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Sample records for low-temperature proton irradiation

  1. Minimizing material damage using low temperature irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craven, E.; Hasanain, F.; Winters, M.

    2012-08-01

    Scientific advancements in healthcare driven both by technological breakthroughs and an aging and increasingly obese population have lead to a changing medical device market. Complex products and devices are being developed to meet the demands of leading edge medical procedures. Specialized materials in these medical devices, including pharmaceuticals and biologics as well as exotic polymers present a challenge for radiation sterilization as many of these components cannot withstand conventional irradiation methods. The irradiation of materials at dry ice temperatures has emerged as a technique that can be used to decrease the radiation sensitivity of materials. The purpose of this study is to examine the effect of low temperature irradiation on a variety of polymer materials, and over a range of temperatures from 0 °C down to -80 °C. The effectiveness of microbial kill is also investigated under each of these conditions. The results of the study show that the effect of low temperature irradiation is material dependent and can alter the balance between crosslinking and chain scission of the polymer. Low temperatures also increase the dose required to achieve an equivalent microbiological kill, therefore dose setting exercises must be performed under the environmental conditions of use.

  2. Effects of low temperature periodic annealing on the deep-level defects in 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.; Chiu, T. T.; Loo, R. Y.

    1981-01-01

    The GaAs solar cell has shown good potential for space applications. However, degradation in performance occurred when the cells were irradiated by high energy electrons and protons in the space environment. The considered investigation is concerned with the effect of periodic thermal annealing on the deep-level defects induced by the 200 keV protons in the AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells. Protons at a fluence of 10 to the 11th P/sq cm were used in the irradiation cycle, while annealing temperatures of 200 C (for 24 hours), 300 C (six hours), and 400 C (six hours) were employed. The most likely candidate for the E(c) -0.71 eV electron trap observed in the 200 keV proton irradiated samples may be due to GaAs antisite, while the observed E(v) +0.18 eV hole trap has been attributed to the gallium vacancy related defect. The obtained results show that periodic annealing in the considered case does not offer any advantages over the one time annealing process.

  3. Preliminary Low Temperature Electron Irradiation of Triple Junction Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2007-01-01

    For many years extending solar power missions far from the sun has been a challenge not only due to the rapid falloff in solar intensity (intensity varies as inverse square of solar distance) but also because some of the solar cells in an array may exhibit a LILT (low intensity low temperature) degradation that reduces array performance. Recent LILT tests performed on commercial triple junction solar cells have shown that high performance can be obtained at solar distances as great as approx. 5 AU1. As a result, their use for missions going far from the sun has become very attractive. One additional question that remains is whether the radiation damage experienced by solar cells under low temperature conditions will be more severe than when measured during room temperature radiation tests where thermal annealing may take place. This is especially pertinent to missions such as the New Frontiers mission Juno, which will experience cell irradiation from the trapped electron environment at Jupiter. Recent testing2 has shown that low temperature proton irradiation (10 MeV) produces cell degradation results similar to room temperature irradiations and that thermal annealing does not play a factor. Although it is suggestive to propose the same would be observed for low temperature electron irradiations, this has not been verified. JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature. A fluence of 1E15 1MeV electrons was

  4. Fast decay of the visible band electron in e-irradiated crystalline ice at low temperature: The isotope effects and the role of a mobile proton in the decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Keisuke; Nagata, Yoshio; Okabe, Shigeru; Kimura, Novio; Tsumori, Kunihiko; Kawanishi, Masaharu; Buxton, George V.; Salmon, G. Arthur

    1982-10-01

    The trapped electron which absorbs in the visible region in crystalline ice e-vis has been studied by pulse radiolysis in the low temperature range 6 to 77 K using 2 μs pulses, and above 77 K using pulses of 40 ps to 6 ns width. The half-life of e-vis in ice around 77 K is unusually short, 8 ns in H2O ice and 120 ns in D2O ice. The decay of e-vis in ice is found to fit Hummel's empirical equation for the decay by geminate ion recombination in a spur. Several other pieces of evidence indicate that the decay occurs in a spur. Electron tunneling from e-vis to the OD radical does not occur in D2O ice. It is concluded that a proton (H3O+) or a deuteron (D3O+) produced in a spur by the irradiation migrates through ice to react with immobile e-vis in the same spur, and that the half-life of e-vis is determined by the mobility of the proton or deuteron. The Arrhenius plot of the half-life in the range 100 to 6 K is nonlinear and shows an activation energy of 20 meV at higher temperatures and much smaller values at temperatures below 50 K (1 meV below 15 K). The causes of the unusual Arrhenius plot and the isotope effect on the proton mobility are discussed.

  5. A positron beam study on vacancy formation in iron by ion beam irradiation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwai, T.; Murakami, K.; Katano, Y.; Iwata, T.; Onitsuka, T.; Abe, H.

    2010-04-01

    This study intends to investigate cascade damage structure produced by energetic ion irradiation. Cascade damage structure is preserved at low temperature below stage I where interstitial atoms begin to migrate. Then positron beam is implanted to the irradiated surface as a vacancy probe to evaluate vacancy concentration remained in the irradiated specimens. By this method, defect production efficiency was evaluated for iron irradiated with proton and carbon ions. The defect production efficiency values indicate enhanced recombination for carbon irradiation due to primary knock-on atoms (PKA) with higher energies.

  6. Thermal conductivity degradation of graphites irradiated at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.; Burchell, T.D.

    1995-04-01

    The objective of this work is to study the thermal conductivity degradation of new, high thermal conductivity graphites and to compare these results to more standard graphites irradiated at low temperatures. Several graphites and graphite composites (C/C`s) have been irradiated near 150{degree}C and at fluences up to a displacement level of 0.24 dpa. The materials ranged in unirradiated room temperature thermal conductivity of these materials varied from 114 W/m-K for H-451 isotropic graphite, to 670 W/m-K for unidirectional FMI-1D C/C composite. At the irradiation temperature a saturation reduction in thermal conductivity was seen to occur at displacement levels of approximately 0.1 dpa. All materials were seen to degrade to approximately 10 to 14 % of their original thermal conductivity after irradiation. The effect of post irradiation annealing on the thermal conductivity was also studied.

  7. Quantum Effects at a Proton Relaxation at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalytka, V. A.; Korovkin, M. V.

    2016-11-01

    Quantum effects during migratory polarization in multi-well crystals (including multi-well silicates and crystalline hydrates) are investigated in a variable electric field at low temperatures by direct quantum-mechanical calculations. Based on analytical solution of the quantum Liouville kinetic equation in the linear approximation for the polarizing field, the non-stationary density matrix is calculated for an ensemble of non-interacting protons moving in the field of one-dimensional multi-well crystal potential relief of rectangular shape. An expression for the complex dielectric constant convenient for a comparison with experiment and calculation of relaxer parameters is derived using the nonequilibrium polarization density matrix. The density matrix apparatus can be used for analytical investigation of the quantum mechanism of spontaneous polarization of a ferroelectric material (KDP and DKDP).

  8. Preliminary low temperature electron irradiation of triple junction solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stella, Paul M.; Mueller, Robert L.; Scrivner, Roy L.; Helizon, Roger S.

    2005-01-01

    JPL has routinely performed radiation testing on commercial solar cells and has also performed LILT testing to characterize cell performance under far sun operating conditions. This research activity was intended to combine the features of both capabilities to investigate the possibility of any room temperature annealing that might influence the measured radiation damage. Although it was not possible to maintain the test cells at a constant low temperature between irradiation and electrical measurements, it was possible to obtain measurements with the cell temperature kept well below room temperature.

  9. Low-temperature electron irradiation and annealing in pure magnesium

    SciTech Connect

    Simester, J.H.

    1982-01-01

    In this study of magnesium after 1.0 MeV electron irradiations at 1.55/sup 0/K, it has been observed that the damage production rate in Mg is (3.57 +- 0.03) x 10/sup -26/ ..cap omega..cm/(e/sup -/ cm/sup 2/). There is no evidence for thermal annealing up to 4/sup 0/K. The low temperature recovery in magnesium is found to consist of two broad substages between 4 to 14/sup 0/K, both of which exhibit evidence for correlated and uncorrelated recovery processes. The two substages are found to have very different frequency factors for annealing, and there is evidence that the recovery processes in the second substage are influenced by those in the first. A model for recovery is proposed using the split configuration in the plane which explains the first substage as being due to interstitial migration in the basal plane and the second to migration perpendicular to the plane.

  10. Dose dependence of mechanical properties in tantalum and tantalum alloys after low temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang

    2008-01-01

    The dose dependence of mechanical properties was investigated for tantalum and tantalum alloys after low temperature irradiation. Miniature tensile specimens of three pure tantalum metals, ISIS Ta, Aesar Ta1, Aesar Ta2, and one tantalum alloy, Ta-1W, were irradiated by neutrons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at ORNL to doses ranging from 0.00004 to 0.14 displacements per atom (dpa) in the temperature range 60 C 100 oC. Also, two tantalum-tungsten alloys, Ta-1W and Ta-10W, were irradiated by protons and spallation neutrons in the LANSCE facility at LANL to doses ranging from 0.7 to 7.5 dpa and from 0.7 to 25.2 dpa, respectively, in the temperature range 50 C 160 oC. Tensile tests were performed at room temperature and at 250oC at nominal strain rates of about 10-3 s-1. All neutron-irradiated materials underwent progressive irradiation hardening and loss of ductility with increasing dose. The ISIS Ta experienced embrittlement at 0.14 dpa, while the other metals retained significant necking ductility. Such a premature embrittlement in ISIS Ta is believed to be because of high initial oxygen concentrations picked up during a pre-irradiation anneal. The Ta-1W and Ta-10W specimens irradiated in spallation condition experienced prompt necking at yield since irradiation doses for those specimens were high ( 0.7 dpa). At the highest dose, 25.2 dpa, the Ta-10W alloy specimen broke with little necking strain. Among the test materials, the Ta-1W alloy displayed the best combination of strength and ductility. The plastic instability stress and true fracture stress were nearly independent of dose. Increasing test temperature decreased strength and delayed the onset of necking at yield.

  11. Defects involving interstitial boron in low-temperature irradiated silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khirunenko, L. I.; Sosnin, M. G.; Duvanskii, A. V.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Riemann, H.

    2016-12-01

    Interstitial boron-related defects in silicon subjected to irradiation with 5 MeV electrons at a temperature of 80 K are investigated by Fourier-transform infrared absorption spectroscopy. This study demonstrates the radiation-enhanced annealing of interstitial boron during irradiation. We have revealed the interaction, which occurs in the course of irradiation, of diffusing interstitial boron atoms with one another and with interstitial oxygen. The local vibrational modes associated with these defects are identified, and the thermal stability of the defects is determined.

  12. Tensile properties of Inconel 718 after low temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byun, T. S.; Farrell, K.

    2003-05-01

    Tensile properties of Inconel 718 (IN718) have been investigated after neutron irradiation to 0.0006-1.2 dpa at 60-100 °C in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The alloy was exposed in solution-annealed (SA) and precipitation-hardened (PH) conditions. Before irradiation, the yield strength of PH IN718 was about 1170 MPa, which was 3.7 times higher than that of SA IN718. In the SA condition, an almost threefold increase in yield strength was found at 1.2 dpa, but the alloy retained a positive strain-hardening capability and a uniform ductility of more than 20%. Comparisons showed that the strain-hardening behavior of the SA IN718 is similar to that of a SA 316LN austenitic stainless steel. In the PH condition, the IN718 displayed no radiation-induced hardening in yield strength and significant softening in ultimate tensile strength. The strain-hardening capability of the PH IN718 decreased with dose as the radiation-induced dissolution of precipitates occurred, which resulted in the onset of plastic instability at strains less than 1% after irradiation to 0.16 or 1.2 dpa. An analysis on plastic instability indicated that the loss of uniform ductility in PH IN718 was largely due to the reduction in strain-hardening rate, while in SA IN718 and SA 316LN stainless steel it resulted primarily from the increase of yield stress.

  13. Low Temperature Irradiation Embrittlement of Reactor Pressure Vessel Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John

    2015-08-01

    The embrittlement trend curve development project for HFIR reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steels was carried out with three major tasks. Which are (1) data collection to match that used in HFIR steel embrittlement trend published in 1994 Journal Nuclear Material by Remec et. al, (2) new embrittlement data of A212B steel that are not included in earlier HFIR RPV trend curve, and (3) the adjustment of nil-ductility-transition temperature (NDTT) shift data with the consideration of the irradiation temperature effect. An updated HFIR RPV steel embrittlement trend curve was developed, as described below. NDTT( C) = 23.85 log(x) + 203.3 log (x) + 434.7, with 2- uncertainty of 34.6 C, where parameter x is referred to total dpa. The developed update HFIR RPV embrittlement trend curve has higher embrittlement rate compared to that of the trend curve developed in 1994.

  14. Irradiation of Frozen Solutions of Ferrous Sulphate as Dosimeter for Low Temperature Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez-Mejorada, G.; Frias, D.

    2006-09-08

    A theoretical model is presented for the evaluation of the energy transferred during the interaction of high energy radiation with icy bodies. Numerical simulations of the chemical reaction system reproduce the behavior of the icy systems (frozen solution of iron salts) after its interaction with the gamma radiation. Simulation experiments of extraterrestrial bodies are useful for space research, where low temperature dosimetry is necessary, especially in trips with humans or in the International Space Station (ISS) where humans are exposed to high radiation doses. The results showed that theoretical model applied for the irradiated system for different doses (from 10 to 2500Gy) and at different temperature (from 77 to 298 deg. K). The system under study was frozen solutions of iron salts and were analyzed (after Melting) by UV-spectroscopy. The systems were irradiates with gamma radiation. It is also shown that the response of the system is a function of the temperature and it was linear with as a function of dose.

  15. Effects of irradiation at low temperature on V-4Cr-4Ti

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Snead, L.L.; Zinkle, S.J.

    1996-10-01

    Irradiation at low temperatures (100 to 275{degrees}C) to 0.5 dpa causes significant embrittlement and changes in the subsequent room temperature tensile properties of V-4Cr-4Ti. The yield strength and microhardness at room temperature increase with increasing irradiation temperature. The tensile flow properties at room temperature show large increases in strength and a complete loss of work hardening capacity with no uniform ductility. Embrittlement, as measured by an increase in the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature, increases with increasing irradiation temperature, at least up to 275{degrees}C. This embrittlement is not due to pickup of O or other interstitial solutes during the irradiation.

  16. Composite electrolyte with proton conductivity for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell

    SciTech Connect

    Raza, Rizwan; Ahmed, Akhlaq; Akram, Nadeem; Saleem, Muhammad; Niaz Akhtar, Majid; Ajmal Khan, M.; Abbas, Ghazanfar; Alvi, Farah; Yasir Rafique, M.; Sherazi, Tauqir A.; Shakir, Imran; Mohsin, Munazza; Javed, Muhammad Sufyan; Zhu, Bin E-mail: zhubin@hubu.edu.cn

    2015-11-02

    In the present work, cost-effective nanocomposite electrolyte (Ba-SDC) oxide is developed for efficient low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). Analysis has shown that dual phase conduction of O{sup −2} (oxygen ions) and H{sup +} (protons) plays a significant role in the development of advanced LTSOFCs. Comparatively high proton ion conductivity (0.19 s/cm) for LTSOFCs was achieved at low temperature (460 °C). In this article, the ionic conduction behaviour of LTSOFCs is explained by carrying out electrochemical impedance spectroscopy measurements. Further, the phase and structure analysis are investigated by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy techniques. Finally, we achieved an ionic transport number of the composite electrolyte for LTSOFCs as high as 0.95 and energy and power density of 90% and 550 mW/cm{sup 2}, respectively, after sintering the composite electrolyte at 800 °C for 4 h, which is promising. Our current effort toward the development of an efficient, green, low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell with the incorporation of high proton conductivity composite electrolyte may open frontiers in the fields of energy and fuel cell technology.

  17. Temperature dependence of the deformation behavior of 316 stainless steel after low temperature neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel-Robertson, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Grossbeck, M.L.

    1996-10-01

    The effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on the tensile behavior of 316 stainless steel have been investigated. A single heat of solution annealed 316 was irradiated to 7 and 18 dpa at 60, 200, 330, and 400{degrees}C. The tensile properties as a function of dose and as a function of temperature were examined. Large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, strain to necking, and strain hardening capacity were seen in this irradiation experiment. The magnitudes of the changes are dependent on both irradiation temperature and neutron dose. Irradiation can more than triple the yield strength over the unirradiated value and decrease the strain to necking (STN) to less than 0.5% under certain conditions. A maximum increase in yield strength and a minimum in the STN occur after irradiation at 330{degrees}C but the failure mode remains ductile.

  18. Low-temperature irradiation effects on tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shiba, Kiyoyuki; Hishinuma, Akimichi

    2000-12-01

    Tensile and Charpy properties of low-activation ferritic steel, F82H irradiated up to 0.8 dpa at low temperature below 300°C were investigated. The helium effect on these properties was also investigated using the boron isotope doping method. Neutron irradiation increased yield stress accompanied with ductility loss, and it also shifted the ductile-to-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) from -50°C to 0°C. Boron-doped F82H showed larger degradation in DBTT and ductility than boron-free F82H, while they had the same yield stress before and after irradiation.

  19. The influence of low temperature on gamma-ray irradiated permanent magnets.

    PubMed

    Han, Young Chul; Cha, Hyun Gil; Kim, Chang Woo; Ji, Eun Sun; Kim, Young Hwan; Kang, Dong In; Kang, Young Soo

    2009-12-01

    The temperature effect on the magnetic property of gamma-ray irradiated Nd-Fe-B and Sr-Ferrite magnets has been investigated. When the permanent magnets are exposed to gamma-ray, it's magnetic and other related properties are declined with degree of dose. The decreased magnetic property by gamma-ray irradiation at low temperature is similar with the result of magnet at high temperature. The temperature effect on the gamma-ray irradiation at exposed moment is also regarded as one of the important parameters for the reduced magnetic properties. The gamma-irradiation at low temperature was carried out at 195 K, and the changed properties of two kinds of magnets before and after gamma-irradiation were comparatively studied. The increased demagnetization of the magnets were studied by Hall probe. And changed Curie temperature and micro-crystal structure of each permanent magnet by gamma-ray irradiation has been also studied. Moreover the strong and broad single line shape of ESR signal in the resonance magnetic field is attributed to unpaired electron of Fe2+ in the sample by the effect of gamma-ray irradiation.

  20. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    It was found that female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was determined to be 7 years after the proton exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received by the experimental animals were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event. It is concluded that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crew members. 15 references.

  1. Proton irradiation and endometriosis

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, D.H.; Yochmowitz, M.G.; Salmon, Y.L.; Eason, R.L.; Boster, R.A.

    1983-08-01

    Female rhesus monkeys given single total-body exposures of protons of varying energies developed endometriosis at a frequency significantly higher than that of nonirradiated animals of the same age. The minimum latency period was 7 years after exposure. The doses and energies of the radiation received were within the range that could be received by an aircrew member in near-earth orbit during a random solar flare event, leading to the conclusion that endometriosis should be a consideration in assessing the risk of delayed radiation effects in female crewmembers.

  2. Using gamma irradiation and low temperature on microbial decontamination of red meat in Iran.

    PubMed

    Sedeh, F M; Arbabi, K; Fatolahi, H; Abhari, M

    2007-03-01

    Gamma irradiation can be used as one of the most efficient methods to reduce microorganisms in food. The irradiation of food is used for a number of purposes, including microbiological control, insects control and inhibition of sprouting and delay of senescence of living food. The aim of this study was to study effects of gamma irradiation, refrigeration and frozen storage as the combination process for improvement of red meat shelf-life. The bovine meat samples were treated with 0, 0.5, 1, 2 and 3 kGy of gamma irradiation and kept in refrigerator for 3 weeks and in freezer for 8 months. The control and irradiated samples were stored at 4-7°C and at -18°C for refrigeration and frozen storage, respectively; and microbial and chemical analyze was done at 1 week and 2 months intervals. In this study the optimum dose of gamma radiation in order to decrease the total count of Mesophilic bacteria, Coliforms, Staphylococcus aureus and especially for elimination of Salmonella was obtained at 3 kGy. Microbial analysis indicated that irradiation and storage at low temperature had a significant effect on the reduction of microbial loads. There was no significant difference in chemical characteristics during freezing storage in bovine meat. Also, irradiated meat samples (3 kGy) were stored in 4-7°C for 14 days, compared to 3 days for non irradiated samples.

  3. In Situ Irradiation and Measurement of Triple Junction Solar Cells at Low Intensity, Low Temperature (LILT) Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, R.D.; Imaizumi, M.; Walters, R.J.; Lorentzen, J.R.; Messenger, S.R.; Tischler, J.G.; Ohshima, T.; Sato, S.; Sharps, P.R.; Fatemi, N.S.

    2008-01-01

    The performance of triple junction InGaP/(In)GaAs/Ge space solar cells was studied following high energy electron irradiation at low temperature. Cell characterization was carried out in situ at the irradiation temperature while using low intensity illumination, and, as such, these conditions reflect those found for deep space, solar powered missions that are far from the sun. Cell characterization consisted of I-V measurements and quantum efficiency measurements. The low temperature irradiations caused substantial degradation that differs in some ways from that seen after room temperature irradiations. The short circuit current degrades more at low temperature while the open circuit voltage degrades more at room temperature. A room temperature anneal after the low temperature irradiation produced a substantial recovery in the degradation. Following irradiation at both temperatures and an extended room temperature anneal, quantum efficiency measurement suggests that the bulk of the remaining damage is in the (In)GaAs sub-cell

  4. Damage structure of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-03-01

    TEM disk specimens of austenitic stainless steel 316LN irradiated to damage levels of about 3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either about 90 C or 250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. The irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 3.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 6.5 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}, a black dot density of 2.2 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3} and 1.6 {times} 10{sup 23} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively, in the steels, and a high density (<1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}) of precipitates in matrix. Cavities could be observed in the specimens after the irradiation. It is suggested that the dislocation loops, the black dots, and the precipitates cause irradiation hardening, an increase in the yield strength and a decrease in the uniform elongation, in the 316LN steel irradiated at low temperature.

  5. Tunnelling in low-temperature hydrogen-atom and proton transfers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnaut, Luis G.; Formosinho, Sebastião J.; Barroso, Monica

    2006-04-01

    The reaction path of the interacting-state model with the Lippincott-Schroeder potential for hydrogen bonds, is used in transition-state theory calculations with the semiclassical correction for tunnelling (LS-ISM/scTST) to estimate proton and hydrogen-atom transfer rates at low temperatures. Down to 100 K, the semiclassical correction leads to semi-empirical rates and isotope effects that are in good agreement with the thermal tautomerism of porphine, and the excited-state tautomerisms of salicylideneanilines and 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)benzoxazole. For lower temperatures, the tunnelling corrections become extremely high and unreliable. It is shown that the permeability of an Eckart barrier fitted to the curvature of the LS-ISM reaction path leads to good estimates of these reaction rates down to 2 K.

  6. Silicon solar cell characterization at low temperatures and low illumination as a function of particulate irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Peacock, C. L., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Various configurations of back surface reflector silicon solar cells including small (2 x 2) cm and large (approx. 6 x 6) cm cells with conventional and wraparound contacts were subjected to 1 MeV electron irradiation and characterized under both Earth orbital and deep space conditions of temperatures and illuminations. Current-Voltage (I-V) data were generated from +65 C to -150 C and at incident illuminations from 135.3 mW/sq cm to 5.4 mW/sq cm for these cells. Degradation in cell performance which is manifested only under deep space conditions is emphasized. In addition, the effect of particle irradiation on the high temperature and high intensity and low temperature and low intensity performance of the cells is described. The cells with wraparound contacts were found to have lower efficiencies at Earth orbital conditions than the cells with conventional contacts.

  7. Low-temperature synthesis of allyl dimethylamine by selective heating under microwave irradiation used for water treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Binghui; Luan, Zhaokun; Li, Mingming

    2005-08-01

    Low-temperature synthesis of allyl dimethylamine (ADA) by selective heating under microwave irradiation (MI) used for water treatment is investigated. The effect of MI, ultrasound irradiation (UI) and conventional heating on yield of ADA, reaction time and the flocculation efficiency of polydiallyl dimethylammunion chloride (PDADMAC) prepared form ADA were studied. The results show that by selective heating at low temperature, MI not only increases yield of ADA and reduces reaction time, but also greatly enhances the flocculation efficiency of PDADMAC.

  8. Bend-fatigue properties of 590 MeV proton irradiated JPCA and 316F SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Kikuchi, K.; Usami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Nishino, Y.; Kawai, M.; Dai, Y.

    2004-08-01

    A beam window of a spallation target will be subjected to proton/neutron irradiation, pressure wave and thermal stresses accompanied by high-energy proton beam injection. To obtain irradiation data, the SINQ target irradiation program (STIP) was initiated in 1996 at PSI. JAERI takes part in STIP and conducted the post-irradiation examination of JPCA, 316F. Irradiation conditions of JAERI specimens were as follows: proton energy was 590 MeV. Irradiation temperature ranged from 135 to 360 °C and irradiation dose from 6.3 to 12.5 dpa. The fatigue life of irradiated specimens is almost the same as that of unirradiated specimens. On the other hand, fracture surfaces varied with irradiation conditions. Specimens irradiated at low temperature fractured in a ductile manner. However, intergranular fractured surfaces were observed for 316F irradiated up to 12.5 dpa at 360 °C.

  9. Dose dependence of strength after low-temperature irradiation in metallic materials

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, Thak Sang; Li, Meimei; Farrell, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    This study intends to review and characterize the low-temperature (< 200 oC) irradiation hardening behaviors in metallic materials and to propose new interpretations on the dose dependence of strength, particularly in the pre-hardening and saturation regimes. The analysis results of yield stress-dose curves indicate that four dose-dependence regimes exist: the pre-hardening, main hardening, saturation, and embrittlement regimes. The semi-log plots of yield stress versus dose data revealed that the pre-hardening regime displaying zero-hardening or softening was common at least for the alloys with low dose data available. It was observed that the dose range of the pre-hardening regime increased with the strength of material, which indicates that slower initiation in irradiation hardening is expected when strength is higher. For the majority of the metallic materials analyzed, it was reconfirmed that the exponent of the power-law hardening function was evaluated to be about 0.5 in the main hardening regime and about 0.1 in the saturation regime. In these positive hardening regimes the low strength pure metals such as Fe, Ta, Cu, and Zr displayed lower hardening exponents. The minimum dose to the saturation of irradiation hardening was in the range of 0.003 0.08 dpa, depending on the category of materials. It was also reaffirmed that there exists a strong relationship between the saturation in irradiation hardening and the occurrence of plastic instability at yield.

  10. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; ...

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutronmore » irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.« less

  11. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Snead, Lance L.; Wirth, Brian D.

    2016-03-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (∼90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S-W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage, providing insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  12. Defect evolution in single crystalline tungsten following low temperature and low dose neutron irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Xunxiang; Koyanagi, Takaaki; Fukuda, Makoto; Katoh, Yutai; Wirth, Brian D; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The tungsten plasma-facing components of fusion reactors will experience an extreme environment including high temperature, intense particle fluxes of gas atoms, high-energy neutron irradiation, and significant cyclic stress loading. Irradiation-induced defect accumulation resulting in severe thermo-mechanical property degradation is expected. For this reason, and because of the lack of relevant fusion neutron sources, the fundamentals of tungsten radiation damage must be understood through coordinated mixed-spectrum fission reactor irradiation experiments and modeling. In this study, high-purity (110) single-crystal tungsten was examined by positron annihilation spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy following low-temperature (~90 °C) and low-dose (0.006 and 0.03 dpa) mixed-spectrum neutron irradiation and subsequent isochronal annealing at 400, 500, 650, 800, 1000, 1150, and 1300 °C. The results provide insights into microstructural and defect evolution, thus identifying the mechanisms of different annealing behavior. Following 1 h annealing, ex situ characterization of vacancy defects using positron lifetime spectroscopy and coincidence Doppler broadening was performed. The vacancy cluster size distributions indicated intense vacancy clustering at 400 °C with significant damage recovery around 1000 °C. Coincidence Doppler broadening measurements confirm the trend of the vacancy defect evolution, and the S–W plots indicate that only a single type of vacancy cluster is present. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy observations at selected annealing conditions provide supplemental information on dislocation loop populations and visible void formation. This microstructural information is consistent with the measured irradiation-induced hardening at each annealing stage. This provides insight into tungsten hardening and embrittlement due to irradiation-induced matrix defects.

  13. Positron trapping at vacancies in electron-irradiated Si at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Maekinen, J.; Corbel, C.; Hautojaervi, P.; Moser, P.; Pierre, F.

    1989-05-15

    Experimental results on positron trapping at vacancies in electron-irradiated silicon are presented. The positron lifetimes 273 +- 3 and 248 +- 2 ps in pure Si and heavily-phosphorus-doped Si ((P) = 10/sup 20/ cm/sup -3/) are assigned to a negative monovacancy V/sup -/ and a negative vacancy-phosphorus pair (V-P)/sup -/, respectively. In pure Si, positron trapping displays a strong negative temperature dependence, and the specific trapping rate reaches very large values (10/sup 17//sup --/10/sup 18/ s/sup -1/) at low temperatures. In Si:P the trapping rate is independent of temperature. These different temperature behaviors are attributed to different positron-trapping mechanisms, a cascade of one-phonon transitions in pure Si, and an Auger process in Si:P.

  14. A theoretical model of accelerated irradiation creep at low temperatures by transient interstitial absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, R.E.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Mansur, L.K.

    1990-01-01

    A theoretical model has been developed using the reaction rate theory of radiation effects to explain experimental results that showed higher than expected values of irradiation creep at low temperatures in the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. The customary assumption that the point defect concentrations are at steady state was not made; rather, the time dependence of the vacancy and interstitial concentrations and the creep rate were explicitly calculated. For temperatures below about 100 to 200{degree}C, the time required for the vacancy concentration to reach steady state exceeds the duration of the experiment. For example, if materials parameters typical of austenitic stainless steel are used, the calculated vacancy transient dose at 100{degree}C is about 100 dpa. At 550{degree}C this transient is over by 10{sup {minus}8} dpa. During the time that the vacancy population remains lower than its steady state value, dislocation climb is increased since defects of primarily one type are being absorbed. Using the time-dependent point defect concentrations, the dislocation climb velocity has been calculated as a function of time and a climb-enabled glide creep model had been invoked. The extended transient time for the vacancies leads to high creep rates at low temperatures. In agreement with the experimental observations, a minimum in the temperature dependence of creep is predicted at a temperature between 50 and 350{degree}C. The temperature at which the minimum occurs decreases as the irradiation dose increases. Predicted values of creep at 8 dpa are in good agreement with the results of the ORR-MFE-6J/7J experiment.

  15. Formation of nanocrystalline silicon in SiO x by soft X-ray irradiation at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heya, Akira; Kusakabe, Fumito; Matsuo, Naoto; Kanda, Kazuhiro; Kohama, Kazuyuki; Ito, Kazuhiro

    2017-03-01

    The low-temperature formation of nanocrystalline Si (nc-Si) in SiO x film is one of the key technologies in the realization of Si-based photonics and memories. We proposed a low-temperature nc-Si formation method with soft X-ray irradiation. The nc-Si formation depended on the Si/O atomic ratio in the pristine SiO x film. The Si-rich regions in SiO x films with Si/O ratios higher than 0.67 were crystallized by atomic migration via electron excitation with soft X-ray irradiation at a photon energy near the core level of Si 2p. nc-Si with a mean size of 20 nm was formed by soft X-ray irradiation at a low temperature of 660 °C.

  16. Tensile and impact properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated at low temperatures in the ATR-A1 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Chung, H.M.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-03-01

    Subsize tensile and Charpy specimens made from several V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti alloys were irradiated in the ATR-A1 experiment to study the effects of low-temperature irradiation on mechanical properties. These specimens were contained in lithium-bonded subcapsules and irradiated at temperatures between {approx}200 and 300 C. Peak neutron damage was {approx}4.7 dpa. Postirradiation testing of these specimens has begun. Preliminary results from a limited number of specimens indicate a significant loss of work-hardening capability and dynamic toughness due to the irradiation. These results are consistent with data from previous low-temperature neutron irradiation experiments on these alloys.

  17. The photosynthetic properties of rice leaves treated with low temperature and high irradiance.

    PubMed

    Hirotsu, Naoki; Makino, Amane; Yokota, Satoshi; Mae, Tadahiko

    2005-08-01

    Photosynthetic characteristics in rice (Oryza sativa L.) leaves were examined after treatment with low temperature (15 degrees C) and high irradiance (1,500 micromol quanta m(-2) s(-1)). Decreases in quantum efficiencies in PSII (PhiPSII) and PSI (PhiPSI) and in the rate of CO2 assimilation were observed with a decrease in the maximal quantum efficiency of PSII (F(v)/F(m)) by simultaneous measurements of Chl fluorescence, P700+ absorbance and gas exchange. The decreases in PhiPSII were most highly correlated with those in CO2 assimilation. Although the initial (the activity immediately measured upon extraction) and total (the activity following pre-incubation with CO2 and Mg2+) activities of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate (RuBP) carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) decreased slightly, the maximal activity (the activity following treatment with SO4(2-)) of Rubisco remained almost constant. These results indicate that the decrease in CO2 assimilation rate with the decreasing F(v)/F(m) was not caused by a decrease in Rubisco activity but rather by a decrease in RuBP regeneration capacity which resulted from the decrease in the rate of the linear electron transport. On the other hand, the decrease in PhiPSI was very small and the ratio of PhiPSI to PhiPSII increased. The de-epoxidation state of xanthophyll cycle pigments also increased. Thus, the cyclic electron transport around PSI occurred in photoinhibited leaves.

  18. Response of Bacillus subtilis spores to dehydration and UV irradiation at extremely low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Dose, K; Klein, A

    1996-02-01

    Spores of Bacillus subtilis have been exposed to the conditions of extreme dehydration (argon/silica gel; simulated space vacuum) for up to 12 weeks at 298 K and 80 K in the dark. The inactivation has been correlated with the production of DNA-double strand-breaks. The temperature-dependence of the rate constants for inactivation or production of DNA-double strand-breaks is surprisingly low. Controls kept in the frozen state at 250 K for the same period of time showed no sign of deterioration. In another series of experiments the spores have been UV irradiated (253.7 nm) at 298 K, 200 K and 80 K after exposure to dehydrating conditions for 3 days. Fluence-effect relationships for inactivation, production of DNA-double strand-breaks and DNA-protein cross-links are presented. The corresponding F37-values for inactivation and production of DNA lesions are significantly increased only at 80 K (factor of 4 to 5). The data indicate that the low temperatures that prevail in the outer parts of the Solar System or at the nightside of Mars or the Moon are not sufficiently low to crucially inhibit inactivation by dehydration. Our data place further constraints on the panspermia hypothesis.

  19. Proton irradiation study of GFR candidate ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gan, Jian; Yang, Yong; Dickson, Clayton; Allen, Todd

    2009-06-01

    This work investigated the microstructural response of SiC, ZrC and ZrN irradiated with 2.6 MeV protons at 800 °C to a fluence of 2.75 × 10 19 protons/cm 2, corresponding to 0.71-1.8 displacement per atom (dpa), depending on the material. The change of lattice constant evaluated using HOLZ patterns is not observed. In comparison to Kr ion irradiation at 800 °C to 10 dpa from the previous studies, the proton irradiated ZrC and ZrN at 1.8 dpa show less irradiation damage to the lattice structure. The proton irradiated ZrC exhibits faulted loops which are not observed in the Kr ion irradiated sample. ZrN shows the least microstructural change from proton irradiation. The microstructure of 6H-SiC irradiated to 0.71 dpa consists of black dot defects at high density.

  20. Proton irradiation of simple gas mixtures: Influence of irradiation parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sack, Norbert J.; Schuster, R.; Hofmann, A.

    1990-01-01

    In order to get information about the influence of irradiation parameters on radiolysis processes of astrophysical interest, methane gas targets were irradiated with 6.5 MeV protons at a pressure of 1 bar and room temperature. Yields of higher hydrocarbons like ethane or propane were found by analysis of irradiated gas samples using gas chromatography. The handling of the proton beam was of great experimental importance for determining the irradiation parameters. In a series of experiments current density of the proton beam and total absorbed energy were shown to have a large influence on the yields of produced hydrocarbons. Mechanistic interpretations of the results are given and conclusions are drawn with regard to the chemistry and the simulation of various astrophysical systems.

  1. Tonoplast lipid composition and proton pump of pineapple fruit during low-temperature storage and blackheart development.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuchan; Pan, Xiaoping; Qu, Hongxia; Underhill, Steven J R

    2014-05-01

    Vacuole represents a major storage organelle playing vital roles in pH homoeostasis and cellular detoxification. The chemical and functional properties of tonoplast in response to chilling temperature and their roles in chilling injury are largely unknown. In the current study, lipid composition of tonoplast and the activities of two vacuolar proton pumps, H?-ATPase (V-ATPase) and H?-pyrophosphatase (V-PPase), were investigated in accordance with the development of blackheart, a form of chilling injury in pineapple fruit (Ananas comosus). Chilling temperature at 10 °C for 1 week induced irreversible blackheart injury in concurrence with a substantial decrease in V-ATPase activity. By contrast, the activity was increased after 1 week at 25 °C. The activity of V-PPase was not changed under both temperatures. Level of total phospholipids of tonoplast decreased at 10 °C, but increased at 25 °C. There was no change at the level of total glycolipids under both temperatures. Thus, low temperature increased the ratio of total glycolipids vs. total phospholipids of tonoplast. Phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine were the predominant phospholipids of tonoplast. Low temperature increased the relative level of phosphatidic acid but decreased the percentage of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylethanolamine. Unsaturated fatty acids accounted for over 60 % of the total tonoplast fatty acids, with C18:1 and C18:2 being predominant. Low temperature significantly decreased the percentage of C18:3. Modification of membrane lipid composition and its effect on the functional property of tonoplast at low temperature were discussed in correlation with their roles in the development of chilling injury in pineapple fruit.

  2. [A role of some intracellular signaling cascades in planarian regeneration activated under irradiation with low-temperature argon plasma].

    PubMed

    Ermakov, A M; Ermakova, O N; Maevskiĭ, E I

    2014-01-01

    Using inhibitory analysis the role of some intracellular signaling pathways in activation of planarian regeneration under the influence of low-temperature argon plasma (LTAP) has been investigated. Inactivation of specific inhibitors of intracellular signaling enzymes such as the receptor tyrosine kinase (EGFR), TGF β receptor, calmodulin, adenylate cyclase, phospholipase A2, phospholipase C, cyclin-dependent protein kinase, JAK2-protein kinase, JNK-protein kinase MEK-protein kinase led to inhibition of the head growth during its regeneration in planarians. Pretreatment with LTAP irradiation provided no inhibitory action of some cascades regulating proliferation. However, the inhibitors of the key regulators of regeneration: TGF β receptor, calmodulin and MEK-protein kinase completely suppressed the activating effect of plasma. Thus, by the example of regenerating planarians it is shown, that biological activity of low-temperature argon plasma LTAP is caused by modulation of a plurality of cellular signaling systems.

  3. Impact behavior of 9-Cr and 12-Cr ferritic steels after low-temperature irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Vitek, J.M.; Corwin, W.R.; Alexander, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    Miniature Charpy impact specimens of 9Cr-1MoVNb and 12Cr-1MoVW steels and these steels with 1 and 2% Ni were irradiated in the High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at 50/sup 0/C to displacement damage levels of up to 9 dpa. Nickel was added to study the effect of transmutation helium. Irradiation caused an increase in the ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT). The 9Cr-1MoVNb steels, with and without nickel, showed a larger shift than the 12Cr-1MoVW steels, with and without nickel. The results indicated that helium also increased the DBTT. The same steels were previously irradiated at higher temperatures. From the present and past tests, the effect of irradiation temperature on the DBTT behavior can be evaluated. For the 9Cr-1MoVNb steel, there is a continuous decrease in the magnitude of the DBTT increase up to an irradiation temperature of about 400/sup 0/C, after which the shift drops rapidly to zero at about 450/sup 0/C. The DBTT of the 12Cr-1MoVW steel shows a maximum increase at an irradiation temperature of about 400/sup 0/C and less of an increase at either higher or lower irradiation temperatures.

  4. Low temperature gamma ray irradiation effects on polymer materials (4)-gas analysis of GFRP and CFRP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudoh, H.; Kasai, N.; Sasuga, T.; Seguchi, T.

    1996-11-01

    Gas analysis was carried out at RT after gamma-irradiation at room temperature and 77K for glass fiber reinforced plastic (GFRP) and carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) having the same epoxy resin matrix. Gas yield from CFRP was less than that from GFRP at RT, but comparable at 77 K. The yields of CO and CO 2 showed a large dependence on the irradiation temperature, i.e. they were much less at 77 K. Radiation resistance of GFRP and CFRP towards 77 K irrdiation is expected to be higher than that towards RT irradiation.

  5. Microstructural analysis of ferritic-martensitic steels irradiated at low temperature in HFIR

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, N.; Robertson, J.P.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Wakai, E.

    1998-09-01

    Disk specimens of ferritic-martensitic steel, HT9 and F82H, irradiated to damage levels of {approximately}3 dpa at irradiation temperatures of either {approximately}90 C or {approximately}250 C have been investigated by using transmission electron microscopy. Before irradiation, tempered HT9 contained only M{sub 23}C{sub 6} carbide. Irradiation at 90 C and 250 C induced a dislocation loop density of 1 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3} and 8 {times} 10{sup 21} m{sup {minus}3}, respectively. in the HT9 irradiated at 250 C, a radiation-induced phase, tentatively identified as {alpha}{prime}, was observed with a number density of less than 1 {times} 10{sup 20} m{sup {minus}3}. On the other hand, the tempered F82H contained M{sub 23}C{sub 6} and a few MC carbides; irradiation at 250 C to 3 dpa caused minor changes in these precipitates and induced a dislocation loop density of 2 {times} 10{sup 22} m{sup {minus}3}. Difference in the radiation-induced phase and the loop microstructure may be related to differences in the post-yield deformation behavior of the two steels.

  6. Evolution of radiation defects in nickel under low-temperature neutron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozlov, A. V.; Panchenko, V. L.; Kozlov, K. A.; Russkikh, I. M.; Kozlov, An. V.

    2014-01-01

    Neutron irradiation of pure nickel samples in an IBB-2M research reactor has been performed at a temperature of 305 K to damaging doses of 0.0015 and 0.15 dpa. Radiation defects formed in the material under irradiation have been investigated using transmission electron microscopy. It has been established that the main types of defects are vacancy clusters and interstitial dislocation loops. Sizes of vacancy clusters have been measured, and histograms of the cluster-size distribution have been constructed. It has been shown that, after irradiation with a dose of 0.15 dpa, the average cluster size is nearly half of that for samples irradiated with a dose of 0.0015 dpa. In the framework of the model of the migration of point defects, their evolution under irradiation has been analyzed. It has been shown that, at a temperature of 305 K, vacancies in nickel are immobile and migrating interstitials falling into clusters recombine with vacancies in them, which results in the exhaustion of clusters. The average life span of clusters has been calculated, and average concentrations of vacancies and interstitials under irradiation have been estimated.

  7. Low-temperature formation of high-quality gate oxide by ultraviolet irradiation on spin-on-glass

    SciTech Connect

    Usuda, R.; Uchida, K.; Nozaki, S.

    2015-11-02

    Although a UV cure was found to effectively convert a perhydropolysilazane (PHPS) spin-on-glass film into a dense SiO{sub x} film at low temperature, the electrical characteristics were never reported in order to recommend the use of PHPS as a gate-oxide material that can be formed at low temperature. We have formed a high-quality gate oxide by UV irradiation on the PHPS film, and obtained an interface midgap trap density of 3.4 × 10{sup 11 }cm{sup −2} eV{sup −1} by the UV wet oxidation and UV post-metallization annealing (PMA), at a temperature as low as 160 °C. In contrast to the UV irradiation using short-wavelength UV light, which is well known to enhance oxidation by the production of the excited states of oxygen, the UV irradiation was carried out using longer-wavelength UV light from a metal halide lamp. The UV irradiation during the wet oxidation of the PHPS film generates electron-hole pairs. The electrons ionize the H{sub 2}O molecules and facilitate dissociation of the molecules into H and OH{sup −}. The OH{sup −} ions are highly reactive with Si and improve the stoichiometry of the oxide. The UV irradiation during the PMA excites the electrons from the accumulation layer, and the built-in electric field makes the electron injection into the oxide much easier. The electrons injected into the oxide recombine with the trapped holes, which have caused a large negative flat band voltage shift after the UV wet oxidation, and also ionize the H{sub 2}O molecules. The ionization results in the electron stimulated dissociation of H{sub 2}O molecules and the decreased interface trap density.

  8. On-line DLTS investigations of vacancy related defects in low-temperature electron irradiated, boron-doped Si

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangenberg, N. R.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.

    2005-02-01

    Vacancy-related defects in Si are explored with deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The measurements are performed on-line on irradiated p-type Si and a new trap with the signature (Epa, σpa) = (0.18 eV, 6.5×10-15 cm2) only present at cryogenic temperatures is studied. Furthermore, the bi-stable boron-vacancy complex is studied and it’s configuration at low temperatures is investigated and found to have the signature (Epa, σpa) = (0.11 eV, 8.2×10-15 cm2).

  9. Hardness of Carburized Surfaces in 316LN Stainless Steel after Low Temperature Neutron Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Byun, TS

    2005-01-31

    A proprietary surface carburization treatment is being considered to minimize possible cavitation pitting of the inner surfaces of the stainless steel target vessel of the SNS. The treatment gives a large supersaturation of carbon in the surface layers and causes substantial hardening of the surface. To answer the question of whether such a hardened layer will remain hard and stable during neutron irradiation, specimens of the candidate materials were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to an atomic displacement level of 1 dpa. Considerable radiation hardening occurred in annealed 316LN stainless steel and 20% cold rolled 316LN stainless steel, and lesser radiation hardening in Kolsterised layers on these materials. These observations coupled with optical microscopy examinations indicate that the carbon-supersaturated layers did not suffer radiation-induced decomposition and softening.

  10. AEM and AES of radiation-induced segregation in proton-irradiated stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kenik, E.A.; Carter, R.D.; Damcott, D.L.; Atzmon, M.; Was, G.S.

    1994-06-01

    In order to avoid complications from long-term induced radioactivity of neutron-irradiated specimens, 4 type 304L alloys were irradiated to 1 dpa with 3.4 MeV protons at 400 C. Analytical electron microscopy and Auger electron spectrometry were used to measure composition at and near grain boundaries in controlled purity alloys. As a result of the narrow RIS profiles (<20 nm width) at grain boundaries induced in these materials by low temperature irradiation and the finite size of the excited volume for x-ray microanalysis, the measured profiles are convolutions of these two factors.

  11. Irradiation effects on interlaminar shear strength of GFRP at low temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Tsukazaki, Y.; Nishijuma, S.; Ueno, S.

    1997-06-01

    The degradation of interlaminar shear strength (ILSS) of GFRPs has been evaluated after 77K electron and 20K reactor irradiation. The GFRPs used in this work were prepared using several matrix resins. Optical microscopic observations of the fracture surfaces were carried out to determine the degradation behavior of ILSS. The fiber exposed area of fracture (interfacial failure) surface was found to be larger with higher absorbed dose. It suggested that the degradation of ILSS was induced by the interface failure between fiber and matrix. The matrix resin was also found to be degraded along with the interface.

  12. Single proton counting at the RIKEN cell irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mäckel, V. Puttaraksa, N.; Kobayashi, T.; Yamazaki, Y.

    2015-08-15

    We present newly developed tapered capillaries with a scintillator window, which enable us to count single protons at the RIKEN cell irradiation setup. Their potential for performing single proton irradiation experiments at our beamline setup is demonstrated with CR39 samples, showing a single proton detection fidelity of 98%.

  13. Effects of low temperature neutron irradiation on deformation behavior of austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, J.E.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Alexander, D.J.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Shiba, K.

    1996-04-01

    An austenitic stainless steel, designated 316LN-IG, has been chosen for the first wall/shield (FW/S) structure for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). The proposed operational temperature range for the structure (100 to 250{degree}C) is below the temperature regimes for void swelling (400-600{degree}C) and for helium embrittlement (500-700{degree}C). However, the proposed neutron dose is such that large changes in yield strength, deformation mode, and strain hardening capacity could be encountered which could significantly affect fracture properties. Definition of the irradiation regimes in which this phenomenon occurs is essential to the establishment of design rules to protect against various modes of failure.

  14. Microstructure of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy after low-temperature irradiation by ions and neutrons

    SciTech Connect

    Gazda, J.; Meshii, M.; Chung, H.M.

    1998-03-01

    Mechanical properties of V-4Cr-4Ti alloy were investigated after low-temperature (<420 C) irradiation. The effects of fast neutrons at 390 C were investigated by irradiation to {approx}4 dpa in the X530 experiment in the EBR-II reactor; these tests were complemented by irradiation with single (4.5-MeV Ni{sup ++}) and dual ion beams (350-keV He{sup +} simultaneously with 4.5-MeV Ni{sup ++}). TEM observations showed the formation of a high density of point-defect clusters and dislocation loops (<30 nm diameter) distributed uniformly in the specimens. Mechanical-property testing showed embrittlement of the alloy. TEM investigations of deformed microstructures were used to determine the causes of embrittlement and yielded observation of dislocation channels propagating through the undeformed matrix. Channels are the sole slip paths and cause early onset of necking and loss of work-hardening in this alloy. Based on a review of the available literature, suggestions are made for further research of slip localization in V-base alloys.

  15. Chemical ordering in ilmenite-hematite bulk ceramics through proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.M.; Navarrete, L.; Dou, J.; Schad, R.; Padmini, P.; Kale, P.; Pandey, R.K.; Shojah-Ardalan, S.; Wilkins, R.

    2004-12-13

    We demonstrated the capability of MeV proton irradiation to promote chemical ordering processes in a solid at low temperature. We used the ilmenite-hematite solid solution system which allows estimation of the degree of ordering through measurement of its magnetization. Normally, ordering through diffusion would require high temperature annealing. At high temperatures, however, the equilibrium state would be less ordered and thus the achievable ordering incomplete. High energetic protons continuously transfer energy to the sample through electronic interaction which locally deposits large quantities of energy without a general increase of the sample temperature. This promotes diffusion processes which allow the system to relax towards the ordered equilibrium state.

  16. Fractionated proton beam irradiation of pituitary adenomas

    SciTech Connect

    Ronson, Brian B.; Schulte, Reinhard W.; Han, Khanh P.; Loredo, Lilia N.; Slater, James M.; Slater, Jerry D. . E-mail: jdslater@dominion.llumc.edu

    2006-02-01

    Purpose: Various radiation techniques and modalities have been used to treat pituitary adenomas. This report details our experience with proton treatment of these tumors. Methods and Materials: Forty-seven patients with pituitary adenomas treated with protons, who had at least 6 months of follow-up, were included in this analysis. Forty-two patients underwent a prior surgical resection; 5 were treated with primary radiation. Approximately half the tumors were functional. The median dose was 54 cobalt-gray equivalent. Results: Tumor stabilization occurred in all 41 patients available for follow-up imaging; 10 patients had no residual tumor, and 3 had greater than 50% reduction in tumor size. Seventeen patients with functional adenomas had normalized or decreased hormone levels; progression occurred in 3 patients. Six patients have died; 2 deaths were attributed to functional progression. Complications included temporal lobe necrosis in 1 patient, new significant visual deficits in 3 patients, and incident hypopituitarism in 11 patients. Conclusion: Fractionated conformal proton-beam irradiation achieved effective radiologic, endocrinological, and symptomatic control of pituitary adenomas. Significant morbidity was uncommon, with the exception of postradiation hypopituitarism, which we attribute in part to concomitant risk factors for hypopituitarism present in our patient population.

  17. Mechanistic interpretation of an observed rate dependence of low temperature swelling of irradiated uranium silicide dispersion fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Rest, J; Hofman, G L

    1990-06-01

    Recent experimental observations on low temperature swelling of irradiated uranium silicide dispersion fuels have indicated that the growth of fission gas bubbles appears to be affected by fission rate. The swelling curve of the material exhibits a distinct knee'' that shifts to higher fission density with increased fission rate due to higher enrichments. Current state-of-the-art models for fission gas behavior do not predict such a dependence. Indirect evidence from various experiments leads the present authors to speculate that a dense network of subgrain boundaries forms at a dose corresponding to the knee'' in the swelling curve, upon which gas bubbles nucleate and then grow at an accelerated rate compared to those in the bulk material. A theoretical formulation is presented wherein the stored energy in the material is concentrated on a network of crystallization'' sites which diminish with dose due to interaction with radiation produced defects (vacancy-impurity pairs). Recrystallization is induced by statistical fluctuations when the energy per site is high enough such that the creation of grain boundary surfaces is offset by the creation of strain free volumes with a resultant net decrease in the free energy of the material. This formulation is shown to provide a reasonable interpretation of the observed phenomena. 11 refs., 7 figs.

  18. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Koike, J; Oshima, T

    1993-08-01

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 x 10(-8) torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively.

  19. Planetary quarantine in the solar system. Survival rates of some terrestrial organisms under simulated space conditions by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, J.; Oshima, T.

    We have been studying the survival rates of some species of terrestrial unicellular and multicellular organism (viruses, bacteria, yeasts, fungi, algae, etc.) under simulated interstellar conditions, in connection with planetary quarantine. The interstellar environment in the solar system has been simulated by low temperature, high vacuum (77 K, 4 × 10 -8 torr), and proton irradiation from a Van de Graaff generator. After exposure to a barrage of protons corresponding to about 250 years of irradiation in solar space, tobacco mosaic virus, Bacillus subtilis spores, Staphylococcus aureus, Micrococcus flavus, Aspergillus niger spores, and Clostridium mangenoti spores showed survival rates of 82, 45, 74, 13, 28, and 25%, respectively.

  20. Effects of low-temperature annealing on the microstructure and grain boundary chemistry of irradiated type 304SS and correlations with IASCC resistance

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobs, A.J.; Dumbill, S.

    1995-12-31

    Low-temperature annealing (LTA) is a known technique for mitigating irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) in laboratory stress corrosion cracking tests. A combined transmission electron microscope (TEM)/scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) study was undertaken to determine the microstructural and/or grain boundary compositional differences between an IASCC-resistant material, which had been mill-annealed, then irradiated and subjected to a low-temperature anneal; and an IASCC-susceptible material, which had been mill-annealed and irradiated only. The material used was commercial-purity Type 304SS from a control blade sheath. Stress corrosion resistance was measured in constant extension rate tensile (CERT) and constant deflection tests in a hot cell. Attempts were made to correlate microhardness data obtained from tested constant deflection specimens with dislocation density measured in the TEM and with IASCC resistance. Phosphorus and silicon segregation and chromium depletion are reported as a function of heat treatment and IASCC resistance.

  1. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Dr. Philip; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J

    2012-01-01

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy.

  2. Anomalous grain growth in the surface region of a nanocrystalline CeO2 film under low-temperature heavy ion irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Edmondson, Philip D.; Zhang, Yanwen; Moll, Sandra J.; Varga, Tamas; Namavar, Fereydoon; Weber, William J.

    2012-06-15

    Grain growth and phase stability of nanocrystalline ceria are investigated under ion irradiation at different temperatures. Irradiations at temperatures of 300 and 400 K result in uniform grain growth throughout the film. Anomalous grain growth is observed in thin films of nanocrystalline ceria under 3 MeV Au+ irradiation at 160 K. At this low temperature, significant grain growth is observed within 100 nm from the surface, no obvious growth is detected in the rest of the films. While the grain growth is attributed to a defect-stimulated mechanism at room temperature and above, a defect diffusion-limited mechanism is significant at low temperature with the primary defect responsible being the oxygen vacancy. The nanocrystalline grains remain in the cubic phase regardless of defect kinetics.

  3. Single crystals of L-O-serine phosphate X-irradiated at low temperatures: EPR, ENDOR, EIE, and DFT studies.

    PubMed

    Øhman, Kjell Tage; Sanderud, Audun; Hole, Eli Olaug; Sagstuen, Einar

    2006-08-10

    Single crystals of the phosphorylated amino acid L-O-serine phosphate were X-irradiated and studied at 10 K and at 77 K using EPR, ENDOR, and EIE techniques. Two radicals, R1(10 K) and R1(77 K), were detected and characterized as two different geometrical conformations of the protonated reduction product >CH-C(OH)(2). R1(10 K) is only observed after irradiation at 10 K, and upon heating to 40 K, R1(10 K) transforms rapidly and irreversibly into R1(77 K). The transition from R1(10 K) to R1(77 K) strongly increases the isotropic hyperfine coupling of the C-CH(beta) coupling (Delta = 32 MHz) and the major C-OH(beta) coupling (Delta = 47 MHz), in sharp contrast to the their much reduced anisotropic hyperfine couplings after the transition. An umbrella-like inversion of the carboxylic acid center, accompanied by minor geometrical adjustments, explains the changes of these observed isotropic and anisotropic couplings. DFT calculations were done on the reduced and protonated L-O-serine phosphate radical at the B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,p)//B3LYP/6-31+G(d) level of theory in order to support the experimental observations. Two different conformations of the anion radical, related by an inversion at the carboxylic center, could be found within the single molecule partial energy-optimization scheme. These two conformations reproduce the experimental hyperfine couplings from radicals R1(10 K) and R1(77 K). A third radical, radical R2, was observed experimentally at both 10 and 77 K and was shown to be due to the decarboxylated L-O-serine phosphate oxidation product, a conclusion fully supported from the DFT calculations. Upon thermal annealing from 77 to 295 K, radicals R1(77 K) and R2 disappeared and all three previously observed room-temperature radicals could be observed. No phosphate-centered radicals could be observed at any temperatures, indicating that the phosphate-ester bond break for one of the room-temperature radicals does not occur by dissociative electron capture at the

  4. [Reduction of radiation-induced vitamin E- and B1- losses by irradiation of foodstuffs at low temperature and by exclusion of atmospheric oxygen].

    PubMed

    Diehl, J F

    1979-10-01

    The protective effect of low temperatures during irradiation on vitamin B1 and E levels in foods is not abolished by subsequent storage or heating. Egg powder irradiated at 1 Mrad in the presence of air and stored for 4 months at ambient temperature lost 68% of its thiamin content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 33% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Sunflower oil irradiated at 3 Mrad in the presence of air and subsequently heated for 1 hour at 180 degrees C lost 98% of its alpha-tocopherol content when irradiated at 20 degrees C, 65% when irradiated at -30 degrees C. Exclusion of atmospheric oxygen by packaging under nitrogen reduced the loss of alpha-tocopherol in irradiated (0.1 Mrad) rolled oats after 8 months of storage from 56 to 5% and the loss of thiamin from 86 to 26%. Vacuum packaging was equally effective during the first 3 months and somewhat less effective during the following 5 months. Packaging under carbon dioxide showed no advantage over packaging in air. Sensory evaluation of rolled oats, raw or cooked, 1 and 3 months after irradiation with 0.1 Mrad indicated no significant quality difference between unirradiated and irradiated samples packaged under nitrogen.

  5. Enhanced proton treatment in mouse tumors through proton irradiated nanoradiator effects on metallic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Ki; Seo, Seung-Jun; Kim, Hong-Tae; Kim, Ki-Hong; Chung, Myung-Hwan; Kim, Kye-Ryung; Ye, Sung-Jun

    2012-12-01

    The impact of protons on metallic nanoparticles (MNPs) produces the potent release of MNP-induced secondary electrons and characteristic x-rays. To determine the ability of secondary radiations to enhance proton treatment, the therapeutic irradiation of tumors was investigated in mice receiving 100-300 mg MNPs/kg intravenously prior to single dose, 10-41 Gy, proton irradiation. A proton beam was utilized to irradiate nanoparticles with a single Bragg peak set to occur inside a tumor volume (fully absorbed) or to occur after the beam had traversed the entire body. The dose-dependent increase in complete tumor regression (CTR) was 37-62% in the fully-absorbed irradiation group or 50-100% in the traversing irradiation group, respectively, compared with the proton-alone control mice (p < 0.01). One year survival was 58-100% versus 11-13% proton alone. The dose-dependent increase of intracellular reactive oxygen species level was 12-36% at 10 Gy compared with the proton-alone control cell. Therapeutic effective drug concentration that led to 100% CTR with a proton dose of 31 Gy was measured either 41 µg Au/g tissue or 59 µg Fe/g tissue. MNP-based proton treatment increased not only percent CTR and survival in vivo but also ROS generation in vitro, suggesting tumor dose enhancement from secondary radiation as one potent pathway of therapeutic enhancement.

  6. Raman Microscopic Characterization of Proton-Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. L.; Davidson, J. L.; Lance, M. J.

    2004-01-01

    The microstructural effects of irradiating polycrystalline diamond films with proton dosages ranging from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 17) H(+) per square centimeter was examined. Scanning Electron Microscopy and Raman microscopy were used to examine the changes in the diamond crystalline lattice as a function of depth. Results indicate that the diamond lattice is retained, even at maximum irradiation levels.

  7. Surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated zirconium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rafique, Mohsin; Chae, San; Kim, Yong-Soo

    2016-02-01

    This paper reports the surface, structural and tensile properties of proton beam irradiated pure zirconium (99.8%). The Zr samples were irradiated by 3.5 MeV protons using MC-50 cyclotron accelerator at different doses ranging from 1 × 1013 to 1 × 1016 protons/cm2. Both un-irradiated and irradiated samples were characterized using Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscope (FESEM), X-ray Diffraction (XRD) and Universal Testing Machine (UTM). The average surface roughness of the specimens was determined by using Nanotech WSxM 5.0 develop 7.0 software. The FESEM results revealed the formation of bubbles, cracks and black spots on the samples' surface at different doses whereas the XRD results indicated the presence of residual stresses in the irradiated specimens. Williamson-Hall analysis of the diffraction peaks was carried out to investigate changes in crystallite size and lattice strain in the irradiated specimens. The tensile properties such as the yield stress, ultimate tensile stress and percentage elongation exhibited a decreasing trend after irradiation in general, however, an inconsistent behavior was observed in their dependence on proton dose. The changes in tensile properties of Zr were associated with the production of radiation-induced defects including bubbles, cracks, precipitates and simultaneous recovery by the thermal energy generated with the increase of irradiation dose.

  8. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This study focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  9. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium - A macroscopic assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Camino, Fernando

    2016-10-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting its lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This paper focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.

  10. Proton irradiation effects on beryllium – A macroscopic assessment

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; ...

    2016-07-01

    Beryllium, due to its excellent neutron multiplication and moderation properties, in conjunction with its good thermal properties, is under consideration for use as plasma facing material in fusion reactors and as a very effective neutron reflector in fission reactors. While it is characterized by unique combination of structural, chemical, atomic number, and neutron absorption cross section it suffers, however, from irradiation generated transmutation gases such as helium and tritium which exhibit low solubility leading to supersaturation of the Be matrix and tend to precipitate into bubbles that coalesce and induce swelling and embrittlement thus degrading the metal and limiting itsmore » lifetime. Utilization of beryllium as a pion production low-Z target in high power proton accelerators has been sought both for its low Z and good thermal properties in an effort to mitigate thermos-mechanical shock that is expected to be induced under the multi-MW power demand. To assess irradiation-induced changes in the thermal and mechanical properties of Beryllium, a study focusing on proton irradiation damage effects has been undertaken using 200 MeV protons from the Brookhaven National Laboratory Linac and followed by a multi-faceted post-irradiation analysis that included the thermal and volumetric stability of irradiated beryllium, the stress-strain behavior and its ductility loss as a function of proton fluence and the effects of proton irradiation on the microstructure using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. The mimicking of high temperature irradiation of Beryllium via high temperature annealing schemes has been conducted as part of the post-irradiation study. This study focuses on the thermal stability and mechanical property changes of the proton irradiated beryllium and presents results of the macroscopic property changes of Beryllium deduced from thermal and mechanical tests.« less

  11. Charging and Discharging Characteristic on PI Films Irradiated by Protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uchiyama, Ryo; Miyake, Hiroaki; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Takada, Tatuo

    We evaluate the dielectric characteristic of polymeric materials for MLI (Multi Layer Insulator, a kind of thermal insulation material) for spacecraft under high energy proton irradiation using results of space charge distribution. Spacecrafts have a serious damage due to the electro-static discharge accident. The electric charges are accumulated in the polymeric materials due to radioactive rays, especially electrons and protons. The charge accumulation is the origin of aging and discharging phenomena, furthermore those become trigger for spacecraft operation anomaly. Therefore, we need to obtain the space charge distribution in the bulks. In this study, we especially focused polyimide films for MLI irradiated by high energy proton. We measured the space charge distribution in the bulks during and after proton beam irradiation. From the results, it is found that positive charges accumulate in the bulk at the position of proton penetration depth. We also obtained same tendency from the results of conductivity measurement treated by ASTM method. From the above reason, we have studied the dielectric characteristics of MLI materials irradiated by radioactive rays, especially we focused the condition of proton irradiation. In this paper, we discuss the dielectric phenomena and the relationship between conductivity and charge accumulation in bulks.

  12. δ-KIO 3·HIO 3: crystal structure, proton disorder and low temperature phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelen, B.; Gavrilko, T.; Panthöfer, M.; Puchkovskaya, G.; Sekirin, I.

    2000-05-01

    δ-KIO 3·HIO 3, obtained by slowly cooling a concentrated solution of KIO 3 and HIO 3, has been investigated by means of single crystal X-ray diffraction measurements at ambient temperature and temperature dependent powder X-ray diffraction, dielectric, calorimetric and FT-IR and FT-Raman measurements. From the single crystal X-ray measurements, the I-O bonding scheme of the iodine atoms and the hydrogen bond system were determined. The crystal structure of δ-KIO 3·HIO 3 was found to consist of [I 3O 9H 3/2] 3/2- ions possibly originating from occupationally disordered [I 3O 9H 2] - and [I 3O 9H] 2- anions. These ions are connected via hydrogen bonds to form plane grids parallel (100) with the K + ions placed between them. Thus δ-KIO 3·HIO 3 should be formulated as K 3/2[I 3O 9H 3/2]. The temperature dependent FT-IR data give an evidence for a dynamic proton disorder at room temperature and for a proton ordering below 220 K, which may be regarded as a structural phase transition in the proton sublattice.

  13. Accumulation and annealing of radiation defects under low-temperature electron and neutron irradiation of ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbuzov, V. L.; Goshchitskii, B. N.; Sagaradze, V. V.; Danilov, S. E.; Kar'kin, A. E.

    2010-10-01

    The processes of accumulation and annealing of radiation defects at low-temperature (77 K) electron and neutron irradiation and their effect on the physicomechanical properties of Fe-Cr alloys and oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel have been studied. It has been shown that the behavior of radiation defects in ODS steel and Fe-Cr alloys is qualitatively similar. Above 250 K, radiation-induced processes of the solid solution decomposition become conspicuous. These processes are much less pronounced in ODS steel because of specific features of its microstructure. Processes related to the overlapping of displacement cascades under neutron irradiation have been considered. It has been shown that, in this case, it is the increase in the size of vacancy clusters, rather than the growth of their concentration, that is prevailing. Possible mechanisms of the radiation hardening of the ODS steel and the Fe-13Cr alloy upon irradiation and subsequent annealing have been discussed.

  14. Proton and neutron irradiation effect of Ti: Sapphires

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, G.; Zhang, J.; Yang, J.

    1999-07-01

    Various effects of proton and neutron irradiated Ti: sapphires were studied. Proton irradiation induced F, F{sup +} and V center in Ti: sapphires and 3310 cm{sup -1} infrared absorption, and made ultraviolet absorption edge shift to short wave. Neutron irradiation produced a number of F, F{sup +} and F{sub 2} centers and larger defects in Ti: sapphires, and changed Ti{sup 4+}into Ti{sup 3+} ions. Such valence state variation enhanced characteristic luminescence of Ti: sapphires, and no singular variances of intrinsic fluorescence spectra of Ti: sapphires took place with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 17}n/cm{sup 2}, but the fluorescence vanished with neutron flux of 1 x 10{sup 18}n/cm{sup 2} which means the threshold for the concentration of improving Ti{sup 3+} ions by neutron irradiation.

  15. Effect of high energy proton irradiation on InAs/GaAs quantum dots: Enhancement of photoluminescence efficiency (up to {approx}7 times) with minimum spectral signature shift

    SciTech Connect

    Sreekumar, R.; Mandal, A.; Gupta, S.K.; Chakrabarti, S.

    2011-11-15

    Graphical abstract: Authors demonstrate enhancement in photoluminescence efficiency (7 times) in single layer InAs/GaAs quantum dots using proton irradiation without any post-annealing treatment via either varying proton energy (a) or fluence (b). The increase in PL efficiency is explained by a proposed model before (c) and after irradiation (d). Highlights: {yields} Proton irradiation improved PL efficiency in InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs). {yields} Proton irradiation favoured defect and strain annihilation in InAs/GaAs QDs. {yields} Reduction in defects/non-radiative recombination improved PL efficiency. {yields} Protons could be used to improve PL efficiency without spectral shift. {yields} QD based devices will be benefited by this technique to improve device performance. -- Abstract: We demonstrate 7-fold increase of photoluminescence efficiency in GaAs/(InAs/GaAs) quantum dot hetero-structure, employing high energy proton irradiation, without any post-annealing treatment. Protons of energy 3-5 MeV with fluence in the range (1.2-7.04) x 10{sup 12} ions/cm{sup 2} were used for irradiation. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed crystalline quality of the GaAs cap layer improves on proton irradiation. Photoluminescence study conducted at low temperature and low laser excitation density proved the presence of non-radiative recombination centers in the system which gets eliminated on proton irradiation. Shift in photoluminescence emission towards higher wavelength upon irradiation substantiated the reduction in strain field existed between GaAs cap layer and InAs/GaAs quantum dots. The enhancement in PL efficiency is thus attributed to the annihilation of defects/non-radiative recombination centers present in GaAs cap layer as well as in InAs/GaAs quantum dots induced by proton irradiation.

  16. The radiolysis and racemization of leucine on proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonner, W. A.; Lemmon, R. M.; Conzett, H. E.

    1982-01-01

    D- and L-Leucine have been subjected to 39-55 percent radiolysis using 0.11 MeV protons, both with the proton beam passing through the sample or being absorbed by it and with quenching the sample immediately on completion of irradiation or after a 21-day interval. Racemization was small (1.1-1.7 percent) and comparable in all cases, suggesting that radioracemization and secondary degradative effects were not important factors in the recent unsuccessful attempts to induce optical activity in DL-Leucine by partial radiolysis using 0-11 MeV longitudinally polarized protons.

  17. Radiation damage in proton irradiated indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    1986-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells exposed to 10 MeV proton irradiations were found to have significantly greater radiation resistance than either GaAs or Si. Performance predictions were obtained for two proton dominated orbits and one in which both protons and electrons were significant cell degradation factors. Array specific power was calculated using lightweight blanket technology, a SEP array structure, and projected cell efficiencies. Results indicate that arrays using fully developed InP cells should out-perform those using GaAs or Si in orbits where radiation is a significant cell degradation factor.

  18. Effect of neutron irradiation at low temperature on the embrittlement of the reduced-activation ferritic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rybin, V. V.; Kursevich, I. P.; Lapin, A. N.

    1998-10-01

    Effects of neutron irradiation to fluence of 2.0 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) in temperature range 70-300°C on mechanical properties and structure of the experimental reduced-activation ferritic 0.1%C-(2.5-12)%Cr-(1-2)%W-(0.2-0.7)%V alloys were investigated. The steels were studied in different initial structural conditions obtained by changing the modes of heat treatments. Effect of neutron irradiation estimated by a shift in ductile-brittle transition temperature (ΔDBTT) and reduction of upper shelf energy (ΔUSE) highly depends on both irradiation condition and steel chemical composition and structure. For the steel with optimum chemical composition (9Cr-1.5WV) after irradiation to 2 × 10 24 n/m 2 ( E ⩾ 0.5 MeV) at 280°C the ΔDBTT does not exceed 25°C. The shift in DBTT increased from 35°C to 110°C for the 8Cr-1.5WV steel at a decrease in irradiation temperature from 300°C to 70°C. The CCT diagrams are presented for several reduced-activated steels.

  19. Electronic properties of deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy and capacitance voltage techniques as well as analysis of the forward current voltage (I-V) characteristics and SEM-EIC data were carried out for proton irradiated GaAs solar cells over a wide range of proton energies and proton fluences. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect energy levels and density, carrier capture cross sections and lifetimes as well as diffusion lengths in the undoped n-GaAs LPE layers were determined. Good correlation between these defect parameters and solar cell performance parameters was obtained for GaAs solar cells irradiated by 200 and 290 KeV protons. It was found that 200 to 290 KeV protons will produce the most defects and damages to the GaAs solar cell structure used. The influence of the low temperature (200 to 400 C) periodic thermal annealing on the deep level defects and the performance of the 200 KeV proton irradiated cells is discussed.

  20. Microbial survival rates of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under low temperature, low pressure, and UV-Irradiation conditions, and their relevance to possible Martian life.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Benjamin; Schulze-Makuch, Dirk

    2006-04-01

    Viability rates were determined for microbial populations of Escherichia coli and Deinococcus radiodurans under the environmental stresses of low temperature (-35 degrees C), low-pressure conditions (83.3 kPa), and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation (37 W/m(2)). During the stress tests the organisms were suspended in saltwater soil and freshwater soil media, at variable burial depths, and in seawater. Microbial populations of both organisms were most susceptible to dehydration stress associated with low-pressure conditions, and to UV irradiation. However, suspension in a liquid water medium and burial at larger depths (5 cm) improved survival rates markedly. Our results indicate that planetary surfaces that possess little to no atmosphere and have low water availability do not constitute a favorable environment for terrestrial microorganisms.

  1. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantopoulou, E.; Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Velentzas, A. D.; Kakabakos, S.; Cefalas, A. C.

    2014-09-01

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm-2) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110-180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, μ-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  2. Viability of Cladosporium herbarum spores under 157 nm laser and vacuum ultraviolet irradiation, low temperature (10 K) and vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Sarantopoulou, E. Stefi, A.; Kollia, Z.; Palles, D.; Cefalas, A. C.; Petrou, P. S.; Bourkoula, A.; Koukouvinos, G.; Kakabakos, S.; Velentzas, A. D.

    2014-09-14

    Ultraviolet photons can damage microorganisms, which rarely survive prolonged irradiation. In addition to the need for intact DNA, cell viability is directly linked to the functionality of the cell wall and membrane. In this work, Cladosporium herbarum spore monolayers exhibit high viability (7%) when exposed to 157 nm laser irradiation (412 kJm⁻²) or vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation (110–180 nm) under standard pressure and temperature in a nitrogen atmosphere. Spore viability can be determined by atomic-force microscopy, nano-indentation, mass, μ-Raman and attenuated reflectance Fourier-transform far-infrared spectroscopies and DNA electrophoresis. Vacuum ultraviolet photons cause molecular damage to the cell wall, but radiation resistance in spores arises from the activation of a photon-triggered signaling reaction, expressed via the exudation of intracellular substances, which, in combination with the low penetration depth of vacuum-ultraviolet photons, shields DNA from radiation. Resistance to phototoxicity under standard conditions was assessed, as was resistance to additional environmental stresses, including exposure in a vacuum, under different rates of change of pressure during pumping time and low (10 K) temperatures. Vacuum conditions were far more destructive to spores than vacuum-ultraviolet irradiation, and UV-B photons were two orders of magnitude more damaging than vacuum-ultraviolet photons. The viability of irradiated spores was also enhanced at 10 K. This work, in addition to contributing to the photonic control of the viability of microorganisms exposed under extreme conditions, including decontamination of biological warfare agents, outlines the basis for identifying bio-signaling in vivo using physical methodologies.

  3. Central nervous system effects of whole-body proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sweet, Tara Beth; Panda, Nirlipta; Hein, Amy M; Das, Shoshana L; Hurley, Sean D; Olschowka, John A; Williams, Jacqueline P; O'Banion, M Kerry

    2014-07-01

    Space missions beyond the protection of Earth's magnetosphere expose astronauts to an environment that contains ionizing proton radiation. The hazards that proton radiation pose to normal tissues, such as the central nervous system (CNS), are not fully understood, although it has been shown that proton radiation affects the neurogenic environment, killing neural precursors and altering behavior. To determine the time and dose-response characteristics of the CNS to whole-body proton irradiation, C57BL/6J mice were exposed to 1 GeV/n proton radiation at doses of 0-200 cGy and behavioral, physiological and immunohistochemical end points were analyzed over a range of time points (48 h-12 months) postirradiation. These experiments revealed that proton radiation exposure leads to: 1. an acute decrease in cell division within the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus, with significant differences detected at doses as low as 10 cGy; 2. a persistent effect on proliferation in the subgranular zone, at 1 month postirradiation; 3. a decrease in neurogenesis at doses as low as 50 cGy, at 3 months postirradiation; and 4. a decrease in hippocampal ICAM-1 immunoreactivity at doses as low as 10 cGy, at 1 month postirradiation. The data presented contribute to our understanding of biological responses to whole-body proton radiation and may help reduce uncertainty in the assessment of health risks to astronauts. These findings may also be relevant to clinical proton beam therapy.

  4. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation. PMID:28084420

  5. Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Liquid Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle G.; Kanai, Yosuke

    2017-01-01

    Molecular behaviour of liquid water under proton irradiation is of great importance to a number of technological and medical applications. The highly energetic proton generates a time-varying field that is highly localized and heterogeneous at the molecular scale, and massive electronic excitations are produced as a result of the field-matter interaction. Using first-principles quantum dynamics simulations, we reveal details of how electrons are dynamically excited through non-equilibrium energy transfer from highly energetic protons in liquid water on the atto/femto-second time scale. Water molecules along the path of the energetic proton undergo ionization at individual molecular level, and the excitation primarily derives from lone pair electrons on the oxygen atom of water molecules. A reduced charge state on the energetic proton in the condensed phase of water results in the strongly suppressed electronic response when compared to water molecules in the gas phase. These molecular-level findings provide important insights into understanding the water radiolysis process under proton irradiation.

  6. Low-temperature low-dose neutron irradiation effects on Brush Wellman S65-C and Kawechi Berylco P0 beryllium

    SciTech Connect

    Snead, L.L.

    1998-09-01

    The mechanical property results for two high quality beryllium materials subjected to low temperature, low dose neutron irradiation in water moderated reactors are presented. Materials chosen were the S65-C ITER candidate material produced by Brush Wellman, and Kawecki Berylco Industries P0 beryllium. Both materials were processed by vacuum hot pressing. Mini sheet tensile and thermal diffusivity specimens were irradiated in the temperature range of {approximately}100--275 C from a fast (E > 0.1 MeV) neutron dose of 0.05 to 1.0 {times} 10{sup 25} n/m{sup 2} in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. As expected from earlier work on beryllium, both materials underwent significant embrittlement with corresponding reduction in ductility and increased strength. Both thermal diffusivity and volumetric expansion were measured and found to be negligible in this temperature and fluence range. Of significance from this work is that while both materials rapidly embrittle at these ITER relevant irradiation conditions, some ductility (>1--2%) remains, which contrasts with a body of earlier work including recent work on the Brush-Wellman S65-C material irradiated to slightly higher neutron fluence.

  7. Creation of carbon onions and coils at low temperature in near-critical benzene irradiated with an ultraviolet laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Takahiro; Watabe, Nami; Whitby, Raymond; Maekawa, Toru

    2007-10-01

    Gas-liquid coexistence curves terminate at their critical points, where second-order phase transitions occur. The specific heat and compressibility increase greatly as the fluid systems approach their critical points. As a result, thermal diffusion is suppressed and the perturbations of the temperature, pressure and density propagate as acoustic waves. In this paper, we irradiate near-critical benzene with a laser beam of 266 nm in wavelength, the energy flux of which is 1.3 and 3.9 mW mm-2, and show that benzene is dissociated and various carbon nano/microstructures such as carbon onions and coils are created. Carbon onions are produced in both subcritical (200 °C) and supercritical (290 °C) benzene, whereas carbon coils are produced on an alloy catalyst composed of (Fe:Cr:Ni = 74:18:8) in supercritical benzene irradiated with a laser beam of 3.9 mW mm-2. The operational temperature of the present method is much lower than that used in conventional carbon structure synthesizing methods and a large number of carbon structures, such as carbon onions and coils, are produced in supercritical benzene.

  8. Dielectric strength, swelling and weight loss of the ITER Toroidal Field Model Coil insulation after low temperature reactor irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humer, K.; Weber, H. W.; Hastik, R.; Hauser, H.; Gerstenberg, H.

    2000-04-01

    The insulation system for the Toroidal Field Model Coil of ITER is a fiber reinforced plastic (FRP) laminate, which consists of a combined Kapton/R-glass-fiber reinforcement tape, vacuum-impregnated with an epoxy DGEBA system. Pure disk shaped laminates, FRP/stainless-steel sandwiches, and conductor insulation prototypes were irradiated at 5 K in a fission reactor up to a fast neutron fluence of 10 22 m -2 ( E>0.1 MeV) to investigate the radiation induced degradation of the dielectric strength of the insulation system. After warm-up to room temperature, swelling, weight loss, and the breakdown strength were measured at 77 K. The sandwich swells by 4% at a fluence of 5×10 21 m-2 and by 9% at 1×10 22 m-2. The weight loss of the FRP is 2% at 1×10 22 m-2. The dielectric strength remained unchanged over the whole dose range.

  9. Radiation Sterilization of Prototype Military Foods: Low-Temperature Irradiation of Codfish Cake, Corned Beef, and Pork Sausage 1

    PubMed Central

    Anellis, Abe; Berkowitz, D.; Swantak, W.; Strojan, C.

    1972-01-01

    “Screening” packs comprising 10 lots each of codfish cake, corned beef, and pork sausage, each lot containing about 106 spores of a different strain (five type A and five type B) of Clostridium botulinum per can, were irradiated at −30 ± 10 C with a series of increasing doses (20 replicate cans/dose) of 60Co gamma rays. The cans were incubated for 3 months at 30 C and examined for swelling, toxin, and recoverable botulinal cells. Based on the latter criterion of spoilage, median lethal dose (LD50) and D values were estimated for each strain in each food. The most resistant strain in codfish cake, corned beef, and pork sausage was, respectively, 53B, 77A, and 41B. There was no clear-cut trend in the comparative order of resistance between the two antigenic types among the three foods. LD50 values gave essentially the same order of resistances as the D values and may be used interchangeably with the latter for the 10 test organisms. “Clearance” packs consisting of the most resistant strain (about 107 spores/can) with its respective food were irradiated with a variety of doses at −30 ± 10 C, using 100 replicate cans/dose (about 109 spores/dose). These packs were incubated for 6 months at 30 C and assayed for the three types of spoilage. Based on recoverable cells, the experimental sterilizing doses (ESD) for codfish cake, corned beef, and pork sausage were 2.5< ESD ≤ 3.0, 2.0 < ESD ≤ 2.5, and 1.5 < ESD ≤ 2.0 Mrad, in that order. Assuming exponential spore death, the 12D values, or minimal radiation doses (MRD), were 3.24, 2.44, and 2.65 Mrad, respectively. Estimation of the MRD values by a method which assumes that spore death in the cans follows a normal distribution, yielded 3.09, 2.57, and 2.39 Mrad, respectively. Weibull analyis of the pooled 10-strain viable cell spoilage data of the screening packs for codfish cake or corned beef suggested that spore death in the cans follows a normal distribution yielded 3.09, 2.57, pooled data were not

  10. Performance of candidate SEPS solar cells as a function of low temperature and low intensity exposure and 1 MeV electron irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.; Little, S. A.; Rives, C. J.; Wagner, P. E.

    1981-01-01

    The behavior of 144 high-performance shallow-junction silicon solar cells under conditions of low temperature and intensity was examined. The cells represented nine combinations of thickness, base resistivity, front surface texture, and rear surface treatment. At least 16 cells of each type were individually tested both as active elements under light levels between 0.04 and 1.0 solar constant and in the dark as passive rectifiers under external forward bias. One cell type was also irradiated with 1 MeV electrons up to 2.7 x 10 to the 15th e/sq cm. The inferior cells demonstrated high ohmic and/or non-ohmic shunting. No series resistance or Schottky barrier effects were observed. Fluences beyond 10 to the 13th e/sq cm lowered cell current, probably by increasing volume recombination.

  11. UV irradiation/cold shock-mediated apoptosis is switched to bubbling cell death at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Hsin-Ping; Huang, Shenq-Shyang; Sheu, Hamm-Ming; Hsu, Li-Jin; Chang, Nan-Shan

    2015-01-01

    When COS7 fibroblasts and other cells were exposed to UVC irradiation and cold shock at 4°C for 5 min, rapid upregulation and nuclear accumulation of NOS2, p53, WWOX, and TRAF2 occurred in 10–30 min. By time-lapse microscopy, an enlarging gas bubble containing nitric oxide (NO) was formed in the nucleus in each cell that finally popped out to cause “bubbling death”. Bubbling occurred effectively at 4 and 22°C, whereas DNA fragmentation was markedly blocked at 4°C. When temperature was increased to 37°C, bubbling was retarded and DNA fragmentation occurred in 1 hr, suggesting that bubbling death is switched to apoptosis with increasing temperatures. Bubbling occurred prior to nuclear uptake of propidium iodide and DAPI stains. Arginine analog Nω-LAME inhibited NO synthase NOS2 and significantly suppressed the bubbling death. Unlike apoptosis, there were no caspase activation and flip-over of membrane phosphatidylserine (PS) during bubbling death. Bubbling death was significantly retarded in Wwox knockout MEF cells, as well as in cells overexpressing TRAF2 and dominant-negative p53. Together, UV/cold shock induces bubbling death at 4°C and the event is switched to apoptosis at 37°C. Presumably, proapoptotic WWOX and p53 block the protective TRAF2 to execute the bubbling death. PMID:25779665

  12. Production of sodium-22 from proton irradiated aluminum

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, Wayne A.; Heaton, Richard C.; Jamriska, David J.

    1996-01-01

    A process for selective separation of sodium-22 from a proton irradiated minum target including dissolving a proton irradiated aluminum target in hydrochloric acid to form a first solution including aluminum ions and sodium ions, separating a portion of the aluminum ions from the first solution by crystallization of an aluminum salt, contacting the remaining first solution with an anion exchange resin whereby ions selected from the group consisting of iron and copper are selectively absorbed by the anion exchange resin while aluminum ions and sodium ions remain in solution, contacting the solution with an cation exchange resin whereby aluminum ions and sodium ions are adsorbed by the cation exchange resin, and, contacting the cation exchange resin with an acid solution capable of selectively separating the adsorbed sodium ions from the cation exchange resin while aluminum ions remain adsorbed on the cation exchange resin is disclosed.

  13. Proteomic Analysis of Proton Beam Irradiated Human Melanoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kedracka-Krok, Sylwia; Jankowska, Urszula; Elas, Martyna; Sowa, Urszula; Swakon, Jan; Cierniak, Agnieszka; Olko, Pawel; Romanowska-Dixon, Bozena; Urbanska, Krystyna

    2014-01-01

    Proton beam irradiation is a form of advanced radiotherapy providing superior distributions of a low LET radiation dose relative to that of photon therapy for the treatment of cancer. Even though this clinical treatment has been developing for several decades, the proton radiobiology critical to the optimization of proton radiotherapy is far from being understood. Proteomic changes were analyzed in human melanoma cells treated with a sublethal dose (3 Gy) of proton beam irradiation. The results were compared with untreated cells. Two-dimensional electrophoresis was performed with mass spectrometry to identify the proteins. At the dose of 3 Gy a minimal slowdown in proliferation rate was seen, as well as some DNA damage. After allowing time for damage repair, the proteomic analysis was performed. In total 17 protein levels were found to significantly (more than 1.5 times) change: 4 downregulated and 13 upregulated. Functionally, they represent four categories: (i) DNA repair and RNA regulation (VCP, MVP, STRAP, FAB-2, Lamine A/C, GAPDH), (ii) cell survival and stress response (STRAP, MCM7, Annexin 7, MVP, Caprin-1, PDCD6, VCP, HSP70), (iii) cell metabolism (TIM, GAPDH, VCP), and (iv) cytoskeleton and motility (Moesin, Actinin 4, FAB-2, Vimentin, Annexin 7, Lamine A/C, Lamine B). A substantial decrease (2.3 x) was seen in the level of vimentin, a marker of epithelial to mesenchymal transition and the metastatic properties of melanoma. PMID:24392146

  14. Crosslinking of polyamide-6 initiated by proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porubská, Mária; Szöllös, Ondrej; Janigová, Ivica; Jomová, Klaudia; Chodák, Ivan

    2017-04-01

    Initiation of crosslinking of polyamide-6 (PA6) by proton beam irradiation was investigated for a virgin material as well as for PA6 containing up to 5 wt% of triallyl cyanurate (TAC) as a crosslinking coagent. The gel point was found to be 144 and 40 kGy for virgin PA6 and for PA6 with 1 wt% of TAC, while for higher TAC content gel content was determined to be around zero absorbed dose. The ratio between crosslinking and scission of macroradicals formed by irradiation was found to be around 0.65 regardless on presence or absence of TAC and its concentration. The more detailed discussion on chemical processes as well as on final structure formation after irradiation is based on data from differential scanning calorimetry, detecting a decrease of both lamellar thickness and crystalline portion, but an increase of glass transition temperature.

  15. Crack-free periodic porous thin films assisted by plasma irradiation at low temperature and their enhanced gas-sensing performance.

    PubMed

    Dai, Zhengfei; Jia, Lichao; Duan, Guotao; Li, Yue; Zhang, Hongwen; Wang, Jingjing; Hu, Jinlian; Cai, Weiping

    2013-09-27

    Homogenous thin films are preferable for high-performance gas sensors because of their remarkable reproducibility and long-term stability. In this work, a low-temperature fabrication route is presented to prepare crack-free and homogenous metal oxide periodic porous thin films by oxygen plasma irradiation instead of high temperature annealing by using a sacrificial colloidal template. Rutile SnO2 is taken as an example to demonstrate the validity of this route. The crack-free and homogenous porous thin films are successfully synthesized on the substrates in situ with electrodes. The SnO2 porous thin film obtained by plasma irradiation is rich in surface OH groups and hence superhydrophilic. It exhibits a more homogenous structure and lower resistance than porous films generated by annealing. More importantly, such thin films display higher sensitivity, a lower detection threshold (100 ppb to acetone) and better durability than those that have been directly annealed, resulting in enhanced gas-sensing performance. The presented method could be applied to synthesize other metal oxide homogenous thin films and to fabricate gas-sensing devices with high performances.

  16. EPR detected polarization transfer between Gd3+ and protons at low temperature and 3.3 T: The first step of dynamic nuclear polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, Vijayasarathi; Hovav, Yonatan; Feintuch, Akiva; Vega, Shimon; Goldfarb, Daniella

    2010-06-01

    Electron-electron double resonance pulsed electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) at 95 GHz (3.3 T) is used to follow the dynamics of the electron spin polarization during the first stages of dynamic nuclear polarization in solids. The experiments were performed on a frozen solution of Gd+3 (S =7/2) in water/glycerol. Focusing on the central |-1/2⟩→|+1/2⟩ transition we measured the polarization transfer from the Gd3+ electron spin to the adjacent H1 protons. The dependence of the echo detected EPR signal on the length of the microwave irradiation at the EPR "forbidden" transition corresponding to an electron and a proton spin flip is measured for different powers, showing dynamics on the microsecond to millisecond time scales. A theoretical model based on the spin density matrix formalism is suggested to account for this dynamics. The central transition of the Gd3+ ion is considered as an effective S =1/2 system and is coupled to H1 (I =1/2) nuclei. Simulations based on a single electron-single nucleus four level system are shown to deviate from the experimental results and an alternative approach taking into account the more realistic multinuclei picture is shown to agree qualitatively with the experiments.

  17. Effect of proton irradiation on superconductivity in optimally doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 single crystals

    DOE PAGES

    Smylie, M. P.; Leroux, M.; Mishra, V.; ...

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, irradiation with 4 MeV protons was used to systematically introduce defects in single crystals of the iron-arsenide superconductor BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, x = 0.33. The effect of disorder on the low-temperature behavior of the London penetration depth λ(T) and transition temperature Tc was investigated. In nearly optimally doped samples with Tc ~ 29 K, signatures of a superconducting gap with nodes were observed. Contrary to previous reports on electron-irradiated crystals, we do not see a disorder-driven lifting of accidental nodes, and we observe that proton-induced defects are weaker pair breakers than electron-induced defects. Finally, we attribute our findings tomore » anisotropic electron scattering caused by proton irradiation defects.« less

  18. Head and neck tumors after energetic proton irradiation in rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D.; Cox, A.; Hardy, K.; Salmon, Y.; Trotter, R.

    1994-10-01

    This is a two-year progress report on a life span dose-response study of brain tumor risk at moderate to high doses of energetic protons. It was initiated because a joint NASA/USAF life span study of rhesus monkeys that were irradiated with 55-MeV protons (average surface dose, 3.5 Gy) indicated that the incidence of brain tumors per unit surface absorbed dose was over 19 times that of the human tinea capitis patients whose heads were exposed to 100 kv x-rays. Examination of those rats that died in the two-year interval after irradiation of the head revealed a linear dose-response for total head and neck tumor incidence in the dose range of 0-8.5 Gy. The exposed rats had a greater incidence of pituitary chromophobe adenomas, epithelial and mesothelial cell tumors than the unexposed controls but the excessive occurrence of malignant gliomas that was observed in the monkeys was absent in the rats. The estimated dose required to double the number of all types of head and neck tumors was 5.2 Gy. The highest dose, 18 Gy, resulted in high mortality due to obstructive squamous metaplasia at less than 50 weeks, prompting a new study of the relative bological effectiveness of high energy protons in producing this lesion.

  19. Irradiation effects on magnetic properties in neutron and proton irradiated reactor pressure vessel steel

    SciTech Connect

    Park, D.G.; Hong, J.H.; Kim, I.S.; Kim, H.C.

    1999-09-01

    The effects of neutron and proton dose on the magnetic properties of a reactor pressure vessel (RPV) steel were investigated. The coercivity and maximum induction increased in two stages with respect to neutron dose, being nearly constant up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa, followed by a rapid increase up to a dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}5} dpa. The coercivity and maximum induction in the proton irradiated specimens also showed a two stage variation with respect to proton dose, namely a rapid increase up to a dose of 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa, then a decrease up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The Barkhausen noise (BN) amplitude in neutron irradiated specimens also varied in two stages in a reverse manner, the transition at the same dose of 1.5 x 10{sup {minus}7} dpa. The BN amplitude in proton irradiated specimens decreased by 60% up to 0.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa followed by an increase up to 1.2 x 10{sup {minus}2} dpa. The results were in good accord with the one dimensional domain wall model considering the density of defects and wall energy.

  20. Ferromagnetism in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Ren-Wei; Wang, Hua-Jie; Chen, Wei-Bin; Li, Fei; Liu, Xue-Chao Zhuo, Shi-Yi; Shi, Er-Wei

    2015-04-15

    Room-temperature ferromagnetism is observed in proton irradiated 4H-SiC single crystal. An initial increase in proton dose leads to pronounced ferromagnetism, accompanying with obvious increase in vacancy concentration. Further increase in irradiation dose lowers the saturation magnetization with the decrease in total vacancy defects due to the defects recombination. It is found that divacancies are the mainly defects in proton irradiated 4H-SiC and responsible for the observed ferromagnetism.

  1. 31P nuclear magnetic resonance study of the proton-irradiated KTiOPO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2013-08-01

    31P nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) was employed to study the effects of proton irradiation on KTiOPO4 (KTP) in view of the previously studied paramagnetic impurity doping effects. High-resolution 31P NMR measurements showed significant increase in the isotropic chemical shifts of the two inequivalent phosphorus sites in the proton-irradiated KTP system, indicating decrease in the electron density around the phosphorous nuclei. The 31P NMR linewidths of the KTP system manifested anomalies associated with the superionic transition and with the polaron formation, which became much weaker after proton irradiation. Besides, the activation energy of the charge carriers increased significantly after proton irradiation.

  2. Proton irradiation effects on the thermoelectric properties in single-crystalline Bi nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Taehoo; Kim, Jeongmin; Song, Min-Jung; Lee, Wooyoung

    2015-05-15

    The effects of proton irradiation on the thermoelectric properties of Bi nanowires (Bi-NWs) were investigated. Single crystalline Bi-NWs were grown by the on-film formation of nanowires method. The devices based on individual Bi-NWs were irradiated with protons at different energies. The total number of displaced atoms was estimated using the Kinchin-Pease displacement model. The electric conductivity and Seebeck coefficient in the Bi-NW devices were investigated before and after proton irradiation at different temperatures. Although the Seebeck coefficient remained stable at various irradiation energies, the electrical conductivity significantly declined with increasing proton energy up to 40 MeV.

  3. On-line DLTS investigations of the mono- and di-vacancy in p-type silicon after low temperature electron irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zangenberg, Nikolaj; Goubet, Jean-Jacques; Nylandsted Larsen, Arne

    2002-01-01

    Using deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS, we have investigated vacancy-related defects created in boron-doped epitaxial Si by 2 MeV electron irradiations at low temperatures (⩽ 40 K) . The vacancy level is found at E v+0.12 eV together with a DLTS peak at E v+0.20 eV which anneals at ˜140 K and is tentatively identified as a vacancy in a different configuration. The emission rate of the dominant vacancy-related deep level in the temperature range from 200 to 550 K, namely the (0/+) transition of the di-vacancy (V 2), displays a very large dependence of the emission rate on the electric field strength in the depletion region of the diodes. This dependence is unexpected in terms of the classical Poole-Frenkel effect, given the neutral charge state of V 2 before hole capture. The effect of high fields appears to be caused by phonon assisted tunneling. When V anneals around 200 K, a new complex assigned to a vacancy-boron pair gives rise to two charge states. Quenching experiments with reverse bias show that the complex is bistable. It anneals at 260 K.

  4. Deficiency in Homologous Recombination Renders Mammalian Cells More Sensitive to Proton Versus Photon Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Nicole; Fontana, Andrea O.; Hug, Eugen B.; Lomax, Antony; Coray, Adolf; Augsburger, Marc; Paganetti, Harald; Sartori, Alessandro A.; Pruschy, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the impact of the 2 major DNA repair machineries on cellular survival in response to irradiation with the 2 types of ionizing radiation. Methods and Materials: The DNA repair and cell survival endpoints in wild-type, homologous recombination (HR)-deficient, and nonhomologous end-joining-deficient cells were analyzed after irradiation with clinically relevant, low-linear energy transfer (LET) protons and 200-keV photons. Results: All cell lines were more sensitive to proton irradiation compared with photon irradiation, despite no differences in the induction of DNA breaks. Interestingly, HR-deficient cells and wild-type cells with small interfering RNA-down-regulated Rad51 were markedly hypersensitive to proton irradiation, resulting in an increased relative biological effectiveness in comparison with the relative biological effectiveness determined in wild-type cells. In contrast, lack of nonhomologous end-joining did not result in hypersensitivity toward proton irradiation. Repair kinetics of DNA damage in wild-type cells were equal after both types of irradiation, although proton irradiation resulted in more lethal chromosomal aberrations. Finally, repair kinetics in HR-deficient cells were significantly delayed after proton irradiation, with elevated amounts of residual γH2AX foci after irradiation. Conclusion: Our data indicate a differential quality of DNA damage by proton versus photon irradiation, with a specific requirement for homologous recombination for DNA repair and enhanced cell survival. This has potential relevance for clinical stratification of patients carrying mutations in the DNA damage response pathways.

  5. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses.

    PubMed

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-03-18

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation.

  6. Delocalized Plastic Flow in Proton-Irradiated Monolithic Metallic Glasses

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Jaewon; Kim, Sunghwan; Ryu, Seunghwa; Jang, Dongchan

    2016-01-01

    Creating new materials with novel properties through structural modification is the Holy Grail of materials science. The range of targetable structures for amplification of mechanical properties in metallic glasses would include types of atomic short range orders at the smallest scale through compositions or morphologies of phases in composites. Even though the usefulness of the latter approach has been successfully demonstrated in the past decades, the feasibility of the former has been incompletely proved with only marginal property improvements reported within experimentally-accessible atomic-level structural changes. Here, we report the significant enhancement of deformability in Zr-based monolithic metallic glass only through the atomic disordering by proton irradiation without altering any other structural traits. Metallic glass nanopillars that originally failed catastrophically without any notable plasticity become capable of attaining more than 30% uniaxial plastic strain accommodated by homogeneous deformation when irradiated to ~1 displacement per atom (DPA). We discuss the atomistic origin of this improved plasticity in terms of density and spatial distributions of icosahedral short range order influenced by irradiation. PMID:26988265

  7. Radiation damage of LSO crystals under γ- and 24 GeV protons irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffray, E.; Barysevich, A.; Fedorov, A.; Korjik, M.; Koschan, M.; Lucchini, M.; Mechinski, V.; Melcher, C. L.; Voitovich, A.

    2013-09-01

    Irradiation damage of undoped and low Ce doped lutetium oxyorthosilicate has been investigated. Crystals were irradiated with both a 60Co γ-quanta source with an absorbed dose of 2000 Gy and, at CERN PS, a high-rate 24 GeV proton beam with a fluence of ˜3.6×1013 p/cm2. Both irradiations produced a similar set of induced absorption bands. However, a shift of the fundamental absorption spectrum cutoff appears after proton irradiation, but not in the case of the γ-irradiation. The observed shift of the band edge in the transmission spectrum following proton irradiation in lutetium oxyorthosilicate crystals indicates that this phenomenon is a general property of heavy crystalline materials. A possible proton-induced transmission damage mechanism is discussed.

  8. Proton irradiation of the CIS115 for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Holland, A. D.; Winstone, G. P.; Gow, J. P. D.; Stefanov, K.; Leese, M.

    2015-09-01

    The CIS115 is one of the latest CMOS Imaging Sensors designed by e2v technologies, with 1504x2000 pixels on a 7 μm pitch. Each pixel in the array is a pinned photodiode with a 4T architecture, achieving an average dark current of 22 electrons pixel-1 s-1 at 21°C measured in a front-faced device. The sensor aims for high optical sensitivity by utilising e2v's back-thinning and processing capabilities, providing a sensitive silicon thickness approximately 9 μm to 12 μm thick with a tuned anti-reflective coating. The sensor operates in a rolling shutter mode incorporating reset level subtraction resulting in a mean pixel readout noise of 4.25 electrons rms. The full well has been measured to be 34000 electrons in a previous study, resulting in a dynamic range of up to 8000. These performance characteristics have led to the CIS115 being chosen for JANUS, the high-resolution and wide-angle optical camera on the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE). The three year science phase of JUICE is in the harsh radiation environment of the Jovian magnetosphere, primarily studying Jupiter and its icy moons. Analysis of the expected radiation environment and shielding levels from the spacecraft and instrument design predict the End Of Life (EOL) displacement and ionising damage for the CIS115 to be equivalent to 1010 10 MeV protons cm-2 and 100 krad(Si) respectively. Dark current and image lag characterisation results following initial proton irradiations are presented, detailing the initial phase of space qualification of the CIS115. Results are compared to the pre-irradiation performance and the instrument specifications and further qualification plans are outlined.

  9. Physics of Double Pulse Irradiation of Targets For Proton Acceleration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M.; Masud, R.; Manzoor, L.; Tiedje, H.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2016-10-01

    Experiments have been carried out on double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets with varying preplasma conditions. Our experiment at the Titan Laser facility utilized two 700 fs, 1054 nm pulses, separated by 1 to 5 ps with a total energy of 100 J, and with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. The proton spectra were measured with radiochromic film stacks and magnetic spectrometers. The prepulse energy was on the order of 10 mJ, which appears to have a moderating effect on the double pulse enhancement of proton beam. We have performed LSP PIC simulations to understand the double pulse enhancement mechanism, as well as the role of preplasma in modifying the interaction. A 1D parameter study was done to isolate various aspects of the interaction, while 2D simulations provide more detailed physical insight and a better comparison with experimental data. Work by the Univ. of Alberta was supported by the Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Hematological and TGF-beta variations after whole-body proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on five bone-marrow-derived cell types and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta 1) were examined and compared to the effects of photons (60Co). C57BL/6 mice were exposed to 3 Gy (0.4 Gy/min) protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at entry (E), or 60Co and euthanized on days 0.5-17 thereafter. 60Co-irradiated animals had decreased erythrocytes, hemoglobin and hematocrit at 12 hours post-exposure; depression was not noted in proton (SOBP or E)-irradiated groups until day 4. Significantly decreased leukocyte counts were observed at this same time in all irradiated groups, with lymphocyte loss being greater than that of monocytes, and the depression was generally maintained. In contrast, the levels of neutrophils and thrombocytes fluctuated, especially during the first week; significant differences were noted among irradiated groups in neutrophil levels. Plasma TGF-beta 1 was elevated on day 7 in the 60Co, but not proton, irradiated mice. Collectively, the data show that dramatic and persistent changes occurred in all irradiated groups. However, few differences in assay results were seen between animals exposed to protons (SOBP or E) or photons, as well as between the groups irradiated with either of the two regions of the proton Bragg curve.

  11. Control of Refractive Index of Fluorinated Polyimide by Proton Beam Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yukitaka; Ohki, Yoshimichi; Saito, Keisuke; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki

    2013-01-01

    To clarify the feasibility of controlling the refractive index of a polymer by proton beam irradiation, we irradiated 1.0 MeV protons to a fluorinated polyimide film. Before and after the proton irradiation at a fluence between 1×1014 and 7×1016 cm-2, the film surface was scanned by a profilometer. It was found that the depth of a dent, which increases with fluence, was induced by the irradiation. The refractive index of the ion-irradiated region was calculated using the Lorentz-Lorenz equation, substituting the depth of the dent and the projected range of the protons. When the fluorinated polyimide was irradiated at a fluence of 7×1016 cm-2, the refractive index increased by about 3.3%, which agrees with the increment in refractive index measured by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The increment in refractive index (0.21%) induced by the irradiation of protons at the fluence of 1×1015 cm-2 is comparable to the value (0.35%) observed when protons were irradiated to SiO2 glass at a similar fluence. Therefore, it is reasonable to assume that the ion irradiation to a polymer can be a good method for fabricating a high-performance polymer-based optical waveguide.

  12. Irradiation-induced effects of proton irradiation on zirconium carbides with different stoichiometries

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Huang; B.R. Maier; T.R. Allen

    2014-10-01

    Zirconium carbide (ZrC) is being considered for utilization in deep burn TRISO fuel particles for hightemperature, gas-cooled reactors. Zirconium carbide has a cubic B1 type crystal structure along with a very high melting point (3420 ?C), exceptional hardness and good thermal and electrical conductivities. Understanding the ZrC irradiation response is crucial for establishing ZrC as an alternative component in TRISO fuel. Until now, very few studies on irradiation effects on ZrC have been released and fundamental aspects of defect evolution and kinetics are not well understood although some atomistic simulations and phenomenological studies have been performed. This work was carried out to understand the damage evolution in float-zone refined ZrC with different stoichiometries. Proton irradiations at 800 ?C up to doses of 3 dpa were performed on ZrCx (where x ranges from 0.9 to 1.2) to investigate the damage evolution. The irradiation-induced defects, such as density of dislocation loops, at different stoichiometries and doses which were characterized by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is presented and discussed.

  13. Magnetism in C{sub 60} films induced by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Satpati, B.; Joseph, B.; Dev, B. N.; Nirmala, R.; Malik, S. K.; Kesavamoorthy, R.

    2007-02-15

    It is shown that polycrystalline fullerene thin films on hydrogen-passivated Si(111) substrates irradiated by 2 MeV protons display ferromagneticlike behavior at 5 K. At 300 K, both the pristine and the irradiated film show diamagnetic behavior. Magnetization data in the temperature range of 2-300 K in 1 T applied field, for the irradiated film show much stronger temperature dependence compared to the pristine film. Possible origins of ferromagneticlike signals in the irradiated films are discussed.

  14. {sup 55}Co separation from proton irradiated metallic nickel

    SciTech Connect

    Valdovinos, H. F. Graves, S. Barnhart, T. Nickles, R. J.

    2014-11-07

    {sup 55}Co with > 97% radionuclidic purity 24 hours after end of bombardment (EoB) was produced from the {sup 58}Ni(p,α) reaction using proton irradiations of 16 MeV on natural nickel. Two-hour irradiations with 25 μA on a 254 μm thick nickel foil generate 0.18 ± 0.01 GBq (n = 3) 24 hours after EoB. The separation of cobalt from the target material and other metallic contaminants present at trace levels is accomplished in HCl medium by two rounds of anion exchange chromatography (AG1-X8) using an automated module driven by a peristaltic pump. 80 ± 5 % (n = 3) of the activity generated at EoB is ready for labeling in 0.1 M HCl one hour after the start of separation. Using 99.999% pure Ni, the reactivity (decay corrected to EoB) with the bifunctional chelator (BFC) DOTA was 8.5 GBq/μmol; enough for radiolabeling BFC conjugated biomolecules at a nmol scale with > 90% yield. Using 99.9% pure Ni the reactivity with DOTA and NOTA was 0.19 +/− 0.09 GBq/μmol and 2.9 +/− 1.7 GBq/μmol (n = 2), respectively. Both cobalt complexes showed 100% in vitro stability in PBS and mouse serum over 41 hours at room temperature. MicroPET images of a miniature Derenzo phantom show excellent resolution where rods of 1.5 mm were separated by two times their diameter.

  15. Proton-irradiation-induced anomaly in the electrical conductivity of a hydrogen-bonded ferroelastic system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Lee, Cheol Eui; Lee, Kwang-Sei

    2009-11-01

    An anomalous abrupt drop in the electrical conductivity has been observed at the ferroelastic phase transition of a proton-irradiated system of hydrogen-bonded TlH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. As a result of the high-resolution {sup 31}P NMR chemical-shift measurements, distinct changes in the atomic displacements due to the irradiation were identified in the ferroelastic and paraelastic phases. Besides, {sup 1}H NMR spin-spin relaxation measurements revealed a change due to the irradiation in the proton dynamics at the ferroelastic phase transition, apparently accounting for the much-reduced electrical conductivity in the paraelastic phase of the irradiated system.

  16. Luminescence imaging of water during proton-beam irradiation for range estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Seiichi Okumura, Satoshi; Komori, Masataka; Toshito, Toshiyuki

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: Proton therapy has the ability to selectively deliver a dose to the target tumor, so the dose distribution should be accurately measured by a precise and efficient method. The authors found that luminescence was emitted from water during proton irradiation and conjectured that this phenomenon could be used for estimating the dose distribution. Methods: To achieve more accurate dose distribution, the authors set water phantoms on a table with a spot scanning proton therapy system and measured the luminescence images of these phantoms with a high-sensitivity, cooled charge coupled device camera during proton-beam irradiation. The authors imaged the phantoms of pure water, fluorescein solution, and an acrylic block. Results: The luminescence images of water phantoms taken during proton-beam irradiation showed clear Bragg peaks, and the measured proton ranges from the images were almost the same as those obtained with an ionization chamber. Furthermore, the image of the pure-water phantom showed almost the same distribution as the tap-water phantom, indicating that the luminescence image was not related to impurities in the water. The luminescence image of the fluorescein solution had ∼3 times higher intensity than water, with the same proton range as that of water. The luminescence image of the acrylic phantom had a 14.5% shorter proton range than that of water; the proton range in the acrylic phantom generally matched the calculated value. The luminescence images of the tap-water phantom during proton irradiation could be obtained in less than 2 s. Conclusions: Luminescence imaging during proton-beam irradiation is promising as an effective method for range estimation in proton therapy.

  17. Proton Irradiation-Induced Metal Voids in Gallium Nitride High Electron Mobility Transistors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    A model was developed to predict void sizes versus dose and validated using data on dislocation density. 14. SUBJECT TERMS radiation , Kirkendall...8   4.   Proton Radiation Effects...Irradiated Devices ............................................................................. 53   E.   VARYING RADIATION FLUENCE DEVICES

  18. Improved normal tissue protection by proton and X-ray microchannels compared to homogeneous field irradiation.

    PubMed

    Girst, S; Marx, C; Bräuer-Krisch, E; Bravin, A; Bartzsch, S; Oelfke, U; Greubel, C; Reindl, J; Siebenwirth, C; Zlobinskaya, O; Multhoff, G; Dollinger, G; Schmid, T E; Wilkens, J J

    2015-09-01

    The risk of developing normal tissue injuries often limits the radiation dose that can be applied to the tumour in radiation therapy. Microbeam Radiation Therapy (MRT), a spatially fractionated photon radiotherapy is currently tested at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF) to improve normal tissue protection. MRT utilizes an array of microscopically thin and nearly parallel X-ray beams that are generated by a synchrotron. At the ion microprobe SNAKE in Munich focused proton microbeams ("proton microchannels") are studied to improve normal tissue protection. Here, we comparatively investigate microbeam/microchannel irradiations with sub-millimetre X-ray versus proton beams to minimize the risk of normal tissue damage in a human skin model, in vitro. Skin tissues were irradiated with a mean dose of 2 Gy over the irradiated area either with parallel synchrotron-generated X-ray beams at the ESRF or with 20 MeV protons at SNAKE using four different irradiation modes: homogeneous field, parallel lines and microchannel applications using two different channel sizes. Normal tissue viability as determined in an MTT test was significantly higher after proton or X-ray microchannel irradiation compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. In line with these findings genetic damage, as determined by the measurement of micronuclei in keratinocytes, was significantly reduced after proton or X-ray microchannel compared to a homogeneous field irradiation. Our data show that skin irradiation using either X-ray or proton microchannels maintain a higher cell viability and DNA integrity compared to a homogeneous irradiation, and thus might improve normal tissue protection after radiation therapy.

  19. Layer-structured LiNi0.8Co0.2O2: A new triple (H+/O2-/e-) conducting cathode for low temperature proton conducting solid oxide fuel cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Liangdong; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-02-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells with proton conducting electrolytes (H-SOFCs) show great potential for more efficient energy conversion over their oxygen ionic conducting counterparts at temperatures below 650 °C, providing a comparably high performance cathode material can be available. A brief review of current development of cathode materials shows that materials with triple (oxygen ionic, protonic, and electronic) conducting properties are most promising for H-SOFCs. In this work, a triple-conducting LiNi0.8Co0.2O2 (LNCO) with layered structure, allowing simultaneous conduction of intrinsic oxygen ion and electron as well as the extrinsic proton, is proposed as a cathode material for H-SOFC. The electrochemical impedance spectroscopy analysis of LNCO shows the good oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) activity with a considerably low activation energy of 0.88 eV, and an evident water uptake capability those facilitate the cathode reaction process. Fuel cells using LNCO cathode on a BaZr0.1Ce0.7Y0.2O3 proton-conducting electrolyte render a peak power density of 410 mW cm-2 at 650 °C under H2/air condition, which is higher than most of the typical cathode materials reported with similar cell configurations. This work also demonstrated a new series of simple and low cost cathode materials simultaneously possessing interesting triple-conduction and good ORR activities for low temperature H-SOFCs.

  20. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects and annealing effects in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1981-01-01

    The radiation induced deep-level defects and the recombination parameters in the proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells were investigated over a wide range of proton energies (from 50 KeV to 10 MeV) and proton fluences (from 10 to the 10th to 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, I-V, C-V, and SEM-EMIC measurement techniques. The measurements were used to determine the defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, carrier lifetimes, and the hole diffusion lengths in the GaAs LPE layers. Results show that a good correlation was obtained between the measured defect parameters and the dark recombination current as well as the performance parameters of the solar cells. The most damages to the cell were produced by the 200 KeV protons. In addition, the effects of low temperatures (200 to 400 C) thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and the dark current of the 200 KeV proton irradiated samples were examined.

  1. Investigation of microstructure and mechanical properties of proton irradiated Zircaloy 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Apu; Kumar, Ajay; Mukherjee, S.; Sharma, S. K.; Dutta, D.; Pujari, P. K.; Agarwal, A.; Gupta, S. K.; Singh, P.; Chakravartty, J. K.

    2016-10-01

    Samples of Zircaloy 2 have been irradiated with 4 MeV protons to two different doses. Microstructures of the unirradiated and irradiated samples have been characterized by Electron Back Scatter Diffraction (EBSD), X-ray diffraction line profile analysis (XRDLPA), Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS) and Coincident Doppler Broadening (CDB) Spectroscopy. Tensile tests and micro hardness measurements have been carried out at room temperature to assess the changes in mechanical properties of Zircaloy 2 due to proton irradiation. The correlation of dislocation density, grain size and yield stress of the irradiated samples indicated that an increase in dislocation density due to irradiation is responsible for the change in mechanical behavior of irradiated Zircaloy.

  2. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    SciTech Connect

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana; Pushpa, N.

    2014-04-24

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  3. High total dose proton irradiation effects on silicon NPN rf power transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharathi, M. N.; Praveen, K. C.; Pushpa, N.; Prakash, A. P. Gnana

    2014-04-01

    The effects of 3 MeV proton irradiation on the I-V characteristics of NPN rf power transistors were studied in the dose range of 100 Krad to 100 Mrad. The different electrical characteristics like Gummel, current gain and output characteristics were systematically studied before and after irradiation. The recovery in the I-V characteristics of irradiated NPN BJTs were studied by isochronal and isothermal annealing methods.

  4. Target depth dependence of damage rate in metals by 150 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshiie, T.; Ishi, Y.; Kuriyama, Y.; Mori, Y.; Sato, K.; Uesugi, T.; Xu, Q.

    2015-01-01

    A series of irradiation experiments with 150 MeV protons was performed. The relationship between target depth (or shield thickness) and displacement damage during proton irradiation was obtained by in situ electrical resistance measurements at 20 K. Positron annihilation lifetime measurements were also performed at room temperature after irradiation, as a function of the target thickness. The displacement damage was found to be high close to the beam incident surface area, and decreased with increasing target depth. The experimental results were compared with damage production calculated with an advanced Monte Carlo particle transport code system (PHITS).

  5. Instrumentation for the in situ control of carrier recombination characteristics during irradiation by protons

    SciTech Connect

    Gaubas, E.; Uleckas, A.; Vaitkus, J.; Raisanen, J.; Tikkanen, P.

    2010-05-15

    Instrument and methods for the remote and in situ control of carrier recombination parameters during irradiation by protons of energy in the range of 3-8 MeV are presented. Direct techniques for measurements and separation of carrier recombination and trapping/generation characteristics based on the analysis of microwave probed photoconductivity transients during exposure on protons of different energies and irradiations at different temperatures are described. Simultaneously, a spectroscopy of activation energy of dominant traps has been performed before and just after irradiation by temperature scans of variation in the recombination parameters.

  6. HTB140 melanoma cells under proton irradiation and/or alkylating agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korićanac, L.; Petrović, I.; Privitera, G.; Cuttone, G.; Ristić-Fira, A.

    2007-09-01

    Chemoresistance is a major problem in the treatment of malignant melanoma. The mainstay of treatment for melanoma is the DNA-alkylating agent dacarbazine (DTIC). Fotemustine (FM), a member of the chloroethylnitrosourea group of alkylating agents, has also demonstrated significant antitumor effects in malignant melanoma. However, the intrinsic and acquired resistance of melanoma limits the clinical application of these drugs. Melanomas are also extremely radioresistant. With the objective of enhancing growth inhibition of melanoma cells, combined treatments of FM or DTIC with proton irradiation have been investigated. These effects were studied on HTB140 melanoma cell viability and proliferation. Cells exposed to treatment with FM and protons have shown inhibition of cell growth and significant reduction of proliferation capacity compared to single irradiation or drug treatment. Treatment with DTIC and protons has shown improved growth inhibition compared to appropriate single drug treatment, while the effects of single proton irradiation have been the most pronounced.

  7. Experimental Studies of Low Energy Proton Irradiation of Thin Vacuum Deposited Aluminum Layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renger, Thomas; Sznajder, Maciej; Geppert, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    We present experimental studies of degradation effects caused by low energetic proton irradiation on thin Aluminum layers. The studies were performed by use the Complex Irradiation Facility (CIF) at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen, Germany. Different proton doses and energies at two temperature levels of the samples were considered.The result of the irradiation tests is a formation of bubbles at the Aluminum surface. They are filled with molecular Hydrogen gas, which is created by the recombination processes of the metal free electrons and the incident protons. The average size of the bubbles increases with higher proton doses. As a consequence of the effect the metallic surface morphology is changed significantly.

  8. Radiograaff, a proton irradiation facility for radiobiological studies at a 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constanzo, J.; Fallavier, M.; Alphonse, G.; Bernard, C.; Battiston-Montagne, P.; Rodriguez-Lafrasse, C.; Dauvergne, D.; Beuve, M.

    2014-09-01

    A horizontal beam facility for radiobiological experiments with low-energy protons has been set up at the 4 MV Van de Graaff accelerator of the Institut de Physique Nucléaire de Lyon. A homogeneous irradiation field with a suitable proton flux is obtained by means of two collimators and two Au-scattering foils. A monitoring chamber contains a movable Faraday cup, a movable quartz beam viewer for controlling the intensity and the position of the initial incident beam and four scintillating fibers for beam monitoring during the irradiation of the cell samples. The beam line is ended by a thin aluminized Mylar window (12 μm thick) for the beam extraction in air. The set-up was simulated by the GATE v6.1 Monte-Carlo platform. The measurement of the proton energy distribution, the evaluation of the fluence-homogeneity over the sample and the calibration of the monitoring system were performed using a silicon PIPS detector, placed in air in the same position as the biological samples to be irradiated. The irradiation proton fluence was found to be homogeneous to within ±2% over a circular field of 20 mm diameter. As preliminary biological experiment, two Human Head and Neck Squamous Carcinoma Cell lines (with different radiosensitivities) were irradiated with 2.9 MeV protons. The measured survival curves are compared to those obtained after X-ray irradiation, giving a Relative Biological Efficiency between 1.3 and 1.4.

  9. Positron annihilation study of proton-irradiated reactor pressure vessel steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiangbing; Wang, Rongshan; Ren, Ai; Huang, Ping; Wu, Yichu; Jiang, Jing; Zhang, Chonghong; Wang, Xitao

    2012-10-01

    The microstructures, irradiation-induced defects and changes of mechanical property of Chinese domestic A508-3 steels after proton irradiation were investigated by TEM, positron lifetime, slow positron beam Doppler broadening spectroscopy and hardness measurements. The defects were induced by 240 keV proton irradiation with fluences of 1.25×1017 ions cm-2 (0.26 dpa), 2.5×1017 ions cm-2 (0.5 dpa), and 5.0×1017 ions cm-2 (1.0 dpa). The TEM observation revealed that the as-received steel had typical bainitic-ferritic microstructures. It was also observed that Doppler broadening S-parameter and average lifetime increased with dose level owing to the formation of defects and voids induced by proton irradiation. The correlation between positron parameters and hardness was found.

  10. Whole-body proton irradiation causes long-term damage to hematopoietic stem cells in mice.

    PubMed

    Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Luo, Yi; Allen, Antiño R; Koturbash, Igor; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2015-02-01

    Space flight poses certain health risks to astronauts, including exposure to space radiation, with protons accounting for more than 80% of deep-space radiation. Proton radiation is also now being used with increasing frequency in the clinical setting to treat cancer. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to better understand the biological effects of proton radiation on the body. Such improved understanding could also lead to more accurate assessment of the potential health risks of proton radiation, as well as the development of improved strategies to prevent and mitigate its adverse effects. Previous studies have shown that exposure to low doses of protons is detrimental to mature leukocyte populations in peripheral blood, however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Some of these detriments may be attributable to damage to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that have the ability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into different lineages of blood cells through hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). The goal of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of low-dose proton irradiation on HSCs. We exposed C57BL/6J mice to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation (150 MeV) and then studied the effects of proton radiation on HSCs and HPCs in the bone marrow (BM) 22 weeks after the exposure. The results showed that mice exposed to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation had a significant and persistent reduction of BM HSCs compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in BM HPCs after proton irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated HSCs and their progeny exhibited a significant impairment in clonogenic function, as revealed by the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) and colony-forming cell assays, respectively. These long-term effects of proton irradiation on HSCs may be attributable to the induction of chronic oxidative stress in HSCs, because HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant increase in NADPH

  11. Whole-Body Proton Irradiation Causes Long-Term Damage to Hematopoietic Stem Cells in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jianhui; Feng, Wei; Wang, Yingying; Luo, Yi; Allen, Antiño R.; Koturbash, Igor; Turner, Jennifer; Stewart, Blair; Raber, Jacob; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Zhou, Daohong; Shao, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Space flight poses certain health risks to astronauts, including exposure to space radiation, with protons accounting for more than 80% of deep-space radiation. Proton radiation is also now being used with increasing frequency in the clinical setting to treat cancer. For these reasons, there is an urgent need to better understand the biological effects of proton radiation on the body. Such improved understanding could also lead to more accurate assessment of the potential health risks of proton radiation, as well as the development of improved strategies to prevent and mitigate its adverse effects. Previous studies have shown that exposure to low doses of protons is detrimental to mature leukocyte populations in peripheral blood, however, the underlying mechanisms are not known. Some of these detriments may be attributable to damage to hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) that have the ability to self-renew, proliferate and differentiate into different lineages of blood cells through hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs). The goal of this study was to investigate the long-term effects of low-dose proton irradiation on HSCs. We exposed C57BL/6J mice to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation (150 MeV) and then studied the effects of proton radiation on HSCs and HPCs in the bone marrow (BM) 22 weeks after the exposure. The results showed that mice exposed to 1.0 Gy whole-body proton irradiation had a significant and persistent reduction of BM HSCs compared to unirradiated controls. In contrast, no significant changes were observed in BM HPCs after proton irradiation. Furthermore, irradiated HSCs and their progeny exhibited a significant impairment in clonogenic function, as revealed by the cobblestone area-forming cell (CAFC) and colony-forming cell assays, respectively. These long-term effects of proton irradiation on HSCs may be attributable to the induction of chronic oxidative stress in HSCs, because HSCs from irradiated mice exhibited a significant increase in NADPH

  12. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, A. P. L; Gibbon, P.

    2007-01-15

    Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.

  13. Production of proton beams with narrow-band energy spectra from laser-irradiated ultrathin foils.

    PubMed

    Robinson, A P L; Gibbon, P

    2007-01-01

    Three-dimensional gridless particle simulations of proton acceleration via irradiation of a very thin foil by a short-pulse, high-intensity laser have been performed to evaluate recently proposed microstructured target configurations. It is found that a pure proton microdot target does not by itself result in a quasimonoenergetic proton beam. Such a beam can only be produced with a very lightly doped target, in qualitative agreement with one-dimensional theory. The simulations suggest that beam quality in current experiments could be dramatically improved by choosing microdot compositions with a 5-10 times lower proton fraction.

  14. The effects of 800 MeV proton irradiation on the corrosion of tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel, and gold

    SciTech Connect

    Lillard, R.S.; Butt, D.P.; Kanner, G.; Daemen, L.

    1997-12-01

    Real time electrochemical data were acquired for tungsten, tantalum, stainless steel 304L, and gold targets during proton irradiation at the LANSCE Weapons Neutron Research Facility. The goal of this research was to establish a better understanding of the corrosion properties of materials as a function of proton irradiation and gain insight into the mechanism of the observed phenomena. The following electrochemical observations were made during proton irradiation of W, Ta, SS304, and Au: (1) the open circuit potential of all materials increased with increasing proton fluence; (2) the corrosion rate (at the OCP) of W and SS304 increased with increasing proton fluence; (3) the passive dissolution rate for SS304 and Ta decreased with increasing proton fluence; (4) the anodic dissolution rate for W increased with increasing proton fluence; (5) the pitting potential for SS304 increased with proton fluence, which is an indication that the material is less susceptible to pitting attack during irradiation.

  15. Materials irradiation facilities at the high-power Swiss proton accelerator complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Werner; Dai, Yong; Glasbrenner, Heike; Aebersold, Hans-Ulrich

    2007-04-01

    Within the Swiss proton accelerator complex at the Paul-Scherrer-Institute (PSI), several irradiation facilities are operated for investigation of materials behavior under high-dose irradiation conditions as well as for neutron activation analysis and isotope production. In LiSoR (liquid solid reaction), a liquid metal loop connected to the 72 MeV proton accelerator Injector 1, steel samples are irradiated while being in contact with flowing lead-bismuth-eutectic (LBE) at elevated temperatures and under tensile stress. In the spallation neutron source SINQ, the STIP program (SINQ Target Irradiation Program) allows materials irradiation under realistic spallation conditions, i.e. in a mixed spectrum of 570 MeV protons and spallation neutrons. Hundreds of samples, mainly austenitic and ferritic-martensitic steels such as 316L, T91 or F82H, were irradiated to doses up to 20 dpa as part of STIP. These also included steel samples in contact with liquid Hg and liquid LBE. MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment), a liquid metal target employing LBE, operated in SINQ during the second half of 2006, can be taken as a materials irradiation facility on its own. Adjacent to the target position, SINQ houses a neutron irradiation rabbit system serving activation analysis and isotope production.

  16. High-energy proton irradiation of C57Bl6 mice under hindlimb unloading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendonca, Marc; Todd, Paul; Orschell, Christie; Chin-Sinex, Helen; Farr, Jonathan; Klein, Susan; Sokol, Paul

    2012-07-01

    Solar proton events (SPEs) pose substantial risk for crewmembers on deep space missions. It has been shown that low gravity and ionizing radiation both produce transient anemia and immunodeficiencies. We utilized the C57Bl/6 based hindlimb suspension model to investigate the consequences of hindlimb-unloading induced immune suppression on the sensitivity to whole body irradiation with modulated 208 MeV protons. Eight-week old C57Bl/6 female mice were conditioned by hindlimb-unloading. Serial CBC and hematocrit assays by HEMAVET were accumulated for the hindlimb-unloaded mice and parallel control animals subjected to identical conditions without unloading. One week of hindlimb-unloading resulted in a persistent, statistically significant 10% reduction in RBC count and a persistent, statistically significant 35% drop in lymphocyte count. This inhibition is consistent with published observations of low Earth orbit flown mice and with crewmember blood analyses. In our experiments the cell count suppression was sustained for the entire six-week period of observation and persisted for at least 7 days beyond the period of active hindlimb-unloading. C57Bl/6 mice were also irradiated with 208 MeV Spread Out Bragg Peak (SOBP) protons at the Midwest Proton Radiotherapy Institute at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. We found that at 8.5 Gy hindlimb-unloaded mice were significantly more radiation sensitive with 35 lethalities out of 51 mice versus 15 out of 45 control (non-suspended) mice within 30 days of receiving 8.5 Gy of SOBP protons (p =0.001). Both control and hindlimb-unloaded stocktickerCBC analyses of 8.5 Gy proton irradiated and control mice by HEMAVET demonstrated severe reductions in WBC counts (Lymphocytes and PMNs) by day 2 post-irradiation, followed a week to ten days later by reductions in platelets, and then reductions in RBCs about 2 weeks post-irradiation. Recovery of all blood components commenced by three weeks post-irradiation. CBC analyses of 8

  17. Anti-angiogenic activity in metastasis of human breast cancer cells irradiated by a proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyu-Shik; Shin, Jin-Sun; Nam, Kyung-Soo; Shon, Yun-Hee

    2012-07-01

    Angiogenesis is an essential process of metastasis in human breast cancer. We investigated the effects of proton beam irradiation on angiogenic enzyme activities and their expressions in MCF-7 human breast cancer cells. The regulation of angiogenic regulating factors, of transforming growth factor- β (TGF- β) and of vesicular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in breast cancer cells irradiated with a proton beam was studied. Aromatase activity and mRNA expression, which is correlated with metastasis, were significantly decreased by irradiation with a proton beam in a dose-dependent manner. TGF- β and VEGF transcriptions were also diminished by proton beam irradiation. In contrast, transcription of tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (TIMPs), also known as biological inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), was dose-dependently enhanced. Furthermore, an increase in the expression of TIMPs caused th MMP-9 activity to be diminished and the MMP-9 and the MMP-2 expressions to be decreased. These results suggest that inhibition of angiogenesis by proton beam irradiation in breast cancer cells is closely related to inhibitions of aromatase activity and transcription and to down-regulation of TGF- β and VEGF transcription.

  18. Magnetic properties of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3}

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungkyu; Jin Kim, Sam; Sung Kim, Chul

    2013-05-07

    The crystal structure and magnetic properties of BiFeO{sub 3} samples, proton-irradiated with 0, 10, and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2}, were investigated with x-ray diffraction (XRD), vibrating sample magnetometer, and Moessbauer spectroscopy measurements. From the Rietveld refinement analysis of the XRD patterns, the crystal structure of BiFeO{sub 3} is determined to be rhombohedral with the space group of R3c. We have observed the decrease in the lattice constant and oxygen occupancy with proton irradiation. The magnetization hysteresis (M-H) curves show the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior in the proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples. The Moessbauer spectra of proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples at 295 K were analyzed with two-sextets (B{sub 1} and B{sub 2}) and doublet. From the isomer shift ({delta}) values, ionic states were determined to be Fe{sup 3+}. Compared to non-irradiated sample, having the antiferromagnetic area ratio (two-sextets) of 45.47, 54.53% the antiferromagnetic and paramagnetic area ratios (doublet) of 10 and 20 pC/{mu}m{sup 2} proton irradiated BiFeO{sub 3} samples are 41.36, 51.26, and 7.38% and 41.03, 50.90, and 8.07%, respectively. Our experimental observation suggests that the increase in the paramagnetic area ratio is due to the disappearance of superexchange interaction, resulted from the removal of the oxygen with proton irradiation. Also, the appearance of the weak ferromagnetic behavior is caused by the breaking of the antiferromagnetic coupling.

  19. Attaining Low Temperatures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wheatley, John D.; Van Till, Howard J.

    1970-01-01

    Discusses the definition of temperature and the concept of order in non-mathematical terms. Describes the cooling techniques necessary in low temperature physics research, including magnetic cooling, the use of the Pomeranchuk Effect, and dilution refrigeration. Outlines the types of phenomena observed in matter within various temperature ranges…

  20. Low temperature fluid blender

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repas, G. A.

    1971-01-01

    Blender supplies hydrogen at temperatures from 289 deg K to 367 deg K. Hydrogen temperature is controlled by using blender to combine flow from liquid hydrogen tank /276 deg K/ and gaseous hydrogen cylinder /550 deg K/. Blenders are applicable where flow of controlled low-temperature fluid is desired.

  1. Proton-induced polonium production in massive lead bismuth target irradiated by 660 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polanski, Aleksander; Petrochenkov, Sergey; Pohorecki, Wladyslaw

    2006-06-01

    The paper presents study of polonium production in bismuth foils placed in lead target. Proton-induced production of residual nuclei 206Po, 207Po, 208Po, 209Po, 210Po in 209Bi foils placed in lead target irradiated by 660 MeV protons was calculated. A comparison with calculated spatial distribution of polonium production using an MCNPX code and experimental results has been performed. The results of calculation will be useful for design of target of Subcritical Assembly in Dubna (SAD).

  2. Deterministic transport calculations of dose profiles due to proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Filippone, W.L.; Smith, M.S.; Santoro, R.T.; Gabriel, T.A.; Alsmiller, R.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Charged-particle transport calculations are most often carried out using the Monte Carlo technique. For example, the TIGER and EGS codes are used for electron transport calculations, while HETC models the transport of protons and heavy ions. In recent years there has been considerable progress in deterministic models of electron transport. Many of these models are also applicable to protons. In this paper we present discrete ordinates solutions to the Spencer-Lewis equation for protons. In its present form, our code calculates the energy deposition profile and primary proton flux in x-y geometry due to proton beam irradiation. Proton energies up to 0.4 GeV are permissible.

  3. Relative degradation of near infrared avalanche photodiodes from proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes are compared for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural differences between devices.

  4. Single shot cell irradiations with laser-driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, N.; Schmid, T. E.; Zlobinskaya, O.; Wilkens, J. J.; Allinger, K.; Hilz, P.; Ma, W.; Reinhardt, S.; Bin, J.; Kiefer, D.; Schreiber, J.; Drexler, G. A.; Friedl, A.

    2013-07-26

    Ion beams are relevant for radiobiological studies in basic research and for application in tumor therapy. Here we present a method to generate nanosecond proton bunches with single shot doses of up to 7 Gray by a tabletop high-power laser. Although in their infancy, laser-ion accelerators allow studying fast radiobiological processes at small-scale laboratories as exemplarily demonstrated by measurements of the relative biological effectiveness of protons in human tumor cells.

  5. Proton irradiation of stem cells: Radiation damage and chemical radioprotection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, R. C.; Montour, J. L.; Gurney, C. W.

    1972-01-01

    Effects of high energy protons on erythropoietic stem cells and radioprotection by chemicals were investigated in NASA Space Radiation Effects Laboratory. The effects of a parallel beam of 600 MeV protons. The fluence, when converted to dose, were referenced to the synchrocyclotron beam monitors which were then used to administer radiation exposures. Mice were given graded doses to 300 rads to determine dose-response curve. Other mice received saline, AET, or 5-hydroxytryptamine 10 to 15 minutes before exposure.

  6. Luminescence characteristics of Sr 4Al 14O 25:Eu,Dy under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toh, K.; Nagata, S.; Tsuchiya, B.; Shikama, T.

    2006-08-01

    Fluorescence and long lasting emission properties of Sr4Al14O25:Eu, Dy were examined under proton irradiation by varying incident energy. The fluorescence spectra have three strong peaks at 400, 480 and 570 nm. The first two peaks are attributed to the luminescence of Eu2+ and exhibit the long lasting property. The peak at 570 nm is attributed to the luminescence of Dy3+; it exhibits no luminescence after the irradiation has been stopped. The fluorescence intensity ratio of Eu2+/Dy3+ exhibits incident energy dependence, and its value increases with an increase in the proton energy. Radiation damages also exhibits incident energy dependence. Therefore, Sr4Al14O25:Eu, Dy exhibits a potential of being employed to identify the incident proton energy. Long lasting emission has some decay time components and the longest one is unaltered by proton energy.

  7. Proton irradiation induced defects in GaN: Rutherford backscattering and thermally stimulated current studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, T.; Nishikata, N.; Kamioka, K.; Kuriyama, K.; Kushida, K.

    2016-03-01

    The proton irradiation induced defects in GaN are studied by combining elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA), thermally stimulated current (TSC), and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy (RBS) measurements. The proton irradiation (peak concentration: 1.0 × 1015 cm-2) into GaN films with a thickness of 3 μm is performed using a 500 keV implanter. The proton concentration by a TRIM simulation is maximum at 3600 nm in depth, which means that the proton beam almost passes through the GaN film. The carrier concentration decreases three orders of magnitude to 1015 cm-3 by the proton irradiation, suggesting the existence of the proton irradiation-induced defects. The ERDA measurements using the 1.5 MeV helium beam can evaluate hydrogen from the surface to ∼300 nm. The hydrogen concentration at ∼220 nm is ∼8.3 × 1013 cm-2 and ∼1.0 × 1014 cm-2 for un-irradiated and as-irradiated samples, respectively, suggesting that electrical properties are almost not affected by hydrogen. TSC measurements show a broad spectrum at around 110 K which can be divided into three traps, P1 (ionization energy 173 meV), P2 (251 meV), and P3 (330 meV). The peak intensity of P1 is much larger than that of P2 and P3. These traps are related to the N vacancy and/or complex involving N vacancy (P1), neutral Ga vacancy (VGa) (P2), and complex involving VGa (P3). The Ga displacement concentration evaluated by RBS measurements is 1.75 × 1019 cm-3 corresponding to 1/1000 of the Ga concentration in GaN. The observed Ga displacement may be origins of P2 and P3 traps.

  8. Accumulation efficiency of cancer stem-like cells post γ-ray and proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Yi; Wang, Weikang; Fu, Qibin; Mei, Tao; Wu, Jingwen; Li, Jia; Yang, Gen; Wang, Yugang

    2012-09-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR) has been proven to be a powerful medical treatment in cancer therapy. Rational and effective use of its killing power depends on understanding IR-mediated responses at the molecular, cellular and tissue levels. Increasing evidence supports that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) play an important role in tumor regrowth and spread post radiotherapy, for they are resistant to various therapy methods including radiation. Presently, SW620 colon carcinoma monolayer culture cells were irradiated with γ-rays and protons of 2 Gy. Then apoptosis, clonogenic survival and the expression of CD133+ protein were examined. The results showed that there was no significantly difference either on long-term clonogenic survival or on short-term apoptosis ratio. However, compared with γ-rays, irradiation with protons was less efficient to accumulate CSCs at the same dose, although both protons and γ-rays can significantly accumulate the CD133+ CSCs subpopulation. In addition, the results of sphere formation assay also confirmed that proton irradiation is less efficient in CSCs accumulation, suggesting proton irradiation might have higher efficiency in CSCs elimination for cancer radiotherapy.

  9. Redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system under high-temperature proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Afonin, N. N.; Logacheva, V. A. Khoviv, A. M.

    2011-12-15

    The redistribution of components in the niobium-silicon system during magnetron-assisted sputtering of niobium, vacuum annealing, and high-temperature proton irradiation is studied. It is established that, during magnetron-assisted sputtering followed by vacuum annealing, silicon penetrates through the metal film to the outer boundary of the film. Under high-temperature proton irradiation, the suppression of the diffusion of niobium into silicon is observed. This effect is attributed to the high concentration of radiation vacancies in the region of the Nb/Si interphase boundary.

  10. Long-lived isotopes production in Pb-Bi target irradiated by high energy protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Pereslavtsev, P. E.

    1995-09-01

    Concentration of long-lived isotopes has been calculated for lead and lead-bismuth targets irradiated by protons with energy 0.4, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.6 GeV. The time of irradiation is equal from 1 month up to 2 years. The data libraries BROND, ADL and MENDL have been used to obtain the rate of nuclider transmutation. All calculations have been performed using the SNT code [1].

  11. Long-lived isotopes production in Pb-Bi target irradiated by high energy protons

    SciTech Connect

    Korovin, Yu. A.; Konobeyev, A. Yu.; Pereslavtsev, P. E.

    1995-09-15

    Concentration of long-lived isotopes has been calculated for lead and lead-bismuth targets irradiated by protons with energy 0.4, 0.8, 1.0 and 1.6 GeV. The time of irradiation is equal from 1 month up to 2 years. The data libraries BROND, ADL and MENDL have been used to obtain the rate of nuclider transmutation. All calculations have been performed using the SNT code.

  12. Observations of defect structure evolution in proton and Ni ion irradiated Ni-Cr binary alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Samuel A.; Barr, Christopher M.; Pakarinen, Janne; Mamivand, Mahmood; Hattar, Khalid; Morgan, Dane D.; Taheri, Mitra; Sridharan, Kumar

    2016-10-01

    Two binary Ni-Cr model alloys with 5 wt% Cr and 18 wt% Cr were irradiated using 2 MeV protons at 400 and 500 °C and 20 MeV Ni4+ ions at 500 °C to investigate microstructural evolution as a function of composition, irradiation temperature, and irradiating ion species. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was applied to study irradiation-induced void and faulted Frank loops microstructures. Irradiations at 500 °C were shown to generate decreased densities of larger defects, likely due to increased barriers to defect nucleation as compared to 400 °C irradiations. Heavy ion irradiation resulted in a larger density of smaller voids when compared to proton irradiations, indicating in-cascade clustering of point defects. Cluster dynamics simulations were in good agreement with the experimental findings, suggesting that increases in Cr content lead to an increase in interstitial binding energy, leading to higher densities of smaller dislocation loops in the Ni-18Cr alloy as compared to the Ni-5Cr alloy.

  13. Comparison of proton microbeam and gamma irradiation for the radiation hardness testing of silicon PIN diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakšić, M.; Grilj, V.; Skukan, N.; Majer, M.; Jung, H. K.; Kim, J. Y.; Lee, N. H.

    2013-09-01

    Simple and cost-effective solutions using Si PIN diodes as detectors are presently utilized in various radiation-related applications in which excessive exposure to radiation degrades their charge transport properties. One of the conventional methods for the radiation hardness testing of such devices is time-consuming irradiation with electron beam or gamma-ray irradiation facilities, high-energy proton accelerators, or with neutrons from research reactors. Recently, for the purpose of radiation hardness testing, a much faster nuclear microprobe based approach utilizing proton irradiation has been developed. To compare the two different irradiation techniques, silicon PIN diodes have been irradiated with a Co-60 gamma radiation source and with a 6 MeV proton microbeam. The signal degradation in the silicon PIN diodes for both irradiation conditions has been probed by the IBIC (ion beam induced charge) technique, which can precisely monitor changes in charge collection efficiency. The results presented are reviewed on the basis of displacement damage calculations and NIEL (non-ionizing energy loss) concept.

  14. The risk of developing a second cancer after receiving craniospinal proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Fontenot, Jonas D; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Zheng, Yuanshui; Taddei, Phillip J; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D; Woo, Shiao

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to compare the risk of developing a second cancer after craniospinal irradiation using photon versus proton radiotherapy by means of simulation studies designed to account for the effects of neutron exposures. Craniospinal irradiation of a male phantom was calculated for passively-scattered and scanned-beam proton treatment units. Organ doses were estimated from treatment plans; for the proton treatments, the amount of stray radiation was calculated separately using the Monte Carlo method. The organ doses were converted to risk of cancer incidence using a standard formalism developed for radiation protection purposes. The total lifetime risk of second cancer due exclusively to stray radiation was 1.5% for the passively scattered treatment versus 0.8% for the scanned proton beam treatment. Taking into account the therapeutic and stray radiation fields, the risk of second cancer from intensity-modulated radiation therapy and conventional radiotherapy photon treatments were 7 and 12 times higher than the risk associated with scanned-beam proton therapy, respectively, and 6 and 11 times higher than with passively scattered proton therapy, respectively. Simulations revealed that both passively scattered and scanned-beam proton therapies confer significantly lower risks of second cancers than 6MV conventional and intensity-modulated photon therapies. PMID:19305036

  15. The risk of developing a second cancer after receiving craniospinal proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Newhauser, Wayne D; Fontenot, Jonas D; Mahajan, Anita; Kornguth, David; Stovall, Marilyn; Zheng, Yuanshui; Taddei, Phillip J; Mirkovic, Dragan; Mohan, Radhe; Cox, James D; Woo, Shiao

    2009-04-21

    The purpose of this work was to compare the risk of developing a second cancer after craniospinal irradiation using photon versus proton radiotherapy by means of simulation studies designed to account for the effects of neutron exposures. Craniospinal irradiation of a male phantom was calculated for passively-scattered and scanned-beam proton treatment units. Organ doses were estimated from treatment plans; for the proton treatments, the amount of stray radiation was calculated separately using the Monte Carlo method. The organ doses were converted to risk of cancer incidence using a standard formalism developed for radiation protection purposes. The total lifetime risk of second cancer due exclusively to stray radiation was 1.5% for the passively scattered treatment versus 0.8% for the scanned proton beam treatment. Taking into account the therapeutic and stray radiation fields, the risk of second cancer from intensity-modulated radiation therapy and conventional radiotherapy photon treatments were 7 and 12 times higher than the risk associated with scanned-beam proton therapy, respectively, and 6 and 11 times higher than with passively scattered proton therapy, respectively. Simulations revealed that both passively scattered and scanned-beam proton therapies confer significantly lower risks of second cancers than 6 MV conventional and intensity-modulated photon therapies.

  16. Water corrosion measurements on tungsten irradiated with high energy protons and spallation neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Scott Lillard, R.; Sommer, Walter F.; Butt, Darryl P.; Gac, Frank D.; Willcutt, Gordon J.; Louthan, McIntyre R.

    2012-12-01

    A detailed analysis was performed on the degradation of a tungsten target under water cooling while being exposed to a 761 MeV proton beam at an average current of 0.867 mA to a maximum fluence of 1.3 × 1021 protons/cm2. The target consisted of 3 mm diameter tungsten rods arranged in bundles and cooled with deionized water flowing over their length. Degradation of the tungsten was measured through analyzing water resistivity, tungsten concentration in water samples that were taken during irradiation and through dimensional measurements on the rods after irradiation. Chemical analysis of irradiated water samples showed W concentrations up to 35 μg/ml. Gamma analysis showed increases in concentrations of many isotopes including W-178, Lu-171, Tm-167, Tm-166, Yb-169 and Hf-175. Dimensional measurements performed after irradiation on the W rods revealed a decrease in diameter as a function of position that followed closely the Gaussian proton beam profile along the rod length and indicated a definite beam-effect. A general decrease in diameter, especially on the coolant-water entrance point where turbulent flow was likely, also suggests a chemically and mechanically-driven corrosion effect. A method to estimate the apparent corrosion rate based on proton fluence is presented and application of this method estimates the material loss rate at about 1.9 W atoms/incident proton. From this result, the corrosion rate of tungsten in a 761 MeV, 0.867 mA proton beam was calculated to be 0.073 cm/full power year. of irradiation.

  17. Cognitive effects of proton irradiation at differing energy levels

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During exploratory class missions to space outside of the magnetic field of the Earth, astronauts will be exposed to various forms of radiation including solar particle events (SPE) which are predominantly composed of protons. As such it is important to characterize the cognitive effects of exposure...

  18. Tensile properties of vanadium-base alloys irradiated in the Fusion-1 low-temperature experiment in the BOR-60 reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gazda, J.; Nowicki, L.J.; Billone, M.C.; Smith, D.L.

    1998-09-01

    The irradiation has been completed and the test specimens have been retrieved from the lithium-bonded capsule at the Research Institute of Atomic Reactors (RIAR) in Russia. During this reporting period, the Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) tensile specimens were received from RIAR and initial testing and examination of these specimens at ANL has been completed. The results, corroborating previous findings showed a significant loss of work hardening capability in the materials. There appears to be no significant difference in behavior among the various heats of vanadium-base alloys in the V-(4-5)Cr-(4-5)Ti composition range. The variations in the preirradiation annealing conditions also produced no notable differences.

  19. Low Temperature Powder Coating

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-09

    Patterson AFB, OH David Piatkowski, Chris Mahendra NAVAIR James Davila, Chris Geib SAIC Beavercreek, OH O G D E N A I R L O G I S T I C S C E N T...PUBLICATIONS Geib , C.W., Davila J.A., Patterson W., et al. “Low Temperature Cure Powder Coating, ESTCP Project WP-0614.” Joint Services Environmental...Management Conference, Columbus, Ohio. 21 – 24 May 2007. Geib , C.W., Davila J.A., Patterson W., et al. “Advances and Testing of Powder Coatings for Aerospace

  20. Effect of annealing on proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN based micro-Hall sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmane, A.; Takahashi, H.; Tashiro, T.; Ko, P. J.; Okada, H.; Sandhu, A.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.

    2014-02-20

    The effect of annealing at 673 K on irradiated micro-Hall sensors irradiated with protons at 380keV and fluences of 10{sup 14}, 10{sup 15} and 10{sup 16} protons/cm{sup 2} is reported. Cathodoluminescence measurements were carried out at room temperature before and after annealing and showed improvement in the band edge band emission of the GaN layer. After annealing a sensor irradiated by 10{sup 15} protons/cm{sup 2} the device became operational with improvements in its magnetic sensitivity. All irradiated sensors showed improvement in their electrical characteristics after annealing.

  1. Proton irradiation creep of Inconel 718 at 300°C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scholz, R.; Matera, R.

    2000-12-01

    Torsional creep tests were conducted on Inconel 718 in the precipitation hardened condition under 17 MeV proton irradiation at 300°C upto a maximum dose of 0.35 dpa. The stress dependence of the irradiation creep rate was linear for the applied shear stresses which ranged from 150 to 450 MPa. The results are discussed in relation to the operating conditions of an ITER-like machine, where Inconel 718 bolts are used to mechanically attach the shielding blanket to the backplate. The irradiation creep induced stress relaxation amounted to about 30% after a dose of 0.35 dpa.

  2. Effects of proton beam irradiation on uveal melanomas: a comparative study of Ki-67 expression in irradiated versus non-irradiated melanomas

    PubMed Central

    Chiquet, C.; Grange, J.; Ayzac, L.; Chauvel, P.; Patricot, L.; Devouassoux-Shish..., M.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the cellular proliferation using the monoclonal antibody Ki-67, in paraffin embedded uveal melanomas irradiated by proton beam, as well as in non-irradiated uveal melanomas.
METHODS—30 enucleated eyes were included for histopathological study and Ki-67 immunostaining. Patients were enucleated between 1991 and 1996 for uveal melanoma, 14 after proton beam irradiation and 16 without treatment (control group). The mean follow up period was 2.5 years after diagnosis and 1 year after enucleation.
RESULTS—A significant relation was found between Ki-67 score and mitotic index (r = 0.56, p = 0.001), histological largest tumour diameter (r = 0.38, p = 0.03), fibrosis (r = −0.35, p = 0.05), absence of tumoral pigmentation (p = 0.05), and presence of vascular thrombosis (p = 0.03). The Ki-67 score was significantly higher in the non-irradiated group (p = 0.01) and in the group of patients whose cause of enucleation was tumoral evolution (p = 0.005) compared with the group of patients enucleated after neovascular glaucoma. The Ki-67 score was very high in a case of orbital recurrence of uveal melanoma and metastatic death. 70% of metastasised tumours showed a Ki-67 score higher than the median value.
CONCLUSION—Ki-67 labelling is a reliable method of estimating the proliferative activity in uveal melanomas after proton beam irradiation. The Ki-67 score is significantly correlated with prognostic variables (mitotic index and histological largest tumour diameter), and with radiation effects after proton beam irradiation.

 PMID:10611107

  3. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium – A dilatometry-based study

    SciTech Connect

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit; Savkliyildiz, Ilyas

    2016-04-07

    S—200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 1020 cm–2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100–200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. Here, the study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  4. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium - A dilatometry-based study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; Ghose, Sanjit; Savkliyildiz, Ilyas

    2016-08-01

    Ssbnd 200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 1020 cm-2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was to qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. The study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.

  5. High-temperature annealing of proton irradiated beryllium – A dilatometry-based study

    DOE PAGES

    Simos, Nikolaos; Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; Zhong, Zhong; ...

    2016-04-07

    S—200 F grade beryllium has been irradiated with 160 MeV protons up to 1.2 1020 cm–2 peak fluence and irradiation temperatures in the range of 100–200 °C. To address the effect of proton irradiation on dimensional stability, an important parameter in its consideration in fusion reactor applications, and to simulate high temperature irradiation conditions, multi-stage annealing using high precision dilatometry to temperatures up to 740 °C were conducted in air. X-ray diffraction studies were also performed to compliment the macroscopic thermal study and offer a microscopic view of the irradiation effects on the crystal lattice. The primary objective was tomore » qualify the competing dimensional change processes occurring at elevated temperatures namely manufacturing defect annealing, lattice parameter recovery, transmutation 4He and 3H diffusion and swelling and oxidation kinetics. Further, quantification of the effect of irradiation dose and annealing temperature and duration on dimensional changes is sought. Here, the study revealed the presence of manufacturing porosity in the beryllium grade, the oxidation acceleration effect of irradiation including the discontinuous character of oxidation advancement, the effect of annealing duration on the recovery of lattice parameters recovery and the triggering temperature for transmutation gas diffusion leading to swelling.« less

  6. Nano-scale chemical evolution in a proton-and neutron-irradiated Zr alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harte, Allan; Topping, M.; Frankel, P.; Jädernäs, D.; Romero, J.; Hallstadius, L.; Darby, E. C.; Preuss, M.

    2017-04-01

    Proton-and neutron-irradiated Zircaloy-2 are compared in terms of the nano-scale chemical evolution within second phase particles (SPPs) Zr(Fe,Cr)2 and Zr2(Fe,Ni). This is accomplished through ultra-high spatial resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy and the use of energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic methods. Fe-depletion is observed from both SPP types after irradiation with both irradiative species, but is heterogeneous in the case of Zr(Fe,Cr)2, predominantly from the edge region, and homogeneously in the case of Zr2(Fe,Ni). Further, there is evidence of a delay in the dissolution of the Zr2(Fe,Ni) SPP with respect to the Zr(Fe,Cr)2. As such, SPP dissolution results in matrix supersaturation with solute under both irradiative species and proton irradiation is considered well suited to emulate the effects of neutron irradiation in this context. The mechanisms of solute redistribution processes from SPPs and the consequences for irradiation-induced growth phenomena are discussed.

  7. Rapid-melt-mediated recrystallization of ZnO thin films grown at low temperature by using KrF excimer laser irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Min-Suk; Seo, Inseok

    2015-11-01

    ZnO thin films with thickness of 150 nm were grown on ITO/glass (ITO-coated glass) substrates by using the radio-frequency (RF) sputtering technique at 400 °C in an Ar atmosphere. An excimer laser irradiation (ELI) treatment was performed on the surface of ZnO thin films at different excimer laser energy densities of 150, 200, and 250 mJ/cm2 in a N2 atmosphere. The ELI treatment promoted the lateral recystallization of the surface area of the ZnO, resulting in a significant improvement of the crystallinity of the ZnO thin films without substrate damage. As-grown ZnO and ELI-treated ZnO thin films were characterized by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The analyses showed that the ZnO thin film treated with ELI at an excimer laser energy density of 150 mJ/cm2 exhibited the best structural properties.

  8. Laser-induced point-defect reaction in proton-irradiated SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zimbone, M.; Litrico, G.; Barbera, M.; Baratta, G. A.; Foti, G.

    2009-01-01

    The defects produced in 4H-SiC epitaxial layers by irradiation with 200-keV H+ were characterized by low-temperature photoluminescence. These defects induce sharp luminescent lines, the so-called alphabet lines. Their intensity shows an evolution under UV-laser irradiation not previously observed. By monitoring the change in the resulting photoluminescence spectra versus time, we distinguish two original ‘families’ of peaks called PB1 and PB2. They display a different, and opposite, behaviour with laser irradiation but they are strongly correlated. In particular, the recovering rate of the PB1 family and the growth rate of the PB2 family are the same, indicating a structural rearrangement of defects.

  9. Developments, characterization and proton irradiation damage tests of AlN detectors for VUV solar observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BenMoussa, A.; Soltani, A.; Gerbedoen, J.-C.; Saito, T.; Averin, S.; Gissot, S.; Giordanengo, B.; Berger, G.; Kroth, U.; De Jaeger, J.-C.; Gottwald, A.

    2013-10-01

    For next generation spaceborne solar ultraviolet radiometers, innovative metal-semiconductor-metal detectors based on wurtzite aluminum nitride are being developed and characterized. A set of measurement campaigns and proton irradiation damage tests was carried out to obtain their ultraviolet-to-visible characterization and degradation mechanisms. First results on large area prototypes up to 4.3 mm diameter are presented here. In the wavelength range of interest, this detector is reasonably sensitive and stable under brief irradiation with a negligible low dark current (3-6 pA/cm2). No significant degradation of the detector performance was observed after exposure to protons of 14.4 MeV energy, showing a good radiation tolerance up to fluences of 1 × 1011 protons/cm2.

  10. Enhanced critical currents of commercial 2G superconducting coated conductors through proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Welp, Ulrich; Leroux, M.; Kihlstrom, K. J.; Kwok, W.-K.; Koshelev, A. E.; Miller, D. J.; Rupich, M. W.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A. P.; Kayani, A.

    2015-03-01

    We report on magnetization and transport measurements of the critical current density, Jc, of commercial 2G YBCO coated conductors before and after proton irradiation. The samples were irradiated along the c-axis with 4 MeV protons. Proton irradiation produces a mixed pinning landscape composed of pre-existing rare earth particles and a uniform distribution of irradiation induced nm-sized defects. This pinning landscape strongly reduces the suppression of Jc in magnetic fields resulting in a doubling of Jc in a field of ~ 4T. The irradiation dose-dependence of Jc is characterized by a temperature and field dependent sweat spot that at 5 K and 6 T occurs around 20x1016 p/cm2. Large-scale time dependent Ginzburg-Landau simulations yield a good description of our results. This work supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. D.O.E., Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (KK, ML, AEK) and by the D.O.E, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02-06CH11357 (UW, WKK).

  11. The influence of relative humidity on iron corrosion under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lapuerta, S.; Bérerd, N.; Moncoffre, N.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Jaffrézic, H.; Crusset, D.; Féron, D.

    2008-03-01

    With regard to the storage for high-level radioactive waste and the reversible period of a geological repository, the influence of proton irradiation on the indoor atmospheric corrosion of iron has been investigated in relation to the relative humidity (RH) in the atmosphere. Irradiation experiments were performed using a 3-MeV extracted proton beam. Relative humidity varies from 0% to 85%. Before and after each irradiation, the surfaces of the sample were characterised by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry in order to determine oxygen concentrations in the metal. The maximum oxidation rate was observed for 45% RH in air under proton irradiation and was compared with literature data without irradiation where the maximum oxidation rate was observed at 95% RH. The experimental results are discussed on the basis of the Langmuir-Hinshelwood (LH) model: they are explained by the contrast between the adsorption of O 2 and H 2O species on the active cathodic sites of the iron surface and by the formation of H +(H 2O) n.

  12. Effects of proton irradiation on nanocluster precipitation in ferritic steel containing fcc alloying additions

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhongwu; Liu, C T; Wang, Xun-Li; Miller, Michael K; Ma, Dong; Chen, Guang; Williams, J R; Chin, Bryan

    2012-01-01

    Newly-developed precipitate-strengthened ferritic steels with and without pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were irradiated with 4 MeV protons to a dose of ~5 mdpa at 50 C and subsequently examined by nanoindentation and atom probe tomography (APT). Irradiation-enhanced precipitation and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates were observed. Copper partitions to the precipitate core along with a segregation of Ni, Al and Mn to the precipitate/matrix interface after both thermal aging and proton irradiation. Proton irradiation induces the precipitation reaction and coarsening of pre-existing nanoscale precipitates, and these results are similar to a thermal aging process. The precipitation and coarsening of nanoscale precipitates are responsible for the changes in hardness. The observation of the radiation-induced softening is essentially due to the coarsening of the pre-existing Cu-rich nanoscale precipitates. The implication of the precipitation on the embrittlement of reactor-pressure-vessel steels after irradiation is discussed.

  13. Defocusing beam line design for an irradiation facility at the TAEA SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, A.; Demirköz, B.; Efthymiopoulos, I.; Yiğitoğlu, M.

    2016-07-01

    Electronic components must be tested to ensure reliable performance in high radiation environments such as Hi-Limu LHC and space. We propose a defocusing beam line to perform proton irradiation tests in Turkey. The Turkish Atomic Energy Authority SANAEM Proton Accelerator Facility was inaugurated in May 2012 for radioisotope production. The facility has also an R&D room for research purposes. The accelerator produces protons with 30 MeV kinetic energy and the beam current is variable between 10 μA and 1.2 mA. The beam kinetic energy is suitable for irradiation tests, however the beam current is high and therefore the flux must be lowered. We plan to build a defocusing beam line (DBL) in order to enlarge the beam size, reduce the flux to match the required specifications for the irradiation tests. Current design includes the beam transport and the final focusing magnets to blow up the beam. Scattering foils and a collimator is placed for the reduction of the beam flux. The DBL is designed to provide fluxes between 107 p /cm2 / s and 109 p /cm2 / s for performing irradiation tests in an area of 15.4 cm × 21.5 cm. The facility will be the first irradiation facility of its kind in Turkey.

  14. Low-dose total-body γ irradiation modulates immune response to acute proton radiation.

    PubMed

    Luo-Owen, Xian; Pecaut, Michael J; Rizvi, Asma; Gridley, Daila S

    2012-03-01

    Health risks due to exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate radiation alone or when combined with acute irradiation are not yet clearly defined. This study quantified the effects of protracted exposure to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays with and without acute exposure to protons on the response of immune and other cell populations. C57BL/6 mice were irradiated with ⁵⁷Co (0.05 Gy at 0.025 cGy/h); subsets were subsequently exposed to high-dose/high-dose-rate proton radiation (250 MeV; 2 or 3 Gy at 0.5 Gy/min). Analyses were performed at 4 and 17 days postexposure. Spleen and thymus masses relative to body mass were decreased on day 4 after proton irradiation with or without pre-exposure to γ rays; by day 17, however, the decrease was attenuated by the priming dose. Proton dose-dependent decreases, either with or without pre-exposure to γ rays, occurred in white blood cell, lymphocyte and granulocyte counts in blood but not in spleen. A similar pattern was found for lymphocyte subpopulations, including CD3+ T, CD19+ B, CD4+ T, CD8+ T and NK1.1+ natural killer (NK) cells. Spontaneous DNA synthesis by leukocytes after proton irradiation was high in blood on day 4 and high in spleen on day 17; priming with γ radiation attenuated the effect of 3 Gy in both body compartments. Some differences were also noted among groups in erythrocyte and thrombocyte characteristics. Analysis of splenocytes activated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 antibodies showed changes in T-helper 1 (Th1) and Th2 cytokines. Overall, the data demonstrate that pre-exposure of an intact mammal to low-dose/low-dose-rate γ rays can attenuate the response to acute exposure to proton radiation with respect to at least some cell populations.

  15. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; Romero, T. J.; Kelsey, C. T.; Olivas, E. R.; Sencer, B. H.; Dickerson, P. O.; Connors, M. A.; John, K. D.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cut into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ∼0.2-0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ∼34-120 °C with short excursion to be ∼47-220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (∼0.2-0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ″ precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (∼11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.

  16. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    DOE PAGES

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; ...

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cutmore » into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ~0.2–0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ~34–120 °C with short excursion to be ~47–220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (~0.2–0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ" precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (~11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.« less

  17. Proton irradiation damage of an annealed Alloy 718 beam window

    SciTech Connect

    Bach, H. T.; Anderoglu, O.; Saleh, T. A.; Romero, T. J.; Kelsey, C. T.; Olivas, E. R.; Sencer, B. H.; Dickerson, P. O.; Connors, M. A.; John, K. D.; Maloy, S. A.

    2015-04-01

    Mechanical testing and microstructural analysis was performed on an Alloy 718 window that was in use at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) Isotope Production Facility (IPF) for approximately 5 years. It was replaced as part of the IPF preventive maintenance program. The window was transported to the Wing 9 hot cells at the Chemical and Metallurgical Research (CMR) LANL facility, visually inspected and 3-mm diameter samples were trepanned from the window for mechanical testing and microstructural analysis. Shear punch testing and optical metallography was performed at the CMR hot cells. The 1-mm diameter shear punch disks were cut into smaller samples to further reduce radiation exposure dose rate using Focus Ion Beam (FIB) and microstructure changes were analyzed using a Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Irradiation doses were determined to be ~0.2–0.7 dpa (edge) to 11.3 dpa (peak of beam intensity) using autoradiography and MCNPX calculations. The corresponding irradiation temperatures were calculated to be ~34–120 °C with short excursion to be ~47–220 °C using ANSYS. Mechanical properties and microstructure analysis results with respect to calculated dpa and temperatures show that significant work hardening occurs but useful ductility still remains. The hardening in the lowest dose region (~0.2–0.7 dpa) was the highest and attributed to the formation of γ" precipitates and irradiation defect clusters/bubbles whereas the hardening in the highest dose region (~11.3 dpa) was lower and attributed mainly to irradiation defect clusters and some thermal annealing.

  18. Technique for comprehensive head and neck irradiation using 3-dimensional conformal proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    McDonald, Mark W.; Walter, Alexander S.; Hoene, Ted A.

    2015-01-01

    Owing to the technical and logistical complexities of matching photon and proton treatment modalities, we developed and implemented a technique of comprehensive head and neck radiation using 3-dimensional (3D) conformal proton therapy. A monoisocentric technique was used with a 30-cm snout. Cervical lymphatics were treated with 3 fields: a posterior-anterior field with a midline block and a right and a left posterior oblique field. The matchline of the 3 cervical nodal fields with the primary tumor site fields was staggered by 0.5 cm. Comparative intensity-modulated photon plans were later developed for 12 previously treated patients to provide equivalent target coverage, while matching or improving on the proton plans' sparing of organs at risk (OARs). Dosimetry to OARs was evaluated and compared by treatment modality. Comprehensive head and neck irradiation using proton therapy yielded treatment plans with significant dose avoidance of the oral cavity and midline neck structures. When compared with the generated intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) plans, the proton treatment plans yielded statistically significant reductions in the mean and integral radiation dose to the oral cavity, larynx, esophagus, and the maximally spared parotid gland. There was no significant difference in mean dose to the lesser-spared parotid gland by treatment modality or in mean or integral dose to the spared submandibular glands. A technique for cervical nodal irradiation using 3D conformal proton therapy with uniform scanning was developed and clinically implemented. Use of proton therapy for cervical nodal irradiation resulted in large volume of dose avoidance to the oral cavity and low dose exposure to midline structures of the larynx and the esophagus, with lower mean and integral dose to assessed OARs when compared with competing IMRT plans.

  19. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, M. H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.; A'Hearn, M. F.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU.

  20. Studies of proton-irradiated cometary-type ice mixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.H.; Donn, B.; Khanna, R.

    1983-06-01

    Cometary ice mixtures are studied in a laboratory experiment designed to simulate the temperature, pressure and radiation environments of the interstellar Oort cloud region, in order to test the hypothesized radiation synthesis mechanism for changing the characteristics of the outer few meters of a comet stored in the Oort cloud for 4.6 billion years. All experiments conducted confirm the synthesis of new molecular species in solid phase mixtures at 20 K. When CH4 is present in the irradiated ice mixture, long chained, voltaile hydrocarbon and CO2 are synthesized together with high molecular weight C compounds present in the room temperature residue. Due to radiation synthesis, about 1 percent of the ice was converted into a nonvolatile residue containing complicated C compounds not present in the blank samples. These results suggest that initial molecular abundances can be altered, and new species created, as a result of radiation synthesis. Irradiated mixtures exhibited thermoluminescence and pressure enhancements during warming, showing the synthesis of reactive species. Outbursts in new comets resulting from similar irradiation-induced exothermic activity would be expected to begin occurring at distances of the order of 100 AU. 40 references.

  1. Quasimonoenergetic proton bunches generation from doped foil targets irradiated by intense lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Cui Yunqian; Wang Weimin; Li Yutong; Sheng Zhengming; Zhang Jie

    2013-02-15

    We propose a scheme to generate 10 MeV-level quasimonoenergetic proton bunches using proton-doped heavy-ion targets irradiated by intense lasers via target normal sheath acceleration. The heavy substrate ions provide a long-life quasi-stable sheath field to accelerate the doped protons at the target rear and consequently a quasimonoenergetic proton bunch is produced. The scheme is demonstrated by two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations. An exemplificative simulation with parameters of targets made by ion-implant technique, a kind of modern doping process, gives a quasimonoenergetic bunch with peak energy {approx}13MeV, energy spread {approx}24%, and {approx}nC charge at the focused laser intensity 10{sup 20}W/cm{sup 2}.

  2. Physiologic and Radiographic Evidence of the Distal Edge of the Proton Beam in Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Krejcarek, Stephanie C.; Grant, P. Ellen; Henson, John W.; Tarbell, Nancy J.; Yock, Torunn I. . E-mail: tyock@partners.org

    2007-07-01

    Purpose: Fatty replacement of bone marrow resulting from radiation therapy can be seen on T1-weighted magnetic resonance (MR) images. We evaluated the radiographic appearance of the vertebral bodies in children treated with proton craniospinal irradiation (CSI) to illustrate the distal edge effect of proton radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: The study cohort consisted of 13 adolescents aged 12-18 years who received CSI with proton radiotherapy at Massachusetts General Hospital. Ten of these patients had reached maximal or near-maximal growth. Proton beam radiation for these 10 patients was delivered to the thecal sac and exiting nerve roots only, whereas the remaining 3 patients had a target volume that included the thecal sac, exiting nerve roots, and entire vertebral bodies. Median CSI dose was 27 [range, 23.4-36] cobalt gray equivalent (CGE) given in 1.8-CGE fractions. Magnetic resonance images of the spine were obtained after completion of radiotherapy. Results: Magnetic resonance images of patients who received proton radiotherapy to the thecal sac only demonstrate a sharp demarcation of hyperintense T1-weighted signal in the posterior aspects of the vertebral bodies, consistent with radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement. Magnetic resonance images of the patients prescribed proton radiotherapy to the entire vertebral column had corresponding hyperintense T1-weighted signal involving the entire vertebral bodies. Conclusion: The sharp delineation of radiation-associated fatty marrow replacement in the vertebral bodies demonstrates the rapid decrease in energy at the edge of the proton beam. This provides evidence for a sharp fall-off in radiation dose and supports the premise that proton radiotherapy spares normal tissues unnecessary irradiation.

  3. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation: II. The role of connexin 32

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Tran, D. T.; Murray, D. K.; Rightnar, S. S.; Todd, S.; Nelson, G. A.

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether connexin 32-type gap junctions contribute to the "contact effect" in follicular thyrocytes and whether the response is influenced by radiation quality. Our previous studies demonstrated that early-passage follicular cultures of Fischer rat thyroid cells express functional connexin 32 gap junctions, with later-passage cultures expressing a truncated nonfunctional form of the protein. This model allowed us to assess the role of connexin 32 in radiation responsiveness without relying solely on chemical manipulation of gap junctions. The survival curves generated after gamma irradiation revealed that early-passage follicular cultures had significantly lower values of alpha (0.04 Gy(-1)) than later-passage cultures (0.11 Gy(-1)) (P < 0.0001, n = 12). As an additional way to determine whether connexin 32 was contributing to the difference in survival, cultures were treated with heptanol, resulting in higher alpha values, with early-passage cultures (0.10 Gy(-1)) nearly equivalent to untreated late-passage cultures (0.11 Gy(-1)) (P > 0.1, n = 9). This strongly suggests that the presence of functional connexin 32-type gap junctions was contributing to radiation resistance in gamma-irradiated thyroid follicles. Survival curves from proton-irradiated cultures had alpha values that were not significantly different whether cells expressed functional connexin 32 (0.10 Gy(-1)), did not express connexin 32 (0.09 Gy(-1)), or were down-regulated (early-passage plus heptanol, 0.09 Gy(-1); late-passage plus heptanol, 0.12 Gy(-1)) (P > 0.1, n = 19). Thus, for proton irradiation, the presence of connexin 32-type gap junctional channels did not influence their radiosensitivity. Collectively, the data support the following conclusions. (1) The lower alpha values from the gamma-ray survival curves of the early-passage cultures suggest greater repair efficiency and/or enhanced resistance to radiation-induced damage, coincident with the

  4. Maximum likelihood estimation of proton irradiated field and deposited dose distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Fumiko; Tomitani, Takehiro; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko

    2007-05-15

    In proton therapy, it is important to evaluate the field irradiated with protons and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Positron emitters generated through fragmentation reactions of target nuclei can be used for this purpose. By detecting the annihilation gamma rays from the positron emitters, the annihilation gamma ray distribution can be obtained which has information about the quantities essential to proton therapy. In this study, we performed irradiation experiments with mono-energetic proton beams of 160 MeV and the spread-out Bragg peak beams to three kinds of targets. The annihilation events were detected with a positron camera for 500 s after the irradiation and the annihilation gamma ray distributions were obtained. In order to evaluate the range and the position of distal and proximal edges of the SOBP, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was applied to the detected distributions. The evaluated values with the MLE method were compared with those estimated from the measured dose distributions. As a result, the ranges were determined with the difference between the MLE range and the experimental range less than 1.0 mm for all targets. For the SOBP beams, the positions of distal edges were determined with the difference less than 1.0 mm. On the other hand, the difference amounted to 7.9 mm for proximal edges.

  5. Maximum likelihood estimation of proton irradiated field and deposited dose distribution.

    PubMed

    Inaniwa, Taku; Kohno, Toshiyuki; Yamagata, Fumiko; Tomitani, Takehiro; Sato, Shinji; Kanazawa, Mitsutaka; Kanai, Tatsuaki; Urakabe, Eriko

    2007-05-01

    In proton therapy, it is important to evaluate the field irradiated with protons and the deposited dose distribution in a patient's body. Positron emitters generated through fragmentation reactions of target nuclei can be used for this purpose. By detecting the annihilation gamma rays from the positron emitters, the annihilation gamma ray distribution can be obtained which has information about the quantities essential to proton therapy. In this study, we performed irradiation experiments with mono-energetic proton beams of 160 MeV and the spread-out Bragg peak beams to three kinds of targets. The annihilation events were detected with a positron camera for 500 s after the irradiation and the annihilation gamma ray distributions were obtained. In order to evaluate the range and the position of distal and proximal edges of the SOBP, the maximum likelihood estimation (MLE) method was applied to the detected distributions. The evaluated values with the MLE method were compared with those estimated from the measured dose distributions. As a result, the ranges were determined with the difference between the MLE range and the experimental range less than 1.0 mm for all targets. For the SOBP beams, the positions of distal edges were determined with the difference less than 1.0 mm. On the other hand, the difference amounted to 7.9 mm for proximal edges.

  6. In-situ proton irradiation and measurement of superconducting rf cavities under cryogenic conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Rusnak, B.; Haynes, W.B.; Chan, K.C.D.

    1997-08-01

    The Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) Project is investigating using a superconducting linac for the high-energy portion of the accelerator. As this accelerator would be used to accelerate a high-current (100-mA) CW proton beam up to 1700 MeV, it is important to determine the effects of stray-beam impingement on the superconducting properties of a 700-MHz niobium cavity. To accomplish this, two 3000-MHz elliptical niobium cavities were placed in a cryostat, cooled to nominally 2 K in sub-atmospheric liquid helium, and irradiated with 798-MeV protons at up to 490 {pi}A average current. The elliptically shaped beam passed through the equatorial regions of both cavities in order to maximize sensitivity to any changes in the superconducting-surface resistance. Over the course of the experiment, 6x10{sup 16} protons were passed through the cavities. After irradiation, the cavities were warmed to 250 K, then recooled to investigate the effects of a room-temperature annealing cycle on the superconducting properties of the irradiated cavities. A detailed description of the experiment and the results shall be presented. These results are important to employing superconducting-rf technology to future high-intensity proton accelerators for use in research and transmutation technologies.

  7. External-Beam Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation Using Multiple Proton Beam Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Xiaochun; Amos, Richard A.; Zhang Xiaodong; Taddei, Phillip J.; Woodward, Wendy A.; Hoffman, Karen E.; Yu, Tse Kuan; Tereffe, Welela; Oh, Julia; Perkins, George H.; Salehpour, Mohammad; Zhang, Sean X.; Sun, Tzou Liang; Gillin, Michael; Buchholz, Thomas A.; Strom, Eric A.

    2011-08-01

    Purpose: To explore multiple proton beam configurations for optimizing dosimetry and minimizing uncertainties for accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) and to compare the dosimetry of proton with that of photon radiotherapy for treatment of the same clinical volumes. Methods and Materials: Proton treatment plans were created for 11 sequential patients treated with three-dimensional radiotherapy (3DCRT) photon APBI using passive scattering proton beams (PSPB) and were compared with clinically treated 3DCRT photon plans. Monte Carlo calculations were used to verify the accuracy of the proton dose calculation from the treatment planning system. The impact of range, motion, and setup uncertainty was evaluated with tangential vs. en face beams. Results: Compared with 3DCRT photons, the absolute reduction of the mean of V100 (the volume receiving 100% of prescription dose), V90, V75, V50, and V20 for normal breast using protons are 3.4%, 8.6%, 11.8%, 17.9%, and 23.6%, respectively. For breast skin, with the similar V90 as 3DCRT photons, the proton plan significantly reduced V75, V50, V30, and V10. The proton plan also significantly reduced the dose to the lung and heart. Dose distributions from Monte Carlo simulations demonstrated minimal deviation from the treatment planning system. The tangential beam configuration showed significantly less dose fluctuation in the chest wall region but was more vulnerable to respiratory motion than that for the en face beams. Worst-case analysis demonstrated the robustness of designed proton beams with range and patient setup uncertainties. Conclusions: APBI using multiple proton beams spares significantly more normal tissue, including nontarget breast and breast skin, than 3DCRT using photons. It is robust, considering the range and patient setup uncertainties.

  8. Projecting EOL dark current distribution of proton irradiated CCDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flores, James S.

    2005-09-01

    Space instrument programs occasionally need an estimate of how dark current distribution of a silicon CCD changes versus proton radiation exposure and temperature. The task that is the subject of this article was started by adopting a relevant gamma distribution model produced by M.S. Robbins [1] and estimating its parameters, α and β, by using data acquired by Demara [2]. The fortuitous result was that α was found to depend solely on damage displacement dose and β was found to be practically equal to the native bulk dark current of silicon. These implications were tested with information from three published articles. In comparison with the published results, the model was found to be accurate within a factor of two.

  9. Proton irradiation effects on 2Gb flash memory

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, William; Nelson, Charles; Marriner, John

    2004-08-18

    The authors report total ionizing dose and single event effects on 2Gb Samsung flash memory devices after exposure to 200 MeV protons to various doses up to 83 krad(Si). They characterize observed failures and single event upsets on 22 devices from two different lots. Devices from both lots are robust to greater than 20 krad(Si) although they see evidence for lot-to-lot variation where only one lot appears robust up to about 50 krad(Si). Single event upsets are observed at a relatively low rate and are consistent with single isolated bit flips within registers that transfer bits to and from the flash memory cells.

  10. Scanning irradiation device for mice in vivo with pulsed and continuous proton beams.

    PubMed

    Greubel, Christoph; Assmann, Walter; Burgdorf, Christian; Dollinger, Günther; Du, Guanghua; Hable, Volker; Hapfelmeier, Alexander; Hertenberger, Ralf; Kneschaurek, Peter; Michalski, Dörte; Molls, Michael; Reinhardt, Sabine; Röper, Barbara; Schell, Stefan; Schmid, Thomas E; Siebenwirth, Christian; Wenzl, Tatiana; Zlobinskaya, Olga; Wilkens, Jan J

    2011-08-01

    A technical set-up for irradiation of subcutaneous tumours in mice with nanosecond-pulsed proton beams or continuous proton beams is described and was successfully used in a first experiment to explore future potential of laser-driven particle beams, which are pulsed due to the acceleration process, for radiation therapy. The chosen concept uses a microbeam approach. By focusing the beam to approximately 100 × 100 μm(2), the necessary fluence of 10(9) protons per cm(2) to deliver a dose of 20 Gy with one-nanosecond shot in the Bragg peak of 23 MeV protons is achieved. Electrical and mechanical beam scanning combines rapid dose delivery with large scan ranges. Aluminium sheets one millimetre in front of the target are used as beam energy degrader, necessary for adjusting the depth-dose profile. The required procedures for treatment planning and dose verification are presented. In a first experiment, 24 tumours in mice were successfully irradiated with 23 MeV protons and a single dose of 20 Gy in pulsed or continuous mode with dose differences between both modes of 10%. So far, no significant difference in tumour growth delay was observed.

  11. Nanoindentation and in situ microcompression in different dose regimes of proton beam irradiated 304 SS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reichardt, A.; Lupinacci, A.; Frazer, D.; Bailey, N.; Vo, H.; Howard, C.; Jiao, Z.; Minor, A. M.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2017-04-01

    Recent developments in micromechanical testing have allowed for the efficient evaluation of radiation effects in micron-scale volumes of ion-irradiated materials. In this study, both nanoindentation and in situ SEM microcompression testing are carried out on 10 dpa proton beam irradiated 304 stainless steel to assess radiation hardening and radiation-induced deformation mechanisms in the material. Using a focused ion beam (FIB), arrays of 2 μm × 2 μm cross-section microcompression pillars are fabricated in multiple dose regimes within the same grain, providing dose-dependent behavior in a single crystal orientation. Analysis of the microcompression load-displacement data and real-time SEM imaging during testing indicates significant hardening, as well as increased localization of deformation in the irradiated material. Although nanoindentation results suggest that irradiation hardening saturates at low doses, microcompression results indicate that the pillar yield stress continues to rise with dose above 10 dpa in the tested orientation.

  12. The effects of oxide evolution on mechanical properties in proton- and neutron-irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Dolph, C. K.; Wharry, J. P.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the effect of irradiation on the strengthening mechanisms of a model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened steel. The alloy was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atoms at 500 °C. Nanoindentation was used to measure strengthening due to irradiation, with neutron irradiation causing a greater increase in yield strength than proton irradiation. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography (APT). Cluster analysis reveals solute migration from the Y-Ti-O-rich nanoclusters to the surrounding matrix after both irradiations, though the effect is more pronounced in the neutron-irradiated specimen. Because the dissolved oxygen atoms occupy interstitial sites in the iron matrix, they contribute significantly to solid solution strengthening. The dispersed barrier hardening model relates microstructure evolution to the change in yield strength, but is only accurate if solid solution contributions to strengthening are considered simultaneously.

  13. Low-Temperature Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.

    2008-01-01

    An effort to extend the low-temperature operational limit of supercapacitors is currently underway. At present, commercially available non-aqueous supercapacitors are rated for a minimum operating temperature of -40 C. A capability to operate at lower temperatures would be desirable for delivering power to systems that must operate in outer space or in the Polar Regions on Earth. Supercapacitors (also known as double-layer or electrochemical capacitors) offer a high power density (>1,000 W/kg) and moderate energy density (about 5 to 10 Wh/kg) technology for storing energy and delivering power. This combination of properties enables delivery of large currents for pulsed applications, or alternatively, smaller currents for low duty cycle applications. The mechanism of storage of electric charge in a supercapacitor -- at the electrical double-layer formed at a solid-electrode/liquid-electrolyte interface -- differs from that of a primary or secondary electrochemical cell (i.e., a battery) in such a manner as to impart a long cycle life (typically >10(exp 6) charge/discharge cycles).

  14. Low Temperature Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graves, David

    2013-10-01

    Ionized gas plasmas near room temperature are used in a remarkable number of technological applications mainly because they are extraordinarily efficient at exploiting electrical power for useful chemical and material transformations near room temperature. In this tutorial address, I will focus on the newest area of low temperature ionized gas plasmas (LTP), in this case operating under atmospheric pressure conditions, in which the temperature-sensitive material is living tissue. LTP research directed towards biomedical applications such as sterilization, surgery, wound healing and anti-cancer therapy has seen remarkable growth in the last 3-5 years, but the mechanisms responsible for the biomedical effects have remained mysterious. It is known that LTP readily create reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS). ROS and RNS (or RONS), in addition to a suite of other radical and non-radical reactive species, are essential actors in an important sub-field of aerobic biology termed ``redox'' (or oxidation-reduction) biology. I will review the evidence suggesting that RONS generated by plasmas are responsible for their observed therapeutic effects. Other possible bio-active mechanisms include electric fields, charges and photons. It is common in LTP applications that synergies between different mechanisms can play a role and I will review the evidence for synergies in plasma biomedicine. Finally, I will address the challenges and opportunities for plasma physicists to enter this novel, multidisciplinary field.

  15. Low Temperature Rosseland Opacities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D. R.

    1994-05-01

    A new, comprehensive set of low temperature opacity data for atoms and molecules has been assembled. From this basic data set, Rosseland and Planck mean opacities have been computed for temperatures between 12,500 K and 700 K. In addition to the standard continuous absorbers, atomic line absorption (with more than 8 million lines), molecular line absorption (with nearly 60 million lines), and grain absorption and scattering (by silicates, iron, carbon, and SiC) have been included. The absorption due to lines is computed monochromatically and included in the mean with the Opacity Sampling technique. Grains are assumed to form in chemical equilibrium and to form into a continuous distribution of ellipsoids which are randomly oriented. Agreement of these opacities with other recent tabulations of opacities (including OP (M. J. Seaton 1994, MNRAS, 266, 805) and OPAL (F. J. Rogers & C. A. Iglesias 1992, ApJS, 79, 507)) for temperatures above 5,000 K is excellent. It is shown that opacities which neglect molecules become unreliable for temperatures below 5,000 K. Similarly, grains must be included in the computation for temperatures below 1,000 - 1,700 K, depending upon the density. Opacity tables can be prepared for a wide variety of chemical compositions, and will be provided upon request. This research is supported by NSF grant AST-9217946.

  16. Synchrotron X-ray Microdiffraction Analysis of Proton Irradiated Polycrystalline Diamond Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newton, R. I.; Davidson, J. L.; Ice, G. E.; Liu, W.

    2004-01-01

    X-ray microdiffraction is a non-destructive technique that allows for depth-resolved, strain measurements with sub-micron spatial resolution. These capabilities make this technique promising for understanding the mechanical properties of MicroElectroMechanical Systems (MEMS). This investigation examined the local strain induced by irradiating a polycrystalline diamond thin film with a dose of 2x10(exp 17) H(+)per square centimeter protons. Preliminary results indicate that a measurable strain, on the order of 10(exp -3), was introduced into the film near the End of Range (EOR) region of the protons.

  17. Photoquenching phenomenon enhanced by proton irradiation in semi-insulating GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Kuriyama, K.; Takahashi, H.; Kawahara, H. ); Hayashi, N.; Watanabe, H.; Sakamoto, I. ); Kohno, I. )

    1990-12-15

    In undoped semi-insulating GaAs, we have found that the quenching phenomena of photoconductance and infrared absorption are enhanced by proton irradiation above 10{sup 13} /cm{sup 2}, accompanied by an increase in near-band-edge infrared absorption. These phenomena disappear with the annihilation of the proton-induced near-band absorption by annealing at 350 {degree}C. It is suggested that the enhanced photoquenching phenomena arise from the increase in the quenchable component due to the transition from the ionized midgap electron trap (EL2{sup +}) to the neutral EL2{sup 0}.

  18. RBE for late somatic effects in mice irradiated with 60 MeV protons relative to X-rays.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Darden, E. B., Jr.; Clapp, N. K.; Bender, R. S.; Jernigan, M. C.; Upton, A. C.

    1971-01-01

    Investigation of the relative biological effectiveness of energetic protons for the induction of somatic effects in a mammal (mice) following whole body irradiation. The proton energy used approximates the mean energy for proton spectra accompanying solar events. The effects on longevity and the incidence of major neoplastic diseases are summarized. The results obtained suggest that medium energy proton irradiation is no more effective, and on the whole, probably less effective, than conventional X radiation for the induction of late radiation effects in the mouse.

  19. Diffusion length damage coefficient and annealing studies in proton-irradiated InP

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Vargas-Aburto, Carlos; Bailey, Sheila G.; Williams, Wendell

    1993-01-01

    We report on the measurement of the diffusion length damage coefficient (K(sub L)) and the annealing characteristics of the minority carrier diffusion length (L(sub n)) in Czochralski-grown zinc-doped indium phosphide (InP), with a carrier concentration of 1 x 10(exp l8) cm(exp -3). In measuring K(sub L) irradiations were made with 0.5 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 1 x 10(exp 11) to 3 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Pre- and post-irradiation electron-beam induced current (EBIC) measurements allowed for the extraction of L(sub n) from which K(sub L) was determined. In studying the annealing characteristics of L(sub n) irradiations were made with 2 MeV protons with fluence of 5 x 10(exp 13) cm(exp -2). Post-irradiation studies of L(sub n) with time at room temperature, and with minority carrier photoinjection and forward-bias injection were carried out. The results showed that recovery under Air Mass Zero (AMO) photoinjection was complete. L(sub n) was also found to recover under forward-bias injection, where recovery was found to depend on the value of the injection current. However, no recovery of L(sub n) after proton irradiation was observed with time at room temperature, in contrast to the behavior of 1 MeV electron-irradiated InP solar cells reported previously.

  20. Effects of thermal annealing on the deep-level defects and I-V characteristics of 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.; Schoenfeld, D. W.; Chiu, T. T.; Loo, R. Y.

    1980-01-01

    Detailed characterization of deep-level defects and analysis of dark I-V data in 200 keV proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells have been carried out for several proton fluences (5 x 10 to the 11th, 10 to the 12th, and 10 to the 13th P/sq cm), using DLTS, C-V, and I-V measurement techniques. To study the effect of low temperature thermal annealing on the deep-level defect properties, these irradiated samples were annealed in vacuum at 300 C for one hour. Comparison was then made on the measured defect parameters (i.e., defect energy levels and densities) and the dark I-V characteristics for both the annealed and unannealed samples.

  1. Magnetism in MoS{sub 2} induced by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Gopinadhan, K.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Chan, T. K.; Yu, X. J.; Zhan, D.; Shen, Z. X.; Cao, L.; Rusydi, A.; Breese, M. B. H.; Thong, John T. L.

    2012-09-03

    Molybdenum disulphide, a diamagnetic layered dichalcogenide solid, is found to show magnetic ordering at room temperature when exposed to a 2 MeV proton beam. The temperature dependence of magnetization displays ferrimagnetic behavior with a Curie temperature of 895 K. A disorder mode corresponding to a zone-edge phonon and a Mo valence higher than +4 has been detected in the irradiated samples using Raman and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, respectively. The possible origins of long-range magnetic ordering in irradiated MoS{sub 2} samples are discussed.

  2. Image analysis of single event transient effects on charge coupled devices irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zujun; Xue, Yuanyuan; Liu, Jing; He, Baoping; Yao, Zhibin; Ma, Wuying

    2016-10-01

    The experiments of single event transient (SET) effects on charge coupled devices (CCDs) irradiated by protons are presented. The radiation experiments have been carried out at the accelerator protons with the energy of 200 MeV and 60 MeV.The incident angles of the protons are at 30°and 90° to the plane of the CCDs to obtain the images induced by the perpendicularity and incline incident angles. The experimental results show that the typical characteristics of the SET effects on a CCD induced by protons are the generation of a large number of dark signal spikes (hot pixels) which are randomly distributed in the "pepper" images. The characteristics of SET effects are investigated by observing the same imaging area at different time during proton radiation to verify the transient effects. The experiment results also show that the number of dark signal spikes increases with increasing integration time during proton radiation. The CCDs were tested at on-line and off-line to distinguish the radiation damage induced by the SET effects or DD effects. The mechanisms of the dark signal spike generation induced by the SET effects and the DD effects are demonstrated respectively.

  3. InGaAs/GaAs Quantum Dots: Effects of Ensemble Interactions, Interdiffusion, Segregation and Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.

    2000-01-01

    A sumary or recent experimental findings on the effects of interdiffusion, segregation, strained ensemble interactions and proton irradiation on the optical properties of InGaAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are presented.

  4. Simulated study on the InP/InGaAs DHBT under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Min, Liu; Yuming, Zhang; Hongliang, Lü; Yimen, Zhang

    2016-11-01

    A 3D model simulation of InP/InGaAs/InP DHBT is reported in this paper. A comprehensive set of built-in physical models are described, including Stratton's hydrodynamic model, high-fields mobility model and thermionic emission model. A mixed-mode environment is required for AC simulation instead of simulating an isolated HBT, in which the HBT is embedded in an external circuit, and the circuit voltage and current equations are solved along with the Poisson equation and transport equations. In AC simulation, simulator Sentaurus provides the computation of the small signal admittance Y matrix. From the results of Y matrix, the small signal equivalent circuit is constructed with the conductance and capacitance obtained from Y matrix, and the AC parameters, such as S-parameters, will be calculated. The small signal AC characteristics of InP/InGaAs DHBTs under proton irradiation are simulated with different fluences of proton irradiation. Simulation results show that the maximum oscillation frequency will be degraded when fluence of proton irradiation is increased. Project supported by the National Basic Research Program of China (No. 2010CB327505), Advance Research project of China (No. 51308xxxx06), and Advance Research Foundation of China (No. 9140A08xxxx11DZ111).

  5. Electron spin coherence of silicon vacancies in proton-irradiated 4H-SiC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Embley, J. S.; Colton, J. S.; Miller, K. G.; Morris, M. A.; Meehan, M.; Crossen, S. L.; Weaver, B. D.; Glaser, E. R.; Carter, S. G.

    2017-01-01

    We report T2 spin coherence times for electronic states localized in Si vacancies in 4 H -SiC . Our spin coherence study included two SiC samples that were irradiated with 2 MeV protons at different fluences (1013 and 1014c m-2 ) in order to create samples with unique defect concentrations. Using optically detected magnetic resonance and spin echo, the coherence times for each sample were measured across a range of temperatures from 8 to 295 K. All echo experiments were done at a magnetic field strength of 0.371 T and a microwave frequency of 10.49 GHz. The longest coherence times were obtained at 8 K, being 270 ±61 μ s for the 1013c m-2 proton-irradiated sample and 104 ±17 μ s for the 1014c m-2 sample. The coherence times for both samples displayed unusual temperature dependencies; in particular, they decreased with temperature until 60 K, then increased until 160 K, then decreased again. This increase between 60 and 160 K is tentatively attributed to a motional Jahn-Teller effect. The consistently longer lifetimes for the 1013c m-2 sample suggest that a significant source of the spin dephasing can be attributed to dipole-dipole interactions between Si vacancies or with other defects produced by the proton irradiation. The lack of a simple exponential decay for our 1014c m-2 sample indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of defect spins.

  6. Measurement and calculation of characteristic prompt gamma ray spectra emitted during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, J C; Peterson, S; McCleskey, M; Roeder, B T; Spiridon, A; Beddar, S; Trache, L

    2009-11-21

    In this paper, we present results of initial measurements and calculations of prompt gamma ray spectra (produced by proton-nucleus interactions) emitted from tissue equivalent phantoms during irradiations with proton beams. Measurements of prompt gamma ray spectra were made using a high-purity germanium detector shielded either with lead (passive shielding), or a Compton suppression system (active shielding). Calculations of the spectra were performed using a model of both the passive and active shielding experimental setups developed using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit. From the measured spectra it was shown that it is possible to distinguish the characteristic emission lines from the major elemental constituent atoms (C, O, Ca) in the irradiated phantoms during delivery of proton doses similar to those delivered during patient treatment. Also, the Monte Carlo spectra were found to be in very good agreement with the measured spectra providing an initial validation of our model for use in further studies of prompt gamma ray emission during proton therapy.

  7. Proton irradiation impacts age-driven modulations of cancer progression influenced by immune system transcriptome modifications from splenic tissue.

    PubMed

    Wage, Justin; Ma, Lili; Peluso, Michael; Lamont, Clare; Evens, Andrew M; Hahnfeldt, Philip; Hlatky, Lynn; Beheshti, Afshin

    2015-09-01

    Age plays a crucial role in the interplay between tumor and host, with additional impact due to irradiation. Proton irradiation of tumors induces biological modulations including inhibition of angiogenic and immune factors critical to 'hallmark' processes impacting tumor development. Proton irradiation has also provided promising results for proton therapy in cancer due to targeting advantages. Additionally, protons may contribute to the carcinogenesis risk from space travel (due to the high proportion of high-energy protons in space radiation). Through a systems biology approach, we investigated how host tissue (i.e. splenic tissue) of tumor-bearing mice was altered with age, with or without whole-body proton exposure. Transcriptome analysis was performed on splenic tissue from adolescent (68-day) versus old (736-day) C57BL/6 male mice injected with Lewis lung carcinoma cells with or without three fractionations of 0.5 Gy (1-GeV) proton irradiation. Global transcriptome analysis indicated that proton irradiation of adolescent hosts caused significant signaling changes within splenic tissues that support carcinogenesis within the mice, as compared with older subjects. Increases in cell cycling and immunosuppression in irradiated adolescent hosts with CDK2, MCM7, CD74 and RUVBL2 indicated these were the key genes involved in the regulatory changes in the host environment response (i.e. the spleen). Collectively, these results suggest that a significant biological component of proton irradiation is modulated by host age through promotion of carcinogenesis in adolescence and resistance to immunosuppression, carcinogenesis and genetic perturbation associated with advancing age.

  8. Proton or photon irradiation for hemangiomas of the choroid? A retrospective comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Hoecht, Stefan . E-mail: stefan.hoecht@charite.de; Wachtlin, Joachim; Bechrakis, Nikolaos E.; Schaefer, Christiane; Heufelder, Jens; Cordini, Dino; Kluge, Heinz; Foerster, Michael; Hinkelbein, Wolfgang

    2006-10-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to compare, on a retrospective basis, the results of therapy in patients with uveal hemangioma treated with photon or proton irradiation at a single center. Methods and Materials: From 1993 to 2002 a total of 44 patients were treated. Until 1998 radiotherapy was given with 6 MV photons in standard fractionation of 2.0 Gy 5 times per week. In 1998 proton therapy became available and was used since then. A dose of 20 to 22.5 Cobalt Gray Equivalent (CGE) 68 MeV protons was given on 4 consecutive days. Progressive symptoms or deterioration of vision were the indications for therapy. Results: Of the 44 patients treated, 36 had circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas and 8 had diffuse choroidal hemangiomas (DCH) and Sturge-Weber syndrome. Of the patients, 19 were treated with photons with a total dose in the range of 16 to 30 Gy. A total of 25 patients were irradiated with protons. All patients with DCH but 1 were treated with photons. Stabilization of visual acuity was achieved in 93.2% of all patients. Tumor thickness decreased in 95.4% and retinal detachment resolved in 92.9%. Late effects, although generally mild or moderate, were frequently detected. In all, 40.9% showed radiation-induced optic neuropathy, maximum Grade I. Retinopathy was found in 29.5% of cases, but only 1 patient experienced more than Grade II severity. Retinopathy and radiation-induced optic neuropathy were reversible in some of the patients and in some resolved completely. No differences could be detected between patients with circumscribed choroidal hemangiomas treated with protons and photons. Treatment was less effective in DCH patients (75%). Conclusions: Radiotherapy is effective in treating choroidal hemangiomas with respect to visual acuity and tumor thickness but a benefit of proton therapy could not be detected. Side effects are moderate but careful monitoring for side effects should be part of the follow-up procedures.

  9. Ciliary body and choroidal melanomas treated by proton beam irradiation. Histopathologic study of eyes

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Albert, D.M.

    1983-09-01

    Proton beam irradiation resulted in clinical and/or histopathological regression of large ciliary body and choroidal melanomas in three eyes. Enucleations were performed 6 1/2 weeks, five months, and 11 months after irradiation for angle-closure glaucoma from total retinal detachment, increase in retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma, respectively. A direct relationship was found between the length of the interval from irradiation to enucleation and the degree of histologic changes. Vascular changes in the tumors included endothelial cell swelling and decreased lumen size, basement membrane thickening, collapse of sinusoidal vessels, and thrombosis of vessels. Although apparently unaltered tumor cells remained, degenerative changes occurred in some melanoma cells, including lipid vacuoles in cytoplasm, pyknotic nuclei, and balloon cell formation. Patchy areas of necrosis and proteinaceous exudate were present. Pigment-laden macrophages were found near tumor vessels and all had a substantial chronic inflammatory infiltrate. The effect of proton beam irradiation on tumor vessels probably plays an important role in uveal melanoma regression.

  10. Hole transport through proton-irradiated p-type silicon wafers during electrochemical anodization

    SciTech Connect

    Breese, M. B. H.; Champeaux, F. J. T.; Bettiol, A. A.; Teo, E. J.; Blackwood, D. J.

    2006-01-15

    The hole current density flowing through and around proton-irradiated areas of p-type silicon during electrochemical anodization is simulated and studied experimentally using scanning electron microscopy and photoluminescence imaging. It is shown that for certain irradiation geometries the current flow may be either reduced or enhanced in areas adjacent to irradiated lines, resulting in enhanced or reduced rates of porous silicon formation and corresponding changes in photoluminescence intensity and feature height. The current flow to the surface is unaffected by both the beam straggle and the high defect density at the end of ion range, enabling feature dimensions of {approx}200 nm to be attained. This study has enabled fabrication of micromachined and patterned porous silicon structures in anodized wafers with accurate control of feature dimensions, layer thickness, and photoluminescence emission wavelength and intensity.

  11. Deep levels induced by high fluence proton irradiation in undoped GaAs diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Polenta, L.; Canali, C.; Nava, F.; Ferrini, R.; Galli, M.

    1998-12-31

    Semi-insulating liquid encapsulated Czochralski grown GaAs has been investigated after irradiation at high fluences of high-energy protons. Electron beam induced current observations of scanning electron microscopy evidenced a radiation stimulated ordering. An analysis has been carried out of the deep levels associated with defects as a function of the irradiation fluence, using complementary current transient spectroscopies. By increasing the irradiation fluence, the concentration of the native traps at 0.37 eV together with that of the EL2 defect significantly increases and, at the same time, two new electron traps at 0.15 eV and 0.18 eV arise and quickly increase in density.

  12. Effects of combined irradiation of 500 keV protons and atomic oxygen on polyimide films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novikov, Lev; Chernik, Vladimir; Zhilyakov, Lev; Voronina, Ekaterina; Chirskaia, Natalia

    2016-07-01

    Polyimide films are widely used on the spacecraft surface as thermal control coating, films in different constuctions, etc. However, the space ionizing radiation of different types can alter the mechanical, optical and electrical properties of polyimide films. For example, it is well known that 20-100 keV proton irradiation causes breaking of chemical bonds and destruction of the surface layer in polyimide, deterioration of its optical properties, etc. In low-Earth orbits serious danger for polymeric materials is atomic oxygen of the upper atmosphere of the Earth, which is the main component in the range of heights of 200-800 km. Due to the orbital spacecraft velocity, the collision energy of oxygen atoms with the surface ( 5 eV) enhances their reactivity and opens additional pathways of their reaction with near-surface layers of materials. Hyperthermal oxygen atom flow causes erosion of the polyimide surface by breaking chemical bonds and forming of volatiles products (primarily, CO and CO _{2}), which leads to mass losses and degradation of material properties. Combined effect of protons and oxygen plasma is expected to give rise to synergistic effects enhancing the destruction of polyimide surface layers. This paper describes experimental investigation of polyimide films sequential irradiation with protons and oxygen plasma. The samples were irradiated by 500 keV protons at fluences of 10 ^{14}-10 ^{16} cm ^{-2} produced with SINP cascade generator KG-500 and 5-20 eV neutral oxygen atoms at fluence of 10 ^{20} cm ^{-2} generated by SINP magnetoplasmodynamics accelerator. The proton bombardment causes the decrease in optical transmission coefficient of samples, but their transmittance recovers partially after the exposure to oxygen plasma. The results of the comparative analysis of polyimide optical transmission spectra, Raman and XPS spectra obtained at different stages of the irradiation of samples, data on mass loss of samples due to erosion of the surface are

  13. Energy from low temperature differences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parsons, B. K.

    1985-05-01

    A number of energy conservation and alternative energy approaches utilize a low temperature heat source. Applications in this category include: solar ponds, ocean thermal energy conversion (OTEC), low temperature solar thermal, geothermal, and waste heat recovery and bottoming cycles. Low temperature power extraction techniques are presented and the differences between closed and open Rankine power cycles are discussed. Specific applications and technical areas of current research in OTEC along with a breakdown of plant operating conditions and a rough cost estimate illustrate how the use of low temperature power conversion technology can be cost effective.

  14. Positron annihilation on defects in silicon irradiated with 15 MeV protons.

    PubMed

    Arutyunov, N Y; Elsayed, M; Krause-Rehberg, R; Emtsev, V V; Oganesyan, G A; Kozlovski, V V

    2013-01-23

    Microstructure and thermal stability of the radiation defects in n-FZ-Si ([P] ≈ 7 × 10(15) cm(-3)) single crystals have been investigated. The radiation defects have been induced by irradiation with 15 MeV protons and studied by means of both the positron lifetime spectroscopy and low-temperature measurements of the Hall effect. At each step of the isochronal annealing over the temperature range ∼60-700 °C the positron lifetime has been measured for the temperature interval ∼30-300 K, and for samples-satellites the temperature dependences of the charge carriers and mobility have been determined over the range ∼4.2-300 K. It is argued that as-grown impurity centers influence the average positron lifetime by forming shallow (E(b) ≈ 0.013 eV) positron states. The radiation-induced defects were also found to trap positrons into weakly bound (E(b) ≤ 0.01 eV) states. These positron states are observed at cryogenic temperatures during the isochronal annealing up to T(anneal.) = 340 °C. The stages of annealing in the temperature intervals ∼60-180 °C and ∼180-260 °C reflect the disappearance of E-centers and divacancies, respectively. Besides these defects the positrons were found to be localized at deep donor centers hidden in the process of annealing up to the temperature T(anneal.) ≈ 300 °C. The annealing of the deep donors occurs over the temperature range ∼300-650 °C. At these centers positrons are estimated to be bound with energies E(b) ≈ 0.096 and 0.021 eV within the temperature intervals ∼200-270 K and ∼166-66 K, respectively. The positron trapping coefficient from these defects increases from ∼1.1 × 10(16) to ∼6.5 × 10(17) s(-1) over the temperature range ∼266-66 K, thus substantiating a cascade phonon-assisted positron trapping mechanism whose efficiency is described by ≈T(-3) law. It is argued that the value of activation energy of the isochronal annealing E(a) ≈ 0.74-0.59 eV is due to dissociation of the

  15. Low Temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistors (HEMTs)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-01

    temperature Photoluminescence (PL) from High Electron Mobility Transistor (HEMT) structures that have been modified by proton irradiation. The samples are...samples and exposed the structures to various levels of proton irradiation. For electronics operating in extreme environments where the parts...valence band, generating photons. This emission could be used to determine the effects of proton irradiation on a 2DEG. Exciting the HEMT samples

  16. Evaluation of the relative biological effectiveness of spot-scanning proton irradiation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Kenichiro; Yasui, Hironobu; Matsuura, Taeko; Yamamori, Tohru; Suzuki, Motofumi; Nagane, Masaki; Nam, Jin-Min; Inanami, Osamu; Shirato, Hiroki

    2016-06-01

    Variations in relative biological effectiveness (RBE) from a fixed value of 1.1 are critical in proton beam therapy. To date, studies estimating RBE at multiple positions relative to the spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP) have been predominantly performed using passive scattering methods, and limited data are available for spot-scanning beams. Thus, to investigate the RBE of spot-scanning beams, Chinese hamster fibroblast V79 cells were irradiated using the beam line at the Hokkaido University Hospital Proton Therapy Center. Cells were placed at six different depths, including the entrance of the proton beam and the proximal and distal part of the SOBP. Surviving cell fractions were analyzed using colony formation assay, and cell survival curves were obtained by the curve fitted using a linear-quadratic model. RBE10 and RBE37 were 1.15 and 1.21 at the center of the SOBP, respectively. In contrast, the distal region showed higher RBE values (1.50 for RBE10 and 1.85 for RBE37). These results are in line with those of previous studies conducted using passive scattering proton beams. Taken together, these data strongly suggest that variations in RBE should be considered during treatment planning for spot-scanning beams as well as for passive scattering proton beams.

  17. First-Principles Investigation of Electronic Excitation Dynamics in Water under Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Kyle; Kanai, Yosuke

    2015-03-01

    A predictive and quantitative understanding of electronic excitation dynamics in water under proton irradiation is of great importance in many technological areas ranging from utilizing proton beam therapy to preventing nuclear reactor damages. Despite its importance, an atomistic description of the excitation mechanism has yet to be fully understood. Identifying how a high-energy proton dissipates its kinetic energy into the electronic excitation is crucial for predicting atomistic damages, later resulting in the formation of different chemical species. In this work, we use our new, large-scale first-principles Ehrenfest dynamics method based on real-time time-dependent density functional theory to simulate the electronic response of bulk water to a fast-moving proton. In particular, we will discuss the topological nature of the electronic excitation as a function of the proton velocity. We will employ maximally-localized functions to bridge our quantitative findings from first-principles simulations to a conceptual understanding in the field of water radiolysis.

  18. Effect of proton irradiation on superconductivity in optimally doped BaFe2(As1-xPx)2 single crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Smylie, M. P.; Leroux, M.; Mishra, V.; Fang, L.; Taddei, K. M.; Chmaissem, O.; Claus, H.; Kayani, A.; Snezhko, A.; Welp, U.; Kwok, W. -K.

    2016-03-10

    In this paper, irradiation with 4 MeV protons was used to systematically introduce defects in single crystals of the iron-arsenide superconductor BaFe2(As1-xPx)2, x = 0.33. The effect of disorder on the low-temperature behavior of the London penetration depth λ(T) and transition temperature Tc was investigated. In nearly optimally doped samples with Tc ~ 29 K, signatures of a superconducting gap with nodes were observed. Contrary to previous reports on electron-irradiated crystals, we do not see a disorder-driven lifting of accidental nodes, and we observe that proton-induced defects are weaker pair breakers than electron-induced defects. Finally, we attribute our findings to anisotropic electron scattering caused by proton irradiation defects.

  19. Response of thyroid follicular cells to gamma irradiation compared to proton irradiation. I. Initial characterization of DNA damage, micronucleus formation, apoptosis, cell survival, and cell cycle phase redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, L. M.; Murray, D. K.; Bant, A. M.; Kazarians, G.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Tran, D. T.

    2001-01-01

    The RBE of protons has been assumed to be equivalent to that of photons. The objective of this study was to determine whether radiation-induced DNA and chromosome damage, apoptosis, cell killing and cell cycling in organized epithelial cells was influenced by radiation quality. Thyroid-stimulating hormone-dependent Fischer rat thyroid cells, established as follicles, were exposed to gamma rays or proton beams delivered acutely over a range of physical doses. Gamma-irradiated cells were able to repair DNA damage relatively rapidly so that by 1 h postirradiation they had approximately 20% fewer exposed 3' ends than their counterparts that had been irradiated with proton beams. The persistence of free ends of DNA in the samples irradiated with the proton beam implies that either more initial breaks or a quantitatively different type of damage had occurred. These results were further supported by an increased frequency of chromosomal damage as measured by the presence of micronuclei. Proton-beam irradiation induced micronuclei at a rate of 2.4% per gray, which at 12 Gy translated to 40% more micronuclei than in comparable gamma-irradiated cultures. The higher rate of micronucleus formation and the presence of larger micronuclei in proton-irradiated cells was further evidence that a qualitatively more severe class of damage had been induced than was induced by gamma rays. Differences in the type of damage produced were detected in the apoptosis assay, wherein a significant lag in the induction of apoptosis occurred after gamma irradiation that did not occur with protons. The more immediate expression of apoptotic cells in the cultures irradiated with the proton beam suggests that the damage inflicted was more severe. Alternatively, the cell cycle checkpoint mechanisms required for recovery from such damage might not have been invoked. Differences based on radiation quality were also evident in the alpha components of cell survival curves (0.05 Gy(-1) for gamma rays, 0

  20. Degradation modeling of InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction solar cells irradiated by protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maximenko, S. I.; Lumb, M. P.; Messenger, S. R.; Hoheisel, R.; Affouda, C.; Scheiman, D.; Gonzalez, M.; Lorentzen, J.; Jenkins, P. P.; Walters, R. J.

    2014-03-01

    Experimental results on triple-junction solar cells irradiated by 3 MeV proton irradiation to very high damage levels are presented. The minority carrier transport properties were obtained through quantum efficiency and EBIC measurements and an analytical drift-diffusion solver was used in understanding the results for different degradation levels where multiple damage mechanisms are evident.

  1. Comparative Effects of 10.2 eV Photon and 200 keV Proton Irradiation on Condensed CO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loeffler, M. J.; Baratta, G. A.; Palumbo, M. E.; Strazzulla, G.; Baragiola, R. A.

    2004-03-01

    We present results from experiments that use infrared spectroscopy to compare production rates of carbon dioxide formed by UV photolysis and 200 keV proton irradiation of carbon monoxide ice at 16 K. We find production rates to be similar for both types of irradiation.

  2. Energetic proton irradiation history of the HED parent body regolith and implications for ancient solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. N.; Garrison, D. H.; Palma, R. L.; Bogard, D. D.

    1997-07-01

    Previous studies have shown that the Kapoeta howardite, as well as several other meteorites, contain excess concentrations of cosmogenic neon in the darkened, solar-irradiated phase compared to the light, non-irradiated phase. The two explanations offered for the nuclear production of these Ne excesses in the parent body regolith are either from galactic particle (GCR) irradiation or from a greatly enhanced flux of energetic solar protons (SCR), as compared to the recent solar flux. Combining new isotopic data we obtained on acid-etched, separated feldspar from Kapoeta light and dark phases with literature data, we show that the cosmogenic 21Ne /22Ne ratio of light phase feldspar (0.80) is consistent with only GCR irradiation in space for ~3 Myr. However, the 21Ne/22Ne ratio (0.68) derived for irradiation of dark phase feldspar in the Kapoeta regolith indicates that cosmogenic Ne was produced in roughly equal proportions from galactic and solar protons. Considering a simple model of an immature Kapoeta parent body regolith, the duration of this early galactic exposure was only ~3-6 Myr, which would be an upper limit to the solar exposure time of individual grains. Concentrations of cosmogenic 21Ne in pyroxene separates and of cosmogenic 126Xe in both feldspar and pyroxene are consistent with this interpretation. The near-surface irradiation time of individual grains in the Kapoeta regolith probably varied considerably due to regolith mixing to an average GCR irradiation depth of ~10 cm. Because of the very different depth scales for production of solar ~Fe tracks, SCR Ne, and GCR Ne, the actual regolith exposure times for average grains probably differed correspondingly. However, both the SCR 21Ne and solar track ages appear to be longer because of enhanced production by early solar activity. The SCR/GCR production ratio of 21Ne inferred from the Kapoeta data is larger by a at least a factor of 10 and possibly as much as a factor of ~50 compared to recent solar

  3. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-01-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for white blood cell (WBC) loss, which are the body’s main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved white blood cell (WBC), specifically neutrophil, loss in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses. PMID:25909052

  4. Effects of a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, Neulasta, in mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanzari, Jenine K.; Krigsfeld, Gabriel S.; Shuman, Anne L.; Diener, Antonia K.; Lin, Liyong; Mai, Wilfried; Kennedy, Ann R.

    2015-04-01

    Astronauts could be exposed to solar particle event (SPE) radiation, which is comprised mostly of proton radiation. Proton radiation is also a treatment option for certain cancers. Both astronauts and clinical patients exposed to ionizing radiation are at risk for loss of white blood cells (WBCs), which are the body's main defense against infection. In this report, the effect of Neulasta treatment, a granulocyte colony stimulating factor, after proton radiation exposure is discussed. Mini pigs exposed to total body proton irradiation at a dose of 2 Gy received 4 treatments of either Neulasta or saline injections. Peripheral blood cell counts and thromboelastography parameters were recorded up to 30 days post-irradiation. Neulasta significantly improved WBC loss, specifically neutrophils, in irradiated animals by approximately 60% three days after the first injection, compared to the saline treated, irradiated animals. Blood cell counts quickly decreased after the last Neulasta injection, suggesting a transient effect on WBC stimulation. Statistically significant changes in hemostasis parameters were observed after proton radiation exposure in both the saline and Neulasta treated irradiated groups, as well as internal organ complications such as pulmonary changes. In conclusion, Neulasta treatment temporarily alleviates proton radiation-induced WBC loss, but has no effect on altered hemostatic responses.

  5. Strong hole-doping and robust resistance-decrease in proton-irradiated graphene

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chul; Kim, Jiho; Kim, SangJin; Chang, Young Jun; Kim, Keun Soo; Hong, ByungHee; Choi, E. J.

    2016-01-01

    Great effort has been devoted in recent years to improve the electrical conductivity of graphene for use in practical applications. Here, we demonstrate the hole carrier density of CVD graphene on a SiO2/Si substrate increases by more than one order of magnitude to n = 3 × 1013 cm−2 after irradiation with a high energy 5 MeV proton beam. As a result, the dc-resistance (R) of graphene is reduced significantly by 60%. Only a negligible amount of defect is created by the irradiation. Also the hole-doped low resistance state of graphene remains robust against external perturbations. This carrier doping is achieved without requiring the bias-gate voltage as is the case for other field effect devices. We make two important observations, (i) occurrence of the doping after the irradiation is turned off (ii) indispensability of the SiO2-layer in the substrate, which leads to a purely electronic mechanism for the doping where electron-hole pair creation and interlayer Coulomb attraction play a major role. A flux-dependent study predicts that an ultrahigh doping may be obtained by longer irradiation. We expect the irradiation doping method could be applied to other atomically thin solids, facilitating the fundamental study and application of the 2d materials. PMID:26888197

  6. Simplified estimation method for dose distributions around field junctions in proton craniospinal irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Haruo; Kase, Yuki; Murayama, Shigeyuki

    2017-03-01

    In radiotherapy involving craniospinal irradiation (CSI), field junctions of therapeutic beams are necessary, because a CSI target is generally several times larger than the maximum field size of the beams. The purpose of this study was to develop a simplified method for estimating dose uniformity around the field junctions in proton CSI. We estimated the dose profiles around the field junctions of proton beams using a simplified field-junction model, in which partial lateral dose distributions around the field edge were assumed to be approximated using the error function. We measured the lateral dose distributions of the proton beams planned for the CSI treatment using a two-dimensional (2D) ionization chamber array. Although dose hot spots and cold spots tend to be underestimated by a chamber array because of the partial volume effect of the sensitive volume and discrete chamber positions, the model estimation results were fairly consistent with the measurements obtained using a 2D chamber array subjected to CSI-simulated serial irradiation. The simplified junction model enabled us to estimate the dose distributions and dependence of the setup position gap on the dose uniformity around the field junctions on the basis of the field-by-field dose profiles measured using the 2D chamber array.

  7. The effect of irradiation with high-energy protons on 4H-SiC detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kazukauskas, V. Jasiulionis, R.; Kalendra, V.; Vaitkus, J.-V.

    2007-03-15

    The effect of irradiation of 4H-SiC ionizing-radiation detectors with various doses (as high as 10{sup 16} cm{sup -2}) of 24-GeV protons is studied. Isotopes of B, Be, Li, He, and H were produced in the nuclear spallation reactions of protons with carbon. Isotopes of Al, Mg, Na, Ne, F, O, and N were produced in the reactions of protons with silicon. The total amount of the produced stable isotopes varied in proportion with the radiation dose from 1.2 x 10{sup 11} to 5.9 x 10{sup 13} cm{sup -2}. It is shown that, at high radiation doses, the contact characteristics of the detectors change appreciably. The potential-barrier height increased from the initial value of 0.7-0.75 eV to 0.85 eV; the rectifying characteristics of the Schottky contacts deteriorated appreciably. These effects are attributed to the formation of a disordered structure of the material as a result of irradiation.

  8. Late cataractogenesis in rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons and radiogenic cataract in other species

    SciTech Connect

    Lett, J.T.; Lee, A.C.; Cox, A.B. )

    1991-05-01

    Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) which were irradiated at ca. 2 years of age with acute doses (less than or equal to 5 Gy) of protons (32-2300 MeV) are exhibiting the late progressive phase of radiation cataractogenesis 20-24 years after exposure, the period during which we have been monitoring the sequelae of irradiation of the lens. The median life span of the primate is approximately 24 years. Analogous late ocular changes also occur in a similar period of the lifetimes of New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits (Oryctolagus cuniculus) exposed at 8-10 weeks of age to 460-MeV {sup 56}Fe ions. In this experiment, which has been in progress for ca. 6 years, we are following the development of radiation-induced lenticular opacification (cataractogenic profiles) throughout the life span. The median life span of the lagomorph is 5-7 years. Cataractogenic profiles for NZW rabbits irradiated with {sup 20}Ne and {sup 40}Ar ions and {sup 60}Co gamma photons were obtained previously. Reference is also made to measurements of the cataractogenic profiles of a short-lived rodent, the Fischer 344 rat (Rattus norvegicus) during the first year after exposure at 8-10 weeks of age to spread-Bragg-peak protons of 55 MeV nominal energy. The median life span of the rodent is reported to be 2-3 years.

  9. Molecular weight distribution of proton irradiated polystyrene studied by diffusion experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delto, Ralf; Brenn, Ruediger

    2007-04-01

    MeV ion irradiation of polymers induces break-up or crosslinking of polymer chains. This leads to an ion-fluence dependent molecular weight (MW) distribution ranging from short scission fragments via larger chain clusters to the interconnected, immobile network fraction. We used diffusion experiments to obtain information about the MW distribution of the mobile chains in dependence of the ion fluence. Double layers of deuterated (dPS) and protonated (hPS) polystyrene on Si wafer substrates were irradiated by 1 MeV protons and annealed at 140 °C for various periods of time. The dPS diffusion depth profiles in the irradiation induced hPS network were measured by 3He nuclear reaction analysis. For calibration the strongly MW dependent diffusion coefficients of dPS chains in hPS networks were determined separately by analogous techniques. The depth profiles were fitted with MW dependent diffusion profiles convoluted with a parametrized MW distribution, and the resulting MW distribution was compared to theory.

  10. The risk of enucleation after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanoma

    SciTech Connect

    Egan, K.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Seddon, J.M.; Glynn, R.J.; Munzenreider, J.E.; Goitein, M.; Verhey, L.; Urie, M.; Koehler, A. )

    1989-09-01

    Enucleation after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanomas occurred in 64 (6.4%) of 994 eyes with a median follow-up time of 2.7 years. The median time between irradiation and enucleation in the 64 enucleated eyes was 13 months. The probability of retaining the eye was 95 and 90%, 2 and 5 years postirradiation, respectively. Three percent of eyes were enucleated during posttreatment year 1, and the yearly rate was 1% by the fourth year. No patient had enucleation later than 5 1/2 years posttreatment. The complication most likely to result in enucleation was neovascular glaucoma although this was frequently managed without enucleation. Other common reasons for enucleation were documented or suspected tumor growth and complete retinal detachment with associated loss of vision. The leading risk factors for enucleation were anterior tumor margin involving the ciliary body, tumor height greater than 8 mm, and proximity of the tumor to the fovea. Based on the presence or absence of these factors, 5-year eye retention rates were 99, 92, and 76% for low-, moderate-, and high-risk groups, respectively. Thus, the probability of eye retention after proton beam irradiation is high even among those at greatest risk of enucleation.

  11. Development of a PET cyclotron based irradiation setup for proton radiobiology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghithan, Sharif; Crespo, Paulo; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Ferreira Marques, Rui; Fraga, F. A. F.; Simões, Hugo; Alves, Francisco; Rachinhas, P. J. B. M.

    2015-02-01

    An out-of-yoke irradiation setup using the proton beam from a cyclotron that ordinary produces radioisotopes for positron emission tomography (PET) has been developed, characterized, calibrated and validated. The current from a 20 μm thick aluminum transmission foil is readout by home-made transimpedance electronics, providing online dose information. The main monitoring variables, delivered in real-time, include beam current, integrated charge and dose rate. Hence the dose and integrated current delivered at a given instant to an experimental setup can be computer-controlled with a shutter. In this work, we report on experimental results and Geant4 simulations of a setup which exploits for the first time the 18 MeV proton beam from a PET cyclotron to irradiate a selected region of a target using the developed irradiation system. By using this system, we are able to deliver a homogeneous beam on targets with 18 mm diameter, allowing to achieve the controlled irradiation of cell cultures located in biological multi-well dishes of 16 mm diameter. We found that the magnetic field applied inside the cyclotron plays a major role for achieving the referred to homogeneity. The quasi-Gaussian curve obtained by scanning the magnet current and measuring the corresponding dose rate must be measured before any irradiation procedure, with the shutter closed. At the optimum magnet current, which corresponds to the center of the Gaussian, a homogenous dose is observed over the whole target area. Making use of a rotating disk with a slit of 0.5 mm at a radius of 150 mm, we could measure dose rates on target ranging from 500 mGy/s down to 5 mGy/s. For validating the developed irradiation setup, several Gafchromic® EBT2 films were exposed to different values of dose. The absolute dose in the irradiated films were assessed in the 2D film dosimetry system of the Department of Radiotherapy of Coimbra University Hospital Center with a precision better than 2%. In the future, we plan

  12. Defect characterization of proton irradiated GaAs pn-junction diodes with layers of InAs quantum dots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Shin-ichiro; Schmieder, Kenneth J.; Hubbard, Seth M.; Forbes, David V.; Warner, Jeffrey H.; Ohshima, Takeshi; Walters, Robert J.

    2016-05-01

    In order to expand the technology of III-V semiconductor devices with quantum structures to both terrestrial and space use, radiation induced defects as well as native defects generated in the quantum structures should be clarified. Electrically active defects in GaAs p+n diodes with embedded ten layers of InAs quantum dots (QDs) are investigated using Deep Level Transient Fourier Spectroscopy. Both majority carrier (electron) and minority carrier (hole) traps are characterized. In the devices of this study, GaP layers are embedded in between the QD layers to offset the compressive stress introduced during growth of InAs QDs. Devices are irradiated with high energy protons for three different fluences at room temperature in order to characterize radiation induced defects. Seven majority electron traps and one minority hole trap are found after proton irradiation. It is shown that four electron traps induced by proton irradiation increase in proportion to the fluence, whereas the EL2 trap, which appears before irradiation, is not affected by irradiation. These defects correspond to electron traps previously identified in GaAs. In addition, a 0.53 eV electron trap and a 0.14 eV hole trap are found in the QD layers before proton irradiation. It is shown that these native traps are also unaffected by irradiation. The nature of the 0.14 eV hole trap is thought to be Ga-vacancies in the GaP strain balancing layers.

  13. Neutron production by a 13C thick target irradiated by 20 90 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lhersonneau, G.; Malkiewicz, T.; Vakhtin, D.; Plokhoi, V.; Alyakrinskiy, O.; Barbui, M.; Brandenburg, S.; Dendooven, P.; Cinausero, M.; Kandiev, Ya.; Kettunen, H.; Khlebnikov, S.; Lyapin, V.; Penttilä, H.; Prete, G.; Rizzi, V.; Samarin, S.; Tecchio, L. B.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tyurin, G.

    2008-10-01

    Neutron production using an enriched 13C carbon converter has been measured during the design study of the italian RIB facility SPES. Energy and angular distributions of neutrons emitted by bombarding a 13C target of stopping length with protons in the range of 20 to 90 MeV have been measured by time-of-flight and activation and compared with the prediction of a Monte Carlo code developed at Snezhinsk. At the proton energy of 100 MeV, firstly envisaged for SPES, the gain with respect to a natural C target is less than a factor of two, while yields still compare well with those for 40 MeV deuterons on natural carbon adopted by SPIRAL-II. At energies near 30 MeV the 13C thick target is definitely more prolific than the target of natural carbon, but both yields with protons are clearly lower than the one with deuterons. At the energy of 20 MeV envisaged for a first stage of SPES it might be more efficient to irradiate the uranium target with protons rather than using the two-stage method with converter.

  14. Proton irradiation effects on advanced digital and microwave III-V components

    SciTech Connect

    Hash, G.L.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Sandoval, C.E.; Connors, M.P.; Sheridan, T.J.; Sexton, F.W.; Slayton, E.M.; Heise, J.A.; Foster, C.

    1994-09-01

    A wide range of advanced III-V components suitable for use in high-speed satellite communication systems were evaluated for displacement damage and single-event effects in high-energy, high-fluence proton environments. Transistors and integrated circuits (both digital and MMIC) were irradiated with protons at energies from 41 to 197 MeV and at fluences from 10{sup 10} to 2 {times} 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2}. Large soft-error rates were measured for digital GaAs MESFET (3 {times} 10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day) and heterojunction bipolar circuits (10{sup {minus}5} errors/bit-day). No transient signals were detected from MMIC circuits. The largest degradation in transistor response caused by displacement damage was observed for 1.0-{mu}m depletion- and enhancement-mode MESFET transistors. Shorter gate length MESFET transistors and HEMT transistors exhibited less displacement-induced damage. These results show that memory-intensive GaAs digital circuits may result in significant system degradation due to single-event upset in natural and man-made space environments. However, displacement damage effects should not be a limiting factor for fluence levels up to 10{sup 14} protons/cm{sup 2} [equivalent to total doses in excess of 10 Mrad(GaAs)].

  15. Early irradiation of matter in the solar system - Magnesium /proton, neutron/ scheme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.

    1976-01-01

    The occurrence of positive and negative Mg-26 anomalies in inclusions of the Allende meteorite is explained in terms of proton bombardment of a gas of solar composition. A significant fraction of Mg-26 in the irradiated gas is stored temporarily in the form of radioactive Al-26 by the reaction Mg-26(p, n)Al-26. Proton fluxes of 10 to the 17th power to 10 to the 19th power protons per square centimeter per year at 1 million electron volts are inferred. Aluminum-rich materials condensing from the gas phase have positive Mg-26 anomalies, whereas magnesium-rich materials have negative Mg-26 anomalies. The proton flux required to account for the observed magnesium anomalies is used to investigate possible isotopic anomalies in the elements from oxygen to argon. Detectable isotopic anomalies are predicted only for neon. The anomalous neon is virtually pure Ne-22 from Na-22 decay. The predicted amount of anomalous Ne-22 is about 10 to the -8th power cubic centimeter (at standard temperature and pressure) per milligram of sodium.

  16. Acute effects of whole-body proton irradiation on the immune system of the mouse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kajioka, E. H.; Andres, M. L.; Li, J.; Mao, X. W.; Moyers, M. F.; Nelson, G. A.; Slater, J. M.; Gridley, D. S.

    2000-01-01

    The acute effects of proton whole-body irradiation on the distribution and function of leukocyte populations in the spleen and blood were examined and compared to the effects of photons derived from a (60)Co gamma-ray source. Adult female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to a single dose (3 Gy at 0.4 Gy/min) of protons at spread-out Bragg peak (SOBP), protons at the distal entry (E) region, or gamma rays and killed humanely at six different times thereafter. Specific differences were noted in the results, thereby suggesting that the kinetics of the response may be variable. However, the lack of significant differences in most assays at most times suggests that the RBE for both entry and peak regions of the Bragg curve was essentially 1.0 under the conditions of this study. The greatest immunodepression was observed at 4 days postexposure. Flow cytometry and mitogenic stimulation analyses of the spleen and peripheral blood demonstrated that lymphocyte populations differ in radiosensitivity, with B (CD19(+)) cells being most sensitive, T (CD3(+)) cells being moderately sensitive, and natural killer (NK1.1(+)) cells being most resistant. B lymphocytes showed the most rapid recovery. Comparison of the T-lymphocyte subsets showed that CD4(+) T helper/inducer cells were more radiosensitive than the CD8(+) T cytotoxic/suppressor cells. These findings should have an impact on future studies designed to maximize protection of normal tissue during and after proton-radiation exposure.

  17. LET-dependent radiosensitization effects of gold nanoparticles for proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Penninckx, Sébastien; Karmani, Linda; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Watillon, Kassandra; Marega, Riccardo; Zola, Jerome; Corvaglia, Valentina; Genard, Geraldine; Gallez, Bernard; Feron, Olivier; Martinive, Philippe; Bonifazi, Davide; Michiels, Carine; Lucas, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    The development of new modalities and protocols is of major interest to improve the outcome of cancer treatment. Given the appealing physical properties of protons and the emerging evidence of biological relevance of the use of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), the radiosensitization effects of GNPs (5 or 10 nm) have been investigated in vitro in combination with a proton beam of different linear energy transfer (LET). After the incubation with GNPs for 24 h, nanoparticles were observed in the cytoplasm of A431 cells exposed to 10 nm GNPs, and in the cytoplasm as well as the nucleus of cells exposed to 5 nm GNPs. Cell uptake of 0.05 mg ml-1 of GNPs led to 0.78 pg Au/cell and 0.30 pg Au/cell after 24 h incubation for 10 and 5 nm GNPs respectively. A marked radiosensitization effect of GNPs was observed with 25 keV μm-1 protons, but not with 10 keV μm-1 protons. This effect was more pronounced for 10 nm GNPs than for 5 nm GNPs. By using a radical scavenger, a major role of reactive oxygen species in the amplification of the death of irradiated cell was identified. All together, these results open up novel perspectives for using high-Z metallic NPs in protontherapy.

  18. Proton Irradiation Facility and space radiation monitoring at the Paul Scherrer Institute.

    PubMed

    Hajdas, W; Zehnder, A; Adams, L; Buehler, P; Harboe-Sorensen, R; Daum, M; Nickson, R; Daly, E; Nieminen, P

    2001-01-01

    The Proton Irradiation Facility (PIF) has been designed and constructed, in cooperation between Paul Scherrer Institute (PSI) and European Space Agency (ESA), for terrestrial proton testing of components and materials for spacecraft. Emphasis has been given to generating realistic proton spectra encountered by space-flights at any potential orbit. The facility, designed in a user-friendly manner, can be readily adapted to the individual requirements of experimenters. It is available for general use serving also in testing of radiation monitors and for proton experiments in different scientific disciplines. The Radiation Environment Monitor REM has been developed for measurements of the spacecraft radiation conditions. Two instruments were launched into space, one into a Geo-stationary Transfer Orbit on board of the STRV-1b satellite and one into a Low Earth Orbit on the Russian MIR station. The next generation of monitors (SREMs--Standard REMs) is currently under development in partnership of ESA, PSI and Contraves-Space. They will operate both as minimum intrusive monitors, which provide radiation housekeeping data and alert the spacecraft when the radiation level crosses allowed limits and as small scientific devices measuring particle spectra and fluxes. Future missions as e.g. INTEGRAL, STRV-1c and PROBA will be equipped with new SREMs.

  19. A method for depth-dose distribution measurements in tissue irradiated by a proton beam

    SciTech Connect

    Gambarini, G.; Birattari, C.; Bartolo, D. de

    1994-12-31

    The use of protons and heavy ions for the treatment of malignant and non-malignant disease has aroused a growing interest in the last decade. The notable advantage of heavy charged particles over photons in external beam radiotherapy lies in the possibility of irradiating a small localized region within the body, keeping a low value for the entrance dose. Owing to this high disuniformity of energy deposition, an essential requirement for treatment planning is a precise evaluation of the spatial distribution of absorbed dose. The proposed method for depth-dose distribution measurements utilizes a chemical dosimeter (ferrous sulphate solution plus sulfuric acid and eventually xylenol orange) incorporated in a gelatine, whose role is the maintenance of spatial information. Ionizing radiation causes a variation in some parameters of the system such as the proton relaxation rates in the solution (measurable by NMR analysis) or the optical absorption of the gel in the visible spectrum (measurable by spectrophotometry).

  20. Delayed effects of proton irradiation in Macaca Mulatta (22-year summary)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woods, D. H.; Hardy, K. A.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Yochmowitz, M. G.; Cordts, R. E.

    1989-05-01

    Lifetime observations on a group of rhesus monkeys indicate that life expectancy loss from exposure to protons in the energy range encountered in the Van Allen belts and solar proton events can be correlated with the dose and energy of radiation. The primary cause of life shortening is nonleukemic cancers. Radiation also increased the rise of endometriosis (an abnormal proliferation of the lining of the uterus in females). Other effects associated with radiation exposures are lowered glucose tolerance and increased incidence of cataracts. Calculations of the relative risk of fatal cancers in the irradiated subjects reveal that the total body surface dose required to double the risk of death from cancer over a 20-year post exposure period varies with the linear energy transfer (LET) of the radiation. The ability to determine the integrated dose and LET spectrum in space radiation exposures of humans is, therefore, critical to the assessment of lifetime cancer risk.

  1. Simulation and experimental verification of prompt gamma-ray emissions during proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Schumann, A; Petzoldt, J; Dendooven, P; Enghardt, W; Golnik, C; Hueso-González, F; Kormoll, T; Pausch, G; Roemer, K; Fiedler, F

    2015-05-21

    Irradiation with protons and light ions offers new possibilities for tumor therapy but has a strong need for novel imaging modalities for treatment verification. The development of new detector systems, which can provide an in vivo range assessment or dosimetry, requires an accurate knowledge of the secondary radiation field and reliable Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents multiple measurements to characterize the prompt γ-ray emissions during proton irradiation and benchmarks the latest Geant4 code against the experimental findings. Within the scope of this work, the total photon yield for different target materials, the energy spectra as well as the γ-ray depth profile were assessed. Experiments were performed at the superconducting AGOR cyclotron at KVI-CART, University of Groningen. Properties of the γ-ray emissions were experimentally determined. The prompt γ-ray emissions were measured utilizing a conventional HPGe detector system (Clover) and quantitatively compared to simulations. With the selected physics list QGSP_BIC_HP, Geant4 strongly overestimates the photon yield in most cases, sometimes up to 50%. The shape of the spectrum and qualitative occurrence of discrete γ lines is reproduced accurately. A sliced phantom was designed to determine the depth profile of the photons. The position of the distal fall-off in the simulations agrees with the measurements, albeit the peak height is also overestimated. Hence, Geant4 simulations of prompt γ-ray emissions from irradiation with protons are currently far less reliable as compared to simulations of the electromagnetic processes. Deviations from experimental findings were observed and quantified. Although there has been a constant improvement of Geant4 in the hadronic sector, there is still a gap to close.

  2. Simulation and experimental verification of prompt gamma-ray emissions during proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schumann, A.; Petzoldt, J.; Dendooven, P.; Enghardt, W.; Golnik, C.; Hueso-González, F.; Kormoll, T.; Pausch, G.; Roemer, K.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-05-01

    Irradiation with protons and light ions offers new possibilities for tumor therapy but has a strong need for novel imaging modalities for treatment verification. The development of new detector systems, which can provide an in vivo range assessment or dosimetry, requires an accurate knowledge of the secondary radiation field and reliable Monte Carlo simulations. This paper presents multiple measurements to characterize the prompt γ-ray emissions during proton irradiation and benchmarks the latest Geant4 code against the experimental findings. Within the scope of this work, the total photon yield for different target materials, the energy spectra as well as the γ-ray depth profile were assessed. Experiments were performed at the superconducting AGOR cyclotron at KVI-CART, University of Groningen. Properties of the γ-ray emissions were experimentally determined. The prompt γ-ray emissions were measured utilizing a conventional HPGe detector system (Clover) and quantitatively compared to simulations. With the selected physics list QGSP_BIC_HP, Geant4 strongly overestimates the photon yield in most cases, sometimes up to 50%. The shape of the spectrum and qualitative occurrence of discrete γ lines is reproduced accurately. A sliced phantom was designed to determine the depth profile of the photons. The position of the distal fall-off in the simulations agrees with the measurements, albeit the peak height is also overestimated. Hence, Geant4 simulations of prompt γ-ray emissions from irradiation with protons are currently far less reliable as compared to simulations of the electromagnetic processes. Deviations from experimental findings were observed and quantified. Although there has been a constant improvement of Geant4 in the hadronic sector, there is still a gap to close.

  3. Deciphering the acute cellular phosphoproteome response to irradiation with X-rays, protons and carbon ions.

    PubMed

    Winter, Martin; Dokic, Ivana; Schlegel, Julian; Warnken, Uwe; Debus, Jürgen; Abdollahi, Amir; Schnölzer, Martina

    2017-03-16

    Radiotherapy is a cornerstone of cancer therapy. The recently established particle therapy with raster-scanning protons and carbon ions landmarks a new era in the field of high-precision cancer medicine. However, molecular mechanisms governing radiation induced intracellular signaling remain elusive. Here, we present the first comprehensive proteomic and phosphoproteomic study applying stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) in combination with high-resolution mass spectrometry to decipher cellular response to irradiation with X-rays, protons and carbon ions. At protein expression level limited alterations were observed 2h post irradiation of human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, 181 phosphorylation sites were found to be differentially regulated out of which 151 sites were not hitherto attributed to radiation response as revealed by crosscheck with the PhosphoSitePlus database. Radiation-induced phosphorylation of the p(S/T)Q motif was the prevailing regulation pattern affecting proteins involved in DNA damage response signaling. Since radiation doses were selected to produce same level of cell kill and DNA double-strand breakage for each radiation quality, DNA damage responsive phosphorylation sites were regulated to same extent. However, differential phosphorylation between radiation qualities was observed for 55 phosphorylation sites indicating the existence of distinct signaling circuitries induced by X-ray versus particle (proton/carbon) irradiation beyond the canonical DNA damage response. This unexpected finding was confirmed in targeted spike-in experiments using synthetic isotope labeled phosphopeptides. Herewith, we successfully validated uniform DNA damage response signaling coexisting with altered signaling involved in apoptosis and metabolic processes induced by X-ray and particle based treatments. In summary, the comprehensive insight into the radiation-induced phosphoproteome landscape is instructive for the design of

  4. Size- and shape-controlled synthesis of Ag nanomaterials via proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong-Joon; Song, Jae Hee

    2012-07-01

    We present a facile one-pot synthetic route for the production of silver nanocrystals via a simple proton beam irradiation process at room temperature. Size- and shape-controlled silver nanostructures were prepared in an aqueous phase-based solution without the addition of any harsh reductants just by changing the stabilizer and by controlling the molar concentration ratios of surfactants to metal precursors. We observed that the size of the resulting Ag nanocrystals was easily varied by changing the stabilizer from hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide to sodium dodecyl sulfate. We also found that the size of the prepared silver nanocrystals decreased as the molar ratio of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide to silver ions was increased.

  5. Nuclear excitation functions from 40 to 200 MeV proton irradiation of terbium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Parker, Lauren A.; Jackman, Kevin R.; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 26 radionuclides, measured with 40-200 MeV proton irradiations of terbium foils. These data provide the basis for the production of medically relevant radionuclides (e.g., 152Tb, 155Tb, 155Eu, and 156Eu) and 153Gd, a potential source used in ongoing efforts to characterize stellar nucleosynthesis routes. Computational predictions from the ALICE2011, CEM03.03, Bertini, and INCL + ABLA codes are compared with newly measured data to contribute to the ongoing process of code development, and yields are calculated for selected radionuclides using measured data.

  6. Production of organic molecules in the outer solar system by proton irradiation - Laboratory simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scattergood, T.; Lesser, P.; Owen, T.

    1975-01-01

    Preliminary experiments to investigate the formation of colored polymers and other interesting molecules by the irradiation of gas mixtures with protons are discussed. As in previous experiments, colored polymers were produced. An important feature of the present work is the presence or absence of absorption at 5 microns in the different materials produced; Titan is quite dark at this wavelength and Io is fairly bright. Such features may provide criteria for accepting or rejecting various materials produced in these experiments as reasonable coloring agents for the outer solar system.

  7. Behavior of optical thin-film materials and coatings under proton and gamma irradiation.

    PubMed

    Di Sarcina, Ilaria; Grilli, Maria Luisa; Menchini, Francesca; Piegari, Angela; Scaglione, Salvatore; Sytchkova, Anna; Zola, Danilo

    2014-02-01

    Optical materials and coatings are exposed to the flux of energetic particles when used in either space applications or nuclear energy plants. The study of their behavior in such an environment is important to avoid failure of the optical components during their operation. The optical performance of several thin-film materials ((HfO2, Ta2O5, Nb2O5, TiO2, SiO2) and coatings, under irradiation with high-dose gamma rays (5.8 MGy) and exposure to low-energy (60 keV) protons, has been investigated. Some variations of optical properties have been detected in silicon oxide after irradiation, while the other materials are stable in such conditions.

  8. {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance study of proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4}

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se-Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Oh, B. H.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Hong, K. S.

    2007-11-01

    We have studied the microscopic structure and dynamics in a proton-irradiated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} single crystal. Our {sup 1}H and {sup 31}P nuclear magnetic resonance measurements indicate that proton irradiation gives rise to a decrease in the local dipolar order of the rigid lattice protons and an increase in interstitial protons as well as structural distortion of the PO{sub 4} tetrahedra.

  9. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton-irradiation on lymphocyte blastogenesis and hematological variables: part II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pecaut, Michael J.; Gridley, Daila S.; Smith, Anna L.; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part II of this study was to evaluate functional characteristics of leukocytes and circulating blood cell parameters after whole-body proton irradiation at varying doses and at low- and high-dose-rates (LDR and HDR, respectively). C57BL/6 mice (n=51) were irradiated and euthanized at 4 days post-exposure for assay. Significant radiation dose- (but not dose-rate-) dependent decreases were observed in splenocyte responses to T and B cell mitogens when compared to sham-irradiated controls (P<0.001). Spontaneous blastogenesis, also significantly dose-dependent, was increased in both blood and spleen (P<0.001). Red blood cell counts, hemoglobin concentration, and hematocrit were decreased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05), whereas thrombocyte numbers were only slightly affected. Comparison of proton- and gamma-irradiated groups (both receiving 3 Gy at HDR) showed a higher level of spontaneous blastogenesis in blood leukocytes and a lower splenocyte response to concanavalin A following proton irradiation (P<0.05). There were no dose rate effects. Collectively, the data demonstrate that the measurements in blood and spleen were largely dependent upon the total dose of proton radiation and that an 80-fold difference in the dose rate was not a significant factor. A difference, however, was found between protons and gamma-rays in the degree of change induced in some of the measurements.

  10. High Strain Fatigue Properties of the F82H Ferritic-Martensitic Steel under Proton Irradiation.

    SciTech Connect

    Marmy, P; Oliver, Brian M. )

    2003-05-15

    During the up and down cycles of a fusion reactor, the first wall is exposed concomitantly to a flux of energetic neutrons that generates radiation defects and to a neutron thermal flux that induces thermal stresses. The resulting strains may exceed the elastic limit and induce a plastic deformation in the material. A similar situation occurs in the window of a spallation liquid source target and results in the same type of damage. This particular loading has been simulated in F82H martensitic ferritic steel, using a device allowing a fatigue test to be carried out during irradiation with 590 MeV protons. All fatigue tests were carried out at 300?C, in a strain controlled test at strain levels around 0.8%. Two different signals have been used: a fully symmetrical triangle wave signal (R=-1) and a triangle ramp with 2 min tension holds. The fatigue was investigated under three different conditions: unirradiated , irradiated and post irradiation tested, and finally in beam tested. The main result is that the in beam tested specimens have the lowest life as compared to the post irradiation tested specimens and unirradiated specimens. Hydrogen is suspected to be the main contributor to the observed embrittlement.

  11. High strain fatigue properties of F82H ferritic martensitic steel under proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.; Oliver, B. M.

    2003-05-01

    During the up and down cycles of a fusion reactor, the first wall is exposed concomitantly to a flux of energetic neutrons that generates radiation defects and to a thermal flux that induces thermal stresses. The resulting strains may exceed the elastic limit and induce plastic deformation in the material. A similar situation occurs in the window of a spallation liquid source target and results in the same type of damage. This particular loading has been simulated in F82H ferritic-martensitic steel, using a device allowing a fatigue test to be carried out during irradiation with 590 MeV protons. All fatigue tests were carried out in a strain controlled test at strain levels around 0.8% and at 300 °C. Two different signals have been used: a fully symmetrical triangle wave signal ( R=-1) and a triangle ramp with 2 min tension holds. The fatigue was investigated under three different conditions: unirradiated, irradiated and post-irradiation tested, and finally in-beam tested. The main result is that the in-beam tested specimens have the lowest life as compared to the post-irradiation tested specimen and unirradiated specimen. Hydrogen is suspected to be the main contributor to the observed embrittlement.

  12. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-09-07

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from (12)C (4.44 MeV) and (16)O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 10(7) oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from (16)O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring (16)O PG emission.

  13. Measurement of characteristic prompt gamma rays emitted from oxygen and carbon in tissue-equivalent samples during proton beam irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Polf, Jerimy C; Panthi, Rajesh; Mackin, Dennis S; McCleskey, Matt; Saastamoinen, Antti; Roeder, Brian T; Beddar, Sam

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to characterize how prompt gamma (PG) emission from tissue changes as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration, and to assess the feasibility of determining elemental concentration in tissues irradiated with proton beams. For this study, four tissue-equivalent water-sucrose samples with differing densities and concentrations of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen were irradiated with a 48 MeV proton pencil beam. The PG spectrum emitted from each sample was measured using a high-purity germanium detector, and the absolute detection efficiency of the detector, average beam current, and delivered dose distribution were also measured. Changes to the total PG emission from 12C (4.44 MeV) and 16O (6.13 MeV) per incident proton and per Gray of absorbed dose were characterized as a function of carbon and oxygen concentration in the sample. The intensity of the 4.44 MeV PG emission per incident proton was found to be nearly constant for all samples regardless of their carbon concentration. However, we found that the 6.13 MeV PG emission increased linearly with the total amount (in grams) of oxygen irradiated in the sample. From the measured PG data, we determined that 1.64 × 107 oxygen PGs were emitted per gram of oxygen irradiated per Gray of absorbed dose delivered with a 48 MeV proton beam. These results indicate that the 6.13 MeV PG emission from 16O is proportional to the concentration of oxygen in tissue irradiated with proton beams, showing that it is possible to determine the concentration of oxygen within tissues irradiated with proton beams by measuring 16O PG emission. PMID:23920051

  14. Gene Expression Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Zhang, Ye; Mangala, Lingegowda; Nie, Ying; Gridley, Daila; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Seidel, Derek V.; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    Crew members face potential consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment including acute radiation syndrome and cancer. The space radiation environment is ample with protons, and numerous studies have been devoted to the understanding of the health consequences of proton exposures. In this project, C57BL/6 mice underwent whole-body exposure to 250 MeV of protons at doses of 0, 0.1, 0.5, 2 and 6 Gy and the gastrointestinal (GI) tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation. Standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes in the tissue showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest dose of 0.1 Gy, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. Results of gene expression changes showed consistent up- or down- regulation, up to 10 fold, of a number of genes across exposure doses that may play a role in proton-induced oxidative stress including Gpx2. A separate study in C57BL/6 mice using the same four hour time point but whole-body gamma-irradiation showed damage to the small intestine with lesions appearing at the smallest dose of 0.05 Gy and increasing with increasing absorbed dose. Expressions of genes associated with oxidative stress processes were analyzed at four hours and twenty-four hours after exposure to gamma rays. We saw a much greater number of genes with significant up- or down-regulation twenty-four hours post-exposure as compared to the four hour time point. At both four hours and twenty-four hours post-exposure, Duox1 and Mpo underwent up-regulation for the highest dose of 6 Gy. Both protons and gamma rays lead to significant variation in gene expressions and these changes may provide insight into the mechanism of injury seen in the GI tract following radiation exposure. We have also completed experiments using a BALB/c mouse model undergoing whole-body exposure to protons. Doses of 0, 0.1, 1 and 2 Gy were used and results will be compared to the work mentioned

  15. Low Temperature Research in Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strayer, D.

    1993-01-01

    The recent flight of the Lambda Point Experiment has demonstrated the potential for performing precise tests of fundamental theories using low temperature techniques in Earth orbit. NASA's Microgravity Science and Applications Division has established a program of successor expermients to investigate other aspects of condensed matter physics using the same low temperature flight facility. This paper describes the new investigations that have been chosen for flight experiments, and those selected for ground-based studies that could lead to flight experiments later.

  16. Sensors for low temperature application

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, Timothy M.; Wuttke, Gilbert H.

    1977-01-01

    A method and apparatus for low temperature sensing which uses gas filled micro-size hollow glass spheres that are exposed in a confined observation area to a low temperature range (Kelvin) and observed microscopically to determine change of state, i.e., change from gaseous state of the contained gas to condensed state. By suitable indicia and classification of the spheres in the observation area, the temperature can be determined very accurately.

  17. MECHANICAL PROPERTIES AND MICROSTRUCTURE IN LOW ACTIVATION MARTENSITIC STEELS F82H AND OPTIMAX AFTER 800 MEV PROTON IRRADIATION

    SciTech Connect

    Y. DAI; ET AL

    1999-10-01

    Low-activation martensitic steels, F82H (mod.) and Optimax-A, have been irradiated with 800-MeV protons up to 5.9 dpa. The tensile properties and microstructure have been studied. The results show that radiation hardening increases continuously with irradiation dose. F82H has lesser irradiation hardening as compared to Optimax-A in the present work and DIN1.4926 from a previous study. The irradiation embrittlement effects are evident in the materials since the uniform elongation is reduced sharply to less than 2%. However, all the irradiated samples ruptured in a ductile-fracture mode. Defect clusters have been observed. The size and the density of defect clusters increase with the irradiation dose. Precipitates are amorphous after irradiation.

  18. Visualization experiment of 30 MeV proton beam irradiated water target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwan Hong, Bong; Gun Yang, Tea; Su Jung, In; Soo Park, Yeun; Hee Cho, Hyung

    2011-11-01

    The nucleate boiling phenomena in a water target irradiated by 30 MeV proton beam were visualized experimentally. The beam size was 10 mm in diameter and beam current of 10, 15 and 20 μA were used, respectively. A target cavity of 4.5 cc in volume was filled with distilled water without atmosphere. A CMOS camera is used to record the phenomena through a side window. The temperature and pressure were measured during experiments. The depth of the Bragg peak was indicated by the blue light emission of the proton beam in the water target. In the case of 10 μA beam intensity, there was no visible phase change but fluxes by convection was observed at the Bragg peak and near the foil surface region. At 15 μA beam intensity, steam bubbles were generated by homogenous nuclear boiling at the Bragg peak and corrupted by cavitation at the upper region. The steam bubble generation point can be indicated by the blue light emission, which can show us the position of the Bragg peak. At 20 μΑ beam intensity, the steam bubbles were generated at Bragg peak and near the foil surface. The homogenous nucleate boiling at the Bragg peak was dominant and the heterogeneous nucleate boiling near the foil surface took place, occasionally. The cavitation of the steam bubble was also observed in the upper region within the target. The penetration depth of the proton beam was change along with the steam bubble formation. The blue light emission of the proton beam in water shows that the penetration depth of the proton beam becomes deeper when vapor bubbles are generated.

  19. WE-D-17A-04: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Volume Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, G; Slater, J; Wroe, A

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To explore the advantages of magnetic focusing for small volume proton irradiations and the potential clinical benefits for radiosurgery targets. The primary goal is to create narrow elongated proton beams of elliptical cross section with superior dose delivery characteristics compared to current delivery modalities (eg, collimated beams). In addition, more general beam shapes are also under investigation. Methods: Two prototype magnets consisting of 24 segments of samarium-cobalt (Sm2Co17) permanent magnetic material adhered into hollow cylinders were manufactured for testing. A single focusing magnet was placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table and 15 mm diameter proton beams with energies and modulation relevant to clinical radiosurgery applications (127 to 186 MeV, and 0 to 30 mm modulation) were delivered to a terminal water tank. Beam dose distributions were measured using a PTW diode detector and Gafchromic EBT2 film. Longitudinal and transverse dose profiles were analyzed and compared to data from Monte Carlo simulations analogous to the experimental setup. Results: The narrow elongated focused beam spots showed high elliptical symmetry indicating high magnet quality. In addition, when compared to unfocused beams, peak-to-entrance depth dose ratios were 11 to 14% larger (depending on presence or extent of modulation), and minor axis penumbras were 11 to 20% smaller (again depending on modulation) for focused beams. These results suggest that the use of rare earth magnet assemblies is practical and could improve dose-sparing of normal tissue and organs at risk while delivering enhanced dose to small proton radiosurgery targets. Conclusion: Quadrapole rare earth magnetic assemblies are a promising and inexpensive method to counteract particle out scatter that tends to degrade the peak to entrance performance of small field proton beams. Knowledge gained from current experiments will inform the design of a prototype treatment

  20. Molecular Hydrogen Bubbles Formation on Thin Vacuum Deposited Aluminum Layers After Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sznajder, Maciej; Geppert, Ulrich

    2014-06-01

    Metals are the most common materials used in space technology. Metal structures, while used in space, are subjected to the full spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation together with particle irradiation. Hence, they undergo degradation. Future space missions are planned to proceed in the interplanetary space, where the protons of the solar wind play a very destructive role on metallic surfaces. Unfortunately, their real degradation behavior is to a great extent unknown.Our aim is to predict materials' behavior in such a destructive environment. Therefore both, theoretical and experimental studies are performed at the German Aerospace Center (DLR) in Bremen, Germany.Here, we report the theoretical results of those studies. We examine the process of H2-bubble formation on metallic surfaces. H2-bubbles are metal caps filled with Hydrogen molecular gas resulting from recombination processes of the metal free electrons and the solar protons. A thermodynamic model of the bubble growth is presented. Our model predicts e.g. the velocity of that growth and the reflectivity of foils populated by bubbles.Formation of bubbles irreversibly changes the surface quality of irradiated metals. Thin metallic films are especially sensitive for such degradation processes. They are used e.g. in the solar sail propulsion technology. The efficiency of that technology depends on the thermoptical properties of the sail materials. Therefore, bubble formation processes have to be taken into account for the planning of long-term solar sail missions.

  1. Production of radionuclides in artificial meteorites irradiated isotropically with 600 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michel, R.; Dragovitsch, P.; Englert, P.; Herpers, U.

    1986-01-01

    The understanding of the production of cosmogenic nuclides in small meteorites (R is less than 40 cm) still is not satisfactory. The existing models for the calculation of depth dependent production rates do not distinguish between the different types of nucleons reacting in a meteorite. They rather use general depth dependent particle fluxes to which cross sections have to be adjusted to fit the measured radionuclide concentrations. Some of these models can not even be extended to zero meteorite sizes without logical contradictions. Therefore, a series of three thick target irradiations was started at the 600 MeV proton beam of the CERN isochronuous cyclotron in order to study the interactions of small stony meteorites with galactic protons. The homogeneous 4 pi irradiation technique used provides a realistic meteorite model which allows a direct comparison of the measured depth profiles with those in real meteorites. Moreover, by the simultaneous measurement of thin target production cross sections one can differentiate between the contributions of primary and secondary nucleons over the entire volume of the artificial meteorite.

  2. Engineering of silicon/HfO{sub 2} interface by variable energy proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Maurya, Savita Maringanti, Radhakrishna; Tribedi, L. C.

    2014-08-18

    Surfaces and interfaces between materials are of paramount importance for various phenomena, such as painting a house, catalyst driven chemical reactions, intricate life processes, corrosion of materials, and fabrication of various semiconductor devices. Interface of silicon or other such substrates with any of the oxides has profound effect on the performance of metal oxide field effect transistors and other similar devices. Since a surface is an abrupt termination of a periodic crystal, surface atoms will have some unsaturated valence electrons and these unsaturated bonds at the semiconductor surface make it chemically highly reactive. Other than annealing, there is not much that can be done to manage these unsaturated bonds. This study was initiated to explore the possibility of repairing these unsaturated dangling bonds that are formed at the silicon and oxide interface during the deposition of oxide layer above silicon, by the use of proton irradiation. In order to improve the interface characteristics, we present a method to modify the interface of silicon and hafnium dioxide after its fabrication, through proton irradiation. Results of the study are promising and probably this method might be used along with other methods such as annealing to modify the interface, after its fabrication.

  3. MeV single-ion beam irradiation of mammalian cells using the Surrey vertical nanobeam, compared with broad proton beam and X-ray irradiations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakrajang, K.; Jeynes, J. C. G.; Merchant, M. J.; Kirkby, K.; Kirkby, N.; Thopan, P.; Yu, L. D.

    2013-07-01

    As a part of a systematic study on mechanisms involved in physical cancer therapies, this work investigated response of mammalian cells to ultra-low-dose ion beam irradiation. The ion beam irradiation was performed using the recently completed nanobeam facility at the Surrey Ion Beam Centre. A scanning focused vertical ion nano-beam was applied to irradiate Chinese hamster V79 cells. The V79 cells were irradiated in two different beam modes, namely, focused single ion beam and defocused scanning broad ion beam of 3.8-MeV protons. The single ion beam was capable of irradiating a single cell with a precisely controlled number of the ions to extremely low doses. After irradiation and cell incubation, the number of surviving colonies as a function of the number of the irradiating ions was measured for the cell survival fraction curve. A lower survival for the single ion beam irradiation than that of the broad beam case implied the hypersensitivity and bystander effect. The ion-beam-induced cell survival curves were compared with that from 300-kV X-ray irradiation. Theoretical studies indicated that the cell death in single ion irradiation mainly occurred in the cell cycle phases of cell division and intervals between the cell division and the DNA replication. The success in the experiment demonstrated the Surrey vertical nanobeam successfully completed.

  4. SPICE-NIRS Microbeam: a focused vertical system for proton irradiation of a single cell for radiobiological research

    PubMed Central

    Konishi, Teruaki; Oikawa, Masakazu; Suya, Noriyoshi; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Maeda, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Alisa; Shiomi, Naoko; Kodama, Kumiko; Hamano, Tsuyoshi; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Isono, Mayu; Hieda, Kotaro; Uchihori, Yukio; Shirakawa, Yoshiyuki

    2013-01-01

    The Single Particle Irradiation system to Cell (SPICE) facility at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) is a focused vertical microbeam system designed to irradiate the nuclei of adhesive mammalian cells with a defined number of 3.4 MeV protons. The approximately 2-μm diameter proton beam is focused with a magnetic quadrupole triplet lens and traverses the cells contained in dishes from bottom to top. All procedures for irradiation, such as cell image capturing, cell recognition and position calculation, are automated. The most distinctive characteristic of the system is its stability and high throughput; i.e. 3000 cells in a 5 mm × 5 mm area in a single dish can be routinely irradiated by the 2-μm beam within 15 min (the maximum irradiation speed is 400 cells/min). The number of protons can be set as low as one, at a precision measured by CR-39 detectors to be 99.0%. A variety of targeting modes such as fractional population targeting mode, multi-position targeting mode for nucleus irradiation and cytoplasm targeting mode are available. As an example of multi-position targeting irradiation of mammalian cells, five fluorescent spots in a cell nucleus were demonstrated using the γ-H2AX immune-staining technique. The SPICE performance modes described in this paper are in routine use. SPICE is a joint-use research facility of NIRS and its beam times are distributed for collaborative research. PMID:23287773

  5. A study on the effects of the proton flux on the irradiated degradation of GaAs/Ge solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jianmin, Hu; Yiyong, Wu; Dezhuang, Yang; Shiyu, He; Zhongwei, Zhang; Yong, Qian; Mengyan, Zhang

    2008-08-01

    Low-energy proton irradiation is one of the important factors which affect applications of GaAs solar cells in space. The proton flux encountered in orbit is much lower than that used during ground-base radiation experiments, thus ground-based experiments are a so-called accelerated simulating process. In this paper, effects of the proton flux on the degradation of GaAs/Ge solar cells using I- V measurements are investigated. The results indicate that low-energy irradiation seriously damages the solar cells. Regardless of the proton energy, the radiation flux shows no influence on the degradation process of the solar cell. The mechanisms for these effects are discussed in detail here.

  6. Characterization of MeV proton acceleration from double pulse irradiation of foil targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kerr, S.; Mo, M. Z.; Masud, R.; Tiedje, H. F.; Tsui, Y.; Fedosejevs, R.; Link, A.; Patel, P.; McLean, H. S.; Hazi, A.; Chen, H.; Ceurvorst, L.; Norreys, P.

    2014-10-01

    We report on the experimental characterization of proton acceleration from double-pulse irradiation of um-scale foil targets. Temporally separated sub-picosecond pulses have been shown to increase the conversion efficiency of laser energy to MeV protons. Here, two 700 fs, 1 ω pulses were separated by 1 to 5 ps; total beam energy was 100 J, with 5-20% of the total energy contained within the first pulse. In contrast to the ultraclean beams used in previous experiments, prepulse energies on the order of 10 mJ were present in the current experiments which appear to have a moderating effect on the enhancement. Proton beam measurements were made with radiochromic film stacks, as well as magnetic spectrometers. The effect on electron generation was measured using Kα emission from buried Cu tracer layers, while specular light diagnostics (FROG, reflection spectralon) indicated the laser coupling efficiency into the target. The results obtained will be presented and compared to PIC simulations. Work by LLNL was performed under the auspices of U.S. DOE under contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  7. Evaluation of irradiation effects of 16 MeV proton-irradiated 12Cr-1MoV steel by small punch (SP) tests

    SciTech Connect

    Chi, S.H.; Hong, J.H. ); Kim, I.S. . Dept. of Nuclear Engineering)

    1994-06-15

    Recently, interest in small-scale specimens for testing irradiated materials has arisen in conjunction with the need to develop materials for fusion reactor materials and to study irradiation effects using an ion irradiation facility. Several attempts have been made to evaluate material property changes due to irradiation using a small specimen technique. The SP (small punch) test is an example of small-scale specimen test techniques, originally developed by Baik et al. to estimate DBTT (ductile-to-brittle transition temperature) using broken standard CVN (Charpy 5-notch) specimens. The objective of the present study is to evaluate 16 MeV proton irradiation effects on a fusion reactor candidate material in terms of changes in energy up to failure and J[sub IC] fracture toughness (SP J[sub IC]) by using a SP test technique and a J[sub IC] - [bar [epsilon

  8. Recovery of damage in rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brucker, G. J.; Van Gunten, O.; Stassinopoulos, E. G.; Shapiro, P.; August, L. S.; Jordan, T. M.

    1983-01-01

    This paper reports on the recovery properties of rad-hard MOS devices during and after irradiation by electrons, protons, alphas, and gamma rays. The results indicated that complex recovery properties controlled the damage sensitivities of the tested parts. The results also indicated that damage sensitivities depended on dose rate, total dose, supply bias, gate bias, transistor type, radiation source, and particle energy. The complex nature of these dependencies make interpretation of LSI device performance in space (exposure to entire electron and proton spectra) difficult, if not impossible, without respective ground tests and analyses. Complete recovery of n-channel shifts was observed, in some cases within hours after irradiation, with equilibrium values of threshold voltages greater than their pre-irradiation values. This effect depended on total dose, radiation source, and gate bias during exposure. In contrast, the p-channel shifts recovered only 20 percent within 30 days after irradiation.

  9. Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study of defects introduced in antimony doped Ge by 2 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nyamhere, C.; Das, A. G. M.; Auret, F. D.; Chawanda, A.; Pineda-Vargas, C. A.; Venter, A.

    2011-08-01

    Deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) and Laplace-DLTS have been used to investigate the defects created in Sb doped Ge after irradiation with 2 MeV protons having a fluence of 1×10 13 protons/cm 2. The results show that proton irradiation resulted in primary hole traps at E V +0.15 and E V +0.30 eV and electron traps at E C -0.38, E C -0.32, E C -0.31, E C -0.22, E C -0.20, E C -0.17, E C -0.15 and E C -0.04 eV. Defects observed in this study are compared with those introduced in similar samples after MeV electron irradiation reported earlier. E C -0.31, E C -0.17 and E C -0.04, and E V +0.15 eV were not observed previously in similar samples after high energy irradiation. Results from this study suggest that although similar defects are introduced by electron and proton irradiation, traps introduced by the latter are dose dependent.

  10. The corrosion of materials in water irradiated by 800 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lillard, R. S.; Pile, D. L.; Butt, D. P.

    2000-02-01

    A method for measuring the real-time corrosion rates for Alloy 718, stainless steels (SS) 304L and 316L nuclear grade (NG), aluminum alloys 5052 (Al5052) and 6061 (Al6061), copper (Cu), tantalum (Ta), and tungsten (W) in two separate water systems that were irradiated by 800 MeV protons is presented. The first water system was fabricated entirely of 304 SS, thoroughly cleaned before operation, and employed hydrogen water chemistry (HWC) to mitigate the formation of some of the radiolysis products. The samples were adequately shielded from the irradiation cavity such that only the effects of water chemistry were investigated. Over the course of that irradiation period the corrosion rates for 304L SS, 316L-NG SS, Alloy 718, and Ta were less than 0.12 μm/yr. For Al6061 and Al5052, the corrosion rates were of the order of 0.50-2.0 μm/yr. The corrosion rate of W was relatively high between 5.0 and 30 μm/yr. The second water system, fabricated from copper piping and steel components, was not cleaned prior to operation, and employed no HWC. In comparison to the other system, the corrosion rates in the copper/steel system were 1-3 orders of magnitude higher. These results are discussed in terms of water radiolysis and water impurity levels.

  11. Doubling the Critical Current Density of 2G-Coated Conductors through Proton Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leroux, Maxime; Jia, Y.; Miller, D. J.; Wen, J. G.; Kwok, W. K.; Welp, U.; Rupich, M.; Fleshler, S.; Malozemoff, A.; Kayani, A.; Ayala-Valenzuela, O.; Civale, L.

    2014-03-01

    The in-field performance of production-line 2nd generation high temperature superconducting cable can be substantially improved by post-fabrication irradiation with 4 MeV protons. A dose of 8 .1016 p / cm2 nearly doubles the critical current in fields of 6 T // c at 27 K and more generally the suppression of Jc in magnetic field is reduced. A mixed pinning landscape composed of preexisting precipitates and twin boundaries and small, finely dispersed irradiation induced defects may account for the improved vortex pinning in high magnetic fields. Our current data-set indicates that there is significant head-room for further enhancements.This work was supported by the Center for Emergent Superconductivity, an Energy Frontier Research Center funded by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences (Y.J., M.L., W.K.K., U.W., O.A.V., L.C.) and by the Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, under Contract No. DE-AC02- 06CH11357 (D.J.M., J.G.W.). Irradiations were carried out at the Western Michigan University accelerator laboratory. Microstructure was characterized in the Electron Microscopy Center at Argonne, supported by the Office of Science-Basic Energy Science.

  12. Small-Scale Mechanical Testing on Proton Beam-Irradiated 304 SS from Room Temperature to Reactor Operation Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vo, H.; Reichardt, A.; Howard, C.; Abad, M. D.; Kaoumi, D.; Chou, P.; Hosemann, P.

    2015-12-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are common structural components in light water reactors. Because reactor components are subjected to harsh conditions such as high operating temperatures and neutron radiation, they can undergo irradiation-induced embrittlement and related failure, which compromises reliable operation. Small-scale mechanical testing has seen widespread use as a testing method for both ion- and reactor-irradiated materials because it allows access to the mechanical properties of the ion beam-irradiated region, and for safe handling of a small amount of activated material. In this study, nanoindentation and microcompression testing were performed on unirradiated and 10 dpa proton-irradiated 304 SS, from 25°C to 300°C. Increases in yield stress (YS), critical resolved shear stress (CRSS) and hardness ( H) were seen in the irradiated region relative to the unirradiated region. Relationships between H, YS, and CRSS of irradiated and unirradiated materials are discussed over this temperature range.

  13. The tensile and fatigue properties of DIN 1.4914 martensitic stainless steel after 590 MeV proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.

    1992-09-01

    Tensile and low cycle fatigue subsize specimens of DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET) have been irradiated with 590 MeV protons to doses up to 1 dpa and at temperatures between 363 and 703 K. The helium produced by spallation reactions was measured as 130 appm/dpa. A strong radiation hardening is found, which decreases as the irradiation temperature increases. The tensile elongation is reduced after irradiation, but the fracture mode is always ductile and transgranular. The radition hardening produced at low irradiation temperatures is recovered after annealing at higher temperatures. Continous softening is observed during low cycle fatigue testing. The rate of softening of the irradiated material is stonger than that of the unirradiated material and tends to reach the saturation level of the latter. The irradiation badly affects the fatigue life, particularly in the temperature domain of dynamic strain ageing between 553 and 653 K.

  14. The comparison of microstructure and nanocluster evolution in proton and neutron irradiated Fe-9%Cr ODS steel to 3 dpa at 500 °C

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swenson, M. J.; Wharry, J. P.

    2015-12-01

    A model Fe-9%Cr oxide dispersion strengthened (ODS) steel was irradiated with protons or neutrons to a dose of 3 displacements per atom (dpa) at a temperature of 500 °C, enabling a direct comparison of ion to neutron irradiation effects at otherwise fixed irradiation conditions. The irradiated microstructures were characterized using transmission electron microscopy and atom probe tomography including cluster analysis. Both proton and neutron irradiations produced a comparable void and dislocation loop microstructure. However, the irradiation response of the Ti-Y-O oxide nanoclusters varied. Oxides remained stable under proton irradiation, but exhibited dissolution and an increase in Y:Ti composition ratio under neutron irradiation. Both proton and neutron irradiation also induced varying extents of Si, Ni, and Mn clustering at existing oxide nanoclusters. Protons are able to reproduce the void and loop microstructure of neutron irradiation carried out to the same dose and temperature. However, since nanocluster evolution is controlled by both diffusion and ballistic impacts, protons are rendered unable to reproduce the nanocluster evolution of neutron irradiation at the same dose and temperature.

  15. Diffusion length variation in 0.5- and 3-MeV-proton-irradiated, heteroepitaxial indium phosphide solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jain, Raj K.; Weinberg, Irving; Flood, Dennis J.

    1993-01-01

    Indium phosphide (InP) solar cells are more radiation resistant than gallium arsenide (GaAs) and silicon (Si) solar cells, and their growth by heteroepitaxy offers additional advantages leading to the development of light weight, mechanically strong, and cost-effective cells. Changes in heteroepitaxial InP cell efficiency under 0.5- and 3-MeV proton irradiations have been explained by the variation in the minority-carrier diffusion length. The base diffusion length versus proton fluence was calculated by simulating the cell performance. The diffusion length damage coefficient, K(sub L), was also plotted as a function of proton fluence.

  16. Dose and dose rate effects of whole-body proton irradiation on leukocyte populations and lymphoid organs: part I

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gridley, Daila S.; Pecaut, Michael J.; Dutta-Roy, Radha; Nelson, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of part I of this study was to evaluate the effects of whole-body proton irradiation on lymphoid organs and specific leukocyte populations. C57BL/6 mice were exposed to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve to total doses of 0.5 gray (Gy), 1.5 Gy, and 3.0 Gy, each delivered at a low dose rate (LDR) of 1 cGy/min and high dose rate (HDR) of 80 cGy/min. Non-irradiated and 3 Gy HDR gamma-irradiated groups were included as controls. At 4 days post-irradiation, highly significant radiation dose-dependent reductions were observed in the mass of both lymphoid organs and the numbers of leukocytes and T (CD3(+)), T helper (CD3(+)/CD4(+)), T cytotoxic (CD3(+)/CD8(+)), and B (CD19(+)) cells in both blood and spleen. A less pronounced dose effect was noted for natural killer (NK1.1(+) NK) cells in spleen. Monocyte, but not granulocyte, counts in blood were highly dose-dependent. The numbers for each population generally tended to be lower with HDR than with LDR radiation; a significant dose rate effect was found in the percentages of T and B cells, monocytes, and granulocytes and in CD4(+):CD8(+) ratios. These data indicate that mononuclear cell response to the entry region of the proton Bragg curve is highly dependent upon the total dose and that dose rate effects are evident with some cell types. Results from gamma- and proton-irradiated groups (both at 3 Gy HDR) were similar, although proton-irradiation gave consistently lower values in some measurements.

  17. Low temperature cross linking polyimides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Serafini, T. T.; Delvigs, P. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A polyimide is formed by cross linking a prepolymer formed by reacting a polyfunctional ester, a polyfunctional amine, and an end-capping unit. By providing an end-capping unit, the prepolymer is curable at a relatively low temperature of about 175 to 245 C.

  18. Catalysts for low temperature oxidation

    DOEpatents

    Toops, Todd J.; Parks, III, James E.; Bauer, John C.

    2016-03-01

    The invention provides a composite catalyst containing a first component and a second component. The first component contains nanosized gold particles. The second component contains nanosized platinum group metals. The composite catalyst is useful for catalyzing the oxidation of carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons, oxides of nitrogen, and other pollutants at low temperatures.

  19. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, J.A.

    1983-05-26

    The invention relates to magnetic refrigeration and more particularly to low temperature refrigeration between about 4 and about 20 K, with an apparatus and method utilizing a belt of magnetic material passed in and out of a magnetic field with heat exchangers within and outside the field operably disposed to accomplish refrigeration.

  20. Low-temperature magnetic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Barclay, John A.

    1985-01-01

    The disclosure is directed to a low temperature 4 to 20 K. refrigeration apparatus and method utilizing a ring of magnetic material moving through a magnetic field. Heat exchange is accomplished in and out of the magnetic field to appropriately utilize the device to execute Carnot and Stirling cycles.

  1. The microstructure of the 1.4914 MANET martensitic steel before and after irradiation with 590 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavillet, D.; Marmy, P.; Victoria, M.

    1992-09-01

    Optical and transmission electron microscope observations, together with SEM (scanning electron microscope) and ASTEM (analytical scanning transmission electron microscope) microanalysis have been performed in samples of the DIN 1.4914 martensitic steel (MANET cast), both before and after irradiation with 590 MeV protons to doses up to 1 dpa at temperatures between 363 and 703 K. The chemical composition of the different carbide geometries have been obtained. No substantial modification of the carbide and precipitate structure is observed after either deformation under fatigue or after irradiation to 1 dpa at 703 K. No bubbles have been observed in a specimen irradiated to 0.7 dpa, containing 87 appm He.

  2. Measurement of the displacement cross-section of copper irradiated with 125 MeV protons at 12 K

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwamoto, Yosuke; Yoshiie, Toshimasa; Yoshida, Makoto; Nakamoto, Tatsushi; Sakamoto, Masaaki; Kuriyama, Yasutoshi; Uesugi, Tomonori; Ishi, Yoshihiro; Xu, Qiu; Yashima, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Fumiaki; Mori, Yoshiharu; Ogitsu, Toru

    2015-03-01

    To validate Monte Carlo codes for the prediction of radiation damage in metals irradiated by >100 MeV protons, the defect-induced electrical resistivity changes related to the displacement cross-section of copper were measured with 125 MeV proton irradiation at 12 K. The cryogenic irradiation system was developed with a Gifford-McMahon cryocooler to cool the sample via an oxygen-free high-conductivity copper plate by conduction cooling. The sample was a copper wire with a 250-μm diameter and 99.999% purity sandwiched between two aluminum nitride ceramic sheets. The electrical resistivity changes of the copper wire were measured using the four-probe technique. After 125 MeV proton irradiation with 1.45 × 1018 protons/m2 at 12 K, the total resistivity increase was 4.94 × 10-13 Ω m (resistance increase: 1.53 μΩ), while the resistivity of copper before irradiation was 9.44 × 10-12 Ω m (resistance: 29.41 μΩ). The resistivity increase did not change during annealing after irradiation below 15 K. The experimental displacement cross-section for 125 MeV irradiation shows similar results to the experimental data for 1.1 and 1.94 GeV. Comparison with the calculated results indicated that the defect production efficiency in Monte Carlo codes gives a good quantitative description of the displacement cross-section in the energy region >100 MeV.

  3. Mouse retinal adaptive response to proton irradiation: Correlation with DNA repair and photoreceptor cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tronov, V. A.; Vinogradova, Yu. V.; Poplinskaya, V. A.; Nekrasova, E. I.; Ostrovsky, M. A.

    2015-01-01

    Emerging body of data indicate protecting effect of low level of stress (preconditioning) on retina. Our previous study revealed non-linear dose-response relationship for cytotoxicity of both ionizing radiation and N-methyl-N-nitrosourea (MNU) on mouse retina. Moreover, non cytotoxic dose of MNU increased tolerance of retina to following challenge dose of MNU. This result displays protection of retina through mechanism of recovery. In present study we used the mouse model for MNU-induced retinal degeneration to evaluate adaptive response of retina to proton irradiation and implication in it of glial Muller cells. The data showed that the recovery of retina after genotoxic agents has been associated with increased efficacy of DNA damage repair and lowered death of retinal photoreceptor cells.

  4. In-growth of an electrically active defect in high-purity silicon after proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Juul Pedersen, H.; Christian Petersen, M.; Privitera, V.; Gurimskaya, Y.; Mesli, A.

    2013-12-14

    Defect-related energy levels in the lower half of the band gap of silicon have been studied with transient-capacitance techniques in high-purity, carbon and oxygen lean, plasma-enhanced chemical-vapor deposition grown, n-and p-type silicon layers after 2-MeV proton irradiations at temperatures at or just below room temperature. The in-growth of a distinct line in deep-level transient spectroscopy spectra, corresponding to a level in the band gap at E{sub V} + 0.357 eV where E{sub V} is the energy of the valence band edge, takes place for anneal temperatures at around room temperature with an activation energy of 0.95 ± 0.08 eV. The line disappears at an anneal temperature of around 450 K. The corresponding defect is demonstrated not to contain boron, carbon, oxygen, or phosphorus. Possible defect candidates are discussed.

  5. Use of the point defect model to interpret the iron oxidation kinetics under proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lapuerta, S.; Moncoffre, N.; Jaffrezic, H.; Millard-Pinard, N.; Bererd, N.; Esnouf, C.; Crusset, D.

    2007-03-15

    This article concerns the study of iron corrosion in wet air under mega-electron-volt proton irradiation for different fluxes at room temperature and with a relative humidity fixed to 45%. Oxidized iron sample surfaces are characterized by ion beam analysis (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and elastic recoil detection analysis), for the elemental analysis. The structural and physicochemical characterization is performed using the x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy techniques. We have also measured the iron oxidation kinetics. Radiation enhanced diffusion and transport processes have been evidenced. The modeling of the experimental data shows that the apparent oxygen diffusion coefficient increases whereas the oxygen transport velocity decreases as function of flux. Finally, the point defect model has been used to determine the electric field value in the samples. Results have shown that the transport process can be attributed to the presence of an electrical potential gradient.

  6. Interaction of defects and H in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, S.M.; Seager, C.H.

    2005-05-01

    Magnesium-doped, p-type GaN containing H was irradiated with MeV protons at room temperature and then annealed at a succession of increasing temperatures, with the behavior of defects and H in the material being followed through infrared absorption spectroscopy, nuclear-reaction analysis of the H, and photoluminescence. The results support the annihilation of Ga Frenkel pairs near room temperature, leaving the N interstitial and N vacancy to influence the elevated-temperature behavior. Multiple changes are observed with increasing temperature, ending with thermal release of the H above 700 deg. C. These effects are interpreted in terms of a succession of complexes involving Mg, the point defects, and H.

  7. Measurement of temperature-dependent defect diffusion in proton-irradiated GaN(Mg, H)

    SciTech Connect

    Fleming, R. M.; Myers, S. M.

    2006-08-15

    Deuterated p-type GaN(Mg,{sup 2}H) films were irradiated at room temperature with 1 MeV protons to create native point defects with a concentration approximately equal to the Mg doping (5x10{sup 19} cm{sup -3}). The samples were then annealed isothermally at a succession of temperatures while monitoring the infrared absorption due to the H local mode of the MgH defect. As the samples were annealed, the MgH absorption signal decreased and a new mode at slightly higher frequency appeared, which has been associated with the approach of a mobile nitrogen interstitial. We used the time dependence of the MgH absorption to obtain a diffusion barrier of the nitrogen interstitial in p-type GaN of 1.99 eV. This is in good agreement with theoretical calculations of nitrogen interstitial motion in GaN.

  8. Biological cell irradiation at ultrahigh dose rate employing laser driven protons

    SciTech Connect

    Doria, D.; Kakolee, K. F.; Kar, S.; and others

    2012-07-09

    The ultrashort duration of laser-driven multi-MeV ion bursts offers the possibility of radiobiological studies at extremely high dose rates. Employing the TARANIS Terawatt laser at Queen's University, the effect of proton irradiation at MeV-range energies on live cells has been investigated at dose rates exceeding 10{sup 9}Gy/s as a single exposure. A clonogenic assay showed consistent lethal effects on V-79 live cells, which, even at these dose rates, appear to be in line with previously published results employing conventional sources. A Relative Biological Effectiveness (RBE) of 1.4{+-}0.2 at 10% survival is estimated from a comparison with a 225 kVp X-ray source.

  9. Cross sections from proton irradiation of thorium at 800 MeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan W.; Mashnik, Stepan G.; Weidner, John W.; Wolfsberg, Laura E.; Fassbender, Michael E.; Jackman, Kevin; Couture, Aaron; Bitteker, Leo J.; Ullmann, John L.; Gulley, Mark S.; Pillai, Chandra; John, Kevin D.; Birnbaum, Eva R.; Nortier, Francois M.

    2013-07-01

    Nuclear formation cross sections are reported for 65 nuclides produced from 800-MeV proton irradiation of thorium foils. These data are useful as benchmarks for computational predictions in the ongoing process of theoretical code development and also in the design of spallation-based radioisotope production currently being considered for multiple radiotherapeutic pharmaceutical agents. Measured data are compared with the predictions of three mcnp6 event generators and used to evaluate the potential for 800-MeV productions of radioisotopes of interest for medical radiotherapy. In only a few instances code predictions are discrepant from measured values by more than a factor of 2, demonstrating satisfactory predictive power across a large mass range. Similarly, agreement between measurements presented here and those previously reported is good, lending credibility to predictions of target yields and radioimpurities for high-energy accelerator-produced radionuclides.

  10. Meteorite-catalyzed syntheses of nucleosides and of other prebiotic compounds from formamide under proton irradiation.

    PubMed

    Saladino, Raffaele; Carota, Eleonora; Botta, Giorgia; Kapralov, Mikhail; Timoshenko, Gennady N; Rozanov, Alexei Y; Krasavin, Eugene; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2015-05-26

    Liquid formamide has been irradiated by high-energy proton beams in the presence of powdered meteorites, and the products of the catalyzed resulting syntheses were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Relative to the controls (no radiation, or no formamide, or no catalyst), an extremely rich, variegate, and prebiotically relevant panel of compounds was observed. The meteorites tested were representative of the four major classes: iron, stony iron, chondrites, and achondrites. The products obtained were amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases, sugars, and, most notably, four nucleosides: cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and thymidine. In accordance with theoretical studies, the detection of HCN oligomers suggests the occurrence of mechanisms based on the generation of radical cyanide species (CN·) for the synthesis of nucleobases. Given that many of the compounds obtained are key components of extant organisms, these observations contribute to outline plausible exogenous high-energy-based prebiotic scenarios and their possible boundary conditions, as discussed.

  11. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, G.E.; Barnes, J.W.

    1979-10-17

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H/sub 2/O/sub 2/, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  12. Hot cell purification of strontium-82, 85 and other isotopes from proton irradiated molybdenum

    DOEpatents

    Bentley, Glenn E.; Barnes, John W.

    1981-01-01

    A process suitable for producing curie quantities of quite pure Sr-82,85 is given. After a Mo target is irradiated with energetic protons having energies greater than about 200 MeV, thus producing a large number of radioactive species, the particular species of Sr-82,85 are substantially separated from the other products by a 6-step process. The process comprises dissolution of the target in H.sub.2 O.sub.2, followed by use of several ion exchange resins, extraction with an organophosphorus compound, and several adjustments of pH values. Other embodiments include processes for producing relatively pure long-lived Rb isotopes, Y-88, and Zr-88.

  13. Meteorite-catalyzed syntheses of nucleosides and of other prebiotic compounds from formamide under proton irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Saladino, Raffaele; Carota, Eleonora; Botta, Giorgia; Kapralov, Mikhail; Timoshenko, Gennady N.; Rozanov, Alexei Y.; Krasavin, Eugene; Di Mauro, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    Liquid formamide has been irradiated by high-energy proton beams in the presence of powdered meteorites, and the products of the catalyzed resulting syntheses were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Relative to the controls (no radiation, or no formamide, or no catalyst), an extremely rich, variegate, and prebiotically relevant panel of compounds was observed. The meteorites tested were representative of the four major classes: iron, stony iron, chondrites, and achondrites. The products obtained were amino acids, carboxylic acids, nucleobases, sugars, and, most notably, four nucleosides: cytidine, uridine, adenosine, and thymidine. In accordance with theoretical studies, the detection of HCN oligomers suggests the occurrence of mechanisms based on the generation of radical cyanide species (CN·) for the synthesis of nucleobases. Given that many of the compounds obtained are key components of extant organisms, these observations contribute to outline plausible exogenous high-energy–based prebiotic scenarios and their possible boundary conditions, as discussed. PMID:25870268

  14. Dosimetric Characteristics of a Two-Dimensional Diode Array Detector Irradiated with Passively Scattered Proton Beams

    PubMed Central

    Liengsawangwong, Praimakorn; Sahoo, Nanayan; Ding, Xiaoning; Lii, MingFwu; Gillin, Michale T.; Zhu, Xiaorong Ronald

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric characteristics of a two-dimensional (2D) diode array detector irradiated with passively scattered proton beams. Materials and Methods: A diode array detector, MapCHECK (Model 1175, Sun Nuclear, Melbourne, FL, USA) was characterized in passive-scattered proton beams. The relative sensitivity of the diodes and absolute dose calibration were determined using a 250 MeV beam. The pristine Bragg curves (PBCs) measured by MapCHECK diodes were compared with those of an ion chamber using a range shift method. The water-equivalent thickness (WET) of the diode array detector’s intrinsic buildup also was determined. The inverse square dependence, linearity, and other proton dosimetric quantities measured by MapCHECK were also compared with those of the ion chambers. The change in the absolute dose response of the MapCHECK as a function of accumulated radiation dose was used as an indicator of radiation damage to the diodes. 2D dose distribution with and without the compensator were measured and compared with the treatment planning system (TPS) calculations. Results: The WET of the MapCHECK diode’s buildup was determined to be 1.7 cm. The MapCHECK-measured PBC were virtually identical to those measured by a parallel-plate ion chamber for 160, 180, and 250 MeV proton beams. The inverse square results of the MapCHECK were within ±0.4% of the ion chamber results. The linearity of MapCHECK results was within 1% of those from the ion chamber as measured in the range between 10 and 300 MU. All other dosimetric quantities were within 1.3% of the ion chamber results. The 2D dose distributions for non-clinical fields without compensator and the patient treatment fields with the compensator were consistent with the TPS results. The absolute dose response of the MapCHECK was changed by 7.4% after an accumulated dose increased by 170 Gy. Conclusions: The MapCHECK is a convenient and useful tool for 2D dose distribution measurements using passively

  15. A proton irradiation test facility for space research in Ankara, Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gencer, Ayşenur; Yiǧitoǧlu, Merve; Bilge Demirköz, Melahat; Efthymiopoulos, Ilias

    2016-07-01

    Space radiation often affects the electronic components' performance during the mission duration. In order to ensure reliable performance, the components must be tested to at least the expected dose that will be received in space, before the mission. Accelerator facilities are widely used for such irradiation tests around the world. Turkish Atomic Energy Authority (TAEA) has a 15MeV to 30MeV variable proton cyclotron in Ankara and the facility's main purpose is to produce radioisotopes in three different rooms for different target systems. There is also an R&D room which can be used for research purposes. This paper will detail the design and current state of the construction of a beamline to perform Single Event Effect (SEE) tests in Ankara for the first time. ESA ESCC No.25100 Standard Single Event Effect Test Method and Guidelines is being considered for these SEE tests. The proton beam kinetic energy must be between 20MeV and 200MeV according to the standard. While the proton energy is suitable for SEE tests, the beam size must be 15.40cm x 21.55cm and the flux must be between 10 ^{5} p/cm ^{2}/s to at least 10 ^{8} p/cm ^{2}/s according to the standard. The beam size at the entrance of the R&D room is mm-sized and the current is variable between 10μA and 1.2mA. Therefore, a defocusing beam line has been designed to enlarge the beam size and reduce the flux value. The beam line has quadrupole magnets to enlarge the beam size and the collimators and scattering foils are used for flux reduction. This facility will provide proton fluxes between 10 ^{7} p/cm ^{2}/s and 10 ^{10} p/cm ^{2}/s for the area defined in the standard when completed. Also for testing solar cells developed for space, the proton beam energy will be lowered below 10MeV. This project has been funded by Ministry of Development in Turkey and the beam line construction will finish in two years and SEE tests will be performed for the first time in Turkey.

  16. Changes in luminescence emission induced by proton irradiation: InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and quantum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Swift, G. M.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W. A.; Tang, Y. S.; Wang, K. L.; Dowd, P.; Zhang, Y. H.

    2000-01-01

    The photoluminescence emission from InGaAs/GaAs quantum-well and quantum-dot (QD) structures are compared after controlled irradiation with 1.5 MeV proton fluxes. Results presented here show a significant enhancement in radiation tolerance with three-dimensional quantum confinement.

  17. A Comparison of Model Calculation and Measurement of Absorbed Dose for Proton Irradiation. Chapter 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zapp, N.; Semones, E.; Saganti, P.; Cucinotta, F.

    2003-01-01

    With the increase in the amount of time spent EVA that is necessary to complete the construction and subsequent maintenance of ISS, it will become increasingly important for ground support personnel to accurately characterize the radiation exposures incurred by EVA crewmembers. Since exposure measurements cannot be taken within the organs of interest, it is necessary to estimate these exposures by calculation. To validate the methods and tools used to develop these estimates, it is necessary to model experiments performed in a controlled environment. This work is such an effort. A human phantom was outfitted with detector equipment and then placed in American EMU and Orlan-M EVA space suits. The suited phantom was irradiated at the LLUPTF with proton beams of known energies. Absorbed dose measurements were made by the spaceflight operational dosimetrist from JSC at multiple sites in the skin, eye, brain, stomach, and small intestine locations in the phantom. These exposures are then modeled using the BRYNTRN radiation transport code developed at the NASA Langley Research Center, and the CAM (computerized anatomical male) human geometry model of Billings and Yucker. Comparisons of absorbed dose calculations with measurements show excellent agreement. This suggests that there is reason to be confident in the ability of both the transport code and the human body model to estimate proton exposure in ground-based laboratory experiments.

  18. SU-D-304-02: Magnetically Focused Proton Irradiation of Small Field Targets

    SciTech Connect

    McAuley, GA; Slater, JM; Slater, JD; Wroe, AJ

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of magnetic focusing for small field proton irradiations. It is hypothesized that magnetic focusing will provide significant dose distribution benefits over standard collimated beams for fields less than 10 mm diameter. Methods: Magnets consisting of 24 segments of radiation hard samarium-cobalt adhered into hollow cylinders were designed and manufactured. Two focusing magnets were placed on a positioning track on our Gantry 1 treatment table. Proton beams with energies of 127 and 157 MeV, 15 and 30 mm modulation, and 8 mm initial diameters were delivered to a water tank using single-stage scattering. Depth dose distributions were measured using a PTW PR60020 diode detector and transverse profiles were measured with Gafchromic EBT3 film. Monte Carlo simulations were also performed - both for comparison with experimental data and to further explore the potential of magnetic focusing in silica. For example, beam spot areas (based on the 90% dose contour) were matched at Bragg depth between simulated 100 MeV collimated beams and simulated beams focused by two 400 T/m gradient magnets. Results: Preliminary experimental results show 23% higher peak to entrance dose ratios and flatter spread out Bragg peak plateaus for 8 mm focused beams compared with uncollimated beams. Monte Carlo simulations showed 21% larger peak to entrance ratios and a ∼9 fold more efficient dose to target delivery compared to spot-sized matched collimated beams. Our latest results will be presented. Conclusion: Our results suggest that rare earth focusing magnet assemblies could reduce skin dose and beam number while delivering dose to nominally spherical radiosurgery targets over a much shorter time compared to unfocused beams. Immediate clinical applications include those associated with proton radiosurgery and functional radiosurgery of the brain and spine, however expanded treatment sites can be also envisaged.

  19. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of 145 MeV proton-irradiated AlBeMet 162

    SciTech Connect

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; McDonald, Kirk T.; Ghose, Sanjit; Zhong, Zhong; Simos, Nikolaos

    2016-08-03

    AlBeMet 162 (Materion Co., formerly Brush Wellman) has been irradiated with 145 MeV protons up to 1.2x1020 cm-2 fluence, with irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-220oC. Macroscopic postirradiation evaluation on the evolution of mechanical and thermal properties was integrated with a comprehensive X-ray- diffraction study using high-energy monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray beams, which offered a microscopic view of the irradiation damage effects on AlBeMet. The study confirmed the stability of the metal-matrix composite, its resistance to proton damage, and the continuing separation of the two distinct phases, fcc aluminum and hcp beryllium, following irradiation. Furthermore, based on the absence of inter-planar distance change during proton irradiation, it was confirmed that the stacking faults and clusters on the Al (111) planes are stable, and thus can migrate from the cascade region and be absorbed at various sinks. XRD analysis of the unirradiated AlBeMet 162 showed clear change in the texture of the fcc phase with orientation especially in the Al (111) reflection which exhibits a “non-perfect” six-fold symmetry, implying lack of isotropy in the composite.

  20. X-Ray Diffraction Studies of 145 MeV proton-irradiated AlBeMet 162

    DOE PAGES

    Elbakhshwan, Mohamed; McDonald, Kirk T.; Ghose, Sanjit; ...

    2016-08-03

    AlBeMet 162 (Materion Co., formerly Brush Wellman) has been irradiated with 145 MeV protons up to 1.2x1020 cm-2 fluence, with irradiation temperatures in the range of 100-220oC. Macroscopic postirradiation evaluation on the evolution of mechanical and thermal properties was integrated with a comprehensive X-ray- diffraction study using high-energy monochromatic and polychromatic X-ray beams, which offered a microscopic view of the irradiation damage effects on AlBeMet. The study confirmed the stability of the metal-matrix composite, its resistance to proton damage, and the continuing separation of the two distinct phases, fcc aluminum and hcp beryllium, following irradiation. Furthermore, based on the absencemore » of inter-planar distance change during proton irradiation, it was confirmed that the stacking faults and clusters on the Al (111) planes are stable, and thus can migrate from the cascade region and be absorbed at various sinks. XRD analysis of the unirradiated AlBeMet 162 showed clear change in the texture of the fcc phase with orientation especially in the Al (111) reflection which exhibits a “non-perfect” six-fold symmetry, implying lack of isotropy in the composite.« less

  1. Positron states and nanoobjects in proton-irradiated quartz single crystals: Positronium atom in quartz

    SciTech Connect

    Grafutin, V. I.; Zaluzhnyi, A. G.; Timoshenkov, S. P.; Britkov, O. M.; Ilyukhina, O. V.; Myasishcheva, G. G.; Prokop'ev, E. P. Funtikov, Yu. V.

    2008-04-15

    The influence of proton bombardment and metal atom impurities on the structure of quartz single crystals has been studied. The related defects have been studied using positron annihilation spectroscopy (angular correlation of positron-annihilation photons), acoustic absorption, and optical absorption measurements. It is shown that the presence of a narrow component f in the angular distribution of annihilation photons (ADAP), which is related to the formation of parapositronium, determines a high sensitivity of this method with respect to features of the crystal structure of quartz. It is established that the defectness of the structure of irradiated quartz crystals can be characterized by the ratio f/f{sub 0} of the relative intensities of narrow components in the ADAP curves measured before (f{sub 0}) and after (f) irradiation. Any process leading to a decrease in the probability of positronium formation (e.g., positron loss as a result of the trapping on defects and the interaction with impurity atoms and lattice distortions) decreases the intensity of the narrow component. Based on the ADAP data, estimates of the radii and concentrations of nanodefects in quartz have been obtained and their variation upon annealing at temperatures up to T = 873 K has been studied.

  2. Proton-associated alpha-irradiation in the early solar system - A possible K-41 anomaly

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dwek, E.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that alpha-particle fluences associated with proton fluences sufficiently high to produce the Al-correlated excess of Mg-26 found in the Allende meteorite produce equally significant amounts of Ca-41. The Ca-41 is produced by Ar-38(alpha,n)Ca-41 reactions occurring in the gas and condenses into the Ca-Al-rich grains forming at that time. After the decay of Ca-41, these grains will have a Ca-correlated excess of K-41. The question is considered whether the proposed scheme is capable of producing an observable excess of K-41. A calculation is conducted of the magnitude of the K-41 excess expected to be found in Ca-Al-rich grains for various ratios of Ca/K by developing an irradiation-condensation model. It is shown that on the basis of the currently available data it is not possible to come to firm conclusions regarding the validity of the irradiation model.

  3. Production of 230U/226Th for targeted alpha therapy via proton irradiation of 231Pa.

    PubMed

    Morgenstern, Alfred; Lebeda, Ondrej; Stursa, Jan; Bruchertseifer, Frank; Capote, Roberto; McGinley, John; Rasmussen, Gert; Sin, Mihaela; Zielinska, Barbara; Apostolidis, Christos

    2008-11-15

    (230)U and its daughter nuclide (226)Th are novel therapeutic nuclides for application in targeted alpha-therapy of cancer. We have investigated the feasibility of producing (230)U/(226)Th via proton irradiation of (231)Pa according to the reaction (231)Pa(p,2n)(230)U. The experimental excitation function for this reaction is reported for the first time. Cross sections were measured using thin targets of (231)Pa prepared by electrodeposition and (230)U yields were analyzed using alpha-spectrometry. Beam parameters (energy and intensity) were determined both by calculation using a mathematical model based on measured beam orbits and beam current integrator and by parallel monitor reactions on copper foils using high-resolution gamma-spectrometry and IAEA recommended cross-section data. The measured cross sections are in good agreement with model calculations using the EMPIRE-II code and are sufficiently high for the production of (230)U/(226)Th in clinically relevant amounts. A highly effective separation process was developed to isolate clinical grade (230)U from irradiated protactinium oxide targets. Product purity was assessed using alpha- and gamma-spectrometry as well as ICPMS.

  4. Low temperature selective absorber research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzenberg, S. A.; Silberglitt, R.

    1982-04-01

    Research carried out since 1979 on selective absorbers is surveyed, with particular attention given to the low-temperature coatings seen as promising for flat plate and evacuated tube applications. The most thoroughly investigated absorber is black chrome, which is highly selective and is the most durable low-temperature absorber. It is believed that other materials, because of their low cost and lower content of strategic materials, may eventually supplant black chrome. Among these candidates are chemically converted black nickel; anodically oxidized nickel, zinc, and copper composites; and nickel or other low-cost multilayer coatings. In reviewing medium and high-temperature research, black chrome, multilayer coatings and black cobalt are seen as best medium-temperature candidates. For high temperatures, an Al2O3/Pt-Al203 multilayer composite or the zirconium diboride coating is preferred.

  5. The effects of irradiation and proton implantation on the density of mobile protons in SiO{sub 2} films

    SciTech Connect

    Vanheusden, K.; Fleetwood, D.M.; Schwank, J.R.; Shaneyfelt, M.R.; Meisenheimer, T.L.; Draper, B.L.

    1998-04-01

    Proton implantation into the buried oxide of Si/SiO{sub 2}/Si structures does not introduce mobile protons. The cross section for capture of radiation-induced electrons by mobile protons is two orders of magnitude smaller than for electron capture by trapped holes. The data provide new insights into the atomic mechanisms governing the generation and radiation tolerance of mobile protons in SiO{sub 2}. This can lead to improved techniques for production and radiation hardening of radiation tolerant memory devices.

  6. Innovative low temperature SOFCs and advanced materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, B.; Yang, X. T.; Xu, J.; Zhu, Z. G.; Ji, S. J.; Sun, M. T.; Sun, J. C.

    High ionic conductivity, varying from 0.01 to 1 S cm -1 between 300 and 700 °C, has been achieved for the hybrid and nano-ceria-composite electrolyte materials, demonstrating a successful application for advanced low temperature solid oxide fuel cells (LTSOFCs). The LTSOFCs were constructed based on these new materials. The performance of 0.15-0.25 W cm -2 was obtained in temperature region of 320-400 °C for the ceria-carbonate composite electrolyte, and of 0.35-0.66 W cm -2 in temperature region of 500-600 °C for the ceria-lanthanum oxide composites. The cell could even function at as low as 200 °C. The cell has also undergone a life test for several months. A two-cell stack was studied, showing expected performance successfully. The excellent LTSOFC performance is resulted from both functional electrolyte and electrode materials. The electrolytes are two phase composite materials based on the oxygen ion and proton conducting phases, or two rare-earth oxides. The electrodes used were based on the same composite material system having excellent compatibility with the electrolyte. They are highly catalytic and conductive thus creating the excellent performances at low temperatures. These innovative LT materials and LTSOFC technologies would open the door for wide applications, not only for stationary but also for mobile power sources.

  7. Significantly Dense Two-Dimensional Hydrogen-Bond Network in a Layered Zirconium Phosphate Leading to High Proton Conductivities in Both Water-Assisted Low-Temperature and Anhydrous Intermediate-Temperature Regions.

    PubMed

    Gui, Daxiang; Zheng, Tao; Xie, Jian; Cai, Yawen; Wang, Yaxing; Chen, Lanhua; Diwu, Juan; Chai, Zhifang; Wang, Shuao

    2016-12-19

    A highly stable layered zirconium phosphate, (NH4)2[ZrF2(HPO4)2] (ZrP-1), was synthesized by an ionothermal method and contains an extremely dense two-dimensional hydrogen-bond network that is thermally stable up to 573 K, leading to combined ultrahigh water-assisted proton conductivities of 1.45 × 10(-2) S cm(-1) at 363 K/95% relative humidity and sustainable anhydrous proton conductivity of 1.1 × 10(-5) S cm(-1) at 503 K.

  8. Isolation of the role of radiation-induced segregation in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking of proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busby, Jeremy Todd

    2001-11-01

    The role of radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in irradiation-assisted stress corrosion cracking (IASCC) was studied in order to better understand the underlying mechanisms of IASCC. High-purity 304L (HP-304L), commercial purity 304 (CP-304) and commercial purity 316 (CP-316) stainless steel alloys were irradiated with 3.2 MeV protons at 400°C (HP-304L) and 360°C (CP-304 and CP-316) to doses ranging from 0.1 and 5.0 dpa. Grain boundary chemistry was measured using scanning transmission electron microscopy with energy-dispersive spectroscopy (STEM/EDS) in both unirradiated and irradiated samples. Unirradiated and irradiated samples of the two commercial purity alloys were also strained to failure in an aqueous environment representative of boiling water reactor cores. The cracking susceptibility and RIS in the proton-irradiated CP-304 is very similar to that from the neutron-irradiated samples. The CP-316 alloy did not crack. Radiation-induced segregation, cracking susceptibility, and dislocation loop microstructure developed at the same rate as a function of dose in the CP-304 alloy. To isolate the effects of RIS in IASCC, post-irradiation annealing was utilized. Simulations of post-irradiation annealing of RIS and dislocation loop microstructure show that dislocation loops are removed preferentially over RIS due to the density of vacancies required and kinetic considerations. Experimental anneals were conducted on HP-304L samples irradiated to 1.0 dpa and CP-304 samples irradiated to 1.0 and 2.5 dpa. Post-irradiation anneals were performed at temperatures ranging from 400°C to 650°C for times between 45 minutes and 5 hours. At all temperatures, the hardness and dislocation densities decreased with increasing annealing time much faster than RIS did. Annealing at 600°C for 90 minutes removed virtually all dislocation microstructure while leaving RIS intact. Cracking susceptibility in the CP-304 alloy was mitigated rapidly during post-irradiation annealing

  9. Use of primary cell cultures to measure the late effects in the skins of rhesus monkeys irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, A. B.; Wood, D. H.; Lett, J. T.

    Previous pilot investigations of the uses of primary cell cultures to study late damage in stem cells of the skin of the New Zealand white (NZW) rabbit and the rhesus monkey /1-3/, have been extended to individual monkeys exposed to 55 MeV protons. Protons of this energy have a larger range in tissue of (~2.6 cm) than the 32 MeV protons (~0.9 cm) to which the animals in our earlier studies had been exposed. Although the primary emphases in the current studies were improvement and simplification in the techniques and logistics of transportation of biopsies to a central analytical facility, comparison of the quantitative measurements obtained thus far for survival of stem cells in the skins from animals irradiated 21 years ago reveals that the effects of both proton energies are similar.

  10. Efficient and stable proton acceleration by irradiating a two-layer target with a linearly polarized laser pulse

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, H. Y.; Yan, X. Q.; Chen, J. E.; He, X. T.; Ma, W. J.; Bin, J. H.; Schreiber, J.; Tajima, T.; Habs, D.

    2013-01-15

    We report an efficient and stable scheme to generate {approx}200 MeV proton bunch by irradiating a two-layer targets (near-critical density layer+solid density layer with heavy ions and protons) with a linearly polarized Gaussian pulse at intensity of 6.0 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} W/cm{sup 2}. Due to self-focusing of laser and directly accelerated electrons in the near-critical density layer, the proton energy is enhanced by a factor of 3 compared to single-layer solid targets. The energy spread of proton is also remarkably reduced. Such scheme is attractive for applications relevant to tumor therapy.

  11. Total Dose Effects on Bipolar Integrated Circuits at Low Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, A. H.; Swimm, R. T.; Thorbourn, D. O.

    2012-01-01

    Total dose damage in bipolar integrated circuits is investigated at low temperature, along with the temperature dependence of the electrical parameters of internal transistors. Bandgap narrowing causes the gain of npn transistors to decrease far more at low temperature compared to pnp transistors, due to the large difference in emitter doping concentration. When irradiations are done at temperatures of -140 deg C, no damage occurs until devices are warmed to temperatures above -50 deg C. After warm-up, subsequent cooling shows that damage is then present at low temperature. This can be explained by the very strong temperature dependence of dispersive transport in the continuous-time-random-walk model for hole transport. For linear integrated circuits, low temperature operation is affected by the strong temperature dependence of npn transistors along with the higher sensitivity of lateral and substrate pnp transistors to radiation damage.

  12. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a “priming” dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a “challenge” dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions. PMID:26948008

  13. A priming dose of protons alters the early cardiac cellular and molecular response to 56Fe irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadan, Samy S.; Sridharan, Vijayalakshmi; Koturbash, Igor; Miousse, Isabelle R.; Hauer-Jensen, Martin; Nelson, Gregory A.; Boerma, Marjan

    2016-02-01

    Purpose: Recent evidence suggests that the heart may be injured by ionizing radiation at lower doses than was previously thought. This raises concerns about the cardiovascular risks from exposure to radiation during space travel. Since space travel is associated with exposure to both protons from solar particle events and heavy ions from galactic cosmic rays, we here examined the effects of a ;priming; dose of protons on the cardiac cellular and molecular response to a ;challenge; dose of 56Fe in a mouse model. Methods: Male C57BL/6 mice at 10 weeks of age were exposed to sham-irradiation, 0.1 Gy of protons (150 MeV), 0.5 Gy of 56Fe (600 MeV/n), or 0.1 Gy of protons 24 hours prior to 0.5 Gy of 56Fe. Hearts were obtained at 7 days post-irradiation and western-blots were used to determine protein markers of cardiac remodeling, inflammatory infiltration, and cell death. Results: Exposure to 56Fe caused an increase in expression of α-smooth muscle cell actin, collagen type III, the inflammatory cell markers mast cell tryptase, CD2 and CD68, the endothelial glycoprotein thrombomodulin, and cleaved caspase 3. Of all proteins investigated, protons at a dose of 0.1 Gy induced a small increase only in cleaved caspase 3 levels. On the other hand, exposure to protons 24 hours before 56Fe prevented all of the responses to 56Fe. Conclusions: This study shows that a low dose of protons may prime the heart to respond differently to a subsequent challenge dose of heavy ions. Further investigation is required to identify responses at additional time points, consequences for cardiac function, threshold dose levels, and mechanisms by which a proton priming dose may alter the response to heavy ions.

  14. Low Temperature Waste Immobilization Testing Vol. I

    SciTech Connect

    Russell, Renee L.; Schweiger, Michael J.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Hrma, Pavel R.; Smith, D. E.; Gallegos, Autumn B.; Telander, Monty R.; Pitman, Stan G.

    2006-09-14

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) is evaluating low-temperature technologies to immobilize mixed radioactive and hazardous waste. Three waste forms—alkali-aluminosilicate hydroceramic cement, “Ceramicrete” phosphate-bonded ceramic, and “DuraLith” alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer—were selected through a competitive solicitation for fabrication and characterization of waste-form properties. The three contractors prepared their respective waste forms using simulants of a Hanford secondary waste and Idaho sodium bearing waste provided by PNNL and characterized their waste forms with respect to the Toxicity Characteristic Leaching Procedure (TCLP) and compressive strength. The contractors sent specimens to PNNL, and PNNL then conducted durability (American National Standards Institute/American Nuclear Society [ANSI/ANS] 16.1 Leachability Index [LI] and modified Product Consistency Test [PCT]) and compressive strength testing (both irradiated and as-received samples). This report presents the results of these characterization tests.

  15. A two-parameter scintillation spectrometer system for measurement of secondary proton, deuteron, and triton distributions from materials under 558-MeV-proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beck, S. M.

    1975-01-01

    A two-parameter scintillation spectrometer system developed and used to obtain proton, deuteron, and triton double differential cross sections from materials under 558-MeV-proton irradiation is described. The system measures both the time of flight of secondary particles over a 488-cm flight path and the energy deposited in a scintillator, 12.7 cm in diameter and 30.48 cm long. The time resolution of the system is 0.39 nsec. The calculated energy resolution based on this time resolution varies with energy from 1.6 precent to 7.75 percent for 50- and 558-MeV protons. Various systematic and statistical errors are evaluated, and the double differential cross sections for secondary proton and deutron production at 20 deg from a 2.35 g/sq cm thick beryllium target are shown as an example of the results obtainable with this system. The uncertainly in the cross sections for secondary protons varies with particle energy from approximately + or - 9 percent at 50 MeV to approximately + or - 11 percent at 558 MeV.

  16. Changes in cellular response to the damage induced in PC-3 prostate cancer cells by proton microbeam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Lipiec, Ewelina W; Wiecheć, Anna; Dulińska-Litewka, Joanna; Kubica, Małgorzata; Lekki, Janusz; Stachura, Zbigniew; Wiltowska-Zuber, Joanna; Kwiatek, Wojciech M

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this research was to find out whether the passage number effect may influence on the PC-3 cells (the human prostate cancer line derived from bone metastases) response to proton radiation. 2 MeV horizontally focused proton microbeam was used as a radiation source. The cells were treated with a counted number of H(+) ions (50-8000) corresponding to doses of 1.3-209 Gy/cell. For comparison, cell death was also induced by UVC radiation. All cells were stained with Hoechst 33342 and propidium iodide and visualized under a fluorescence microscope. Necrosis was observed at: a) 8000 protons per cell (corresponding to ∼209 Gy/cell) after 2-4 passages, b) 3200 protons per cell (corresponding to ∼84 Gy/cell) for cells after 11-14 passages and c) only 800 protons per cell (corresponding to ∼2 Gy/cell ) after 47-50 passages. Apoptosis was efficiently induced, by protons, only in cells after 50 passages. The results showed that the laboratory conditions affected cellular response of PC-3 cell line to the proton irradiation. The cellular response to the radiation treatment strongly depends on number of passages.

  17. Frequency of Early and Late Chromosome Aberrations in Different Types of Cells After Proton and Fe Ion Irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Tao; Wu, Honglu; Zhang, Ye; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Kadhim, Munira; Wilson, Bobby; Bowler, Deborah

    2016-07-01

    DNA damages induced by space radiation, consisting of protons and high-LET charged particles, can be complex in nature, which are often left unrepaired and cause chromosomal aberrations. Increased level of genomic instability is attributed to tumorigenesis and increased cancer risks. To investigate genomic instability induced by charged particles, human lymphocytes ex vivo, human fibroblasts, and human mammary epithelial cells, as well as mouse bone marrow stem cells isolated from CBA/CaH and C57BL/6 strains were exposed to high energy protons and Fe ions. Metaphase chromosome spreads at different cell divisions after radiation exposure were collected and, chromosome aberrations were analyzed with fluorescence in situ hybridization with whole chromosome-specific probes for human cells. With proton irradiation, levels of chromosome aberrations decreased by about 50% in both lymphocytes and epithelial cells after multiple cell divisions, compared to initial chromosome aberrations at 48 hours post irradiation in both cell types. With Fe ion irradiation, however, the frequency of chromosome aberrations in lymphocytes after multiple cell divisions was significantly lower than that in epithelial cells at comparable cell divisions, while their initial chromosome aberrations were at similar levels. Similar to the human cells, after Fe ion irradiation, the frequency of late chromosome aberrations was similar to that of the early damages for radio-sensitive CBA cells, but different for radio-resistant C57 cells. Our results suggest that relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values are dependent not only on radiation sources, but also on cell types and cell divisions.

  18. Relativistic Sommerfeld Low Temperature Expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lourenço, O.; Dutra, M.; Delfino, A.; Sá Martins, J. S.

    We derive a relativistic Sommerfeld expansion for thermodynamic quantities in many-body fermionic systems. The expansion is used to generate the equation of state of the Walecka model and its isotherms. We find that these results are in good agreement with numerical calculations, even when the expansion is truncated at its lowest order, in the low temperature regime, defined by T/xf ≪ 1. Although the interesting region near the liquid-gas phase transition is excluded by this criterion, the expansion may still find usefulness in the study of very cold nuclear matter systems, such as neutron stars.

  19. Proton irradiation results for long-wave HgCdTe infrared detector arrays for Near-Earth Object Camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorn, Meghan L.; Pipher, Judith L.; McMurtry, Craig; Hartman, Spencer; Mainzer, Amy; McKelvey, Mark; McMurray, Robert; Chevara, David; Rosser, Joshua

    2016-07-01

    HgCdTe detector arrays with a cutoff wavelength of ˜10 μm intended for the Near-Earth Object Camera (NEOCam) space mission were subjected to proton-beam irradiation at the University of California Davis Crocker Nuclear Laboratory. Three arrays were tested-one with 800-μm substrate intact, one with 30-μm substrate, and one completely substrate-removed. The CdZnTe substrate, on which the HgCdTe detector is grown, has been shown to produce luminescence in shorter wave HgCdTe arrays that causes an elevated signal in nonhit pixels when subjected to proton irradiation. This testing was conducted to ascertain whether or not full substrate removal is necessary. At the dark level of the dewar, we detect no luminescence in nonhit pixels during proton testing for both the substrate-removed detector array and the array with 30-μm substrate. The detector array with full 800-μm substrate exhibited substantial photocurrent for a flux of 103 protons/cm2 s at a beam energy of 18.1 MeV (˜750 e-/s) and 34.4 MeV (˜65 e-/s). For the integrated space-like ambient proton flux level measured by the Spitzer Space Telescope, the luminescence would be well below the NEOCam dark current requirement of <200 e-/s, but the pattern of luminescence could be problematic, possibly complicating calibration.

  20. Effects of proton irradiation on single-stranded DNA studied by using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lee, Cheol Eui; Han, J. H.

    2016-08-01

    X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) has been employed in order to study the effects of proton irradiation on herring sperm single-stranded DNA. Systematic changes of the chemical shifts in the C, N, O, and P XPS line components as functions of the irradiation dose were observed, indicative of the bonding configurations in the DNA system. While the C 1 s XPS lines showed weak blueshifts, the N 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2 p XPS lines showed blueshifts with a marked dependence on the irradiation dose in a prominent manner. Our results show that linear energy transfer by charged particles and photons may have distinct molecular-level effects as the C 1 s, N 1 s, O 1 s, and P 2 p XPS lines showed redshifts in our previous study of effects of the γ-ray irradiation on the same system.

  1. Spreading resistance and C-DLTS spectra of proton-irradiated mesa diodes made on thick epitaxial Si layers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nossarzewska-Orłowska, E.; Kozłowski, R.; Brzozowski, A.

    1999-04-01

    High-resistivity, thick silicon epitaxial layers, deposited on Czochralski silicon (CZ Si) substrate were used as a material for test diodes. Resistivity profile as a function of depth and deep-level spectra were measured by spreading resistance method and deep-level transient spectroscopy (C-DLTS) on non-irradiated and proton irradiated mesa diodes. A deep level with activation energy E c-0.52 eV, attributed to V 2O defect, dominates in the non-irradiated diodes. After irradiation two levels, Ec-0.38 and Ec-0.45 eV, related to divacancies and the level Ec-0.17 eV corresponding to VO complex are distinguished.

  2. SU-E-T-337: Treatment Planning Study of Craniospinal Irradiation with Spot Scanning Proton Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Tasson, A; Beltran, C; Laack, N; Childs, S; Tryggestad, E; Whitaker, T

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a treatment planning technique that achieves optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, and interfield position errors for craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using spot scanning proton radiotherapy. Methods: Eighteen CSI patients who had previously been treated using photon radiation were used for this study. Eight patients were less than 10 years old. The prescription dose was 23.4Gy in 1.8Gy fractions. Two different field arrangement types were investigated: 1 posterior field per isocenter and 2 posterior oblique fields per isocenter. For each field type, two delivery configurations were used: 5cm bolus attached to the treatment table and a 4.5cm range shifter located inside the nozzle. The target for each plan was the whole brain and thecal sac. For children under the age of 10, all plan types were repeated with an additional dose of 21Gy prescribed to the vertebral bodies. Treatment fields were matched by stepping down the dose in 10% increments over 9cm. Robustness against 3% and 3mm uncertainties, as well as a 3mm inter-field error was analyzed. Dose coverage of the target and critical structure sparing for each plan type will be considered. Ease of planning and treatment delivery was also considered for each plan type. Results: The mean dose volume histograms show that the bolus plan with posterior beams gave the best overall plan, and all proton plans were comparable to or better than the photon plans. The plan type that was the most robust against the imposed uncertainties was also the bolus plan with posterior beams. This is also the plan configuration that is the easiest to deliver and plan. Conclusion: The bolus plan with posterior beams achieved optimal robustness against systematic position and range uncertainties, as well as inter-field position errors.

  3. SU-E-T-533: LET Dependence Correction of Radiochromic Films for Application in Low Energy Proton Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Reinhardt, S; Wuerl, M; Assmann, W; Parodi, K; Greubel, C; Wilkens, J; Hillbrand, M; Mairani, A

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Many cell irradiation experiments with low-energy laser-driven ions rely on radiochromic films (RCF), because of their dose-rate independent response and superior spatial resolution. RCF dosimetry in low-energy ion beams requires a correction of the LET dependent film response. The relative efficiency (RE), the ratio of photon to proton dose that yields the same film darkening, is a measure for the film’s LET dependence. A direct way of RE determination is RCF irradiation with low-energy mono-energetic protons and hence, well-defined LET. However, RE is usually determined using high energy proton depth dose measurements where RE corrections require knowledge of the average LET in each depth, which can be either track (tLET) or dose (dLET) averaged. The appropriate LET concept has to be applied to allow a proper film response correction. Methods: Radiochromic EBT2 and EBT3 films were irradiated in clinical photon and proton beams. For each depth of the 200 MeV proton depth dose curve, tLET and dLET were calculated by special user routines from the Monte Carlo code FLUKA. Additional irradiations with mono-energetic low energy protons (4–20 MeV) serve as reference for the RE determination. Results: The difference of dLET and tLET increases with depth, with the dLET being almost twice as large as the tLET for the maximum depth. The comparison with mono-energetic measurements shows a good agreement of the RE for the dLET concept, while a considerably steeper drop in RE is observed when applying the tLET. Conclusion: RCF can be used as reference dosimeter for biomedical experiments with low-energy proton beams if appropriate LET corrections are applied. When using depth dose measurements from clinical proton accelerators for these corrections, the concept of dLET has to be applied. Acknowledgement: This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence ‘Munich-Centre for Advanced Photonics’ (MAP). This work was funded by the DFG Cluster of Excellence

  4. Craniospinal Irradiation Techniques: A Dosimetric Comparison of Proton Beams With Standard and Advanced Photon Radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Myonggeun; Shin, Dong Ho; Kim, Jinsung; Kim, Jong Won; Kim, Dae Woong; Park, Sung Yong; Lee, Se Byeong; Kim, Joo Young; Park, Hyeon-Jin; Park, Byung Kiu; Shin, Sang Hoon

    2011-11-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the dosimetric benefits of advanced radiotherapy techniques for craniospinal irradiation in cancer in children. Methods and Materials: Craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using three-dimensional conformal radiotherapy (3D-CRT), tomotherapy (TOMO), and proton beam treatment (PBT) in the scattering mode was planned for each of 10 patients at our institution. Dosimetric benefits and organ-specific radiation-induced cancer risks were based on comparisons of dose-volume histograms (DVHs) and on the application of organ equivalent doses (OEDs), respectively. Results: When we analyzed the organ-at-risk volumes that received 30%, 60%, and 90% of the prescribed dose (PD), we found that PBT was superior to TOMO and 3D-CRT. On average, the doses delivered by PBT to the esophagus, stomach, liver, lung, pancreas, and kidney were 19.4 Gy, 0.6 Gy, 0.3 Gy, 2.5 Gy, 0.2 Gy, and 2.2 Gy for the PD of 36 Gy, respectively, which were significantly lower than the doses delivered by TOMO (22.9 Gy, 4.5 Gy, 6.1 Gy, 4.0 Gy, 13.3 Gy, and 4.9 Gy, respectively) and 3D-CRT (34.6 Gy, 3.6 Gy, 8.0 Gy, 4.6 Gy, 22.9 Gy, and 4.3 Gy, respectively). Although the average doses delivered by PBT to the chest and abdomen were significantly lower than those of 3D-CRT or TOMO, these differences were reduced in the head-and-neck region. OED calculations showed that the risk of secondary cancers in organs such as the stomach, lungs, thyroid, and pancreas was much higher when 3D-CRT or TOMO was used than when PBT was used. Conclusions: Compared with photon techniques, PBT showed improvements in most dosimetric parameters for CSI patients, with lower OEDs to organs at risk.

  5. A Comparison of Molecular and Histopathological Changes in Mouse Intestinal Tissue Following Whole-Body Proton- or Gamma-Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Purgason, Ashley; Mangala, Lingegowda; Zhang, Ye; Hamilton, Stanley; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    There are many consequences following exposure to the space radiation environment which can adversely affect the health of a crew member. Acute radiation syndrome (ARS) involving nausea and vomiting, damage to radio-sensitive tissue such as the blood forming organs and gastrointestinal tract, and cancer are some of these negative effects. The space radiation environment is ample with protons and contains gamma rays as well. Little knowledge exists to this point, however, regarding the effects of protons on mammalian systems; conversely several studies have been performed observing the effects of gamma rays on different animal models. For the research presented here, we wish to compare our previous work looking at whole-body exposure to protons using a mouse model to our studies of mice experiencing whole-body exposure to gamma rays as part of the radio-adaptive response. Radio-adaptation is a well-documented phenomenon in which cells exposed to a priming low dose of radiation prior to a higher dose display a reduction in endpoints like chromosomal aberrations, cell death, micronucleus formation, and more when compared to their counterparts receiving high dose-irradiation only. Our group has recently completed a radio-adaptive experiment with C57BL/6 mice. For both this study and the preceding proton research, the gastrointestinal tract of each animal was dissected four hours post-irradiation and the isolated small intestinal tissue was fixed in formalin for histopathological examination or snap-frozen in liquid nitrogen for RNA isolation. Histopathologic observation of the tissue using standard H&E staining methods to screen for morphologic changes showed an increase in apoptotic lesions for even the lowest doses of 0.1 Gy of protons and 0.05 Gy of gamma rays, and the percentage of apoptotic cells increased with increasing dose. A smaller percentage of crypts showed 3 or more apoptotic lesions in animals that received 6 Gy of gamma-irradiation compared to mice

  6. A model for proton-irradiated GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, J. W.; Walker, G. H.; Outlaw, R. A.; Stock, L. V.

    1982-01-01

    A simple model for proton radiation damage in GaAs heteroface solar cells is developed. The model includes the effects of spatial nonuniformity of low energy proton damage. Agreement between the model and experimental proton damage data for GaAs heteroface solar cells is satisfactory. An extension of the model to include angular isotropy, as is appropriate for protons in space, is shown to result in significantly less cell damage than for normal proton incidence.

  7. [Manifestation of the adaptive response and bystander-effect of C3H10T1/2 fibroblasts irradiated by protons and gamma-rays].

    PubMed

    Voskanian, K Sh; Mitsyn, G V; Gaevskiĭ, V N

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive response and bystander-effect were studied in mice fibroblasts irradiated by gamma-rays and protons with the energy of 150 MeV Monolayer of fibroblasts cultivated on the wall of a plastic vial first were exposed to 2 and 4 cGy of ionizing radiation (presumably adaptive doses) and later, after 40-min. or 16-hr. period at 37 degrees C, to damaging 4 Gy. To study the bystander-effect, either the whole vial surface (25 cm2) or central area (1 cm2) were irradiated by a beam of protons. The results showed that the preliminary gamma-irradiation 40-min. or 16-hr. before exposure to the damaging dose equally alleviates the harmful effect of protons on fibroblasts. The adaptive response was observed as in the cells subjected to the direct irradiation by protons at 4 Gy, so in bystander-cells. When protons were used for adaptive irradiation, the response was visible only to the dose of 4 cGy in fibroblasts exposed to gamma-radiation 16 hrs. later. In all the rest cases, proton- and gamma-induced damages added together. Besides, the experiments showed that the adaptive effect of protons is passed on to bystander-cells. Adaptive and damaging gamma-irradiation evoked the response invariably.

  8. Uveal melanomas near the optic disc or fovea. Visual results after proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Seddon, J.M.; Gragoudas, E.S.; Egan, K.M.; Glynn, R.J.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Austin-Seymour, M.; Goitein, M.; Verhey, L.; Urie, M.; Koehler, A.

    1987-04-01

    Proximity to the disc and fovea is a risk factor for visual loss after proton beam irradiation of uveal melanomas. Of 562 eyes treated over a 10-year period with pretreatment visual acuity of 20/200 or better, 363 (64.6%) contained tumors within 2 disc diameters (DD) of the disc or fovea. Rates of visual loss after treatment to worse than 20/200 and causes of visual decline were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier analysis. Cumulative rates of visual loss among subjects with tumors near the disc or fovea were 33 and 47% 1 and 2 years after treatment compared to 17 and 28%, respectively, for subjects with tumors located farther from both structures. The leading cause of visual loss in the first year among eyes with tumors near the disc or fovea was retinal detachment. Controlling for other predictors of visual loss to worse than 20/200, location near the disc or fovea was independently related to visual loss primarily due to retinal detachment, cataract, and radiation retinopathy. Despite the unfavorable location of these tumors, over half of patients with 20/200 or better pretreatment visual acuity had useful vision 2 years after treatment.

  9. Room temperature preparation of Pt-decorated MWCNTs by using proton beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yeong-Joon; Lee, Yoon Ji; Song, Jae Hee

    2016-09-01

    We present a facile one-pot preparation route for the production of multiwalled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-Pt nanoparticle composites in an aqueous solution at room temperature by using proton beam irradiation process without the addition of any reducing reagents. We utilized hexade-cyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB)-stabilized pristine and thiol-functionalized MWCNTs for the synthesis of MWCNT-Pt nanoparticle composites and compared the deposition trends of the platinum nanoparticles onto the surfaces of pristine MWCNTs and surface-modified MWCNTs, respectively. Thiolated MWCNTs were densely and uniformly decorated with Pt nanoparticles while pristine MWCNTs were not. The Pt nanostructures on the surfaces of MWCNTs were spherical, and the average diameter was in the range of ~2 nm. Also, two different metal precursors, H2PtCl6 and Na2PtCl6, were used to find any distinguishable decoration patterns on the surface-modified MWCNTs; however, the deposition patterns were observed to be not very different.

  10. Binary nucleation at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zahoransky, R. A.; Peters, F.

    1985-01-01

    The onset of homogeneous condensation of binary vapors in the supersaturated state is studied in ethanol/n-propanol and water/ethanol via their unsteady expansion in a shock tube at temperatures below 273 K. Ethanol/n-propanol forms a nearly ideal solution, whereas water/ethanol is an example of a strongly nonideal mixture. Vapor mixtures of various compositions are diluted in dry air at small mole fractions and expanded in the driver section from room temperature. The onset of homogeneous condensation is detected optically and the corresponding thermodynamic state is evaluated. The experimental results are compared with the binary nucleation theory, and the particular problems of theoretical evaluation at low temperatures are discussed.

  11. Guanine radical reaction processes: a computational description of proton transfer in X-irradiated 9-ethylguanine single crystals.

    PubMed

    Jayatilaka, Nayana; Nelson, William H

    2008-12-25

    Computational methods based on DFT procedures have been used to investigate proton-transfer processes in irradiated 9-ethylguanine crystals. Previous experimental results from X-irradiation and study of this system at 10 K found significant concentrations of two main products, R1, formed by N7-hydrogenation of the purine ring, and R2, the primary one-electron oxidation product (Jayatilaka, N.; Nelson, W. H. J. Phys. Chem. B 2007, 111, 7887). The objective of this work is to describe the processes leading to these products using computational methods that take into account molecular packing and bulk dielectric properties. The basic concept is that a proton will transfer following ionization if the net electronic energy of the system, consisting of the donor plus the acceptor plus any intervening molecules, becomes lower. Three approaches were used to investigate this concept, two based on energies computed for single molecules and one based on energies computed for two-molecule clusters arranged as in the crystals. The results are that the methods successfully predict the observed behavior, that it is energetically favorable on one-electron reduction for proton H1 to transfer from a neutral molecule to N7 of the neighbor, forming the N7-hydrogenated product, and that there is virtually no energy advantage for a proton to transfer upon one-electron oxidation. The results also support the proposal that the C8 H-addition radical, found only upon irradiation at 300 K, was the product of intramolecular transfer of the H7 proton to C8 in a process apparently requiring sufficient thermal energy for activation. Finally, the computations predict hyperfine couplings and tensors in very good agreement with those from experiment, thereby providing additional evidence for the success of the computations in describing the experimental observations.

  12. Study of radiation induced deep-level defects in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1980-01-01

    Radiation induced deep-level defects (both electron and hole traps) in proton irradiated AlGaAs-GaAs p-n junction solar cells are investigated along with the correlation between the measured defect parameters and the solar cell performance parameters. The range of proton energies studied was from 50 KeV to 10 MeV and the proton fluence was varied from 10 to the 10th power to 10 to the 13th power P/sq cm. Experimental tools employed include deep-level transient spectroscopy, capacitance-voltage, current voltage, and SEM-EBIC methods. Defect and recombination parameters such as defect density and energy level, capture cross section, carrier lifetimes and effective hole diffusion lengths in n-GaAs LPE layers were determined from these measurements.

  13. Measurement of prompt gamma profiles in inhomogeneous targets with a knife-edge slit camera during proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priegnitz, M.; Helmbrecht, S.; Janssens, G.; Perali, I.; Smeets, J.; Vander Stappen, F.; Sterpin, E.; Fiedler, F.

    2015-06-01

    Proton and ion beam therapies become increasingly relevant in radiation therapy. To fully exploit the potential of this irradiation technique and to achieve maximum target volume conformality, the verification of particle ranges is highly desirable. Many research activities focus on the measurement of the spatial distributions of prompt gamma rays emitted during irradiation. A passively collimating knife-edge slit camera is a promising option to perform such measurements. In former publications, the feasibility of accurate detection of proton range shifts in homogeneous targets could be shown with such a camera. We present slit camera measurements of prompt gamma depth profiles in inhomogeneous targets. From real treatment plans and their underlying CTs, representative beam paths are selected and assembled as one-dimensional inhomogeneous targets built from tissue equivalent materials. These phantoms have been irradiated with monoenergetic proton pencil beams. The accuracy of range deviation estimation as well as the detectability of range shifts is investigated in different scenarios. In most cases, range deviations can be detected within less than 2 mm. In close vicinity to low-density regions, range detection is challenging. In particular, a minimum beam penetration depth of 7 mm beyond a cavity is required for reliable detection of a cavity filling with the present setup. Dedicated data post-processing methods may be capable of overcoming this limitation.

  14. Synchrotron FTIR shows evidence of DNA damage and lipid accumulation in prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells following proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipiec, Ewelina; Bambery, Keith R.; Heraud, Phil; Hirschmugl, Carol; Lekki, Janusz; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Tobin, Mark J.; Vogel, Christian; Whelan, Donna; Wood, Bayden R.

    2014-09-01

    Synchrotron Radiation Fourier Transform Infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of single human prostate adenocarcinoma PC-3 cells, irradiated with a defined number of 2 MeV protons generated by a proton microbeam along with non-irradiated control cells, were analysed using multivariate methods. A number of different Principal Component Analysis (PCA) models were tested and the spectral ranges associated with nucleic acids, proteins and lipids were analysed separately. The results show a dose dependent shift of the Osbnd Psbnd O asymmetric stretching mode from 1234 cm-1 to 1237 cm-1, consistent with local disorder in the B-DNA conformation along with a change in intensity of the Osbnd Psbnd O symmetric stretching band at 1083 cm-1 indicative of chromatin fragmentation - the natural consequence of a high number of DNA Double Strand Breaks (DSBs). 2D mapping of characteristic functional groups at the diffraction limit shows evidence of lipid deposition and chromatin condensation in cells exposed to protons indicative of cell apoptosis following irradiation. These studies lay the foundation for understanding the macromolecular changes that occur to cells in response to radiation therapy, which has important implications in the treatment of tumours.

  15. Photosynthesis, photoinhibition and low temperature acclimation in cold tolerant plants.

    PubMed

    Huner, N P; Oquist, G; Hurry, V M; Krol, M; Falk, S; Griffith, M

    1993-07-01

    Cold acclimation requires adjustment to a combination of light and low temperature, conditions which are potentially photoinhibitory. The photosynthetic response of plants to low temperature is dependent upon time of exposure and the developmental history of the leaves. Exposure of fully expanded leaves of winter cereals to short-term, low temperature shiftsinhibits whereas low temperature growthstimulates electron transport capacity and carbon assimilation. However, the photosynthetic response to low temperature is clearly species and cultivar dependent. Winter annuals and algae which actively grow and develop at low temperature and moderate irradiance acquire a resistance to irradiance 5- to 6-fold higher than their growth irradiance. Resistance to short-term photoinhibition (hours) in winter cereals is a reflection of the increased capacity to keep QA oxidized under high light conditions and low temperature. This is due to an increased capacity for photosynthesis. These characteristics reflect photosynthetic acclimation to low growth temperature and can be used to predict the freezing tolerance of cereals. It is proposed that the enhanced photosynthetic capacity reflects an increased flux of fixed carbon through to sucrose in source tissue as a consequence of the combined effects of increased storage of carbohydrate as fructans in the vacuole of leaf mesophyll cells and an enhanced export to the crown due to its increased sink activity. Long-term exposure (months) of cereals to low temperature photoinhibition indicates that this reduction of photochemical efficiency of PS II represents a stable, long-term down regulation of PS II to match the energy requirements for CO2 fixation. Thus, photoinhibition in vivo should be viewed as the capacity of plants to adjust photosynthetically to the prevailing environmental conditions rather than a process which necessarily results in damage or injury to plants. Not all cold tolerant, herbaceous annuals use the same

  16. Histologic effects of high energy electron and proton irradiation of rat brain detected with a silver-degeneration stain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Switzer, R. C.; Bogo, V.; Mickley, G. A.

    1994-10-01

    Application of the degeneration sensitive, cupric-silver staining method to brain sections of male Sprague-Dawley rats irradiated 4 days before sacrifice with 155 Mev protons, 2-8 Gy at 1 Gy/min (N=6) or 22-101Gy at 20 Gy/min (N=16) or with 18.6 Mev electrons, 32-67 Gy at 20 Gy/min (N=20), doses which elicit behavioral changes (accelerod or conditioned taste aversion), resulted in a display of degeneration of astrocyte-like cell profiles which were not uniformly distributed. Plots of `degeneration scores' (counts of profiles in 29 areas) vs. dose for the proton and electron irradiations displayed a linear dose response for protons in the range of 2-8 Gy. In the 20-100 Gy range, for both electrons and protons the points were distributed in a broad band suggesting a saturation curve. The dose range in which these astrocyte-like profiles becomes maximal corresponds well with the dose range for the X-ray eradication of a subtype of astrocytes, `beta astrocytes`.

  17. Structural and property changes in poly (vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) 70/30 mol % copolymer induced by proton irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lau, S. T.; Chan, H. L. W.; Choy, C. L.

    2005-02-01

    Poly(vinylidene fluoride trifluoroethylene) 70/30 mol % copolymer has been irradiated with 3 MeV protons at doses ranging from 43 to 200 Mrad. The effects of irradiation on the polarization hysteresis, dielectric properties, lattice spacing, phase transition behavior and electric-field-induced strain have been studied. The irradiated copolymer exhibits the characteristic behavior of a relaxor ferroelectric, including frequency dispersion of the dielectric constant, which follows the Vogel Fulcher rule. These results indicate that the proton irradiation breaks up the coherent polarization domains in the copolymer into nano-sized regions, thereby converting the copolymer to a relaxor ferroelectric. X-ray diffraction measurements show that the nano-sized regions are in the non-polar phase. Since the lattice spacing of the non-polar phase is substantially different from that of the polar phase, the local phase transformation between these two phases induced by an external electric field gives rise to a large lattice strain and hence a giant electrostrictive response.

  18. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chui, T.; Holmes, W.; Lai, A.; Croonquist, A.; Eraker, J.; Abbott, R.; Mills, G.; Mohl, J.; Craig, J.; Balachandra, B.; Gannon, J.

    2000-01-01

    We describe the design and development of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility, which is intended to provide a unique environment of low temperature and microgravity for the scientists to perform breakthrough investigations on board the International Space Station.

  19. The low temperature microgravity physics facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Croonquist, A P.; Liu, F. C.; Larson, M. E.; Chui, T. C.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  20. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pensinger, J. F.; Chui, T.; Croonquist, A.; Larson, M.; Liu, F.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility currently in the design phase is a multiple user and multiple flight facility intended to provide a long duration low temperature environment onboard the International Space Station.

  1. Investigations of ultrafast charge dynamics in laser-irradiated targets by a self probing technique employing laser driven protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, H.; Kar, S.; Cantono, G.; Nersisyan, G.; Brauckmann, S.; Doria, D.; Gwynne, D.; Macchi, A.; Naughton, K.; Willi, O.; Lewis, C. L. S.; Borghesi, M.

    2016-09-01

    The divergent and broadband proton beams produced by the target normal sheath acceleration mechanism provide the unique opportunity to probe, in a point-projection imaging scheme, the dynamics of the transient electric and magnetic fields produced during laser-plasma interactions. Commonly such experimental setup entails two intense laser beams, where the interaction produced by one beam is probed with the protons produced by the second. We present here experimental studies of the ultra-fast charge dynamics along a wire connected to laser irradiated target carried out by employing a 'self' proton probing arrangement - i.e. by connecting the wire to the target generating the probe protons. The experimental data shows that an electromagnetic pulse carrying a significant amount of charge is launched along the wire, which travels as a unified pulse of 10s of ps duration with a velocity close to speed of light. The experimental capabilities and the analysis procedure of this specific type of proton probing technique are discussed.

  2. Effects of proton irradiation on the performance of InP/GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, Irving; Swartz, C. K.; Brinker, David J.; Wilt, D. M.

    1991-01-01

    InP solar cells are known to be more radiation resistant than either GaAs or Si. In addition, AMO total area efficiencies approaching 19 percent were attained for InP. However, the present high substrate cost presents a barrier to the eventual widespread use of InP cells in space. In addition, if cell thinning becomes desirable, their relative fragility presents a problem. For these reasons, the NASA Lewis Research Center has initiated a program, aimed at producing thin InP cells, by heteroepitaxial deposition of InP on cheaper, more durable substrates. To date, a short term feasibility study as Spire has resulted in cells processed from InP heteroepitaxially deposited on Si substrates with an intervening thin GaAs layer (InP/GaAs/Si) and cells produced from InP deposited on GaAs (InP/GaAs). As a result of this short study efficiencies of over 7 and 9 percent were achieved for InP/GaAs/Si and InP/GaAs respectively. Although these efficiencies are low, they represent a modest and encouraging starting point for a more intensive program. Obviously, when considering economy and mechanical strength, cells processed on silicon substrates are preferred. However, although the InP/GaAs cells are not the final desirable products of this program, their properties serve to highlight several roadblocks to be overcome in producing cells with the more desirable cost and strength properties. Hence, in the present case, the properties of the InP/GaAs cells before and after irradiation by 10 MeV protons are examined. A similar study of InP/GaAs/Si cells will be reported on at a later date.

  3. NSBRI Radiation Effects: Carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley Rats Irradiated with Iron Ions, Protons, or Photons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dicello, J. F.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Gridley, D. S.; Howard, S. P.; Novak, G. R.; Ricart-Arbona, R.; Strandberg, J. D.; Vazquez, M. E.; Williams, J. R.; Zhang, Y.; Zhou, H.; Huso, D. L.

    1999-01-01

    Our ability to confidently develop appropriate countermeasures for radiations in space in terms of shielding and design of a spacecraft, the mission scenario, or chemoprevention is severely limited by the uncertainties in both the risk itself and the change in that risk with intervention. Despite the fact that the risk of carcinogenesis from exposures of personnel to radiations on long-term missions is considered one of the worst hazards in space, only a limited amount of in-vivo data exist for tumor induction from exposures to protons or energetic heavy ions (HZEs) at lower doses. The most extensive work remains the landmark study. for tumor development in the harderian gland of the mouse. The objective of this study is to characterize the level of risk for tumor induction in another relevant animal model. Subsequent experiments are designed to test the hypothesis that the level of risk can be reduced by pharmaceutical intervention in the promoting and progressing stages of the disease rather than in the initiating stage. The work presented here results from a cooperative effort on the part of investigators from two projects of the Radiation-Effects Team of the National Space Biomedical Research Institute (NSBRI). The collaborating projects are the Core Project which is investigating the risk of carcinogenesis in Sprague-Dawley rats and the Chemoprevention Project which is investigating the ability of Tamoxifen to reduce the number of malignant tumors in the irradiated animals. Research at the cellular and subcellular levels is being conducted in two other projects of the Radiation-Effects Team, Cytogenetics with J. R. Williams as Principal Investigator and Mutations from Repeated DNA Sequences. Results for these other projects also are being presented at this Workshop.

  4. Proton Beam Craniospinal Irradiation Reduces Acute Toxicity for Adults With Medulloblastoma

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Aaron P.; Barney, Christian L.; Grosshans, David R.; McAleer, Mary Frances; Groot, John F. de; Puduvalli, Vinay K.; Tucker, Susan L.; Crawford, Cody N.; Khan, Meena; Khatua, Soumen; Gilbert, Mark R.; Brown, Paul D.; Mahajan, Anita

    2013-06-01

    Purpose: Efficacy and acute toxicity of proton craniospinal irradiation (p-CSI) were compared with conventional photon CSI (x-CSI) for adults with medulloblastoma. Methods and Materials: Forty adult medulloblastoma patients treated with x-CSI (n=21) or p-CSI (n=19) at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center from 2003 to 2011 were retrospectively reviewed. Median CSI and total doses were 30.6 and 54 Gy, respectively. The median follow-up was 57 months (range 4-103) for x-CSI patients and 26 months (range 11-63) for p-CSI. Results: p-CSI patients lost less weight than x-CSI patients (1.2% vs 5.8%; P=.004), and less p-CSI patients had >5% weight loss compared with x-CSI (16% vs 64%; P=.004). p-CSI patients experienced less grade 2 nausea and vomiting compared with x-CSI (26% vs 71%; P=.004). Patients treated with x-CSI were more likely to have medical management of esophagitis than p-CSI patients (57% vs 5%, P<.001). p-CSI patients had a smaller reduction in peripheral white blood cells, hemoglobin, and platelets compared with x-CSI (white blood cells 46% vs 55%, P=.04; hemoglobin 88% vs 97%, P=.009; platelets 48% vs 65%, P=.05). Mean vertebral doses were significantly associated with reductions in blood counts. Conclusions: This report is the first analysis of clinical outcomes for adult medulloblastoma patients treated with p-CSI. Patients treated with p-CSI experienced less treatment-related morbidity including fewer acute gastrointestinal and hematologic toxicities.

  5. Stray radiation dose and second cancer risk for a pediatric patient receiving craniospinal irradiation with proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Mirkovic, Dragan; Fontenot, Jonas D.; Giebeler, Annelise; Zheng, Yuanshui; Kornguth, David; Mohan, Radhe; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2009-04-01

    Proton beam radiotherapy unavoidably exposes healthy tissue to stray radiation emanating from the treatment unit and secondary radiation produced within the patient. These exposures provide no known benefit and may increase a patient's risk of developing a radiogenic cancer. The aims of this study were to calculate doses to major organs and tissues and to estimate second cancer risk from stray radiation following craniospinal irradiation (CSI) with proton therapy. This was accomplished using detailed Monte Carlo simulations of a passive-scattering proton treatment unit and a voxelized phantom to represent the patient. Equivalent doses, effective dose and corresponding risk for developing a fatal second cancer were calculated for a 10-year-old boy who received proton therapy. The proton treatment comprised CSI at 30.6 Gy plus a boost of 23.4 Gy to the clinical target volume. The predicted effective dose from stray radiation was 418 mSv, of which 344 mSv was from neutrons originating outside the patient; the remaining 74 mSv was caused by neutrons originating within the patient. This effective dose corresponds to an attributable lifetime risk of a fatal second cancer of 3.4%. The equivalent doses that predominated the effective dose from stray radiation were in the lungs, stomach and colon. These results establish a baseline estimate of the stray radiation dose and corresponding risk for a pediatric patient undergoing proton CSI and support the suitability of passively-scattered proton beams for the treatment of central nervous system tumors in pediatric patients.

  6. Noise performance of 0.35-(mu)m SOI CMOS devices and micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binkley, D. M.; Hopper, C. E.; Cressler, J. D.; Mojarradi, M. M.; Blalock, B. J.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents measured noise for 0.35(mu)m, silicon-on-insulator devices and a micropower preamplifier following 63-MeV, 1-Mrad (Si) proton irradiation. Flicker noise voltage, important for gyros having low frequency output, increases less than 32% after irradiation.

  7. Order in dense hydrogen at low temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, B.; Ashcroft, N. W.

    2004-01-01

    By increase in density, impelled by pressure, the electronic energy bands in dense hydrogen attain significant widths. Nevertheless, arguments can be advanced suggesting that a physically consistent description of the general consequences of this electronic structure can still be constructed from interacting but state-dependent multipoles. These reflect, in fact self-consistently, a disorder-induced localization of electron states partially manifesting the effects of proton dynamics; they retain very considerable spatial inhomogeneity (as they certainly do in the molecular limit). This description, which is valid provided that an overall energy gap has not closed, leads at a mean-field level to the expected quadrupolar coupling, but also for certain structures to the eventual emergence of dipolar terms and their coupling when a state of broken charge symmetry is developed. A simple Hamiltonian incorporating these basic features then leads to a high-density, low-temperature phase diagram that appears to be in substantial agreement with experiment. In particular, it accounts for the fact that whereas the phase I–II phase boundary has a significant isotope dependence, the phase II–III boundary has very little. PMID:15028839

  8. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and Testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Progress has been made in the preparation and characterization of thin electrolytes and porous LSM substrates. Both of these tasks are essentially on or ahead of schedule. In our proposal, we suggested that the ZrO{sub 2}/Sc system needed to be considered as a candidate as a thin electrolyte. This was because microcrystalline ZrO{sub 2}/Sc has a significantly higher ionic conductivity than YSZ, particularly at the lower temperatures. As a result, some 0.5 micron thick film of ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc on an alumina substrate (grain size 20nm) was prepared and the electrical conductivity measured as a function of temperature and oxygen activity. The Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} certainly has a higher conductivity that either 20nm or 2400nm YSZ, however, electronic conductivity dominates the conductivity for oxygen activities below 10{sup -15}. Whereas for YSZ, electronic conductivity is not a problem until the oxygen activity decreases below 10{sup -25}. These initial results show that the ionic conductivity of 20nm YSZ and 20nm ZrO{sub 2}/16% Sc are essentially the same and the enhanced conductivity which is observed for Sc doping in microcrystalline specimens is not observed for the same composition when it is nanocrystalline. In addition they show that the electronic conductivity of Sc doped ZrO{sub 2} is at least two orders of magnitude higher than that observed for YSZ. The conclusion one reaches is that for 0.5 to 1 micron thick nanocrystalline films, Sc doping of ZrO{sub 2} has no benefits compared to YSZ. As a result, electrolyte films of ZrO{sub 2}/Sc should not be considered as candidates

  9. Comparison of cell repair mechanisms by means of chromosomal aberration induced by proton and gamma irradiation - preliminary results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowalska, A.; Czerski, K.; Kaczmarski, M.; Lewocki, M.; Masojć, B.; Łukowiak, A.

    2015-03-01

    DNA damage of peripheral blood lymphocytes exposed to gamma and proton irradiation is studied by means of chromosome aberrations to validate the efficiency of the repair mechanisms of individual cells. A new method based on an observed deviation from the Poisson statistics of the chromosome aberration number is applied for estimation of a repair factor ( RF) defined as a ratio between originally damaged cells to the amount of finally observed aberrations. The repair factors are evaluated by studying the variance of individual damage factors in a collective of healthy persons at a given dose as well as by using the chi-square analysis for the dose-effect curves. The blood samples from fifteen donors have been irradiated by Co60 gamma rays and from nine persons by 150 MeV protons with different doses up to 2 Gy. A standard extraction of lymphocyte has been used whereby dicentrics, acentrics and rings have been scored under a microscope. The RF values determined for the proton radiation are slightly larger than for gamma rays, indicating that up to 70% DNA double strand breaks can be repaired.

  10. Thermal conductivity profile determination in proton-irradiated ZrC by spatial and frequency scanning thermal wave methods

    SciTech Connect

    Jensen, C.; Chirtoc, M.; Horny, N.; Antoniow, J. S.; Pron, H.; Ban, H.

    2013-10-07

    Using complementary thermal wave methods, the irradiation damaged region of zirconium carbide (ZrC) is characterized by quantifiably profiling the thermophysical property degradation. The ZrC sample was irradiated by a 2.6 MeV proton beam at 600 °C to a dose of 1.75 displacements per atom. Spatial scanning techniques including scanning thermal microscopy (SThM), lock-in infrared thermography (lock-in IRT), and photothermal radiometry (PTR) were used to directly map the in-depth profile of thermal conductivity on a cross section of the ZrC sample. The advantages and limitations of each system are discussed and compared, finding consistent results from all techniques. SThM provides the best resolution finding a very uniform thermal conductivity envelope in the damaged region measuring ∼52 ± 2 μm deep. Frequency-based scanning PTR provides quantification of the thermal parameters of the sample using the SThM measured profile to provide validation of a heating model. Measured irradiated and virgin thermal conductivities are found to be 11.9 ± 0.5 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1} and 26.7 ±1 W m{sup −1} K{sup −1}, respectively. A thermal resistance evidenced in the frequency spectra of the PTR results was calculated to be (1.58 ± 0.1) × 10{sup −6} m{sup 2} K W{sup −1}. The measured thermal conductivity values compare well with the thermal conductivity extracted from the SThM calibrated signal and the spatially scanned PTR. Combined spatial and frequency scanning techniques are shown to provide a valuable, complementary combination for thermal property characterization of proton-irradiated ZrC. Such methodology could be useful for other studies of ion-irradiated materials.

  11. Capability demonstration of simultaneous proton beam irradiation during exposure to molten lead-bismuth eutectic for HT9 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qvist, Staffan; Bolind, Alan Michael; Hosemann, Peter; Wang, Yongqiang; Tesmer, Joseph; De Caro, Magdalena Serrano; Bourke, Mark

    2013-01-01

    We report the design and assembly of a corrosion station to enable simultaneous proton irradiation of a metallic surface that was also in contact with molten lead-bismuth eutectic (LBE). The capability has been established at the ion beam materials laboratory at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The engineering design focused on temperature and oxygen content control in the LBE, as well as the ability to achieve doses significantly in excess of 1 dpa in the contact region over the irradiation campaigns. In the preliminary demonstration of capability reported here, a sample made of HT9 steel was placed in contact with LBE at 450 °C and irradiated for 58 h at an average proton beam current of 0.3 μA/mm2. SRIM [1] calculations indicate that the nominal surface dose ranged from approximately 3-22 dpa. This paper outlines the experimental setup and design constraints. Characterization of the sample will be reported in a subsequent paper.

  12. Effects of grain boundary misorientation on solute segregation in thermally sensitized and proton-irradiated 304 stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duh, T. S.; Kai, J. J.; Chen, F. R.

    2000-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the grain boundary misorientation on the radiation-induced segregation (RIS) in 304 stainless steels. There were four test conditions for the specimens: (1) as-received (AR) with enriched Cr at grain boundary, (2) AR + 1 dpa proton irradiation at 450°C, (3) thermally sensitized (SEN), and (4) SEN + 1 dpa proton irradiation at 450°C. The Cr/Ni-concentration profiles were measured by using FEGTEM/EDS and the grain boundary misorientation was determined with the aid of simulated Kikuchi patterns. A delayed Cr depletion compared to no pre-enrichment condition was found at grain boundaries in AR + 1 dpa specimens. The Cr-concentration profile gets narrower and deeper in SEN + 1 dpa specimens. The degree of grain boundary segregation was observed to be higher at random boundaries than special boundaries. The segregation cusps were measured at grain boundaries of Σ3,Σ9 and Σ15 in SEN + 1 dpa 304 stainless steel specimens. From the fitted segregation cusps, it seems that the Cr segregation level at special boundaries in irradiated sensitized 304 stainless steels increases with Σ for values up to Σ=15.

  13. Postirradiation electron transfer vs differential radical decay in X-irradiated DNA and its mixtures with additives. Electron spin resonance spectroscopy in LiBr glass at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Pal, Chandrima; Hüttermann, Jürgen

    2006-08-03

    Free radical formation in DNA and in colyophilized mixtures of DNA with the additives mitoxantrone and riboflavin was monitored after X-ray irradiation in frozen aqueous glasses (7 M LiBr/D2O) at 77 K by electron spin resonance (ESR) spectroscopy. Specifically, the postirradiation time course at 77 K of the respective free radical intensity residing on DNA or on the additive was probed in order to test the hypothesis of electron transfer from DNA, e.g., to mitoxantrone after irradiation under these conditions (e.g., Messer, A.; Carpenter, K.; Forzley, K.; Buchanan, J.; Yang, S.; Razskazovskii, Y.; Cai, Z.; Sevilla, M. D. J. Phys. Chem. B 2000, 104, 1128). For both additives, different additive loadings and irradiation doses were employed. The observed relative change in contributions of DNA and of additive radical components to the experimental spectra with time could be ascribed, for both additives, unequivocally to independent, differential fading of component radicals. Transfer from DNA to the additive, e.g., by electron tunneling as proposed before could be ruled out to occur by a detailed, quantitative analysis of the experimental spectra using reconstruction techniques. Additional studies were performed with the nucleotides TMP and dCMP and its mixtures with mitoxantrone in order to describe the time course in systems which are expected to behave independently; the results supported the conclusions arrived at from the analysis of the DNA/additive system. A model was proposed to describe the postirradiation radical fading mechanisms which involve liberation of radiation-induced matrix-trapped defects with time. It was assumed that these defects are ESR-mute and react with radicals by net radical destruction. Some experimental observations are presented concerning influence of temperature and of the matrix on the fading processes. These seem to argue in favor of such a model although a detailed, quantitative description is still not possible.

  14. X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies of MeV proton irradiated graphite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathew, S.; Joseph, B.; Sekhar, B. R.; Dev, B. N.

    2008-07-01

    Poly-crystalline graphite samples were irradiated using 2.25 MeV H + ions with a fluence of 2 × 10 17 ions/cm 2. Magnetic ordering in highly oriented pyrolytic graphite samples have been reported earlier under the similar irradiation conditions [Esquinazi et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 91 (2003) 227201]. In that study, the authors attribute the observed irradiation induced magnetic ordering to the formation of a mixed sp 2-sp 3 hybridized carbon atoms. In the present study, we report the X-ray photoelectron and Raman spectroscopic studies on pristine and irradiated samples. Irradiated samples are found to show an increased number of sp 3 hybridized carbon atoms. However, the Raman spectrum, specially the second order data, do indicate that the nature of the graphene lattice structure has been preserved in the irradiated samples. The mechanisms for the irradiation induced enhancement in sp 3 hybridization are discussed.

  15. The affect of erbium hydride on the conversion efficience to accelerated protons from ultra-shsort pulse laser irradiated foils

    SciTech Connect

    Offermann, Dustin Theodore

    2008-01-01

    This thesis work explores, experimentally, the potential gains in the conversion efficiency from ultra-intense laser light to proton beams using erbium hydride coatings. For years, it has been known that contaminants at the rear surface of an ultra-intense laser irradiated thin foil will be accelerated to multi-MeV. Inertial Confinement Fusion fast ignition using proton beams as the igniter source requires of about 1016 protons with an average energy of about 3MeV. This is far more than the 1012 protons available in the contaminant layer. Target designs must include some form of a hydrogen rich coating that can be made thick enough to support the beam requirements of fast ignition. Work with computer simulations of thin foils suggest the atomic mass of the non-hydrogen atoms in the surface layer has a strong affect on the conversion efficiency to protons. For example, the 167amu erbium atoms will take less energy away from the proton beam than a coating using carbon with a mass of 12amu. A pure hydrogen coating would be ideal, but technologically is not feasible at this time. In the experiments performed for my thesis, ErH3 coatings on 5 μm gold foils are compared with typical contaminants which are approximately equivalent to CH1.7. It will be shown that there was a factor of 1.25 ± 0.19 improvement in the conversion efficiency for protons above 3MeV using erbium hydride using the Callisto laser. Callisto is a 10J per pulse, 800nm wavelength laser with a pulse duration of 200fs and can be focused to a peak intensity of about 5 x 1019W/cm2. The total number of protons from either target type was on the order of 1010. Furthermore, the same experiment was performed on the Titan laser, which has a 500fs pulse duration, 150J of energy and can be focused to about 3 x 1020 W/cm2. In this experiment 1012 protons were seen from both erbium hydride and

  16. Radiation effects on organic insulator films at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoka, H.; Miyata, K.

    1985-08-01

    The radiation effects of some organic insulator films have been studied at low temperature. The specimens used were thin films of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), polyphenylene sulfide (PPS), polyether etherketone (PEEK), and polypyromellitimide (PPMI, Kapton H). Reactor irradiations were performed at 20 K and tensile properties of the irradiated films were measured at 77 K. In the irradiated PET, the tensile strength remarkably decreased with an increase in the absorbed dose above 2 MGy and the ultimate elongation gradually reduced with increasing dose. On the other hand, no essential changes in mechanical properties were observed for both PPS and PEEK films after irradiation up to 8 MGy at 20 K. As far as the present experiments are concerned, the radiation tolerances of PPS and PEEK films have been proved to be of the same level as that of PPMI film.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation on luminescence and carrier dynamics of self-assembled III-V quatum dots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leon, R.; Marcinkevicius, S.; Siegert, J.; Magness, B.; Taylor, W.; Lobo, C.

    2002-01-01

    The effects of proton irradiation (1.5 MeV) on photoluminescence intensities and carrier dynamics were compared between III-V quantum dots and similar quantum well structures. A significant enhancement in radiation tolerance is seen with three-dimensional quantum confinement. Measurements were carried out in different quantum dot (QD) structures, varying in material (InGaAs/GaAs and InAlAs/AlGaAs), QD surface density (4x10^8 to 3x10'^10 cm^-2), and substrate orientation [(100) and (311) B]. Similar trends were observed for all QD samples. A slight increase in PL emission after low to intermediate proton doses, are also observed in InGaAs/GaAs (100) QD structures. The latter is explained in terms of more efficient carrier transfer from the wetting layer via radiation-induced defects.

  18. Measurement and modelling of radionuclide production in thick spherical targets irradiated isotropically with 1600 MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Michel, R.; Lange, H.J.; Leya, I.; Luepke, M.; Herpers, U.; Meltzow, B.; Roesel, R.; Filges, D.; Cloth, P.; Dragovitsch, P.

    1994-12-31

    Two thick spherical targets made of gabbro and of steel with radii of 25 and 10 cm, respectively, were isotropically irradiated with 1.6 GeV protons at the Saturne accelerator at Laboratoire National Saturne/Saclay in order to simulate the interactions of galactic cosmic ray (GCR) protons with stony and iron meteoroids. The artificial meteoroids contained large numbers of individual small targets of up to 27 elements, in which the depth-dependent production of residual nuclides was measured by {gamma}-, accelerator and conventional mass spectrometry. Theoretical production depth profiles were derived by folding depth-dependent spectra of primary and secondary particles calculated by the HERMES code system with experimental and theoretical production rates shortcomings of the cross section data base can be distinguished and medium-energy neutron cross sections can be improved.

  19. Self-overcoming of the boiling condition by pressure increment in a water target irradiated by proton beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Bong Hwan; Kang, Joonsun; Jung, In Su; Ram, Han Ga; Park, Yeun Soo; Cho, Hyung Hee

    2013-11-01

    An experiment was conducted to examine and visualize the boiling phenomena inside a water target by irradiating it with a proton beam from MC-50 cyclotron. The boiling phenomena were recorded with a CMOS camera. While an increase of the fraction of the water vapor volume is generally considered to be normal when water is boiled by a proton beam, our experiment showed the opposite result. The volume expansion of the liquid water exceeded the compressibility of the initial air volume. A grid structure in front of the entrance window foil held the target volume constant. Therefore, the phenomena inside the target underwent an isochoric process, and the pressure inside the target was increased rapidly beyond the pressure at the boiling point. Consequently, there was no more bulk boiling in the Bragg-peak region in the target water. Our results show that the boiling of the water can be controlled by controlling the equilibrium pressure of the water target.

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2000-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. During this time period substantial progress has been made in developing low temperature deposition techniques to produce dense, nanocrystalline yttrium-stabilized zirconia films on both dense oxide and polymer substrates. Microstructural changes in unsupported nanocrystalline yttrium stabilized zirconia (ZrO{sub 2}:16%Y, or YSZ) thin films were examined as a function of temperature and annealing time in order to determine the grain growth exponent and the mechanisms of pinhole formation. Grain growth and pinhole formation were measured using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), normal imaging mode transmission electron microscopy (TEM), electron diffraction, and energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS). Grain growth was found to vary with a time exponent of about one half before pinhole formation and about one third after. Pinhole formation in 70 nm thick films occurred at temperatures near 600 C, corresponding to a grain size of about 15 nm, or a grain size to film thickness ration of approximately 0.25. The deposition of films on porous substrates is hampered by the penetration of the polymer precursor solution into the substrate whose pores as > 0.2 {micro}m, therefore much attention has to be paid to the development of porous colloidal oxide films onto surfaces. Thus during this line period we have been studying these films. Optical properties have proven to be an excellent way to study the quality of these nanoporous films. The influence of porosity and densification on optical properties of films on sapphire substrates that were prepared from water colloidal suspensions of small ({approx}5nm) particles of ceria was investigated. The colloidal ceria films have initially very porous structure (porosity about 50%) and densification starts at about 600 C accompanied by

  1. Low Dose Gamma Irradiation Potentiates Secondary Exposure to Gamma Rays or Protons in Thyroid Tissue Analogs

    SciTech Connect

    Green, Lora M

    2006-05-25

    We have utilized our unique bioreactor model to produce three-dimensional thyroid tissue analogs that we believe better represent the effects of radiation in vivo than two-dimensional cultures. Our thyroid model has been characterized at multiple levels, including: cell-cell exchanges (bystander), signal transduction, functional changes and modulation of gene expression. We have significant preliminary data on structural, functional, signal transduction and gene expression responses from acute exposures at high doses (50-1000 rads) of gamma, protons and iron (Green et al., 2001a; 2001b; 2002a; 2002b; 2005). More recently, we used our DOE funding (ending Feb 06) to characterize the pattern of radiation modulated gene expression in rat thyroid tissue analogs using low-dose/low-dose rate radiation, plus/minus acute challenge exposures. Findings from these studies show that the low-dose/low-dose rate “priming” exposures to radiation invoked changes in gene expression profiles that varied with dose and time. The thyrocytes transitioned to a “primed” state, so that when the tissue analogs were challenged with an acute exposure to radiation they had a muted response (or an increased resistance) to cytopathological changes relative to “un-primed” cells. We measured dramatic differences in the primed tissue analogs, showing that our original hypothesis was correct: that low dose gamma irradiation will potentiate the repair/adaptation response to a secondary exposure. Implications from these findings are that risk assessments based on classical in vitro tissue culture assays will overestimate risk, and that low dose rate priming results in a reduced response in gene expression to a secondary challenge exposure, which implies that a priming dose provides enhanced protection to thyroid cells grown as tissue analogs. If we can determine that the effects of radiation on our tissue analogs more closely resemble the effects of radiation in vivo, then we can better

  2. Proton Irradiation Alters Expression of FGF-2 In Human Lens Epithelial Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blakely, E. A.; Bjornstad, K. A.; Chang, P. Y.; McNamara, M. P.; Chang, E.

    1999-01-01

    We are investigating a role for proton radiation-induced changes in FGF-2 gene expression as part of the mechanism(s) underlying lens cell injury. Radiation injury to the human lens is associated with the induction of cataract following exposure to protons.

  3. Io's surface composition based on reflectance spectra of sulfur/salt mixtures and proton-irradiation experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nash, D. B.; Fanale, F. P.

    1977-01-01

    Available full-disk reflectance spectra of Io in the range 0.3 to 2.5 microns have been used to determine a surface compositional model for Io that is consistent with Io's other known chemical and physical properties. Results indicate that the surface of Io contains abundant dehydrated salts of high Na, Mg, and Fe(3+) content such as bloedite and ferrous iron sulfate. Experiments were performed studying the irradiation damage effects from low-energy proton bombardment, since Io is immersed in Jupiter's magnetosphere.

  4. Mega-electron-volt proton irradiation on supported and suspended graphene: A Raman spectroscopic layer dependent study

    SciTech Connect

    Mathew, S.; Thong, John T. L.; Chan, T. K.; Breese, M. B. H.; Zhan, D.; Shen, Z. X.; Gopinadhan, K.; Dhar, S.; Venkatesan, T.; Roy Barman, A.

    2011-10-15

    Graphene samples with 1, 2, and 4 layers and 1 + 1 folded bi-layers and graphite have been irradiated with 2 MeV protons at fluences ranging from 1 x 10{sup 15} to 6 x 10{sup 18} ions/cm{sup 2}. The samples were characterized using visible and UV Raman spectroscopy and Raman microscopy. The ion-induced defects were found to decrease with increasing number of layers. Graphene samples suspended over etched holes in SiO{sub 2} have been fabricated and used to investigate the influence of the substrate SiO{sub 2} for defect creation in graphene. While Raman vibrational modes at 1460 cm{sup -1} and 1555 cm{sup -1} have been observed in the visible Raman spectra of substantially damaged graphene samples, these modes were absent in the irradiated-suspended monolayer graphene.

  5. Measurement of Neutrons in Different Pb/U Setups Irradiated by Relativistic Protons and Deuterons by means of Activation Samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, V.; Svoboda, O.; Vrzalová, J.; Suchopár, M.; Geier, B.; Kugler, A.; Honusek, M.; the Collaboration Energy; Radioactive Waste, Transmutation of

    2012-05-01

    The collaboration Energy and Transmutation of Radioactive Waste uses different setups consisting of lead, uranium and graphite irradiated by relativistic protons and deuterons to study transmutation of radioactive materials by produced neutrons. Our group measured spatial distribution of neutrons by means of activation samples during the assembly irradiation by the JINR Nuclotron beams. We also present results of simulations using MCNPX code and their comparison with obtained experimental data. We use Au, Al, Bi, In and Ta foils as activation detectors, but unfortunately almost no experimental cross-section data for observed threshold (n,xn) reactions are available for higher neutron energies. Therefore we carried out series experiments devoted to determination of neutron cross-sections of various threshold reactions using different quasi-monoenergetic neutron sources.

  6. Investigation of the radiation resistance of triple-junction a-Si:H alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lord, Kenneth R., II; Walters, Michael R.; Woodyard, James R.

    1993-01-01

    The effect of 1.00 MeV proton irradiation on hydrogenated amorphous silicon alloy triple-junction solar cells is reported for the first time. The cells were designed for radiation resistance studies and included 0.35 cm(sup 2) active areas on 1.0 by 2.0 cm(sup 2) glass superstrates. Three cells were irradiated through the bottom contact at each of six fluences between 5.10E12 and 1.46E15 cm(sup -2). The effect of the irradiations was determined with light current-voltage measurements. Proton irradiation degraded the cell power densities from 8.0 to 98 percent for the fluences investigated. Annealing irradiated cells at 200 C for two hours restored the power densities to better than 90 percent. The cells exhibited radiation resistances which are superior to cells reported in the literature for fluences less than 1E14 cm(sup -2).

  7. Performance, Defect Behavior and Carrier Enhancement in Low Energy, Proton Irradiated p(+)nn(+) InP Solar Cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinberg, I.; Rybicki, G. C.; Vargas-Aburto, C.; Jain, R. K.; Scheiman, D.

    1994-01-01

    InP p(+)nn(+) cells, processed by MOCVD, were irradiated by 0.2 MeV protons and their performance and defect behavior observed to a maximum fluence of 10(exp 13)/sq cm. Their radiation induced degradation, over this fluence range, was considerably+less than observed for similarly irradiated, diffused junction n p InP cells. Significant degradation occurred in both the cell's emitter and base regions the least degradation occurring in the depletion region. A significant increase in series resistance occurs at the highest fluenc.e. Two majority carrier defect levels, E7 and E10, are observed by DLTS with activation energies at (E(sub C) - 0.39)eV and (E(sub C) - 0.74)eV respectively. The relative concentration of these defects differs considerably from that observed after 1 MeV electron irradiation. An increased carrier concentration in the cell's n-region was observed at the highest proton fluence, the change in carrier concentration being insignificant at the lower fluences. In agreement with previous results, for 1 and 1.5 MeV electron irradiated InP p(+)n junctions, the defect level E10 is attributed to a complex between zinc, diffused into the n-region from the zinc doped emitter, and a radiation induced defect. The latter is assumed to be either a phosphorus vacancy or interstitial. The increased, or enhanced carrier concentration is attributed to this complex acting as a donor.

  8. Thermal stability of deep level defects induced by high energy proton irradiation in n-type GaN

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Farzana, E.; Sun, W. Y.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.; McSkimming, B.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.

    2015-10-21

    The impact of annealing of proton irradiation-induced defects in n-type GaN devices has been systematically investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Moderate temperature annealing (>200–250 °C) causes significant reduction in the concentration of nearly all irradiation-induced traps. While the decreased concentration of previously identified N and Ga vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.13 eV, 0.16 eV, and 2.50 eV generally followed a first-order reaction model with activation energies matching theoretical values for N{sub I} and V{sub Ga} diffusion, irradiation-induced traps at E{sub C} − 0.72 eV, 1.25 eV, and 3.28 eV all decrease in concentration in a gradual manner, suggesting a more complex reduction mechanism. Slight increases in concentration are observed for the N-vacancy related levels at E{sub C} − 0.20 eV and 0.25 eV, which may be due to the reconfiguration of other N-vacancy related defects. Finally, the observed reduction in concentrations of the states at E{sub C} − 1.25 and E{sub C} − 3.28 eV as a function of annealing temperature closely tracks the detailed recovery behavior of the background carrier concentration as a function of annealing temperature. As a result, it is suggested that these two levels are likely to be responsible for the underlying carrier compensation effect that causes the observation of carrier removal in proton-irradiated n-GaN.

  9. Effect of proton irradiation followed by hindlimb unloading on bone in mature mice: a model of long-duration spaceflight.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Shane A; Bandstra, Eric R; Willey, Jeffrey S; Riffle, Stephanie E; Tirado-Lee, Leidamarie; Nelson, Gregory A; Pecaut, Michael J; Bateman, Ted A

    2012-10-01

    Bone loss associated with microgravity unloading is well documented; however, the effects of spaceflight-relevant types and doses of radiation on the skeletal system are not well defined. In addition, the combined effect of unloading and radiation has not received much attention. In the present study, we investigated the effect of proton irradiation followed by mechanical unloading via hindlimb suspension (HLS) in mice. Sixteen-week-old female C57BL/6 mice were either exposed to 1 Gy of protons or a sham irradiation procedure (n=30/group). One day later, half of the mice in each group were subjected to four weeks of HLS or normal loading conditions. Radiation treatment alone (IRR) resulted in approximately 20% loss of trabecular bone volume fraction (BV/TV) in the tibia and femur, with no effect in the cortical bone compartment. Conversely, unloading induced substantially greater loss of both trabecular bone (60-70% loss of BV/TV) and cortical bone (approximately 20% loss of cortical bone volume) in both the tibia and femur, with corresponding decreases in cortical bone strength. Histological analyses and serum chemistry data demonstrated increased levels of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption in unloaded mice, but not IRR. HLS+IRR mice generally experienced greater loss of trabecular bone volume fraction, connectivity density, and trabecular number than either unloading or irradiation alone. Although the duration of unloading may have masked certain effects, the skeletal response to irradiation and unloading appears to be additive for certain parameters. Appropriate modeling of the environmental challenges of long duration spaceflight will allow for a better understanding of the underlying mechanisms mediating spaceflight-associated bone loss and for the development of effective countermeasures.

  10. Effects of Alpha Particle and Proton Beam Irradiation as Putative Cross-Talk between A549 Cancer Cells and the Endothelial Cells in a Co-Culture System

    PubMed Central

    Riquier, Hélène; Abel, Denis; Wera, Anne-Catherine; Heuskin, Anne-Catherine; Genard, Géraldine; Lucas, Stéphane; Michiels, Carine

    2015-01-01

    Background: High-LET ion irradiation is being more and more often used to control tumors in patients. Given that tumors are now considered as complex organs composed of multiple cell types that can influence radiosensitivity, we investigated the effects of proton and alpha particle irradiation on the possible radioprotective cross-talk between cancer and endothelial cells. Materials and Methods: We designed new irradiation chambers that allow co-culture study of cells irradiated with a particle beam. A549 lung carcinoma cells and endothelial cells (EC) were exposed to 1.5 Gy of proton beam or 1 and 2 Gy of alpha particles. Cell responses were studied by clonogenic assays and cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry. Gene expression studies were performed using Taqman low density array and by RT-qPCR. Results: A549 cells and EC displayed similar survival fraction and they had similar cell cycle distribution when irradiated alone or in co-culture. Both types of irradiation induced the overexpression of genes involved in cell growth, inflammation and angiogenesis. Conclusions: We set up new irradiation chamber in which two cell types were irradiated together with a particle beam. We could not show that tumor cells and endothelial cells were able to protect each other from particle irradiation. Gene expression changes were observed after particle irradiation that could suggest a possible radioprotective inter-cellular communication between the two cell types but further investigations are needed to confirm these results. PMID:25794049

  11. Low Temperature Thermometry Using Inexpensive Silicon Diodes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waltham, N. R.; And Others

    1981-01-01

    Describes the use of silicon diodes for low temperature thermometry in the teaching laboratory. A simple and inexpensive circuit for display of the diode forward voltage under constant current conditions is described, and its application in the evaluation of low cost silicon diodes as low temperature thermometers is presented. (SK)

  12. Neutron yield from a thick 13C target irradiated by 90 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyakrinskiy, O.; Andrighetto, A.; Barbui, M.; Brandenburg, S.; Cinausero, M.; Dalena, B.; Dendooven, P.; Fioretto, E.; Lhersonneau, G.; Lyapin, W.; Prete, G.; Simonetti, G.; Stroe, L.; Tecchio, L. B.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2005-08-01

    In the context of the design of an intense source of low and intermediate energy neutrons, the angular and energy distributions of neutrons produced in the interaction of 90 MeV protons in a 13C target, in which the protons are stopped, have been measured by time-of-flight and activation techniques. As compared to 12C the yield is less than a factor two higher, while it is somewhat less than for a 9Be target.

  13. Low cost/low intensity 50 MeV proton irradiation facility

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, S.L.; Martin, R.L.

    1985-01-01

    Protons have been proposed as one of the most useful particles for radiation therapy, but have found limited use due to the cost and scarcity of medium energy proton accelerators. However, the highly successful program on the Harvard Cyclotron has increased interest in expanding the number of treatment facilities. In order to demonstrate that high intensity proton accelerators are not required and to gain experience with treating patients using protons, a low cost and low intensity source of 50 MeV protons was developed at Argonne. Although the beam penetration is limited to 22 mm, the beam is capable of treating a major fraction of the ocular melanoma tumors treated at the Harvard Cyclotron. This beam operates parasitically with the Rapid Cycling Synchrotron at Argonne using a source of 50 MeV H/sup 0/ atoms which are produced by stripping in the gas of the 50 MeV H/sup -/ linear accelerator. A stripping fraction of about 3 to 5 x 10/sup -5/ is observed and yields a 0.4 namp beam of protons. Results on the properties and operation of this parasitic beam are presented. 5 refs., 3 figs.

  14. Spacecraft Charging in Low Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Linda N.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft charging in plasma and radiation environments is a temperature dependent phenomenon due to the reduction of electrical conductivity in dielectric materials at low temperatures. Charging time constants are proportional to l/conductivity may become very large (on the order of days to years) at low temperatures and accumulation of charge densities in insulators in charging environments traditionally considered benign at ambient temperatures may be sufficient to produce charge densities and electric fields of concern in insulators at low temperatures. Low temperature charging is of interest because a number of spacecraft-primarily infrared astronomy and microwave cosmology observatories-are currently being design, built, and or operated at very cold temperatures on the order of 40K to 100K. This paper reviews the temperature dependence of spacecraft charging processes and material parameters important to charging as a function of temperature with an emphasis on low temperatures regimes.

  15. Optical evaluation of the ionized EL2 fraction in proton (24 GeV) irradiated semi-insulating GaAs

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrini, R.; Galli, M.; Guizzetti, G.; Patrini, M.; Nava, F.

    1997-11-01

    Semi-insulating SI GaAs samples from a zone refined crystal were irradiated with high energy protons (24 GeV/c, fluences up to 1.64{times}10{sup 14}p/cm{sup 2}). Optical spectra in transmittance and reflectance were accurately measured in the energy range of 0.6{endash}1.4 eV to determine, through the absorption coefficient, the concentrations of both neutral and ionized EL2 defects as a function of the proton fluence. Both these concentrations have been shown to increase linearly with the proton fluence; this behavior well explains the remarkable decrease of the charge collection efficiency observed in proton irradiated GaAs detectors at doses associated with high luminosity beams at a new particle collider accelerator (e.g., the LHC at the CERN laboratory). {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Estimating the effectiveness of human-cell irradiation by protons of a therapeutic beam of the joint institute for nuclear research phasotron using cytogenetic methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytseva, E. M.; Govorun, R. D.; Mitsin, G. V.; Molokanov, A. G.

    2011-11-01

    The effectiveness of the impact of therapeutic proton beams in human cells with respect to the criterion of formation of chromosome aberrations in human-blood lymphocytes is estimated. The physical characteristics of radiation (proton LET at the input of the object and in the region of the modified Bragg peak) and the role of the biological factor (the differences in the radiosensitivity of nondividing cells corresponding to the irradiation of normal tissues along the proton-beam path and tumor tissues) are taken into account. The relative biological effectiveness of protons is ˜1 at the beam input of the object and ˜1.2 in the Bragg peak region. Taking into account the higher radiosensitivity of dividing cells in the G 2 phase of the cell cycle, the irradiation effectiveness increases to ˜1.4.

  17. Prediction of production of 22Na in a gas-cell target irradiated by protons using Monte Carlo tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eslami, M.; Kakavand, T.; Mirzaii, M.; Rajabifar, S.

    2015-01-01

    The 22Ne(p,n)22Na is an optimal reaction for the cyclotron production of 22Na. This work tends to monitor the proton induced production of 22Na in a gas-cell target, containing natural and enriched neon gas, using Monte Carlo method. The excitation functions of reactions are calculated by both TALYS-1.6 and ALICE/ASH codes and then the optimum energy range of projectile for the high yield production is selected. A free gaseous environment of neon at a particular pressure and temperature is prearranged and the proton beam is transported within it using Monte Carlo codes MCNPX and SRIM. The beam monitoring performed by each of these codes indicates that the gas-cell has to be designed as conical frustum to reach desired interactions. The MCNPX is also employed to calculate the energy distribution of proton in the designed target and estimation of the residual nuclei during irradiation. The production yield of 22Na in 22Ne(p,n)22Na and natNe(p,x)22Na reactions are estimated and it shows a good agreement with the experimental results. The results demonstrate that Monte Carlo makes available a beneficial manner to design and optimize the gas targets as well as calibration of detectors, which can be used for the radionuclide production purposes.

  18. Significant increase of the ferroelectric phase transition temperature in partially deuterated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} by proton irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Kyu Won; Oh, B. H.; Kweon, J. J.; Lee, Cheol Eui

    2007-09-17

    The ferroelectric phase transition temperature was significantly raised by 5 K in partially deuterated KH{sub 2}PO{sub 4} irradiated by a proton beam. Increase in the hydrogen bond length was indicated by the dielectric constant analysis. Deuteron nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements of the electric field gradient tensor showed atomic displacement after the proton irradiation, and {sup 31}P NMR measurements of the chemical shift tensor revealed phosphorous displacement in the hydrogen-bonded direction and the PO{sub 4} tetrahedral distortion. Increase of the phase transition temperature can be closely related to the structural modification involving the hydrogen-bond geometry.

  19. Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Dickman, John E.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott

    1997-01-01

    Many space and some terrestrial applications would benefit from the availability of low-temperature electronics. Exploration missions to the outer planets, Earth-orbiting and deep-space probes, and communications satellites are examples of space applications which operate in low-temperature environments. Space probes deployed near Pluto must operate in temperatures as low as -229 C. Figure 1 depicts the average temperature of a space probe warmed by the sun for various locations throughout the solar system. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low-temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. The development of electrical power systems capable of extremely low-temperature operation represents a key element of some advanced space power systems. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program at NASA Lewis Research Center focuses on the design, fabrication, and characterization of low-temperature power systems and the development of supporting technologies for low-temperature operations such as dielectric and insulating materials, power components, optoelectronic components, and packaging and integration of devices, components, and systems.

  20. Annealing characteristics of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells irradiated with 1.00 MeV protons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdulaziz, Salman S.; Woodyard, James R.

    1991-01-01

    Amorphous Si:H and amorphous Si sub x, Ge sub (1-x):H solar cells were irradiated with 1.00 MeV proton fluences in the range of 1.00E14 to 1.25E15 cm (exp -2). Annealing of the short circuit current density was studied at 0, 22, 50, 100, and 150 C. Annealing times ranged from an hour to several days. The measurements confirmed that annealing occurs at 0 C and the initial characteristics of the cells are restored by annealing at 200 C. The rate of annealing does not appear to follow a simple nth order reaction rate model. Calculations of the short-circuit current density using quantum efficiency measurements and the standard AM1.5 global spectrum compare favorably with measured values. It is proposed that the degradation in J sub sc with irradiation is due to carrier recombination through the fraction of D (o) states bounded by the quasi-Fermi energies. The time dependence of the rate of annealing of J sub sc does appear to be consistent with the interpretation that there is a thermally activated dispersive transport mechanism which leads to the passivation of the irradiation induced defects.

  1. Improved Low Temperature Performance of Supercapacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J.; West, William C.; Smart, Marshall C.; Gnanaraj, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Low temperature double-layer capacitor operation enabled by: - Base acetonitrile / TEATFB salt formulation - Addition of low melting point formates, esters and cyclic ethers center dot Key electrolyte design factors: - Volume of co-solvent - Concentration of salt center dot Capacity increased through higher capacity electrodes: - Zeolite templated carbons - Asymmetric cell designs center dot Continuing efforts - Improve asymmetric cell performance at low temperature - Cycle life testing Motivation center dot Benchmark performance of commercial cells center dot Approaches for designing low temperature systems - Symmetric cells (activated carbon electrodes) - Symmetric cells (zeolite templated carbon electrodes) - Asymmetric cells (lithium titanate/activated carbon electrodes) center dot Experimental results center dot Summary

  2. [Low temperature plasma technology for biomass refinery].

    PubMed

    Fu, Xiaoguo; Chen, Hongzhang

    2014-05-01

    Biorefinery that utilizes renewable biomass for production of fuels, chemicals and bio-materials has become more and more important in chemical industry. Recently, steam explosion technology, acid and alkali treatment are the main biorefinery treatment technologies. Meanwhile, low temperature plasma technology has attracted extensive attention in biomass refining process due to its unique chemical activity and high energy. We systemically summarize the research progress of low temperature plasma technology for pretreatment, sugar platflow, selective modification, liquefaction and gasification in biomass refinery. Moreover, the mechanism of low temperature plasma in biorefinery and its further development were also discussed.

  3. SU-E-T-748: Theoretical Investigation On Using High Energy Proton Beam for Total-Body-Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, M; Zou, J; Chen, T; Yue, N

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The broad-slow-rising entrance dose region proximal to the Bragg peak made by a mono-energetic proton beam could potentially be used for total body irradiation (TBI). Due to the quasi-uniform dose deposition, customized thickness compensation may not be required to deliver a uniform dose to patients with varied thickness. We investigated the possibility, efficacy, and hardware requirement to use such proton beam for TBI. Methods: A wedge shaped water phantom with thickness varying from 2 cm to 40 cm was designed to mimic a patient. Geant4 based Monte Carlo code was used to simulate broad mono-energetic proton beams with energy ranging from 250 MeV to 300 MeV radiating the phantom. A 6 MV photon with 1 cm water equivalent build-up used for conventional TBI was also calculated. A paired-opposing beam arrangement with no thickness compensation was used to generate TBI plans for all beam energies. Dose from all particles were scored on a grid size of 2 mm{sup 3}. Dose uniformity across the phantom was calculated to evaluate the plan. The field size limit and the dose uniformity of Mevion S250 proton system was examined by using radiochromic films placed at extended treatment distance with the open large applicator and 90° gantry angle. Results: To achieve a maximum ± 7.5% dose variation, the largest patient thickness variation allowed for 250 MeV, 275 MeV, and 300 MeV proton beams were 27.0 cm, 34.9 cm and 36.7 cm. The value for 6 MV photon beam was only 8.0 cm to achieve the same dose variation. With open gantry, Mevion S250 system allows 5 m source-to-surface distance producing an expected 70 cm{sup 2} field size. Conclusion: Energetic proton beam can potentially be used to deliver TBI. Treatment planning and delivery would be much simple since no thickness compensation is required to achieve a uniform dose distribution.

  4. Photocarrier radiometry for predicting the degradation of electrical parameters of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, P.; Liu, J. Y.; Yuan, H. M.; Oliullah, Md.; Wang, F.; Wang, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the monocrystalline silicon (c-Si) solar cell irradiated by 100 KeV proton beams at various fluences is investigated. A one-dimensional two-layer carrier density wave model has been developed to estimate the minority carrier lifetime of n-region and p-region of the non-irradiated c-Si solar cell by best fitting with the experimental photocarrier radiometry (PCR) signal (the amplitude and the phase). Furthermore, the lifetime is used to determine the initial defect density of the quasi-neutral region (QNR) of the solar cell to predict its I-V characteristics. The theoretically predicted short-circuit current density (Jsc), and open-circuit voltage (Voc) of the non-irradiated samples are in good agreement with experiment. Then a three-region defect distribution model for the c-Si solar cell irradiated by proton beams is carried out to describe the defect density distribution according to Monte Carlo simulation results and the initial defect density of the non-irradiated sample. Finally, we find that the electrical measurements of Jsc and Voc of the solar cells irradiated at different fluences using 100 KeV proton beams are consistent with the PCR predicting results.

  5. Delayed Effects of Proton Irradiation in Macaca Mulatta. II. Mortality (15-Year Report).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-01-01

    undercount in the above 9 categories. For example, Wood et al. (14) report 38 cases of endome - triosis among the proton exposed; while only 26 cases of...animals was the high incidence of deaths due to radiation-induced neoplastic change including malignant tumors and endome - triosis. The death rate in

  6. Silicon solar cell development and radiation effects study for low temperature and low illumination intensity operation, volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirkpatrick, A. R.

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a study to determine the effect of in-situ proton irradiation upon low temperature, low intensity performance of several cell types. The cell types were selected in an attempt to distinguish variations in temperature-dependent radiation resistance which could be attributed to the n-p or p-n structure, diffused or implanted junctions, crucible grown or float-zone type base material, and high or low base resistivity. The results indicate that while expected variations of performance occur at room temperature, all cell types degrade more or less similarly at lower temperatures with normalized degradation becoming increasingly rapid as temperature is reduced. Recommendations for an optimized cell for Jupiter probe use are included along with a definition of the testing required on these cells to insure good performance characteristics.

  7. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  8. Performance of membrane electrode assemblies based on proton exchange membranes prepared by pre-irradiation induced grafting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Jingye; Matsuura, Akio; Kakigi, Tomoyuki; Miura, Takaharu; Oshima, Akihiro; Washio, Masakazu

    Proton exchange membranes (PEMs) were prepared by pre-irradiation induced grafting of styrene (S) or styrene/divinylbenzene (S/DVB) into the radiation-crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene (RX-PTFE) films and then sulfonated. The thicknesses of the obtained PEMs were lower than 20 μm and the ion exchange capacity (IEC) values were around 2 meq g -1. The surfaces of the PEMs and carbon electrodes were coated with Nafion ® dispersion, and then membrane electrode assembles (MEAs) were prepared by hot-pressing them together. A MEA based on a Nafion ® 112 membrane was also prepared under same procedure for comparison. The performances of the MEAs in a single cell were tested under different cell temperatures and humidifications. Electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS) were measured with ac frequencies which ranged from 100 kHz to 1 Hz at a dc density of 0.5 A cm -2. The obtained impedance curves in Nyquist representation were semicircular.

  9. SU-E-J-247: A Simulation of X-Ray Emission with Gold Nanoparticle Irradiated by Energetic Proton Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Newpower, M; Ahmad, S; Chen, Y

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To investigate the proton induced X-ray emissions in gold-water mixture materials. Methods: In this study a Monte Carlo simulation was created using the GEANT4 toolkit (version 4.9.6). The geometry in this setup includes a 2 cm × 2 cm × 2 cm target, a scoring sphere (radius = 10 cm) and a 65 MeV planar proton source (2 cm × 2 cm). Four concentrations of a gold-water solution were irradiated with 5×10{sup 5} incident protons at a distance of 0.5 cm perpendicular to the surface of the target. The solutions of gold-water mixture had 10%, 5%, 1% and 0.5% of gold by mass, respectively. The number of photon emitting for the target was counted in the scoring sphere for the energy range of 0-86.0 keV in 0.1 keV bins. For this study the reference physics list PhysListEmStandard was used together with the x-ray fluorescence, Auger electron and PIXE (particle induced xray emission) options enabled. The range cuts for photons and electrons were set at 0.5 mm and 1.0 mm, respectively. Results: In the energy spectra of emitting X-ray fluorescence, peaks from gold K shell characteristic x-rays (68.8 and 66.9 keV) were observed. The number of counts under the peaks of Ka1 and Ka2 was found to increase with the increasing of the gold concentrations in the mixture materials. The X-ray yields (for both Ka1 and Ka2) when fitted with least-square method as a function of gold concentration demonstrate a linear dependency with R{sup 2} > 0.96. The Ka1yield per incident proton was found to be 0.0016 for 10% gold-water mixture solutions. Conclusion: This preliminary study with PIXE technique with gold nanoparticle has demonstrated potentials for its utilization in the development of range and dose verification methodology that is currently of great interest in the field of proton radiation therapy.

  10. TH-C-BRD-12: Robust Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy Plan Can Eliminate Junction Shifts for Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Liao, L; Jiang, S; Li, Y; Wang, X; Li, H; Zhu, X; Sahoo, N; Gillin, M; Mahajan, A; Grosshans, D; Zhang, X; Lim, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The passive scattering proton therapy (PSPT) technique is the commonly used radiotherapy technique for craniospinal irradiation (CSI). However, PSPT involves many numbers of junction shifts applied over the course of treatment to reduce the cold and hot regions caused by field mismatching. In this work, we introduced a robust planning approach to develop an optimal and clinical efficient techniques for CSI using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) so that junction shifts can essentially be eliminated. Methods: The intra-fractional uncertainty, in which two overlapping fields shift in the opposite directions along the craniospinal axis, are incorporated into the robust optimization algorithm. Treatment plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm were designed and compared with the plan designed using the non-robust optimization. Robustness of the plans were evaluated based on dose profiles along the craniospinal axis for the plans applying 3 mm intra-fractional shift. The dose intra-fraction variations (DIV) at the junction are used to evaluate the robustness of the plans. Results: The DIVs are 7.9%, 6.3%, 5.0%, 3.8%, 2.8% and 2.2%, for the robustly optimized plans with junction sizes 3,5,10,15,20,25 cm. The DIV are 10% for the non-robustly optimized plans with junction size 25 cm. The dose profiles along the craniospinal axis exhibit gradual and tapered dose distribution. Using DIVs less than 5% as maximum acceptable intrafractional variation, the overlapping region can be reduced to 10 cm, leading to potential reduced number of the fields. The DIVs are less than 5% for 5 mm intra-fractional shifts with junction size 25 cm, leading to potential no-junction-shift for CSI using IMPT. Conclusion: This work is the first report of the robust optimization on CSI based on IMPT. We demonstrate that robust optimization can lead to much efficient carniospinal irradiation by eliminating the junction shifts.

  11. A comparison of 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma irradiation induced degradation in the electrical characteristics of N-channel MOSFETs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anjum, Arshiya; Vinayakprasanna, N. H.; Pradeep, T. M.; Pushpa, N.; Krishna, J. B. M.; Gnana Prakash, A. P.

    2016-07-01

    N-channel depletion MOSFETs were irradiated with 4 MeV Proton and Co-60 gamma radiation in the dose range of 100 krad(Si) to 100 Mrad(Si). The electrical characteristics of MOSFET such as threshold voltage (Vth), density of interface trapped charges (ΔNit), density of oxide trapped charges (ΔNot), transconductance (gm), mobility (μ), leakage current (IL) and drain saturation current (ID Sat) were studied as a function of dose. A considerable increase in ΔNit and ΔNot and decrease in Vth,gm, μ, and ID Sat was observed after irradiation. The results of 4 MeV Proton irradiation were compared with that of Co-60 gamma radiation and it is found that the degradation is more for the devices irradiated with 4 MeV Protons when compared with the Co-60 gamma radiation. This indicates that Protons induce more trapped charges in the field oxide region when compared to the gamma radiation.

  12. Chemical isolation of .sup.82 Sr from proton-irradiated Mo targets

    DOEpatents

    Grant, Patrick M.; Kahn, Milton; O'Brien, Jr., Harold A.

    1976-01-01

    Spallation reactions are induced in Mo targets with 200-800 MeV protons to produce microcurie to millicurie amounts of a variety of radionuclides. A six-step radiochemical procedure, incorporating precipitation, solvent extractions, and ion exchange techniques, has been developed for the separation and purification of Sr radioactivities from other spallation products and the bulk target material. Radiostrontium can be quantitatively recovered in a sufficiently decontaminated state for use in biomedical generator development.

  13. Electronics Demonstrated for Low- Temperature Operation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad; Gerber, Scott S.

    2000-01-01

    The operation of electronic systems at cryogenic temperatures is anticipated for many NASA spacecraft, such as planetary explorers and deep space probes. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would experience an average temperature near Saturn of about 183 C. Electronics capable of low-temperature operation in the harsh deep space environment also would help improve circuit performance, increase system efficiency, and reduce payload development and launch costs. An ongoing research and development program on low-temperature electronics at the NASA Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field is focusing on the design of efficient power systems that can survive and exploit the advantages of low-temperature environments. The targeted systems, which are mission driven, include converters, inverters, controls, digital circuits, and special-purpose circuits. Initial development efforts successfully demonstrated the low-temperature operation and cold-restart of several direct-current/direct-current (dc/dc) converters based on different types of circuit design, some with superconducting inductors. The table lists some of these dc/dc converters with their properties, and the photograph shows a high-voltage, high-power dc/dc converter designed for an ion propulsion system for low-temperature operation. The development efforts of advanced electronic systems and the supporting technologies for low-temperature operation are being carried out in-house and through collaboration with other Government agencies, industry, and academia. The Low Temperature Electronics Program supports missions and development programs at NASA s Jet Propulsion Laboratory and Goddard Space Flight Center. The developed technologies will be transferred to commercial end users for applications such as satellite infrared sensors and medical diagnostic equipment.

  14. Effects of proton irradiation and temperature on 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicoletta, C. A.

    1973-01-01

    The 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm silicon solar cells were exposed to 1.0 MeV protons at a fixed flux of 10 to the 9th power P/sq cm-sec and fluences of 10 to the 10th power, 10 to the 11th power, 10 to the 12th power and 3 X 10 to the 12th power P/sq cm. I-V curves of the cells were made at room temperature, 65 C and 165 C after each irradiation. A value of 139.5 mw/sq cm was taken as AMO incident energy rate per unit area. Degradation occurred for both uncovered 1 ohm-cm and 10 ohm-cm cells. Efficiencies are generally higher than those of comparable U.S. cells tested earlier. Damage (loss in maximum power efficiency) with proton fluence is somewhat higher for 10 ohm-cm cells, measured at the three temperatures, for fluences above 2 X 10 to the 11th power P/sq cm. Cell efficiency, as expected, changes drastically with temperature.

  15. Degradation mechanisms of 2 MeV proton irradiated AlGaN/GaN HEMTs

    SciTech Connect

    Greenlee, Jordan D. Anderson, Travis J.; Koehler, Andrew D.; Weaver, Bradley D.; Kub, Francis J.; Hobart, Karl D.; Specht, Petra; Dubon, Oscar D.; Luysberg, Martina; Weatherford, Todd R.

    2015-08-24

    Proton-induced damage in AlGaN/GaN HEMTs was investigated using energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and simulated using a Monte Carlo technique. The results were correlated to electrical degradation using Hall measurements. It was determined by EDS that the interface between GaN and AlGaN in the irradiated HEMT was broadened by 2.2 nm, as estimated by the width of the Al EDS signal compared to the as-grown interface. The simulation results show a similar Al broadening effect. The extent of interfacial roughening was examined using high resolution TEM. At a 2 MeV proton fluence of 6 × 10{sup 14} H{sup +}/cm{sup 2}, the electrical effects associated with the Al broadening and surface roughening include a degradation of the ON-resistance and a decrease in the electron mobility and 2DEG sheet carrier density by 28.9% and 12.1%, respectively.

  16. Quantum simulation of low-temperature metallic liquid hydrogen.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ji; Li, Xin-Zheng; Zhang, Qianfan; Probert, Matthew I J; Pickard, Chris J; Needs, Richard J; Michaelides, Angelos; Wang, Enge

    2013-01-01

    The melting temperature of solid hydrogen drops with pressure above ~65 GPa, suggesting that a liquid state might exist at low temperatures. It has also been suggested that this low-temperature liquid state might be non-molecular and metallic, although evidence for such behaviour is lacking. Here we report results for hydrogen at high pressures using ab initio methods, which include a description of the quantum motion of the protons. We determine the melting temperature as a function of pressure and find an atomic solid phase from 500 to 800 GPa, which melts at <200 K. Beyond this and up to 1,200 GPa, a metallic atomic liquid is stable at temperatures as low as 50 K. The quantum motion of the protons is critical to the low melting temperature reported, as simulations with classical nuclei lead to considerably higher melting temperatures of ~300 K across the entire pressure range considered.

  17. Functional outcome of patients with benign meningioma treated by 3D conformal irradiation with a combination of photons and protons

    SciTech Connect

    Noel, Georges . E-mail: noel@ipno.in2p3.fr; Bollet, Marc A.; Calugaru, Valentin; Feuvret, Loic; Haie-Meder, Christine; Dhermain, Frederic; Ferrand, Regis; Boisserie, Gilbert; Beaudre, Anne; Mazeron, Jean-Jacques; Habrand, Jean-Louis

    2005-08-01

    Purpose: To evaluate efficacy and tolerance of external fractionated combination of photon and proton radiation therapy (RT) for intracranial benign meningiomas. Methods and Materials: Between 1994 and 2002, 51 patients with intracranial meningiomas of the base of the skull were treated with a combination of photon and proton RT. Median total dose was 60.6 cobalt Gy equivalent (54-64). One hundred eight eye-related symptoms were collected; 80 other symptoms were noted and followed up. Results: Mean follow-up was 25.4 months. Acute tolerance was excellent. Out of the 108 eye-related symptoms, 106 (96%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported for 73 (68.8%) of them. Out of the 88 other miscellaneous symptoms, 81 (92%) were evaluated. Improvements were reported in 54 cases (67%). Median time to improvement ranged from 1 to 24 months after completion of the radiotherapy, depending on the symptom. We did not observe any worsening of primary clinical signs. Radiologically, 1 patient relapsed 4 months after the end of irradiation. Pathology revealed a malignant (Grade 3) transformation of the initial Grade 1 meningioma. Four-year local control and overall survival rates were, respectively, 98% and 100%. Stabilization of the tumor was observed in 38 cases (72%), volume reduction in 10 cases (20%), and intratumor necrosis in 3 cases. Two patients complained of Grade 3 side effects: 1 unilateral hearing loss requiring aid and 1 case of complete pituitary deficiency. Conclusion: These results stressed the clinical efficacy of fractionated-associated photon-proton RT in the treatment of meningiomas, especially on cranial nerve palsies, without severe toxicity in almost all patients.

  18. Low Temperature Synthesis of Carbon Nanotubes by Direct Microwave Irradiation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-08-09

    REPORT DATE 09 AUG 2007 2. REPORT TYPE FInal 3. DATES COVERED 09-05-2005 to 08-11-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Microwave synthesis of nano ...after completing the analysis of synthesized CNTs. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Nanotechnology, Carbon nano tubes 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17...compounds such as thiophene, and sulfur was detected as a sulfide phase from the catalyst surface even in micro -contents. In our experiments, Y-junction

  19. Low Temperature Hall Measurements of Neutron Irradiated Silicon Carbide

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-03-01

    general programming interface bus (GPIB). Table 3: Equipment List for Keithley System 110 Make Model Name Keithley 617 Electrometer Keithley 196 Voltmeter...concentration with temperature as measured by the S110 system . Theory models the temperature dependence of carrier concentration as an exponential. 44 y = 8E+16x...Penney Model of Conduction ........................................................................ 7 Silicon Carbide

  20. Recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (rMnSOD): a positive effect on the immunohematological state of mice irradiated with protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambesi-Impiombato, Francesco Saverio; Belov, Oleg; Bulinina, Taisia; Ivanov, Alexander; Mancini, Aldo; Borrelli, Antonella; Krasavin, Eugene A.

    Protons represent the largest component of space radiation. In this regard screening of radioprotective drugs capable of increasing radioresistance of astronauts obligatory includes studying these compounds using proton radiation injury models. The recombinant human manganese superoxide dismutase (rMnSOD) had previously demonstrated its efficacy on an in vivo X-ray induced injury model, when multiple intraperitoneal treatments allowed the survival of mice irradiated with doses which were lethal for the control animals (Borrelli A et al. “A recombinant MnSOD is radioprotective for normal cells and radiosensitizing for tumor cells”. Free Radic Biol Med. 2009, 46, 110-6). Using the model of sublethal whole-body irradiation with protons available at Phasotron of Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna, Russia), we reconstruct the bone-marrow form of the acute radiation sickness to test the radioprotective effect of rMnSOD. Male (CBAxC57Bl6) F1 hybrid SPF mice weighting approximately 24 g were exposed to 171 MeV protons at the dose of 4 Gy. After irradiation, the sixfold daily subcutaneous treatment with rMnSOD has provided a statistically significant acceleration of the recovery of thymus and spleen mass and of the number of leukocytes in mice peripheral blood. In the control, untreated and irradiated mice, these positive effects were not observed even on day 7 after exposure. The number of karyocytes in bone marrow of irradiated mice has even exceeded its basal level in the control group 7 days after irradiation. The rMnSOD-treated group has thus demonstrated a significant hyper-restoration of this characteristic. In the presentation, several possibilities of using of rMnSOD in space medicine will be discussed, taking into account various biomedically relevant effects of this enzyme.

  1. Dark Current Degradation of Near Infrared Avalanche Photodiodes from Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, Heidi N.; Johnston, Allan H.

    2004-01-01

    InGaAs and Ge avalanche photodiodes (APDs) are examined for the effects of 63-MeV protons on dark current. Dark current increases were large and similar to prior results for silicon APDs, despite the smaller size of InGaAs and Ge devices. Bulk dark current increases from displacement damage in the depletion regions appeared to be the dominant contributor to overall dark current degradation. Differences in displacement damage factors are discussed as they relate to structural and material differences between devices.

  2. SU-E-T-266: Development of Evaluation System of Optimal Synchrotron Controlling Parameter for Spot Scanning Proton Therapy with Multiple Gate Irradiations in One Operation Cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, T; Fujii, Y; Miyamoto, N; Matsuura, T; Takao, S; Matsuzaki, Y; Koyano, H; Shirato, H; Nihongi, H; Umezawa, M; Matsuda, K; Umegaki, K

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: We have developed a gated spot scanning proton beam therapy system with real-time tumor-tracking. This system has the ability of multiple-gated irradiation in a single synchrotron operation cycle controlling the wait-time for consecutive gate signals during a flat-top phase so that the decrease in irradiation efficiency induced by irregular variation of gate signal is reduced. Our previous studies have shown that a 200 ms wait-time is appropriate to increase the average irradiation efficiency, but the optimal wait-time can vary patient by patient and day by day. In this research, we have developed an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on the log data of the real-time-image gated proton beam therapy (RGPT) system. Methods: The developed system consists of logger for operation of RGPT system and software for evaluation of optimal wait-time. The logger records timing of gate on/off, timing and the dose of delivered beam spots, beam energy and timing of X-ray irradiation. The evaluation software calculates irradiation time in the case of different wait-time by simulating the multiple-gated irradiation operation using several timing information. Actual data preserved in the log data are used for gate on and off time, spot irradiation time, and time moving to the next spot. Design values are used for the acceleration and deceleration times. We applied this system to a patient treated with the RGPT system. Results: The evaluation system found the optimal wait-time of 390 ms that reduced the irradiation time by about 10 %. The irradiation time with actual wait-time used in treatment was reproduced with accuracy of 0.2 ms. Conclusion: For spot scanning proton therapy system with multiple-gated irradiation in one synchrotron operation cycle, an evaluation system of the optimal wait-time in each irradiation based on log data has been developed. Funding Support: Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) through the FIRST

  3. Low-temperature properties of aviation fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Brunton, C.; Voisey, M.A.; Willcock, C.R.

    1983-01-01

    A review is presented of work on the low-temperature properties of aviation turbine fuels that has been carried out in recent years at Thornton Research Centre. Details of both simulated full-scale aircraft tank tests and laboratory evaluations are included. Zero holdup is considered as a low-temperature specification parameter and a novel method for measuring its value is described. Experimental results are presented which demonstrate that a change from a freezing point to a flow criterion could provide an increase in fuel availability without prejudicing flight safety.

  4. Prototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-02-01

    Zimmerman successfully operated a point-Contact Nb SQUID on a four- stage stirling cycle cryocooler with a mechanical drive power of approxi- mately 15...AD-ADL2 622 LAKE SHORE CRYOTRONICS INC WESTERVILLE OH F/6 13/1 PROTOTYPE LOW TEMPERATURE LOW POWER CRYOCOOLER ,(U) FE13 82 W G P IERC E N0001INROC...pPrototype Low Temperature Low Power Cryocooler // It by Warren G. Pierce February 1982 Prepared under Contract No. N00014-80-C-0825 by LAKE SHORE

  5. Low temperature monitoring system for subsurface barriers

    DOEpatents

    Vinegar, Harold J.; McKinzie, II. Billy John

    2009-08-18

    A system for monitoring temperature of a subsurface low temperature zone is described. The system includes a plurality of freeze wells configured to form the low temperature zone, one or more lasers, and a fiber optic cable coupled to at least one laser. A portion of the fiber optic cable is positioned in at least one freeze well. At least one laser is configured to transmit light pulses into a first end of the fiber optic cable. An analyzer is coupled to the fiber optic cable. The analyzer is configured to receive return signals from the light pulses.

  6. Effects of proton irradiation on flux-pinning properties of underdoped Ba(Fe0.96Co0.04)2As2 pnictide superconductor

    DOE PAGES

    Salem-Sugui, S.; Moseley, D.; Stuard, S. J.; ...

    2016-10-13

    We study the effect of proton irradiation on Ba(Fe0.96Co0.04)2As2 superconducting single crystals from combined magnetisation and magnetoresistivity measurements. The study allows the extraction of the values of the apparent pinning energy U0 of the samples prior to and after irradiation, as well as comparison of the values of U0 obtained from the flux-flow reversible region with those from the flux-creep irreversible region. Irradiation reduces Tc modestly, but significantly reduces U0 in both regimes: the critical current density Jc is modified, most strikingly by the disappearance of the second magnetisation peak after irradiation. Analysis of the functional form of the pinningmore » force and of the temperature dependence of Jc for zero field, indicates that proton irradiation in this case has not changed the pinning regime, but has introduced a high density of shallow point-like defects. Lastly, by considering a model that takes into account the effect of disorder on the irreversibility line, the data suggests that irradiation produced a considerable reduction in the average effective disorder overall, consistent with the changes observed in U0 and Jc.« less

  7. Induction and Rejoining of DNA Double Strand Breaks Assessed by H2AX Phosphorylation in Melanoma Cells Irradiated with Proton and Lithium Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Ibanez, Irene L.; Bracalente, Candelaria; Molinari, Beatriz L.; Palmieri, Monica A.; Policastro, Lucia; Kreiner, Andres J.; Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro; Navalesi, Daniela; Davidson, Jorge; Davidson, Miguel; Vazquez, Monica; Ozafran, Mabel; Duran, Hebe

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the induction and rejoining of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in melanoma cells exposed to low and high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation. Methods and Materials: DSBs and survival were determined as a function of dose in melanoma cells (B16-F0) irradiated with monoenergetic proton and lithium beams and with a gamma source. Survival curves were obtained by clonogenic assay and fitted to the linear-quadratic model. DSBs were evaluated by the detection of phosphorylated histone H2AX ({gamma}H2AX) foci at 30 min and 6 h post-irradiation. Results: Survival curves showed the increasing effectiveness of radiation as a function of LET. {gamma}H2AX labeling showed an increase in the number of foci vs. dose for all the radiations evaluated. A decrease in the number of foci was found at 6 h post-irradiation for low LET radiation, revealing the repair capacity of DSBs. An increase in the size of {gamma}H2AX foci in cells irradiated with lithium beams was found, as compared with gamma and proton irradiations, which could be attributed to the clusters of DSBs induced by high LET radiation. Foci size increased at 6 h post-irradiation for lithium and proton irradiations in relation with persistent DSBs, showing a correlation with surviving fraction. Conclusions: Our results showed the response of B16-F0 cells to charged particle beams evaluated by the detection of {gamma}H2AX foci. We conclude that {gamma}H2AX foci size is an accurate parameter to correlate the rejoining of DSBs induced by different LET radiations and radiosensitivity.

  8. Calculations of the displacement damage and short-circuit current degradation in proton irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeh, C. S.; Li, S. S.; Loo, R. Y.

    1987-01-01

    A theoretical model for computing the displacement damage defect density and the short-circuit current (I sub sc) degradation in proton-irradiated (AlGa)As-GaAs p-n junction solar cells is presented. Assumptions were made with justification that the radiation induced displacement defects form an effective recombination center which controls the electron and hole lifetimes in the junction space charge region and in the n-GaAs active layer of the irradiated GaAs p-n junction cells. The degradation of I sub sc in the (AlGa)As layer was found to be negligible compared to the total degradation. In order to determine the I sub sc degradation, the displacement defect density, path length, range, reduced energy after penetrating a distance x, and the average number of displacements formed by one proton scattering event were first calculated. The I sub sc degradation was calculated by using the electron capture cross section in the p-diffused layer and the hole capture cross section in the n-base layer as well as the wavelength dependent absorption coefficients. Excellent agreement was found between the researchers calculated values and the measured I sub sc in the proton irradiated GaAs solar cells for proton energies of 100 KeV to 10 MeV and fluences from 10 to the 10th power p/square cm to 10 to the 12th power p/square cm.

  9. Low temperature synthesis of methyl formate

    DOEpatents

    Mahajan, Devinder; Slegeir, William A.; Sapienza, Richard S.; O'Hare, Thomas E.

    1986-01-01

    A gas reaction process for the preferential production of methyl formate over the co-production of methanol wherein the reactant ratio of CO/H.sub.2 is upgraded and this reaction takes place at low temperatures of 50.degree.-150.degree. C. and moderate pressures of .gtoreq.100 psi.

  10. Second Skin Protection against Low Temperature Exposure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    against injurious effects from exposure to low temperatures. Vinyl plastisols with good viscosity stability have been developed. Accelerators are...of plasticol or silicone rubber foamed on the skin for thermal insulation and thin dense covering layer of plastisol or silicone rubber for abrasion resistance.

  11. Industrial Applications of Low Temperature Plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Bardsley, J N

    2001-03-15

    The use of low temperature plasmas in industry is illustrated by the discussion of four applications, to lighting, displays, semiconductor manufacturing and pollution control. The type of plasma required for each application is described and typical materials are identified. The need to understand radical formation, ionization and metastable excitation within the discharge and the importance of surface reactions are stressed.

  12. Fuzzy Logic Controller for Low Temperature Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hahn, Inseob; Gonzalez, A.; Barmatz, M.

    1996-01-01

    The most common temperature controller used in low temperature experiments is the proportional-integral-derivative (PID) controller due to its simplicity and robustness. However, the performance of temperature regulation using the PID controller depends on initial parameter setup, which often requires operator's expert knowledge on the system. In this paper, we present a computer-assisted temperature controller based on the well known.

  13. Critical current density of Nb3Sn wires after irradiation with 65MeV and 24GeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spina, T.; Scheuerlein, C.; Richter, D.; Bottura, L.; Ballarino, A.; Flükiger, R.

    2014-05-01

    Industrial Nb3Sn wires with Ti and Ta additives (RRP process) and with Ta additives (PIT process) with a diameter of 1 mm have been irradiated at room temperature with protons of 65 MeV and of 24 GeV at various fluences up to 1×1021 p/m2. A steady increase of Jc vs. fluence was observed for all the wires up to the highest fluence. The observed increase of Jc at 4.2K in all wires was quite similar in spite of the very different proton energies. With increasing fluence. the radiation induced pinning force was found to increase. the enhancement Jc/Jco after 5.04×1020 p/m2 reaching 1.4 for Ta and 1.8 for Ti alloyed wires at 10T. The present results were quantitatively analysed by assuming a radiation induced point pinning mechanism in addition to grain boundary pinning. The results are compared with those of an ongoing neutron irradiation study undertaken on the same Nb3Sn wires in collaboration with the Atominstitut Vienna. Proton irradiation was found to produce considerably higher damage than neutron irradiation.

  14. Optical spectroscopy and imaging of colour centres in lithium fluoride crystals and thin films irradiated by 3 MeV proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piccinini, M.; Ambrosini, F.; Ampollini, A.; Carpanese, M.; Picardi, L.; Ronsivalle, C.; Bonfigli, F.; Libera, S.; Vincenti, M. A.; Montereali, R. M.

    2014-05-01

    Lithium fluoride is a well-known dosimeter material and it is currently under investigation also for high-resolution radiation imaging detectors based on colour centre photoluminescence. In order to extend their applications, proton beams of 3 MeV energy, produced by a linear accelerator, were used to irradiate LiF crystals and thin films in the fluence range of 1010-1015 protons/cm2. The irradiation induces the formation of colour centres, mainly the primary F centre and the aggregate F2 and F3+ defects, which are stable at room temperature. By optical pumping in the blue spectral region, the F2 and F3+ centres emit broad photoluminescence bands in the visible spectral range. By conventional fluorescence microscopy, the integrated photoluminescence intensity was carefully measured in LiF crystals and thin films as a function of the irradiation fluence: a linear optical response was obtained in a large range of fluence, which is dependent on the used LiF samples. Colour centres concentrations were estimated in LiF crystals by optical absorption spectroscopy. It was possible to record the transversal proton beam intensity profile by acquiring the photoluminescence image of the irradiated spots on LiF films.

  15. The Role of Non-Targeted Effects as Mediators in the Biological Effects of Proton Irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.; Dicello, John F.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis that non-DNA targets are primary initiators and mediators of the biological effects of ionizing radiation, such as proton beams and heavy ions, has gained much interest. These phenomena have been denoted as non-targeted or bystander effects to distinguish them from the more traditionally studied model that focuses on direct damage to DNA causing chromosomal rearrangements and mutations as causative of most biological endpoints such as cell killing, tissue damage, and cancer. We review cellular and extra-cellular structures and signal transduction pathways that have been implemented in these recent studies. Non-targeted effects of interest include oxidative damage to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, disruption of the extra-cellular matrix, and modification of cytokine signaling including TGF-beta, and gap junction communication. We present an introduction to these targets and pathways, and contrast there role with DNA damage pathways.

  16. Protons or megavoltage X-rays as boost therapy for patients irradiated for localized prostatic carcinoma. An early phase I/II comparison

    SciTech Connect

    Duttenhaver, J.R.; Shipley, W.U.; Perrone, T.; Verhey, L.J.; Goitein, M.; Munzenrider, J.E.; Prout, G.R.; Parkhurst, E.C.; Suit, H.D.

    1983-05-01

    A total of 180 patients with carcinoma of the prostate limited to the pelvis were treated with one of two external beam irradiation techniques between 1972 and 1979. One hundred and sixteen patients were treated with conventional pelvic megavoltage x-ray therapy. Sixty-four patients were treated with combined pelvic x-ray therapy plus a perineal proton beam boost to a carefully defined prostatic tumor volume. A 160 MeV proton beam has been modified to irradiate patients with localized tumors by using conventional treatment schedules. This proton beam has the physical advantage over megavoltage x-rays of reducing the dose to normal tissues adjacent to the tumor volume. By using the proton beam boost we have delivered an increased prostatic tumor dose of 500 to 700 cGy without increasing treatment morbidity at all. The two groups are actuarially analyzed for patient survival, disease-free survival and local recurrence-free survival, and thus far, no significant differences have been noted. Because of the minimal complications observed in the proton group despite a 10% increase in dose, a randomized clinical trial comparing these two treatment techniques is studied.

  17. Effects of proton irradiation on a gas phase in which condensation takes place. I Negative Mg-26 anomalies and Al-26. [applied to solar and meteoritic composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heymann, D.; Dziczkaniec, M.; Walker, A.; Huss, G.; Morgan, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    In the present paper, isotopic effects in magnesium generated in a proton-irradiated gas phase are examined, taking only (p,n), (p,d), and (p, alpha) reactions in magnesium, aluminum, and silicon into consideration. In the presence of proton radiation, the three elements are 'removed' from the gas phase by condensation. It is required that a value of Al-26/Al-27 greater than 6 times 10 to the -5th must be reached, consistent with the value deduced by Lee Papanastassiou, and Wasserburg (1976) from their studies of the Allende meteorite. The calculations show that fast aluminum condensation reduces the required proton fluence substantially, that a significant fraction of aluminum remains uncondensed when the above value of the Al-26/Al-27 ratio is reached, that a detectable MG-24 excess is very likely to occur, that detectable negative MG-28 anomalies can be generated, and that proton fluxes and irradiation times can be varied simultaneously, and over a wide range of values, without significant changes in the required proton fluence.

  18. SU-E-T-621: Analysis of Robustness of Proton Pencil Beam Scanning Technique for Delivery of Craniospinal Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, H; Kirk, M; Zhai, H; Ding, X; Liu, H; Hill-Kayser, C; Lustig, R; Tochner, Z; McDonough, J; Both, S

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the robustness and safety of craniospinal irradiation (CSI) planned with a proton pencil beam scanning (PBS) technique which overcomes the complexity of the planning associated with feathering match lines. Methods: Six CSI patients were planned with gradient-dose matching using PBS technique. Uniform dose coverage to the entire target volumes was achieved with averaged junction lengths of 6.9±0.3 cm. Robustness of the plans was evaluated by shifting the isocenter of each treatment field by ±3 mm in longitudinal direction and compared with the original non-shifted plan with metrics of conformity number (CN) and homogeneity index (HI). An anthropomorphic phantom study using film measurements was also carried out on a plan with 5 cm junction length. Results: For a given junction length, the dose errors were directly proportional to the setup errors. Setup errors of 3 mm from each field caused on average 3.5% lower CN and 2.1% higher HI. Minimal D95% to PTV and D98% to CTV were reduced by 2.2%±1.5% and 2.8%±1.7% respectively. A drop of maximal 6.8%±5.5% on the minimal dose to the cribriform plate was also observed. When the junction length was 5cm or longer, these 3mm setup errors from each field resulted in up to 12% dose errors. Consistent results were reached between film measurements and planned dose profiles in the junction area. Due to near-zero exit doses beyond the target volume, sparing of anterior organs such as heart, liver, lung and kidney were observed. Conclusions: Longitudinal setup errors directly reduce the dosimetric accuracy of the CSI treatment with matched proton fields. The reported technique creates a slow dose gradient in the junction area, which makes the treatment more robust and safe to longitudinal setup errors compared to conventional feathering methods.

  19. Partial recovery of the magnetoelectrical properties of AlGaN/GaN-based micro-Hall sensors irradiated with protons

    SciTech Connect

    Abderrahmane, A.; Tashiro, T.; Takahashi, H.; Ko, P. J.; Okada, H.; Sandhu, A.; Sato, S.; Ohshima, T.

    2014-01-13

    The effect of annealing on the magnetoelectrical properties of proton-irradiated micro-Hall sensors at an energy of 380 keV and very high proton fluences was studied. Recovery of the electron mobility and a decrease in the sheet resistance of the annealed micro-Hall sensors, as well as an enhancement in their magnetic sensitivity were reported. Trap removal and an improvement in the crystal quality by removing defects were confirmed through current–voltage measurements and Raman spectroscopy, respectively.

  20. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, Kazuyuki; Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-01

    The effect of 1H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951-6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the 1H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  1. Proton decoupling and recoupling under double-nutation irradiation in solid-state NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Takeda, Kazuyuki Wakisaka, Asato; Takegoshi, K.

    2014-12-14

    The effect of {sup 1}H decoupling in magic-angle spinning solid-state NMR is studied under radiofrequency irradiation causing simultaneous nutations around a pair of orthogonal axes. Double-nutation with an arbitrary pair of nutation frequencies is implemented through modulation of the amplitude, phase, and frequency of the transmitting pulses. Similarity and difference of double-nutation decoupling and two-pulse phase-modulation decoupling schemes [A. E. Bennett, C. M. Rienstra, M. Auger, K. V. Lakshmi, and R. G. Griffin, J. Chem. Phys. 103, 6951–6958 (1995) and I. Scholz, P. Hodgkinson, B. H. Meier, and M. Ernst, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 114510 (2009)] are discussed. The structure of recoupling bands caused by interference of the {sup 1}H spin nutation with sample spinning is studied by both experiments and numerical simulations.

  2. Low-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy of photoactive yellow protein.

    PubMed

    Imamoto, Y; Shirahige, Y; Tokunaga, F; Kinoshita, T; Yoshihara, K; Kataoka, M

    2001-07-31

    The photocycle intermediates of photoactive yellow protein (PYP) were characterized by low-temperature Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The difference FTIR spectra of PYP(B), PYP(H), PYP(L), and PYP(M) minus PYP were measured under the irradiation condition determined by UV-visible spectroscopy. Although the chromophore bands of PYP(B) were weak, intense sharp bands complementary to the 1163-cm(-1) band of PYP, which show the chromophore is deprotonated, were observed at 1168-1169 cm(-1) for PYP(H) and PYP(L), indicating that the proton at Glu46 is not transferred before formation of PYP(M). Free trans-p-coumaric acid had a 1294-cm(-1) band, which was shifted to 1288 cm(-1) in the cis form. All the difference FTIR spectra obtained had the pair of bands corresponding to them, indicating that all the intermediates have the chromophore in the cis configuration. The characteristic vibrational modes at 1020-960 cm(-1) distinguished the intermediates. Because these modes were shifted by deuterium-labeling at the ethylene bond of the chromophore while labeling at the phenol part had no effect, they were attributed to the ethylene bond region. Hence, structural differences among the intermediates are present in this region. Bands at about 1730 cm(-1), which show that Glu46 is protonated, were observed for all intermediates except for PYP(M). Because the frequency of this mode was constant in PYP(B), PYP(H), and PYP(L), the environment of Glu46 is conserved in these intermediates. The photocycle of PYP would therefore proceed by changing the structure of the twisted ethylene bond of the chromophore.

  3. Conversion Coefficients for Proton Beams using Standing and Sitting Male Hybrid Computational Phantom Calculated in Idealized Irradiation Geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, C; Bolch, W E; Hunt, J G; Júnior, A B Carvalho

    2016-09-24

    The aim of this study was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed doses per fluence (DT/Φ) using the sitting and standing male hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. Sex-averaged effective dose per fluence (E/Φ) using the results of DT/Φ for the male and female hybrid phantom in standing and sitting postures were also calculated. Results of E/Φ of UFH/NCI standing phantom were also compared with tabulated effective dose conversion coefficients provided in ICRP publication 116. To develop an exposure scenario implementing the male UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures was used the radiation transport code MCNPX. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 antero-posterior (AP), postero-anterior (PA), right and left lateral, rotational (ROT) and isotropic (ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the lower abdominal region, such as prostate, testes and urinary bladder, especially in the AP geometry. Results of effective dose conversion coefficients were 18% higher in the standing posture of the UFH/NCI phantom, especially below 100 MeV in AP and PA. In lateral geometry, the conversion coefficients values below 20 MeV were 16% higher in the sitting posture. In ROT geometry, the differences were below 10%, for almost all energies. In ISO geometry, the differences in E/Φ were negligible. The results of E/Φ of UFH/NCI phantom were in general below the results of the conversion coefficients provided in ICRP publication 116.

  4. SU-E-T-557: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac Devices Irradiated During Proton Therapy Using Indium Foils

    SciTech Connect

    Avery, S; Christodouleas, J; Delaney, K; Diffenderfer, E; Brown, K

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Measuring Neutron Activation of Cardiac devices Irradiated during Proton Therapy using Indium Foils Methods: The foils had dimensions of 25mm x 25mm x 1mm. After being activated, the foils were placed in a Canberra Industries well chamber utilizing a NaI(Tl) scintillation detector. The resulting gamma spectrum was acquired and analyzed using Genie 2000 spectroscopy software. One activation foil was placed over the upper, left chest of RANDO where a pacemaker would be. The rest of the foils were placed over the midline of the patient at different distances, providing a spatial distribution over the phantom. Using lasers and BBs to align the patient, 200 MU square fields were delivered to various treatment sites: the brain, the pancreas, and the prostate. Each field was shot at least a day apart, giving more than enough time for activity of the foil to decay (t1=2 = 54.12 min). Results: The net counts (minus background) of the three aforementioned peaks were used for our measurements. These counts were adjusted to account for detector efficiency, relative photon yields from decay, and the natural abundance of 115-In. The average neutron flux for the closed multi-leaf collimator irradiation was measured to be 1.62 x 106 - 0.18 x 106 cm2 s-1. An order of magnitude estimate of the flux for neutrons up to 1 keV from Diffenderfer et al. gives 3 x 106 cm2 s-1 which does agree on the order of magnitude. Conclusion: Lower energy neutrons have higher interaction cross-sections and are more likely to damage pacemakers. The thermal/slow neutron component may be enough to estimate the overall risk. The true test of the applicability of activation foils is whether or not measurements are capable of predicting cardiac device malfunction. For that, additional studies are needed to provide clinical evidence one way or the other.

  5. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility: Low Temperature Materials Synthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, David E.; Moon, Ji-Won; Armstrong, Beth L.; Datskos, Panos G.; Duty, Chad E.; Gresback, Ryan; Ivanov, Ilia N.; Jacobs, Christopher B.; Jellison, Gerald Earle; Jang, Gyoung Gug; Joshi, Pooran C.; Jung, Hyunsung; Meyer, III, Harry M.; Phelps, Tommy

    2015-06-30

    The Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) low temperature materials synthesis project was established to demonstrate a scalable and sustainable process to produce nanoparticles (NPs) for advanced manufacturing. Previous methods to chemically synthesize NPs typically required expensive, high-purity inorganic chemical reagents, organic solvents and high temperatures. These processes were typically applied at small laboratory scales at yields sufficient for NP characterization, but insufficient to support roll-to-roll processing efforts or device fabrication. The new NanoFermentation processes described here operated at a low temperature (~60 C) in low-cost, aqueous media using bacteria that produce extracellular NPs with controlled size and elemental stoichiometry. Up-scaling activities successfully demonstrated high NP yields and quality in a 900-L pilot-scale reactor, establishing this NanoFermentation process as a competitive biomanufacturing strategy to produce NPs for advanced manufacturing of power electronics, solid-state lighting and sensors.

  6. Building a Cryogen Efficient Low Temperature Lab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, John

    2015-03-01

    Over the past few years we have built a new low temperature laboratory at the University of Alberta to study quantum optomechanics and superfluids in confined geometries. With liquid helium at 11/liter in Alberta, helium consumption was a top concern, but so was vibration for optomechanics experiments and magnet stability for ultra-low temperature experiments. I will describe the wet system we have constructed, along with our automated helium recovery and delivery system. Currently our system runs, fully loaded with a sensitive optomechanics experiment at 9 mK, with a waste of one liquid liter equivalent per day of operation - with room for improvement. This may provide a model for both new laboratories and upgrades to existing wet systems.

  7. Cyclic and low temperature effects on microcircuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weissflug, V. A.; Sisul, E. V.

    1977-01-01

    Cyclic temperature and low temperature operating life tests, and pre-/post-life device evaluations were used to determine the degrading effects of thermal environments on microcircuit reliability. Low power transistor-transistor-logic gates and linear devices were included in each test group. Device metallization systems included aluminum metallization/aluminum wire, aluminum metallization/gold wire, and gold metallization/gold wire. Fewer than 2% electrical failures were observed during the cyclic and low temperature life tests and the post-life evaluations revealed approximately 2% bond pull failures. Reconstruction of aluminum die metallization was observed in all devices and the severity of the reconstruction appeared to be directly related to the magnitude of the temperature excursion. All types of bonds except the gold/gold bonds were weakened by exposure to repeated cyclic temperature stress.

  8. Thermodynamic power stations at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malherbe, J.; Ployart, R.; Alleau, T.; Bandelier, P.; Lauro, F.

    The development of low-temperature thermodynamic power stations using solar energy is considered, with special attention given to the choice of the thermodynamic cycle (Rankine), working fluids (frigorific halogen compounds), and heat exchangers. Thermomechanical conversion machines, such as ac motors and rotating volumetric motors are discussed. A system is recommended for the use of solar energy for irrigation and pumping in remote areas. Other applications include the production of cold of fresh water from brackish waters, and energy recovery from hot springs.

  9. Low temperature FMR linewidth in reentrant magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Belozorov, D.P.; Vertiy, A.A.; Golik, A.V.; Tarapov, S.I.

    1994-03-01

    The FMR linewidth is studied experimentally for reentrant magnets (Fe{sub x}Ni{sub 100{minus}x}){sub 77}B{sub 13}Si{sub 10} in the temperature interval 0.3K < T < 200K, for frequencies 68 GHz < {h_bar}{omega}/kT < 78 GHz. The low temperature interval down to T {approx} 0.3K is thoroughly explored. The linewidth behavior agrees qualitatively with the theoretical model.

  10. Advanced Regenerators for Very Low Temperature Cryocoolers.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    Ray Radebaugh of the National Institute of Standards and Technology, Boulder, Colorado. The analyses of the very low temperature thermal properties...2rh. 15 Radebaugh (Bib. 21) has shown that AP can be equated to a loss 6P in gross refrigeration rate OE by 6p = 7r 6E AP/(PH - PJ where AP is the...refrigeration minus resultant enthalpy flow) occurs at a smaller phase angle. Radebaugh (Bib. 20, 21) derived the analytic relationships among these

  11. Low-Temperature Spacecraft: Challenges/Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dickman, J. E.; Patterson, R. L.; Overton, E.; Hammoud, A. N.; Gerber, S. S.

    2001-01-01

    Imagine sending a spacecraft into deep space that operates at the ambient temperature of its environment rather than hundreds of degrees Kelvin warmer. The average temperature of a spacecraft warmed only by the sun drops from 279 K near the Earth's orbit to 90 K near the orbit of Saturn, and to 44 K near Pluto's orbit. At present, deep space probes struggle to maintain an operating temperature near 300 K for the onboard electronics. To warm the electronics without consuming vast amounts of electrical energy, radioisotope heater units (RHUs) are used in vast numbers. Unfortunately, since RHU are always 'on', an active thermal management system is required to reject the excess heat. A spacecraft designed to operate at cryogenic temperatures and shielded from the sun by a large communication dish or solar cell array could be less complex, lighter, and cheaper than current deep space probes. Before a complete low-temperature spacecraft becomes a reality, there are several challenges to be met. Reliable cryogenic power electronics is one of the major challenges. The Low-Temperature Power Electronics Research Group at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) has demonstrated the ability of some commercial off the shelf power electronic components to operate at temperatures approaching that of liquid nitrogen (77 K). Below 77 K, there exists an opportunity for the development of reliable semiconductor power switching technologies other than bulk silicon CMOS. This paper will report on the results of NASA GRC's Low-Temperature Power Electronics Program and discuss the challenges to (opportunities for) the creation of a low-temperature spacecraft.

  12. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential Estimate

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  13. Low-Temperature Hydrothermal Resource Potential

    SciTech Connect

    Katherine Young

    2016-06-30

    Compilation of data (spreadsheet and shapefiles) for several low-temperature resource types, including isolated springs and wells, delineated area convection systems, sedimentary basins and coastal plains sedimentary systems. For each system, we include estimates of the accessible resource base, mean extractable resource and beneficial heat. Data compiled from USGS and other sources. The paper (submitted to GRC 2016) describing the methodology and analysis is also included.

  14. A study of the double-acceptor level of the silicon divacancy in a proton irradiated n-channel CCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, D.; Hall, D.; Gow, J. P. D.; Holland, A.

    2016-08-01

    Radiation damage effects are problematic for space-based detectors. Highly energetic particles, predominantly from the sun can damage a detector and reduce its operational lifetime. For an image sensor such as a Charge-Coupled Device (CCD) impinging particles can potentially displace silicon atoms from the CCD lattice, creating defects which can trap signal charge and degrade an image through smearing. This paper presents a study of one energy level of the silicon divacancy defect using the technique of single trap-pumping on a proton irradiated n-channel CCD. The technique allows for the study of individual defects at a sub-pixel level, providing highly accurate data on defect parameters. Of particular importance when concerned with CCD performance is the emission time-constant of a defect level, which is the time-scale for which it can trap a signal charge. The trap-pumping technique is a direct probe of individual defect emission time-constants in a CCD, allowing for them to be studied with greater precision than possible with other defect analysis techniques such as deep-level transient spectroscopy on representative materials.

  15. Study of neutron spectra in a water bath from a Pb target irradiated by 250 MeV protons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yan-Yan; Zhang, Xue-Ying; Ju, Yong-Qin; Ma, Fei; Zhang, Hong-Bin; Chen, Liang; Ge, Hong-Lin; Wan, Bo; Luo, Peng; Zhou, Bin; Zhang, Yan-Bin; Li, Jian-Yang; Xu, Jun-Kui; Wang, Song-Lin; Yang, Yong-Wei; Yang, Lei

    2015-04-01

    Spallation neutrons were produced by the irradiation of Pb with 250 MeV protons. The Pb target was surrounded by water which was used to slow down the emitted neutrons. The moderated neutrons in the water bath were measured by using the resonance detectors of Au, Mn and In with a cadmium (Cd) cover. According to the measured activities of the foils, the neutron flux at different resonance energies were deduced and the epithermal neutron spectra were proposed. Corresponding results calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX were compared with the experimental data to check the validity of the code. The comparison showed that the simulation could give a good prediction for the neutron spectra above 50 eV, while the finite thickness of the foils greatly effected the experimental data in low energy. It was also found that the resonance detectors themselves had great impact on the simulated energy spectra. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation and Strategic Priority Research Program of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (11305229, 11105186, 91226107, 91026009, XDA03030300)

  16. Niobium-based sputtered thin films for corrosion protection of proton-irradiated liquid water targets for [18F] production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skliarova, H.; Azzolini, O.; Cherenkova-Dousset, O.; Johnson, R. R.; Palmieri, V.

    2014-01-01

    Chemically inert coatings on Havar® entrance foils of the targets for [18F] production via proton irradiation of enriched water at pressurized conditions are needed to decrease the amount of ionic contaminants released from Havar®. In order to find the most effective protective coatings, the Nb-based coating microstructure and barrier properties have been correlated with deposition parameters such as substrate temperature, applied bias, deposition rate and sputtering gas pressure. Aluminated quartz used as a substrate allowed us to verify the protection efficiency of the desirable coatings as diffusion barriers. Two modelling corrosion tests based on the extreme susceptibility of aluminum to liquid gallium and acid corrosion were applied. Pure niobium coatings have been found to be less effective barriers than niobium-titanium coatings. But niobium oxide films, according to the corrosion tests performed, showed superior barrier properties. Therefore multi-layered niobium-niobium oxide films have been suggested, since they combine the high thermal conductivity of niobium with the good barrier properties of niobium oxide.

  17. Trapping in proton irradiated p+-n-n+ silicon sensors at fluences anticipated at the HL-LHC outer tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, W.; Bergauer, T.; Dragicevic, M.; Friedl, M.; Fruehwirth, R.; Hoch, M.; Hrubec, J.; Krammer, M.; Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Alderweireldt, S.; Beaumont, W.; Janssen, X.; Luyckx, S.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Barria, P.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Dobur, D.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Lenzi, Th.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, Th.; Mohammadi, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-Conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Thomas, L.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Wang, J.; Zenoni, F.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; De Bruyn, I.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Tavernier, S.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G.; Van Parijs, I.; Strom, D. A.; Basegmez, S.; Bruno, G.; Castello, R.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; De Callatay, B.; Delaere, C.; Du Pree, T.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jez, P.; Michotte, D.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pagano, D.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Caebergs, T.; Daubie, E.; Hammad, G. H.; Härkönen, J.; Lampén, T.; Luukka, P.-R.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuovinen, E.; Eerola, P.; Tuuva, T.; Beaulieu, G.; Boudoul, G.; Combaret, C.; Contardo, D.; Gallbit, G.; Lumb, N.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Perries, S.; Sabes, D.; Vander Donckt, M.; Verdier, P.; Viret, S.; Zoccarato, Y.; Agram, J.-L.; Conte, E.; Fontaine, J.-Ch.; Andrea, J.; Bloch, D.; Bonnin, C.; Brom, J.-M.; Chabert, E.; Charles, L.; Goetzmann, Ch.; Gross, L.; Hosselet, J.; Mathieu, C.; Richer, M.; Skovpen, K.; Pistone, C.; Fluegge, G.; Kuensken, A.; Geisler, M.; Pooth, O.; Stahl, A.; Autermann, C.; Edelhoff, M.; Esser, H.; Feld, L.; Karpinski, W.; Klein, K.; Lipinski, M.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pierschel, G.; Preuten, M.; Raupach, F.; Sammet, J.; Schael, S.; Schwering, G.; Wittmer, B.; Wlochal, M.; Zhukov, V.; Bartosik, N.; Behr, J.; Burgmeier, A.; Calligaris, L.; Dolinska, G.; Eckerlin, G.; Eckstein, D.; Eichhorn, T.; Fluke, G.; Garay Garcia, J.; Gizhko, A.; Hansen, K.; Harb, A.; Hauk, J.; Kalogeropoulos, A.; Kleinwort, C.; Korol, I.; Lange, W.; Lohmann, W.; Mankel, R.; Maser, H.; Mittag, G.; Muhl, C.; Mussgiller, A.; Nayak, A.; Ntomari, E.; Perrey, H.; Pitzl, D.; Schroeder, M.; Seitz, C.; Spannagel, S.; Zuber, A.; Biskop, H.; Blobel, V.; Buhmann, P.; Centis-Vignali, M.; Draeger, A.-R.; Erfle, J.; Garutti, E.; Haller, J.; Hoffmann, M.; Junkes, A.; Lapsien, T.; Mättig, S.; Matysek, M.; Perieanu, A.; Poehlsen, J.; Poehlsen, T.; Scharf, Ch.; Schleper, P.; Schmidt, A.; Sola, V.; Steinbrück, G.; Wellhausen, J.; Barvich, T.; Barth, Ch.; Boegelspacher, F.; De Boer, W.; Butz, E.; Casele, M.; Colombo, F.; Dierlamm, A.; Eber, R.; Freund, B.; Hartmann, F.; Hauth, Th.; Heindl, S.; Hoffmann, K.-H.; Husemann, U.; Kornmeyer, A.; Mallows, S.; Muller, Th.; Nuernberg, A.; Printz, M.; Simonis, H. J.; Steck, P.; Weber, M.; Weiler, Th.; Bhardwaj, A.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, A.; Ranjan, K.; Bakhshiansohl, H.; Behnamian, H.; Khakzad, M.; Naseri, M.; Cariola, P.; De Robertis, G.; Fiore, L.; Franco, M.; Loddo, F.; Sala, G.; Silvestris, L.; Creanza, D.; De Palma, M.; Maggi, G.; My, S.; Selvaggi, G.; Albergo, S.; Cappello, G.; Chiorboli, M.; Costa, S.; Giordano, F.; Di Mattia, A.; Potenza, R.; Saizu, M. A.; Tricomi, A.; Tuvè, C.; Barbagli, G.; Brianzi, M.; Ciaranfi, R.; Civinini, C.; Gallo, E.; Meschini, M.; Paoletti, S.; Sguazzoni, G.; Ciulli, V.; D'Alessandro, R.; Gonzi, S.; Gori, V.; Focardi, E.; Lenzi, P.; Scarlini, E.; Tropiano, A.; Viliani, L.; Ferro, F.; Robutti, E.; Lo Vetere, M.; Gennai, S.; Malvezzi, S.; Menasce, D.; Moroni, L.; Pedrini, D.; Dinardo, M.; Fiorendi, S.; Manzoni, R. A.; Azzi, P.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Dall'Osso, M.; Dorigo, T.; Giubilato, P.; Pozzobon, N.; Tosi, M.; Zucchetta, A.; De Canio, F.; Gaioni, L.; Manghisoni, M.; Nodari, B.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Comotti, D.; Ratti, L.; Bilei, G. M.; Bissi, L.; Checcucci, B.; Magalotti, D.; Menichelli, M.; Saha, A.; Servoli, L.; Storchi, L.; Biasini, M.; Conti, E.; Ciangottini, D.; Fanò, L.; Lariccia, P.; Mantovani, G.; Passeri, D.; Placidi, P.; Salvatore, M.; Santocchia, A.; Solestizi, L. A.; Spiezia, A.; Androsov, K.; Azzurri, P.; Arezzini, S.; Bagliesi, G.; Basti, A.; Boccali, T.; Bosi, F.; Castaldi, R.; Ciampa, A.; Ciocci, M. A.; Dell'Orso, R.; Fedi, G.; Giassi, A.; Grippo, M. T.; Lomtadze, T.; Magazzu, G.; Mazzoni, E.; Minuti, M.; Moggi, A.; Moon, C. S.; Morsani, F.; Palla, F.; Palmonari, F.; Raffaelli, F.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Serban, A. T.; Spagnolo, P.; Tenchini, R.; Venturi, A.; Verdini, P. G.; Martini, L.; Messineo, A.; Rizzi, A.; Tonelli, G.; Calzolari, F.; Donato, S.; Fiori, F.; Ligabue, F.; Vernieri, C.; Demaria, N.; Rivetti, A.; Bellan, R.; Casasso, S.; Costa, M.; Covarelli, R.; Migliore, E.; Monteil, E.; Musich, M.; Pacher, L.; Ravera, F.; Romero, A.; Solano, A.; Trapani, P.; Jaramillo Echeverria, R.; Fernandez, M.; Gomez, G.; Moya, D.; Gonzalez Sanchez, F. J.; Munoz Sanchez, F. J.; Vila, I.; Virto, A. L.; Abbaneo, D.; Ahmed, I.; Albert, E.; Auzinger, G.; Berruti, G.; Bianchi, G.; Blanchot, G.; Breuker, H.; Ceresa, D.; Christiansen, J.; Cichy, K.; Daguin, J.; D'Alfonso, M.; D'Auria, A.; Detraz, S.; De Visscher, S.; Deyrail, D.; Faccio, F.; Felici, D.; Frank, N.; Gill, K.; Giordano, D.; Harris, P.; Honma, A.; Kaplon, J.; Kornmayer, A.; Kottelat, L.; Kovacs, M.; Mannelli, M.; Marchioro, A.; Marconi, S.; Martina, S.; Mersi, S.; Michelis, S.; Moll, M.; Onnela, A.; Pakulski, T.; Pavis, S.; Peisert, A.; Pernot, J.-F.; Petagna, P.; Petrucciani, G.; Postema, H.; Rose, P.; Rzonca, M.; Stoye, M.; Tropea, P.; Troska, J.; Tsirou, A.; Vasey, F.; Vichoudis, P.; Verlaat, B.; Zwalinski, L.; Bachmair, F.; Becker, R.; Bäni, L.; di Calafiori, D.; Casal, B.; Djambazov, L.; Donega, M.; Dünser, M.; Eller, P.; Grab, C.; Hits, D.; Horisberger, U.; Hoss, J.; Kasieczka, G.; Lustermann, W.; Mangano, B.; Marionneau, M.; Martinez Ruiz del Arbol, P.; Masciovecchio, M.; Perrozzi, L.; Roeser, U.; Rossini, M.; Starodumov, A.; Takahashi, M.; Wallny, R.; Amsler, C.; Bösiger, K.; Caminada, L.; Canelli, F.; Chiochia, V.; de Cosa, A.; Galloni, C.; Hreus, T.; Kilminster, B.; Lange, C.; Maier, R.; Ngadiuba, J.; Pinna, D.; Robmann, P.; Taroni, S.; Yang, Y.; Bertl, W.; Deiters, K.; Erdmann, W.; Horisberger, R.; Kaestli, H.-C.; Kotlinski, D.; Langenegger, U.; Meier, B.; Rohe, T.; Streuli, S.; Chen, P.-H.; Dietz, C.; Grundler, U.; Hou, W.-S.; Lu, R.-S.; Moya, M.; Wilken, R.; Cussans, D.; Flacher, H.; Goldstein, J.; Grimes, M.; Jacob, J.; Seif El Nasr-Storey, S.; Cole, J.; Hobson, P.; Leggat, D.; Reid, I. D.; Teodorescu, L.; Bainbridge, R.; Dauncey, P.; Fulcher, J.; Hall, G.; Magnan, A.-M.; Pesaresi, M.; Raymond, D. M.; Uchida, K.; Coughlan, J. A.; Harder, K.; Ilic, J.; Tomalin, I. R.; Garabedian, A.; Heintz, U.; Narain, M.; Nelson, J.; Sagir, S.; Speer, T.; Swanson, J.; Tersegno, D.; Watson-Daniels, J.; Chertok, M.; Conway, J.; Conway, R.; Flores, C.; Lander, R.; Pellett, D.; Ricci-Tam, F.; Squires, M.; Thomson, J.; Burt, K.; Ellison, J.; Hanson, G.; Malberti, M.; Olmedo, M.; Cerati, G.; Sharma, V.; Vartak, A.; Yagil, A.; Zevi Della Porta, G.; Dutta, V.; Gouskos, L.; Incandela, J.; Kyre, S.; McColl, N.; Mullin, S.; White, D.; Cumalat, J. P.; Ford, W. T.; Gaz, A.; Krohn, M.; Stenson, K.; Wagner, S. R.; Baldin, B.; Bolla, G.; Burkett, K.; Butler, J.; Cheung, H.; Chramowicz, J.; Christian, D.; Cooper, W. E.; Deptuch, G.; Derylo, G.; Gingu, C.; Gruenendahl, S.; Hasegawa, S.; Hoff, J.; Howell, J.; Hrycyk, M.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, M.; Jung, A.; Joshi, U.; Kahlid, F.; Lei, C. M.; Lipton, R.; Liu, T.; Los, S.; Matulik, M.; Merkel, P.; Nahn, S.; Prosser, A.; Rivera, R.; Shenai, A.; Spiegel, L.; Tran, N.; Uplegger, L.; Voirin, E.; Yin, H.; Adams, M. R.; Berry, D. R.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, O.; Gerber, C. E.; Hofman, D. J.; Kapustka, B. K.; O'Brien, C.; Sandoval Gonzalez, D. I.; Trauger, H.; Turner, P.; Parashar, N.; Stupak, J.; Bortoletto, D.; Bubna, M.; Hinton, N.; Jones, M.; Miller, D. H.; Shi, X.; Tan, P.; Baringer, P.; Bean, A.; Benelli, G.; Gray, J.; Majumder, D.; Noonan, D.; Sanders, S.; Stringer, R.; Ivanov, A.; Makouski, M.; Skhirtladze, N.; Taylor, R.; Anderson, I.; Fehling, D.; Gritsan, A.; Maksimovic, P.; Martin, C.; Nash, K.; Osherson, M.; Swartz, M.; Xiao, M.; Acosta, J. G.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Oliveros, S.; Perera, L.; Summers, D.; Bloom, K.; Bose, S.; Claes, D. R.; Dominguez, A.; Fangmeier, C.; Gonzalez Suarez, R.; Meier, F.; Monroy, J.; Hahn, K.; Sevova, S.; Sung, K.; Trovato, M.; Bartz, E.; Duggan, D.; Halkiadakis, E.; Lath, A.; Park, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Stone, R.; Walker, M.; Malik, S.; Mendez, H.; Ramirez Vargas, J. E.; Alyari, M.; Dolen, J.; George, J.; Godshalk, A.; Iashvili, I.; Kaisen, J.; Kharchilava, A.; Kumar, A.; Rappoccio, S.; Alexander, J.; Chaves, J.; Chu, J.; Dittmer, S.; Kaufman, G.; Mirman, N.; Ryd, A.; Salvati, E.; Skinnari, L.; Thom, J.; Thompson, J.; Tucker, J.; Winstrom, L.; Akgün, B.; Ecklund, K. M.; Nussbaum, T.; Zabel, J.; Betchart, B.; Covarelli, R.; Demina, R.; Hindrichs, O.; Petrillo, G.; Eusebi, R.; Osipenkov, I.; Perloff, A.; Ulmer, K. A.; Delannoy, A. G.; D'Angelo, P.; Johns, W.

    2016-04-01

    The degradation of signal in silicon sensors is studied under conditions expected at the CERN High-Luminosity LHC. 200 μm thick n-type silicon sensors are irradiated with protons of different energies to fluences of up to 3 · 1015 neq/cm2. Pulsed red laser light with a wavelength of 672 nm is used to generate electron-hole pairs in the sensors. The induced signals are used to determine the charge collection efficiencies separately for electrons and holes drifting through the sensor. The effective trapping rates are extracted by comparing the results to simulation. The electric field is simulated using Synopsys device simulation assuming two effective defects. The generation and drift of charge carriers are simulated in an independent simulation based on PixelAV. The effective trapping rates are determined from the measured charge collection efficiencies and the simulated and measured time-resolved current pulses are compared. The effective trapping rates determined for both electrons and holes are about 50% smaller than those obtained using standard extrapolations of studies at low fluences and suggest an improved tracker performance over initial expectations.

  18. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice and changes in these phases as the result of proton irradiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hudson, Reggie L.; Moore, Marla H.

    1992-01-01

    Far infrared spectra from 20 microns (500 cm(sup -1)) to 100 microns (100 cm(sup -1)) of water ice were measured. Amorphous ice deposited at 13 K has one absorption band at 45 microns (220 cm(sup -1)). Amorphous ice evolves into a crystalline form with absorptions at 44 microns (229 cm(sup -1)) and 62 microns (162 cm(sup -1)) as the temperature is increased to 155 K. Spectra documenting this phase change are presented as well as spectra of crystalline ice at temperatures between 13 K and 155 K. Far infrared spectra of amorphous and crystalline water ice before and after proton irradiation are also presented. Changes in these two forms are discussed in relation to ices in comets, grains, and planetary satellites in various radiation environments. Observations of non-terrestrial clathrate hydrates are still lacking despite the fact that clathrates first were suggested to exist in cometary and interstellar ices over forty years ago. Spectroscopy, the most direct method of astronomical detection, has been hampered by the similarity of clathrate hydrate spectra to those of unenclathrated guest molecules and solid H2O. A methanol (CH3OH) clathrate hydrate, using a recently published procedure, was prepared and its far-IR spectrum investigated. The spectrum is quite differenct from that of either unenclathrated CH3OH or solid H2O and so should be of value in astronomical searches for this clathrate.

  19. Multiple endocrine adenomatosis with Cushing's disease and the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome responsive to proton beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Veseley, D.L.; Fass, F.H.

    1981-09-01

    Multiple endocrine adenomatosis (MEA) or neoplasia is a hereditary disorder consisting of tumors of hyperplasia of several endocrine glands. In MEA-1 the pituitary, parathyroids, and pancreatic islets are most frequently involved, while in MEA-2 the thyroid (medullary carcinoma of the thyroid), parathyroids,and adrenals (pheochromocytomas) are the endocrine glands most likely to be involved. Cushings's syndrome may occur in MEA-1 and has also been found in patients with MEA-2, where the cause of Cushing's syndrome is usually ectopic ACTH production from medullary carcinoma of the thyroid. Recently, there have been reports of amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome in patients with MEA-1, and confirmation that hyperprolactinemia is associated with this syndrom has been found in patients with MEA-1. The present report details a patient who has been followed up for 20 years since she first presented with amenorrhea and galactorrhea. Ten years after first being seen she was noted to have Cushing's syndrom and hyperparathyroidism due to parathyroid hyperplasia. Both the amenorrhea-galactorrhea syndrome and Cushing's sydrome disappeared with proton beam irradiation to the pituitary.

  20. Dynamical States of Low Temperature Cirrus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barahona, D.; Nenes, A.

    2011-01-01

    Low ice crystal concentration and sustained in-cloud supersaturation, commonly found in cloud observations at low temperature, challenge our understanding of cirrus formation. Heterogeneous freezing from effloresced ammonium sulfate, glassy aerosol, dust and black carbon are proposed to cause these phenomena; this requires low updrafts for cirrus characteristics to agree with observations and is at odds with the gravity wave spectrum in the upper troposphere. Background temperature fluctuations however can establish a dynamical equilibrium between ice production and sedimentation loss (as opposed to ice crystal formation during the first stages of cloud evolution and subsequent slow cloud decay) that explains low temperature cirrus properties. This newly-discovered state is favored at low temperatures and does not require heterogeneous nucleation to occur (the presence of ice nuclei can however facilitate its onset). Our understanding of cirrus clouds and their role in anthropogenic climate change is reshaped, as the type of dynamical forcing will set these clouds in one of two preferred microphysical regimes with very different susceptibility to aerosol.

  1. The radiation tolerance of particular optical fibers at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abramovitch, Joshua

    2011-10-01

    This research project seeks to characterize a number of optical fibers in an irradiated, low-temperature environment, so that they may be used in the Large Hadron Collider's (LHC's) high luminosity upgrade at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN). In the LHC experiments such as ATLAS and CMS, silicon pixel detectors are used to precisely measure the trajectories of charged particles. These detectors operate in a radioactive environment with ambient temperatures of -20 to -30 degrees Celsius, hence the requirement of radiation tolerance at low temperatures. A number of new fibers have been selected for their decreased bend sensitivity and improved bandwidth. Since, the LHC luminosity upgrade's requirements are very stringent, the vendor's specification data will be replaced with the results of this project. An optical test bench was needed to characterize the optical fibers in ionizing radiation from a Co-60 gamma source at Brookhaven National Laboratory in February 2011. Such a multi-channel optical measurement setup is not commercially available, and was as such designed in-house. Multiple 850nm VCSEL laser were used as sources, and TI OPT101 chips were used as detectors. This research contributes to the optical link R&D project with Fermi National Laboratory, Oxford University, and CERN, and my work's progress is integrated into the project flow of this international collaborative group.

  2. Power change in amorphous silicon technology by low temperature annealing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mittal, Ankit; Rennhofer, Marcus; Dangel, Angelika; Duman, Bogdan; Schlosser, Victor

    2015-07-01

    Amorphous silicon (a-Si) is one of the best established thin-film solar-cell technologies. Despite its long history of research, it still has many critical issues because of its defect rich material and its susceptibility to degrade under light also called as Staebler-Wronski effect (SWE). This leads to an increase in the defect density of a-Si, but as a metastable effect it can be completely healed at temperatures above 170 °C. Our study is focused on investigating the behavior of annealing of different a-Si modules under low temperature conditions below 80 °C indicated by successive change of module power. These conditions reflect the environmental temperature impact of the modules in the field, or integrated in buildings as well. The power changes were followed by STC power rating and investigation of module-power evolution under low irradiance conditions at 50 W/m2. Our samples were recovered close to their initial state of power, reaching as high as 99% from its degraded value. This shows the influence of low temperature annealing and light on metastable module behavior in a-Si thin-film modules.

  3. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries.

    PubMed

    Alves, M C; Santos, W S; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E; Hunt, John G; Carvalho Júnior, A B

    2014-12-21

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  4. Organ and effective dose conversion coefficients for a sitting female hybrid computational phantom exposed to monoenergetic protons in idealized irradiation geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, M. C.; Santos, W. S.; Lee, Choonsik; Bolch, Wesley E.; Hunt, John G.; Carvalho Júnior, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    The conversion coefficients (CCs) relate protection quantities, mean absorbed dose (DT) and effective dose (E), with physical radiation field quantities, such as fluence (Φ). The calculation of CCs through Monte Carlo simulations is useful for estimating the dose in individuals exposed to radiation. The aim of this work was the calculation of conversion coefficients for absorbed and effective doses per fluence (DT/ Φ and E/Φ) using a sitting and standing female hybrid phantom (UFH/NCI) exposure to monoenergetic protons with energy ranging from 2 MeV to 10 GeV. The radiation transport code MCNPX was used to develop exposure scenarios implementing the female UFH/NCI phantom in sitting and standing postures. Whole-body irradiations were performed using the recommended irradiation geometries by ICRP publication 116 (AP, PA, RLAT, LLAT, ROT and ISO). In most organs, the conversion coefficients DT/Φ were similar for both postures. However, relative differences were significant for organs located in the abdominal region, such as ovaries, uterus and urinary bladder, especially in the AP, RLAT and LLAT geometries. Anatomical differences caused by changing the posture of the female UFH/NCI phantom led an attenuation of incident protons with energies below 150 MeV by the thigh of the phantom in the sitting posture, for the front-to-back irradiation, and by the arms and hands of the phantom in the standing posture, for the lateral irradiation.

  5. The effects of electron and proton radiation on GaSb infrared solar cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruenbaum, P. E.; Avery, J. E.; Fraas, L. M.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium antimonide (GaSb) infrared solar cells were exposed to 1 MeV electrons and protons up to fluences of 1 times 10(exp 15) cm (-2) and 1 times 10(exp 12) cm (-2) respectively. In between exposures, current voltage and spectral response curves were taken. The GaSb cells were found to degrade slightly less than typical GaAs cells under electron irradiation, and calculations from spectral response curves showed that the damage coefficient for the minority carrier diffusion length was 3.5 times 10(exp 8). The cells degraded faster than GaAs cells under proton irradiation. However, researchers expect the top cell and coverglass to protect the GaSb cell from most damaging protons. Some annealing of proton damage was observed at low temperatures (80 to 160 C).

  6. Effect of proton and gamma irradiation on human lung carcinoma cells: Gene expression, cell cycle, cell death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition and cancer-stem cell trait as biological end points.

    PubMed

    Narang, Himanshi; Kumar, Amit; Bhat, Nagesh; Pandey, Badri N; Ghosh, Anu

    2015-10-01

    Proton beam therapy is a cutting edge modality over conventional gamma radiotherapy because of its physical dose deposition advantage. However, not much is known about its biological effects vis-a-vis gamma irradiation. Here we investigated the effect of proton- and gamma- irradiation on cell cycle, death, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and "stemness" in human non-small cell lung carcinoma cells (A549). Proton beam (3MeV) was two times more cytotoxic than gamma radiation and induced higher and longer cell cycle arrest. At equivalent doses, numbers of genes responsive to proton irradiation were ten times higher than those responsive to gamma irradiation. At equitoxic doses, the proton-irradiated cells had reduced cell adhesion and migration ability as compared to the gamma-irradiated cells. It was also more effective in reducing population of Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) like cells as revealed by aldehyde dehydrogenase activity and surface phenotyping by CD44(+), a CSC marker. These results can have significant implications for proton therapy in the context of suppression of molecular and cellular processes that are fundamental to tumor expansion.

  7. Low-temperature EPR spectra of synthetic diamond and type Ib nanodiamond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaisnoras, R.; Kulbickas, A.; Kobets, M.; Dergachev, K.; Khatsko, E.

    2013-11-01

    Low-frequency resonance studies of single crystal diamond and type Ib nanodiamond (powder) unirradiated and irradiated by protons at temperatures of 300 and 500 K are reported. EPR spectra typical of paramagnetic nitrogen centers are observed. It is shown that when synthetic diamond crystals are irradiated by protons, additional lines appear in the EPR spectra which can be attributed to radiation induced nitrogen-vacancy centers (NV defects).

  8. Intensity Modulated Proton Therapy for Craniospinal Irradiation: Organ-at-Risk Exposure and a Low-Gradient Junctioning Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Stoker, Joshua B.; Grant, Jonathan; Zhu, X. Ronald; Pidikiti, Rajesh; Mahajan, Anita; Grosshans, David R.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To compare field junction robustness and sparing of organs at risk (OARs) during craniospinal irradiation (CSI) using intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) to conventional passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT). Methods and Materials: Ten patients, 5 adult and 5 pediatric patients, previously treated with PSPT-based CSI were selected for comparison. Anterior oblique cranial fields, using a superior couch rotation, and posterior spinal fields were used for IMPT planning. To facilitate low-gradient field junctioning along the spine, the inverse-planning IMPT technique was divided into 3 stages. Dose indices describing target coverage and normal tissue dose, in silico error modeling, and film dosimetry were used to assess plan quality. Results: Field junction robustness along the spine was improved using the staged IMPT planning technique, reducing the worst case impact of a 4-mm setup error from 25% in PSPT to <5% of prescription dose. This was verified by film dosimetry for clinical delivery. Exclusive of thyroid dose in adult patients, IMPT plans demonstrated sparing of organs at risk as good or better than PSPT. Coverage of the cribriform plate for pediatric (V95% [percentage of volume of the target receiving at least 95% of the prescribed dose]; 87 ± 11 vs 92 ± 7) and adult (V95%; 94 ± 7 vs 100 ± 1) patients and the clinical target in pediatric (V95%; 98 ± 2 vs 100 ± 1) and adult (V95%; 100 ± 1 vs 100 ± 1) patients for PSPT and IMPT plans, respectively, were comparable or improved. For adult patients, IMPT target dose inhomogeneity was increased, as determined by heterogeneity index (HI) and inhomogeneity coefficient (IC). IMPT lowered maximum spinal cord dose, improved spinal dose homogeneity, and reduced exposure to other OARs. Conclusions: IMPT has the potential to improve CSI plan quality and the homogeneity of intrafractional dose at match lines. The IMPT approach developed may also simplify treatments and reduce

  9. Vapor pressures of acetylene at low temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masterson, C. M.; Allen, John E., Jr.; Kraus, G. F.; Khanna, R. K.

    1990-01-01

    The atmospheres of many of the outer planets and their satellites contain a large number of hydrocarbon species. In particular, acetylene (C2H2) has been identified at Jupiter, Saturn and its satellite Titan, Uranus and Neptune. In the lower atmospheres of these planets, where colder temperatures prevail, the condensation and/or freezing of acetylene is probable. In order to obtain accurate models of the acetylene in these atmospheres, it is necessary to have a complete understanding of its vapor pressures at low temperatures. Vapor pressures at low temperatures for acetylene are being determined. The vapor pressures are measured with two different techniques in order to cover a wide range of temperatures and pressures. In the first, the acetylene is placed in a sample tube which is immersed in a low temperature solvent/liquid nitrogen slush bath whose temperature is measured with a thermocouple. The vapor pressure is then measured directly with a capacitance manometer. For lower pressures, a second technique which was called the thin-film infrared method (TFIR) was developed. It involves measuring the disappearance rate of a thin film of acetylene at a particular temperature. The spectra are then analyzed using previously determined extinction coefficient values, to determine the disappearance rate R (where R = delta n/delta t, the number of molecules that disappear per unit time). This can be related to the vapor pressure directly. This technique facilitates measurement of the lower temperatures and pressures. Both techniques have been calibrated using CO2, and have shown good agreement with the existing literature data.

  10. Low temperature elastic behavior of rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulrich, T. J.; Darling, T. W.; McCall, K. R.; Fenn, J.

    2002-12-01

    The resonant frequencies of a material sample are directly related to the elastic constants characterizing the sample. Thus, by studying trends in resonant frequencies as a function of temperature, the elastic behavior of the sample may be inferred, and changes in the physical properties of the material may be tracked (for example, phase changes). Historically, tracking the resonant frequencies of a crystalline sample as a function of temperature is one of the most sensitive methods for identifying phase changes in the sample. We are using Resonant Ultrasound Spectroscopy (RUS) to track the resonant frequencies of rock samples at low temperatures. Our initial measurements showed unexpected behavior in a millimeter-sized sample of Berea sandstone in the temperature range from 77 K to 300 K [Ulrich and Darling, 2001], including hysteresis in the temperature dependence of the resonant frequencies, and softening rather than hardening as the temperature decreases. A second experimental apparatus has been developed to make RUS measurements on samples up to 2 cm by 3 cm by 8 cm in size, and over the temperature range 77 K - 400 K. RUS measurements using the new experimental system have been made on several rock samples, as well as several standards, and will be described in this talk. In general, the rock samples exhibit anomalous elastic behavior, consistent with the initial measurements on much smaller samples. Similar elastic phenomena, with similar activation energies, are seen in these rocks in room temperature measurements of resonant frequency versus strain [Tencate and Shankland, 1996]. Thus, low temperature measurements could provide insight into the mechanisms for the nonlinear elastic behavior of rocks and other materials. Ulrich T.J., Darling T.W., Observation of anomalous elastic behavior in rock at low temperatures. Geophys. Res. Let., Vol. 28, No. 11, pgs. 2293-2296, June 1, 2001. Tencate J.A., Shankland, T.J., Slow dynamics in the nonlinear response of

  11. The development of low temperature curing adhesives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, H. E.; Sutherland, J. D.; Hom, J. M.; Sheppard, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    An approach for the development of a practical low temperature (293 K-311 K/68 F-100 F) curing adhesive system based on a family of amide/ester resins was studied and demonstrated. The work was conducted on resin optimization and adhesive compounding studies. An improved preparative method was demonstrated which involved the reaction of an amine-alcohol precursor, in a DMF solution with acid chloride. Experimental studies indicated that an adhesive formulation containing aluminum powder provided the best performance when used in conjunction with a commercial primer.

  12. Low-temperature heat transfer in nanowires.

    PubMed

    Glavin, B A

    2001-05-07

    A new regime of low-temperature heat transfer in suspended nanowires is predicted. It takes place when (i) only "acoustic" phonon modes of the wire are thermally populated and (ii) phonons are subject to the effective elastic scattering. Qualitatively, the main peculiarities of heat transfer originate due to the appearance of the flexural modes with high density of states in the wire phonon spectrum. They give rise to the T(1/2) temperature dependence of the wire thermal conductance. Experimental situations where the new regime is likely to be detected are discussed.

  13. Investigations of Low Temperature Time Dependent Cracking

    SciTech Connect

    Van der Sluys, W A; Robitz, E S; Young, B A; Bloom, J

    2002-09-30

    The objective of this project was to investigate metallurgical and mechanical phenomena associated with time dependent cracking of cold bent carbon steel piping at temperatures between 327 C and 360 C. Boiler piping failures have demonstrated that understanding the fundamental metallurgical and mechanical parameters controlling these failures is insufficient to eliminate it from the field. The results of the project consisted of the development of a testing methodology to reproduce low temperature time dependent cracking in laboratory specimens. This methodology was used to evaluate the cracking resistance of candidate heats in order to identify the factors that enhance cracking sensitivity. The resultant data was integrated into current available life prediction tools.

  14. Low temperature waste form process intensification

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, K. M.; Cozzi, A. D.; Hansen, E. K.; Hill, K. A.

    2015-09-30

    This study successfully demonstrated process intensification of low temperature waste form production. Modifications were made to the dry blend composition to enable a 50% increase in waste concentration, thus allowing for a significant reduction in disposal volume and associated costs. Properties measurements showed that the advanced waste form can be produced using existing equipment and processes. Performance of the waste form was equivalent or better than the current baseline, with approximately double the amount of waste incorporation. The results demonstrate the feasibility of significantly accelerating low level waste immobilization missions across the DOE complex and at environmental remediation sites worldwide.

  15. Ionometric determination of fluorides at low temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Kostyukova, I.S.; Ennan, A.A.; Dzerzhko, E.K.; Leivikova, A.A.

    1995-12-01

    A method for determining fluoride ions in solution at low temperatures using a solid-contact fluorine-selective electrode (FSE) has been developed. The effect of temperature (60 to -15{degrees}C) on the calibration slope, potential equilibrium time, and operational stability is studied; the effect of an organic additive (cryoprotector) on the calibration slope is also studied. The temperature relationships obtained for the solid-contact FSEs allow appropriate corrections to be applied to the operational algorithm of the {open_quotes}Ftoring{close_quotes} hand-held semiautomatic HF gas analyzer for the operational temperature range of -16 to 60{degrees}C.

  16. Cryocoolers near their low-temperature limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Waele, A. T. A. M.

    2015-07-01

    This paper analyses the recently-observed temperature-time dependence in a GM-cooler near its low-temperature limit. The paper mainly focusses on GM-coolers with 4He as the working fluid, but some attention is also paid to pulse-tube refrigerators (PTR's) using 3He and many features of the treatment equally apply to Stirling coolers. Ample attention is paid to the thermodynamics of the cycle by considering the isentropes in the Tp-diagrams of 4He and 3He. The role of the line, where the thermal expansion coefficient is zero, is emphasized. Some fundamental thermodynamic relationships are derived.

  17. Low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Bingchen; Shen, Xiaonan; Shang, Jingzhi; Cong, Chunxiao; Yang, Weihuang; Eginligil, Mustafa E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg; Yu, Ting E-mail: meginligil@ntu.edu.sg

    2014-11-01

    High photoresponse can be achieved in monolayers of transition metal dichalcogenides. However, the response times are inconveniently limited by defects. Here, we report low temperature photoresponse of monolayer tungsten disulphide prepared by exfoliation and chemical vapour deposition (CVD) method. The exfoliated device exhibits n-type behaviour; while the CVD device exhibits intrinsic behaviour. In off state, the CVD device has four times larger ratio of photoresponse for laser on/off and photoresponse decay–rise times are 0.1 s (limited by our setup), while the exfoliated device has few seconds. These findings are discussed in terms of charge trapping and localization.

  18. Effect of proton irradiation dose on InAlN/GaN metal-oxide semiconductor high electron mobility transistors with Al2O3 gate oxide

    DOE PAGES

    Ahn, Shihyun; Kim, Byung -Jae; Lin, Yi -Hsuan; ...

    2016-07-26

    The effects of proton irradiation on the dc performance of InAlN/GaN metal-oxide-semiconductor high electron mobility transistors (MOSHEMTs) with Al2O3 as the gate oxide were investigated. The InAlN/GaN MOSHEMTs were irradiated with doses ranging from 1×1013 to 1×1015cm–2 at a fixed energy of 5MeV. There was minimal damage induced in the two dimensional electron gas at the lowest irradiation dose with no measurable increase in sheet resistance, whereas a 9.7% increase of the sheet resistance was observed at the highest irradiation dose. By sharp contrast, all irradiation doses created more severe degradation in the Ohmic metal contacts, with increases of specificmore » contact resistance from 54% to 114% over the range of doses investigated. These resulted in source-drain current–voltage decreases ranging from 96 to 242 mA/mm over this dose range. The trap density determined from temperature dependent drain current subthreshold swing measurements increased from 1.6 × 1013 cm–2 V–1 for the reference MOSHEMTs to 6.7 × 1013 cm–2 V–1 for devices irradiated with the highest dose. In conclusion, the carrier removal rate was 1287 ± 64 cm–1, higher than the authors previously observed in AlGaN/GaN MOSHEMTs for the same proton energy and consistent with the lower average bond energy of the InAlN.« less

  19. Inter-Institutional Comparison of Personalized Risk Assessments for Second Malignant Neoplasms for a 13-Year-Old Girl Receiving Proton versus Photon Craniospinal Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Taddei, Phillip J.; Khater, Nabil; Zhang, Rui; Geara, Fady B.; Mahajan, Anita; Jalbout, Wassim; Pérez-Andújar, Angélica; Youssef, Bassem; Newhauser, Wayne D.

    2015-01-01

    Children receiving radiotherapy face the probability of a subsequent malignant neoplasm (SMN). In some cases, the predicted SMN risk can be reduced by proton therapy. The purpose of this study was to apply the most comprehensive dose assessment methods to estimate the reduction in SMN risk after proton therapy vs. photon therapy for a 13-year-old girl requiring craniospinal irradiation (CSI). We reconstructed the equivalent dose throughout the patient’s body from therapeutic and stray radiation and applied SMN incidence and mortality risk models for each modality. Excluding skin cancer, the risk of incidence after proton CSI was a third of that of photon CSI. The predicted absolute SMN risks were high. For photon CSI, the SMN incidence rates greater than 10% were for thyroid, non-melanoma skin, lung, colon, stomach, and other solid cancers, and for proton CSI they were non-melanoma skin, lung, and other solid cancers. In each setting, lung cancer accounted for half the risk of mortality. In conclusion, the predicted SMN risk for a 13-year-old girl undergoing proton CSI was reduced vs. photon CSI. This study demonstrates the feasibility of inter-institutional whole-body dose and risk assessments and also serves as a model for including risk estimation in personalized cancer care. PMID:25763928

  20. Catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD) processes in aged and proton-irradiated high power InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sin, Yongkun; LaLumondiere, Stephen; Foran, Brendan; Lotshaw, William; Moss, Steven C.

    2013-02-01

    Recent remarkable success of fiber lasers and amplifiers results from continued improvements in performance characteristics of broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained quantum well (QW) lasers. Unprecedented characteristics of single emitters include optical output powers of over 20 W and power conversion efficiencies of over 70% under CW operation. Leading high power laser diode manufacturers have recently demonstrated encouraging reliability in these lasers mainly targeted for industrial applications, but long-term reliability of these lasers has never been demonstrated for satellite communication systems in the space environment. Furthermore, as reported by two groups in 2009, the dominant failure mode of these lasers is catastrophic optical bulk damage (COBD), which is a new failure type that requires physics of failure investigation to understand its root causes. For the present study, we investigated reliability, proton radiation effects, and the root causes of COBD processes in MOCVD-grown broad-area InGaAs-AlGaAs strained QW lasers using various failure mode analysis (FMA) techniques. Two different approaches, accelerated life-testing and proton irradiation, were taken to generate lasers at different stages of degradation. Our objectives were to (i) study the effects of point defects introduced during crystal growth and those induced by proton irradiation with different energies and fluences in the lasers on degradation processes and to (ii) compare trap characteristics and carrier dynamics in pre- and post-stressed lasers with those in pre- and post-proton irradiated lasers. During entire accelerated life-tests, time resolved electroluminescence (TREL) techniques were employed to observe formation of a hot spot and subsequent formation and progression of dark spots and dark lines through windowed n-contacts.

  1. Choosing a low-temperature sterilization technology.

    PubMed

    1999-11-01

    Low-temperature sterilization technologies are used instead of steam for sterilizing heat-sensitive or moisture-intolerant surgical equipment and supplies. In this Guidance Article, we describe several common alternatives, but we focus specifically on the two that have generated the most interest in recent years: ethylene oxide (EtO) and gas plasma sterilization. Ethylene oxide has been used as a low-temperature sterilization technology since the 1950s. Although EtO can be used safely, exposure to this gas is known to be a health hazard, and the emissions from certain EtO sterilizers are known to pollute the atmosphere. For these reasons, the use of EtO is regulated--more strictly in some regions than in others--and many healthcare facilities have decided to investigate alternative technologies. Gas plasma sterilization emerged in the 1990s as one promising alternative. This method appears to pose fewer health and environmental risks, and it offers faster turnaround times. However, this technology also has some limitations. We describe the advantages and disadvantages of both methods, along with the factors to consider when selecting from among these alternatives, in this Guidance Article.

  2. Low Temperature Decomposition Rates for Tetraphenylborate Ion

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, D.D.

    1998-11-18

    Previous studies indicated that palladium is catalyzes rapid decomposition of alkaline tetraphenylborate slurries. Additional evidence suggest that Pd(II) reduces to Pd(0) during catalyst activation. Further use of tetraphenylborate ion in the decontamination of radioactive waste may require removal of the catalyst or cooling to temperatures at which the decomposition reaction proceeds slowly and does not adversely affect processing. Recent tests showed that tetraphenylborate did not react appreciably at 25 degrees Celsius over six months suggesting the potential to avoid the decomposition at low temperatures. The lack of reaction at low temperature could reflect very slow kinetics at the lower temperature, or may indicate a catalyst ''deactivation'' process. Previous tests in the temperature range 35 to 70 degrees Celsius provided a low precision estimate of the activation energy of the reaction with which to predict the rate of reaction at 25 percent Celsius. To understand the observations at 25 degrees Celsius, experiments must separate the catalyst activation step and the subsequent reaction with TPB. Tests described in this report represent an initial attempt to separate the two steps and determine the rate and activation energy of the reaction between active catalyst and TPB. The results of these tests indicate that the absence of reaction at 25 degrees Celsius was caused by failure to activate the catalyst or the presence of a deactivating mechanism. In the presence of activated catalyst, the decomposition reaction rate is significant.

  3. Antimisting kerosene: Low temperature degradation and blending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yavrouian, A.; Parikh, P.; Sarohia, V.

    1988-01-01

    The inline filtration characteristics of freshly blended and degraded antimisting fuels (AMK) at low temperature are examined. A needle valve degrader was modified to include partial recirculation of degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop. A pressure drop across the needle valve of up to 4,000 psi was used. The pressure drop across a 325 mesh filter screen placed inline with the degrader and directly downstream of the needle valve was measured as a function of time for different values of pressure drop across the needle valve. A volume flux of 1 gpm/sq in was employed based on the frontal area of the screen. It was found that, at ambient temperatures, freshly blended AMK fuel could be degraded using a single pass degradation at 4,000 psi pressure drop across the needle valve to give acceptable filterability performance. At fuel temperatures below -20 C, degradation becomes increasingly difficult and a single pass technique results in unacceptable filtration performance. Recirculation of a fraction of the degraded fuel and heat addition in the bypass loop improved low temperature degradation performance. The problem is addressed of blending the AMK additive with Jet A at various base fuel temperatures.

  4. Low temperature plasma sintering of silver nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Siyuan; Bromberg, Vadim; Liu, Liang; Egitto, Frank D.; Chiarot, Paul R.; Singler, Timothy J.

    2014-02-01

    The fabrication of flexible electronics using the deposition of solution-processed nanomaterials generally requires low-temperature post-processing to optimize functionality. We studied sintering of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) films on glass substrates by applying argon (Ar) plasma to achieve improved electrical conductivity. This process meets the low temperature processing requirements for standard low-cost polymeric flexible substrates. The relationship between plasma parameters (such as power and sintering time) versus sintering results (such as electrical sheet resistance, sintered structure depth, materials composition variation, and film nanostructure) is reported for 23 and 77 nm diameter AgNPs. In addition, plasma processing typically induces a small surface thermal effect. We monitored the surface temperatures of the AgNP films in-situ during plasma sintering. By sintering control groups at these monitored surface temperatures using a vacuum oven, we confirmed that the resistivity due to plasma sintering is less than that produced by thermal sintering. Our data show that, the measured lowest resistivities for plasma sintered AgNP films are about only 5 and 12 times greater than the bulk Ag resistivity for 23 and 77 nm, respectively.

  5. Low temperature alteration processes affecting ultramafic bodies

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nesbitt, H.W.; Bricker, O.P.

    1978-01-01

    At low temperatures, in the presence of an aqueous solution, olivine and orthopyroxene are not stable relative to the hydrous phases brucite, serpentine and talc. Alteration of dunite and peridotite to serpentine or steatite bodies must therefore proceed via non-equilibrium processes. The compositions of natural solutions emanating from dunites and peridotites demonstrate that the dissolution of forsterite and/or enstatite is rapid compared with the precipitation of the hydrous phases; consequently, dissolution of anhydrous minerals controls the chemistry of such solutions. In the presence of an aqueous phase, precipitation of hydrous minerals is the rate-controlling step. Brucite-bearing and -deficient serpentinites alter at low temperature by non-equilibrium processes, as evidenced by the composition of natural solutions from these bodies. The solutions approach equilibrium with the least stable hydrous phase and, as a consequence, are supersaturated with other hydrous phases. Dissolution of the least stable phase is rapid compared to precipitation of other phases, so that the dissolving mineral controls the solution chemistry. Non-equilibrium alteration of anhydrous ultramafic bodies continues until at least one anhydrous phase equilibrates with brucite, chrysotile or talc. The lowest temperature (at a given pressure) at which this happens is defined by the reaction: 3H2O + 2Mg2SiO4 ??? Mg3Si2O5(OH)4 + Mg(OH)2 (Johannes, 1968, Contrib. Mineral. Petrol. 19, 309-315) so that non-equilibrium alteration may occur well into greenschist facies metamorphic conditions. ?? 1978.

  6. Efficient prepreg recycling at low temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pannkoke, Kord; Oethe, Marcus; Busse, Jürgen

    When manufacturing fibre reinforced plastics engineers are still confronted with a lack of experience concerning efficient recycling methods for prepreg cutting waste. Normally, the prepregs are cured and subsequently milled to use them as a filler material for polymers. However, this method is expensive and it is difficult to find applications for the milled FRP. An alternative method to recycle CFRP prepregs will be presented in this paper. Cutting the uncured prepreg waste was done by means of a saw mill which was cooled down to low temperatures. Working temperatures of -30°C are sufficient to harden the uncured resin and to achieve cuttable prepregs. Furthermore, post-curing during the cutting process is avoided with this technique. The result is a `cotton'-like matted structure with random fibre orientation and fibre length distribution. Subsequent curing was done by means of a press and an autoclave, respectively. It will be shown by means of tension and bending tests that low-temperature cutting of uncured prepregs is a way to partly conserve the high valuation of FRP during recycling. Furthermore, it offers possibilities for various applications.

  7. SU-E-T-628: Predicted Risk of Post-Irradiation Cerebral Necrosis in Pediatric Brain Cancer Patients: A Treatment Planning Comparison of Proton Vs. Photon Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, D; Zhang, R; Sanders, M; Newhauser, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Post-irradiation cerebral necrosis (PICN) is a severe late effect that can Result from brain cancers treatment using radiation therapy. The purpose of this study was to compare the treatment plans and predicted risk of PICN after volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) to the risk after passively scattered proton therapy (PSPT) and intensity modulated proton therapy (IMPT) in a cohort of pediatric patients. Methods: Thirteen pediatric patients with varying age and sex were selected for this study. A clinical treatment volume (CTV) was constructed for 8 glioma patients and 5 ependymoma patients. Prescribed dose was 54 Gy over 30 fractions to the planning volume. Dosimetric endpoints were compared between VMAT and proton plans. The normal tissue complication probability (NTCP) following VMAT and proton therapy planning was also calculated using PICN as the biological endpoint. Sensitivity tests were performed to determine if predicted risk of PICN was sensitive to positional errors, proton range errors and selection of risk models. Results: Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a significant increase in the maximum dose and reduction in the total brain volume irradiated to low doses compared with the VMAT plans. The average ratios of NTCP between PSPT and VMAT were 0.56 and 0.38 for glioma and ependymoma patients respectively and the average ratios of NTCP between IMPT and VMAT were 0.67 and 0.68 for glioma and ependymoma plans respectively. Sensitivity test revealed that predicted ratios of risk were insensitive to range and positional errors but varied with risk model selection. Conclusion: Both PSPT and IMPT plans resulted in a decrease in the predictive risk of necrosis for the pediatric plans studied in this work. Sensitivity analysis upheld the qualitative findings of the risk models used in this study, however more accurate models that take into account dose and volume are needed.

  8. The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Warren; Lai, Anthony; Croonquist, Arvid; Chui, Talso; Eraker, J. H.; Abbott, Randy; Mills, Gary; Mohl, James; Craig, James; Balachandra, Balu; Gannon, Jade

    2000-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is being developed by NASA to provide long duration low temperature and microgravity environment on the International Space Station (ISS) for performing fundamental physics investigations. Currently, six experiments have been selected for flight definition studies. More will be selected in a two-year cycle, through NASA Research Announcement. This program is managed under the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Experiments Project Office at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The facility is being designed to launch and returned to earth on a variety of vehicles including the HII-A and the space shuttle. On orbit, the facility will be connected to the Exposed Facility on the Japanese Experiment Module, Kibo. Features of the facility include a cryostat capable of maintaining super-fluid helium at a temperature of 1.4 K for 5 months, resistance thermometer bridges, multi-stage thermal isolation system, thermometers capable of pico-Kelvin resolution, DC SQUID magnetometers, passive vibration isolation, and magnetic shields with a shielding factor of 80dB. The electronics and software architecture incorporates two VME buses run using the VxWorks operating system. Technically challenging areas in the design effort include the following: 1) A long cryogen life that survives several launch and test cycles without the need to replace support straps for the helium tank. 2) The minimization of heat generation in the sample stage caused by launch vibration 3) The design of compact and lightweight DC SQUID electronics. 4) The minimization of RF interference for the measurement of heat at pico-Watt level. 5) Light weighting of the magnetic shields. 6) Implementation of a modular and flexible electronics and software architecture. The first launch is scheduled for mid-2003, on an H-IIA Rocket Transfer Vehicle, out of the Tanegashima Space Center of Japan. Two identical facilities will be built. While one facility is onboard

  9. Radically Different Kinetics at Low Temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sims, Ian

    2014-06-01

    The use of the CRESU (Cinétique de Réaction en Ecoulement Supersonique Uniforme, or Reaction Kinetics in Uniform Supersonic Flow) technique coupled with pulsed laser photochemical kinetics methods has shown that reactions involving radicals can be very rapid at temperatures down to 10 K or below. The results have had a major impact in astrochemistry and planetology, as well as proving an exacting test for theory. The technique has also been applied to the formation of transient complexes of interest both in atmospheric chemistry and combustion. Until now, all of the chemical reactions studied in this way have taken place on attractive potential energy surfaces with no overall barrier to reaction. The F + H2 {→} HF + H reaction does possess a substantial energetic barrier ({\\cong} 800 K), and might therefore be expected to slow to a negligible rate at very low temperatures. In fact, this H-atom abstraction reaction does take place efficiently at low temperatures due entirely to tunneling. I will report direct experimental measurements of the rate of this reaction down to a temperature of 11 K, in remarkable agreement with state-of-the-art quantum reactive scattering calculations by François Lique (Université du Havre) and Millard Alexander (University of Maryland). It is thought that long chain cyanopolyyne molecules H(C2)nCN may play an important role in the formation of the orange haze layer in Titan's atmosphere. The longest carbon chain molecule observed in interstellar space, HC11N, is also a member of this series. I will present new results, obtained in collaboration with Jean-Claude Guillemin (Ecole de Chimie de Rennes) and Stephen Klippenstein (Argonne National Labs), on reactions of C2H, CN and C3N radicals (using a new LIF scheme by Hoshina and Endo which contribute to the low temperature formation of (cyano)polyynes. H. Sabbah, L. Biennier, I. R. Sims, Y. Georgievskii, S. J. Klippenstein, I. W. M. Smith, Science 317, 102 (2007). S. D. Le Picard, M

  10. EUV induced low temperature SF6-based plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartnik, A.; Wachulak, P.; Fiedorowicz, H.; Skrzeczanowski, W.; Jarocki, R.; Fok, T.; Węgrzyński, Ł.

    2016-03-01

    In this work spectral investigations of low temperature F-rich photoionized plasmas were performed. The photoionized plasmas were created by irradiation of SF6 gas with intense EUV (extreme ultraviolet) radiation pulses. Two laser plasma EUV sources of different parameters used in the experiments were based on 0.8 J /4ns and 10 J/ 10 ns Nd:YAG lasers respectively. Both sources operated at 10 Hz repetition rate. The EUV radiation was focused using a dedicated reflective collector onto the gas stream, injected into a vacuum chamber synchronously with the EUV pulses. Irradiation of the SF6 gas resulted in dissociative ionization of the molecules, leading to creation of SFn+ ions and fluorine atoms. Further photo- or electron impact ionization and excitation processes allow for formation of photoionized plasmas emitting radiation in the wide spectral range. Emission spectra were measured in the EUV and optical ranges. The EUV spectra contained multiple spectral lines, originating from F II, F III and S II ions. The UV/VIS spectra were composed of spectral lines corresponding to radiative transitions in F II, F I and S II species. A computer simulation of the F II spectrum was performed using a collisional-radiative PrismSPECT code. Parameters of the photoionized plasmas were estimated by fitting the spectrum obtained from the simulations to the experimental one. Apart from that, the electron temperature was estimated employing Boltzmann plots based on the UV/VIS spectrum.

  11. Investigation of the effects of head irradiation with gamma rays and protons on startle and pre-pulse inhibition behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Haerich, Paul; Eggers, Cara; Pecaut, Michael J

    2012-05-01

    With the increased international emphasis on manned space exploration, there is a growing need to understand the impact of the spaceflight environment on health and behavior. One particularly important aspect of this environment is low-dose radiation. In the present studies, we first characterized the γ- and proton-irradiation dose effect on acoustic startle and pre-pulse inhibition behaviors in mice exposed to 0-5 Gy brain-localized irradiation, and assessed these effects 2 days later. Subsequently, we used 2 Gy to assess the time course of γ- and proton-radiation effects on startle reactivity 0-8 days after exposure. Exposures targeted the brain to minimize the impact of peripheral inflammation-induced sickness behavior. The effects of radiation on startle were subtle and acute. Radiation reduced the startle response at 2 and 5 Gy. Following a 2-Gy exposure, the response reached a minimum at the 2-day point. Proton and γ-ray exposures did not differ in their impact on startle. We found there were no effects of radiation on pre-pulse inhibition of the startle response.

  12. Proton irradiation effects on deep level states in Mg-doped p-type GaN grown by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Z.; Arehart, A. R.; Ringel, S. A.; Kyle, E. C. H.; Speck, J. S.; Chen, J.; Zhang, E. X.; Fleetwood, D. M.; Schrimpf, R. D.

    2015-01-12

    The impact of proton irradiation on the deep level states throughout the Mg-doped p-type GaN bandgap is investigated using deep level transient and optical spectroscopies. Exposure to 1.8 MeV protons of 1 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} and 3 × 10{sup 13 }cm{sup −2} fluences not only introduces a trap with an E{sub V} + 1.02 eV activation energy but also brings monotonic increases in concentration for as-grown deep states at E{sub V} + 0.48 eV, E{sub V} + 2.42 eV, E{sub V} + 3.00 eV, and E{sub V} + 3.28 eV. The non-uniform sensitivities for individual states suggest different physical sources and/or defect generation mechanisms. Comparing with prior theoretical calculations reveals that several traps are consistent with associations to nitrogen vacancy, nitrogen interstitial, and gallium vacancy origins, and thus are likely generated through displacing nitrogen and gallium atoms from the crystal lattice in proton irradiation environment.

  13. 1.5 MeV proton irradiation effects on electrical and structural properties of TiO{sub 2}/n-Si interface

    SciTech Connect

    Ishfaq, M.; Rizwan Khan, M.; Bhopal, M. F.; Nasim, F.; Ali, A.; Bhatti, A. S.; Ahmed, I.; Bhardwaj, Sunil; Cepek, Cinzia

    2014-05-07

    In this paper, we report the effect of 1.5 MeV proton beam irradiation dose on the structural and electrical properties of TiO{sub 2} thin films deposited on n–Si substrates. The formation and transformation of different TiO{sub 2} phases in the irradiated thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). X-ray diffraction measurements revealed that the as grown film was rich in Ti{sub 5}O{sub 9} phase and then converted to mixed phases of TiO{sub 2} (rutile and anatase) after exposure with radiation doses up to 5 × 10{sup 14} cm{sup −2}. The XPS results revealed the formation of oxygen vacancy (negative) traps in the exposed TiO{sub 2} films, which showed strong dependence on the dose. The C-V measurements showed that proton radiations also damaged the Si substrate and created deep level defects in the substrate, which caused a shift of 0.26 ± 0.01 V in the flat band voltage (V{sub FB}). I–V measurements showed that the ideality factor increased and the rectification ratio dropped with the increase in the radiation dose. The present study showed the stability of TiO{sub 2}/Si interface and TiO{sub 2} film as an oxide layer against proton radiations.

  14. Low-temperature geothermal resources of Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Schuster, J.E.; Bloomquist, R.G.

    1994-06-01

    This report presents information on the location, physical characteristics, and water chemistry of low-temperature geothermal resources in Washington. The database includes 941 thermal (>20C or 68F) wells, 34 thermal springs, lakes, and fumaroles, and 238 chemical analyses. Most thermal springs occur in the Cascade Range, and many are associated with stratovolcanoes. In contrast, 97 percent of thermal wells are located in the Columbia Basin of southeastern Washington. Some 83.5 percent are located in Adams, Benton, Franklin, Grant, Walla Walla, and Yakima Counties. Yakima County, with 259 thermal wells, has the most. Thermal wells do not seem to owe their origin to local sources of heat, such as cooling magma in the Earth`s upper crust, but to moderate to deep circulation of ground water in extensive aquifers of the Columbia River Basalt Group and interflow sedimentary deposits, under the influence of a moderately elevated (41C/km) average geothermal gradient.

  15. Low Temperature SQUID for NDE Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz (Technical Monitor); Selim, Raouf

    2003-01-01

    We have developed a low temperature SuperConducting Quantum Interference Device - SQUID measurement system for detection of defects deep under the surface of aluminum structures using eddy current techniques. The system uses a two dimensional planar inducer with two different excitation frequencies to induce a current in the sample. We have developed a data analysis software program that enabled us to distinguish between round defects (holes), straight defects (slots) and slots close to holes simulating cracks starting from rivets in aluminum structures. We were able to detect defects that are 8mm below the surface. We have also measured the change in phase of the detected signal as a function of depth of the defect. This relationship can be used to determine the depth of hidden flaws. Using this analysis software with the high temperature SQUID system at NASA Langley we were able to detect slots close to holes in layered aluminum sample.

  16. Low temperature double-layer capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, Erik J. (Inventor); Smart, Marshall C. (Inventor); West, William C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Double-layer capacitors capable of operating at extremely low temperatures (e.g., as low as -75.degree. C.) are disclosed. Electrolyte solutions combining a base solvent (e.g., acetonitrile) and a cosolvent are employed to lower the melting point of the base electrolyte. Example cosolvents include methyl formate, ethyl acetate, methyl acetate, propionitrile, butyronitrile, and 1,3-dioxolane. An optimized concentration (e.g., 0.10 M to 0.75 M) of salt, such as tetraethylammonium tetrafluoroborate, is dissolved into the electrolyte solution. In some cases (e.g., 1,3-dioxolane cosolvent) additives, such as 2% by volume triethylamine, may be included in the solvent mixture to prevent polymerization of the solution. Conventional device form factors and structural elements (e.g., porous carbon electrodes and a polyethylene separator) may be employed.

  17. Magnetic refrigeration for low-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barclay, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    The application of refrigeration at low temperatures ranging from production of liquid helium for medical imaging systems to cooling of infrared sensors on surveillance satellites is discussed. Cooling below about 15 K with regenerative refrigerators is difficult because of the decreasing thermal mass of the regenerator compared to that of the working material. In order to overcome this difficulty with helium gas as the working material, a heat exchanger plus a Joule-Thomson or other exponder is used. Regenerative magnetic refrigerators with magnetic solids as the working material have the same regenerator problem as gas refrigerators. This problem provides motivation for the development of nonregenerative magnetic refrigerators that span approximately 1 K to approximately 0 K. Particular emphasis is placed on high reliability and high efficiency. Calculations indicate considerable promise in this area. The principles, the potential, the problems, and the progress towards development of successful 4 to 20 K magnetic refrigerators are discussed.

  18. Evaluation of Low Temperature CO Removal Catalysts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monje, Oscar

    2015-01-01

    CO removal from spacecraft gas streams was evaluated for three commercial, low temperature oxidation catalysts: Carulite 300, Sofnocat 423, and Hamilton Sundstrand Pt1. The catalysts were challenged with CO concentrations (1-100 ppm) under dry and wet (50% humidity) conditions using 2-3 % O2. CO removal and CO2 concentration were measured at constant feed composition using a FTIR. Water vapor affected the CO conversion of each catalyst differently. An initial screening found that Caulite 300 could not operate in humid conditions. The presence of water vapor affected CO conversion of Sofnocat 423 for challenge concentrations below 40 ppm. The conversion of CO by Sofnocat 423 was 80% at CO concentrations greater than 40 ppm under both dry and moist conditions. The HS Pt1 catalyst exhibited CO conversion levels of 100% under both dry and moist conditions.

  19. Low temperature catalyst system for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.

    1984-04-20

    This patent discloses a catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (150/sup 0/C) and preferably in the range 80 to 120/sup 0/C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen. The catalyst components are used in slurry form and comprise (1) a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH-ROH-M(OAc)/sub 2/ where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1 to 6 carbon atoms and (2) a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. For the first component, Nic is preferred (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). For the second component, Mo(CO)/sub 6/ is preferred. The mixture is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  20. Low temperature catalysts for methanol production

    DOEpatents

    Sapienza, R.S.; Slegeir, W.A.; O'Hare, T.E.; Mahajan, D.

    1986-09-30

    A catalyst and process useful at low temperatures (below about 160 C) and preferably in the range 80--120 C used in the production of methanol from carbon monoxide and hydrogen are disclosed. The catalyst is used in slurry form and comprises a complex reducing agent derived from the component structure NaH--RONa-M(OAc)[sub 2] where M is selected from the group consisting of Ni, Pd, and Co and R is a lower alkyl group containing 1--6 carbon atoms. This catalyst is preferably used alone but is also effective in combination with a metal carbonyl of a group VI (Mo, Cr, W) metal. The preferred catalyst precursor is Nic (where M = Ni and R = tertiary amyl). Mo(CO)[sub 6] is the preferred metal carbonyl if such component is used. The catalyst is subjected to a conditioning or activating step under temperature and pressure, similar to the parameters given above, to afford the active catalyst.

  1. REFRIGERATION ESPECIALLY FOR VERY LOW TEMPERATURES

    DOEpatents

    Kennedy, P.B.; Smith, H.R. Jr.

    1960-09-13

    A refrigeration system for producing very low temperatures is described. The system of the invention employs a binary mixture refrigerant in a closed constant volume, e.g., Freon and ethylene. Such mixture is compressed in the gaseous state and is then separated in a fractionating column element of the system. Thenceforth, the first liquid to separate is employed stagewise to cool and liq uefy successive portions of the refrigerant at successively lower temperatures by means of heat exchangers coupled between the successive stages. When shut down, all of the volumes of the system are interconnected and a portion of the refrigerant remains liquid at ambient temperatures so that no dangerous overpressures develop. The system is therefore rugged, simple and dependable in operation.

  2. Low-temperature gas from marine shales

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200°C in the subsurface and generally above 300°C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100°C, robust gas generation below 100°C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300° below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50°C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1–C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (~1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50°C (57.4 μg C1–C5/g rock) than at 350°C by thermal cracking (12 μg C1–C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300° below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible. PMID:19236698

  3. Low-temperature gas from marine shales.

    PubMed

    Mango, Frank D; Jarvie, Daniel M

    2009-02-23

    Thermal cracking of kerogens and bitumens is widely accepted as the major source of natural gas (thermal gas). Decomposition is believed to occur at high temperatures, between 100 and 200 degrees C in the subsurface and generally above 300 degrees C in the laboratory. Although there are examples of gas deposits possibly generated at lower temperatures, and reports of gas generation over long periods of time at 100 degrees C, robust gas generation below 100 degrees C under ordinary laboratory conditions is unprecedented. Here we report gas generation under anoxic helium flow at temperatures 300 degrees below thermal cracking temperatures. Gas is generated discontinuously, in distinct aperiodic episodes of near equal intensity. In one three-hour episode at 50 degrees C, six percent of the hydrocarbons (kerogen & bitumen) in a Mississippian marine shale decomposed to gas (C1-C5). The same shale generated 72% less gas with helium flow containing 10 ppm O2 and the two gases were compositionally distinct. In sequential isothermal heating cycles (approximately 1 hour), nearly five times more gas was generated at 50 degrees C (57.4 microg C1-C5/g rock) than at 350 degrees C by thermal cracking (12 microg C1-C5/g rock). The position that natural gas forms only at high temperatures over geologic time is based largely on pyrolysis experiments under oxic conditions and temperatures where low-temperature gas generation could be suppressed. Our results indicate two paths to gas, a high-temperature thermal path, and a low-temperature catalytic path proceeding 300 degrees below the thermal path. It redefines the time-temperature dimensions of gas habitats and opens the possibility of gas generation at subsurface temperatures previously thought impossible.

  4. Evaluation of critical resolved shear strength and deformation mode in proton-irradiated austenitic stainless steel using micro-compression tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Hyung-Ha; Ko, Eunsol; Kwon, Junhyun; Hwang, Seong Sik; Shin, Chansun

    2016-03-01

    Micro-compression tests were applied to evaluate the changes in the strength and deformation mode of proton-irradiated commercial austenitic stainless steel. Proton irradiation generated small dots at low dose levels and Frank loops at high dose levels. The increase in critical resolved shear stresses (CRSS) was measured from micro-compression of pillars and the Schmid factor calculated from the measured loading direction. The magnitudes of the CRSS increase were in good agreement with the values calculated from the barrier hardening model using the measured size and density of radiation defects. The deformation mode changed upon increasing the irradiation dose level. At a low radiation dose level, work hardening and smooth flow behavior were observed. Increasing the dose level resulted in the flow behavior changing to a distinct heterogeneous flow, yielding a few large strain bursts in the stress-strain curves. The change in the deformation mode was related to the formation and propagation of defect-free slip bands. The effect of the orientation of the pillar or loading direction on the strengths is discussed.

  5. Quantification of rat retinal growth and vascular population changes after single and split doses of proton irradiation: translational study using stereology methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mao, Xiao W.; Archambeau, John O.; Kubinova, Lucie; Boyle, Soames; Petersen, Georgia; Grove, Roger; Nelson, G. A. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    This study quantified architectural and population changes in the rat retinal vasculature after proton irradiation using stereology. A 100 MeV conformal proton beam delivered 8, 14, 20 and 28 Gy as single and split doses to the whole eye. The vascular networks were prepared from retinal digests. Stereological methods were used to obtain the area of the retina and unbiased estimates of microvessel/artery/vein endothelial, pericyte and smooth muscle population, and vessel length. The retinal area increased progressively in the unirradiated, age-matched controls and in the retinas irradiated with 8 and 14 Gy, indicating uniform progressive retinal growth. No growth occurred after 20 and 28 Gy. Regression analysis of total endothelial cell number in all vessels (arteries, veins and capillaries) after irradiation documented a progressive time- and dose-dependent cell loss occurring over 15 to 24 months. The difference from controls was significant (P<0.01) after 28 Gy given in single and split doses and after 20 Gy given as a split dose (P<0.05). Total vessel length in microvessel was significantly shortened at 20 and 28 Gy compared to that of controls (P<0.05). No evident dose recovery was observed in the endothelial populations after split doses. At 10 Gy, the rate of endothelial cell loss, a dose parameter used to characterize the time- and dose-dependent loss of the endothelial population, was doubled.

  6. Effect of irradiation with MeV protons and electrons on the conductivity compensation and photoluminescence of moderately doped p-4H-SiC (CVD)

    SciTech Connect

    Kozlovski, V. V.; Lebedev, A. A. Bogdanova, E. V.; Seredova, N. V.

    2015-09-15

    The compensation of moderately doped p-4H-SiC samples grown by the chemical vapor deposition (CVD) method under irradiation with 0.9-MeV electrons and 15-MeV protons is studied. The experimentally measured carrier removal rates are 1.2–1.6 cm{sup –1} for electrons and 240–260 cm{sup –1} for protons. The dependence of the concentration of uncompensated acceptors and donors, measured in the study, demonstrates a linear decrease with increasing irradiation dose to the point of complete compensation. This run of the dependence shows that compensation of the samples is due to the transition of carriers to deep centers formed by primary radiation-induced defects. It is demonstrated that, in contrast to n-SiC (CVD), primary defects in the carbon sublattice of moderately doped p-SiC (CVD) only cannot account for the compensation process. In p-SiC, either primary defects in the silicon sublattice, or defects in both sublattices are responsible for conductivity compensation. Also, photoluminescence spectra are examined in relation to the irradiation dose.

  7. SU-E-T-47: Application of the Repair-Misrepair-Fixation RBE Model to Describe the Results of High Resolution Proton Irradiation Cell Survival Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Peeler, C; Bronk, L; Taleei, R; Guan, F; Grosshans, D; Mirkovic, D; Titt, U; Mohan, R

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To develop a system to rapidly and accurately calculate RBE with the repair-misrepair-fixation (RMF) model for proton therapy data sets and to evaluate its effectiveness in modeling RBE for cell survival experiments performed with the H460 cell line for a range of proton LET. Methods: A system for using the Monte Carlo Damage Simulation (MCDS) software with high performance computing was developed. Input for the MCDS software for a range of proton energies in increments of 0.1 MeV was generated and simulated. The output data were then used to determine doseaveraged quantities for the RMF model based on equivalently binned proton energy spectra. The method was applied to calculate RBE at 50% survival for experimental cell survival data. Experimental data were obtained using a system which allowed for the accumulation of cell survival data at known values of dose-averaged proton LETs at a range of doses. RBE was calculated based directly on a Cs-137 reference experiment and, additionally, according to fitted values of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model. Results: Dose-averaged RMF model quantities were calculated using the HPC system. Compared to experimental RBE determined using a Cs-137 irradiation as a reference, the RBE from the model differed by at most 49%. RBE based on the fitted values of θ and κ differed by at most 18% for the highest LET. Conclusion: A system for rapidly generating data necessary to calculate RBE with the RMF model has been developed. For the H460 cell line, the RMF model could not reproduce the experimentally determined RBE based solely on the photon reference data. Fitting of the θ and κ terms of the RMF model indicates that their values increase for proton LET exceeding approximately 10 keV/µm. NIH Program Project Grant P01CA021239.

  8. A low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor prepared on plastic substrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chih-Hung; Chang, Shoou-Jinn; Hsueh, Ting-Jen

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a low-temperature ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was prepared on plastic substrate. The operating temperature of the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor was reduced to room temperature using ultraviolet illumination. The experimental results indicate a favorable sensor response at low temperature, with the best response at 60 °C. The results also reveal that the ZnO nanowire ethanol gas sensor can be easily integrated into portable products, whose waste heat can improve sensor response and achieve energy savings, while energy consumption can be further reduced by solar irradiation.

  9. A reverse pendulum bath cryostat design suitable for low temperature scanning probe microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heyde, M.; Thielsch, G.; Rust, H.-P.; Freund, H.-J.

    2005-03-01

    A new low temperature, ultrahigh vacuum cryostat design has been developed for atomic force and scanning tunnelling microscopy measurements. A microscope can be operated at 5 K in ultrahigh vacuum. The microscope body is thermally connected to a reverse pendulum and completely surrounded by a radiation shield. The design allows in situ dosing and irradiation of the sample as well as for easy access of tip and sample. The temperature performance and the vibrational properties of the reverse pendulum design are demonstrated in detail. A brief overview of low temperature instrumentation in scanning probe microscopy is given.

  10. Modeling Low-temperature Geochemical Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordstrom, D. K.

    2003-12-01

    Geochemical modeling has become a popular and useful tool for a wide number of applications from research on the fundamental processes of water-rock interactions to regulatory requirements and decisions regarding permits for industrial and hazardous wastes. In low-temperature environments, generally thought of as those in the temperature range of 0-100 °C and close to atmospheric pressure (1 atm=1.01325 bar=101,325 Pa), complex hydrobiogeochemical reactions participate in an array of interconnected processes that affect us, and that, in turn, we affect. Understanding these complex processes often requires tools that are sufficiently sophisticated to portray multicomponent, multiphase chemical reactions yet transparent enough to reveal the main driving forces. Geochemical models are such tools. The major processes that they are required to model include mineral dissolution and precipitation; aqueous inorganic speciation and complexation; solute adsorption and desorption; ion exchange; oxidation-reduction; or redox; transformations; gas uptake or production; organic matter speciation and complexation; evaporation; dilution; water mixing; reaction during fluid flow; reaction involving biotic interactions; and photoreaction. These processes occur in rain, snow, fog, dry atmosphere, soils, bedrock weathering, streams, rivers, lakes, groundwaters, estuaries, brines, and diagenetic environments. Geochemical modeling attempts to understand the redistribution of elements and compounds, through anthropogenic and natural means, for a large range of scale from nanometer to global. "Aqueous geochemistry" and "environmental geochemistry" are often used interchangeably with "low-temperature geochemistry" to emphasize hydrologic or environmental objectives.Recognition of the strategy or philosophy behind the use of geochemical modeling is not often discussed or explicitly described. Plummer (1984, 1992) and Parkhurst and Plummer (1993) compare and contrast two approaches for

  11. The science capability of the Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, M.; Croonquist, A.; Dick, G. J.; Liu, Y.

    2002-01-01

    The Low Temperature Microgravity Physics Facility (LTMPF) is a multiple user and multiple-flight NASA facility that will provide a low temperature environment for about 4. 5 months on board the International Space Station (ISS).

  12. Study of electronic properties in proton- and electron-irradiated GaAlAs and GaAs solar cell materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, S. S.

    1978-01-01

    Diagnostical measurement techniques such as dark I-V, C-V, the thermally insulated capacitance, and the deep level transient spectroscopy methods were employed to study defect properties in the proton-irradiated n-GaAs materials. Defect energy levels, thermal emission rates, and capture cross sections of electrons as well as trap densities were deduced from these measurements and the results are presented. Correlations between the measured defect parameters and the dark I-V characteristics of the n-GaAs Schottky barrier diodes are also discussed. Defect energy levels (i.e., electron traps) determined are also compared with published data in order to identify their physical origins.

  13. Comparison of the (p,xn) cross sections from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Y.Y.; Zhou, M.L.

    1982-01-01

    We have measured absolute cross sections for (p,xn) reactions (x ranges from 0 to 8) from /sup 238/U, /sup 235/U, and /sup 232/Th targets irradiated with 200-MeV protons at the Brookhaven AGS Linac injector. Chemical yields were determined by using /sup 239/Np and /sup 233/Pa as tracers. Yield patterns obtained in this work can be compared to the experimental results and theoretical calculations from earlier work, and they are consistent within the framework of intranuclear cascade followed by neutron evaporation and fission competition.

  14. Low Temperature Aluminum Dissolution Of Sludge Waste

    SciTech Connect

    Keefer, M.T.; Hamm, B.A.; Pike, J.A.

    2008-07-01

    primarily of radioactive wastes containing a very high aluminum concentration. Based on initial laboratory testing and previous sludge characterization, aluminum in this sludge could be dissolved at low temperature (no more than 65 deg. C) in a concentrated caustic solution. The amount of aluminum predicted to dissolve under these conditions ranged from 25% to 80%. An opportunity existed to remove a significant amount of aluminum prior to vitrification in DWPF and increase the level of understanding of the effects of caustic dissolution of aluminum at lower temperatures. This paper presents the results of a real waste laboratory demonstration and full-scale implementation of a low temperature aluminum dissolution process which should be considered as a viable means to reduce radioactive sludge mass and reduce the amount of waste to be vitrified. (authors)

  15. Tests of the radiation hardness of VLSI Integrated Circuits and Silicon Strip Detectors for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider) under neutron, proton, and gamma irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ziock, H.J.; Milner, C.; Sommer, W.F. ); Carteglia, N.; DeWitt, J.; Dorfan, D.; Hubbard, B.; Leslie, J.; O'Shaughnessy, K.F.; Pitzl, D.; Rowe, W.A.; Sadrozinski, H.F.W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E. . Inst. for Particle Physics); Ellison, J.A. ); Ferguson, P. ); Giubellino

    1990-01-01

    As part of a program to develop a silicon strip central tracking detector system for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) we are studying the effects of radiation damage in silicon detectors and their associated front-end readout electronics. We report on the results of neutron and proton irradiations at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) and {gamma}-ray irradiations at UC Santa Cruz (UCSC). Individual components on single-sided AC-coupled silicon strip detectors and on test structures were tested. Circuits fabricated in a radiation hard CMOS process and individual transistors fabricated using dielectric isolation bipolar technology were also studied. Results indicate that a silicon strip tracking detector system should have a lifetime of at least one decade at the SSC. 17 refs., 17 figs.

  16. Can We Spare the Pancreas and Other Abdominal Organs at Risk? A Comparison of Conformal Radiotherapy, Helical Tomotherapy and Proton Beam Therapy in Pediatric Irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Jouglar, Emmanuel; Wagner, Antoine; Delpon, Grégory; Campion, Loïc; Meingan, Philippe; Bernier, Valérie; Demoor-Goldschmidt, Charlotte; Mahé, Marc-André; Lacornerie, Thomas; Supiot, Stéphane

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Late abdominal irradiation toxicity during childhood included renal damage, hepatic toxicity and secondary diabetes mellitus. We compared the potential of conformal radiotherapy (CRT), helical tomotherapy (HT) and proton beam therapy (PBT) to spare the abdominal organs at risk (pancreas, kidneys and liver- OAR) in children undergoing abdominal irradiation. Methods We selected children with abdominal tumors who received more than 10 Gy to the abdomen. Treatment plans were calculated in order to keep the dose to abdominal OAR as low as possible while maintaining the same planned target volume (PTV) coverage. Dosimetric values were compared using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results The dose distribution of 20 clinical cases with a median age of 8 years (range 1–14) were calculated with different doses to the PTV: 5 medulloblastomas (36 Gy), 3 left-sided and 2 right-sided nephroblastomas (14.4 Gy to the tumor + 10.8 Gy boost to para-aortic lymphnodes), 1 left-sided and 4 right-sided or midline neuroblastomas (21 Gy) and 5 Hodgkin lymphomas (19.8 Gy to the para-aortic lymphnodes and spleen). HT significantly reduced the mean dose to the whole pancreas (WP), the pancreatic tail (PT) and to the ipsilateral kidney compared to CRT. PBT reduced the mean dose to the WP and PT compared to both CRT and HT especially in midline and right-sided tumors. PBT decreased the mean dose to the ispilateral kidney but also to the contralateral kidney and the liver compared to CRT. Low dose to normal tissue was similar or increased with HT whereas integral dose and the volume of normal tissue receiving at least 5 and 10 Gy were reduced with PBT compared to CRT and HT. Conclusion In children undergoing abdominal irradiation therapy, proton beam therapy reduces the dose to abdominal OAR while sparing normal tissue by limiting low dose irradiation. PMID:27764132

  17. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  18. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  19. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...

  20. 46 CFR 57.05-5 - Low temperature application.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Low temperature application. 57.05-5 Section 57.05-5 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING WELDING AND BRAZING Performance Qualifications § 57.05-5 Low temperature application. For low temperature application, each...