes of AlN. Detailed structural characterization of these Er doped AlN NPs will be carried out using a High-Resolution TEM, results of which will be included in my talk. Low temperature Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out for these a-AlN:Er NPs. The corresponding Er+3 ion emission peaks were compared to the CL emission spectra obtained for a-AlN:Er thin films, and for commercially obtained Erbium-Oxide NPs. These spectroscopic results will be discussed in detail. I will also present the CL results obtained for in-air and in-nitrogen atmosphere annealed a-AlN:Er NPs. In addition to this, I will illustrate how these Er doped NPs can be used as nano-scale temperature sensors. The SNOM help provided by Prof. Hugh Richardson is gratefully acknowledged.

  12. Low-temperature GaN growth on silicon substrates by single gas-source epitaxy and photo-excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Trivedi, R.A.; Tolle, J.; Chizmeshya, A.V.G.; Roucka, R.; Ritter, Cole; Kouvetakis, J.; Tsong, I.S.T.

    2005-08-15

    We report a unique low-temperature growth method for epitaxial GaN on Si(111) substrates via a ZrB{sub 2}(0001) buffer layer. The method utilizes the decomposition of a single gas-source precursor (D{sub 2}GaN{sub 3}){sub 3} on the substrate surface to form GaN. The film growth process is further promoted by irradiation of ultraviolet light to enhance the growth rate and ordering of the film. The best epitaxial film quality is achieved at a growth temperature of 550 deg. C with a growth rate of 3 nm/min. The films exhibit intense photoluminescence emission at 10 K with a single peak at 3.48 eV, indicative of band-edge emission for a single-phase hexagonal GaN film. The growth process achieved in this study is compatible with low Si processing temperatures and also enables direct epitaxy of GaN on ZrB{sub 2} in contrast to conventional metalorganic chemical vapor deposition based approaches.

  13. Multi-zone modelling of partially premixed low-temperature combustion in pilot-ignited natural-gas engines

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnan, S. R.; inivasan, K. K.

    2010-09-14

    Detailed results from a multi-zone phenomenological simulation of partially premixed advanced-injection low-pilot-ignited natural-gas low-temperature combustion are presented with a focus on early injection timings (the beginning of (pilot) injection (BOI)) and very small diesel quantities (2-3 per cent of total fuel energy). Combining several aspects of diesel and spark ignition engine combustion models, the closed-cycle simulation accounted for diesel autoignition, diesel spray combustion, and natural-gas combustion by premixed turbulent flame propagation. The cylinder contents were divided into an unburned zone, several pilot fuel zones (or 'packets') that modelled diesel evaporation and ignition, a flame zone for natural-gas combustion, and a burned zone. The simulation predicted the onset of ignition, cylinder pressures, and heat release rate profiles satisfactorily over a wide range of BOIs (20-60° before top dead centre (before TDC)) but especially well at early BOIs. Strong coupling was observed between pilot spray combustion in the packets and premixed turbulent combustion in the flame zone and, therefore, the number of ignition centres (packets) profoundly affected flame combustion. The highest local peak temperatures (greater than 2000 K) were observed in the packets, while the flame zone was much cooler (about 1650 K), indicating that pilot diesel spray combustion is probably the dominant source of engine-out emissions of nitrogen oxide (NOx). Further, the 60° before TDC BOI yielded the lowest average peak packet temperatures (about 1720 K) compared with the 20° before TDC BOI (about 2480 K) and 40° before TDC BOI (about 2700 K). These trends support experimental NOx trends, which showed the lowest NOx emissions for the 60°, 20°, and 40° before TDC BOIs in that order. Parametric studies showed that increasing the intake charge temperature, pilot quantity, and natural-gas equivalence ratio all led to higher peak

  14. Vehicle exhaust gas clearance by low temperature plasma-driven nano-titanium dioxide film prepared by radiofrequency magnetron sputtering.

    PubMed

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas.

  15. Vehicle Exhaust Gas Clearance by Low Temperature Plasma-Driven Nano-Titanium Dioxide Film Prepared by Radiofrequency Magnetron Sputtering

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Shuang; Liang, Yongdong; Sun, Shujun; Zhang, Kai; Zhang, Jue; Fang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    A novel plasma-driven catalysis (PDC) reactor with special structure was proposed to remove vehicle exhaust gas. The PDC reactor which consisted of three quartz tubes and two copper electrodes was a coaxial dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) reactor. The inner and outer electrodes firmly surrounded the outer surface of the corresponding dielectric barrier layer in a spiral way, respectively. Nano-titanium dioxide (TiO2) film prepared by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering was coated on the outer wall of the middle quartz tube, separating the catalyst from the high voltage electrode. The spiral electrodes were designed to avoid overheating of microdischarges inside the PDC reactor. Continuous operation tests indicated that stable performance without deterioration of catalytic activity could last for more than 25 h. To verify the effectiveness of the PDC reactor, a non-thermal plasma(NTP) reactor was employed, which has the same structure as the PDC reactor but without the catalyst. The real vehicle exhaust gas was introduced into the PDC reactor and NTP reactor, respectively. After the treatment, compared with the result from NTP, the concentration of HC in the vehicle exhaust gas treated by PDC reactor reduced far more obviously while that of NO decreased only a little. Moreover, this result was explained through optical emission spectrum. The O emission lines can be observed between 870 nm and 960 nm for wavelength in PDC reactor. Together with previous studies, it could be hypothesized that O derived from catalytically O3 destruction by catalyst might make a significant contribution to the much higher HC removal efficiency by PDC reactor. A series of complex chemical reactions caused by the multi-components mixture in real vehicle exhaust reduced NO removal efficiency. A controllable system with a real-time feedback module for the PDC reactor was proposed to further improve the ability of removing real vehicle exhaust gas. PMID:23560062

  16. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not...

  17. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 153.964 Section 153.964... CARRYING BULK LIQUID, LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Operations Cargo Transfer Procedures § 153.964 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not...

  18. Gas feed system for the T-15 tokamak discharge chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulyaev, V. A.; Levkov, B. S.; Maslennikov, E. A.; Notkin, G. E.; Polkanov, V. N.; Shchedrov, V. M.

    Hydrogen (deuterium) and rare gas feed system for the T-15 tokamak discharge chamber is described. Fast-response pulsed piezovalve designs used in the gas feed system are presented. Problems of automated gas feed control, depending on discharge chamber wall gas saturation, diaphragm and plasma parameters, are considered.

  19. Oxynitrided Surface Layer Produced On Ti6Al4V Titanium Alloy Under Low Temperature Glow Discharge Conditions For Medical Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Wierzchon, T.; Ossowski, M.; Borowski, T.; Morgiel, J.; Czarnowska, E.

    2011-01-17

    In spite that titanium oxides increase biocompatibility of titanium implants but their functional life is limited due to the problems arising from brittles and metalosis. Therefore technology, that allow to produce composite surface layer with controlled microstructure, chemical and phase composition and surface morphology on titanium alloy and eliminates the oxides disadvantages has been existing till now is searched. The requirements of titanium and its alloys implants can be fulfill by the low-temperature glow discharge assisted oxynitriding.The paper describes the surface layer of TiO{sub 2}+TiN+Ti{sub 2}N+{alpha}Ti(N) type produced at temperature 680 deg. C that preserves mechanical properties of titanium alloy Ti6Al4V. Characteristics of produced diffusion multi-phase surface layers in range of phase composition, microstructure (SEM, TEM, XRD) and its properties, such as frictional wear resistance are presented. The biological properties in dependency to the applied sterilization method are also analyzed.Properties of produced surface layers are discussed with reference to titanium alloy. The obtained data show that produced surface layers improves titanium alloy properties both frictional wear and biological. Preliminary in vitro examinations show good biocompatibility and antithrombogenic properties.

  20. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge by...

  1. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge by...

  2. 46 CFR 154.1838 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Discharge by gas pressurization. 154.1838 Section 154... SAFETY STANDARDS FOR SELF-PROPELLED VESSELS CARRYING BULK LIQUEFIED GASES Operations § 154.1838 Discharge by gas pressurization. The person in charge of cargo transfer may not authorize cargo discharge by...

  3. Sounding experiments of high pressure gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Biele, Joachim K.

    1998-07-10

    A high pressure discharge experiment (200 MPa, 5{center_dot}10{sup 21} molecules/cm{sup 3}, 3000 K) has been set up to study electrically induced shock waves. The apparatus consists of the combustion chamber (4.2 cm{sup 3}) to produce high pressure gas by burning solid propellant grains to fill the electrical pump chamber (2.5 cm{sup 3}) containing an insulated coaxial electrode. Electrical pump energy up to 7.8 kJ at 10 kV, which is roughly three times of the gas energy in the pump chamber, was delivered by a capacitor bank. From the current-voltage relationship the discharge develops at rapidly decreasing voltage. Pressure at the combustion chamber indicating significant underpressure as well as overpressure peaks is followed by an increase of static pressure level. These data are not yet completely understood. However, Lorentz forces are believed to generate pinching with subsequent pinch heating, resulting in fast pressure variations to be propagated as rarefaction and shock waves, respectively. Utilizing pure axisymmetric electrode initiation rather than often used exploding wire technology in the pump chamber, repeatable experiments were achieved.

  4. Frugal Biotech Applications of Low-Temperature Plasma.

    PubMed

    Machala, Zdenko; Graves, David B

    2017-09-01

    Gas discharge low-temperature air plasma can be utilized for a variety of applications, including biomedical, at low cost. We term these applications 'frugal plasma' - an example of frugal innovation. We demonstrate how simple, robust, low-cost frugal plasma devices can be used to safely disinfect instruments, surfaces, and water. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  6. Discharge source with gas curtain for protecting optics from particles

    DOEpatents

    Fornaciari, Neal R.; Kanouff, Michael P.

    2004-03-30

    A gas curtain device is employed to deflect debris that is generated by an extreme ultraviolet and soft x-ray radiation discharge source such as an electric discharge plasma source. The gas curtain device projects a stream of gas over the path of the radiation to deflect debris particles into a direction that is different from that of the path of the radiation. The gas curtain can be employed to prevent debris accumulation on the optics used in photolithography.

  7. 2D fluid simulations of discharges at atmospheric pressure in reactive gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourdon, Anne

    2015-09-01

    Since a few years, low-temperature atmospheric pressure discharges have received a considerable interest as they efficiently produce many reactive chemical species at a low energy cost. This potential is of great interest for a wide range of applications as plasma assisted combustion or biomedical applications. Then, in current simulations of atmospheric pressure discharges, there is the need to take into account detailed kinetic schemes. It is interesting to note that in some conditions, the kinetics of the discharge may play a role on the discharge dynamics itself. To illustrate this, we consider the case of the propagation of He-N2 discharges in long capillary tubes, studied for the development of medical devices for endoscopic applications. Simulation results put forward that the discharge dynamics and structure depend on the amount of N2 in the He-N2 mixture. In particular, as the amount of N2 admixture increases, the discharge propagation velocity in the tube increases, reaches a maximum for about 0 . 1 % of N2 and then decreases, in agreement with experiments. For applications as plasma assisted combustion with nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, there is the need to handle the very different timescales of the nanosecond discharge with the much longer (micro to millisecond) timescales of combustion processes. This is challenging from a computational point of view. It is also important to better understand the coupling of the plasma induced chemistry and the gas heating. To illustrate this, we present the simulation of the flame ignition in lean mixtures by a nanosecond pulsed discharge between two point electrodes. In particular, among the different discharge regimes of nanosecond repetitively pulsed discharges, a ``spark'' regime has been put forward in the experiments, with an ultra-fast local heating of the gas. For other discharge regimes, the gas heating is much weaker. We have simulated the nanosecond spark regime and have observed shock waves

  8. Development of low temperature battery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Armstrong, G. M.

    1967-01-01

    Self-contained low temperature battery system consisting of a magnesium anode, potassium thiocyanate-ammonia electrolyte and a cathode composed of a mixture of sulfur, carbon, and mercuric sulfate operates for at least seventy-two hours within a discharge temperature range of plus 20 degrees C to minus 90 degrees C.

  9. Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique

    PubMed Central

    Blocquet, Marion; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Amedro, Damien; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-01-01

    •OH and •HO2 radicals are known to be the key species in the development of ignition. A direct measurement of these radicals under low-temperature oxidation conditions (T = 550–1,000 K) has been achieved by coupling a technique named fluorescence assay by gas expansion, an experimental technique designed for the quantification of these radicals in the free atmosphere, to a jet-stirred reactor, an experimental device designed for the study of low-temperature combustion chemistry. Calibration allows conversion of relative fluorescence signals to absolute mole fractions. Such radical mole fraction profiles will serve as a benchmark for testing chemical models developed to improve the understanding of combustion processes. PMID:24277836

  10. Quantification of OH and HO2 radicals during the low-temperature oxidation of hydrocarbons by Fluorescence Assay by Gas Expansion technique.

    PubMed

    Blocquet, Marion; Schoemaecker, Coralie; Amedro, Damien; Herbinet, Olivier; Battin-Leclerc, Frédérique; Fittschen, Christa

    2013-12-10

    •OH and •HO2 radicals are known to be the key species in the development of ignition. A direct measurement of these radicals under low-temperature oxidation conditions (T = 550-1,000 K) has been achieved by coupling a technique named fluorescence assay by gas expansion, an experimental technique designed for the quantification of these radicals in the free atmosphere, to a jet-stirred reactor, an experimental device designed for the study of low-temperature combustion chemistry. Calibration allows conversion of relative fluorescence signals to absolute mole fractions. Such radical mole fraction profiles will serve as a benchmark for testing chemical models developed to improve the understanding of combustion processes.

  11. Battling Bacterial Biofilms with Gas Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zelaya, Anna; Vandervoort, Kurt; Brelles-Mariño, Graciela

    Most studies dealing with growth and physiology of bacteria have been carried out using free-living cells. However, most bacteria live in communities referred to as biofilms where cooperative interactions among their members make conventional methods of controlling microbial growth often ineffective. The use of gas discharge plasmas represents an alternative to traditional decontamination/sterilization methods. We studied biofilms using two organisms, Chromobacterium violaceum and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. With the first organism we demonstrated almost complete loss of cell culturability after a 5-min plasma treatment. However, additional determinations showed that non-culturable cells were still alive after short exposure times. We have recently reported the effect of plasma on P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on borosilicate coupons. In this paper, we present results for plasma treatments of 1-, 3-, and 7-day old P. aeruginosa biofilms grown on polycarbonate or stainless-steel coupons. Results indicate nearly 100% of ­biofilm inactivation after 5 min of exposure with similar inactivation kinetics for 1-, 3-, and 7-day-old biofilms, and for both materials used. The inactivation kinetics is similar for both organisms, suggesting that the method is useful regardless of the type of biofilm. AFM images show changes in biofilm structure for various plasma exposure times.

  12. Coupled gas discharge and pulse circuit analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Dadelszen, Michael; Rothe, Dietmar E.

    1991-04-01

    Two examples of the importance of accurate coupling of driving electric circuits to discharge models, when simulating fast pulse discharges, are presented. The first example uses a commercial electric field analysis code, TETRAelf, to simulate a pulsed discharge TEA CO2 laser and demonstrates the value of including displacement current effects in the modeling of the avalanche phase of the discharge. The second example uses a commercial electric circuit analysis package, ECA, to simulate a three-electrode, long-pulse, 2-J, XeCl excimer laser. Both the saturable magnetic cores and the discharge kinetics are included in the simulation. Comparisons are made between the numerical results and experimental data.

  13. Kinetics of charged particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in a nonuniform electrostatic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, V. A.; Krichevskii, S. V.; Markushin, M. A.

    2017-01-01

    A high-voltage gas discharge is of interest as a possible means of generating directed flows of low-temperature plasma in the off-electrode space distinguished by its original features [1-4]. We propose a model for calculating the trajectories of charges particles in a high-voltage gas discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.15 Torr existing in a nonuniform electrostatic field and the strength of this field. Based on the results of our calculations, we supplement and refine the extensive experimental data concerning the investigation of such a discharge published in [1, 2, 5-8]; good agreement between the theory and experiment has been achieved. The discharge burning is initiated and maintained through bulk electron-impact ionization and ion-electron emission. We have determined the sizes of the cathode surface regions responsible for these processes, including the sizes of the axial zone involved in the discharge generation. The main effect determining the kinetics of charged particles consists in a sharp decrease in the strength of the field under consideration outside the interelectrode space, which allows a free motion of charges with specific energies and trajectories to be generated in it. The simulation results confirm that complex electrode systems that allow directed plasma flows to be generated at a discharge current of hundreds or thousands of milliamperes and a voltage on the electrodes of 0.3-1 kV can be implemented in practice [3, 9, 10].

  14. Modeling nitrogen-gas, -liquid, -solid chemistries at low temperatures (173-298 K) with applications to Titan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marion, G. M.; Kargel, J. S.; Catling, D. C.; Lunine, J. I.

    2014-07-01

    Molecular diatomic nitrogen (henceforth, “nitrogen”) is a major gas on Venus, Earth, Mars, Titan, Triton, and Pluto; a major condensed liquid component on Titan; and major condensed ices on Triton and Pluto. Nitrogen also occurs as a component of air gas hydrates in Earth’s polar ice sheets. The Solar System’s nitrogen originally might have been produced by condensation of nitrogen ice in the outer Solar Nebula disk, or it might have first condensed as and then decomposed from nitrogen gas hydrate or ammonia. The specific objectives of this study were to add nitrogen into the FREZCHEM model (which already included ammonia) and explore some roles of nitrogen on planetary satellites, especially Titan, where nitrogen is a major atmospheric gas and a component of Titan’s hydrocarbon-rich lakes and rain. Nitrogen gases, aqueous phases, and gas hydrates were added to FREZCHEM. Nitrogen, methane, and carbon dioxide gas hydrates were parallel with respect to temperature, which allowed extensions to 173 K, including for mixed N2-CH4 and N2-CO2 gas hydrates. Simulations from 273 to 173 K used a surface Titan pressure of 1.467 bars with a major mixing gas of nitrogen at 1.394 bars (95%) and methane at 0.073 bars (5%). These gas concentrations eventually led to formation of N2-CH4 gas hydrate at 178 K, which suggests that these gas hydrates could be forming on the surface of Titan today (at 94 K) and in sub-surfaces with higher temperatures. On Earth, air gas hydrates are common deep within polar ice sheets and are dominated by atmospheric N2/O2 gas compositions; and as a consequence, gas hydrates do not control, but are controlled by, atmospheric N2/O2 gas compositions. Given that Earth and Titan have similar atmospheric nitrogen (0.78 vs. 1.39 bars) and icy environments, on neither body are gas hydrates likely the main source of atmospheric nitrogen; but rather, atmospheric gases are likely the source of minor amounts of nitrogen in gas hydrates on Earth and Titan.

  15. Helium-3 gas self-diffusion in a nematically ordered aerogel at low temperatures: enhanced role of adsorption.

    PubMed

    Kuzmin, Vyacheslav; Safiullin, Kajum; Stanislavovas, Andrey; Tagirov, Murat

    2017-08-30

    We performed (3)He gas diffusion measurements for the first time in a highly porous ordered Al2O3 aerogel sample at a temperature of 4.2 K using a nuclear magnetic resonance field gradient technique. A strong influence of (3)He adsorption in the aerogel on self-diffusion is observed. The classical consideration of adsorptive gas diffusion in mesopores leads to anomalously high tortuosity factors. The application of a more sophisticated model than the simple combination of empirical two-phase diffusion and the Knudsen gas diffusion models is required to explain our results. Anisotropic properties of the aerogel are not reflected in the observed gas diffusion even at low gas densities where the anisotropic Knudsen regime of diffusion is expected. The observed gas densification indicates the influence of the aerogel attractive potential on the molecular dynamics, which probably explains the reduced diffusion process. Perhaps this behavior is common for any adsorptive gases in nanopores.

  16. Polishing of Optical Media by Dielectric Barrier Discharge Inert Gas Plasma at Atmospheric Pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerhard, C.; Weihs, T.; Luca, A.; Wieneke, S.; Viöl, W.

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, surface smoothing of optical glasses, glass ceramic and sapphire using a low-power dielectric barrier discharge inert gas plasma at atmospheric pressure is presented. For this low temperature treatment method, no vacuum devices or chemicals are required. It is shown that by such plasma treatment the micro roughness and waviness of the investigated polished surfaces were significantly decreased, resulting in a decrease in surface scattering. Further, plasma polishing of lapped fused silica is introduced. Based on simulation results, a plasma physical process is suggested to be the underlying mechanism for initialising the observed smoothing effect.

  17. Sensitive glow discharge ion source for aerosol and gas analysis

    DOEpatents

    Reilly, Peter T. A.

    2007-08-14

    A high sensitivity glow discharge ion source system for analyzing particles includes an aerodynamic lens having a plurality of constrictions for receiving an aerosol including at least one analyte particle in a carrier gas and focusing the analyte particles into a collimated particle beam. A separator separates the carrier gas from the analyte particle beam, wherein the analyte particle beam or vapors derived from the analyte particle beam are selectively transmitted out of from the separator. A glow discharge ionization source includes a discharge chamber having an entrance orifice for receiving the analyte particle beam or analyte vapors, and a target electrode and discharge electrode therein. An electric field applied between the target electrode and discharge electrode generates an analyte ion stream from the analyte vapors, which is directed out of the discharge chamber through an exit orifice, such as to a mass spectrometer. High analyte sensitivity is obtained by pumping the discharge chamber exclusively through the exit orifice and the entrance orifice.

  18. Effect of nitrogen gas packaging on the quality and microbial growth of fresh-cut vegetables under low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Koseki, Shigenobu; Itoh, Kazuhiko

    2002-02-01

    Nitrogen (N2) gas packaging for fresh-cut vegetables (lettuce and cabbage) has been examined as a means of modified atmosphere packaging (MAP) for extending the shelf life of cut vegetables. Gas composition in enclosed packages that contained cut vegetables and were filled with 100% N2 had an oxygen (O2) concentration of 1.2 to 5.0% and a carbon dioxide (CO2) concentration of 0.5 to 3.5% after 5 days of storage. An atmosphere of low concentrations of O2 and high CO2 conditions occurred naturally in the package filled with N2 gas. Degradation of cut vegetables in terms of appearance was delayed by N2 gas packaging. Because of this effect, the appearance of fresh-cut vegetables packaged with N2 gas remained acceptable at temperatures below 5 degrees C after 5 days. Treatment with acidic electrolyzed water (AcEW) contributed to the acceptability of the vegetables' appearance at 5 and 10 degrees C in the air-packaging system. N2 gas packaging did not significantly affect the growth of microbial populations (total aerobic bacteria, coliform bacteria, Bacillus cereus, and psychrotrophic bacteria) in or on cut vegetables at 1, 5, and 10 degrees C for 5 days. Microbial growth in or on the cut vegetables was inhibited at 1 degrees C for 5 days regardless of atmospheric conditions.

  19. Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative Analysis of Gas Mixtures at Low Temperatures for Homeland Security Applications.

    PubMed

    Meier, D C; Benkstein, K D; Hurst, W S; Chu, P M

    2017-05-01

    Performance standard specifications for point chemical vapor detectors are established in ASTM E 2885-13 and ASTM E 2933-13. The performance evaluation of the detectors requires the accurate delivery of known concentrations of the chemical target to the system under test. Referee methods enable the analyte test concentration and associated uncertainties in the analyte test concentration to be validated by independent analysis, which is especially important for reactive analytes. This work extends the capability of a previously demonstrated method for using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy for quantitatively evaluating the composition of vapor streams containing hazardous materials at Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGL) to include test conditions colder than laboratory ambient temperatures. The described method covers the use of primary reference spectra to establish analyte concentrations, the generation of secondary reference spectra suitable for measuring analyte concentrations under specified testing environments, and the use of additional reference spectra and spectral profile strategies to mitigate the uncertainties due to impurities and water condensation within the low-temperature (7 °C, -5 °C) test cell. Important benefits of this approach include verification of the test analyte concentration with characterized uncertainties by in situ measurements co-located with the detector under test, near-real-time feedback, and broad applicability to toxic industrial chemicals.

  20. Fourier Transform Infrared Absorption Spectroscopy for Quantitative Analysis of Gas Mixtures at Low Temperatures for Homeland Security Applications

    PubMed Central

    Meier, D.C.; Benkstein, K.D.; Hurst, W.S.; Chu, P.M.

    2016-01-01

    Performance standard specifications for point chemical vapor detectors are established in ASTM E 2885-13 and ASTM E 2933-13. The performance evaluation of the detectors requires the accurate delivery of known concentrations of the chemical target to the system under test. Referee methods enable the analyte test concentration and associated uncertainties in the analyte test concentration to be validated by independent analysis, which is especially important for reactive analytes. This work extends the capability of a previously demonstrated method for using Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) absorption spectroscopy for quantitatively evaluating the composition of vapor streams containing hazardous materials at Acute Exposure Guideline Levels (AEGL) to include test conditions colder than laboratory ambient temperatures. The described method covers the use of primary reference spectra to establish analyte concentrations, the generation of secondary reference spectra suitable for measuring analyte concentrations under specified testing environments, and the use of additional reference spectra and spectral profile strategies to mitigate the uncertainties due to impurities and water condensation within the low-temperature (7 °C, −5 °C) test cell. Important benefits of this approach include verification of the test analyte concentration with characterized uncertainties by in situ measurements co-located with the detector under test, near-real-time feedback, and broad applicability to toxic industrial chemicals. PMID:28090126

  1. Discharge effects on gas flow dynamics in a plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xian, Yu Bin; Hasnain Qaisrani, M.; Yue, Yuan Fu; Lu, Xin Pei

    2016-10-01

    Plasma is used as a flow visualization method to display the gas flow of a plasma jet. Using this method, it is found that a discharge in a plasma jet promotes the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. A discharge at intermediate frequency (˜6 kHz in this paper) has a stronger influence on the gas flow than that at lower or higher frequencies. Also, a higher discharge voltage enhances the transition of the gas flow to turbulence. Analysis reveals that pressure modulation induced both by the periodically directed movement of ionized helium and Ohmic heating on the gas flow plays an important role in inducing the transition of the helium flow regime. In addition, since the modulations induced by the high- and low-frequency discharges are determined by the frequency-selective effect, only intermediate-frequency (˜6 kHz) discharges effectively cause the helium flow transition from the laminar to the turbulent flow. Moreover, a discharge with a higher applied voltage makes a stronger impact on the helium flow because it generates stronger modulations. These conclusions are useful in designing cold plasma jets and plasma torches. Moreover, the relationship between the discharge parameters and the gas flow dynamics is a useful reference on active flow control with plasma actuators.

  2. 1D simulation of runaway electrons generation in pulsed high-pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozhevnikov, V. Yu.; Kozyrev, A. V.; Semeniuk, N. S.

    2015-10-01

    The results of theoretical modelling of runaway electron generation in the high-pressure nanosecond pulsed gas discharge are presented. A novel hybrid model of gas discharge has been successfully built. Hydrodynamic and kinetic approaches are used simultaneously to describe the dynamics of different components of low-temperature discharge plasma. To consider motion of ions and low-energy (plasma) electrons the corresponding equations of continuity with drift-diffusion approximation are used. To describe high-energy (runaway) electrons the Boltzmann kinetic equation is included. As a result of the simulation we obtained spatial and temporal distributions of charged particles and electric field in a pulsed discharge. Furthermore, the energy spectra calculated runaway electrons in different cross-sections, particularly, the discharge gap in the anode plane. It is shown that the average energy of fast electrons (in eV) in the anode plane is usually slightly higher than the instantaneous value of the applied voltage to the gap (in V).

  3. Characteristics of surface-wave plasma with air-simulated N2 O2 gas mixture for low-temperature sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, L.; Nonaka, H.; Zhou, H. Y.; Ogino, A.; Nagata, T.; Koide, Y.; Nanko, S.; Kurawaki, I.; Nagatsu, M.

    2007-02-01

    Sterilization experiments using low-pressure air discharge plasma sustained by the 2.45 GHz surface-wave have been carried out. Geobacillus stearothermoplilus spores having a population of 3.0 × 106 were sterilized for only 3 min using air-simulated N2-O2 mixture gas discharge plasma, faster than the cases of pure O2 or pure N2 discharge plasmas. From the SEM analysis of plasma-irradiated spores and optical emission spectroscopy measurements of the plasmas, it has been found that the possible sterilization mechanisms of air-simulated plasma are the chemical etching effect due to the oxygen radicals and UV emission from the N2 molecules and NO radicals in the wavelength range 200-400 nm. Experiment suggested that UV emission in the wavelength range less than 200 nm might not be significant in the sterilization. The UV intensity at 237.0 nm originated from the NO γ system (A 2Σ+ → X 2Π) in N2-O2 plasma as a function of the O2 percentage added to N2-O2 mixture gas has been investigated. It achieved its maximum value when the O2 percentage was roughly 10-20%. This result suggests that air can be used as a discharge gas for sterilization, and indeed we have confirmed a rapid sterilization with the actual air discharge at a sample temperature of less than 65 °C.

  4. Gas discharges in very small gaps in relation to electrography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schramm, J.; Witter, K.

    1973-06-01

    Gas discharges in very small electrode arrangements, with air gaps below 50 microns, as are often used in modern electrostatic recording, have been studied. In particular, the breakdown voltage as a function of the air gap, the charging mechanism for various recording media, the statistical variation of the time lag of the discharges as well as the temporal formation of the discharge have all been investigated. There is good agreement between experimental and theoretical results.

  5. Deflagration-to-Detonation Transition Control by Nanosecond Gas Discharges

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-04-07

    Report 3. DATES COVERED (From – To) 1 April 2007 - 18 August 09 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deflagration-To- Detonation Transition Control By Nanosecond...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT During the current project, an extensive experimental study of detonation initiation by high{voltage...nanosecond gas discharges has been performed in a smooth detonation tube with different discharge chambers and various discharge cell numbers. The chambers

  6. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, Gary; D'Silva, Arthur P.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1986-05-06

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  7. Atmospheric pressure helium afterglow discharge detector for gas chromatography

    DOEpatents

    Rice, G.; D'Silva, A.P.; Fassel, V.A.

    1985-04-05

    An apparatus for providing a simple, low-frequency, electrodeless discharge system for atmospheric pressure afterglow generation. A single quartz tube through which a gas mixture is passed is extended beyond a concentric electrode positioned thereabout. A grounding rod is placed directly above the tube outlet to permit optical viewing of the discharge between the electrodes.

  8. Gas Discharge and Experiments for Plasma Display Panel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-07-01

    margin, luminance, luminous efficiency, Penning effect and Paschen curve with varying gas composition and pressure. For pure helium and neon gas ...The discharge energy of a Xenon atom is easily eliminated by activated gases such as hydrogen. Xenon has been the predominant noble gas dopant that has...mobility of Xe ion in He gas . 9 5. PENNING EFFECT Penning effect does not play a significant role in mixtures of neon with more than a few percent of xenon

  9. Milestone report: The simulation of radiation driven gas diffusion in UO2 at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, Michael William; Kuganathan, Navaratnarajah; Burr, Patrick A; Rushton, Michael J.; Grimes, Robin W; Turbull, James Anthony; Stanek, Christopher Richard; Andersson, Anders David

    2016-10-24

    Below 1000 K it is thought that fission gas diffusion in nuclear fuel during irradiation occurs through atomic mixing due to radiation damage. This is an important process for nuclear reactor performance as it affects fission gas release, particularly from the periphery of the pellet where such temperatures are normal. Here we present a molecular dynamics study of Xe and Kr diffusion due to irradiation. Thermal spikes and cascades have been used to study the electronic stopping and ballistic phases of damage, respectively. Our results predict that O and Kr exhibit the greatest diffusivity and U the least, while Xe lies in between. It is concluded that the ballistic phase does not sufficiently account for the experimentally observed diffusion. Preliminary thermal spike calculations indicate that the electronic stopping phase generates greater fission gas displacement than the ballistic phase, although further calculation must be carried out to confirm this. A good description of the system by the empirical potentials is important over the very wide temperatures induced during thermal spike and damage cascade simulations. This has motivated the development of a parameter set for gas-actinide and gas-oxygen interactions that is complementary for use with a recent many-body potential set. A comprehensive set of density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to study Xe and Kr incorporation at a number of sites in CeO2, ThO2, UO2 and PuO2. These structures were used to fit a potential, which was used to generate molecular dynamics (MD) configurations incorporating Xe and Kr at 300 K, 1500 K, 3000 K and 5000 K. Subsequent matching to the forces predicted by DFT for these MD configurations was used to refine the potential set. This fitting approach ensured weighted fitting to configurations that are thermodynamically significant over a broad temperature range, while avoiding computationally expensive DFT-MD calculations

  10. Electro-physical properties of thin films based on metal-containing polyacrylonitrile for application in low temperature gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenistaya, T. V.; Ivanenko, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The metal-containing (Cu, Co, Ag, Cr) polyacrylonitrile (PAN) thin films were fabricated using IR-pyrolysis under low vacuum conditions in different temperature and time modes. The thickness of the fabricated films was between 0.01÷0.68 μm. The metal-containing PAN films had the resistance values in the range from 2.9·102 to 5.1·1011 Ohm. It has been investigated that the film thickness, resistance and gas sensitivity of the samples depends on the composition of the initial solution and on the process parameters of the film material’s fabrication. It has been studied that the samples demonstrate gas-sensing properties to CO, NO2, Cl2 and gasoline vapours at room temperature.

  11. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  12. Endotoxin removal by radio frequency gas plasma (glow discharge)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poon, Angela

    2011-12-01

    -IR measurements were repeated after employing 3-minute RFGD treatments sequentially for more than 10 cycles to observe removal of deposited matter that correlated with diminished EU titers. The results showed that 5 cycles, for a total exposure time of 15 minutes to low-temperature gas plasma, was sufficient to reduce endotoxin titers to below 0.05 EU/ml, and correlated with concurrent reduction of major endotoxin reference standard absorption bands at 3391 cm-1, 2887 cm-1, 1646 cm -1 1342 cm-1, and 1103 cm-1 to less than 0.05 Absorbance Units. Band depletion varied from 15% to 40% per 3-minute cycle of RFGD exposure, based on peak-to-peak analyses. In some cases, 100% of all applied biomass was removed within 5 sequential 3-minute RFGD cycles. The lipid ester absorption band expected at 1725 cm-1 was not detectable until after the first RFGD cycle, suggesting an unmasking of the actual bacterial endotoxin membrane induced within the gas plasma environment. Future work must determine the applicability of this low-temperature, quick depyrogenation process to medical devices of more complicated geometry than the flat surfaces tested here.

  13. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  14. LOW TEMPERATURE X-RAY DIFFRACTION STUDIES OF NATURAL GAS HYDRATE SAMPLES FROM THE GULF OF MEXICO

    SciTech Connect

    Rawn, Claudia J; Sassen, Roger; Ulrich, Shannon M; Phelps, Tommy Joe; Chakoumakos, Bryan C; Payzant, E Andrew

    2008-01-01

    Clathrate hydrates of methane and other small alkanes occur widespread terrestrially in marine sediments of the continental margins and in permafrost sediments of the arctic. Quantitative study of natural clathrate hydrates is hampered by the difficulty in obtaining pristine samples, particularly from submarine environments. Bringing samples of clathrate hydrate from the seafloor at depths without compromising their integrity is not trivial. Most physical property measurements are based on studies of laboratory-synthesized samples. Here we report X-ray powder diffraction measurements of a natural gas hydrate sample from the Green Canyon, Gulf of Mexico. The first data were collected in 2002 and revealed ice and structure II gas hydrate. In the subsequent time the sample has been stored in liquid nitrogen. More recent X-ray powder diffraction data have been collected as functions of temperature and time. This new data indicates that the larger sample is heterogeneous in ice content and shows that the amount of sII hydrate decreases with increasing temperature and time as expected. However, the dissociation rate is higher at lower temperatures and earlier in the experiment.

  15. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene–benzene vs benzene–rare gas atom collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Jie; Krems, Roman V.; Li, Zhiying

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom–molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom–benzene calculations with those for benzene–benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene–benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  16. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: Benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V.

    2014-10-01

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  17. Collision lifetimes of polyatomic molecules at low temperatures: benzene-benzene vs benzene-rare gas atom collisions.

    PubMed

    Cui, Jie; Li, Zhiying; Krems, Roman V

    2014-10-28

    We use classical trajectory calculations to study the effects of the interaction strength and the geometry of rigid polyatomic molecules on the formation of long-lived collision complexes at low collision energies. We first compare the results of the calculations for collisions of benzene molecules with rare gas atoms He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the collision complexes increase monotonically with the strength of the atom-molecule interaction. We then compare the results of the atom-benzene calculations with those for benzene-benzene collisions. The comparison illustrates that the mean lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collision complexes are significantly reduced due to non-ergodic effects prohibiting the molecules from sampling the entire configuration space. We find that the thermally averaged lifetimes of the benzene-benzene collisions are much shorter than those for Xe with benzene and similar to those for Ne with benzene.

  18. Gas exchange and low temperature resistance in two tropical high mountain tree species from the Venezuelan Andes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavieres, Lohengrin A.; Rada, Fermín; Azócar, Aura; García-Núñez, Carlos; Cabrera, Hernán M.

    2000-05-01

    Temperature may determine altitudinal tree distribution in different ways: affecting survival through freezing temperatures or by a negative carbon balance produced by lower photosynthetic rates. We studied gas exchange and supercooling capacity in a timberline and a treeline species ( Podocarpus oleifolius and Espeletia neriifolia, respectively) in order to determine if their altitudinal limits are related to carbon balance, freezing temperature damage, or both. Leaf gas exchange, leaf temperature-net photosynthesis curves and leaf temperature at which ice formation occurred were measured at two sites along an altitudinal gradient. Mean CO 2 assimilation rates for E. neriifolia were 3.4 and 1.3 μmol·m -2·s -1, at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean night respiration was 2.2 and 0.9 μmol·m -2·s -1 for this species at 2 400 and 3 200 m, respectively. Mean assimilation rates for P. oleifolius were 3.8 and 2.2 μmol·m -2·s -1 at 2 550 and 3 200 m, respectively. Night respiration was 0.8 μmol·m -2·s -1 for both altitudes. E. neriifolia showed similar optimum temperatures for photosynthesis at both altitudes, while a decrease was observed in P. oleifolius.E. neriifolia and P. oleifolius presented supercooling capacities of -6.5 and -3.0 °C, respectively. For E. neriifolia, freezing resistance mechanisms are sufficient to reach higher altitudes; however, other environmental factors such as cloudiness may be affecting its carbon balance. P. oleifolius does not reach higher elevations because it does not have the freezing resistance mechanisms.

  19. Facile Rearrangement of 3-Oxoalkyl Radicals is Evident in Low-Temperature Gas-Phase Oxidation of Ketones

    SciTech Connect

    Scheer, Adam M.; Welz, Oliver; Sasaki, Darryl Y.; Osborn, David L.; Taatjes, Craig A.

    2013-08-23

    The pulsed photolytic chlorine-initiated oxidation of methyl-tert-butyl ketone (MTbuK), di-tert-butyl ketone (DTbuK), and a series of partially deuterated diethyl ketones (DEK) is studied in the gas phase at 8 Torr and 550–650 K. Products are monitored as a function of reaction time, mass, and photoionization energy using multiplexed photoionization mass spectrometry with tunable synchrotron ionizing radiation. The results establish that the primary 3-oxoalkyl radicals of those ketones, formed by abstraction of a hydrogen atom from the carbon atom in γ-position relative to the carbonyl oxygen, undergo a rapid rearrangement resulting in an effective 1,2-acyl group migration, similar to that in a Dowd–Beckwith ring expansion. Without this rearrangement, peroxy radicals derived from MTbuK and DTbuK cannot undergo HO2 elimination to yield a closed-shell unsaturated hydrocarbon coproduct. However, not only are these coproducts observed, but they represent the dominant oxidation channels of these ketones under the conditions of this study. For MTbuK and DTbuK, the rearrangement yields a more stable tertiary radical, which provides the thermodynamic driving force for this reaction. Even in the absence of such a driving force in the oxidation of partially deuterated DEK, the 1,2-acyl group migration is observed. Quantum chemical (CBS-QB3) calculations show the barrier for gas-phase rearrangement to be on the order of 10 kcal mol–1. The MTbuK oxidation experiments also show several minor channels, including β-scission of the initial radicals and cyclic ether formation.

  20. Surface-wave produced discharges in hydrogen: II. Modifications of the discharge structure for varying gas-discharge conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paunska, Ts; Schlüter, H.; Shivarova, A.; Tarnev, Kh

    2003-11-01

    The self-consistent structure of diffusion-controlled surface-wave-sustained discharges (SWSDs) in hydrogen is presented in terms of its dependence on the varying gas-discharge conditions (wave-frequency and gas-pressure). First, results for the interrelated variations of the plasma characteristics (concentrations of the ionic (H+, H2+ and H3+) and neutral-gas (H and H2) species, electron and gas temperatures, power Theta absorbed on average by an electron) over a wide range of variation of the electron concentration bar ne (averaged over the discharge cross section) are discussed for different gas-pressures. This exhibits not only the influence of changing gas-pressure but also the influence of varying wave-frequency, since, as is known, the range of the bar ne variation along the plasma columns in SWSDs shifts towards higher bar ne with increase in the wave-frequency. The necessity of using effective ion mobilities for lower pressure is demonstrated. The redistribution—with variation in the electron concentration—of the main processes which contribute to Theta is shown. Next, the complete structure of microwave and rf-discharges is shown by also including the resulting axial profiles of electron concentrations and wave characteristics (wavenumber and space damping rate). The wave behaviour is described in radially inhomogeneous plasmas with arbitrary collisions. With the choice of rf- and microwave-discharges, the results obtained cover regimes of weak and strong collisions. The type of electron heating in the wave field is discussed. The influence of changing the wall temperature as well as of varying the wall temperature along the discharge length is described. Finally, effects related to the radial plasma-density inhomogeneity and changing radius of the discharge tube are presented.

  1. Low temperature circulating fluidized bed gasification and co-gasification of municipal sewage sludge. Part 1: Process performance and gas product characterization.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Tobias Pape; Sárossy, Zsuzsa; Gøbel, Benny; Stoholm, Peder; Ahrenfeldt, Jesper; Frandsen, Flemming Jappe; Henriksen, Ulrik Birk

    2017-08-01

    Results from five experimental campaigns with Low Temperature Circulating Fluidized Bed (LT-CFB) gasification of straw and/or municipal sewage sludge (MSS) from three different Danish municipal waste water treatment plants in pilot and demonstration scale are analyzed and compared. The gasification process is characterized with respect to process stability, process performance and gas product characteristics. All experimental campaigns were conducted at maximum temperatures below 750°C, with air equivalence ratios around 0.12 and with pure silica sand as start-up bed material. A total of 8600kg of MSS dry matter was gasified during 133h of operation. The average thermal loads during the five experiments were 62-100% of nominal capacity. The short term stability of all campaigns was excellent, but gasification of dry MSS lead to substantial accumulation of coarse and rigid, but un-sintered, ash particles in the system. Co-gasification of MSS with sufficient amounts of cereal straw was found to be an effective way to mitigate these issues as well as eliminate thermal MSS drying requirements. Characterization of gas products and process performance showed that even though gas composition varied substantially, hot gas efficiencies of around 90% could be achieved for all MSS fuel types. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Pulsed Electrical Discharge in a Gas Bubble in Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Erica; Gershman, Sophia; Mozgina, Oksana

    2005-10-01

    This experiment is an investigation of the electrical and optical characteristics of a pulsed electrical discharge ignited in a gas bubble in water in a needle-to-plane electrode geometry. Argon or oxygen gas is fed through a platinum hypodermic needle that serves as the high voltage electrode. The gas filled bubble forms at the high voltage electrode with the tip of the needle inside the bubble. The discharge in the gas bubble in water is produced by applying 5 -- 15 kV, microsecond long rectangular pulses between the electrodes submerged in water. The voltage across the electrodes and the current are measured as functions of time. Electrical measurements suggest a discharge ignited in the bubble (composed of the bubbled gas and water vapor) without breakdown of the entire water filled electrode gap. Time-resolved optical emission measurements are taken in the areas of the spectrum corresponding to the main reactive species produced in the discharge, e.g. OH 309 nm, Ar 750 nm, and O 777 nm emissions using optical filters. The discharge properties are investigated as a function of the applied voltage, the distance between the electrodes, the gas in the bubble (Ar or O2). Work supported by the US Army, Picatinny Arsenal, NJ and the US DOE (Contract number DE-AC02-76CH03073).

  3. Periodically Discharging, Gas-Coalescing Filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Donald Layne; Holder, Donald W.

    2006-01-01

    A proposed device would remove bubbles of gas from a stream of liquid (typically water), accumulate the gas, and periodically release the gas, in bulk, back into the stream. The device is intended for use in a flow system (1) in which there is a requirement to supply bubble-free water to a downstream subsystem and (2) that includes a sensor and valves, just upstream of the subsystem, for sensing bubbles and diverting the flow from the subsystem until the water stream is again free of bubbles. By coalescing the gas bubbles and then periodically releasing the accumulated gas, the proposed device would not contribute to net removal of gas from the liquid stream; nevertheless, it would afford an advantage by reducing the frequency with which the diverter valves would have to be activated. The device (see figure) would include an upper and a lower porous membrane made of a hydrophilic material. Both membranes would cover openings in a tube leading to an outlet. These membranes would allow water, but not gas bubbles, to pass through to the interior of the tube. Inside the tube, between the two membranes, there would be a flow restrictor that would play a role described below. Below both membranes there would be a relief valve. Water, possibly containing bubbles, would enter from the top and would pass through either the lower membrane or both membranes, depending how much gas had been accumulated thus far. When the volume of accumulated gas was sufficient to push the top surface of the liquid below the lower porous membrane, water could no longer flow through either membrane toward the outlet. This blockage would cause an increase in back pressure that would cause the relief valve to open. The opening of the relief valve would allow both the water and the bulk-accumulated gas to pass through to the outlet. Once the gas had been pushed out, water would once again flow through both membranes at a much lower pressure drop. The flow restrictor would maintain enough pressure

  4. Supported Copper, Nickel and Copper-Nickel Nanoparticle Catalysts for Low Temperature Water-Gas-Shift Reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jiann-Horng

    Hydrogen is being considered worldwide as a future replacement for gasoline, diesel fuel, natural gas in both the transportation and non-transportation sectors. Hydrogen is a versatile energy carrier that can be produced from a variety of widely available primary energy sources, including coal, natural gas, biomass, solar, wind, and nuclear power. Coal, the most abundant fossil fuel on the planet, is being looked at as the possible future major source of H2, due to the development of the integrated gasification combined cycle (IGCC) and integrated gasification fuel cell technologies (IGFC). The gasification of coal produces syngas consisting of predominately carbon monoxide and hydrogen with some remaining hydrocarbons, carbon dioxide and water. Then, the water-gas shift reaction is used to convert CO to CO2 and additional hydrogen. The present work describes the synthesis of model Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni catalysts prepared from metal colloids, and compares their behavior in the WGS reaction to that of traditional impregnation catalysts. Initially, we systematically explored the performance of traditional Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni WGS catalysts made by impregnation methods. Various bimetallic Cu-Ni catalysts were prepared by supported impregnation and compared to monometallic Cu and Ni catalysts. The presence of Cu in bimetallic catalysts suppressed undesirable methanation side reaction, while the Ni component was important for high WGS activity. Colloidal Cu, Ni and Cu-Ni alloy nanoparticles obtained by chemical reduction were deposited onto alumina to prepare supported catalysts. The resulting Cu and Ni nanoparticle catalysts were found to be 2.5 times more active in the WGS reaction per unit mass of active metal as compared to catalysts prepared by the conventional impregnation technique. The powder XRD and HAADF-STEM provided evidence supporting the formation of Cu-Ni particles containing the Cu core and Cu-Ni alloy shell. The XPS data indicated surface segregation of Cu in

  5. Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Carter, James G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1984-01-01

    Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF.sub.4, C.sub.2 F.sub.6, C.sub.3 F.sub.8, n-C.sub.4 F.sub.10, WF.sub.6, (CF.sub.3).sub.2 S and (CF.sub.3).sub.2 O.

  6. Gas mixture for diffuse-discharge switch

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Carter, J.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1982-08-31

    Gaseous medium in a diffuse-discharge switch of a high-energy pulse generator is formed of argon combined with a compound selected from the group consisting of CF/sub 4/, C/sub 2/F/sub 6/, C/sub 3/F/sub 8/, n-C/sub 4/F/sub 10/, WF/sub 6/, (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/S and (CF/sub 3/)/sub 2/O.

  7. Low temperature H2S removal with 3-D structural mesoporous molecular sieves supported ZnO from gas stream.

    PubMed

    Li, L; Sun, T H; Shu, C H; Zhang, H B

    2016-07-05

    A series of 3-dimensional (3-D) structural mesoporous silica materials, SBA-16, MCM-48 and KIT-6, was synthesized and supported with different ZnO loadings (10, 20, 30, and 40 wt%) by the incipient wetness method to evaluate the performances on H2S removal at room temperature. These materials were characterized by N2 adsorption, XRD, and TEM to investigate their textural properties. All the ZnO-loaded adsorbents exhibited the H2S removal capacity of bellow 0.1 ppmv. With the best ZnO loading percentage of 30 wt% on MCM-48 and KIT-6, 20 wt% on SBA-16 according to the results of breakthrough test, further increasing ZnO loading caused the decrease of the adsorption capacity due to the agglomeration of ZnO. Besides, the H2S adsorption capacities of the supports materials varied in the order of KIT-6>MCM-48>SBA-16, which was influenced primarily by their pore volume and pore size. With the largest pores in these 3-D arrangement materials, KIT-6 showed the best performance of supported material for ZnO, due to its retained superior physical properties as well as large pore diameter to allow faster gas-solid interaction and huge pore volume to disperse ZnO on the surface of it.

  8. A sapphire cell for high-pressure, low-temperature neutron-scattering experiments on gas hydrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rondinone, A. J.; Jones, C. Y.; Marshall, S. L.; Chakoumakos, B. C.; Rawn, C. J.; Lara-Curzio, E.

    2003-01-01

    A single-crystal sapphire cell for performing neutron-scattering experiments on gas hydrates synthesized in situ was designed and fabricated to operate at pressures up to 350 bar (1 bar = 10(5) Pa) and temperatures between 10 and 300 K. The single-crystal cell is cut off-axis from the c-axis of sapphire to avoid Bragg diffraction in the scattering plane for the Debye-Scherrer geometry. The cell is pressurized from a boosted pumping station via a small-diameter stainless-steel pipe. The cell is cylindrical with no external supports. The design of the cell allows the unobstructed detection of neutrons scattered from the sample. This requirement necessitated a departure from the predominant style of sapphire cells reported in the literature. Several iterations of design modifications and finite-element modeling were performed prior to building the prototype. The cell was tested hydrostatically at room temperature. Preliminary inelastic neutron scattering data are reported to verify the performance of the cell.

  9. Atomically Dispersed Au-(OH)x Species Bound on Titania Catalyze the Low-Temperature Water-Gas Shift Reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Ming; Allard, Lawrence F; Flytzani-Stephanopoulos, Maria

    2013-03-27

    We report a new method for stabilizing appreciable loadings (~1 wt %) of isolated gold atoms on titania and show that these catalyze the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction. The method combines a typical gold deposition/precipitation method with UV irradiation of the titania support suspended in ethanol. Dissociation of H2O on the thus-created Au–O–TiOx sites is facile. At higher gold loadings, nanoparticles are formed, but they were shown to add no further activity to the atomically bound gold on titania. Removal of this “excess” gold by sodium cyanide leaching leaves the activity intact and the atomically dispersed gold still bound on titania. The new materials may catalyze a number of other reactions that require oxidized active metal sites.

  10. Effective approach for taking into account interactions of quasiparticles from the low-temperature behavior of a deformed fermion-gas model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Algin, Abdullah; Arikan, Ali Serdar

    2017-04-01

    A deformed fermion gas model aimed at taking into account thermal and electronic properties of quasiparticle systems is devised. The model is constructed by the fermionic Fibonacci oscillators whose spectrum is given by a generalized Fibonacci sequence. We first introduce some new properties concerning the Fibonacci calculus. We then investigate the low-temperature thermostatistical properties of the model, and derive many of the deformed thermostatistical functions such as the chemical potential and the entropy in terms of the model deformation parameters p and q. We specifically focus on the p,q-deformed Sommerfeld parameter for the heat capacity of the model, and its behavior is compared with those of both the free-electron Fermi theory and the experimental data for some materials. The results obtained in this study reveal that the present deformed fermion model leads to an effective approach accounting for interaction and compositeness of quasiparticles, which have remarkable implications in many technological applications such as in nanomaterials.

  11. Stability of gas discharge channels for final beam transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tauschwitz, A.; Birkner, R.; Knobloch, R.; Neff, S.; Niemann, C.; Penache, D.; Presura, R.; Ponce, D.; Yu, S.

    2002-07-01

    Discharge plasma channels have been investigated in recent years at Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung Darmstadt (GSI) and at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory in Berkeley, California, in a number of experiments. A short summary of the experimental work at Berkeley and GSI is given. Different initiation mechanisms for gas discharges of up to 60 kA were studied and compared. In the Berkeley experiments, laser ionization of organic vapors in a buffer gas was used to initiate and direct the discharge while at GSI, laser gas heating and ion-beam-induced gas ionization were tested as initiation mechanisms. These three initiation techniques are compared and the stability of the resulting discharge channels is discussed. A discharge current of 50 kA, a channel diameter well below 1 cm, a pointing stability better than 200 [mu]m, and MHD stability of more than 10 [mu]s have been demonstrated simultaneously in the recent experiments. These parameters are sufficient or close to the requirements of a reactor application depending on the details of the target design. The experimental results show that transport channels work with sufficient stability, reproducibility, and ion optical properties for a wide pressure range of discharge gases and pressures.

  12. Crack-free periodic porous thin films assisted by plasma irradiation at low temperature and their enhanced gas-sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Jia, Lichao; Duan, Guotao; Li, Yue; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Jingjing; Hu, Jinlian; Cai, Weiping

    2013-09-27

    Homogenous thin films are preferable for high-performance gas sensors because of their remarkable reproducibility and long-term stability. In this work, a low-temperature fabrication route is presented to prepare crack-free and homogenous metal oxide periodic porous thin films by oxygen plasma irradiation instead of high temperature annealing by using a sacrificial colloidal template. Rutile SnO2 is taken as an example to demonstrate the validity of this route. The crack-free and homogenous porous thin films are successfully synthesized on the substrates in situ with electrodes. The SnO2 porous thin film obtained by plasma irradiation is rich in surface OH groups and hence superhydrophilic. It exhibits a more homogenous structure and lower resistance than porous films generated by annealing. More importantly, such thin films display higher sensitivity, a lower detection threshold (100 ppb to acetone) and better durability than those that have been directly annealed, resulting in enhanced gas-sensing performance. The presented method could be applied to synthesize other metal oxide homogenous thin films and to fabricate gas-sensing devices with high performances.

  13. Abiotic methane flux from the Chimaera seep and Tekirova ophiolites (Turkey): Understanding gas exhalation from low temperature serpentinization and implications for Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etiope, Giuseppe; Schoell, Martin; Hosgörmez, Hakan

    2011-10-01

    The emission of abiotic methane (CH 4) into the atmosphere from low temperature serpentinization in ophiolitic rocks is documented to date only in four countries, the Philippines, Oman, New Zealand, and Turkey. Serpentinization produces large amounts of hydrogen (H 2) which in theory may react with CO 2 or CO to form hydrocarbons (Fischer-Tropsch Type synthesis, FTT). Similar mechanisms have been invoked to explain the CH 4 detected on Mars, so that understanding flux and exhalation modality of ophiolitic gas on Earth may contribute to decipher the potential degassing on Mars. This work reports the first direct measurements of gas (CH 4, CO 2) flux ever done on onshore ophiolites with present-day serpentinization. We investigated the Tekirova ophiolites at Çirali, in Turkey, hosting the Chimaera seep, a system of gas vents issuing from fractures in a 5000 m 2 wide ophiolite outcrop. At this site at least 150-190 t of CH 4 is annually released into the atmosphere. The molecular and isotopic compositions of C 1-C 5 alkanes, CO 2, and N 2 combined with source rock maturity data and thermogenic gas formation modelling suggested a dominant abiotic component (~ 80-90%) mixed with thermogenic gas. Abiotic H 2-rich gas is likely formed at temperatures below 50 °C, suggested by the low deuterium/hydrogen isotopic ratio of H 2 (δD H2: - 720‰), consistent with the low geothermal gradient of the area. Abiotic gas synthesis must be very fast and effective in continuously producing an amount of gas equivalent to the long-lasting (> 2 millennia) emission of > 100 t CH 4 yr - 1 , otherwise pressurised gas accumulation must exist. Over the same ophiolitic formation, 3 km away from Chimaera, we detected an invisible microseepage of abiotic CH 4 with fluxes from 0.07 to 1 g m - 2 d - 1 . On Mars similar fluxes could be able to sustain the CH 4 plume apparently recognised in the Northern Summer 2003 (10 4 or 10 5 t yr - 1 ) over the wide olivine bedrock and outcrops of hydrated

  14. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-12-01

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, x-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  15. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  16. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    DOE PAGES

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; ...

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The resultsmore » obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.« less

  17. Recent studies on nanosecond-timescale pressurized gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Yatom, S.; Shlapakovski, A.; Beilin, L.; Stambulchik, E.; Tskhai, S.; Krasik, Ya E.

    2016-10-05

    The results of recent experimental and numerical studies of nanosecond high-voltage discharges in pressurized gases are reviewed. The discharges were ignited in a diode filled by different gases within a wide range of pressures by an applied pulsed voltage or by a laser pulse in the gas-filled charged resonant microwave cavity. Fast-framing imaging of light emission, optical emission spectroscopy, X-ray foil spectrometry and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering were used to study temporal and spatial evolution of the discharge plasma density and temperature, energy distribution function of runaway electrons and dynamics of the electric field in the plasma channel. The results obtained allow a deeper understanding of discharge dynamical properties in the nanosecond timescale, which is important for various applications of these types of discharges in pressurized gases.

  18. Interaction of a surface glow discharge with a gas flow

    SciTech Connect

    Aleksandrov, A. L. Schweigert, I. V.

    2010-05-15

    A surface glow discharge in a gas flow is of particular interest as a possible tool for controlling the flow past hypersonic aircrafts. Using a hydrodynamic model of glow discharge, two-dimensional calculations for a kilovolt surface discharge in nitrogen at a pressure of 0.5 Torr are carried out in a stationary gas, as well as in a flow with a velocity of 1000 m/s. The discharge structure and plasma parameters are investigated near a charged electrode. It is shown that the electron energy in a cathode layer reaches 250-300 eV. Discharge is sustained by secondary electron emission. The influence of a high-speed gas flow on the discharge is considered. It is shown that the cathode layer configuration is flow-resistant. The distributions of the electric field and electron energy, as well as the ionization rate profile in the cathode layer, do not change qualitatively under the action of the flow. The basic effect of the flow's influence is a sharp decrease in the region of the quasineutral plasma surrounding the cathode layer due to fast convective transport of ions.

  19. GAS DISCHARGE SWITCH EVALUATION FOR RHIC BEAM ABORT KICKER APPLICATION.

    SciTech Connect

    ZHANG,W.; SANDBERG,J.; SHELDRAKE,R.; PIRRIE,C.

    2002-06-30

    A gas discharge switch EEV HX3002 is being evaluated at Brookhaven National Laboratory as a possible candidate of RHIC Beam Abort Kicker modulator main switch. At higher beam energy and higher beam intensity, the switch stability becomes very crucial. The hollow anode thyratron used in the existing system is not rated for long reverse current conduction. The reverse voltage arcing caused thyratron hold-off voltage de-rating has been the main limitation of the system operation. To improve the system reliability, a new type of gas discharge switch has been suggested by Marconi Applied Technology for its reverse conducting capability.

  20. Conformational properties of 1-cyano-1-silacyclohexane, C5H10SiHCN: Gas electron diffraction, low-temperature NMR and quantum chemical calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belyakov, Alexander V.; Sigolaev, Yrii F.; Shlykov, Sergey A.; Wallevik, Sunna Ó.; Jonsdottir, Nanna R.; Jonsdottir, Sigridur; Kvaran, Ágúst; Bjornsson, Ragnar; Arnason, Ingvar

    2017-03-01

    The conformational preference of the cyano group of the 1-cyano-1-silacyclohexane was studied experimentally by means of gas electron diffraction (GED) and dynamic nuclear magnetic resonance (DNMR) as well as by quantum chemical (QC) calculations applying high-level coupled cluster methods as well as DFT methods. According to the GED experiment, the compound exists in the gas-phase as a mixture of two conformers possessing the chair conformation of the six-membered ring and Cs symmetry while differing in the axial or equatorial position of the substituent (axial = 84(12) mol %/equatorial = 16(12) mol %) at T = 279(3) K, corresponding to an A value (Gax - Geq) of -1.0(4) kcal mol-1. Gas-phase CCSD(T) calculations predict an A value of -0.72 kcal mol-1 at 279 K. In contrast, the low-temperature 13C NMR experiments resulted in an axial/equatorial ratio of 35/65 mol % at 120 K corresponding to an A value of 0.14 kcal mol-1. An average value for ΔG#e→a = 5.6 ± 0.1 kcal mol-1 was obtained for the temperature range 110-145 K. The dramatically different conformational behaviour in the gas-phase (GED) compared to the liquid phase (DNMR) suggests a strong solvation effect. According to natural bond orbital analysis the axial conformer of the title compound is an example of stabilization of a form, which is not favored by electrostatic effects and is favored predominantly by steric and conjugation effects.

  1. Study on the removal of elemental mercury from simulated flue gas by Fe₂O₃-CeO₂/AC at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yan; Li, Caiting; Zhao, Lingkui; Xie, Yin'e; Zhang, Xunan; Zeng, Guangming; Wu, Huiyu; Zhang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    Fe2O3 and CeO2 modified activated coke (AC) synthesized by the equivalent-volume impregnation were employed to remove elemental mercury (Hg(0)) from simulated flue gas at a low temperature. Effects of the mass ratio of Fe2O3 and CeO2, reaction temperature, and individual flue gas components including O2, NO, SO2, and H2O (g) on Hg(0) removal efficiency of impregnated AC were investigated. The samples were characterized by Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Results showed that with optimal mass percentage of 3 % Fe2O3 and 3 % CeO2 on Fe3Ce3/AC, the Hg(0) removal efficiency could reach an average of 88.29 % at 110 °C. Besides, it was observed that O2 and NO exhibited a promotional effect on Hg(0) removal, H2O (g) exerted a suppressive effect, and SO2 showed an insignificant inhibition without O2 to some extent. The analysis of XPS indicated that the main species of mercury on used Fe3Ce3/AC was HgO, which implied that adsorption and catalytic oxidation were both included in Hg(0) removal. Furthermore, the lattice oxygen, chemisorbed oxygen, and/or weakly bonded oxygen species made a contribution to Hg(0) oxidation.

  2. Development of novel low-temperature selective hydrogen gas sensors made of palladium/oxide or nitride capped Magnesium-transition metal hydride films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Yu Ming

    Palladium capped Mg-based transition metal alloy film (Pd/Mg-TM) is a potentially useful hydrogen gas (H2) sensing material, which can operate at low temperature for detection of H2 leakage in an environment to ensure safe use and storage of the gas. The Pd layer catalytically dissociates hydrogen molecules, and the hydrogen atoms produced can enter (hydridation) or be detached (dehydridation) from the alloy layer. These processes are reversible, such that the film is switchable between a metal state and a hydride state, giving rise to substantial changes in its optical transmittance/reflectance and electrical resistivity. Unlike a conventional metal-oxide (MOx) H2 sensor, hydridation of an Mg-TM film is associated with relatively low enthalpy, and hence can perform at temperature much lower than the operation temperature of an MOx sensor (typically around 500°C or above). As such, an Mg-TM based sensor does not experience undesired annealing effect during operation, and hence is much more stable and durable. Furthermore, the detection selectivity of a Pd/Mg-TM film versus other reducing gases is superior to most conventional MOx-type hydrogen sensors. In this project, we systematically investigated the H2 sensing properties of Pd/Mg-TM films.

  3. METHOD AND APPARATUS FOR PRODUCING INTENSE ENERGETIC GAS DISCHARGES

    DOEpatents

    Bell, P.R.; Luce, J.S.

    1960-01-01

    A device for producing an energetic gas arc discharge employing the use of gas-fed hollow cathode and anode electrodes is reported. The rate of feed of the gas to the electrodes is regulated to cause complete space charge neutralization to occur within the electrodes. The arc discharge is closely fitted within at least one of the electrodes so tint the gas fed to this electrode is substantially completely ionized before it is emitted into the vacuum chamber. It is this electrode design and the axial potential gradient that exists in the arc which permits the arc to be operated in low pressures and at volthges and currents that permit the arc to be energetic. The use of the large number of energetic ions that are accelerated toward the cathode as a propulsion device for a space vehicle is set forth.

  4. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, S.E.; Orlando, T.M.; Tonkyn, R.G.

    1999-06-22

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes. 12 figs.

  5. Method and apparatus for processing exhaust gas with corona discharge

    DOEpatents

    Barlow, Stephan E.; Orlando, Thomas M.; Tonkyn, Russell G.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is placing a catalyst coating upon surfaces surrounding a volume containing corona discharge. In addition, the electrodes are coated with a robust dielectric material. Further, the electrodes are arranged so that at least a surface portion of each electrode extends into a flow path of the exhaust gas to be treated and there is only exhaust gas in the volume between each pair of electrodes.

  6. Gas laser in which the gas is excited by capacitor discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Lacour, B.; de Witte, O.; Maillet, M.; Vannier, C.

    1985-01-22

    A gas laser in which the gas is excited by laser discharge, said laser including two capacitors formed by two parallel metal plates between which two dielectric parts are spaced apart to form a passage which contains the laser gas. It further includes a transformer whose secondary winding is connected to the plates and whose primary winding is connected in series with a capacitor, means for charging and capacitor and a thyristor for discharging the capacitor in the primary winding. Application to exciting gas lasers in which the gas contains a dye stuff.

  7. Direct-current converter for gas-discharge lamps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutus, P.

    1980-01-01

    Metal/halide and similar gas-discharge lamps are powered from low-voltage dc source using small efficient converter. Converter is useful whenever 60-cycle ac power is not available or where space and weight allocations are limited. Possible applications are offshore platforms, mobile homes, and emergency lighting. Design innovations give supply high reliability and efficiency up to 75 percent.

  8. Physics and Chemistry of MW Discharge in Gas Flows

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-21

    main discharge area body ( Hallo ). One of the possible ways for measuring of electron temperature and concentration in these very thin and spatially...cold bulk hallo , whereas the first negative – from the hot breakdown filament. Gas temperature in channel filament turned out to be about 3000K

  9. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Li, He-Ping Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu; Nie, Qiu-Yue

    2015-12-15

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A–X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  10. Comparison of electrical and optical characteristics in gas-phase and gas-liquid phase discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qazi, H. I. A.; Nie, Qiu-Yue; Li, He-Ping; Zhang, Xiao-Fei; Bao, Cheng-Yu

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents an AC-excited argon discharge generated using a gas-liquid (two-phase) hybrid plasma reactor, which mainly consists of a powered needle electrode enclosed in a conical quartz tube and grounded deionized water electrode. The discharges in the gas-phase, as well as in the two-phase, exhibit two discharge modes, i.e., the low current glow-like diffuse mode and the high current streamer-like constrict mode, with a mode transition, which exhibits a negative resistance of the discharges. The optical emission spectral analysis shows that the stronger diffusion of the water vapor into the discharge region in the two-phase discharges boosts up the generation of OH (A-X) radicals, and consequently, leads to a higher rotational temperature in the water-phase plasma plume than that of the gas-phase discharges. Both the increase of the power input and the decrease of the argon flow rate result in the increase of the rotational temperature in the plasma plume of the water-phase discharge. The stable two-phase discharges with a long plasma plume in the water-phase under a low power input and gas flow rate may show a promising prospect for the degradation of organic pollutants, e.g., printing and dyeing wastewater, in the field of environmental protection.

  11. Pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gershman, Sophia

    A phenomenological picture of pulsed electrical discharge in gas bubbles in water is produced by combining electrical, spectroscopic, and imaging methods. The discharge is generated by applying one microsecond long 5 to 20 kilovolt pulses between the needle and disk electrodes submerged in water. A gas bubble is generated at the tip of the needle electrode. The study includes detailed experimental investigation of the discharge in argon bubbles and a brief look at the discharge in oxygen bubbles. Imaging, electrical characteristics, and time-resolved optical emission data point to a fast streamer propagation mechanism and formation of a plasma channel in the bubble. Spectroscopic methods based on line intensity ratios and Boltzmann plots of line intensities of argon, atomic hydrogen, and argon ions and the examination of molecular emission bands from molecular nitrogen and hydroxyl radicals provide evidence of both fast beam-like electrons and slow thermalized ones with temperatures of 0.6 -- 0.8 electron-volts. The collisional nature of plasma at atmospheric pressure affects the decay rates of optical emission. Spectroscopic study of rotational-vibrational bands of hydroxyl radical and molecular nitrogen gives vibrational and rotational excitation temperatures of the discharge of about 0.9 and 0.1 electron-volt, respectively. Imaging and electrical evidence show that discharge charge is deposited on the bubble wall and water serves as a dielectric barrier for the field strength and time scales of this experiment. Comparing the electrical and imaging information for consecutive pulses applied at a frequency of 1 Hz indicates that each discharge proceeds as an entirely new process with no memory of the previous discharge aside from long-lived chemical species, such as ozone and oxygen. Intermediate values for the discharge gap and pulse duration, low repetition rate, and unidirectional character of the applied voltage pulses make the discharge process here unique

  12. Synergetic aspects of gas-discharge: lateral patterns in dc systems with a high ohmic barrier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Purwins, H.-G.; Stollenwerk, L.

    2014-12-01

    The understanding of self-organized patterns in spatially extended nonlinear dissipative systems is one of the most challenging subjects in modern natural sciences. Such patterns are also referred to as dissipative structures. We review this phenomenon in planar low temperature dc gas-discharge devices with a high ohmic barrier. It is demonstrated that for these systems a deep qualitative understanding of dissipative structures can be obtained from the point of view of synergetics. At the same time, a major contribution can be made to the general understanding of dissipative structures. The discharge spaces of the experimentally investigated systems, to good approximation, have translational and rotational symmetry by contraction. Nevertheless, a given system may exhibit stable current density distributions and related patterns that break these symmetries. Among the experimentally observed fundamental patterns one finds homogeneous isotropic states, fronts, periodic patterns, labyrinth structures, rotating spirals, target patterns and localized filaments. In addition, structures are observed that have the former as elementary building blocks. Finally, defect structures as well as irregular patterns are common phenomena. Such structures have been detected in numerous other driven nonlinear dissipative systems, as there are ac gas-discharge devices, semiconductors, chemical solutions, electrical networks and biological systems. Therefore, from the experimental observations it is concluded that the patterns in planar low temperature dc gas-discharge devices exhibit universal behavior. From the theoretical point of view, dissipative structures of the aforementioned kind are also referred to as attractors. The possible sets of attractors are an important characteristic of the system. The number and/or qualitative nature of attractors may change when changing parameters. The related bifurcation behavior is a central issue of the synergetic approach chosen in the present

  13. Comparison of the effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization on the molecular structure, fatigue resistance, and wear behavior of UHMWPE.

    PubMed

    Goldman, M; Pruitt, L

    1998-06-05

    The effects of gamma radiation and low temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma (HPGP) sterilization on structure and cyclic mechanical properties were examined for orthopedic grade ultra-high-molecular-weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) and compared to each other as well as to no sterilization (control). Density was monitored with a density gradient column and was found to be directly influenced by the sterilization method employed: Gamma radiation led to an increase, while plasma did not. Oxidation of the polymer was studied by observing changes in the carbonyl peak with Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and was found to be strongly affected by both gamma radiation and subsequent aging, while plasma sterilization had little effect. Gamma radiation resulted in embrittlement of the polymer and a decreased resistance to fatigue crack propagation. This mechanical degradation was a direct consequence of postradiation oxidation and molecular evolution of the polymer and was not observed in the plasma-sterilized polymer. Both gamma radiation and plasma sterilization led to improved wear performance of the UHMWPE compared to the nonsterile control material.

  14. Low temperature near infrared plasmonic gas sensing of gallium and aluminum doped zinc oxide thin films from colloidal inks (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturaro, Marco; Della Gaspera, Enrico; Martucci, Alessandro; Guglielmi, Massimo

    2015-08-01

    We obtained Gallium-doped and Aluminum-doped Zinc Oxide nanocrystals by non aqueous colloidal heat-up synthesis. These nanocrystals are transparent in the visible range but exhibit localized surface plasmon resonances (LSPRs) in the near IR range, tunable and shiftable with dopant concentration (up to 20% mol nominal). GZO and AZO inks can be deposited by spin coating, dip coating or spray coating on glass or silicon, leading to uniform and high optical quality thin films. To enhance absorbtion in the infrared region, samples can be annealed in inert or reductant atmosphere (N2/Argon or H2 in Argon) resulting in plasmon intensity enhancement due to oxygen vacancies and conduction band electrons density increment. Then IR plasmon has been exploited for gas sensing application, according to the plasmon shifting for carrier density variations, due to electrons injection or removal by the target gas/sample chemical interactions. To obtain a functional sensor at low temperature, another treatment was investigated, involving surfanctant removal by dipping deposited films in a solution of organic acid, tipically oxalic acid in acetonitrile; such process could pave the way to obtain similar sensors deposited on plastics. Finally, GZO and AZO thin films proved sensibility to H2 and NOx, and in particular circumstances also to CO, from room temperature to 200°C. Sensibility behavior for different dopant concentration and temperture was investigated both in IR plasmon wavelengths (~2400 nm) and zinc oxide band gap (~370 nm). An enhancement in sensitivity to H2 is obtained by adding Pt nanoparticles, exploiting catalytic properties of Platinum for hydrogen splitting.

  15. Noble gas isotopes as low-budget exploration and monitoring tool for high- and low-temperature geothermal systems in extensional tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kraml, Michael; Jodocy, Marco; Aeschbach, Werner; Kreuter, Horst

    2017-04-01

    Since viable geothermal systems in extensional settings are sparse compared to those situated in subduction zone environments, a specifically adapted exploration methodology of the former is currently not fully established. Standardized exploration methods applicable to geothermal systems related to subduction zones do not always deliver reliable or even deliver misleading results (e.g. Ochmann et al. 2010). The identification of promising prospects at the beginning of surface exploration studies is saving time and money of the project developer and investor. Noble gas isotope analyses can provide a low-budget tool for assessing the quality of the prospect in a very early exploration phase. Case studies of high- and low-temperature prospects situated in the East African Rift System and the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany will be presented and compared to other extensional areas like the Basin and Range Province, U.S.A. (Kraml et al. 2016a,b). Noble gas isotopes are also a versatile tool for monitoring of geothermal reservoirs during the production/exploitation phase. References Kraml, M., Jodocy, M., Reinecker, J., Leible, D., Freundt, F., Al Najem, S., Schmidt, G., Aeschbach, W., and Isenbeck-Schroeter, M. (2016a): TRACE: Detection of Permeable Deep-Reaching Fault Zone Sections in the Upper Rhine Graben, Germany, During Low-Budget Isotope-Geochemical Surface Exploration. Proceedings European Geothermal Congress 2016, Strasbourg, France, 19-24 Sept 2016 Kraml, M., Kaudse, T., Aeschbach, W. and Tanzanian Exploration Team (2016b): The search for volcanic heat sources in Tanzania: A helium isotope perspective. Proceedings 6th African Rift Geothermal Conference, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, 2nd-4th November 2016 Ochmann, N., Kraml, M., Lindenfeld, M., Yakovlev, A., Rümpker, G., Babirye, P. (2010): Microearthquake Survey at the Buranga Geothermal Prospect (Western Uganda). Proceedings World Geothermal Congress, 25-29 April 2010, Bali, Indonesia (paper number 1126)

  16. Pre-breakdown evaluation of gas discharge mechanisms in microgaps

    SciTech Connect

    Semnani, Abbas; Peroulis, Dimitrios; Venkattraman, Ayyaswamy; Alexeenko, Alina A.

    2013-04-29

    The individual contributions of various gas discharge mechanisms to total pre-breakdown current in microgaps are quantified numerically. The variation of contributions of field emission and secondary electron emission with increasing electric field shows contrasting behavior even for a given gap size. The total current near breakdown decreases rapidly with gap size indicating that microscale discharges operate in a high-current, low-voltage regime. This study provides the first such analysis of breakdown mechanisms and aids in the formulation of physics-based theories for microscale breakdown.

  17. Development of a pulsed uniform supersonic gas expansion system based on an aerodynamic chopper for gas phase reaction kinetic studies at ultra-low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez, E.; Ballesteros, B.; Canosa, A.; Townsend, T. M.; Maigler, F. J.; Napal, V.; Rowe, B. R.; Albaladejo, J.

    2015-04-01

    A detailed description of a new pulsed supersonic uniform gas expansion system is presented together with the experimental validation of the setup by applying the CRESU (French acronym for Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme or Reaction Kinetics in a Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique to the gas-phase reaction of OH radicals with 1-butene at ca. 23 K and 0.63 millibars of helium (carrier gas). The carrier gas flow, containing negligible mixing ratios of OH-precursor and 1-butene, is expanded from a high pressure reservoir (337 millibars) to a low pressure region (0.63 millibars) through a convergent-divergent nozzle (Laval type). The novelty of this experimental setup is that the uniform supersonic flow is pulsed by means of a Teflon-coated aerodynamic chopper provided with two symmetrical apertures. Under these operational conditions, the designed Laval nozzle achieves a temperature of (22.4 ± 1.4) K in the gas jet. The spatial characterization of the temperature and the total gas density within the pulsed uniform supersonic flow has also been performed by both aerodynamical and spectroscopic methods. The gas consumption with this technique is considerably reduced with respect to a continuous CRESU system. The kinetics of the OH+1-butene reaction was investigated by the pulsed laser photolysis/laser induced fluorescence technique. The rotation speed of the disk is temporally synchronized with the exit of the photolysis and the probe lasers. The rate coefficient (kOH) for the reaction under investigation was then obtained and compared with the only available data at this temperature.

  18. Attaining Low Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John D.; Van Till, Howard J.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the definition of temperature and the concept of order in non-mathematical terms. Describes the cooling techniques necessary in low temperature physics research, including magnetic cooling, the use of the Pomeranchuk Effect, and dilution refrigeration. Outlines the types of phenomena observed in matter within various temperature ranges…

  19. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  20. Attaining Low Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John D.; Van Till, Howard J.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the definition of temperature and the concept of order in non-mathematical terms. Describes the cooling techniques necessary in low temperature physics research, including magnetic cooling, the use of the Pomeranchuk Effect, and dilution refrigeration. Outlines the types of phenomena observed in matter within various temperature ranges…

  1. Atmospheric pressure glow discharge generated in nitrogen-methane gas mixture: PTR-MS analyzes of the exhaust gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torokova, Lucie; Mazankova, Vera; Krcma, Frantisek; Mason, Nigel J.; Matejcik, Stefan

    2015-07-01

    This paper reports the results of an extensive study of with the in situ mass spectrometry analysis of gaseous phase species produced by an atmospheric plasma glow discharge in N2-CH4 gas mixtures (with methane concentrations ranging from 1% to 4%). The products are studied using proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS). HCN and CH3CN are identified as the main gaseous products. Hydrazine, methanimine, methyldiazene, ethylamine, cyclohexadiene, pyrazineacetylene, ethylene, propyne and propene are identified as minor compounds. All the detected compounds and their relative abundances are determined with respect to the experimental conditions (gas composition and applied power). The same molecules were observed by the Cassini-Huygens probe in Titan's atmosphere (which has same N2-CH4 gas mixtures). Such, experiments show that the formation of such complex organics in atmospheres containing C, N and H, like that of Titan, could be a source of prebiotic molecules. Contribution to the topical issue "The 14th International Symposium on High Pressure Low Temperature Plasma Chemistry (HAKONE XIV)", edited by Nicolas Gherardi, Ronny Brandenburg and Lars Stollenwark

  2. Application of Carbon Nanotubes As Electrodes in Gas Discharge Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, Rachel; Simendinger, William; Debbault, Chris; Shimoda, Hideo; Fleming, Les; Stoner, Brian; Zhou, Otto

    2000-03-01

    Gas-tube protector units are used in telecom network interface device boxes and central office switching gears to provide protection from lightning and AC power cross facults on the telecom network. Current gas discharge tube (GDT) protector units are unreliable from the standpoint of mean turn-on voltage and run-to-run variability. Molybdenum electrodes with various interlayer materials were coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes and analyzed for both electron field emission and discharge properties. A mean DC breakdown voltage of 448.5V and a standard deviation of 4.8V over 100 surges were observed in nanotube-based GDTs with 1mm gap spacing between the electrodes. The breakdown reliability is a factor of 4-20 better and the breakdown voltage is 30% lower the commercial products measured. The enhanced performance shows that nanotube-based GDTs are attractive overvoltage protection units in advanced telecom networks.

  3. Application of carbon nanotubes as electrodes in gas discharge tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosen, R.; Simendinger, W.; Debbault, C.; Shimoda, H.; Fleming, L.; Stoner, B.; Zhou, O.

    2000-03-01

    Gas-tube protector units are used in telecom network interface device boxes and central office switching gears to provide protection from lightning and alternating current power cross faults on the telecom network. Current gas discharge tube (GDT) protector units are unreliable from the standpoint of mean turn-on voltage and run-to-run variability. Molybdenum electrodes with various interlayer materials were coated with single-walled carbon nanotubes and analyzed for both electron field emission and discharge properties. A mean direct current breakdown voltage of 448.5 V and a standard deviation of 4.8 V over 100 surges were observed in nanotube-based GDTs with 1 mm gap spacing between the electrodes. The breakdown reliability is a factor of 4-20 better and the breakdown voltage is ˜30% lower than the two commercial products measured. The enhanced performance shows that nanotube-based GDTs are attractive overvoltage protection units in advanced telecom networks.

  4. Gas temperature measurements in deuterium hollow cathode glow discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Majstorović, Gordana; Šišović, Nikola

    2016-03-25

    We report results of optical emission spectroscopy measurements of rotational T{sub rot} and translational (gas) temperature of deuterium molecules in a hollow cathode (HC) glow discharge. The rotational temperature of excited electronic state of D{sub 2} was determined from the intensity distribution in the rotational structure of Q branch of the two Fulcher-α diagonal bands: (ν’=ν”=2) and (ν’=ν”=3). The population of excited energy levels, determined from relative line intensities, was used to derive radial rotational temperature distributions as well as gas temperature distribution of deuterium molecule.

  5. Relativistic Sommerfeld Low Temperature Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, O.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    We derive a relativistic Sommerfeld expansion for thermodynamic quantities in many-body fermionic systems. The expansion is used to generate the equation of state of the Walecka model and its isotherms. We find that these results are in good agreement with numerical calculations, even when the expansion is truncated at its lowest order, in the low temperature regime, defined by T/xf ≪ 1. Although the interesting region near the liquid-gas phase transition is excluded by this criterion, the expansion may still find usefulness in the study of very cold nuclear matter systems, such as neutron stars.

  6. Innovative discharge geometries for diffusion-cooled gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapucci, Antonio

    2004-09-01

    Large area, narrow discharge gap, diffusion cooled gas lasers are nowadays a well established technology for the construction of industrial laser sources. Successful examples exist both with the slab (Rofin-Sinar) or coaxial (Trumpf) geometry. The main physical properties and the associated technical problems of the transverse large area RF discharge, adopted for the excitation of high power diffusion cooled gas lasers, are reviewed here. The main problems of this technology are related to the maintenance of a uniform and stable plasma excitation between closely spaced large-area electrodes at high power-density loading. Some practical solutions such as distributed resonance of the discharge channel proved successful in the case of square or rectangular cross-sections but hardly applicable to geometries such as that of coaxial electrodes. In this paper we present some solutions, adopted by our group, for the development of slab and annular CO2 lasers and for CO2 laser arrays with linear or circular symmetry. We will also briefly mention the difficulties encountered in the extraction of a good quality beam from an active medium with such a cross section. A problem that has also seen some interesting solutions.

  7. Low Temperature Powder Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    Patterson AFB, OH David Piatkowski, Chris Mahendra NAVAIR James Davila, Chris Geib SAIC Beavercreek, OH O G D E N A I R L O G I S T I C S C E N T...PUBLICATIONS Geib , C.W., Davila J.A., Patterson W., et al. “Low Temperature Cure Powder Coating, ESTCP Project WP-0614.” Joint Services Environmental...Management Conference, Columbus, Ohio. 21 – 24 May 2007. Geib , C.W., Davila J.A., Patterson W., et al. “Advances and Testing of Powder Coatings for Aerospace

  8. Memory effect in semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; Kurt, H.; Salamov, B. G. Yücel

    2008-11-01

    The memory effect in the planar semiconductor gas discharge system at different pressures (15-760 Torr) and interelectrode distances (60-445 µm) was experimentally studied. The study was performed on the basis of current-voltage characteristic (CVC) measurements with a time lag of several hours of afterglow periods. The influence of the active space charge remaining from the previous discharge on the breakdown voltage (UB) has been analysed using the CVC method for different conductivities of semiconductor GaAs photocathode. CVC showed that even a measurement taken 96 h after the first breakdown was influenced by accumulated active particles deposited from the previous discharge. Such phenomena based on metastable atoms surviving from the previous discharge and recombined on the cathode to create initial electrons in the avalanche mechanism are shown to be fully consistent with CVC data for both pre-breakdown and post-breakdown regions. However, in the post-breakdown region pronounced negative differential conductivity was observed. Such nonlinear electrical property of GaAs is attributed to the existence of deep electronic defect called EL2 in the semiconductor cathode material. On the other hand, the CVC data for subsequent dates present a correlation of memory effect and hysteresis behaviour. The explanation for such a relation is based on the influence of long lived active charges on the electronic transport mechanism of semiconductor material.

  9. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  10. Gas-discharge plasma sources for nonlocal plasma technology

    SciTech Connect

    Demidov, V. I.; DeJoseph, C. A. Jr.; Simonov, V. Ya.

    2007-11-12

    Nonlocal plasma technology is based on the effect of self-trapping of fast electrons in the plasma volume [V. I. Demidov, C. A. DeJoseph, Jr., and A. A. Kudryavtsev, Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 215002 (2006)]. This effect can be achieved by changing the ratio of fast electron flux to ion flux incident on the plasma boundaries. This in turn leads to a significant change in plasma properties and therefore can be useful for technological applications. A gas-discharge device which demonstrates control of the plasma properties by this method is described.

  11. Decomposition of dimethylamine gas with dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhaolian; Zhao, Jie; Huang, Hong ying; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Renxi

    2013-09-15

    The decomposition of dimethylamine (DMA) with gas under high flow rate was investigated with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) technology. Different parameters including removal efficiency, energy yield, carbon balance and CO2 selectivity, secondary products, as well as pathways and mechanisms of DMA degradation were studied. The experimental results showed that removal efficiency of DMA depended on applied voltage and gas flow rate, but had no obvious correlation with initial concentration. Excellent energy performance was obtained using present DBD technology for DMA abatement. When experiment conditions were controlled at: gas flow rate of 14.9 m(3)/h, initial concentration of 2104 mg/m(3), applied voltage of 4.8 kV, removal efficiency of DMA and energy yield can reach 85.2% and 953.9 g/kWh, respectively. However, carbon balance (around 40%) was not ideal due to shorter residence time (about 0.1s), implying that some additional conditions should be considered to improve the total oxidation of DMA. Moreover, secondary products in outlet gas stream were detected via gas chromatogram-mass spectrum and the amounts of NO3(-) and NO2(-) were analyzed by ion chromatogram. The obtained data demonstrated that NOx might be suppressed due to reductive NH radical form DMA dissociation. The likely reaction pathways and mechanisms for the removal of DMA were suggested based on products analysis. Experimental results demonstrated the application potential of DBD as a clean technology for organic nitrogen-containing gas elimination from gas streams. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Removal of residual dissolved methane gas in an upflow anaerobic sludge blanket reactor treating low-strength wastewater at low temperature with degassing membrane.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Wasala M K R T W; Satoh, Hisashi; Sasakawa, Manabu; Nakahara, Yoshihito; Takahashi, Masahiro; Okabe, Satoshi

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we investigated the efficiency of dissolved methane (D-CH(4)) collection by degasification from the effluent of a bench-scale upflow anaerobic sludge blanket (UASB) reactor treating synthetic wastewater. A hollow-fiber degassing membrane module was used for degasification. This module was connected to the liquid outlet of the UASB reactor. After chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency of the UASB reactor became stable, D-CH(4) discharged from the UASB reactor was collected. Under 35 °C and a hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 10 h, average D-CH(4) concentration could be reduced from 63 mg COD L(-1) to 15 mg COD L(-1); this, in turn, resulted in an increase in total methane (CH(4)) recovery efficiency from 89% to 97%. Furthermore, we investigated the effects of temperature and HRT of the UASB reactor on degasification efficiency. Average D-CH(4) concentration was as high as 104 mg COD L(-1) at 15 °C because of the higher solubility of CH(4) gas in liquid; the average D-CH(4) concentration was reduced to 14 mg COD L(-1) by degasification. Accordingly, total CH(4) recovery efficiency increased from 71% to 97% at 15 °C as a result of degasification. Moreover, degasification tended to cause an increase in particulate COD removal efficiency. The UASB reactor was operated at the same COD loading rate, but different wastewater feed rates and HRTs. Although average D-CH(4) concentration in the UASB reactor was almost unchanged (ca. 70 mg COD L(-1)) regardless of the HRT value, the CH(4) discharge rate from the UASB reactor increased because of an increase in the wastewater feed rate. Because the D-CH(4) concentration could be reduced down to 12 ± 1 mg COD L(-1) by degasification at an HRT of 6.7 h, the CH(4) recovery rate was 1.5 times higher under degasification than under normal operation.

  13. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section... discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode gas discharge tubes designed to demonstrate the effects of a flow of electrons or the production of...

  14. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section... discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode gas discharge tubes designed to demonstrate the effects of a flow of electrons or the production of...

  15. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section... discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode gas discharge tubes designed to demonstrate the effects of a flow of electrons or the production of...

  16. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section... discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode gas discharge tubes designed to demonstrate the effects of a flow of electrons or the production of...

  17. 21 CFR 1020.20 - Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Cold-cathode gas discharge tubes. 1020.20 Section... discharge tubes. (a) Applicability. The provisions of this section are applicable to cold-cathode gas discharge tubes designed to demonstrate the effects of a flow of electrons or the production of...

  18. Low Temperature Rosseland Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. R.

    1994-05-01

    A new, comprehensive set of low temperature opacity data for atoms and molecules has been assembled. From this basic data set, Rosseland and Planck mean opacities have been computed for temperatures between 12,500 K and 700 K. In addition to the standard continuous absorbers, atomic line absorption (with more than 8 million lines), molecular line absorption (with nearly 60 million lines), and grain absorption and scattering (by silicates, iron, carbon, and SiC) have been included. The absorption due to lines is computed monochromatically and included in the mean with the Opacity Sampling technique. Grains are assumed to form in chemical equilibrium and to form into a continuous distribution of ellipsoids which are randomly oriented. Agreement of these opacities with other recent tabulations of opacities (including OP (M. J. Seaton 1994, MNRAS, 266, 805) and OPAL (F. J. Rogers & C. A. Iglesias 1992, ApJS, 79, 507)) for temperatures above 5,000 K is excellent. It is shown that opacities which neglect molecules become unreliable for temperatures below 5,000 K. Similarly, grains must be included in the computation for temperatures below 1,000 - 1,700 K, depending upon the density. Opacity tables can be prepared for a wide variety of chemical compositions, and will be provided upon request. This research is supported by NSF grant AST-9217946.

  19. Radial Measurements of Gas Discharge Parameters of Atmospheric Pressure Microplasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caetano, R.; Hoyer, Y. D.; Barbosa, I. M.; Grigorov, K. G.; Sismanoglu, B. N.

    2013-07-01

    In this work Abel inversion technique was used for radial measurements of the microplasma in Ar-2%H2 flow at open atmosphere. The gas discharge parameters were investigated using spatially resolved high resolution optical emission spectroscopy (OES) to allow acquisition of OH (A 2Σ+, ν = 0 →X 2Π, ν‧ = 0) rotational bands at 306.357 nm, Ar I 603.213 nm line and N2(C3∏u, ν = 0 →B3∏g, ν‧ = 0) second positive system with the band head at 337.13 nm. The nonthermal plasma was generated between microhollow anode ( 500 μm inner diameter) and a cathode copper foil, fed by direct current source for a current ranging from 20 mA to 100 mA (Townsend discharge from 20 mA to 30 mA, normal glow discharge from 30 mA to 80 mA at 210 V and abnormal discharge beyond 90 mA). The 1.5 mm length cylindrical-shape plasma has an outspread bright disk (negative glow region) near the cathode surface. Besides the gas temperature, the excitation temperature was measured radially for a current ranging from 20 mA to 100 mA, either from Boltzmann-plot of Ar I 4p - 4s and 5p - 4s transitions of excited argon or from Cu I two lines method of excited cuprum atoms released from the cathode surface. The measurements showed a nearly bell-shaped distribution of these temperatures, peaked at 120 μm from the center with the minimum at the plasma border. The average excitation temperature was about 8000 K (maximum 10,000 K) and the average rotational temperature was about 650 K (maximum 800 K) from 20 K to 100 K. For the N2 second positive system with Δν = -2 it was estimated the vibrational temperature for the bright disk (1500 K to 5000 K). Hβ line Stark broadening was employed to define the electron number density of the negative glow (1015cm-3).

  20. ORAL ISSUE OF THE JOURNAL "USPEKHI FIZICHESKIKH NAUK": Modeling of gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Boris M.

    2009-06-01

    The condition for the self-maintenance of a gas discharge plasma (GDP) is derived from its ionization balance expressed in the Townsend form and may be used as a definition of a gas discharge plasma in its simplest form. The simple example of a gas discharge plasma in the positive column of a cylindrical discharge tube allows demonstrating a wide variety of possible GDP regimes, revealing a contradiction between simple models used to explain gas discharge regimes and the large number of real processes responsible for the self-maintenance of GDP. The variety of GDP processes also results in a stepwise change of plasma parameters and developing some instabilities as the voltage or discharge current is varied. As a consequence, new forms and new applications of gas discharge arise as technology progresses.

  1. Special features of oxygen distribution in the surface region of steel IOKhN2 under the effect of gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nosenko, V. Yu.; Pivovarov, A. L.; Chenakin, S. P.; Cherepin, V. T.

    1996-04-01

    In recent years technological processes and methods of treatment that include the use of low-temperature gas-discharge plasma have become very popular. Ion-plasma technologies are used successfully for cleaning the surface of materials or creating thin-film structures and coatings and for chemicothermal treatment (nitriding, siliconizing, boronizing, carburizing, etc.) of various metals and alloys. The effect of the plasma of a gas glow discharge on a solid body can be manifested in a change in the chemical composition of its surface region. This is caused by the introduction of elements from the gas atmosphere into the specimen and by the redistribution of the matrix components in this region. The nature of such a redistribution of the components under the action of a gas-discharge plasma is not completely clear, which, among other reasons, is associated with the insufficiency of experimental and theoretical data on the problem. The present work concerns the causes and possible mechanism of the appearance of an oxygen-rich layer in the near-surface region of steel 10KhN2 after the action of a glow-discharge plasma in He, N2 + 25% H2, and Ar atmospheres. A correct explanation of this phenomenon can have a decisive role in understanding the special features of the diffusion processes occurring in a solid body under the effect of a gas-discharge plasma.

  2. Destruction of Bacterial Biofilms Using Gas Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramzon, Nina

    2005-03-01

    Biofilms are bacterial communities embedded in an exopolysaccharidic matrix with a complex architectural structure. Bacteria in biofilms show different properties from those in free life thus, conventional methods of killing bacteria are often ineffective with biofilms. The use of plasmas potentially offers an alternative to conventional sterilization methods since plasmas contain a mixture of charged particles, chemically reactive species, and UV radiation. 4 and 7 day-old biofilms were produced using two bacterial species: Rhizobium gallicum and Chromobacterium violaceum. Gas discharge plasma was produced by using an AtomfloTM reactor (Surfx Technologies) and bacterial biofilms were exposed to it for different periods of time. Our results show that a 10-minute plasma treatment was able to kill 100% of the cells in most cases. Optical emission spectroscopy was used to study plasma composition which is then correlated with the effectiveness of killing. These results indicate the potentiality of plasma as an alternative sterilization method. Supported by CSuperb.

  3. Ionization front in a high-current gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, Edgar Y.; Randolph, Thomas M.

    2007-02-01

    Spectroscopic measurements of ion/neutral density ratio profiles are made inside the high-current, low-pressure discharge of a coaxial magnetoplasmadynamic thruster and show the existence of a thin ionization front, upstream in the discharge, that effectively ionizes the incoming gas to ionization levels above 50%. The measurements allow an estimate of the width of this ionization front to be on the order of a few millimeters. Due to the known existence of microturbulence in the plasma, which can produce suprathermal electrons, an explanation of the measurements based on the existence of a suprathermal tail in the electron energy distribution function is sought. A theoretical model for the width of the ionization front is combined with a multilevel excitation model for argon and shows that a Maxwellian electron distribution function cannot account for the small length scale of the ionization front, and that the latter is more consistent with an electron distribution function having a suprathermal population, the magnitude of which is estimated by comparing the model to the experiments.

  4. Kinetics of high pressure argon-helium pulsed gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmons, D. J.; Weeks, D. E.

    2017-05-01

    Simulations of a pulsed direct current discharge are performed for a 7% argon in helium mixture at a pressure of 270 Torr using both zero- and one-dimensional models. Kinetics of species relevant to the operation of an optically pumped rare-gas laser are analyzed throughout the pulse duration to identify key reaction pathways. Time dependent densities, electron temperatures, current densities, and reduced electric fields in the positive column are analyzed over a single 20 μs pulse, showing temporal agreement between the two models. Through the use of a robust reaction rate package, radiation trapping is determined to play a key role in reducing A r (1 s5) metastable loss rates through the reaction sequence A r (1 s5)+e-→A r (1 s4)+e- followed by A r (1 s4)→A r +ℏω . Collisions with He are observed to be responsible for A r (2 p9) mixing, with nearly equal rates to A r (2 p10) and A r (2 p8) . Additionally, dissociative recombination of A r2+ is determined to be the dominant electron loss mechanism for the simulated discharge conditions and cavity size.

  5. Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Slegeir, William A.; Sapienza, Richard S.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

  6. Low Temperature Regenerator Study.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-08-01

    a definite value: where eis Avogadros number k is the Boltzman constant and V. is the gas constant . This relationship, known as the law of Dulong and...II - Constant (Eq. 7); number of degrees of freedom for cluster structure = Bessel function index S = Specific heat additive constant for cluster...wave velocity C-S = Wave propagation velocity in a specific medium C_. = Transverse wave velocity -, =Specific heat at constant volume S= Specific heat

  7. Transport properties in semiconductor-gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; (Yücel) Kurt, H.; Albarzanji, A. O.; Alekperov, S. D.; Salamov, B. G.

    2009-09-01

    Nonlinear electrical transport of semi-insulating (SI) GaAs detector in semiconductor-gas discharge IR image converter (SGDIC) are studied experimentally for a wide range of the gas pressures ( p = 28-55 Torr), interelectrode distances ( d = 445-525 μm) and inner electrode diameters ( D = 12-22 mm) of photocathode. The destabilization of homogeneous state observed in a planar dc-driven structure is due to nonlinear transport properties of GaAs photocathode. Experimental investigation of electrical instability in SGDIC structure was analyzed using hysteresis, N-shaped negative differential conductivity (NDC) current voltage characteristics (CVC) and dynamic behavior of current in a wide range of feeding voltage ( U = 590-1000 V) under different IR light intensities incident on cathode material. It is established that hysteresis are related to electron capture and emission from EL2 deep center on the detector substrate. We have experimentally investigated domain velocity and electron mobility based on well-understood transferred electron effect (TEE) for abovementioned nonlinear electrical characteristics of SI GaAs. The experimental findings are in good agreement with estimated results reported by other independent authors.

  8. Simulation of discharge in insulating gas from initial partial discharge to growth of a stepped leader using the percolation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sasaki, Akira; Kato, Susumu; Takahashii, Eiichi; Kishimoto, Yasuaki; Fujii, Takashi; Kanazawa, Seiji

    2016-02-01

    We show a cell simulation of a discharge in an insulating gas from the initial partial discharge to leader inception until breakdown, based on the percolation model. In the model, we consider that the propagation of the leader occurs when connections between randomly produced ionized regions in the discharge medium are established. To determine the distribution of ionized regions, the state of each simulation cell is decided by evaluating the probability of ionization in SF6, which depends on the local electric field. The electric field as well as the discharge current are calculated by solving circuit equations for the network of simulation cells. Both calculations are coupled to each other and the temporal evolution of discharge is self-consistently calculated. The model dependence of the features of the discharge is investigated. It is found that taking the suppression of attachment in the presence of a discharge current into account, the calculation reproduces the behavior of experimental discharges. It is shown that for a strong electric field, the inception of a stepped leader causes immediate breakdown. For an electric field of 30-50% of the critical field, the initial partial discharge persists for a stochastic time lag and then the propagation of a leader takes place. As the strength of the electric field decreases, the time lag increases rapidly and eventually only a partial discharge with a short arrested leader occurs, as observed in experiments.

  9. Emission spectroscopic study on gas-gas interactions in glow discharge plasmas using several binary gas mixtures.

    PubMed

    Wagatsuma, Kazuaki

    2010-01-01

    Emission spectra of constituent gas species from glow discharge plasmas using argon-helium, krypton-helium, argon-krypton, and krypton-argon gas mixtures were analyzed to elucidate collisional energy transfer between these gas species occurring in the plasma. In the argon-helium mixed gas plasma, the enhancement or quenching of particular Ar II lines was observed when helium was added to an argon-matrix glow discharge plasma, meaning that a redistribution in the population among the excited levels could be induced through argon-helium collisions. On the other hand, the krypton-helium plasma showed little change in the emission intensities of Kr II lines when helium was added to a krypton-matrix glow discharge plasma, meaning that energy exchanges between krypton and helium excited species occur inactively. These phenomena are principally because the excitation energy as well as the spin multiplicity between collision partners follow both the energy resonance conditions and the spin conservation rule in collisions of the second kind in the argon-helium system, but not in the krypton-helium system. In the argon-krypton and krypton-argon mixed gas plasmas, significant intensity changes of particular Ar II or Kr II lines could not be found; therefore, there were no dominant channels for energy exchanges between argon and krypton species in the mixed gas plasmas.

  10. Growth of arc in high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge by gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Yatsui, Kiyoshi; Masuda, Wataru

    2000-10-01

    Effects of gas density depletion on arc formation of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge have been investigated by eliminating the other factors which may affect the discharge stability, such as shock waves, residual ions, electrode heating, and discharge products. The gas density depletion has been simulated by utilizing a subsonic gas flow between the curved electrodes combined with a convergent nozzle and a divergent diffuser. A comparison has been made on the discharge in the aerodynamically created gas density depletion with the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge within a stable gas. We have found that the large gas density depletion, Δρ/ρ0˜-3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of ˜50 Hz, tends to cause an arc-like filament or an arc without the shocks, ions, electrode heating, and products. However, the second discharge in the double-pulse discharge becomes an arc in much smaller gas density depletion (Δρ/ρ0˜-1.2% corresponding to PRR ˜3 Hz). Therefore, the collapse of high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge is most likely caused by some factor other than the gas density depletion.

  11. Three-dimensional patterns in dielectric barrier discharge with “H” shaped gas gap

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Xing; Dong, Lifang Wang, Hao; Zhang, Hao; Liu, Ying; Liu, Weibo; Fan, Weili; Pan, Yuyang

    2016-08-15

    Three-dimensional (3D) patterns are obtained for the first time in dielectric barrier discharge by a special designed device with “H” shaped gas gap which consists of a single gas layer gap and two double gas layer gaps. Three dimensional spatiotemporal characteristics of discharge are investigated by photomultiplier and intensified charge-coupled device camera. Results show that the discharge first generates in the single gas layer gap and the coupled filaments in the double gas layer gap present the simultaneity characteristics. The formation of 3D patterns is determined by the distribution of the effective field of the applied field and the wall charge field.

  12. Energy from low temperature differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.

    1985-05-01

    A number of energy conservation and alternative energy approaches utilize a low temperature heat source. Applications in this category include: solar ponds, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), low temperature solar thermal, geothermal, and waste heat recovery and bottoming cycles. Low temperature power extraction techniques are presented and the differences between closed and open Rankine power cycles are discussed. Specific applications and technical areas of current research in OTEC along with a breakdown of plant operating conditions and a rough cost estimate illustrate how the use of low temperature power conversion technology can be cost effective.

  13. Rotating structures and vortices in low temperature plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre

    2014-10-01

    Rotating structures are present in a number of low temperature EXB devices such as Hall thrusters, magnetrons, Penning discharges etc...Some aspects of the physics of these rotating instabilities are specific to low temperature plasmas because of the relatively large collisionality, the role of ionization, and the fact that ions are often non-magnetized. On the basis of fully kinetic simulations (Particle-In-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions) we describe the formation of a rotating instability associated with an ionization front (``rotating spoke'') and driven by a cross-field current in a self-sustained cylindrical magnetron discharge at gas pressure on the order of 1 Pa. The rotating spoke is a strong double layer (electrostatic sheath) moving towards the higher potential region at a velocity close to the critical ionization velocity, a concept proposed by Alfvén in the context of the formation of the solar system. The mechanisms of cross-field electron transport induced by this instability are analyzed. At lower pressure (<0.01 Pa) the plasma of a magnetron discharge is non-neutral and the simulations predict the formation of electron vortices rotating in the azimuthal direction and resulting from the diocotron instability. The properties of these vortices are specific since they form in a self-sustained discharge where ionization (and losses at the ends of the plasma column) play an essential role in contrast with the electron vortices in pure electron plasmas. We discuss and analyze the mechanisms leading to the generation, dynamics and merging of these self-sustained electron vortices, and to the periodic ejection of fast electrons at the column ends (consistent with previous experimental observations).

  14. Study of gas discharge with a liquid cathode at maximum thermal load to the cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazmeev, G. Kh; Timerkaev, B. A.; Tazmeev, Kh K.; Arslanov, I. M.; Tazmeev, B. K.; Sarvarov, F. S.

    2017-01-01

    Thermal phenomena were experimentally studied in the atmospheric pressure gas discharge between the electrolyte liquid cathode and the metal anode under conditions in which the electrolyte temperature is close to the boiling temperature. It is shown that electrolyte mass discharge can only be reduced to a certain limit, while maintaining stable mode of burning discharge.

  15. Gas discharges in fumarolic ice caves of Erebus volcano, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, T. P.; Curtis, A. G.; Kyle, P. R.; Sano, Y.

    2013-12-01

    reactions. We are confident that the atmospheric component is not the result of sampling procedure but intrinsic to the ice cave system. In addition to carbon dioxide, magmatic gases emitted from Erebus lava lake contain significant amounts of SO2, HCl, HF, CO and H2 [1,2]. The acid magmatic gases (SO2, HCl, HF) and a significant amount of the CO2 are likely absorbed by the subsurface ice/water system. The atmospheric components (Ar, nitrogen, oxygen) likely enter the system at shallow levels. The relative abundances of these components reflect degassing fractionation of these volatiles from liquid water at low temperatures, suggesting the presence of liquid water in the subsurface. [1] Oppenheimer, C., Kyle, P.R., 2008. Probing the magma plumbing of Erebus volcano, Antarctica, by open-path FTIR spectroscopy of gas emissions. J. Vol. Geoth. Res. 177, 743-754. [2] Moussallam, Y., Oppenheimer, C., et al., 2012. Hydrogen emission from Erebus volcano, Antarctica. Bull. Volcan 74, 2109-2120.

  16. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-01

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  17. Particle-in-cell modeling of gas-confined barrier discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Levko, Dmitry; Raja, Laxminarayan L.

    2016-04-15

    Gas-confined barrier discharge is studied using the one-dimensional Particle-in-Cell Monte Carlo Collisions model for the conditions reported by Guerra-Garcia and Martinez-Sanchez [Appl. Phys. Lett. 106, 041601 (2015)]. Depending on the applied voltage, two modes of discharge are observed. In the first mode, the discharge develops in the entire interelectrode gap. In the second mode, the discharge is ignited and develops only in the gas layer having smaller breakdown voltage. The one-dimensional model shows that for the conditions considered, there is no streamer stage of breakdown as is typical for a traditional dielectric barrier discharge.

  18. Organic Combustion in the Presence of Ca-Carbonate and Mg-Perchlorate: A Possible Source for the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, Douglas; Ming, D.; Niles, P.; Sutter, B.; Lauer, H.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Lander were the detection of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in landing site soils. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument on the Phoenix lander could heat samples up to approx.1000 C and monitor evolved gases with a mass spectrometer. TEGA detected a low (approx.350 C) and high (approx.750 C) temperature CO2 release. The high temp release was attributed to the thermal decomposition of Ca-carbonate (calcite). The low temperature CO2 release could be due to desorption of CO2, decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or the combustion of organic material. A new hypothesis has also been proposed that the low temperature CO2 release could be due to the early breakdown of calcite in the presence of the decomposition products of certain perchlorate salts [3]. We have investigated whether or not this new hypothesis is also compatible with organic combustion. Magnesium perchlorate is stable as Mg(ClO4)2-6H2O on the martian surface [4]. During thermal decomposition, this perchlorate salt releases H2O, Cl2, and O2 gases. The Cl2 can react with water to form HCl which then reacts with calcite, releasing CO2 below the standard thermal decomposition temperature of calcite. However, when using concentrations of perchlorate and calcite similar to what was detected by Phoenix, the ratio of high:low temperature CO2 evolved is much larger in the lab, indicating that although this process might contribute to the low temp CO2 release, it cannot account for all of it. While H2O and Cl2 cause calcite decomposition, the O2 evolved during perchlorate decomposition can lead to the combustion of any reduced carbon present in the sample [5]. We investigate the possible contribution of organic molecules to the low temperature CO2 release seen on Mars.

  19. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  20. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  1. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  2. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  3. 46 CFR 153.462 - Static discharges from inert gas systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Static discharges from inert gas systems. 153.462... Equipment Special Requirements for Flammable Or Combustible Cargoes § 153.462 Static discharges from inert... create static arcing as the inert gas is injected into the tank....

  4. Intracavity absorption and emission spectroscopy of atoms in pulsed gas discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Serdyukov, V. I.; Poplavskii, Yu. A.; Sinitsa, L. N.

    2009-07-15

    Absorption and emission spectra of U and Na atoms in the 590-nm spectral range were studied experimentally using pulsed hollow-cathode gas discharges. The spectra were recorded with a high-sensitivity intracavity laser spectrometer. The possibility of generating coherent emission on atomic emission lines in gas-discharge plasmas was demonstrated experimentally.

  5. Low Temperature Distillation for Desalination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, William

    2013-11-01

    We examine a unique configuration that combines the evaporator and condenser in a low temperature distillation process. The low temperature (pressure) container is designed to use waste heat from a power plant as the hot source and a water reservoir as the cold source. Fresh and saline streams of droplets in close proximity create interesting hydrodynamic challenges for the directional stability of the droplets.

  6. Inception of Snapover and Gas Induced Glow Discharges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galofaro, J. T.; Vayner, B. V.; Degroot, W. A.; Ferguson, D. C.; Thomson, C. D.; Dennison, J. R.; Davies, R. E.

    2000-01-01

    Ground based experiments of the snapover phenomenon were conducted in the large vertical simulation chamber at the Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plasma Interaction Facility (PIF). Two Penning sources provided both argon and xenon plasmas for the experiments. The sources were used to simulate a variety of ionospheric densities pertaining to a spacecraft in a Low Earth Orbital (LEO) environment. Secondary electron emission is believed responsible for dielectric surface charging, and all subsequent snapover phenomena observed. Voltage sweeps of conductor potentials versus collected current were recorded in order to examine the specific charging history of each sample. The average time constant for sample charging was estimated between 25 and 50 seconds for all samples. It appears that current drops off by approximately a factor of 3 over the charging time of the sample. All samples charged in the forward and reverse bias directions, demonstrated hysteresis. Current jumps were only observed in the forward or positive swept voltage direction. There is large dispersion in tile critical snapover potential when repeating sweeps on any one sample. The current ratio for the first snapover region jumps between 2 and 4.6 times, with a standard deviation less than 1.6. Two of the samples showed even larger current ratios. It is believed the second large snapover region is due to sample outgassing. Under certain preset conditions, namely at the higher neutral gas background pressures, a perceptible blue-green glow was observed around the conductor. The glow is believed to be a result of secondary electrons undergoing collisions with an expelled tenuous cloud of gas, that is outgassed from the sample. Spectroscopic measurements of the glow discharge were made in an attempt to identify specific lines contributing to the observed glow.

  7. High selectivity of a CuO modified hollow SnO2 nanofiber gas sensor to H2S at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiejie; Gao, Chaojun; Yang, Hui; Wang, Xinchang; Jia, Jianfeng

    2017-08-01

    CuO modified hollow SnO2 nanofibers with large specific surface area were successfully synthesized via a simple two-step process, using the electrospinning method and hydrothermal technique. Gas-sensing experiments on hierarchically CuO modified SnO2 hollow nanofibers displayed higher sensitivity and selectivity to H2S gas at lower operating temperatures compared with unmodified hollow SnO2 nanofibers. At the optimal operating temperature of 125 °C, the highest response value to 10 ppm H2S gas reached 410. Response time decreased when the concentration of H2S increased. It is almost no response to other gases when the operating temperature falls below 200 °C. The specific interaction between H2S gas and the CuO nanoparticles, as well as the amplifier effect on the gas response by the p-n junctions, strongly enhances the selectivity to H2S gas at a lower operating temperature.

  8. Characteristics of excitation discharge of an excimer laser in gas density depletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imada, Go; Masuda, Wataru; Yatsui, Kiyoshi

    1998-12-01

    The influences of gas density depletion on the highly- repetitive, high-pressure, pulsed glow discharge for excitation of excimer laser have been investigated eliminating the other instabilities, such as shock waves, residual ions, discharge products and electrode heating. The gas density depletion is simulated by utilizing a subsonic flow between the curved electrodes. The comparison has been made on the discharge occurred in the presence of the gas density depletion with the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment. We have found that the big gas density non uniformity, (Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 3.6% corresponding to a pulse repetition rate (PRR) of approximately 20 Hz, tends to cause the arc discharge without the shocks, ions, discharge products and electrode heating. On the other hand, the second discharge on the double-pulse experiment becomes arc discharge in much smaller non uniformity ((Delta) (rho) /(rho) 0 approximately 1.2% corresponding to PRR approximately 3 Hz). The arc discharge in the double-pulse experiment might be driven by the residual ions and/or discharge products other than gas density depletion except for PRR greater than 20 Hz.

  9. Reaction mechanism for the aqueous-phase mineral carbonation of heat-activated serpentine at low temperatures and pressures in flue gas conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Louis-César; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra

    2014-05-06

    Mineral carbonation is known as one of the safest ways to sequester CO2. Nevertheless, the slow kinetics and low carbonation rates constitute a major barrier for any possible industrial application. To date, no studies have focused on reacting serpentinite with a relatively low partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) close to flue gas conditions. In this work, finely ground and heat-treated serpentinite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4] extracted from mining residues was reacted with a 18.2 vol % CO2 gas stream at moderate global pressures to investigate the effect on CO2 solubility and Mg leaching. Serpentinite dissolution rates were also measured to define the rate-limiting step. Successive batches of gas were contacted with the same serpentinite to identify surface-limiting factors using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Investigation of the serpentinite carbonation reaction mechanisms under conditions close to a direct flue gas treatment showed that increased dissolution rates could be achieved relative to prior work, with an average Mg dissolution rate of 3.55 × 10(-11) mol cm(-2) s(-1). This study provides another perspective of the feasibility of applying a mineral carbonation process to reduce industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from large emission sources.

  10. Role of flue gas components in mercury oxidation over TiO2 supported MnOx-CeO2 mixed-oxide at low temperature.

    PubMed

    Li, Hailong; Wu, Chang-Yu; Li, Ying; Li, Liqing; Zhao, Yongchun; Zhang, Junying

    2012-12-01

    MnO(x)-CeO(2) mixed-oxide supported on TiO(2) (Mn-Ce/Ti) was synthesized by an ultrasound-assisted impregnation method and employed to oxidize elemental mercury (Hg(0)) at 200°C in simulated coal combustion flue gas. Over 90% of Hg(0) oxidation was achieved on the Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst at 200°C under simulated flue gas representing those from burning low-rank coals with a high gas hourly space velocity of 60,000 h(-1). Gas-phase O(2) regenerated the lattice oxygen and replenished the chemisorbed oxygen, which facilitated Hg(0) oxidation. HCl was the most effective flue gas component responsible for Hg(0) oxidation. 10 ppm HCl plus 4% O(2) resulted in 100% Hg(0) oxidation under the experimental conditions. SO(2) competed with Hg(0) for active sites, thus deactivating the catalyst's capability in oxidizing Hg(0). NO covered the active sites and consumed surface oxygen active for Hg(0) oxidation, hence limiting Hg(0) oxidation. Water vapor showed prohibitive effect on Hg(0) oxidation due to its competition with HCl and Hg(0) for active adsorption sites. This study provides information about the promotional or inhibitory effects of individual flue gas components on Hg(0) oxidation over a highly effective Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst. Such knowledge is of fundamental importance for industrial applications of the Mn-Ce/Ti catalyst in coal-fired power plants. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Low-temperature plasma for compositional depth profiling of crosslinking organic multilayers: comparison with C60 and giant argon gas cluster sources.

    PubMed

    Muramoto, Shin; Rading, Derk; Bush, Brian; Gillen, Greg; Castner, David G

    2014-09-30

    For organic electronics, device performance can be affected by interlayer diffusion across interfaces. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) can resolve buried structures with nanometer resolution, but instrument artifacts make this difficult. Low-temperature plasma (LTP) is suggested as a way to prepare artifact-free surfaces for accurate determination of chemical diffusion. A model organic layer system consisting of three 1 nm delta layers of 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (BCP) separated by three 30 nm layers of tris(8-hydroxyquinolinato)aluminum (Alq3) was used to evaluate the effectiveness of LTP etching for the preparation of crater edge surfaces for subsequent compositional depth profile analysis. This was compared with depth profiles obtained using an instrument equipped with an argon cluster sputter source. The quality of the depth profiles was determined by comparing the depth resolutions of the BCP delta layers. The full width at half maximum gave depth resolutions of 6.9 nm and 6.0 nm using LTP, and 6.2 nm and 5.8 nm using argon clusters. In comparison, the 1/e decay length of the trailing edge gave depth resolutions of 2.0 nm and 1.8 nm using LTP, and 3.5 nm and 3.4 nm using argon clusters. The comparison of the 1/e decay lengths showed that LTP can determine the thickness and composition of the buried structures without instrument artifacts. Although it does suffer from contaminant deposition, LTP was shown to be a viable option for preparing crater edges for a more accurate determination of buried structures. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  12. A summary of volatile impurity measurements and gas generation studies on MISSTD-1, a high-purity plutonium oxide produced by low-temperature calcination of plutonium oxalate

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, John M.; Narlesky, Joshua E.; Veirs, Douglas K.

    2012-06-08

    Plutonium dioxide of high specific surface area was subjected to long-term tests of gas generation in sealed containers. The material preparation and the storage conditions were outside the bounds of acceptable parameters defined by DOE-STD-3013-2012 in that the material was stabilized to a lower temperature than required and had higher moisture content than allowed. The data provide useful information for better defining the bounding conditions for safe storage. Net increases in internal pressure and transient increases in H{sub 2} and O{sub 2} were observed, but were well within the bounds of gas compositions previously shown to not threaten integrity of 3013 containers.

  13. Influence of volume recombination on characteristics of positive column in narrow gas discharge tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mikhaylovskaya, L. V.; Mykhaylovska, A. S.

    2007-06-01

    The theoretical analysis of the influence of a volume electron-ionic recombination on energy and spatial characteristics of the glow discharge plasma of the positive column in gases is developed taking into account the equation for a longitudinal electric field and Ohm's low for a full electrical current. It is shown, that under certain conditions, even in the diffusion mode of glow discharge, this influence reduces to essential modifications of the internal discharge parameters (electron temperature, electron concentration at the tube axis and longitudinal electric field). Dependences of the internal gas discharge plasma parameters on the external ones, such as gas pressure, the discharge current, the radius of working capillary are considered for the narrow gas discharge tubes.

  14. Discharge instabilities in high-pressure helium-fluorine laser gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Peters, Peter J. M.; Boller, Klaus-Jochen

    2005-03-01

    Discharge instabilities in F2 based excimer gas lasers are investigated using a small-scale discharge system. After preionizing the gas volume, a fast rising voltage pulse initiates the discharge. The temporal development of the discharge is monitored via its fluorescence by an intensified CCD camera with a gating time of 10 ns. Homogeneous discharges are produced in gas mixtures of He/1mbar F2 and He/1mbar F2/30mbar Xe at a total pressure of 2 bar for pump pulse duratins up to 70 ns (FWHM). The addition of Xe to He/F2 mixture does not lead to discharge instabilities while the introduction of more F2 results in hotspot and filament formation.

  15. Low-temperature plasma simulations with the LSP PIC code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, Johan; Khrabrov, Alex; Kaganovich, Igor; Keating, David; Selezneva, Svetlana; Sommerer, Timothy

    2014-10-01

    The LSP (Large-Scale Plasma) PIC-MCC code has been used to simulate several low-temperature plasma configurations, including a gas switch for high-power AC/DC conversion, a glow discharge and a Hall thruster. Simulation results will be presented with an emphasis on code comparison and validation against experiment. High-voltage, direct-current (HVDC) power transmission is becoming more common as it can reduce construction costs and power losses. Solid-state power-electronics devices are presently used, but it has been proposed that gas switches could become a compact, less costly, alternative. A gas-switch conversion device would be based on a glow discharge, with a magnetically insulated cold cathode. Its operation is similar to that of a sputtering magnetron, but with much higher pressure (0.1 to 0.3 Torr) in order to achieve high current density. We have performed 1D (axial) and 2D (axial/radial) simulations of such a gas switch using LSP. The 1D results were compared with results from the EDIPIC code. To test and compare the collision models used by the LSP and EDIPIC codes in more detail, a validation exercise was performed for the cathode fall of a glow discharge. We will also present some 2D (radial/azimuthal) LSP simulations of a Hall thruster. The information, data, or work presented herein was funded in part by the Advanced Research Projects Agency-Energy (ARPA-E), U.S. Department of Energy, under Award Number DE-AR0000298.

  16. Quantitative investigation of xenon consumption and recovery during low pressure ac discharges in rare gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafast, H.; Redlich, L.; Linke, H.-P.

    2006-11-01

    Xe gas in low pressure discharge tubes (20 mm diameter, 800 mm length, commercial hollow electrodes at 650 mm distance, 50 Hz, 60 mA) was quantitatively determined using quadrupole mass spectrometry (QMS). The temporal Xe gas evolution over 5 to 20 h of gas discharge revealed the consumption and recovery of Xe gas to be dependent on the prevailing gas composition. The net consumption in the standard Xe/He(2.0/98) gas mixture was much faster than that in Xe/Kr/He(1.9/93/5). Xe recovery during discharges in 'preloaded' tubes refilled with pure gas revealed an increasing efficiency in the sequence He < Ne < Ar < Kr, being most efficient with the first refilling. The temporal evolution of Xe gas was simulated by a kinetic model based on two equilibria between Xe gas and Xe incorporated in the glass tube walls (1) and the electrodes (2). It is concluded that the experimental setup, the elaborated measurement procedures and the kinetic model provide a good basis for further quantitative investigations. The net Xe gas consumption during discharge, which is presently limiting the tube lifetime, may be reduced particularly by improving the discharge gas composition and the electrode materials.

  17. Vibrational wave packets: Molecular state reconstruction in the gas phase and mixed quantum/semiclassical descriptions of small-molecule dynamics in low-temperature solid media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapman, Craig Thomas

    We explore the reconstruction of B-state vibrational wave packets in I2 from simulated two-color nonlinear wave packet interferometry data. As a simplification of earlier proposals, we make use of different vibrational energy ranges in the B-state---rather than different electronic potential surfaces---for the short-pulse preparation and propagation of both target and reference wave packets. Numerical results from noisy interferograms indicate that experimental reconstruction should be possible with high fidelity (>0.99). Time-resolved coherent nonlinear optical experiments on small molecules in low-temperature host crystals are exposing valuable information on quantum mechanical dynamics in condensed media. We make use of generic features of these systems to frame two simple, comprehensive theories that will enable the efficient calculation of their ultrafast spectroscopic signals and support their interpretation in terms of the underlying chemical dynamics. Both treatments rely on the identification of normal coordinates to unambiguously partition the well-structured guest-host complex into a system and a bath and expand the overall wave function as a sum of product states between fully anharmonic vibrational basis states for the system and approximate Gaussian wave packets for the bath degrees of freedom. The theories exploit the fact that ultrafast experiments typically drive large-amplitude motion in a few intramolecular degrees of freedom of higher frequency than the crystal phonons, while these intramolecular vibrations indirectly induce smaller-amplitude---but still perhaps coherent---motion among the lattice modes. The equations of motion for the time-dependent parameters of the bath wave packets are fairly compact in a fixed vibrational basis/Gaussian bath (FVB/GB) approach. An alternative adiabatic vibrational basis/Gaussian bath (AVB/GB) treatment leads to more complicated equations of motion involving adiabatic and nonadiabatic vector potentials

  18. Formation of an out-of-electrode plasma in a high-voltage gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolpakov, V. A.; Kolpakov, A. I.; Podlipnov, V. V.

    2013-04-01

    The formation of an out-of-electrode plasma in a high-voltage gas discharge is studied. The occurrence and self-maintenance of a gas discharge and its associated plasma fluxes on the straight portions of electrical field lines are predicted theoretically and confirmed experimentally. It is shown that the focusing of the gas discharge and plasma fluxes is provided by increasing the length of the field line straight portions toward the symmetry axis of a hole in the anode. It is found that, when the discharge power (more specifically, an accelerating voltage applied to the electrodes of the gas-discharge tube) rises, the straight portions of the field lines elongate and concentrate near the symmetry axis of the hole in the anode. Recommendations are given on using the out-of-electrode plasma in surface micro- and nanostructuring.

  19. Note: Fiber optic transport probe for Hall measurements under light and magnetic field at low temperatures: Case study of a two dimensional electron gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bhadauria, P. P. S.; Gupta, Anurag; Kumar, Pramod; Dogra, Anjana; Budhani, R. C.

    2015-05-15

    A fiber optic based probe is designed and developed for electrical transport measurements in presence of quasi-monochromatic (360–800 nm) light, varying temperature (T = 1.8–300 K), and magnetic field (B = 0–7 T). The probe is tested for the resistivity and Hall measurements performed on a LaAlO{sub 3}–SrTiO{sub 3} heterointerface system with a conducting two dimensional electron gas.

  20. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  1. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  2. The application of an assisting gas plasma generator for low- temperature magnetron sputtering of Ti-C-Mo-S antifriction coatings on titanium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potekaev, A. I.; Savostikov, V. M.; Tabachenko, A. N.; Dudarev, E. F.; Melnikova, E. A.; Shulepov, I. A.

    2015-11-01

    The positive effect of assisting influence of high-density gas plasma formed by an independent plasma generator PINK on mechanical and tribological characteristics of Ti-C- Mo-S magnetron coating on titanium alloys at lowered to 350°C temperature of coating regardless of alloy structural condition was revealed by methods of calotest, nanorecognition, scratch testing and frictional material tests. The coating formed by means of a combined magnetron plasma method reduces titanium alloys friction coefficient in multiple times and increases wear resistance by two orders of magnitude. At the same time the mechanical properties of ultra-fine-grained titanium alloys obtained by nanostructuring do not deteriorate.

  3. An Evaluation of the International Maritime Organization’s Gaseous Agents Test Protocol with Halocarbon Agents and an Inert Gas, 180 Deg Nozzles, and Low Temperature Conditioned Cylinders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-12-01

    halocarbons and one inert gas) were included in this evaluation. These agents include heptafluoropropane C3HF7 (FM-200), perfluoropropane C3F8 (CEA-308...CEA-308 FM-200 NAF-SIII* Inergen** Chemical Formula CF3Br C3F8 C3HF7 82%CHClF2(R-22), 9.5% C2HCIF4 (R-124), 4.75% C2HCI2F3 (R-123), and 3.75...Product Wave Numbers Agent / Compound Wave Number (cm") FM-200 (C3HF7) 2034 CEA-308 ( C3F8 ) 2040 Hydrogen Fluoride (HF) 4003,4041, and 4077 The HF

  4. [Low-temperature sterilization for the surgical infection prophylaxis].

    PubMed

    Kornev, I I; Baranov, G A; Ul'ianov, V I

    2011-01-01

    The comparative characteristic of the accepted methods of low-temperature sterilization of medical equipment is given. Special attention is devoted to the surgical infection prophylaxis. The efficacy, expediency and safety of gas sterilization with ethilenoxide is proved. Plasmic methods of sterilization is recommended for use together with other methods of low-temperature sterilization.

  5. Low temperature barrier wellbores formed using water flushing

    DOEpatents

    McKinzie, II; John, Billy [Houston, TX; Keltner, Thomas Joseph [Spring, TX

    2009-03-10

    A method of forming an opening for a low temperature well is described. The method includes drilling an opening in a formation. Water is introduced into the opening to displace drilling fluid or indigenous gas in the formation adjacent to a portion of the opening. Water is produced from the opening. A low temperature fluid is applied to the opening.

  6. Simulation of waves of partial discharges in a chain of gas inclusions located in condensed dielectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kupershtokh, A. L.; Karpov, D. I.

    2016-10-01

    A stochastic model of partial discharges inside gas inclusions in condensed dielectrics was developed. The possibility of a "relay-race" wave propagation mechanism of partial discharges in a linear chain of gas inclusions is shown. The lattice Boltzmann method is successfully implemented for three-dimensional computer simulations of flows of dielectric fluid with bubbles. Growth and elongation of bubbles in a liquid dielectric under the action of a strong electric field are simulated. The physical model of propagation of partial discharges along a chain of gas bubbles in a liquid is formulated.

  7. PREFACE: Low temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gali Yunusovich, Dautov; Kashapov Faikovich, Nail; Larionov, Viktor; Gerfanovich Zaripov, Renat; Galyautdinov Tagirovich, Raphael; Ilnaz, Fayrushin; Ramil Nailevich, Kashapov

    2013-12-01

    In November 2013 the V Republican Scientific Technical Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings' was held in Kazan. The Conference took place from 4-7 November at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and Kazan Federal University chaired by a member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan Nail Kashapov, Professor, Doctor of Technical Science, and a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Tatarstan. At the conference, the participants were offered a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and computational aspects of the research problems in the physics and technology of low-temperature plasma. There was also a whole series of works devoted to the study of thin films, obtained by low-temperature plasma. For the second year at this conference, work dedicated to the related field of pulsation combustion and low- temperature plasma was considered. In addition much interest is devoted to reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electron trodes and the study of dusty plasmas. The VI All-Russian Conference 'Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings', an extended version with international participation, is scheduled to take place in November 2014. Nail Kashapov Editor

  8. Rapid synthesis and characterization of hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods for high performance, low temperature NO2 gas sensor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponnuvelu, Dinesh Veeran; Pullithadathil, Biji; Prasad, Arun K.; Dhara, Sandip; Ashok, Anuradha; Mohamed, Kamruddin; Tyagi, Ashok Kumar; Raj, Baldev

    2015-11-01

    A rapid synthesis route for hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods has been realized for ultrasensitive, trace-level NO2 gas sensor applications. ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods are structurally analyzed using X-ray diffraction (XRD), high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Optical characterization using UV-visible (UV-vis), photoluminescence (PL) and Raman spectroscopies elucidate alteration in the percentage of defect and charge transport properties of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods. The study reveals the accumulation of electrons at metal-semiconductor junctions leading to upward band bending for ZnO and thus favors direct electron transfer from ZnO to Au nanoclusters, which mitigates charge carrier recombination process. The operating temperature of ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor significantly decreased to 150 °C compared to alternate NO2 sensors (300 °C). Moreover, a linear sensor response in the range of 0.5-5 ppm of NO2 concentration was observed with a lowest detection limit of 500 ppb using conventional electrodes. The defects with deep level, observed in ZnO nanorods and hybrid ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods influences local electron density, which in-turn indirectly influence the gas sensing properties. The ZnO@Au core-shell nanorods based sensor exhibited good selectivity toward NO2 and was found to be very stable.

  9. The Reductive Dehydration of Cellulose by Solid/Gas Reaction with TiCl4 at Low Temperature: A Cheap, Simple, and Green Process for Preparing Anatase Nanoplates and TiO2 /C Composites.

    PubMed

    Plumejeau, Sandrine; Rivallin, Matthieu; Brosillon, Stephan; Ayral, André; Heux, Laurent; Boury, Bruno

    2016-11-21

    Metal oxides and metal oxide/carbon composites are entering the development of new technologies and should therefore to be prepared by sustainable chemistry processes. Therefore, a new aspect of the reactivity of cellulose is presented through its solid/gas reaction with vapour of titanium(IV) chloride in anhydrous conditions at low temperature (80 °C). This reaction leads to two transformations both for cellulose and titanium(IV) chloride. A reductive dehydration of cellulose is seen at the lowest temperature ever reported and results in the formation of a carbonaceous fibrous solid as the only carbon-containing product. Simultaneously, the in situ generation of water leads to the formation of titanium dioxide with an unexpected nanoplate morphology (ca. 50 nm thickness) and a high photocatalytic activity. We present the evidence showing the evolution of the cellulose and the TiO2 nanostructure formation, along with its photocatalytic activity. This low-temperature process avoids any other reagents and is among the greenest processes for the preparation of anatase and also for TiO2 /carbon composites. The anisotropic morphology of TiO2 questions the role of the cellulose on the growing process of these nanoparticles.

  10. Efficient gas lasers pumped by double-discharge circuits with semiconductor opening switch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, Alexei N.; Tarasenko, Victor F.

    2012-01-01

    A review of applications of double-discharge circuits based on generators with inductive energy storage (IES) and semiconductor opening switches (SOS) for efficient excitation of different gas lasers is presented. Using a pre-pulse-sustainer circuit technique based on inductive energy storage and semiconductor opening switch generators allows the formation of a pre-pulse with high amplitude and short rise-time and provides a sharp increase of discharge current which significantly improves discharge stability and life-time of the volume discharge in gas mixtures containing halogens. A pre-pulse with high pumping power forms a high-density discharge plasma and an inversion population in gas mixtures under study within ∼10 ns and provides both early onset of lasing and conditions for efficient excitation of an active medium from the storage capacitor. As a result, pulse duration, output energy and efficiency of the lasers under study were improved.

  11. Interelectrode bridging of carbon nanotube fibrous assembly induced by gas discharge breakdown

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Hideki; Mizushima, Yuuki; Komatsu, Yusuke

    2017-01-01

    In this work, we demonstrate a fibrous assembly of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) induced by a gas discharge breakdown that bridge the distance between two planar electrodes. To achieve this, we placed the two planar electrodes, one of which was covered with a CNT film, in a chamber; a vacuum pump was used to evacuate the air from the chamber and replace it with inert gas. By then applying a voltage between the electrodes, we induced a discharge breakdown between them. This caused the CNTs coated on the electrode surface to detach and form fibrous assemblies. The assemblies elongated and reached the opposite electrode, thereby creating bridges between the electrodes. These bridges formed when the gas pressure was greater than ca. 1.0 × 103 Pa and in combination with the occurrence of a spark discharge. At lower pressures, a glow discharge occurred, and no bridge formation was observed, indicating that the discharge mode is critical for the bridge formation.

  12. Observations of the [HNCS]/[HSCN] Ratio in Sgr B2 and TMC-1: Evidence for Low-temperature Gas-phase Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adande, G. R.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.; Quan, D.; Herbst, E.

    2010-12-01

    Millimeter observations of isothiocyanic acid (HNCS) and its higher energy isomer, thiocyanic acid (HSCN), have been carried out toward Sgr B2 and TMC-1 using the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. For both species, the JKa,Kc = 80,8 → 70,7 and 90,9 → 80,8 transitions near 91-93 GHz and 103-106 GHz were mapped across a 6' × 3' region, centered near Sgr B2(M). Comparative mapping observations were also done for the JKa,Kc = 40,4 → 30,3 line of HNCO and HOCN near 84-87 GHz. In addition, the JKa,Kc = 70,7 → 60,6 and 80,8 → 70,7 transitions of both HNCS and HSCN were detected in TMC-1, the first identification of either molecule in a cold, dark cloud. Emission from HNCS and HSCN was found to be extended over the Sgr B2 cloud, with a single velocity component and a linewidth of ~20-25 km s-1. Column densities derived for HSCN in Sgr B2 are typically N tot ~ (0.2-1) × 1013 cm-2, with N tot ~ (0.8-5) × 1013 cm-2 for the more stable isomer, HNCS. In TMC-1, these species have similar column densities of (6-8) × 1010 cm-2. The [HNCS]/[HSCN] abundance ratio ranges from 2 to 7 in Sgr B2, with a value of ~1 in TMC-1. In contrast, the [HNCO]/[HOCN] ratio in Sgr B2 is ~110-250. Gas-grain chemical models do not reproduce the observed abundances of the sulfur isomers in either source. Given the energy difference of over 3200 K between HNCS and HSCN, these observations suggest that both molecules are produced from gas-phase, ion-molecule chemistry with a common precursor, HNCSH+. The oxygen analogs, in contrast, probably have a more complex chemical network, perhaps involving the H2NCO+ precursor, which preferentially leads to HNCO.

  13. OBSERVATIONS OF THE [HNCS]/[HSCN] RATIO IN Sgr B2 AND TMC-1: EVIDENCE FOR LOW-TEMPERATURE GAS-PHASE CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Adande, G. R.; Halfen, D. T.; Ziurys, L. M.; Quan, D.; Herbst, E.

    2010-12-10

    Millimeter observations of isothiocyanic acid (HNCS) and its higher energy isomer, thiocyanic acid (HSCN), have been carried out toward Sgr B2 and TMC-1 using the 12 m telescope of the Arizona Radio Observatory. For both species, the J{sub Ka,Kc} = 8{sub 0,8} {yields} 7{sub 0,7} and 9{sub 0,9} {yields} 8{sub 0,8} transitions near 91-93 GHz and 103-106 GHz were mapped across a 6' x 3' region, centered near Sgr B2(M). Comparative mapping observations were also done for the J{sub Ka,Kc} = 4{sub 0,4} {yields} 3{sub 0,3} line of HNCO and HOCN near 84-87 GHz. In addition, the J{sub Ka,Kc} = 7{sub 0,7} {yields} 6{sub 0,6} and 8{sub 0,8} {yields} 7{sub 0,7} transitions of both HNCS and HSCN were detected in TMC-1, the first identification of either molecule in a cold, dark cloud. Emission from HNCS and HSCN was found to be extended over the Sgr B2 cloud, with a single velocity component and a linewidth of {approx}20-25 km s{sup -1}. Column densities derived for HSCN in Sgr B2 are typically N{sub tot} {approx} (0.2-1) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}, with N{sub tot} {approx} (0.8-5) x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} for the more stable isomer, HNCS. In TMC-1, these species have similar column densities of (6-8) x 10{sup 10} cm{sup -2}. The [HNCS]/[HSCN] abundance ratio ranges from 2 to 7 in Sgr B2, with a value of {approx}1 in TMC-1. In contrast, the [HNCO]/[HOCN] ratio in Sgr B2 is {approx}110-250. Gas-grain chemical models do not reproduce the observed abundances of the sulfur isomers in either source. Given the energy difference of over 3200 K between HNCS and HSCN, these observations suggest that both molecules are produced from gas-phase, ion-molecule chemistry with a common precursor, HNCSH{sup +}. The oxygen analogs, in contrast, probably have a more complex chemical network, perhaps involving the H{sub 2}NCO{sup +} precursor, which preferentially leads to HNCO.

  14. Investigation of thin/well-tunable liquid/gas diffusion layers exhibiting superior multifunctional performance in low-temperature electrolytic water splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Zhenye; Mo, Jingke; Yang, Gaoqiang; Retterer, Scott T.; Cullen, David A.; Toops, Todd J.; Green Jr, Johney B.; Mench, Matthew M.; Zhang, Feng-Yuan

    2016-10-11

    Liquid/gas diffusion layers (LGDLs), which are located between the catalyst layer (CL) and bipolar plate (BP), play an important role in enhancing the performance of water splitting in proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs). They are expected to transport electrons, heat, and reactants/products simultaneously with minimum voltage, current, thermal, interfacial, and fluidic losses. Here in this study, the thin titanium-based LGDLs with straight-through pores and well-defined pore morphologies are comprehensively investigated for the first time. The novel LGDL with a 400 μm pore size and 0.7 porosity achieved a best-ever performance of 1.66 V at 2 A cm-2 and 80 °C, as compared to the published literature. The thin/well-tunable titanium based LGDLs remarkably reduce ohmic and activation losses, and it was found that porosity has a more significant impact on performance than pore size. In addition, an appropriate equivalent electrical circuit model has been established to quantify the effects of pore morphologies. The rapid electrochemical reaction phenomena at the center of the PEMEC are observed by coupling with high-speed and micro-scale visualization systems. Lastly, the observed reactions contribute reasonable and pioneering data that elucidate the effects of porosity and pore size on the PEMEC performance. This study can be a new guide for future research and development towards high-efficiency and low-cost hydrogen energy.

  15. Investigation of thin/well-tunable liquid/gas diffusion layers exhibiting superior multifunctional performance in low-temperature electrolytic water splitting

    DOE PAGES

    Kang, Zhenye; Mo, Jingke; Yang, Gaoqiang; ...

    2016-10-11

    Liquid/gas diffusion layers (LGDLs), which are located between the catalyst layer (CL) and bipolar plate (BP), play an important role in enhancing the performance of water splitting in proton exchange membrane electrolyzer cells (PEMECs). They are expected to transport electrons, heat, and reactants/products simultaneously with minimum voltage, current, thermal, interfacial, and fluidic losses. Here in this study, the thin titanium-based LGDLs with straight-through pores and well-defined pore morphologies are comprehensively investigated for the first time. The novel LGDL with a 400 μm pore size and 0.7 porosity achieved a best-ever performance of 1.66 V at 2 A cm-2 and 80more » °C, as compared to the published literature. The thin/well-tunable titanium based LGDLs remarkably reduce ohmic and activation losses, and it was found that porosity has a more significant impact on performance than pore size. In addition, an appropriate equivalent electrical circuit model has been established to quantify the effects of pore morphologies. The rapid electrochemical reaction phenomena at the center of the PEMEC are observed by coupling with high-speed and micro-scale visualization systems. Lastly, the observed reactions contribute reasonable and pioneering data that elucidate the effects of porosity and pore size on the PEMEC performance. This study can be a new guide for future research and development towards high-efficiency and low-cost hydrogen energy.« less

  16. Investigation of isochronal annealing on the optical properties of HWCVD amorphous silicon nitride deposited at low temperatures and low gas flow rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, T. F. G.; Jacobs, S.; Cummings, F. R.; Oliphant, C. J.; Malgas, G. F.; Arendse, C. J.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon nitride (a-SiNx:H) is used as anti-reflection coatings in commercial solar cells. A final firing step in the production of micro-crystalline silicon solar cells allows hydrogen effusion from the a-SiNx:H into the solar cell, and contributes to bulk passivation of the grain boundaries. In this study a-SiNx:H deposited in a hot-wire chemical vapour deposition (HWCVD) chamber with reduced gas flow rates and filament temperature compared to traditional deposition regimes, were annealed isochronally. The UV-visible reflection spectra of the annealed material were subjected to the Bruggeman Effective Medium Approximation (BEMA) treatment, in which a theoretical amorphous semiconductor was combined with particle inclusions due to the structural complexities of the material. The extraction of the optical functions and ensuing Wemple-DeDomenici analysis of the wavelength-dependent refractive index allowed for the correlation of the macroscopic optical properties with the changes in the local atomic bonding configuration, involving silicon, nitrogen and hydrogen.

  17. A Possible Organic Contribution to the Low Temperature CO2 Release Seen in Mars Phoenix Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Archer, P. D. Jr.; Lauer, H. V., Jr.; Sutter, B.; Ming, D. W.; Niles, P. B.; Boynton, W. V.

    2012-01-01

    Two of the most important discoveries of the Phoenix Mars Lander were the discovery of approx.0.6% perchlorate [1] and 3-5% carbonate [2] in the soils at the landing site in the martian northern plains. The Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) instrument was one of the tools that made this discovery. After soil samples were delivered to TEGA and transferred into small ovens, the samples could be heated up to approx.1000 C and the gases that evolved during heating were monitored by a mass spectrometer. A CO2 signal was detected at high temperature (approx.750 C) that has been attributed to calcium carbonate decomposition. In addition to this CO2 release, a lower temperature signal was seen. This lower temperature CO2 release was postulated to be one of three things: 1) desorption of CO2, 2) decomposition of a different carbonate mineral, or 3) CO2 released due to organic combustion. Cannon et al. [3] present another novel hypothesis involving the interaction of decomposition products of a perchlorate salt and calcium carbonate.

  18. Determination of gas-discharge plasma parameters in powerful metal halide vapor lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, Krassimir A.; Slaveeva, Stefka I.; Fedchenko, Yulian I.

    2016-01-01

    Powerful metal halide vapor lasers are excited with nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in complex multicomponent gas mixtures. Using a new method, thermal conductivity of various 5- and 6-component gas mixtures is obtained under gas-discharge conditions, which are optimal for laser operation on the corresponding metal atom and ion transitions. Assuming that the gas temperature varies only in the radial direction and using the calculated thermal conductivities, an analytical solution of the steady-state heat conduction equation is found for uniform and radially nonuniform power input in various laser tube constructions. Using the results obtained for time-resolved electron temperature by measurement of electrical discharge characteristics and analytically solving steady-state heat conduction equation for electrons as well, radial distribution of electron temperature is also obtained for the discharge period.

  19. Origin of huge photoluminescence efficiency improvement in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells with low-temperature GaN cap layer grown in N2/H2 mixture gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Yadan; Lu, Taiping; Zhou, Xiaorun; Zhao, Guangzhou; Dong, Hailiang; Jia, Zhigang; Liu, Xuguang; Xu, Bingshe

    2017-06-01

    The nominal internal quantum efficiency of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells significantly increases from 5.6 to 26.8%, as a low-temperature GaN cap layer is grown in N2/H2 mixture gas. Meanwhile, the room-temperature photoluminescence (PL) peak energy shows a merely 73 meV blue shift. On the basis of temperature-dependent PL characteristics analysis, the huge improvement in PL efficiency arises mainly from the “etching effect” of hydrogen, which reduces the defect density and indium segregation at the upper well/barrier interface, and consequently contributes to the decrease in the number of nonradiative recombination centers and the enhancement of carrier localization.

  20. High-quality AlGaN/GaN grown on sapphire by gas-source molecular beam epitaxy using a thin low-temperature AlN layer

    SciTech Connect

    Jurkovic, M.J.; Li, L.K.; Turk, B.; Wang, W.I.; Syed, S.; Simonian, D.; Stormer, H.L.

    2000-07-01

    Growth of high-quality AlGaN/GaN heterostructures on sapphire by ammonia gas-source molecular beam epitaxy is reported. Incorporation of a thin AlN layer grown at low temperature within the GaN buffer is shown to result in enhanced electrical and structural characteristics for subsequently grown heterostructures. AlGaN/GaN structures exhibiting reduced background doping and enhanced Hall mobilities (2100, 10310 and 12200 cm{sup 2}/Vs with carrier sheet densities of 6.1 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2}, and 5.8 x 10{sup 12} cm{sup {minus}2} at 300 K, 77 K, and 0.3 K, respectively) correlate with dislocation filtering in the thin AlN layer. Magnetotransport measurements at 0.3 K reveal well-resolved Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations starting at 3 T.

  1. Isolation and characterization of charge-tagged phenylperoxyl radicals in the gas phase: direct evidence for products and pathways in low temperature benzene oxidation.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Benjamin B; Harman, David G; Kenttämaa, Hilkka I; Trevitt, Adam J; Blanksby, Stephen J

    2012-12-28

    The phenylperoxyl radical has long been accepted as a critical intermediate in the oxidation of benzene and an archetype for arylperoxyl radicals in combustion and atmospheric chemistry. Despite being central to many contemporary mechanisms underpinning these chemistries, reports of the direct detection or isolation of phenylperoxyl radicals are rare and there is little experimental evidence connecting this intermediate with expected product channels. We have prepared and isolated two charge-tagged phenyl radical models in the gas phase [i.e., 4-(N,N,N-trimethylammonium)phenyl radical cation and 4-carboxylatophenyl radical anion] and observed their reactions with dioxygen by ion-trap mass spectrometry. Measured reaction rates show good agreement with prior reports for the neutral system (k(2)[(Me(3)N(+))C(6)H(4)˙ + O(2)] = 2.8 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), Φ = 4.9%; k(2)[((-)O(2)C)C(6)H(4)˙ + O(2)] = 5.4 × 10(-11) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), Φ = 9.2%) and the resulting mass spectra provide unequivocal evidence for the formation of phenylperoxyl radicals. Collisional activation of isolated phenylperoxyl radicals reveals unimolecular decomposition by three pathways: (i) loss of dioxygen to reform the initial phenyl radical; (ii) loss of atomic oxygen yielding a phenoxyl radical; and (iii) ejection of the formyl radical to give cyclopentadienone. Stable isotope labeling confirms these assignments. Quantum chemical calculations for both charge-tagged and neutral phenylperoxyl radicals confirm that loss of formyl radical is accessible both thermodynamically and entropically and competitive with direct loss of both hydrogen atom and carbon dioxide.

  2. Storage of CO2 at low temperature as liquid or solid gas hydrate - Application to the Biscay deep zone in the French EEZ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnol, André; Thinon, Isabelle; Audigane, Pascal; Leynet, Aurélien

    2013-04-01

    Amongst the various CO2 geological storage options currently under consideration, the deep saline aquifers (beyond 800-m depth) were considered to present the most interesting storage capacity due to the density of CO2 in its supercritical state. However, at lower temperature, another form of storage is possible, either in the state of CO2 hydrates or liquid CO2 (1, 2). In Alaska, a first demonstrator showed recently the possibility of exchange of CO2 and CH4 in natural gas hydrates. At higher pressures common in deep-sea sediments, liquid CO2 can be denser than the overlying seawater and therefore be trapped in the marine sediments (2). We explored in this work the storage capacity at the Biscay deep zone in the French Exclusive Economic Zone (EEZ). A local bathymetry of the zone (abyssal plain and continental margin) was used to define a potential interesting zone for the CO2 storage, considering different safety criteria. A sensitivity analysis on the geothermal gradient was carried out using two extreme scenarios (Low and High gradient) based on the available Ocean Drilling Program's data. In both cases, the Negative Buoyancy Zone (NBZ) and the CO2 Hydrate Formation Zone (HFZ) were calculated using the GERG-2008 Equation of State for liquid CO2 and the CSMGem code for CO2 hydrate, respectively. Following this sensitivity analysis, a CO2 injection depth is proposed and the French "deep offshore" storage capacity is quantitatively evaluated and compared to the "onshore" storage capacity in deep saline aquifers. References 1. Le Nindre Y., Allier D., Duchkov A., Altunina L. K., Shvartsev S., Zhelezniak M. and Klerkx J. (2011) Storing CO2 underneath the Siberian Permafrost: A win-win solution for long-term trapping of CO2 and heavy oil upgrading. Energy Procedia4, 5414-5421 2. House K. Z., Schrag D. P., Harvey C. F. and Lackner K. S. (2006) Permanent carbon dioxide storage in deep-sea sediments. PNAS

  3. Quasi-stationary convection in a periodic-pulsed optical discharge in high pressure rare gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimakov, V. P.; Kuznetsov, V. A.; Solovyov, N. G.; Shemyakin, A. N.; Shilov, A. O.; Yakimov, M. Yu

    2017-02-01

    Unusual convection flows were observed in stabilized pre-breakdown phase of the periodic-pulsed optical discharge (POD) called “quiet” POD. The discharge was a relatively weakly glowing plasma filament sustained by focused λ = 1.064 μm laser pulses with repetition rate of fr = 50÷100 kHz at the intensity several times below than that required for the optical breakdown to occur. No strong shock waves or irregular turbulence around the discharge were observed, in contrast to breakdown types of POD. Significant laser beam refraction measured in the beam cross-section behind the discharge zone was explained by the gas heating in the discharge up to 10 kK, providing high gradients of gas density and refraction index. Intense convective flow was detected on the schlieren images as thermal traces of the laser-induced gas streams flowing from the discharge zone, directed mainly normally to the optical axis. Repeated relaxation of the gas expanding after being rapidly heated by the laser pulse is proposed to explain the effect. The periodic-pulsed discharge located in the elongated beam waist generates an anisotropic heated region with gas streams and vortices, which may form the observed regular convective flow at the late stages of expanding.

  4. Initiation of long, free-standing z discharges by CO2 laser gas heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemann, C.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Neff, S.; Knobloch, R.; Birkner, R.; Presura, R.; Hoffmann, D. H. H.; Yu, S. S.; Sharp, W. M.

    2002-01-01

    High current discharge channels can neutralize both current and space charge of very intense ion beams. Therefore, they are considered an interesting solution for final focus and beam transport in a heavy ion beam fusion reactor. At the Gesellschaft für Schwerionenforschung accelerator facility, 50 cm long, free-standing discharge channels were created in a 60 cm diameter metallic chamber. Discharges with currents of 45 kA in 2 to 25 mbar ammonia (NH3) gas are initiated by a CO2 laser pulse along the channel axis before the capacitor bank is triggered. Resonant absorption of the laser, tuned to the v2 vibration of the ammonia molecule, causes strong gas heating. Subsequent expansion and rarefaction of the gas prepare the conditions for a stable discharge to fulfill the requirements for ion beam transport. The influence of an electric prepulse on the high current discharge was investigated. This article describes the laser-gas interaction and the discharge initiation mechanism. We found that channels are magnetohydrodynamic stable up to currents of 45 kA, measured by fast shutter and streak imaging techniques. The rarefaction of the laser heated gas is studied by means of a one-dimensional Lagrangian fluid code (CYCLOPS) and is identified as the dominant initiation mechanism of the discharge.

  5. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, Scott R.; Christophorou, Loucas G.

    1990-01-01

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue of the combined physio-electric properties of the mixture components.

  6. Gas-discharge probe microscopy of water-carrying channels in wood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanov-Omskii, V. I.; Ivanova, E. I.

    2012-04-01

    We have used a gas-discharge imaging technique to study the water transport channels (tracheids) in wood samples. Results obtained for the samples of bitch and aspen show features of this variant of the probe microscopy and show its additional possibilities as compared to optical microscopy. It is concluded that gas-discharge probe microscopy can be used for additional diagnostics of the structure of plant and animal tissues.

  7. Rice husk ash/calcium oxide/ceria sorbent for simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide and nitric oxide from flue gas at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlan, I.; Lee, K.T.; Kamaruddin, A.H.; Mohamed, A.R.

    2009-06-15

    The reduction of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) emissions has become an isssue of great importance to government regulatory agencies and general public due to their negative effect towards the environment and human health. In this work, the simultaneous removal of sulfur dioxide (SO{sub 2}) and nitric oxide (NO) from simulated flue gas was investigated in a fixed-bed reactor using rice husk ash (RHA)/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. Attention was focused on the major reactor operation parameters affecting sorption capacity of RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent, which include feed concentration of SO{sub 2} and NO, relative humidity (RH), operating temperature and space velocity (GHSV). This is because such information is unavailable for RHA-based sorbent and the effects of these parameters reported in the literature are also not reliable. Enhancement effect of NO on removal of SO{sub 2} was observed and the presence of SO{sub 2} was essential to the removal of NO. However, at a high level of SO{sub 2}/NO concentration, competition in the sorption of NO and SO{sub 2} on the sorbent active sites might have occurred. RH was found to significantly enhance the SO{sub 2} sorption of the RHA/CaO/CeO{sub 2} sorbent. By contrast, NO sorption capacity decreases when RH was further introduced, as it was not easy to sorb NO in the presence of water. Apart from that, the results also shows that there was a threshold value for the RH to ensure higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal and this value was observed at 50% RH. Higher operating temperatures were favored for SO{sub 2} and NO removal. Nevertheless, beyond 150 degrees C the SO{sub 2} removal was found to decrease. On the other hand, a lower space velocity resulted in a higher SO{sub 2} and NO removal.

  8. Temporally, spatially, and spectrally resolved barrier discharge produced in trapped helium gas at atmospheric pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Chiper, Alina Silvia; Popa, Gheorghe

    2013-06-07

    Experimental study was made on induced effects by trapped helium gas in the pulsed positive dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) operating in symmetrical electrode configuration at atmospheric pressure. Using fast photography technique and electrical measurements, the differences in the discharge regimes between the stationary and the flowing helium are investigated. It was shown experimentally that the trapped gas atmosphere (TGA) has notable impact on the barrier discharge regime compared with the influence of the flowing gas atmosphere. According to our experimental results, the DBD discharge produced in trapped helium gas can be categorized as a multi-glow (pseudo-glow) discharge, each discharge working in the sub-normal glow regime. This conclusion is made by considering the duration of current pulse (few {mu}s), their maximum values (tens of mA), the presence of negative slope on the voltage-current characteristic, and the spatio-temporal evolution of the most representative excited species in the discharge gap. The paper focuses on the space-time distribution of the active species with a view to better understand the pseudo-glow discharge mechanism. The physical basis for these effects was suggested. A transition to filamentary discharge is suppressed in TGA mode due to the formation of supplementary source of seed electrons by surface processes (by desorption of electrons due to vibrationally excited nitrogen molecules, originated from barriers surfaces) rather than volume processes (by enhanced Penning ionisation). Finally, we show that the pseudo-glow discharge can be generated by working gas trapping only; maintaining unchanged all the electrical and constructive parameters.

  9. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  10. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  11. Low temperature cross linking polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A polyimide is formed by cross linking a prepolymer formed by reacting a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end-capping unit. By providing an end-capping unit, the prepolymer is curable at a relatively low temperature of about 175 to 245 C.

  12. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  13. Transformations of dust structures in glow DC discharge in neon: effect of gas temperature and discharge current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polyakov, D. N.; Shumova, V. V.; Vasilyak, L. M.

    2017-08-01

    The dependence of the shape of the dust structures on discharge current and pressure in neon glow DC discharge at temperatures 77 K and 295 К has been studied experimentally. It was found that when the discharge current was increased, the radial size of the dust cloud increased, and the axial size decreased. It was found that at 295 К the dust clouds were formed by individual dust particles, while at 77 K they consisted of a mixture of dust particles and simplest threadlike clusters formed from dust particles. The decrease of gas pressure led to increase in distances between the dust particles and clusters, and reduced the dynamic stability of the dust particles and clusters. At 295 К an increase of the discharge current resulted in the formation of voids in dust structures, while at 77 K the formation of the dust structures with voids was not observed even at maximum discharge currents. The formation of clusters at cryogenic cooling can be interpreted as ‘condensation’ and ‘deposition’ of dust particles.

  14. Study of the magnetomechanical effect in a gas discharge with the use of dust particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzlieva, E. S.; Karasev, V. Yu.; Éikhval'D, A. I.

    2002-06-01

    This paper reports on a test using laser Doppler anemometry of the hypothesis that the magnetomechanical effect involves rotation of the plasma of the positive gas-discharge column in an axial magnetic field. This was done by measuring the velocities of the dust macroparticles dropping in a vertical discharge tube. No rotation of the gas was revealed at a sensitivity of 40 cm/s. The rotation of dust particles suspended in striations and in the trap near the narrowed region of the discharge in a magnetic field was observed. The possible connection of this rotation with the magnetomechanical effect is discussed.

  15. An evidence of period doubling bifurcation in a dc driven semiconductor-gas discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansuroglu, D.; Uzun-Kaymak, I. U.; Rafatov, I.

    2017-05-01

    We present an experimental study of nonlinearity observed in a dc driven semiconductor-gas discharge system. The plasma glow is generated using planar electrodes in a vacuum chamber filled with nitrogen gas at partial atmospheric pressure. The discharge behaves oscillatory in time, showing single and sometimes multiple periodicities in plasma current and voltage measurements. Harmonic frequency generations and period doubling cascade are investigated experimentally by varying the applied voltage. To identify the stability condition, numerical simulations are conducted using COMSOL® Multiphysics software. The discharge is modeled as a one dimensional plasma slab. Numerical results are in good agreement with the experimental measurements.

  16. Decomposition of phenol by hybrid gas/liquid electrical discharge reactors with zeolite catalysts.

    PubMed

    Kusić, Hrvoje; Koprivanac, Natalija; Locke, Bruce R

    2005-10-17

    Application of hybrid gas/liquid electrical discharge reactors and a liquid phase direct electrical discharge reactor for degradation of phenol in the presence and absence of zeolites have been investigated. Hybrid gas/liquid electrical discharges involve simultaneous high voltage electrical discharges in water and in the gas phase above the water surface leading to the additional OH radicals in the liquid phase and ozone formation in the gas phase with subsequent dissolution into the liquid. The role of applied zeolites, namely NH4ZSM5, FeZSM5 and HY, were also studied. Phenol degradation and production of primary phenol by-products, catechol and hydroquinone, during the treatment were monitored by HPLC measurements. The highest phenol removal results, 89.4-93.6%, were achieved by electrical discharge in combination with FeZSM5 in all three configurations of corona reactors. These results indicate that the Fenton reaction has significant influence on overall phenol removal efficiency in the electrical discharge/FeZSM5 system due to the additional OH radical formation from hydrogen peroxide generated by the water phase discharge.

  17. Polywater: an attempt at synthesis in a gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Leiga, A G; Vance, D W; Ward, A T

    1970-04-03

    An attempt to produce polywater in a corona discharge in moist air was unsuccessful. However, the major product produced, nitric acid, has a midrange infrared spectrum which is strikingly similar to that reported for polywater. The Raman spectrum offers a better means of distinguishing between nitric acid and polywater than the infrared spectrum does.

  18. Impact of gas flow rate on breakdown of filamentary dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höft, H.; Becker, M. M.; Kettlitz, M.

    2016-03-01

    The influence of gas flow rate on breakdown properties and stability of pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in a single filament arrangement using a gas mixture of 0.1 vol. % O2 in N2 at atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of electrical and optical diagnostics, accompanied by fluid dynamics and electrostatics simulations. A higher flow rate perpendicular to the electrode symmetry axis resulted in an increased breakdown voltage and DBD current maximum, a higher discharge inception jitter, and a larger emission diameter of the discharge channel. In addition, a shift of the filament position for low gas flow rates with respect to the electrode symmetry axis was observed. These effects can be explained by the change of the residence time of charge carriers in the discharge region—i.e., the volume pre-ionization—for changed flow conditions due to the convective transport of particles out of the center of the gap.

  19. Impact of gas flow rate on breakdown of filamentary dielectric barrier discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Höft, H. Becker, M. M.; Kettlitz, M.

    2016-03-15

    The influence of gas flow rate on breakdown properties and stability of pulsed dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in a single filament arrangement using a gas mixture of 0.1 vol. % O{sub 2} in N{sub 2} at atmospheric pressure was investigated by means of electrical and optical diagnostics, accompanied by fluid dynamics and electrostatics simulations. A higher flow rate perpendicular to the electrode symmetry axis resulted in an increased breakdown voltage and DBD current maximum, a higher discharge inception jitter, and a larger emission diameter of the discharge channel. In addition, a shift of the filament position for low gas flow rates with respect to the electrode symmetry axis was observed. These effects can be explained by the change of the residence time of charge carriers in the discharge region—i.e., the volume pre-ionization—for changed flow conditions due to the convective transport of particles out of the center of the gap.

  20. Initiation of long, free-standing Z-discharges by CO2 laser gas heating

    SciTech Connect

    Nieman, C.; Tauschwitz, A.; Penache, D.; Neff, S.; Knobloch, R.; Birkner, R.; Presura, R.; Hoffmann, D.H.H.; Yu, S.S.; Sharp, W.M.

    2004-04-19

    High current discharge channels can neutralize both current and space charge of very intense ion beams. Therefore they are considered as an interesting alternative for the final focus and beam transport in a heavy ion beam fusion reactor. At the GSI accelerator facility, 50 cm long, stable, free-standing discharge channels with currents in excess of 40 kA in 2 to 25 mbar ammonia (NH{sub 3}) gas are investigated for heavy ion beam transport studies. The discharges are initiated by a CO{sub 2} laser pulse along the channel axis before the discharge is triggered. Resonant absorption of the laser, tuned to the {nu}{sub 2} vibration of the ammonia molecule, causes strong gas heating. Subsequent expansion and rarefaction of the gas prepare the conditions for a stable discharge to fulfill the requirements for ion beam transport. This paper describes the laser-gas interaction and the discharge initiation mechanism. We report on the channel stability and evolution, measured by fast shutter and streak imaging techniques. The rarefaction of the laser heated gas is studied by means of a hydrocode simulation.

  1. The THS experiment: probing Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen; Beauchamp, Jack L; Salama, Farid

    2014-06-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, a complex chemistry between N2 and CH4 occurs at temperatures lower than 200K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature in order to help interpret Cassini’s observational data. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature 150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge 200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.Here we present the complementary results of two studies of the gas and solid phase. A Mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS experiment is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps as well as specific chemical pathways of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. The more complex chemistry, observed in the gas phase when adding trace elements to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, has also been confirmed by an extensive study of the solid phase products: Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that aggregates produced in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixtures (up to 5 μm in diameter) are much larger than those produced in N2-CH4 mixtures (0.1-0.5 μm), and Nuclear Magnetic Resonance results support a growth evolution of the chemistry when adding acetylene to the N2-CH4 mixture, resulting in the production of more complex hydrogen bonds than with a simple N2-CH4 mixture

  2. Low temperature electrolytes for lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhovak, Denise R.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1991-01-01

    Combinations of methyl formate (MF) and propylene carbonate (PC) using salt concentrations of 0.6 to 2.4 M, with lithium hexafluoroarsenate and lithium tetrafluoroborate in a five to one molar ratio, were investigated as electrolytes in lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries. The composition of the electrolyte affected cell performance at low temperature, self-discharge and abuse resistance as characterized by short circuit and crush testing. The electrolyte that provided the best combination of good low temperature performance, low cell self-discharge and abuse resistance was 0.6 M salt in 10:90 PC/MF.

  3. Low temperature electrolytes for lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tuhovak, Denise R.; Takeuchi, Esther S.

    1991-01-01

    Combinations of methyl formate (MF) and propylene carbonate (PC) using salt concentrations of 0.6 to 2.4 M, with lithium hexafluoroarsenate and lithium tetrafluoroborate in a five to one molar ratio, were investigated as electrolytes in lithium/silver vanadium oxide batteries. The composition of the electrolyte affected cell performance at low temperature, self-discharge and abuse resistance as characterized by short circuit and crush testing. The electrolyte that provided the best combination of good low temperature performance, low cell self-discharge and abuse resistance was 0.6 M salt in 10:90 PC/MF.

  4. Choosing a low-temperature sterilization technology.

    PubMed

    1999-11-01

    Low-temperature sterilization technologies are used instead of steam for sterilizing heat-sensitive or moisture-intolerant surgical equipment and supplies. In this Guidance Article, we describe several common alternatives, but we focus specifically on the two that have generated the most interest in recent years: ethylene oxide (EtO) and gas plasma sterilization. Ethylene oxide has been used as a low-temperature sterilization technology since the 1950s. Although EtO can be used safely, exposure to this gas is known to be a health hazard, and the emissions from certain EtO sterilizers are known to pollute the atmosphere. For these reasons, the use of EtO is regulated--more strictly in some regions than in others--and many healthcare facilities have decided to investigate alternative technologies. Gas plasma sterilization emerged in the 1990s as one promising alternative. This method appears to pose fewer health and environmental risks, and it offers faster turnaround times. However, this technology also has some limitations. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of both methods, along with the factors to consider when selecting from among these alternatives, in this Guidance Article.

  5. Plasma Physics Issues in Gas Discharge Laser Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    34 Carbon dioxide electric Flow. New York: Ronald Press. 1953. discharge laser kinetics handbook." Avco Everett Res. Lab.. Apr. 1975: [106] M. A...the the 275-306 nm range yielded as much as h W of CW power. 4 B. Molecular Lasers s The introduction of new UV and VUV molecular lasers over 0( the...permission). in pumping molecular lasers by electron impact is the H, VUV laser experiments reported by Benerofe et. al. [291. Molecular C. Future

  6. Waveguide CO2 laser gain - Dependence on gas kinetic and discharge properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1976-01-01

    A simple rate-equation approach is used to examine the gas-kinetic and discharge properties of waveguide CO2 lasers. The dependence of the population inversion and laser small-signal gain on gas pressure, gas mixture, pumping rate (discharge current), tube bore diameter, and wall temperature is calculated along with the dependence of laser tunability on the gas-kinetic properties and cavity losses. It is found that for low-loss cavities, the laser tunability may substantially exceed the molecular full width at half-maximum. Furthermore, the more helium-rich gas mixtures give greater tunability when cavity losses are small, and less tunability when cavity losses are large. By contrast with conventional lasers, the waveguide-laser transition is homogeneously broadened. Thus, the dependence of gain on gas pressure and other kinetic properties differs substantially from that predicted by scaling results from conventional low-pressure lasers.

  7. Ionometric determination of fluorides at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyukova, I.S.; Ennan, A.A.; Dzerzhko, E.K.; Leivikova, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    A method for determining fluoride ions in solution at low temperatures using a solid-contact fluorine-selective electrode (FSE) has been developed. The effect of temperature (60 to -15{degrees}C) on the calibration slope, potential equilibrium time, and operational stability is studied; the effect of an organic additive (cryoprotector) on the calibration slope is also studied. The temperature relationships obtained for the solid-contact FSEs allow appropriate corrections to be applied to the operational algorithm of the {open_quotes}Ftoring{close_quotes} hand-held semiautomatic HF gas analyzer for the operational temperature range of -16 to 60{degrees}C.

  8. Effect of corona discharge on the gas composition of the sample flow in a Gas Particle Partitioner.

    PubMed

    Asbach, Christof; Kuhlbusch, Thomas A J; Fissan, Heinz

    2005-09-01

    A Gas Particle Partitioner (GPP) that allows highly efficient separation of gas and particles with no effect on the thermodynamic conditions and substantially no change of the gas composition has been developed. The GPP is a coaxial arrangement with inner and outer electrodes and utilizes a corona discharge to electrically charge the particles and a strong electric field to remove them from the sample flow. Several measures were taken to avoid an influence of the corona discharge on the gas composition. The GPP can be applied for various applications. This paper focuses on the use of the GPP as a pre-filter for gas analyzers, where zero pressure drop and a minimization of the influence of the corona discharge on the gas composition are the main objective. Due to its design, the GPP introduces no changes to the thermodynamic conditions. However, corona discharge is known to produce significant amounts of ozone and oxides of nitrogen. The effect of the corona on the gas composition of the sample flow was determined under various conditions. The gas concentrations strongly depended on several aspects, such as material and diameter of the corona wire and polarity of the corona voltage. Due to the measures taken to minimize an effect on the gas composition, the concentrations of these gases could effectively be reduced. Along with the maximum gas-particle separation efficiency of near 100%, the additional O3 concentration was 42 ppbV and the additional NO2 concentration 15 ppbV. If an efficiency of 95% is acceptable, the added concentrations can be as low as 2.5 ppbV (O3) and 0.5 ppbV (NO2), respectively.

  9. Low temperature selective absorber research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, S. A.; Silberglitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    Research carried out since 1979 on selective absorbers is surveyed, with particular attention given to the low-temperature coatings seen as promising for flat plate and evacuated tube applications. The most thoroughly investigated absorber is black chrome, which is highly selective and is the most durable low-temperature absorber. It is believed that other materials, because of their low cost and lower content of strategic materials, may eventually supplant black chrome. Among these candidates are chemically converted black nickel; anodically oxidized nickel, zinc, and copper composites; and nickel or other low-cost multilayer coatings. In reviewing medium and high-temperature research, black chrome, multilayer coatings and black cobalt are seen as best medium-temperature candidates. For high temperatures, an Al2O3/Pt-Al203 multilayer composite or the zirconium diboride coating is preferred.

  10. Reinforced ploymers at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, G.

    1982-01-01

    The low electrical and thermal conductivity, high specific strength, and excellent fatigue behavior of fiber-reinforced composites make them a necessary supplement and sometimes a favored alternative to metals for lowtemperature technology. This survey details these features and also examines the drawbacks of high brittleness and low interlaminar shear strength of such polymers as fiberglass, carbon-fiber, and Kevlar-fiber expoxies. Stress-strain curves, tables which list the stiffness, strength, fatigue, thermal-insular, electrical-insular, thermal contraction and workability properties at low temperatures, and microphotographs of those composites are presented. Among the results are the findings that carbon-fiber composites exhibit a very high mechanical stiffness or strength, comparable to or higher than that of steel, and that at low temperatures carbon-fiber composites have a much higher insulation capacity than steel. A combination of strong carbon-fibers and tough glass fibers results in a superior composite than either fiber alone.

  11. Procees for low temperature carbonization of hydrogenation residues

    SciTech Connect

    Escher, G.; Holighaus, R.; Wenning, H. P.

    1985-04-23

    The residues obtained in the hydrogenation of oil, especially heavy oil, or of coal are subjected to low temperature carbonization in a drum, preferably a rotary drum, at temperatures between approximately 400/sup 0/ C. and approximately 600/sup 0/ C., by means of a carbonization gas after the separation of the condensable portions and heating to temperatures between approximately 600/sup 0/ C. and approximately 950/sup 0/ C. which is introduced into the low temperature carbonization drum. The gas is heated to tepmeratures between approximately 600/sup 0/ C. and approximately 950/sup 0/ C. indirectly by flue gases arising from the combustion of oil or gas, for example, of excess carbonization gas. The residue to be carbonized at low temperature is introduced into the hot gas in a finely dispersed state and preferably atomized.

  12. PREFACE: VII Conference on Low Temperature Plasma in the Processes of Functional Coating Preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nail, Kashapov

    2016-01-01

    The VII All-Russian (with international participation) Scientific Technical Conference "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings" took place from 4-7 November 2015 at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and the Kazan Federal University. The conference was attended by over 150 people from Russia and abroad. The participants proposed a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and experimental aspects of the problems of the physics of low-temperature plasma. We heard the reports of experts from leading universities and research organizations in the field of plasma physics: Moscow State University, St. Petersburg State University, MEPhI, Tomsk Polytechnic University, Institute of High Current Electronics SB RAS, etc. A series of works were devoted to the study of thin films obtained by low-temperature plasma. This year, work dedicated to the related field of heat mass transfer in multiphase media and low-temperature plasma was also presented. Of special interest were reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electrodes and the study of dusty plasmas. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., professor (Kazan Federal University)

  13. PREFACE: VI Scientific Technical Conference on "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2014-11-01

    The VI Republican Scientific Technical Conference "Low-temperature plasma during the deposition of functional coatings" took place from 4 to 7 November 2014 at the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan and the Kazan Federal University. The conference was chaired by a Member of the Academy of Sciences of the Republic of Tatarstan Nail Kashapov -Professor, Doctor of Technical Sciences- a member of the Scientific and Technical Council of the Ministry of Economy of the Republic of Tatarstan. At the conference, the participants discussed a wide range of issues affecting the theoretical and computational aspects of research problems in the physics and technology of low-temperature plasma. A series of works were devoted to the study of thin films obtained by low-temperature plasma. This year work dedicated to the related field of heat mass transfer in multiphase media and low-temperature plasma was also presented. Of special interest were reports on the exploration of gas discharges with liquid electrolytic electrotrodes and the study of dusty plasmas. Kashapov Nail, D.Sc., Professor (Kazan Federal University)

  14. Toxic Gas Removal by Dielectric Discharge with Corona Effect

    SciTech Connect

    Moreno, H.; Pacheco, M.; Mercado, A.; Cruz, A.; Pacheco, J.; Yousfi, M.; Eichwald, O.; Benhenni, M.

    2006-12-04

    In this work, a theoretical and experimental study on SO2 and NOx removal by non-thermal plasma technology, more specifically a dielectric barrier (DBD) discharge combined with the Corona effect, is presented. Results obtained from a theoretical study describe the chemical kinetic model of SO2 and NOx removal processes; the effect of OH radicals in removal of both gases is noteworthy. Experimental results of de-SO2 process are reported. Also, optical emission spectroscopy study was applied on some atomic helium lines to obtain temperature of electrons in the non-thermal plasma.

  15. Estimating the extreme low-temperature event using nonparametric methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Silva, Anisha

    This thesis presents a new method of estimating the one-in-N low temperature threshold using a non-parametric statistical method called kernel density estimation applied to daily average wind-adjusted temperatures. We apply our One-in-N Algorithm to local gas distribution companies (LDCs), as they have to forecast the daily natural gas needs of their consumers. In winter, demand for natural gas is high. Extreme low temperature events are not directly related to an LDCs gas demand forecasting, but knowledge of extreme low temperatures is important to ensure that an LDC has enough capacity to meet customer demands when extreme low temperatures are experienced. We present a detailed explanation of our One-in-N Algorithm and compare it to the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution. We show that our One-in-N Algorithm estimates the one-in- N low temperature threshold more accurately than the methods using the generalized extreme value distribution, the normal distribution, and the variance-weighted composite distribution according to root mean square error (RMSE) measure at a 5% level of significance. The One-in- N Algorithm is tested by counting the number of times the daily average wind-adjusted temperature is less than or equal to the one-in- N low temperature threshold.

  16. Effect of duty-cycles on the air plasma gas-phase of dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barni, R.; Biganzoli, I.; Dell'Orto, E. C.; Riccardi, C.

    2015-10-01

    An experimental investigation concerning the effects of a duty-cycle in the supply of a dielectric barrier discharge in atmospheric pressure air has been performed. Electrical characteristics of the discharge have been measured, focusing mainly on the statistical properties of the current filaments and on dielectric surface charging, both affected by the frequent repetition of breakdown imposed by the duty-cycle. Information on the gas-phase composition was gathered too. In particular, a strong enhancement in the ozone formation rate is observed when suitable long pauses separate the active discharge phases. A simulation of the chemical kinetics in the gas-phase, based on a simplified discharge modeling, is briefly described in order to shed light on the observed increase in ozone production. The effect of a duty-cycle on surface modification of polymeric films in order to increase their wettability has been investigated too.

  17. Stratification of the plasma column in transverse nanosecond gas discharges with a hollow cathode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashurbekov, N. A.; Iminov, K. O.

    2015-10-01

    Electric and optical characteristics and the structure of spatial distribution of optical radiation from a transverse nanosecond discharge with a hollow cathode in inert gases are systematically studied experimentally. It is found that for moderate working gas pressures in nanosecond discharges with extended electrodes, a periodic plasma structure appears in the form of standing strata. The strata formation boundaries and the critical values of the discharge voltage and current are determined from the gas pressure in helium, neon, and argon under experimental conditions. It is found that the most probable mechanisms of strata formation are the direct ionization of atoms by an electron impact and electron drift in an electric field. The smearing of the plasma structure upon an increase in the voltage applied to electrodes is explained by the emergence of accelerated electrons in the discharge gap.

  18. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... system; (b) The pressurization medium is either the cargo vapor or a nonflammable, nontoxic gas inert to the cargo; and (c) The pressurizing line has: (1) A pressure reducing valve whose setting does not exceed 90% of the tank's relief valve setting and a manual control valve between the pressure reducing...

  19. 46 CFR 153.964 - Discharge by gas pressurization.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... system; (b) The pressurization medium is either the cargo vapor or a nonflammable, nontoxic gas inert to the cargo; and (c) The pressurizing line has: (1) A pressure reducing valve whose setting does not exceed 90% of the tank's relief valve setting and a manual control valve between the pressure reducing...

  20. Zero Discharge Water Management for Horizontal Shale Gas Well Development

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Ziemkiewicz; Jennifer Hause; Raymond Lovett; David Locke Harry Johnson; Doug Patchen

    2012-03-31

    Hydraulic fracturing technology (fracking), coupled with horizontal drilling, has facilitated exploitation of huge natural gas (gas) reserves in the Devonian-age Marcellus Shale Formation (Marcellus) of the Appalachian Basin. The most-efficient technique for stimulating Marcellus gas production involves hydraulic fracturing (injection of a water-based fluid and sand mixture) along a horizontal well bore to create a series of hydraulic fractures in the Marcellus. The hydraulic fractures free the shale-trapped gas, allowing it to flow to the well bore where it is conveyed to pipelines for transport and distribution. The hydraulic fracturing process has two significant effects on the local environment. First, water withdrawals from local sources compete with the water requirements of ecosystems, domestic and recreational users, and/or agricultural and industrial uses. Second, when the injection phase is over, 10 to 30% of the injected water returns to the surface. This water consists of flowback, which occurs between the completion of fracturing and gas production, and produced water, which occurs during gas production. Collectively referred to as returned frac water (RFW), it is highly saline with varying amounts of organic contamination. It can be disposed of, either by injection into an approved underground injection well, or treated to remove contaminants so that the water meets the requirements of either surface release or recycle use. Depending on the characteristics of the RFW and the availability of satisfactory disposal alternatives, disposal can impose serious costs to the operator. In any case, large quantities of water must be transported to and from well locations, contributing to wear and tear on local roadways that were not designed to handle the heavy loads and increased traffic. The search for a way to mitigate the situation and improve the overall efficiency of shale gas production suggested a treatment method that would allow RFW to be used as make

  1. Degradation of Microcystin-LR by Gas-Liquid Interfacial Discharge Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Qing; Zhang, Yi; Wu, Kaibin

    2013-12-01

    In this study, we report on the degradation of microcystin-LR (MC-LR) by gas-liquid interfacial discharge plasma. The influences of operation parameters such as average input voltage, electrode distance and gas flow rate are investigated. Experimental results indicate that the input voltage and gas flow rate have positive influences on MC-LR degradation, while the electrode distance has a negative one. After 6 min discharge with 25 kV average input voltage and 60 L/h air aeration, the degradation rate of MC-LR achieves 75.3%. H2O2 and O3 generated by discharge both in distilled water and MC-LR solution are measured. Moreover, an emission spectroscopy is used as an indicator of the processes that take place on the gas-liquid boundary and inside plasma. Varied types of radicals (O, ·OH, CO, O3, etc.) are proved to be present in the gas phase during gas-liquid interfacial discharge.

  2. Observations of a helium-air gas-confined barrier discharge operated in diffuse mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqun; Dong, Xi; Mao, Wenhao; Yue, Yuanfu; Jiang, Jun; Zhang, Chaohai; Lu, Xinpei

    2017-08-01

    With ambient air instead of solid dielectric operating as the insulating layer, a diffuse helium/air gas-confined barrier discharge with a coaxial jet configuration is demonstrated for the first time. The effects of the helium gas flow rate, the diameter, and the vertical position of the helium gas flow on the breakdown characteristics of the diffuse mode are investigated. As the applied voltage increases, a diffuse plasma layer is first ignited within the helium gas column followed by a typical filamentary discharge bridging the whole gap. With the replacement of ambient air by N2 or O2 gas, the diffuse mode can be achieved with relatively lower breakdown voltage in the case of N2 gas while it is not observable in the case of O2 gas. The dynamics of the diffuse discharge show that the plasma front crosses the helium gas column vertically at an average velocity of ˜104 m/s, and then splits into two horizontally counter-propagating plasma fronts with the dark channel left behind.

  3. Characteristics of the effect of low-current gas discharge on a strong shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapushkina, T. A.; Erofeev, A. V.

    2017-03-01

    The effect of nonequilibrium plasma medium created by low-current gas discharge on a shock wave (Mach number M = 6.8) has been investigated. The shock wave is generated in a shock tube with a circular cross section and then passes through the area of the effect in the working chamber having a square cross section. The gas discharge is ignited in the area of the effect before the arrival of the shock wave by applying voltage to special pin electrodes mounted in the upper and lower walls of the working chamber. In the experiment, the phenomenon of broadening of the shock wave and an increase of its propagation velocity when passing through the region of nonequilibrium gas-discharge plasma was discovered.

  4. Investigation Of The High-Voltage Discharge On The Surface Of Gas-Liquid System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen-Kuok, Shi; Morgunov, Aleksandr; Malakhov, Yury; Korotkikh, Ivan

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes an experimental setup for study of physical processes in the high-voltage discharge on the surface of gas-liquid system at atmospheric pressure. Measurements of electrical and optical characteristics of the high-voltage discharge in gas, at the surface of the gas-liquid system and in the electrolyte are obtained. The parameters of the high-voltage discharge and the conditions for its stable operation are presented. Investigations with various electrolytes and cathode assemblies of various materials and sizes were carried out. The installation can be used for the processing and recycling of industrial and chemical liquid waste. Professor of Laboratory of Plasma Physics, National Research University MPEI, Krasnokazarmennya Str.14, 111250, Moscow, Russia.

  5. Study of a DC gas discharge with a copper cathode in a water flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazmeev, G. Kh.; Timerkaev, B. A.; Tazmeev, Kh. K.

    2017-07-01

    A dc gas discharge between copper electrodes in the current range of 5-20 A was studied experimentally. The discharge gap length was varied within 45-70 mm. The cathode was a 10-mm-diameter rod placed in the water flowing out from a dielectric tube. Three discharge configurations differing in the position of the cathode upper end with respect to the water surface were considered: (i) above water; (ii) flush with the water surface, and (iii) under water. The electric and optical characteristics of the discharge in the second configuration were studied in more detail. It is established that the discharge properties are similar to those of an electric arc. Considerable cathode erosion was observed in the third configuration. It is revealed that fine-dispersed copper grains form in the course of erosion.

  6. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-05-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  7. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  8. Rapid Decomposition of Cellulose Dissolved in Ionic Liquid Using Gas-Liquid Interface Discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furukawa, Shoichiro; Inoue, Nobuhiro; Ishioka, Toshio; Furuya, Kenji; Harata, Akira

    2012-07-01

    Cellulose was dissolved at 3 wt % in 15 mL of 1-allyl-3-methylimidazolium chloride ([Amim]Cl) together with 2 wt % water, and then gas-liquid interface discharge was carried out at 20 W for 200 s. As a result, 7.6% of initially dissolved cellulose decomposed and 3.9% of initially dissolved cellulose changed into reducing sugar. Adding a small amount of water to the solution was essential for the decomposition of cellulose. [Amim]Cl was stable against the discharge, as determined from the NMR signals measured before and after the discharge.

  9. Electron density measurements in a photoinitiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited laser gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seguin, V. A.; Seguin, H. J. J.; Capjack, C. E.; Nikumb, S. K.

    1986-11-01

    Measurements of the electron density within a photo-initiated, impulse-enhanced, electrically excited (PIE) laser gas discharge are presented. Ion current measurements were made using a single Langmuir electrostatic probe positioned within the laser discharge volume. Calculations of the electron density were made utilizing a thick-sheath analysis. The results indicate that the electron density increases by two orders of magnitude as the pulser power level is increased. In addition, the electron density was observed to decrease markedly as the dc discharge current was increased.

  10. Aerodynamic Stabilization of an Electrical Discharge for Gas Lasers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-09-01

    the cavity. A hermetical seal obviates using makeup gases and improves system efficiency. The NASA system has only one heat exchanger. Because of the...17 3. The quantities ao and Is as a function of the total gas pressure ... ........ . .... .... .......... 21 4. Sealed or low flow CO 2 laser...21, which are optimum for C02-N2-He lasers. The apparatus used was a sealed or low flow laser (Fig. 4) capable of producing approximately 4W of

  11. Effects of Gas Flow Rate on the Discharge Characteristics of a DC Excited Plasma Jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xuechen; Jia, Pengying; Di, Cong; Bao, Wenting; Zhang, Chunyan

    2015-09-01

    A direct current (DC) source excited plasma jet consisting of a hollow needle anode and a plate cathode has been developed to form a diffuse discharge plume in ambient air with flowing argon as the working gas. Using optical and electrical methods, the discharge characteristics are investigated for the diffuse plasma plume. Results indicate that the discharge has a pulse characteristic, under the excitation of a DC voltage. The discharge pulse corresponds to the propagation process of a plasma bullet travelling from the anode to the cathode. It is found that, with an increment of the gas flow rate, both the discharge plume length and the current peak value of the pulsed discharge decrease in the laminar flow mode, reach their minima at about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly increase in the turbulent mode. However, the frequency of the pulsed discharge increases in the laminar mode with increasing the argon flow rate until the argon flow rate equals to about 1.5 L/min, and then slightly decreases in the turbulent mode. supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 10805013, 11375051), Funds for Distinguished Young Scientists of Hebei Province, China (No. A2012201045), Department of Education for Outstanding Youth Project of China (No. Y2011120), and Youth Project of Hebei University of China (No. 2011Q14)

  12. Ultra-low temperature MAS-DNP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daniel; Bouleau, Eric; Saint-Bonnet, Pierre; Hediger, Sabine; De Paëpe, Gaël

    2016-03-01

    Since the infancy of NMR spectroscopy, sensitivity and resolution have been the limiting factors of the technique. Regular essential developments on this front have led to the widely applicable, versatile, and powerful spectroscopy that we know today. However, the Holy Grail of ultimate sensitivity and resolution is not yet reached, and technical improvements are still ongoing. Hence, high-field dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) making use of high-frequency, high-power microwave irradiation of electron spins has become very promising in combination with magic angle sample spinning (MAS) solid-state NMR experiments. This is because it leads to a transfer of the much larger polarization of these electron spins under suitable irradiation to surrounding nuclei, greatly increasing NMR sensitivity. Currently, this boom in MAS-DNP is mainly performed at minimum sample temperatures of about 100 K, using cold nitrogen gas to pneumatically spin and cool the sample. This Perspective deals with the desire to improve further the sensitivity and resolution by providing "ultra"-low temperatures for MAS-DNP, using cryogenic helium gas. Different designs on how this technological challenge has been overcome are described. It is shown that stable and fast spinning can be attained for sample temperatures down to 30 K using a large cryostat developed in our laboratory. Using this cryostat to cool a closed-loop of helium gas brings the additional advantage of sample spinning frequencies that can greatly surpass those achievable with nitrogen gas, due to the differing fluidic properties of these two gases. It is shown that using ultra-low temperatures for MAS-DNP results in substantial experimental sensitivity enhancements and according time-savings. Access to this temperature range is demonstrated to be both viable and highly pertinent.

  13. Highly active Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction: Effects of the carbide metal/carbon ratio on the catalyst performance

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, José A.; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Gutierrez, Ramón A.

    2016-09-20

    We present that Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC(001) are excellent catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2) reaction. They exhibit high-activity, stability and selectivity. The highest catalytic activities are seen for small coverages of Pt on the carbide substrates. Synergistic effects at the metal-carbide interface produce an enhancement in chemical activity with respect to pure Pt, MoC and TiC. A clear correlation is found between the ability of the Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC(001) surfaces to partially dissociate water and their catalytic activity for the WGS reaction. Finally, an overall comparison of the results for Pt/MoC and Pt/Mo2C(001) indicates that the metal/carbon ratio in the carbide support can have a strong influence in the stability and selectivity of WGS catalysts and is a parameter that must be taken into consideration when designing these systems.

  14. Highly active Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift reaction: Effects of the carbide metal/carbon ratio on the catalyst performance

    DOE PAGES

    Rodriguez, José A.; Ramírez, Pedro J.; Gutierrez, Ramón A.

    2016-09-20

    We present that Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC(001) are excellent catalysts for the low-temperature water-gas shift (WGS, CO + H2O → H2 + CO2) reaction. They exhibit high-activity, stability and selectivity. The highest catalytic activities are seen for small coverages of Pt on the carbide substrates. Synergistic effects at the metal-carbide interface produce an enhancement in chemical activity with respect to pure Pt, MoC and TiC. A clear correlation is found between the ability of the Pt/MoC and Pt/TiC(001) surfaces to partially dissociate water and their catalytic activity for the WGS reaction. Finally, an overall comparison of the results for Pt/MoC andmore » Pt/Mo2C(001) indicates that the metal/carbon ratio in the carbide support can have a strong influence in the stability and selectivity of WGS catalysts and is a parameter that must be taken into consideration when designing these systems.« less

  15. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Bacterial Biofilms Treated with Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Zelaya, Anna; Brelles-Marino, Graciela

    2012-02-01

    We present investigations of bacterial biofilms before and after treatment with gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve biofilm communities, where bacteria grow embedded in an exopolysaccharide matrix, and cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard inactivation methods. In this study, biofilms formed by the opportunistic bacterium Pseudomonas aeruginosa were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). Through AFM images and micromechanical measurements we observed bacterial morphological damage and reduced AFM tip-sample surface adhesion following plasma treatment.

  16. Numerical simulation of gas discharge CO II lasers with conic tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ravil S.; Safiullin, Rafail K.

    2006-01-01

    The results of numerical simulation for fast-axial-flow gas discharge CO II lasers are presented. Quasi-one-dimensional consideration of the processes for powefil CO II lasers with conic discharge tubes shows that laser operation may be more effective in the case of tubes which are narrowed down fiom anode to cathode provided that gas flow is directed towards the cathode. On the contrary, when tube is narrowed down from cathode to anode, no any advantage in the laser operation may be received. The calculated quantities are in satisfactory agreement with the available experimental data.

  17. Binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in glow discharge closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Hunter, S.R.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1988-04-27

    Highly efficient binary and ternary gas mixtures for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches are disclosed. The binary mixtures are combinations of helium or neon and selected perfluorides. The ternary mixtures are combinations of helium, neon, or argon, a selected perfluoride, and a small amount of gas that exhibits enhanced ionization characteristics. These mixtures are shown to be the optimum choices for use in diffuse glow discharge closing switches by virtue if the combines physio-electric properties of the mixture components. 9 figs.

  18. Improvement of gas-jet ejector discharge characteristics with heads, chevrons, and tubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sobolev, A. V.; Zapryagaev, V. I.; Mal'Kov, V. M.

    2007-06-01

    Properties of gas-jet ejectors with converging mixing chamber operated under critical and subcritical flow conditions are examined. Establishment of the critical operation mode in such ejectors started up with and without the secondary gas flow is considered. The mechanism underlying the emergence of flow pulsations at low rates of the low-head flow is described. Results of an experimental study aimed at the improvement of ejector discharge characteristics by chamber-length reduction and related mixing enhancement are reported. As flow-mixing elements, slotted heads, chevrons, and tubs are considered. The best discharge characteristics were obtained with nozzles provided with tubs.

  19. Atomic Force Microscope Investigations of Biofilm-Forming Bacterial Cells Treated with Gas Discharge Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vandervoort, Kurt; Renshaw, Andrew; Abramzon, Nina; Brelles-Marino, Graciela

    2009-03-01

    We present investigations of biofilm-forming bacteria before and after treatment from gas discharge plasmas. Gas discharge plasmas represent a way to inactivate bacteria under conditions where conventional disinfection methods are often ineffective. These conditions involve bacteria in biofilm communities, where cooperative interactions between cells make organisms less susceptible to standard killing methods. Chromobacterium violaceum were imaged before and after plasma treatment using an atomic force microscope (AFM). After 5 min. plasma treatment, 90% of cells were inactivated, that is, transformed to non-culturable cells. Results for cell surface morphology and micromechanical properties for plasma treatments lasting from 5 to 60 minutes were obtained and will be presented.

  20. Emission Spectroscopy of the 4X Source Discharge With and Without N2 Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Horace Vernon

    2016-01-14

    This tech note summarizes the December, 1988 emission spectroscopy measurements made on the 4X source discharge with and without N₂ gas added to the H + Cs discharge. This study is motivated by the desire to understand why small amounts of N₂ gas added to the source discharge results in a reduction in the H⁻ beam noise. The beneficial effect of N₂ gas on H⁻ beam noise was first discovered by Bill Ingalls and Stu Orbesen on the ATS SAS source. For the 4X source the observed effect is that when N2 gas is added to the discharge the H⁻ beam noise is reduced about a factor of 2.

  1. Gas temperature layer visualization in hypersonic shock tunnel using electric discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagadeesh, Gopalan; Nagashetty, K.; Srinivasa Rao, B. R.; Reddy, K. P. J.

    2001-04-01

    A novel technique for visualizing the gas temperature layer around bodies flying at hypersonic speeds is presented. The high temperature zone is visualized by photographing the light emitted from the electric discharge generated over a model exposed to hypersonic flow in a shock tunnel. The technique is based on electrical discharge phenomena, where the frequency of radiation emitted by the discharge path passing through the flow field varies with the temperature of the gas medium in the discharge path. The experiments are carried out in the Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore, India, hypersonic shock tunnel HST-1 at a nominal Mach number of 5.75 using helium as the driver gas, with free stream velocity of 1.38 km/s and free stream molecular density of 2.3396 X 1016 molecules/cm3. The electric discharge is generated across a line electrode embedded in the model surface and a point electrode suspended in the free stream. A high voltage discharge device (1.6 kV and 1 A) along with a micro-controller based pulse delay control module is integrated with the shock tunnel for generating and controlling electric discharge which lasts for approximately 2 microseconds. The gas temperature layer at zero angle of incidence around a flat plate and slightly blunted (5 mm bluntness radius) 20 degree apex angle slender cone model are visualized in this study. The visualized thickness of the high temperature layer around the flat plate is approximately 2 mm, which agrees well with numerical simulation, carried out using 2-D Navier-Stokes equations.

  2. CORONA DISCHARGE IGNITION FOR ADVANCED STATIONARY NATURAL GAS ENGINES

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Paul D. Ronney

    2003-09-12

    An ignition source was constructed that is capable of producing a pulsed corona discharge for the purpose of igniting mixtures in a test chamber. This corona generator is adaptable for use as the ignition source for one cylinder on a test engine. The first tests were performed in a cylindrical shaped chamber to study the characteristics of the corona and analyze various electrode geometries. Next a test chamber was constructed that closely represented the dimensions of the combustion chamber of the test engine at USC. Combustion tests were performed in this chamber and various electrode diameters and geometries were tested. The data acquisition and control system hardware for the USC engine lab was updated with new equipment. New software was also developed to perform the engine control and data acquisition functions. Work is underway to design a corona electrode that will fit in the new test engine and be capable igniting the mixture in one cylinder at first and eventually in all four cylinders. A test engine was purchased for the project that has two spark plug ports per cylinder. With this configuration it will be possible to switch between corona ignition and conventional spark plug ignition without making any mechanical modifications.

  3. Discharge characteristics and hydrodynamics behaviors of atmospheric plasma jets produced in various gas flow patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setsuhara, Yuichi; Uchida, Giichiro; Nakajima, Atsushi; Takenaka, Kosuke; Koga, Kazunori; Shiratani, Masaharu

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric nonequilibrium plasma jets have been widely employed in biomedical applications. For biomedical applications, it is an important issue to understand the complicated mechanism of interaction of the plasma jet with liquid. In this study, we present analysis of the discharge characteristics of a plasma jet impinging onto the liquid surface under various gas flow patterns such as laminar and turbulence flows. For this purpose, we analyzed gas flow patters by using a Schlieren gas-flow imaging system in detail The plasma jet impinging into the liquid surface expands along the liquid surface. The diameter of the expanded plasma increases with gas flow rate, which is well explained by an increase in the diameter of the laminar gas-flow channel. When the gas flow rate is further increased, the gas flow mode transits from laminar to turbulence in the gas flow channel, which leads to the shortening of the plasm-jet length. Our experiment demonstrated that the gas flow patterns strongly affect the discharge characteristics in the plasma-jet system. This study was partly supported by a Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research on Innovative Areas ``Plasma Medical Innovation'' (24108003) from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology, Japan (MEXT).

  4. A powerful electrohydrodynamic flow generated by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge in a gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebogatkin, S. V.; Rebrov, I. E.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2016-01-01

    Theoretical and experimental studies of an electrohydrodynamic flow induced by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge distributed over a dielectric surface in a gas have been conducted. Dependences of the ion current, the gas flow velocity, and the spatial distributions thereof on the parameters of the power supply of the plasma ion emitter and an external electric field determined by the collector grid voltage have been described.

  5. A powerful electrohydrodynamic flow generated by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge in a gas

    SciTech Connect

    Nebogatkin, S. V.; Rebrov, I. E.; Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamshchikov, V. A.

    2016-01-15

    Theoretical and experimental studies of an electrohydrodynamic flow induced by a high-frequency dielectric barrier discharge distributed over a dielectric surface in a gas have been conducted. Dependences of the ion current, the gas flow velocity, and the spatial distributions thereof on the parameters of the power supply of the plasma ion emitter and an external electric field determined by the collector grid voltage have been described.

  6. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  7. Low temperature boron doped diamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Hongjun; Arumugam, Prabhu U.; Siddiqui, Shabnam; Carlisle, John A.

    2013-06-01

    Low temperature boron doped diamond (LT-BDD) film deposited under 600 °C (460 °C minimum) has been reported. Study reveals that the deposition temperature and boron dopant cause nanocrystalline diamond (NCD) instead of ultrananocrystalline diamond (UNCD®). Unlike conventional NCD, LT-BDD has faster renucleation rate, which ensures a low surface roughness (approximately 10 nm at 0.6 μm thickness). The overall characteristics of LT-BDD are mixed with the characteristics of conventional NCD and UNCD. Raman spectrum and electrochemical characterization prove that the quality of LT-BDD is similar to those grown under 650-900 °C. LT-BDD enables diamond applications on microelectromechanical systems, bio- and optical technologies.

  8. Real gas effects on charging and discharging processes of high pressure pneumatics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Yuxi; Wang, Xuanyin; Ge, Yaozheng

    2013-01-01

    The high pressure pneumatic system has been applied to special industries. It may cause errors when we analyze high pressure pneumatics under ideal gas assumption. However, the real gas effect on the performances of high pressure pneumatics is seldom investigated. In this paper, the real gas effects on air enthalpy and internal energy are estimated firstly to study the real gas effect on the energy conversion. Under ideal gas assumption, enthalpy and internal energy are solely related to air temperature. The estimation result indicates that the pressure enthalpy and pressure internal energy of real pneumatic air obviously decrease the values of enthalpy and internal energy for high pressure pneumatics, and the values of pressure enthalpy and pressure internal energy are close. Based on the relationship among pressure, enthalpy and internal energy, the real gas effects on charging and discharging processes of high pressure pneumatics are estimated, which indicates that the real gas effect accelerates the temperature and pressure decreasing rates during discharging process, and decelerates their increasing rates during charging process. According to the above analysis, and for the inconvenience in building the simulation model for real gas and the difficulty of measuring the detail thermal capacities of pneumatics, a method to compensate the real gas effect under ideal gas assumption is proposed by modulating the thermal capacity of the pneumatic container in simulation. The experiments of switching expansion reduction (SER) for high pressure pneumatics are used to verify this compensating method. SER includes the discharging process of supply tanks and the charging process of expansion tank. The simulated and experimental results of SER are highly consistent. The proposed compensation method provides a convenient way to obtain more realistic simulation results for high pressure pneumatics.

  9. Waveguide CO2 laser gain: Dependence on gas kinetic and discharge properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, S. C.

    1975-01-01

    Using a simple rate equation approach the gas kinetic and discharge properties of waveguide CO2 lasers were examined. The dependence was calculated of the population inversion and laser small signal gain on gas pressure, gas mixture, pumping rate (discharge current), tube bore diameter, and wall temperature. At higher pressures the gain is optimized by using more helium rich mixtures and smaller bore diameters. The dependence of laser tunability on the gas kinetic properties and cavity losses was determined, it was found that for loss cavities the laser tunability may substantially exceed the molecular fullwidth at half maximum. The more helium rich gas mixtures give greater tunability when cavity losses are small and less tunability when cavity losses are large. The role of the various gases in the waveguide CO2 laser is the same as that in conventional devices, by contrast with conventional lasers, the waveguide laser transition is homogeneously broadened. The dependence of gain on gas pressure and other kinetic and discharge properties differs substantially from that predicted by scaling results from conventional low pressure lasers.

  10. Degradation of dyes by active species injected from a gas phase surface discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jie; Wang, Tiecheng; Lu, Na; Zhang, Dandan; Wu, Yan; Wang, Tianwei; Sato, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    A reactor, based on the traditional gas phase surface discharge (GPSD), is designed for degradation of dye wastewater in this study. The reactor is characterized by using the dye wastewater as a ground electrode. A spiral discharge electrode of stainless steel wire attached on the inside wall of a cylindrical insulating medium and the wastewater surrounding the insulating medium for simultaneous cooling of the discharge electrode constitute the reactor. The active chemical radicals generated by the discharge of the spiral electrode are injected into the water with the carrier gas. The removal of three organic dyes (including methyl red (MR), reactive brilliant blue (RBB) and cationic red (CR)) in aqueous solution is investigated. The effects of electrode configuration, discharge voltage and solution pH value on the decoloration efficiency of MR are discussed. The experimental results show that over 95% of decoloration efficiencies for all the dyes are obtained after several minutes of plasma treatment. 40% of chemical oxygen demand removal of MR is obtained after 8 min of discharge treatment. Furthermore, it is found that ozone mainly affects the removal of dyes and several aliphatic compounds are identified as the oxidation products of MR. The possible degradation pathways of MR by GPSD are proposed.

  11. The dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure in neutral beam ion sources on HL-2A tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, H. L.; Cao, J. Y.; Rao, J.; Lei, G. J.; Jiang, S. F.; Liu, H.; Yu, L. M.; Xie, W. M.; Li, M.; Yang, X. F.; Zou, G. Q.; Lu, D. L.; Duan, X. R.

    2012-02-15

    The discharge gas pressure is a key factor to influence the extracted current of ion source. In this paper, the dependence of extracted current on discharge gas pressure was investigated in detail at different arc discharge currents. The discharge gas pressure with a very broad range (0.1 Pa-2.7 Pa) was scanned for the first time. It is turned out that, with the increasing of discharge gas pressure, the extracted current increases and the arc voltage decreases at different arc currents; however, when the discharge gas pressure exceeds a certain value, the extracted current decreases. For the same discharge gas pressure, the higher the arc current, the higher the arc voltage and the extracted current are. The arc efficiency was also calculated, and its dependence on gas pressure was almost the same with the dependence of extracted current on gas pressure, but at the same discharge gas pressure, the lower the arc current, the higher the arc efficiency is and the lower the extracted current is.

  12. Numerical simulation of the processes in fast flow gas discharge CO2 lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeev, Ravil S.; Safioulline, Rafail K.

    2004-05-01

    In the report the results of numerical simulation of the processes in discharge chambers (DC) of fast flow CO2 lasers, are presented. The investigations for longitudinal glow discharge (quasi-one-dimensional and two-dimensional flow) using four- and six-temperature models, were performed. Distributions of gas dynamic quantities, densities of charged particles, electric field strength, as well as vibrational temperatures of CO2, N2 and CO species, within the DC were calculated. Quasi-one-dimensional consideration of processes for powerful CO2 lasers with conic discharge tubes has shown that narrowed along the gas flow tubes must be more effective for laser operation than cylindrical ones. The calculated quantities are in satisfactory agreement with available experimental data.

  13. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    SciTech Connect

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-15

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH{sub 4}: O{sub 2} gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  14. Ignition of a combustible gas mixture by a high-current electric discharge in a closed volume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezhetskaya, N. K.; Gritsinin, S. I.; Kop'ev, V. A.; Kossyi, I. A.; Kuleshov, P. S.; Popov, N. A.; Starik, A. M.; Tarasova, N. M.

    2009-06-01

    Results are presented from experimental studies and numerical calculations of the ignition of a stoichiometric CH4: O2 gas mixture by a high-current gliding discharge. It is shown that this type of discharge generates an axially propagating thermal wave (precursor) that penetrates into the gas medium and leads to fast gas heating. This process is followed by an almost simultaneous ignition of the gas mixture over the entire reactor volume.

  15. Computer simulation of effect of conditions on discharge-excited high power gas flow CO laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochiai, Ryo; Iyoda, Mitsuhiro; Taniwaki, Manabu; Sato, Shunichi

    2017-01-01

    The authors have developed the computer simulation codes to analyze the effect of conditions on the performances of discharge excited high power gas flow CO laser. The six be analyzed. The simulation code described and executed by Macintosh computers consists of some modules to calculate the kinetic processes. The detailed conditions, kinetic processes, results and discussions are described in this paper below.

  16. Characterization of a radio frequency hollow electrode discharge at low gas pressures

    SciTech Connect

    Ahadi, Amir Mohammad; Rehders, Stefan; Strunskus, Thomas; Faupel, Franz; Trottenberg, Thomas; Kersten, Holger

    2015-08-15

    A radio frequency (RF) hollow discharge configuration is presented, which makes use of a combination of RF plasma generation and the hollow cathode effect. The system was especially designed for the treatment of nanoparticles, plasma polymerization, and nanocomposite fabrication. The process gas streams through the plasma in the inner of the cylindrical electrode system. In the here presented measurements, pure argon and argon with oxygen admixtures are exemplarily used. The discharge is characterized by probe measurements in the effluent, electrical measurements of the discharge parameters, and visual observations of the plasma glow. It is found that the RF fluctuations of the plasma potential are weak. The plasma potential resembles the one of a DC hollow cathode discharge, the RF hollow electrode acts as a cathode due to the self-bias, and a high voltage sheath forms in its inner cylinder.

  17. Environmental and Economic Assessment of Discharges from Gulf of Mexico Region Oil and Gas Operations

    SciTech Connect

    Gettleson, David A

    1999-10-28

    The primary objectives of the project are to increase the base of scientific knowledge concerning (1) the fate and environmental effects of organics, trace metals, and NORM in water, sediment, and biota near several offshore oil and gas facilities; (2) the characteristics of produced water and produced sand discharges as they pertain to organics, trace metals, and NORM variably found in association with the discharges; (3) the recovery of three terminated produced water discharge sites located in wetland and high-energy open bay sites of coastal Louisiana; (4) the economic and energy supply impacts of existing and anticipated federal and state offshore and coastal discharge regulations; and (5) the catch, consumption and human use patterns of seafood species collected from coastal and offshore waters. The products of the effort will be a series of technical reports detailing the study procedures, results, and conclusions which contribute to the transfer of technology to the scientific community, petroleum industry, and state and federal agencies.

  18. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration Nd on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of Nd leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 102-108cm-3 , discharge current density 10-1-101mA/cm2 , and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5μm . The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  19. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Sukhinin, G. I.; Fedoseev, A. V.

    2010-01-15

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N{sub d} on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N{sub d} leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10{sup 2}-10{sup 8} cm{sup -3}, discharge current density 10{sup -1}-10{sup 1} mA/cm{sup 2}, and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 mum. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  20. Influence of dust-particle concentration on gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Sukhinin, G I; Fedoseev, A V

    2010-01-01

    A self-consistent kinetic model of a low-pressure dc glow discharge with dust particles based on Boltzmann equation for the electron energy distribution function is presented. The ions and electrons production in ionizing processes as well as their recombination on the dust-particle surface and on the discharge tube wall were taken into account. The influence of dust-particle concentration N(d) on gas discharge and dust particles parameters was investigated. It is shown that the increase of N(d) leads to the increase of an averaged electric field and ion density, and to the decrease of a dust-particle charge and electron density in the dusty cloud. The results were obtained in a wide region of different discharge and dusty plasma parameters: dust particles density 10(2)-10(8) cm(-3), discharge current density 10(-1)-10(1) mA/cm(2), and dust particles radius 1, 2, and 5 microm. The scaling laws for dust-particle surface potential and electric filed dependencies on dust-particle density, particle radius and discharge currents were revealed. It is shown that the absorption of electrons and ions on the dust particles surface does not lead to the electron energy distribution function depletion due to a self-consistent adjustment of dust particles and discharge parameters.

  1. Dimmable Electronic Ballast for a Gas Discharge Lamp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raducanu, Marius; Hennings, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Titanium dioxide (TiO2) is the most efficient photocatalyst for organic oxidative degradation. TiO2 is effective not only in aqueous solution, but also in nonaqueous solvents and in the gas phase. It is photostable, biologically and chemically inert, and non-toxic. Low-energy UV light (approximately 375 nm, UV-A) can be used to photoactivate TiO2. TiO2 photocatalysis has been used to mineralize most types of organic compounds. Also, TiO2 photocatalysis has been effectively used in sterilization. This effectiveness has been demonstrated by its aggressive destruction of microorganisms, and aggressive oxidation effects of toxins. It also has been used for the oxidation of carbon monoxide to carbon dioxide, and ammonia to nitrogen. Despite having many attractive features, advanced photocatalytic oxidation processes have not been effectively used for air cleaning. One of the limitations of the traditional photocatalytic systems is the ballast that powers (lights) the bulbs. Almost all commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) ballasts are not dimmable and do not contain safety features. COTS ballasts light the UV lamp as bright as the bulb can be lit, and this results in shorter bulb lifetime and maximal power consumption. COTS magnetic ballasts are bulky, heavy, and inefficient. Several iterations of dimmable electronic ballasts have been developed. Some manifestations have safety features such as broken-bulb or over-temperature warnings, replace-bulb alert, logbulb operational hours, etc. Several electronic ballast boards capable of independently lighting and controlling (dimming) four fluorescent (UV light) bulbs were designed, fabricated, and tested. Because of the variation in the market bulb parameters, the ballast boards were designed with a very broad range output. The ballast boards can measure and control the current (power) for each channel.

  2. Combined effects Na and SO2 in flue gas on Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalyst for low temperature selective catalytic reduction of NO by NH3 simulated by Na2SO4 doping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Aiyi; Yu, Danqing; Yang, Liu; Sheng, Zhongyi

    2016-08-01

    A series of Mn-Ce/TiO2 catalysts were synthesized through an impregnation method and used for low temperature selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of NOx with ammonia (NH3). Na2SO4 was added into the catalyst to simulate the combined effects of alkali metal and SO2 in the flue gas. Experimental results showed that Na2SO4 had strong and fluctuant influence on the activity of Mn-Ce/TiO2, because the effect of Na2SO4 included pore occlusion and sulfation effect simultaneously. When Na2SO4 loading content increased from 0 to 1 wt.%, the SCR activities of Na2SO4-doped catalysts decreased greatly. With further increasing amount of Na2SO4, however, the catalytic activity increased gradually. XRD results showed that Na2SO4 doping could induce the crystallization of MnOx phases, which were also confirmed by TEM and SEM results. BET results showed that the surface areas decreased and a new bimodal mesoporous structure formed gradually with the increasing amount of Na2SO4. XPS results indicated that part of Ce4+ and Mn3+ were transferred to Ce3+ and Mn4+ due to the sulfation after Na2SO4 deposition on the surface of the catalysts. When the doped amounts of Na2SO4 increased, NH3-TPD results showed that the Lewis acid sites decreased and the Brønsted acid sites of Mn-Ce/TiO2 increased quickly, which could be considered as another reason for the observed changes in the catalytic activity. The decreased Mn and Ce atomic concentration, the changes of their oxidative states, and the variation in acidic properties on the surface of Na2SO4-doped catalysts could be the reasons for the fluctuant changes of the catalytic activity.

  3. Low Temperature Water–gas Shift: Differences in Oxidation States Observed with Partially Reduced Pt/MnOX and Pt/CeOX Catalysts Yield Differences in OH Group Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Ribeiro, M.; Jacobs, G; Graham, U; Azzam, K; Linganiso, L; Davis, B

    2010-01-01

    The Pt-ceria synergy may be described as the dehydrogenation of formate formed on the surface of the partially reducible oxide (PRO), ceria, by Pt across the interface, with H{sub 2}O participating in the transition state. However, due to the rising costs of rare earth oxides like ceria, replacement by a less expensive partially reducible oxide, like manganese oxide, is desirable. In this contribution, a comparison between Pt/ceria and Pt/manganese oxide catalysts possessing comparable Pt dispersions reveals that there are significant differences and certain similarities in the nature of the two Pt/PRO catalysts. With ceria, partial reduction involves reduction of the oxide surface shell, with Ce{sup 3+} at the surface and Ce{sup 4+} in the bulk. In the case of manganese oxide, partial reduction results in a mixture of Mn{sup 3+} and Mn{sup 2+}, with Mn{sup 2+} located at the surface. With Pt/CeO{sub X}, a high density of defect-associated bridging OH groups react with CO to yield a high density of the formate intermediate. With Pt/MnO{sub X}, the fraction of reactive OH groups is low and much lower formate band intensities result upon CO adsorption; moreover, there is a greater fraction of OH groups that are essentially unreactive. Thus, much lower CO conversion rates are observed with Pt/MnO{sub X} during low temperature water-gas shift. As with ceria, increasing the Pt loading facilitates partial reduction of MnO{sub X} to lower temperature, indicating metal-oxide interactions should be taken into account.

  4. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; Gannon, J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  5. The low temperature microgravity physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Croonquist, A P.; Liu, F. C.; Larson, M. E.; Chui, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  6. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Chui, T.; Croonquist, A.; Larson, M.; Liu, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  7. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  8. Neutral gas temperature estimates and metastable resonance energy transfer for argon-nitrogen discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Greig, A. Charles, C.; Boswell, R. W.

    2016-01-15

    Rovibrational spectroscopy band fitting of the nitrogen (N{sub 2}) second positive system is a technique used to estimate the neutral gas temperature of N{sub 2} discharges, or atomic discharges with trace amounts of a N{sub 2} added. For mixtures involving argon and N{sub 2}, resonant energy transfer between argon metastable atoms (Ar*) and N{sub 2} molecules may affect gas temperature estimates made using the second positive system. The effect of Ar* resonance energy transfer is investigated here by analyzing neutral gas temperatures of argon-N{sub 2} mixtures, for N{sub 2} percentages from 1% to 100%. Neutral gas temperature estimates are higher than expected for mixtures involving greater than 5% N{sub 2} addition, but are reasonable for argon with less than 5% N{sub 2} addition when compared with an analytic model for ion-neutral charge exchange collisional heating. Additional spatiotemporal investigations into neutral gas temperature estimates with 10% N{sub 2} addition demonstrate that although absolute temperature values may be affected by Ar* resonant energy transfer, spatiotemporal trends may still be used to accurately diagnose the discharge.

  9. Estimation of Plasma Parameters in a Gas-Discharge Tube Using the Terminal Characteristics and a Transient Computer Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    ESTIMATION OF PLASMA PARAMETERS IN A GAS - DISCHARGE TUBE USING THE TERMINAL CHARACTERISTICS AND A TRANSIENT COMPUTER MODEL G. B. Masten Logicon RDA...REPORT DATE JUN 1997 2. REPORT TYPE N/A 3. DATES COVERED - 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Estimation Of Plasma Parameters In A Gas - Discharge Tube Using

  10. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1988-06-28

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  11. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, Loucas G.; Hunter, Scott R.

    1990-01-01

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc.

  12. Binary and ternary gas mixtures with temperature enhanced diffuse glow discharge characteristics for use in closing switches

    DOEpatents

    Christophorou, L.G.; Hunter, S.R.

    1990-06-26

    An improvement to the gas mixture used in diffuse glow discharge closing switches is disclosed which includes binary and ternary gas mixtures which are formulated to exhibit decreasing electron attachment with increasing temperature. This increases the efficiency of the conductance of the glow discharge and further inhibits the formation of an arc. 11 figs.

  13. Multiwalled carbon nanotubes produced by direct current arc discharge in hydrogen gas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jinno, M.; Bandow, S.; Ando, Y.

    2004-11-01

    Multiwalled carbon nanotubes were produced by direct current (DC) arc discharge in the mixture gas of H 2-N 2. Raman scattering spectroscopy was used to characterize the MWNTs. Radial breathing mode vibration signals were observed at 272 and 388 cm -1. Tangential mode vibration signal was observed at ≈1582 cm -1, and other intense signals were also observed at ≈1860 cm -1for the MWNTs produced in the gas with the H 2 contents exceeding 90%. DC arc discharge in pure D 2 was also carried out, by which it was confirmed that the peak position and intensity of the Raman signal at ≈1860 cm -1 were independent of whether the gas was H 2 or D 2. This suggests that the ≈1860 cm -1 band is not associated with hydrogen-based vibrations.

  14. The Effect of Gas Flow Rate on Radio-Frequency Hollow Cathode Discharge Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Guoming; Sun, Qian; Zhao, Shuxia; Gao, Shuxia; Zhang, Lianzhu

    2014-07-01

    It is known that gas flow rate is a key factor in controlling industrial plasma processing. In this paper, a 2D PIC/MCC model is developed for an rf hollow cathode discharge with an axial nitrogen gas flow. The effects of the gas flow rate on the plasma parameters are calculated and the results show that: with an increasing flow rate, the total ion (N+2, N+) density decreases, the mean sheath thickness becomes wider, the radial electric field in the sheath and the axial electric field show an increase, and the energies of both kinds of nitrogen ions increase; and, as the axial ion current density that is moving toward the ground electrode increases, the ion current density near the ground electrode increases. The simulation results will provide a useful reference for plasma jet technology involving rf hollow cathode discharges in N2.

  15. Modelling of the temporal evolution of the gas temperature in N2 discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Guerra, Vasco

    2017-05-01

    The time-dependent evolution of the energy transfer to gas heating in a pure N2 discharge produced in a cylindrical tube at low pressures (1-10 Torr) is studied for different fixed values of the reduced electric field and electron density. We consider a model based on the self-consistent solutions to the time-dependent gas thermal balance equation coupled to the electron, vibrational, and chemical kinetic equations for the most important heavy species produced in N2 plasma discharges. The results of this model provide the temporal variation of the radially averaged value of the gas temperature, as well as the corresponding gas heating mechanisms. It is shown that the pooling reactions N2(A) + N2(A) → N2(B) + N2 and N2(A) + N2(A) → N2(C) + N2 are responsible for a smooth increase in the gas temperature before the first millisecond. For longer times, gas heating is found to be mainly caused by vibrational energy exchanges from non-resonant vibration-vibration (V-V) processes between N2 molecules and by vibration-translation (V-T) N2-N collisions. The heating rates of these different gas heating mechanisms and the gas temperature are calculated for a reduced electric field of 50 and 100 Td (1 Td = 10-17 Vcm2), an electron density of 1010 and 1011 cm-3, and a pressure of 1 and 10 Torr. The fractional power converted to gas heating from electronic and vibrational excitation is also calculated for these parameters, being respectively ˜2% and in the range 10%-35%. The effect of having a contribution of non-resonant V-V processes to gas cooling within the time interval 0.1-1 ms is analysed. The role of the gas temperature on the temporal evolution of the vibrational distribution of N2(X, v) molecules is also discussed.

  16. Low power gas discharge plasma mediated inactivation and removal of biofilms formed on biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Traba, Christian; Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2013-03-20

    The antibacterial activity of gas discharge plasma has been studied for quiet some time. However, high biofilm inactivation activity of plasma was only recently reported. Studies indicate that the etching effect associated with plasmas generated represent an undesired effect, which may cause live bacteria relocation and thus contamination spreading. Meanwhile, the strong etching effects from these high power plasmas may also alter the surface chemistry and affect the biocompatibility of biomaterials. In this study, we examined the efficiency and effectiveness of low power gas discharge plasma for biofilm inactivation and removal. Among the three tested gases, oxygen, nitrogen, and argon, discharge oxygen demonstrated the best anti-biofilm activity because of its excellent ability in killing bacteria in biofilms and mild etching effects. Low power discharge oxygen completely killed and then removed the dead bacteria from attached surface but had negligible effects on the biocompatibility of materials. DNA left on the regenerated surface after removal of biofilms did not have any negative impact on tissue cell growth. On the contrary, dramatically increased growth was found for these cells seeded on regenerated surfaces. These results demonstrate the potential applications of low power discharge oxygen in biofilm treatments of biomaterials and indwelling device decontaminations.

  17. Size-controlled synthesis and gas sensing application of tungsten oxide nanostructures produced by arc discharge.

    PubMed

    Fang, F; Kennedy, J; Futter, J; Hopf, T; Markwitz, A; Manikandan, E; Henshaw, G

    2011-08-19

    Several different synthetic methods have been developed to fabricate tungsten oxide (WO(3)) nanostructures, but most of them require exotic reagents or are unsuitable for mass production. In this paper, we present a systematic investigation demonstrating that arc discharge is a fast and inexpensive synthesis method which can be used to produce high quality tungsten oxide nanostructures for NO(2) gas sensing measurements. The as-synthesized WO(3) nanostructures are characterized by x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), finger-print Raman spectroscopy and proton induced x-ray emission (PIXE). The analysis shows that spheroidal-shaped monoclinic WO(3) crystal nanostructures were produced with an average diameter of 30 nm (range 10-100 nm) at an arc discharge current of 110 A and 300 Torr oxygen partial pressure. It is found that the morphology is controlled by the arc discharge parameters of current and oxygen partial pressure, e.g. a high arc discharge current combined with a low oxygen partial pressure results in small WO(3) nanostructures with improved conductivity. Sensors produced from the WO(3) nanostructures show a strong response to NO(2) gas at 325 °C. The ability to tune the morphology of the WO(3) nanostructures makes this method ideal for the fabrication of gas sensing materials.

  18. Nanosecond-timescale high-pressure gas discharge in a microwave pulse compressor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shlapakovski, Anatoli; Beilin, Leonid; Krasik, Yakov

    2016-09-01

    The results of experimental and numerical studies of the microwave plasma discharge initiated by a nanosecond laser pulse are presented. The discharge is ignited in the pressurized gas filling the switch, which opens the charged resonant cavity, so that the accumulated microwave energy is rapidly released into a load. Fast-framing optical imaging showed that the plasma in the switch appears as filaments expanding along the RF electric field. The temporal evolution of the plasma density was derived from time-resolved spectroscopic measurements. With increasing microwave energy in the cavity, the plasma appears earlier in time after the laser beam enters the switch and its density rises more steeply reaching values which exceed 1016 cm-3 at a gas pressure of 2 .105 Pa. Numerical simulations were conducted using the gas conductivity model of plasma and representation of discharge origin by setting initial population of seed electrons treated by PIC algorithm. The results showed good agreement with the experiments and explained how the self-consistent dynamics of the plasma and RF fields determines the quality of microwave output pulses. In addition, the dynamics of the microwave energy absorption in the discharge plasma was studied. It was shown that at a high pressure, even with an unlimited rate of ionization, a significant portion of the stored energy, 20%, is lost. This work was partially supported by the BSF Grant No. 2012038.

  19. Effect of preionization, fluorine concentration, and current density on the discharge uniformity in F2 excimer laser gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, D.; Bastiaens, H. M. J.; Boller, K. J.; Peters, P. J. M.

    2007-08-01

    The discharge homogeneity in F2-based excimer laser gas mixtures and its dependence on various key parameters, such as the degree of preionization, preionization delay time, F2 concentration and current density, is investigated in a small x-ray preionized discharge chamber. The spatial and temporal evolution of the discharges is monitored by taking photographs of the discharge fluorescence with a fast intensified CCD camera. It is found that a preionization electron density of about 107 cm-3 bar-1 is sufficient to initiate a streamer-free homogeneous discharge in gas mixtures of helium and fluorine with multiatmospheric gas pressure. The accompanying optimum time delay between the application of the x-ray pulse and voltage across the discharge electrodes is determined to be about 20 ns. It is shown that in spite of these optimum initial conditions, a homogeneous glow discharge eventually transforms into an inhomogeneous discharge containing numerous filaments. Our experiments show that the higher the initial F2 concentration, the initial current density or the pump power density, the shorter the time interval over which the discharge stays homogeneous. By a quantitative characterization and defining a detailed measure of the observed discharge inhomogeneity we find that halogen depletion, as suggested from the theory, is responsible for the temporal instability of discharges in such laser gas mixtures, as the experimental results are in good agreement with the theory on the halogen depletion instability mechanism.

  20. Two-stage plasma gun based on a gas discharge with a self-heating hollow emitter.

    PubMed

    Vizir, A V; Tyunkov, A V; Shandrikov, M V; Oks, E M

    2010-02-01

    The paper presents the results of tests of a new compact two-stage bulk gas plasma gun. The plasma gun is based on a nonself-sustained gas discharge with an electron emitter based on a discharge with a self-heating hollow cathode. The operating characteristics of the plasma gun are investigated. The discharge system makes it possible to produce uniform and stable gas plasma in the dc mode with a plasma density up to 3x10(9) cm(-3) at an operating gas pressure in the vacuum chamber of less than 2x10(-2) Pa. The device features high power efficiency, design simplicity, and compactness.

  1. Gas-discharge plasma initiated in air by a radiation pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Butakyi, V.I.; Tel'nikin, A.A.

    1985-08-01

    The authors consider the formation of a non-equilibrium gas-discharge plasma in air under the action of a radiation at a wavelength of 10.6 micrometers with a duration of 10/sup -6/ seconds. They show that the air discharge occurs under nonequilibrium conditions by formation of an autoionization complex with subsequent oscillatory excitation of molecules. They use the diffusion approximation to find the molecular distribution function over oscillatory degrees of freedom. They calculate the electron temperature and concentration in the breakdown plasma with consideration of multistep ionization of molecules and dissociative recombination of charged particles. In conclusion, they find that experimental results agree with their calculations.

  2. Gas laser for efficient sustaining a continuous optical discharge plasma in scientific and technological applications

    SciTech Connect

    Zimakov, V P; Kuznetsov, V A; Kedrov, A Yu; Solov'ev, N G; Shemyakin, A N; Yakimov, M Yu

    2009-09-30

    A stable high-power laser is developed for the study and technical applications of a continuous optical discharge (COD). The laser based on the technology of a combined discharge in a scheme with a fast axial gas flow emits 2.2 kW at 10.6 {mu}m per meter of the active medium in continuous and repetitively pulsed regimes with the electrooptical efficiency 20%. The sustaining of the COD plasma in argon and air is demonstrated at the atmospheric pressure. The emission properties of the COD plasma are studied and its possible applications are discussed. (lasers)

  3. Simple experiment on the sputtering rate of solids in gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Reyes, Jorge C.; Korolov, Ihor; Matthews, Lorin S.; Hyde, Truell W.

    2017-06-01

    We present a very simple and sensitive method to measure the sputtering rate of solid materials in stationary low-pressure gas discharges. The method is based on the balance of the centrifugal force and the confinement electric force acting on a single electrically charged dust particle in a rotating environment. We demonstrate the use and sensitivity of this method in a capacitively coupled radio frequency argon discharge. We were able to detect a reduction of 10 nm in the diameter of a single dust particle.

  4. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-01

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ˜30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  5. Piezoelectric transformers for low-voltage generation of gas discharges and ionic winds in atmospheric air

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Michael J.; Go, David B.

    2015-12-28

    To generate a gas discharge (plasma) in atmospheric air requires an electric field that exceeds the breakdown threshold of ∼30 kV/cm. Because of safety, size, or cost constraints, the large applied voltages required to generate such fields are often prohibitive for portable applications. In this work, piezoelectric transformers are used to amplify a low input applied voltage (<30 V) to generate breakdown in air without the need for conventional high-voltage electrical equipment. Piezoelectric transformers (PTs) use their inherent electromechanical resonance to produce a voltage amplification, such that the surface of the piezoelectric exhibits a large surface voltage that can generate corona-like discharges on its corners or on adjacent electrodes. In the proper configuration, these discharges can be used to generate a bulk air flow called an ionic wind. In this work, PT-driven discharges are characterized by measuring the discharge current and the velocity of the induced ionic wind with ionic winds generated using input voltages as low as 7 V. The characteristics of the discharge change as the input voltage increases; this modifies the resonance of the system and subsequent required operating parameters.

  6. Gas breakdown mechanism in pulse-modulated asymmetric ratio frequency dielectric barrier discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Qi; Sun, Jizhong; Nozaki, Tomohiro; Ding, Zhenfeng; Ding, Hongbin; Wang, Zhanhui; Wang, Dezhen

    2014-08-01

    The gas breakdown mechanisms, especially the roles of metastable species in atmospheric pressure pulse-modulated ratio frequency barrier discharges with co-axial cylindrical electrodes, were studied numerically using a one dimensional self-consistent fluid model. Simulation results showed that in low duty cycle cases, the electrons generated from the channels associated with metastable species played a more important role in initializing next breakdown than the direct ionization of helium atoms of electronic grounded states by electron-impact. In order to quantitatively evaluate the contribution to the discharge by the metastables, we defined a "characteristic time" and examined how the value varied with the gap distance and the electrode asymmetry. The results indicated that the lifetime of the metastable species (including He*and He2*) was much longer than that of the pulse-on period and as effective sources of producing electrons they lasted over a period up to millisecond. When the ratio of the outer radius to the inner radius of the cylindrical electrodes was far bigger than one, it was found that the metastables distributed mainly in a cylindrical region around the inner electrode. When the ratio decreased as the inner electrode moved outward, the density of metastables in the discharge region near the outer electrode became gradually noticeable. As the discharging gap continued to decrease, the two hill-shaped distributions gradually merged to one big hill. When the discharge spacing was fixed, asymmetric electrodes facilitated the discharge.

  7. Evaluation of the potentials of humic acid removal in water by gas phase surface discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Yan, Qiuhe; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-02-01

    Degradation of humic acid (HA), a predominant type of natural organic matter in ground water and surface waters, was conducted using a gas phase surface discharge plasma system. HA standard and two surface waters (Wetland, and Weihe River) were selected as the targets. The experimental results showed that about 90.9% of standard HA was smoothly removed within 40 min's discharge plasma treatment at discharge voltage 23.0 kV, and the removal process fitted the first-order kinetic model. Roles of some active species in HA removal were studied by evaluating the effects of solution pH and OH radical scavenger; and the results presented that O3 and OH radical played significant roles in HA removal. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) and FTIR analysis showed that HA surface topography and molecular structure were changed during discharge plasma process. The mineralization of HA was analyzed by UV-Vis spectrum, dissolved organic carbon (DOC), specific UV absorbance (SUVA), UV absorption ratios, and excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorescence. The formation of disinfection by-products during HA sample chlorination was also identified, and CHCl3 was detected as the main disinfection by-product, but discharge plasma treatment could suppress its formation to a certain extent. In addition, approximately 82.3% and 67.9% of UV254 were removed for the Weihe River water and the Wetland water after 40 min of discharge plasma treatment.

  8. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates

  9. Is Submarine Groundwater Discharge a Gas Hydrate Formation Mechanism on the Circum-Arctic Shelf?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2015-12-01

    Methane hydrate is an ice-like solid that can sequester large quantities of methane gas in marine sediments along most continental margins where thermodynamic conditions permit its formation. Along the circum-Arctic shelf, relict permafrost-associated methane hydrate deposits formed when non-glaciated portions of the shelf experienced subaerial exposure during ocean transgressions. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of circum-Arctic shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with relict submarine permafrost. Heat flow observations on the Alaskan North Slope and Canadian Beaufort Shelf suggest the movement of groundwater offshore, but direct observations of groundwater flow do not exist. Submarine discharge, an offshore flow of fresh, terrestrial groundwater, can affect the temperature and salinity field in shelf sediments, and may be an important factor in submarine permafrost and gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. Submarine groundwater discharge may also enhance the transport of organic matter for methanogenesis within marine sediments. Because it is buoyancy-driven, the velocity field contains regions with a vertical (upward) component as groundwater flows offshore. This combination of factors makes submarine groundwater discharge a potential mechanism controlling permafrost-associated gas hydrate evolution on the Arctic continental shelf. In this study, we quantitatively investigate the feasibility of submarine groundwater discharge as a control on permafrost-associated gas hydrate formation on the Arctic continental shelf, using the Canadian Beaufort Shelf as an example. We have developed a shelf-scale, two-dimensional numerical model based on the finite volume method for two-phase flow of pore fluid and methane gas within Arctic shelf sediments. The model tracks the evolution of the pressure, temperature, salinity, methane gas, methane hydrate, and permafrost fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of

  10. Handheld low-temperature plasma probe for portable "point-and-shoot" ambient ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Wiley, Joshua S; Shelley, Jacob T; Cooks, R Graham

    2013-07-16

    We describe a handheld, wireless low-temperature plasma (LTP) ambient ionization source and its performance on a benchtop and a miniature mass spectrometer. The source, which is inexpensive to build and operate, is battery-powered and utilizes miniature helium cylinders or air as the discharge gas. Comparison of a conventional, large-scale LTP source against the handheld LTP source, which uses less helium and power than the large-scale version, revealed that the handheld source had similar or slightly better analytical performance. Another advantage of the handheld LTP source is the ability to quickly interrogate a gaseous, liquid, or solid sample without requiring any setup time. A small, 7.4-V Li-polymer battery is able to sustain plasma for 2 h continuously, while the miniature helium cylinder supplies gas flow for approximately 8 continuous hours. Long-distance ion transfer was achieved for distances up to 1 m.

  11. Characterisation of a dielectric barrier surface twin discharge using defined gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offerhaus, Björn; Kogelheide, Friederike; Lackmann, Jan-Wilm; Bibinov, Nikita; Smith, Ryan; Bracht, Vera; Stapelmann, Katharina; Awakowicz, Peter; Aept Team; Bimap Team

    2016-09-01

    In the last decades extensive study has been performed on dielectric barrier discharges (DBDs) in several fields of applications of non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasmas. Their applicability ranges from health-promoting effects to the human skin to air decontamination combined with a rather good scalability. Further insight into their physical and chemical properties is mandatory for a proper configuration of plasma sources for a given application. In our case a dielectric barrier surface twin discharge is ignited in different gas mixtures. The surface discharge electrode is made of an Al2O3 plate working as a dielectric barrier and grid-structured copper traces on each side of the plate. The electrode is connected to a HV-HF plasma generator with external transformer. The plasma parameters are determined via OES using an absolutely calibrated Echelle-spectrometer.

  12. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2002-01-01

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  13. Compressor discharge bleed air circuit in gas turbine plants and related method

    DOEpatents

    Anand, Ashok Kumar; Berrahou, Philip Fadhel; Jandrisevits, Michael

    2003-04-08

    A gas turbine system that includes a compressor, a turbine component and a load, wherein fuel and compressor discharge bleed air are supplied to a combustor and gaseous products of combustion are introduced into the turbine component and subsequently exhausted to atmosphere. A compressor discharge bleed air circuit removes bleed air from the compressor and supplies one portion of the bleed air to the combustor and another portion of the compressor discharge bleed air to an exhaust stack of the turbine component in a single cycle system, or to a heat recovery steam generator in a combined cycle system. In both systems, the bleed air diverted from the combustor may be expanded in an air expander to reduce pressure upstream of the exhaust stack or heat recovery steam generator.

  14. Environmental policy constraints for acidic exhaust gas scrubber discharges from ships.

    PubMed

    Ülpre, H; Eames, I

    2014-11-15

    Increasingly stringent environmental legislation on sulphur oxide emissions from the combustion of fossil fuels onboard ships (International Maritime Organization (IMO) Regulation 14) can be met by either refining the fuel to reduce sulphur content or by scrubbing the exhaust gases. Commonly used open loop marine scrubbers discharge warm acidic exhaust gas wash water into the sea, depressing its pH. The focus on this paper is on the physics and chemistry behind the disposal of acidic discharges in seawater. The IMO Marine Environment Protection Committee (MEPC 59/24/Add.1 Annex 9) requires the wash water to reach a pH greater than 6.5 at a distance of 4m from the point of discharge. We examine the engineering constraints, specifically size and number of ports, to identify the challenges of meeting regulatory compliance.

  15. Low-Temperature Extraction of Oil From Shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Technique increases recovery and energy efficiency. Advantages of method greater product yield and, because of the relatively low temperatures, minimal gas formation, smaller amounts of char byproduct, and less carbonate-rock decomposition. Up to 94 percent by weight of organic material in shale extracted.

  16. Low-temperature sterilization alternatives in the 1990s

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, P. . Surgical Div.)

    1994-01-01

    Vapor phase hydrogen peroxide, gas plasma, ozone, and peracetic acids have been commercialized as alternative technologies for low-temperature sterilization. None are viewed as a total replacement for ethylene oxide for on-site sterilization of reusable, heat-sensitive medical materials in healthcare facilities.

  17. Low-Temperature Extraction of Oil From Shale

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Compton, L. E.

    1985-01-01

    Technique increases recovery and energy efficiency. Advantages of method greater product yield and, because of the relatively low temperatures, minimal gas formation, smaller amounts of char byproduct, and less carbonate-rock decomposition. Up to 94 percent by weight of organic material in shale extracted.

  18. Electron density measurement in gas discharge plasmas by optical and acoustic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biagioni, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bellaveglia, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Cianchi, A.; Di Giovenale, D.; Di Pirro, G.; Ferrario, M.; Filippi, F.; Mostacci, A.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.; Vaccarezza, C.; Villa, F.; Zigler, A.

    2016-08-01

    Plasma density represents a very important parameter for both laser wakefield and plasma wakefield acceleration, which use a gas-filled capillary plasma source. Several techniques can be used to measure the plasma density within a capillary discharge, which are mainly based on optical diagnostic methods, as for example the well-known spectroscopic method using the Stark broadening effect. In this work, we introduce a preliminary study on an alternative way to detect the plasma density, based on the shock waves produced by gas discharge in a capillary. Firstly, the measurements of the acoustic spectral content relative to the laser-induced plasmas by a solid target allowed us to understand the main properties of the acoustic waves produced during this kind of plasma generation; afterwards, we have extended such acoustic technique to the capillary plasma source in order to calibrate it by comparison with the stark broadening method.

  19. A sensitive gas chromatography detector based on atmospheric pressure chemical ionization by a dielectric barrier discharge.

    PubMed

    Kirk, Ansgar T; Last, Torben; Zimmermann, Stefan

    2017-02-03

    In this work, we present a novel concept for a gas chromatography detector utilizing an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization which is initialized by a dielectric barrier discharge. In general, such a detector can be simple and low-cost, while achieving extremely good limits of detection. However, it is non-selective apart from the use of chemical dopants. Here, a demonstrator manufactured entirely from fused silica capillaries and printed circuit boards is shown. It has a size of 75×60×25mm(3) and utilizes only 2W of power in total. Unlike other known discharge detectors, which require high-purity helium, this detector can theoretically be operated using any gas able to form stable ion species. Here, purified air is used. With this setup, limits of detection in the low parts-per-billion range have been obtained for acetone.

  20. Computational modelling of discharges within the impulse plasma deposition accelerator with a gas valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabiński, Marek; Choduń, Rafał; Nowakowska-Langier, Katarzyna; Zdunek, Krzysztof

    2014-05-01

    The paper presents computational studies of working medium dynamics during the impulse plasma deposition (IPD) process when the electric discharge in an interelectrode region is initiated by a gas introduced through a fast-acting valve. During the computational simulations the influence of different discharge parameters on the plasma dynamics was studied. The optimization of the device includes the calculation of the current sheath movement and the sensibility analysis of its dynamics to geometrical and operational parameters. It was found that gas injection can be considered as a useful tool in optimization of the coatings obtained with the IPD technique. Computer simulation results indicate the direction of changes in the development and application of the analysed surface engineering method.

  1. TOPICAL REVIEW: Optical emission spectroscopy in low-temperature plasmas containing argon and nitrogen: determination of the electron temperature and density by the line-ratio method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xi-Ming; Pu, Yi-Kang

    2010-10-01

    This article reviews a variety of methods to obtain the electron temperature and density by the emission line ratios for low-temperature plasmas containing argon or nitrogen gas. Based on the collisional-radiative model of excited particles, the underlying principle of each of these methods is described, along with the criterion on how to select an appropriate line-ratio method according to the discharge conditions. Limitations on the application of each line-ratio technique are also discussed.

  2. Low Temperature Catalyst for NH3 Removal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar; Melendez, Orlando

    2013-01-01

    Air revitalization technologies maintain a safe atmosphere inside spacecraft by the removal of C02, ammonia (NH3), and trace contaminants. NH3 onboard the International Space Station (ISS) is produced by crew metabolism, payloads, or during an accidental release of thermal control refrigerant. Currently, the ISS relies on removing NH3 via humidity condensate and the crew wears hooded respirators during emergencies. A different approach to cabin NH3 removal is to use selective catalytic oxidation (SCO), which builds on thermal catalytic oxidation concepts that could be incorporated into the existing TCCS process equipment architecture on ISS. A low temperature platinum-based catalyst (LTP-Catalyst) developed at KSC was used for converting NH3 to H20 and N2 gas by SCO. The challenge of implementing SCO is to reduce formation of undesirable byproducts like NOx (N20 and NO). Gas mixture analysis was conducted using FTIR spectrometry in the Regenerable VOC Control System (RVCS) Testbed. The RVCS was modified by adding a 66 L semi-sealed chamber, and a custom NH3 generator. The effect of temperature on NH3 removal using the LTP-Catalyst was examined. A suitable temperature was found where NH3 removal did not produce toxic NO, (NO, N02) and N20 formation was reduced.

  3. Static gas-liquid interfacial direct current discharge plasmas using ionic liquid cathode

    SciTech Connect

    Kaneko, T.

    2009-05-15

    Due to the unique properties of ionic liquids such as their extremely low vapor pressure and high heat capacity, we have succeeded in creating the static and stable gas (plasmas)-liquid (ionic liquids) interfacial field using a direct current discharge under a low gas pressure condition. It is clarified that the ionic liquid works as a nonmetal liquid electrode, and furthermore, a secondary electron emission coefficient of the ionic liquid is larger than that of conventional metal electrodes. The plasma potential structure of the gas-liquid interfacial region, and resultant interactions between the plasma and the ionic liquid are revealed by changing a polarity of the electrode in the ionic liquid. By utilizing the ionic liquid as a cathode electrode, the positive ions in the plasma region are found to be irradiated to the ionic liquid. This ion irradiation causes physical and chemical reactions at the gas-liquid interfacial region without the vaporization of the ionic liquid.

  4. Advanced low-temperature sorbents

    SciTech Connect

    Ayala, R.E.; Venkataramani, V.S.; Abbasian, J.; Hill, A.H.

    1995-12-01

    A number of promising technologies are currently being optimized for coal-based power generation, including the Integrated-Gasification Combined Cycle (IGCC) system. If IGCC is to be used successfully for power generation, an economic and efficient way must be found to remove the contaminants, particularly sulfur species, found in coal gas. Except for the hot gas desulfurization system, all major components of IGCC are commercially available or have been shown to meet system requirements. Over the last two decades, the U.S. Department of Energy/Morgantown Energy Technology Center (DOE/METC) has sponsored development of various configurations of high-temperature desulfurization systems including fixed-bed, moving-bed, transport-bed, and fluidized-bed systems. Because of their mode of operation and requirements for sorbent manufacturing, the fixed-bed systems can generally use the same materials as moving-bed configurations, i.e., pelletized or extruded sorbents, while fluidized-bed (circulating or bubbling configurations) and transport reactor configurations use materials generally described as agglomerated or granulated.The objective of this program is to remove hydrogen sulfides from coal gas using sorbent materials.

  5. Rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2017-05-01

    Results of an experimental research of a rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional negative corona discharge are presented. The most of measurements were performed for an air insulated two-electrode switch assembled of cylindrical electrodes of 22 mm diameter and 100 mm length, arranged parallel to each other, with a spark gap between them varying from 6 to 15 mm. A set of 1 to 5 needles connected to a negative cylindrical electrode and located aside of them were used for corona discharges. The needle positions, allowing an effecient stabilization of the pulsed breakdown voltage and preventing the a transition of the corona discharge in a spark form, were found. It was shown that the gas preionization by the UV-radiation of the parallel corona discharge provides a stable operation of the switch with low variations of the pulsed breakdown voltage, not exceeding 1% for a given voltage rise-time tested within the range from 40 ns to 5 µs.

  6. Spectroscopic assessment of argon gas discharge induced radiolysis of aqueous adenine and thymine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Xi; Huang, Qing; Dang, Bingrong; Wang, Xiangqin; Yu, Zengliang

    2011-12-01

    Ionizing radiation influences life profoundly for it can modify genetic materials. It is a long-standing task to investigate the interaction between energetic particles and DNA together with its components such as nucleotides, nucleosides and bases so as to predict and assess the potential biological effects. In this study, argon gas discharge was employed to produce energetic ions and electrons. The gas discharge caused the radiolysis of aqueous bases and the involved reactions were analyzed by means of spectroscopic tools including UV-vis absorption, fluorescence and Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, also assisted by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS). It was found that the discharge resulted in the adenine-derived lesions such as 4,6-diamino-5-formamidopyrimidine, 8-OH-Ade and 2-OH-Ade in the radiolysis of aqueous adenine, as well as the thymine-derived lesions such as thymine glycol, 5-hydroxy-6-hydrothymine and/or 6-hydroxy-5-hydrothymine, 5-hydroxymethyluracil and 5-formyluracil in the radiolysis of aqueous thymine. The study of radio-sensitivity showed that adenine was more resistant to the discharge. The mechanisms of the involved reactions were studied in detail, confirming that the hydroxyl radical played a dominant role.

  7. Study of the switching rate of gas-discharge devices based on the open discharge with counter-propagating electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Bokhan, P. A.; Gugin, P. P.; Lavrukhin, M. A.; Zakrevsky, Dm. E.

    2015-06-15

    The switching rate of gas-discharge devices “kivotrons” based on the open discharge with counter-propagating electron beams has been experimentally studied. Structures with 2-cm{sup 2} overall cathode area were examined. The switching time was found to show a monotonic decrease with increasing the working-gas helium pressure and with increasing the voltage across the discharge gap at breakdown. The minimum switching time was found to be ∼240 ps at 17 kV voltage, and the maximum rate of electric-current rise limited by the discharge-circuit inductance was 3 × 10{sup 12 }A/s.

  8. A Method for Removal of CO from Exhaust Gas Using Pulsed Corona Discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaohong; Yang, Lin; Lei, Yuyong; Wang, Jiansheng; Lu, Yiyu

    2000-10-01

    An experimental study of the oxidation of CO in exhaust gas from a motorcycle has been carried out using plasma chemical reactions in a pulsed corona discharge. In the process, some main parameters, such as the initial CO concentration, amplitude and frequency of pulses, residence time, reactor volume, and relative humidity (RH), as well as their effects on CO removal characteristics, were investigated. O3, which is beneficial to reducing CO, was produced during CO removal . When the exhaust gas was at ambient temperature, more than 80% CO removal efficiency was realized at an initial concentration of 288 ppm in a suitable range of the parameters.

  9. A method for removal of CO from exhaust gas using pulsed corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Yang, L; Lei, Y; Wang, J; Lu, Y

    2000-10-01

    An experimental study of the oxidation of CO in exhaust gas from a motorcycle has been carried out using plasma chemical reactions in a pulsed corona discharge. In the process, some main parameters, such as the initial CO concentration, amplitude and frequency of pulses, residence time, reactor volume, and relative humidity (RH), as well as their effects on CO removal characteristics, were investigated. O3, which is beneficial to reducing CO, was produced during CO removal. When the exhaust gas was at ambient temperature, more than 80% CO removal efficiency was realized at an initial concentration of 288 ppm in a suitable range of the parameters.

  10. Theory of a stationary microwave discharge with multiply charged ions in an expanding gas jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Abramov, I. S.; Golubev, S. V.; Gospodchikov, E. D.

    2016-08-01

    The formation of a jet of a nonequilibrium multiply charged ion plasma is studied in the inhomogeneous gas jet. It is shown that the geometrical divergence of the jet restricts the maximum ion charge state and results in the spatial localization of the discharge. Stationary solutions corresponding to such regimes are constructed. The model proposed can be used to optimize modern experiments on generation of hard UV radiation due to the line emission of multiply ionized atoms in a gas jet heated by high-power millimeter and submillimeter radiation.

  11. Theory of a stationary microwave discharge with multiply charged ions in an expanding gas jet

    SciTech Connect

    Shalashov, A. G. Abramov, I. S.; Golubev, S. V.; Gospodchikov, E. D.

    2016-08-15

    The formation of a jet of a nonequilibrium multiply charged ion plasma is studied in the inhomogeneous gas jet. It is shown that the geometrical divergence of the jet restricts the maximum ion charge state and results in the spatial localization of the discharge. Stationary solutions corresponding to such regimes are constructed. The model proposed can be used to optimize modern experiments on generation of hard UV radiation due to the line emission of multiply ionized atoms in a gas jet heated by high-power millimeter and submillimeter radiation.

  12. Decolorization of Acid Orange 7 solution by gas-liquid gliding arc discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Du, ChangMing; Shi, TaiHong; Sun, YuWei; Zhuang, XiaoFeng

    2008-06-15

    The decolorization of 180 microM aqueous solutions of Acid Orange 7 (AO7) by means of a non-thermal plasma technique (i.e., the gas-liquid gliding arc discharge, which is generated between at least two metal electrodes with AC high voltage) was investigated in this paper. The effects of the plasma treatment time and the type of feeding gas, including air, oxygen, nitrogen and argon of the dye removal were determined. It is found that the voltage cycles of the gas-liquid gliding arc discharge are characterized by a moderate increase in the tension which is represented by a peak followed by an abrupt decrease and a current peak in the half period (10 ms); the concentration of AO7 solution decreases exponentially to reach 58.9, 77.4, 89.1, 95.1 and 99% in 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 min, respectively, and the ln(Ct/C0) varies linearly with the treatment time t, indicating that decolorization reaction follow first pseudo-order kinetics with a constant rate of 0.03327 min(-1) when air was used as feeding gas; the decolorization rate during the plasma treatment is the greatest for oxygen as the feeding gas, in turn followed by air and argon, and was the least when using nitrogen. The variations of pH and conductivity and the formations of hydrogen peroxide and ozone are measured.

  13. Time-dependent coupled kinetics and gas temperature in N2-NO pulsed discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pintassilgo, Carlos D.; Welzel, Stefan

    2016-10-01

    A self-consistent time-dependent kinetic model coupled to the gas thermal balance equation is presented for a N2-1%NO millisecond pulsed DC discharge at a pressure of 266 Pa (2 Torr) and a current of 35 mA. The model provides the temporal evolution of the most important heavy species of interest to this work such as N2(X1Σg+, v), NO(X2Π), N2(A3Σu+), N2(a'1Σu-), N(4S) and O(3P), simultaneously with the time-dependent variation of the gas temperature. Predicted results for NO number densities during the pulse are compared to experimental ones measured by time-resolved quantum cascade laser absorption spectroscopy (QCLAS). The agreement between experiment and modelling predictions is very reasonable, mainly until a pulse duration of 2 ms, revealing the temporal evolution of the most important creation and loss mechanisms of NO(X). Simulations show a slow gas heating during the first millisecond. Thereafter, gas heating is accelerated and levels off at a time ~ 40 ms. These effects are explained and discussed in detail, together with the analysis of the fraction of the discharge power transferred to gas heating.

  14. Control of stochastic sensitivity in a stabilization problem for gas discharge system

    SciTech Connect

    Bashkirtseva, Irina

    2015-11-30

    We consider a nonlinear dynamic stochastic system with control. A problem of stochastic sensitivity synthesis of the equilibrium is studied. A mathematical technique of the solution of this problem is discussed. This technique is applied to the problem of the stabilization of the operating mode for the stochastic gas discharge system. We construct a feedback regulator that reduces the stochastic sensitivity of the equilibrium, suppresses large-amplitude oscillations, and provides a proper operation of this engineering device.

  15. Electron beam method and apparatus for obtaining uniform discharges in electrically pumped gas lasers

    DOEpatents

    Fenstermacher, Charles A.; Boyer, Keith

    1986-01-01

    A method and apparatus for obtaining uniform, high-energy, large-volume electrical discharges in the lasing medium of a gas laser whereby a high-energy electron beam is used as an external ionization source to ionize substantially the entire volume of the lasing medium which is then readily pumped by means of an applied potential less than the breakdown voltage of the medium. The method and apparatus are particularly useful in CO.sub.2 laser systems.

  16. VUV generation by adiabatically expanded and excited by a DC electrical discharge Argon gas

    SciTech Connect

    Pipergias, K.; Yasemidis, D.; Reppa, E.; Pentaris, D.; Efthimiopoulos, T.; Merlemis, N.; Giannetas, V.

    2010-11-10

    We investigate the emission of Argon (Ar) gas which is adiabatically expanded through a nozzle and excited using a DC electrical discharge. Because of the expansion and the electronic excitation, Ar dimers and clusters are formed, which give radiation in the second (2nd) and in the third (3rd) continua of Ar, centered at about 126 and 254 nm respectively. We particularly focus our study on the 2nd continuum, in order to develop a laser at this wavelength.

  17. Theoretical Study of Plasma Parameters Dependence on Gas Temperature in an Atmospheric Pressure Argon Microwave Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Pencheva, M.; Benova, E.; Zhelyazkov, I.

    2008-03-19

    The gas temperature is an important parameter in many applications of atmospheric pressure microwave discharges (MW). That is why it is necessary to study the influence of that temperature on the plasma characteristics. Our investigation is based on a self-consistent model including the wave electrodynamics and gas-discharge kinetics. We adopt a blocks' energy structure of the argon excited atom. More specifically, we consider 7 different blocks of states, namely 4s, 4p, 3d, 5s, 5p, 4d, and 6s. Each block k is characterized by its effective energy uk (derived as an average energy of all levels in the block), as well as its effective g-factor and population. The argon dimmer, atomic and molecular ions are also taken into account in the model. We solve the Boltzmann equation in order to get the electron energy distribution function and the necessary rate constants of the elementary processes. The collisional-radiative part of the model is based on 87 processes. As a result we obtain the electron and ions' number densities, mean electron energy, mean power for sustaining an electron--ion pair in the discharge bulk, as well as the population of the excited blocks of states of the argon atom as functions of the gas temperature.

  18. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Prasetyaningrum, A. Ratnawati,; Jos, B.

    2015-12-29

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O{sub 3}) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  19. Effect of pulsed corona discharge voltage and feed gas flow rate on dissolved ozone concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasetyaningrum, A.; Ratnawati, Jos, B.

    2015-12-01

    Ozonization is one of the methods extensively used for water purification and degradation of organic materials. Ozone (O3) is recognized as a powerful oxidizing agent. Due to its strong oxidability and better environmental friendless, ozone increasing being used in domestic and industrial applications. Current technology in ozone production utilizes several techniques (corona discharge, ultra violet radiation and electrolysis). This experiment aimed to evaluating effect of voltage and gas flow rate on ozone production with corona discharge. The system consists of two net-type stainless steel electrode placed in a dielectric barrier. Three pulsed voltage (20, 30, 40 KV) and flow rate (5, 10, 15 L/min) were prepare for operation variable at high frequency (3.7 kHz) with AC pulsed power supply. The dissolved ozone concentration depends on the applied high-voltage level, gas flow rate and the discharge exposure duration. The ozone concentration increases with decreasing gas flow rate. Dissolved ozone concentrations greater than 200 ppm can be obtained with a minimum voltage 40 kV.

  20. Radiation properties of low-pressure discharges in rare-gas mixtures containing xenon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gortchakov, S.; Uhrlandt, D.

    2005-02-01

    Glow discharges in mixtures of xenon with other rare gases can be used as alternatives to mercury-containing UV/VUV radiation sources and fluorescent lamps. The advantages of such sources are environmental compatibility, instant light output after switching on, and less pronounced temperature dependence. However, the optimum choice of the gas composition with respect to the maximum efficiency and power of the xenon resonance radiation as well as to a stable discharge operation still remains an open question. The dc cylindrical positive column of low-pressure discharges in rare-gas mixtures is studied by a detailed self-consistent kinetic description. The influence of the buffer gases helium, neon and argon as well as the appropriate choice of the xenon admixture are revealed by analysing different triple-gas mixtures. Changes in the global power budget and the radial structure of the plasma are discussed. A mixture of He and about 1-2% Xe arises as an optimum composition.

  1. Dynamics of spiral patterns in gas discharge detected by optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fan; Wang, Mingyi; Liu, Shuhua

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics behavior of spiral patterns is investigated in gas discharge using optical method. Rich kinks of spiral patterns are obtained and the formation and evolution process is investigated. The process of pattern formation is breakdown -> hexagon -> bee comb-like -> strip -> spiral -> chaos. Spiral pattern always formed after the strip pattern. It is found that the temperature of the water electrodes plays an important role in the spiral patterns formation. When it exceeds 20°C no spiral has been obtained. The discharge current waveform and the emission spectrum of the discharge have been measured when the filaments self-organized in spiral pattern. Electron excited temperature of forming spiral pattern is calculated using intensity ratio method. It is found that the electron excited temperature of spiral pattern increase as the power supply frequency increased. Relation between wavelength and discharge parameter has been measured. It shows that the wavelength of spiral pattern increases as the discharge gap increases, and decreases as the air ratio mixed in argon increases. Accompanying measurements proved that the wavelength is approximately linear to the square root of the spiral rotating period .This work has useful reference value for studying pattern dynamics.

  2. Improvement of discharge pumping for pulsed high-pressure gas lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velikin, Alexei A.; Galaktionov, Imar I.; Belov, Sergei N.; Kanatenko, Michael A.; Podmoshensky, Ivan V.

    1990-10-01

    This paper presents an upgrading technique using anisotropic-resistive (AR) electrodes and radionucide pre-ionization for discharge pumping of pulsed high-pressure gas lasers. Plutonium-238, polonium-210 and krypton-85 radionucide alpha and beta radiation sources were effectivelyused for pre-ionization in the volumetric discharge setup. These sources feature high stability, versatility and simplicity as compared to traditional UV irradiation and electron beam ionization techniques. The use of AR electrodes makes it possible to suppress efficiently electrode instabilities in volumetric discharges with various power modes of operation and to increase energy input in an active medium by a factor of 2-3 due to extended discharge duration in the volumetric phase. With the use of the AR cathode as an alternative to a metal one, a commercially available photo-ionization 2 laser gained two-fold increase in generation energy. It also showed a stable operation of the volumetric discharge in Ar, Kr, Xe mixtures with He at atmospheric pressure and allowed us to obtain generation in An, Kr!, Xe! spectral lines.

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by

  4. Low temperature performance of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, E. S.; Tuhovak, D. R.; Post, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells for low temperature applications have been developed. Prismatic and spirally wound AA cells were tested under constant load discharge of 0.3 to 1.8 amps or pulse discharge of 0.225 or 1.0 amps at temperatures from -40 to 25 C. At -40 C with current densities of 2.5 mA/cm2, 23 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under constant load discharge and 40 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under pulse test. Self-discharge estimates of 0.7 percent per year at 25 C were obtained from microcalorimetry. Preliminary safety testing of the cells revealed no violent performance under short circuit or crush tests.

  5. Low temperature performance of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, E. S.; Tuhovak, D. R.; Post, C. J.

    Lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells for low temperature applications have been developed. Prismatic and spirally wound AA cells were tested under constant load discharge of 0.3 to 1.8 amps or pulse discharge of 0.225 or 1.0 amps at temperatures from -40 to 25 C. At -40 C with current densities of 2.5 mA/cm2, 23 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under constant load discharge and 40 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under pulse test. Self-discharge estimates of 0.7 percent per year at 25 C were obtained from microcalorimetry. Preliminary safety testing of the cells revealed no violent performance under short circuit or crush tests.

  6. Low temperature performance of lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, E. S.; Tuhovak, D. R.; Post, C. J.

    1990-01-01

    Lithium/silver vanadium oxide cells for low temperature applications have been developed. Prismatic and spirally wound AA cells were tested under constant load discharge of 0.3 to 1.8 amps or pulse discharge of 0.225 or 1.0 amps at temperatures from -40 to 25 C. At -40 C with current densities of 2.5 mA/cm2, 23 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under constant load discharge and 40 percent of theoretical capacity was achieved under pulse test. Self-discharge estimates of 0.7 percent per year at 25 C were obtained from microcalorimetry. Preliminary safety testing of the cells revealed no violent performance under short circuit or crush tests.

  7. Influence of the microstructure on the charge transport in semiconductor gas discharge electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadiq, Y.; Aktas, K.; Acar, S.; Salamov, B. G.

    2010-06-01

    Experimental results with nonlinear features and hysteresis characteristics in the pre-breakdown Townsend discharge regime is studied experimentally for a planar microstructure with a GaAs photocathode, an interelectrode gap thickness of 445 μm and gas pressure in the range 28-66 Torr. An investigation of the effect of the voltage amplitude on the dynamics of transient processes in the semiconductor gas discharge microstructure was made to explain the mechanism of the current decay. A linearly increasing voltage (i.e. 3 V s and 5 V s voltage rate) was applied to the system to study current instability. The nonlinear transport mechanism of carriers through the cross-section of the discharge gap i.e. the appearance of the spatio-temporal self-organization of a nonlinear dissipative system, non-equilibrium electron motion and autocatalytic effect of carrier accumulation in the gas layer attributed to decrease of current with the increase of applied voltage. It is established that the pre-breakdown current decreases anomalously with increase of the feeding voltage and illumination intensity on the photocathode. The current density change through the cross-section of the discharge gap, i.e. the appearance of the spatio-temporal self-organization of nonlinear dissipative systems, causes these observed effects. On the other hand, the oscillatory current with non-monotonic N-shaped and hysteresis peculiarities in post-breakdown region is known to be related to a nonlinear mechanism of carrier transport in the semiconductor material caused by EL2 defect centres.

  8. Analytical model of atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive Penning discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieberman, M. A.

    2015-04-01

    Atmospheric and near-atmospheric pressure, helium/trace gas radio-frequency capacitive discharges have wide applications. An analytic equilibrium solution is developed based on a homogeneous, current-driven discharge model that includes sheath and electron multiplication effects and contains two electron populations. A simplified chemistry is used with four unknown densities: hot electrons, warm electrons, positive ions and metastables. The dominant electron-ion pair production is Penning ionization, and the dominant ion losses are to the walls. The equilibrium particle balances are used to determine a single ionization balance equation for the warm electron temperature, which is solved, both approximately within the α- and γ-modes, and exactly by conventional root-finding techniques. All other discharge parameters are found, the extinction and α-γ transitions are determined, and a similarity law is given, in which the equilibrium for a short gap at high pressure can be rescaled to a longer gap at lower pressure. Within the α-mode, we find the scaling of the discharge parameters with current density, frequency, gas density and gap width. The analytic results are compared to hybrid and particle-in-cell (PIC) results for He/0.1%N2, and to hybrid results for He/0.1%H2O. For nitrogen, a full reaction set is used for the hybrid calculations and a simplified reaction set for the PIC simulations. For the chemically complex water trace gas, a set of 209 reactions among 43 species is used. The analytic results are found to be in reasonably good agreement with the more elaborate hybrid and PIC calculations.

  9. Effect of Submarine Groundwater Discharge on Relict Arctic Submarine Permafrost and Gas Hydrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frederick, J. M.; Buffett, B. A.

    2014-12-01

    Permafrost-associated gas hydrate deposits exist at shallow depths within the sediments of the circum-Arctic continental shelves. Degradation of this shallow water reservoir has the potential to release large quantities of methane gas directly to the atmosphere. Gas hydrate stability and the permeability of the shelf sediments to gas migration is closely linked with submarine permafrost. Submarine permafrost extent depends on several factors, such as the lithology, sea level variations, mean annual air temperature, ocean bottom water temperature, geothermal heat flux, and the salinity of the pore water. The salinity of the pore water is especially relevant because it partially controls the freezing point for both ice and gas hydrate. Measurements of deep pore water salinity are few and far between, but show that deep off-shore sediments are fresh. Deep freshening has been attributed to large-scale topographically-driven submarine groundwater discharge, which introduces fresh terrestrial groundwater into deep marine sediments. We investigate the role of submarine ground water discharge on the salinity field and its effects on the seaward extent of relict submarine permafrost and gas hydrate stability on the Arctic shelf with a 2D shelf-scale model based on the finite volume method. The model tracks the evolution of the temperature, salinity, and pressure fields given imposed boundary conditions, with latent heat of water ice and hydrate formation included. The permeability structure of the sediments is coupled to changes in permafrost. Results show that pore fluid is strongly influenced by the permeability variations imposed by the overlying permafrost layer. Groundwater discharge tends to travel horizontally off-shore beneath the permafrost layer and the freshwater-saltwater interface location displays long timescale transient behavior that is dependent on the groundwater discharge strength. The seaward permafrost extent is in turn strongly influenced by the

  10. [The influence factors of SO2 removal in flue gas with a pulsed corona discharge].

    PubMed

    Li, J; Wu, Y; Wang, N; Li, G; Zhang, Y

    2001-09-01

    The influence of the operation parameters on SO2 removal rate with a pulsed corona discharge was studied in this paper, in order to promote the industrial applications of this technology. The flow rate of the flue gas was 1000-3000 m3/h. The SO2 removal rate reached 80%. The range of SO2 concentration in flue gas was 1000-2000 ml/m3. The flue gas temperature was 60 degrees C-80 degrees C. The molecule ratio of NH3 to SO2 was 2. The energy consumption was 3-5 W.h/Nm3. The wire-plane electrode structure and a positive high voltage pulse power supply were used in the experiment.

  11. Nondestructive Evaluation of the J-2X Direct Metal Laser Sintered Gas Generator Discharge Duct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Esther, Elizabeth A.; Beshears, Ronald D.; Lash, Rhonda K.

    2012-01-01

    The J-2X program at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) procured a direct metal laser sintered (DMLS) gas generator discharge duct from Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne and Morris Technologies for a test program that would evaluate the material properties and durability of the duct in an engine-like environment. DMLS technology was pursued as a manufacturing alternative to traditional techniques, which used off nominal practices to manufacture the gas generator duct's 180 degree turn geometry. MSFC's Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) Team performed radiographic, ultrasonic, computed tomographic, and fluorescent penetrant examinations of the duct. Results from the NDE examinations reveal some shallow porosity but no major defects in the as-manufactured material. NDE examinations were also performed after hot-fire testing the gas generator duct and yielded similar results pre and post-test and showed no flaw growth or development.

  12. Analytical calculation of the gas temperature and time-resolved measurement of the electron temperature of a gas discharge in He and Ne-He mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Slaveeva, S. I.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2012-03-01

    The gas and electron temperatures were determined in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in a new high-temperature discharge tube design developed for a high-power large-volume middle-infrared He-SrBr2 laser. Assuming that the gas temperature varies only in the radial direction, analytical solution of the steady-state heat conduction equation was obtained at uniform power input and, for the first time, for each zone of the discharge tube, namely, discharge zone, ceramic tube, discharge-free zone incompactly filled with zirconia fibers insulation, and quartz tube. The line-ratio optical emission spectroscopy method was used to determine experimentally for the first time the time-resolved electron temperature in the discharge afterglow, namely, measurement of the relative intensities of some He and Ne spectral lines originating from different upper levels. The average values of the electron temperature were also found by averaging the time-resolved electron temperature over the time.

  13. Scenario Analysis of the Impact on Drinking Water Intakes from Bromide in the Discharge of Treated Oil and Gas Wastewater

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    EPA scientists created different scenarios for conventional commercial wastewater treatment plants that treat oil and gas wastewaters to evaluate the impact from bromide in discharges by the CWTP plants.

  14. Plasma Discharges in Gas Bubbles in Liquid Water: Breakdown Mechanisms and Resultant Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gucker, Sarah M. N.

    The use of atmospheric pressure plasmas in gases and liquids for purification of liquids has been investigated by numerous researchers, and is highly attractive due to their strong potential as a disinfectant and sterilizer. However, the fundamental understanding of plasma production in liquid water is still limited. Despite the decades of study dedicated to electrical discharges in liquids, many physical aspects of liquids, such as the high inhomogeneity of liquids, complicate analyses. For example, the complex nonlinearities of the fluid have intricate effects on the electric field of the propagating streamer. Additionally, the liquid material itself can vaporize, leading to discontinuous liquid-vapor boundaries. Both can and do often lead to notable hydrodynamic effects. The chemistry of these high voltage discharges on liquid media can have circular effects, with the produced species having influence on future discharges. Two notable examples include an increase in liquid conductivity via charged species production, which affects the discharge. A second, more complicated scenario seen in some liquids (such as water) is the doubling or tripling of molecular density for a few molecule layers around a high voltage electrode. These complexities require technological advancements in optical diagnostics that have only recently come into being. This dissertation investigates several aspects of electrical discharges in gas bubbles in liquids. Two primary experimental configurations are investigated: the first allows for single bubble analysis through the use of an acoustic trap. Electrodes may be brought in around the bubble to allow for plasma formation without physically touching the bubble. The second experiment investigates the resulting liquid phase chemistry that is driven by the discharge. This is done through a dielectric barrier discharge with a central high voltage surrounded by a quartz discharge tube with a coil ground electrode on the outside. The plasma

  15. Electrospray mass spectrometry of methanol and water solutions suppression of electric discharge with SF6 gas.

    PubMed

    Ikonomou, M G; Blades, A T; Kebarle, P

    1991-12-01

    An equation by D. P. H. Smith predicts the capillary voltage required for the onset of electrospray (ES). For different solvents the voltage increases with the square root of the surface tension. Water requires a potential that is 1.8 times higher than that for methanol. This is verified experimentally. The higher potential required for water leads to ES in the presence of corona electric discharge. For low total ES plus corona currents, the electrosprayed analyte ion intensity is not adversely affected by the presence of discharge. At high total currents, there is a large decrease of analyte sensitivity. The sensitivity decrease is probably due to adverse space charge effect at high currents. The discharge can be suppressed by adding sulfur hexafluoride to the ambient gas. Both sensitivity and signal stability are improved. However, the sensitivity still remains lower by a factor of - 4 relative to that observed with methanol. This is attributed to lower efficiency of gas-phase ion formation from charged water, relative to methanol, droplets.

  16. Breakdown voltage reliability improvement in gas-discharge tube surge protectors employing graphite field emitters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Žumer, Marko; Zajec, Bojan; Rozman, Robert; Nemanič, Vincenc

    2012-04-01

    Gas-discharge tube (GDT) surge protectors are known for many decades as passive units used in low-voltage telecom networks for protection of electrical components from transient over-voltages (discharging) such as lightning. Unreliability of the mean turn-on DC breakdown voltage and the run-to-run variability has been overcome successfully in the past by adding, for example, a radioactive source inside the tube. Radioisotopes provide a constant low level of free electrons, which trigger the breakdown. In the last decades, any concept using environmentally harmful compounds is not acceptable anymore and new solutions were searched. In our application, a cold field electron emitter source is used as the trigger for the gas discharge but with no activating compound on the two main electrodes. The patent literature describes in details the implementation of the so-called trigger wires (auxiliary electrodes) made of graphite, placed in between the two main electrodes, but no physical explanation has been given yet. We present experimental results, which show that stable cold field electron emission current in the high vacuum range originating from the nano-structured edge of the graphite layer is well correlated to the stable breakdown voltage of the GDT surge protector filled with a mixture of clean gases.

  17. A compact repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge.

    PubMed

    Pang, Lei; Zhang, Qiaogen; Ren, Baozhong; He, Kun

    2011-04-01

    Uniform and stable discharge plasma requires very short duration pulses with fast rise times. A repetitive high-voltage nanosecond pulse generator for the application of gas discharge is presented in this paper. It is constructed with all solid-state components. Two-stage magnetic compression is used to generate a short duration pulse. Unlike in some reported studies, common commercial fast recovery diodes instead of a semiconductor opening switch (SOS) are used in our experiment that plays the role of SOS. The SOS-like effects of four different kinds of diodes are studied experimentally to optimize the output performance. It is found that the output pulse voltage is higher with a shorter reverse recovery time, and the rise time of pulse becomes faster when the falling time of reverse recovery current is shorter. The SOS-like effect of the diodes can be adjusted by changing the external circuit parameters. Through optimization the pulse generator can provide a pulsed voltage of 40 kV with a 40 ns duration, 10 ns rise time, and pulse repetition frequency of up to 5 kHz. Diffuse plasma can be formed in air at standard atmospheric pressure using the developed pulse generator. With a light weight and small packaging the pulse generator is suitable for gas discharge application. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  18. A high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antipov, E. I.; Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2016-12-01

    The characteristics of a high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization of the gas (air) in a spark gap by an additional corona discharge are investigated. The experiments were performed in a voltage range of 10-45 kV using a two-electrode switch consisting of two cylindrical electrodes with a diameter of 22 mm and a length of 100 mm and a set of laterally located corona-discharge needles. The requirements for the position and size of the needles are defined for which a corona discharge is ignited before a breakdown of the main gap and does not change to a sparking form, and the entire length of the rail electrodes is efficiently used. The fulfillment of these requirements ensures stable operation of the switch with a small variation of the pulse breakdown voltage, which is not more than 1% for a fixed voltage-pulse rise time in the range from 150 ns to 3.5 μs. A short delay time of the switch breakdown makes it possible to control the two-electrode switch by an overvoltage pulse of nanosecond duration.

  19. A high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization by an additional corona discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Antipov, E. I.; Belozerov, O. S.; Krastelev, E. G.

    2016-12-15

    The characteristics of a high-current rail-type gas switch with preionization of the gas (air) in a spark gap by an additional corona discharge are investigated. The experiments were performed in a voltage range of 10–45 kV using a two-electrode switch consisting of two cylindrical electrodes with a diameter of 22 mm and a length of 100 mm and a set of laterally located corona-discharge needles. The requirements for the position and size of the needles are defined for which a corona discharge is ignited before a breakdown of the main gap and does not change to a sparking form, and the entire length of the rail electrodes is efficiently used. The fulfillment of these requirements ensures stable operation of the switch with a small variation of the pulse breakdown voltage, which is not more than 1% for a fixed voltage-pulse rise time in the range from 150 ns to 3.5 μs. A short delay time of the switch breakdown makes it possible to control the two-electrode switch by an overvoltage pulse of nanosecond duration.

  20. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  1. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  2. Investigating Titan's Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature in Support of the NASA Cassini Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Salama, Farid

    2013-01-01

    Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 and CH4, is the siege of a complex chemistry induced by solar UV radiation and electron bombardment from Saturn's magnetosphere. This organic chemistry occurs at temperatures lower than 200 K and leads to the production of heavy molecules and subsequently solid aerosols that form the orange haze surrounding Titan. The Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment has been developed on the COSMIC simulation chamber at NASA Ames in order to study the different steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature and to provide laboratory data in support for Cassini data analysis. The chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas mixture is adiabatically cooled to Titan-like temperature (approx. 150 K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma discharge. Different gas mixtures containing N2, CH4, and the first products of the N2,-CH4 chemistry (C2H2, C2H4, C6H6...) but also heavier molecules such as PAHs or nitrogen containing PAHs can be injected. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed. Here we present the results of recent gas phase and solid phase studies that highlight the chemical growth evolution when injecting heavier hydrocarbon trace elements in the initial N2-CH4 mixture. Due to the short residence time of the gas in the plasma discharge, only the first steps of the chemistry have time to occur in a N2-CH4 discharge. However by adding acetylene and benzene to the initial N2-CH4 mixture, we can study the intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways. These results show the uniqueness of the THS experiment to help understand the first and intermediate steps of Titan fs atmospheric chemistry as well as specific chemical pathways leading to Titan fs haze formation.

  3. Search for helium synthesis on a platinum cathode in a gas discharge in deuterium. A negative result

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aleksandrov, E. B.; Kulyasov, V. N.; Yakobson, N. N.

    2017-07-01

    An attempt has been made to detect a helium synthesis reaction resulting from a collision of deuterium nuclei diffusing on a surface of a platinum cathode under gas-discharge conditions. After 134 h of discharge in a flask with deuterium, helium spectral lines have not been detected with an accuracy of 10-4 of the intensity of deuterium spectral lines.

  4. Prototype low temperature low power cryocooler

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, W.G.

    1982-02-01

    Over the past several years considerable interest has developed for low power, low cost mechanical cryocoolers for use in cooling SQUIDS and other superconducting devices. In 1977 Dr. Jim Zimmerman of National Bureau of Standards, Boulder, CO described a stirling cycle cryocooler that exhibited the following desirable characteristics: (1) Low input power (approximately 50 watts connected load); (2) Modest cooling capacity at very low temperature; (3) Constructed of non-ferromagnetic materials; and (4) Simple design. Dr. Zimmerman's intent was to demonstrate the feasibility of constructing a simple low power cryocooler capable of cooling an operational SQUID. After several modifications of the original cryocooler, Dr. Zimmerman successfully operated a point-Contact Nb SQUID on a four-stage stirling cycle cryocooler with a mechanical drive power of approximately 15 watts, and a capacity of few milliwatts at less than 9 Kelvin. During this period Lake Shore Cryotronics, Inc. successfully negotiated an exclusive licensing (for the U.S.) agreement with Oxford Instruments Ltd. concerning a simple patented single stage cryocooler utilizing a slide-valve-controlled gas driven displacer drive head, powered by a remote conventional high speed compressor. The lowest temperature achieved was less than 20 Kelvin with the two stage cylinder/displacer operating at a cycle rate of 2Hz, 100 psi inlet (pressure), and 20 psi outlet pressure.

  5. Low temperature growth of boron nitride nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chee Huei; Xie, Ming; Wang, Jiesheng; Khin Yap, Yoke

    2008-03-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs) are promising nanostuctures that will complement the applications of carbon nanotubes in various emerging areas. However, the synthesis of BNNTs is still challenging and required high growth temperatures (1500 C to 3000 C). Here we will discuss about two approaches for low temperature growth of BNNTs. First, we have reported on the growth of pure BNNTs at 600 C by a plasma-enhanced pulsed-laser deposition (PE-PLD) technique [1]. These BNNTs were grown vertically-aligned on substrates. Latest result on the effect of catalyst, growth temperatures, ambient gas pressures, substrate bias voltages and the growth mechanism will be discussed in the meeting. Secondly, effective growth of BNNTs is recently achieved by conventional thermal chemical vapor deposition (CVD). Our new CVD approach leads to effective growth of long and clean BNNTs at 1200 C. SEM, TEM, EELS, Raman, FTIR, and UV absorption data indicate that these BNNTs are having high structural ordered and a energy band gap > 5.6 eV. [1]. J. Wang et. al, Nano Lett. 5, 2528 (2005).

  6. Analysis of double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharges and its improvement

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, DongLin Li, XiaoPing; Xie, Kai; Liu, ZhiWei; Shao, MingXu

    2015-01-15

    The double-probe has been used successfully in radio-frequency discharges. However, in low-frequency discharges, the double-probe I-V curve is so much seriously distorted by the strong plasma potential fluctuations that the I-V curve may lead to a large estimate error of plasma parameters. To suppress the distortion, we investigate the double-probe characteristics in low-frequency gas discharge based on an equivalent circuit model, taking both the plasma sheath and probe circuit into account. We discovered that there are two primary interferences to the I-V curve distortion: the voltage fluctuation between two probe tips caused by the filter difference voltage and the current peak at the negative edge of the plasma potential. Consequently, we propose a modified passive filter to reduce the two types of interference simultaneously. Experiments are conducted in a glow-discharge plasma (f = 30 kHz) to test the performance of the improved double probe. The results show that the electron density error is reduced from more than 100% to less than 10%. The proposed improved method is also suitable in cases where intensive potential fluctuations exist.

  7. Organic acids enhanced decoloration of azo dye in gas phase surface discharge plasma system.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tiecheng; Qu, Guangzhou; Ren, Jingyu; Sun, Qiuhong; Liang, Dongli; Hu, Shibin

    2016-01-25

    A gas phase surface discharge plasma combined with organic acids system was developed to enhance active species mass transfer and dye-containing wastewater treatment efficacy, with Acid Orange II (AO7) as the model pollutant. The effects of discharge voltage and various organic acid additives (acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid) on AO7 decoloration efficiency were evaluated. The experimental results showed that an AO7 decoloration efficiency of approximately 69.0% was obtained within 4 min of discharge plasma treatment without organic acid addition, which was improved to 82.8%, 83.5% and 88.6% within the same treatment time with the addition of acetic acid, lactic acid and nonoic acid, respectively. The enhancement effects on AO7 decoloration efficiency could be attributed to the decrease in aqueous surface tension, improvement in bubble distribution and shape, and increase in ozone equivalent concentration. The AO7 wastewater was biodegradable after discharge plasma treatment with the addition of organic acid. AO7 decomposition intermediates were analyzed by UV-vis spectrometry and GC-MS; 2-naphthol, 1,4-benzoquinone, phthalic anhydride, coumarin, 1,2-naphthoquinone, and 2-formyl-benzoic acid were detected. A possible pathway for AO7 decomposition in this system was proposed.

  8. Singlet delta oxygen production in a 2D micro-discharge array in air: effect of gas residence time and discharge power

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nayak, Gaurav; Santos Sousa, João; Bruggeman, Peter J.

    2017-03-01

    The production of singlet delta oxygen (O2(a 1Δg)) is of growing interest for many applications. We report on the measurement of O2(a 1Δg) and ozone (O3) in a room temperature atmospheric pressure discharge in dry air. The plasma source is a 2D array of micro-discharges generated by an alternating current voltage at 20 kHz. The study focuses on the effect of gas flow through the discharge. The maximum investigated flow rate allows reducing the gas residence time in the discharge zone to half the discharge period. Results indicate that the residence time and discharge power have a major effect on the O2(a 1Δg) production. Different O2(a 1Δg) density dependencies on power are observed for different flow rates. Effects of collisional quenching on the as-produced and measured O2(a 1Δg) densities are discussed. The flow rate also allows for control of the O2(a 1Δg) to O3 density ratio in the effluent from 0.7 to conditions of pure O3.

  9. Plasma ionization frequency, edge-to-axis density ratio, and density on axis of a cylindrical gas discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Palacio Mizrahi, J. H.

    2014-06-15

    A rigorous derivation of expressions, starting from the governing equations, for the ionization frequency, edge-to-axis ratio of plasma density, plasma density at the axis, and radially averaged plasma density in a cylindrical gas discharge has been obtained. The derived expressions are simple and involve the relevant parameters of the discharge: Cylinder radius, axial current, and neutral gas pressure. The found expressions account for ion inertia, ion temperature, and changes in plasma ion collisionality.

  10. Spacecraft Charging in Low Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda N.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft charging in plasma and radiation environments is a temperature dependent phenomenon due to the reduction of electrical conductivity in dielectric materials at low temperatures. Charging time constants are proportional to l/conductivity may become very large (on the order of days to years) at low temperatures and accumulation of charge densities in insulators in charging environments traditionally considered benign at ambient temperatures may be sufficient to produce charge densities and electric fields of concern in insulators at low temperatures. Low temperature charging is of interest because a number of spacecraft-primarily infrared astronomy and microwave cosmology observatories-are currently being design, built, and or operated at very cold temperatures on the order of 40K to 100K. This paper reviews the temperature dependence of spacecraft charging processes and material parameters important to charging as a function of temperature with an emphasis on low temperatures regimes.

  11. [Study on Spectral Characteristics of Micro Plasma Channels of Different Gas-Gap in Dielectric Barrier Discharge].

    PubMed

    Gao, Ye-nan; Dong, Li-fang; Liu, Ying

    2015-10-01

    By optical emission spectrum, we report on the first investigation on the plasma parameters of micro plasma channels which are generated in two gas-gaps with different thickness in a triple-layer dielectric barrier discharge system. Different from the micro plasma channels formed in traditional two-layer dielectric barrier discharge, micro plasma channels formed in the triple-layer dielectric barrier discharge system reflect a unique discharge characteristic. From the pattern images taken by an ordinary camera, it shows that micro plasma channels generated in two discharge gas-gaps discharge with different sizes and light intensities. The micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap are much bigger than those in narrow gas-gap, and their light intensities are obvious stronger. By collecting the emission spectra of N2 second positive band (C3∏u --> B3∏g ) and calculating the relative intensity ratio method of N2 molecular ion line at 391.4 and the N2 molecular line at 394.1, the molecular vibration temperature and the average electron energy of micro plasma channels in two gas-gaps as functions of Argon concentration and applied voltage are investigated, respectively. It is found that the molecular vibration temperature and the average electron energy of micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap are lower than those in narrow gas-gap, and they both decrease with the increasing of the Argon concentration. As the applied voltage increases, micro plasma channels in wide gas-gap vary in a small range on the above two plasma investigations, while those in narrow gas-gap vary obviously. It indicates that micro plasma channels in narrow gas-gap are more sensitive to the applied voltage and they have a wider variation range of electric field than those in wide gas-gap.

  12. Development of a parallel implicit solver of fluid modeling equations for gas discharges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hung, Chieh-Tsan; Chiu, Yuan-Ming; Hwang, Feng-Nan; Wu, Jong-Shinn

    2011-01-01

    A parallel fully implicit PETSc-based fluid modeling equations solver for simulating gas discharges is developed. Fluid modeling equations include: the neutral species continuity equation, the charged species continuity equation with drift-diffusion approximation for mass fluxes, the electron energy density equation, and Poisson's equation for electrostatic potential. Except for Poisson's equation, all model equations are discretized by the fully implicit backward Euler method as a time integrator, and finite differences with the Scharfetter-Gummel scheme for mass fluxes on the spatial domain. At each time step, the resulting large sparse algebraic nonlinear system is solved by the Newton-Krylov-Schwarz algorithm. A 2D-GEC RF discharge is used as a benchmark to validate our solver by comparing the numerical results with both the published experimental data and the theoretical prediction. The parallel performance of the solver is investigated.

  13. Magnetic Ignition of Pulsed Gas Discharges in Air of Low Pressure in a Coaxial Plasma Gun

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thom, Karlheinz; Norwood, Joseph, Jr.

    1961-01-01

    The effect of an axial magnetic field on the breakdown voltage of a coaxial system of electrodes has been investigated by earlier workers. For low values of gas pressure times electrode spacing, the breakdown voltage is decreased by the application of the magnetic field. The electron cyclotron radius now assumes the role held by the mean free path in nonmagnetic discharges and the breakdown voltage becomes a function of the magnetic flux density. In this paper the dependence of the formative time lag as a function of the magnetic flux density is established and the feasibility of using a magnetic field for igniting high-voltage, high-current discharges is shown through theory and experiment. With a 36 microfarad capacitor bank charged to 48,000 volts, a peak current of 1.3 x 10( exp 6) amperes in a coaxial type of plasma gun was achieved with a current rise time of only 2 microseconds.

  14. Runaway electron beams in the gas discharge for UV nitrogen laser excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Khomich, V. Yu.; Yamschikov, V. A.

    2011-12-15

    The review of the methods for obtaining the runaway electron beams in the gas discharge is performed. The new method is offered, using which the beam is first formed in a narrow gap ({approx}1 mm) between the cathode and the grid and then it is accelerated by the field of the plasma column of the anomalous self-sustained discharge in the main gap (10-20 mm long). The electron beams with an energy of about 10 keV and current density of 10{sup 3} A/cm{sup 2} at a molecular nitrogen pressure of up to 100 Torr have been obtained experimentally. The results of research of the UV nitrogen laser with an excitation via runaway electron beam and radiation of energy of {approx}1 mJ are given. The UV nitrogen laser generation with the energy of {approx}1 mJ has been obtained by the runaway electron beams.

  15. Kinetic temperature of dust particle motion in gas-discharge plasma.

    PubMed

    Norman, G E; Timofeev, A V

    2011-11-01

    A system of equations describing motion of dust particles in gas discharge plasma is formulated. This system is developed for a monolayer of dust particles with an account of dust particle charge fluctuations and features of the discharge near-electrode layer. Molecular dynamics simulation of the dust particles system is performed. A mechanism of dust particle average kinetic energy increase is suggested on the basis of theoretical analysis of the simulation results. It is shown that heating of dust particles' vertical motion is initiated by forced oscillations caused by the dust particles' charge fluctuations. The process of energy transfer from vertical to horizontal motion is based on the phenomenon of the parametric resonance. The combination of parametric and forced resonances explains the abnormally high values of the dust particles' kinetic energy. Estimates of frequency, amplitude, and kinetic energy of dust particles are close to the experimental values.

  16. Experimental Investigation of Breakdown Voltage and Electrical Breakdown Time Delay of Commercial Gas Discharge Tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pejović, Milić Momčilo; Pejović, Momčilo Milić; Stanković, Koviljka

    2011-08-01

    This article presents the experimental results of DC dynamic breakdown voltage Ub for small voltage increase rates and electrical breakdown time delay td of commercial gas discharge tubes. It was shown that Ub is a stochastic value with Gauss distribution for voltage increase rates ≥2 V/s. In order to determine the static breakdown voltage Us as a deterministic quantity, the mean values of the dynamic breakdown voltage \\bar{U}b as a function of voltage increase rate k were extrapolated until the intersection with \\bar{U}b axis using linear fit. The intersection point (for k = 0) correspond to Us value. Additional experiments were performed in order to verify the temperature stability of these components over the wide temperature range from 25 to 250 °C. The experimental results of electrical breakdown time delay are also presented in the paper. Electrical breakdown time delay if often refereed as delay response and it is also very important parameter of gas filled devices. It was shown when the voltage higher then 310 V is applied to those components, the mean value of electrical breakdown time delay \\bar{t}d insignificantly varies to the value of relaxation time τ≈ 1 s, while the breakdown probability is close to one for the voltages higher then 380 V. These facts show that the commercial gas discharge tubes are very reliable for the protection for voltages higher then 380 V.

  17. Effect of humidity on gas temperature in the afterglow of pulsed positive corona discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Ryo; Teramoto, Yoshiyuki; Oda, Tetsuji

    2010-01-01

    The effects of humidity on gas temperature in the afterglow of a pulsed positive corona discharge are studied. The gas temperature is measured using the laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) of NO molecules. The discharge occurs in a 13 mm point-to-plane gap under atmospheric pressure. When the water vapor concentration in air is increased from 0.5% to 2.4%, the temperature increases from 550 to 850 K near the anode tip, and from 350 to 650 K at a position 2.5 mm from the anode tip. The gas heating in the humid environment is due to the fast vibration-to-vibration processes of the O2-H2O and N2-H2O systems and the extremely rapid vibration-to-translation process of the H2O-H2O system. These processes accelerate the transfer of energy from O2(v) and N2(v) to translational energy. Measurements of the LIF of O2(v = 6) show that the decay rate of O2(v) density is increased by humidification.

  18. Simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, Alexandre A.

    2012-06-01

    In this work, we are going to perform a simulation of a wire-cylinder-plate positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas, and compare our results with already published experimental results in air for the same structure. We have chosen to simulate this innovative geometry because it has been established experimentally that it can generate a thrust per unit electrode length transmitted to the gas of up to 0.35 N/m and is also able to induce an ion wind top velocity in the range of 8-9 m/s in air. In our model, the used ion source is a small diameter wire, which generates a positive corona discharge in nitrogen gas directed to the ground electrode, after which the generated positive ions are further accelerated in the acceleration channel between the ground and cathode. By applying the fluid dynamic and electrostatic theories, all hydrodynamic and electrostatic forces that act on the considered geometries will be computed in an attempt to theoretically confirm the generated ion wind profile and also the thrust per unit electrode length. These results are important to establish the validity of this simulation tool for the future study and development of this effect for practical purposes.

  19. Effects of water vapor on flue gas conditioning in the electric fields with corona discharge.

    PubMed

    Liqiang, Qi; Yajuan, Zhang

    2013-07-15

    Sulfur dioxide (SO2) removal via pulsed discharge nonthermal plasma in the absence of ammonia was investigated to determine how electrostatic precipitators (ESPs) can effectively collect particulate matter less than 2.5μm in diameter from flue gas. SO2 removal increased as water vapor concentration increased. In a wet-type plasma reactor, directing a gas-phase discharge plasma toward the water film surface significantly enhanced the liquid-phase oxidation of HSO3(-) to SO4(2-). Comparisons of various absorbents revealed that the hydroxyl radical is a key factor in plasma-induced liquid-phase reactions. The resistivity, size distribution, and cohesive force of fly ash at different water vapor contents were measured using a Bahco centrifuge, which is a dust electrical resistivity test instrument, as well as a cohesive force test apparatus developed by the researchers. When water vapor content increased by 5%, fly ash resistivity in flue gas decreased by approximately two orders of magnitude, adhesive force and size increased, and specific surface area decreased. Therefore, ESP efficiency increased. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. A parallel hybrid numerical algorithm for simulating gas flow and gas discharge of an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, K.-M.; Hu, M.-H.; Hung, C.-T.; Wu, J.-S.; Hwang, F.-N.; Chen, Y.-S.; Cheng, G.

    2012-12-01

    Development of a hybrid numerical algorithm which couples weakly with the gas flow model (GFM) and the plasma fluid model (PFM) for simulating an atmospheric-pressure plasma jet (APPJ) and its acceleration by two approaches is presented. The weak coupling between gas flow and discharge is introduced by transferring between the results obtained from the steady-state solution of the GFM and cycle-averaged solution of the PFM respectively. Approaches of reducing the overall runtime include parallel computing of the GFM and the PFM solvers, and employing a temporal multi-scale method (TMSM) for PFM. Parallel computing of both solvers is realized using the domain decomposition method with the message passing interface (MPI) on distributed-memory machines. The TMSM considers only chemical reactions by ignoring the transport terms when integrating temporally the continuity equations of heavy species at each time step, and then the transport terms are restored only at an interval of time marching steps. The total reduction of runtime is 47% by applying the TMSM to the APPJ example presented in this study. Application of the proposed hybrid algorithm is demonstrated by simulating a parallel-plate helium APPJ impinging onto a substrate, which the cycle-averaged properties of the 200th cycle are presented. The distribution patterns of species densities are strongly correlated by the background gas flow pattern, which shows that consideration of gas flow in APPJ simulations is critical.

  1. 2D numerical modelling of gas temperature in a nanosecond pulsed longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge excited in a high temperature gas-discharge tube for the high-power strontium laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernogorova, T. P.; Temelkov, K. A.; Koleva, N. K.; Vuchkov, N. K.

    2016-05-01

    An active volume scaling in bore and length of a Sr atom laser excited in a nanosecond pulse longitudinal He-SrBr2 discharge is carried out. Considering axial symmetry and uniform power input, a 2D model (r, z) is developed by numerical methods for determination of gas temperature in a new large-volume high-temperature discharge tube with additional incompact ZrO2 insulation in the discharge free zone, in order to find out the optimal thermal mode for achievement of maximal output laser parameters. A 2D model (r, z) of gas temperature is developed by numerical methods for axial symmetry and uniform power input. The model determines gas temperature of nanosecond pulsed longitudinal discharge in helium with small additives of strontium and bromine.

  2. Modeling Low-temperature Geochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, D. K.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical modeling has become a popular and useful tool for a wide number of applications from research on the fundamental processes of water-rock interactions to regulatory requirements and decisions regarding permits for industrial and hazardous wastes. In low-temperature environments, generally thought of as those in the temperature range of 0-100 °C and close to atmospheric pressure (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101,325 Pa), complex hydrobiogeochemical reactions participate in an array of interconnected processes that affect us, and that, in turn, we affect. Understanding these complex processes often requires tools that are sufficiently sophisticated to portray multicomponent, multiphase chemical reactions yet transparent enough to reveal the main driving forces. Geochemical models are such tools. The major processes that they are required to model include mineral dissolution and precipitation; aqueous inorganic speciation and complexation; solute adsorption and desorption; ion exchange; oxidation-reduction; or redox; transformations; gas uptake or production; organic matter speciation and complexation; evaporation; dilution; water mixing; reaction during fluid flow; reaction involving biotic interactions; and photoreaction. These processes occur in rain, snow, fog, dry atmosphere, soils, bedrock weathering, streams, rivers, lakes, groundwaters, estuaries, brines, and diagenetic environments. Geochemical modeling attempts to understand the redistribution of elements and compounds, through anthropogenic and natural means, for a large range of scale from nanometer to global. "Aqueous geochemistry" and "environmental geochemistry" are often used interchangeably with "low-temperature geochemistry" to emphasize hydrologic or environmental objectives.Recognition of the strategy or philosophy behind the use of geochemical modeling is not often discussed or explicitly described. Plummer (1984, 1992) and Parkhurst and Plummer (1993) compare and contrast two approaches for

  3. Evaluation of a pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector for the determination of neon concentrations by gas chromatography.

    PubMed

    Lasa, J; Mochalski, P; Pusz, J

    2004-05-07

    A pulse-discharge helium ionisation detector, PDHID (Valco, PD-D2-I) with sample introduced to the discharge zone is shown to be applicable for reliable determinations of neon by gas chromatography. The detection level of 80 pg was obtained, but the dependence between detector response and neon mass was non-linear. However, for the discharge gas doped with 33 ppm of neon, a linear response to the neon mass up to 10(-5) g and the detection level of 0.5 ng were obtained. The method can be used for measuring neon concentrations in groundwater systems for hydrogeological purposes.

  4. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  5. Radiation hardness of gas discharge tubes and avalanche diodes used for transient voltage suppression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osmokrović, P.; Jurosević, M.; Stanković, K.; Vujisić, M.

    The widespread use of gas discharge tubes (GDTs) and avalanche diodes for transient voltage suppression (TVS) in many cases results in their exposure to ionizing radiation. The aim of this paper is to investigate the influence of irradiation on these TVS devices' characteristics, by exposing them to a combined neutron/gamma radiation field. Experimental results show that irradiation of TVS diodes causes a lasting degradation of their protective characteristics. On the other hand, GDTs exhibit a temporary change of performance. The observed effects are presented with the accompanying theoretical interpretations, based on the interaction of radiation with materials constituting the investigated devices.

  6. Dynamics of the water molecule density in a discharge chamber filled with a low-pressure humid gas

    SciTech Connect

    Bernatskiy, A. V. Ochkin, V. N.; Bafoev, R. N.; Antipenkov, A. B.

    2016-10-15

    The dynamics of the H{sub 2}O molecule density in a metal gas-discharge chamber filled with low-pressure water vapor or its mixtures with noble gases was investigated by manometric and spectral methods. Regimes both with and without discharge excitation were studied. In the absence of a discharge, the molecule density dynamics is governed by the heterogeneous interaction of molecules with the chamber walls. In the presence of a discharge, in addition to the heterogeneous interaction, fast plasmachemical molecule dissociation also contributes to the initial stage of H{sub 2}O molecule loss. The role of heating of the chamber walls is discussed.

  7. Modelling the interaction between the plasma and the neutral gas in a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Guiberteau, E.; Bonhomme, G.; Zoheir, C.

    1995-12-31

    We present here the first results obtained from the modelling of a pulsed glow discharge in nitrogen, taking into account the heat transfer to the neutral gas. The aim of modelling is to optimize the plasma process in a nitriding reactor. The iron sample to be nitrided forms the cathode of the glow discharge at low pressure (100 to 200 Pa). The reactor uses two disks of diameter 50 mm as electrodes with a 40 mm gap. It works in a pulsed regime (cycle period varies from 10 to 100 ms) with a discharge duration which can be varied from 0.5 to 10 ms. Experimental studies have been carried out using emission spectroscopy resolved in space (1 mm) and time (1 {mu}s), under various discharge and post-discharge durations. These studies have shown the important effect of energy transfer from the discharge to the neutral gas. In fact this transfer produces an expansion of the negative glow observed when the post-discharge duration is decreased. A realistic modelling should thus be performed bearing in mind that the neutral gas behaves not as a thermostat. Consequently the thermal and hydrodynamic evolution of the neutral gas must be considered in the whole modelling.

  8. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  9. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  10. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  11. The THS Experiment: Simulating Titans Atmospheric Chemistry at Low Temperature (200K)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid; Contreras, Cesar Sanchez; Bejaoui, Salma; Foing, Bernard; Pascale, Ehrenfreund

    2015-01-01

    In Titan's atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature ( approximately 150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (approximately 200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics. A recent mass spectrometry[1] study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini's CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine

  12. The THS: Simulating Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, Ella; Upton, Kathleen T.; Beauchamp, Jack L.; Salama, Farid

    2015-08-01

    In Titan’s atmosphere, composed mainly of N2 (95-98%) and CH4 (2-5%), a complex chemistry occurs at low temperature, and leads to the production of heavy organic molecules and subsequently solid aerosols. Here, we used the Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental setup developed at the NASA Ames COSmIC simulation facility to study Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at low temperature. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas- and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics.A recent mass spectrometry study of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan’s atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini’s CAPS-IBS instrument. The results of a complementary study of the solid phase are consistent with the chemical growth evolution observed in the gas phase. Grains and aggregates form in the gas phase and can be jet deposited on various substrates for ex situ analysis. Scanning Electron Microscopy images show that more complex mixtures produce larger aggregates. A DART mass spectrometry analysis of the solid phase has detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS aerosols. X-ray Absorption Near Edge Structure (XANES) measurements also show the presence of imine and nitrile

  13. Evolution of a vortex in gas-discharge plasma with allowance for gas compressibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhomlinov, V. S.; Mustafaev, A. S.

    2016-09-01

    The dynamics of a vortex tube in a compressible medium with the Rayleigh energy release mechanism has been considered theoretically. The analytic theory of this phenomenon is constructed and various approximations have been considered. The range of applicability conditions for the vortex formation theory has been extended substantially. It has been shown based on the model of a plasma as a Rayleigh medium that, for a certain relative orientation of the vortex axis and the electric field vector at an air pressure of tens of Torr, a vortex tube in the glow discharge plasma is destroyed over time intervals on the order of hundredths of a second. It has been found that allowance for the compressibility leads to an increase in the rate of vortex destruction. For this medium, the time dependences of the tangential velocity in a vortex tube have been calculated for various initial parameters. The similarity rules for the given phenomena and the universal dependence of the vortex tube dynamics have been obtained.

  14. Carbon dioxide fixation by microalgae photosynthesis using actual flue gas discharged from a boiler

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Hiroyo; Shioji, Norio; Hamasaki, Akihiro

    1995-12-31

    To mitigate CO{sub 2} discharged from thermal power plants, studies on CO{sub 2} fixation by the photosynthesis of microalgae using actual exhaust gas have been carried out. The results are as follows: (1) A method is proposed for evaluating the maximum photosynthesis rate in the raceway cultivator using only the algal physical properties; (2) Outdoor cultivation tests taking actual flue gas were performed with no trouble or break throughout 1 yr using the strain collected in the test; (3) The produced microalgae is effective as solid fuel; and (4) The feasibility studies of this system were performed. The system required large land area, but the area is smaller than that required for other biomass systems, such as tree farms.

  15. Determination of limiting gas and liquid discharge through columns with tubular contact devices

    SciTech Connect

    Skvirskii, M.E.; Chernyshev, V.I.; Gertsovskii, V.A.; Olevskii, V.M.

    1984-01-01

    In order for the efficiency of heat- and mass-exchange columns with tubular contact devices to be elevated it is essential to determine at the design stage the limiting discharges (loads) of the gas and liquid phase with precision. The influence of the physiochemical properties of the liquid and gas on the limiting loads of the phases was studied. Distilled water, aqueous glycerin solutions, a mixture of kerosene and carbon tetrachloride, and other mixtures were tested in a laminar-wavy liquid film flow regime. The curve calculated by an equation generalized from the experimental data is compared with experimental data of other researchers. The equation makes it possible to determine by experimental calculation method the rate of flooding of a film tubular column with any geometric determination.

  16. Investigation of scaling laws as applied to the gas discharge in the case of a barrier-discharge-excited Kr/CCl4 mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pikulev, A. A.; Tsvetkov, V. M.

    2010-01-01

    The electrical and luminescent characteristics of a barrier-discharge lamp filled with a Kr/CCl4 (150: 1) mixture are experimentally studied versus the value of pd, which varies in the range (7.6-14) × 103 Pa cm. When simulating the gas discharge using similarity parameters, the following relationships are fulfilled: for pd = const ( p is the pressure, d is the interelectrode distance), the pulse duration and the mean current density are τ j ˜ 1/ p and < j> ˜ p; the surface charge density on the electrodes, σ ˜ const; the duration of the UV radiation pulse and the efficiency of UV radiation due to a KrCl* (222 nm) exciplex, τrad ˜ 1/ p and η ˜ p 2. The maximal radiation efficiency achieved in the experiments is about 13%. Deviations from the similarity laws for the gas discharge are related to the filamentary form of the observed discharge. Qualitative analysis indicates that similarity laws may be fulfilled for such a form of discharge as well but locally, within a single filament.

  17. Application of bipolar gas discharge for water sterilization from S.aureus and E-coli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taran, Anatoliy; Okhrimovskyy, Andriy; Komozynskyi, Petro; Kyslytsyn, Oleksandr; Taran, Svitlana; Filimonova, Nataliya; Lesnoy, Viktor; Oranska, Daria

    2016-09-01

    Recently, water treatment by gas discharge above the surface of the liquid has attracted a lot of attention. In most cases, however, the unipolar power source is used. Bipolar pulses of high voltage and current can increases degree of water sterilization from organic compounds, both chemical and bacterial since non equilibrium atmospheric plasma contains not only electrons but also positive and negative ions as well as an excited molecules or atoms and active radicals. Heavy charged particles of both signs, accelerated by bipolar electric field, can easily destroy chemical and biological contaminants in water. To evaluate this phenomenon, high voltage bipolar pulse generator was used. The amplitude of the pulse voltage was approaching value of 200 kV at the discharge ignition. The repetition time was varied from 1 to 14 milliseconds. Current pulse had a shape of a superposition of bipolar pulses with decaying amplitude. Liquid surface was used as a cathode or anode.Two types of contaminants, S.aureus and E.coli, with was 1 . 5 ×108 CFU/mL were treated by bipolar high voltage pulse discharge. After 30 minutes of exposition, no contaminants were observed within the water.

  18. Modeling the Dynamics of Micro- and Macroparticles in a Combined Gas-Discharge Installation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astashinskii, V. V.; Bogach, M. I.; Burachevskii, A. V.

    2016-05-01

    We present a model of the dynamics of micro- and macroparticles in a combined gas-discharge installation that accounts for the processes of metal explosion (heating of a metal in its solid state, melting, heating of the liquid metal, intense evaporation, ionization in metal vapor), a magnetohydrodynamic description of plasma acceleration (on the basis of the mass, momentum, and energy conservation laws neglecting the plasma viscosity and thermal conductivity), and a description of the processes of energy transfer from a high-velocity stream to accelerated particles. It has been established that the process of melting terminates in 1.3 ns after the start of the discharge and that the evaporation terminates in 480 ns. The stage of cooling starts in 21 μs. The average density of the plasma upon completion of the evaporation process can be estimated to be 1.7·10-5 g/cm3, with the pressure being of the order of 1.5·104 Pa and the total time of discharge, of about 250 μs.

  19. Origin and distribution of thiophenes and furans in gas discharges from active volcanoes and geothermal systems.

    PubMed

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-03-31

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C(2)-C(20) species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C(4)H(8)O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection.

  20. Origin and Distribution of Thiophenes and Furans in Gas Discharges from Active Volcanoes and Geothermal Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tassi, Franco; Montegrossi, Giordano; Capecchiacci, Francesco; Vaselli, Orlando

    2010-01-01

    The composition of non-methane organic volatile compounds (VOCs) determined in 139 thermal gas discharges from 18 different geothermal and volcanic systems in Italy and Latin America, consists of C2–C20 species pertaining to the alkanes, alkenes, aromatics and O-, S- and N-bearing classes of compounds. Thiophenes and mono-aromatics, especially the methylated species, are strongly enriched in fluids emissions related to hydrothermal systems. Addition of hydrogen sulphide to dienes and electrophilic methylation involving halogenated radicals may be invoked for the formation of these species. On the contrary, the formation of furans, with the only exception of C4H8O, seems to be favoured at oxidizing conditions and relatively high temperatures, although mechanisms similar to those hypothesized for the production of thiophenes can be suggested. Such thermodynamic features are typical of fluid reservoirs feeding high-temperature thermal discharges of volcanoes characterised by strong degassing activity, which are likely affected by conspicuous contribution from a magmatic source. The composition of heteroaromatics in fluids naturally discharged from active volcanoes and geothermal areas can then be considered largely dependent on the interplay between hydrothermal vs. magmatic contributions. This implies that they can be used as useful geochemical tools to be successfully applied in both volcanic monitoring and geothermal prospection. PMID:20480029

  1. Studies on gas breakdown in pulsed radio frequency atmospheric pressure glow discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Huo, W. G.; Jian, S. J.; Yao, J.; Ding, Z. F.

    2014-05-15

    In pulsed RF atmospheric pressure glow discharges, the gas breakdown judged by the rapid drop in the amplitude of the pulsed RF voltage is no longer universally true. The steep increment of the plasma-absorbed RF power is proposed to determine the gas breakdown. The averaged plasma-absorbed RF power over a pulse period is used to evaluate effects of the preceding pulsed RF discharge on the breakdown voltage of the following one, finding that the breakdown voltage decreases with the increment in the averaged plasma-absorbed RF power under constant pulse duty ratio. Effects of the pulse off-time on the breakdown voltage and the breakdown delay time are also studied. The obtained dependence of the breakdown voltage on the pulse off-time is indicative of the transitional plasma diffusion processes in the afterglow. The breakdown voltage varies rapidly as the plasma diffuses fast in the region of moderate pulse off-time. The contribution of nitrogen atom recombination at the alumina surface is demonstrated in the prolonged memory effect on the breakdown delay time vs. the pulse off-time and experimentally validated by introducing a trace amount of nitrogen into argon at short and long pulse off-times.

  2. Hydrogen generation in a microhollow cathode discharge in high-pressure ammonia-argon gas mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, H.; Martus, K.; Lee, W. Y.; Becker, K.

    2004-04-01

    We explored the feasibility of using a single flow-through microhollow cathode discharge (MHCD) as a non-thermal plasma source for hydrogen (H2) production for portable fuel cell applications. The MHCD device consisted of two thin metal electrodes separated by a mica spacer with a single-hole, roughly 100 [mu]m in diameter, through all three layers. The efficiency of the MHCD reactor for H2 generation from NH3 was analyzed by monitoring the products formed in the discharge in a mass spectrometer. Using a gas mixture of up to 10% NH3 in Ar at pressures up to one atmosphere, the MHCD reactor achieved a maximum ammonia conversion of slightly more than 20%. The overall power efficiency of the MHCD reactor reached a peak value of about 11%. The dependence of NH3 conversion and power efficiency on the residence time of the gas in the MHCD plasma was studied. Experiments using pulsed excitation of the MHCD plasma indicated that pulsing can increase the power efficiency. Design and operating criteria are proposed for a microplasma-based H2 generator that can achieve a power efficiency above the break-even point, i.e., a microplasma reactor that requires less electrical power to generate and maintain the plasma than the power that can be obtained from the conversion of the H2 generated in the microplasma reactor.

  3. Ptychographic imaging with a compact gas-discharge plasma extreme ultraviolet light source.

    PubMed

    Odstrcil, M; Bussmann, J; Rudolf, D; Bresenitz, R; Miao, Jianwei; Brocklesby, W S; Juschkin, L

    2015-12-01

    We report the demonstration of a scanning probe coherent diffractive imaging method (also known as ptychographic CDI) using a compact and partially coherent gas-discharge plasma source of extreme ultraviolet (EUV) radiation at a 17.3 nm wavelength. Until now, CDI has been mainly carried out with coherent, high-brightness light sources, such as third generation synchrotrons, x-ray free-electron lasers, and high harmonic generation. Here we performed ptychographic lensless imaging of an extended sample using a compact, lab-scale source. The CDI reconstructions were achieved by applying constraint relaxation to the CDI algorithm. Experimental results indicate that our method can handle the low spatial coherence and broadband nature of the EUV illumination, as well as the residual background due to visible light emitted by the gas-discharge source. The ability to conduct ptychographic imaging with lab-scale and partially coherent EUV sources is expected to significantly expand the applications of this powerful CDI method.

  4. Natural gas in Lake Erie: a reconnaissance survey of discharges from an offshore drilling rig

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrante, J.G.; Dettmann, E.H.; Parker, J.I.

    1980-10-01

    Field studies were conducted May 28-June 1, 1979, to determine the chemical composition and physical behavior of discharges from an offshore gas drilling rig in the central basin of Lake Erie. The drilling operation was observed for four days, from rig jackup to the circulation of mud through the borehole after drilling had been completed. Resuspension studies using nephelometry, supplemented with chemical analyses, indicated little resuspension of lake bottom materials or release of metals to the water column during rig jack-up. Portions of the turbidity plumes generated during drilling were buoyant. Three surface turbidity plumes were mapped with nephelometry to a point at which particulate concentrations reached background levels in the Lake. Detectable plumes were approx. 400 to 1500 m in length and had maximum widths < 230 m. A chemical survey conducted in the plume during early gas shows indicated that discharged inorganic chemical species were rapidly diluted to background concentrations and that methane and ethane concentrations were substantially reduced within 330 m of the rig. There was no evidence of carbon tetrachloride extractable hydrocarbons (CTEH) above background concentrations during this chemical plume survey. However, a pair of water samples taken within 100 m of the rig approximately 3 hours after drilling of the target zone was completed had CTEH concentrations that were a factor of 2.4 above background.

  5. Dust trap formation in a non-self-sustained discharge with external gas ionization

    SciTech Connect

    Filippov, A. V. Babichev, V. N.; Pal’, A. F.; Starostin, A. N.; Cherkovets, V. E.; Rerikh, V. K.; Taran, M. D.

    2015-11-15

    Results from numerical studies of a non-self-sustained gas discharge containing micrometer dust grains are presented. The non-self-sustained discharge (NSSD) was controlled by a stationary fast electron beam. The numerical model of an NSSD is based on the diffusion drift approximation for electrons and ions and self-consistently takes into account the influence of the dust component on the electron and ion densities. The dust component is described by the balance equation for the number of dust grains and the equation of motion for dust grains with allowance for the Stokes force, gravity force, and electric force in the cathode sheath. The interaction between dust grains is described in the self-consistent field approximation. The height of dust grain levitation over the cathode is determined and compared with experimental results. It is established that, at a given gas ionization rate and given applied voltage, there is a critical dust grain size above which the levitation condition in the cathode sheath cannot be satisfied. Simulations performed for the dust component consisting of dust grains of two different sizes shows that such grains levitate at different heights, i.e., size separation of dust drains levitating in the cathode sheath of an NSSD takes place.

  6. Optical and application study of gas-liquid discharge excited by bipolar nanosecond pulse in atmospheric air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Sen; Wang, Wen-chun; Yang, De-zheng; Liu, Zhi-jie; Zhang, Shuai

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a bipolar nanosecond pulse with 20 ns rising time is employed to generate air gas-liquid diffuse discharge plasma with room gas temperature in quartz tube at atmospheric pressure. The image of the discharge and optical emission spectra of active species in the plasma are recorded. The plasma gas temperature is determined to be approximately 390 K by compared the experimental spectra with the simulated spectra, which is slightly higher than the room temperature. The result indicated that the gas temperature rises gradually with pulse peak voltage increasing, while decreases slightly with the electrode gap distance increasing. As an important application, bipolar nanosecond pulse discharge is used to sterilize the common microorganisms (Actinomycetes, Candida albicans and Escherichia coli) existing in drinking water, which performs high sterilization efficiency.

  7. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  8. Li/CFx Cells Optimized for Low-Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smart, Marshall C.; Whitacre, Jay F.; Bugga, Ratnakumar V.; Prakash, G. K. Surya; Bhalla, Pooja; Smith, Kiah

    2009-01-01

    Some developments reported in prior NASA Tech Briefs articles on primary electrochemical power cells containing lithium anodes and fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx) cathodes have been combined to yield a product line of cells optimized for relatively-high-current operation at low temperatures at which commercial lithium-based cells become useless. These developments have involved modifications of the chemistry of commercial Li/CFx cells and batteries, which are not suitable for high-current and low-temperature applications because they are current-limited and their maximum discharge rates decrease with decreasing temperature. One of two developments that constitute the present combination is, itself, a combination of developments: (1) the use of sub-fluorinated carbonaceous (CFx wherein x<1) cathode material, (2) making the cathodes thinner than in most commercial units, and (3) using non-aqueous electrolytes formulated especially to enhance low-temperature performance. This combination of developments was described in more detail in High-Energy-Density, Low- Temperature Li/CFx Primary Cells (NPO-43219), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 31, No. 7 (July 2007), page 43. The other development included in the present combination is the use of an anion receptor as an electrolyte additive, as described in the immediately preceding article, "Additive for Low-Temperature Operation of Li-(CF)n Cells" (NPO- 43579). A typical cell according to the present combination of developments contains an anion-receptor additive solvated in an electrolyte that comprises LiBF4 dissolved at a concentration of 0.5 M in a mixture of four volume parts of 1,2 dimethoxyethane with one volume part of propylene carbonate. The proportion, x, of fluorine in the cathode in such a cell lies between 0.5 and 0.9. The best of such cells fabricated to date have exhibited discharge capacities as large as 0.6 A h per gram at a temperature of 50 C when discharged at a rate of C/5 (where C is the magnitude of the

  9. The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with dielectric barrier discharge in gas-liquid mixture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dan; Sun, Bing; Zhu, Xiaomei; Yan, Zhiyu; Liu, Hui; Liu, Yongjun

    2013-03-01

    The inactivation of Chlorella spp. with high voltage and frequency pulsed dielectric barrier discharge in hybrid gas-liquid reactor with a suspension electrode was studied experimentally. In the hybrid gas-liquid reactor, a steel plate was used as high voltage electrode while a quartz plate as a dielectric layer, another steel plate placing in the aqueous solution worked as a whole ground electrode. A suspension electrode is installed near the surface of solution between high voltage and ground electrode to make the dielectric barrier discharge uniform and stable, the discharge gap was between the quartz plate and the surface of the water. The effect of peak voltage, treatment time, the initial concentration of Chlorella spp. and conductivity of solution on the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. was investigated, and the inactivation mechanism of Chlorella spp. preliminarily was studied. Utilizing this system inactivation of Chlorella spp., the inactivation rate increased with increasing of peak voltage, treatment time and electric conductivity. It was found that the inactivation rate of Chlorella spp. arrived at 100% when the initial concentration was 4 × 106 cells mL-1, and the optimum operation condition required a peak voltage of 20 kV, a treatment time of 10 min and a frequency of 7 kHz. Though the increasing of initial concentration of the Chlorella spp. contributed to the addition of interaction probability between the Chlorella spp. and O3, H2O2, high-energy electrons, UV radiation and other active substances, the total inactivation number raise, but the inactivation rate of the Chlorella spp. decreased.

  10. Association of gas hydrate formation in fluid discharges with anomalous hydrochemical profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matveeva, T.

    2009-04-01

    Numerous investigations worldwide have shown that active underwater fluid discharge produces specific structures on the seafloor such as submarine seepages, vents, pockmarks, and collapse depressions. Intensive fluxes of fluids, especially of those containing hydrocarbon gases, result in specific geochemical and physical conditions favorable for gas hydrate (GH) formation. GH accumulations associated with fluid discharge are usually controlled by fluid conduits such as mud volcanoes, diapirs or faults. During last decade, subaqueous GHs become the subject of the fuel in the nearest future. However, the expediency of their commercial development can be proved solely by revealing conditions and mechanisms of GH formation. Kinetic of GH growth (although it is incompletely understood) is one of the important parameters controlling their formation among with gas solubility, pressure, temperature, gas quantity and others. Original large dataset on hydrate-related interstitial fluids obtained from different fluid discharge areas at the Sea of Okhotsk, Black Sea, Gulf of Cadiz, Lake Baikal (Eastern Siberia) allow to suggest close relation of the subaqueous GH formation process to anomalous hydrochemical profiles. We have studied the chemical and isotopic composition of interstitial fluids from GH-bearing and GH-free sediments obtained at different GH accumulations. Most attention was paid to possible influence of the interstitial fluid chemistry on the kinetic of GH formation in a porous media. The influence of salts on methane solubility within hydrate stability zones was considered by Handa (1990), Zatsepina & Buffet (1998), and later by Davie et al. (2004) from a theoretical point of view. Our idea is based on the experimentally proved fact that fugacity coefficient of methane dissolved in saline gas-saturated water which is in equilibrium with hydrates, is higher than that in more fresh water though the solubility is lower. Therefore, if a gradient of water salinity

  11. The physical nature of the phenomenon of positive column plasma constriction in low-pressure noble gas direct current discharges

    SciTech Connect

    Kurbatov, P. F.

    2014-02-15

    The essence of the positive-column plasma constriction for static (the diffusion mode) and dynamic ionization equilibrium (the stratificated and constricted modes) is analyzed. Two physical parameters, namely, the effective ionization rate of gas atoms and the ambipolar diffusion coefficient of electrons and ions, determine the transverse distribution of discharge species and affect the current states of plasma. Transverse constriction of the positive column takes place as the gas ionization level (discharge current) and pressure increase. The stratified mode (including the constricted one) is observed between the two adjacent types of self-sustained discharge phases when they coexist together at the same time or in the same place as a coherent binary mixture. In the case, a occurrence of the discharge phase with more high electron density presently involve a great decrease in the cross-section of the current channel for d.c. discharges. Additional physical factors, such as cataphoresis and electrophoresis phenomena and spatial gas density inhomogeneity correlated with a circulatory flow in d.c. discharges, are mainly responsible for the current hysteresis and partially constricted discharge.

  12. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-01

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  13. Inactivation of possible micromycete food contaminants using the low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide

    SciTech Connect

    Čeřovský, M.; Khun, J.; Rusová, K.; Scholtz, V.; Soušková, H.

    2013-09-15

    The inhibition effect of hydrogen peroxide aerosol, low-temperature plasma and their combinations has been studied on several micromycetes spores. The low-temperature plasma was generated in corona discharges in the open air apparatus with hydrogen peroxide aerosol. Micromycete spores were inoculated on the surface of agar plates, exposed solely to the hydrogen peroxide aerosol, corona discharge or their combination. After incubation the diameter of inhibition zone was measured. The solely positive corona discharge exhibits no inactivation effect, the solely negative corona discharge and solely hydrogen peroxide aerosol exhibit the inactivation effect, however their combinations exhibit to be much more effective. Low-temperature plasma and hydrogen peroxide aerosol present a possible alternative method of microbial decontamination of food, food packages or other thermolabile materials.

  14. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions.

    PubMed

    Bukin, Sergei V; Pavlova, Olga N; Manakov, Andrei Y; Kostyreva, Elena A; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M; Mamaeva, Elena V; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V; Zemskaya, Tamara I

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids.

  15. The Ability of Microbial Community of Lake Baikal Bottom Sediments Associated with Gas Discharge to Carry Out the Transformation of Organic Matter under Thermobaric Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Bukin, Sergei V.; Pavlova, Olga N.; Manakov, Andrei Y.; Kostyreva, Elena A.; Chernitsyna, Svetlana M.; Mamaeva, Elena V.; Pogodaeva, Tatyana V.; Zemskaya, Tamara I.

    2016-01-01

    The ability to compare the composition and metabolic potential of microbial communities inhabiting the subsurface sediment in geographically distinct locations is one of the keys to understanding the evolution and function of the subsurface biosphere. Prospective areas for study of the subsurface biosphere are the sites of hydrocarbon discharges on the bottom of the Lake Baikal rift, where ascending fluxes of gas-saturated fluids and oil from deep layers of bottom sediments seep into near-surface sediment. The samples of surface sediments collected in the area of the Posolskaya Bank methane seep were cultured for 17 months under thermobaric conditions (80°C, 5 MPa) with the addition of complementary organic substrate, and a different composition for the gas phase. After incubation, the presence of intact cells of microorganisms, organic matter transformation and the formation of oil biomarkers was confirmed in the samples, with the addition of Baikal diatom alga Synedra acus detritus, and gas mixture CH4:H2:CO2. Taxonomic assignment of the 16S rRNA sequence data indicates that the predominant sequences in the enrichment were Sphingomonas (55.3%), Solirubrobacter (27.5%) and Arthrobacter (16.6%). At the same time, in heat-killed sediment and in sediment without any additional substrates, which were cultivated in a CH4 atmosphere, no geochemical changes were detected, nor the presence of intact cells and 16S rRNA sequences of Bacteria and Archaea. This data may suggest that the decomposition of organic matter under culturing conditions could be performed by microorganisms from low-temperature sediment layers. One possible explanation of this phenomenon is migration of the representatives of the deep thermophilic community through fault zones in the near surface sediment layers, together with gas-bearing fluids. PMID:27242716

  16. Numerical simulation of low-temperature helium plasma source for biomedical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bekasov, Vladimir; Zamchy, Roman; Kudryavtsev, Anatoly

    2016-09-01

    Numerical simulation of low-temperature helium plasma for biomedical applications was conducted. The plasma source is presented as a rod electrode located above the grounded plate. Helium acts as a working gas, which is supplied to the discharge through a quartz tube surrounding the rod electrode. An AC voltage with a frequency of 13 kHz and amplitude of up to 3 kV is applied to the electrode. Distance between rod tip and plate varies from 1 to 8 centimeters. Helium blow rate is considered in the range from 1 to 10 m / s. For a description of the discharge, in this paper, two-dimensional extended fluid model was presented. It consists of the continuity equations for calculating the concentration of particles, the energy balance equation for finding the electron temperature and the Poisson equation for electric fields. To calculate the velocity of neutral particles Navier-Stokes equations was solved, and thermal conductivity equation was solved for calculating the heating of the neutral gas. The work was supported by Saint Petersburg State University (Grant ?11.37.212.2016).

  17. Application of Atmospheric-Pressure Microwave Line Plasma for Low Temperature Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Haruka; Nakano, Suguru; Itoh, Hitoshi; Sekine, Makoto; Hori, Masaru; Toyoda, Hirotaka

    2015-09-01

    Atmospheric pressure (AP) plasmas have been given much attention because of its high cost benefit and a variety of possibilities for industrial applications. In various kinds of plasma production technique, pulsed-microwave discharge plasma using slot antenna is attractive due to its ability of high-density and stable plasma production. In this plasma source, however, size of the plasma has been limited up to a few cm in length due to standing wave inside a waveguide. To solve this, we have proposed a newly-developed AP microwave plasma source that utilizes not standing wave but travelling wave. By using this plasma source, spatially-uniform AP line plasma with 40 cm in length was realized by pure helium discharge in 60 cm slot and with nitrogen gas additive of 1%. Furthermore, gas temperature as low as 400 K was realized in this device. In this study, as an example of low temperature processes, hydrophilic treatment of PET films was performed. Processing speed increased with pulse frequency and a water contact angle of ~20° was easily obtained within 5 s with no thermal damage to the substrate. To evaluate treatment-uniformity of long line length, PET films were treated by 90 cm slot-antenna plasma and uniform treatment performance was confirmed.

  18. Efficiency of Pumping of the Active Medium of Metal Vapor Lasers: Gas-Discharge Tubes with Electrodes in the Hot Zone of the Discharge Channel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yudin, N. A.; Yudin, N. N.

    2016-10-01

    The electrophysical approach is used to estimate conditions for effective pumping of the active medium of lasers on self-terminating metal atom transitions in gas-discharge tubes (GDT) with electrodes located in the hot zone of the discharge channel. It is demonstrated that in the laser discharge contour there are processes limiting the frequency and energy characteristics (FEC) of radiation. The mechanism of influence of these processes on the FEC of radiation, and technical methods of their neutralization are considered. It is demonstrated that the practical efficiency of a copper vapor laser can reach 10% under conditions of neutralization of these processes. Conditions for forming the distributed GDT impedance when the active medium is pumped on the front of the fast ionization wave are determined.

  19. The Fungal Spores Survival Under the Low-Temperature Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soušková, Hana; Scholtz, V.; Julák, J.; Savická, D.

    This paper presents an experimental apparatus for the decontamination and sterilization of water suspension of fungal spores. The fungicidal effect of stabilized positive and negative corona discharges on four fungal species Aspergillus oryzae, Clacosporium sphaerospermum, Penicillium crustosum and Alternaria sp. was studied. Simultaneously, the slower growing of exposed fungal spores was observed. The obtained results are substantially different in comparison with those of the analogous experiments performed with bacteria. It may be concluded that fungi are more resistant to the low-temperature plasma.

  20. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  1. Generation of low-temperature air plasma for food processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanova, Olga; Demidova, Maria; Astafiev, Alexander; Pinchuk, Mikhail; Balkir, Pinar; Turantas, Fulya

    2015-11-01

    The project is aimed at developing a physical and technical foundation of generating plasma with low gas temperature at atmospheric pressure for food industry needs. As known, plasma has an antimicrobial effect on the numerous types of microorganisms, including those that cause food spoilage. In this work an original experimental setup has been developed for the treatment of different foods. It is based on initiating corona or dielectric-barrier discharge in a chamber filled with ambient air in combination with a certain helium admixture. The experimental setup provides various conditions of discharge generation (including discharge gap geometry, supply voltage, velocity of gas flow, content of helium admixture in air and working pressure) and allows for the measurement of the electrical discharge parameters. Some recommendations on choosing optimal conditions of discharge generation for experiments on plasma food processing are developed.

  2. Three-dimensional modeling of the neutral gas depletion effect in a helicon discharge plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kollasch, Jeffrey; Schmitz, Oliver; Norval, Ryan; Reiter, Detlev; Sovinec, Carl

    2016-10-01

    Helicon discharges provide an attractive radio-frequency driven regime for plasma, but neutral-particle dynamics present a challenge to extending performance. A neutral gas depletion effect occurs when neutrals in the plasma core are not replenished at a sufficient rate to sustain a higher plasma density. The Monte Carlo neutral particle tracking code EIRENE was setup for the MARIA helicon experiment at UW Madison to study its neutral particle dynamics. Prescribed plasma temperature and density profiles similar to those in the MARIA device are used in EIRENE to investigate the main causes of the neutral gas depletion effect. The most dominant plasma-neutral interactions are included so far, namely electron impact ionization of neutrals, charge exchange interactions of neutrals with plasma ions, and recycling at the wall. Parameter scans show how the neutral depletion effect depends on parameters such as Knudsen number, plasma density and temperature, and gas-surface interaction accommodation coefficients. Results are compared to similar analytic studies in the low Knudsen number limit. Plans to incorporate a similar Monte Carlo neutral model into a larger helicon modeling framework are discussed. This work is funded by the NSF CAREER Award PHY-1455210.

  3. The influence of submarine groundwater discharge on greenhouse gas evasion from coastal waters (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, I. R.

    2013-12-01

    Coastal waters are thought to play a major role on global carbon budgets but we still lack a quantitative understanding about some mechanisms driving greenhouse gas cycling in coastal waters. Very little is known about the role of submarine groundwater discharge (SGD) in delivering carbon to rivers, estuaries and coastal waters even though the concentrations of most carbon species in groundwater are often much higher than those in surface waters. I hypothesize that SGD plays a significant role in coastal carbon and greenhouse gas budgets even if the volumetric SGD contribution is small. I will report new, detailed observations of radon (a natural groundwater tracer) and carbon dioxide and methane concentrations and stable isotopes in tidal rivers, estuaries, coastal wetlands, mangroves and coral reef lagoons. Groundwater exchange at these contrasting sites was driven by a wide range of processes, including terrestrial hydraulic gradients, tidal pumping, and convection. In all systems, SGD was an important source of carbon dioxide, DIC, and methane to surface waters. In some cases, groundwater seepage alone could account for 100% of carbon dioxide evasion from surface waters to the atmosphere. Combining high precision in situ radon and greenhouse gas concentration and stable isotope observations allows for an effective, unambiguous assessment of how groundwater seepage drives carbon dynamics in surface waters.

  4. The THS Experiment: Ex Situ Analyses of Titan's Aerosol Analogs Produced at Low Temperature (200K)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sciamma-O'Brien, E. M.; Upton, K. T.; Beauchamp, J. L.; Salama, F.

    2014-12-01

    In the study presented here, we used the COSmIC/Titan Haze Simulation (THS) experiment, an experimental platform developed to study Titan's atmospheric chemistry at low temperature, to produce aerosols representative of the early stages of Titan's aerosol formation. In the THS, the chemistry is simulated by plasma in the stream of a supersonic expansion. With this unique design, the gas is jet-cooled to Titan-like temperature (~150K) before inducing the chemistry by plasma, and remains at low temperature in the plasma discharge (~200K). Because of the pulsed nature of the plasma, the residence time of the gas in the discharge is only a few microseconds, which leads to a truncated chemistry and allows for the study of the first and intermediate steps of the chemistry. Different N2-CH4-based gas mixtures can be injected in the plasma, with or without the addition of heavier precursors present as trace elements on Titan, in order to monitor the evolution of the chemical growth. Both the gas phase and solid phase products resulting from the plasma-induced chemistry can be monitored and analyzed using a combination of complementary in situ and ex situ diagnostics. In a recently published study, a mass spectrometry analysis of the gas phase has demonstrated that the THS is a unique tool to probe the first and intermediate steps of Titan's atmospheric chemistry at Titan-like temperature. In particular, the mass spectra obtained in a N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixture are relevant for comparison to Cassini's CAPS-IBS instrument. Here we present the results of a complementary study of the solid phase. Scanning Electron Microscopy images have shown that aggregates produced in N2-CH4-C2H2-C6H6 mixtures are much larger (up to 5 μm in diameter) than those produced in N2-CH4 mixtures (0.1-0.5 μm). Direct Analysis in Real Time mass spectrometry (DART-MS) combined with Collision Induced Dissociation (CID) have detected the presence of aminoacetonitrile, a precursor of glycine, in the THS

  5. Observation of the stratified glow mode in helium/argon gas-confined barrier discharge at atmospheric pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shuqun; Dong, Xi; Mao, Wenhao; Jiang, Jun; Yue, Yuanfu; Lu, Xinpei; Zhang, Chaohai

    2017-09-01

    A diffuse He gas-confined barrier discharge insulated by an Ar gas layer instead of a solid dielectric is reported for the first time. It is unexpected to observe that the diffuse Ar plasma attached to the electrode is generated along with the He plasma. The Ar/He/Ar plasma layers with diffuse appearance are visually separated by dark space and thus form the stratified glow. The presence of the stratified mode is largely dependent on the applied voltage, the Ar flow rate and the diameter of the helium gas flow. As the diameter of the helium gas flow decreases from 2.5 mm to 0.9 mm, the discharge mode transits from a stratified glow to filamentary with the amplitude of the discharge current increasing from 0.28 mA to 3.8 A. High-speed photographs of the stratified glow show that the plasma is ignited at the He/Ar gaseous interface, and then expands uniformly towards both the He and Ar gas layers. After the plasma front in He gas layer is quenched at the opposite gaseous interface, the plasma volume starts expanding towards the periphery of the electrode, similar to the dielectric barrier glow discharge.

  6. Stream measurements locate thermogenic methane fluxes in groundwater discharge in an area of shale-gas development.

    PubMed

    Heilweil, Victor M; Grieve, Paul L; Hynek, Scott A; Brantley, Susan L; Solomon, D Kip; Risser, Dennis W

    2015-04-07

    The environmental impacts of shale-gas development on water resources, including methane migration to shallow groundwater, have been difficult to assess. Monitoring around gas wells is generally limited to domestic water-supply wells, which often are not situated along predominant groundwater flow paths. A new concept is tested here: combining stream hydrocarbon and noble-gas measurements with reach mass-balance modeling to estimate thermogenic methane concentrations and fluxes in groundwater discharging to streams and to constrain methane sources. In the Marcellus Formation shale-gas play of northern Pennsylvania (U.S.A.), we sampled methane in 15 streams as a reconnaissance tool to locate methane-laden groundwater discharge: concentrations up to 69 μg L(-1) were observed, with four streams ≥ 5 μg L(-1). Geochemical analyses of water from one stream with high methane (Sugar Run, Lycoming County) were consistent with Middle Devonian gases. After sampling was completed, we learned of a state regulator investigation of stray-gas migration from a nearby Marcellus Formation gas well. Modeling indicates a groundwater thermogenic methane flux of about 0.5 kg d(-1) discharging into Sugar Run, possibly from this fugitive gas source. Since flow paths often coalesce into gaining streams, stream methane monitoring provides the first watershed-scale method to assess groundwater contamination from shale-gas development.

  7. Low temperature growth study of nano-crystalline TiO2 thin films deposited by RF sputtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safeen, K.; Micheli, V.; Bartali, R.; Gottardi, G.; Laidani, N.

    2015-07-01

    Precise control of the various structural phases of TiO2 at a low temperature is particularly important for practical applications. In this work, the deposition conditions for the growth of anatase and rutile phase at a low temperature (⩽300 °C) were optimized. TiO2 films were deposited by radio frequency (RF) sputtering of a ceramic TiO2 target in argon and argon-oxygen plasma (10 and 20% O2) at room temperature. For the films deposited in pure Ar and 20% O2, the growth temperature was varied from 25 to 400 °C. The plasma properties were investigated using optical emission spectroscopy (OES) in a wide range of values of gas composition (0-50% O2 in Ar-O2 mixture). The structural and chemical properties were characterized by means of x-ray diffraction (XRD) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that O2 addition to the Ar-O2 gas mixture significantly changed the density of the plasma species (Ar, Ar+, Ti, Ti+ and O), which in turn influence the crystal structure and surface chemistry of the prepared films. Anatase phase was obtained for the films grown in Ar-O2 plasma over the whole range of temperature. In contrast, the films deposited in argon discharge largely persist in amorphous phase at temperature ⩽200 °C and revealed the formation of single rutile phase at ⩾300 °C. The oxygen vacancies detected by XPS analysis for the films deposited in Ar plasma facilitate the growth of a rutile phase at low temperature (˜300 °C). Our results demonstrate that oxygen negative ions, oxygen vacancies and surface energy conditions at the substrate are the key parameters controlling the phase of the prepared films at low temperature.

  8. Autonomous portable pulsed-periodical generator of high-power radiofrequency-pulses based on gas discharge with hollow cathode.

    PubMed

    Bulychev, Sergey V; Dubinov, Alexander E; L'vov, Igor L; Popolev, Vyacheslav L; Sadovoy, Sergey A; Sadchikov, Eugeny A; Selemir, Victor D; Valiulina, Valeria K; Vyalykh, Dmitry V; Zhdanov, Victor S

    2016-05-01

    Portable autonomous generator of high-power RF-pulses based on the gas discharge with hollow cathode has been designed, fabricated, and tested. Input and output characteristics are the following: discharge current amplitude is 800 A, duration of generated RF-pulses is 350 ns, carrier frequency is ∼90 MHz, power in RF-pulse is 0.5 MW, pulse repetition rate is 0.5 kHz, and device efficiency is ∼25%.

  9. Sterilization of Fungus in Water by Pulsed Power Gas Discharge Reactor Spraying Water Droplets for Water Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Tsukasa; Handa, Taiki; Minamitani, Yasushi

    We study sterilization of bacteria in water using pulsed streamer discharge of gas phase. This method enhances efficiency of water treatment by spraying pretreatment water in a streamer discharge area. In this paper, yeast was sterilized because we assumed a case that fungus like mold existed in wastewater. As a result, colony forming units decreased rapidly for 2 minutes of the processing time, and all yeast sterilized by 45 minutes of the processing time.

  10. Theoretical and experimental determination of gas and electron temperatures for gas discharges in Ne and He mixtures with copper, bromine, hydrogen and strontium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Temelkov, K. A.; Vuchkov, N. K.; Freijo-Martin, I.; Ekov, R. P.

    2010-02-01

    Thermal conductivities of binary gas systems are calculated on the basis of 12-6 Lennard-Jones and rigid sphere inter-atomic interaction approximations for the case of gas discharges in He and Ne with small admixtures of copper, bromine, hydrogen and strontium. Assuming that the gas temperature varies only in the radial direction and using the calculated thermal conductivities, an analytical solution of the steady-state heat conduction equation is found for two discharge tube constructions. Two cases of uniform and non-uniform power input are considered. For both cases the average gas temperature is found by averaging the radial gas temperature distribution over the radius. Measurement of the relative intensities of some He and Ne spectral lines, originating from different upper levels, has enabled us to determine the average electron temperature.

  11. Physical mechanisms of self-organization and formation of current patterns in gas discharges of the Townsend and glow types

    SciTech Connect

    Raizer, Yu. P.; Mokrov, M. S.

    2013-10-15

    The paper discusses current filamentation and formation of current structures (in particular, hexagonal current patterns) in discharges of the Townsend and glow types. The aim of the paper, which is in part a review, is to reveal basic reasons for formation of current patterns in different cases, namely, in dielectric barrier discharge, discharge with semiconductor cathode, and micro-discharge between metallic electrodes. Pursuing this goal, we give a very brief review of observations and discuss only those theoretical, computational, and experimental papers that shed light on the physical mechanisms involved. The mechanisms are under weak currents—the thermal expansion of the gas as a result of Joule heating; under enhanced currents—the electric field and ionization rate redistribution induced by space charge. Both mechanisms lead to instability of the homogeneous discharges. In addition, we present new results of numerical simulations of observed short-living current filaments which are chaotic in space and time.

  12. Impacts from oil and gas produced water discharges on the gulf of Mexico hypoxic zone.

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, M. E.; Satterlee, K.; Veil, J. A.; Environmental Science Division; ExxonMobil Production Co.; Shell Offshore

    2006-01-01

    Shallow water areas of the Gulf of Mexico continental shelf experience low dissolved oxygen (hypoxia) each summer. The hypoxic zone is primarily caused by input of nutrients from the Mississippi and Atchafalaya Rivers. The nutrients stimulate the growth of phytoplankton, which leads to reduction of the oxygen concentration near the sea floor. During the renewal of an offshore discharge permit used by the oil and gas industry in the Gulf of Mexico, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) identified the need to assess the potential contribution from produced water discharges to the occurrence of hypoxia. The EPA permit required either that all platforms in the hypoxic zone submit produced water samples, or that industry perform a coordinated sampling program. This paper, based on a report submitted to EPA in August 2005 (1), describes the results of the joint industry sampling program and the use of those results to quantify the relative significance of produced water discharges in the context of other sources on the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. In the sampling program, 16 facilities were selected for multiple sampling - three times each at one month intervals-- and another 34 sites for onetime sampling. The goal of the sampling program was to quantify the sources and amount of oxygen demand associated with a variety of Gulf of Mexico produced waters. Data collected included direct oxygen demand measured by BOD5 (5-day biochemical oxygen demand) and TOC (total organic carbon) and indirect oxygen demand measured by nitrogen compounds (ammonia, nitrate, nitrate, and TKN [total Kjeldahl nitrogen]) and phosphorus (total phosphorus and orthophosphate). These data will serve as inputs to several available computer models currently in use for forecasting the occurrence of hypoxia in the Gulf of Mexico. The output of each model will be compared for consistency in their predictions and then a semi-quantitative estimate of the relative significance of

  13. Elongated dust clouds in a uniform DC positive column of low pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usachev, A. D.; Zobnin, A. V.; Petrov, O. F.; Fortov, V. E.; Thoma, M. H.; Pustylnik, M. Y.; Fink, M. A.; Morfill, G. E.

    2016-06-01

    Experimental investigations of the formation of elongated dust clouds and their influence on the plasma glow intensity of the uniform direct current (DC) positive column (PC) have been performed under microgravity conditions. For the axial stabilization of the dust cloud position a polarity switching DC gas discharge with a switching frequency of 250 Hz was used. During the experiment, a spontaneous division of one elongated dust cloud into two smaller steady state dust clouds has been observed. Quantitative data on the dust cloud shape, size and dust number density distribution were obtained. Axial and radial distributions of plasma emission within the 585.2 nm and 703.2 nm neon spectral lines were measured over the whole discharge volume. It has been found that both spectral line intensities at the dust cloud region grew 1.7 times with respect to the undisturbed positive column region; in this the 585.2 nm line intensity increased by 10% compared to the 703.2 nm line intensity. For a semi-quantitative explanation of the observed phenomena the Schottky approach based on the equation of diffusion was used. The model reasonably explains the observed glow enhancement as an increasing of the ionization rate in the discharge with dust cloud, which compensates ion-electron recombination on the dust grain surfaces. In this, the ionization rate increases due to the growing of the DC axial electric field, and the glow grows directly proportional to the electric field. It is shown that the fundamental condition of the radial stability of the dusty plasma cloud is equal to the ionization and recombination rates within the cloud volume that is possible only when the electron density is constant and the radial electric field is absent within the dust cloud.

  14. Structure of carbon dendrites obtained in an atmospheric-pressure gas discharge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danilaev, M. P.; Bogoslov, E. A.; Pol'skii, Yu. E.; Nasybullin, A. R.; Pudovkin, M. S.; Khadiev, A. R.

    2017-02-01

    The influence of growth conditions on the carbon dendrite structure has been investigated. The threshold values of the ratio between electron temperature T e and kinetic temperature T of the gas near a needle electrode and of the discharge current density, which are necessary for dendritic growth, have been determined. It has been shown that the hexagonal structure of submicron carbon particles arises when a number of hydrocarbons are used to synthesize dendrites. It has been found that the degree of order in the carbon structure can be controlled by applying external actions at the stage of graphite particle nucleation. The characteristic frequencies of inertial actions that may be energetically appropriate must exceed 10 kHz.

  15. Compact soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge light source.

    PubMed

    Benk, Markus; Bergmann, Klaus; Schäfer, David; Wilhein, Thomas

    2008-10-15

    We report on a soft x-ray microscope using a gas-discharge plasma with pseudo spark-like electrode geometry as a light source. The source produces a radiant intensity of 4 x 10(13) photons/(sr pulse) for the 2.88 nm emission line of helium-like nitrogen. At a demonstrated 1 kHz repetition rate a brilliance of 4.3 x 10(9) photons/(microm2 sr s) is obtained for the 2.88 nm line. Ray-tracing simulations show that, employing an adequate grazing incidence collector, a photon flux of 1 x 10(7) photons/(microm2 s) can be achieved with the current source. The applicability of the presented pinch plasma concept to soft x-ray microscopy is demonstrated in a proof-of-principle experiment.

  16. Fast gas chromatography of explosive compounds using a pulsed-discharge electron capture detector.

    PubMed

    Collin, Olivier L; Niegel, Claudia; Derhodes, Kate E; McCord, Bruce R; Jackson, Glen P

    2006-07-01

    The detection of a mixture of nine explosive compounds, including nitrate esters, nitroaromatics, and a nitramine in less than 140 sec is described. The new method employs a commercially available pulsed-discharge electron capture detector (PDECD) coupled with a microbore capillary gas chromatography (GC) column in a standard GC oven to achieve on-column detection limits between 5 and 72 fg for the nine explosives studied. The PDECD has the benefit that it uses a pulsed plasma to generate the standing electron current instead of a radioactive source. The fast separation time limits on-column degradation of the thermally labile compounds and decreases the peak widths, which results in larger peak intensities and a concomitant improvement in detection limits. The combination of short analysis time and low detection limits make this method a potential candidate for screening large numbers of samples that have been prepared using techniques such as liquid-liquid extraction or solid-phase microextraction.

  17. Characteristics of gas-liquid pulsed discharge plasma reactor and dye decoloration efficiency.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing; Aye, Nyein Nyein; Gao, Zhiying; Lv, Dan; Zhu, Xiaomei; Sato, Masayuki

    2012-01-01

    The pulsed high-voltage discharge is a new advanced oxidation technology for water treatment. Methyl Orange (MO) dye wastewater was chosen as the target object. Some investigations were conducted on MO decoloration including the discharge characteristics of the multi-needle reactor, parameter optimization, and the degradation mechanism. The following results were obtained. The color group of the azo dye MO was effectively decomposed by water surface plasma. The decoloration rate was promoted with the increase of treatment time, peak voltage, and pulse frequency. When the initial conductivity was 1700 microS/cm, the decoloration rate was the highest. The optimum distance between the needle electrodes and the water surface was 1 mm, the distance between the grounding electrode and the water surface was 28 mm, and the number of needle electrodes and spacing between needles were 24 and 7.5 mm, respectively. The decoloration rate of MO was affected by the gas in the reactor and varied in the order oxygen > air> argon > nitrogen, and the energy yield obtained in this investigation was 0.45 g/kWh.

  18. Zero Liquid Discharge (ZLD) System for Flue-Gas Derived Water From Oxy-Combustion Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sivaram Harendra; Danylo Oryshchyn; Thomas Ochs; Stephen J. Gerdemann; John Clark

    2011-10-16

    Researchers at the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) located in Albany, Oregon, have patented a process - Integrated Pollutant Removal (IPR) that uses off-the-shelf technology to produce a sequestration ready CO{sub 2} stream from an oxy-combustion power plant. Capturing CO{sub 2} from fossil-fuel combustion generates a significant water product which can be tapped for use in the power plant and its peripherals. Water condensed in the IPR{reg_sign} process may contain fly ash particles, sodium (from pH control), and sulfur species, as well as heavy metals, cations and anions. NETL is developing a treatment approach for zero liquid discharge while maximizing available heat from IPR. Current treatment-process steps being studied are flocculation/coagulation, for removal of cations and fine particles, and reverse osmosis, for anion removal as well as for scavenging the remaining cations. After reverse osmosis process steps, thermal evaporation and crystallization steps will be carried out in order to build the whole zero liquid discharge (ZLD) system for flue-gas condensed wastewater. Gypsum is the major product from crystallization process. Fast, in-line treatment of water for re-use in IPR seems to be one practical step for minimizing water treatment requirements for CO{sub 2} capture. The results obtained from above experiments are being used to build water treatment models.

  19. Prototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Zimmerman successfully operated a point-Contact Nb SQUID on a four- stage stirling cycle cryocooler with a mechanical drive power of approxi- mately 15...AD-ADL2 622 LAKE SHORE CRYOTRONICS INC WESTERVILLE OH F/6 13/1 PROTOTYPE LOW TEMPERATURE LOW POWER CRYOCOOLER ,(U) FE13 82 W G P IERC E N0001INROC...pPrototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler // It by Warren G. Pierce February 1982 Prepared under Contract No. N00014-80-C-0825 by LAKE SHORE

  20. Low-temperature properties of aviation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Brunton, C.; Voisey, M.A.; Willcock, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of work on the low-temperature properties of aviation turbine fuels that has been carried out in recent years at Thornton Research Centre. Details of both simulated full-scale aircraft tank tests and laboratory evaluations are included. Zero holdup is considered as a low-temperature specification parameter and a novel method for measuring its value is described. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that a change from a freezing point to a flow criterion could provide an increase in fuel availability without prejudicing flight safety.