Science.gov

Sample records for lower-extremity swelling mimicking

  1. Myoparasitism mimicking parotid swelling: a rare presentation of cysticercosis

    PubMed Central

    Tewari, Sandeep; Singh, Saumya; Jaiswal, Vaibhav; Mishra, Anand Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Muscular infestation with larval stage of Taenia solium is a well-recognised entity but cysticercosis of the head and neck region is a rarity. We present a case of 35-year-old young man with diffuse swelling of 3.5×4 cm in the parotid region on the right side of the face with signs of inflammation. Diagnosis was established on high-resolution ultrasonography which revealed it to be of parasitic origin. The patient was managed with antihelminthic pharmacotherapy and improved within a month. Thus cysticercosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of subcutaneous swellings of the head and neck region, especially in endemic zones and it must be investigated well with appropriate imaging modalities so that inadvertent surgery can be avoided. PMID:24842360

  2. Lower extremity venous reflux

    PubMed Central

    Baliyan, Vinit; Tajmir, Shahein; Ganguli, Suvranu; Prabhakar, Anand M.

    2016-01-01

    Venous incompetence in the lower extremity is a common clinical problem. Basic understanding of venous anatomy, pathophysiologic mechanisms of venous reflux is essential for choosing the appropriate treatment strategy. The complex interplay of venous pressure, abdominal pressure, venous valvular function and gravitational force determine the venous incompetence. This review is intended to provide a succinct review of the pathophysiology of venous incompetence and the current role of imaging in its management. PMID:28123974

  3. Asymmetric Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy With Unilateral Tongue Swelling Mimicking Stroke.

    PubMed

    Chi, Man Sum; Ng, Shi Hon; Chan, Lok Yiu

    2016-11-01

    A 60-year-old man presented with acute onset of left hemiparesis and left hypoglossal nerve palsy with ipsilateral tongue swelling. He then progressed to tetraparesis in a few days. Cerebrospinal fluid showed cell protein dissociation. A nerve conduction study showed motor axonal neuropathy with sensory sparing. A subsequent blood test revealed anti-GD1b IgG antibody positivity. He was diagnosed to have acute motor axonal neuropathy (AMAN) and treated with a course of intravenous immunoglobulin with slow improvement. This is probably the first AMAN with asymmetrical presentation mimicking stroke reported in the literature in detail. The anti-GD1b IgG antibody is also not commonly associated with AMAN.

  4. Lower extremity abnormalities in children.

    PubMed

    Sass, Pamela; Hassan, Ghinwa

    2003-08-01

    Rotational and angular problems are two types of lower extremity abnormalities common in children. Rotational problems include intoeing and out-toeing. Intoeing is caused by one of three types of deformity: metatarsus adductus, internal tibial torsion, and increased femoral anteversion. Out-toeing is less common than intoeing, and its causes are similar but opposite to those of intoeing. These include femoral retroversion and external tibial torsion. Angular problems include bowlegs and knock-knees. An accurate diagnosis can be made with careful history and physical examination, which includes torsional profile (a four-component composite of measurements of the lower extremities). Charts of normal values and values with two standard deviations for each component of the torsional profile are available. In most cases, the abnormality improves with time. A careful physical examination, explanation of the natural history, and serial measurements are usually reassuring to the parents. Treatment is usually conservative. Special shoes, cast, or braces are rarely beneficial and have no proven efficacy. Surgery is reserved for older children with deformity from three to four standard deviations from the normal.

  5. Lower extremity edema in a child due to pectus excavatum.

    PubMed

    Iannucci, Glen J; Slesnick, Timothy C; Kogon, Brian; Samai, Cyrus

    2015-02-01

    A previously healthy 11-year-old girl was referred for pediatric cardiology evaluation because of the development of progressive bilateral lower extremity swelling over the course of 2 years. Her prior workup had included a negative result for proteinuria and a negative ultrasound for deep venous thrombosis. On physical examination, in addition to her edema, she was found to have a severe pectus excavatum deformity, which prompted cardiac magnetic resonance imaging. This study demonstrated compression of the inferior vena cava. She underwent uneventful pectus repair with use of a modified Ravitch procedure and experienced complete resolution of her lower extremity edema.

  6. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis

    PubMed Central

    Al-Shaar, Hussam Abou; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z.

    2015-01-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction. PMID:26492118

  7. Acute cervical cord infarction in anterior spinal artery territory with acute swelling mimicking myelitis.

    PubMed

    Abou Al-Shaar, Hussam; AbouAl-Shaar, Iyad; Al-Kawi, Mohammed Z

    2015-10-01

    Acute infarction of the cervical segment of the spinal cord is extremely uncommon. Patients may present with signs and symptoms mimicking that of acute myelitis. On imaging, both conditions may present as a hyperintense area on T-2 weighted MRI. History of sudden onset is essential in establishing the diagnosis. We report a case of cervical spinal cord infarction in a 40-year-old man who was diagnosed with acute transverse myelitis, and was treated with high dose intravenous corticosteroids followed by 5 sessions of plasma exchange. An MRI of the spine revealed abnormal high T2 signal intensity extending from the C2 to C7 level involving the anterior two-thirds of the cord with more central involvement. The findings were consistent with anterior spinal artery territory cervical cord infarction.

  8. The MR appearance of volume overload in the lower extremities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meler, J. D.; Solomon, M. A.; Steele, J. R.; Yancy, C. W. Jr; Parkey, R. W.; Fleckenstein, J. L.; Blomqvist, C. G. (Principal Investigator)

    1997-01-01

    PURPOSE: Our goal was to describe the MR findings of volume overload (VO) in the lower extremities. METHOD: Fifteen individuals were studied, including eight healthy controls and seven patients with VO (four cardiac, three renal). MR evaluation included various SE techniques. Edema detection, localization, and symmetry were assessed subjectively. Relaxation time estimates were also made of the subcutaneous tissue, marrow, and three muscles. RESULTS: Subcutaneous tissue was markedly edematous in seven of seven patients and asymmetric in four of seven, whereas marrow was normal in all patients. Muscle edema was mild and asymmetric in six and two of seven patients, respectively. Perifascial fluid collections were identified in six of seven patients. CONCLUSION: Subcutaneous tissue edema is the dominant feature of VO in the lower extremities. Perifascial fluid is common but does not necessarily distribute symmetrically. Muscle edema is relatively mild. These findings should aid in identifying VO as the potential cause of swelling in patients with swollen legs.

  9. Lower extremity muscle activation during baseball pitching.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Brian M; Stodden, David F; Nixon, Megan K

    2010-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate muscle activation levels of select lower extremity muscles during the pitching motion. Bilateral surface electromyography data on 5 lower extremity muscles (biceps femoris, rectus femoris, gluteus maximus, vastus medialis, and gastrocnemius) were collected on 11 highly skilled baseball pitchers and compared with individual maximal voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) data. The pitching motion was divided into 4 distinct phases: phase 1, initiation of pitching motion to maximum stride leg knee height; phase 2, maximum stride leg knee height to stride foot contact (SFC); phase 3, SFC to ball release; and phase 4, ball release to 0.5 seconds after ball release (follow-through). Results indicated that trail leg musculature elicited moderate to high activity levels during phases 2 and 3 (38-172% of MVIC). Muscle activity levels of the stride leg were moderate to high during phases 2-4 (23-170% of MVIC). These data indicate a high demand for lower extremity strength and endurance. Specifically, coaches should incorporate unilateral and bilateral lower extremity exercises for strength improvement or maintenance and to facilitate dynamic stabilization of the lower extremities during the pitching motion.

  10. Lower extremity injuries sustained while farming.

    PubMed

    Neil, Janice A

    2002-01-01

    Today's complex farm environment can pose many threats to the lower extremities of all people especially those with chronic diseases that affect the lower extremities. The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of injuries to the lower extremities among farmers and to rank the importance of these incidents in order to plan prevention programs. one hundred farmers were surveyed at a large farm show in the southeastern United States. An average of 4.86 injuries per farmer were reported. Blisters from work shoes or boots, followed by injuries from animals stepping on the feet were the most common injuries. Since those with chronic illnesses are especially prone to injury and disability, regular foot assessments, evaluation, and education about the hazards of farming are mainstays of prevention.

  11. Overuse lower extremity injuries in sports.

    PubMed

    Fullem, Brian W

    2015-04-01

    When athletes train harder the risk of injury increases, and there are several common overuse injuries to the lower extremity. Three of the most common lower extremity overuse injuries in sports are discussed including the diagnosis and treatments: medial tibal stress syndrome, iliotibial band syndrome, and stress fractures. The charge of sports medicine professionals is to identify and treat the cause of the injuries and not just treat the symptoms. Symptomatology is an excellent guide to healing and often the patient leads the physician to the proper diagnosis through an investigation of the athlete's training program, past injury history, dietary habits, choice of footwear, and training surface.

  12. Exclusive lower extremity mirror movements and diastematomyelia.

    PubMed

    Tubbs, R Shane; Smyth, Matthew D; Dure, Leon S; Oakes, W Jerry

    2004-01-01

    Mirror movements usually seen in the Klippel-Feil syndrome are most commonly appreciated in the upper extremities. Lower extremity involvement is seen rarely and when observed, is found in conjunction with upper extremity mirror movements. We report what we believe to be the first case of mirror movements found exclusively in the lower extremities in a female patient presenting with tethered cord syndrome. Our hopes are that this report will help elucidate mechanisms involved with these anomalous movements, as currently there is no commonly accepted etiology.

  13. Primary lower extremity lymphedema: CT diagnosis

    SciTech Connect

    Gamba, J.L.; Silverman, P.M.; Ling, D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Korobkin, M.

    1983-10-01

    The CT findings of two cases of primary lymphedema of the lower extremities are presented. CT showed a coarse, nonenhancing, reticular pattern in an enlarged subcutaneous compartment. CT excluded the diagnosis of secondary lymphedema from an obstructing mass by demonstrating a normal retroperitoneum and pelvis. The CT findings are correlated with pedal lymphangiograms.

  14. Total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2015-05-01

    There are approximately 1.6 million lower extremity amputees in the United States. Lower extremity amputees are subject to increased physical demands proportional to their level of amputation. Lower extremity amputees have a 6-fold higher risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip and a 2-fold risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in contralateral hip when compared with the non-amputee population. Additionally, there is a 3-fold increased risk of developing radiographic osteoarthritis in the ipsilateral hip after an above knee amputation when compared with a below knee amputation. The authors retrospectively reviewed 35 total hip arthroplasties after lower extremity amputation. The mean clinical follow-up was 5.3±4.0 years. The mean time from lower extremity amputation to total hip arthroplasty was 12.2±12.8 years after a contralateral amputation and 5.4±6.0 years after an ipsilateral amputation (P=.050). The mean time to total hip arthroplasty was 15.6±15.4 years after an above knee amputation and 6.4±6.1 years after a below knee amputation (P=.021). There was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 35.9±21.8 to 76.8±12.8 with total hip arthroplasty after a contralateral amputation (P<.001). There also was a statistically significant improvement in the mean Harris Hip Score from 25.4±21.7 to 78.6±17.1 with total hip arthroplasty after an ispilateral amputation (P<.001). Three (17.7%) total hip arthroplasties after a contralateral amputation and 2 (11.1%) total hip arthroplasties after an ipsilateral amputation required revision total hip arthroplasty. Patients with an ipsilateral amputation or a below knee amputation progress to total hip arthroplasty faster than those with a contralateral amputation or an above knee amputation, respectively. Lower extremity amputees experience clinically significant improvements with total hip arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation.

  15. Reconstructive Surgery of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Claridge, R.J.

    1990-01-01

    Non-operative treatments for degenerative arthritis, such as physiotherapy, anti-inflammatory medication, and occupational therapy, can help reduce the impact of the disease on the joint and hence on the mobility of the patient. Once the joint has become so diseased that non-operative modalities are inadequate, it is the task of the orthopedic surgeon to evaluate these individuals and determine which ones would benefit from a reconstructive procedure. The author explores the indications for arthrotomies, resection arthroplasties, arthrodeses, osteotomies, and total joint replacements. Total joint arthroplasty has revolutionized the treatment of degenerative arthritis of the lower extremity, although it is not a panacea for arthritis in the lower extremity. PMID:21234075

  16. Lower Extremity Permanent Dialysis Vascular Access.

    PubMed

    Parekh, Vishal B; Niyyar, Vandana D; Vachharajani, Tushar J

    2016-09-07

    Hemodialysis remains the most commonly used RRT option around the world. Technological advances, superior access to care, and better quality of care have led to overall improvement in survival of patients on long-term hemodialysis. Maintaining a functioning upper extremity vascular access for a prolonged duration continues to remain a challenge for dialysis providers. Frequently encountered difficulties in clinical practice include (1) a high incidence of central venous catheter-related central vein stenosis and (2) limited options for creating a functioning upper extremity permanent arteriovenous access. Lack of surgical skills, fear of complications, and limited involvement of the treating nephrologists in the decision-making process are some of the reasons why lower extremity permanent dialysis access remains an infrequently used option. Similar to upper extremity vascular access options, lower extremity arteriovenous fistula remains a preferred access over arteriovenous synthetic graft. The use of femoral tunneled catheter as a long-term access should be avoided as far as possible, especially with the availability of newer graft-catheter hybrid devices. Our review provides a summary of clinical evidence published in surgical, radiology, and nephrology literature highlighting the pros and cons of different types of lower extremity permanent dialysis access.

  17. MRSA infection in lower extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Edris, Bree; Reed, James F

    2008-03-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is one of the most frequently isolated bacteria in wound cultures. MRSA has been linked to lengthened wound healing times, an increase in adverse postoperative outcomes, and mortality. This study investigated the incidence of MRSA in lower extremity wounds and examined outcomes associated with MRSA-infected wounds versus non-MRSA-infected wounds. A retrospective study was conducted. Patients with MRSA-infected wounds were compared with those with uninfected wounds in a 1:2 ratio. Demographics, infection, and stay information were collected. Data were analyzed using SPSS 15.0. 51 patients were included (17 with MRSA and 34 without MRSA). Patients with MRSA had increased lengths of stay and a higher incidence of adverse postoperative outcomes compared with non-MRSA patients. An MRSA infection adversely affects a patient's hospital course. Preoperative screening for MRSA and postoperative surveillance should be considered to prevent and eliminate the spread of this virulent bacterium.

  18. Changes in lower extremity prosthetic practice.

    PubMed

    Trower, Ted A

    2006-02-01

    In recent years, much attention has been given to the revolution in new materials for prosthetics and the components that they have made possible. The average weight of a delivered prosthesis has decreased, currently available components offer improved function and superior symmetry of gait, and limb interfaces provide superior skin protection and comfort. The focus on the features of these components sometimes has led to neglect of the basic elements of prosthetic design--the fit and the alignment. If the fit and alignment are on the mark, an amputee can function at remarkably high levels with rudimentary components. This article discusses the basics of lower extremity prosthetic practice and addresses challenges for the future.

  19. Lower extremity free flaps: a review

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Mark D.; Bowen, C. Vaughan; Manktelow, Ralph T.; Graham, John; Boyd, J. Brian

    1996-01-01

    Objective To identify factors related to free-flap coverage of lower extremity fractures that are linked to a negative outcome. Design A chart review. Setting A large microsurgical referral centre. Patients From 1981 to 1989, the records of all patients who underwent free-tissue transfer to the lower extremity with more than 1 year of follow-up were selected. From this was drawn a subgroup of 49 patients (mean age, 36 years) who had tibial fractures (55% were motor vehicle injuries) and in almost all cases established soft-tissue or bony defects. They formed the study group. Intervention Free-flap transfer. Outcome Measures Factors that might be associated with free-flap failure: mechanism of injury, grade of tibial fracture, history of smoking, diabetes, peripheral vascular disease, ischemic heart disease, vascular compromise in the leg preoperatively, recipient artery used, type of anastomosis, and hypertension or hypotension intraoperatively. Results Type IIIB tibial fractures were the most frequent (67%) and carried a significantly (p = 0.02) higher risk of free-flap failure than other types of fracture. Patients underwent a mean of four procedures before referral for free-tissue transfer. The mean time from injury to flap coverage was 1006 days. Stable, long-term coverage of the free flaps was achieved in 78% of patients. Wound breakdown was most often caused by recurrent osteomyelitis (65%). Seventy-four percent of the fractures healed. The amputation rate was 10%. Four patients required repeat free-flap transfer for limb salvage. Conclusion Only the grade of tibial fracture could be significantly related to postoperative free-flap failure. PMID:8640624

  20. Lower extremity kinematics of athletics curve sprinting.

    PubMed

    Alt, Tobias; Heinrich, Kai; Funken, Johannes; Potthast, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Curve running requires the generation of centripetal force altering the movement pattern in comparison to the straight path run. The question arises which kinematic modulations emerge while bend sprinting at high velocities. It has been suggested that during curve sprints the legs fulfil different functions. A three-dimensional motion analysis (16 high-speed cameras) was conducted to compare the segmental kinematics of the lower extremity during the stance phases of linear and curve sprints (radius: 36.5 m) of six sprinters of national competitive level. Peak joint angles substantially differed in the frontal and transversal plane whereas sagittal plane kinematics remained unchanged. During the prolonged left stance phase (left: 107.5 ms, right: 95.7 ms, straight: 104.4 ms) the maximum values of ankle eversion (left: 12.7°, right: 2.6°, straight: 6.6°), hip adduction (left: 13.8°, right: 5.5°, straight: 8.8°) and hip external rotation (left: 21.6°, right: 12.9°, straight: 16.7°) were significantly higher. The inside leg seemed to stabilise the movement in the frontal plane (eversion-adduction strategy) whereas the outside leg provided and controlled the motion in the horizontal plane (rotation strategy). These results extend the principal understanding of the effects of curve sprinting on lower extremity kinematics. This helps to increase the understanding of nonlinear human bipedal locomotion, which in turn might lead to improvements in athletic performance and injury prevention.

  1. Lower extremity kinetics in tap dance.

    PubMed

    Mayers, Lester; Bronner, Shaw; Agraharasamakulam, Sujani; Ojofeitimi, Sheyi

    2010-01-01

    Tap dance is a unique performing art utilizing the lower extremities as percussion instruments. In a previous study these authors reported decreased injury prevalence among tap dancers compared to other dance and sports participants. No biomechanical analyses of tap dance exist to explain this finding. The purpose of the current pilot study was to provide a preliminary overview of normative peak kinetic and kinematic data, based on the hypothesis that tap dance generates relatively low ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments. Six professional tap dancers performed four common tap dance sequences that produced data captured by the use of a force platform and a five-camera motion analysis system. The mean vertical ground reaction force for all sequences was found to be 2.06+/-0.55 BW. Mean peak sagittal, frontal, and transverse plane joint moments (hip, knee, and ankle) ranged from 0.07 to 2.62 N.m/kg. These small ground reaction forces and joint forces and moments support our hypothesis, and may explain the relatively low injury incidence in tap dancers. Nevertheless, the analysis is highly complex, and other factors remain to be studied and clarified.

  2. Adaptive prosthetics for the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Carroll, K

    2001-06-01

    The potential for lifestyle recovery is tremendous for most lower extremity amputees. The amazing and ever-expanding array of adaptive prosthetics can help make the devastating loss of amputation more bearable for patients, their families, and their health care team. The new amputee, in a state of shock and grief, does not know what his or her prosthetic options are. It is crucial that the surgeon is knowledgeable about what the patient can have and what the patient needs to ask for. Dana Bowman stated: Ideally, the new amputee should say to their doctor, "I'd like my leg to be lightweight, flexible, durable, comfortable. I want to do sports or I want to ride bikes with my kids." Whatever it is they like to do. I was told I would never be able to wear two dynamic feet and that my sky diving days were over. I said, "Well how do you know? Can't I try?" It took years to find out what I could have and then to find people to help me get it. The prosthetic prescription the physician writes is the patient's gateway to the kind of prosthetics that will enable him or her to pursue the activities of their life. Often, new amputees end up with the bare minimum prosthesis, which can cause problems with comfort and mobility. A poorly designed or badly fitting prosthesis is as disabling as the actual amputation. When the surgeon can help the amputee and his or her family understand what kind of prosthetic choices are available, it establishes an optimistic outlook that is highly beneficial to the entire recovery process physically and mentally. "When I lost my leg, if someone would have told me that I could at least try to run again, that would have meant a lot," said Brian Frasure. "Getting that positive mental attitude is every bit as important as having good medical and prosthetic care." By asking probing questions about the patient's preamputation lifestyle and postamputation goals, the physician can write a prescription for truly adaptive prosthetics. The surgeon should

  3. Bilateral Lower-Extremity Edema Caused by Iliopsoas Bursal Distention after Hip Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Ahsan, Syed T.

    2016-01-01

    Lower-extremity edema is encountered by internists, nephrologists, vascular specialists, and many others. We report a case of an elderly woman who presented with a painful, swollen left leg. Without a clear diagnosis, she had been taking diuretics for the past 8 years for swelling in both legs. After extensive investigation, we found that her lower-extremity edema was due to bilateral iliopsoas bursal distention secondary to degeneration of her hip prostheses. Chronic breakdown of the polyethylene component of the hip prostheses had led to a communication between the artificial joints and the iliopsoas bursae. With the aid of ultrasonographic guidance, she underwent drainage, followed by clinical and radiographic improvement. Although case reports have described leg swelling arising from extravascular compression by enlarged iliopsoas bursae, we think that this is the first case of clinically significant bilateral lower-extremity edema arising from that cause. More important than the novelty is the inappropriate use of diuretics to treat lower-extremity edema without first establishing a diagnosis. PMID:28100982

  4. [Ultrasound examination for lower extremity deep vein thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Toyota, Kosaku

    2014-09-01

    Surgery is known to be a major risk factor of vein thrombosis. Progression from lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) to pulmonary embolism can lead to catastrophic outcome, although the incidence ratio is low. The ability to rule in or rule out DVT is becoming essential for anesthesiologists. Non-invasive technique of ultrasonography is a sensitive and specific tool for the assessment of lower extremity DVT. This article introduces the basics and practical methods of ultrasound examination for lower extremity DVT.

  5. Ultrasonography of the lower extremity veins: anatomy and basic approach

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Kyu; Kang, Chang Ho; Cho, Sung Bum

    2017-01-01

    Ultrasonography is an imaging modality widely used to evaluate venous diseases of the lower extremities. It is important to understand the normal venous anatomy of the lower extremities, which has deep, superficial, and perforating venous components, in order to determine the pathophysiology of venous disease. This review provides a basic description of the anatomy of the lower extremity veins and useful techniques for approaching each vein via ultrasonography. PMID:28260355

  6. Lower Extremity Biomechanical Demands During Saut de Chat Leaps.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Danielle N; Kulig, Kornelia

    2016-12-01

    In dance, high demands are placed on the lower extremity joints during jumping tasks. The purpose of this study was to compare biomechanical demands placed on the lower extremity joints during the takeoff and landing phases of saut de chat leaps.

  7. Objective criteria accurately predict amputation following lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Johansen, K; Daines, M; Howey, T; Helfet, D; Hansen, S T

    1990-05-01

    MESS (Mangled Extremity Severity Score) is a simple rating scale for lower extremity trauma, based on skeletal/soft-tissue damage, limb ischemia, shock, and age. Retrospective analysis of severe lower extremity injuries in 25 trauma victims demonstrated a significant difference between MESS values for 17 limbs ultimately salvaged (mean, 4.88 +/- 0.27) and nine requiring amputation (mean, 9.11 +/- 0.51) (p less than 0.01). A prospective trial of MESS in lower extremity injuries managed at two trauma centers again demonstrated a significant difference between MESS values of 14 salvaged (mean, 4.00 +/- 0.28) and 12 doomed (mean, 8.83 +/- 0.53) limbs (p less than 0.01). In both the retrospective survey and the prospective trial, a MESS value greater than or equal to 7 predicted amputation with 100% accuracy. MESS may be useful in selecting trauma victims whose irretrievably injured lower extremities warrant primary amputation.

  8. Lymphedema of the lower extremities: Evaluation by microcolloidal imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Intenzo, C.M.; Desai, A.G.; Kim, S.S.; Park, C.H.; Merli, G.J. )

    1989-02-01

    Contrast lymphangiography has been the traditional radiographic method for imaging the lymphatic system of the lower extremities. Because of the difficulty in performing the procedure and its potential side effects, radionuclide lymphangiography is a safe and reliable alternative. Technetium-99m labeled to antimony trisulfide colloid was used in nine patients presenting with lymphedema of the lower extremities. The procedure was relatively simple to perform, and no adverse effects were noted.

  9. Lymphaticovenous Anastomosis Releases the Lower Extremity Lymphedema-associated Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hisako; Zhou, Han Peng; Tange, Shuichi; Kikuchi, Kazuki

    2017-01-01

    Background: We investigate the effectiveness of lymphaticovenous anastomosis (LVA) in releasing lymphedema-associated pain. Methods: We performed a retrospective analysis. Subjects of this study included lower extremity lymphedema patients who presented persistent and constant degrees of pain in their lower limbs. LVA was performed under local anesthesia. The preoperative lower extremity pain and postoperative lower extremity pain were surveyed using the visual analog scale on a score from 0 to 10. The circumferences of the limbs were also recorded. Results: A total of 8 patients (16 lower limbs) were included. The subjects included 1 man and 7 women, and their average age was 72 years. The average follow-up period was 17 months. The average preoperative and postoperative visual analog scale scores were 5.3 and 1.8, respectively. Moreover, 7 patients who had records of their lower extremity circumference observed an average changing rate of −4.7% in lower extremity lymphedema index after the surgery. Conclusion: LVA can release the pain in the affected limbs of lymphedema. PMID:28203506

  10. A Comprehensive Approach to Lower Extremity Free-tissue Transfer

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this study was to introduce a comprehensive approach to lower extremity free-tissue transfer and report the clinical outcome that has been achieved with this approach. Methods: The comprehensive approach developed by the author includes patient selection, flap selection, selection of the recipient vessels, flap dissection, flap preparation, microvascular anastomosis, flap inset, immediate postoperative care, intermediate postoperative care, and further follow-up care. Each part of this approach has its own special considerations. In an 8-year period, 28 consecutive lower extremity free-tissue transfers were performed in 28 patients by the author. The clinical outcomes were recorded based on the success of free-tissue transfer, any reoperations related to the revision of microvascular anastomosis, and any partial or total flap loss during an 8-year follow-up. Results: All 28 lower extremity free-tissue transfers were performed successfully. All patients were discharged home once they tolerated dangling. No reoperations were needed for revision of microvascular anastomosis. No total or partial flap loss was encountered. Overall success of free-tissue transfer to the lower extremity in this series was 100%. Conclusions: An ideal outcome of free-tissue transfer to the lower extremity can be accomplished with this comprehensive approach developed by the author. With good surgical judgment, adequate microsurgical skill, step-by-step intraoperative execution, and a protocol-driven clinical practice, the reconstructive surgeon should be able to improve his or her success for free-tissue transfer to the lower extremity. PMID:28280670

  11. Lower extremity rotational and angular issues in children.

    PubMed

    Mooney, James F

    2014-12-01

    Familial concern regarding perceived rotational and angular deformities is a common part of any primary care practice. It is essential for the medical practitioner to understand the wide normal range in children and the natural history of lower extremity development over time. Most lower extremity rotational and angular issues in young children resolve spontaneously over time, and require little or no intervention. In the current atmosphere of medical cost containment, coupled with the shortage of pediatric orthopedic surgeons, many of these patients should be managed by the primary care provider and do not require referral for more specialized care.

  12. Compound or Specially Designed Flaps in the Lower Extremities.

    PubMed

    Battiston, Bruno; Ciclamini, Davide; Tang, Jin Bo

    2017-04-01

    Novel and combined tissue transfers from the lower extremity provide new tools to combat soft tissue defects of the hand, foot, and ankle, or fracture nonunion. Flaps can be designed for special purposes, such as providing a gliding bed for a grafted or repaired tendon or for thumb or finger reconstruction. Propeller flaps can cover soft tissue defects of the leg and foot. In repairing severe bone and soft tissue defects of the lower extremity, combined approaches, including external fixators, one-stage vascularized bone grafting, and skin or muscle flap coverage of the traumatized leg and foot, have become popular.

  13. Changing step width alters lower extremity biomechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Brindle, Richard A; Milner, Clare E; Zhang, Songning; Fitzhugh, Eugene C

    2014-01-01

    Step width is a spatiotemporal parameter that may influence lower extremity biomechanics at the hip and knee joint. The purpose of this study was to determine the biomechanical response of the lower extremity joints to step width changes during running. Lower extremity data from 30 healthy runners, half of them male, were collected during running in three step width conditions: preferred, wide, and narrow. Dependent variables and step width were analyzed using a mixed model ANOVA and pairwise t-tests for post hoc comparisons. Step width was successfully altered in the wide and narrow conditions. Generally, frontal plane peak values decreased as step width increased from narrow to preferred to wide. Peak hip adduction and rearfoot eversion angles decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Peak knee abduction moment and knee abduction impulse also decreased as step width increased from narrow to wide. Although men and women ran differently, gender only influenced the effect of step width on peak rearfoot inversion moment. In conclusion, step width influences lower extremity biomechanics in healthy runners. When step width increased from narrow to wide, peak values of frontal plane variables decreased. In addition to previously reported changes at the rearfoot, the hip and knee joint biomechanics were also influenced by changes in step width.

  14. Scintigraphic demonstration of lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Gensburg, R.S.; Kawashima, A.; Sandler, C.M.

    1988-07-01

    The scintigraphic findings on bone imaging in two patients with extensive lower extremity periostitis secondary to venous insufficiency are presented. One of these patients had bilateral disease. The use of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate scanning in an attempt to exclude concurrent osteomyelitis is also addressed.

  15. Relationships Between Lower Extremity Alignment and the Quadriceps Angle

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Boling, Michelle C.; Levine, Beverly; Shultz, Sandra J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine the extent to which select lower extremity alignment characteristics of the pelvis, hip, knee, and foot are related to the Q angle. Design Descriptive cohort study design. Setting Applied Neuromechanics Research Laboratory. Participants Two hundred eighteen participants (102 males, 116 females). Assessment of Risk Factors Eight clinical measures of static alignment of the left lower extremity were measured by a single examiner to determine the impact of lower extremity alignment on the magnitude of Q angle. Main Outcome Measures Q angle, pelvic angle, hip anteversion, tibiofemoral angle, genu recurvatum, tibial torsion, navicular drop, and femur and tibia length. Results Once all alignment variables were accounted for, greater tibiofemoral angle and femoral anteversion were significant predictors of greater Q angle in both males and females. Pelvic angle, genu recurvatum, tibial torsion, navicular drop, and femur to tibia length ratio were not significant independent predictors of Q angle in males or females. Conclusions Greater femoral anteversion and tibiofemoral angle result in greater Q angle, with changes in tibiofemoral angle having a substantially greater impact on the magnitude of the Q angle compared with femoral anteversion. As such, the Q angle seems to largely represent a frontal plane alignment measure. As many knee injuries seem to result from a combination of both frontal and transverse plane motions and forces, this may in part explain why Q angle has been found to be a poor independent predictor of lower extremity injury risk. PMID:19423972

  16. Lower extremity manifestations of nutritional deficiencies in gastrointestinal disease.

    PubMed

    Schiraldi-Deck, F G; Grovit, M; Desai, S N

    1998-07-01

    Voluminous information can be written on the nutritional deficiencies that are secondary to gastrointestinal disease. This highly complicated system, with its immunologic pathogenesis, can affect every system of the body. This article describes how these manifestations of gastrointestinal disease affect the lower extremities.

  17. Adolescent baseball pitching technique: lower extremity biomechanical analysis.

    PubMed

    Milewski, Matthew D; Õunpuu, Sylvia; Solomito, Matthew; Westwell, Melany; Nissen, Carl W

    2012-11-01

    Documentation of the lower extremity motion patterns of adolescent pitchers is an important part of understanding the pitching motion and the implication of lower extremity technique on upper extremity loads, injury and performance. The purpose of this study was to take the initial step in this process by documenting the biomechanics of the lower extremities during the pitching cycle in adolescent pitchers and to compare these findings with the published data for older pitchers. Three-dimensional motion analysis using a comprehensive lower extremity model was used to evaluate the fast ball pitch technique in adolescent pitchers. Thirty-two pitchers with a mean age of 12.4 years (range 10.5-14.7 years) and at least 2 years of experience were included in this study. The pitchers showed a mean of 49 ± 12° of knee flexion of the lead leg at foot contact. They tended to maintain this position through ball release, and then extended their knee during the follow through phase (ball release to maximal internal glenohumeral rotation). The lead leg hip rapidly progressed into adduction and flexion during the arm cocking phase with a range of motion of 40 ± 10° adduction and 30 ± 13° flexion. The lead hip mean peak adduction velocity was 434 ± 83°/s and flexion velocity was 456 ± 156°/s. Simultaneously, the trailing leg hip rapidly extended approaching to a mean peak extension of -8 ± 5° at 39% of the pitch cycle, which is close to passive range of motion constraints. Peak hip abduction of the trailing leg at foot contact was -31 ± 12°, which also approached passive range of motion constraints. Differences and similarities were also noted between the adolescent lower extremity kinematics and adult pitchers; however, a more comprehensive analysis using similar methods is needed for a complete comparison.

  18. Outcomes of lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Baril, Donald T.; Patel, Virendra I.; Judelson, Dejah R.; Goodney, Philip P.; McPhee, James T.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Cronenwett, Jack L.; Schanzer, Andres

    2013-01-01

    Objective Acute limb ischemia remains one of the most challenging emergencies in vascular surgery. Historically, outcomes following interventions for acute limb ischemia have been associated with high rates of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine contemporary outcomes following lower extremity bypass performed for acute limb ischemia. Methods All patients undergoing infrainguinal lower extremity bypass between 2003 and 2011 within hospitals comprising the Vascular Study Group of New England were identified. Patients were stratified according to whether or not the indication for lower extremity bypass was acute limb ischemia. Primary end points included bypass graft occlusion, major amputation, and mortality at 1 year postoperatively as determined by Kaplan-Meier life table analysis. Multivariable Cox proportional hazards models were constructed to evaluate independent predictors of mortality and major amputation at 1 year. Results Of 5712 lower extremity bypass procedures, 323 (5.7%) were performed for acute limb ischemia. Patients undergoing lower extremity bypass for acute limb ischemia were similar in age (66 vs 67; P = .084) and sex (68% male vs 69% male; P = .617) compared with chronic ischemia patients, but were less likely to be on aspirin (63% vs 75%; P < .0001) or a statin (55% vs 68%; P < .0001). Patients with acute limb ischemia were more likely to be current smokers (49% vs 39%; P < .0001), to have had a prior ipsilateral bypass (33% vs 24%; P = .004) or a prior ipsilateral percutaneous intervention (41% vs 29%; P = .001). Bypasses performed for acute limb ischemia were longer in duration (270 vs 244 minutes; P = .007), had greater blood loss (363 vs 272 mL; P < .0001), and more commonly utilized prosthetic conduits (41% vs 33%; P = .003). Acute limb ischemia patients experienced increased in-hospital major adverse events (20% vs 12%; P < .0001) including myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure exacerbation

  19. Physical activity among adult survivors of childhood lower extremity sarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Wampler, Meredith A.; Galantino, Mary Lou; Huang, Sujuan; Gilchrist, Laura S.; Marchese, Victoria G.; Morris, G. Stephen; Scalzitti, David A.; Hudson, Melissa M.; Oeffinger, Kevin C.; Stovall, Marilyn; Leisenring, Wendy M.; Armstrong, Gregory T.; Robison, Leslie L.; Ness, Kirsten K.

    2011-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Adult survivors of childhood lower-extremity sarcoma are largely physically inactive, a behavior which potentially compounds their health burden. Altering this behavior requires understanding those factors that contribute to their physical inactivity. Therefore, this investigation sought to identify factors associated with inactivity in this subpopulation of cancer survivors. METHODS Demographic, personal, treatment and physical activity information from adult survivors of childhood lower-extremity sarcomas was obtained from the Childhood Cancer Survivor Study (CCSS) cohort. Generalized linear models were used to identify variables that best identified those individuals who were physically inactive. RESULTS Only 41% of survivors met Center for Disease Control (CDC) activity guidelines. Survivors were 1.20 (95% CI 1.11–1.30) more likely compared to CCSS sibling cohort and 1.12 (95% CI 1.10–1.15) times more likely than the general population to fail to meet CDC guidelines. Significant predictors of physical inactivity included female sex, hemipelvectomy surgery, and platinum and vinca alkaloid chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS The primary findings of this study are that survivors of childhood onset lower-extremity sarcoma are 1) highly likely to be physically inactive and 2) less likely than their siblings or the general population to regularly exercise. This study has identified treatment related risk factors associated with inactivity that will help health and wellness practitioners develop successful exercise interventions to help these survivors achieve recommended levels of physical activity for health. IMPLICATIONS FOR CANCER SURVIVORS These results suggest that physical activity interventions for adult survivors of childhood lower-extremity sarcomas should be sex specific and responsive to unique physical late effects experienced by these survivors. PMID:21681405

  20. Lower extremity finite element model for crash simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Schauer, D.A.; Perfect, S.A.

    1996-03-01

    A lower extremity model has been developed to study occupant injury mechanisms of the major bones and ligamentous soft tissues resulting from vehicle collisions. The model is based on anatomically correct digitized bone surfaces of the pelvis, femur, patella and the tibia. Many muscles, tendons and ligaments were incrementally added to the basic bone model. We have simulated two types of occupant loading that occur in a crash environment using a non-linear large deformation finite element code. The modeling approach assumed that the leg was passive during its response to the excitation, that is, no active muscular contraction and therefore no active change in limb stiffness. The approach recognized that the most important contributions of the muscles to the lower extremity response are their ability to define and modify the impedance of the limb. When nonlinear material behavior in a component of the leg model was deemed important to response, a nonlinear constitutive model was incorporated. The accuracy of these assumptions can be verified only through a review of analysis results and careful comparison with test data. As currently defined, the model meets the objective for which it was created. Much work remains to be done, both from modeling and analysis perspectives, before the model can be considered complete. The model implements a modeling philosophy that can accurately capture both kinematic and kinetic response of the lower limb. We have demonstrated that the lower extremity model is a valuable tool for understanding the injury processes and mechanisms. We are now in a position to extend the computer simulation to investigate the clinical fracture patterns observed in actual crashes. Additional experience with this model will enable us to make a statement on what measures are needed to significantly reduce lower extremity injuries in vehicle crashes. 6 refs.

  1. Anticipatory Effects on Lower Extremity Neuromechanics During a Cutting Task

    PubMed Central

    Meinerz, Carolyn M.; Malloy, Philip; Geiser, Christopher F.; Kipp, Kristof

    2015-01-01

    Context  Continued research into the mechanism of noncontact anterior cruciate ligament injury helps to improve clinical interventions and injury-prevention strategies. A better understanding of the effects of anticipation on landing neuromechanics may benefit training interventions. Objective  To determine the effects of anticipation on lower extremity neuromechanics during a single-legged land-and-cut task. Design  Controlled laboratory study. Setting  University biomechanics laboratory. Participants  Eighteen female National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I collegiate soccer players (age = 19.7 ± 0.8 years, height = 167.3 ± 6.0 cm, mass = 66.1 ± 2.1 kg). Intervention(s)  Participants performed a single-legged land-and-cut task under anticipated and unanticipated conditions. Main Outcome Measure(s)  Three-dimensional initial contact angles, peak joint angles, and peak internal joint moments and peak vertical ground reaction forces and sagittal-plane energy absorption of the 3 lower extremity joints; muscle activation of selected hip- and knee-joint muscles. Results  Unanticipated cuts resulted in less knee flexion at initial contact and greater ankle toe-in displacement. Unanticipated cuts were also characterized by greater internal hip-abductor and external-rotator moments and smaller internal knee-extensor and external-rotator moments. Muscle-activation profiles during unanticipated cuts were associated with greater activation of the gluteus maximus during the precontact and landing phases. Conclusions  Performing a cutting task under unanticipated conditions changed lower extremity neuromechanics compared with anticipated conditions. Most of the observed changes in lower extremity neuromechanics indicated the adoption of a hip-focused strategy during the unanticipated condition. PMID:26285089

  2. The timing of microsurgical reconstruction in lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Karanas, Yvonne L; Nigriny, John; Chang, James

    2008-01-01

    The timing of post traumatic microsurgical lower extremity reconstruction was defined by Godina in 1986, with recommendations for flap coverage of Gustillo grade IIIb/c fractures within 72 hours of injury. Godina's study showed the highest risk of infection and flap loss in the delayed period (72 hours-90 days). Subsequent authors have also cited lower rates of flap loss and infection when repair was performed "early". However, the definition of "early" remains ambiguous. We hypothesized that definitive debridement with optimal dressing care, meticulous microsurgical treatment planning, and vessel anastomoses outside of the zone of injury would allow for delayed reconstruction with high success rates. A retrospective review of 14 lower extremity reconstructions with free flaps was undertaken over a 4-year period. All patients underwent reconstruction in the delayed (>72 hours) period. There were no flap losses and one case of late osteomyelitis. We conclude that lower extremity reconstruction can be performed safely and effectively in the "delayed" period to allow for wound debridement, stabilization of other injuries, and transfer to a microsurgical facility.

  3. Joint swelling

    MedlinePlus

    Swelling of a joint ... Joint swelling may occur along with joint pain . The swelling may cause the joint to appear larger or abnormally shaped. Joint swelling can cause pain or stiffness. After an ...

  4. Exercise Sandals Increase Lower Extremity Electromyographic Activity During Functional Activities

    PubMed Central

    Hirth, Christopher J.; Guskiewicz, Kevin M.

    2003-01-01

    Objective: Anecdotal evidence suggests that use of Exercise Sandals results in a number of positive clinical outcomes. However, little research has been conducted to determine their efficacy objectively. Our purposes were to determine the effect of Exercise Sandals on lower leg electromyography (EMG) during activities in the Exercise Sandals and to compare EMG associated with Exercise Sandals with traditional lower extremity rehabilitation exercises. Design and Setting: Two within-subjects, repeated-measures designs were used to identify differences in lower extremity EMG: (1) between activities with and without Exercise Sandals and (2) between Exercise Sandals activities and traditional rehabilitation activities. All data were collected in the Sports Medicine Research Laboratory. Subjects: Eighteen subjects involved in rehabilitation using Exercise Sandals for at least 2 weeks within the year before data collection. Measurements: Mean EMG amplitudes from the tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, soleus, and lateral gastrocnemius muscles were measured during single-leg stance, side stepping, and “high knees,” all performed with and without the Exercise Sandals, as well as single-leg stance on a foam surface and T-band kicks in the sagittal and frontal planes. Results: Exercise Sandals increased lower leg EMG activity, particularly in the ankle invertors and evertors. Also, activities involving the Exercise Sandals resulted in EMG activity similar to or exceeding that associated with traditional ankle-rehabilitation exercises. Conclusions: These results, coupled with the fact that Exercise Sandals are used in a functional closed kinetic chain manner, suggest that they are an effective means of increasing lower extremity muscle activity. PMID:14608427

  5. Gas gangrene without wound: both lower extremities affected simultaneously.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jun; Wu, Xiao-Tao; Kong, Xiang-Fei; Tang, Wen-Hao; Cheng, Jian-Ming; Wang, Hai-Liang

    2008-10-01

    Gas gangrene is a necrotizing soft tissue infection characterized by muscular necrosis and gas formation. It develops quickly and can cause septic shock and death. In adults, gas gangrene used to be a well-known complication of war wounds. Recently, cases of spontaneous or nontraumatic gas gangrene have been reported in both adults and children. We report a case of nontraumatic gas gangrene involving both the lower extremities simultaneously. Pathogenesis of this fatal soft tissue infection is discussed.We also review the diagnosis and treatment aspects of this entity.

  6. Role of vascularized bone grafts in lower extremity osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Yuan-Kun; Yen, Cheng-Yo

    2007-01-01

    Vascularized bone grafting seems to be a valuable reconstructive technique for the treatment of osteomyelitis with skeletal defects greater than 6 cm in length. Fibular osteocutaneous, composite rib, and iliac osteocutaneous flaps are the most commonly used vascularized bone grafts clinically. Vascularized bone can obliterate dead space, bridge large bone defects, enhance bone healing, resist infection by ensuring blood supply, allow early rehabilitation, and ensure better clinical outcomes in the treatment of lower extremity osteomyelitis. Success rates range from 80% to 95%. Complications of surgery include anastomosis failure, donor site problems, and fracture of the grafted bone.

  7. Unusual cause of lower extremity wounds: Cobb syndrome.

    PubMed

    Abtahi-Naeini, Bahareh; Saffaei, Ali; Pourazizi, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    Cobb syndrome (Cutaneomeningospinal Angiomatosis) is a rare segmental neurocutaneous syndrome associated with metameric cutaneous and spinal cord arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). In this syndrome, capillary malformation or angiokeratoma-like lesions are formed in a dermatomal distribution, with an AVM in the corresponding segment of the spinal cord. The spinal cord lesions can cause neurological disorder and paraplegia, which typically develop during young adulthood. We report a 32-year-old male with the Cobb syndrome associated with lower extremity painful wounds and acute-onset paraplegia due to metameric vascular malformations.

  8. Chronic edema of the lower extremities: international consensus recommendations for compression therapy clinical research trials.

    PubMed

    Stout, N; Partsch, H; Szolnoky, G; Forner-Cordero, I; Mosti, G; Mortimer, P; Flour, M; Damstra, R; Piller, N; Geyer, M J; Benigni, J-P; Moffat, C; Cornu-Thenard, A; Schingale, F; Clark, M; Chauveau, M

    2012-08-01

    Chronic edema is a multifactorial condition affecting patients with various diseases. Although the pathophysiology of edema varies, compression therapy is a basic tenant of treatment, vital to reducing swelling. Clinical trials are disparate or lacking regarding specific protocols and application recommendations for compression materials and methodology to enable optimal efficacy. Compression therapy is a basic treatment modality for chronic leg edema; however, the evidence base for the optimal application, duration and intensity of compression therapy is lacking. The aim of this document was to present the proceedings of a day-long international expert consensus group meeting that examined the current state of the science for the use of compression therapy in chronic edema. An expert consensus group met in Brighton, UK, in March 2010 to examine the current state of the science for compression therapy in chronic edema of the lower extremities. Panel discussions and open space discussions examined the current literature, clinical practice patterns, common materials and emerging technologies for the management of chronic edema. This document outlines a proposed clinical research agenda focusing on compression therapy in chronic edema. Future trials comparing different compression devices, materials, pressures and parameters for application are needed to enhance the evidence base for optimal chronic oedema management. Important outcomes measures and methods of pressure and oedema quantification are outlined. Future trials are encouraged to optimize compression therapy in chronic edema of the lower extremities.

  9. Wound size measurement of lower extremity ulcers using segmentation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dadkhah, Arash; Pang, Xing; Solis, Elizabeth; Fang, Ruogu; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity ulcers are one of the most common complications that not only affect many people around the world but also have huge impact on economy since a large amount of resources are spent for treatment and prevention of the diseases. Clinical studies have shown that reduction in the wound size of 40% within 4 weeks is an acceptable progress in the healing process. Quantification of the wound size plays a crucial role in assessing the extent of healing and determining the treatment process. To date, wound healing is visually inspected and the wound size is measured from surface images. The extent of wound healing internally may vary from the surface. A near-infrared (NIR) optical imaging approach has been developed for non-contact imaging of wounds internally and differentiating healing from non-healing wounds. Herein, quantitative wound size measurements from NIR and white light images are estimated using a graph cuts and region growing image segmentation algorithms. The extent of the wound healing from NIR imaging of lower extremity ulcers in diabetic subjects are quantified and compared across NIR and white light images. NIR imaging and wound size measurements can play a significant role in potentially predicting the extent of internal healing, thus allowing better treatment plans when implemented for periodic imaging in future.

  10. MRI of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children

    PubMed Central

    Aydıngöz, Üstün; Özdemir, Zeynep Maraş; Güneş, Altan; Ergen, Fatma Bilge

    2016-01-01

    Although generally more common in adults, lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes are also observed in the pediatric age group. Encompassing femoroacetabular impingement, iliopsoas impingement, subspine impingement, and ischiofemoral impingement around the hip; patellar tendon–lateral femoral condyle friction syndrome; iliotibial band friction syndrome; and medial synovial plica syndrome in the knee as well as talocalcaneal impingement on the hindfoot, these syndromes frequently cause pain and may mimic other, and occasionally more ominous, conditions in children. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) plays a key role in the diagnosis of musculoskeletal impingement and friction syndromes. Iliopsoas, subspine, and ischiofemoral impingements have been recently described, while some features of femoroacetabular and talocalcaneal impingements have recently gained increased relevance in the pediatric population. Fellowship-trained pediatric radiologists and radiologists with imaging workloads of exclusively or overwhelmingly pediatric patients (particularly those without a structured musculoskeletal imaging program as part of their imaging training) specifically need to be aware of these rare syndromes that mostly have quite characteristic imaging findings. This review highlights MRI features of lower extremity impingement and friction syndromes in children and provides updated pertinent pathophysiologic and clinical data. PMID:27538047

  11. Clinical challenge: cutaneous Kaposi's sarcoma of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Erika L; Pierpont, Yvonne N; Donate, Guillermo; Hiro, Mattew H; Mannari, Rudolph J; Strickland, Theodore J; Robson, Martin C; Payne, Wyatt G

    2011-04-01

    Kaposi's sarcoma (KS) typically presents as multiple bilateral cutaneous patches or plaques of the lower extremities. This malignancy, however, can evolve with atypical presentation masquerading as a chronic wound. Lesions can mimic venous stasis ulcers, arterial insufficiency, vascular ulcers or chronic-infected wounds. With acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-associated KS, lesions are even more widespread, and can affect the respiratory tract, lymph nodes, gastrointestinal tract, spleen, liver and, rarely, bone. As the initial diagnosis of KS is generally determined clinically, a high index of suspicion is necessary for all patients with a known or suspected history of HIV/AIDS. Tissue biopsy with histological analysis is essential for all wound types in this patient subset, regardless of wound presentation. The purpose of this report is to review the pathogenesis as well as the typical and atypical presentations of KS with an example of a diagnostic dilemma.

  12. First successful lower-extremity transplantation: technique and functional result.

    PubMed

    Zuker, Ronald M; Redett, Rick; Alman, Ben; Coles, John G; Timoney, Norma; Ein, Sigmund H

    2006-05-01

    Composite tissue transplantation has emerged as a viable alternative to prosthetics and complex reconstructive surgery. Thus far it is reserved for cases which cannot be effectively reconstructed and where it offers some benefits over prostheses. It has been used in the upper extremity with encouraging results and, most recently, in the face. This report outlines what is believed to be the first such use in the lower extremity. A normal lower limb in a 3-month-old ischiopagus twin who was not going to survive was transplanted to the appropriate pelvic position, revascularized, and reinnervated in an otherwise healthy sister. The limb survived and, because of the immune compatibility, did not require immune suppressive therapy. The return of muscle function in the transplanted limb is encouraging. The transplanted limb appears to be fully sensate. In addition to reinnervation, the limb is now spontaneously under the cortical control of the recipient.

  13. Predicting Functional Status Following Amputation After Lower Extremity Bypass

    PubMed Central

    Suckow, Bjoern D.; Goodney, Philip P.; Cambria, Robert A.; Bertges, Daniel J.; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Indes, Jeffrey E.; Schanzer, Andres; Stone, David H.; Kraiss, Larry W.; Cronenwett, Jack L.

    2012-01-01

    Background Some patients who undergo lower extremity bypass (LEB) for critical limb ischemia ultimately require amputation. The functional outcome achieved by these patients after amputation is not well known. Therefore, we sought to characterize the functional outcome of patients who undergo amputation after LEB, and to describe the pre- and perioperative factors associated with independent ambulation at home after lower extremity amputation. Methods Within a cohort of 3,198 patients who underwent an LEB between January, 2003 and December, 2008, we studied 436 patients who subsequently received an above-knee (AK), below-knee (BK), or minor (forefoot or toe) ipsilateral or contralateral amputation. Our main outcome measure consisted of a “good functional outcome,” defined as living at home and ambulating independently. We calculated univariate and multivariate associations among patient characteristics and our main outcome measure, as well as overall survival. Results Of the 436 patients who underwent amputation within the first year following LEB, 224 of 436 (51.4%) had a minor amputation, 105 of 436 (24.1%) had a BK amputation, and 107 of 436 (24.5%) had an AK amputation. The majority of AK (75 of 107, 72.8%) and BK amputations (72 of 105, 70.6%) occurred in the setting of bypass graft thrombosis, whereas nearly all minor amputations (200 of 224, 89.7%) occurred with a patent bypass graft. By life-table analysis at 1 year, we found that the proportion of surviving patients with a good functional outcome varied by the presence and extent of amputation (proportion surviving with good functional outcome = 88% no amputation, 81% minor amputation, 55% BK amputation, and 45% AK amputation, p = 0.001). Among those analyzed at long-term follow-up, survival was slightly lower for those who had a minor amputation when compared with those who did not receive an amputation after LEB (81 vs. 88%, p = 0.02). Survival among major amputation patients did not significantly

  14. Normal venous anatomy and physiology of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Notowitz, L B

    1993-06-01

    Venous disease of the lower extremities is common but is often misunderstood. It seems that the focus is on the exciting world of arterial anatomy and pathology, while the topic of venous anatomy and pathology comes in second place. However, venous diseases such as chronic venous insufficiency, leg ulcers, and varicose veins affect much of the population and may lead to disability and death. Nurses are often required to answer complex questions from the patients and his or her family about the patient's disease. Patients depend on nurses to provide accurate information in terms they can understand. Therefore it is important to have an understanding of the normal venous system of the legs before one can understand the complexities of venous diseases and treatments. This presents an overview of normal venous anatomy and physiology.

  15. Incorporating kettlebells into a lower extremity sports rehabilitation program.

    PubMed

    Brumitt, Jason; En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith; Meira, Erik P

    2010-12-01

    The primary goal of a sports rehabilitation program is to return the injured athlete back to competition as quickly and as safely as possible. Sports physical therapists utilize a variety of exercise equipment to help an athlete restore function after an injury. An injured athlete's therapeutic exercise program frequently includes the prescription of functional strengthening and power exercises during the later stages of rehabilitation. One piece of exercise equipment, the kettlebell, has gained popularity for its ability to allow the user to perform functional power exercises. The unique exercises that can be performed with kettlebells may have utility in sports physical therapy practice. This clinical suggestion outlines the clinical rationale for the inclusion of kettlebell exercises when rehabilitating an athlete with a lower extremity injury.

  16. INCORPORATING KETTLEBELLS INTO A LOWER EXTREMITY SPORTS REHABILITATION PROGRAM

    PubMed Central

    En Gilpin, Hui; Brunette, Meredith; Meira, Erik P.

    2010-01-01

    The primary goal of a sports rehabilitation program is to return the injured athlete back to competition as quickly and as safely as possible. Sports physical therapists utilize a variety of exercise equipment to help an athlete restore function after an injury. An injured athlete's therapeutic exercise program frequently includes the prescription of functional strengthening and power exercises during the later stages of rehabilitation. One piece of exercise equipment, the kettlebell, has gained popularity for its ability to allow the user to perform functional power exercises. The unique exercises that can be performed with kettlebells may have utility in sports physical therapy practice. This clinical suggestion outlines the clinical rationale for the inclusion of kettlebell exercises when rehabilitating an athlete with a lower extremity injury. PMID:21655384

  17. Lower extremity and carotid artery disease in COPD

    PubMed Central

    Linnhoff, Fabian; van Essen, Fabian; Pingel, Simon; Schaefer, Christian Alexander; Schahab, Nadjib; Fimmers, Rolf; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk

    2016-01-01

    In view of their common chronic inflammatory process, we sought to determine the linkage between peripheral artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 107 COPD patients (mean±sd age 64.6±10.4 years, 52.2% male) and 22 control smokers without previously diagnosed peripheral artery disease underwent standardised angiological examination for lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) and carotid artery disease. LEAD was significantly more prevalent in COPD patients than in controls (80.4% versus 54.5%, p=0.002). Among COPD patients, 57.0%, 12.2%, 10.3% and 0.9% were found to be in Fontaine stages I, IIA, IIB and III, respectively. As with carotid artery disease, its frequency increased from 36.4% in controls to 58.9% in COPD patients (p=0.003). Carotid plaque burden, LEAD Fontaine degrees as well as pulse wave index and ankle–brachial index manifested significant impairment over percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 % pred) (p=0.02, p<0.001, p=0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease status was the strongest independent predictor for the presence of plaque in lower extremity arteries (odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.19–2.25, p=0.003) and carotids (odds ratio 1.66, 95% CI 1.14–2.44, p=0.009). As compared with control smokers, peripheral artery disease is diagnosed in a sizeable proportion of COPD patients and exhibits significant distributive differences over FEV1 % pred that exceed the susceptibility conferred by common cardiovascular stressors. PMID:28053972

  18. Development of HIFU Treatment for Lower Extremity Varicose Veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senoo, Naohiko; Ushijima, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Jun; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Deguchi, Juno; Takagi, Shu; Miyata, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) has recently been developed as a noninvasive therapeutic method. In our study, a novel noninvasive therapy with HIFU was proposed for occlusion of lower extremity varicose veins. The temperature increase caused by HIFU is used to occlude varicose veins. Occluded veins became fibrotic, resulting in complete recovery. Our final goal is the medical application of HIFU treatment for varicose veins. In this study, we attempted to occlude the veins of rabbits. Prior to venous occlusion experiments, the area heated by HIFU was investigated using bovine serum albumin (BSA) gel, which denatures at >70 °C. The results indicate that the size of the heated area mainly depends on intensity at the focal point and the exposure time. A tendency was also seen for the heated area to extend toward the transducer with increasing exposure time. In animal experiments, skin burns during HIFU exposure represented a critical problem. We therefore examined the safe range of HIFU intensities in abdominal exposure experiments before conducting venous occlusion experiments. The ultrasound frequency was 1.7 MHz. Intensity at the focal point was 900 W/cm2, and the exposure time was 20 s. Rabbits underwent chemical depilation and echo gel was applied to the exposed skin to fill the boundary gap. Target veins were compressed during HIFU exposure to avoid thermal dissipation, and hyaluronan water solution was injected between the veins and skin to maintain the distance between the skin and veins at ≥5 mm. Veins were then exposed to HIFU and occluded. The capability of HIFU treatment to occlude lower extremity varicose veins was verified by the present study.

  19. Lower extremity and carotid artery disease in COPD.

    PubMed

    Pizarro, Carmen; Linnhoff, Fabian; van Essen, Fabian; Pingel, Simon; Schaefer, Christian Alexander; Schahab, Nadjib; Fimmers, Rolf; Nickenig, Georg; Skowasch, Dirk

    2016-10-01

    In view of their common chronic inflammatory process, we sought to determine the linkage between peripheral artery disease and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). 107 COPD patients (mean±sd age 64.6±10.4 years, 52.2% male) and 22 control smokers without previously diagnosed peripheral artery disease underwent standardised angiological examination for lower extremity artery disease (LEAD) and carotid artery disease. LEAD was significantly more prevalent in COPD patients than in controls (80.4% versus 54.5%, p=0.002). Among COPD patients, 57.0%, 12.2%, 10.3% and 0.9% were found to be in Fontaine stages I, IIA, IIB and III, respectively. As with carotid artery disease, its frequency increased from 36.4% in controls to 58.9% in COPD patients (p=0.003). Carotid plaque burden, LEAD Fontaine degrees as well as pulse wave index and ankle-brachial index manifested significant impairment over percentage predicted forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 % pred) (p=0.02, p<0.001, p=0.01 and p<0.001, respectively). Multivariate analysis revealed that COPD Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease status was the strongest independent predictor for the presence of plaque in lower extremity arteries (odds ratio 1.63, 95% CI 1.19-2.25, p=0.003) and carotids (odds ratio 1.66, 95% CI 1.14-2.44, p=0.009). As compared with control smokers, peripheral artery disease is diagnosed in a sizeable proportion of COPD patients and exhibits significant distributive differences over FEV1 % pred that exceed the susceptibility conferred by common cardiovascular stressors.

  20. Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Tendinopathies in Military Personnel

    PubMed Central

    Owens, Brett D.; Wolf, Jennifer Moriatis; Seelig, Amber D.; Jacobson, Isabel G.; Boyko, Edward J.; Smith, Besa; Ryan, Margaret A.K.; Gackstetter, Gary D.; Smith, Tyler C.; Bagnell, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    Background: Overuse injuries have a significant impact on United States military service members, but research to date has been limited in its ability to assess occupational and behavioral risk factors. Hypothesis/Purpose: To prospectively identify risk factors for the development of lower extremity tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis in United States military personnel. Study Design: Descriptive epidemiology study. Methods: Baseline data from the Millennium Cohort Study, a long-term observational cohort of military personnel, were utilized. Service members were enrolled in the cohort in 2001, 2004, and 2007. A total of 80,106 active-duty personnel were followed over 1 year for the development of patellar tendinopathy, Achilles tendinopathy, and plantar fasciitis. Regression analyses were used to estimate significant associations between each tendinopathy, plantar fasciitis, and demographic, behavioral, and occupational characteristics. Results: Using medical records, 450 cases of Achilles tendinitis, 584 cases of patellar tendinopathy, and 1228 cases of plantar fasciitis were identified. Recent deployment was associated with an increased risk for developing plantar fasciitis (adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.27; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.04-1.56). Moderate weekly alcohol consumption was marginally associated with an increased risk for Achilles tendinopathy (AOR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.00-1.76). Overweight or obese individuals were more likely to develop Achilles tendinopathy and plantar fasciitis. Conclusion: Lower extremity tendinopathies and plantar fasciitis are common among military service members, and this study identified several modifiable risk factors for their occurrence. These potential risk factors could serve as the focus for future preventive and intervention studies. PMID:26535232

  1. Lower Extremity Overuse Conditions Affecting Figure Skaters During Daily Training

    PubMed Central

    Campanelli, Valentina; Piscitelli, Francesco; Verardi, Luciano; Maillard, Pauline; Sbarbati, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Background Most ice figure skaters train and compete with ongoing issues in the lower extremities, which are often overlooked by the skaters and considered injuries only when they prevent the athletes from skating. Although not severe, these conditions impair the quality of daily training and compromise the skaters’ state of mind and performances. Purpose (1) To determine the point prevalence of the ongoing lower extremity overuse conditions in a population of ice figure skaters of all ages and levels and (2) to identify the risk factors contributing to the development of the most common ongoing conditions. Study Design Cross-sectional study; Level of evidence, 3. Methods A total of 95 skaters of all ages and skating levels were evaluated in a single examination in the middle of the competitive season. Data collection consisted of a questionnaire, clinical examination, and measurement of the skaters’ characteristics and the equipment used. Results Retrocalcaneal bursitis was the most common problem, affecting at least 1 foot in 34% of the skaters evaluated, followed by posterior heel skin calluses and superficial calcaneal bursitis, which affected 29% and 28% of skaters, respectively. The prevalence of the majority of these conditions was 10% to 32% higher in elite skaters than in nonelite skaters. Higher boot–foot length difference was associated with greater risk of superficial calcaneal bursitis in the landing foot of elite skaters, while higher body weight and greater in-skate ankle flexibility were associated with the development of retrocalcaneal bursitis in nonelite skaters. Only 30 skaters (32%) wore the appropriate boot size, while 57 skaters (51%) could not dorsiflex their ankles properly while wearing skates. Conclusion The heel represents a major area of concern for the high prevalence of calcaneal bursitis and calluses in proximity of the Achilles tendon, suggesting that improvements on the boot heel cup design should take priority. The

  2. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-10-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients' functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients' self-care ability.

  3. Nursing assessment of injuries to the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Wassel, A

    1981-12-01

    When assessing injuries to the lower extremity, they can best be discussed if divided into two groups: (1) vehicular or crushing injuries; and (2) nonvehicular, torsion, or overuse injuries. Vehicular injuries require speedy, accurate assessment as they are often complex and frequently involve other systems. The patient is initially stabilized, then assessment of orthopedic problems is begun. The nurse's role is an assistive one. If the patient is admitted to the hospital, orthopedic care involves prevention of complications, reduction of pain, and assisting the patient in daily activities. Nonvehicular injuries are more chronic in nature. The patient may have unsuccessfully ignored the problem, tried home remedies, or attempted to work with it. At this point, they are seen in the physician's office, hoping for a cure. After diagnosis, proper instruction for a rehabilitation program is begun. Treatment for a sprain, strain, or overuse syndrome can often be done at home. An active program should be encouraged and the patient should be taught why the problem occurred initially and how it can be prevented in the future.

  4. Rehabilitation for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fangyong; Hong, Yi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To study the characteristics and treatment strategy for patients with paraplegia and lower extremity amputation. [Subjects] Six cases were selected from among the patients admitted to the China Rehabilitation Research Center from 1991 to 2014. The criteria for the six cases were spinal cord injury with amputation immediately or in a short time (1 week) after the trauma. [Methods] General information, clinical diagnosis, treatment, rehabilitation and other data were analyzed. [Results] All the six cases were injured by high energy or complex energy accidents: two cases by falls after high voltage electric shock, one by an oil pipeline explosion, one by the impact of a falling tower crane and received high energy traffic accident injuries (one was hit by a train, and the other was hit by a truck at high speed). All the six cases had thoracic and lumbar vertebral injuries and complete paraplegia. Amputation stump infection occurred in four cases. After comprehensive rehabilitation treatment, patients’ functional independence measure (FIM) scores improved significantly, but American Spinal Injury Association (ASIA) scores and ASIA Impairment Scale (AIS) grades showed no significant improvement. [Conclusion] When formulating the clinical treatment and rehabilitation for spinal cord injury with amputation patients, simultaneous consideration of the characteristics of the spinal cord injury and amputation is needed to develop an individualized strategy. For spinal cord injury with limb amputation patients, prostheses should allow the improvement of patients’ self-care ability. PMID:26644641

  5. Stenting for Peripheral Artery Disease of the Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Executive Summary Background Objective In January 2010, the Medical Advisory Secretariat received an application from University Health Network to provide an evidentiary platform on stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease. The purpose of this health technology assessment is to examine the effectiveness of primary stenting as a treatment management for peripheral artery disease of the lower extremities. Clinical Need: Condition and Target Population Peripheral artery disease (PAD) is a progressive disease occurring as a result of plaque accumulation (atherosclerosis) in the arterial system that carries blood to the extremities (arms and legs) as well as vital organs. The vessels that are most affected by PAD are the arteries of the lower extremities, the aorta, the visceral arterial branches, the carotid arteries and the arteries of the upper limbs. In the lower extremities, PAD affects three major arterial segments i) aortic-iliac, ii) femoro-popliteal (FP) and iii) infra-popliteal (primarily tibial) arteries. The disease is commonly classified clinically as asymptomatic claudication, rest pain and critical ischemia. Although the prevalence of PAD in Canada is not known, it is estimated that 800,000 Canadians have PAD. The 2007 Trans Atlantic Intersociety Consensus (TASC) II Working Group for the Management of Peripheral Disease estimated that the prevalence of PAD in Europe and North America to be 27 million, of whom 88,000 are hospitalizations involving lower extremities. A higher prevalence of PAD among elderly individuals has been reported to range from 12% to 29%. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) estimated that the prevalence of PAD is 14.5% among individuals 70 years of age and over. Modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors associated with PAD include advanced age, male gender, family history, smoking, diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia. PAD is a strong predictor of myocardial infarction (MI

  6. Lower extremity muscular strength, sedentary behavior, and mortality.

    PubMed

    Loprinzi, Paul D

    2016-04-01

    To examine whether lower extremity strength (LES) is predictive of all-cause mortality, independent of physical activity and among those with vary levels of sedentary behavior. Data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was used (N = 2768; 50-85 years). Peak isokinetic knee extensor strength was objectively measured, sedentary behavior and physical activity were self-reported, and mortality was assessed via the National Death Index, with follow-up through 2011. Participants were followed for up to 12.6 years with the weighted average follow-up period lasting 9.9 years (standard error, 1.13). In the sample, 321,996 person-months occurred with a mortality rate of 2.1 deaths per 1000 person-months. After adjustments (including physical activity), for every 15 N increase in LES, participants had a 7 % reduced risk of all-cause mortality (HR = 0.93; 95 % CI 0.91-0.95; P < 0.001). When adding a three-level sedentary behavior variable (< 2, 2-4, 5+ h/day) as a covariate in this model, results were unchanged (HR = 0.93; 95 % CI 0.92-0.96; P < 0.001). Similarly, when sedentary behavior was included as a continuous covariate in the model, results regarding the relationship between LES and mortality were unchanged (HR = 0.94; 95 % CI 0.91-0.96; P < 0.001). There was no evidence of statistical interaction between LES and sedentary behavior on all-cause mortality (HRinteraction = 1.01; 95 % CI 0.92-1.10; P = 0.88). LES was inversely associated with all-cause mortality, and this association was unchanged when considering the participant's sedentary behavior.

  7. Reoperative lower extremity revascularization with cadaver vein for limb salvage.

    PubMed

    Bannazadeh, Mohsen; Sarac, Timur P; Bena, James; Srivastava, Sunita; Ouriel, Kenneth; Clair, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated our experience using cryopreserved cadaver vein allografts (CVGs) for infrageniculate revascularization in patients with a history of failed bypass or no suitable autogenous vein. Records of all patients who underwent lower extremity revascularization with CVG for critical limb ischemia were reviewed. Patient demographics, vessel treated, and postoperative course were analyzed. Patients who had a redo cadaver vein bypass were compared to those with a first-time cadaver vein bypass. Cumulative patency rates, limb salvage, mortality, and factors associated with outcomes were determined using the Kaplan-Meier method with Cox proportional hazards. Between January 2000 and December 2006, 66 CVGs were done in 56 patients out of 1,726 total bypasses. There were 36 men and 20 women, and the mean age was 71.67 +/- 10.50 years. Mean follow-up was 12.12 +/- 14.16 months. Seventy-eight percent of patients had previous bypasses, and 50% of all failed bypasses were failed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene bypasses. Operative indications were tissue loss (73%) and ischemic rest pain (27%). The mean preoperative ankle-brachial index was 0.43 +/- 0.16, and this increased to 0.89 +/- 0.18 at 30 days (p = 0.001). Procedure-related complications included graft infection (3, 4%), graft thrombosis (3, 4%), pseudoaneurysm (3, 4%), and bleeding (2, 3%). Cumulative 1-year primary, primary assisted, secondary patencies, limb salvage, and survival rates with confidence intervals were 0.19 (0.10-0.36), 0.29 (0.18-0.47), 0.42 (0.29-0.60), 0.73 (0.62-0.86), and 0.77 (0.65-0.90). Reoperative procedures fared the same as primary procedures. Multivariable analysis showed that predictors for increased risk of secondary patency loss were age >70 (hazard ratio [HR] = 3.13, p = 0.009) and patients with secondary revascularization (HR = 3.36, p = 0.015). Older patients (HR = 2.92, p = 0.042) and those with renal insufficiency (HR = 2.92, p = 0.019) were at increased risk of mortality. CVG

  8. Weight Lifting in Patients With Lower Extremity Lymphedema Secondary to Cancer: A Pilot and Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Katz, Elana; Dugan, Nicole L; Cohn, Joy C.; Chu, Christina; Smith, Rebecca G.; Schmitz, Kathryn H.

    2010-01-01

    Objective To assess the feasibility of recruiting and retaining cancer survivors with lower limb lymphedema into an exercise intervention study. To develop preliminary estimates regarding the safety and efficacy of this intervention. We hypothesized that progressive weight training would not exacerbate leg swelling and that the intervention would improve functional mobility and quality of life. Design Before-after pilot study of 5 months duration. Setting University of Pennsylvania Participants Cancer survivors with a known diagnosis of lower limb lymphedema (N=10) were directly referred by University of Pennsylvania clinicians. All 10 participants completed the study. Intervention Twice weekly slowly progressive weight-lifting, supervised for 2 months, unsupervised for 3 months. Main Outcome Measures The primary outcome was interlimb volume differences as measured by optoelectronic perometry. Additional outcome measures included safety (adverse events), muscle strength, objective physical function, and quality of life. Results Interlimb volume differences were 44.4 and 45.3% at baseline and 5 months, respectively (pre-post comparison, p = 0.70). There were 2 unexpected incident cases of cellulitus within the first two months. Both resolved with oral antibiotics and complete decongestive therapy by 5 months. Bench and leg press strength increased by 47% and 27% over 5 months (p = 0.001 and p = 0.07, respectively). Distance walked in 6 minutes increased by 7% in 5 months (p = 0.01). No improvement was noted in self-reported quality of life. Conclusions Recruitment of patients with lower limb lymphedema into an exercise program is feasible. Despite some indications that the intervention may be safe (e.g., a lack of clinically significant interlimb volume increases over 5 months), the unexpected finding of two cellulitic infections among the 10 participants suggests additional study is required before concluding lower extremity lymphedema patients can safely perform

  9. The Effects of Load Carriage and Muscle Fatigue on Lower-Extremity Joint Mechanics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, He; Frame, Jeff; Ozimek, Elicia; Leib, Daniel; Dugan, Eric L.

    2013-01-01

    Military personnel are commonly afflicted by lower-extremity overuse injuries. Load carriage and muscular fatigue are major stressors during military basic training. Purpose: To examine effects of load carriage and muscular fatigue on lower-extremity joint mechanics during walking. Method: Eighteen men performed the following tasks: unloaded…

  10. Lower-extremity overuse injury and use of foot orthotic devices in women's basketball.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Walter L; Raedeke, Susanne G

    2006-01-01

    One hundred thirty-two female basketball players were observed for lower-extremity overuse injury between 1993 and 2004. Athletes studied between 1993 and 1996 did not receive foot orthotic devices and composed the control group. The treatment group comprised athletes studied between 1996 and 2004. Athletes in the treatment group were given a foot orthotic device before participation in basketball. Data analysis included lower-extremity overuse injury rates and the effect of foot orthotic devices on lower-extremity overuse injury rates by means of an incidence density ratio. The control group had a lower-extremity overuse injury rate of 5.37 per 1,000 exposures, and the treatment group had a rate of 6.44 per 1,000 exposures. The incidence density ratio was not significant (P = .44). This study rejects the concept that foot orthotic devices may assist in prevention of lower-extremity overuse injury in female basketball players.

  11. Leg Swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... swelling. References Sterns RH. Pathophysiology and etiology of edema in adults. www.uptodate.com/home. Accessed Dec. 29, 2016. Edema. Merck Manual Professional Version. http://www.merckmanuals.com/ ...

  12. Difficulty with daily activities involving the lower extremities in people with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Poole, Janet L; Brandenstein, Jane

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the extent of lower extremity impairments in motion and strength in people with systemic sclerosis and the relationships of the impairments to limitations in activities of daily living primarily involving the lower extremities. Participants were 69 persons with SSc who received evaluations of lower extremity joint motion (Keitel function test), strength (timed-stands test), and basic mobility (timed up and go test) and completed a demographic questionnaire regarding symptoms in the lower extremities. Activity limitations were measured by the Rheumatoid and Arthritis Outcome Score (RAOS) which examines functional ability, pain, and quality of life. The participants had difficulty with items requiring external rotation of the hips and lower extremity strength. There were moderate correlations between the impairment measures of joint motion, strength, mobility, and activity limitations. Fair correlations were found between the skin scores and the RAOS sections except for pain. The results of this study show that lower extremity involvement is present in persons with SSc. The findings, regarding strength, mobility, and joint motion are related to the ability to perform everyday activities involving the lower extremities, suggest that these areas should be targeted for intervention in persons with SSc.

  13. Necrotizing Fasciitis of the Lower Extremity Caused by Serratia marcescens A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Heigh, Evelyn G; Maletta-Bailey, April; Haight, John; Landis, Gregg S

    2016-03-01

    Necrotizing fasciitis is a rare and potentially fatal infection, with mortality of up to 30%. This case report describes a patient recovering from a laryngectomy for laryngeal squamous cell cancer who developed nosocomial necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity due to Serratia marcescens . Only eight cases of necrotizing fasciitis exclusive to the lower extremity due to S marcescens have been previously reported. Patients with S marcescens necrotizing fasciitis of the lower extremity often have multiple comorbidities, are frequently immunosuppressed, and have a strikingly high mortality rate.

  14. Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries: anatomy and scanning guidelines

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries is a valuable technique, although it is less frequently indicated for peripheral arterial disease than for deep vein thrombosis or varicose veins. Ultrasonography can diagnose stenosis through the direct visualization of plaques and through the analysis of the Doppler waveforms in stenotic and poststenotic arteries. To perform Doppler ultrasonography of the lower extremity arteries, the operator should be familiar with the arterial anatomy of the lower extremities, basic scanning techniques, and the parameters used in color and pulsed-wave Doppler ultrasonography. PMID:28219004

  15. Management of Lower Extremity and Pelvic Tumors Using Computer Assisted Modeling (CAM) A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Haskoor, John; Sinno, Sammy; Blank, Alan; Saadeh, Pierre; Rapp, Timothy

    2016-06-01

    Computer assisted modeling (CAM) has become an important tool in surgical oncology and reconstructive surgery. The preservation of the limb is an important consideration when approaching the treatment of lower extremity and pelvic tumors. The use of cutting guides allows for optimal conservation of disease-free bone and maintenance of function. We present a small case series that illustrates the use of CAM in patients with lower extremity and pelvic bone tumors.

  16. An update around the evidence base for the lower extremity ultrasound regional block technique

    PubMed Central

    Fanelli, Andrea; Ghisi, Daniela; Melotti, Rita Maria

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound guidance currently represents the gold standard for regional anesthesia. In particular for lower extremity blocks, despite the heterogeneity and the lack of large randomized controlled trials, current literature shows a modest improvement in block onset and quality compared with other localization techniques. This review aims to present the most recent findings on the application of ultrasound guidance for each single lower extremity approach. PMID:26918177

  17. Risk factors for lower extremity injury: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, D; Connolly, D; Beynnon, B

    2003-01-01

    Prospective studies on risk factors for lower extremity injury are reviewed. Many intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors have been implicated; however, there is little agreement with respect to the findings. Future prospective studies are needed using sufficient sample sizes of males and females, including collection of exposure data, and using established methods for identifying and classifying injury severity to conclusively determine addtional risk factors for lower extremity injury. PMID:12547739

  18. Multiple hereditary exostoses as a rare nonatherosclerotic etiology of chronic lower extremity ischemia.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imtiaz; West, Charles A; Sangster, Guillermo P; Heldmann, Maureen; Doucet, Linda; Olmedo, Margaret

    2010-04-01

    Nonatherosclerotic etiologies of arterial insufficiency are uncommon but important causes of chronic lower extremity ischemia. We report a patient with multiple hereditary exostoses (MHE) presenting with lifestyle-limiting lower extremity claudication and popliteal artery occlusion secondary to a large osteochondroma. The presence of MHE with associated osteochondroma resulting in arterial occlusion is a rare condition. Management strategies for treating large osteochondromas adjacent to or with vessel involvement in asymptomatic patients remain undefined.

  19. [Continuous epidural blockade for frostbite of the lower extremities (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Schlarb, K

    1980-06-01

    We describe the case of a patient suffering from freezing of the lower extremities, for which continuous epidural-blockade, over a period of four days, was conducted. By this means it was possible to relieve the vessel-spasm caused by the freezing and the patient was spared bilateral upper-thigh amputation. As the lower extremities are concerned in many cases of freezing, a continuous epidural-blockade as described here, seems to be the therapy to choose.

  20. Measurements of HIFU-induced Lesions in BSA Gel Phantoms for HIFU Treatment of Varicose Veins of Lower Extremity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushijima, Hiroyuki; Senoo, Naohiko; Suzuki, Jun; Ichiyanagi, Mitsuhisa; Yoshinaka, Kiyoshi; Deguchi, Juno; Takagi, Shu; Miyata, Tetsuro; Matsumoto, Yoichiro

    2011-09-01

    HIFU treatment has been developed for various diseases because of its minimal invasiveness, and we are now developing a HIFU treatment for varicose veins of the lower extremity. Previous studies have succeeded in occluding rabbit's veins with HIFU, but the success rate was low (about 10%). Failures were mainly caused by skin burns. When the heating lesion comes close to skin, the absorbed ultrasound energy may cause skin burns. Therefore, it is necessary to study the relationships between HIFU lesions and skin burns to improve the success rate. To visualize heating lesions from HIFU, we used tissue-mimicking BSA gel phantoms. We tried various concentrations of BSA in gels, and determined 14% BSA as the most suitable for phantoms for experiments. The attenuation coefficient of the gel was 0.73 dB/cm, and the denaturation temperature was 70 °C. We put the BSA gel phantom in a water tank in which the temperature was kept at 39 °C, and used HIFU exposures at various intensities and irradiation times. After irradiation, we measured the sizes and positions of HIFU-induced lesions, and the results indicate that the sizes of lesion become larger when the intensitiy rises or irradiation time becomes longer. Furthermore, when the intensity rises and irradiation time becomes longer, the heating lesions move closer to upper surface of the gel, which means skin easily gets burned. Thus we have investigated relationships between HIFU parameters and heated lesions that can be used for further research into HIFU treatment of varicose veins of the lower extremity.

  1. Intrathoracic tumor of the chest wall: A case of Castleman's disease mimicking myositis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Tampakis, Athanasios; Tampaki, Ekaterini Christina; Daikeler, Thomas; Lardinois, Didier

    2017-01-10

    Castleman's disease refers to a group of uncommon lymphoproliferative disorders which exhibit common lymph-node histological features. A 72-year-old male patient presented with signs of lower limb myositis. Detailed work-up focused initially on evaluating hematological malignancies, the presence of a solid tumor, autoimmune diseases and degenerative disorders of the peripheral nerves. Finally, a PET-CT scan was performed to exclude paraneoplastic manifestations of a primary tumor, revealing  however a tumor of the thoracic wall. The definite histological diagnosis confirmed the presence of unicentric Castleman's disease of the chest wall. The manifestations of the present case suggest that a systemic inflammation might occur in the unicentric form of the disease possibly due to cytokine hypersecretion. The unicentric manifestation of the disease should be well distinguished from the multicentric appearance. Unicentric disease is a surgical condition and warrants a follow-up based on the systemic inflammation that might occur.

  2. Lower extremities and iliopsoas pyomyositis with concurrent septic arthritis and spinal epidural abscess in a diabetic patient.

    PubMed

    Vallianou, N; Gounari, P; Skourtis, A; Kougias, M; Sioula, E

    2013-10-01

    Pyomyositis is a rarely encountered infection among diabetics, which usually affects lower extremities. Herein, we present a case of lower extremities and iliopsoas pyomyositis with concurrent septic arthritis and spinal epidural abscess in a patient with poorly controlled diabetes mellitus.

  3. Treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds using human fibroblast-derived dermis: a retrospective analysis.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Russell M; Smith, Nicholas C; Dux, Katherine; Stuck, Rodney M

    2014-04-01

    Human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute is a well-studied treatment for diabetic foot ulcers; however, no case series currently exist for its use in healing postoperative wounds of the lower extremity. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 32 lower extremity postoperative wounds treated weekly with human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute. Postoperative wounds were defined as a wound resulting from an open partial foot amputation, surgical wound dehiscence, or nonhealing surgical wound of the lower extremity. Wound surface area was calculated at 4 and 12 weeks or until wound closure if prior to 12 weeks. Postoperative wounds treated with weekly applications showed mean improvement in surface area reduction of 63.6% at 4 weeks and 96.1% at 12 weeks. More than 56% of all wounds healed prior to the 12-week endpoint. Additionally, only one adverse event was noted in this group. This retrospective review supports the use of human fibroblast-derived dermis skin substitute in the treatment of postoperative lower extremity wounds. This advanced wound care therapy aids in decreased total healing time and increased rate of healing for not only diabetic foot wounds but also postoperative wounds of the lower extremity, as demonstrated by this retrospective review.

  4. Lower extremity work is associated with club head velocity during the golf swing in experienced golfers.

    PubMed

    McNally, M P; Yontz, N; Chaudhari, A M

    2014-08-01

    While the golf swing is a complex whole body movement requiring coordination of all joints to achieve maximum ball velocity, the kinetic contribution of the lower extremities to club head velocity has not been quantified, despite the perception that the legs are a primary source of power during the swing. Mechanical power at the hips, knees, and ankles was estimated during the downswing phase of a full swing with a driver using a passive optical motion capture system and 2 force plates for adult males across a range of age and self-reported skill levels. Total work by the lower extremities was calculated by integrating the powers of all 6 joints over the downswing. Regression analyses showed that total lower extremity work was a strong predictor of club head velocity (R=0.63). Secondary analyses showed different relationships to club head velocity in lead and trail leg lower extremity joints, but none of these were as predictive of club head velocity as the total work performed by the lower extremities. These results provide quantitative evidence that the lower body's kinetic contribution may be an important factor in achieving greater club head velocity, contributing to greater driving distance and overall golf performance.

  5. Effect of Lower Extremity Stretching Exercises on Balance in Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ravi Shankar; Alahmari, Khalid A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to find “Effect of lower extremity stretching exercises on balance in the geriatric population. Method 60 subjects (30 male and 30 female) participated in the study. The subjects underwent 10 weeks of lower limb stretching exercise program. Pre and post 10 weeks stretching exercise program, the subjects were assessed for balance, using single limb stance time in seconds and berg balance score. These outcome measures were analyzed. Results Pre and post lower extremity stretching on balance was analyzed using paired t test. Of 60 subjects 50 subjects completed the stretching exercise program. Paired sample t test analysis showed a significant improvement in single limb stance time (eyes open and eyes closed) (p<0.001) and berg balance score (p<0.001). Conclusion Lower extremity stretching exercises enhances balance in the geriatric population and thereby reduction in the number of falls. PMID:27610062

  6. Recent advances in lower extremity amputations and prosthetics for the combat injured patient.

    PubMed

    Fergason, John; Keeling, John J; Bluman, Eric M

    2010-03-01

    Blast-related extremity trauma represents a serious challenge because of the extent of bone and soft tissue damage. Fragmentation and blast injuries account for 56% of all injuries produced within the Iraqi and Afghan theaters where, as of July 2009, 723 combatants have sustained lower extremity limb loss. If limb salvage is not practical, or fails, then amputation should be considered. Amputation can be a reliable means toward pain relief and improvement of function. Optimizing functional outcome is paramount when deciding on definitive amputation level. Preservation of joint function improves limb biomechanics in many cases. Increased limb length also allows for the benefits associated with articular and distal limb proprioception. Amputees with improved lower extremity function also usually exhibit less energy consumption. Function and length are generally directly correlated, whereas energy consumption and length are inversely related. This article discusses the surgical principles of lower extremity amputation and postoperative management of amputees, and the various prosthetic options available.

  7. Lower extremity orthoses in children with spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy: implications for nurses, parents, and caregivers.

    PubMed

    Cervasio, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Understanding trends in the prevalence of children with cerebral palsy is vital to evaluating and estimating supportive services for children, families, and caregivers. The majority of children with cerebral palsy require lower extremity orthoses to stabilize their muscles. The pediatric nurse needs a special body of knowledge to accurately assess, apply, manage, teach, and evaluate the use of lower extremity orthoses typically prescribed for this vulnerable population. Inherent in caring for these children is the need to teach the child, the family, and significant others the proper application and care of the orthoses used in hospital and community settings. Nursing literature review does not provide a basis for evidence in designing and teaching orthopaedic care for children with orthoses. A protocol for orthoses management has been developed to assist caregivers to accurately care for children with lower extremity orthotic devices.

  8. Effects of different sitting positions on skin temperature of the lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Seung; Shim, JeMyung; Kim, SungJoong; Shim, JungMyo

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effect of different sitting positions on the skin temperature of the lower extremity. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 23 healthy university students (8 males, 15 females). [Methods] Normal sitting (NS), upper leg cross (ULC) and ankle on knee (AOK) positions were conducted to measure the changes in skin temperature using digital infrared thermographic imaging (DITI). [Results] ULC upper ankle, NS upper shin, ULC upper shin and NS lower shin showed significant declines in temperature with time. [Conclusion] These finding suggest that the ULC and NS sitting positions cause decline of blood flow volume to the lower extremity resulting in decrease of temperature of the lower extremity. Especially, sitting with the legs crossed interferes with the circulation of blood flowing volume much more than just sitting in a chair.

  9. Evaluation and Treatment of Patients With Lower Extremity Peripheral Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manesh R.; Conte, Michael S.; Cutlip, Donald E.; Dib, Nabil; Geraghty, Patrick; Gray, William; Hiatt, William R.; Ho, Mami; Ikeda, Koji; Ikeno, Fumiaki; Jaff, Michael R.; Jones, W. Schuyler; Kawahara, Masayuki; Lookstein, Robert A.; Mehran, Roxana; Misra, Sanjay; Norgren, Lars; Olin, Jeffrey W.; Povsic, Thomas J.; Rosenfield, Kenneth; Rundback, John; Shamoun, Fadi; Tcheng, James; Tsai, Thomas T.; Suzuki, Yuka; Vranckx, Pascal; Wiechmann, Bret N.; White, Christopher J.; Yokoi, Hiroyoshi; Krucoff, Mitchell W.

    2016-01-01

    The lack of consistent definitions and nomenclature across clinical trials of novel devices, drugs, or biologics poses a significant barrier to accrual of knowledge in and across peripheral artery disease therapies and technologies. Recognizing this problem, the Peripheral Academic Research Consortium, together with the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and the Japanese Pharmaceuticals and Medical Devices Agency, has developed a series of pragmatic consensus definitions for patients being treated for peripheral artery disease affecting the lower extremities. These consensus definitions include the clinical presentation, anatomic depiction, interventional outcomes, surrogate imaging and physiological follow-up, and clinical outcomes of patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease. Consistent application of these definitions in clinical trials evaluating novel revascularization technologies should result in more efficient regulatory evaluation and best practice guidelines to inform clinical decisions in patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease. PMID:25744011

  10. [Detection and treatment of lower extremity neuropathy in patients with diabetic foot].

    PubMed

    Kucherenko, N V; Skrypova, T V; Liutkevych, V F; Turans'kyĭ, A I; Skybun, V M

    2001-08-01

    Possibilities of diagnosis and treatment of the lower extremities neuropathy were studied in 118 patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). Neurological examination, investigation of algesic, vibratory and temperature sensibility, thermography of feet were done in each patient. Electrostimulation treatment using therapeutic-diagnostic complex "Salut 11" was applied in 47 patients. Algesic syndrome and paresthesia occurs in the absence of the ulcerative-necrotic changes of foot or together with disorders of passability of the lower extremity main arteries. Ulcerative-necrotic changes of the foot tissues, caused by diabetic microangiopathy, are observed in the absence of pain and paresthesia, witnessing the presence of various mechanisms of the diabetic neuropathy occurrence. Application of the alpha-lipoic acid preparations had promoted the reduction of the pain and paresthesia intensity in 63% of patients. Usage of the lower extremities electromyoneurostimulation with the help of permanent impulsive current promotes the healing improvement of the purulent-necrotic wounds and ulcers of foot in patients with DM.

  11. Sex Differences and Representative Values for 6 Lower Extremity Alignment Measures

    PubMed Central

    Medina McKeon, Jennifer M; Hertel, Jay

    2009-01-01

    Context: A discrepancy in anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury rates exists between men and women. Structural differences between the sexes often are implicated as a factor in this discrepancy. Researchers anecdotally assume that men and women tend to display different normative values for certain lower extremity alignments, but published information about these values is limited. Objective: To evaluate the effect of sex on 6 measures of lower extremity alignment and to report representative values of these measures from a sample of active adults and elite athletes. Design: Descriptive cohort design. Setting: University research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 118 healthy adults (57 men: age  =  21.1 ± 3.0 years, height  =  179.1 ± 7.3 cm, mass  =  79.8 ± 13.0 kg; 61 women: age  =  20.0 ± 1.6 years, height  =  167.7 ± 6.7 cm, mass  =  62.7 ± 5.5 kg) volunteered. Main Outcome Measure(s): Six common measures of lower extremity posture (navicular drop, tibial varum, quadriceps angle, genu recurvatum, anterior pelvic tilt, femoral anteversion) were collected using established methods. One measurement was taken for each participant for each lower extremity alignment. We measured the right lower extremity only. Results: Compared with men, women demonstrated larger quadriceps angles, more genu recurvatum, greater anterior pelvic tilt, and more femoral anteversion. Conclusions: We observed differences between men and women for 4 of the 6 lower extremity alignments that we measured. Future researchers should focus on identifying how sex and skeletal alignment affect biomechanical performance of functional tasks and what these differences specifically mean regarding the discrepancy in anterior cruciate ligament injury rates between the sexes. PMID:19478840

  12. Lower Extremity Fatigue, Sex, and Landing Performance in a Population With Recurrent Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Haddas, Ram; James, C. Roger; Hooper, Troy L.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Low back pain and lower extremity injuries affect athletes of all ages. Previous authors have linked a history of low back pain with lower extremity injuries. Fatigue is a risk factor for lower extremity injuries, some of which are known to affect female athletes more often than their male counterparts. Objective: To determine the effects of lower extremity fatigue and sex on knee mechanics, neuromuscular control, and ground reaction force during landing in people with recurrent low back pain (LBP). Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: A clinical biomechanics laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: Thirty-three young adults with recurrent LBP but without current symptoms. Intervention(s): Fatigue was induced using a submaximal free-weight squat protocol with 15% body weight until task failure was achieved. Main Outcome Measure(s): Three-dimensional knee motion, knee and ankle moments, ground reaction force, and trunk and lower extremity muscle-activity measurements were collected during 0.30-m drop vertical-jump landings. Results: Fatigue altered landing mechanics, with differences in landing performance between sexes. Women tended to have greater knee-flexion angle at initial contact, greater maximum knee internal-rotation angle, greater maximum knee-flexion moment, smaller knee-adduction moment, smaller ankle-inversion moment, smaller ground reaction force impact, and earlier multifidus activation. In men and women, fatigue produced a smaller knee-abduction angle at initial contact, greater maximum knee-flexion moment, and delays in semitendinosus, multifidus, gluteus maximus, and rectus femoris activation. Conclusions: Our results provide evidence that during a fatigued 0.30-m landing sequence, women who suffered from recurrent LBP landed differently than did men with recurrent LBP, which may increase women's exposure to biomechanical factors that can contribute to lower extremity injury. PMID:25322344

  13. Office evaluation and treatment of lower extremity injuries in the runner.

    PubMed

    Mattalino, A J; Deese, J M; Campbell, E D

    1989-07-01

    Lower extremity problems in the runner are common and often perplexing. Although many problems such as acute tendinitis and mild sprains can be treated with short periods of rest and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, some will be chronic or recurrent in nature. These persistent problems can cause even a serious runner to reduce his activity greatly or even give up the sport entirely. Chronic recurring ailments should be examined carefully with a high suspicion of a biomechanical imbalance in the foot or lower extremity. With a basic understanding of the biomechanics of the foot and ankle and the stresses incurred during running, most of the problems can be managed conservatively.

  14. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art.

    PubMed

    Sista, Akhilesh K; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A; Madoff, David C

    2015-07-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article.

  15. Ultrasound-guided tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheter placement in infants.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Subramanian; Moe, David C; Vo, Jack N

    2013-12-01

    Tunneled lower extremity peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are placed in infants under combined ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance in the interventional radiology suite. In infants requiring a bedside procedure, image guidance is limited, often using portable radiographs during the procedure. This report demonstrates feasibility of placing tunneled lower extremity PICCs using ultrasound as the sole imaging modality for vascular access, intravascular length measurement, and final confirmation of catheter tip position in a case series of 15 critically ill infants. The technique negates the need for added imaging confirmation methods that use ionizing radiation and can be performed at the bedside.

  16. Lower extremity power training in elderly subjects with moderate mobility limitations: A randomized controlled trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adults were randomized to either high-velocity high-power training (POW), slow-velocity progressive resistance training (STR) or a control group of lower extremity stretching (CON). Training was performed three times per week for 12 weeks and subjects completed t...

  17. [Differential diagnosis of skin changes on the lower extremities in chronic venous insufficiency].

    PubMed

    Binder, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Varicous veins and postthrombotic syndrome can make typical reversible or irreversible skin changes on the lower extremities if no treatment is initiated. The typical clinical signs should be recognised in an early stage and possible differential diagnoses have to be excluded.

  18. The impact of lower extremity mass and inertia manipulation on sprint kinematics.

    PubMed

    Bennett, John P; Sayers, Mark G L; Burkett, Brendan J

    2009-12-01

    Resistance sprint training is a sprint-specific training protocol commonly employed by athletes and coaches to enhance sprint performance. This research quantified the impact of lower extremity mass and inertia manipulation on key temporal and kinematic variables associated with sprint performance. A 3-dimensional analysis of 40 m sprinting was conducted on 8 elite sprinters under normal conditions and resisted sprint training. Results of the study showed that lower extremity additional mass training (at 10% individual segment weight) led to a significant reduction in sprint time for both the 10-m to 20-m and the 30-m to 40-m splits and the total 40 m measure. The stride velocity throughout the 20-m to 30-m phase of the sprint trials was also shown to be significantly reduced in the lower extremity mass and inertia manipulation condition. Importantly, no significant differences were observed across the remaining spatiotemporal variables of stride length, stride frequency, total stride time, and ground contact time. For coaches and athletes, the addition of specific lower extremity mass could improve the athlete's sprint performance without any measured effect on the technique of highly trained elite sprinters.

  19. Lower Extremity Power Training in Elderly Subjects with Mobility Limitations: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Aims This study investigated whether high-velocity high-power training (POW) improved lower extremity muscle power and quality in functionally-limited elders greater than traditional slow-velocity progressive resistance training (STR). Methods Fifty-seven community-dwelling older adul...

  20. Aberrant Lower Extremity Arterial Anatomy in Microvascular Free Fibula Flap Candidates: Management Algorithm and Case Presentations.

    PubMed

    Golas, Alyssa R; Levine, Jamie P; Ream, Justin; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2016-10-14

    An accurate and comprehensive understanding of lower extremity arterial anatomy is essential for the successful harvest and transfer of a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap (FFF). Minimum preoperative evaluation includes detailed history and physical including lower extremity pulse examination. Controversy exists regarding whether preoperative angiographic imaging should be performed for all patients. Elevation of an FFF necessitates division of the peroneal artery in the proximal lower leg and eradicates its downstream flow. For patients in whom the peroneal artery comprises the dominant arterial supply to the foot, FFF elevation is contraindicated. Detailed preoperative knowledge of patient-specific lower extremity arterial anatomy can help to avoid ischemia or limb loss resulting from FFF harvest. If preoperative angiographic imaging is omitted, careful attention must be paid to intraoperative anatomy. Should pedal perfusion rely on the peroneal artery, reconstructive options other than an FFF must be pursued. Given the complexity of surgical decision making, the authors propose an algorithm to guide the surgeon from the preoperative evaluation of the potential free fibula flap patient to the final execution of the surgical plan. The authors also provide 3 clinical patients in whom aberrant lower extremity anatomy was encountered and describe each patient's surgical course.

  1. Aberrant Lower Extremity Arterial Anatomy in Microvascular Free Fibula Flap Candidates: Management Algorithm and Case Presentations.

    PubMed

    Golas, Alyssa R; Levine, Jamie P; Ream, Justin; Rodriguez, Eduardo D

    2016-11-01

    An accurate and comprehensive understanding of lower extremity arterial anatomy is essential for the successful harvest and transfer of a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap (FFF). Minimum preoperative evaluation includes detailed history and physical including lower extremity pulse examination. Controversy exists regarding whether preoperative angiographic imaging should be performed for all patients. Elevation of an FFF necessitates division of the peroneal artery in the proximal lower leg and eradicates its downstream flow. For patients in whom the peroneal artery comprises the dominant arterial supply to the foot, FFF elevation is contraindicated. Detailed preoperative knowledge of patient-specific lower extremity arterial anatomy can help to avoid ischemia or limb loss resulting from FFF harvest. If preoperative angiographic imaging is omitted, careful attention must be paid to intraoperative anatomy. Should pedal perfusion rely on the peroneal artery, reconstructive options other than an FFF must be pursued. Given the complexity of surgical decision making, the authors propose an algorithm to guide the surgeon from the preoperative evaluation of the potential free fibula flap patient to the final execution of the surgical plan. The authors also provide 3 clinical patients in whom aberrant lower extremity anatomy was encountered and describe each patient's surgical course.

  2. [Cross-cultural adaptation and Argentine validation of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale Questionnaire].

    PubMed

    Dell'Era, Silvina; Dimaro, Mariana; Gamboa, Anabella; Spath, María Belén; Salzberg, Sandra; Hernández, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    The Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS) is a self-report questionnaire created to evaluate a patient's functional status in a wide spectrum of lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions. Thus far, there is no valid version in Argentina. The aims of this study were to translate the LEFS, cross-culturally adapt it for use in the Argentine population, and validate it in our country by determining its psychometric properties in patients over the age of 18 with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions, comparing it with the SF-36 and the following functional tests: step test and timed up and go. One hundred and thirty three patients were included between July 2010 and January 2012. The test-retest reliability was high, with an ICC of 0.91 (95% CI 0.85 - 0.94). The correlation of the LEFS with the physical functioning subscale and the physical component summary score of the SF-36 was high (p < 0.001) and showed moderate response with the timed up and go and step test at the baseline (p < 0.001). This version of the LEFS is a valid, reliable tool used in Argentina to measure functional status in patients with lower extremity musculoskeletal conditions that we recommend for future clinical research projects and daily clinical use.

  3. Lower Extremity Muscle Mass Predicts Functional Performance in Mobility-Limited Elders

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objectives This study examined the influence of lower extremity body composition and muscle strength on the severity of mobility-disability in community-dwelling older adults. Methods Fifty-seven older males and females (age 74.2 +/- 7 yrs; BMI 28.9 +/- 6 kg/m2) underwent an objective assessment ...

  4. Incidence of deep vein thrombosis in erysipelas or cellulitis of the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Mohammadreza; Samiee, Mitra M; Spencer, Frederick A

    2013-03-01

    The incidence of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in patients with erysipelas and cellulitis of the lower extremities is unknown. As such, the indication and efficacy of prophylactic anticoagulation for prevention of DVT in these patients is unclear. The main goal of this review is to provide an estimate of the incidence of DVT in erysipelas and cellulitis based on existing literature. A comprehensive search of the electronic sources: MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, LILAC and Cochrane without any language limitation was performed from 1950 to April 2011 for articles focused on the occurrence of DVT in cellulitis or erysipelas of the lower extremities. The selected studies were divided into two groups according to presence or absence of systematic investigation for DVT. Those studies in which the patients received prophylactic or therapeutic anticoagulants before a diagnosis of DVT were excluded. The reported incidence rate of DVT in patients with erysipelas or cellulitis of the lower extremities is highly variable, ranging from 0 to 15%. In this review, the overall incidence rates of DVT in studies with and without systematic investigation for thromboembolism were 2.72% (95% CI: 1.71-3.75%) and 0.68% (95% CI: 0.27-1.07%), respectively. Given the low reported overall incidence of DVT, neither routine prophylactic anticoagulation nor systematic paraclinical investigation for DVT is indicated in low risk patients with erysipelas or cellulitis of the lower extremities. DVT should still be considered in patients with high pretest probability or other thromboembolic risk factors.

  5. Importance of the functional examination in lower extremities in patients with rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Wareńczak, Agnieszka; Lisiński, Przemysław; Huber, Juliusz

    2014-01-01

    This paper deals with evaluation of the lower extremity efficiency and balance in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients. The authors' own test (LLFT-lower extremities functional test) and balance tests during normal standing and tandem positions with eyes opened or closed were used. Twelve patients with RA and fifteen controls for comparison were examined. Center feet of pressure dislocation on platform in normal standing with eyes open, normal standing with eyes closed, tandem left foot in front and tandem right foot in front positions and further dynamic balance tests on three different boards were analyzed. Visual Analogue Scale monitored the level of pain after each LLFT task. There was found a relation between the intensity of pain and overloading of joints in particular tasks, resulting in lower extremities dysfunction. A significant disbalance in medio-lateral direction during normal standing with eyes closed and tandem right foot in front positions and also in anterior-posterior direction in tandem right foot in front position during static balance tests was found. Correlations showed that patient's age, disease duration and Steinbrocker Functional Classes have an influence on parameters of balance tests. Results indicate that complex dysfunction of lower extremities causes disbalance of posture in static conditions.

  6. Bone and soft-tissue infections of the lower extremity in diabetics.

    PubMed

    LeFrock, J L; Joseph, W S

    1995-01-01

    The foot is the most common site of infection in the diabetic individual, and one of every four diabetics eventually seeks medical care for a foot problem. This article examines pathologic conditions of the lower extremity from a variety of views, including pathophysiology, classification, microbiology, infections, osteomyelitis, treatment, and prevention strategies.

  7. Effect of walking speed on lower extremity joint loading in graded ramp walking.

    PubMed

    Schwameder, Hermann; Lindenhofer, Elke; Müller, Erich

    2005-07-01

    Lower extremity joint loading during walking is strongly affected by the steepness of the slope and might cause pain and injuries in lower extremity joint structures. One feasible measure to reduce joint loading is the reduction of walking speed. Positive effects have been shown for level walking, but not for graded walking or hiking conditions. The aim of the study was to quantify the effect of walking speed (separated into the two components, step length and cadence) on the joint power of the hip, knee and ankle and to determine the knee joint forces in uphill and downhill walking. Ten participants walked up and down a ramp with step lengths of 0.46, 0.575 and 0.69 m and cadences of 80, 100 and 120 steps per minute. The ramp was equipped with a force platform and the locomotion was filmed with a 60 Hz video camera. Loading of the lower extremity joints was determined using inverse dynamics. A two-dimensional knee model was used to calculate forces in the knee structures during the stance phase. Walking speed affected lower extremity joint loading substantially and significantly. Change of step length caused much greater loading changes for all joints compared with change of cadence; the effects were more distinct in downhill than in uphill walking. The results indicate that lower extremity joint loading can be effectively controlled by varying step length and cadence during graded uphill and downhill walking. Hikers can avoid or reduce pain and injuries by reducing walking speed, particularly in downhill walking.

  8. A Canadian population-based description of the indications for lower-extremity amputations and outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Kayssi, Ahmed; de Mestral, Charles; Forbes, Thomas L.; Roche-Nagle, Graham

    2016-01-01

    Background To our knowledge, there have been no previously published reports characterizing lower-extremity amputations in Canada. The objective of this study was to describe the indications and outcomes of lower-extremity amputations in the Canadian population. Methods We performed a retrospective cohort study of all adult patients who underwent lower-extremity amputation in Canada between 2006 and 2009. Patients were identified from the Canadian Institute for Health Information’s Discharge Abstract Database, which includes all hospital admissions across Canada with the exception of the province of Quebec. Pediatric, trauma, and outpatients were excluded. Results During the study period, 5342 patients underwent lower-extremity amputations in 207 Canadian hospitals. The mean age was 67 ± 13 years, and 68% were men. Amputations were most frequently indicated after admission for diabetic complications (81%), cardiovascular disease (6%), or cancer (3%). In total, 65% of patients were discharged to another inpatient or long-term care facility, and 26% were discharged home with or without extra support. Most patients were diabetic (96%) and most (65%) required a below-knee amputation. Predictors of prolonged (> 7 d) hospital stay included amputation performed by a general surgeon; cardiovascular risk factors, such as diabetes, hypertension, ischemic heart disease, congestive heart failure, or hyperlipidemia; and undergoing the amputation in the provinces of Newfoundland and Labrador, New Brunswick, or British Columbia. Conclusion There is variability in the delivery of lower-extremity amputations and postoperative hospital discharges among surgical specialists and regions across Canada. Future work is needed to investigate the reasons for this variability and to develop initiatives to shorten postoperative hospital stays. PMID:27007090

  9. A functional agility short-term fatigue protocol changes lower extremity mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Nelson; Quammen, David; Lucci, Shawn; Greska, Eric; Onate, James

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a functional agility fatigue protocol on lower extremity biomechanics between two unanticipated tasks (stop-jump and sidestep). The subjects consisted of fifteen female collegiate soccer athletes (19 ± 0.7 years, 1.67 ± 0.1 m, 61.7 ± 8 kg) free of lower extremity injury. Participants performed five trials of stop-jump and sidestep tasks. A functional short-term agility protocol was performed, and immediately following participants repeated the unanticipated running tasks. Lower extremity kinematic and kinetic values were obtained pre and post fatigue. Repeated measures analyses of variance were conducted for each dependent variable with an alpha level set at 0.05. Knee position post-fatigue had increased knee internal rotation (11.4 ± 7.5° vs. 7.9 ± 6.5° p = 0.011) than pre-fatigue, and a decreased knee flexion angle (−36.6 ± 6.2° vs.−40.0 ± 6.3°, p = 0.003), as well as hip position post-fatigue had decreased hip flexion angle (35.5 ± 8.7° vs. 43.2 ± 9.5°, p = 0.002). A quick functional fatigue protocol altered lower extremity mechanics of Division I collegiate soccer athletes during landing tasks. Proper mechanics should be emphasized from the beginning of practice/game to aid in potentially minimizing the effects of fatigue in lower extremity mechanics. PMID:22424559

  10. Reliability and Validity of a Partial Weight Bearing Measure of Lower Extremity Performance

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Michelle; O'Rand, Denise; Levy, Susan

    2009-01-01

    Background Methods of measuring lower extremity function is limited for those with partial weight bearing (PWB) status in early phases of a lower extremity rehabilitation program. Objectives The purpose of this study was to measure intra-rater reliability of two lower extremity PWB performance measures using an incline exercise apparatus and to evaluate the concurrent validity and responsiveness to change of these two measures. Methods Thirty-seven adult patients with lower extremity injuries were measured on two PWB measures (PWB20 and PWB30) of lower extremity performance as well as several common measures of LE function. After initial testing, subjects were asked to return for retesting, following four to six weeks of rehabilitation intervention. Reliability of the data from the measures was tested using intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC); validity was based on bivariate correlations of the measures. The minimal detectable change (MDC) value and limb symmetry index (LSI) were used to study the responsiveness of the PWB measures. Results The ICC for the PWB20 and PWB30 were 0.95 and 0.98, respectively. The bivariate correlations of the PWB20 with stair climbing and walking speed were greater than those of the PWB30. Correlations ranged from r = 0.49 to 0.72 between the PWB measures and the functional measures. For most patients, their change in score between initial testing and follow-up exceeded the MDC; the LSI improved for all patients. Conclusion Using the incline apparatus yielded reliable PWB data. In addition, performance on the PWB measures correlated fairly well with common measures of function. PMID:21509110

  11. Respiratory and skeletal muscle strength in COPD: Impact on exercise capacity and lower extremity function

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Jonathan; Yelin, Edward H.; Katz, Patricia P.; Sanchez, Gabriela; Iribarren, Carlos; Eisner, Mark D.; Blanc, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE We sought to quantify the impact of respiratory muscle and lower extremity strength on exercise capacity and lower extremity function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). METHODS In 828 persons with COPD, we assessed the impact of reduced respiratory (maximum inspiratory pressure, MIP) and lower extremity muscle strength (quadriceps, QS) on exercise capacity (6 Minute Walk Distance, 6MWT) and lower extremity function (LEF, Short Physical Performance Battery). Multiple regression analyses taking into account key covariates, including lung function and smoking, tested the associations between muscle strength and exercise and functional capacity. RESULTS For each ½ standard deviation (0.5 SD) decrement in QS, men walked 18.3 meters less during 6MWT (95% CI −24.1 to −12.4); women 25.1 meters less (95% CI −31.1 to −12.4). For each 0.5 SD decrement in MIP, men walked 9.4 meters less during 6MWT (95% CI – 15.2 to −3.6); women 8.7 meters less (95% CI −14.1 to −3.4). For each 0.5 SD decrease in QS, men had a 1.32 higher odds (95% CI: 1.11 to 1.15) of poor LEF; women, 1.87 higher odds (95% CI: 1.54 to 2.27). Lower MIP (per 0.5 SD) was associated with increased odds of poor LEF in women (OR 1.18, 95% CI: 1.00 to 1.39), but not in men (OR 1.10, 95% CI: 0.93 to 1.31). CONCLUSION In COPD, reduced respiratory and lower extremity muscle strength are associated with decreased exercise and functional capacity. Muscle weakness is likely an important component of impairment and disability in patients with COPD. PMID:21240003

  12. Physical Exam Risk Factors for Lower Extremity Injury in High School Athletes: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Onate, James A.; Everhart, Joshua S.; Clifton, Daniel R.; Best, Thomas M.; Borchers, James R.; Chaudhari, Ajit M.W.

    2016-01-01

    Objective A stated goal of the preparticipation physical evaluation (PPE) is to reduce musculoskeletal injury, yet the musculoskeletal portion of the PPE is reportedly of questionable use in assessing lower extremity injury risk in high school-aged athletes. The objectives of this study are: (1) identify clinical assessment tools demonstrated to effectively determine lower extremity injury risk in a prospective setting, and (2) critically assess the methodological quality of prospective lower extremity risk assessment studies that use these tools. Data Sources A systematic search was performed in PubMed, CINAHL, UptoDate, Google Scholar, Cochrane Reviews, and SportDiscus. Inclusion criteria were prospective injury risk assessment studies involving athletes primarily ages 13 to 19 that used screening methods that did not require highly specialized equipment. Methodological quality was evaluated with a modified physiotherapy evidence database (PEDro) scale. Main Results Nine studies were included. The mean modified PEDro score was 6.0/10 (SD, 1.5). Multidirectional balance (odds ratio [OR], 3.0; CI, 1.5–6.1; P < 0.05) and physical maturation status (P < 0.05) were predictive of overall injury risk, knee hyperextension was predictive of anterior cruciate ligament injury (OR, 5.0; CI, 1.2–18.4; P < 0.05), hip external: internal rotator strength ratio of patellofemoral pain syndrome (P = 0.02), and foot posture index of ankle sprain (r = −0.339, P = 0.008). Conclusions Minimal prospective evidence supports or refutes the use of the functional musculoskeletal exam portion of the current PPE to assess lower extremity injury risk in high school athletes. Limited evidence does support inclusion of multidirectional balance assessment and physical maturation status in a musculoskeletal exam as both are generalizable risk factors for lower extremity injury. PMID:26978166

  13. Long Term Outcomes of Arteriovenous Grafts for Hemodialysis in Lower Extremities

    PubMed Central

    Han, Seok; Song, Dan; Yun, Sangchul

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The lower extremity has received its fair share of attention as a vascular access site in patients who have exhausted their upper arm vessels. However, experiences with lower extremity arteriovenous grafts (AVGs) have so far been disappointing because of high infection rates and severe limb ischemia. We report our experience with hemodialysis access from the lower extremity. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of 60 lower extremity AVGs created between January 2003 and December 2011 was performed. Age, sex, etiology of end-stage renal disease and complications were tabulated. Primary and secondary patency rates were determined. Results: The average age of the study population was 56 years and 38 patients were female. Renal failure was associated with hypertension in 40 (66.7%) patients, diabetes in 28 (46.7%) patients and cardiovascular disease in 9 (15.0%) patients. The follow-up period was 8–108 months. Fifty-four patients had bilateral central vein stenosis. Seven (11.7%) patients had primary failure of their AVG. There was no operation-related death. Primary and secondary patency rates were: 66% and 90% at 1 year, 40% and 90% at 2 years, 27% and 87% at 3 years, and 18% and 87% at 5 years, respectively. There were 105 postoperative complications that developed in 67 patients. Postoperative complications were: thrombosis (30), proximal vein stenosis (56), infection (9), bleeding with hematoma (1), perigraft seroma (3), steal syndrome (2), and pseudoaneurysm (4). Conclusion: A lower extremity AVG seems to be a viable option in patients with unusable upper extremity veins. PMID:28042558

  14. Classifying lower extremity muscle fatigue during walking using machine learning and inertial sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lockhart, Thurmon E; Soangra, Rahul

    2014-03-01

    Fatigue in lower extremity musculature is associated with decline in postural stability, motor performance and alters normal walking patterns in human subjects. Automated recognition of lower extremity muscle fatigue condition may be advantageous in early detection of fall and injury risks. Supervised machine learning methods such as support vector machines (SVMs) have been previously used for classifying healthy and pathological gait patterns and also for separating old and young gait patterns. In this study we explore the classification potential of SVM in recognition of gait patterns utilizing an inertial measurement unit associated with lower extremity muscular fatigue. Both kinematic and kinetic gait patterns of 17 participants (29 ± 11 years) were recorded and analyzed in normal and fatigued state of walking. Lower extremities were fatigued by performance of a squatting exercise until the participants reached 60% of their baseline maximal voluntary exertion level. Feature selection methods were used to classify fatigue and no-fatigue conditions based on temporal and frequency information of the signals. Additionally, influences of three different kernel schemes (i.e., linear, polynomial, and radial basis function) were investigated for SVM classification. The results indicated that lower extremity muscle fatigue condition influenced gait and loading responses. In terms of the SVM classification results, an accuracy of 96% was reached in distinguishing the two gait patterns (fatigue and no-fatigue) within the same subject using the kinematic, time and frequency domain features. It is also found that linear kernel and RBF kernel were equally good to identify intra-individual fatigue characteristics. These results suggest that intra-subject fatigue classification using gait patterns from an inertial sensor holds considerable potential in identifying "at-risk" gait due to muscle fatigue.

  15. Electrical conductivity imaging of lower extremities using MREIT: postmortem swine and in vivo human experiments.

    PubMed

    Woo, Eung Je; Kim, Hyung Joong; Minhas, Atul S; Kim, Young Tae; Jeong, Woo Chul; Kwon, O

    2008-01-01

    Cross-sectional conductivity images of lower extremities were reconstructed using Magnetic Resonance Electrical Impedance Tomography (MREIT) techniques. Carbon-hydrogel electrodes were adopted for postmortem swine and in vivo human imaging experiments. Due to their large surface areas and good contacts on the skin, we could inject as much as 10 mA into the lower extremities of human subjects without producing a painful sensation. Using a 3T MREIT system, we first performed a series of postmortem swine experiments and produced high-resolution conductivity images of swine legs. Validating the experimental protocol for the lower extremities, we revised it for the following human experiments. After the review of the Institutional Review Board (IRB), we conducted our first MREIT experiments of human subjects using the same 3T MREIT system. Collecting magnetic flux density data inside lower extremities subject to multiple injection currents, we reconstructed cross-sectional conductivity images using the harmonic B(z) algorithm. The conductivity images very well distinguished different parts of muscles inside the lower extremities. The outermost fatty layer was clearly shown in each conductivity image. We could observe severe noise in the outer layer of the bones primarily due to the MR signal void phenomenon there. Reconstructed conductivity images indicated that the internal regions of the bones have relatively high conductivity values. Future study is desired in terms of the conductivity image reconstruction algorithm to improve the image quality. Further human imaging experiments are planned and being conducted to produce high-resolution conductivity images from different parts of the human body.

  16. Reliability of the mangled extremity severity score in combat-related upper and lower extremity injuries

    PubMed Central

    Ege, Tolga; Unlu, Aytekin; Tas, Huseyin; Bek, Dogan; Turkan, Selim; Cetinkaya, Aytac

    2015-01-01

    Background: Decision of limb salvage or amputation is generally aided with several trauma scoring systems such as the mangled extremity severity score (MESS). However, the reliability of the injury scores in the settling of open fractures due to explosives and missiles is challenging. Mortality and morbidity of the extremity trauma due to firearms are generally associated with time delay in revascularization, injury mechanism, anatomy of the injured site, associated injuries, age and the environmental circumstance. The purpose of the retrospective study was to evaluate the extent of extremity injuries due to ballistic missiles and to detect the reliability of mangled extremity severity score (MESS) in both upper and lower extremities. Materials and Methods: Between 2004 and 2014, 139 Gustillo Anderson Type III open fractures of both the upper and lower extremities were enrolled in the study. Data for patient age, fire arm type, transporting time from the field to the hospital (and the method), injury severity scores, MESS scores, fracture types, amputation levels, bone fixation methods and postoperative infections and complications retrieved from the two level-2 trauma center's data base. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values of the MESS were calculated to detect the ability in deciding amputation in the mangled limb. Results: Amputation was performed in 39 extremities and limb salvage attempted in 100 extremities. The mean followup time was 14.6 months (range 6–32 months). In the amputated group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremity were 8.8 (range 6–11) and 9.24 (range 6–11), respectively. In the limb salvage group, the mean MESS scores for upper and lower extremities were 5.29 (range 4–7) and 5.19 (range 3–8), respectively. Sensitivity of MESS in upper and lower extremities were calculated as 80% and 79.4% and positive predictive values detected as 55.55% and 83.3%, respectively. Specificity of MESS score for

  17. Diagnosis and Treatment of Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis: Korean Practice Guidelines

    PubMed Central

    Min, Seung-Kee; Kim, Young Hwan; Joh, Jin Hyun; Kang, Jin Mo; Park, Ui Jun; Kim, Hyung-Kee; Chang, Jeong-Hwan; Park, Sang Jun; Kim, Jang Yong; Bae, Jae Ik; Choi, Sun Young; Kim, Chang Won; Park, Sung Il; Yim, Nam Yeol; Jeon, Yong Sun; Yoon, Hyun-Ki; Park, Ki Hyuk

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity deep vein thrombosis is a serious medical condition that can result in death or major disability due to pulmonary embolism or post-thrombotic syndrome. Appropriate diagnosis and treatment are required to improve symptoms and salvage the affected limb. Early thrombus clearance rapidly resolves symptoms related to venous obstruction, restores valve function and reduces the incidence of post-thrombotic syndrome. Recently, endovascular treatment has been established as a standard method for early thrombus removal. However, there are a variety of views regarding the indications and procedures among medical institutions and operators. Therefore, we intend to provide evidence-based guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis by multidisciplinary consensus. These guidelines are the result of a close collaboration between interventional radiologists and vascular surgeons. The goals of these guidelines are to improve treatment, to serve as a guide to the clinician, and consequently to contribute to public health care. PMID:27699156

  18. Diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation of stress fractures in the lower extremity in runners

    PubMed Central

    Kahanov, Leamor; Eberman, Lindsey E; Games, Kenneth E; Wasik, Mitch

    2015-01-01

    Stress fractures account for between 1% and 20% of athletic injuries, with 80% of stress fractures in the lower extremity. Stress fractures of the lower extremity are common injuries among individuals who participate in endurance, high load-bearing activities such as running, military and aerobic exercise and therefore require practitioner expertise in diagnosis and management. Accurate diagnosis for stress fractures is dependent on the anatomical area. Anatomical regions such as the pelvis, sacrum, and metatarsals offer challenges due to difficulty differentiating pathologies with common symptoms. Special tests and treatment regimes, however, are similar among most stress fractures with resolution between 4 weeks to a year. The most difficult aspect of stress fracture treatment entails mitigating internal and external risk factors. Practitioners should address ongoing risk factors to minimize recurrence. PMID:25848327

  19. Incidence and determinants of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    van Gent, R N; Siem, D; van Middelkoop, M; van Os, A G; Bierma‐Zeinstra, S M A; Koes, B W

    2007-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to present a systematic overview of published reports on the incidence and associated potential risk factors of lower extremity running injuries in long distance runners. An electronic database search was conducted using the PubMed–Medline database. Two observers independently assessed the quality of the studies and a best evidence synthesis was used to summarise the results. The incidence of lower extremity running injuries ranged from 19.4% to 79.3%. The predominant site of these injuries was the knee. There was strong evidence that a long training distance per week in male runners and a history of previous injuries were risk factors for injuries, and that an increase in training distance per week was a protective factor for knee injuries. PMID:17473005

  20. Lower Extremity Radicular Pain Caused by Entrapped Sigmoid Colon Between L5 and S1 Vertebrae

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sanghyung; Park, Noh Kyoung; Cho, Kyoung Jin; Baek, Jung Hyun; Lim, Jeong-Wook; Choi, Dongjin

    2015-01-01

    Intestinal entrapment between two vertebral bodies is very rare. In all previous cases, it occurred by major trauma. However, the bowel entrapment between two vertebral bodies without trauma has never been reported, not to mention as the cause of lower extremity radicular pain. We describe the case of an 82-year-old female patient with right lower extremity radicular pain without recent trauma history. The patient was diagnosed sigmoid colon entrapment between the L5 and S1 vertebrae by lumbar spinal computerized tomography and magnetic resonance imaging, and showed improvement in radicular pain after manual reduction of interpositioned colon during surgery. Intestinal entrapment between two vertebrae without trauma is caused by degenerative and vacuum changes of the intervertebral disc combined with the anterior longitudinal ligament injury. PMID:26619145

  1. The effects of band exercise using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation on muscular strength in lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    Rhyu, Hyun-Seung; Kim, Su-Hyun; Park, Hye-Sang

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether a six-week elastic band exercise program using proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) can increase isotonic strength of abductor muscles in the lower extremity. Twenty-eight healthy students from S university were divided into an experimental group and control group. Each group was participated in pre and post-measurement in isotonic strength using an isotonic analyzer, En-treeM. Experimental group performed elastic band exercise using PNF pattern for a six-weeks, in contrast, control group did not take any exercise. In the results of this study, isotonic strength measurements of abductor muscles in lower extremity in experimental group were significantly different after exercise, but control group did not show any significant changes. Therefore, we hope that resistive exercise would be very valuable for healthy people as well as the old people with weakened muscle strength. PMID:25830142

  2. Practice guidelines for early ambulation of burn survivors after lower extremity grafts.

    PubMed

    Nedelec, Bernadette; Serghiou, Michael A; Niszczak, Jonathan; McMahon, Margaret; Healey, Tanja

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this review was to systematically evaluate the available clinical evidence for early ambulation of burn survivors after lower extremity skin grafting procedures so that practice guidelines could be proposed. It provides evidence-based recommendations, specifically for the rehabilitation interventions required for early ambulation of burn survivors. These guidelines are designed to assist all healthcare providers who are responsible for initiating and supporting the ambulation and rehabilitation of burn survivors after lower extremity grafting. Summary recommendations were made after the literature, retrieved by systematic review, was critically appraised and the level of evidence determined according to Oxford Centre for Evidence-Based Medicine criteria. A formal consensus exercise was performed to address some of the identified gaps in the literature which were believed to be critical building blocks of clinical practice.

  3. "One-stop hybrid procedure" in the treatment of vascular injury of lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Tan, Hao; Zhang, Lian-Yang; Guo, Qing-Shan; Yao, Yuan-Zhang; Sun, Shi-Jin; Wang, Tao; Li, Ying-Cai; Xiong, Kun-Lin

    2015-02-01

    As a new surgical technique, "one-stop hybrid procedure" is rarely applied in trauma patients. This paper aims to explore its role in vascular injury of the lower extremity. Vascular intervention combined with open surgery was performed to treat three cases of vessel injuries of the lower extremity in our hybrid operating room. One patient with stab injury to the left femoral vein was treated by temporary artery blocking after excluding arterial injury by angiography, followed by blocking surgery and debridement and repair of the injured vein. The other two patients with drug addiction history, who were found to have pricking injuries to the femoral artery combined with local infection, were successfully treated by endovascular techniques and open debridement. One-stop hybrid procedure in treating vascular injury patients could simplify the operation procedure, reduce operative risk, and achieve good curative effect.

  4. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading after ACL reconstruction: more than meets the eye.

    PubMed

    Chmielewski, Terese L

    2011-06-01

    Sports fans know that movement patterns are important for athletic performance. Similarly, clinicians know that addressing abnormal movement patterns after an anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction is important for a successful return to sport. The kinematic (motion) component of movement patterns is more easily observed than the kinetic (forces) component, thus more commonly addressed in ACL reconstruction rehabilitation. Ignoring the kinetic component, though, could impede a successful return to sport. Asymmetrical lower extremity loading has been reported in a variety of activities following ACL reconstruction, and may contribute to both short- and long-term consequences. It is important that clinicians become aware of the potential for asymmetrical lower extremity loading to affect patient outcomes and for researchers to enlarge the body of knowledge.

  5. Total knee arthroplasty after lower extremity amputation: a review of 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Amanatullah, Derek F; Trousdale, Robert T; Sierra, Rafael J

    2014-08-01

    Below knee amputation protects the ipsilateral knee from osteoarthritis and overloads the contralateral knee predisposing it to symptomatic osteoarthritis. We retrospectively reviewed 13 primary total knee arthroplasty (TKAs) in 12 patients with a prior lower extremity amputation. Twelve TKAs were performed on the contralateral side of the amputated limb while only one TKA was performed on the ipsilateral side. The average clinical follow-up was 6.8 ± 4.8 years. Knee Society Scores improved from 30.4 ± 11.8 to 88.5 ± 4.2 after TKA with a prior contralateral amputation. Three (23.1%) patients with TKA after contralateral amputation had aseptic loosening of the tibial component. Patients experience clinically significant improvement with TKA after lower extremity amputation. Augmentation of tibial fixation with a stem may be advisable during TKA after contralateral amputation.

  6. Antibiotic stewardship: the lower-extremity physician's prescription for effectively treating infection.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert G; Joseph, Warren S

    2014-01-01

    The discovery of antibiotic drugs was one of the most significant medical achievements of the 20th century. The improper use of antibiotic drugs to prevent and treat infections has resulted in the emergence of resistance. Antimicrobic stewardship programs are becoming a mainstay in the fight against multidrug-resistant organisms. Individual clinicians should be encouraged to adopt the principles of antibiotic stewardship when treating lower-extremity infections in their scope of practice. First, a review of the available literature outlining the concept and practice of antibiotic stewardship is offered. Second, a discussion describing how to adopt and apply these principles to the individual clinician's practice as it applies to lower-extremity infections is offered. Finally, specific antimicrobial pharmacologic spectra and antibiogram information are offered.

  7. Endovascular Interventions for Acute and Chronic Lower Extremity Deep Venous Disease: State of the Art

    PubMed Central

    Sista, Akhilesh K.; Vedantham, Suresh; Kaufman, John A.

    2015-01-01

    The societal and individual burden caused by acute and chronic lower extremity venous disease is considerable. In the past several decades, minimally invasive endovascular interventions have been developed to reduce thrombus burden in the setting of acute deep venous thrombosis to prevent both short- and long-term morbidity and to recanalize chronically occluded or stenosed postthrombotic or nonthrombotic veins in symptomatic patients. This state-of-the-art review provides an overview of the techniques and challenges, rationale, patient selection criteria, complications, postinterventional care, and outcomes data for endovascular intervention in the setting of acute and chronic lower extremity deep venous disease. Online supplemental material is available for this article. © RSNA, 2015 PMID:26101920

  8. Bilateral lower extremity hyperkeratotic plaques: a case report of ichthyosis vulgaris

    PubMed Central

    Leight, Hayley; Zinn, Zachary; Jalali, Omid

    2015-01-01

    Here, we report a case of a middle-aged woman presenting with severe, long-standing, hyperkeratotic plaques of the lower extremities unrelieved by over-the-counter medications. Initial history and clinical findings were suggestive of an inherited ichthyosis. Ichthyoses are genetic disorders characterized by dry scaly skin and altered skin-barrier function. A diagnosis of ichthyosis vulgaris was confirmed by histopathology. Etiology, prevalence, and treatment options are discussed. PMID:26396540

  9. Application of Advanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging Techniques in Evaluation of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Braun, Hillary J.; Dragoo, Jason L.; Hargreaves, Brian A.; Levenston, Marc E.; Gold, Garry E.

    2012-01-01

    Synopsis This article reviews current magnetic resonance imaging techniques for imaging the lower extremity, focusing on imaging of the knee, ankle, and hip joints. Recent advancements in MRI include imaging at 7 Tesla, using multiple receiver channels, T2* imaging, and metal suppression techniques, allowing more detailed visualization of complex anatomy, evaluation of morphological changes within articular cartilage, and imaging around orthopedic hardware. PMID:23622097

  10. Determination of three-dimensional joint loading within the lower extremities in snowboarding.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Andreas; McAlpine, Paul; Borrani, Fabio; Edelmann-Nusser, Jürgen

    2012-02-01

    In the biomechanical literature only a few studies are available focusing on the determination of joint loading within the lower extremities in snowboarding. These studies are limited to analysis in a restricted capture volume due to the use of optical video-based systems. To overcome this restriction the aim of the present study was to develop a method to determine net joint moments within the lower extremities in snowboarding for complete measurement runs. An experienced snowboarder performed several runs equipped with two custom-made force plates as well as a full-body inertial measurement system. A rigid, multi-segment model was developed to describe the motion and loads within the lower extremities. This model is based on an existing lower-body model and designed to be run by the OpenSim software package. Measured kinetic and kinematic data were imported into the OpenSim program and inverse dynamic calculations were performed. The results illustrate the potential of the developed method for the determination of joint loadings within the lower extremities for complete measurement runs in a real snowboarding environment. The calculated net joint moments of force are reasonable in comparison to the data presented in the literature. A good reliability of the method seems to be indicated by the low data variation between different turns. Due to the unknown accuracy of this method the application for inter-individual studies as well as studies of injury mechanisms may be limited. For intra-individual studies comparing different snowboarding techniques as well as different snowboard equipment the method seems to be beneficial. The validity of the method needs to be studied further.

  11. Major lower extremity amputation after multiple revascularizations: was it worth it?

    PubMed

    Reed, Amy B; Delvecchio, Cindy; Giglia, Joseph S

    2008-01-01

    Lower extremity revascularization is often described as excessively lesion-centric, with insufficient focus on the patient. We investigated patients' perspectives of multiple procedures for limb salvage that culminated in major lower extremity amputation. A prospective vascular surgery database was queried from January 2000 to December 2005 for patients who had undergone below-knee (BKA) or above-knee (AKA) amputation after failed lower extremity revascularization. Patients were surveyed via telephone by a vascular nurse regarding thoughts on undergoing multiple procedures for limb salvage, involvement in decision making, functional status (work, meal preparation, shopping, driving), use of prosthesis, and independence. The Social Security Death Index was utilized to verify patient survival. Amputations for infection were excluded. Seventy-eight patients underwent AKA or BKA after failed revascularization. Forty-six patients (59%) were alive at 5 years. Thirteen patients were lost to follow-up, leaving 33 available for survey. A total of 142 lower extremity revascularizations (median = 4/patient) were performed on these patients including 94 surgical bypasses (median = 3/patient) and 48 percutaneous interventions (median = 1/patient). Eighty-five percent (28 of 33 patients) of amputees surveyed would do everything to save the leg if faced with a similar scenario, regardless of the number of procedures. Fifty-four percent (18/33) of patients actively used a prosthesis, and 91% (30/33) resided at home. In retrospect, patients are willing to undergo multiple revascularizations--percutaneous or open--to attempt limb salvage even if the eventual result is major amputation. Independence and functional status appear to be obtainable in a majority of patients. Patient-oriented outcomes are necessary to guide revascularization, whether it is by a percutaneous or open technique.

  12. The traumatic lower extremity amputee: surgical challenges and advances in prosthetics.

    PubMed

    Cannada, Lisa K; Vaidya, Rahul; Covey, Dana C; Hanna, Kathryn; Dougherty, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The mangled lower extremity is a challenging injury to treat. Orthopaedic surgeons treating patients with these severe injuries must have a clear understanding of contemporary advantages and disadvantages of limb salvage versus amputation. It is helpful to review the acute management of mangled extremity injuries in the civilian and military populations, to be familiar with current postoperative protocols, and to recognize recent advances in prosthetic devices.

  13. Epidemiology of Stress Fracture and Lower Extremity Overuse Injury in Female Recruits

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-04-01

    L., B. DRINKWATER, M. JOHNSON, and A. LOUCKS. American college of sports medicine position stand. The female athlete triad . Med. Sci. Sports Exerc...However, the overall lower-extremity overuse injury rates were comparable with females in a study of high school runners that used a per athletic exposure...concurs with other female recruit (28) and athlete studies (2,5). The conflicting injury distributions among female recruit studies may be attributable to

  14. [Gender determination based on osteometric characteristics of the upper and lower extremities by discriminant analysis].

    PubMed

    Zviagin, V N; Sineva, I M

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the osteological collection of the Chair of Antropology of the Moscow State University. The results of measurement of length of long tubular bones and articular parts of scapula and pelvis were statistically treated. The complex of discriminant models calculated by the Fisher's method is recommended for the sex identification. The diagnostic accuracy is 74 - 83.5% (separated bones) and 85.7 - 95.2% (complex of bones of upper and lower extremities).

  15. [Surgical treatment of recurrence of the varicose veins in the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Henyk, S M; Oleksyn, V I; Henyk, I S

    2000-11-01

    The results of treatment in 1080 patients with the lower extremities varicose disease (VD) were analyzed. For the subcutaneous veins recurrent varicose (SVV) there were operated 11.2% patients, including, once--76.1%, twice--17.4%, three times--6.5%. In all 146 the operations were performed. Sclerosing therapy of SVV was applied in 21 patients. Basic mistake during performance of the first operative intervention for the VD was insufficient evaluation of character of the blood outflow disorder.

  16. Fatigue influences lower extremity angular velocities during a single-leg drop vertical jump

    PubMed Central

    Tamura, Akihiro; Akasaka, Kiyokazu; Otsudo, Takahiro; Shiozawa, Junya; Toda, Yuka; Yamada, Kaori

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Fatigue alters lower extremity landing strategies and decreases the ability to attenuate impact during landing. The purpose of this study was to reveal the influence of fatigue on dynamic alignment and joint angular velocities in the lower extremities during a single leg landing. [Subjects and Methods] The 34 female college students were randomly assigned to either the fatigue or control group. The fatigue group performed single-leg drop vertical jumps before, and after, the fatigue protocol, which was performed using a bike ergometer. Lower extremity kinematic data were acquired using a three-dimensional motion analysis system. The ratio of each variable (%), for the pre-fatigue to post-fatigue protocols, were calculated to compare differences between each group. [Results] Peak hip and knee flexion angular velocities increased significantly in the fatigue group compared with the control group. Furthermore, hip flexion angular velocity increased significantly between each group at 40 milliseconds after initial ground contact. [Conclusion] Fatigue reduced the ability to attenuate impact by increasing angular velocities in the direction of hip and knee flexion during landings. These findings indicate a requirement to evaluate movement quality over time by measuring hip and knee flexion angular velocities in landings during fatigue conditions. PMID:28356640

  17. Lower extremity biomechanics during weightlifting exercise vary across joint and load.

    PubMed

    Kipp, Kristof; Harris, Chad; Sabick, Michelle B

    2011-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of load on lower extremity biomechanics during the pull phase of the clean. Kinematic and kinetic data of the 3 joints of the lower extremity were collected while participants performed multiple sets of cleans at 3 percentages: 65, 75, and 85% of 1 repetition maximum (1RM). General linear models with repeated measures were used to assess the influence of load on angular velocities, net torques, powers, and rates of torque development at the ankle, knee, and hip joint. The results suggest that the biomechanical demands required from the lower extremities change with the lifted load and to an extent depend on the respective joint. Most notably, the hip and knee extended significantly faster than the ankle independent of load, whereas the hip and ankle generally produced significantly higher torques than the knee did. Torque, rate of torque development (RTD), and power were maximimal at 85% of 1RM for the ankle joint and at 75% of 1RM for the knee joint. Torque and RTD at the hip were maximal at loads >75% of 1RM. This study provides important novel information about the mechanical demands of a weightlifting exercise and should be heeded in the design of resistance training programs.

  18. Lower Extremity Function following Partial Calcanectomy in High-Risk Limb Salvage Patients

    PubMed Central

    Oliver, Noah G.; Steinberg, John S.; Powers, Kelly; Evans, Karen K.; Kim, Paul J.; Attinger, Christopher E.

    2015-01-01

    Partial calcanectomy (PC) is an established limb salvage procedure for treatment of deep heel ulceration with concomitant calcaneal osteomyelitis. The purpose of this study is to determine if a relationship exists between the amount of calcaneus removed during PC and the resulting lower extremity function and limb salvage outcomes. Consecutive PC patients were retrospectively divided into two cohorts defined by the amount of calcaneus resected before wound closure: patients in cohort 1 retained = 50% of calcaneus, while patients in cohort 2 underwent resection of >50% of the calcaneus. The Lower Extremity Function Scale (LEFS) was used to assess postoperative lower extremity function. The average amount of calcaneus resected was 13% ± 9.2 (1–39%) and 74% ± 19.5 (51–100) in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (P < 0.0001). Below knee amputation was performed in 7 (28%) and 5 (29%) of subjects in cohorts 1 and 2, respectively (P = 1.0). The average LEFS score was 33.9 ± 15.0 for subjects in cohort 1 and 36.2 ± 19.9 for the subjects cohort 2 (P = 0.8257) which correlates to “moderate to quite a bit of difficulty.” Our study suggests that regardless of the amount of calcaneus resected, PC provides a viable treatment option for high-risk patients with calcaneal osteomyelitis. PMID:25692151

  19. Trauma patients warrant upper and lower extremity venous duplex ultrasound surveillance

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Alonso; Tyroch, Alan H.; McLean, Susan F.; Smith, Jody; Ramos, Alex

    2017-01-01

    Background: Due to the high incidence of thromboembolic events (deep venous thrombosis [DVT] and pulmonary embolus [PE]) after injury, many trauma centers perform lower extremity surveillance duplex ultrasounds. We hypothesize that trauma patients are at a higher risk of upper extremity DVTs (UEDVTs) than lower extremity DVTs (LEDVTs), and therefore, all extremities should be evaluated. Materials and Methods: A retrospective chart and trauma registry review of Intensive Care Unit trauma patients with upper and LEDVTs detected on surveillance duplex ultrasound from January 2010 to December 2014 was carried out. Variables reviewed were age, gender, injury severity score, injury mechanism, clot location, day of clot detection, presence of central venous pressure catheter, presence of inferior vena cava filter, mechanical ventilation, and fracture. Results: A total of 136 patients had a DVT in a 5-year period: upper - 71 (52.2%), lower - 61 (44.9%), both upper and lower - 4 (2.9%). Overall, 75 (55.2%) patients had a UEDVT. Upper DVT vein: Brachial (62), axillary (26), subclavian (11), and internal jugular (10). Lower DVT vein: femoral (58), popliteal (14), below knee (4), and iliac (2). 10.3% had a PE: UEDVT - 5 (6.7%) and LEDVT - 9 (14.8%) P = 0.159. Conclusions: The majority of the DVTs in the study were in the upper extremities. For trauma centers that aggressively screen the lower extremities with venous duplex ultrasound, surveillance to include the upper extremities is warranted. PMID:28367009

  20. Lower extremity lipedema, upper extremity lipodystrophy and severe calcinosis complicating juvenile dermatomyositis.

    PubMed

    Pavlov-Dolijanovic, Slavica R; Vujasinovic Stupar, Nada Z; Gavrilov, Nikola; Seric, Srdjan

    2014-11-01

    Juvenile dermatomyositis (JDM) is a rare but complex and potentially life-threatening autoimmune disease of childhood. Significant proportions of patients have residual weakness, muscle atrophy, joint contractures, and calcinosis. Recently, new clinical findings, such as lipodystrophy accompanied with increased fat deposition in certain areas, have been reported. So far, it is not known whether the redistribution of body fat may be the type of lipedema of lower extremity. We describe a 39-year-old woman who was diagnosed with JDM at the age of 7. Later she developed symmetrical lipodystrophy of upper extremities and symmetrical lipedema of lower extremities (making 2 and 58.3 % of total body fat mass, respectively), with multiple calcified nodules in the subcutaneous tissues. These nodules gradually increased in size despite therapy. Capillaroscopy findings showed scleroderma-like abnormalities. ANA and anti-U1RNP antibodies were positive. Similar cases with simultaneous occurrence of the lipedema of lower extremities, lipodystrophy of upper extremities, and severe calcinosis complicating JDM have not been published so far. We showed that the calcinosis and lipodystrophy were associated with short duration of active disease. Also, we display case that raises the question whether it is possible overlapping autoimmune diseases revealed during follow-up.

  1. Lower extremity biomechanical changes associated with symmetrical torso loading during simulated marching.

    PubMed

    Seay, Joseph F; Fellin, Rebecca E; Sauer, Shane G; Frykman, Peter N; Bensel, Carolyn K

    2014-01-01

    The dose-response relationship between biomechanical variables and the magnitude of external loads is unclear. The use of different load distributions (e.g., pack types) may confound results because of changes in torso center of mass. Therefore, we examined the relationship between load magnitude and sagittal plane lower extremity mechanics of Soldiers walking with two symmetrically distributed loads. Fourteen Soldiers marched on a force-sensing treadmill at 1.34 m/s for 10 minutes with no load (BW_00) and while wearing vest-borne loads of 15 kg (BW_15) and 55 kg (BW_55). The effects of the loads on sagittal plane joint angles and moments were compared using 1-way repeated measures analyses of variance. Compared with BW_00, knee extension moment increased with the 15- and the 55-kg loads (both p < 0.003), confirming previously reported load-related biomechanical responses. Knee moment increases during early stance appeared to be the primary means by which the lower extremity counteracted BW_15 during early stance; in contrast, hip extensors and ankle dorsiflexors appeared to be the primary muscular efforts responsible for propulsion during late stance. Findings elucidated the effects of load magnitude on lower extremity mechanics without postural changes that result from pack-related shifts in torso center of mass.

  2. Computed tomography-based quantitative assessment of lower extremity lymphedema following treatment for gynecologic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seung Hyun; Kim, Young Jae; Kim, Kwang Gi; Hwang, Ji Hye

    2017-01-01

    Objective To develop an algorithmic quantitative skin and subcutaneous tissue volume measurement protocol for lower extremity lymphedema (LEL) patients using computed tomography (CT), to verify the usefulness of the measurement techniques in LEL patients, and to observe the structural characteristics of subcutaneous tissue according to the progression of LEL in gynecologic cancer. Methods A program for algorithmic quantitative analysis of lower extremity CT scans has been developed to measure the skin and subcutaneous volume, muscle compartment volume, and the extent of the peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern. The CT venographies of 50 lower extremities from 25 subjects were reviewed in two groups (acute and chronic lymphedema). Results A significant increase in the total volume, subcutaneous volume, and extent of peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern except quantitative muscle volume was identified in the more-affected limb. The correlation of CT-based total volume and subcutaneous volume measurements with volumetry measurement was strong (correlation coefficient: 0.747 and 0.749, respectively). The larger extent of peculiar trabecular area with a honeycombed pattern in the subcutaneous tissue was identified in the more-affected limb of chronic lymphedema group. Conclusion CT-based quantitative assessments could provide objective volume measurements and information about the structural characteristics of subcutaneous tissue in women with LEL following treatment for gynecologic cancer. PMID:28028991

  3. Correlation between Intrinsic Patellofemoral Pain Syndrome in Young Adults and Lower Extremity Biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Ohjeoung; Yun, Mijung; Lee, Wanhee

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the correlation between intrinsic patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS) in young adults and lower extremity biomechanics. [Subjects] This experiment was carried out with sixty (24 men and 32 women), who are normal university students as subjects. [Methods] All subjects underwent 3 clinical evaluations. For distinguishing the intrinsic PFPS from controls, we used the Modified Functional Index Questionnaire (MFIQ), Clarke's test and the Eccentric step test. Based on the results of the tests, subjects who were classified as positive for 2 more tests were allocated to the bilateral or unilateral intrinsic PFPS group (n=14), and the others were allocated to the control group (n=42). These two groups were tested for hamstring tightness, foot overpronation, and static Q-angle and dynamic Q-angle. These are the four lower extremity biomechanic, cited as risk factors of patellofemoral pain syndrome. [Results] The over pronation, static Q-angle and the dynamic Q-angle were not significantly different between the two groups. However, the hamstring tightness of the PFPS group was significantly greater than that of the controls. [Conclusion] We examined individuals for intrinsic patellofemoral pain syndrome in young adults and lower extremity biomechanics. We found a strong correlation between intrinsic PFPS and hamstring tightness.

  4. Terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity: absent lateral ray and a normal fibula

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jae Kwang; Chung, Moon Sang; Lee, Sang Ki

    2007-01-01

    Congenital lateral ray deficiency is considered to be a manifestation of fibular hemimelia. However, we have noted patients with absent lateral ray but stable knee and ankle joints, and named this condition terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity. This study was undertaken to further define this group of patients and to compare these patients with fibular hemimelia patients. Four boys and one girl of mean age six years two months were in the terminal hemimelic group and four boys and three girls of mean age eight years seven months in the fibular hemimelic group at the final evaluation. Clinical features commonly observed in the fibular hemimelia such as knee valgus, knee instability, tibial bowing, ball and socket ankle, ankle instability, tarsal coalition, leg length inequality were compared between both groups. Terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity was the same as fibular hemimelia in clinical features below the ankle joint. However, terminal hemimela was found to be milder than fibular hemimelia in terms of limb shortening. The clinical features above the ankle joint were different between both groups. Knees and ankles were stable, and gait disturbance were rarely noticed in patients with terminal hemimelia of the lower extremity. PMID:17558505

  5. Predictors of lower extremity injuries in team sports (PROFITS-study): a study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Pasanen, Kati; Rossi, Marko T; Parkkari, Jari; Heinonen, Ari; Steffen, Kathrin; Myklebust, Grethe; Krosshaug, Tron; Vasankari, Tommi; Kannus, Pekka; Avela, Janne; Kulmala, Juha-Pekka; Perttunen, Jarmo; Kujala, Urho M; Bahr, Roald

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Several intrinsic risk factors for lower extremity injuries have been proposed, including lack of proper knee and body control during landings and cutting manoeuvres, low muscular strength, reduced balance and increased ligament laxity, but there are still many unanswered questions. The overall aim of this research project is to investigate anatomical, biomechanical, neuromuscular, genetic and demographic risk factors for traumatic non-contact lower extremity injuries in young team sport athletes. Furthermore, the research project aims to develop clinically oriented screening tools for predicting future injury risk. Methods Young female and male players (n=508) from nine basketball teams, nine floorball teams, three ice hockey teams, and one volleyball team accepted the invitation to participate in this four-and-half-year prospective follow-up study. The players entered the study either in 2011, 2012 or 2013, and gave blood samples, performed physical tests and completed the baseline questionnaires. Following the start of screening tests, the players will be followed for sports injuries through December 2015. The primary outcome is a traumatic non-contact lower extremity injury. The secondary outcomes are other sports-related injuries. Injury risk is examined on the basis of anatomical, biomechanical, neuromuscular, genetic and other baseline factors. Univariate and multivariate regression models will be used to investigate association between investigated parameters and injury risk. PMID:27900143

  6. Somatotype of the individuals with lower extremity amputation and its association with cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Mozumdar, Arupendra; Roy, Subrata K

    2008-03-01

    Anthropometric somatotyping is one of the methods to describe the shape of the human body, which shows some associations with an individual's health and disease condition, especially with cardiovascular diseases (CVD). Individuals with lower extremity amputation (LEA) are known to be more vulnerable to the cardiovascular risk. The objectives of the present study are to report the somatotype of the individuals having lower extremity amputation, to study the possible variation in somatotype between two groups of amputated individuals, and to study the association between cardiovascular disease risk factor and somatotype components among individuals with locomotor disability. 102 adult male individuals with unilateral lower-extremity amputation residing in Calcutta and adjoining areas were investigated. The anthropometric data for somatotyping and data on cardiovascular risk traits (such as body mass index, blood pressure measurements, blood lipids) have been collected. The somatotyping technique of Carter & Heath (1990) has been followed. The result shows high mean values of endomorphy and mesomorphy components and a low mean value of the ectomorphy component among the amputated individuals having cardiovascular risks. The results of both discriminant analysis and logistic regression analysis show a significant relationship between somatotype components and CVD risk among the individuals with LEA. The findings of the present study support the findings of similar studies conducted on the normal population. Diagnosis of CVD risk condition through somatotyping can be utilized in prevention/treatment management for the individuals with LEA.

  7. Lower Extremity Ulcers in Systemic Sclerosis: Features and Response to Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugam, Victoria K.; Price, Patricia; Attinger, Christopher E.; Steen, Virginia D.

    2010-01-01

    Nondigital lower extremity ulcers are a difficult to treat complication of scleroderma, and a significant cause of morbidity. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of nondigital lower extremity ulcers in scleroderma and describe the associations with autoantibodies and genetic prothrombotic states. A cohort of 249 consecutive scleroderma patients seen in the Georgetown University Hosptial Division of Rheumatology was evaluated, 10 of whom had active ulcers, giving a prevalence of 4.0%. Patients with diffuse scleroderma had shorter disease duration at the time of ulcer development (mean 4.05 years ± 0.05) compared to those with limited disease (mean 22.83 years ± 5.612, P value .0078). Ulcers were bilateral in 70%. In the 10 patients with ulcers, antiphospholipid antibodies were positive in 50%, and genetic prothrombotic screen was positive in 70% which is higher than expected based on prevalence reports from the general scleroderma population. Of patients with biopsy specimens available (n = 5), fibrin occlusive vasculopathy was seen in 100%, and all of these patients had either positive antiphospholipid antibody screen, or positive genetic prothrombotic profile. We recommend screening scleroderma patients with lower extremity ulcers for the presence of anti-phospholipid antibodies and genetic prothrombotic states. PMID:20827313

  8. Management of sacroiliac dysfunction and lower extremity lymphedema using a comprehensive treatment approach: a case report.

    PubMed

    Crane, Patricia

    2009-01-01

    Sacroiliac joint (SIJ) dysfunction, a common source of low back and buttock pain, can occur from cumulative shear or torsional forces during activities such as walking that require weight to transfer from one extremity to the other. Individuals with lower extremity lymphedema may also experience SIJ dysfunction. The purpose of this article was to describe the examination, diagnosis, and intervention for a patient with lower extremity lymphedema and sacroiliac joint dysfunction. The patient was a 50-year-old female with increased left lower extremity lymphedema and left buttock and groin pain that was previously treated unsuccessfully with physical therapy. SIJ dysfunction was attributable to an alteration in gait pattern caused by increased limb volume associated with lymphedema. The patient was treated for 19 visits over six weeks with complete decongestive therapy (CDT), muscle energy techniques, core stabilization, and the application of a pelvic support belt. Objective changes include decreased lymphedema, increased lower abdominal and lumbar extension strength, and decreased Oswetry Disability Index ratings. The patient was able to ambulate community distances without an assistive device and to resume unsupervised strength and conditioning without pain.

  9. An analysis of the effect of lower extremity strength on impact severity during a backward fall.

    PubMed

    Sandler, R; Robinovitch, S

    2001-12-01

    At least 280 000 hip fractures occur annually in the U.S. at an estimated cost of $9 billion. While over 90 percent of these are caused by falls, only about 2 percent of all falls result in hip fracture. Evidence suggests that the most important determinants of hip fracture risk during a fall are the body's impact velocity and configuration. Accordingly, protective responses for reducing impact velocity and the likelihood for direct impact to the hip, strongly influence fracture risk. One method for reducing the body's impact velocity and kinetic energy during a fall is to absorb energy in the lower extremity muscles during descent, as occurs during sitting and squatting. In the present study, we employed a series of in verted pendulum models to determine: (a) the theoretical effect of this mechanism on impact severity during a backward fall, and (b) the effect on impact severity of age-related declines (or exercise-induced enhancements) in lower extremity strength. Compared to the case of a fall with zero energy absorption in the lower extremity joints, best-case falls (which involved 81 percent activation of ankle and hip muscles, but only 23 percent activation of knees muscles) involved 79 percent attenuation (from 352 J to 74 J) in the body's vertical kinetic energy at impact (KEv), and 48 percent attenuation (from 3.22 to 1.68 m/s) in the downward velocity of the pelvis at impact (v(v)). Among the mechanisms responsible for this were: (1) eccentric contraction of lower extremity muscles during descent, which resulted in up to 150 J of energy absorption; (2) impact with the trunk in an upright configuration, which reduced the change in potential energy associated with the fall by 100 J; and (3) knee extension during the final stage of descent, which "transferred" up to 90 J of impact energy into horizontal (as opposed to vertical) kinetic energy. Declines in joint strength reduced the effectiveness of mechanisms (1) and (3), and thereby increased impact

  10. Clinical and functional outcomes of acute lower extremity compartment syndrome at a Major Trauma Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Lollo, Loreto; Grabinsky, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background: Acute lower extremity compartment syndrome (CS) is a condition that untreated causes irreversible nerve and muscle ischemia. Treatment by decompression fasciotomy without delay prevents permanent disability. The use of intracompartmental pressure (iCP) measurement in uncertain situations aids in diagnosis of severe leg pain. As an infrequent complication of lower extremity trauma, consequences of CS include chronic pain, nerve injury, and contractures. The purpose of this study was to observe the clinical and functional outcomes for patients with lower extremity CS after fasciotomy. Methods: Retrospective chart analysis for patients with a discharge diagnosis of CS was performed. Physical demographics, employment status, activity at time of injury, injury severity score, fracture types, pain scores, hours to fasciotomy, iCP, serum creatine kinase levels, wound treatment regimen, length of hospital stay, and discharge facility were collected. Lower extremity neurologic examination, pain scores, orthopedic complications, and employment status at 30 days and 12 months after discharge were noted. Results: One hundred twenty-four patients were enrolled in this study. One hundred and eight patients were assessed at 12 months. Eighty-one percent were male. Motorized vehicles caused 51% of injuries in males. Forty-one percent of injuries were tibia fractures. Acute kidney injury occurred in 2.4%. Mean peak serum creatine kinase levels were 58,600 units/ml. Gauze dressing was used in 78.9% of nonfracture patients and negative pressure wound vacuum therapy in 78.2% of fracture patients. About 21.6% of patients with CS had prior surgery. Nearly 12.9% of patients required leg amputation. Around 81.8% of amputees were male. Sixty-seven percent of amputees had associated vascular injuries. Foot numbness occurred in 20.5% of patients and drop foot palsy in 18.2%. Osteomyelitis developed in 10.2% of patients and fracture nonunion in 6.8%. About 14.7% of patients

  11. A review of the risk factors for lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers.

    PubMed

    Bowerman, Erin Anne; Whatman, Chris; Harris, Nigel; Bradshaw, Elizabeth

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to review the evidence for selected risk factors of lower extremity overuse injuries in young elite female ballet dancers. An electronic search of key databases from 1969 to July 2013 was conducted using the keywords dancers, ballet dancers, athletes, adolescent, adolescence, young, injury, injuries, risk, overuse, lower limb, lower extremity, lower extremities, growth, maturation, menarche, alignment, and biomechanics. Thirteen published studies were retained for review. Results indicated that there is a high incidence of lower extremity overuse injuries in the target population. Primary risk factors identified included maturation, growth, and poor lower extremity alignment. Strong evidence from well-designed studies indicates that young elite female ballet dancers suffer from delayed onset of growth, maturation, menarche, and menstrual irregularities. However, there is little evidence that this deficit increases the risk of overuse injury, with the exception of stress fractures. Similarly, there is minimal evidence linking poor lower extremity alignment to increased risk of overuse injury. It is concluded that further prospective, longitudinal studies are required to clarify the relationship between growth, maturation, menarche, and lower extremity alignment, and the risk of lower extremity overuse injury in young elite female ballet dancers.

  12. Effect of landing height on frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energy dissipation at lower extremity joints.

    PubMed

    Yeow, C H; Lee, P V S; Goh, J C H

    2009-08-25

    Lack of the necessary magnitude of energy dissipation by lower extremity joint muscles may be implicated in elevated impact stresses present during landing from greater heights. These increased stresses are experienced by supporting tissues like cartilage, ligaments and bones, thus aggravating injury risk. This study sought to investigate frontal plane kinematics, kinetics and energetics of lower extremity joints during landing from different heights. Eighteen male recreational athletes were instructed to perform drop-landing tasks from 0.3- to 0.6-m heights. Force plates and motion-capture system were used to capture ground reaction force and kinematics data, respectively. Joint moment was calculated using inverse dynamics. Joint power was computed as a product of joint moment and angular velocity. Work was defined as joint power integrated over time. Hip and knee joints delivered significantly greater joint power and eccentric work (p<0.05) than the ankle joint at both landing heights. Substantial increase (p<0.05) in eccentric work was noted at the hip joint in response to increasing landing height. Knee and hip joints acted as key contributors to total energy dissipation in the frontal plane with increase in peak ground reaction force (GRF). The hip joint was the top contributor to energy absorption, which indicated a hip-dominant strategy in the frontal plane in response to peak GRF during landing. Future studies should investigate joint motions that can maximize energy dissipation or reduce the need for energy dissipation in the frontal plane at the various joints, and to evaluate their effects on the attenuation of lower extremity injury risk during landing.

  13. The Effect of Social Integration on Outcomes after Major Lower Extremity Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Hawkins, Alexander T.; Pallangyo, Anthony J.; Herman, Ayesiga M.; Schaumeier, Maria J.; Smith, Ann D.; Hevelone, Nathanael D.; Crandell, David M.; Nguyen, Louis

    2016-01-01

    Objective Major lower extremity amputation is a common procedure that results in a profound change in a patient's life. We sought to determine the association between social support and outcomes after amputation. We hypothesized that patients with greater social support will have better post amputation outcomes. Methods From November 2011 to May 2013, we conducted a cross-sectional, observational, multicenter study. Social integration was measured by the social integration subset of the Short Form (Craig Handicap Assessment and Reporting Technique (CHART). Systemic social support was assessed by comparing a US and Tanzanian population. Walking function was measured using the 6MWT and quality of life (QoL) was measured using the EQ-5D. Results 102 major lower extremity amputees were recruited. 63 patients were enrolled in the US with a mean age of 58.0. Forty-two (67%) were male. Patients with low social integration were more likely to be unable to ambulate (no walk 39% vs. slow walk 23% vs. fast walk 10%; P=.01) and those with high social integration were more likely to be fast walkers (no walk 10% vs. slow walk 59% vs. fast walk 74%; P=.01). This relationship persisted in a multivariable analysis. Increasing social integration scores were also positively associated with increasing quality of life scores in a multivariable analysis (β .002; SE .0008; P = .02). In comparing the US population with the Tanzanian cohort (39 subjects), there were no significant differences between functional or quality of life outcomes in the systemic social support analysis. Conclusions In the US population, increased social integration is associated with both improved function and quality of life outcomes among major lower extremity amputees. Systemic social support, as measured by comparing the US population with a Tanzanian population, was not associated with improved function or quality of life outcomes. In the US, steps should be taken to identify and aid amputees with poor

  14. Use of Multiple Adjunctive Negative Pressure Wound Therapy Modalities to Manage Diabetic Lower-Extremity Wounds

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Various treatment options exist for wound healing; however, clinical assessment of the patient and the wound environment must be considered before determining an optimal wound treatment plan. Negative pressure wound therapy alone and/or with an instilled topical solution can be effective in adjunctive management of acute and chronic wounds. Hyperbaric oxygen therapy has also been shown to contribute to the wound-healing process. A pilot evaluation using a multistep approach of adjunctive negative pressure wound therapy with instillation and a dwell time, standard negative pressure wound therapy, and hyperbaric oxygen therapy was explored to manage postsurgical, diabetic lower-extremity wounds with a significant bioburden. Methods: Three diabetic patients with lower-extremity ulcers were treated after surgical intervention. Multistep wound therapy consisted of (1) negative pressure wound therapy with instillation of normal saline with a 20-minute dwell time, followed by 2 hours of negative pressure at −150 mm Hg for 3 to 4 days; (2) 1 to 3 weeks of continuous negative pressure at −150 mm Hg; and (3) multiple treatments of hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Results: After surgery, wound closure was achieved within 4 weeks postinitiation of multistep wound therapy. All patients regained limb function and recovered with no long-term sequelae. Conclusions: In these 3 cases, a multistep wound therapy approach after surgery resulted in successful outcomes; however, larger prospective studies are needed to demonstrate the potential efficacy of this approach in the postsurgical management of complex, diabetic lower-extremity wounds. PMID:28077984

  15. Development of a simplified finite element model of the 50th percentile male occupant lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Doron; Moreno, Daniel P; Stitzel, Joel D; Gayzik, F Scott

    2014-01-01

    A simplified lower extremity model was developed using the geometry from the Global Human Body Models Consortium (GHBMC) 50th percentile male occupant model v4.1.1 (M50) as a base. This simplified model contains 31.4x103 elements and has structures that represent bone (assumed rigid) and soft tissue. This element total is substantially reduced compared to 117.7x103 elements in the original M50 lower extremity. The purpose of this simplified computational model is to output rapid kinematic and kinetic data when detailed structural response or injury prediction data is not required. The development process included evaluating the effects of element size, material properties, and contact definitions on total run time and response. Two simulations were performed to analyze this model; a 4.9 m/s knee bolster impact and a 6.9 m/s lateral knee impact using LS-DYNA R6.1.1. The 40 ms knee bolster impact and lateral knee impact tests required 5 and 7 minutes to run, respectively on 4 cores. The original detailed M50 lower extremity model required 94 and 112 minutes to run the same boundary conditions, on the same hardware, representing a reduction in run time of on average 94%. A quantitative comparison was made by comparing the peak force of the impacts between the two models. This simplified leg model will become a component in a simplified full body model of the seated, 50th percentile male occupant. The significantly reduced run time will be valuable for parametric studies with a full body finite element model.

  16. Early versus delayed amputation in the setting of severe lower extremity trauma.

    PubMed

    Williams, Zachary F; Bools, Lindsay M; Adams, Ashley; Clancy, Thomas V; Hope, William W

    2015-06-01

    Leg-threatening injuries present patients and clinicians with the difficult decision to pursue primary amputation or attempt limb salvage. The effects of delayed amputation after failed limb salvage on outcomes, such as prosthetic use and hospital deposition, are unclear. We evaluated the timing of amputations and its effects on outcomes. We retrospectively reviewed all trauma patients undergoing lower extremity amputation from January 1, 2000 through December 31, 2010 at a Level 2 trauma center. Patients undergoing early amputation (amputation within 48 hours of admission) were compared with patients undergoing late amputation (amputations >48 hours after admission). Patient demographics, injury specifics, operative characteristics, and outcomes were documented. During the 11-year study period, 43 patients had a lower extremity amputation and 21 had early amputations. The two groups were similar except for a slightly higher Mangled Extremity Severity Score in the early amputation group. Total hospital length of stay significantly differed between groups, with the late amputation group length of stay being nearly twice as long. The late amputation group had significantly more ipsilateral leg complications than the early group (77% vs 15%). There was a trend toward more prosthetic use in the early group (93%vs 57%, P = 0.07). Traumatic lower extremity injuries requiring amputation are rare at our institution (0.3% incidence). Regardless of the amputation timing, most patients were able to obtain a prosthetic. Although the late group had a longer length of hospital stay and more local limb complications, attempted limb salvage still appears to be a viable option for appropriately selected trauma patients.

  17. Autologous Fat Grafting in Severe Lower Extremity Asymmetries: Report of Four Cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity asymmetries are challenging problems in plastic and aesthetic surgery practice. Regardless of their origin, atrophies and asymmetries can be extremely varied and difficult to solve with simple techniques. Objectives:  The author reports his experience in the treatment of four patients suffering from severe lower extremity atrophy and asymmetry of different etiologies with autologous fat grafting. Methods: A total of four cases are presented. Patient selection was based on the severity of atrophy and asymmetry. Two patients were treated with two sessions of simple fat grafting and two patients with one session of cell-enriched fat grafting. The end point in each session was determined by tension/blanching of soft tissues. All patients were followed up for at least 12 months after the last session. During the postoperative follow-up, variables, such as objective volume improvement, objective girth loss, return to daily activities, and patient satisfaction, were analyzed. Results: The initial analysis of postoperative results showed a good patient satisfaction rate with no relevant complications and an early return to daily activities. Estimated mean volume improvement for simple fat grafting cases was estimated as 44% after two treatments. Mean volume improvement in cell-enriched fat grafting cases was estimated as 25% after only one treatment. Conclusions: Autologous fat grafting is a safe, effective, and reliable technique to perform aesthetic and reconstructive reshaping of a lower extremity in cases of atrophy or severe asymmetry. Depending on the preoperative soft tissue compliance, cell-assisted fat grafting will play an important role in reducing the number of sessions to perform. PMID:26824005

  18. Haptic biofeedback for improving compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Fu, Michael C; DeLuke, Levi; Buerba, Rafael A; Fan, Richard E; Zheng, Ying Jean; Leslie, Michael P; Baumgaertner, Michael R; Grauer, Jonathan N

    2014-11-01

    After lower-extremity orthopedic trauma and surgery, patients are often advised to restrict weight bearing on the affected limb. Conventional training methods are not effective at enabling patients to comply with recommendations for partial weight bearing. The current study assessed a novel method of using real-time haptic (vibratory/vibrotactile) biofeedback to improve compliance with instructions for partial weight bearing. Thirty healthy, asymptomatic participants were randomized into 1 of 3 groups: verbal instruction, bathroom scale training, and haptic biofeedback. Participants were instructed to restrict lower-extremity weight bearing in a walking boot with crutches to 25 lb, with an acceptable range of 15 to 35 lb. A custom weight bearing sensor and biofeedback system was attached to all participants, but only those in the haptic biofeedback group were given a vibrotactile signal if they exceeded the acceptable range. Weight bearing in all groups was measured with a separate validated commercial system. The verbal instruction group bore an average of 60.3±30.5 lb (mean±standard deviation). The bathroom scale group averaged 43.8±17.2 lb, whereas the haptic biofeedback group averaged 22.4±9.1 lb (P<.05). As a percentage of body weight, the verbal instruction group averaged 40.2±19.3%, the bathroom scale group averaged 32.5±16.9%, and the haptic biofeedback group averaged 14.5±6.3% (P<.05). In this initial evaluation of the use of haptic biofeedback to improve compliance with lower-extremity partial weight bearing, haptic biofeedback was superior to conventional physical therapy methods. Further studies in patients with clinical orthopedic trauma are warranted.

  19. Actions of Two Bi-Articular Muscles of the Lower Extremity: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Landin, Dennis; Thompson, Melissa; Reid, Meghan

    2016-01-01

    The extremities of the human body contain several bi-articular muscles. The actions produced by muscles at the joints they cross are greatly influenced by joint moment arms and muscle length. These factors are dynamic and subject to change as joint angles are altered. Therefore, to more completely understand the actions of such muscles, the angles of both joints must be manipulated. This report reviews investigations, which have explored the actions of two bi-articular muscles of the lower extremities (gastrocnemius and rectus femoris) as the joints they cross are moved into various combinations of angles. The findings have both clinical and physical performance ramifications. PMID:27298656

  20. Poor outcome of bilateral lower extremity morel-lavallee lesions: a case report.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Sharon S; Molmenti, Ernesto P; Siskind, Eric; Kasabian, Armen K; Huang, Su-I D

    2014-03-01

    The Morel-Lavallee lesion is a closed, internal degloving injury that results when a strong, shearing force is applied parallel to the plane of injury, as is common in vehicular trauma. It is an underdiagnosed entity that is often missed during the initial trauma workup as symptoms can be subtle. There are few reports of lesions occurring below the knee. Most cases affect the proximal thigh and trochanter, as these tend to be dependent areas in high velocity trauma. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first literature report of bilateral lower extremity Morel-Lavallee lesions.

  1. Severe myalgia of the lower extremities as the first clinical feature of meningococcal purpura fulminans.

    PubMed

    de Souza, Alexandre Leite; Sztajnbok, Jaques; Salgado, Maristela Marques; Romano, Carla C; Alkmin, Maria das Graças Adelino; Duarte, Alberto J S; Seguro, Antonio Carlos

    2007-10-01

    In patients with meningococcal infection, devastating presentations, such as purpura fulminans, which can progress to extensive tissue necrosis of the limbs and digits, have a significant social impact. The case presented herein illustrates such a phenomenon in a patient who developed bilateral necrosis of the lower extremities as a result of infection with Neisseria meningitis. We emphasize that severe myalgia was the first clinical manifestation of meningococcal purpura fulminans in our case. However, myalgia has typically been overlooked and undervalued as an early clinical feature of meningococcal sepsis. Early recognition and prompt initial antibiotic therapy continue to be the cornerstones of the successful management of this dramatic disease, reducing morbidity and mortality.

  2. Hyperglycemia is Associated with the Incidence of Frailty and Lower Extremity Mobility Limitations in Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Kalyani, Rita Rastogi; Tian, Jing; Xue, Qian-Li; Walston, Jeremy; Cappola, Anne R.; Fried, Linda P.; Brancati, Frederick L.; Blaum, Caroline S.

    2012-01-01

    Objectives To determine the degree to which hyperglycemia predicts the development of frailty and/or lower extremity mobility limitations. Design Secondary data analysis of longitudinal data collected in a prospective cohort study. Setting Baltimore, Maryland Participants We examined 329 women from the Women’s Health and Aging Studies II aged 70–79 years at baseline who had all variables needed for analysis. Methods Hemoglobin A1c [HbA1c] at baseline was the independent variable and categorized as: <5.5%, 5.5 to 5.9%, 6.0–6.4%, 6.5–7.9%, ≥8%. The incidence of frailty and lower extremity mobility limitations (based on self-reported walking difficulty, walking speed, and short performance physical battery [SPPB] score) was determined (follow-up≈9 years). Frailty was assessed using the Cardiovascular Health Study criteria. Covariates included demographics, body mass index, interleukin-6, and clinical history of comorbidities. Statistical analyses included Kaplan-Meier survival curves and Cox regression models adjusting for key covariates. Results In time-to-event analyses, HbA1c category was associated with incidence of walking difficulty (p=0.049) and low physical performance (p=0.001); association with incidence of frailty and low walking speed had a trend towards significance (both p=0.10). In demographics-adjusted regression models, HbA1c≥8% (versus<5.5%) was associated with an approximately three-times increased risk of incident frailty and three-to-five times increased risk of lower extremity mobility limitations (all p<0.05). In fully adjusted models, HbA1c≥8% (versus<5.5%) was associated with incident frailty (hazard ratio[HR]=3.33, 95% confidence interval=1.24–8.93), walking difficulty (HR=3.47,1.26–9.55), low walking speed (HR=2.82,1.19–6.71), and low physical performance (HR=3.60,1.52–8.53). Conclusions Hyperglycemia is associated with the development of frailty and lower extremity mobility limitations in older women; future studies

  3. Sports nuclear medicine. Bone imaging for lower extremity pain in athletes

    SciTech Connect

    Brill, D.R.

    1983-03-01

    Increased participation in sports by the general public has led to an increase in sports-induced injuries, including stress fractures, shin splints, arthritis, and a host of musculotendinous maladies. Bone scintigraphy with Tc-99m MDP has been used with increasing frequency in detecting stress fractures, but this study can miss certain important conditions and detect other lesions of lesser clinical significance. This paper demonstrates the spectrum of findings on bone scanning in nonacute sports trauma and offers suggestions for the optimal use of Tc-99m MDP for detecting the causes of lower extremity pain in athletes.

  4. Benign monomelic amyotrophy of the lower extremity: report of two cases and literature review.

    PubMed

    Dimachkie, M M; Justiz, W; Vriesendorp, F J

    2000-06-01

    Benign monomelic amyotrophy is an uncommon cause of progressive mildly disabling atrophy and weakness of a limb. It predominantly affects the distal upper limb of young men. We present two women with benign monomelic of amyotrophy of the lower extremity. Although thedisorder seemed clinically confined to a leg, we confirmed by electromyography chronic denervgation of the contralaterral extremity of both patients and in the arm of one patient.We review the literature and discuss the differential diagnosis. Benign monomelic amyotrophy is a diagnosis of exclusion that requires consideration in young women with unilateral leg atrophy.

  5. Diffuse lipofibromatosis of the lower extremity masquerading as a vascular anomaly.

    PubMed

    Greene, Arin K; Karnes, Julie; Padua, Horacio M; Schmidt, Birgitta A; Kasser, James R; Labow, Brian I

    2009-06-01

    Lipofibromatosis is a slow-growing, childhood soft-tissue neoplasm that is often confused with other conditions. We report a patient with lipofibromatosis causing extremity enlargement at birth. The lesion initially was thought to be a vascular anomaly or lipedema on clinical and MRI examination. When involving the lower extremity, diffuse lipofibromatosis must be differentiated from more common causes of lower limb enlargement in children: lymphatic malformation, lymphedema, or lipedema. Compared with these more frequent conditions, lipofibromatosis usually causes less morbidity. Management of the tumor includes observation or excision. Because complete extirpation of the lesion is difficult, the recurrence rate is high.

  6. Ability of Lower-Extremity Injury Severity Scores to Predict Functional Outcome After Limb Salvage

    PubMed Central

    Ly, Thuan V.; Travison, Thomas G.; Castillo, Renan C.; Bosse, Michael J.; MacKenzie, Ellen J.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Lower-extremity injury severity scoring systems were developed to assist surgeons in decision-making regarding whether to amputate or perform limb salvage after high-energy trauma to the lower extremity. These scoring systems have been shown to not be good predictors of limb amputation or salvage. This study was performed to evaluate the clinical utility of the five commonly used lower-extremity injury severity scoring systems as predictors of final functional outcome. Methods: We analyzed data from a cohort of patients who participated in a multicenter prospective study of clinical and functional outcomes after high-energy lower-extremity trauma. Injury severity was assessed with use of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score; the Limb Salvage Index; the Predictive Salvage Index; the Nerve Injury, Ischemia, Soft-Tissue Injury, Skeletal Injury, Shock, and Age of Patient Score; and the Hannover Fracture Scale-98. Functional outcomes were measured with use of the physical and psychosocial domains of the Sickness Impact Profile at both six months and two years following hospital discharge. Four hundred and seven subjects for whom the reconstruction regimen was considered successful at six months were included in the analysis. We used partial correlation statistics and multiple linear regression models to quantify the association between injury severity scores and Sickness Impact Profile outcomes with the subjects' ages held constant. Results: The mean age of the patients was thirty-six years (interquartile range, twenty-six to forty-four years); 75.2% were male and 24.8% were female. The median Sickness Impact Profile scores were 15.2 and 6.0 points at six and twenty-four months, respectively. The analysis showed that none of the scoring systems were predictive of the Sickness Impact Profile outcomes at six or twenty-four months to any reasonable degree. Likewise, none were predictive of patient recovery between six and twenty-four months postoperatively as

  7. [Therapeutic approach in vascular injuries of the lower extremity: Amputation or limb salvage].

    PubMed

    Ozal, E; Us, M H; Bingöl, H; Oz, B S; Kuralay, E; Tatar, H

    2001-07-01

    The management of lower extremity trauma with vasculary involvement should be directed toward to the salvage of the extremity or to the primary amputation according to the additional pathologies, parameters of the patient and the extremity. We investigated the efficiency of Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) system which is proposed as an grading system to evaluate the change to extremity salvage or the risk for onset of systemic complications. 81 patients with lower extremity trauma were analyzed according to MESS criteria. 79 of the patients were men and mean age was 23 +/- 4. Fourteen patients had higher MESS score. (MESS > 7). Seven of them were older than 50 years. Primary amputation was performed in four of these 7 patients. Vascular repair was performed in three of patients. Multiorgan failure was developed in two of them and both patients died. Secondary amputation was performed to another patients underwent vasculary repair who had MESS > 7 score. Primary amputation was not performed directly in young patients who had MESS > 7. Secondary amputation was required in two of these patients. MESS scoring system can easily predict amputation in older patients but may cause unnecessary amputation in young patients.

  8. Genomic and Proteomic Determinants of Lower Extremity Revascularization Failure: Rationale and Study Design

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Peter R.; O'Malley, Kerri A.; Feezor, Robert J.; Moldawer, Lyle L.; Seeger, James M.

    2007-01-01

    This translational research program applies a working model of advanced functional genomics/proteomics and bioinformatics to human peripheral arterial occlusive disease (PAOD). It is a multidisciplinary collaborative effort of clinicians, scientists, and statisticians with an advisory panel comprised of experts in inflammation biology, vascular biology, molecular genetics, bioinformatics, clinical trial design, and epidemiology. The proposed human initiative is designed to study 300 symptomatic patients with PAOD undergoing medical management with or without vascular intervention by either lower extremity angioplasty/stenting or vein graft bypass. The study aims to test the hypothesis that the systemic inflammatory response following vascular intervention influences the local milieu responsible for vascular repair and adaptation. The expectation is that this response is not uniform in all patients, but rather, is modulated by either preoperative genetic predisposition or post-procedure differential regulation of the innate immune response to injury that promotes a maladaptive phenotype leading to intervention failure. Therefore, some of these differences may be present and detectable pre-intervention amenable to class prediction and prospective treatment strategies, while others may be detectable in the early post-procedure period, prior to the onset of clinical failure, permitting interventions to prevent an adverse outcome. The combination of genomic/proteomic data together with functional and quality of life outcome measures to define a critical model for class prediction and analysis should lead to new knowledge about failure mechanisms of vascular intervention and new strategies to improve existing approaches to lower extremity revascularization. PMID:17544028

  9. Effects of shoe type on lower extremity muscle activity during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-12-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of different shoe types on lower extremity muscle activity in healthy young women by using electromyography. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy young women in their 20s were included in this single-group repeated measures study. The subjects were divided into three groups: Converse sneakers, rain boots, and combat boots. The subjects walked on a treadmill at 4 km/h for 30 min, during which six muscles were examined using electromyography: the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, semimembranosus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and medial head of the gastrocnemius. Between switching shoe types, a 24-h rest period was instated to prevent the fatigue effect from treadmill walking. [Results] One-way analysis of variance used to compare electromyography results among the three groups showed that the main effect of group differed significantly for the vastus medialis. Vastus medialis activity was higher in the rain boots group than the Converse sneakers group, and it was higher in the combat boots group than rain boots group. [Conclusion] Shoe type affects lower extremity muscle activity. Our findings may help individuals choose the ideal shoes for daily walking.

  10. Effects of shoe type on lower extremity muscle activity during treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Mi-Kyoung; Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to analyze the effects of different shoe types on lower extremity muscle activity in healthy young women by using electromyography. [Subjects and Methods] Fifteen healthy young women in their 20s were included in this single-group repeated measures study. The subjects were divided into three groups: Converse sneakers, rain boots, and combat boots. The subjects walked on a treadmill at 4 km/h for 30 min, during which six muscles were examined using electromyography: the rectus femoris, vastus medialis, semimembranosus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and medial head of the gastrocnemius. Between switching shoe types, a 24-h rest period was instated to prevent the fatigue effect from treadmill walking. [Results] One-way analysis of variance used to compare electromyography results among the three groups showed that the main effect of group differed significantly for the vastus medialis. Vastus medialis activity was higher in the rain boots group than the Converse sneakers group, and it was higher in the combat boots group than rain boots group. [Conclusion] Shoe type affects lower extremity muscle activity. Our findings may help individuals choose the ideal shoes for daily walking. PMID:26834363

  11. Effects of physical characteristics and residence style on alignment of lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jangwon; Park, Hye-Sang

    2016-04-01

    This research was performed to identify the incidence of deformity of lower extremity and to identify the relationship of the incidence between the deformities. Once the incidences and relationship are found, next purpose was to find the effects of physical characteristics and residence styles on the development of lower extremity deformities. One hundred fifteen males and 108 females participated in this study. Data collecting was performed by questionnaire and visual postural evaluation. The incidence of genu varus was significantly high in standing-up life style compared to sitting-on life style (chi-square=8.28; P=0.004). However, the incidences of heel varus (chi-square=13.223; P=0.004) and femoral torsion (chi-square=19.347; P<0.0001) were significantly high in sitting-on life style than standing-up life style. The incidences of genu varus (chi-square=24.18; P<0.0001), heel varus (chi-square= 15.412; P<0.0001), and tibial torsion (chi-square=6.285; P<0.012) were significantly high in sitting-on life style compared to standing-up life style (P<0.05). The odd ratio result for sitting-on life style against standing-up life style showed 6.6 times significantly high relationship in femoral torsion (95% confidence range, 1.64-26.47) in men.

  12. Anesthesia and Postoperative Respiratory Compromise Following Major Lower Extremity Surgery: Implications for Combat Casualties.

    PubMed

    Galvagno, Samuel M; Brayanov, Jordan; Williams, George; George, Edward E

    2017-03-01

    Care of military casualties requires not only assessment of patient, injury, and setting, but also the consequences of care decisions on other organ systems. In contemporary conflicts, pelviperineal and lower extremity trauma are common injuries, yet the optimal perioperative anesthetic and analgesic care remains unclear. Residual anesthesia and opioids can cause respiratory depression, specifically postoperative respiratory depression and opioid-induced respiratory depression. This observational study quantified and compared the incidences of respiratory depression following general anesthesia (GA) and spinal anesthesia (SA) for lower extremity surgery. Respiratory data were collected from 173 patients receiving either GA (n = 43) or SA (n = 130) via a bioimpedance-based respiratory volume monitor. Patients were further subdivided by postoperative opioid administration. The overall incidence of respiratory depression was significantly higher in the SA group (48/130 vs. 6/43, p = 0.004). These findings suggest that, while SA may be considered the safer alternative, it may in fact introduce confounding factors, which increase the risk of respiratory depression. Ensuring adequate respiratory status is particularly critical for the military population, as combat casualties are often monitored in understaffed environments following surgery. Using an SA strategy instead of GA may not prevent postoperative respiratory depression, and respiratory volume monitor monitoring may be useful to optimize care.

  13. Lymphoedema of the lower extremities--background, pathophysiology and diagnostic considerations.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Mads R; Simonsen, Lene; Karlsmark, Tonny; Bülow, Jens

    2010-11-01

    Lymphoedema of the lower extremities is a chronic debilitating disease that is often underdiagnosed. Early diagnosis and treatment is paramount in reducing the risk of progression and complications. Lymphoedema has traditionally been defined as interstitial oedema and protein accumulation because of a defect in the lymphatic drainage; however, some findings suggest that the interstitial protein concentration may be low in some types of lymphoedema. Primary lymphoedema is caused by an inherent defect in the lymphatic vessels or lymph nodes. Secondary lymphoedema is caused by damages to the lymphatic system most often caused by cancer or its treatment. Many of the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms have yet to be elucidated. Many methods have been developed for examination of the lymphatic system. Lymphoscintigraphy is presently the preferred diagnostic modality. Lack of consensus regarding protocol and qualitative interpretation criteria results in a too observer dependent outcome. Methods for objectifying the scintigraphy through quantification have been criticized. Depot clearance rates are an alternative method of quantification of lymphatic drainage capacity. This method however has mostly been applied on upper extremity lymphoedema. The aim of this review is to provide a literature-based overview of the aetiology and pathophysiology of lower extremity lymphoedema and to summarize the current knowledge about lymphoscintigraphy and depot clearance techniques. The abundance of factors influencing the outcome of the examination stresses the need for consensus regarding examination protocols and interpretation. Further studies are needed to improve diagnostic performance and understanding of pathophysiological mechanisms.

  14. Sequence Comparison for Non-Enhanced MRA of the Lower Extremity Arteries at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Johst, Sören; Orzada, Stephan; Fischer, Anja; Schäfer, Lena C.; Nassenstein, Kai; Umutlu, Lale; Lauenstein, Thomas C.; Ladd, Mark E.; Maderwald, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    In this study three sequences for non-contrast-enhanced MRA of the lower extremity arteries at 7T were compared. Cardiac triggering was used with the aim to reduce signal variations in the arteries. Two fast single-shot 2D sequences, a modified Ultrafast Spoiled Gradient Echo (UGRE) sequence and a variant of the Quiescent-Interval Single-Shot (QISS) sequence were triggered via phonocardiogram and compared in volunteer examinations to a non-triggered 2D gradient echo (GRE) sequence. For image acquisition, a 16-channel transmit/receive coil and a manually positionable AngioSURF table were used. To tackle B1 inhomogeneities at 7T, Time-Interleaved Acquisition of Modes (TIAMO) was integrated in GRE and UGRE. To compare the three sequences quantitatively, a vessel-to-background ratio (VBR) was measured in all volunteers and stations. In conclusion, cardiac triggering was able to suppress flow artifacts satisfactorily. The modified UGRE showed only moderate image artifacts. Averaged over all volunteers and stations, GRE reached a VBR of 4.18±0.05, UGRE 5.20±0.06, and QISS 2.72±0.03. Using cardiac triggering and TIAMO imaging technique was essential to perform non-enhanced MRA of the lower extremities vessels at 7T. The modified UGRE performed best, as observed artifacts were only moderate and the highest average VBR was reached. PMID:24454963

  15. Lower extremity joint loading during level walking with Masai barefoot technology shoes in overweight males.

    PubMed

    Buchecker, M; Wagner, H; Pfusterschmied, J; Stöggl, T L; Müller, E

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of Masai barefoot technology (MBT) shoes on lower extremity joint loading in overweight males during level walking. Therefore, lower extremity kinematics, kinetics, and muscle electromyographic signals of the vastus lateralis (VL), biceps femoris (BF), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM) were recorded in 10 overweight males at a self-chosen walking speed with MBT shoes and conventional shoes. Selected peak joint moments, maximal joint force loading rates, mean muscle intensities, and co-activation indices of the VL/BF, as well as of the VL/GM were analyzed and compared for the two shoe conditions using paired Student's t-tests (α=0.05). Results showed that walking with MBT shoes reduced first peak knee adduction moments in overweight subjects. During midstance and terminal stance, increases in VL/GM co-activation, accompanied by increases in VL and GM (only terminal stance) intensities were found for the MBT situation. Kinetic variables analyzed to assess ankle and hip joint loading did not exhibit any statistical differences. These results suggest that using MBT shoes diminishes medial compartment loads at the knee without overloading hip or ankle joints in overweight males. However, the additional muscle loading should not be overlooked, and warrants further investigation.

  16. Effect of rain boot shaft length on lower extremity muscle activity during treadmill walking

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Yoo, Kyung-Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the extent of lower extremity muscle activity before and after walking based on rain boot shaft length. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects, 12 young and healthy females, were divided into three groups based on rain boot shaft length (long, middle, and short). They walked on a treadmill for 30 minutes. Activity of the rectus femoris, vastus lateralis, semitendinosus, tibialis anterior, peroneus longus, and gastrocnemius was measured using electromyography before and after walking. Two-way repeated measures analysis of variance was performed to compare the muscle activities of each group. [Results] There were no significant differences in terms of the interactive effects between group and time for all muscles, the main effects of group, or the main effects of time. [Conclusion] The results of this study may indicate that movement of the lower extremities was not significantly limited by friction force based on the characteristics of the boot material or the circumference of the boot shaft. Thus, it may be helpful instead to consider the material of the sole or the weight of the boots when choosing which rain boots to wear. PMID:27799685

  17. Gait Training Interventions for Lower Extremity Amputees: A Systematic Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Highsmith, M Jason; Andrews, Casey R; Millman, Claire; Fuller, Ashley; Kahle, Jason T; Klenow, Tyler D; Lewis, Katherine L; Bradley, Rachel C; Orriola, John J

    2016-09-01

    Lower extremity (LE) amputation patients who use prostheses have gait asymmetries and altered limb loading and movement strategies when ambulating. Subsequent secondary conditions are believed to be associated with gait deviations and lead to long-term complications that impact function and quality of life as a result. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence supporting gait training interventions and to formulate evidence statements to guide practice and research related to therapeutic gait training for lower extremity amputees. A systematic review of three databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES). Eighteen manuscripts were included in the review, which covered two areas of gait training interventions: 1) overground and 2) treadmill-based. Eight EESs were synthesized. Four addressed overground gait training, one covered treadmill training, and three statements addressed both forms of therapy. Due to the gait asymmetries, altered biomechanics, and related secondary consequences associated with LE amputation, gait training interventions are needed along with study of their efficacy. Overground training with verbal or other auditory, manual, and psychological awareness interventions was found to be effective at improving gait. Similarly, treadmill-based training was found to be effective: 1) as a supplement to overground training; 2) independently when augmented with visual feedback and/or body weight support; or 3) as part of a home exercise plan. Gait training approaches studied improved multiple areas of gait, including sagittal and coronal biomechanics, spatiotemporal measures, and distance walked.

  18. Experimal study of young male drivers' responses to vehicle collision using EMG of lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zhenhai; Li, Chuzhao; Hu, Hongyu; Zhao, Hui; Chen, Chaoyang; Yu, Huili

    2015-01-01

    A driver's response to a front-coming vehicle collision consists of braking reaction time and braking behavior. The purpose was to investigate drivers' responses at different speeds, relative distances, and particularly the behavior on the accelerator at the collision moment. Twelve young men participated in driving simulator tests. Vehicle parameters and electromyograms (EMGs) of the drivers' tibialis anterior muscles were recorded and responses were analyzed. The drivers' braking reaction time windows were divided into pre-motor time, muscle activation time, accelerator release time, and movement time. By comparing the reaction times and collision times, braking behaviors were investigated. It was found that movement times (r = -0.281) decreased with speed. Pre-motor times (r = 0.326) and muscle activation times (r = 0.281) increased with relative distance. At the collision moment, the probability of the driver's lower extremity being on the accelerator, in the air, and on the brake pedal was 7.4%, 18.9%, and 73.7%, respectively. With higher speeds and smaller distances, the lower extremity was more likely to be in the air or even on the accelerator in different muscle activation states. The driver will collide in normal driving postures which muscles are not or not fully activated in very urgent situation.

  19. Ganglion cysts of the lower extremity: an analysis of 54 cases and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Rozbruch, S R; Chang, V; Bohne, W H; Deland, J T

    1998-02-01

    This article reviews 54 consecutive patients with lower extremity ganglion cysts that were surgically removed and histologically confirmed at the Hospital for Special Surgery from 1981 to 1993. Lower extremity ganglia were more common among women. Patients' ages ranged from 13 to 80 years, with the fifth and sixth decades being the most common. Size of the cysts ranged from 3 cm to 10 cm (average: 2.9 cm). Thirty-six (67%) patients had ganglion cysts of the foot and ankle, and 18 (33%) patients had ganglion cysts of the knee area. Four (7%) patients had intraosseous ganglia located in the proximal tibia, patella, and the first metatarsal head. Follow-up data of 40 (74%) patients at an average of 5.9 years (range: 1 to 12.5 years) were obtained. Satisfaction was reported by 83% of patients. Recurrence was seen in 10% of patients, and a report of no or mild pain was given by 86% of the group. Patients who underwent revision ganglion excision had inferior results. Only 25% reported satisfaction and 50% reported no or mild pain. Patients who underwent curettage of an intraosseous ganglion appeared to have superior results. All patients reported satisfaction and no or mild pain. The performance of a concomitant surgical procedure, the anatomic region of the ganglion, or type of postoperative immobilization did not appear to affect the outcome.

  20. Reconstruction of lower extremity with perforator free flaps by free style approach in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Song, Jin Woo; Ben-Nakhi, Muneera; Hong, Joon Pio

    2012-11-01

    Pediatric reconstruction using microsurgery is accepted normal practice, and the use of perforator flaps is slowly increasing. This study presents clinical work using various perforator free flaps by free style approach to reconstruct lower extremity soft tissue defects in pediatric patients and evaluates its efficacy. Between June 2002 and February 2011, 32 cases (mean age: 10.1 years) were reconstructed with free style perforator free flaps. Retrospective evaluations for flap survival, growth character, and other associated morbidities were performed. Flaps used in this series are anterolateral thigh (ALT) perforator, superficial circumflex iliac artery perforator (SCIP), upper medial thigh perforator, and posterior interosseous perforator free flaps. The free style approach for pedicle dissection was successful in all cases. Early postoperative complications were 15.6% from hematoma collection to partial loss of flap. Although there was no total loss in this series, one case needed additional flap coverage to cover the partial loss of the flap. The long-term follow-up showed contracture along the margin, with 16% needing a releasing procedure. Bone growth was not affected by flap contracture. The overall results show perforator flaps using the free style approach to be a reliable and feasible approach for lower extremity reconstruction in the pediatric population.

  1. Preservation of lower extremity amputation length using muscle perforator free flaps.

    PubMed

    Hallock, G G

    2008-06-01

    Coverage of any lower extremity amputation stump must be durable to resist external forces, well contoured, and thin enough for proper shoewear or prothesis fitting. Preservation of bone length to maximise the ability to ambulate is also of paramount importance. If local soft tissues are inadequate to fulfil these prerequisites, consideration of a microsurgical tissue transfer is a reasonable option, especially to cover bone or save a major joint. Muscle perforator free flaps, as shown in this series of eight patients using four different donor sites, are a versatile alternative for the necessary soft tissue augmentation. Multiple choices are available and often even from the involved lower extremity to minimise further morbidity. The vascular pedicles of this genré of flaps are relatively exceedingly long and of respectable calibre to facilitate reaching an appropriate recipient site. They can be sensate if desired. Of course, muscle function is by definition preserved. Complications are minimal and usually related to the reason for the amputation in the first place.

  2. Risk Factors and Indications for Readmission Following Lower Extremity Amputation in the ACS-NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Curran, Thomas; Zhang, Jennifer Q.; Lo, Ruby C.; Fokkema, Margriet; McCallum, John C.; Buck, Dominique; Darling, Jeremy; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Postoperative readmission, recently identified as a marker of hospital quality in the Affordable Care Act, is associated with increased morbidity, mortality and healthcare costs, yet data on readmission following lower extremity amputation is limited. We evaluated risk factors for readmission and post-discharge adverse events following lower extremity amputation in the ACS-NSQIP. STUDY DESIGN All patients undergoing transmetatarsal (TMA), below-knee (BKA) or above-knee amputation (AKA) in the 2011 – 2012 NSQIP were identified. Independent pre-discharge predictors of 30-day readmission were determined using multivariable logistic regression. Readmission indication and re-interventions, available in the 2012 NSQIP only, were also evaluated. RESULTS We identified 5,732 patients undergoing amputation (TMA: 12%; BKA: 51%; AKA: 37%). Readmission rate was 18%. Post-discharge mortality rate was 5% (TMA: 2%; BKA: 3%; AKA: 8%; p<.001). Overall complication rate was 43% (In-hospital: 32%; Post-discharge: 11%). Reoperation was for wound related complication or additional amputation in 79% of cases. Independent predictors of readmission included chronic nursing home residence (OR: 1.3; 95% CI: 1.0–1.7), non-elective surgery (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7), prior revascularization/amputation (OR: 1.4; 95% CI: 1.1–1.7), preoperative congestive heart failure (OR: 1.7; 95% CI: 1.2–2.4), and preoperative dialysis (OR: 1.5; 95% CI: 1.2–1.9). Guillotine amputation (OR: .6; 95%CI: .4–.9) and non-home discharge (OR: .7; 95%CI: .6–1.0) were protective of readmission. Wound related complications accounted for 49% of readmissions. CONCLUSIONS Post discharge morbidity, mortality and readmission are common following lower extremity amputation. Closer follow up of high risk patients, optimization of medical comorbidities and aggressive management of wound infection may play a role in decreasing readmission and post discharge adverse events. PMID:24985536

  3. Sagittal alignment of the spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis in patients with severe knee osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, W. J.; Liu, F.; Zhu, Y.W.; Sun, M.H.; Qiu, Y.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Normal sagittal spine-pelvis-lower extremity alignment is crucial in humans for maintaining an ergonomic upright standing posture, and pathogenesis in any segment leads to poor balance. The present study aimed to investigate how this sagittal alignment can be affected by severe knee osteoarthritis (KOA), and whether associated changes corresponded with symptoms of lower back pain (LBP) in this patient population. Methods Lateral radiograph films in an upright standing position were obtained from 59 patients with severe KOA and 58 asymptomatic controls free from KOA. Sagittal alignment of the spine, pelvis, hip and proximal femur was quantified by measuring several radiographic parameters. Global balance was accessed according to the relative position of the C7 plumb line to the sacrum and femoral heads. The presence of chronic LBP was documented. Comparisons between the two groups were carried by independent samples t-tests or chi-squared test. Results Patients with severe KOA showed significant backward femoral inclination (FI), hip flexion, forward spinal inclination, and higher prevalence of global imbalance (27.1% versus 3.4%, p < 0.001) compared with controls. In addition, patients with FI of 10° (n = 23) showed reduced lumbar lordosis and significant forward spinal inclination compared with controls, whereas those with FI > 10° (n = 36) presented with significant pelvic anteversion and hip flexion. A total of 39 patients with KOA (66.1%) suffered from LBP. There was no significant difference in sagittal alignment between KOA patients with and without LBP. Conclusions The sagittal alignment of spine-pelvis-lower extremity axis was significantly influenced by severe KOA. The lumbar spine served as the primary source of compensation, while hip flexion and pelvic anteversion increased for further compensation. Changes in sagittal alignment may not be involved in the pathogenesis of LBP in this patient population. Cite this article: W. J. Wang, F. Liu

  4. Clinical and Ultrasonographic Evaluation of Lower-extremity Vein Thrombosis in Behcet Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seyahi, Emire; Cakmak, Osman Serdal; Tutar, Burcin; Arslan, Caner; Dikici, Atilla Suleyman; Sut, Necdet; Kantarci, Fatih; Tuzun, Hasan; Melikoglu, Melike; Yazici, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Vascular involvement can be seen in up to 40% of patients with Behcet syndrome (BS), the lower-extremity vein thrombosis (LEVT) being the most common type. The aim of the current study was to compare venous Doppler findings and clinical features between BS patients with LEVT and control patients diagnosed as having LEVT due to other causes. All consecutive 78 patients (71 men, 7 women; mean age 38.6 ± 10.3 years) with LEVT due to BS and 50 control patients (29 men, 21 women; mean age 42.0 ± 12.5 years) who had LEVT due to other causes, or idiopathic, were studied with the help of a Doppler ultrasonography after a detailed clinical examination. Patterns of venous disease were identified by cluster analyses. Clinical features of chronic venous disease were assessed using 2 classification systems. Venous claudication was also assessed. Patients with BS were more likely to be men, had significantly earlier age of onset of thrombosis, and were treated mainly with immunosuppressives and less frequently with anticoagulants. Furthermore, they had significantly more bilateral involvement, less complete recanalization, and more frequent collateral formation. While control patients had a disorganized pattern of venous involvement, BS patients had a contiguous and symmetric pattern, involving all deep and superficial veins of the lower extremities, with less affinity for crural veins. Clinical assessment, as measured by the 2 classification systems, also indicated a more severe disease among the BS patients. In line, 51% of the BS patients suffered from severe post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) and 32% from venous claudication, whereas these were present in 8% and 12%, respectively, among the controls. Among BS patients, a longer duration of thrombosis, bilateral femoral vein involvement, and using no anticoagulation along with immunosuppressive treatment when first diagnosed were found to be associated independently with severe PTS. Lower-extremity vein

  5. Role for Lower Extremity Interstitial Fluid Volume Changes in the Development of Orthostasis after Simulated Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Platts, Steven H.; Summers, Richard L.; Martin, David S.; Meck, Janice V.; Coleman, Thomas G.

    2007-01-01

    Reentry orthostasis after exposure to the conditions of spaceflight is a persistent problem among astronauts. In a previous study, a computer model systems analysis was used to examine the physiologic mechanisms involved in this phenomenon. In this analysis, it was determined that an augmented capacitance of lower extremity veins due to a fluid volume contracture of the surrounding interstitial spaces during spaceflight results in an increase in sequestered blood volume upon standing and appears to be the initiating mechanism responsible for reentry orthostasis. In this study, we attempt to validate the central premise of this hypothesis using a ground-based spaceflight analog. 10 healthy subjects were placed at bed rest in a 6 head down tilt position for 60 days of bed rest. The impact of adaptations in interstitial fluid volume and venous capacitance in the lower extremities were then observed during a standard tilt test protocol performed before and after the confinement period. The interstitial thickness superficial to the calcaneous immediately below the lateral malleolus was measured using ultrasound with a 17-5 MHz linear array transducer. Measurements of the changes in anterior tibial vein diameter during tilt were obtained by similar methods. The measurements were taken while the subjects were supine and then during upright tilt (80') for thirty minutes, or until the subject had signs of presyncope. Additional measurements of the superficial left tibia interstitial thickness and stroke volume by standard echocardiographic methods were also recorded. In addition, calf compliance was measured over a pressure range of 10-60 mmHg, using plethysmography, in a subset of these subjects (n = 5). There was a average of 6% diminution in the size of the lower extremity interstitial space as compared to measurements acquired prior to bed rest. This contracture of the interstitial space coincided with a subsequent relative increase in the percentage change in tibial

  6. Creation of a neo-aortoiliac system from lower extremity deep and superficial veins.

    PubMed Central

    Clagett, G P; Bowers, B L; Lopez-Viego, M A; Rossi, M B; Valentine, R J; Myers, S I; Chervu, A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This study evaluated the morbidity, mortality, and intermediate term follow-up of patients undergoing replacement of their aortoiliac-femoral systems with lower extremity deep and superficial veins. SUMMARY BACKGROUND DATA: The most commonly used treatment for aortic prosthetic infection is ectopic bypass and removal of the prosthesis. The overall mortality rate with this approach is approximately 20%, with an amputation rate of 10% to 14%. Other limitations include thrombosis of the ectopic bypass leading to limb loss, reinfection of the ectopic bypass, and aortic stump blowout. Dissatisfaction with this approach has led the authors to develop the following. METHODS: A neo-aortoiliac system (NAIS) was fashioned from lower extremity deep veins (DV), greater saphenous veins (GSV), or both in patients with infected aortobifemoral prosthesis (n = 17) and other complex aortic problems (n = 3). Removal of infected prosthetic material, harvest of vein, and creation of NAIS was performed as a single-staged procedure. RESULTS: The in-hospital mortality and amputation rates were 10% each. The mean (+/- standard deviation [SD]) operative time was 6.5 +/- 1.8 hours and the blood transfusion requirement was 4 +/- 3 units. Four patients experienced postoperative gastrointestinal complications with peritonitis and sepsis; NAIS vein graft resisted infection and remained intact. The mean follow-up time was 22.5 +/- 16 months. NAISs constructed from GSVs were prone to the development of focal stenoses requiring intervention or diffuse neointimal hyperplasia leading to occlusion. In contrast, all NAISs from larger caliber DVs have remained widely patent. The failure rate of GSV NAISs was 64%, compared to 0% for DV NAISs (p = 0.006). Despite the high failure rate in patients with GSV NAISs, none has required amputation. In patients who had DVs harvested for NAIS reconstruction, limb edema and other signs of venous hypertension have been minimal. CONCLUSION: NAIS

  7. MR Imaging Appearances of Soft Tissue Flaps Following Reconstructive Surgery of the Lower Extremity

    PubMed Central

    Girish, Gandikota; Jacobson, Jon A; Kim, Sung Moon; Brigido, Monica K; Dong, Qian; Jamadar, David A

    2015-01-01

    MR imaging appearances of different types of reconstructive muscle flaps following reconstructive surgery of the lower extremity with associated post-surgical changes due to altered anatomy, radiation, and potential complications, can be challenging. A multidisciplinary therapeutic approach to tumors allows for limb salvage therapy in a majority of the patients. Decision-making for specific types of soft tissue reconstruction is based on the body region affected, as well as the size and complexity of the defect. Hematomas and infections are early complications that can jeopardize flap viability. The local recurrence of a tumor within six months after a complete resection with confirmed tumor-free margins and adjuvant radiation therapy is rare. Identification of a new lesion similar to the initial tumor favors a finding of tumor recurrence. PMID:25598685

  8. Acute Osteochondral Fractures in the Lower Extremities - Approach to Identification and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, M.E; DaCambra, M.P; Jibri, Z; Dhillon, S; Jen, H; Jomha, N.M

    2015-01-01

    Chondral and osteochondral fractures of the lower extremities are important injuries because they can cause pain and dysfunction and often lead to osteoarthritis. These injuries can be misdiagnosed initially which may impact on the healing potential and result in poor long-term outcome. This comprehensive review focuses on current pitfalls in diagnosing acute osteochondral lesions, potential investigative techniques to minimize diagnostic errors as well as surgical treatment options. Acute osteochondral fractures are frequently missed and can be identified more accurately with specific imaging techniques. A number of different methods can be used to fix these fractures but attention to early diagnosis is required to limit progression to osteoarthritis. These fractures are common with joint injuries and early diagnosis and treatment should lead to improved long term outcomes. PMID:26587063

  9. Lower extremity soft tissue defect reconstruction with the serratus anterior flap.

    PubMed

    Mastroianni, Melissa; Leto Barone, Angelo A; Shanmugarajah, Kumaran; Leonard, David A; Di Rosa, Luigi; Feingold, Randall S; Israeli, Ron; Cetrulo, Curtis L

    2014-03-01

    Reconstruction of limb-threatening lower extremity defects presents unique challenges. The selected method must provide adequate coverage of exposed bone, joints, and tendons while maximizing function of the limb. The traditional workhorse flaps, the free latissimus dorsi and rectus abdominis flaps, have been associated with donor site morbidity and bulkiness that can impair rehabilitation. We report a case series (n = 18) in which the free serratus anterior muscle flap and split thickness skin graft (STSG) was used for lower limb soft tissue coverage. Injuries were due to diabetes (9/18), trauma (7/18), and chronic venous stasis (2/18). A 94% flap survival rate was observed and all but one patient was ambulatory. No donor site morbidity was reported. Our series demonstrates that serratus anterior is an advantageous, reliable free flap with minimal donor site morbidity.

  10. Newly Developed Urinary Retention and Motor Weakness of Lower Extremities in a Postherpetic Neuralgia Patient

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mi Hyun; Song, Jang Ho; Lee, Doo Ik; Ahn, Hyun Soo; Park, Ji Woong

    2013-01-01

    During the early stage of postherpetic neuralgia, an epidural block on the affected segment is helpful in controlling pain and preventing progression to a chronic state. The main neurologic complication following an epidural block is cord compression symptom due to an epidural hematoma. When neurologic complications arise from an epidural block for the treatment of postherpetic neuralgia, it is important to determine whether the complications are due to the procedure or due to the herpes zoster itself. We report a case of a patient who was diagnosed with herpes zoster myelitis during treatment for postherpetic neuralgia. The patient complained of motor weakness in the lower extremities after receiving a thoracic epidural block six times. Although initially, we believed that the complications were due to the epidural block, it was ultimately determined to be from the herpes zoster myelitis. PMID:23342213

  11. Bilateral lower extremity gangrene requiring amputation associated with heparin-induced thrombocytopenia: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Brian P; Lawrence, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Heparin is a common cause of thrombocytopenia in hospitalized patients. Between 10% and 15% of patients receiving therapeutic doses of heparin develop thrombocytopenia. Heparin-induced thrombocytopenia (HIT) can cause severe bleeding and thrombosis owing to intravascular platelet aggregation. HIT must be distinguished from other causes of thrombocytopenia. Importantly, heparin use is often associated with an early fall in the platelet count that usually occurs within the first 4 days of initiation and recovers without cessation of heparin treatment. This nonimmune heparin-associated thrombocytopenia has not been found to be associated with thrombosis and does not necessitate discontinuation of heparin. The authors present a case report of a 70-year-old man who received heparin therapy following aortic tissue valve replacement and aortic root repair with graft and developed bilateral lower extremity arterial clots 6 days postoperatively in the setting of positive heparin antibody titers. Ultimately the patient required bilateral above-knee amputations.

  12. Measurement of anastomosis geometry in lower extremity bypass grafts with 3-D ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Leotta, Daniel F; Primozich, Jean F; Lowe, Christopher M; Karr, Leni N; Bergelin, Robert O; Beach, Kirk W; Zierler, R Eugene

    2005-10-01

    The attachment sites of lower extremity bypass grafts are known to exhibit a wide range of geometries. Factors that determine the geometry of a given anastomosis include graft material, graft site, native vessel size, graft size and individual patient anatomy. Therefore, it is difficult to specify a standard anastomosis geometry before surgery and difficult to predict the effect of the geometry on long-term graft patency. We have used 3-D ultrasound imaging to study 46 proximal anastomoses of lower limb bypass grafts. We have developed methods to characterize the 3-D geometry of the anastomosis in terms of component sizes and angles. These detailed geometric measurements describe a range of anastomosis geometries and establish standardized parameters across cases that can be used to relate anastomosis geometry to outcome.

  13. Indocyanine Green Lymphographic Signs of Lymphatic Collateral Formation in Lower Extremity Lymphedema After Cancer Resection.

    PubMed

    Tashiro, Kensuke; Shibata, Takashi; Mito, Daisuke; Ishiura, Ryohei; Kato, Motoi; Yamashita, Shuji; Narushima, Mitsunaga; Iida, Takuya; Koshima, Isao

    2016-08-01

    Indocyanine green lymphography has recently been used to assess lymphatic vessel function in lymphedema patients. Postoperative collateral lymphatic vessels toward ipsilateral axillary lymph nodes are rarely seen above the umbilical level in lower lymphedema patients. Between January 2012 and December 2014, we performed indocyanine green lymphography of 192 limbs in 96 lower extremity lymphedema cases. As a result, dermal back flow appeared in 95 cases, with 38 in the lower abdominal area and 31 in the genital area. We confirmed 3 cases of superficial lymphatic collateral ways extending above the umbilical level to the axillary lymph nodes. All 3 cases had similarity in lower abdominal edema, so excessive lymphatic fluid in the lower abdomen was assumed to be the cause. Lymphatic collateral ways from abdomen to axillary lymph nodes in this study was likely to be designed to prevent the progress of lymphedema.

  14. Impact of an absorbent silver-eluting dressing system on lower extremity revascularization wound complications.

    PubMed

    Childress, Beverly B; Berceli, Scott A; Nelson, Peter R; Lee, W Anthony; Ozaki, C Keith

    2007-09-01

    Surgical wounds for lower extremity revascularization are prone to infection and dehiscence. Acticoat Absorbent, an antimicrobial dressing, offers sustained release of ionic silver. We hypothesized that immediate application of Acticoat as a postoperative dressing would reduce wound complications in patients undergoing leg revascularization. All infrainguinal revascularization cases involving leg incisions at a single Veterans Administration Medical Center were identified from July 1, 2002, to September 30, 2005. The control group received conventional dressings, while the treatment group received an Acticoat dressing. Wound complication rates were captured via National Surgical Quality Improvement Program data. Patient characteristics and procedure distributions were similar between groups. The wound complication rate fell 64% with utilization of the Acticoat-based dressing (control 14% [17/118], treatment 5% [7/130]; P = 0.016). An Acticoat-based dressing system offers a potentially useful, cost-effective adjunct to reduce open surgical leg revascularization wound complications.

  15. Bilateral lower-extremity numbness and ataxia in a young female runner

    PubMed Central

    Casagranda, Bethany; Srivastava, Udayan; Heller, Matthew T.

    2015-01-01

    Inferior vena cava (IVC) absence is thought to have either embryologic or developmental etiologies, depending on the degree of absence. Entire absence of the IVC is thought to be due to embryologic insult, whereas recent studies propose that infrarenal IVC absence is developmental, secondary to perinatal thrombosis. Here we report on an adolescent woman with infrarenal absence of IVC and common iliac veins. Clinically, she presented with bilateral lower-extremity numbness and ataxia following strenuous exercise (running > 1 mile). Symptoms resolved with 30 seconds of rest. Radiographically, MRI revealed extensive collateral vasculature that had developed within the paravertebral soft tissues and epidural space of the spinal canal; these collaterals coursed through the neural foramina and caused moderate stenosis at L4/5 and L5/S1. PMID:27186259

  16. [The use of gravitation overloading in the treatment of obliterative atherosclerosis of lower extremity arteries].

    PubMed

    Galkin, R A; Kotel'nikov, G P; Makarov, I V; Oparin, A N

    2003-01-01

    The article sums up results of treatment of 152 patients with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremity arteries which were exposed to 2-3 G gravitation overloading made in a centrifuge of a short radius in direction head--pelvis. The gravitation overloading in the regimen followed were not found to have negative effects of central hemodynamics. Peripheral circulation was noted to considerably improve which is confirmed: 1) by clinical data showing 2-5 times longer distance of painless walking; 2) by the data of ultrasound dopplerography manifested as larger volume rate of blood flow and regional perfusion index; 3) by thermographic explorations evidencing the recovery of the thermoprophile of the legs and feet. Thus, the application of gravitation overloading is a new effective method of conservative treatment of patients with the pathology in question.

  17. Free radial forearm flap versatility for the head and neck and lower extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Chicarilli, Z.N.; Ariyan, S.; Cuono, C.B.

    1986-07-01

    Microsurgical techniques have developed numerous territories suitable for free tissue transfer. However, the demand for thin cutaneous resurfacing limits the choice of flaps available to the reconstructive microsurgeon. The radial forearm flap is a thin, axial, fasciocutaneous flap, offering pliable cutaneous resurfacing, with or without sensation. We have used 15 flaps to reconstruct defects in the head and neck and lower extremity resulting from burns, blunt and avulsive trauma, radiation necrosis, and tumor ablation. Two flaps (15 percent) developed venous congestion and were salvaged by reoperation. One retrograde flap (7.5 percent) developed partial necrosis from arterial insufficiency. Neural re-innervation was successful in two out of three patients in whom it was attempted. Two patients (15%) sustained minor donor site skin graft loss that healed secondarily. In our series of predominantly older patients the donor sites have been relatively inconspicuous at one year follow-up. A functional restoration was achieved in all patients.

  18. Effects of bridging plus exercises with heel lift on lower extremity muscles

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Won-gyu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of the bridging plus exercise with heel lift on lower extremity muscles. [Subjects and Methods] Nine healthy males participated. The subjects performed bridging exercises under two conditions. Surface electromyography was used to measure the electrical activities of the medial hamstring (MH) and the gluteus maximus (GM) muscles. [Results] Activation of the MH muscle during bridging with heel lift decreased, and activation of the GM muscle during bridging with heel lift increased compared to those with the bridging exercise. [Conclusion] This result showed that bridging plus exercises with heel lift could be an effective exercise for patients with compensatory mechanisms during bridging exercises, such as weak GM with hamstring tightness. PMID:27313376

  19. Case report: lower extremity deep vein thrombosis following an intense calf workout.

    PubMed

    Yim, Eugene S; Friedberg, Ryan P

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of a high-performance athlete with hemoglobin SC who presented with asymmetric calf soreness after an intense calf workout. By ultrasonography, he was diagnosed with a deep vein thrombosis (DVT) of his right calf. Subsequently he presented with a number of sequelae of sickle cell disease: acute chest syndrome, avascular necrosis of the hips, and chronic kidney disease. The case is instructive as an example of DVT after exercise of the lower extremities, which has not been documented well. The case also illustrates a number of health sequelae of sickle cell disease that mimic more common musculoskeletal complaints. Sports medicine providers will have to consider these uncommon but profound diagnostic entities when caring for athletes with sickle cell disease. The case further highlights how research can inform the clinical decisions and policies aimed at reducing the risk of life-threatening and lifelong sequelae of sickle cell disease in athletes.

  20. The Effect of Manipulating Subject Mass on Lower Extremity Torque Patterns During Locomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeWitt, John K.; Cromwell, Ronita L.; Hagan, R. Donald

    2007-01-01

    During locomotion, humans adapt their motor patterns to maintain coordination despite changing conditions (Reisman et al., 2005). Bernstein (1967) proposed that in addition to the present state of a given joint, other factors, including limb inertia and velocity, must be taken into account to allow proper motion to occur. During locomotion with added mass counterbalanced using vertical suspension to maintain body weight, vertical ground reaction forces (GRF's) increase during walking but decrease during running, suggesting that adaptation may be velocity-specific (De Witt et al., 2006). It is not known, however, how lower extremity joint torques adapt to changes in inertial forces. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the effects of increasing body mass while maintaining body weight upon lower-limb joint torque during walking and running. We hypothesized that adaptations in joint torque patterns would occur with the addition of body mass.

  1. [Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry in Ilizarov lower extremity lengthening: preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Wroński, S; Wojciechowski, P; Wójcik, K; Kusz, D

    1999-01-01

    Ilizarov method for lower extremity lengthening has been employed in 107 patients. Some 25% of numerous complications are bony union disturbances. Dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) for assessment of new bone formation was introduced to reduce these problems. Detailed densitometry methodology developed on the ground of 93 measurements in 11 patients is presented. Pre-operative measurement was followed by subsequent evaluations done every 3 weeks after the onset of distraction. DEXA was capable of showing the callus 3-4 weeks earlier than conventional radiography. DEXA allows for adjusting the pace of lengthening to the extent of new bone mineralization, evaluation of lengthening achieved, determining the timing for safe removal of the apparatus. The need for temporary rearranging of the apparatus and troublesome image analysis are among the drawbacks of the method.

  2. Navigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Biologically Based Assay of Lower Extremity Impairment and Gait Velocity

    PubMed Central

    Dunning, Kari; Ying, Jun; Laine, Jarmo; Page, Stephen J.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. (a) To determine associations among motor evoked potential (MEP) amplitude, MEP latency, lower extremity (LE) impairment, and gait velocity and (b) determine the association between the presence of a detectable MEP signal with LE impairment and with gait velocity. Method. 35 subjects with chronic, stable LE hemiparesis were undergone TMS, the LE section of the Fugl-Meyer Impairment Scale (LE FM), and 10-meter walk test. We recorded presence, amplitude, and latency of MEPs in the affected tibialis anterior (TA) and soleus (SO). Results. MEP presence was associated with higher LEFM scores in both the TA and SO. MEP latency was larger in subjects with lower LEFM and difficulty walking. Conclusion. MEP latency appears to be an indicator of LE impairment and gait. Significance. Our results support the precept of using TMS, particularly MEP latency, as an adjunctive LE outcome measurement and prognostic technique. PMID:28243474

  3. New Clinical and Research Trends in Lower Extremity Management for Ambulatory Children with Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Diane L.; Alter, Katharine E.; Chambers, Henry

    2010-01-01

    Synopsis Cerebral palsy is the most prevalent physical disability in childhood and includes a group of disorders with varying manifestations and levels of capability in individuals given this diagnosis. This chapter will focus on current and future intervention strategies for improving mobility and participation over the lifespan for ambulatory children with cerebral palsy (CP). The provision and integration of physical therapy, medical and orthopedic surgery management focused primarily on the lower extremities will be discussed here. Some of the newer trends are: more intense and task-related exercise strategies, greater precision in tone identification and management, and a shift towards musculoskeletal surgery that focuses more on promoting dynamic bony alignment and less on releasing or lengthening tendons. Advances in basic and clinical science and technology development are changing existing paradigms and offering renewed hope for improved functioning for children with CP who are currently facing a lifelong disability with unique challenges at each stage in life. PMID:19643348

  4. Prevention of lower extremity stress fractures: a controlled trial of a shock absorbent insole.

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, L I; Dziados, J E; Jones, B H; Brundage, J F; Harris, J M; Sullivan, R; Gill, P

    1988-01-01

    A prospective controlled trial was carried out to determine the usefulness of a viscoelastic polymer insole in prevention of stress fractures and stress reactions of the lower extremities. The subjects were 3,025 US Marine recruits who were followed for 12 weeks of training at Parris Island, South Carolina. Polymer and standard mesh insoles were systematically distributed in boots that were issued to members of odd and even numbered platoons. The most important finding was that an elastic polymer insole with good shock absorbency properties did not prevent stress reactions of bone during a 12-week period of vigorous physical training. To control for the confounding effects of running in running shoes, which occurred for about one and one-half hours per week for the first five weeks, we also examined the association of age of shoes and cost of shoes with injury incidence. A slight trend of increasing stress injuries by increasing age of shoes was observed. However, this trend did not account for the similarity of rates in the two insole groups. In addition, we observed a strong trend of decreasing stress injury rate by history of increasing physical activity, as well as a higher stress injury rate in White compared to Black recruits. The results of the trial were not altered after controlling for these factors. This prospective study confirms previous clinical reports of the association of stress fractures with physical activity history. The clinical application of a shock absorbing insole as a preventive for lower extremity stress reactions is not supported in these uniformly trained recruits. The findings are relevant to civilian populations. PMID:3056045

  5. Lower Extremity Muscle Activation and Kinematics of Catchers When Throwing Using Various Squatting and Throwing Postures

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yi-Chien; Lo, Kuo-Cheng; Wang, Lin-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the differences in joint motions and muscle activities of the lower extremities involved in various squatting postures. The motion capture system with thirty-one reflective markers attached on participants was used for motion data collection. The electromyography system was applied over the quadriceps, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius muscles of the pivot and stride leg. The joint extension and flexion in wide squatting are greater than in general squatting (p = 0.005). Knee joint extension and flexion in general squatting are significantly greater than in wide squatting (p = 0.001). The adduction and abduction of the hip joint in stride passing are significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). Furthermore, the adduction and abduction of the knee joint in stride passing are also significantly greater than in step squatting (p = 0.000). When stride passing is performed, the muscle activation of the hamstring of the pivot foot in general squatting is significantly greater than in wide squatting (p < 0.05), and this difference continues to the stride period. Most catchers use a general or wide squatting width, exclusive of a narrow one. Therefore, the training design for strengthening the lower extremity muscles should consider the appropriateness of the common squat width to enhance squat-up performance. For lower limb muscle activation, wide squatting requires more active gastrocnemius and tibialis anterior muscles. Baseball players should extend the knee angle of the pivot foot before catching the ball. Key points Common squatting width can enhance squat-up performance through strengthening lower body muscle. Wide squatting width might improve lower body muscle activation, leading to more effective communication between the brain and the muscle group. The benefit might be improved coordination of lower body muscle. Common and wide squatting width might be cycled through training to enhance the strengthen and

  6. Relationships between lower-extremity flexibility, asymmetries, and the Y balance test.

    PubMed

    Overmoyer, Grant V; Reiser, Raoul F

    2015-05-01

    Joint flexibility, bilateral asymmetries in flexibility, and bilateral asymmetries in performance of the Y Balance Test have been associated with injuries. However, relationships among these attributes are unclear. The goal of this investigation was to examine how flexibility and flexibility asymmetries relate to the Y Balance Test. Twenty healthy active young adults (9 men and 11 women; mean ± SD: age = 21.9 ± 2.6 years; height = 171 ± 8.8 cm; mass = 67.2 ± 1.9 kg) performed 9 different lower extremity active range of motion (AROM) tests and the Y Balance Test in a single visit. Significant correlations (p ≤ 0.05) existed between bilateral average AROM measures and bilateral average Y Balance Test scores at the ankle and hip. Specifically, ankle dorsiflexion AROM at 0° knee flexion significantly correlated with Anterior, Posterolateral, and Composite directional scores of the Y Balance Test (r = 0.497-0.736). Significant correlations in ankle dorsiflexion AROM at 90° knee flexion also existed with Anterior, Posterolateral, Posteromedial, and Composite directional scores (r = 0.472-0.795). Hip flexion AROM was significantly correlated with Posterolateral, Posteromedial, and Composite directional scores (r = 0.457-0.583). Significant correlations between asymmetries in AROM and asymmetries in the Y Balance Test existed only in ankle plantarflexion with Anterior, Posterolateral, and Composite directional scores of the Y Balance Test (r = 0.520-0.636). Results suggest that when used with recreationally active healthy adults, the Y Balance Test may help identify lower-extremity flexibility deficits and flexibility asymmetries in the ankle and hip regions but may need to be used in conjunction with additional tests to understand a broader picture of functional movement and injury risk.

  7. A study of lower extremity amputation rates in older diabetic South Carolinians.

    PubMed

    Gonsalves, Wanda C; Gessey, Mark E; Mainous, Arch G; Tilley, Barbara C

    2007-02-01

    Several studies have shown that lower extremity non-traumatic amputations for diabetic patients disproportionately affect senior minorities. Our study uses population and Medicare data from the year 2000 to profile the magnitude of this disparity by county in South Carolina and its relation to race, gender, per capita income, and the number of primary care physicians. Data from 1998-2001 is used to investigate trends in amputation rates for the state as a whole and for individual counties. Lower extremity non-traumatic amputation (LEA) rates in black diabetic Medicare patients are more than twice that of White diabetic Medicare patients. In 2000, the three counties with the highest LEA rates for black males were Barnwell (5.06%), Allendale (4.87%), and Florence (4.50%). LEA rates are not related to the number of primary care physicians per 10,000 county residents or per capita income. All gender/race groups saw declines in LEA rates. Although our study could not explain the socioeconomic factors involved, it does mirror other prior studies that show a racial disparity in LEAs. Similarly, men have a greater risk of diabetic non-traumatic LEAs. Interestingly however, having more primary care physicians per 10,000 county residents does not decrease the rate of amputations. Policy makers and insurance brokers may utilize our findings to target the areas of most need for intervention and further studies. Improved adherence to guidelines by primary care physicians, decreasing barriers to health care access, educating patients about the severity of diabetes and its complications, and providing more culturally competent care may lessen the burden of this disability for our minority patients. In the era of "pay for performance", the rate of LEAs as a proxy of poor diabetic care management must clearly improve. Fortunately, the decrease in LEA rates over time as shown in our study is a step in the right direction. However, the decrease is not consistent across all counties

  8. Digital filtering of three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics: an assessment.

    PubMed

    Sinclair, Jonathan; Taylor, Paul John; Hobbs, Sarah Jane

    2013-12-18

    Errors in kinematic data are referred to as noise and are an undesirable portion of any waveform. Noise is typically removed using a low-pass filter which removes the high frequency components of the signal. The selection of an optimal frequency cut-off is very important when processing kinematic information and a number of techniques exists for the determination of an optimal frequency cut-off. Despite the importance of cut-off frequency to the efficacy of kinematic analyses there is currently a paucity of research examining the influence of different cut-off frequencies on the resultant 3-D kinematic waveforms and discrete parameters. Twenty participants ran at 4.0 m•s-1 as lower extremity kinematics in the sagittal, coronal and transverse planes were measured using an eight camera motion analysis system. The data were filtered at a range of cut-off frequencies and the discrete kinematic parameters were examined using repeated measures ANOVA's. The similarity between the raw and filtered waveforms were examined using intra-class correlations. The results show that the cut-off frequency has a significant influence on the discrete kinematic measure across displacement and derivative information in all three planes of rotation. Furthermore, it was also revealed that as the cut-off frequency decreased the attenuation of the kinematic waveforms became more pronounced, particularly in the coronal and transverse planes at the second derivative. In conclusion, this investigation provides new information regarding the influence of digital filtering on lower extremity kinematics and re-emphasizes the importance of selecting the correct cut-off frequency.

  9. [Recent Knowledge of Smoking and Peripheral Arterial Disease in Lower Extremities].

    PubMed

    Sotoda, Yoko; Hirooka, Shigeki; Orita, Hiroyuki; Wakabayashi, Ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) is an atherosclerotic obstructive disease of the arteries in lower extremities. Patients with PAD show high rates of mortality from coronary artery disease (CAD) and stroke. Smoking as well as diabetes is an important risk factor for PAD. A lesion of PAD in the lower extremities tends to be more proximal in smokers than in nonsmokers and to be more distal in patients with diabetes than in nondiabetics. By a systematic review, the odds ratio for PAD of smokers vs nonsmokers has been reported to be in the range of 1.7-7.4. Previous epidemiological studies suggest a stronger association of smoking with PAD than that with CAD. Nitric oxide (NO) is an important molecule suppressing the progression of atherosclerosis, but this function is compromised by smoking. Smoking decreases the bioactivity of NO and the expression level of NO synthase. In addition, smoking results in deteriorations of risk factors for atherosclerosis such as decreases in blood HDL (high-density lipoprotein) cholesterol and tissue plasminogen activator levels and increases in the levels of blood triglycerides, LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol, fibrinogen and the von Willebrand factor. Thus, smoking increases blood coagulability and deteriorates the blood lipid profile, resulting in thrombogenetic proneness and dyslipidemia. Smoking also increases the generation of atherogenic oxidized LDL in blood and decreases antiatherogenic prostacyclin production in the vascular endothelium. Smoking cessation is important for the prevention and therapy of PAD, and to this end, counseling by physicians and nicotine replacement therapy are useful and strongly recommended for patients with PAD.

  10. Trunk and Lower Extremity Kinematics During Stair Descent in Women With or Without Patellofemoral Pain

    PubMed Central

    Schwane, Brandi G.; Goerger, Benjamin M.; Goto, Shiho; Blackburn, J. Troy; Aguilar, Alain J.; Padua, Darin A.

    2015-01-01

    Context There is limited evidence indicating the contribution of trunk kinematics to patellofemoral pain (PFP). A better understanding of the interaction between trunk and lower extremity kinematics in this population may provide new avenues for interventions to treat PFP. Objective To compare trunk and lower extremity kinematics between participants with PFP and healthy controls during a stair-descent task. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants Twenty women with PFP (age = 22.2 ± 3.1 years, height = 164.5 ± 9.2 cm, mass = 63.5 ± 13.6 kg) and 20 healthy women (age = 21.0 ± 2.6 years, height = 164.5 ± 7.1 cm, mass = 63.8 ± 12.7 kg). Intervention(s) Kinematics were recorded as participants performed stair descent at a controlled velocity. Main Outcome Measure(s) Three-dimensional joint displacement of the trunk, hip, and knee during the stance phase of stair descent for the affected leg was measured using a 7-camera infrared optical motion-capture system. Pretest and posttest pain were assessed using a visual analogue scale. Kinematic differences between groups were determined using independent-samples t tests. A 2 × 2 mixed-model analysis of variance (group = PFP, control; time = pretest, posttest) was used to compare knee pain. Results We observed greater knee internal-rotation displacement for the PFP group (12.8° ± 7.2°) as compared with the control group (8.9° ± 4.4°). No other between-groups differences were observed for the trunk, hip, or other knee variables. Conclusions We observed no difference in trunk kinematics between groups but did note differences in knee internal-rotation displacement. These findings contribute to the current knowledge of altered movement in those with PFP and provide direction for exercise interventions. PMID:25898109

  11. Effect of Reduced Stiffness Dance Flooring on Lower Extremity Joint Angular Trajectories During a Ballet Jump.

    PubMed

    Hackney, James; Brummel, Sara; Newman, Mary; Scott, Shannon; Reinagel, Matthew; Smith, Jennifer

    2015-09-01

    We carried out a study to investigate how low stiffness flooring may help prevent overuse injuries of the lower extremity in dancers. It was hypothesized that performing a ballet jump (sauté) on a reduced stiffness dance floor would decrease maximum joint flexion angles and negative angular velocities at the hips, knees, or ankles compared to performing the same jump on a harder floor. The participants were 15 young adult female dancers (age range 18 to 28, mean = 20.89 ± 2.93 years) with at least 5 years of continuous ballet experience and without history of serious lower body injury, surgery, or recent pain. They performed sautés on a (low stiffness) Harlequin ® WoodSpring Floor and on a vinyl-covered hardwood on concrete floor. Maximum joint flexion angles and negative velocities at bilateral hips, knees, and ankles were measured with the "Ariel Performance Analysis System" (APAS). Paired one-tailed t-tests yielded significant decreases in maximum knee angle (average decrease = 3.4° ± 4.2°, p = 0.026) and angular negative velocity of the ankles (average decrease = 18.7°/sec ± 27.9°/sec, p = 0.009) with low stiffness flooring. If the knee angle is less acute, then the length of the external knee flexion moment arm will also be shorter and result in a smaller external knee flexion moment, given an equal landing force. Also, high velocities of eccentric muscle contraction, which are necessary to control negative angular velocity of the ankle joint, are associated with higher risk of musculotendinous injury. Hence, our findings indicate that reduced floor stiffness may indeed help decrease the likelihood of lower extremity injuries.

  12. Gait Training Interventions for Lower Extremity Amputees: A Systematic Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Highsmith, M. Jason; Andrews, Casey R.; Millman, Claire; Fuller, Ashley; Kahle, Jason T.; Klenow, Tyler D.; Lewis, Katherine L.; Bradley, Rachel C.; Orriola, John J.

    2016-01-01

    Lower extremity (LE) amputation patients who use prostheses have gait asymmetries and altered limb loading and movement strategies when ambulating. Subsequent secondary conditions are believed to be associated with gait deviations and lead to long-term complications that impact function and quality of life as a result. The purpose of this study was to systematically review the literature to determine the strength of evidence supporting gait training interventions and to formulate evidence statements to guide practice and research related to therapeutic gait training for lower extremity amputees. A systematic review of three databases was conducted followed by evaluation of evidence and synthesis of empirical evidence statements (EES). Eighteen manuscripts were included in the review, which covered two areas of gait training interventions: 1) overground and 2) treadmill-based. Eight EESs were synthesized. Four addressed overground gait training, one covered treadmill training, and three statements addressed both forms of therapy. Due to the gait asymmetries, altered biomechanics, and related secondary consequences associated with LE amputation, gait training interventions are needed along with study of their efficacy. Overground training with verbal or other auditory, manual, and psychological awareness interventions was found to be effective at improving gait. Similarly, treadmill-based training was found to be effective: 1) as a supplement to overground training; 2) independently when augmented with visual feedback and/or body weight support; or 3) as part of a home exercise plan. Gait training approaches studied improved multiple areas of gait, including sagittal and coronal biomechanics, spatiotemporal measures, and distance walked. PMID:28066520

  13. Active Ankle Movements Prevent Formation of Lower-Extremity Deep Venous Thrombosis After Orthopedic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ye; Guan, Xiang-Hong; Wang, Rui; Li, Bin; Ning, Bo; Su, Wei; Sun, Tao; Li, Hong-Yan

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to assess the preventive value of active ankle movements in the formation of lower-extremity deep venous thrombosis (DVT), attempting to develop a new method for rehabilitation nursing after orthopedic surgery. Material/Methods We randomly assigned 193 patients undergoing orthopedic surgery in the lower limbs into a case group (n=96) and a control group (n=97). The control group received routine nursing while the case group performed active ankle movements in addition to receiving routine nursing. Maximum venous outflow (MVO), maximum venous capacity (MVC), and blood rheology were measured and the incidence of DVT was recorded. Results On the 11th and 14th days of the experiment, the case group had significantly higher MVO and MVC than the control group (all P<0.05). The whole-blood viscosity at high shear rate and the plasma viscosity were significantly lower in the case group than in the control group on the 14th day (both P<0.05). During the experiment, a significantly higher overall DVT incidence was recorded in the control group (8 with asymptomatic DVT) compared with the case group (1 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.034). During follow-up, the case group presented a significantly lower DVT incidence (1 with symptomatic DVT and 4 with asymptomatic DVT) than in the control group (5 with symptomatic DVT and 10 with asymptomatic DVT) (P=0.031). Conclusions Through increasing MVO and MVC and reducing blood rheology, active ankle movements may prevent the formation of lower-extremity DVT after orthopedic surgery. PMID:27600467

  14. Lower extremity preference during gross and fine motor skills performed in sitting and standing postures.

    PubMed

    Beling, J; Wolfe, G A; Allen, K A; Boyle, J M

    1998-12-01

    The evaluation of lower limb preference in physical therapy practice is critical in order for the clinician to assist patients with functional retraining tasks. No studies in the physical therapy literature present a systematic approach to determine the criteria needed to identify the preferred limb. This research was designed to present a series of tests for effectiveness in determining limb preference. The purpose of this study was to determine whether lower limb preference existed in a group of recreationally athletic women when performing either stability or dynamic skills with the lower extremities while sitting or standing. The relationship of such a preference to handedness was also determined. Forty female recreational athletes, 20 right-handed subjects and 20 left-handed subjects, who ranged in age from 21 to 35 years, participated in this study. Subjects performed three repetitions of the following tests in both sitting and standing: kick a ball, swing a leg over a box, pick up a marble with the toes, and trace a triangle with the toes. The subjects were also asked to stand on one leg. The order of performing the tests was randomized. The results indicated that right-handed subjects performed activities more consistently with one lower extremity when compared with left-handed subjects, regardless of posture (sitting or standing). The difference in limb choice between right- and left-handed subjects was significant for all activities (p < .05). The considerable sensitivity of foot and leg performance following neurological insult renders the assessment of foot and leg preference very important for purposes of clinical rehabilitation.

  15. Influence of Lower Extremity Muscle Size and Quality on Stair-Climb Performance in Career Firefighters.

    PubMed

    Kleinberg, Craig R; Ryan, Eric D; Tweedell, Andrew J; Barnette, Timothy J; Wagoner, Chad W

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of lower extremity muscular size and quality on stair-climb performance (SCP) in career firefighters. Forty-six male career firefighters (age = 37.0 ± 7.2 years; stature = 180.2 ± 6.9 cm; body mass = 108.0 ± 19.8 kg) volunteered for this study. Panoramic ultrasound images of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were obtained to determine cross-sectional area (CSA) and echo intensity (EI) of each muscle. The CSA of each muscle was then summed together and normalized to body mass (CSA/BM [QCSA]). Additionally, EI was averaged across both muscles (QEI). Participants then performed a timed and weighted SCP assessment where they ascended and descended 26 stairs 4 times as quickly as possible while wearing a weighted vest (22.73 kg) to simulate the weight of their self-contained breathing apparatus and turnout gear. Bivariate correlations and stepwise regression analyses were used to examine the relationships among variables and the relative contributions of QCSA and QEI to SCP. Partial correlations were used to examine the relationship between QCSA and SCP and QEI and SCP while controlling for age and body mass index (BMI). The results indicated that QCSA and QEI were significantly related to SCP before (r = -0.492, p = 0.001; r = 0.363, p = 0.013, respectively) and after accounting for age and BMI (r = -0.324, p = 0.032; r = 0.413, p = 0.005, respectively). Both QCSA and QEI contributed significantly to the prediction of SCP (r = 0.560, p < 0.001). These findings indicate that lower extremity muscle size and quality are important contributors to critical firefighting tasks, which have been shown to be improved with resistance training.

  16. Lower Extremity Amputations in Persons with and without Diabetes in Italy: 2001–2010

    PubMed Central

    Lombardo, Flavia L.; Maggini, Marina; De Bellis, Alessandra; Seghieri, Giuseppe; Anichini, Roberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective To analyze hospitalization for lower extremity amputations (LEAs) and amputee rates in persons with and without diabetes in Italy. Research Design and Methods All patients with LEAs in the period 2001–2010 were identified analyzing the National Hospital Discharge Record database. For each year, amputee and hospitalization rates for LEAs were calculated either for persons with diabetes or without. Time trend for major and minor amputations were analysed. Results From 2001 to 2010 a mean annual number of 11,639 individuals underwent a lower extremity amputation: 58.6% had diabetes accounting for 60.7% of total hospitalizations. In 2010, the crude amputee rate for LEAs was 20.4 per 100,000 inhabitants: 247.2 for 100.000 persons with diabetes, and 8.6 for those without diabetes. Having diabetes was associated to an increased risk of amputation (Poisson estimated RR 10.9, 95%CI 9.4–12.8). Over the whole period, a progressive reduction of amputee rates was observed for major amputations either among persons with diabetes (−30.7%) or without diabetes (−12.5%), while the rates of minor amputations increased progressively (+22.4%) among people without diabetes and were nearly stable in people with diabetes (−4.6%). A greater number of minor amputations were performed among persons with than without diabetes: in 2010, the minor-to-major ratio among persons with diabetes (2.5) was more than twice than in those without diabetes (1.0). Conclusions The nationwide analyses confirm a progressive reduction of hospitalization and amputee rates for major LEAs, suggesting an earlier and more diffuse approach aimed at limb salvage. PMID:24489723

  17. Irrigation solutions in open fractures of the lower extremities: evaluation of isotonic saline and distilled water

    PubMed Central

    Olufemi, Olukemi Temiloluwa; Adeyeye, Adeolu Ikechukwu

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Open fractures are widely considered as orthopaedic emergencies requiring immediate intervention. The initial management of these injuries usually affects the ultimate outcome because open fractures may be associated with significant morbidity. Wound irrigation forms one of the pivotal principles in the treatment of open fractures. The choice of irrigation fluid has since been a source of debate. This study aimed to evaluate and compare the effects of isotonic saline and distilled water as irrigation solutions in the management of open fractures of the lower extremities. Wound infection and wound healing rates using both solutions were evaluated. Methods: This was a prospective hospital-based study of 109 patients who presented to the Accident and Emergency department with open lower limb fractures. Approval was sought and obtained from the Ethics Committee of the Hospital. Patients were randomized into either the isotonic saline (NS) or the distilled water (DW) group using a simple ballot technique. Twelve patients were lost to follow-up, while 97 patients were available until conclusion of the study. There were 50 patients in the isotonic saline group and 47 patients in the distilled water group. Results: Forty-one (42.3%) of the patients were in the young and economically productive strata of the population. There was a male preponderance with a 1.7:1 male-to-female ratio. The wound infection rate was 34% in the distilled water group and 44% in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.315). The mean time ± SD to wound healing was 2.7 ± 1.5 weeks in the distilled water group and 3.1 ± 1.8 weeks in the isotonic saline group (p = 0.389). Conclusions: It was concluded from this study that the use of distilled water compares favourably with isotonic saline as an irrigation solution in open fractures of the lower extremities. PMID:28134091

  18. Acute arterial embolism of left lower extremity caused by paradoxical embolism in Ebstein's anomaly

    PubMed Central

    LI, Jun-Sheng; Ma, Jie; Yan, Zi-Xing; Cheng, Dong-Ming; Chang, Liang; Zhang, Hai-Chun; Liu, Jiang-Yan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Ebstein's anomaly is a benign and stable congenital heart disease for asymptomatic patients. Despite a low incidence of Ebstein's anomaly (EA), patients’ quality of life can be badly affected by EA without positive surgical intervention. Especially EA is associated with other congenital heart disease, such as the atrial septal defect, patent foramen ovale, and arterial embolism exclude other reasons, it is often considered to be the consequence of paradoxical embolism, and surgical intervention must be conducted. Case report: An 11-year-old girl falling off the bed suffered pain from left lower extremity. Echocardiographic evaluation revealed an EA, severe tricuspid regurgitation, and secundum atrial septal defect. Both left leg amputation and cardiac surgery were conducted after recovery. Under the condition of anesthesia cardiopulmonary bypass extracorporeal circulation, atrial septal defect repair and Cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve were performed. Patient recovered well and left hospital smoothly. Discussion: EA is a rare and complex congenital cardiac malformation. There are about 80% to 90% of EA patients with combined atrial septal defect and patent foramen ovale. Sudden arterial occlusion is very rare especially in childhood. When thoracic roentgenoscopy, arterial blood gas analysis, coagulation test, and echocardiographic of lower extremity deep venous system are all normal, one should consider the possibility of a paradoxical embolism. If patients have the paradoxical embolism or worsening tricuspid regurgitation, the most suitable therapeutic regimen should be chosen according to patients’ condition. With surgical techniques and methods renewed continuously, cone reconstruction of the tricuspid valve has been confirmed in clinical trials, which can use its own tissues to form not only central bloodstream, but also the coaption between leaflet and leaflet. PMID:28151866

  19. The propeller flap for chronic osteomyelitis of the lower extremities: a case report.

    PubMed

    Rubino, C; Figus, A; Mazzocchi, M; Dessy, L A; Martano, A

    2009-10-01

    The goals of the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis are infection eradication with systemic antibiotic therapy and local management with radical excision of the infected tissue and obliteration of the remaining dead space. Adequate debridement and coverage with a well-vascularised tissue are mandatory for successful outcomes. Use of muscle covering for chronic osteomyelitis in the lower extremities is considered the best procedure. However, there have been instances where debridement of the bone tissue did not leave a deep cavity along the leg bones and fasciocutaneous flaps can be used in these instances to cover the defect and to restore function without recurrence of the disease. Recently, free non-muscle flaps have been used and assessed for chronic osteomyelitis or covering of exposed bone. Perforator flaps have been shown to be well vascularised due to a structural haemodynamic enhancement. In the light of these findings we report a successful case of chronic osteomyelitis of the right fibula treated with excision of the affected tissue and covering with a propeller flap. Instead of free flap covering, in order to optimise surgical reconstruction, reducing the operative time, donor and recipient site morbidity and risk of total flap failure, local perforator flaps and particularly the propeller flap may be indicated in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis in selected patients when the defect is limited and there is no need to fill a deep bone cavity or a dead space. To our knowledge, this the first report of the use of a propeller flap in the treatment of chronic osteomyelitis in the lower extremities.

  20. Revision Rate and Risk Factors After Lower Extremity Amputation in Diabetic or Dysvascular Patients.

    PubMed

    Wanivenhaus, Florian; Mauler, Flavien; Stelzer, Teresa; Tschopp, Alois; Böni, Thomas; Berli, Martin C

    2016-01-01

    This article reports the revision rate and possible risk factors for lower extremity amputations in patients with diabetes mellitus or peripheral arterial disease (PAD). Data were collected from 421 patients with diabetes mellitus or PAD who underwent amputations of the lower extremity at the authors' institution from 2002 to 2012. There was a 25.2% overall revision rate. Mean time from amputation to revision was 244 days (range, 2-2590 days). Patients with diabetes mellitus had a significantly higher rate of revision to a more proximal level compared with patients without diabetes mellitus (type 1: odds ratio [OR]=3.73; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.21-11.52; P=.022; and type 2: OR=2.3; 95% CI, 1.07-4.95; P=.033). A significant increase in revision rates was observed from Fontaine stage 0 to IV (stage 0: 17.9%; stage IV, 34.7%; P=.03). Risk factors for revision were diabetic nephropathy (OR=2.26; 95% CI, 1.4-3.63; P=.001) and polyneuropathy (OR=1.68; 95% CI, 1.03-2.73; P=.037). Patients who underwent revision amputation had a significantly younger mean age than patients who did not undergo revision amputation (65.23 years [range, 40-92 years] vs 68.52 years [range, 32-96 years]; P=.013). Anticipated amputation in this patient population requires a multidisciplinary approach with optimization of the patient's health. In the authors' clinical practice, the determination of the appropriate amputation level is performed individually for each patient, considering the risk factors identified in this study and the patient's expected mobilization potential, social background, and acceptance of a more proximal primary amputation level.

  1. The thoracodorsal artery perforator flap with a vascularized scapular segment for reconstruction of a composite lower extremity defect.

    PubMed

    Momeni, A; Krischak, S; Bannasch, H

    2006-01-01

    High-energy trauma resulting in a composite defect of the lower extremity confronts the microvascular surgeon with more difficulties than do free flap reconstruction elsewhere in the body, since the choice of distant recipient vessels is particularly difficult. Combining principles of perforator flap surgery with those of composite tissue transfer, we designed a thoracodorsal artery perforator flap with a vascularized bone segment from the scapula for reconstruction of a composite lower extremity defect in a patient following a paragliding accident. This is the first report on the application of a composite thoracodorsal artery perforator flap with vascularized scapula in lower extremity reconstruction. Among its multiple advantages, such as preservation of latissimus dorsi function, it is a good tool for one-stage reconstruction of traumatic composite lower extremity defects because its low donor site morbidity and long vascular pedicle enables anastomosis placement outside the zone of injury.

  2. [Osteoid osteoma in the lower extremity of the radius: about a case, rare location and review of the literature].

    PubMed

    Abdelhafid, Derfoufi; Moncef, Erraji; Abdessamad, Kharraji; Najib, Abdeljaouad; Hicham, Yacoubi

    2016-01-01

    Osteoid osteoma is a benign but painful bone tumor whose treatment involves complete surgical resection. We report the case of a young patient with osteoid osteoma in the lower extremity of the radius.

  3. The effect of virtual reality-based eccentric training on lower extremity muscle activation and balance in stroke patients

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seung Kyu; Yang, Dae Jung; Uhm, Yo Han; Heo, Jae Won; Kim, Je Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of virtual reality-based eccentric training on lower extremity muscle activity and balance in stroke patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty stroke patients participated, with 15 patients allotted to each of two eccentric training groups: one using a slow velocity (group I) and one using a fast velocity (group II). The virtual reality-based eccentric training was performed by the patients for 30 minutes once a day, 5 days a week, for 8 weeks using an Eccentron system. Surface electromyography was used to measure the lower extremity muscle activity, while a BioRescue was used to measure balancing ability. [Results] A significant difference in lower extremity muscle activation and balance ability was observed in group I compared with group II. [Conclusion] This study showed that virtual reality-based eccentric training using a slow velocity is effective for improving lower extremity muscle activity and balance in stroke patients. PMID:27512263

  4. An evidence-based review of hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions to address dynamic lower extremity valgus

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Kevin R; Nguyen, Anh-Dung; Dischiavi, Steven L; Hegedus, Eric J; Zuk, Emma F; Taylor, Jeffrey B

    2015-01-01

    Deficits in proximal hip strength or neuromuscular control may lead to dynamic lower extremity valgus. Measures of dynamic lower extremity valgus have been previously shown to relate to increased risk of several knee pathologies, specifically anterior cruciate ligament ruptures and patellofemoral pain. Therefore, hip-focused interventions have gained considerable attention and been successful in addressing these knee pathologies. The purpose of the review was to identify and discuss hip-focused exercise interventions that aim to address dynamic lower extremity valgus. Previous electromyography, kinematics, and kinetics research support the use of targeted hip exercises with non-weight-bearing, controlled weight-bearing, functional exercise, and, to a lesser extent, dynamic exercises in reducing dynamic lower extremity valgus. Further studies should be developed to identify and understand the mechanistic relationship between optimized biomechanics during sports and hip-focused neuromuscular exercise interventions. PMID:26346471

  5. The functional outcome of lower-extremity fractures with vascular injury.

    PubMed

    Lin, C H; Wei, F C; Levin, L S; Su, J I; Yeh, W L

    1997-09-01

    Salvage of lower-extremity Gustilo type IIIC fractures is difficult, time-consuming for the patients and physicians, and not universally successful because of poor functional outcomes. Even if successful with limb salvage, the functional result may be unsatisfactory because of mutilating injuries to muscle and nerve, bone loss, and the presence of chronic infection. From July 1991 until July 1994, revascularizations of open IIIC fractures were attempted for wounds with Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) < or = 10. The functional results were evaluated at 2 years after injury. Thirty-six lower-extremity revascularizations were performed on 34 patients, including 1 patient with bilateral distal tibial IIIC fractures and a child with IIIC femoral fracture accompanied by ipsilateral distal tibial amputation. Excluded were patients with below-ankle IIIC fractures as well as patients who underwent immediate amputation at admission. After the revascularization, seven patients with IIIC fractures (7 of 36, 19.4%) underwent secondary amputation within 1 week. At the 2-year follow-up, the overall secondary amputation rate was 25% (9 of 36) and the salvage rate was 75% (27 of 36). Those were no deaths. Of the 29 salvaged limbs among these 27 patients, 23 limbs (23 of 29, 79.3%) required secondary coverage procedures that included 12 free flap transfers (12 of 29, 41.4%). Every patient needed subsequent reconstructive surgery to achieve an acceptable functional result. In this series, MESS was able to predict the secondary amputation rate and the functional result. Sixteen of the 17 limb-salvaged patients with MESS < or = 7 were able to achieve minimal functional requirements, whereas 3 of the 10 patients with MESS = 8 to 10 failed to achieve minimal functional requirements at the 2-year follow-up. Using statistical analysis, we found that the salvaged limbs with MESS < or = 9 exhibited a significant difference in achieving adequate function compared with limbs with MESS

  6. Lower Extremity Microembolism in Open vs. Endovascular Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Repair

    PubMed Central

    Toursavadkohi, Shahab; Kakkos, Stavros K.; Rubinfeld, Ilan; Shepard, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    Although previous studies have documented the occurrence of microembolization during abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) repair by both open and endovascular approaches, no study has compared the downstream effects of these two repair techniques on lower extremity hemodynamics. In this prospective cohort study, 20 patients were treated with endovascular aneurysm repair (EVAR) (11 Zenith, 8 Excluder, and 1 Medtronic) and 18 patients with open repair (OR) (16 bifurcated grafts, 2 tube grafts). Pre- and postoperative ankle-brachial indices (ABIs) and toe-brachial indices (TBIs) were measured preoperatively and on postoperative day (POD) 1 and 5. Demographics and preoperative ABIs/TBIs were identical in EVAR (0.97/0.63) and OR (0.96/0.63) patients (p = 0.21). There was a significant decrease in ABIs/TBIs following both EVAR (0.83/0.52, p = 0.01) and OR (0.73/0.39, p = 0.003) on POD #1, although this decrease was greater following OR than EVAR (p = 0.002). This difference largely resolved by POD #5 (p = 0.41). In the OR group, TBIs in the limb in which flow was restored first was significantly reduced compared to the contralateral limb (0.50 vs. 0.61, p = 0.03). In the EVAR group, there was also a difference in TBIs between the main body insertion side and the contralateral side (0.50 vs. 0.59, p = 0.02). Deterioration of lower extremity perfusion pressures occurs commonly after AAA repair regardless of repair technique. Toe perfusion is worse in the limb opened first during OR and on the main body insertion side following EVAR, suggesting that microembolization plays a major role in this deterioration. The derangement following OR is more profound than after EVAR on POD #1, but recovers rapidly. This finding suggests that microembolizarion may be worse with OR or alternatively that other factors associated with OR (e.g., the hemodynamic response to surgery with redistribution of flow to vital organs peri-operatively) may play a role. PMID

  7. Stiffness and ultimate load of osseointegrated prosthesis fixations in the upper and lower extremity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Techniques for the skeletal attachment of amputation-prostheses have been developed over recent decades. This type of attachment has only been performed on a small number of patients. It poses various potential advantages compared to conventional treatment with a socket, but is also associated with an increased risk of bone or implant-bone interface fracture in the case of a fall. We therefore investigated the bending stiffness and ultimate bending moment of such devices implanted in human and synthetic bones. Methods Eight human specimens and 16 synthetic models of the proximal femora were implanted with lower extremity prostheses and eight human specimens and six synthetic humeri were implanted with upper extremity prostheses. They were dissected according to typical amputation levels and underwent loading in a material testing machine in a four-point bending setup. Bending stiffness, ultimate bending moment and fracture modes were determined in a load to failure experiment. Additionally, axial pull-out was performed on eight synthetic specimens of the lower extremity. Results Maximum bending moment of the synthetic femora was 160.6±27.5 Nm, the flexural rigidity of the synthetic femora was 189.0±22.6 Nm2. Maximum bending moment of the human femora was 100.4±38.5 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 137.8±29.4 Nm2. The maximum bending moment of the six synthetic humeri was 104.9±19.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity was 63.7±3.6 Nm2. For the human humeri the maximum bending moment was 36.7±11.0 Nm, and the flexural rigidity at was 43.7±10.5 Nm2. The maximum pull-out force for the eight synthetic femora was 3571±919 N. Conclusion Significant differences were found between human and synthetic specimens of the lower and upper extremity regarding maximum bending moment, bending displacement and flexural rigidity. The results of this study are relevant with respect to previous finding regarding the load at the interfaces of osseointegrated prosthesis

  8. Does This Older Adult With Lower Extremity Pain Have the Clinical Syndrome of Lumbar Spinal Stenosis?

    PubMed Central

    Suri, Pradeep; Rainville, James; Kalichman, Leonid; Katz, Jeffrey N.

    2012-01-01

    Context The clinical syndrome of lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a common diagnosis in older adults presenting with lower extremity pain. Objective To systematically review the accuracy of the clinical examination for the diagnosis of the clinical syndrome of LSS. Data Sources MEDLINE, EMBASE, and CINAHL searches of articles published from January 1966 to September 2010. Study Selection Studies were included if they contained adequate data on the accuracy of the history and physical examination for diagnosing the clinical syndrome of LSS, using a reference standard of expert opinion with radiographic or anatomic confirmation. Data Extraction Two authors independently reviewed each study to determine eligibility, extract data, and appraise levels of evidence. Data Synthesis Four studies evaluating 741 patients were identified. Among patients with lower extremity pain, the likelihood of the clinical syndrome of LSS was increased for individuals older than 70 years (likelihood ratio [LR], 2.0; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.6–2.5), and was decreased for those younger than 60 years (LR, 0.40; 95% CI, 0.29–0.57). The most useful symptoms for increasing the likelihood of the clinical syndrome of LSS were having no pain when seated (LR, 7.4; 95% CI, 1.9–30), improvement of symptoms when bending forward (LR, 6.4; 95% CI, 4.1–9.9), the presence of bilateral buttock or leg pain (LR, 6.3; 95% CI, 3.1–13), and neurogenic claudication (LR, 3.7; 95% CI, 2.9–4.8). Absence of neurogenic claudication (LR, 0.23; 95% CI, 0.17–0.31) decreased the likelihood of the diagnosis. A wide-based gait (LR, 13; 95% CI, 1.9–95) and abnormal Romberg test result (LR, 4.2; 95% CI, 1.4–13) increased the likelihood of the clinical syndrome of LSS. A score of 7 or higher on a diagnostic support tool including history and examination findings increased the likelihood of the clinical syndrome of LSS (LR, 3.3; 95% CI, 2.7–4.0), while a score lower than 7 made the diagnosis much less

  9. Factors associated with lower extremity atherosclerotic disease in Chinese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Qingge; He, Binbin; Zhu, Chaoyu; Xiao, Yuanyuan; Wei, Li; Jia, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Early detection and treatment of lower extremity atherosclerotic disease (LEAD), and controlling its risk factors are critical in preventing amputation and death in diabetic patients. This study aimed to investigate the factors associated with LEAD in Chinese diabetic patients. In this case-control study, patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) (N = 1289) were divided into 2 groups according to the ultrasonic Doppler examination: with (LEAD+, n = 737) and without (LEAD−, n = 552) LEAD. In subgroup analysis, the LEAD+ group was divided based on the diameter of lower-extremity arteries: LEAD+A (1%–49% reduction) and LEAD+B (≥50% reduction). Clinical and demographic data of patients were analyzed. Compared with the LEAD− group, serum creatinine levels were significantly increased (P < 0.001), whereas glomerular filtration rate (GFR) was significantly decreased (P < 0.001) in the LEAD+ group. Multivariate analysis results showed that GFR (odds ratio [OR] 0.991, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.986–0.997, P = 0.003), diabetes duration (OR 1.055, 95% CI 1.026–1.084, P < 0.001), age (OR 1.123, 95% CI 1.104–1.142, P < 0.001), and uric acid (OR 1.002, 95% CI 1.000–1.004, P = 0.031) were independently associated with LEAD in patients with T2DM. Furthermore, multivariate analysis showed that age (OR 1.078, 95% CI 1.048–1.109, P < 0.001) and GFR (OR 0.985, 95% CI 0.975–0.994, P = 0.002) were independently associated with the severity of arterial lesions in patients with T2DM and LEAD. The risk factors of LEAD in Chinese patients with T2DM include age, course of disease, uric acid, and GFR. Patients with T2DM, high uric acid levels, and declined GFR could be listed in the high-risk group for LEAD. PMID:28002317

  10. Differences in Lower Extremity and Trunk Kinematics between Single Leg Squat and Step Down Tasks

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Cara L.; Foch, Eric; Luko, Marc M.; Loverro, Kari L.; Khuu, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The single leg squat and single leg step down are two commonly used functional tasks to assess movement patterns. It is unknown how kinematics compare between these tasks. The purpose of this study was to identify kinematic differences in the lower extremity, pelvis and trunk between the single leg squat and the step down. Fourteen healthy individuals participated in this research and performed the functional tasks while kinematic data were collected for the trunk, pelvis, and lower extremities using a motion capture system. For the single leg squat task, the participant was instructed to squat as low as possible. For the step down task, the participant was instructed to stand on top of a box, slowly lower him/herself until the non-stance heel touched the ground, and return to standing. This was done from two different heights (16cm and 24cm). The kinematics were evaluated at peak knee flexion as well as at 60° of knee flexion. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between the angles at those two time points were also calculated to better understand the relationship between each task. The tasks resulted in kinematics differences at the knee, hip, pelvis, and trunk at both time points. The single leg squat was performed with less hip adduction (p ≤ 0.003), but more hip external rotation and knee abduction (p ≤ 0.030), than the step down tasks at 60° of knee flexion. These differences were maintained at peak knee flexion except hip external rotation was only significant in the 24cm step down task (p ≤ 0.029). While there were multiple differences between the two step heights at peak knee flexion, the only difference at 60° of knee flexion was in trunk flexion (p < 0.001). Angles at the knee and hip had a moderate to excellent correlation (r = 0.51–0.98), but less consistently so at the pelvis and trunk (r = 0.21–0.96). The differences in movement patterns between the single leg squat and the step down should be considered when selecting a single leg task

  11. Differences in Lower Extremity and Trunk Kinematics between Single Leg Squat and Step Down Tasks.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Cara L; Foch, Eric; Luko, Marc M; Loverro, Kari L; Khuu, Anne

    2015-01-01

    The single leg squat and single leg step down are two commonly used functional tasks to assess movement patterns. It is unknown how kinematics compare between these tasks. The purpose of this study was to identify kinematic differences in the lower extremity, pelvis and trunk between the single leg squat and the step down. Fourteen healthy individuals participated in this research and performed the functional tasks while kinematic data were collected for the trunk, pelvis, and lower extremities using a motion capture system. For the single leg squat task, the participant was instructed to squat as low as possible. For the step down task, the participant was instructed to stand on top of a box, slowly lower him/herself until the non-stance heel touched the ground, and return to standing. This was done from two different heights (16 cm and 24 cm). The kinematics were evaluated at peak knee flexion as well as at 60° of knee flexion. Pearson correlation coefficients (r) between the angles at those two time points were also calculated to better understand the relationship between each task. The tasks resulted in kinematics differences at the knee, hip, pelvis, and trunk at both time points. The single leg squat was performed with less hip adduction (p ≤ 0.003), but more hip external rotation and knee abduction (p ≤ 0.030), than the step down tasks at 60° of knee flexion. These differences were maintained at peak knee flexion except hip external rotation was only significant in the 24 cm step down task (p ≤ 0.029). While there were multiple differences between the two step heights at peak knee flexion, the only difference at 60° of knee flexion was in trunk flexion (p < 0.001). Angles at the knee and hip had a moderate to excellent correlation (r = 0.51-0.98), but less consistently so at the pelvis and trunk (r = 0.21-0.96). The differences in movement patterns between the single leg squat and the step down should be considered when selecting a single leg task

  12. Effects of cold water immersion on lower extremity joint biomechanics during running.

    PubMed

    Fukuchi, Claudiane Arakaki; da Rocha, Emmanuel Souza; Stefanyshyn, Darren John

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the influence of cryotherapy on lower extremity running biomechanics. Twenty-six healthy male volunteers were randomised into two intervention groups: cold water (cold water at ~11°C) or tepid water (tepid water at ~26°C). They were required to run at 4.0 ± 0.2 m · s(-1) before and after they underwent water immersion for 20 min. Differences between pre- and post-intervention were used to compare the influence of water intervention during running. Peak joint angles, peak joint moments, peak ground reaction forces (GRF) and contact time (CT) were calculated using three-dimensional gait analysis. Independent t-tests were applied with a significant alpha level set at 0.05. Decreased peak propulsive and vertical GRF, decreased plantarflexion moments, increased hip flexion angle and longer CT were observed following cold water immersion. Although cold water immersion (cryotherapy) affected the running movement, none of the alterations have been related to running biomechanical patterns associated with injuries. Therefore, our results indicated that cold water immersion appears safe prior to running activities.

  13. MR Angiography of the Lower Extremities with a Moving-Bed Infusion-Tracking Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, W.M.; Schlejen, P.M.; Eikelboom, B.C.; Graaf, Y. van der; Mali, W.P.T.M.

    2003-02-15

    Purpose: To assess the value of MR angiography (MRA) with automatic table movement in a consecutive series of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Methods: Seventy-two patients underwent both conventional angiography (CA) and MRA for peripheral arterial occlusive disease. Both techniques were scored in a masked way. Consensus scoring for CA was compared with MRA scoring per observer. If there was a discrepancy in scoring of asegment on MRA and CA, the images were reviewed and a consensus arrived at. Results: Observer A found 7.4% and observer B found 6.5% of the segments could not be analyzed on MRA. Observer A scored 11.4% dissimilar on MRA and CA, observer B 15.2%. In the aortoiliacarteries, this was mainly caused by stents and overestimation of stenoses; in the crural arteries it resulted from underestimation of the stenoses on MRA. Overall sensitivity and specificity for the aortoiliac, femoropopliteal and crural vessels were respectively 90% and 91%, 90% and 96%, 59% and 96% for observer A, and 85% and 91%, 84% and 89%, 68% and 85% for observer B. Conclusion: Although MRA of the lower extremities is a promising technique, improvements still need to be made. In particular, MRA below the knee is suboptimal for clinical use.

  14. Effects of combined exercise on changes of lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jaehyun; Lee, Joongsook; Yang, Jeongok; Lee, Bomjin; Han, Dongwook

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the effects of combined exercise for a period of 12 weeks on the changes in lower extremity muscle activation during walking in older women. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 22 elderly women who were 65 years of age or older and living in B-City. The subjects had no nervous system or muscular system diseases that might affect walking in the previous two years. [Methods] Muscle activation was measured by using surface EMG (QEMG-8, Laxtha, Daejeon, Republic of Korea). The subjects were asked to walk on an 8 m of footpath at a natural speed. In order to minimize the noise from the cable connecting the EMG measuring instrument to the electrodes, tape was used to affix the electrodes so that they would not fall off the subjects. The EMG data were analyzed by using the RMS. [Results] Muscle activation of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tibialis anterior, and gastrocnemius was increased significantly after combined exercise for 12 weeks. However, no increase was observed in the left biceps femoris. [Conclusion] It was demonstrated that our exercise program, which includes aerobic walking exercises, senior-robics, and muscle strengthening exercises using elastic bands, is very effective for reorganizing the normal gait pattern in the cerebral cortex and improving muscle strength. PMID:26157253

  15. Lower extremity thrust and non-thrust joint mobilization for patellofemoral pain syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Brad G; Simon, Corey B

    2014-05-01

    A 40-year old female presented to physical therapy with a one-year history of insidious right anteromedial and anterolateral knee pain. Additionally, the patient had a history of multiple lateral ankle sprains bilaterally, the last sprain occurring on the right ankle 1 year prior to the onset of knee pain. The patient was evaluated and given a physical therapy diagnosis of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS), with associated talocrural and tibiofemoral joint hypomobility limiting ankle dorsiflexion and knee extension, respectively. Treatment included a high-velocity low amplitude thrust manipulation to the talocrural joint, which helped restore normal ankle dorsiflexion range of motion. The patient also received tibiofemoral joint non-thrust manual therapy to regain normal knee extension mobility prior to implementing further functional progression exercises to her home program (HEP). This case report highlights the importance of a detailed evaluation of knee and ankle joint mobility in patients presenting with anterior knee pain. Further, manual physical therapy to the lower extremity was found to be successful in restoring normal movement patterns and pain-free function in a patient with chronic anterior knee pain.

  16. Validity of the lower extremity functional movement screen in patients with chronic ankle instability

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Ho-Suk; Shin, Won-Seob

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to provide evidence of construct validity for the lower extremity functional movement screen (LE-FMS) based on hypothesis testing in patients with chronic ankle instability (CAI). [Subjects] The subjects were 20 healthy subjects and 20 patients with CAI who had a history of ankle sprain with pain for more than 1 day. [Methods] All participants were measured using the Foot and Ankle Disability Index (FADI) and evaluated with the LE-FMS. The screen included the deep squat, the hurdle step (HS) and the in-line lunge (ILL). The symmetry ratios (RS) were accurately measured during the deep squat trial. [Results] Between the two groups, there were significant differences in scores on the LE-FMS, HS, ILL, RS, FADI, and FADI-sport. The FADI was strongly correlated with both LE-FMS score (r=0.807) and ILL score (r=0.896). There was a strong relationship (r=0.818) between LE-FMS score and FADI-sport. [Conclusion] These results suggest that the LE-FMS may be used to detect deficits related to CAI. Additionally, this instrument is reliable in detecting functional limitations in patients with CAI. PMID:26180349

  17. Imaging of Sports-related Injuries of the Lower Extremity in Pediatric Patients.

    PubMed

    O'Dell, M Cody; Jaramillo, Diego; Bancroft, Laura; Varich, Laura; Logsdon, Gregory; Servaes, Sabah

    2016-10-01

    With increasing participation and intensity of training in youth sports in the United States, the incidence of sports-related injuries is increasing, and the types of injuries are shifting. In this article, the authors review sports injuries of the lower extremity, including both acute and overuse injuries, that are common in or specific to the pediatric population. Common traumatic injuries that occur in individuals of all ages (eg, tears of the acetabular labrum and anterior cruciate ligament) are not addressed, although these occur routinely in pediatric sports. However, some injuries that occur almost exclusively in high-level athletes (eg, athletic pubalgia) are reviewed to increase awareness and understanding of these entities among pediatric radiologists who may not be familiar with them and thus may not look for them. Injuries are described according to their location (ie, hip, knee, or foot and ankle) and pathologic process (eg, apophysitis, osteochondritis dissecans). Examples of abnormalities and normal variants of the anatomy that are often misdiagnosed are provided. The injuries reviewed represent a common and growing subset of pathologic processes about which all pediatric and musculoskeletal radiologists should be knowledgeable. Understanding physeal injury is especially important because missed diagnoses can lead to premature physeal closure and osteoarthritis. (©)RSNA, 2016.

  18. [Diagnostics and treatment of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease; guideline and registry].

    PubMed

    Vahl, A; Elsman, B; van Enst, A

    2016-01-01

    - Revision of the 2005 guideline 'Diagnostics and treatment of lower extremity peripheral arterial disease' and the development of an audit have instigated a degree of efficiency and transparency for the treatment of patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). - The key recommendations are that first-line treatment of patients, who - preferably by means of a consultation in a vascular laboratory - are diagnosed with intermittent claudication, is supervised exercise therapy and secondary prevention. Referral for second-line treatment only needs to occur when invasive therapy is considered, for example when there is insufficient improvement in symptoms or in patients who have or are developing critical ischemia. - In case of endovascular treatments it is not necessary to insert stents routinely; this can be reserved for cases where the angiographic result of the angioplasty is insufficient. - All patients with PAD are registered on the DAPA register ('Dutch audit for peripheral arterial disease'), which has two unique characteristics: patient reported outcome measures (PROMs) are recorded and a case mix correction is incorporated for the PROMs and amputation-free survival through linkage with the health insurance database.

  19. Common Patterns of Congenital Lower Extremity Shortening: Diagnosis, Classification, and Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Bedoya, Maria A; Chauvin, Nancy A; Jaramillo, Diego; Davidson, Richard; Horn, B David; Ho-Fung, Victor

    2015-01-01

    Congenital lower limb shortening is a group of relatively rare, heterogeneous disorders. Proximal focal femoral deficiency (PFFD) and fibular hemimelia (FH) are the most common pathologic entities in this disease spectrum. PFFD is characterized by variable degrees of shortening or absence of the femoral head, with associated dysplasia of the acetabulum and femoral shaft. FH ranges from mild hypoplasia to complete absence of the fibula with variable shortening of the tibia. The development of the lower limb requires complex and precise gene interactions. Although the etiologies of PFFD and FH remain unknown, there is a strong association between the two disorders. Associated congenital defects in the lower extremity are found in more than 50% of patients with PFFD, ipsilateral FH being the most common. FH also has a strong association with shortening and bowing of the tibia and with foot deformities such as absence of the lateral rays of the foot. Early diagnosis and radiologic classification of these abnormalities are imperative for appropriate management and surgical planning. Plain radiography remains the main diagnostic imaging modality for both PFFD and FH, and appropriate description of the osseous abnormalities seen on radiographs allows accurate classification, prognostic evaluation, and surgical planning. Minor malformations may commonly be misdiagnosed.

  20. Split-belt Treadmill Walking Alters Lower Extremity Frontal Plane Mechanics.

    PubMed

    Roper, Jaimie A; Roemmich, Ryan T; Tillman, Mark D; Terza, Matthew J; Hass, Chris J

    2017-01-13

    Interventions that manipulate gait speed may also affect the control of frontal plane mechanics. Expanding the current knowledge of frontal plane adaptations during split-belt treadmill walking could advance our understanding of the influence of asymmetries in gait speed on frontal plane mechanics and provide insight into the breadth of adaptations required by split-belt walking. Thirteen young, healthy participants, free from lower extremity injury walked on a split-belt treadmill with belts moving simultaneously at different speeds. We examined frontal plane mechanics of the ankle, knee, and hip joints during split-belt walking, as well as medio-lateral ground reaction forces (ML-GRF). We did not observe alterations in the frontal mechanics produced during early or late adaptation of split-belt walking when compared to conditions where the belts moved together. We did observe that ML-GRF and hip moment impulse of the fast limb increased over time with adaptation to split-belt walking. These results suggest this modality may provide a unique therapy for individuals with gait pathologies, impairments, or compensation(s).

  1. The effects of running in an exerted state on lower extremity kinematics and joint timing.

    PubMed

    Dierks, Tracy A; Davis, Irene S; Hamill, Joseph

    2010-11-16

    Runners rarely run to the point of maximum fatigue or exhaustion. However, no studies have investigated how the level of exertion associated with a typical running session influences running mechanics. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects that running in an exerted state had on the kinematics and joint timing within the lower extremity of uninjured, recreational runners. Twenty runners performed a prolonged treadmill run at a self-selected pace that best represented each runner's typical training run. The run ended based on heart rate or perceived exertion levels that represented a typical training run. Kinematics and joint timing between the foot, knee, and hip were analyzed at the beginning and end of the run. Increases were primarily observed at the end of the run for the peak angles, excursions, and peak velocities of eversion, tibial internal rotation, and knee internal rotation. No differences were observed for knee flexion, hip internal rotation, or any joint timing relationship. Based on these results, runners demonstrated subtle changes in kinematics in the exerted state, most notably for eversion. However, runners were able to maintain joint timing throughout the leg, which may have been a function of the knee. Thus, uninjured runners normally experience small alterations in kinematics when running with typical levels of exertion. It remains unknown how higher levels of exertion influence kinematics with joint timing and the association with running injuries, or how populations with running injuries respond to typical levels of exertion.

  2. Kinematic characteristics of the lower extremity during a simulated skiing exercise in healthy participants

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyo Taek; Roh, Hyo Lyun; Kim, Yoon Sang

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] Currently, various simulators are produced and used for athlete’s exercise, rehabilitation, and training. In this study, we analyzed the kinematic factors of sectional and total movements in healthy participants by providing group-dependent information during simulated exercise. [Subjects and Methods] Participants in this study included 26 male adults (non-experts and experts); experts held a certificate issued by the Korea Ski Instructors Association. The elapsed times in each phase, the difference in the lower extremity angles, and muscle activity were computed through analysis of kinematic factors. [Results] We observed that motions in the experts took shorter time to perform than that in non-experts, and showed larger variation of lower limb joint angle in most events during simulated skiing. There were also significant group-dependent differences in the peak and mean EMG values during simulated skiing. [Conclusion] A non-expert’s posture leads to enhanced muscle activity to keep the lower body in balance. We suggest the following training guideline: initially, non-experts should maintain appropriate range of motion with lower-intensity exercise to improve muscle endurance. It can be useful in providing preliminary data for future training and rehabilitation studies, as well as improvements in muscle strength and balance. PMID:27065554

  3. Lower Extremity Joint Angle Tracking with Wireless Ultrasonic Sensors during a Squat Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yongbin; Soh, Cheong Boon; Gunawan, Erry; Low, Kay-Soon; Thomas, Rijil

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an unrestrained measurement system based on a wearable wireless ultrasonic sensor network to track the lower extremity joint and trunk kinematics during a squat exercise with only one ultrasonic sensor attached to the trunk. The system consists of an ultrasound transmitter (mobile) and multiple receivers (anchors) whose positions are known. The proposed system measures the horizontal and vertical displacement, together with known joint constraints, to estimate joint flexion/extension angles using an inverse kinematic model based on the damped least-squares technique. The performance of the proposed ultrasonic measurement system was validated against a camera-based tracking system on eight healthy subjects performing a planar squat exercise. Joint angles estimated from the ultrasonic system showed a root mean square error (RMSE) of 2.85° ± 0.57° with the reference system. Statistical analysis indicated great agreements between these two systems with a Pearson's correlation coefficient (PCC) value larger than 0.99 for all joint angles' estimation. These results show that the proposed ultrasonic measurement system is useful for applications, such as rehabilitation and sports. PMID:25915589

  4. The Reverse Superficial Sural Artery Flap Revisited for Complex Lower Extremity and Foot Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Sugg, Kristoffer B.; Schaub, Timothy A.; Concannon, Matthew J; Cederna, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soft-tissue defects of the distal lower extremity and foot present significant challenges to the reconstructive surgeon. The reverse superficial sural artery flap (RSSAF) is a popular option for many of these difficult wounds. Our initial experience with this flap at multiple institutions resulted in a 50% failure rate, mostly because of critical venous congestion. To overcome this, we have modified our operative technique, which has produced a more reliable flap. Methods: All patients reconstructed with an RSSAF between May 2002 and September 2013 were retrospectively reviewed. In response to a high rate of venous congestion in an early group of patients, we adopted a uniform change in operative technique for a late group of patients. A key modification was an increase in pedicle width to at least 4 cm. Outcomes of interest included postoperative complications and limb salvage rate. Results: Twenty-seven patients were reconstructed with an RSSAF (n = 12 for early group, n = 15 for late group). Salvage rate in the early group was 50% compared with 93% in the late group (P = 0.02). Postoperative complications (75% vs. 67%, P = 0.70) were similar between groups. Venous congestion that required leech therapy was 42% in the early group (n = 5) and 0% in the late group (P = 0.01). Conclusions: Venous congestion greatly impairs the survival of the RSSAF. A pedicle width of at least 4 cm is recommended to maintain venous drainage and preserve flap viability. PMID:26495232

  5. Lower extremity and spine characteristics in young dancers with and without patellofemoral pain.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Nili; Tenenbaum, Shay; Hershkovitz, Israel; Zeev, Aviva; Siev-Ner, Itzhak

    2017-01-31

    Very little is known about patellofemoral pain syndrome (PPFS) among young dancers. Understanding the mechanism of the injury and implementing a preventative programme are important in order to minimize the risk of PFPS. The aim of the current study is to determine the extent to which factors such as lower extremity and back characteristics are common among dancers with PFPS. The study population included 271 dancers with PFPS and 271 non-injured dancers, aged 10-16 years. All dancers were screened for morphometric profile, dance discipline (h/week), anatomical anomalies (present/absent of scoliosis, genu valgus/varum, etc.), and joint range of motion (measured by goniometer at the hip, knee, ankle, foot, and spinal joints). The predicting factors for PFPS among young dancers (10-11 years old) were: hyper hip abduction (OR = 0.906) and lower back and hamstring flexibility (OR = 3.542); for adolescent dancers (12-14 years old): hyper ankle dorsiflexion (OR = 0.888), hind foot-varum (OR = 0.260), and mobility of patella (OR = 2.666); and, for pre-mature dancers (15-16 years old): scoliosis (OR = 5.209), limited ankle plantar-flexion (OR = 1.060), and limited hip internal rotation (OR = 1.063). In conclusion, extrinsic and intrinsic parameters predisposing the dancers to knee injuries should be identified by screening in early stages of dance classes.

  6. Postural stability in altered and unaltered sensory environments following fatiguing exercise of lower extremity joints.

    PubMed

    Dickin, D C; Doan, J B

    2008-12-01

    Investigations of postural recovery following controlled external perturbations have provided models for healthy and pathological balance behavior. Less work, however, has investigated postural responses related to internal perturbations of the balance system. In this study, lower extremity joint (knee, or ankle) and overall fatigue of the dominant leg provided the internal perturbations to the balance system. Postural sway was examined during unilateral dominant leg standing before and immediately following fatiguing exercise, as well as at 10, 20, and 30 min post-fatigue activity. Sway was measured in both firm and sway-referenced support surface (external perturbation) conditions. Both joint-localized fatigue and overall fatigue were found to induce impairments in postural control, which were further exacerbated by external postural perturbations. Follow-up pairwise comparisons indicated that these impairments persisted at 10 and 30 min post-fatigue. No differences in postural sway were found between fatigue locations or across any interactions between sway and fatigue location. The results indicated that muscular fatigue imposed a prolonged internal perturbation to postural control, regardless of any individual or combined joint fatigue localization. This global effect, combined with the prolonged impairment in postural response, provides support for critical contributions from a central mechanism to postural deficits due to fatigue.

  7. A Real-Time Fatigue Monitoring and Analysis System for Lower Extremity Muscles with Cycling Movement

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Szi-Wen; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Chan, Hsiao-Lung; Chang, Ya-Ju; Ku, Chia-Hao

    2014-01-01

    A real-time muscle fatigue monitoring system was developed to quantitatively detect the muscle fatigue of subjects during cycling movement, where a fatigue progression measure (FPM) was built-in. During the cycling movement, the electromyogram (EMG) signals of the vastus lateralis and gastrocnemius muscles in one leg as well as cycling speed are synchronously measured in a real-time fashion. In addition, the heart rate (HR) and the Borg rating of perceived exertion scale value are recorded per minute. Using the EMG signals, the electrical activity and median frequency (MF) are calculated per cycle. Moreover, the updated FPM, based on the percentage of reduced MF counts during cycling movement, is calculated to measure the onset time and the progressive process of muscle fatigue. To demonstrate the performance of our system, five young healthy subjects were recruited. Each subject was asked to maintain a fixed speed of 60 RPM, as best he/she could, under a constant load during the pedaling. When the speed reached 20 RPM or the HR reached the maximal training HR, the experiment was then terminated immediately. The experimental results show that the proposed system may provide an on-line fatigue monitoring and analysis for the lower extremity muscles during cycling movement. PMID:25014101

  8. The independent contribution of diabetic foot ulcer on lower extremity amputation and mortality risk

    PubMed Central

    Martins-Mendes, D.; Monteiro-Soares, M.; Boyko, E. J.; Ribeiro, M.; Barata, P.; Lima, J.; Soares, R.

    2014-01-01

    Aims To estimate 3-year risk for diabetic foot ulcer (DFU), lower extremity amputation (LEA) and death; determine predictive variables and assess derived models accuracy. Material and Methods Retrospective cohort study including all subjects with diabetes enrolled in our diabetic foot outpatient clinic from beginning 2002 until middle 2010. Data was collected from clinical records. Results 644 subjects with mean age of 65.1 (±11.2) and diabetes duration of 16.1 (±10.8) years. Cumulative incidence was 26.6% for DFU, 5.8% for LEA and 14.0% for death. In multivariate analysis, physical impairment, peripheral arterial disease complication history, complication count and previous DFU were associated with DFU; complication count, foot pulses and previous DFU with LEA and age, complication count and previous DFU with death. Predictive models’ areas under the ROC curves from 0.80 to 0.83. A simplified model including previous DFU and complication count presented high accuracy. Previous DFU was associated with all outcomes, even when adjusted for complication count, in addition to more complex models. Conclusions DFU seems more than a marker of complication status, having independent impact on LEA and mortality risk. Proposed models may be applicable in healthcare settings to identify patients at higher risk of DFU, LEA and death. PMID:24877985

  9. A general model for estimating lower extremity inertial properties of individuals with transtibial amputation.

    PubMed

    Ferris, Abbie E; Smith, Jeremy D; Heise, Gary D; Hinrichs, Richard N; Martin, Philip E

    2017-03-21

    Lower extremity joint moment magnitudes during swing are dependent on the inertial properties of the prosthesis and residual limb of individuals with transtibial amputation (TTA). Often, intact limb inertial properties (INTACT) are used for prosthetic limb values in an inverse dynamics model even though these values overestimate the amputated limb's inertial properties. The purpose of this study was to use subject-specific (SPECIFIC) measures of prosthesis inertial properties to generate a general model (GENERAL) for estimating TTA prosthesis inertial properties. Subject-specific mass, center of mass, and moment of inertia were determined for the shank and foot segments of the prosthesis (n=11) using an oscillation technique and reaction board. The GENERAL model was derived from the means of the SPECIFIC model. Mass and segment lengths are required GENERAL model inputs. Comparisons of segment inertial properties and joint moments during walking were made using three inertial models (unique sample; n=9): (1) SPECIFIC, (2) GENERAL, and (3) INTACT. Prosthetic shank inertial properties were significantly smaller with the SPECIFIC and GENERAL model than the INTACT model, but the SPECIFIC and GENERAL model did not statistically differ. Peak knee and hip joint moments during swing were significantly smaller for the SPECIFIC and GENERAL model compared with the INTACT model and were not significantly different between SPECIFIC and GENERAL models. When subject-specific measures are unavailable, using the GENERAL model produces a better estimate of prosthetic side inertial properties resulting in more accurate joint moment measurements for individuals with TTA than the INTACT model.

  10. Lower extremity control during turns initiated with and without hip external rotation.

    PubMed

    Zaferiou, Antonia M; Flashner, Henryk; Wilcox, Rand R; McNitt-Gray, Jill L

    2017-02-08

    The pirouette turn is often initiated in neutral and externally rotated hip positions by dancers. This provides an opportunity to investigate how dancers satisfy the same mechanical objectives at the whole-body level when using different leg kinematics. The purpose of this study was to compare lower extremity control strategies during the turn initiation phase of pirouettes performed with and without hip external rotation. Skilled dancers (n=5) performed pirouette turns with and without hip external rotation. Joint kinetics during turn initiation were determined for both legs using ground reaction forces (GRFs) and segment kinematics. Hip muscle activations were monitored using electromyography. Using probability-based statistical methods, variables were compared across turn conditions as a group and within-dancer. Despite differences in GRFs and impulse generation between turn conditions, at least 90% of each GRF was aligned with the respective leg plane. A majority of the net joint moments at the ankle, knee, and hip acted about an axis perpendicular to the leg plane. However, differences in shank alignment relative to the leg plane affected the distribution of the knee net joint moment when represented with respect to the shank versus the thigh. During the initiation of both turns, most participants used ankle plantar flexor moments, knee extensor moments, flexor and abductor moments at the push leg׳s hip, and extensor and abductor moments at the turn leg׳s hip. Representation of joint kinetics using multiple reference systems assisted in understanding control priorities.

  11. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries

    PubMed Central

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13–14 years (Bantam level) from 11–12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries. PMID:27920584

  12. Stress fractures in the lower extremity. The importance of increasing awareness amongst radiologists.

    PubMed

    Berger, Ferco H; de Jonge, Milko C; Maas, Mario

    2007-04-01

    Stress fractures are fatigue injuries of bone usually caused by changes in training regimen in the population of military recruits and both professional and recreational athletes. Raised levels of sporting activity in today's population and refined imaging technologies have caused a rise in reported incidence of stress fractures in the past decades, now making up more than 10% of cases in a typical sports medicine practice. Background information (including etiology, epidemiology, clinical presentation and treatment and prevention) as well as state of the art imaging of stress fractures will be discussed to increase awareness amongst radiologists, providing the tools to play an important role in diagnosis and prognosis of stress fractures. Specific fracture sites in the lower extremity will be addressed, covering the far majority of stress fracture incidence. Proper communication between treating physician, physical therapist and radiologist is needed to obtain a high index of suspicion for this easily overlooked entity. Radiographs are not reliable for detection of stress fractures and radiologists should not falsely be comforted by them, which could result in delayed diagnosis and possibly permanent consequences for the patient. Although radiographs are mandatory to rule out differentials, they should be followed through when negative, preferably by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), as this technique has proven to be superior to bone scintigraphy. CT can be beneficial in a limited number of patients, but should not be used routinely.

  13. The effects of a pelvic belt on trunk and lower extremity muscles in the bridge position

    PubMed Central

    Cha, Hyun-Gyu; Wu, Yan-Ting; Kim, Myoung-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of a pelvic belt on the activities of trunk and lower extremity muscles in normal adults. [Subjects and Methods] The subjects were 20 normal individuals without a history of orthopedic problems. The pelvic compression belt (The Com-Pressor, OPTP, Minneapolis, MN, USA) was an adjustable body belt with four elastic compression bands that provide stabilizing pressure and was designed to adjust the amount of force applied and to alter sites of compression. The body belt was placed below the anterior superior iliac spine, and stabilizing pressure was applied to the belt using the elastic compression bands in the bridge position after confirming the site of compression. [Results] The subjects showed a significant decrease in muscle activation in the erector spinae, oblique internus abdominis, rectus femoris, and biceps femoris while wearing the pelvic belt. [Conclusion] The use of a pelvic compression belt with external pelvic compression might improve pelvic joint stability and alter neuromotor control of the lumbopelvic and thigh muscles. PMID:28174437

  14. Advances in the treatment of lower extremity wounds applied to military casualties.

    PubMed

    Jorgenson, D S; Antoine, G A

    1995-03-01

    A review of six patients with severe lower extremity injuries (four of six with grade IIIB tibia fractures), resulting from combat in Somalia, was undertaken to identify patterns of injury, treatment, and problems unique to combat injuries. An AK-47 gunshot was the mechanism of injury in five of six patients. Muscle flaps were required in all patients (four pedicled muscle flaps and three free vascularized flaps), with five of six patients undergoing flap closure during the subacute phase. Ilizarov devices were used in three of four grade IIIB tibia fractures. Five major nerve injuries were identified in three of six patients. The ballistic effect of an AK-47 to the soft tissues of the extremity is not a high-energy wound as seen in civilian blunt trauma. Knowledge of ballistics and the delay in definitive flap coverage secondary to evacuation allowed definition of zones of injury and successful use of local flaps in the majority of our patients. The high number of nerve injuries not commonly described with blunt trauma may prevent full rehabilitation.

  15. Evaluation, management and prevention of lower extremity youth ice hockey injuries.

    PubMed

    Popkin, Charles A; Schulz, Brian M; Park, Caroline N; Bottiglieri, Thomas S; Lynch, T Sean

    2016-01-01

    Ice hockey is a fast-paced sport played by increasing numbers of children and adolescents in North America and around the world. Requiring a unique blend of skill, finesse, power and teamwork, ice hockey can become a lifelong recreational activity. Despite the rising popularity of the sport, there is ongoing concern about the high frequency of musculoskeletal injury associated with participation in ice hockey. Injury rates in ice hockey are among the highest in all competitive sports. Numerous research studies have been implemented to better understand the risks of injury. As a result, rule changes were adopted by the USA Hockey and Hockey Canada to raise the minimum age at which body checking is permitted to 13-14 years (Bantam level) from 11-12 years (Pee Wee). Continuing the education of coaches, parents and players on rules of safe play, and emphasizing the standards for proper equipment use are other strategies being implemented to make the game safer to play. The objective of this article was to review the evaluation, management and prevention of common lower extremity youth hockey injuries.

  16. Intrarater reliability of hand held dynamometry in measuring lower extremity isometric strength using a portable stabilization device.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Steven M; Cheng, M Samuel; Smith, A Russell; Kolber, Morey J

    2017-02-01

    Hand held dynamometry (HHD) is a more objective way to quantify muscle force production (MP) compared to traditional manual muscle testing. HHD reliability can be negatively impacted by both the strength of the tester and the subject particularly in the lower extremities due to larger muscle groups. The primary aim of this investigation was to assess intrarater reliability of HHD with use of a portable stabilization device for lower extremity MP in an athletic population. Isometric lower extremity strength was measured for bilateral lower extremities including hip abductors, external rotators, adductors, knee extensors, and ankle plantar flexors was measured in a sample of healthy recreational runners (8 male, 7 females, = 30 limbs) training for a marathon. These measurements were assessed using an intrasession intrarater reliability design. Intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) were calculated using 3,1 model based on the single rater design. The standard error of measurement (SEM) for each muscle group was also calculated. ICC were excellent ranging from ICC (3,1) = 0.93-0.98 with standard error of measurements ranging from 0.58 to 17.2 N. This study establishes the use of a HHD with a portable stabilization device as demonstrating good reliability within testers for measuring lower extremity muscle performance in an active healthy population.

  17. Driving evaluation methods for able-bodied persons and individuals with lower extremity disabilities: a review of assessment modalities

    PubMed Central

    Greve, Julia Maria D'Andréa; Santos, Luciana; Alonso, Angelica Castilho; Tate, Denise G

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the driving abilities of individuals with disabilities is often a very challenging task because each medical condition is accompanied by physical impairments and because relative individual functional performance may vary depending on personal characteristics. We identified existing driving evaluation modalities for able-bodied and lower extremity-impaired subjects (spinal cord injury patients and amputees) and evaluated the potential relationships between driving performance and the motor component of driving. An extensive scoping review of the literature was conducted to identify driving assessment tools that are currently used for able-bodied individuals and for those with spinal cord injury or lower extremity amputation. The literature search focused on the assessment of the motor component of driving. References were electronically obtained via Medline from the PubMed, Ovid, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases. This article compares the current assessments of driving performance for those with lower extremity impairments with the assessments used for able-bodied persons. Very few articles were found concerning “Lower Extremity Disabilities,” thus confirming the need for further studies that can provide evidence and guidance for such assessments in the future. Little is known about the motor component of driving and its association with the other driving domains, such as vision and cognition. The available research demonstrates the need for a more evidenced-based understanding of how to best evaluate persons with lower extremity impairment. PMID:26375567

  18. The great mimickers of rosacea.

    PubMed

    Olazagasti, Jeannette; Lynch, Peter; Fazel, Nasim

    2014-07-01

    Although rosacea is one of the most common conditions treated by dermatologists, it also is one of the most misunderstood. It is a chronic disorder affecting the central parts of the face and is characterized by frequent flushing; persistent erythema (ie, lasting for at least 3 months); telangiectasia; and interspersed episodes of inflammation with swelling, papules, and pustules. Understanding the clinical variants and disease course of rosacea is important to differentiate this entity from other conditions that can mimic rosacea. Herein we present several mimickers of rosacea that physicians should consider when diagnosing this condition.

  19. Risk Factors for Readmission Following Lower Extremity Bypass in the ACS-NSQIP

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jennifer Q.; Curran, Thomas; McCallum, John C.; Wang, Li; Wyers, Mark C.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Guzman, Raul J.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Readmission is associated with high mortality, morbidity, and cost. We used the ACS-NSQIP to determine risk factors for readmission following lower extremity bypass (LEB). Methods We identified all patients who received LEB in the 2011 ACS-NSQIP database. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess independent predictors of 30-day readmission. We also identified our institutional contribution of LEB patients to the ACS-NSQIP from 2005–2011 to determine our institution’s rate of readmission and readmission indications. Results Among 5018 patients undergoing LEB, ACS-NSQIP readmission analysis was performed on 4512, excluding those whose readmission data was unavailable, suffered a death on index admission, or remained in the hospital at 30 days. Overall readmission rate was 18%, and readmission rate of those with NSQIP captured complications was 8%. Multivariable predictors of readmission were dependent functional status (OR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.08–1.79), dyspnea (OR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.02–1.60), cardiac comorbidity (OR 1.46, 95% CI: 1.16–1.84), dialysis dependence (OR 1.44, 95% CI: 1.05–1.97), obesity (OR 1.28, 95% CI: 1.07–1.53), malnutrition (OR 1.42, 95% CI 1.12–1.79), CLI operative indication (OR 1.40, 95% CI: 1.10–1.79), and return to the operating room on index admission (OR 8.0, 95% CI: 6.68–9.60). The most common post-discharge complications occurring in readmitted patients included wound complications (56%), multiple complications (22%), and graft failure (5%). Our institutional data contributed 465 LEB patients to the ACS-NSQIP from 2005–2012, with an overall readmission rate of 14%. Unplanned readmissions related to the original LEB (related unplanned) made up 75% of cases. The remainder 25% included readmissions that were planned staged procedures related to the original LEB (related planned, 11%) and admissions for a completely unrelated reason (unrelated unplanned, 14%). The most common readmission indications included

  20. Lower Extremity Kinematics and Ground Reaction Forces After Prophylactic Lace-Up Ankle Bracing

    PubMed Central

    DiStefano, Lindsay J; Padua, Darin A; Brown, Cathleen N; Guskiewicz, Kevin M

    2008-01-01

    Context: Long-term effects of ankle bracing on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics are unknown. Ankle motion restriction may negatively affect the body's ability to attenuate ground reaction forces (GRFs). Objective: To evaluate the immediate and long-term effects of ankle bracing on lower extremity kinematics and GRFs during a jump landing. Design: Experimental mixed model (2 [group] × 2 [brace] × 2 [time]) with repeated measures. Setting: Sports medicine research laboratory. Patients or Other Participants: A total of 37 healthy subjects were assigned randomly to either the intervention (n  =  11 men, 8 women; age  =  19.63 ± 0.72 years, height  =  176.05 ± 10.58 cm, mass  =  71.50 ± 13.15 kg) or control group (n  =  11 men, 7 women; age  =  19.94 ± 1.44 years, height  =  179.15 ± 8.81 cm, mass  =  74.10 ± 10.33 kg). Intervention(s): The intervention group wore braces on both ankles and the control group did not wear braces during all recreational activities for an 8-week period. Main Outcome Measure(s): Initial ground contact angles, maximum joint angles, time to reach maximum joint angles, and joint range of motion for sagittal-plane knee and ankle motion were measured during a jump-landing task. Peak vertical GRF and the time to reach peak vertical GRF were assessed also. Results: While participants were wearing the brace, ankle plantar flexion at initial ground contact (brace  =  35° ± 13°, no brace  =  38° ± 15°, P  =  .024), maximum dorsiflexion (brace  =  21° ± 7°, no brace  =  22° ± 6°, P  =  .04), dorsiflexion range of motion (brace  =  56° ± 14°, no brace  =  59° ± 16°, P  =  .001), and knee flexion range of motion (brace  =  79° ± 16°, no brace  =  82° ± 16°, P  =  .036) decreased, whereas knee flexion at initial ground contact increased (brace  =  12° ± 9°, no brace  =  9° ± 9°, P  =  .0001). Wearing the brace for 8

  1. Muscle activation patterns of the upper and lower extremity during the windmill softball pitch.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Gretchen D; Plummer, Hillary A; Keeley, David W

    2011-06-01

    Fast-pitch softball has become an increasingly popular sport for female athletes. There has been little research examining the windmill softball pitch in the literature. The purpose of this study was to describe the muscle activation patterns of 3 upper extremity muscles (biceps, triceps, and rhomboids [scapular stabilizers]) and 2 lower extremity muscles (gluteus maximus and medius) during the 5 phases of the windmill softball pitch. Data describing muscle activation were collected on 7 postpubescent softball pitchers (age 17.7 ± 2.6 years; height 169 ± 5.4 cm; mass 69.1 ± 5.4 kg). Surface electromyographic data were collected using a Myopac Jr 10-channel amplifier (RUN Technologies Scientific Systems, Laguna Hills, CA, USA) synchronized with The MotionMonitor™ motion capture system (Innovative Sports Training Inc, Chicago IL, USA) and presented as a percent of maximum voluntary isometric contraction. Gluteus maximus activity reached (196.3% maximum voluntary isometric contraction [MVIC]), whereas gluteus medius activity was consistent during the single leg support of phase 3 (101.2% MVIC). Biceps brachii activity was greatest during phase 4 of the pitching motion. Triceps brachii activation was consistently >150% MVIC throughout the entire pitching motion, whereas the scapular stabilizers were most active during phase 2 (170.1% MVIC). The results of this study indicate the extent to which muscles are activated during the windmill softball pitch, and this knowledge can lead to the development of proper preventative and rehabilitative muscle strengthening programs. In addition, clinicians will be able to incorporate strengthening exercises that mimic the timing of maximal muscle activation most used during the windmill pitching phases.

  2. A lower-extremities kinematic comparison of deep-water running styles and treadmill running.

    PubMed

    Killgore, Garry L; Wilcox, Anthony R; Caster, Brian L; Wood, Terry M

    2006-11-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to identify a deep-water running (DWR) style that most closely approximates terrestrial running, particularly relative to the lower extremities. Twenty intercollegiate distance runners (women, N = 12; men, N = 8) were videotaped from the right sagittal view while running on a treadmill (TR) and in deep water at 55-60% of their TR VO(2)max using 2 DWR styles: cross-country (CC) and high-knee (HK). Variables of interest were horizontal (X) and vertical (Y) displacement of the knee and ankle, stride rate (SR), VO(2), heart rate (HR), and rating of perceived exertion (RPE). Multivariate omnibus tests revealed statistically significant differences for RPE (p < 0.001). The post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences between TR and both DWR styles (p < 0.001). The kinematic variables multivariate omnibus tests were found to be statistically significant (p < 0.001 to p < 0.019). The post hoc pairwise comparisons revealed significant differences in SR (p < 0.001) between TR (1.25 +/- 0.08 Hz) and both DWR styles and also between the CC (0.81 +/- 0.08 Hz) and HK (1.14 +/- 0.10 Hz) styles of DWR. The CC style of DWR was found to be similar to TR with respect to linear ankle displacement, whereas the HK style was significantly different from TR in all comparisons made for ankle and knee displacement. The CC style of DWR is recommended as an adjunct to distance running training if the goal is to mimic the specificity of the ankle linear horizontal displacement of land-based running, but the SR will be slower at a comparable percentage of VO(2)max.

  3. Temperature Changes in Deep Muscles of Humans During Upper and Lower Extremity Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Wirth, Valerie J.; Van Lunen, Bonnie L.; Mistry, Dilaawar; Saliba, Ethan; McCue, Frank C.

    1998-01-01

    Objective: To examine the effect of 15 minutes of upper and lower extremity exercise on raising intramuscular temperature in the triceps surae to 39 ° C to 45 ° C (the therapeutic range). Design and Setting: Intramuscular temperature was measured 5 cm deep in the triceps surae using a 23-gauge thermistor needle microprobe connected to a monitor. Each subject was tested under 3 conditions: 15 minutes of rest, 15 minutes of jogging on a treadmill, and 15 minutes of handpedaling an upper-body ergometer. Exercise bouts were performed at 70% of each subject's maximum heart rate. Subjects: Six males, either sedentary or recreational athletes (age = 21.3 ± 2.9 years; ht = 176.8 ± 6.0 cm; wt = 72.7 ± 11.6 kg; resting heart rate = 57.8 ± 6.74 bpm; target heart rate = 156.5 ± 3.0 bpm), volunteered to participate in this experiment. Measurements: Intramuscular temperature was measured at a depth of 5 cm before and after each test condition. Results: Data analyses consisted of analyses of variance with repeated measures and a Tukey post hoc test (P < .05). The results showed a significant temperature increase over baseline after exercise on the treadmill (2.2 ° C ± 0.63 ° C); however, it did not yield temperature increases ≥ 39 ° C. No significant temperature change occurred after exercise on the upper-body ergometer (-0.45 ° C ± 0.80 ° C). Conclusions: Active exercise increased intramuscular temperature in working muscles but did not affect intramuscular temperature in nonworking muscles. In addition, 15 minutes of jogging on a treadmill at 70% of maximum heart rate was not sufficient to raise intramuscular temperature to 39 ° C to 45 ° C. ImagesFigure 1.Figure 2. PMID:16558512

  4. Long-term prognostic analysis of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qiang; Yu, Zongxue; Wang, Jinjun; Chen, Xiao; Li, Lin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to observe the long-term prognostic value of early interventional therapy for lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (LDVT). In total, 85 patients diagnosed with LDVT for the first time were consecutively selected (identified course of disease was <3 months), and were divided into the control group with 43 cases and the observation group with 42 cases according to different therapeutic methods. The control group received anticoagulation therapy and thrombolysis, or integrated surgical thrombectomy, a conventional open operation, while the observation group received comprehensive treatment, combining endovascular catheter-directed thrombolysis and thrombectomy. The therapeutic effects were compared. After treatment, the differences in circumference of the thigh and shank between the affected and unaffected extremities, and vein dysfunction score of the two groups were decreased compared with before treatment. In addition, the above indexes of the observation group were significantly lower than in the control group (P<0.05). The clinical effective rate and effective extent of the observation group were higher than those of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). The occurrence rate of post-thrombotic syndrome in the observation group was lower than that of the control group, and there was no difference in comparison of grading. The recurrence rate and restenosis rate of the observation group were lower than in the control group, while the patency rate of the observation group was higher than that of the control group, and the differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). In conclusion, early catheter-directed invention of thrombolysis with thrombectomy for LDVT has good clinical effect in the short-term and long-term. PMID:28105087

  5. Lower Extremity Arterial Bypass with Arm Vein Conduits and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dae-Joon; Park, Yang-Jin; Yoon, Kyoung Won; Heo, Seon-Hee; Kim, Dong-Ik; Kim, Young-Wook

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The superiority of autogenous vein conduits is well known in lower extremity arterial bypass (LEAB). Among various alternative conduits for LEAB, long-term results of arm vein grafts were investigated in this study. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively reviewed clinical characteristics of 28 patients who underwent infrainguinal LEAB with autogenous arm vein grafts at a single institute between January 2003 and December 2015. All procedures were performed in the absence of adequate saphenous veins. Graft patency was determined by periodic examinations with duplex ultrasonography. Results: Autologous arm vein grafts were implanted for 28 patients (mean age, 60.4±16.8 years; range, 20–82 years; male, 92.9%; atherosclerosis, 19 [67.9%]; and non-atherosclerotic disease 9 [32.1%] including 5 patients with Buerger’s disease). Source of arm vein were basilic 13 (46.4%), cephalic 4 (14.3%) and composition graft with other veins in 11 (39.3%) cases. The level of distal anastomosis was distributed as popliteal in 5 (17.9%), tibio-peroneal in 21 (75.0%) and inframalleolar artery in 2 (7.1%) cases. Mean duration of follow-up was 41.5±46.9 months (range, 1–138 months). Cumulative primary patency rates at 1, 3, and 5 years were 66.5%, 60.9% and 60.9%, respectively. Assisted-primary patency rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 66.5%, 66.5% and 66.5%, respectively. Secondary patency rates at 1, 3 and 5 years were 70.8%, 70.8% and 70.8%, respectively. There was one limb amputation during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Arm veins are a useful alternative conduit when great saphenous veins are not available during LEAB. PMID:28042555

  6. Gender and Age-Related Differences in Bilateral Lower Extremity Mechanics during Treadmill Running

    PubMed Central

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Hettinga, Blayne A.; Osis, Sean T.; Ferber, Reed

    2014-01-01

    Female runners have a two-fold risk of sustaining certain running-related injuries as compared to their male counterparts. Thus, a comprehensive understanding of the sex-related differences in running kinematics is necessary. However, previous studies have either used discrete time point variables and inferential statistics and/or relatively small subject numbers. Therefore, the first purpose of this study was to use a principal component analysis (PCA) method along with a support vector machine (SVM) classifier to examine the differences in running gait kinematics between female and male runners across a large sample of the running population as well as between two age-specific sub-groups. Bilateral 3-dimensional lower extremity gait kinematic data were collected during treadmill running. Data were analysed on the complete sample (n = 483: female 263, male 220), a younger subject group (n = 56), and an older subject group (n = 51). The PC scores were first sorted by the percentage of variance explained and we also employed a novel approach wherein PCs were sorted based on between-gender statistical effect sizes. An SVM was used to determine if the sex and age conditions were separable and classifiable based on the PCA. Forty PCs explained 84.74% of the variance in the data and an SVM classification accuracy of 86.34% was found between female and male runners. Classification accuracies between genders for younger subjects were higher than a subgroup of older runners. The observed interactions between age and gender suggest these factors must be considered together when trying to create homogenous sub-groups for research purposes. PMID:25137240

  7. Distant Migration of Multiple Siliconomas in Lower Extremities following Breast Implant Rupture: Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Joo Hyun; Song, Seung Yong; Lew, Dae Hyun

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Siliconoma from ruptured breast implants has been reported in multiple body sites, including but not limited to the breast parenchyma, axillary lymph nodes, upper arm, and even lower leg. In this regard, we report a rare case of distant silicone migration to the lower extremities after traumatic breast implant rupture. A 55-year-old Asian woman who received bilateral augmentation mammoplasty 20 years ago presented with ruptured breast implants from a car accident 2 years earlier. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed intracapsular and extracapsular rupture of the right breast implant, showing “linguine sign.” We removed the bilateral breast implants and performed capsulectomy and bilateral reduction mammoplasty using inverted-T incisions. The implant was confirmed as a smooth, silicone gel–filled mammary implant of 125 cm3 by a Japanese manufacturer, Koken. During her regular follow-up outpatient visits, physical examination revealed 2.5- × 1.5-cm ill-defined, tender, subcutaneous nodules on both knees and 8.5- × 3.0-cm inflammatory changes in the inguinal area with persistent pain. Computed tomography showed no definite mass, but rather infiltrative, nonenhancing soft-tissue densities in the subcutaneous layers of the bilateral inguinal and knee areas. Surgical excision was performed, and pathologic findings confirmed variable vacuoles with foreign body reaction and fibrosis, consistent with siliconoma. It is important to acknowledge that siliconomas can be encountered in patients with ruptured breast implants, especially those manufactured decades ago. Our patient with masses as remote as the inguinal and knee areas is a prime example of how far siliconomas can migrate. PMID:27826457

  8. Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society - update. Sonography of the lower extremity veins.

    PubMed

    Małek, Grzegorz; Nowicki, Andrzej

    2014-09-01

    This article has been prepared on the basis of the Ultrasonography Standards of the Polish Ultrasound Society (2011) and updated based on the latest findings and reports. Ultrasound examination of the lower extremity veins is relatively easy and commonly used to confirm or rule out venous thrombosis. However, a relatively easy compression test frequently requires experience, particularly in situations when imaging is difficult (due to lymphedema, dressing or thick tissues). The technique is time-consuming and requires assessment of each deep vein every 1 cm. Lesions in the deep veins cannot be ruled out when the vessels are assessed in only 2-3 points - a full examination is needed. The value of the method is the highest when the proximal section is assessed and the lowest when crural veins are evaluated. Doppler sonography is the basic method used when patients are prepared for a surgery of varicose veins. The assessment of the superficial veins prior to this procedure is tedious and requires knowledge of anatomy together with numerous variants. A considerable challenge is posed by re-assessment of recurrent varicose veins following a previous surgery. The Standards include anatomic nomenclature proposed by the Polish Society for Vascular Surgery and Polish Society of Phlebology, which should facilitate communication with clinicians. The most beneficial patient positions have been thoroughly discussed in terms of safety and effectiveness of the examination. Sometimes during such an examination, no venous pathology is found, but other changes with symptoms that suggest deep thrombophlebitis are detected. In such a situation, it is necessary to conduct an initial (or complete, if possible) assessment of lesions as well as provide recommendations connected with further, more detailed diagnosis.

  9. Reducing major lower extremity amputations after the introduction of a multidisciplinary team for the diabetic foot.

    PubMed

    Rubio, José Antonio; Aragón-Sánchez, Javier; Jiménez, Sara; Guadalix, Gregorio; Albarracín, Agustín; Salido, Carmen; Sanz-Moreno, José; Ruiz-Grande, Fernando; Gil-Fournier, Nuria; Álvarez, Julia

    2014-03-01

    We analyzed the incidence of lower extremity amputations (LEAs) in the 3rd Health Care Area of Madrid before and after the March 2008 introduction of a multidisciplinary team for managing diabetic foot disease. We compared the amputation rates in people with and without diabetes during 2 periods: before (2001-2007) and after (2008-2011) the introduction of a Multidisciplinary Diabetic Foot Unit (MDFU). We also analyzed the trend of the amputation rates by joinpoint regression analysis and measured the annual percentage change (APC). During the study period, 514 nontraumatic LEAs were performed, 374 (73%) in people with diabetes and 140 (27%) in people without the disease. The incidence of LEAs showed a significant reduction in major amputations in people with diabetes, from 6.1 per 100 000 per year (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.9 to 7.2), in the 2001 to 2007 period, to 4.0 per 100 000 per year (95% CI = 2.6 to 5.5) in the 2008 to 2011 period (P = .020). There were no changes in incidence of minor or total amputations in the diabetic population or in amputations in the nondiabetic population during the study period. Joinpoint regression analysis showed a significant reduction in the incidence of major LEAs in diabetic population with an APC of -6.6% (95% CI = -10.2 to -2.8; P = .003), but there were no other significant changes. This study demonstrates that the introduction of a multidisciplinary team, coordinated by an endocrinologist and a podiatrist, for managing diabetic foot disease is associated with a reduction in the incidence of major amputations in patients with diabetes.

  10. Occurrence and Impact of Lower Extremity Ulcer in Rheumatoid Arthritis - A Population Based Study

    PubMed Central

    Jebakumar, Adlene J; Udayakumar, P Deepak; Crowson, Cynthia S.; Gabriel, Sherine E.; Matteson, Eric L.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To assess the occurrence, risk factors, morbidity and mortality associated with lower extremity (LE) ulcers in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Methods Retrospective review of Olmsted County, Minnesota residents who first fulfilled 1987 American College of Rheumatology criteria for RA in 1980–2007 with follow-up to death, migration or April 2012. Only LE ulcers that developed after the diagnosis of RA were included. Results The study included 813 patients with 9771 total person-years of follow-up. 125 patients developed LE ulcers (total of 171 episodes), corresponding to a rate of occurrence of 1.8 episodes per 100 person-years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.5, 2.0 per 100 person-years). The cumulative incidence of first LE ulcers was 4.8% at 5 years after diagnosis of RA and increased to 26.2% by 25 years. Median time for the LE ulcer to heal was 30 days. Ten of 171 (6%) episodes led to amputation. LE ulcers in RA were associated with increased mortality (HR 2.42; 95% CI: 1.71, 3.42) adjusted for age, sex and calendar year. Risk factors for LE ulcers included age (HR 1.73 per 10 year increase; 95% CI: 1.47, 2.04); rheumatoid factor positivity (HR 1.63; 95% CI: 1.05, 2.53); presence of rheumatoid nodules (HR 2.14; 95% CI: 1.39, 3.31); and venous thromboembolism (HR 2.16; 95% CI: 1.07, 4.36). Conclusions LE ulcers are common among patients with RA. The cumulative incidence increased by 1% per year. A significant number require amputation. Patients with RA who have LE ulcers are at two-fold risk for premature mortality. PMID:24429171

  11. Impact of supplementation with bicarbonate on lower-extremity muscle performance in older men and women

    PubMed Central

    Castaneda-Sceppa, C.; Harris, S. S.; Palermo, N. J.; Cloutier, G.; Ceglia, L.; Dallal, G. E.

    2010-01-01

    Summary This study describes the impact of bicarbonate treatment for 3 months on net acid excretion (NAE), nitrogen excretion, and muscle performance in older men and women. Bicarbonate reduced NAE, and the decrement was associated with a decrease in nitrogen excretion. Treatment also improved muscle power and endurance in the women. Introduction Bicarbonate enhances muscle performance during strenuous exercise, but its effect on performance during normal activity in older subjects is unknown. Methods In this trial, healthy subjects age 50 and older were randomized to 67.5 mmol of bicarbonate or to no bicarbonate daily for 3 months. Changes in lower-extremity muscle power, endurance, urinary nitrogen, and NAE were compared across treatment groups in the 162 participants included in the analyses. Results In the men and the women, bicarbonate was well tolerated, and as expected, it significantly decreased NAE. The change in NAE correlated with change in nitrogen excretion in women (r=0.32, P=0.002) with a similar trend in men (r=0.23, P=0.052). In the women, bicarbonate increased double leg press power at 70% one repetition maximum by 13% (P=0.003) compared with no bicarbonate and improved other performance measures. Treatment with bicarbonate had no significant effect on muscle performance in the men. Conclusions Ingestion of bicarbonate decreased nitrogen excretion and improved muscle performance in healthy postmenopausal women. The bicarbonate-induced decline in NAE was associated with reduced nitrogen excretion in both men and women. These findings suggest that bicarbonate merits further evaluation as a safe, low-cost intervention that may attenuate age-related loss of muscle performance and mass in the elderly. PMID:19727904

  12. Brain activation of lower extremity movement in chronically impaired stroke survivors.

    PubMed

    Luft, Andreas R; Forrester, Larry; Macko, Richard F; McCombe-Waller, Sandy; Whitall, Jill; Villagra, Federico; Hanley, Daniel F

    2005-05-15

    Lower extremity paresis poses significant disability to chronic stroke survivors. Unlike for the upper extremity, cortical adaptations in networks controlling the paretic leg have not been characterized after stroke. Here, the hypotheses are that brain activation associated with unilateral knee movement in chronic stroke survivors is abnormal, depends on lesion location, and is related to walking ability. Functional magnetic resonance imaging of unilateral knee movement was obtained in 31 patients 26.9 months (mean, IQ range: 11.3-68.1) after stroke and in 10 age-matched healthy controls. Strokes were stratified according to lesion location. Locomotor disability (30 ft walking speed) did not differ between patient groups (9 cortical, 12 subcortical, 10 brainstem lesions). Significant differences in brain activation as measured by voxel counts in 10 regions of interest were found between controls and patients with brainstem (P = 0.006) and cortical strokes (P = 0.002), and between subcortical and cortical patients (P = 0.026). Statistical parametric mapping of data per group revealed similar activation patterns in subcortical patients and controls with recruitment of contralateral primary motor cortex (M1), supplementary motor area (SMA), and bilateral somatosensory area 2 (S2). Cortical recruitment was reduced in brainstem and cortical stroke. Better walking was associated with lesser contralateral sensorimotor cortex activation in brainstem, but stronger recruitment of ipsilateral sensorimotor and bilateral somatosensory cortices in subcortical and cortical patients, respectively. A post hoc comparison of brainstem patients with and without mirror movements (50%) revealed lesser recruitment of ipsilateral cerebellum in the latter. Subcortical patients with mirror movements (58%) showed lesser bilateral sensorimotor cortex activation. No cortical patient had mirror movements. The data reveal adaptations in networks controlling unilateral paretic knee movement in

  13. Preparatory band specific premotor cortical activity differentiates upper and lower extremity movement.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Lewis A; Carpenter, Mackenzie; Mizelle, J C; Forrester, Larry

    2008-01-01

    Event related desynchronization (ERD) allows evaluation of brain signals in multiple frequency dimensions. The purpose of this study was to determine left hemispheric non-primary motor cortex differences at varying frequencies of premovement ERD for similar movements by end-effectors of the upper and lower extremities. We recorded 32-channel electroencephalography (EEG) while subjects performed self-paced right ankle dorsiflexion and wrist extension. Electromyography (EMG) was recorded over the tibialis anterior and extensor carpi ulnaris. EEG was analyzed for premovement ERD within the alpha (8-12 Hz), low beta (13-18 Hz) and high beta (18-22 Hz) frequencies over the premotor, motor, and sensory areas of the left and mesial cortex from -1.5 to 0 s before movement. Within the alpha and high beta bands, wrist movements showed limited topography, but greater ERD over posterior premotor cortex areas. Alpha ERD was also significantly greater over the lateral motor cortex for wrist movements. In the low beta band, wrist movements provided extensive ERD differences to include the left motor and mesial/lateral premotor areas, whereas ankle movements showed only limited ERD activity. Overall, alpha and high beta activity demonstrated distinctions that are consistent with mapping of wrist and ankle representations over the sensorimotor strip, whereas the low beta representation demonstrated the clearest distinctions between the limbs over widespread brain areas, particularly the lateral premotor cortex. This suggests limited leg premovement activity at the dorsolateral premotor cortex. Low beta ERD may be reflect joint or limb specific preparatory activity in the premotor area. Further work is required to better evaluate the extent of this low beta activity for multiple comparative joints.

  14. Trends in diabetes-related lower extremities amputations in Romania-A five year nationwide evaluation.

    PubMed

    Veresiu, Ioan Andrei; Iancu, Silvia Stefania; Bondor, Cosmina

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a nationwide evaluation of the frequency, incidence and trends of diabetes-related LEA (lower extremities amputations) in Romania. We have retrospectively analysed DRG data (ICD 10 AM codes) from all hospitals in the country, over a 5 year period (2006-2010). Knowing the shortcomings of this approach, we have assumed that our study can serve as a platform for future comparisons. The total number of non-traumatic diabetes related LEA procedures was 24,312, they were performed in 16,873 patients with diabetes, 22.55% with type 1 diabetes, 70.26 with type 2 diabetes and 7.19% with non-specified diabetes at discharge. The total number of hospital admissions for these patients was 46,985. During the five years of the study there was an increase in the absolute number of major amputations (above the ankle), as well as of minor amputations. The rate of amputations decreased in type 1 diabetes, from baseline (2006): -8.15% in 2007, -25.83% in 2008, -23.43% in 2009, -27.71% in 2010, whereas it increased in type 2 diabetes in the respective years: 16.96%, 60.75%, 66.91%, and 104.64%, due to an increase in minor amputations and mainly in elderly people. Male: female amputations rate was 2:1 in type 1 diabetes patients and 2.4:1 in type 2 diabetes patients. This study, the first of its kind in the Romanian population, offers a starting point for future comparisons and identifies a target for preventive measures.

  15. Spectral Clustering for Unsupervised Segmentation of Lower Extremity Wound Beds Using Optical Images.

    PubMed

    Dhane, Dhiraj Manohar; Krishna, Vishal; Achar, Arun; Bar, Chittaranjan; Sanyal, Kunal; Chakraborty, Chandan

    2016-09-01

    Chronic lower extremity wound is a complicated disease condition of localized injury to skin and its tissues which have plagued many elders worldwide. The ulcer assessment and management is expensive and is burden on health establishment. Currently accurate wound evaluation remains a tedious task as it rely on visual inspection. This paper propose a new method for wound-area detection, using images digitally captured by a hand-held, optical camera. The strategy proposed involves spectral approach for clustering, based on the affinity matrix. The spectral clustering (SC) involves construction of similarity matrix of Laplacian based on Ng-Jorden-Weiss algorithm. Starting with a quadratic method, wound photographs were pre-processed for color homogenization. The first-order statistics filter was then applied to extract spurious regions. The filter was selected based on the performance, evaluated on four quality metrics. Then, the spectral method was used on the filtered images for effective segmentation. The segmented regions were post-processed using morphological operators. The performance of spectral segmentation was confirmed by ground-truth pictures labeled by dermatologists. The SC results were additionally compared with the results of k-means and Fuzzy C-Means (FCM) clustering algorithms. The SC approach on a set of 105 images, effectively delineated targeted wound beds yielding a segmentation accuracy of 86.73 %, positive predictive values of 91.80 %, and a sensitivity of 89.54 %. This approach shows the robustness of tool for ulcer perimeter measurement and healing progression. The article elucidates its potential to be incorporated in patient facing medical systems targeting a rapid clinical assistance.

  16. Gender differences of lower extremity amputation risk in patients with diabetic foot: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhu-Qi; Chen, Hong-Lin; Zhao, Fang-Fang

    2014-09-01

    In this meta-analysis, we aim to evaluate gender differences of lower extremity amputation risk in patients with diabetic foot. Systematic computerized searches of PubMed and Web of Knowledge were performed. The pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for amputation risk were calculated. Twenty studies with 15 385 case (present amputation) and 438 760 control (absent amputation) patients were included in the meta-analysis. The pooled crude OR was 1.676 (95% CI 1.307-2.149; Z = 4.07, P = .000). In the retrospective study subgroup, the pooled OR was 1.708 (95% CI = 1.235-2.363; Z = 3.24, P = .001); in the prospective study subgroup, the pooled OR was 1.478 (95% CI = 1.189-1.838; Z = 3.51, P = .000). The pooled adjusted OR was 1.439 (95% CI = 1.238-1.671; Z = 4.76, P = .000). In retrospective study subgroup, the pooled OR was 1.440 (95% CI = 1.208-1.717; Z = 4.07, P = .000); in prospective study subgroup, the pooled OR was 1.478 (95% CI = 1.080-2.024; Z = 2.44, P = .015). No significant publication bias was found. Sensitivity analyses by omitting a heterogeneity study showed the results were robust. In conclusion, our meta-analysis indicates that men with diabetic foot have about one half increased amputation risk than women with diabetic foot. Men with diabetes should receive more complete follow-up and more adequate health education.

  17. Combined Direct and Indirect CT Venography (Combined CTV) in Detecting Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wan-Yin; Wang, Li-Wei; Wang, Shao-Juan; Yin, Xin-Dao; Gu, Jian-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of combined direct and indirect CT venography (combined CTV) in the detection of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LEDVT). The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and patients or qualifying family members provided informed consent. A total of 96 consecutive patients undergoing combined CTV were prospectively enrolled. A combined examination with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) plus duplex ultrasonography (US) was used as the criterion standard. Three observers were blinded to clinical, DSA, and US results, and they independently analyzed all combined CTV datasets. Interobserver agreement was expressed in terms of the Cohen k value for categorical variables. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of combined CTV in the detection of LEDVT were determined by using patient- and location-based evaluations. Of the 96 patients, DSA plus US revealed LEDVT in 125 segmental veins in 63 patients. Patient-based evaluation with combined CTV yielded an accuracy of 96.9% to 97.9%, a sensitivity of 95.2% to 96.8%, a specificity of 100% to 100%, a PPV of 100% to 100%, and an NPV of 91.7% to 94.3% in the detection of LEDVT. Location-based evaluation yielded similar results. Through combined direct and indirect CTV, patients obtained a combined CT angiogram on the diseased limb and an indirect CT angiogram on the opposite side. The image quality of combined CTV was superior to an indirect venogram. Combined CTV shows promising diagnostic accuracy in the detection of LEDVT with 3-dimensional modeling of the lower limb venous system. PMID:26986113

  18. Systolic Blood Pressure Variability and Lower Extremity Amputation In a Non-Elderly Population with Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Budiman-Mak, Elly; Epstein, Noam; Brennan, Meghan; Stuck, Rodney; Guihan, Marylou; Huo, Zhiping; Emanuele, Nicholas; Sohn, Min-Woong

    2016-01-01

    Objective Systolic blood pressure (SBP) variability is emerging as a new risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, diabetic nephropathy, and other atherosclerotic conditions. Our objective is to examine whether it has any prognostic value for lower-extremity amputations. Research Design and Methods This is a nested case-control study of a cohort of patients with diabetes aged < 60 years and treated in the US Department of Veterans Healthcare system in 2003. They were followed over five years for any above-ankle (major) amputations. For each case with a major amputation (event), we randomly selected up to five matched controls based on age, sex, race/ethnicity, and calendar time. SBP variability was computed using three or more blood pressure measures taken during the one-year period before the event. Patients were classified into quartiles according to their SBP variability. Results The study sample included 1038 cases and 2932 controls. Compared to Quartile 1 (lowest variability), Quartile 2 had 1.4 times (OR = 1.44, 95% CI = 1.00 – 2.07) and Quartiles 3 and 4 (highest) had 2.5 times (OR for Quartile 3 = 2.62, 95% CI = 1.85 – 3.72; OR for Quartile 4 = 2.50, 95% CI = 1.74 – 3.59) higher risk of major amputation (P for trend < 0.001). This gradient relationship held in both normotensive and hypertensive groups as well as for individuals without prior peripheral vascular disease. Conclusions This is the first study to show a significant graded relationship between SBP variability and risk of major amputation among non-elderly persons with diabetes. PMID:26809904

  19. Combined Direct and Indirect CT Venography (Combined CTV) in Detecting Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wan-Yin; Wang, Li-Wei; Wang, Shao-Juan; Yin, Xin-Dao; Gu, Jian-Ping

    2016-03-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of combined direct and indirect CT venography (combined CTV) in the detection of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (LEDVT). The institutional review board approved the study protocol, and patients or qualifying family members provided informed consent. A total of 96 consecutive patients undergoing combined CTV were prospectively enrolled. A combined examination with digital subtraction angiography (DSA) plus duplex ultrasonography (US) was used as the criterion standard. Three observers were blinded to clinical, DSA, and US results, and they independently analyzed all combined CTV datasets. Interobserver agreement was expressed in terms of the Cohen k value for categorical variables. Accuracy, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), and negative predictive value (NPV) of combined CTV in the detection of LEDVT were determined by using patient- and location-based evaluations. Of the 96 patients, DSA plus US revealed LEDVT in 125 segmental veins in 63 patients. Patient-based evaluation with combined CTV yielded an accuracy of 96.9% to 97.9%, a sensitivity of 95.2% to 96.8%, a specificity of 100% to 100%, a PPV of 100% to 100%, and an NPV of 91.7% to 94.3% in the detection of LEDVT. Location-based evaluation yielded similar results. Through combined direct and indirect CTV, patients obtained a combined CT angiogram on the diseased limb and an indirect CT angiogram on the opposite side. The image quality of combined CTV was superior to an indirect venogram. Combined CTV shows promising diagnostic accuracy in the detection of LEDVT with 3-dimensional modeling of the lower limb venous system.

  20. A review of propeller flaps for distal lower extremity soft tissue reconstruction: Is flap loss too high?

    PubMed

    Nelson, Jonas A; Fischer, John P; Brazio, Philip S; Kovach, Stephen J; Rosson, Gedge D; Rad, Ariel N

    2013-10-01

    Soft tissue coverage in the distal lower extremity remains a significant challenge. While free flaps are often utilized for larger defects, local perforator-based propeller flaps may be ideal for smaller wounds requiring coverage. Propeller flaps can provide excellent form and function for both traumatic and atraumatic defects with minimal donor site morbidity but can have concerning rates of flap loss. We reviewed the literature, identifying 21 studies presenting 310 propeller flaps for distal lower extremity reconstruction. Total flap necrosis was noted in 5.5% of flaps, with partial necrosis in 11.6%. While these flaps do enable transfer of local, healthy tissue to the defect site without the need for a microsurgical anastomosis, this rate of flap loss is concerning and appropriate patient selection is crucial. This review provides a brief history and overview of the clinical application and research into distal lower extremity perforator propeller flaps to place this technique into a clinical context.

  1. Acute ischemia of bilateral lower extremities as a presenting feature of disseminated mucormycosis endocarditis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Tachamo, Niranjan; Rajagopalan, Priya; Nazir, Salik; Lohani, Saroj; Le, Brian; Patel, Nitin

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated mucormycosis endocarditis is extremely rare, and only a few cases have actually been reported in the literature. It is almost universally fatal despite aggressive surgical and medical management. In this article, we present the case of a 48-year-old immunocompromised male with mucormycosis endocarditis, who presented with acute bilateral lower extremity ischemia and passed away due to subsequent multi-organ failure. To our knowledge, this is the first case report of disseminated mucormycosis native valve endocarditis presenting as acute bilateral lower extremity ischemia. PMID:27987284

  2. Lower Extremity Biomechanical Relationships with Different Speeds in Traditional, Minimalist, and Barefoot Footwear

    PubMed Central

    Fredericks, William; Swank, Seth; Teisberg, Madeline; Hampton, Bethany; Ridpath, Lance; Hanna, Jandy B.

    2015-01-01

    Minimalist running footwear has grown increasingly popular. Prior studies that have compared lower extremity biomechanics in minimalist running to traditional running conditions are largely limited to a single running velocity. This study compares the effects of running at various speeds on foot strike pattern, stride length, knee angles and ankle angles in traditional, barefoot, and minimalist running conditions. Twenty-six recreational runners (19-46 years of age) ran on a treadmill at a range of speeds (2.5-4.0 m·sec-1). Subjects ran with four different footwear conditions: personal, standard, and minimalist shoes and barefoot. 3D coordinates from video data were collected. The relationships between speed, knee and ankle angles at foot strike and toe-off, relative step length, and footwear conditions were evaluated by ANCOVA, with speed as the co-variate. Distribution of non-rearfoot strike was compared across shod conditions with paired t-tests. Non-rearfoot strike distribution was not significantly affected by speed, but was different between shod conditions (p < 0.05). Footwear condition and speed significantly affected ankle angle at touchdown, independent of one another (F [3,71] = 10.28, p < 0.001), with barefoot and minimalist running exhibiting greater plantarflexion at foot strike. When controlling for foot strike style, barefoot and minimalist runners exhibited greater plantarflexion than other conditions (p < 0.05). Ankle angle at lift-off and relative step length exhibited a significant interaction between speed and shod condition. Knee angles had a significant relationship with speed, but not with footwear. There is a clear influence of footwear, but not speed, on foot strike pattern. Additionally, speed and footwear predict ankle angles (greater plantarflexion at foot strike) and may have implications for minimalist runners and their risk of injury. Long-term studies utilizing various speeds and habituation times are needed. Key points Foot strike

  3. Cross-Cultural Adaptation and Validation of the Lower Extremity Measure Into German

    PubMed Central

    Käch, Kurt; Frei, Hans Curd; Rudin, Mark; Leimbacher, Melanie; Platz, Andreas

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The Lower Extremity Measure (LEM) was developed to provide a specific instrument to detect changes in physical function in patients with hip fracture. Of 29 questions, 3 have a valid “not applicable” answer option. The goal of this study was to validate the LEM in German and to determine the added value to the physical functioning (pf) subscale of the Short Form 36 (SF-36). Materials and Methods: The LEM was translated according to published guidelines and administered to patients with hip fracture (31 A1-A3 and 31 B1-B3) shortly after surgery (baseline), at 3 months (3M), and for reliability testing at 3 months plus 1 week (3M+). The reproducibility, internal consistency, floor and ceiling effects, construct validity, and responsiveness of the German LEM were assessed. Results: A total of 106 patients completed the LEM and SF-36 (mean age 75.5; 67% women) at baseline (mean of 4.9 days after operation), and 88 completed both questionnaires at both the 3M and 3M+ assessments. At each assessment time point, between 6% and 23% of the patients answered 7 questions as “not applicable.” Reproducibility and internal consistency were high (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.93; Cronbach's α = .96). No floor effect (0%) and a minor ceiling effect (7.87%) were found for the total LEM score. The strongest correlation was found between the LEM and the SF-36 subscale pf (Spearman ρ = .93). Responsiveness was similar for the SF-36 pf subscale and the LEM when using effect size (SF-36 pf 0.71 vs LEM 0.72) and better for the LEM when using standardized response mean (SF-36 pf 0.65 vs LEM 0.76). Discussion: The German LEM is a reliable, valid, and responsive measure for the self-assessment of patients after hip fracture surgery. As a number of questions are not applicable to elderly patients, the added value of this lengthy questionnaire in these often frail, sometimes cognitively impaired patients is still open for debate. PMID:26623163

  4. Lower extremity biomechanical relationships with different speeds in traditional, minimalist, and barefoot footwear.

    PubMed

    Fredericks, William; Swank, Seth; Teisberg, Madeline; Hampton, Bethany; Ridpath, Lance; Hanna, Jandy B

    2015-06-01

    Minimalist running footwear has grown increasingly popular. Prior studies that have compared lower extremity biomechanics in minimalist running to traditional running conditions are largely limited to a single running velocity. This study compares the effects of running at various speeds on foot strike pattern, stride length, knee angles and ankle angles in traditional, barefoot, and minimalist running conditions. Twenty-six recreational runners (19-46 years of age) ran on a treadmill at a range of speeds (2.5-4.0 m·sec(-1)). Subjects ran with four different footwear conditions: personal, standard, and minimalist shoes and barefoot. 3D coordinates from video data were collected. The relationships between speed, knee and ankle angles at foot strike and toe-off, relative step length, and footwear conditions were evaluated by ANCOVA, with speed as the co-variate. Distribution of non-rearfoot strike was compared across shod conditions with paired t-tests. Non-rearfoot strike distribution was not significantly affected by speed, but was different between shod conditions (p < 0.05). Footwear condition and speed significantly affected ankle angle at touchdown, independent of one another (F [3,71] = 10.28, p < 0.001), with barefoot and minimalist running exhibiting greater plantarflexion at foot strike. When controlling for foot strike style, barefoot and minimalist runners exhibited greater plantarflexion than other conditions (p < 0.05). Ankle angle at lift-off and relative step length exhibited a significant interaction between speed and shod condition. Knee angles had a significant relationship with speed, but not with footwear. There is a clear influence of footwear, but not speed, on foot strike pattern. Additionally, speed and footwear predict ankle angles (greater plantarflexion at foot strike) and may have implications for minimalist runners and their risk of injury. Long-term studies utilizing various speeds and habituation times are needed. Key points

  5. LOWER EXTREMITY HYPERMOBILITY, BUT NOT CORE MUSCLE ENDURANCE INFLUENCES BALANCE IN FEMALE COLLEGIATE DANCERS

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Nelson; Caswell, Shane V.; Ambegaonkar, Gautam P.; Wyon, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    Background Dance is a physically demanding activity, with almost 70% of all injuries in dancers occurring in the lower extremity (LE). Prior researchers report that muscle function (e.g. muscle endurance) and anatomical factors (e.g. hypermobility) affect physical performance (e.g. balance) and can subsequently influence LE injury risk. Specifically, lesser core muscle endurance, balance deficits, and greater hypermobility are related to increased LE injury risk. However, the potentials interrelationships among these factors in dancers remain unclear. Purpose The purposes of this study were to examine the relationships among core muscle endurance, balance, and LE hypermobility, and determine the relative contributions of core muscle endurance and LE hypermobility as predictors of balance in female collegiate dancers. Study Design Cross-sectional Methods Core muscle endurance was evaluated using the combined average anterior, left, and right lateral plank test time scores(s). LE hypermobility was measured using the LE-specific Beighton hypermobility measure, defining hypermobility if both legs had greater than 10 ° knee hyperextension. Balance was measured via the composite anterior, posterolateral, and posteromedial Star Excursion Balance Test (SEBT) reach distances (normalized to leg length) in 15 female healthy collegiate dancers (18.3 + 0.5yrs, 165.5 + 6.9cm, 63.7 + 12.1kg). Point-biserial-correlation-coefficients examined relationships and a linear regression examined whether core endurance and hypermobility predicted balance (p<.05). Results LE hypermobility (Yes; n = 3, No; n = 12) and balance (87.2 + 8.3% leg length) were positively correlated r(14)=.67, (p=.01). However, core endurance (103.9 + 50.6 s) and balance were not correlated r(14)=.32, (p=.26). LE hypermobility status predicted 36.9% of the variance in balance scores (p=.01). Conclusion LE hypermobility, but not core muscle endurance may be related to balance in female

  6. Blood Transfusion for Lower Extremity Bypass Is Associated with Increased Wound Infection and Graft Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Tze-Woei; Farber, Alik; Hamburg, Naomi M; Eberhardt, Robert T; Rybin, Denis; Doros, Gheorghe; Eldrup-Jorgensen, Jens; Goodney, Philip P; Cronenwett, Jack L; Kalish, Jeffrey A

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND Packed RBC transfusion has been postulated to increase morbidity and mortality after cardiac/general surgical operations, but its effects after lower extremity bypass (LEB) have not been studied extensively. STUDY DESIGN Using the Vascular Study Group of New England’s database (2003–2010), we examined 1,880 consecutive infrainguinal LEB performed for critical limb ischemia. Perioperative transfusion was categorized as 0 U, 1 to 2 U, and ≥3 U. Cohort frequency group matching was used to compare groups of patients receiving 1 to 2 U and 0 U with patients receiving ≥3 U using age, coronary artery disease, diabetes, urgency, and indication of revascularization. Primary end points were perioperative mortality, wound infection, and loss of primary graft patency at discharge, as well as 1-year mortality and loss of primary graft patency. RESULTS In the study cohort, 1,532 LEBs (81.5%) received 0 U, 248 LEBs (13.2%) received 1 to 2 U, and 100 LEBs (5.3%) received ≥3 U transfusion. In the study cohort and group frequency matched cohort, transfusion was associated with significantly higher perioperative wound infection (0 U:4.8% vs 1 to 2 U: 6.5% vs ≥3 U: 14.0%; p = 0.0004) and graft thrombosis at discharge (4.5% vs 7.7% vs 15.3%; p < 0.0001). At 1 year, there were no differences in infection or graft patency. In multivariate analysis, transfusion was independently associated with increased perioperative wound infection in the study cohort and group frequency matched cohort (1 to 2 U vs 0 U: adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 1.4; 95% CI, 0.8–2.5; p 0.263; ≥3 U vs 0 U: OR = 3.5; 95% CI, 1.8–6.7; p = 0.0002; overall p = 0.002) and increased graft at thrombosis discharge (1 to 2 U vs 0 U: OR = 2.1; 95% CI, 1.2–3.6; p = 0.01; ≥3 U vs 0 U: OR = 4.8; 95% CI, 2.5–9.2; p < 0.0001, overall p < 0.0001). CONCLUSIONS Perioperative transfusion in patients undergoing LEB is associated with increased perioperative wound infection and graft thrombosis. From this

  7. Morphing of geometric composites via residual swelling.

    PubMed

    Pezzulla, Matteo; Shillig, Steven A; Nardinocchi, Paola; Holmes, Douglas P

    2015-08-07

    Understanding and controlling the shape of thin, soft objects has been the focus of significant research efforts among physicists, biologists, and engineers in the last decade. These studies aim to utilize advanced materials in novel, adaptive ways such as fabricating smart actuators or mimicking living tissues. Here, we present the controlled growth-like morphing of 2D sheets into 3D shapes by preparing geometric composite structures that deform by residual swelling. The morphing of these geometric composites is dictated by both swelling and geometry, with diffusion controlling the swelling-induced actuation, and geometric confinement dictating the structure's deformed shape. Building on a simple mechanical analog, we present an analytical model that quantitatively describes how the Gaussian and mean curvatures of a thin disk are affected by the interplay among geometry, mechanics, and swelling. This model is in excellent agreement with our experiments and numerics. We show that the dynamics of residual swelling is dictated by a competition between two characteristic diffusive length scales governed by geometry. Our results provide the first 2D analog of Timoshenko's classical formula for the thermal bending of bimetallic beams - our generalization explains how the Gaussian curvature of a 2D geometric composite is affected by geometry and elasticity. The understanding conferred by these results suggests that the controlled shaping of geometric composites may provide a simple complement to traditional manufacturing techniques.

  8. A Comparison of the Lower Extremity Proprioceptive Senses of the University Students That Exercise Regularly and Those Who Do Not

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Göktepe, Mehmet

    2016-01-01

    This study has been conducted with a view to identifying and comparing the lower extremity proprioceptive senses of the university students who exercise regularly and those who do not. The study group included voluntary participants studying at various departments of Agri Ibrahim Çeçen University (Faculty of Education and Physical Education and…

  9. Early Mobilization after Free-flap Transfer to the Lower Extremities: Preferential Use of Flow-through Anastomosis

    PubMed Central

    Kayano, Shuji; Fujiki, Masahide; Chuman, Hirokazu; Kawai, Akira; Sakuraba, Minoru

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prolonged bed rest and elevation have traditionally been considered necessary after free-flap transfer to the lower extremities. In this retrospective study, we tried to mobilize patients early after free-flap transfer to the lower extremity by means of flow-through anastomosis for both arteries and veins. Methods: This study included 13 consecutive patients who underwent immediate free-flap transfer after wide resection of soft-tissue tumors of the lower extremity from March 2012 through July 2013. The defects were above the knee in 5 patients and below the knee in 8 patients. In all patients, flow-through anastomosis was used for both arteries and veins. The patients were mobilized starting on the first postoperative day, and their activities of daily life were gradually expanded, depending on the wound conditions. Postoperative complications and the progression of their activities of daily life were investigated retrospectively. Results: No anastomotic failure or take back occurred. Partial flap necrosis occurred in 1 patient because of a poor perforator but was unrelated to early mobilization. All patients could move to wheelchairs on the first postoperative day. Within 1 week, 12 of 13 patients could start dangling and 10 of 13 patients could start ambulating. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that early mobilization after free-flap transfer to the lower extremity is made possible by flow-through anastomosis for both arteries and veins. Flow-through flaps have stable circulation from the acute phase and can tolerate early dangling and ambulation. PMID:25289320

  10. Hip external rotator strength is associated with better dynamic control of the lower extremity during landing tasks

    PubMed Central

    Malloy, Philip; Morgan, Alexander; Meinerz, Carolyn; Geiser, Christopher F.; Kipp, Kristof

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the association between hip strength and lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during unanticipated single leg landing and cutting tasks in collegiate female soccer players. Twenty-three NCAA division I female soccer players were recruited for strength testing and biomechanical analysis. Maximal isometric hip abduction and external rotation strength were measured using a hand held dynamometer and expressed as muscle torque (force × femoral length) and normalized to body weight. Three-dimensional lower extremity kinematics and kinetics were assessed with motion analysis and force plates, and an inverse dynamics approach was used to calculate net internal joint moments that were normalized to body weight. Greater hip external rotator strength was significantly associated with greater peak hip external rotation moments (r = .47; p = 0.021), greater peak knee internal rotation moments (r = .41; p = 0.048), greater hip frontal plane excursion (r = .49; p = 0.017), and less knee transverse plane excursion (r = −.56; p = .004) during unanticipated single-leg landing and cutting tasks. In addition a statistical trend was detected between hip external rotator strength and peak hip frontal plane moments (r = .39; p = .06). The results suggest that females with greater hip external rotator strength demonstrate better dynamic control of the lower extremity during unanticipated single leg landing and cutting tasks and provide further support for the link between hip strength and lower extremity landing mechanics. PMID:26110347

  11. [Stimulation of lower extremity peripheral circulation in patients with obliterating arteriosclerosis by the wire insertion into the bone marrow canal].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, G P; Rechkin, M iu; Shchurova, E N; Bunov, V S; Beloborodov, R N

    2005-01-01

    The method of applying the Ilizarov apparatus on the injured segment of the lower extremities introduced from below into the marrowy cavity in 16 patients with a precritical degree of blood circulation impairment (II and III stages according to Pokrovsky classification) resulted in stable compensation of ischemic derangements.

  12. Orthoses posted in both the forefoot and rearfoot reduce moments and angular impulses on lower extremity joints during walking.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Wen-Hao; Lewis, Cara L; Monaghan, Gail M; Saltzman, Elliot; Hamill, Joseph; Holt, Kenneth G

    2014-08-22

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the effects of orthoses designed to support the forefoot and rearfoot on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity joints during walking. Fifteen participants volunteered for this study. Kinematic and kinetic variables during overground walking were compared with the participants wearing sandals without orthoses or sandals with orthoses. Orthoses increased knee internal abduction moment during late stance and knee abduction angular impulse, and reduced the medial ground reaction force during late stance, adduction free moment, forefoot eversion angle, ankle inversion moment and angular impulse, hip adduction angle, hip abduction moment, and hip external rotation moment and angular impulse (p<0.05). Orthoses decreased the torsional forces on the lower extremity and reduced the loading at the hip during walking. These findings combined with our previous studies and those of others suggest that forefoot abnormalities are critically important in influencing lower extremity kinematics and kinetics, and may underlie some non-traumatic lower extremity injuries.

  13. Outcomes of catheter-directed treatment of lower extremity deep vein thrombosis of patients presenting to a tertiary care hospital

    PubMed Central

    Sundar, Gaurav; Keshava, Shyamkumar N; Moses, Vinu; Chiramel, George K; Ahmed, Munawwar; Mammen, Suraj; Aggarwal, Sunil; Stephen, Edwin

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT) is a common illness with an annual incidence of 1 per 1000 adults. The major long-term complication of DVT is post-thrombotic syndrome (PTS) which occurs in up to 60% of patients within 2 years of an episode of DVT. Aims: We aim to evaluate the outcomes of catheter-directed treatment (CDT) for symptomatic acute or subacute lower extremity DVT. Materials and Methods: A retrospective 12-year study was conducted on the outcomes of CDT on 54 consecutive patients who presented with acute or subacute lower extremity DVT to our hospital. Statistical Analysis: Descriptive summary statistics and the Chi-square test were used to measure the outcomes of CDT. Results: Grade 3 thrombolysis was achieved in 25 (46.3%) patients, grade 2 thrombolysis in 25 (46.3%) patients, and grade 1 thrombolysis in 4 (7.4%) patients. Significant recanalization (grade 2 or 3 thrombolysis) was possible in 50 (92.6%) patients. There was no statistically significant difference in the percentage of significant recanalization that could be achieved between patients who underwent CDT before and after 10 days. There was no significant difference between the thrombolysis achieved between urokinase and r-tPA. PTS was seen in 33% of the patients. Major complications were seen in 5.5% of the patients. Conclusion: CDT is a safe and effective therapeutic technique in patients with acute and subacute lower extremity DVT, if appropriate patient selection is made. PMID:27081228

  14. [The treatment of acute and chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities by using Lioton-1000 gel].

    PubMed

    Sukharev, I I; Vlaĭkov, G G

    1999-01-01

    The results of treatment of 110 patients with an acute and chronic venous insufficiency of the lower extremities were analysed. The original access to the v. saphena magna opening of the leg and the vein stripper are proposed. The necessity of the concomitant veins excision was substantiated, and the expediency of the antibiotics, antiaggregants and the heparin-containing preparations administration also.

  15. A single bout of resistance exercise does not affect nonlinear dynamics of lower extremity kinematics during treadmill walking.

    PubMed

    Nessler, Jeff A; Huynh, Hal; McDougal, Mary

    2011-06-01

    Peripheral fatigue has been known to result in altered force output and muscle recruitment patterns by the CNS. These changes may affect lower extremity movement during gait, and such behavior may present implications for the interpretation of nonlinear analysis of gait in situations where a subject might become fatigued. The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of a single bout of resistance training on lower extremity movement during treadmill walking in healthy subjects. Fifteen recreationally active subjects performed two 10min trials of treadmill walking at their preferred speed while knee and ankle kinematics of their right limb were recorded via optical motion capture. Between walking trials, subjects performed a series of lower extremity resistance exercises designed to induce moderate muscular fatigue. Detrended fluctuation analysis of stride length and stride time revealed that statistical persistence was unaffected by moderate muscle fatigue. Estimates of finite-time maximal Lyapunov exponents for ankle angle, knee angle, and vertical ankle movement over the short (0-1 stride) and long (4-10 strides) term were also unaffected by a single bout of resistance training. These results suggest that control of locomotion in healthy individuals, as measured by the nonlinear dynamics of lower extremity movement used here, is relatively robust to moderate muscle fatigue. Additional work with greater levels of fatigue will be necessary to fully characterize the effects of muscular fatigue on gait.

  16. Guideline for the management of wounds in patients with lower-extremity neuropathic disease: an executive summary.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Penny Ellen; Fields-Varnado, Myra

    2013-01-01

    This article summarizes the WOCN Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients with Lower Extremity Neuropathic Disease. It is intended for use by physicians, nurses, therapists, and other health care professionals who work with adults who have or are at risk for, lower-extremity neuropathic disease (LEND), and includes updated scientific literature available from January 2003 through February 2012. The full guideline contains definitions of lower extremity neuropathic disorders and disease, prevalence of the problem, relevance and significance of the disorders, as well as comprehensive information about etiology, the nervous system, pathogenesis, and the overall management goals for patients at risk for developing neuropathic foot ulcers. A detailed assessment section describes how to conduct a full clinical history and physical examination. The guideline also provides two approaches to interventions. The first focuses on prevention strategies to reduce the risk of developing LEND wounds or recurrence, including life-long foot offloading, routine dermal temperature surveillance, use of adjunctive therapies, medication management, and implementing lower extremity amputation prevention measures and patient self-care education. The second approach summarized LEND wound management strategies including wound cleansing, debridement, infection management, maintenance of intact peri-wound skin, nutrition considerations, pain and paresthesia management, edema management, offloading and management of gait and foot deformity, medication management, surgical options, adjunctive therapies, patient education, and health care provider follow-up. A comprehensive reference list, glossary of terms, and several appendices regarding an algorithm to determine wound etiology, pharmacology, Lower Extremity Amputation (LEAP) Program, diabetes foot screening and other information is available at the end of the guideline.

  17. Single injection protocol for coronary and lower extremity CT angiographies in patients suspected for peripheral arterial disease

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Ashish; Kondo, Takeshi; Amanuma, Makoto; Oida, Akitsugu; Sano, Tomonari; Sachin, Saboo S.; Takase, Shinichi; Rybicki, Frank J.; Kumamaru, Kanako K.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To evaluate the feasibility of a single injection protocol for coronary CT angiography (CTA) and lower extremity CTA in patients suspected for peripheral arterial disease (PAD). This prospective observational study included a total of 103 patients who showed an ankle brachial index ≤0.9 and underwent the single injection protocol for coronary and lower extremity CTA. All CTAs used iodinated contrast (weight × 0.06 mL/s × 20 seconds). A prospective Electrocardiogram (ECG)-gated coronary CTA was performed, followed by helical lower extremity CTA beginning 9 seconds after coronary CTA. Using catheter angiography as reference standard, diagnostic ability of CTA was evaluated. The mean total volume of iodinated contrast used was 70 ± 14 mL. Contrast opacification in the superficial femoral artery was adequate (408 ± 97  Hounsfield Units [HU]) and PAD was detected in 72.8% (75/103). The estimated radiation doses for lower extremity and coronary CTA were 3.6 ± 1.2 and 5.5 ± 4.5 mSv. A significant coronary stenosis was detected in 47 patients (45.6%). Coronary CT image quality was recorded as excellent in 86.4%, acceptable in 11.7%, and unacceptable for 1.9%. Contrast opacification within the superficial femoral artery was adequate in all cases while 27.2% needed an additional scan below the calf to capture the contrast bolus arrival in the smaller lower extremity vessels. Segment based sensitivity, specificity, positive, and negative predictive values were 57.9%, 97.9%, 73.8%, and 95.9% for the coronary CTA, and 63.4%, 91.5%, 76.3%, and 85.3% for peripheral CTA. A single injection protocol for coronary CTA and lower extremity CTA is feasible with a relatively small volume of iodinated contrast. PMID:27861382

  18. Factors influencing outcome following limb-threatening lower limb trauma: lessons learned from the Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP).

    PubMed

    MacKenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J

    2006-01-01

    The Lower Extremity Assessment Project (LEAP) is a multicenter study of severe lower extremity trauma in the US civilian population. At 2- and 7-year follow-ups, the LEAP study found no difference in functional outcome between patients who underwent either limb salvage surgery or amputation. However, outcomes on average were poor for both groups. This study and others provide evidence of wide-ranging variations in outcome following major limb trauma, with a substantial proportion of patients experiencing long-term disability. In addition, outcomes often are more affected by the patient's economic, social, and personal resources than by the initial treatment of the injury--specifically, amputation or reconstruction and level of amputation. A conceptual framework for examining outcomes after injury may be used to identify opportunities for interventions that would improve outcomes. Because of essential differences between the civilian and military populations, the findings of the LEAP study may correlate only roughly with combat casualty outcomes.

  19. Does dance-based therapy increase gait speed in older adults with chronic lower extremity pain: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Krampe, Jean; Wagner, Joanne M; Hawthorne, Kelly; Sanazaro, Deborah; Wong-Anuchit, Choochart; Budhathoki, Chakra; Lorenz, Rebecca A; Raaf, Soren

    2014-01-01

    A decreased gait speed in older adults can lead to dependency when the individuals are no longer able to participate in activities or do things for themselves. Thirty-seven senior apartment residents (31 females; Mean age=80.6 years; SD=8.9) with lower extremity pain/stiffness participated in a feasibility and preliminary efficacy study of 12 weeks (24 sessions). Healthy-Steps dance therapy compared to a wait-list control group. Small improvements in gait speed ([ES]=0.33) were noted for participants completing 19-24 dance sessions. Improvements in gait speed measured by a 10 Meter Walk Test (0.0517 m/s) exceeded 0.05 m/s, a value deemed to be meaningful in community dwelling older adults. These feasibility study findings support the need for additional research using dance-based therapy for older adults with lower extremity pain.

  20. Two Simple Leg Net Devices Designed to Protect Lower-Extremity Skin Grafts and Donor Sites and Prevent Decubitus Ulcer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-02-01

    Two Simple Leg Net Devices Designed to Protect Lower-Extremity Skin Grafts and Donor Sites and Prevent Decubitus Ulcer Travis L. Hedman, MPT, OCS... decubitus . Pressure ulcer is a serious health prob- lem and can cause pain, suffering, disability, and even death.1,2 The cost of treatment for a...single pressure decubitus has been estimated to be as high as $70,000.3 Therefore, prevention is paramount. The prevention of pressure ulcers is far less

  1. Manual physical therapy combined with high-intensity functional rehabilitation for severe lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries: a case series*

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Michael S.; Deyle, Gail D.; Owens, Johnny; Gill, Norman W.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Severe lower extremity trauma accounts for large healthcare costs and often results in elective amputation and poor long-term outcomes. The purpose of this case series is to describe an orthopedic manual physical therapy (OMPT) approach combined with a return to run (RTR) clinical pathway consisting of high-intensity functional rehabilitation with a custom energy-storing orthosis. Methods Three consecutive male patients, aged 21–23 years, with severe lower extremity musculoskeletal injuries were treated with a combined intervention that included a mean (SD) of 12 (2·1) OMPT sessions and 24 (8·7) functional rehabilitation sessions over a mean of 6 weeks (1·0). Additional training with a custom energy-storing orthosis consisted of a mean of 15 (1·2) additional sessions over 4 weeks. Patient self-report outcome measures and a variety of physical performance tests captured change in function. Results Baseline lower extremity functional scale (LEFS) and foot and ankle ability measure activities of daily living subscale (FAAM-ADL) scores indicated severe disability. All patients exceeded the minimal clinically important difference (MCID) in at least one self-report outcome or physical performance test without a brace. Two of three patients exceeded the MCID for at least two physical performance tests after training with and utilizing a custom energy-storing orthosis. Discussion Clinically meaningful changes in self-reported function or physical performance were observed in all patients. A multi-modal approach, including manual therapy and functional exercise, may address the entire spectrum of impairments in patients with severe lower extremity trauma, resulting in improvements in both braced and un-braced function. PMID:27252581

  2. Strategies for Managing Massive Defects of the Foot in High-Energy Combat Injuries of the Lower Extremity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Strategies for Managing Massive Defects of the Foot in High-Energy Combat Injuries of the Lower Extremity John J. Keeling, MDa,b,c,d,e,*, Joseph R...Naval Medical Center, 8901 Rockville Pike, Bethesda, MD 20889 5600, USA b Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Service, National Naval Medical Center (NNMC...Antonio, TX 78234 6315, USA h Orthopaedic Foot and Ankle Service, Walter Reed Army Medical Center (WRAMC), 6900 Georgia Avenue NW, Washington, DC 20307

  3. Shales and swelling soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franklin, J. A.; Dimillio, A. F.; Strohm, W. E., Jr.; Vandre, B. C.; Anderson, L. R.

    The thirteen (13) papers in this report deal with the following areas: a shale rating system and tentative applications to shale performance; technical guidelines for the design and construction of shale embankments; stability of waste shale embankments; dynamic response of raw and stabilized Oklahoma shales; laboratory studies of the stabilization of nondurable shales; swelling shale and collapsing soil; development of a laboratory compaction degradation test for shales; soil section approach for evaluation of swelling potential soil moisture properties of subgrade soils; volume changes in compacted clays and shales on saturation; characterization of expansive soils; pavement roughness on expansive clays; and deep vertical fabric moisture barriers in swelling soils.

  4. Effect of vibration on muscle strength imbalance in lower extremity using multi-control whole body vibration platform.

    PubMed

    Yu, Chang Ho; Seo, Shin Bae; Kang, Seung Rok; Kim, Kyung; Kwon, Tae Kyu

    2015-01-01

    This study shows the improvement of muscle activity and muscle strength imbalance in the lower extremities through independent exercise loads in vibration platform. Twenty females of age 20 participated in this study. The subjects were divided into WBV group, with more than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities, and control group, with less than 10% of muscle strength imbalance between left and right the lower extremities. As the prior experiment showed, different exercise postures provide different muscular activities. As a result, the highest muscular activity was found to be in the low squat posture. Therefore, the LS posture was selected for the exercise in this experiment. Vibration intensities were applied to dominant muscle and non-dominant muscle, and the vibration frequency was fixed at 25Hz for the WBV group. The control group was asked to perform the same exercise as the WBV group, without stimulated vibration. This exercise was conducted for a total of 4 weeks. As a result, the WBV group which showed an average deviation of 16% before the experiment, tended to decrease approximately to 5%. In this study, vibration exercise using load deviation is shown to be effective in improving the muscle strength imbalance.

  5. Foot, leg, and ankle swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... feet - legs; Ankle swelling; Foot swelling; Leg swelling; Edema - peripheral; Peripheral edema ... 51. Trayes KP, Studdiford JS, Pickle S, Tully AS. Edema: Diagnosis and management. Am Fam Phys . 2013;88( ...

  6. Infiltration in Swelling Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giraldez, Juan V.; Sposito, Garrison

    1985-01-01

    Infiltration phenomena in swelling soils were investigated theoretically. The approach taken consisted of applying both the approximate analytical techniques developed by J.-Y. Parlange and co-workers and conventional finite difference numerical methods to study the generalized Richards equation for one-dimensional infiltration in a swelling soil. Equations were derived for the ponding time and the post-ponding infiltration rate that are generalizations of the Parlange-Smith model expressions for rigid soils. Ponding times for swelling soils were shown to be shorter than those for nonswelling analogs, and post-ponding infiltration rates in swelling soils were shown to approach zero instead of becoming equal to the hydraulic conductivity, as in rigid soils. These results were confirmed, both qualitatively and quantitatively, with the numerical model, which also provided instantaneous moisture profiles and surface swelling predictions in agreement with field observations. A three-parameter infiltration equation proposed recently by J.-Y. Parlange et al. (1982) was generalized to describe swelling soils and shown to be in good agreement with published laboratory and field data. It appears that the generalized analytical model equations developed can be employed conveniently in hydrologic applications which do not require high accuracy in predictions.

  7. Immunoscintigraphic detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities by means of human antifibrin monoclonal antibodies labeled with sup 111 In

    SciTech Connect

    Lusiani, L.; Zanco, P.; Visona, A.; Breggion, G.; Pagnan, A.; Ferlin, G. )

    1989-07-01

    A new monoclonal antibody specific for the beta-chain of human fibrin (C22A) and labeled with 111In has been obtained and successfully used in rabbits and dogs for the in vivo detection of venous thrombosis. Studies in humans are currently ongoing. In order to assess the diagnostic value of 111In-antifibrin for the detection of venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, the authors investigated 25 consecutive patients. Ten patients had clinical and instrumental (contrast phlebography and duplex scanning) evidence of acute deep venous thrombosis (DVT), 3 had a long-standing DVT with relapsing episodes of swelling and pain, 5 had superficial venous thrombosis, and the remaining 7 had no signs of thrombosis at all. Twenty patients were being treated with heparin. All patients received 111In-antifibrin at the dose of 74 MBq IV and were scanned with a large field of view gamma camera coupled with a high-energy, parallel-hole collimator at 30 minutes and three, six, and twenty-four hours postinjection. Only the persistence of an abnormal uptake at twenty-four hours confirmed by two observers at visual inspection was considered as positive. A positive result was obtained in 9 of 10 DVT patients (90% sensitivity) and in all SVT patients. The single DVT patient with a negative 111In-antifibrin test had the longest interval between scintigraphy and onset of symptoms (fifty-five days). Thus, the age of thrombi represented a substantial limitation for the test. A false-positive result was obtained in a single SVT patient, in whom also a deep involvement, unconfirmed by phlebography, was suspected (91.6% specificity).

  8. Twenty‐eight‐joint counts invalidate the DAS28 remission definition owing to the omission of the lower extremity joints: a comparison with the original DAS remission

    PubMed Central

    Landewé, R; van der Heijde, D; van der Linden, S; Boers, M

    2006-01-01

    Objective To compare 28 joint disease activity score (DAS28) remission with comprehensive joint count DAS remission in rheumatoid arthritis. Methods 620 actually measured paired observations of DAS28 and DAS were analysed in 155 patients. Discordant observations (either DAS or DAS28 below remission cut off level: 1.6 for DAS and 2.6 for DAS28) and concordant observations (both DAS and DAS28 below their remission cut off level) were analysed separately. Results 91 of 620 paired DAS observations (15%) were discordant; 87 (in 53 patients) comprised observations in which the DAS28 remission criterion, but not the DAS remission criterion, was met. The reverse was found in only four observations, which were therefore omitted. With the original DAS as standard, DAS28 sensitivity was 95% and specificity 84%. Probability plots showed a swollen joint count >0 in 75% of discordant pairs v 48% of concordant pairs. The same was found for total joint count (TJC >0 in 90% v 40%; median TJC, 0 v 6) and patient global assessment, but not for ESR. Individual joint analysis showed that 51% of discordant v 18% of concordant observations (p<0.0005) had involvement of lower extremity joints that are not included in the DAS28. Conclusions DAS remission is more conservative than DAS28 remission. Activity (tenderness and swelling) in joints not included in the reduced joint counts (ankles, feet) mainly account for the discrepancy between the two assessments. DAS28 remission at a cut off level of 2.6 has insufficient construct validity and should be used with caution in clinical practice and clinical trials. PMID:16219709

  9. Impact of Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa Inhibitors Use on Outcomes After Lower Extremity Endovascular Interventions From Nationwide Inpatient Sample (2006-2011).

    PubMed

    Echeverria, Angela; Krajcer, Zvonimir

    2016-10-01

    Anticoagulant and antiplatelet medications are necessary in peripheral endovascular intervention, but a standardized approach has not yet been established. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor use in endovascular lower extremity interventions decreased overall amputation rates. Glycoprotein IIb/IIIa inhibitor use in endovascular lower extremity interventions increased postprocedural bleeding and complications requiring intervention.

  10. A randomized, controlled trial of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain [ISRCTN 16558617

    PubMed Central

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Boswell, Mark V; Rivera, Jose J; Pampati, Vidya Sagar; Damron, Kim S; McManus, Carla D; Brandon, Doris E; Wilson, Sue R

    2005-01-01

    Background Postoperative epidural fibrosis may contribute to between 5% to 60% of the poor surgical outcomes following decompressive surgery. Correlations have been reported between epidural scarring and radicular pain, poor surgical outcomes, and a lack of any form of surgical treatment. The use of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis in recent years in the management of chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain has been described. Methods A prospective, randomized, double-blind trial was conducted to determine the outcome of spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis to reduce pain and improve function and psychological status in patients with chronic refractory low back and lower extremity pain. A total of 83 patients were evaluated, with 33 patients in Group I and 50 patients in Group II. Group I served as the control, with endoscopy into the sacral level without adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Group II received spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, followed by injection of local anesthetic and steroid. Results Among the 50 patients in the treatment group receiving spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis, significant improvement without adverse effects was shown in 80% at 3 months, 56% at 6 months, and 48% at 12 months. The control group showed improvement in 33% of the patients at one month and none thereafter. Based on the definition that less than 6 months of relief is considered short-term and longer than 6 months of relief is considered long-term, a significant number of patients obtained long-term relief with improvement in pain, functional status, and psychological status. Conclusion Spinal endoscopic adhesiolysis with targeted delivery of local anesthetic and steroid is an effective treatment in a significant number of patients with chronic low back and lower extremity pain without major adverse effects. PMID:16000173

  11. The effects of tai chi chuan combined with vibration training on balance control and lower extremity muscle power.

    PubMed

    Chung, Pao-Hung; Lin, Guan-Lun; Liu, Chiang; Chuang, Long-Ren; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether performing Tai Chi Chuan on a customized vibration platform could enhance balance control and lower extremity muscle power more efficiently than Tai Chi Chuan alone in an untrained young population. Forty-eight healthy young adults were randomly assigned to the following three groups: a Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training group (TCV), a Tai Chi Chuan group (TCC) or a control group. The TCV group underwent 30 minutes of a reformed Tai Chi Chuan program on a customized vibration platform (32 Hz, 1 mm) three times a week for eight weeks, whereas the TCC group was trained without vibration stimuli. A force platform was used to measure the moving area of a static single leg stance and the heights of two consecutive countermovement jumps. The activation of the knee extensor and flexor was also measured synchronously by surface electromyography in all tests. The results showed that the moving area in the TCV group was significantly decreased by 15.3%. The second jump height in the TCV group was significantly increased by 8.14%, and the activation of the knee extensor/flexor was significantly decreased in the first jump. In conclusion, Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control, and the positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli still remains significant because there is no cross-interaction between the two different types of training methods. Key pointsEight weeks of Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control for an untrained young population.The positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli during Tai Chi Chuan movements still remains significant because of SSC mechanism.Combining Tai Chi Chuan with vibration training is more efficient and does not decrease the overall training effects due to a cross-interaction of each other.

  12. The Effects of Tai Chi Chuan Combined with Vibration Training on Balance Control and Lower Extremity Muscle Power

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Pao-Hung; Lin, Guan-Lun; Liu, Chiang; Chuang, Long-Ren; Shiang, Tzyy-Yuang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether performing Tai Chi Chuan on a customized vibration platform could enhance balance control and lower extremity muscle power more efficiently than Tai Chi Chuan alone in an untrained young population. Forty-eight healthy young adults were randomly assigned to the following three groups: a Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training group (TCV), a Tai Chi Chuan group (TCC) or a control group. The TCV group underwent 30 minutes of a reformed Tai Chi Chuan program on a customized vibration platform (32 Hz, 1 mm) three times a week for eight weeks, whereas the TCC group was trained without vibration stimuli. A force platform was used to measure the moving area of a static single leg stance and the heights of two consecutive countermovement jumps. The activation of the knee extensor and flexor was also measured synchronously by surface electromyography in all tests. The results showed that the moving area in the TCV group was significantly decreased by 15.3%. The second jump height in the TCV group was significantly increased by 8.14%, and the activation of the knee extensor/flexor was significantly decreased in the first jump. In conclusion, Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control, and the positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli still remains significant because there is no cross-interaction between the two different types of training methods. Key points Eight weeks of Tai Chi Chuan combined with vibration training can more efficiently improve balance control for an untrained young population. The positive training effect on the lower extremity muscle power induced by vibration stimuli during Tai Chi Chuan movements still remains significant because of SSC mechanism. Combining Tai Chi Chuan with vibration training is more efficient and does not decrease the overall training effects due to a cross-interaction of each other

  13. Wearing a safety harness during treadmill walking influences lower extremity kinematics mainly through changes in ankle regularity and local stability

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Wearing a harness during treadmill walking ensures the subject's safety and is common practice in biomedical engineering research. However, the extent to which such practice influences gait is unknown. This study investigated harness-related changes in gait patterns, as evaluated from lower extremity kinematics during treadmill walking. Findings Healthy subjects (n = 10) walked on a treadmill at their preferred speed for 3 minutes with and without wearing a harness (LiteGait®, Mobility Research, Inc.). In the former condition, no weight support was provided to the subjects. Lower extremity kinematics was assessed in the sagittal plane from the mean (meanRoM), standard deviation (SDRoM) and coefficient of variation (CoVRoM) of the hip, knee, and ankle ranges of motion (RoM), as well as from the sample entropy (SampEn) and the largest Lyapunov exponent (LyE) of the joints' angles. Wearing the harness increased the meanRoM of the hip, the SDRoM and the CoVRoM of the knee, and the SampEn and the LyE of the ankle. In particular, the harness effect sizes for both the SampEn and the LyE of the ankle were large, likely reflecting a meaningful decline in the neuromuscular stabilizing control of this joint. Conclusions Wearing a harness during treadmill walking marginally influences lower extremity kinematics, resulting in more or less subtle changes in certain kinematic variables. However, in cases where differences in gait patterns would be expressed through modifications in these variables, having subjects walk with a harness may mask or reinforce such differences. PMID:22305105

  14. Functional Foot Symmetry and Its Relation to Lower Extremity Physical Performance in Older Adults: The Framingham Foot Study

    PubMed Central

    Riskowski, J.L.; Hagedorn, TJ; Dufour, AB; Hannan, MT

    2012-01-01

    Background While many studies use gait symmetry as a marker of healthy gait, the evidence that gait symmetry exists is limited. Because gait symmetry is thought to arise through laterality (i.e., limb preference) and affects gait retraining efforts, it is important to understand if symmetry exists during gait in older adults. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate foot and gait symmetry in the population-based Framingham Foot Study as well as to determine the effects of vertical force symmetry on physical performance measures. Methods Members of the Framingham Foot Study were included in this analysis (N=1333). Foot function and force data were collected using the Tekscan Matscan during self-selected gait, with symmetry evaluated using the symmetry index. The short physical performance battery (SPPB) measures of balance, chair stands and gait speed assessed lower extremity physical function. Participants were evaluated using quartiles of gait speed and foot symmetry to determine the effects of symmetry on lower extremity physical function. Results Individuals with faster gait speed displayed greater foot function asymmetry; individuals with −3.0% to −9.5% asymmetry in foot function performed better on the short physical performance battery (SPPB). Further, with aging, the degree of asymmetry was reduced. Conclusions While this research suggests that a moderate degree of foot asymmetry is associated with better lower extremity function, the causes of vertical force asymmetry are unknown. Future studies should evaluate the causes of foot asymmetry and should track the changes in symmetry that occur with aging. PMID:22560642

  15. [Lower extremity deformities as an obstacle in rehabilitation of meningomyelocele patients--pathogenesis and principles of treatment].

    PubMed

    Szulc, A; Głowacki, M

    1998-01-01

    The fate of 89 patients with meningomyelocele operated at the Institute of Orthopedics and Rehabilitation in Poznań between 1970 and 1989 due to paretic deformities of lower extremities has been traced by the authors. Deformities prevented nursing, standing or ambulating; their type and results of treatment have been related to the level of neurosegmental lesion. Modified Sharrard's classification served to group the patients. The level of lesion established during lower extremities muscles testing has been verified after neurological examination supplemented with electrophysiological tests: sensory response within L3-S2 dermatomes, afferent conduction velocity of the peroneal nerve and selected muscles of lower extremity electromyogram. Deformities due to inadequate nursing (hip and knee contractures and equinus foot) were the main obstacle in the rehabilitation in patients with spinal Th12-L2 lesion. In patients with L3-L5 lesion hip contractures were accompanied by dislocation or subluxation of the hip due to muscular imbalance. Knee contracture was less frequent in this group and foot deformities were diverse. Surgical correction of paretic deformity of the hip was the last stage of management designed to promote rehabilitation, following previous foot and knee surgery. In patients with Th12-L2 lesion recurrence of contractures made standing and walking impossible. In patients with L3-L5 neurosegmental lesion surgery for paretic dislocation or subluxation of the hip inclusive of open reduction, varus-derotation osteotomy of the proximal femur, transiliac osteotomy and iliopsoas transfer to the greater trochanter according to Mustard resulted in stable hip. Seventy percent of patients with L3-L4 lesion and all patients with L5 lesion profited from hip surgery with reduced orthotic use and effective gait.

  16. METHODOLOGICAL REPORT: Dynamic Field Tests used in an NFL Combine Setting to Identify Lower Extremity Functional Asymmetries

    PubMed Central

    Hickey, Kathryn C.; Quatman, Carmen E.; Myer, Gregory D.; Ford, Kevin R.; Brosky, Joseph A.; Hewett, Timothy E.

    2013-01-01

    Side-to-side differences in lower extremity biomechanics may be predictive of increased risk of lower extremity injuries in athletes. The purpose of this report is to provide field testing methodology for tests designed to isolate lower extremity asymmetry and to demonstrate the potential for these tests to provide reliable measures. Six athletes (3 females, 3 males), were tested on two consecutive days for activities incorporated into a replicated NFL combine setting. VHP and jump height were measured on a portable force platform as athletes performed maximum effort hops for 10 seconds. The MAT test incorporates two 90° single leg cuts during the trial and was measured as total time for completion. Intraclass correlations (within ICC [3,k], between: ICC [3,1]) were calculated. The VHP test had good to excellent within session reliability for peak power of both the right (ICC = 0.942) and left (ICC = 0.895) sides. Jump height showed excellent within session reliability for both the right (ICC = 0.963) and left (ICC = 0.940) sides. The between session reliability for peak power between jumps was good for the right (ICC = 0.748) and left (ICC = 0.834) sides. Jump height showed good to excellent between session reliability on the right (ICC = 0.794) and left (ICC = 0.909) sides. The MAT test also showed good reliability between days (ICC = 0.825). The results indicate that the VHP test provides reliable assessment of both within and between session jump height and power production. The MAT test also provides good reliability between testing days. Both the VHP test and the MAT test may be useful for clinicians to identify the presence of lower limb asymmetry and potential injury risk factors in athletic populations. PMID:19910824

  17. TLEM 2.0 - a comprehensive musculoskeletal geometry dataset for subject-specific modeling of lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Carbone, V; Fluit, R; Pellikaan, P; van der Krogt, M M; Janssen, D; Damsgaard, M; Vigneron, L; Feilkas, T; Koopman, H F J M; Verdonschot, N

    2015-03-18

    When analyzing complex biomechanical problems such as predicting the effects of orthopedic surgery, subject-specific musculoskeletal models are essential to achieve reliable predictions. The aim of this paper is to present the Twente Lower Extremity Model 2.0, a new comprehensive dataset of the musculoskeletal geometry of the lower extremity, which is based on medical imaging data and dissection performed on the right lower extremity of a fresh male cadaver. Bone, muscle and subcutaneous fat (including skin) volumes were segmented from computed tomography and magnetic resonance images scans. Inertial parameters were estimated from the image-based segmented volumes. A complete cadaver dissection was performed, in which bony landmarks, attachments sites and lines-of-action of 55 muscle actuators and 12 ligaments, bony wrapping surfaces, and joint geometry were measured. The obtained musculoskeletal geometry dataset was finally implemented in the AnyBody Modeling System (AnyBody Technology A/S, Aalborg, Denmark), resulting in a model consisting of 12 segments, 11 joints and 21 degrees of freedom, and including 166 muscle-tendon elements for each leg. The new TLEM 2.0 dataset was purposely built to be easily combined with novel image-based scaling techniques, such as bone surface morphing, muscle volume registration and muscle-tendon path identification, in order to obtain subject-specific musculoskeletal models in a quick and accurate way. The complete dataset, including CT and MRI scans and segmented volume and surfaces, is made available at http://www.utwente.nl/ctw/bw/research/projects/TLEMsafe for the biomechanical community, in order to accelerate the development and adoption of subject-specific models on large scale. TLEM 2.0 is freely shared for non-commercial use only, under acceptance of the TLEMsafe Research License Agreement.

  18. Does Eccentric Exercise Reduce Pain and Improve Strength in Physically Active Adults With Symptomatic Lower Extremity Tendinosis? A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Wasielewski, Noah J; Kotsko, Kevin M

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To critically review evidence for the effectiveness of eccentric exercise to treat lower extremity tendinoses. Data Sources: Databases used to locate randomized controlled trials (RCTs) included PubMed (1980–2006), CINAHL (1982–2006), Web of Science (1995–2006), SPORT Discus (1980–2006), Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro), and the Cochrane Collaboration Database. Key words included tendon, tendonitis, tendinosis, tendinopathy, exercise, eccentric, rehabilitation, and therapy. Study Selection: The criteria for trial selection were (1) the literature was written in English, (2) the research design was an RCT, (3) the study participants were adults with a clinical diagnosis of tendinosis, (4) the outcome measures included pain or strength, and (5) eccentric exercise was used to treat lower extremity tendinosis. Data Extraction: Specific data were abstracted from the RCTs, including eccentric exercise protocol, adjunctive treatments, concurrent physical activity, and treatment outcome. Data Synthesis: The calculated post hoc statistical power of the selected studies (n = 11) was low, and the average methodologic score was 5.3/10 based on PEDro criteria. Eccentric exercise was compared with no treatment (n = 1), concentric exercise (n = 5), an alternative eccentric exercise protocol (n = 1), stretching (n = 2), night splinting (n = 1), and physical agents (n = 1). In most trials, tendinosis-related pain was reduced with eccentric exercise over time, but only in 3 studies did eccentric exercise decrease pain relative to the control treatment. Similarly, the RCTs demonstrated that strength-related measures improved over time, but none revealed significant differences relative to the control treatment. Based on the best evidence available, it appears that eccentric exercise may reduce pain and improve strength in lower extremity tendinoses, but whether eccentric exercise is more effective than other forms of therapeutic exercise for the resolution

  19. Efficacy of Lower-Extremity Venous Thrombolysis in the Setting of Congenital Absence or Atresia of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Ganguli, Suvranu Kalva, Sanjeeva; Oklu, Rahmi; Walker, T. Gregory; Datta, Neil; Grabowski, Eric F.; Wicky, Stephan

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: A rare but described risk factor for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), predominately in the young, is congenital agenesis or atresia of the inferior vena cava (IVC). The optimal management for DVT in this subset of patients is unknown. We evaluated the efficacy of pharmacomechanical catheter-directed thrombolysis (PCDT) followed by systemic anticoagulation in the treatment of acute lower-extremity DVT in the setting of congenital IVC agenesis or atresia. Materials and Methods: Between November of 2005 and May of 2010, six patients (three women [average age 21 years]) were referred to our department with acute lower-extremity DVT and subsequently found to have IVC agenesis or atresia on magnetic resonance imaging. A standardized technique for PCDT (the Angiojet Rheolytic Thrombectomy System followed by the EKOS Microsonic Accelerated Thrombolysis System) was used for all subjects. Successful thrombolysis was followed by systemic heparinization with transition to Coumadin or low molecular-weight heparin and compression stockings. Subjects were followed-up at 1, 3, and then every 6 months after the procedure with clinical assessment and bilateral lower-extremity venous ultrasound. Results: All PCDT procedures were technically successful. No venous stenting or angioplasty was performed. The average thrombolysis time was 28.6 h (range 12-72). Two patients experienced heparin-induced thrombocytopenia, and one patient developed a self-limited knee hemarthrosis, No patients were lost to follow-up. The average length of follow-up was 25.8 {+-} 20.2 months (range 3.8-54.8). No incidence of recurrent DVT was identified. There were no manifestations of postthrombotic syndrome. Conclusions: PCDT followed by systemic anticoagulation and the use of compression stockings appears to be safe and effective in relatively long-term follow-up treatment of patients who present with acute DVT and IVC agenesis or atresia.

  20. An Argument for Salvage in Severe Lower Extremity Trauma with Posterior Tibial Nerve Injury: The Ganga Hospital Experience

    PubMed Central

    Momoh, Adeyiza O.; Kumaran, Senthil; Lyons, Daniel; Venkatramani, Hari; Ramkumar, Sanjai; Chung, Kevin C.; Sabapathy, S. Raja

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Absence of plantar sensation is a critical factor considered in favor of amputation for patients with lower limb-threatening injuries. This study aims to assess outcomes of limb salvage in a group of patients with severe lower extremity injuries associated with posterior tibial nerve transection. METHODS We studied eight cases of limb salvage after traumatic injuries with documented tibial nerve laceration managed at Ganga Hospital, India. Functional and health-related quality of life outcomes were assessed. Outcomes from this case series were compared to outcomes of studies from a systematic literature review on salvage of the severely injured lower extremity. RESULTS Patients in this case series reported mild pain (median score 20 on a 100 scale visual analog scale) with some return of plantar sensation in patients with tibial nerve repairs (median score 2/5). Patients demonstrated a decrease in ankle motion (27.5 degrees plantar flexion, 10 degrees extension) and muscle strength (median heel flexor score 3/5). All patients could ambulate independently. Quality of life and function measured by validated instruments revealed minimal disability. We identified 1,767 articles on lower extremity trauma and 14 articles were systematically reviewed. Relative to the case series, published articles reported similarly diminished ankle motion and muscle strength, with reports of mild pain in select studies. Patient reported outcome instruments found variations in the degree of physical disability based on time from the injury. CONCLUSIONS Though limited in number, this case series demonstrates the value of limb salvage even for patients with posterior tibial nerve injury. PMID:26270902

  1. Use of Intra-Arterial Chemotherapy and Embolization Before Limb Salvage Surgery for Osteosarcoma of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Huojun Yang Jijin Lu Jianping; Lai Chaojen; Sheng Jin; Li Yuxiao; Hao Qiang; Zhang Shunmin; Gupta, Sanjay

    2009-07-15

    We report our experience with the use of intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before limb salvage surgery in patients with osteosarcoma of the lower extremity. We evaluated the effect of this procedure on the degree of tumor necrosis and on the amount of blood loss during surgery. We reviewed the medical records of all patients who received intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization before undergoing limb salvage surgery for osteosarcoma of the lower extremity at our institution between January 2003 and April 2008. Patient demographic, tumor characteristics, treatment details, postembolization complications, and surgical and pathological findings were recorded for each patient. We evaluated the operative time, estimated blood loss (EBL), and volume of blood transfusion during surgery and in the postoperative period in all patients in the study group. The same parameters were recorded for 65 other patients with lower extremity osteosarcoma who underwent limb salvage operation at our institution without undergoing preoperative intervention. The study included 47 patients (25 males and 22 females). Angiography showed that the tumors were hypervascular. Intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization were performed successfully, resulting in a substantial reduction or complete disappearance of tumor stain in all patients. No major complications were encountered. At the time of surgery, performed 3-7 days after embolization, a fibrous edematous band around the tumor was observed in 43 of the 47 patients, facilitating surgery. The goal of limb salvage was achieved successfully in all cases. Percentage tumor necrosis induced by treatment ranged from 70.2% to 94.2% (average, 82.9%). EBL during surgery, EBL from drains in the postoperative period, total EBL, and transfusion volumes were significantly lower in the 47 study patients compared to the 65 patients who underwent surgery without preoperative treatment with intra-arterial chemotherapy and embolization. The

  2. Quantifying Emergency Department Visits From Sport and Recreation: Focus on the Lower Extremity and Knee, 1997–2009

    PubMed Central

    Tenan, Matthew S.

    2016-01-01

    Context:  Few authors have reported nationally representative data on the number of sport and recreation (SR) injuries resulting in emergency department (ED) visitation. The existing studies have only provided 1 or 2 years of data and are not longitudinal in nature. Objective:  To use a novel algorithmic approach to determine if ED visitation is due to SR, resulting in a substantially larger longitudinal dataset. Design:  Descriptive epidemiology study. Setting:  Hospital. Patients or Other Participants:  The National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, a stratified random-sample survey of US hospital EDs was combined for years 1997–2009. There were 15 699 unweighted patient visits determined to be from SR. Main Outcome Measure(s):  A custom algorithm classified SR visits based on the International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification E-code and pattern recognition of narrative text. Sport and recreation visits were assessed by age and categorized according to broad injury classifications. Additional quantification was performed on SR visits for lower extremity and knee-specific injuries. Sample weights were applied to provide national annual estimates. Results:  Annually, 4 243 000 ED visits resulted from SR. The largest classification of injury from SR was sprains and strains (896 000/y). Males had substantially more SR-related ED visits than females (2 929 000/y versus 1 314 000/y). For patients 10–49 years old, 1 093 000 lower extremity and 169 000 knee-specific injury visits annually were from SR. For both injury types, males had a higher rate of ED visitation; however, females had 25% and 39% greater odds of visitation for lower extremity and knee-specific injury, respectively. Conclusions:  The burden on the health system of ED visits from SR was substantial. Males presented in the ED at a higher rate for SR injury, though females had a higher proportion of lower extremity and knee

  3. Older women with dementia can perform fast alternating forearm movements and performance is correlated with tests of lower extremity function

    PubMed Central

    Bramell-Risberg, Eva; Jarnlo, Gun-Britt; Elmståhl, Sölve

    2013-01-01

    Background: The purpose of this work was to study the performance and reliability of a test of fast alternating forearm movements and its relationship with measures of lower extremity function in older women with dementia. Methods: Fast alternating movements was studied in 26 female patients (mean age 81.7 ± 5.9 years) with dementia and 34 controls (mean age 87.5 ± 4.7 years). Subgroup analyses for those aged 80–89 years were performed due to significant differences in the mean ages of the study groups. Test–retest reliability for alternating forearm movements was studied in 11 patients (mean age 80.3 ± 6.7 years) and 10 controls (mean age 87.4 ± 1.6 years). Pulses generated were transformed to an analog signal shown on a modified electrocardiogram. Numbers of cycles at 10 and 15 seconds were calculated for the right and left hand. Walking 2 × 15 m and the Get-Up-and Go (GUG) test were performed at self-selected and maximal speed. Associations between tests of upper and lower extremity function were sought in eight patients (mean age 85 ± 2.7 years) and 16 controls (mean age 85.1 ± 2.8 years) and also according to types of dementia in nine patients with probable Alzheimer’s disease and 10 patients with other types of dementia. Results: Patients with dementia could perform the test and had significantly fewer cycles (P = 0.02–0.006) at both 10 and 15 seconds compared with controls after age adjustment. A higher number of cycles was associated with higher self-selected walking speeds in patients (r = −0.79). Test–retest reliability for alternating forearm movements was high for both patients (intraclass correlation 0.88–0.94) and controls (intraclass correlation 0.74–0.94). Conclusion: Alternating forearm movements at fast speed can be used as a reliable test in both patients with dementia and healthy older subjects. The test can be used as a measure of bradykinesia and might be useful as a proxy for lower extremity function in older persons

  4. Fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation for treatment of chronic low back and lower extremity pain

    PubMed Central

    Gozani, Shai N

    2016-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine if fixed-site high-frequency transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (FS-TENS) is effective in treating chronic low back and lower extremity pain. Background Transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation is widely used for treatment of chronic pain. General-purpose transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation devices are designed for stimulation anywhere on the body and often cannot be used while the user is active or sleeping. FS-TENS devices are designed for placement at a pre-determined location, which enables development of a wearable device for use over extended time periods. Methods Study participants with chronic low back and/or lower extremity pain self-administered an FS-TENS device for 60 days. Baseline, 30-, and 60-day follow-up data were obtained through an online questionnaire. The primary outcome measure was the patient global impression of change. Pain intensity and interference were assessed using the Brief Pain Inventory. Changes in use of concomitant pain medications were evaluated with a single-item global self-rating. Results One hundred and thirty participants were enrolled, with 88 completing the 60-day follow-up questionnaire. Most participants (73.9%) were 50 years of age or older. At baseline, low back pain was identified by 85.3%, lower extremity pain by 71.6%, and upper extremity pain by 62.5%. Participants reported widespread pain, at baseline, with a mean of 3.4 (standard deviation 1.1) pain sites. At the 60-day follow-up, 80.7% of participants reported that their chronic pain had improved and they were classified as responders. Baseline characteristics did not differentiate non-responders from responders. There were numerical trends toward reduced pain interference with walking ability and sleep, and greater pain relief in responders. There was a large difference in use of concomitant pain medications, with 80.3% of responders reporting a reduction compared to 11.8% of non

  5. Coexistence of splenic hemangioma and vascular malformation of the lower extremity in a child: a case report.

    PubMed

    Gawrych, Elzbieta; Walecka, Anna; Kwas, Artur; Materny, Jacek; Sawicki, Marcin

    2012-01-01

    We report a rare finding of the coexistence of splenic hemangioma and progressive vascular malformation of the left lower extremity in a child. The lesion on the left calf was described as a vascular malformation in computed tomography and magnetic resonance. At the age of one year, the abdominal Doppler ultrasound was normal. The examination was repeated at the age of six years due to recurrent pain in the left hypochondrium and revealed giant multiple splenic hemangiomas. The girl underwent splenectomy at the age of 14 years. Histological findings demonstrated multiple cavernous hemangiomas. We present our case report regarding the diagnosis of spleen hemangioma and indications for surgical management in children.

  6. Roy’s Adaptation Model-Guided Education and Promoting the Adaptation of Veterans With Lower Extremities Amputation

    PubMed Central

    Azarmi, Somayeh; Farsi, Zahra

    2015-01-01

    Background: Any defect in extremities of the body can affect different life aspects. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-guided education on promoting the adaptation of veterans with lower extremities amputation. Patients and Methods: In a randomized clinical trial, 60 veterans with lower extremities amputation referring to Kowsar Orthotics and Prosthetics Center of veterans clinic in Tehran, Iran, were recruited with convenience method and were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups during 2013 - 2014. For data collection, Roy’s adaptation model questionnaire was used. After completing the questionnaires in both groups, maladaptive behaviors were determined in the intervention group and an education program based on Roy’s adaptation model was implemented. After two months, both groups completed the questionnaires again. Data was analyzed with SPSS software. Results: Independent t-test showed statistically significant differences between the two groups in the post-test stage in terms of the total score of adaptation (P = 0.001) as well as physiologic (P = 0.0001) and role function modes (P = 0.004). The total score of adaptation (139.43 ± 5.45 to 127.54 ± 14.55, P = 0.006) as well as the scores of physiologic (60.26 ± 5.45 to 53.73 ± 7.79, P = 0.001) and role function (20.30 ± 2.42 to 18.13 ± 3.18, P = 0.01) modes in the intervention group significantly increased, whereas the scores of self-concept (42.10 ± 4.71 to 39.40 ± 5.67, P = 0.21) and interdependence (16.76 ± 2.22 to 16.30 ± 2.57, P = 0.44) modes in the two stages did not have a significant difference. Conclusions: Findings of this research indicated that the Roy’s adaptation model-guided education promoted the adaptation level of physiologic and role function modes in veterans with lower extremities amputation. However, this intervention could not promote adaptation in self-concept and interdependence modes. More

  7. Patterns in swelling hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacMinn, Chris; Bertrand, Thibault; Peixinho, Jorge; Mukhopadhyay, Shomeek

    2016-11-01

    Swelling is a process in which a porous material spontaneously grows by absorbing additional pore fluid. Polymeric hydrogels are highly deformable materials that can experience very large volume changes during swelling. This allows a small amount of dry gel to absorb a large amount of fluid, making gels extremely useful in applications from moisture control to drug delivery. However, a well-known consequence of these extreme volume changes is the emergence of a striking morphological instability. We study the transient mechanics of this instability here by combining a theoretical model with a series of simple experiments, focusing on the extent to which this instability can be controlled by manipulating the rate of swelling.

  8. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat.

    PubMed

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; Macdonald, Valerie

    2013-10-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma.

  9. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; MacDonald, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma. PMID:24155419

  10. Muscle transposition and skin grafting for salvage of below-knee amputation level after bilateral lower extremity thermal injury.

    PubMed

    Açikel, C; Peker, F; Akmaz, I; Ulkür, E

    2001-12-01

    Thermal injury to the lower extremity sometimes necessitates amputation around the knee joint. Knee function is so critical to prosthetic rehabilitation that every attempt should be made to salvage the knee joint. This report presents an unusual case of bilateral lower extremity flame burn requiring amputations. While the distal two-thirds of the legs and both feet were totally necrotic, the thermal damage was limited to skin and subcutaneous tissue sparing muscle and bone in the proximal one-third of the legs and posterior thighs. The below-knee amputation level was salvaged by muscle transposition over the anterior tibia and resurfacing of muscle cuffs with thick split-thickness skin grafts. The post-operative period was uneventful. Amputation stumps tolerated the below-knee prosthesis well and the patient attained independent functional prosthetic ambulation at the post-operative fourth month. It is known from the reconstruction of the plantar foot that skin-grafted muscle tissue tolerates weight bearing and shearing forces well. This principle can also be used for salvage aspects of the below-knee amputation level.

  11. Development of THOR-FLx: A Biofidelic Lower Extremity for Use with 5th Percentile Female Crash Test Dummies.

    PubMed

    Shams, Tariq; Beach, David; Huang, Tsai-Jeon; Rangarajan, N; Haffner, Mark

    2002-11-01

    A new lower leg/ankle/foot system has been designed and fabricated to assess the potential for lower limb injuries to small females in the automotive crash environment. The new lower extremity can be retrofitted at present to the distal femur of the 5th percentile female Hybrid III dummy. Future plans are for integration of this design into the 5th percentile female THOR dummy now under development. The anthropometry of the lower leg and foot is based mainly on data developed by Robbins for the 5th percentile female, while the biomechanical response requirements are based upon scaling of 50th percentile male THOR-Lx responses. The design consists of the knee, tibia, ankle joints, foot, a representation of the Achilles tendon, and associated flesh/skins. The new lower extremity, known as THOR-FLx, is designed to be biofidelic under dynamic axial loading of the tibia, static and dynamic dorsiflexion, static plantarflexion and inversion/eversion. Instrumentation includes accelerometers, load cells, and rotary potentiometers to capture relevant kinematic and dynamic information from the foot and tibia. This paper will describe the performance requirements for THOR-FLx, the methodology used in its' development, results of component tests, and the biofidelity tests conducted on the full assembly.

  12. Evaluation of the age-related changes in movement smoothness in the lower extremity joints during lifting.

    PubMed

    Sakata, Kiyoshi; Kogure, Akira; Hosoda, Masataka; Isozaki, Koji; Masuda, Tadashi; Morita, Sadao

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to analyze age-related movement smoothness changes in the lower extremity joints during load lifting. A total of 10 young and 13 elderly subjects participated in the study. Infrared reflective markers were attached to body landmarks in each subject. While the subjects stood on force plates and lifted a box, the marker displacements and ground reaction forces were measured using a 3D motion analysis system. The jerk square mean value (JSM) was defined as the lower extremity joint movement smoothness index during lifting. JSM represented the average of the square of the joint angle third derivative value, according to the jerk third derivative of the position data. Each subject's JSM values were calculated for the hip, knee and ankle joints. Movement smoothness appeared to decrease as JSM increased. Multiple regression analyses were performed for dependent variables (hip, knee and ankle joint JSM values) and independent variables (age, hand grip strength, sex difference and lifting duration). The level of significance was set at p<0.05. For the hip joint JSM, the regression coefficient for age was significantly positive and that for lifting duration was significantly negative. For the knee joint JSM, the regression coefficient for lifting duration was significantly negative. For the ankle joint JSM, the regression coefficients for age and hand grip strength were significantly positive and that for lifting duration was significantly negative. These results suggest that movement smoothness in the hip and ankle joints during lifting decreases with advancing age.

  13. Gunther Tulip Inferior Vena Cava Filter Placement During Treatment for Deep Venous Thrombosis of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagami, Takuji Kato, Takeharu; Iida, Shigeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Nishimura, Tsunehiko

    2005-05-15

    Purpose. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of Gunther tulip retrievable vena cava filter (GTF) implantation to prevent pulmonary embolism during intravenously administered thrombolytic and anticoagulation therapy and interventional radiological therapy for occlusive or nonocclusive deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower extremity. Methods. We evaluated placement of 55 GTFs in 42 patients with lower extremity DVT who had undergone various treatments including those utilizing techniques of interventional radiology. Results. Worsening of pulmonary embolism in patients with existing pulmonary embolism or in those without pulmonary embolism at the time of GTF insertion was avoided in all patients. All attempts at implantation of the GTF were safely accomplished. Perforation and migration experienced by one patient was the only complication. Mean period of treatment for DVT under protection from pulmonary embolism by the GTF was 12.7 {+-} 8.3 days (mean {+-} SD, range 4-37 days). We attempted retrieval of GTFs in 18 patients in whom the venous thrombus had disappeared after therapy, and retrieval in one of these 18 cases failed. GTFs were left in the vena cava in 24 patients for permanent use when the DVT was refractory to treatment. Conclusion. The ability of the GTF to protect against pulmonary embolism during treatment of DVT was demonstrated. Safety in both placement and retrieval was clarified. Because replacement with a permanent filter was not required, use of the GTF was convenient when further protection from complicated pulmonary embolism was necessary.

  14. Disparity between functional recovery and daily use of the upper and lower extremities during subacute stroke rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Rand, Debbie; Eng, Janice J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Although inpatient rehabilitation may enhance an individual’s functional ability after stroke, it is not known whether these improvements are accompanied by an increase in daily use of the arms and legs. Objective To determine the change in daily use of the upper and lower extremities of stroke patients during rehabilitation and to compare these values with that of community-dwelling older adults. Methods A total of 60 stroke patients underwent functional assessments and also wore 3 accelerometers for 3 consecutive weekdays on admission to rehabilitation and 3 weeks later prior to hospital discharge. The number of steps and upper-extremity activity counts were measured over the waking hours and during daily use for occupational therapy and physical therapy (PT) sessions. Healthy older adults (n = 40) also wore 3 accelerometers for 5 consecutive days. Results Stroke patients demonstrated a significant increase in mobility function, and this was accompanied by an increase in daily walking over the entire day as well as in PT. However, increases in daily walking were found predominantly in patients who were wheelchair users (and not walkers) at the time of admission. Control walking values (5202 steps) were more than 17 times that of stroke patients. Despite significant improvements in paretic hand function, no increase in daily use of the paretic or nonparetic hand was found over the entire day or in PT. Conclusions. A disparity between functional recovery and increases in daily use of the upper and lower extremities was found during inpatient stroke rehabilitation. PMID:21693771

  15. Dynamic Frequency Analyses of Lower Extremity Muscles during Sit-To-Stand Motion for the Patients with Knee Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Kentaro; Yagi, Masahide

    2016-01-01

    Objective Muscle activities during the sit-to-stand motion (STS) are characterized by coordinated movements between hip extensors and knee extensors. However, previous reports regarding the STS and lower extremity muscle activities have focused on some quantitative assessment, but little qualitative research. This study aimed to examine the muscle activities of the lower extremity both quantitatively and qualitatively. Methods Study participants included 13 patients with knee osteoarthritis (knee OA) and 11 age-matched asymptomatic controls. The task was STS from a chair with a height-adjustable seat. EMG activities were acquired using surface electromyogram. The root mean square signals normalized as a percentage of maximum voluntary isometric contraction values (RMS%MVC) and the mean power frequency (MPF) were calculated. Results During STS, knee OA patients had increased RMS%MVC of the vastus medialis and raised MPF of the rectus femoris before buttocks-off. Conclusion These findings suggest that STS of knee OA patients not only increased relative muscle activity of the vastus medialis, but also enlisted the rectus femoris in knee extension to improve muscle contraction force by activating more type II fibers to accomplish buttocks-off. PMID:26807578

  16. The Effects of Visual Field Conditions on Electromyography of the Lower Extremities during Reaching Tasks in Healthy Adults

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jun Hyuk; Lee, Kyeong Soon; Oh, Tae Young

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to identify the effects of visual field condition on electromyography of the lower extremities during arm reaching in healthy adults, and to compare differences in electromyography of the lower extremities between young and old adults according to visual fields condition. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine young persons in their 20s and 19 elderly persons in their 60s, a total of 48 persons, participated in this study. Prior to participation in the study, each subject signed an informed consent form to comply with ethics guidelines dictated by the ethics committee for research at Silla University, Korea. We collected the muscle activation data for both of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle during reaching by subjects using electromyography. Data analysis with SPSS for Window Version 20.0 was performed using repeated one-way analysis of variance according to visual fields and age. [Results] There were no significantly differences between subjects in their 20s and 60s to visual field conditions except for left tibialis anterior muscle activation during left-side reaching. Left tibialis anterior muscle activation in subjects in their 60s was higher than in subjects in their 20s during left-side reaching. [Conclusion] We determined that tibialis anterior muscle activation in subjects in their 60s was higher than in subjects in their 20s. We suggest that visual field conditions are the important factor for physical therapy interventions to improve balance and priority of intervention . PMID:24764630

  17. Hotspot swells revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Scott D.; Adam, Claudia

    2014-10-01

    The first attempts to quantify the width and height of hotspot swells were made more than 30 years ago. Since that time, topography, ocean-floor age, and sediment thickness datasets have improved considerably. Swell heights and widths have been used to estimate the heat flow from the core-mantle boundary, constrain numerical models of plumes, and as an indicator of the origin of hotspots. In this paper, we repeat the analysis of swell geometry and buoyancy flux for 54 hotspots, including the 37 considered by Sleep (1990) and the 49 considered by Courtillot et al. (2003), using the latest and most accurate data. We are able to calculate swell geometry for a number of hotspots that Sleep was only able to estimate by comparison with other swells. We find that in spite of the increased resolution in global bathymetry models there is significant uncertainty in our calculation of buoyancy fluxes due to differences in our measurement of the swells’ width and height, the integration method (volume integration or cross-sectional area), and the variations of the plate velocities between HS2-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 1990) and HS3-Nuvel1a (Gripp and Gordon, 2002). We also note that the buoyancy flux for Pacific hotspots is in general larger than for Eurasian, North American, African and Antarctic hotspots. Considering that buoyancy flux is linearly related to plate velocity, we speculate that either the calculation of buoyancy flux using plate velocity over-estimates the actual vertical flow of material from the deep mantle or that convection in the Pacific hemisphere is more vigorous than the Atlantic hemisphere.

  18. A study of the effects of prolonged simulated microgravity on the musculature of the lower extremities in man - An introduction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Paul; Convertino, Victor A.

    1989-01-01

    The experimental approach and the protocol are described for a study designed to investigate the effect of prolonged microgravity (simulated by a continuous exposure of subjects to 30-d-long 6-deg headdown tilt) on the musculature of the lower extremities in humans. The objectives of this study are as follows: (1) to determine changes in the functional characteristics of knee joint flexor and extensor muscle group; (2) to examine changes in the histochemical, biochemical, electron microscopic, and computed tomographic characteristics of skeletal muscle; (3) to determine if functional characteristics of skeletal muscle would be normalized four weeks after the bedrest; and (4) to compare these results to those of spaceflight. Percutaneous muscle biopsy, computed tomography, anthropometry, and in vivo muscle strength measurements are to be used to assess mechanical, structural, and metabolic characteristics of skeletal muscle.

  19. [Functional insufficiency of the venous valve apparatus and venous return from the lower extremities in humans during the standing test].

    PubMed

    Modin, A Iu

    2006-01-01

    The studies were performed with participation of 16 normal subjects with the US Doppler evidence of functional insufficiency of the deep vein valves in a lower extremity. Valve insufficiency was of the latent clinical form without symptoms of chronic venous insufficiency. Functioning of the contralateral leg venous valves was normal in all subjects. Linear velocities of blood flow in the femoral vein in both extremities in the horizontal and vertical position were compared. In the horizontal position, outflow from the deep vein with valve disfunction was 1.5 times (p<0.01) higher comparing with the other leg as the control. In vertical subjects, outflow from the compromised vein was, on the contrary, reduced almost by half as compared with the healthy leg. These features of local phlebohemodynamics at the outlet of insufficient vein appear to determine the intensity of passive mechanic blood redistribution driven by the gravity.

  20. The association between social participation and lower extremity muscle strength, balance, and gait speed in US adults.

    PubMed

    Warren, Meghan; Ganley, Kathleen J; Pohl, Patricia S

    2016-12-01

    Social participation is associated with healthy aging, and although associations have been reported between social participation and demographics, no published studies have examined a relationship between social participation and measures amenable to intervention. The purpose was to explore the association between self-reported social participation and lower extremity strength, balance, and gait speed. A cross-sectional analysis of US adults (n = 2291; n = 1,031 males; mean ± standard deviation age 63.5 ± 0.3 years) from the 2001-2 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was conducted. Two questions about self-reported difficulty with social participation were categorized into limited (yes/no). The independent variables included knee extension strength (n = 1537; classified as tertiles of weak, normal, and strong), balance (n = 1813; 3 tests scored as pass/fail), and gait speed (n = 2025; dichotomized as slow [less than 1.0 m/s] and fast [greater than or equal to 1.0 m/s]). Logistic regression, accounting for the complex survey design and adjusting for age, sex, physical activity, and medical conditions, was used to estimate the odds of limitation in social participation with each independent variable. Alpha was decreased to 0.01 due to multiple tests. Slower gait speed was significantly associated with social participation limitation (odds ratio = 3.1; 99% confidence interval: 1.5-6.2). No significant association was found with social participation and lower extremity strength or balance. The odds of having limitation in social participation were 3 times greater in those with slow gait speed. Prospective studies should examine the effect of improved gait speed on levels of social participation.

  1. Effects of Eccentric Strength Training on Different Maximal Strength and Speed-Strength Parameters of the Lower Extremity.

    PubMed

    Wirth, Klaus; Keiner, Michael; Szilvas, Elena; Hartmann, Hagen; Sander, Andre

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this investigation was to analyze the effects of an eccentric strength training protocol using supramaximal loads (>1 repetition maximum [1RM]) on different maximal and explosive strength parameters of the lower extremity. The eccentric maximal strength (EX max), maximal isometric strength ("maximal voluntary contraction" [MVC]), 1RM, explosive strength ("rate of force development" [RFD]), countermovement jump, and squat jump height were tested before and after a training period of 6 weeks. The training group was composed of 15 individuals with low-weight training experience and a control group of 13 subjects, also with a low-weight training experience. The lower extremities were trained 3 days per week using a 45° leg press. Each training session comprised 5 sets of 3 repetitions with a 6-minute rest between each set. The training weights were adjusted continuously during each training session and between training sessions. In each case, a load was chosen that could be lowered unilaterally in a controlled manner by the subjects. For the concentric part of the exercise, 2 investigators lifted the weight to the starting position. After 6 weeks, strength training with supramaximal loads showed a significant increase in EX max (28.2%, p < 0.001) and 1RM (31.1%, p < 0.001). The increases observed in the control group were not significant. Changes in MVC, RFD, and vertical jump heights were not significant in both groups. The results of this study suggest that in untrained subjects, unilateral eccentric strength training in the leg press generates equal and significant improvements in unilateral eccentric and bilateral eccentric-concentric maximal strength, with a nonsignificant transfer to vertical jump performances and unilateral isometric force production.

  2. Effects of the lower extremities muscle activation during muscular strength training on an unstable platform with magneto-rheological dampers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piao, YongJun; Choi, YounJung; Kim, JungJa; Kwan, TaeKyu; Kim, Nam-Gyun

    2009-03-01

    Adequate postural balance depends on the spatial and temporal integration of vestibular, visual, and somatosensory information. Especially, the musculoskeletal function (range of joint, flexibility of spine, muscular strength) is essential in maintaining the postural balance. Muscular strength training methods include the use of commercialized devices and repeatable resistance training tools (rubber band, ball, etc). These training systems cost high price and can't control of intensity. Thus we suggest a new training system which can adjust training intensity and indicate the center of pressure of a subject while the training was passively controlled by applying controlled electric current to the Magneto- Rheological damper. And we performed experimental studies on the muscular activities in the lower extremities during maintaining, moving and pushing exercises on an unstable platform with Magneto rheological dampers. A subject executed the maintaining, moving and pushing exercises which were displayed in a monitor. The electromyographic signals of the eight muscles in lower extremities were recorded and analyzed in the time and frequency domain: the muscles of interest were rectus femoris, biceps femoris, tensor fasciae latae, vastus lateralis, vastus medialis, gastrocnemius, tibialis anterior, and soleus. The experimental results showed the difference of muscular activities at the four moving exercises and the nine maintaining exercises. The rate of the increase in the muscular activities was affected by the condition of the unstable platform with MR dampers for the maintaining and moving exercises. The experimental results suggested the choice of different maintaining and moving exercises could selectively train different muscles with varying intensity. Furthermore, the findings also suggested the training using this system can improve the ability of postural balance.

  3. A Comparison of Stride Length and Lower Extremity Kinematics during Barefoot and Shod Running in Well Trained Distance Runners

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Peter; Ledingham, James; Clarke, Sarah; Collins, DJ; Jakeman, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Stride length, hip, knee and ankle angles were compared during barefoot and shod running on a treadmill at two speeds. Nine well-trained (1500m time: 3min:59.80s ± 14.7 s) male (22 ±3 years; 73 ±9 kg; 1.79 ±0.4 m) middle distance (800 m – 5,000 m) runners performed 2 minutes of running at 3.05 m·s-1 and 4.72 m·s-1 on an treadmill. This approach allowed continuous measurement of lower extremity kinematic data and calculation of stride length. Statistical analysis using a 2X2 factorial ANOVA revealed speed to have a main effect on stride length and hip angle and footwear to have a main effect on hip angle. There was a significant speed*footwear interaction for knee and ankle angles. Compared to shod running at the lower speed (3.05 m·s-1), well trained runners have greater hip, knee and ankle angles when running barefoot. Runners undertake a high volume (~75%) of training at lower intensities and therefore knowledge of how barefoot running alters running kinematics at low and high speeds may be useful to the runner. Key points Barefoot and shod kinematics are examined in competitive track runners with a mean 1500m personal best of 3:59:80. Previous literature has not investigated competitive track runners. Compared to amateur runners, competitive track runners demonstrate a smaller reduction in stride length during barefoot running at ~3 m·s-1. There is no difference in stride length or lower extremity kinematics when running at 4.72 m·s-1. Given that competitive runners spend a large (~75%) amount of time training at lower speeds, interventions which favourably alter running kinematics may be advantageous for the prevention of injury. PMID:27803620

  4. Illustration of Cost Saving Implications of Lower Extremity Nerve Decompression to Prevent Recurrence of Diabetic Foot Ulceration

    PubMed Central

    Rankin, Timothy M.; Miller, John D.; Gruessner, Angelika C.; Nickerson, D. Scott

    2015-01-01

    The US diabetic foot ulcer (DFU) incidence is 3-4% of 22.3 million diagnosed diabetes cases plus 6.3 million undiagnosed, 858 000 cases total. Risk of recurrence after healing is 30% annually. Lower extremity multiple nerve decompression (ND) surgery reduces neuropathic DFU (nDFU) recurrence risk by >80%. Cost effectiveness of hypothetical ND implementation to minimize nDFU recurrence is compared to the current $6.171 billion annual nDFU expense. A literature review identified best estimates of annual incidence, recurrence risk, medical management expense, and noneconomic costs for DFU. Illustrative cost/benefit calculations were performed assuming widespread application of bilateral ND after wound healing to the nDFU problem, using Center for Medicare Services mean expense data of $1143/case for unilateral lower extremity ND. Calculations use conservative, evidence-based cost figures, which are contemporary (2012) or adjusted for inflation. Widespread adoption of ND after nDFU healing could reduce annual DFU occurrences by at least 21% in the third year and 24% by year 5, representing calculated cost savings of $1.296 billion (year 3) to $1.481 billion (year 5). This scenario proffers significant expense reduction and societal benefit, and represents a minimum 1.9× return on the investment cost for surgical treatment. Further large cost savings would require reductions in initial DFU incidence, which ND might achieve by selective application to advanced diabetic sensorimotor polyneuropathy (DSPN). By minimizing the contribution of recurrences to yearly nDFU incidence, ND has potential to reduce by nearly $1 billion the annual cost of DFU treatment in the United States. PMID:26055081

  5. A research on the effects of practicing Baduanjin on the lower extremities by using sEMG

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jin, Li; Li, Ran; Chen, Jing; Tian, Ye

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of practicing Baduanjin exercises on the lower extremities of subjects, using electromyography analysis, and values of IEMG were calculated. [Subjects] Forty, healthy adults were randomly assigned as subjects to two groups: SG (Study Group, n=20) who received twelve weeks of Baduanjin training, and CG (Control Group, n=20), who received no training. [Methods] A sixteen-channel sEMG system (ME6000, Mega Electronics Ltd., Kuopio, Finland) was selected to record and measure activity changes in two muscles (vastus medialis and vastus lateralis). [Results] After twelve-week of Baduanjin training, the results of this study showed that the SG group had significant increases in values of IEMG in second, fifth and seventh section of the Baduanjin exercises. In second section, the values of IEMG had increased for 56.95% in vastus lateralis (p < 0.05) and for 40.04% in vastus medialis (p < 0.05). In fifth section, the values of IEMG had increased for 37.61% in vastus lateralis (p < 0.05) and for 33.83% in vastus medialis (p < 0.05). In seventh section, the increasement of IEMG values was 47.19% in vastus lateralis (p < 0.05) and 49.31% in vastus medialis (p < 0.05). [Conclusion] This study indicated that performing twelve-week of Baduanjin training can significantly increase the strength and the physical function of the lower extremities among healthy adults. With no adverse events from exercise were reported during the training procedure, the safety and low intensity of Baduanjin exercise was also proved, it could be widely taken as an appropriate no-risk treatment exercise for healthy adults.

  6. Asymmetry of magnetic motor evoked potentials recorded in calf muscles of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremity.

    PubMed

    Olex-Zarychta, Dorota; Koprowski, Robert; Sobota, Grzegorz; Wróbel, Zygmunt

    2009-08-07

    The aim of the study was to determine the applicability of magnetic stimulation and magnetic motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in motor asymmetry studies by obtaining quantitative and qualitative measures of efferent activity during low intensity magnetic stimulation of the dominant and non-dominant lower extremities. Magnetic stimulation of the tibial nerve in the popliteal fossa was performed in 10 healthy male right-handed and right-footed young adults. Responses were recorded from the lateral head of the gastrocnemius muscles of the right and left lower extremities. Response characteristics (duration, onset latency, amplitude) were analyzed in relation to the functional dominance of the limbs and in relation to the direction of the current in the magnetic coil by use of the Wilcoxon pair sequence test. The CCW direction of coil current was related to reduced amplitudes of recorded MEPs. Greater amplitudes of evoked potentials were recorded in the non-dominant extremity, both in the CW and CCW coil current directions, with the statistical significance of this effect (p=0.005). No differences in duration of response were found in the CW current direction, while in CCW the time of the left-side response was prolonged (p=0.01). In the non-dominant extremity longer onset latencies were recorded in both current directions, but only for the CW direction the side asymmetries showed a statistical significance of p=0.005. In the dominant extremity the stimulation correlated with stronger paresthesias, especially using the CCW direction of coil current. The results indicate that low intensity magnetic stimulation may be useful in quantitative and qualitative research into the motor asymmetry.

  7. Effects of a 10-Week Inspiratory Muscle Training Program on Lower-Extremity Mobility in People with Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fry, Donna

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary muscle weakness is common in ambulatory people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and may lead to deficits in mobility function. The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of a 10-week home-based exercise program using an inspiratory muscle threshold trainer (IMT) on the results of four lower-extremity physical performance tests in people with MS. The study design was a two-group (experimental-control), pretest-posttest study. Outcome measures consisted of pulmonary function measures including maximal inspiratory pressure (MIP), maximal expiratory pressure (MEP), and maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV), and the following lower-extremity physical performance measures: the 6-Minute Walk (6MW) distance, gait velocity (GV), the Sit-to-Stand Test (SST), the Functional Stair Test (FST), and a balance test (BAL). A total of 46 ambulatory participants (Expanded Disability Status Scale [EDSS] score, 2.0–6.5) with MS were randomly assigned to an intervention group (mean EDSS score, 4.1) that received 10 weeks of home-based inspiratory muscle training or a nontreatment control group (mean EDSS score, 3.2). Of the original 46 participants, 20 intervention group participants and 19 control group participants completed the study. Compared with the control group, the intervention group made significantly greater gains in inspiratory muscle strength (P = .003) and timed balance scores (P = .008). A nonsignificant improvement in 6MW distance (P = .086) was also noted in the IMT-trained group as compared with the control group. This is the first study directly linking improvement in respiratory function to improvement in physical performance function in people with mild-to-moderate disability due to MS. PMID:24453703

  8. Evaluation of the field tests of flexibility of the lower extremity: reliability and the concurrent and factorial validity.

    PubMed

    Bozic, Predrag R; Pazin, Nemanja R; Berjan, Bobana B; Planic, Nenad M; Cuk, Ivan D

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the standard field tests of flexibility of the lower extremity through their (a) intratrial and test-retest reliability, (b) concurrent validity with respect to a high-precision 3D system for kinematic recording, and (c) factorial validity. Physically active men (n = 84) were tested over 2 separate sessions by means of standard simple devices (kinanthropometry, ruler, and protractor) on the following flexibility tests: leg raise in a supine position, hip abduction test, single-legged knee bend (SLKB), sideward leg splits (SdLS), sit and reach (SR), sideways leg splits, and lengthwise leg splits. Additionally, 17 participants were simultaneously tested by means of a laboratory 3D kinematic analysis system. Most of the tests demonstrated high intratrial and test-retest reliability and concurrent validity. The exceptions were SLKB and SR tests that revealed not only a somewhat lower reliability but also a lower concurrent validity. For estimation of factorial validity, we applied a principal component analysis of the intercorrelations among the evaluated flexibility tests that revealed a single extracted principal component. Strong mutual relationships among them also suggest that very few of them, if not a single one, should be applied within the standard batteries of physical performance tests. We particularly recommend using SdLS over the most frequently used SR not only because of its relatively high reliability and validity but also because of its postural properties. Finally, we conclude that most of the standard field tests of flexibility of the lower extremity based on using inexpensive field equipment could be both reliable and valid and, therefore, justified for use in routine testing.

  9. A review of synthetic playing surfaces, the shoe-surface interface, and lower extremity injuries in athletes.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Samuel A; Fabricant, Peter D; Khair, M Michael; Haleem, Amgad M; Drakos, Mark C

    2012-11-01

    The evolution of synthetic playing surfaces began in the 1960s and has had an impact on field use, shoe-surface dynamics, and the incidence of sports-related injuries. Modern third-generation turfs are being installed in recreational facilities and professional stadiums worldwide. Currently, > two-thirds of National Football League teams, > 100 National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I football teams, and > 1000 high schools in the United States have installed synthetic playing surfaces. Those in favor of such playing surfaces note their unique combination of versatility and durability; they can be used in both ideal and inclement weather conditions. However, the more widespread installation and use of these surfaces have raised questions and concerns regarding the impact of artificial turf on the type and severity of sports-related injuries. There appears to be no question that the shoe-surface interface has a significant impact on such injuries. Independent variables such as weather conditions, contact versus noncontact sport, shoe design, and field wear complicate many of the results reported in the literature, thereby preventing an accurate assessment of the true risk(s) associated with certain shoe-surface combinations. Historically, studies suggest that artificial turf is associated with a higher incidence of injury. Furthermore, reliable biomechanical data suggest that both the torque and strain experienced by lower extremity joints generated by artificial surfaces may be more than those generated by natural grass fields. Recent data from the National Football League support this theory and suggest that elite athletes may sustain more injuries, even when playing on the newer artificial surfaces. By contrast, some reports based on data collected from lower-level athletes suggest that artificial turf may protect against injury. This review discusses the history of artificial surfaces, the biomechanics of the shoe-surface interface, and some common

  10. A dynamical system analysis of the development of spontaneous lower extremity movements in newborn and young infants.

    PubMed

    Gima, Hirotaka; Ohgi, Shohei; Morita, Satoru; Karasuno, Hiroshi; Fujiwara, Takayuki; Abe, Koji

    2011-01-01

    This study's aim was to evaluate the characteristics of newborn and young infants' spontaneous lower extremity movements by using dynamical systems analysis. Participants were 8 healthy full-term newborn infants (3 boys, 5 girls, mean birth weight and gestational age were 3070.6 g and 39 weeks). A tri-axial accelerometer measured limb movement acceleration in 3-dimensional space. Movement acceleration signals were recorded during 200 s from just below the ankle when the infant was in an active alert state and lying supine (sampling rate 200 Hz). Data were analyzed linearly and nonlinearly. As a result, the optimal embedding dimension showed more than 5 at all times. Time dependent changes started at 6 or 7, and over the next four months decreased to 5 and from 6 months old, increased. The maximal Lyapnov exponent was positive for all segments. The mutual information is at its greatest range at 0 months. Between 3 and 4 months the range in results is narrowest and lowest in value. The mean coefficient of correlation for the x-axis component was negative and y-axis component changed to a positive value between 1 month old and 4 months old. Nonlinear time series analysis suggested that newborn and young infants' spontaneous lower extremity movements are characterized by a nonlinear chaotic dynamics with 5 to 7 embedding dimensions. Developmental changes of an optimal embedding dimension showed a U-shaped phenomenon. In addition, the maximal Lyapnov exponents were positive for all segments (0.79-2.99). Infants' spontaneous movement involves chaotic dynamic systems that are capable of generating voluntary skill movements.

  11. Mobility-Related Consequences of Reduced Lower-Extremity Peripheral Nerve Function with Age: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Rachel E.; Caserotti, Paolo; Cauley, Jane A.; Boudreau, Robert M.; Goodpaster, Bret H.; Vinik, Aaron I.; Newman, Anne B.; Strotmeyer, Elsa S.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to systematically review the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility in older adults. The National Library of Medicine (PubMed) was searched on March 23, 2015 with no limits on publication dates. One reviewer selected original research studies of older adults (≥65 years) that assessed the relationship between lower-extremity peripheral nerve function and mobility-related outcomes. Participants, study design and methods of assessing peripheral nerve impairment were evaluated and results were reported and synthesized. Eight articles were identified, including 6 cross-sectional and 2 longitudinal studies. These articles investigated 6 elderly cohorts (4 from the U.S. and 2 from Italy): 3 community-dwelling (including 1 with only disabled women and 1 without mobility limitations at baseline), 1 with both community-dwelling and institutionalized residents, 1 from a range of residential locations, and 1 of patients with peripheral arterial disease. Mean ages ranged from 71-82 years. Nerve function was assessed by vibration threshold (n=2); sensory measures and clinical signs and symptoms of neuropathy (n=2); motor nerve conduction (n=1); and a combination of both sensory measures and motor nerve conduction (n=3). Each study found that worse peripheral nerve function was related to poor mobility, although relationships varied based on the nerve function measure and mobility domain assessed. Six studies found that the association between nerve function and mobility persisted despite adjustment for diabetes. Evidence suggests that peripheral nerve function impairment at various levels of severity is related to poor mobility independent of diabetes. Relationships varied depending on peripheral nerve measure, which may be particularly important when investigating specific biological mechanisms. Future research needs to identify risk factors for peripheral nerve decline beyond diabetes, especially those

  12. [The influence of the training of the muscular component of the musculo-venous pump in the lower extremities on the clinical course of varicose vein disease].

    PubMed

    Kravtsov, P F; Katorkin, S E; Volkovoi, V V; Sizonenko, Ya V

    2016-01-01

    Investigations of the influence of the training of the muscular component of the musculo-venous pump in the lower extremities on the clinical course of varicose vein disease and correction of the step cycle are currently underway.

  13. Bilateral axillary lymph node uptake of radiotracer during lower extremity and scrotal lymphoscintigraphy in a case of primary scrotal lymphoedema

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Anuj; Jaimini, Abhinav

    2011-01-01

    Lymphoscintigraphy is a useful technique for the evaluation of lymphatic function in the presence of limb swelling. The authors report a case where genital swelling in a 20-year-old man was investigated by lymphoscintigraphy. We performed lower limb lymphoscintigraphy and scrotal lymphoscintigraphy in the patient on two different days. Lower limb revealed dermal backflow pattern in lower limbs, inguinoscrotal reflux of the lymph and unexpected avid radiotracer uptake in the axillae bilaterally. Scrotal lymphoscintigraphy revealed slow movement of the lymph from the scrotal skin and again unexpected avid radiotracer uptake in the axillae bilaterally. Findings were concluded as congenital hypoplasia of lymphatics in lower limbs, congenital lymphectasia/compensatory megalymphatics in scrotum and aberrant lymphatic pathway, possibly due to malfunctioning/nonfunctioning thoracic duct. PMID:23559718

  14. C-reactive protein and brain natriuretic peptide as predictors of adverse events after lower extremity endovascular revascularization

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Patrick A.; Schlarb, Haley; Campbell, John E.; Williams, David; Thompson, Stephanie N.; John, Molly; Campbell, James R.; AbuRahma, Ali F.

    2015-01-01

    Background High-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) have been shown to be independent predictors of adverse cardiovascular outcomes and increased risk of secondary interventions or limb loss in patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD). To assist clinicians in decision-making about treatment approaches and predicting postprocedure mortality and morbidity, we retrospectively examined patients with preprocedure hsCRP and BNP levels who underwent elective angioplasty or stent placement for lower extremity PAD. Methods The study period was from January 1, 2007, to December 31, 2012, and patients were included who had angioplasty or stenting for PAD. Minimal required follow-up for study inclusion was at least one postoperative ankle-brachial index, contrast angiography, or duplex imaging of the treated limb. Events of interest included major adverse limb events (MALE), defined as target vessel revascularization, amputation, or disease progression by 1 year, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE; stroke, myocardial infarction, or death) by 2 years. Elevated/abnormal values for our biomarkers of interest were established by the upper limits of our institution's clinical laboratory reference range (hsCRP, >0.80 mg/dL; BNP, >100 pg/mL). Results A total of 159 limbs in 118 patients were included in analysis (42% men; median age [range], 64 [42-87] years). All limbs were symptomatic (Rutherford classification: 1-6). Iliac artery revascularization without other adjunct lower extremity intervention was performed in 60% of the limbs. High hsCRP levels (>0.80 mg/dL) were present in 32 patients (27%) and high BNP values (>100 pg/mL) in 24 patients (20%). Kaplan-Meier analysis with log-rank comparison demonstrated that elevated hsCRP levels were associated with MALE but only in limbs receiving interventions distal to the iliac arteries (P = .005). High BNP levels did not affect MALE rates (P = .821). Conversely, both elevated BNP

  15. Pelvic Rotation and Lower Extremity Motion with Two Different Front Foot Directions in the Tennis Backhand Groundstroke

    PubMed Central

    Iwamoto, Sayumi; Fukubayashi, Toru; Hume, Patria

    2013-01-01

    When a tennis player steps forward to hit a backhand groundstroke in closed stance, modifying the direction of the front foot relative to the net may reduce the risk of ankle injury and increase performance. This study evaluated the relationship between pelvic rotation and lower extremity movement during the backhand groundstroke when players stepped with toes parallel to the net (Level) or with toes pointed towards the net (Net). High school competitive tennis players (eleven males and seven females, 16.8 ± 0.8 years, all right- handed) performed tennis court tests comprising five maximum speed directional runs to the court intersection line to hit an imaginary ball with forehand or backhand swings. The final backhand groundstroke for each player at the backcourt baseline was analyzed. Pelvic rotation and lower extremity motion were quantified using 3D video analysis from frontal and sagittal plane camera views reconstructed to 3D using DLT methods. Plantar flexion of ankle and supination of the front foot were displayed for both Net and Level groups during the late phase of the front foot step. The timings of the peak pelvis rotational velocity and peak pelvis rotational acceleration showed different pattern for Net and Level groups. The peak timing of the pelvis rotational velocity of the Level group occurred during the late phase of the step, suggesting an increase in the risk of inversion ankle sprain and a decrease in stroke power compared to the Net group. Key Points Regarding the movement of the forefoot, the Net group and the Level group showed a pattern of supination-pronation-supination during the front stepping foot contact phase (FSFCP). However, the Level group showed only supination of various degrees during FSFCP. For the Net group, the maximum angular velocity of pelvis occurred in the early phase of FSFCP before impact; however, for the Level group, the maximum angular velocity of pelvis occurred in the latter phase of FSFCP after impact. The

  16. The Influence of a Prefabricated Foot Orthosis on Lower Extremity Mechanics During Running in Individuals With Varying Dynamic Foot Motion.

    PubMed

    Almonroeder, Thomas G; Benson, Lauren C; O'Connor, Kristian M

    2016-09-01

    Study Design Controlled laboratory study, cross-sectional. Background Orthotic prescription is often based on the premise that the mechanical effects will be more prominent in individuals with greater calcaneal eversion. Objective To compare the effects of a prefabricated foot orthosis on lower extremity kinematics and kinetics between recreational athletes with high and low calcaneal eversion during running. Methods Thirty-one recreational athletes were included in this study. Three-dimensional kinematic and kinetic data were collected while running with and without a foot orthosis. Participants were grouped based on the degree of calcaneal eversion during the running trials relative to a standing trial (dynamic foot motion). The effects of the orthosis on the frontal and transverse plane angles and moments of the hip and knee were compared between the 10 participants with the greatest and least amount of dynamic foot motion. Results There were no significant interactions (group by orthotic condition) for any of the kinematic or kinetic variables of interest. Conclusion The effects of an orthosis on the mechanics of the hip and knee do not appear to be dependent on an individual's dynamic foot motion. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):749-755. Epub 5 Aug 2016. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.6253.

  17. The effect of hip abductor exercise on muscle strength and trunk stability after an injury of the lower extremities

    PubMed Central

    Kak, Hwang-Bo; Park, Sun-Ja; Park, Byun-Joon

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The gluteus medius, a hip abductor, controls femoral movement and stabilizes the pelvis during lower extremity mobilization. [Subjects] This study enrolled 24 subjects into control and experimental groups. [Methods] This randomized controlled study included patients who underwent arthroscopy after meniscus injury and started a rehabilitative exercise program 8 weeks after surgery. Subjects were divided into the experimental gluteus medius resistance exercise group (n=12) and the control group (n=12). The study investigated muscle strength and balance of the flexors, extensors, and abductors of the knee for 8 weeks. [Results] Strengths of knee extensors in patients who underwent rehabilitative exercise for 8 weeks were measured. Strength of the knee extensors of the experimental and control groups increased by 40% and 31%, respectively; strength of the hip flexors of the experimental and control groups increased by 31% and 18%, respectively. Strength of the hip joint muscles showed a 40% increase in the experimental group and a 14% increase in the control group. However, there was a significant difference (18%) in muscle strength of the hip abductors between the groups. Measurements of trunk lateral flexion showed a difference within a group, but no intergroup difference was found. [Conclusion] This study investigated the effect of hip abductor exercise on muscular strength and trunk stability in patients with a meniscus injury. PMID:27134387

  18. Three-dimensional lower extremity joint loading in a carved ski and snowboard turn: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Klous, Miriam; Müller, Erich; Schwameder, Hermann

    2014-01-01

    A large number of injuries to the lower extremity occur in skiing and snowboarding. Due to the difficulty of collecting 3D kinematic and kinetic data with high accuracy, a possible relationship between injury statistic and joint loading has not been studied. Therefore, the purpose of the current study was to compare ankle and knee joint loading at the steering leg between carved ski and snowboard turns. Kinetic data were collected using mobile force plates mounted under the toe and heel part of the binding on skies or snowboard (KISTLER). Kinematic data were collected with five synchronized, panning, tilting, and zooming cameras. An extended version of the Yeadon model was applied to calculate inertial properties of the segments. Ankle and knee joint forces and moments were calculated using inverse dynamic analysis. Results showed higher forces along the longitudinal axis in skiing and similar forces for skiing and snowboarding in anterior-posterior and mediolateral direction. Joint moments were consistently greater during a snowboard turn, but more fluctuations were observed in skiing. Hence, when comparing joint loading between carved ski and snowboard turns, one should differentiate between forces and moments, including the direction of forces and moments and the turn phase.

  19. 2014 Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients With Lower-Extremity Arterial Disease (LEAD): An Executive Summary.

    PubMed

    Bonham, Phyllis A; Flemister, Bonny G; Droste, Linda R; Johnson, Jan J; Kelechi, Teresa; Ratliff, Catherine R; Varnado, Myra F

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a summary of the recommendations from the 2014 Guideline for Management of Wounds in Patients With Lower-Extremity Arterial Disease (LEAD), published by the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society (WOCN). This article provides an overview of the process used to update and develop the guideline, and specific recommendations from the guideline for assessment, referral for further evaluation, interventions (ie, debridement, dressings, infection, antibiotics, nutrition, pain management, compression issues, medications, surgical options, and adjunctive therapies), and patient education and risk-reduction strategies. The LEAD guideline is a resource for physicians, nurses, therapists, and other healthcare professionals who work with adults who have/or are at risk for wounds due to LEAD. The full text of the published guideline, which includes the available evidence supporting the recommendations and a complete reference list, is available from the WOCN Society, 1120 Rt. 73, Suite 200, Mount Laurel, NJ, 08054; Web site: www.wocn.org. Refer to the Supplemental Digital Content (Supplement Digital Content 1, http://links.lww.com/JWOCN/A31) associated with this article for the complete reference list for the guideline. The guideline has been accepted for publication by the National Guideline Clearinghouse (www.guideline.gov/).

  20. The efficacy of negative pressure wound therapy in the management of lower extremity trauma: review of clinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Kanakaris, N K; Thanasas, C; Keramaris, N; Kontakis, G; Granick, Mark S; Giannoudis, P V

    2007-12-01

    A large number of aids have been conceived and introduced into clinical practice (nutritional supplements, local dressings, technical innovations) aimed at facilitating and optimising wound healing in both acute and chronic wound settings. Among these advances, negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) has been introduced during the last 30 years, and has been analysed in over 400 manuscripts of the English, Russian and German literature. Until very recently, vacuum assisted closure (VAC) (KCI, TX, USA) has been the only readily available commercial device that provides localised negative pressure to the wound and is the predominant agent used to deliver NPWT featured in this review. We conducted a comprehensive review of the existing clinical evidence of the English literature on the applications of NPWT in the acute setting of trauma and burns of the lower extremity. Overall, 16 clinical studies have been evaluated and scrutinised as to the safety and the efficacy of this adjunct therapy in the specific environment of trauma. Effectiveness was comparable to the standard dressing and wound coverage methods. The existing clinical evidence justifies its application in lower limb injuries associated with soft tissue trauma.

  1. RETURN TO PLAY PROGRESSION FOR RUGBY FOLLOWING INJURY TO THE LOWER EXTREMITY: A CLINICAL COMMENTARY AND REVIEW OF THE LITERATURE

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Chelseana C.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Purpose Rugby requires unique demands from its players. Those involved in rehabilitation and care of these athletes must possess an understanding of both the game and various positions. There have been numerous reports focusing on the physiological demands and biomechanical analyses of various components of gameplay, but no specific progression has been developed to assist clinicians assessing the readiness to return of a player after injury. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to outline testing components, general gameplay guidelines, movement progressions, and sport and position-specific progressions related to rugby gameplay following a lower extremity injury. Description of Topic This commentary provides a recommended progression for clinical use for use in a return to rugby program. It includes metabolic considerations, advanced strengthening exercises, agility exercises, and incorporation of drills specific to the sport of rugby that may be performed with the clinician or with assistance from team members. This progression also includes testing parameters for each phase and guidance for clinicians regarding the ability to gauge readiness to return to sport. Discussion It is essential that an athlete returning to the sport of rugby undertake a guided, graduated return to sport progression to ensure safety and to decrease the risk of re-injury. This proposed return to sport progression outlines key parameters for both the sport as a whole and for various specific positions. Level of Evidence Level 5 – Clinical Commentary, Review of Literature PMID:27104062

  2. Age-related differences in muscle control of the lower extremity for support and propulsion during walking

    PubMed Central

    Toda, Haruki; Nagano, Akinori; Luo, Zhiwei

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] This study examined age-related differences in muscle control for support and propulsion during walking in both males and females in order to develop optimal exercise regimens for muscle control. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty elderly people and 20 young people participated in this study. Coordinates of anatomical landmarks and ground reaction force during walking were obtained using a 3D motion analysis system and force plates. Muscle forces during walking were estimated using OpenSim. Muscle modules were obtained by using non-negative matrix factorization analysis. A two-way analysis of covariance was performed to examine the difference between the elderly and the young in muscle weightings using walking speed as a covariate. The similarities in activation timing profiles between the elderly and the young were analyzed by cross-correlation analysis in males and females. [Results] In the elderly, there was a change in the coordination of muscles around the ankle, and muscles of the lower extremity exhibited co-contraction in late stance. Timing and shape of these modules were similar between elderly and young people. [Conclusion] Our results suggested that age-related alteration of muscle control was associated with support and propulsion during walking. PMID:27134360

  3. A Comparison of Stride Length and Lower Extremity Kinematics during Barefoot and Shod Running in Well Trained Distance Runners.

    PubMed

    Francis, Peter; Ledingham, James; Clarke, Sarah; Collins, D J; Jakeman, Philip

    2016-09-01

    Stride length, hip, knee and ankle angles were compared during barefoot and shod running on a treadmill at two speeds. Nine well-trained (1500m time: 3min:59.80s ± 14.7 s) male (22 ±3 years; 73 ±9 kg; 1.79 ±0.4 m) middle distance (800 m - 5,000 m) runners performed 2 minutes of running at 3.05 m·s(-1) and 4.72 m·s(-1) on an treadmill. This approach allowed continuous measurement of lower extremity kinematic data and calculation of stride length. Statistical analysis using a 2X2 factorial ANOVA revealed speed to have a main effect on stride length and hip angle and footwear to have a main effect on hip angle. There was a significant speed*footwear interaction for knee and ankle angles. Compared to shod running at the lower speed (3.05 m·s(-1)), well trained runners have greater hip, knee and ankle angles when running barefoot. Runners undertake a high volume (~75%) of training at lower intensities and therefore knowledge of how barefoot running alters running kinematics at low and high speeds may be useful to the runner.

  4. The effect of lateral banking on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity during lateral cutting movements.

    PubMed

    Wannop, John W; Graf, Eveline S; Stefanyshyn, Darren J

    2014-02-01

    There are many aspects of cutting movements that can limit performance, however, the implementation of lateral banking may reduce some of these limitations. Banking could provide a protective mechanism, placing the foot and ankle in orientations that keep them out of dangerous positions. This study sought to determine the effect of two banking angles on the kinematics and kinetics of the lower extremity during two athletic maneuvers. Kinematic and kinetic data were collected on 10 recreational athletes performing v-cuts and side shuffle movements on different banked surfaces (0°, 10°, 20°). Each sample surface was rigidly attached to the force platform. Joint moments were calculated and compared between conditions using a repeated measures ANOVA. Banking had a pronounced effect on the ankle joint. As banking increased, the amount of joint loading in the transverse and frontal planes decreased likely leading to a reduction in injury risk. Also an increase in knee joint loading in the frontal plane was seen during the 20° bank during the v-cut. Conversely loading in the sagittal plane at the ankle joint increased with banking and coupled with a reorientation of the ground reaction vector may facilitate a performance increase. The current study indicates that the 10° bank may be the optimal bank, in that it decreases ankle joint loading, as well as increases specific performance variables while not increasing frontal plane knee joint loading. If banking could be incorporated in footwear it may be able to provide a protective mechanism for athletes.

  5. Severe open fractures of the lower extremity: a retrospective evaluation of the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS)

    PubMed

    McNamara, M G; Heckman, J D; Corley, F G

    1994-01-01

    Recent reports using the Mangled Extremity Severity Score (MESS) suggest that a score of > or = 7 is 100% accurate in predicting the need for amputation of severely injured lower extremities. To further evaluate the value of the MESS in predicting amputation, specifically with respect to type IIIB and type IIIC (Gustilo and Anderson) open fractures of the tibia, we retrospectively evaluated 24 patients with these injuries. A significant difference (p = 0.001) between MESS values of 13 salvaged (6.36 +/- 0.35 SEM) and 11 amputated limbs (6.36 +/- 0.54 SEM) was found. A MESS value of > or = 4 was most sensitive (100%); a MESS value of > or = 7 was most specific, and a MESS value of > or = 7 was found to have a positive predictive value of 100%. Subsequently, we addressed recent criticisms of the MESS by including nerve injury in the scoring system and by separating soft-tissue and skeletal injury components of the MESS. We modified the MESS with a score called the NISSSA and applied it retrospectively to our cases. After careful statistical comparison we found both the MESS and NISSSA to be highly accurate (p < 0.005) in predicting amputation. The NISSSA was found to be more sensitive (81.8% versus 63.6%) and more specific (92.3 versus 69.2%).

  6. Characteristics of Patients with Lower Extremity Trauma with Improved and Not Improved Pain During Hospitalization: A pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Griffioen, Mari A; Johantgen, Meg; Von Rueden, Kathryn; Greenspan, Joel D.; Dorsey, Susan G.; Renn, Cynthia L.

    2015-01-01

    Background Up to 62% of patients report chronic pain at the injury site 6-12 months after blunt trauma, with pain from lower extremity fractures exceeding that from other sites. High pain intensity at time of injury is a risk factor for chronic pain, but it is not clear what patient characteristics influence the pain intensity level during the immediate hospitalization following injury. Aim The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the feasibility of collecting pain scores from medical records, to calculate pain trajectories, and to determine whether it is possible to examine patient characteristics by classifying them into those whose pain improved and those whose pain did not improve. Design This descriptive study retrospectively reviewed medical records of 18 randomly chosen patients admitted to an academic trauma center. Methods Patient characteristics and pain scores were collected form electronic and handwritten medical records. Results The pain trajectories calculated from routinely collected pain scores during the in-patient stay showed that for 44% of the patients the pain improved during the hospitalization, for 39% the pain remained the same and for 17% the pain worsened. Variables age, smoking, weight, abbreviated injury scores, length of hospital stay, mean pain score and opioid equianalgesic dose differed based on pain trajectory. Conclusion While patient characteristics differed based on pain trajectory, any significant effects seen from individual tests should be considered tentative, given the number of analyses conducted on this data set. However, feasibility and significance of conducting a larger study has been established. PMID:26545732

  7. A Decade of Progress Using Virtual Reality for Poststroke Lower Extremity Rehabilitation: Systematic Review of the Intervention Methods

    PubMed Central

    Luque-Moreno, Carlos; Ferragut-Garcías, Alejandro; Rodríguez-Blanco, Cleofás; Heredia-Rizo, Alberto Marcos; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Jesús; Kiper, Pawel; Oliva-Pascual-Vaca, Ángel

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To develop a systematic review of the literature, to describe the different virtual reality (VR) interventions and interactive videogames applied to the lower extremity (LE) of stroke patients, and to analyse the results according to the most frequently used outcome measures. Material and Methods. An electronic search of randomized trials between January 2004 and January 2014 in different databases (Medline, Cinahl, Web of Science, PEDro, and Cochrane) was carried out. Several terms (virtual reality, feedback, stroke, hemiplegia, brain injury, cerebrovascular accident, lower limb, leg, and gait) were combined, and finally 11 articles were included according to the established inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results. The reviewed trials showed a high heterogeneity in terms of study design and assessment tools, which makes it difficult to compare and analyze the different types of interventions. However, most of them found a significant improvement on gait speed, balance and motor function, due to VR intervention. Conclusions. Although evidence is limited, it suggests that VR intervention (more than 10 sessions) in stroke patients may have a positive impact on balance, and gait recovery. Better results were obtained when a multimodal approach, combining VR and conventional physiotherapy, was used. Flexible software seems to adapt better to patients' requirements, allowing more specific and individual treatments. PMID:26539480

  8. Design and evaluation of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton for investigation of motor adaptation in lower extremity joints.

    PubMed

    Shamaei, Kamran; Cenciarini, Massimo; Adams, Albert A; Gregorczyk, Karen N; Schiffman, Jeffrey M; Dollar, Aaron M

    2014-06-01

    In this study, we describe the mechanical design and control scheme of a quasi-passive knee exoskeleton intended to investigate the biomechanical behavior of the knee joint during interaction with externally applied impedances. As the human knee behaves much like a linear spring during the stance phase of normal walking gait, the exoskeleton implements a spring across the knee in the weight acceptance (WA) phase of the gait while allowing free motion throughout the rest of the gait cycle, accomplished via an electromechanical clutch. The stiffness of the device is able to be varied by swapping springs, and the timing of engagement/disengagement changed to accommodate different loading profiles. After describing the design and control, we validate the mechanical performance and reliability of the exoskeleton through cyclic testing on a mechanical knee simulator. We then describe a preliminary experiment on three healthy adults to evaluate the functionality of the device on both left and right legs. The kinetic and kinematic analyses of these subjects show that the exoskeleton assistance can partially/fully replace the function of the knee joint and obtain nearly invariant moment and angle profiles for the hip and ankle joints, and the overall knee joint and exoskeleton complex under the applied moments of the exoskeleton versus the control condition, implying that the subjects undergo a considerable amount of motor adaptation in their lower extremities to the exoskeletal impedances, and encouraging more in-depth future experiments with the device.

  9. Lower Extremity Muscle Thickness During 30-Day 6 degrees Head-Down Bed Rest with Isotonic and Isokinetic Exercise Training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, S.; Kirby, L. C.; Greenleaf, J. E.

    1993-01-01

    Muscle thickness was measured in 19 Bed-Rested (BR) men (32-42 year) subjected to IsoTonic (ITE, cycle orgometer) and IsoKi- netic (IKE, torque orgometer) lower extremity exercise training, and NO Exercise (NOE) training. Thickness was measured with ultrasonography in anterior thigh-Rectus Femoris (RF) and Vastus Intermadius (VI), and combined posterior log-soleus, flexor ballucis longus, and tibialis posterior (S + FHL +TP) - muscles. Compared with ambulatory control values, thickness of the (S + FHL + TP) decreased by 90%-12% (p less than 0.05) In all three test groups. The (RF) thickness was unchanged in the two exercise groups, but decreased by 10% (p less than 0.05) in the NOE. The (VI) thickness was unchanged In the ITE group, but decreased by 12%-l6% (p less than 0.05) in the IKE and NOE groups. Thus, intensive, alternating, isotonic cycle ergometer exercise training is as effective as intensive, intermittent, isokinetic exercise training for maintaining thicknesses of rectus femoris and vastus lntermedius anterior thigh muscles, but not posterior log muscles, during prolonged BR deconditioning.

  10. Use of a Dehydrated Amniotic Membrane Allograft on Lower Extremity Ulcers in Patients with Challenging Wounds: A Retrospective Case Series.

    PubMed

    Lintzeris, Dimitrios; Yarrow, Kari; Johnson, Laura; White, Amber; Hampton, Amanda; Strickland, Andy; Albert, Kristy; Cook, Arlene

    2015-10-01

    Lower extremity ulcers in patients with diabetes mellitus may take a long time to heal despite the use of advanced topical therapies. A retrospective review of cases was conducted to assess the use of a dehydrated amniotic membrane allograft (DAMA) in a convenience sample of 9 wounds in 8 patients (5 men, 3 women, average age 62 years [range 31-81 years]) with diabetes mellitus and/or vascular disease. Wound data and patient characteristics were abstracted from medical records. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the data. In 5 of 9 wounds, DAMA was applied after a failure to demonstrate a 50% reduction in area after 4 weeks of treatment with advanced wound care, offloading, and compression as indicated. In 4 wounds, DAMA was applied 2-4 weeks after presentation because of concerns about existing patient risk factors for nonhealing. Wounds were present for an average of 11 weeks (range 1-35 weeks) before application of DAMA. Mean baseline wound area and volume were 3.11 cm2 (± 3.73) and 0.55 cm3 (± 0.58), respectively. All wounds healed in an average of 5.7 (± 2.9) weeks (range: 1-9 weeks) after a mean of 2.7 applications (± 1.7) (range 1-5 applications). No adverse events occurred. These observations suggest prospective, randomized, controlled clinical studies to compare the use of DAMA to other topical treatment modalities are warranted.

  11. Reference values for the Y Balance Test and the lower extremity functional scale in young healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Alnahdi, Ali H; Alderaa, Asma A; Aldali, Ali Z; Alsobayel, Hana

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to establish gender-specific reference values for the Y Balance Test (YBT) and the Arabic version of the Lower Extremity Functional Scale (LEFS-Ar) in healthy young adults in Saudi Arabia, and to examine gender differences in the YBT and LEFS-Ar values. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy young adults (31 females, 30 males) completed the YBT and LEFS-Ar in 1 test session. Descriptive statistical analysis (mean, standard deviation, 95% confidence interval) was used to compute the YBT and LEFS-Ar reference values. Independent t-tests were used to examine gender differences in the YBT and LEFS-Ar values. [Results] Gender-specific reference values were obtained for the right, left, dominant, and non-dominant leg as well as for the average performance of both the legs. males showed greater YBT normalized reach distances than females did in the anterior, posteromedial, and posterolateral directions; furthermore, males showed higher YBT composite scores than females did. However, the LEFS-Ar values did not differ between males and females. [Conclusion] Gender-specific reference values were obtained for the YBT and LEFS-Ar in healthy young adults in Saudi Arabia. males performed better than females did in the YBT. However, no gender differences were noted in LEFS-Ar. PMID:26834380

  12. Using a structured, computer-administered questionnaire for evaluating health-related QOL with chronic lower extremity wounds.

    PubMed

    Harlin, Stephen L; Harlin, Ryan D; Sherman, Thomas I; Rozsas, Courtney M; Shafqat, M Shuja; Meyers, William

    2009-09-15

    Patients with chronic wounds of the lower extremity (CWLEs) often experience functional disability and emotional distress; incorporating health-related quality of life (HRQoL) measurements in clinical practice may improve understanding of chronic wound patients' healthcare needs. A computer-administered instrument that measures HRQoL variables in patients with CWLEs was developed to overcome common limitations to assessing HRQoL in this population. Face validity of the questionnaire variables assessing physical, social, emotional, and functional well-being was obtained and a computer application to display the structured questionnaire on an electronic kiosk with touch-screen interface was developed. All patient responses are stored in the clinic's electronic health record system. To evaluate use of this system in a wound care clinic, 66 consecutive patients were asked to complete the questionnaire; of those, 64 participated. Internal consistency of the instrument across responses was estimated by the Kuder-Richardson formula 20 as 0.79. None of the patients requested help completing the questionnaire or working with the touch-screen interface. Patients most frequently reported frustration (63%), trouble sleeping (48%), anxiety (42%), and impaired mobility (41%), confirming that CWLEs negatively affect patient quality of life. These findings suggest that additional validation and reliability studies, including research to evaluate the relationship between HRQoL, protocols of care, and wound outcomes, are warranted.

  13. Correlation between the selective control assessment of lower extremity and pediatric balance scale scores in children with spastic cerebral palsy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Hyoungwon

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the correlation between the Selective Control Assessment of Lower Extremity (SCALE) and Pediatric Balance Scales (PBS) in children with spastic cerebral palsy and further to test whether the SCALE is a valid tool to predict the PBS. [Subjects and Methods] A cross-sectional study was conducted to evaluate the SCALE and PBS in 23 children (9 females, 14 males, GMFCS level I–III) with spastic cerebral palsy. [Results] Both the SCALE and PBS scores for children with spastic hemiplegia were significantly higher than those for children with spastic diplegia. The scores for SCALE items were low for distal parts. The PBS items that were difficult for the participants to perform were items 8, 9, 10, and 14 with the highest difficulty experienced for item 8 followed by items 9, 10, and 14. The correlation coefficient (0.797) between the SCALE and PBS scores was statistically significant. The correlations between each SCALE item and the PBS scores were also statistically significant. SCALE items were significantly correlated with two PBS dimensions (standing and postural change). [Conclusion] In SCALE assessment, more severe deficits were observed in the distal parts. Standing and postural changes in the PBS method were difficult for the participants to perform. The two tests, that is, the SCALE and PBS, were highly correlated. Therefore, the SCALE is useful to prediction of PBS outcomes and is also applicable as a prognostic indicator for treatment planning. PMID:26834323

  14. Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis with Percutaneous Rheolytic Thrombectomy Versus Thrombolysis Alone in Upper and Lower Extremity Deep Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hyun S. Patra, Ajanta; Paxton, Ben E.; Khan, Jawad; Streiff, Michael B.

    2006-12-15

    Purpose. To compare the efficacy of catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) alone versus CDT with rheolytic percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) for upper and lower extremity deep vein thrombosis (DVT). Methods. A retrospective cohort of consecutive patients with acute iliofemoral or brachiosubclavian DVT treated with urokinase CDT was identified, and a chart review was conducted. Demographic characteristics, treatment duration, total lytic dose, clot lysis rates and complications were compared in patients treated with urokinase CDT alone or combined CDT and rheolytic PMT. Results. Forty limbs in 36 patients were treated with urokinase CDT alone. Twenty-seven limbs in 21 patients were treated with urokinase CDT and rheolytic PMT. The mean treatment duration for urokinase CDT alone was 48.0 {+-} 27.1 hr compared with 26.3 {+-} 16.6 hr for urokinase CDT and rheolytic PMT (p = 0.0004). The mean urokinase dose required for CDT alone was 5.6 {+-} 5.3 million units compared with 2.7 {+-} 1.8 million units for urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT (p = 0.008). Complete clot lysis was achieved in 73% (29/40) of DVT treated with urokinase CDT alone compared with 82% (22/27) treated with urokinase CDT with rheolytic PMT. Conclusion. Percutaneous CDT with rheolytic PMT is as effective as CDT alone for acute proximal extremity DVT but requires significantly shorter treatment duration and lower lytic doses. Randomized studies to confirm the benefits of pharmacomechanical thrombolysis in the treatment of acute proximal extremity DVT are warranted.

  15. Validation of the Microsoft Kinect® camera system for measurement of lower extremity jump landing and squatting kinematics.

    PubMed

    Eltoukhy, Moataz; Kelly, Adam; Kim, Chang-Young; Jun, Hyung-Pil; Campbell, Richard; Kuenze, Christopher

    2016-01-01

    Cost effective, quantifiable assessment of lower extremity movement represents potential improvement over standard tools for evaluation of injury risk. Ten healthy participants completed three trials of a drop jump, overhead squat, and single leg squat task. Peak hip and knee kinematics were assessed using an 8 camera BTS Smart 7000DX motion analysis system and the Microsoft Kinect® camera system. The agreement and consistency between both uncorrected and correct Kinect kinematic variables and the BTS camera system were assessed using interclass correlations coefficients. Peak sagittal plane kinematics measured using the Microsoft Kinect® camera system explained a significant amount of variance [Range(hip) = 43.5-62.8%; Range(knee) = 67.5-89.6%] in peak kinematics measured using the BTS camera system. Across tasks, peak knee flexion angle and peak hip flexion were found to be consistent and in agreement when the Microsoft Kinect® camera system was directly compared to the BTS camera system but these values were improved following application of a corrective factor. The Microsoft Kinect® may not be an appropriate surrogate for traditional motion analysis technology, but it may have potential applications as a real-time feedback tool in pathological or high injury risk populations.

  16. Evaluation of elastic bands for lower extremity resistance training in adults with and without musculo-skeletal pain.

    PubMed

    Sundstrup, E; Jakobsen, M D; Andersen, C H; Bandholm, T; Thorborg, K; Zebis, M K; Andersen, L L

    2014-10-01

    Therapists commonly use elastic bands in resistance exercises during rehabilitation of smaller muscles, such as in the shoulder. However, the effectiveness has not yet been investigated for larger muscle groups. This study investigates muscle activity during lower extremity exercises. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 10 muscles was measured in 24 women and 18 men during lunges with elastic resistance, lunges with dumbbells, and unilateral leg press in machine using 10 repetition maximum loadings, and normalized to maximal voluntary isometric contraction EMG. Lunges with dumbbells and leg press showed higher activity than lunges with elastic resistance for the vasti and rectus femoris (P < 0.01), whereas lunges with elastic resistance showed higher activity of gluteus maximus, hamstrings, and erector spinae (P < 0.01). Gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip did not influence these findings. However, pain in the lower back decreased muscular activity of the gluteus maximus and vastus medialis (P < 0.01). Lunges with elastic resistance induce high levels of muscle activity in all the large muscle groups at the hip, knee, and back. Importantly, the efficiency of these exercises was equally high regardless of gender, age, and pain in the knees and hip, whereas pain in the lower back led to altered activation strategies.

  17. Preoperative Angiographic Criteria for Predicting Free-Flap Transfer Outcomes in Patients With Lower-Extremity Peripheral Arterial Disease.

    PubMed

    Park, Sang Woo; Kim, Junhyung; Choi, Jaehoon; Kim, Jun Sik; Lee, Jeong Hwan; Park, Young Sook

    2016-09-29

    Patients scheduled for microsurgical reconstruction of the lower leg often receive preoperative assessment of recipient vessels using angiography. However, no clear standard is available for evaluating angiographic results to predict free-flap survival outcomes. We developed angiographic criteria for predicting surgical outcome in patients with lower-extremity peripheral arterial disease based on abnormality of the anterior tibial and posterior tibial arteries. We applied the criteria to a small number of patients scheduled for microsurgical reconstruction of the lower leg. Angiographies with arterial abnormalities were classified into 3 groups: favorable free-flap survival, compromised free-flap survival, and postsurgical pedal ischemia. The study enrolled 50 patients between 2005 and 2013. In 42% of patients, arterial abnormalities were observed by angiography. Age >65 years was the strongest risk factor for development of lower-leg arterial abnormality (P < .001). The anterior tibial and peroneal arteries were significantly more stenotic than other vessels. In the favorable free-flap survival and compromised free-flap survival groups, free-flap transfers were attempted in 7 patients but intraoperatively abandoned in 2 patients, with postoperative failure in 1 patient. In the postsurgical pedal ischemia group, free-flap transfers were attempted in 10 patients but intraoperatively abandoned in 6 patients, with postoperative failure in 3.

  18. Factors Associated With Late Specialized Rehabilitation among Veterans with Lower Extremity Amputation Who Underwent Immediate Postoperative Rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Kurichi, Jibby E.; Xie, Dawei; Kwong, Pui L.; Bates, Barbara E.; Vogel, W. Bruce; Stineman, Margaret G.

    2011-01-01

    Objective To determine what patient- and facility-level characteristics drive late specialized rehabilitation among veterans who already received immediate postoperative services. Design Data were obtained from 8 administrative databases for 2,453 patients who underwent lower extremity amputation in Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in 2002-2004. A Cox proportional hazards model was used to determine the hazards ratios and 95% confidence intervals of the factors associated with days to readmission for late services after discharge from the surgical hospitalization. Results There were 2,304 patients who received only immediate postoperative services, while 152 also received late specialized rehabilitation. After adjustment, veterans who were less disabled physically, residing in the South Central compared to the Southeast region, and had their surgeries in CARF accredited facilities were all more likely to receive late services. The hazards ratios for type of immediate postoperative rehabilitation were not constant over time. At hospital discharge, there was no difference in receipt, however, after 3 months, those who received early specialized rehabilitation were significantly less likely to receive late services. Conclusion The factors associated with late specialized rehabilitation were due mainly to facility-level characteristics and care process variables. Knowledge of these factors may help with decision-making policies regarding CARF accredited units. PMID:21389847

  19. The effect of ground tilt on the lower extremity muscle activity of stroke patients performing squat exercises.

    PubMed

    Ki, Kyog-Il; Choi, Jong-Duk; Cho, Hyuk-Shin

    2014-07-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of ground tilt on the lower extremity muscle activity of stroke patients performing squat exercises. [Subjects] Fifteen hemiparetic patients volunteered to participate in this study. [Methods] The subjects performed squat exercises at three different ground tilt angles: 15° plantar flexion, a neutral position, and 15° dorsiflexion. A surface electromyogram (sEMG) was used to record the electromyographic activities of the leg extensor muscle in the vastus lateralis (VL), vastus medialis (VM), gastrocnemius lateralis (GL), and gastrocnemius medialis (GM). The sEMG activity was analyzed using a one-way repeated measures ANOVA and a post hoc Bonferroni correction. [Results] The results of this study are summarized as follows. Significant differences were noted for the VL and the GL when the angle of the ankle joint was between the 15° plantar flexion and neutral positions during squat exercises involving the VL and when the angle of the ankle joint was between the neutral position and 15° dorsiflexion during squat exercises involving the VM. [Conclusion] In this study, sEMG showed that the VL and GL changed significantly during squat exercises according to the ground tilt angle of hemiparetic patients. Therefore, squat exercises with different ground tilt angles can be used to improve VL and GL strength.

  20. Development of body weight support gait training system using pneumatic Mckibben actuators -control of lower extremity orthosis.

    PubMed

    Mat Dzahir, M A; Nobutomo, T; Yamamoto, S I

    2013-01-01

    Recently, robot assisted therapy devices are increasingly used for spinal cord injury (SCI) rehabilitation in assisting handicapped patients to regain their impaired movements. Assistive robotic systems may not be able to cure or fully compensate impairments, but it should be able to assist certain impaired functions and ease movements. In this study, the control system of lower extremity orthosis for the body weight support gait training system which implements pneumatic artificial muscle (PAM) is proposed. The hip and knee joint angles of the gait orthosis system are controlled based on the PAM coordinates information from the simulation. This information provides the contraction data for the mono- and bi-articular PAMs that are arranged as posterior and anterior actuators to simulate the human walking motion. The proposed control system estimates the actuators' contraction as a function of hip and knee joint angles. Based on the contraction model obtained, input pressures for each actuators are measured. The control system are performed at different gait cycles and two PMA settings for the mono- and bi-articular actuators are evaluated in this research. The results showed that the system was able to achieve the maximum muscle moment at the joints, and able to perform the heel contact movement. This explained that the antagonistic mono- and bi-articular actuators worked effectively.

  1. Application of exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurements for detection of proximal lower extremity arterial disease: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mahe, Guillaume; Kalra, Manju; Abraham, Pierre; Liedl, David A; Wennberg, Paul W

    2015-06-01

    Proximal claudication is secondary to ischemia caused by peripheral artery disease (PAD), whereas proximal pseudo-claudication is secondary to other disease processes such as hip arthritis, spinal stenosis, neuropathy, and so forth. The differentiation between the two can be challenging. Exercise transcutaneous oxygen pressure measurement (exercise-TcPO2) allows noninvasive detection of flow-reducing lesions in the proximal arteries and tributaries of the lower extremity arterial tree. We present the first case report in the United States using an exercise-TcPO2 algorithm. A 71-year-old diabetic patient with proximal left-sided and right-calf claudication with indeterminate ankle-brachial indices underwent an exercise-TcPO2 study before and after endovascular intervention. Four TcPO2 probes were placed: one at chest level (reference probe), one on each buttock, and one on the symptomatic calf. The Delta from Resting Oxygen Pressure (DROP) index was calculated at each probe site using a previously validated protocol. Proximal left- and right-calf ischemia were confirmed by the initial exercise-TcPO2, and, after endovascular treatment of the left iliac artery lesion, improvements in proximal exercise-TcPO2 values were found. These data suggest that exercise-TcPO2 can be useful in PAD evaluation in patients with non-compressible arteries and/or proximal claudication.

  2. A Comparison of Interside Asymmetries of Lower Extremity Somatosensory Evoked Potentials in Anesthetized Patients with Unilateral Lumbosacral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Hale, Tyson; Knecht, Aaron

    2017-01-01

    Study Design Prospective cohort study. Purpose This study was to investigate interside asymmetries of three lower extremity somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) in anesthetized patients with unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Although interside asymmetry is an established criterion of abnormal SSEP, little is known which of the lower SSEPs is more sensitive in detecting interside asymmetry in anesthetized patients. Methods Superficial peroneal nerve SSEP (SPN-SSEP), posterior tibial nerve SSEP (PTN-SSEP), and sural nerve SSEP were obtained in 31 lumbosacral surgery patients with unilateral lumbosacral radiculopathy, and compared with a group of 22 control subjects. Results The lumbosacral group showed significant larger interside asymmetry ratios of P37 latencies in SPN-SSEP and PTN-SSEP, and significant larger interside asymmetry ratio of P37-N45 amplitude in SPN-SSEP, when comparing with the control group. Within the lumbosacral group but not the control group, SPN-SSEP displayed significant larger interside asymmetry ratio in P37 latency. When referencing to the control group, more patients in the lumbosacral group displayed abnormal interside SPN-SSEP latency asymmetries which corroborated the symptom laterality. Conclusions The data suggested that SPN-SSEP was more sensitive in detecting interside latency asymmetry in anesthetized patients. PMID:28243377

  3. Wireless wearable range-of-motion sensor system for upper and lower extremity joints: a validation study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Yogaprakash; Yen, Shih-Cheng; Lee, Wangwei; Gao, Fan; Zhao, Ziyi; Li, Jingze; Hon, Benjamin; Tian-Ma Xu, Tim; Cheong, Angela; Koh, Karen; Ng, Yee-Sien; Chew, Effie; Koh, Gerald

    2015-01-01

    Range-of-motion (ROM) assessment is a critical assessment tool during the rehabilitation process. The conventional approach uses the goniometer which remains the most reliable instrument but it is usually time-consuming and subject to both intra- and inter-therapist measurement errors. An automated wireless wearable sensor system for the measurement of ROM has previously been developed by the current authors. Presented is the correlation and accuracy of the automated wireless wearable sensor system against a goniometer in measuring ROM in the major joints of upper (UEs) and lower extremities (LEs) in 19 healthy subjects and 20 newly disabled inpatients through intra (same) subject comparison of ROM assessments between the sensor system against goniometer measurements by physical therapists. In healthy subjects, ROM measurements using the new sensor system were highly correlated with goniometry, with 95% of differences < 20° and 10° for most movements in major joints of UE and LE, respectively. Among inpatients undergoing rehabilitation, ROM measurements using the new sensor system were also highly correlated with goniometry, with 95% of the differences being < 20° and 25° for most movements in the major joints of UE and LE, respectively. PMID:26609398

  4. Relation of selective voluntary motor control of the lower extremity and extensor strength of the knee joint in children with spastic diplegia

    PubMed Central

    Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Takaki, Kenji; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Nitta, Osamu

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of this study was to investigate differences in selective voluntary motor control of the lower extremities by objective assessment and determine the relationship between selective voluntary motor control and knee extensor strength in children with spastic diplegia. [Subjects and Methods] Forty individuals who had spastic cerebral palsy, with Gross Motor Function Classification System levels ranging from I to III, were assessed using the Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity and by testing the maximum knee extensor strength. The unaffected side was defined as the lower limb with the higher score, and the affected side was defined as the lower limb with the lower score. [Results] The Selective Control Assessment of the Lower Extremity score on the affected side had a lower average than that on the unaffected side. The scores showed a significant inverse correlation with the maximum knee extensor strength. [Conclusion] There was bilateral difference in the selective voluntary motor control of the lower extremities in children with spastic diplegia, and the selective voluntary motor control of the lower extremity was related to maximum knee extensor strength. PMID:27390436

  5. Do ergogenic AIDS alter lower extremity joint alignment during a functional movement lunge prior to and following an exercise bout?

    PubMed

    Mills, Chris; Knight, James; Milligan, Gemma

    2015-03-29

    Ergogenic aids have been used to alter joint kinematics in an attempt to minimise injury risk, yet the effectiveness of these aids may be compromised following a bout of exercise. This preliminary study aimed to measure the effect of compression garments and Kinesio Tape® on lower extremity joint alignment prior to and following an exercise bout. Eight male athletes (age = 24.1 ± 3.0 years, body height = 177.4 ± 5.2 cm, body mass = 72.3 ± 7.2 kg) volunteered to participant in this study. Joint kinematics were recorded whilst all participants performed three rotational lunges, in three conditions (control, compression garment, Kinesio Tape®), prior to and following a 10 minute exercise bout. Frontal plane kinematics (lateral pelvic tilt, knee valgus, ankle inversion/eversion) were used to assess ergogenic aid effectiveness during the lunge. Participants exhibited no significant differences in joint kinematics between ergogenic aid conditions prior to the exercise bout. Following exercise the only significant difference occurred within the Kinesio Tape® condition where maximum knee valgus angle significantly increased from 6.5° prior to exercise, to 7.7° following the exercise bout. The results of this study suggest joint kinematics are not affected by the ergogenic aids in this study prior to an exercise bout. However, there is evidence to suggest that the application of Kinesio Tape® may allow an increase in knee valgus angle following a bout of exercise, yet, compression garments are effective at maintaining joint alignment following a bout of exercise.

  6. Improvement of lower extremity electrodiagnostic findings following a trial of spinal manipulation and motion-based therapy

    PubMed Central

    Morningstar, Mark W

    2006-01-01

    Background Lumbar disc herniation is a problem frequently encountered in manual medicine. While manual therapy has shown reasonable success in symptomatic management of these cases, little information is known how manual therapy may affect the structure and function of the lumbar disc itself. In cases where lumbar disc herniation is accompanied by radicular symptoms, electrodiagnostic testing has been used to provide objective clinical information on nerve function. This report examines the treatment rendered for a patient with lower extremity neurological deficit, as diagnosed on electrodiagnostic testing. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation and exercises performed on a Pettibon Wobble Chair™, using electrodiagnostic testing as the primary outcome assessment. Case Presentation An elderly male patient presented to a private spine clinic with right-sided foot drop. He had been prescribed an ankle-foot orthosis for this condition. All sensory, motor, and reflex findings in the right leg and foot were absent. This was validated on prior electromyography and nerve conduction velocity testing, performed by a board certified neurologist. Patient was treated using spinal manipulation twice-weekly and wobble chair exercises three times daily for 90 days total. Following this treatment, the patient was referred for follow-up electrodiagnostic studies. Significant improvements were made in these studies as well as self-rated daily function. Conclusion Motion-based therapies, as part of a comprehensive rehabilitation program, may contribute to the restoration of daily function and the reversal of neurological insult as detected by electrodiagnostic testing. Electrodiagnostic testing may be a useful clinical tool to evaluate the progress of chiropractic patients with lumbar disc herniation and radicular pain syndromes. PMID:16968536

  7. Do Ergogenic Aids Alter Lower Extremity Joint Alignment During a Functional Movement Lunge Prior to and Following an Exercise Bout?

    PubMed Central

    Mills, Chris; Knight, James; Milligan, Gemma

    2015-01-01

    Ergogenic aids have been used to alter joint kinematics in an attempt to minimise injury risk, yet the effectiveness of these aids may be compromised following a bout of exercise. This preliminary study aimed to measure the effect of compression garments and Kinesio Tape® on lower extremity joint alignment prior to and following an exercise bout. Eight male athletes (age = 24.1 ± 3.0 years, body height = 177.4 ± 5.2 cm, body mass = 72.3 ± 7.2 kg) volunteered to participant in this study. Joint kinematics were recorded whilst all participants performed three rotational lunges, in three conditions (control, compression garment, Kinesio Tape®), prior to and following a 10 minute exercise bout. Frontal plane kinematics (lateral pelvic tilt, knee valgus, ankle inversion/eversion) were used to assess ergogenic aid effectiveness during the lunge. Participants exhibited no significant differences in joint kinematics between ergogenic aid conditions prior to the exercise bout. Following exercise the only significant difference occurred within the Kinesio Tape® condition where maximum knee valgus angle significantly increased from 6.5° prior to exercise, to 7.7° following the exercise bout. The results of this study suggest joint kinematics are not affected by the ergogenic aids in this study prior to an exercise bout. However, there is evidence to suggest that the application of Kinesio Tape® may allow an increase in knee valgus angle following a bout of exercise, yet, compression garments are effective at maintaining joint alignment following a bout of exercise. PMID:25964805

  8. Modeling of the blood flow in the lower extremities for dynamic diffuse optical tomography of peripheral artery disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marone, A.; Hoi, J. W.; Khalil, M. A.; Kim, H. K.; Shrikhande, G.; Dayal, R.; Hielscher, A. H.

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral Arterial Disease (PAD) is caused by a reduction of the internal diameters of the arteries in the upper or lower extremities mainly due to atherosclerosis. If not treated, its worsening may led to a complete occlusion, causing the death of the cells lacking proper blood supply, followed by gangrene that may require chirurgical amputation. We have recently performed a clinical study in which good sensitivities and specificities were achieved with dynamic diffuse optical tomography. To gain a better understanding of the physiological foundations of many of the observed effects, we started to develop a mathematical model for PAD. The model presented in this work is based on a multi-compartment Windkessel model, where the vasculature in the leg and foot is represented by resistors and capacitors, the blood pressure with a voltage drop, and the blood flow with a current. Unlike existing models, the dynamics induced by a thigh-pressure-cuff inflation and deflation during the measurements are taken into consideration. This is achieved by dynamically varying the resistances of the large veins and arteries. By including the effects of the thigh-pressure cuff, we were able to explain many of the effects observed during our dynamic DOT measurements, including the hemodynamics of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin concentration changes. The model was implemented in MATLAB and the simulations were normalized and compared with the blood perfusion obtained from healthy, PAD and diabetic patients. Our preliminary results show that in unhealthy patients the total system resistance is sensibly higher than in healthy patients.

  9. Trends in Lower-Extremity Amputations in People With and Without Diabetes in Spain, 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Andrés, Ana; Martínez-Huedo, María A.; Carrasco-Garrido, Pilar; Hernández-Barrera, Valentin; Gil-de-Miguel, Ángel; Jiménez-García, Rodrigo

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To examine trends in nontraumatic lower-extremity amputations (LEAs) over an 8-year period in patients with and without diabetes in Spain. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We identified all patients who underwent an LEA using national hospital discharge data. Discharges were grouped by diabetes status: type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, and no diabetes. The incidence of discharges attributed to amputations were calculated overall and stratified by diabetes status and year. We calculated length of stay and in-hospital fatality stratified by diabetes status and type of LEA. RESULTS From 2001 to 2008, 46,536 minor LEAs and 43,528 major LEAs were performed. In patients with type 1 diabetes, the incidence of minor and major amputations decreased significantly from 2001 to 2008 (0.88–0.43 per 100,000 inhabitants and 0.59–0.22 per 100,000 inhabitants, respectively). In patients with type 2 diabetes, the incidence of minor and major LEAs increased significantly (9.23–10.9 per 100,000 inhabitants and 7.12–7.47 per 100,000 inhabitants). Hospital stay was similar among type 1 diabetic and type 2 diabetic subjects, according to the type of LEA. Only in-hospital mortality for minor LEAs among type 1 diabetic subjects decreased significantly (4.0% in 2001 vs. 1.6% in 2008). CONCLUSIONS Our national data show a decrease in the incidence of major and minor LEAs in patients with type 1 diabetes and an increase among patients with type 2 diabetes. Further improvement is necessary in the preventive care and early treatment of patients with diabetes. The management of foot lesions, especially among type 2 diabetic patients, is particularly urgent. PMID:21593299

  10. Effects of Gait Self-Efficacy and Lower-Extremity Physical Function on Dual-Task Performance in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Diane K; Banducci, Sarah E; Daugherty, Ana M; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth A; Porter, Gwenndolyn C; Burzynska, Agnieszka; Shen, Sa; Kramer, Arthur F; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Despite evidence of self-efficacy and physical function's influences on functional limitations in older adults, few studies have examined relationships in the context of complex, real-world tasks. The present study tested the roles of self-efficacy and physical function in predicting older adults' street-crossing performance in single- and dual-task simulations. Methods. Lower-extremity physical function, gait self-efficacy, and street-crossing success ratio were assessed in 195 older adults (60-79 years old) at baseline of a randomized exercise trial. During the street-crossing task, participants walked on a self-propelled treadmill in a virtual reality environment. Participants crossed the street without distraction (single-task trials) and conversed on a cell phone (dual-task trials). Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized associations independent of demographic and clinical covariates. Results. Street-crossing performance was better on single-task trials when compared with dual-task trials. Direct effects of self-efficacy and physical function on success ratio were observed in dual-task trials only. The total effect of self-efficacy was significant in both conditions. The indirect path through physical function was evident in the dual-task condition only. Conclusion. Physical function can predict older adults' performance on high fidelity simulations of complex, real-world tasks. Perceptions of function (i.e., self-efficacy) may play an even greater role. The trial is registered with United States National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT01472744; Fit & Active Seniors Trial).

  11. Exoskeleton control for lower-extremity assistance based on adaptive frequency oscillators: adaptation of muscle activation and movement frequency.

    PubMed

    Aguirre-Ollinger, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we analyze a novel strategy for assisting the lower extremities based on adaptive frequency oscillators. Our aim is to use the control algorithm presented here as a building block for the control of powered lower-limb exoskeletons. The algorithm assists cyclic movements of the human extremities by synchronizing actuator torques with the estimated net torque exerted by the muscles. Synchronization is produced by a nonlinear dynamical system combining an adaptive frequency oscillator with a form of adaptive Fourier analysis. The system extracts, in real time, the fundamental frequency component of the net muscle torque acting on a specific joint. Said component, nearly sinusoidal in shape, is the basis for the assistive torque waveform delivered by the exoskeleton. The action of the exoskeleton can be interpreted as a virtual reduction in the mechanical impedance of the leg. We studied the ability of human subjects to adapt their muscle activation to the assistive torque. Ten subjects swung their extended leg while coupled to a stationary hip joint exoskeleton. The experiment yielded a significant decrease, with respect to unassisted movement, of the activation levels of an agonist/antagonist pair of muscles controlling the hip joint's motion, which suggests the exoskeleton control has potential for assisting human gait. A moderate increase in swing frequency was observed as well. We theorize that the increase in frequency can be explained by the impedance model of the assisted leg. Per this model, subjects adjust their swing frequency in order to control the amount of reduction in net muscle torque.

  12. An enhanced treatment program with markedly reduced mortality after a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation

    PubMed Central

    Kristensen, Morten T; Holm, Gitte; Krasheninnikoff, Michael; Jensen, Pia S; Gebuhr, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Historically, high 30-day and 1-year mortality post-amputation rates (> 30% and 50%, respectively) have been reported in patients with a transtibial or higher non-traumatic lower extremity amputation (LEA). We evaluated whether allocating experienced staff and implementing an enhanced, multidisciplinary recovery program would reduce the mortality rates. We also determined factors that influenced mortality rates. Patients and methods 129 patients with a LEA were consecutively included over a 2-year period, and followed after admission to an acute orthopedic ward. Mortality was compared with historical and concurrent national controls in Denmark. Results The 30-day and 1-year mortality rates were 16% and 37%, respectively, in the intervention group, as compared to 35% and 59% in the historical control group treated in the same orthopedic ward. Cox proportional harzards models adjusted for age, sex, residential and health status, the disease that caused the amputation, and the index amputation level showed that 30-day and 1-year mortality risk was reduced by 52% (HR =0.48, 95% CI: 0.25–0.91) and by 46% (HR =0.54, 95% CI: 0.35–0.86), respectively, in the intervention group. The risk of death was increased for patients living in a nursing home, for patients with a bilateral LEA, and for patients with low health status. Interpretation With similarly frail patient groups and instituting an enhanced program for patients after LEA, the risks of death by 30 days and by 1 year after LEA were markedly reduced after allocating staff with expertise. PMID:27088484

  13. Post-Exercise Phosphocreatine Recovery, an Index of Mitochondrial Oxidative Phosphorylation, is Reduced in Diabetic Patients With Lower Extremity Complications

    PubMed Central

    Tecilazich, Francesco; Dinh, Thanh; Lyons, Thomas E.; Guest, Julie; Villafuerte, Rose; Sampanis, Christos; Gnardellis, Charalambos; Zuo, Chun; Veves, Aristidis

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify differences in the post-exercise phosphocreatine (PCr) recovery, an index of mitochondrial function, in diabetic patients with and without lower extremity complications. Research Methods and Design We enrolled healthy control subjects and three groups of T2DM patients: patients without complications, with peripheral neuropathy and both peripheral neuropathy and peripheral arterial disease. We employed Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopic (MRS) measurements to perform continuous measurements of phosphorous metabolites (PCr and Pi) during a 3-minute graded exercise at the level of the posterior calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus muscles). Micro- and macrovascular reactivity measurements were also performed. Results The resting Pi/PCr ratio and PCr at baseline and the maximum reached during exercise was similar in all groups. The post-exercise time required for recovery of Pi/PCr ratio and PCr levels to resting levels, an assessment of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, was significantly higher in the diabetic patients with neuropathy and those with both neuropathy and PAD (p <0.01 for both measurements). These two groups had also higher levels of TNFα, (p<0.01) and G-CSF (p <0.05). Multiple regression analysis showed that only G-CSF, OPG and TNFα were significant contributing factors in the variation of the Pi/PCr ratio recovery time. No associations were observed between micro- and macrovascular reactivity measurements and Pi/Pcr ration or Pcr recovery time. Conclusions Mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation is impaired only in T2DM patients with neuropathy whether PAD is present or not and is associated with the increased proinflammatory state that was observed in these groups. PMID:23465172

  14. Functional MRI determination of a dose-response relationship to lower extremity neuromuscular electrical stimulation in healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gerald V; Alon, Gad; Roys, Steven R; Gullapalli, Rao P

    2003-05-01

    Although empirical evidence supports the use of neuromuscular electrical stimulation (NMES) to treat physical impairments associated with stroke, the mechanisms underlying the efficacy of this modality are poorly understood. Recent studies have employed functional imaging to investigations of brain responses to median nerve stimulation. These studies suggest a dose-response relationship may exist between selected stimulation parameters and hemodynamic responses in sensorimotor regions. However, substantial gaps exist in this literature. The present study was designed to address these deficiencies. Ten healthy subjects participated. In phase one, four stimulus intensity levels were established: (1). sensory threshold [Th], (2). (MM-Th)x0.333+Th [low-intermediate level, LI], (3). (MM-Th)x0.666+Th [high-intermediate level, HI], and (4). maximal motor (MM). In phase two, subjects were scanned using a spiral-echoplanar imaging technique at each stimulus level. Image sets were analyzed to determine hemodynamic responses at the highest Pearson correlation level ( r) ascertained for each of five areas of interest (AOI): (1). primary sensory, (2). primary motor, (3). cingulate gyrus, (4). thalamus, and (5). cerebellum. ANOVA demonstrated significant main effects for BOLD signal amplitude ( p<0.05) changes in all AOI. Similarly, ANOVA showed significant differences in the volume of activation ( p<0.05) with increasing stimulus intensity in four AOI. Secondary analyses of pooled data showed increasing probabilities of activation at higher stimulus intensities within each AOI. Collectively, these data indicate a dose-response relationship exists between lower extremity NMES and brain activation in specific neural regions. The current results, while limited in their generalizability, are foundational for future studies of interventions using NMES.

  15. Investigation of the Saturation Pulse Artifact in Non-Enhanced MR Angiography of the Lower Extremity Arteries at 7 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Johst, Sören; Maderwald, Stefan; Fischer, Anja; Quick, Harald H.; Ladd, Mark E.; Orzada, Stephan

    2015-01-01

    When performing non-enhanced time-of-flight MR angiography of the lower extremity arteries at 7 T with cardiac triggering, the acquisition time is a crucial consideration. Therefore, in previous studies, saturation RF pulses were applied only every second TR. In the axial source images a slight artifact with an appearance similar to aliasing could be observed. The purpose of this study was to investigate the origin of this artifact. The reason for the artifact is supposed to be related to the two effective TRs during acquisition caused by the sparsely applied saturation RF pulse. Several sequence variants were simulated and implemented within the sequence source code to examine this hypothesis. An adaptation of the excitation flip angles for each TR as well as a correction factor for the k-space data was calculated. Additionally, a different ordering of the k-space data during acquisition was implemented as well as the combination of the latter with the k-space correction factor. The observations from the simulations were verified using both a static and a flow phantom and, finally, in a healthy volunteer using the same measurement setup as in previous volunteer and patient studies. Of all implemented techniques, only the reordering of the k-space was capable of suppressing the artifact almost completely at the cost of creating a ringing artifact. The phantom measurements showed the same results as the simulations and could thus confirm the hypothesis regarding the origin of the artifact. This was additionally verified in the healthy volunteer. The origin of the artifact could be confirmed to be the periodic signal variation caused by two effective TRs during acquisition. PMID:25785837

  16. [ANALYSIS OF THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN THR83ALA POLYMORPHISM OF MATRIX GLA-PROTEIN GENE AND LOWER EXTREMITY ARTERIAL CALCIFICATION].

    PubMed

    Ataman, Yu; Еrmolenko, Т; Grek, A; Zharkova, A; Ovechkin, D

    2016-03-01

    Lower extremity arterial calcification (AC) is a common pathological process that has independent significance in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases. There is evidence that development of AC associated with Thr83Ala polymorphism of matrix GLA-protein gene. The objective of this study was to examine the association between Thr83Ala polymorphism of matrix Cla protein (MGP) gene and AC in male and female subjects of the Ukrainian population. 40 AC and 40 healthy controls were recruited to the study. MGP exon 4 Thr83Ala polymorphism (rs 4236) was examined using the polymerase chain reaction with subsequent restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The obtained data show that the substitution of threonin by alanine at position 83 in a molecule of MGP can affect its functional characteristics and anticalcinogenic properties. The distribution of homozygous carriers of a major allelic variant, and heterozygous and homozygous minor allele variants of Thr83Ala polymorphism in patients with AC was 40,0%, 47,5%, and 12,5% respectively. The corresponding distribution of variants in the control group was 32,5%, 42,5% and 25,0% (p=0,352 by χ2 -test). In women who are carriers of Ala/Ala-variant, CA occurs more rarely than in men with the same genotype (p=0,036 by χ2 -test). The substitution of threonine by alanine due to MGP exon 4 Thr83Ala polymorphism is related to a decrease in the likelihood of CA in female persons in the Ukrainian population.

  17. Epidural ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine reduces propofol requirement based on bispectral index in patients undergoing lower extremity and abdominal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Joy, Renu; Pujari, Vinayak Seenappa; Chadalawada, Mohan V. R.; Cheruvathoor, Ajish Varghese; Bevinguddaiah, Yatish; Sheshagiri, Nirmal

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aim: To assess the amount of propofol required for induction based on bispectral index (BIS) after administering epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine alone and ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine in patients undergoing lower extremities and abdominal surgeries. Subjects and Methods: A double-blinded randomized clinical trial was carried out in 60 patients over a period of 2 years in a tertiary care hospital. American Society of Anaesthesiologists I or II in age group 18–65 years were included in the study. Group R received epidural anesthesia with ropivacaine alone, and Group D received ropivacaine and dexmedetomidine. General anesthesia was induced with propofol under BIS monitoring after 15 min. Onset of sensory and motor block, time for loss of consciousness and total amount of propofol used during induction to achieve the BIS value < 55 were recorded. Student's t-test and Chi-square test were used to find the significance of study parameters. Results: Time of onset of sensory block (Group R 11.30 ± 1.64/Group D 8.27 ± 0.83 min), motor block (Group R 14.16 ± 1.33/Group D 12.63 ± 1.22 min), time for loss of consciousness (Group R 90.57 ± 11.05/Group D 73.67 ± 16.34 s), and total amount of propofol (Group R 129.83 ± 22.38/Group D 92.13 ± 12.93 s) were reduced in Group D which was statistically significant with P < 0.001. Conclusion: Epidural ropivacaine with dexmedetomidine significantly reduces the total propofol dose required for induction of anesthesia. Also, it decreases the onset time of sensory and motor block and provides good hemodynamic stability. PMID:26957689

  18. Prevalence and Correlates of Lower-Extremity Amputation in Patients With Diabetic Foot Ulcer in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dong D; Jamjoom, Reda A; Alzahrani, Anas H; Hu, Frank B; Alzahrani, Hasan A

    2016-03-01

    This cross-sectional study investigated the prevalence and correlates of lower-extremity amputation (LEA) in a Saudi population with diabetic foot ulcer. The study population consisted of 91 participants, with a median age of 55.0 years. Biomarkers were measured following standard protocols. Local symptoms of foot ulcer, including peripheral neuropathy (PN), peripheral artery disease (PAD), and foot infection were diagnosed by standard objective diagnostic tools or diagnosed clinically by a specialized surgeon. The severity of foot ulcer was classified according to the Wagner wound classification system. The prevalence of LEA was 29.7% in this population. The odds ratio for LEA comparing extreme tertiles was 2.42 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.70-8.45; P for trend = .03) for ulcer size and 0.22 (95% CI = 0.06-0.87; P for trend = .03) for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. C-reactive protein and homocysteine levels were each positively associated with odds of LEA, but the associations became nonsignificant in multivariable models. Participants with foot infection showed a significantly higher adjusted prevalence of LEA (40.7%, 95% CI = 27.1%-54.3%) compared with those without foot infections (19.3%, 95% CI = 6.0%-32.4%, P = .03). Participants with Wagner grade ≥3 presented a significantly higher prevalence (40.5%, 95% CI = 27.8%-53.2%) than those with Wagner grade of 1 or 2 (16.4%, 95% CI = 2.4%-30.5%, P = .02). Participants with PN and PAD showed nonsignificantly higher prevalence of LEA. We found a relatively high prevalence of LEA as well as several clinical markers and local symptoms associated with LEA in this Saudi population with diabetic foot ulcer.

  19. The effect of prosthetic foot push-off on mechanical loading associated with knee osteoarthritis in lower extremity amputees.

    PubMed

    Morgenroth, David C; Segal, Ava D; Zelik, Karl E; Czerniecki, Joseph M; Klute, Glenn K; Adamczyk, Peter G; Orendurff, Michael S; Hahn, Michael E; Collins, Steven H; Kuo, Art D

    2011-10-01

    Lower extremity amputation not only limits mobility, but also increases the risk of knee osteoarthritis of the intact limb. Dynamic walking models of non-amputees suggest that pushing-off from the trailing limb can reduce collision forces on the leading limb. These collision forces may determine the peak knee external adduction moment (EAM), which has been linked to the development of knee OA in the general population. We therefore hypothesized that greater prosthetic push-off would lead to reduced loading and knee EAM of the intact limb in unilateral transtibial amputees. Seven unilateral transtibial amputees were studied during gait under three prosthetic foot conditions that were intended to vary push-off. Prosthetic foot-ankle push-off work, intact limb knee EAM and ground reaction impulses for both limbs during step-to-step transition were measured. Overall, trailing limb prosthetic push-off work was negatively correlated with leading intact limb 1st peak knee EAM (slope=-.72±.22; p=.011). Prosthetic push-off work and 1st peak intact knee EAM varied significantly with foot type. The prosthetic foot condition with the least push-off demonstrated the largest knee EAM, which was reduced by 26% with the prosthetic foot producing the most push-off. Trailing prosthetic limb push-off impulse was negatively correlated with leading intact limb loading impulse (slope=-.34±.14; p=.001), which may help explain how prosthetic limb push-off can affect intact limb loading. Prosthetic feet that perform more prosthetic push-off appear to be associated with a reduction in 1st peak intact knee EAM, and their use could potentially reduce the risk and burden of knee osteoarthritis in this population.

  20. Longitudinal relationships between anxiety, depression, and pain: results from a two-year cohort study of lower extremity trauma patients.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Renan C; Wegener, Stephen T; Heins, Sara E; Haythornthwaite, Jennifer A; Mackenzie, Ellen J; Bosse, Michael J

    2013-12-01

    Previous studies have shown that pain, depression, and anxiety are common after trauma. A longitudinal relationship between depression, anxiety, and chronic pain has been hypothesized. Severe lower extremity trauma patients (n = 545) were followed at 3, 6, 12, and 24 months after injury using a visual analog "present pain intensity" scale and the depression and anxiety scales of the Brief Symptom Inventory. Structural model results are presented as Standardized Regression Weights (SRW). Multiple imputation was used to account for missing data. A single structural model including all longitudinal pain intensity, anxiety symptoms, and depression symptoms time-points yielded excellent fit measures. Pain weakly predicted depression (3-6 months SRW = 0.07, P = .05; 6-12 months SRW = 0.06, P = .10) and anxiety (3-6 months SRW = 0.05, P = .21; 6-12 months SRW = 0.08, P = .03) during the first year after injury, and did not predict either construct beyond 1 year. Depression did not predict pain over any time period. In contrast, anxiety predicted pain over all time periods (3-6 months SRW = 0.11, P = .012; 6-12 months SRW = 0.14, P = .0065; 12-24 months SRW = 0.18, P < .0001). The results suggest that in the early phase after trauma, pain predicts anxiety and depression, but the magnitude of these relationships are smaller than the longitudinal relationship from anxiety to pain over this period. In the late (or chronic) phase after injury, the longitudinal relationship from anxiety on pain nearly doubles and is the only significant relationship. Despite missing data and a single item measure of pain intensity, these results provide evidence that negative mood, specifically anxiety, has an important role in the persistence of acute pain.

  1. Influence of gait analysis on decision-making for lower extremity orthopaedic surgery: Baseline data from a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Wren, Tishya A L; Otsuka, Norman Y; Bowen, Richard E; Scaduto, Anthony A; Chan, Linda S; Sheng, Minya; Hara, Reiko; Kay, Robert M

    2011-07-01

    Previous studies examining the influence of gait analysis on surgical decision-making have been limited by the lack of a control group. The aim of this study was to use data from a randomized controlled trial to determine the effects of gait analysis on surgical decision-making in children with cerebral palsy (CP). 178 ambulatory children with CP (110 male; age 10.3±3.8 years) being considered for lower extremity orthopaedic surgery underwent gait analysis and were randomized into one of two groups: gait report group (N=90), where the orthopaedic surgeon received the gait analysis report, and control group (N=88), where the surgeon did not receive the gait report. Data regarding specific surgeries were recorded by the treating surgeon before gait analysis, by the gait laboratory surgeon after gait analysis, and after surgery. Agreement between the treatment done and the gait analysis recommendations was compared between groups using the 2-sided Fisher's Exact test. When a procedure was planned initially and also recommended by gait analysis, it was performed more often in the gait report group (91% vs. 70%, p<0.001). When the gait laboratory recommended against a planned procedure, the plan was changed more frequently in the gait report group (48% vs. 27%, p=0.009). When the gait laboratory recommended adding a procedure, it was added more frequently in the gait report group (12% vs. 7%, p=0.037). These results provide a stronger level of evidence demonstrating that gait analysis changes treatment decision-making and also reinforces decision-making when it agrees with the surgeon's original plan.

  2. Long-Term Clinical and Functional Outcomes After Treatment for Localized Ewing's Tumor of the Lower Extremity

    SciTech Connect

    Indelicato, Daniel J.; Keole, Sameer R. Shahlaee, Amir H.; Gibbs, Charles P.; Scarborough, Mark T.; Marcus, Robert B.

    2008-02-01

    Purpose: Retrospective review describing the 35-year University of Florida experience with Ewing's tumors of the lower extremity. Patients and Methods: Fifty-three patients were treated between 1971 and 2006. Thirty patients were treated with radiotherapy (RT) alone and 23 patients were treated with surgery {+-} RT. Larger tumors and tumors of the femur were treated more often with definitive RT. Median potential follow-up was 19.2 years. Functional outcome was assessed using the Toronto Extremity Salvage Score (TESS). Results: Before 1985, 24% of patients were treated with surgery; since then, the rate has increased to 61%. The 15-year actuarial overall survival (OS), cause-specific survival (CSS), freedom from relapse, and limb preservation rates were 68% vs. 47% (p = 0.21), 73% vs. 47% (p = 0.13), 73% vs. 40% (p = 0.03), and 43% vs. 40% (p = 0.52), respectively, for patients treated with surgery {+-} RT vs. RT alone. Excluding 8 patients who underwent amputation or rotationplasty, the 15-year actuarial local control rate was 100% for the surgery {+-} RT group and 68% for the definitive RT group (p = 0.03). The ranges of the TESS for surgery {+-} RT vs. RT alone were 70-100 (mean, 94) and 97-100 (mean, 99), respectively. Twenty-six percent (6/23) of patients had complications related to surgery requiring amputation or reoperation. Conclusions: Overall survival and CSS were not statistically compromised, but we observed an increased risk of relapse and local failure in patients treated with RT alone, thereby justifying a transition toward primary surgical management in suitable patients. However, despite an adverse risk profile, patients treated with RT alone had similar long-term amputation-free survival and demonstrated comparable functional outcomes. Poor results observed in Ewing's of the femur mandate innovative surgical and RT strategies.

  3. Survey Criteria for Fibromyalgia Independently Predict Increased Postoperative Opioid Consumption after Lower Extremity Joint Arthroplasty: A Prospective, Observational Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Brummett, Chad M.; Janda, Allison M.; Schueller, Christa M.; Tsodikov, Alex; Morris, Michelle; Williams, David A.; Clauw, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Variance in pain following total knee and hip arthroplasty may be due to a number of procedural and peripheral factors but also, in some individuals, to aberrant central pain processing as is described in conditions like fibromyalgia. To test this hypothesis, we conducted a prospective, observational cohort study of patients undergoing lower extremity joint arthroplasty. Methods 519 patients were preoperatively phenotyped using validated self-reported pain questionnaires, psychological measures, and health information. In addition to assessing factors previously found to be associated with poor outcomes in arthroplasty, participants also completed the American College of Rheumatology survey criteria for fibromyalgia. Previous studies have suggested that rather than being “present” or “absent,” features of fibromyalgia as measured by this instrument, occur over a wide continuum. Postoperative pain control was assessed by total postoperative opioid consumption. Results Preoperatively, patients with higher fibromyalgia survey scores were younger, more likely to be female, taking more opioids, reported higher pain severity, and had a more negative psychological profile. In the multivariate analysis, the fibromyalgia survey score, younger age, preoperative opioid use, knee (vs. hip), pain severity at baseline, and the anesthetic technique were all predictive of increased postoperative opioid consumption. Conclusions Using the survey criteria for fibromyalgia distinct phenotypic differences were found, and the measure was independently predictive of opioid consumption. This self-report measure may provide an additional simple means of predicting postoperative pain outcomes and analgesic requirements. Future studies are needed to determine whether tailored therapies can improve postoperative pain control in this population. PMID:24343289

  4. Risk of lower extremity arterial disease in a cohort of workers occupationally exposed to ionizing radiation over a prolonged period.

    PubMed

    Azizova, Tamara V; Bannikova, Maria V; Grigorieva, Evgenia S; Bagaeva, Yaroslava P; Azizova, Elena V

    2016-05-01

    In this study the incidence risk of lower extremity arterial disease (LEAD; international classification of diseases version 9 code 440.2) was assessed in a cohort of workers occupationally exposed to radiation over a prolonged period. The study cohort includes 22,377 workers of the Mayak Production Association (25% of whom are females) first employed at one of the main facilities in 1948-1982 and followed up to the end of 2008. Dose estimates used in the study are provided by Mayak Worker Dosimetry System 2008. The mean total dose from external gamma-rays is 0.54 Gy for males and 0.44 Gy for females. The mean absorbed liver dose from internal alpha-radiation due to incorporated plutonium is 0.23 Gy in males and 0.44 Gy in females. Relative risks and excess relative risks per unit dose (ERR/Gy) are calculated based on maximum likelihood. A total of 943 cases of LEAD are registered in the study cohort during the follow-up of 512,801 person-years. A significant association of LEAD incidence with total dose from external gamma-rays (based on a linear model) was revealed, and the ERR/Gy is 0.27 (95% confidence interval (CI) 0.11; 0.48). It turned out that a linear-exponential model provides a better fit of the data (∆AIC = 9.957). Inclusion of an adjustment for internal alpha-radiation dose resulted in the reduction of the ERR/Gy to 0.19 (95% CI 0.05; 0.39), but the risk remains significant. No association of LEAD incidence with dose from internal alpha-radiation was found in the study worker cohort. It is concluded that this study provides evidence for an association of LEAD incidence with dose from external gamma-rays taking non-radiation factors into account.

  5. Effects of Gait Self-Efficacy and Lower-Extremity Physical Function on Dual-Task Performance in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Banducci, Sarah E.; Daugherty, Ana M.; Fanning, Jason; Awick, Elizabeth A.; Porter, Gwenndolyn C.; Burzynska, Agnieszka; Shen, Sa; Kramer, Arthur F.; McAuley, Edward

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. Despite evidence of self-efficacy and physical function's influences on functional limitations in older adults, few studies have examined relationships in the context of complex, real-world tasks. The present study tested the roles of self-efficacy and physical function in predicting older adults' street-crossing performance in single- and dual-task simulations. Methods. Lower-extremity physical function, gait self-efficacy, and street-crossing success ratio were assessed in 195 older adults (60–79 years old) at baseline of a randomized exercise trial. During the street-crossing task, participants walked on a self-propelled treadmill in a virtual reality environment. Participants crossed the street without distraction (single-task trials) and conversed on a cell phone (dual-task trials). Structural equation modeling was used to test hypothesized associations independent of demographic and clinical covariates. Results. Street-crossing performance was better on single-task trials when compared with dual-task trials. Direct effects of self-efficacy and physical function on success ratio were observed in dual-task trials only. The total effect of self-efficacy was significant in both conditions. The indirect path through physical function was evident in the dual-task condition only. Conclusion. Physical function can predict older adults' performance on high fidelity simulations of complex, real-world tasks. Perceptions of function (i.e., self-efficacy) may play an even greater role. The trial is registered with United States National Institutes of Health ClinicalTrials.gov (ID: NCT01472744; Fit & Active Seniors Trial). PMID:28255557

  6. Virtual Reality Training with Three-dimensional Video Games Improves Postural Balance and Lower Extremity Strength in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yongwoo; Choi, Wonjae; Lee, Kyeongjin; Song, Changho; Lee, Seungwon

    2017-03-14

    Avatar-based three-dimensional technology is a new approach to improve physical function in older adults. The aim of this study was to use three-dimensional video gaming technology in virtual reality training to improve postural balance and lower extremity strength in a population of community-dwelling older adults. The experimental group participated in the virtual reality training program for 60 minutes, twice a week, for 6 weeks. Both experimental and control groups were given 3 times for falls prevention education at the first, third, and fifth weeks. The experimental group showed significant improvements not only in static and dynamic postural balance but also lower extremity strength (p < .05). Furthermore, the experimental group was improved to overall parameters compared with control group (p < .05). Therefore, three-dimensional video gaming technology might be beneficial for improving postural balance, and lower extremity strength in community-dwelling older adults.

  7. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  8. Impact of betablockers on general and local outcome in patients hospitalized for lower extremity peripheral artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Mirault, Tristan; Galloula, Alexandre; Cambou, Jean-Pierre; Lacroix, Philippe; Aboyans, Victor; Boulon, Carine; Constans, Joel; Bura-Riviere, Alessandra; Messas, Emmanuel

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) is one manifestation of atherosclerosis. Patients with PAD have an increased rate of mortality due to concurrent coronary artery disease and hypertension. Betablockers (BB) may, therefore, be prescribed, especially in case of heart failure. However, BB safety in PAD is controversial, because of presumed peripheral hemodynamic consequences of BB that could lead to worsening of symptoms in patients with PAD. In this context, we aimed to determine the impact of BB on all-cause and cardiovascular mortality and amputation rate at 1 year after hospitalization for PAD from the COPART Registry population. This is a prospective multicenter observational study collecting data from consecutive patients hospitalized for PAD in vascular medicine departments of 4 academic hospitals in France. Patients with, either claudication, critical limb ischemia or acute lower limb ischemia related to a documented PAD were included. We compared the outcomes of patients with BB versus those without BB in their prescription list at hospital discharge. The mean age of the study population was 70.9 years, predominantly composed of males (71%). Among the 1267 patients at admission, 28% were treated by BB for hypertension, prior myocardial infarction or heart failure. During their hospital stay, 40% underwent revascularization (including bypass surgery 29% and angioplasty 74%), 17% required an amputation, and 5% died. In a multivariate analysis, only prior myocardial infarction was found associated with BB prescription with an odds ratio (OR) of 3.11, P < 0.001. Conversely, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or PAD with ulcer impeded BB prescription (OR: 0.57 and 0.64, P = 0.007; P = 0.001, respectively). One-year overall mortality of patients with BB did not differ from those without (23% vs. 23%, P = 0.95). The 1-year amputation rate did not differ either (4% vs. 6%, P = 0.14). Patients hospitalized for PAD with a

  9. Risk factors for lower extremity amputation in patients with diabetic foot ulcers: a hospital-based case–control study

    PubMed Central

    Pemayun, Tjokorda Gde Dalem; Naibaho, Ridho M.; Novitasari, Diana; Amin, Nurmilawati; Minuljo, Tania Tedjo

    2015-01-01

    Background Diabetic foot ulcers (DFU) may cause significant morbidity and lower extremity amputation (LEA) due to diabetic foot problems can occur more often compared to the general population. The purpose of the present study was to use an epidemiological design to determine and to quantify the risk factors of subsequent amputation in hospitalized DFU patients. Methods We performed a hospital-based, case–control study of 47 DFU patients with LEA and 47 control DFU patients without LEA. The control subjects were matched to cases in respect to age (±5 years), sex, and nutritional status, with ratio of 1:1. This study was conducted in Dr. Kariadi General Hospital Semarang between January 2012 and December 2014. Patients’ demographical data and all risk factors-related information were collected from clinical records using a short structural chart. Using LEA as the outcome variable, we calculated odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) by logistic regression. Univariate and stepwise logistic regression analyses were used to assess the independent effect of selected risk factors associated with LEA. The data were analyzed in SPSS version 21. Results There were 47 case–control pairs, all of which were diagnosed with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Seven potential independent variables show a promise of influence, the latter being defined as p≤0.15 upon univariate analysis. Multivariable logistic regression identified levels of HbA1c ≥8% (OR 20.47, 95% CI 3.12–134.31; p=0.002), presence of peripheral arterial disease (PAD) (OR 12.97, 95% CI 3.44–48.88; p<0.001), hypertriglyceridemia (OR 5.58, 95% CI 1.74–17.91; p=0.004), and hypertension (OR 3.67, 95% CI 1.14–11.79; p=0.028) as the independent risk factors associated with subsequent LEA in DFU. Conclusions Several risk factors for LEA were identified. We found that HbA1c ≥8%, PAD, hypertriglyceridemia, and hypertension have been recognized as the predictors of LEA in this study. Good glycemic

  10. Psychometric Evaluation of the Lower Extremity Computerized Adaptive Test, the Modified Harris Hip Score, and the Hip Outcome Score

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Man; Hon, Shirley D.; Cheng, Christine; Franklin, Jeremy D.; Aoki, Stephen K.; Anderson, Mike B.; Kapron, Ashley L.; Peters, Christopher L.; Pelt, Christopher E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The applicability and validity of many patient-reported outcome measures in the high-functioning population are not well understood. Purpose: To compare the psychometric properties of the modified Harris Hip Score (mHHS), the Hip Outcome Score activities of daily living subscale (HOS-ADL) and sports (HOS-sports), and the Lower Extremity Computerized Adaptive Test (LE CAT). The hypotheses was that all instruments would perform well but that the LE CAT would show superiority psychometrically because a combination of CAT and a large item bank allows for a high degree of measurement precision. Study Design: Cohort study (diagnosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: Data were collected from 472 advanced-age, active participants from the Huntsman World Senior Games in 2012. Validity evidences were examined through item fit, dimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, differential item functioning, person raw score to measure correlation, and instrument coverage (ie, ceiling and floor effects), and reliability evidences were examined through Cronbach alpha and person separation index. Results: All instruments demonstrated good item fit, unidimensionality, monotonicity, local independence, and person raw score to measure correlations. The HOS-ADL had high ceiling effects of 36.02%, and the mHHS had ceiling effects of 27.54%. The LE CAT had ceiling effects of 8.47%, and the HOS-sports had no ceiling effects. None of the instruments had any floor effects. The mHHS had a very low Cronbach alpha of 0.41 and an extremely low person separation index of 0.08. Reliabilities for the LE CAT were excellent and for the HOS-ADL and HOS-sports were good. Conclusion: The LE CAT showed better psychometric properties overall than the HOS-ADL, HOS-sports, and mHHS for the senior population. The mHHS demonstrated pronounced ceiling effects and poor reliabilities that should be of concern. The high ceiling effects for the HOS-ADL were also of concern. The LE CAT was superior

  11. Triaxial modulation of the acceleration induced in the lower extremity during whole-body vibration training: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Cook, David P; Mileva, Katya N; James, Darren C; Zaidell, Lisa N; Goss, Victor G; Bowtell, Joanna L

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to quantify vibration transmissibility through the lower extremity during exercise on a whole-body vibration (WBV) platform. Six healthy adults completed 20 trials of 30-second static squat exercise at 30 or 40 degrees of knee flexion angle on a WBV platform working at combinations of 5 frequencies (VF: 20, 25, 30, 35, 40 Hz) and 2 amplitudes (VA: low, 1.5 mm or high, 3 mm). Accelerations induced by the platform were recorded simultaneously at the shank and the thigh using triaxial accelerometers positioned at the segmental center of mass. Root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration amplitude and transmission ratios between the platform and the leg segments were calculated and compared between the experimental conditions. An alpha level of 0.05 was set to establish significance. Shank vertical acceleration was greatest at the lower VF (p = 0.028), higher VA (p = 0.028), and deeper squat (p = 0.048). Thigh vertical acceleration was not affected by depth of squat (p = 0.25), but it was greatest at higher VA (p = 0.046) and lower VF (p = 0.028). Medial-lateral shank acceleration was greatest at higher VF and deeper squat (both p = 0.046) and at higher VA (p = 0.028). Medial-lateral thigh acceleration was positively related to both VF (p = 0.046) and VA (p = 0.028) but was not affected by knee angle (p = 0.46). Anterior-posterior shank acceleration was higher at deeper squat (p = 0.046) and at lower VF and higher VA (both p = 0.028). Anterior-posterior thigh acceleration was related positively to the VA (p = 0.028), inversely to the VF (p = 0.028), and not dependent on knee angle (p = 0.75). Identification of specific vibration parameters and posture, which underpin WBV training efficacy, will enable coaches and athletes to design WBV training programs to specifically target shank or thigh muscles for enhanced performance.

  12. COMPARISON OF TRUNK AND LOWER EXTREMITY MUSCLE ACTIVITY AMONG FOUR STATIONARY EQUIPMENT DEVICES: UPRIGHT BIKE, RECUMBENT BIKE, TREADMILL, AND ELLIPTIGO®

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Ryan; Gibson, Chris; Kearney, Andrew; Busemeyer, Tommy

    2016-01-01

    Background Stationary equipment devices are often used to improve fitness. The ElliptiGO® was recently developed that blends the elements of an elliptical trainer and bicycle, allowing reciprocal lower limb pedaling in an upright position. However, it is unknown whether the muscle activity used for the ElliptiGO® is similar to walking or cycling. To date, there is no information comparing muscle activity for exercise on the treadmill, stationary upright and recumbent bikes, and the ElliptiGO®. Purpose/Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to assess trunk and lower extremity muscle activity among treadmill walking, cycling (recumbent and upright) and the ElliptiGO® cycling. It was hypothesized that the ElliptiGO® and treadmill would elicit similar electromyographic muscle activity responses compared to the stationary bike and recumbent bike during an exercise session. Study Design Cohort, repeated measures Methods Twelve recreationally active volunteers participated in the study and were assigned a random order of exercise for each of the four devices (ElliptiGO®, stationary upright cycle ergometer, recumbent ergometer, and a treadmill). Two-dimensional video was used to monitor the start and stop of exercise and surface electromyography (SEMG) were used to assess muscle activity during two minutes of cycling or treadmill walking at 40-50% heart rate reserve (HRR). Eight muscles on the dominant limb were used for analysis: gluteus maximus (Gmax), gluteus medius (Gmed), biceps femoris (BF), lateral head of the gastrocnemius (LG), tibialis anterior (TA), rectus femoris (RF). Two trunk muscles were assessed on the same side; lumbar erector spinae at L3-4 level (LES) and rectus abdominus (RA). Maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVIC) were determined for each muscle and SEMG data were expressed as %MVIC in order to normalize outputs. Results The %MVIC for RF during ElliptiGO® cycling was higher than recumbent cycling. The LG muscle activity was highest

  13. Ipsilateral lower extremity joint involvement increases the risk of poor pain and function outcomes after hip or knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    strongly associated with poor pain and function outcomes. A potential way to improve outcomes is to address ipsilateral lower extremity joint involvement. PMID:23738845

  14. A comprehensive literature review of the pelvis and the lower extremity FE human models under quasi-static conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Dirini, R M A; Thewlis, D; Paul, G

    2012-01-01

    Finite Element Modeling (FEM) has become a vital tool in the automotive design and development processes. FEM of the human body is a technique capable of estimating parameters that are difficult to measure in experimental studies with the human body segments being modeled as complex and dynamic entities. Several studies have been dedicated to attain close-to-real FEMs of the human body (Pankoke and Siefert 2007; Amann, Huschenbeth et al. 2009; ESI 2010). The aim of this paper is to identify and appraise the state-of-the art models of the human body which incorporate detailed pelvis and/or lower extremity models. Six databases and search engines were used to obtain literature, and the search was limited to studies published in English since 2000. The initial search results identified 636 pelvis-related papers, 834 buttocks-related papers, 505 thigh-related papers, 927 femur-related papers, 2039 knee-related papers, 655 shank-related papers, 292 tibia-related papers, 110 fibula-related papers, 644 ankle-related papers, and 5660 foot-related papers. A refined search returned 100 pelvis-related papers, 45 buttocks-related papers, 65 thigh-related papers, 162 femur-related papers, 195 knee-related papers, 37 shank-related papers, 80 tibia-related papers, 30 fibula-related papers and 102 ankle-related papers and 246 foot-related papers. The refined literature list was further restricted by appraisal against a modified LOW appraisal criteria. Studies with unclear methodologies, with a focus on populations with pathology or with sport related dynamic motion modeling were excluded. The final literature list included fifteen models and each was assessed against the percentile the model represents, the gender the model was based on, the human body segment/segments included in the model, the sample size used to develop the model, the source of geometric/anthropometric values used to develop the model, the posture the model represents and the finite element solver used for the

  15. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 +/- 4, n = 22, 12 females) w...

  16. Managing Lower Extremity Muscle Tone and Function in Children with Cerebral Palsy via Eight-Week Repetitive Passive Knee Movement Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cheng, Hsin-Yi Kathy; Ju, Yan-Ying; Chen, Chia-Ling; Chang, Ya-Ju; Wong, Alice May-Kuen

    2013-01-01

    This study used a repeated measures design to assess the effect of an eight-week repetitive passive movement (RPM) intervention on lower extremity muscle tone and function in children with cerebral palsy (CP). Eighteen children (aged 9.5 [plus or minus] 2.1 years) with spastic CP were randomly assigned to a knee RPM intervention condition of 3…

  17. Use and Complications of Operative Control of Arterial Inflow in Combat Casualties with Traumatic Lower-extremity Amputations Caused by Improvised Explosive Devices

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    GO, Adams SA, Tai NR, Russell R, Morrison J, et al. Early management of proximal traumatic lower extremity amputation and pelvic injury caused by...1869Y1872. 13. Morrison JJ, Percival TJ, Markov NP, Villamaria C, Scott DJ, Saches KA, et al. Aortic balloon occlusion is effective in controlling pelvic

  18. A failure of preoperative duplex imaging to diagnose a lower extremity venous aneurysm in a patient with severe chronic venous insufficiency

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Roy Wesley; Parkerson, Godfrey Ross; Ottinger, Mary; Rodriguez, Eduardo; Park, Brian

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We present a case of recurrent bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers in association with a superficial venous aneurysm at the right saphenofemoral junction that was misdiagnosed on preoperative duplex scanning. Methods: A 53-year-old female presented to our clinic with 6-year history of bilateral lower extremity venous stasis ulcers. Her past medical history was significant for refractory venous stasis ulcers of the bilateral lower extremities present for 6 years and morbid obesity. Results: Preoperative venous duplex demonstrated severe venous insufficiency of the superficial and deep systems, but a venous aneurysm was not appreciated. During the high ligation of the right saphenofemoral junction, a 3 × 4 × 5 cm aneurysm was encountered. Repair consisted of aneurysm resection, high ligation of the greater saphenous vein, dissociation of the great saphenous and anterior saphenous veins, and stab phlebectomy of large varicose veins of the thigh and lower leg. The patient recovered uneventfully and experienced complete healing of the venous stasis ulcer in several weeks. Conclusion: Superficial venous aneurysms of the lower extremity are rare and can be often missed on preoperative duplex ultrasound imaging. Large diameter measurements of the proximal greater saphenous vein and obesity increase the risk of misdiagnosing venous aneurysms with duplex imaging; therefore, clinical suspicion must remain high. These aneurysms can be associated with significant symptoms for which repair is indicated. PMID:28255445

  19. Co-Activity during Maximum Voluntary Contraction: A Study of Four Lower-Extremity Muscles in Children with and without Cerebral Palsy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tedroff, Kristina; Knutson, Loretta M.; Soderberg, Gary L.

    2008-01-01

    This study was designed to determine whether children with cerebral palsy (CP) showed more co-activity than comparison children in non-prime mover muscles with regard to the prime mover during maximum voluntary isometric contraction (MVIC) of four lower-extremity muscles. Fourteen children with spastic diplegic CP (10 males, four females; age…

  20. Relationship of lower extremity alignment during the wall squat and single-leg jump: assessment of single-leg landing using three-dimensional motion analysis

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Manabu; Matsumoto, Takaaki; Ono, Susumu; Koseki, Hirohisa; Watarai, Koji

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between malalignment and lower-extremity injury and to determine the optimal dynamic alignment of the lower extremity with wall squats. [Subjects and Methods] Healthy individuals from one therapy school were enrolled and assigned to a wall squat normal or abnormal group based on their forms during wall squats. The abnormal group was found to be more prone to lower-extremity injury on three-dimensional motion analysis. Eight students from each group were randomly chosen for the study. The effects of single-leg landing movements were assessed using three-dimensional motion analysis. [Results] In the sagittal plane, significant flexion of the hip and knee joints occurred 0.02 and 0.04 seconds after initial foot contact with the ground in the normal and abnormal groups, respectively. In the frontal plane, significant adduction of the hip joint occurred at 0.07 seconds in the abnormal group. [Conclusion] The abnormal group tended to display later flexion of the hip and knee joints and narrower hip, knee, and ankle range of motion than the normal group, suggesting that dynamic alignment of the lower extremity in the abnormal group likely made them susceptible to injury. PMID:27390393

  1. The Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System: risk stratification based on wound, ischemia, and foot infection (WIfI).

    PubMed

    Mills, Joseph L; Conte, Michael S; Armstrong, David G; Pomposelli, Frank B; Schanzer, Andres; Sidawy, Anton N; Andros, George

    2014-01-01

    Critical limb ischemia, first defined in 1982, was intended to delineate a subgroup of patients with a threatened lower extremity primarily because of chronic ischemia. It was the intent of the original authors that patients with diabetes be excluded or analyzed separately. The Fontaine and Rutherford Systems have been used to classify risk of amputation and likelihood of benefit from revascularization by subcategorizing patients into two groups: ischemic rest pain and tissue loss. Due to demographic shifts over the last 40 years, especially a dramatic rise in the incidence of diabetes mellitus and rapidly expanding techniques of revascularization, it has become increasingly difficult to perform meaningful outcomes analysis for patients with threatened limbs using these existing classification systems. Particularly in patients with diabetes, limb threat is part of a broad disease spectrum. Perfusion is only one determinant of outcome; wound extent and the presence and severity of infection also greatly impact the threat to a limb. Therefore, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Guidelines Committee undertook the task of creating a new classification of the threatened lower extremity that reflects these important considerations. We term this new framework, the Society for Vascular Surgery Lower Extremity Threatened Limb Classification System. Risk stratification is based on three major factors that impact amputation risk and clinical management: Wound, Ischemia, and foot Infection (WIfI). The implementation of this classification system is intended to permit more meaningful analysis of outcomes for various forms of therapy in this challenging, but heterogeneous population.

  2. Prospective multicenter study of quality of life before and after lower extremity vein bypass in 1404 patients with critical limb ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Louis L.; Moneta, Gregory L.; Conte, Michael S.; Bandyk, Dennis F.; Clowes, Alexander W.; Seely, B. Lynn

    2010-01-01

    Background Patients with critical limb ischemia (CLI) have multiple comorbidities and limited life spans. The ability of infrainguinal vein bypass to improve quality of life (QoL) in patients with CLI has therefore been questioned. Prospective preoperative and postoperative QoL data for patients undergoing lower extremity vein bypass for CLI are presented. Methods A validated, disease-specific QoL questionnaire (VascuQoL) with activity, symptom, pain, emotional, and social domains and responses scored 1 (lowest QoL) to 7 (best QoL) was administered before surgery and at 3 and 12 months after lower extremity vein bypass for CLI. Changes in QoL at 3 and 12 months after lower extremity vein bypass and multiple predetermined variables potentially influencing QoL after lower extremity vein bypass were analyzed to determine the effect of lower extremity vein bypass on QoL in CLI patients. Results A total of 1404 patients had lower extremity vein bypass for CLI at 83 centers in the United States and Canada as part of the PREVENT III clinical trial. Surveys were completed in 1296 patients at baseline, 862 patients at 3 months, and 732 patients at 12 months. The global QoL score (mean ± SD) was 2.8 ± 1.1 at baseline and was 4.7 ± 1.4 and 5.1 ± 1.4 at 3 and 12 months, respectively. Mean changes from baseline at 3 and 12 months were statistically significant (P < .0001). Improved QoL scores extended across all domains. Diabetes and the development of graft-related events were associated with decreased improvement in QoL scores, though the mean relative change from baseline remained positive. Conclusions Patients with CLI have a low QoL at baseline that is improved at 3 and 12 months after lower extremity vein bypass. QoL improvements are lower in diabetic patients and those who develop graft-related events. Successful revascularization can be expected to improve QoL in patients with CLI, with benefits that are sustained to at least 1 year. PMID:17098529

  3. The effects of horseback riding simulator exercises on the muscle activity of the lower extremities according to changes in arm posture

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jungseo; Lee, Sangyong; Lee, Daehee

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study aimed to determine the effects of horseback riding simulator exercise on the muscle activities of the lower extremities according to changes in arm posture. [Subjects] The subjects of this study were 30 normal adult males and females. [Methods] The horseback riding simulator exercise used a horseback riding simulator device; two arm postures were used, posture 1 (holding the handle of the device) and posture 2 (crossing both arms, with both hands on the shoulders). Electromyography was used to compare the muscle activities of the rectus femoris, biceps femoris, and hip adductors in the lower extremities. [Results] Posture 2 had significantly higher muscle activity than posture 1. [Conclusion] Posture 2, which entailed crossing both arms with both hands on the shoulders, was an effective intervention for improved muscle activity in the hip adductors. PMID:26504280

  4. Effects of Low-Impact Dance on Blood Biochemistry, Bone Mineral Density, the Joint Range of Motion of Lower Extremities, Knee Extension Torque, and Fall in Females.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hui Ying; Tu, Jui Hung; Hsu, Chin Hsing; Tsao, Te Hung

    2016-01-01

    The effect of low-impact dance on blood metabolites, the joint range of motion (ROM) of the lower extremities, knee extension torque, bone mass density (BMD), the number of falls, and the confidence to perform daily activities (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale [MFES]) was examined in older sedentary women (age: 59 ± 4 years) before and after a 16-week intervention. Results showed that the average score for the MFES, some parameters of blood chemistry, and joint ROM were significantly improved after low-impact intervention. In addition to improvements in blood lipids and body fat percentages, the increases shown in the parameters regarding the lower extremities may contribute to confidence in performing common daily activities in older women, although the number of falls did not significantly differ between the two groups during the 16-week period.

  5. Sixty-four-slice CT angiography to determine the three dimensional relationships of vascular and soft tissue wounds in lower extremity war time injuries.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer M; Fox, Charles J; Brazaitis, Michael P; Via, Kathy; Garcia, Roman; Feuerstein, Irwin M

    2010-01-01

    This article analyzes the use and benefits of the 64-slice CT scanner in determining the 3D relationships of vascular and soft tissue wounds in lower extremity war time injuries. A brief overview of CT scanning is given as well as the techniques used to produce the images needed for diagnosis. The series follows two similar cases of war time injury patients at the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The first case is a 30-year-old active duty male, who presented with multiple trauma from a motor vehicle accident because of an improvised explosive device (IED) blast, sustaining substantial lower extremity injuries. The second case is a 34-year-old active duty male, who presented with multiple trauma blast injuries. Both cases were of interest because the vasculature was found to be very close to the surface of the wound, which put the arteries at risk for rupture and for iatrogenic injury during repeated debridements.

  6. Feasibility and outcomes of a classical Pilates program on lower extremity strength, posture, balance, gait, and quality of life in someone with impairments due to a stroke.

    PubMed

    Shea, Sarah; Moriello, Gabriele

    2014-07-01

    Pilates is a method that can potentially be used for stroke rehabilitation to address impairments in gait, balance, strength, and posture. The purpose of this case report was to document the feasibility of using Pilates and to describe outcomes of a 9-month program on lower extremity strength, balance, posture, gait, and quality of life in an individual with stroke. The participant was taught Pilates exercises up to two times per week for nine months in addition to traditional rehabilitation in the United States. Outcomes were assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS), Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), GAITRite System(®), 5 repetition sit-to-stand test (STST), and flexicurve. Improvements were found in balance, lower extremity strength, and quality of life. Posture and gait speed remained the same. While these changes cannot be specifically attributed to the intervention, Pilates may have added to his overall rehabilitation program and with some modifications was feasible to use in someone with a stroke.

  7. 24–48 hour preoperative “surveillance” lower extremity venous Doppler's: Aren’t they worthwhile prior to spine surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Epstein, Nancy E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Most previous studies focused on the utility of Doppler surveillance to determine the incidence of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) following spine surgery. Here, we utilized Doppler surveillance to assess the frequency of DVT prior to spine surgery. Methods: We asked, how often do patients exhibit preoperative DVT? To answer this, for over a 7-month period, bilateral lower extremity venous Doppler's were prospectively obtained 24–48 hours prior to a variety of spinal operations among 45 patients. This did not include an analysis of postoperative venous Doppler's/incidence of pulmonary embolism for these patients. Results: Of the 45 patients, 3 (6.7%) exhibited preoperative positive/abnormal venous duplex studies (unilaterally) that led to cancellation of spinal surgery. One patient, a 56-year-old female, with a C6-C7 cervical disc, demonstrated a proximal right lower extremity DVT; she required full-dose anticoagulation and her surgery was cancelled. In two cases, a 42-year-old female and a 55-year-old male, exhibited DVT in the right posterior tibial and left peroneal veins respectively; both operations were cancelled, and they were placed on anticoagulants by their internists. Conclusions: Over a 7-month period, prospective “surveillance Dopplers” of both lower extremities obtained 24–48 hours prior to spinal surgery documented 3 (6.7%) positive studies out of a series of 45 patients. One instance of DVT was proximal (e.g. femoral in local) whereas 2 were distal. These data showed that preoperative surveillance Doppler of both lower extremities was “worthwhile.” However, performing these studies earlier than 24-48 hrs prior to surgery would help avoid last minute cancellations. PMID:28144488

  8. Body Mass Index: Surgical Site Infections and Mortality After Lower Extremity Bypass from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program 2005-2007

    PubMed Central

    Giles, Kristina A.; Hamdan, Allen D.; Pomposelli, Frank B.; Wyers, Mark C.; Siracuse, Jeffrey J.; Schermerhorn, Marc L.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives Patients undergoing lower extremity bypass are at high risk for surgical site infections (SSI). We examine lower extremity bypasses by graft origin and body mass index (BMI) classification to analyze differences in postoperative mortality and SSI occurrence. Methods The 2005-2007 National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), a multi-institutional risk-adjusted database, was queried to compare perioperative mortality (30-day), overall morbidity, and SSIs after lower extremity arterial bypass for peripheral arterial disease. Bypass was stratified by graft origin as aorto-iliac, femoral, or popliteal. Patient demographics, comorbidities, operative, and post-operative occurrences were analyzed. Results There were 7,595 bypasses performed (1,596 aorto-iliac, 5,483 femoral, and 516 popliteal origin). Mortality was similar regardless of bypass origin (2.8%, 2.4%, & 2.7%, P=.57). Surgical site infections occurred in 11% of overall cases (10%, 11%, & 11%, P=.47). Graft failure was significantly associated with postoperative SSI occurrence (OR 2.4, 95%CI 1.9-3.1, P<.001) as was postoperative sepsis (OR 6.5, 95%CI 5.1-8.3, P<.001). Independent predictors of mortality were age, aorto-iliac bypass origin, underweight, normal weight, or morbid obesity (compared to overweight and obese), end stage renal disease, poor preoperative functional status, preoperative sepsis, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, hypoalbuminemia, and cardiac disease. Independent predictors of SSI were obesity, diabetes, poor preoperative functional status, a history of smoking, and female gender. Conclusions Surgical site infections occur frequently after lower extremity bypass regardless of bypass origin and are associated with early graft failure and sepsis. Obesity predicts postoperative SSI. Mortality risk was greatest in the underweight followed by morbidly obese and normal weight patients, while overweight and mild-moderate obesity were associated with the lowest mortality

  9. Effect of Roy’s Adaptation Model-Guided Education on Coping Strategies of the Veterans with Lower Extremities Amputation: A Double-Blind Randomized Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Farsi, Zahra; Azarmi, Somayeh

    2016-01-01

    Background: Any defect in the extremities of the body can affect different life aspects. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of Roy’s adaptation model-guided education on coping strategies of the veterans with lower extremities amputation. Methods: In a double-blind randomized controlled clinical trial, 60 veterans with lower extremities amputation referring to Kowsar Orthotics and Prosthetics Center of Veterans Clinic in Tehran, Iran were recruited using convenience method and randomly assigned to intervention and control groups in 2013-2014. Lazarus and Folkman coping strategies questionnaire was used to collect the data. After completing the questionnaires in both groups, maladaptive behaviours were determined in the intervention group and an education program based on Roy’s adaptation model was implemented. After 2 months, both groups completed the questionnaires again. Data were analyzed using SPSS software. Results: Independent T-test showed that the score of the dimensions of coping strategies did not have a statistically significant difference between the intervention and control groups in the pre-intervention stage (P>0.05). This test showed a statistically significant difference between the two groups in the post-intervention stage in terms of the scores of different dimensions of coping strategies (P>0.05), except in dimensions of social support seeking and positive appraisal (P>0.05). Conclusion: The findings of this research indicated that the Roy’s adaptation model-guided education improved the majority of coping strategies in veterans with lower extremities amputation. It is recommended that further interventions based on Roy’s adaptation model should be performed to improve the coping of the veterans with lower extremities amputation. Trial Registration Number: IRCT2014081118763N1 PMID:27218110

  10. [An assessment of the efficacy of intravenous monotherapy with the preparation solcoseryl in patients with arteriosclerosis obliterans of the vessels of the lower extremities].

    PubMed

    Luk'ianov, Iu V; Shlomin, V V; Sokurenko, G Iu; Didenko, Iu P; Orlov, N N; Kondrat'ev, V M; Batalin, I V

    2000-01-01

    The authors share their experiences with using Solcoseryl in treatment of 158 patients with obliterating atherosclerosis of the lower extremity vessels. This treatment was found to be very effective. A scheme of the treatment is proposed after which the improved quality of life retains during not less than 6 months in 93% of the patients. The accessory maintenance therapy with minimum doses of aspirin and nicotinic acid is enough between the courses of treatment with Solcoseryl.

  11. Effects of dynamic warm-up with and without a weighted vest on lower extremity power performance of high school male athletes.

    PubMed

    Reiman, Michael P; Peintner, Ashley M; Boehner, Amber L; Cameron, Cori N; Murphy, Jessica R; Carter, John W

    2010-12-01

    This study examined lower extremity power performance, using the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test, after a dynamic warm-up with (resisted) and without (nonresisted) a weighted vest. Sixteen (n = 16) high school male football players, ages 14-18 years, participated in 2 randomly ordered testing sessions. One session involved performing the team's standard dynamic warm-up while wearing a vest weighted at 5% of the individual athlete's body weight before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The second session involved performing the same dynamic warm-up without wearing a weighted vest before performing 3 trials of the Margaria-Kalamen Power Test. The warm-up performed by the athletes consisted of various lower extremity dynamic movements over a 5-minute period. No significant difference was found in power performance between the resisted and nonresisted dynamic warm-up protocols (p > 0.05). The use of a dynamic warm-up with a vest weighted at 5% of the athlete's body weight was not advantageous for increasing lower extremity power output in this study. The results of this study suggest that resisted dynamic warm-up protocols may not augment the production of power performance in high school football players.

  12. The intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of lower extremity muscle strength assessment of healthy adults using a hand held dynamometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seong-Gil; Lee, Yun-Seob

    2015-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine the intra- and inter-rater reliabilities of lower extremity muscle strength assessment of healthy adults using hand held dynamometer. [Subjects and Methods] A total of 55 students (19 males and 36 females) in Y University in Gyeongsangnam-do, South Korea participated in this study. Lower extremity muscle strength was measured using a hand-held dynamometer (Commander Muscle Tester, JTech, USA). Flexion and extension strengths of the hip joint, the knee joint, and the ankle joint were measured. [Results] The intra-rater reliabilities were excellent (above 0.9) for the flexion and extension strengths of the ankle, knee, and hip joints. The inter-rater reliabilities were also excellent (above 0.8) for the flexion and extension strengths of the ankle, knee, and hip joint. [Conclusion] Lower extremity muscle strength assessment using a hand-held dynamometer provided consistent results when conducted by different examiners and when measured several times. Therefore, this method is a useful way of deriving objective and quantitative measurement values.

  13. Effects of dopamine replacement therapy on lower extremity kinetics and kinematics during a rapid force production task in persons with Parkinson disease.

    PubMed

    Foreman, K Bo; Singer, Madeline L; Addison, Odessa; Marcus, Robin L; LaStayo, Paul C; Dibble, Leland E

    2014-01-01

    Postural instability appears to be a dopamine resistance motor deficit in persons with Parkinson disease (PD); however, little is known about the effects of dopamine replacement on the relative biomechanical contributions of individual lower extremity joints during postural control tasks. To gain insight, we examined persons with PD using both clinical and laboratory measures. For a clinical measure of motor severity we utilized the Unified Parkinson Disease Rating Scale motor subsection during both OFF and ON medication conditions. For the laboratory measure we utilized data gathered during a rapid lower extremity force production task. Kinematic and kinetic variables at the hip, knee, and ankle were gathered during a counter movement jump during both OFF and ON medication conditions. Sixteen persons with PD with a median Hoehn and Yahr severity of 2.5 completed the study. Medication resulted in significant improvements of angular displacement for the hip, knee, and ankle. Furthermore, significant improvements were revealed only at the hip for peak net moments and average angular velocity compared to the OFF medication condition. These results suggest that dopamine replacement medication result in decreased clinical motor disease severity and have a greater influence on kinetics and kinematics proximally. This proximally focused improvement may be due to active recruitment of muscle force and reductions in passive restraint during lower extremity rapid force production.

  14. Effects of sensorimotor foot training on the symmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities of patients in the chronic phase after stroke

    PubMed Central

    Goliwas, Magdalena; Kocur, Piotr; Furmaniuk, Lech; Majchrzycki, Marian; Wiernicka, Marzena; Lewandowski, Jacek

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effects of sensorimotor foot stimulation on the symmetry of weight distribution on the feet of patients in the chronic post-stroke phase. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a prospective, single blind, randomized controlled trial. In the study we examined patients with chronic stroke (post-stroke duration > 1 year). They were randomly allocated to the study group (n=8) or to the control group (n=12). Both groups completed a standard six-week rehabilitation programme. In the study group, the standard rehabilitation programme was supplemented with sensorimotor foot stimulation training. Each patient underwent two assessments of symmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities with and without visual control, on a treadmill, with stabilometry measurements, and under static conditions. [Results] Only the study group demonstrated a significant increase in the weight placed on the leg directly affected by stroke, and a reduction in asymmetry of weight-bearing on the lower extremities. [Conclusion] Sensorimotor stimulation of the feet enhanced of weight bearing on the foot on the side of the body directly affected by stroke, and a decreased asymmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities of patients in the chronic post-stroke phase. PMID:26504326

  15. Effects of sensorimotor foot training on the symmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities of patients in the chronic phase after stroke.

    PubMed

    Goliwas, Magdalena; Kocur, Piotr; Furmaniuk, Lech; Majchrzycki, Marian; Wiernicka, Marzena; Lewandowski, Jacek

    2015-09-01

    [Purpose] To assess the effects of sensorimotor foot stimulation on the symmetry of weight distribution on the feet of patients in the chronic post-stroke phase. [Subjects and Methods] This study was a prospective, single blind, randomized controlled trial. In the study we examined patients with chronic stroke (post-stroke duration > 1 year). They were randomly allocated to the study group (n=8) or to the control group (n=12). Both groups completed a standard six-week rehabilitation programme. In the study group, the standard rehabilitation programme was supplemented with sensorimotor foot stimulation training. Each patient underwent two assessments of symmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities with and without visual control, on a treadmill, with stabilometry measurements, and under static conditions. [Results] Only the study group demonstrated a significant increase in the weight placed on the leg directly affected by stroke, and a reduction in asymmetry of weight-bearing on the lower extremities. [Conclusion] Sensorimotor stimulation of the feet enhanced of weight bearing on the foot on the side of the body directly affected by stroke, and a decreased asymmetry of weight distribution on the lower extremities of patients in the chronic post-stroke phase.

  16. Sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Smita S; Romanelli, Paolo; Kirsner, Robert S

    2009-11-01

    Sarcoidosis--a chronic, multisystem disease of unknown etiology characterized by noncaseating granulomas--may cause ulcerative lesions, particularly in African American women. A case of ulcerative sarcoidosis mimicking a venous ulcer is presented. The patient is a 44-year-old African American hypertensive, obese woman with a nonhealing medially based lower leg ulcer of 3 years' duration clinically consistent with a venous ulcer. The ulcer did not heal with compression therapy and pentoxifylline. Subsequent biopsies showed granulomatous inflammation consistent with sarcoidosis. When intralesional triamcinolone was added to compression therapy, the ulcer resolved after 3 months. Given its propensity toward formation on the lower extremities and ulcerative and atrophic appearance, ulcerative sarcoidosis should be considered in the differential diagnosis of a venous ulcer refractory to standard therapy, especially in African American women.

  17. The association of meniscal status, lower extremity alignment, and body mass index with chondrosis at the time of revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Brophy, Robert H.; Haas, Amanda K.; Huston, Laura J.; Nwosu, Sam K.; Wright, Rick W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Knees undergoing revision ACL reconstruction (rACLR) have a high prevalence of articular cartilage lesions. Hypothesis The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that the prevalence of chondrosis at the time of rACLR is associated with meniscus status and lower extremity alignment. Study design Cross sectional study. Methods Data from the prospective Multicenter ACL Revision Study (MARS) cohort was reviewed to identify patients with pre-operative lower extremity alignment films. Lower extremity alignment was defined by the weight bearing line (WBL) as a percentage of the tibial plateau width, while the chondral and meniscal status of each weight bearing compartment was recorded at the time of surgery. Multivariable proportional odds models were constructed and adjusted for relevant factors in order to examine which risk factors were independently associated with the degree of medial and lateral compartment chondrosis. Results The cohort included 246 patients with lower extremity alignment films at the time of rACLR. Average (SD) patient age was 26.9 (9.5) years with a BMI of 26.4 (4.6). The medial compartment had more chondrosis (Grade 2/3: 42%, Grade 4: 6.5%) than the lateral compartment (Grade 2/3: 26%, Grade 4: 6.5%). Disruption of the meniscus was noted in 35% of patients on the medial side and 16% in the lateral side. The average (SD) WBL was measured to be 0.43 (0.13). Medial compartment chondrosis was associated with BMI (p=0.025), alignment (p=0.002), and medial meniscus status (p=0.001). None of the knees with the WBL lateral to 0.625 had Grade 4 chondrosis in the medial compartment. Lateral compartment chondrosis was significantly associated with age (p=0.013) and lateral meniscus status (p<0.001). Subjects with ‘intact’ menisci were found to decrease their odds of having chondrosis by 64–84%. Conclusions The status of articular cartilage in the tibiofemoral compartments at the time of rACLR is related to meniscal status. Lower

  18. Unexpected Swelling of Stiff DNA in a Polydisperse Crowded Environment.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hongsuk; Toan, Ngo Minh; Hyeon, Changbong; Thirumalai, D

    2015-09-02

    We investigate the conformations of DNA-like stiff chains, characterized by contour length (L) and persistence length (lp), in a variety of crowded environments containing monodisperse soft spherical (SS) and spherocylindrical (SC) particles, a mixture of SS and SC, and a milieu mimicking the composition of proteins in the Escherichia coli cytoplasm. The stiff chain, whose size modestly increases in SS crowders up to ϕ ≈ 0.1, is considerably more compact at low volume fractions (ϕ ≤ 0.2) in monodisperse SC particles than in a medium containing SS particles. A 1:1 mixture of SS and SC crowders induces greater chain compaction than the pure SS or SC crowders at the same ϕ, with the effect being highly nonadditive. We also discover a counterintuitive result that the polydisperse crowding environment, mimicking the composition of a cell lysate, swells the DNA-like polymer, which is in stark contrast to the size reduction of flexible polymers in the same milieu. Trapping of the stiff chain in a fluctuating tube-like environment created by large-sized crowders explains the dramatic increase in size and persistence length of the stiff chain. In the polydisperse medium, mimicking the cellular environment, the size of the DNA (or related RNA) is determined by L/lp. At low L/lp, the size of the polymer is unaffected, whereas there is a dramatic swelling at an intermediate value of L/lp. We use these results to provide insights into recent experiments on crowding effects on RNA and also make testable predictions.

  19. Non-isothermal extrudate swell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konaganti, Vinod Kumar; Derakhshandeh, Maziar; Ebrahimi, Marzieh; Mitsoulis, Evan; Hatzikiriakos, Savvas G.

    2016-12-01

    The non-isothermal extrudate swell of a high molecular weight high-density polyethylene (HDPE) in long capillary and slit dies is studied numerically (ANSYS POLYFLOW®) using an integral K-BKZ constitutive model including crystallization kinetics, determined experimentally. The Nakamura model is used for crystallization of the HDPE, where the crystallization rate parameter is evaluated by using the well-known Ziabicki equation. This non-isothermal extrudate swell phenomenon is simulated using the pseudo-time integral K-BKZ model with the Wagner damping function along with the differential form of the Nakamura model to account for the crystallization of the extrudate. The swell measurements were carried out under non-isothermal conditions by extruding the polymer melt at 200 °C through long capillary and slit dies to ambient air at 25 °C, 110 °C, and 200 °C. The numerical results are found to be in excellent agreement with experimental observations.

  20. Chronic pain in the pelvic area or lower extremities after rectal cancer treatment and its impact on quality of life: a population-based cross-sectional study.

    PubMed

    Feddern, Marie-Louise; Jensen, Troels Staehelin; Laurberg, Søren

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this investigation was to examine the prevalence of and factors associated with chronic pain in the pelvic area or lower extremities after rectal cancer treatment and its impact on quality of life (QoL). This is a population-based cross-sectional study of chronic pain and QoL in patients treated for rectal cancer from 2001 to 2007. A modified version of the Brief Descriptive Danish Pain Questionnaire and the European Organization for Research and Treatment of Cancer QLQ-C30 questionnaire were mailed to 1713 Danish patients. Informative answers were obtained from 1369 patients (80%). A total of 426 patients (31%) reported chronic pain in the pelvic area or lower extremities, 173 (41%) of whom had daily pain. Pain in other parts of the body was associated with the presence of pain in the pelvic region (odds ratio [OR] 4.81 [3.63-6.38], P < 0.001). Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed an association with chronic pain in female patients (OR 1.91 [1.51-2.43], P < 0.001) and in those who received radio(chemo)therapy (OR 1.31 [1.01-1.7], P = 0.041) or underwent abdominoperineal excision (OR 1.71 [1.19-2.44], P = 0.003), total mesorectal excision (OR 1.39 [1.01-1.90], P = 0.041), and Hartmann procedure (OR 1.72 [1.04-2.84], P = 0.33) compared with partial mesorectal excision. Ordinal regression analysis showed a strong association between all QoL subgroups and pelvic pain. Chronic pain in the pelvic region or lower extremities after rectal cancer treatment is a common but largely neglected problem that is associated with female gender, type of surgery, radio(chemo)therapy, and young age, all of which impact the patient's QoL.

  1. Myositis ossificans: the mimicker

    PubMed Central

    Govindarajan, Arunkumar; Sarawagi, Radha; Prakash, Manikka Lakshmanan

    2013-01-01

    A 14-year-old boy presented with upper backache and a painful swelling in the right paraspinal region for 7 days. He had no history of trauma. MRI showed a non-specific ill-defined heterogeneous lesion, which showed intense postcontrast enhancement. Ultrasonogram showed a peripheral sheet of calcification around the lesion. A CT scan showed a faint rim of calcification, which increased in thickness over weeks, confirming the diagnosis as myositis ossificans. We present our approach to the case and also review the imaging features of different stages of the disease process and their differentials. PMID:24326436

  2. Swelling

    MedlinePlus

    ... the following: Acute glomerulonephritis Burns , including sunburn Chronic kidney disease Heart failure Liver failure from cirrhosis Nephrotic syndrome Poor nutrition Pregnancy Thyroid disease Too little albumin in the blood ( ...

  3. Three Patients With Lower Extremity Tumors Referred Through Medical Channels to Physical Therapists: A Description of Clinical Reasoning, Screening, and Collaborative Practice.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Seth; Denninger, Thomas; Porter, Scott

    2017-03-29

    Study Design Resident's case problem. Background Although rare in the general population, bone and soft tissue tumors may be more frequently encountered in patients seeking physical therapy because of the propensity to mimic commonly treated musculoskeletal disorders. Screening for tumors requires the physical therapist be attentive to unexpected findings. The purpose of this paper was to describe the clinical reasoning and screening processes of physical therapists that facilitated the timely recognition of bone and soft tumors in 3 patients referred through medical channels. Diagnosis The referral diagnoses were lumbar spinal stenosis, calcaneal bursitis, and post-excisional quadriceps weakness. When comprehensively examined, each of the patients had either atypical examination findings or failed to respond to physical therapy treatment. After the physical therapists alerted the appropriate medical providers of the examination findings, diagnoses of high grade osteosarcoma of the pelvis, chondroma of the knee, and liposarcoma of the thigh followed. Discussion Tumors of the lower extremity can initially mimic common musculoskeletal pathology. Physical therapists must remain alert for red flags, atypical signs and symptoms, and poor responses to treatment even when patients are referred through medical channels. Particular attention is necessary in the case of unusual lower extremity symptoms, where over half of primary malignant tumors occur. Level of Evidence IV. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther, Epub 29 Mar 2017. doi:10.2519/jospt.2017.7037.

  4. Remote ischaemic conditioning in the context of type 2 diabetes and neuropathy: the case for repeat application as a novel therapy for lower extremity ulceration.

    PubMed

    Epps, J A; Smart, N A

    2016-09-09

    An emerging treatment modality for reducing damage caused by ischaemia-reperfusion injury is ischaemic conditioning. This technique induces short periods of ischaemia that have been found to protect against a more significant ischaemic insult. Remote ischaemic conditioning (RIC) can be administered more conveniently and safely, by inflation of a pneumatic blood pressure cuff to a suprasystolic pressure on a limb. Protection is then transferred to a remote organ via humoral and neural pathways. The diabetic state is particularly vulnerable to ischaemia-reperfusion injury, and ischaemia is a significant cause of many diabetic complications, including the diabetic foot. Despite this, studies utilising ischaemic conditioning and RIC in type 2 diabetes have often been disappointing. A newer strategy, repeat RIC, involves the repeated application of short periods of limb ischaemia over days or weeks. It has been demonstrated that this improves endothelial function, skin microcirculation, and modulates the systemic inflammatory response. Repeat RIC was recently shown to be beneficial for healing in lower extremity diabetic ulcers. This article summarises the mechanisms of RIC, and the impact that type 2 diabetes may have upon these, with the role of neural mechanisms in the context of diabetic neuropathy a focus. Repeat RIC may show more promise than RIC in type 2 diabetes, and its potential mechanisms and applications will also be explored. Considering the high costs, rates of chronicity and serious complications resulting from diabetic lower extremity ulceration, repeat RIC has the potential to be an effective novel advanced therapy for this condition.

  5. Premature Epiphyseal Closure of the Lower Extremities Contributing to Short Stature after cis-Retinoic Acid Therapy in Medulloblastoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Noyes, Jessica J.; Levine, Michael A.; Belasco, Jean B.; Mostoufi-Moab, Sogol

    2015-01-01

    Background Prolonged cis-Retinoic Acid (cis-RA) exposure contributes to premature epiphyseal closure. Cis-RA is administered in various treatment regimens for pediatric cancers, thus increasing the risk for bone deformities and compromised growth. Results We present a case of premature epiphyseal closure in a 9 year-old female with history of medulloblastoma and treatment with a multimodal regimen including cis-RA. She was subsequently diagnosed with radiation-induced endocrine late effects including hypothyroidism and growth hormone deficiency (GHD). Seven months after initiation of GH, increased prominence of wrists and knees combined with deceleration in growth velocity prompted further evaluation; radiographs revealed bilateral premature closure of distal femur and proximal tibia growth plates despite normal left wrist bone age. Conclusion High doses of vitamin A and its analogs are linked to premature closure of lower extremity growth plates in animals and children. Pediatric brain tumor patients are at increased risk of growth failure due to concurrent radiation-induced GHD, damage to spinal bones, and cis-RA associated premature closure of lower extremity growth plates, with significant reduction in adult stature. A better appreciation of the detrimental effect of cis-RA on the growing skeleton is needed to monitor at-risk patients and to provide timely interventions. PMID:26457578

  6. Gabapentin Does Not Appear to Improve Postoperative Pain and Sleep Patterns in Patients Who Concomitantly Receive Regional Anesthesia for Lower Extremity Orthopedic Surgery: A Randomized Control Trial

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Shawn; Reilly, Mark C.; Shulman, Steven

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, gabapentin has gained popularity as an adjuvant therapy for the treatment of postoperative pain. Numerous studies have shown a decrease in pain score, even with immediate postoperative activity, which is significant for early post-op ambulation and regaining functionality sooner. However, studies have been in conclusive in patients undergoing lower extremity orthopedic surgery. For this reason, we hoped to study the effect of gabapentin on postoperative pain in patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, total hip arthroplasty, or a hip fracture repair. This was done in the setting of ensuring adequate postoperative analgesia with regional blocks and opioid PCA, as is protocol at our institution. Given the sedative effects of gabapentin and the potential for improving postoperative sleep patterns, we also studied the drug's effect on this aspect of our patient's postoperative course. We utilized the Pittsburg Sleep Quality Index and Visual Analog Scale for pain to obtain a more objective standardized score amongst our study population. Our results indicate that gabapentin does not offer any additional relief in pain or improve sleep habits in patients who have received either a femoral or lumbar plexus block for lower extremity orthopedic surgery. This trial is registered with NCT01546857. PMID:28348503

  7. Distally based saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap combined with vac therapy for soft tissue reconstruction and hardware salvage in the lower extremities.

    PubMed

    Wen, Gen; Wang, Chun-Yang; Chai, Yi-Min; Cheng, Liang; Chen, Ming; Yi-Min, L V

    2013-11-01

    The complex wound with the exposed hardware and infection is one of the common complications after the internal fixation of the tibia fracture. The salvage of hardware and reconstruction of soft tissue defect remain challenging. In this report, we presented our experience on the use of the distally based saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap combined with vacuum-assisted closure (VAC) therapy for the coverage of the soft tissue defect and the exposed hardware in the lower extremity with fracture. Between January 2008 and July 2010, seven patients underwent the VAC therapy followed by transferring a reversed saphenous neurocutaneous perforator flap for reconstruction of the wound with exposed hardware around the distal tibia. The sizes of the flaps ranged from 6 × 3 cm to 15 × 6 cm. Six flaps survived completely. Partial necrosis occurred in one patient. There were no other complications of repair and donor sites. Bone healing was achieved in all patients. In conclusion, the reversed saphenous neurocutaneous perfortor flaps combined with the VAC therapy might be one of the options to cover the complex wound with exposed hardware in the lower extremities.

  8. Observed Rates of Lower Extremity Stress Fractures After Implementation of the Army Physical Readiness Training Program at JBSA Fort Sam Houston.

    PubMed

    Chalupa, Robyn L; Aberle, Curtis; Johnson, Anthony E

    2016-01-01

    Millions of dollars are lost each year to the US military in medical discharges from injuries sustained in the initial training of recruits. Most medical discharges in recruits are related to musculoskeletal overuse injuries, including stress fractures. Any strategies that can reduce injury rates are also likely to reduce rates of medical discharge. This study evaluated the Army Physical Readiness Training (PRT) program which was established to provide a method of physical fitness training that would reduce the number of preventable injuries. We conducted a retrospective study to evaluate the number of lower extremity stress fractures that were diagnosed in the 6 months prior to and 6 months following the implementation of the PRT program. Electronic medical records were queried for specific diagnoses of stress fractures to the pelvis, femoral neck, femoral shaft, tibia, fibula, tarsals and metatarsals. The observed number of diagnoses in each time period were compared using the χ² method. Decrease was shown not only in the overall occurrence of stress fractures, but specifically in the occurrence of stress fractures of the femoral neck, femoral shaft, and tarsals. Our study was able to show a correlation between the PRT program and a decrease in the observed occurrence of lower extremity stress fractures.

  9. Diabetic Myonecrosis: A Rare Complication of Diabetes Mellitus Mimicking Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Khanna, Himanshu K.; Stevens, Andrew C.

    2017-01-01

    Patient: Male, 54 Final Diagnosis: Diabetic myonecrosis Symptoms: Calf pain and swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: — Specialty: Internal Medicine Objective: Rare disease Background: Diabetic myonecrosis is an uncommon complication of long-standing poorly controlled diabetes mellitus. It presents as acute non-traumatic swelling and pain of the lower extremity, which can mimic deep vein thrombosis (DVT). The clinical course is usually self-limiting and patients respond well to supportive medical therapy. Case Report: A 54-year-old male with past medical history of poorly controlled diabetes mellitus type II, hyperlipidemia, gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and remote history of DVT presented to our emergency department with 2-week history of progressively worsening left calf pain and swelling. On physical examination, the patient had increased warmth, edema, erythema, and tenderness in the left calf, with positive Homan’s sign. A lower-extremity venous Doppler was negative for DVT. His creatinine phosphokinase (CPK) level was normal, but hemoglobin A1C was 11.0%, reflective of poor glycemic control. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the left calf revealed a focus of non-enhancement in the gastrocnemius muscle along with increased enhancement of the rest of the muscle, suggestive of diabetic myonecrosis. Conclusions: Diabetic myonecrosis is a rare complication of long-standing diabetes mellitus that can often mimic DVT. Diagnosis can be made on an MRI, and treatment involves strict glycemic control along with antiplatelet therapy and non-steroidal anti-inflammatories (NSAIDs). PMID:28074044

  10. Possible neuro-Sweet disease mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata--case report.

    PubMed

    Akiba, Chihiro; Esaki, Takanori; Ando, Maya; Furuya, Tsuyoshi; Noda, Kazuyuki; Nakao, Yasuaki; Yamamoto, Takuji; Okuma, Yasuyuki; Mori, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    A 62-year-old male presented with a rare case of possible neuro-Sweet Disease (NSD) mimicking brain tumor in the medulla oblongata, manifesting as numbness in the bilateral upper and lower extremities, gait disturbance, dysarthria, and swallowing disturbance which gradually deteriorated over 3 months. Magnetic resonance imaging showed a mass lesion in the medulla oblongata, extending to the upper cervical cord with rim enhancement by gadolinium. The preoperative diagnosis was brain tumor, such as glioma, or inflammatory disease. His neurological symptoms gradually deteriorated, so biopsy was performed through the midline suboccipital approach. Histological examination showed infiltration of inflammatory cells, mainly lymphocytes and macrophages. Human leukocyte antigen typing showed Cw1 and B54 which strongly suggested possible NSD. Steroid pulse therapy was started after surgery and the clinical symptoms improved. Neurosurgeons should be aware of inflammatory disorders such as NSD mimicking brain tumor.

  11. Swelling-resistant nuclear fuel

    DOEpatents

    Arsenlis, Athanasios [Hayward, CA; Satcher, Jr., Joe; Kucheyev, Sergei O [Oakland, CA

    2011-12-27

    A nuclear fuel according to one embodiment includes an assembly of nuclear fuel particles; and continuous open channels defined between at least some of the nuclear fuel particles, wherein the channels are characterized as allowing fission gasses produced in an interior of the assembly to escape from the interior of the assembly to an exterior thereof without causing significant swelling of the assembly. Additional embodiments, including methods, are also presented.

  12. Indolent palatal swelling: Catch 22

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Preeti; Wadhwan, Vijay; Kumar, K. V. Arun; Venkatesh, Arvind; Thapa, Timsy

    2016-01-01

    We present an interesting but intriguing case of an indolent palatal swelling. The lesion was asymptomatic causing little discomfort to the patient and thus was an incidental clinical finding. Provisional diagnosis was a benign, minor salivary gland tumor. Clinical differential diagnoses included benign lymphoepithelial lesion or mucus extravasation phenomenon. Nevertheless, we also considered malignancies such as mucoepidermoid carcinoma, lymphoma, and neoplasm of the maxillary sinus. However, the histopathology revealed a rare clinicopathologic entity prompting immediate treatment of the lesion. PMID:28356700

  13. Influence of Whole-Body Vibration Training Without Visual Feedback on Balance and Lower-Extremity Muscle Strength of the Elderly

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Lai, Chung-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ling; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Lee, Meng-Chih; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of whole-body vibration (WBV) training without visual feedback on balance and lower-extremity muscle strength in the elderly. Elderly subjects who did not exercise regularly participated in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into a WBV with eyes open group, a visual feedback-deprived plus WBV (VFDWBV) group, and a control group (0 Hz, eyes open). WBV training was provided over a 3-month period, 3 times per week for 5 min each session. Balance performance was measured with the limits of stability test, and muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer. A total of 45 elderly subjects with an average age of 69.22 ± 3.97 years, divided into a WBV group (n = 14), a VFDWBV group (n = 17), and a control group (n = 14), completed the trial. Statistically significant differences were found in the balance performance of the 3 groups at different time points (time × group interaction: F = 13.213, P < 0.001), and the VFDWBV group had more improvement in balance than the WBV and control groups. The strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles had time × group interactions: F = 29.604, P < 0.001 and F = 4.684, P = 0.015, respectively; the VFDWBV group had more improvement on lower-extremity muscle strength than the WBV and control groups. The 6-month follow-up showed that the rates of hospital visits for medical services due to falls were 0% in the WBV group (0/14), 0% in the VFDWBV group (0/17), and 28.57% in the control group (4/14). Results showed that WBV training at 20 Hz without visual feedback can significantly improve the balance performance and lower-extremity muscle strength of the elderly. PMID:26844514

  14. Influence of Whole-Body Vibration Training Without Visual Feedback on Balance and Lower-Extremity Muscle Strength of the Elderly: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Shiuan-Yu; Lai, Chung-Liang; Chang, Kai-Ling; Hsu, Pi-Shan; Lee, Meng-Chih; Wang, Chun-Hou

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of whole-body vibration (WBV) training without visual feedback on balance and lower-extremity muscle strength in the elderly.Elderly subjects who did not exercise regularly participated in this study. Subjects were randomly divided into a WBV with eyes open group, a visual feedback-deprived plus WBV (VFDWBV) group, and a control group (0 Hz, eyes open). WBV training was provided over a 3-month period, 3 times per week for 5 min each session. Balance performance was measured with the limits of stability test, and muscle strength was measured with an isokinetic dynamometer.A total of 45 elderly subjects with an average age of 69.22  ±  3.97 years, divided into a WBV group (n = 14), a VFDWBV group (n = 17), and a control group (n = 14), completed the trial. Statistically significant differences were found in the balance performance of the 3 groups at different time points (time × group interaction: F = 13.213, P < 0.001), and the VFDWBV group had more improvement in balance than the WBV and control groups. The strength of the knee extensor and flexor muscles had time × group interactions: F = 29.604, P < 0.001 and F = 4.684, P = 0.015, respectively; the VFDWBV group had more improvement on lower-extremity muscle strength than the WBV and control groups. The 6-month follow-up showed that the rates of hospital visits for medical services due to falls were 0% in the WBV group (0/14), 0% in the VFDWBV group (0/17), and 28.57% in the control group (4/14).Results showed that WBV training at 20  Hz without visual feedback can significantly improve the balance performance and lower-extremity muscle strength of the elderly.

  15. Loading modalities and bone structures at nonweight-bearing upper extremity and weight-bearing lower extremity: a pQCT study of adult female athletes.

    PubMed

    Nikander, Riku; Sievänen, Harri; Uusi-Rasi, Kirsti; Heinonen, Ari; Kannus, Pekka

    2006-10-01

    This cross-sectional study of adult female athletes assessed whether the apparent loading-related differences in bone structure are primarily associated with the loading type or the muscle performance-related joint moments. Several structural variables at shaft sites of the tibia, radius and humerus, and distal sites of the tibia and radius were measured with peripheral quantitative computed tomography (pQCT) among 113 female national level athletes (representing hurdling, volleyball, soccer, racket-sports and swimming) and their 30 nonathletic referents. For the weight-bearing lower extremities, the loading modalities of the above sports were classified into high-impact (hurdling, volleyball), odd-impact (soccer, racket-sports) and repetitive, nonimpact (swimming) loadings; and for the nonweight-bearing upper extremities into high magnitude (functional weightlifting in hurdling and soccer), impact (volleyball, racket-sports) and repetitive, nonimpact (swimming) loadings. As expected, athletes' bone mass was substantially higher at loaded bone sites compared with the nonathletic referents, but more pertinently to the locomotive perspective, the loading-induced additional bone mass seemed to be used to build mechanically strong and appropriate bone structures. Compared with controls, the weight-bearing bone structures of female athletes (swimmers excluded) were characterized by larger diaphysis, thicker cortices and somewhat denser trabecular bone. The athletes' bones at the nonweight-bearing upper extremity were generally larger in cross-sectional area. The estimated indices of joint moment (muscle force x estimated lever arm) were explained from 29% to 50%, and the loading modalities from 8% to 25%, of the variance in most bone variables (P < 0.05) of the tibia (shaft and distal site). In contrast to the weight-bearing tibia, only the estimated joint moment was positively associated (P < 0.05) with the structural characteristics of the radius and humerus

  16. The Use of Color-Coded Duplex Scanning in the Selection of Patients with Lower Extremity Arterial Disease for Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty: A Prospective Study

    SciTech Connect

    Elsman, Bernard H.P.; Legemate, Dink A.; Heyden, Frank W.H.M. van der; Vos, Henk de; Mali, Willem P.T.M.; Eikelboom, Bert C.

    1996-09-15

    Purpose: To exploit the potential benefits of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) in patients with short obstructive lesions in the lower extremity, it is preferable to select patients suitable for PTA before proceeding to hospital admission and angiography. The aim of this prospective study was to evaluate the role of color-coded duplex scanning in the correct selection of patients for PTA and its influence on planning the approach to the lesion. Methods: On the basis of clinical history, physical examination, pressure indices, and ultrasound duplex scanning, 109 patients were scheduled for PTA. Results: The indication for PTA was correct in 103 patients (94%), while the procedure was performed successfully in 98 patients (90%). The approach to the lesion was planned successfully in the majority of patients. Conclusion: This study shows that it is justifiable to plan PTA on the basis of information obtained by duplex scanning. Results of the duplex scan may guide the catheterization route.

  17. Repair of a wide lower extremity defect with cross-leg free transfer of latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior combined flap: a case report.

    PubMed

    Turgut, Gursel; Kayalı, Mahmut Ulvi; Köse, Ozkan; Baş, Lütfü

    2010-12-01

    Composite tissue loss in extremities involving neurovascular structures has been a major challenge for reconstructive surgeons. Reconstruction of large defects can only be achieved with microsurgical procedures. The success of free flap operations depends on the presence of healthy recipient vessels. In cases with no suitable donor artery and vein or in which even the use of vein grafts would not be feasible, the lower limb can be salvaged with a cross-leg free flap procedure. We present a case with a large composite tissue loss that was reconstructed with cross-leg free transfer of a combined latissimus dorsi and serratus anterior muscle flap. This case indicates that this large muscle flap can survive with the cross-leg free flap method and this technique may be a viable alternative for large lower extremity defects that have no reliable recipient artery.

  18. Effects of fast and slow squat exercises on the muscle activity of the paretic lower extremity in patients with chronic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Yeop

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the speed of squat exercises on paretic lower extremity muscle activity in patients with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Ten stroke patients performed fast and slow squat exercises for 2 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. The muscle activities of the paretic and non-paretic sides of the rectus femoris muscle, the biceps femoris muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle were assessed and compared using surface electromyography. [Results] The paretic side of the rectus femoris muscle showed statistically significant differences in the fast squat exercise group, which demonstrated the highest muscle activity during the rapid return to the upright position. [Conclusion] The rectus femoris muscle showed the highest muscle activity during the return to the upright position during the fast squat exercise, which indicates that the rectus femoris muscle is highly active during the fast squat exercise. PMID:26356385

  19. Effects of fast and slow squat exercises on the muscle activity of the paretic lower extremity in patients with chronic stroke.

    PubMed

    Choi, Young-Ah; Kim, Jin-Seop; Lee, Dong-Yeop

    2015-08-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of the speed of squat exercises on paretic lower extremity muscle activity in patients with hemiplegia following a stroke. [Subjects and Methods] Ten stroke patients performed fast and slow squat exercises for 2 seconds and 8 seconds, respectively. The muscle activities of the paretic and non-paretic sides of the rectus femoris muscle, the biceps femoris muscle, and the tibialis anterior muscle were assessed and compared using surface electromyography. [Results] The paretic side of the rectus femoris muscle showed statistically significant differences in the fast squat exercise group, which demonstrated the highest muscle activity during the rapid return to the upright position. [Conclusion] The rectus femoris muscle showed the highest muscle activity during the return to the upright position during the fast squat exercise, which indicates that the rectus femoris muscle is highly active during the fast squat exercise.

  20. An investigation of lower extremity energy dissipation strategies during single-leg and double-leg landing based on sagittal and frontal plane biomechanics.

    PubMed

    Yeow, Chen Hua; Lee, Peter Vee Sin; Goh, James Cho Hong

    2011-06-01

    There is limited understanding of the differences in lower extremity energy dissipation strategies between single-leg and double-leg landing maneuvers. This study sought to investigate these differences in sagittal and frontal planes, and explain the differences using kinematics and kinetics. We hypothesized that single-leg and double-leg landing maneuvers involve different lower extremity energy dissipation strategies in both planes. Ten recreational athletes were recruited and instructed to perform double-leg and single-leg landing from 0.60-m height. Force-plates and motion-capture system were used to obtain kinetics and kinematics data respectively. Joint power was taken as product of joint moment and angular velocity. Joint work was computed as integral of joint power over time, whereby negative work represented energy dissipation. In the sagittal plane, the hip and knee showed major contributions to energy dissipation during double-leg landing; the hip and ankle were the dominant energy dissipaters during single-leg landing. In the frontal plane, the hip acted as the key energy dissipater during double-leg landing; the knee contributed the most energy dissipation during single-leg landing. The knee also exhibited greater frontal plane joint ROM, moment and energy dissipation during single-leg landing than double-leg landing. Our findings indicated that different energy dissipation strategies were adopted for double-leg and single-leg landing in sagittal and frontal planes. Considering the prominent frontal plane biomechanics exhibited by the knee during single-leg landing, we expect that this maneuver may have greater likelihood of leading to traumatic knee injuries, particularly non-contact ACL injuries, compared to the double-leg landing maneuver.

  1. Longitudinal decline of lower extremity muscle power in healthy and mobility-limited older adults: influence of muscle mass, strength, composition, neuromuscular activation and single fiber contractile properties

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Kieran F.; Pasha, Evan; Doros, Gheorghe; Clark, David J.; Patten, Carolynn; Phillips, Edward M.; Frontera, Walter R.; Fielding, Roger A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose This longitudinal study examined the major physiological mechanisms that determine the age-related loss of lower extremity muscle power in two distinct groups of older humans. We hypothesized that after ~ 3 years of follow-up, mobility-limited older adults (mean age: 77.2 ± 4, n = 22, 12 females) would have significantly greater reductions in leg extensor muscle power compared to healthy older adults (74.1 ± 4, n = 26, 12 females). Methods Mid-thigh muscle size and composition were assessed using computed tomography. Neuromuscular activation was quantified using surface electromyography and vastus lateralis single muscle fibers were studied to evaluate intrinsic muscle contractile properties. Results At follow-up, the overall magnitude of muscle power loss was similar between groups: mobility-limited: −8.5% vs. healthy older: −8.8%, P > 0.8. Mobility-limited elders had significant reductions in muscle size (−3.8%, P< 0.01) and strength (−5.9%, P< 0.02), however, these parameters were preserved in healthy older (P ≥ 0.7). Neuromuscular activation declined significantly within healthy older but not in mobility-limited participants. Within both groups, the cross sectional areas of type I and type IIA muscle fibers were preserved while substantial increases in single fiber peak force ( > 30%), peak power (> 200%) and unloaded shortening velocity (>50%) were elicited at follow-up. Conclusion Different physiological mechanisms contribute to the loss of lower extremity muscle power in healthy older and mobility-limited older adults. Neuromuscular changes may be the critical early determinant of muscle power deficits with aging. In response to major whole muscle decrements, major compensatory mechanisms occur within the contractile properties of surviving single muscle fibers in an attempt to restore overall muscle power and function with advancing age. PMID:24122149

  2. A Prospective Cohort Study of the Effects of Lower Extremity Orthopaedic Surgery on Outcome Measures in Ambulatory Children With Cerebral Palsy

    PubMed Central

    Gorton, George Edwin; Abel, Mark F.; Oeffinger, Donna J.; Bagley, Anita; Rogers, Sarah P.; Damiano, Diane; Romness, Mark; Tylkowski, Chester

    2010-01-01

    Background Lower-extremity musculotendinous surgery is standard treatment for ambulatory children with deformities such as joint contractures and bony torsions resulting from cerebral palsy (CP). However, evidence of efficacy is limited to retrospective, uncontrolled studies with small sample sizes focusing on gait variables and clinical examination measures. The aim of this study was to prospectively examine whether lower-extremity musculotendinous surgery in ambulatory children with CP improves impairments and function measured by gait and clinical outcome tools beyond changes found in a concurrent matched control group. Methods Seventy-five children with spastic CP (Gross Motor Function Classification System levels I to III, age 4 to 18 y) that underwent surgery to improve gait were individually matched on the basis of sex, Gross Motor Function Classification System level, and CP subtype to a nonsurgical cohort, minimizing differences in age and Gross Motor Function Measure Dimension E. At baseline and at least 12 months after baseline or surgery, participants completed gait analysis and Gross Motor Function Measure, and parents completed outcome questionnaires. Mean changes at follow-up were compared using analysis of covariance adjusted for baseline differences. Results Surgery ranged from single-level soft tissue release to multilevel bony and/or soft tissue procedures. At follow-up, after correcting for baseline differences, Gillette Gait Index, Pediatric Outcomes Data Collection Instrument Expectations, and Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Physical Functioning improved significantly for the surgical group com