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Sample records for lowering plasma cholesterol

  1. Tartary buckwheat sprout powder lowers plasma cholesterol level in rats.

    PubMed

    Kuwabara, Tomoko; Han, Kyu-Ho; Hashimoto, Naoto; Yamauchi, Hiroaki; Shimada, Ken-Ichiro; Sekikawa, Mitsuo; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2007-12-01

    We examined the effects of different types of buckwheat sprouts on the plasma cholesterol concentration, fecal steroid excretion and hepatic mRNA expression related to cholesterol metabolism in rats. Rats were fed a cholesterol-free diet with 5 g of Kitawasesoba common buckwheat sprout powder (KS)/100 g, 5 g of Hokkai T no. 8 tartary buckwheat sprout powder (HS-8)/100 g or 5 g of Hokkai T no. 9 tartary buckwheat sprout powder (HS-9)/100 g of diet for 4 wk. Control rats were fed a diet with alpha-cornstarch instead of sprout powder for 4 wk. There were no significant differences in food intake, body weight, liver weight or cecal contents among the groups. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations in the HS-8 and HS-9 groups were significantly lower than in the control group, whereas there was no significant difference between the KS and control groups. Fecal bile acid excretion and cecal short-chain fatty acid concentrations in the KS, HS-8 and HS-9 groups were significantly greater than in the control group. Furthermore, fecal matter excretion in the KS, HS-8 and HS-9 groups tended to be increased compared to the control group, with that in the HS-8 group being significantly higher than in the control group. Hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression in the KS, HS-8 and HS-9 groups and hepatic HMG-CoA reductase mRNA expression in the HS-9 group were significantly higher than in the control group. The results suggest that tartary buckwheat sprout powder has a serum cholesterol-lowering function by enhancing fecal bile acid excretion through increased fecal matter excretion or the upregulation of hepatic cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase mRNA expression in rats.

  2. Triterpenic Acids Present in Hawthorn Lower Plasma Cholesterol by Inhibiting Intestinal ACAT Activity in Hamsters.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yuguang; Vermeer, Mario A; Trautwein, Elke A

    2011-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida) is an edible fruit used in traditional Chinese medicine to lower plasma lipids. This study explored lipid-lowering compounds and underlying mechanisms of action of hawthorn. Hawthorn powder extracts inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity in Caco-2 cells. The inhibitory activity was positively associated with triterpenic acid (i.e., oleanolic acid (OA) and ursolic acid (UA)) contents in the extracts. Cholesterol lowering effects of hawthorn and its potential additive effect in combination with plant sterol esters (PSE) were further studied in hamsters. Animals were fed a semi-synthetic diet containing 0.08% (w/w) cholesterol (control) or the same diet supplemented with (i) 0.37% hawthorn dichloromethane extract, (ii) 0.24% PSE, (iii) hawthorn dichloromethane extract (0.37%) plus PSE (0.24%) or (iv) OA/UA mixture (0.01%) for 4 weeks. Compared to the control diet, hawthorn, PSE, hawthorn plus PSE and OA/UA significantly lowered plasma non-HDL (VLDL + LDL) cholesterol concentrations by 8%, 9%, 21% and 6% and decreased hepatic cholesterol ester content by 9%, 23%, 46% and 22%, respectively. The cholesterol lowering effects of these ingredients were conversely associated with their capacities in increasing fecal neutral sterol excretion. In conclusion, OA and UA are responsible for the cholesterol lowering effect of hawthorn by inhibiting intestinal ACAT activity. In addition, hawthorn and particularly its bioactive compounds (OA and UA) enhanced the cholesterol lowering effect of plant sterols.

  3. Macadamia nut consumption lowers plasma total and LDL cholesterol levels in hypercholesterolemic men.

    PubMed

    Garg, Manohar L; Blake, Robert J; Wills, Ron B H

    2003-04-01

    This study was conducted to assess the cholesterol-lowering potential of macadamia nuts. Seventeen hypercholesterolemic men (mean age 54 y) were given macadamia nuts (40-90 g/d), equivalent to 15% energy intake, for 4 wk. Plasma total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, triglycerides and homocysteine concentrations and the fatty acid composition of plasma lipids were determined before and after treatment. Plasma MUFA 16:1(n-7), 18:1(n-7) and 20:1(n-9) were elevated after intervention with macadamia nuts. Plasma (n-6) and (n-3) PUFA concentrations were unaffected by macadamia nut consumption. Plasma total cholesterol and LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased by 3.0 and 5.3%, respectively, and HDL cholesterol levels increased by 7.9% in hypercholesterolemic men after macadamia nut consumption. Plasma triglyceride and homocysteine concentrations were not affected by treatment. Macadamia nut consumption was associated with a significant increase in the relative intake of MUFA and a reduced relative intake of saturated fatty acids and PUFA. This study demonstrates that macadamia nut consumption as part of a healthy diet favorably modifies the plasma lipid profile in hypercholesterolemic men despite their diet being high in fat.

  4. Artichoke extract lowered plasma cholesterol and increased fecal bile acids in Golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Zhiyi; Lee, Sun-Ok; Ye, Zhong; Wu, Xianai; Hendrich, Suzanne

    2012-07-01

    A study was conducted in hamsters to determine if artichoke leaf extract (ALE) could lower plasma total and non-HDL cholesterol by increasing fecal excretion of neutral bile acids and sterols. Sixty-four Golden Syrian hamsters (8 week old) were fed control diet or a similar diet containing ALE (4.5 g/kg diet) for 6 weeks. No significant changes for total cholesterol, HDL, non-HDL cholesterol triglycerides or fecal neutral sterols and bile acids were found after 21 days for ALE-fed animals compared with controls. But after 42 days, ALE-fed male hamsters had significantly lower total cholesterol (15%), non-HDL cholesterol (30%) and triglycerides (22%) and female hamsters fed ALE showed reductions of 15% for total cholesterol, 29% for non-HDL cholesterol and 29% for triglycerides compared with controls. Total neutral sterol and bile acids concentrations increased significantly by 50% and 53% in fecal samples of ALE fed males, and 82.4% and 25% in ALE fed females compared with controls. The ALE lowered hamster plasma cholesterol levels by a mechanism involving the greater excretion of fecal bile acids and neutral sterols after feeding for 42 days. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  5. Plasma cholesterol-lowering and transient liver dysfunction in mice lacking squalene synthase in the liver.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Shuichi; Yagyu, Hiroaki; Tozawa, Ryuichi; Tazoe, Fumiko; Takahashi, Manabu; Kitamine, Tetsuya; Yamamuro, Daisuke; Sakai, Kent; Sekiya, Motohiro; Okazaki, Hiroaki; Osuga, Jun-ichi; Honda, Akira; Ishibashi, Shun

    2015-05-01

    Squalene synthase (SS) catalyzes the biosynthesis of squalene, the first specific intermediate in the cholesterol biosynthetic pathway. To test the feasibility of lowering plasma cholesterol by inhibiting hepatic SS, we generated mice in which SS is specifically knocked out in the liver (L-SSKO) using Cre-loxP technology. Hepatic SS activity of L-SSKO mice was reduced by >90%. In addition, cholesterol biosynthesis in the liver slices was almost eliminated. Although the hepatic squalene contents were markedly reduced in L-SSKO mice, the hepatic contents of cholesterol and its precursors distal to squalene were indistinguishable from those of control mice, indicating the presence of sufficient centripetal flow of cholesterol and/or its precursors from the extrahepatic tissues. L-SSKO mice showed a transient liver dysfunction with moderate hepatomegaly presumably secondary to increased farnesol production. In a fed state, the plasma total cholesterol and triglyceride were significantly reduced in L-SSKO mice, primarily owing to reduced hepatic VLDL secretion. In a fasted state, the hypolipidemic effect was lost. mRNA expression of liver X receptor α target genes was reduced, while that of sterol-regulatory element binding protein 2 target genes was increased. In conclusion, liver-specific ablation of SS inhibits hepatic cholesterol biosynthesis and induces hypolipidemia without increasing significant mortality.

  6. The Interpretation of Cholesterol Balance Derived Synthesis Data and Surrogate Noncholesterol Plasma Markers for Cholesterol Synthesis under Lipid Lowering Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Stellaard, Frans

    2017-01-01

    The cholesterol balance procedure allows the calculation of cholesterol synthesis based on the assumption that loss of endogenous cholesterol via fecal excretion and bile acid synthesis is compensated by de novo synthesis. Under ezetimibe therapy hepatic cholesterol is diminished which can be compensated by hepatic de novo synthesis and hepatic extraction of plasma cholesterol. The plasma lathosterol concentration corrected for total cholesterol concentration (R_Lath) as a marker of de novo cholesterol synthesis is increased during ezetimibe treatment but unchanged under treatment with ezetimibe and simvastatin. Cholesterol balance derived synthesis data increase during both therapies. We hypothesize the following. (1) The cholesterol balance data must be applied to the hepatobiliary cholesterol pool. (2) The calculated cholesterol synthesis value is the sum of hepatic de novo synthesis and the net plasma—liver cholesterol exchange rate. (3) The reduced rate of biliary cholesterol absorption is the major trigger for the regulation of hepatic cholesterol metabolism under ezetimibe treatment. Supportive experimental and literature data are presented that describe changes of cholesterol fluxes under ezetimibe, statin, and combined treatments in omnivores and vegans, link plasma R_Lath to liver function, and define hepatic de novo synthesis as target for regulation of synthesis. An ezetimibe dependent direct hepatic drug effect cannot be excluded. PMID:28321334

  7. Therapeutic RNAi targeting PCSK9 acutely lowers plasma cholesterol in rodents and LDL cholesterol in nonhuman primates.

    PubMed

    Frank-Kamenetsky, Maria; Grefhorst, Aldo; Anderson, Norma N; Racie, Timothy S; Bramlage, Birgit; Akinc, Akin; Butler, David; Charisse, Klaus; Dorkin, Robert; Fan, Yupeng; Gamba-Vitalo, Christina; Hadwiger, Philipp; Jayaraman, Muthusamy; John, Matthias; Jayaprakash, K Narayanannair; Maier, Martin; Nechev, Lubomir; Rajeev, Kallanthottathil G; Read, Timothy; Röhl, Ingo; Soutschek, Jürgen; Tan, Pamela; Wong, Jamie; Wang, Gang; Zimmermann, Tracy; de Fougerolles, Antonin; Vornlocher, Hans-Peter; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G; Manoharan, Muthiah; Koteliansky, Victor; Horton, Jay D; Fitzgerald, Kevin

    2008-08-19

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) regulates low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) protein levels and function. Loss of PCSK9 increases LDLR levels in liver and reduces plasma LDL cholesterol (LDLc), whereas excess PCSK9 activity decreases liver LDLR levels and increases plasma LDLc. Here, we have developed active, cross-species, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) capable of targeting murine, rat, nonhuman primate (NHP), and human PCSK9. For in vivo studies, PCSK9 and control siRNAs were formulated in a lipidoid nanoparticle (LNP). Liver-specific siRNA silencing of PCSK9 in mice and rats reduced PCSK9 mRNA levels by 50-70%. The reduction in PCSK9 transcript was associated with up to a 60% reduction in plasma cholesterol concentrations. These effects were shown to be mediated by an RNAi mechanism, using 5'-RACE. In transgenic mice expressing human PCSK9, siRNAs silenced the human PCSK9 transcript by >70% and significantly reduced PCSK9 plasma protein levels. In NHP, a single dose of siRNA targeting PCSK9 resulted in a rapid, durable, and reversible lowering of plasma PCSK9, apolipoprotein B, and LDLc, without measurable effects on either HDL cholesterol (HDLc) or triglycerides (TGs). The effects of PCSK9 silencing lasted for 3 weeks after a single bolus i.v. administration. These results validate PCSK9 targeting with RNAi therapeutics as an approach to specifically lower LDLc, paving the way for the development of PCSK9-lowering agents as a future strategy for treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  8. Plasma cholesterol-lowering effect on rats of dietary fiber extracted from immature plants.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, N; Taniguchi, Y; Kiriyama, S

    2000-12-01

    Crude dietary fiber samples were prepared from beet, cabbage, Japanese radish, onion and mung bean sprouts (BF, CF, RF, OF and MF, respectively). These samples contained total dietary fiber at the levels of 814, 699, 760, 693 and 666 g/kg, respectively. To examine the effect of these dietary fiber sources on the plasma cholesterol concentration, male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed on a fiber-free (FF) diet or on an FF diet supplemented with 5% or 10% dietary fiber. Dietary fiber extracted from vegetables, wood cellulose (CL), pectin (PE) and guar gum (GG) were used as the fiber sources. Compared with the rats fed on the FF diet, a significant reduction in the plasma cholesterol concentration was observed in the rats fed on BF, CF, RF, MF, PE or GG after a 21-d feeding period. Cecal acetate, n-butyrate and total short-chain fatty acids were significantly higher in the rats fed on these dietary fibers, except for CF, than in those fed on the FF diet. A negative correlation was apparent between the total dietary fiber content, hemicellulose content and pectin content of each dietary fiber source and the plasma cholesterol concentration. These results suggest that some vegetable fibers exert a plasma cholesterol-lowering effect through cecal fermentation of these fibers.

  9. Dietary flaxseed lignan extract lowers plasma cholesterol and glucose concentrations in hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Wang, Xiaobing; Liu, Yi; Tian, Haimei; Flickinger, Brent; Empie, Mark W; Sun, Sam Z

    2008-06-01

    Lignans, derived from flaxseed, are phyto-oestrogens being increasingly studied for their health benefits. An 8-week, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was conducted in fifty-five hypercholesterolaemic subjects, using treatments of 0 (placebo), 300 or 600 mg/d of dietary secoisolariciresinol diglucoside (SDG) from flaxseed extract to determine the effect on plasma lipids and fasting glucose levels. Significant treatment effects were achieved (P < 0.05 to < 0.001) for the decrease of total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and glucose concentrations, as well as their percentage decrease from baseline. At weeks 6 and 8 in the 600 mg SDG group, the decreases of TC and LDL-C concentrations were in the range from 22.0 to 24.38 % respectively (all P < 0.005 compared with placebo). For the 300 mg SDG group, only significant differences from baseline were observed for decreases of TC and LDL-C. A substantial effect on lowering concentrations of fasting plasma glucose was also noted in the 600 mg SDG group at weeks 6 and 8, especially in the subjects with baseline glucose concentrations > or = 5.83 mmol/l (lowered 25.56 and 24.96 %; P = 0.015 and P = 0.012 compared with placebo, respectively). Plasma concentrations of secoisolariciresinol (SECO), enterodiol (ED) and enterolactone were all significantly raised in the groups supplemented with flaxseed lignan. The observed cholesterol-lowering values were correlated with the concentrations of plasma SECO and ED (r 0.128-0.302; P < 0.05 to < 0.001). In conclusion, dietary flaxseed lignan extract decreased plasma cholesterol and glucose concentrations in a dose-dependent manner.

  10. Corn fiber oil lowers plasma cholesterol levels and increases cholesterol excretion greater than corn oil and similar to diets containing soy sterols and soy stanols in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, T A; DeSimone, A P; Romano, C A; Nicolosi, R J

    2000-09-01

    The aims of this study were to compare the cholesterol-lowering properties of corn fiber oil (CFO) to corn oil (CO), whether the addition of soy stanols or soy sterols to CO at similar levels in CFO would increase CO's cholesterol-lowering properties, and the mechanism(s) of action of these dietary ingredients. Fifty male Golden Syrian hamsters were divided into 5 groups of 10 hamsters each, based on similar plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels. The first group of hamsters was fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet containing either 5% coconut oil + 0.24% cholesterol (coconut oil), 5% CO, 5% CFO, 5% CO + 0.6% soy sterols (sterol), or 5% CO + 0.6% soy stanols (stanol) in place of the coconut oil for 4 weeks. The stanol diet significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma TC compared to all other dietary treatments. Also, the CFO and sterol diets significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma TC compared to the CO and coconut oil diets. The CFO, sterol, and stanol diets significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma non-high density lipoprotein cholesterol compared to the CO and coconut oil diets. The stanol diet significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) compared to all other dietary treatments. The sterol diet significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma HDL-C compared to the CO and coconut oil diets, whereas the CFO diet significantly inhibited the elevation of plasma HDL-C compared to the coconut oil diet only. No differences were observed between the CFO and CO for plasma HDL-C. There were no differences observed between groups for plasma triglycerides. The CO and CFO diets had significantly less hepatic TC compared to the coconut oil, sterol, and stanol diets. The CO and CFO diets had significantly less hepatic free cholesterol compared to the sterol and stanol diets but not compared to the coconut oil diet; whereas the coconut oil and sterol diets had significantly less hepatic free cholesterol

  11. Inclusion of Almonds in a Cholesterol-Lowering Diet Improves Plasma HDL Subspecies and Cholesterol Efflux to Serum in Normal-Weight Individuals with Elevated LDL Cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Berryman, Claire E; Fleming, Jennifer A; Kris-Etherton, Penny M

    2017-08-01

    Background: Almonds may increase circulating HDL cholesterol when substituted for a high-carbohydrate snack in an isocaloric diet, yet little is known about the effects on HDL biology and function.Objective: The objective was to determine whether incorporating 43 g almonds/d in a cholesterol-lowering diet would improve HDL subspecies and function, which were secondary study outcomes.Methods: In a randomized, 2-period, crossover, controlled-feeding study, a diet with 43 g almonds/d (percentage of total energy: 51% carbohydrate, 16% protein, and 32% total and 8% saturated fat) was compared with a similar diet with an isocaloric muffin substitution (58% carbohydrate, 15% protein, and 26% total and 8% saturated fat) in men and women with elevated LDL cholesterol. Plasma HDL subspecies and cholesterol efflux from J774 macrophages to human serum were measured at baseline and after each diet period. Diet effects were examined in all participants (n = 48) and in normal-weight (body mass index: <25; n = 14) and overweight or obese (≥25; n = 34) participants by using linear mixed models.Results: The almond diet, compared with the control diet, increased α-1 HDL [mean ± SEM: 26.7 ± 1.5 compared with 24.3 ± 1.3 mg apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)/dL; P = 0.001]. In normal-weight participants, the almond diet, relative to the control diet, increased α-1 HDL (33.7 ± 3.2 compared with 28.4 ± 2.6 mg apoA-I/dL), the α-1 to pre-β-1 ratio [geometric mean (95% CI): 4.3 (3.3, 5.7) compared with 3.1 (2.4, 4.0)], and non-ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 cholesterol efflux (8.3% ± 0.4% compared with 7.8% ± 0.3%) and decreased pre-β-2 (3.8 ± 0.4 compared with 4.6 ± 0.4 mg apoA-I/dL) and α-3 (23.5 ± 0.9 compared with 26.9 ± 1.1 mg apoA-I/dL) HDL (P < 0.05). No diet effects were observed in the overweight or obese group.Conclusions: Substituting almonds for a carbohydrate-rich snack within a lower-saturated-fat diet may be a simple strategy to maintain a favorable

  12. Gel coating of edible Brasenia schreberi leaves lowers plasma cholesterol in hamsters (abstract)

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The young leaves of B. schreberi are coated with gelatinous water-insoluble mucilage. This mucilage is a polysaccharide composed of galactose, mannose, fucose and other monosaccharides. Since some carbohydrate gels are hypocholesterolemic, we evaluated the cholesterol lowering properties in male h...

  13. Capsaicinoids but not their analogue capsinoids lower plasma cholesterol and possess beneficial vascular activity.

    PubMed

    Huang, Weihuan; Cheang, Wai San; Wang, Xiaobo; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Ma, Ka Ying; Zheng, Fangrui; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2014-08-20

    Capsaicinoids exist in chili peppers, whereas capsinoids are present in some sweet peppers. The present study investigated the effects of capsaicinoids and capsinoids on plasma lipids, relaxation of the aorta, atherosclerotic plaque development, and fecal sterol excretion in hamsters fed a high-cholesterol diet. Five groups of male hamsters were given the control diet or one of the four experimental diets containing 1.3 mmol of capsaicinoids (NL), 2.6 mmol of capsaicinoids (NH), 1.3 mmol of capsinoids (OL), or 2.6 mmol of capsinoids (OH), respectively. Results showed capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could decrease plasma total cholesterol (TC), reduce the formation of atherosclerotic plaque, and relax the aortic artery. This was accompanied by a 28-175% increase in fecal excretion of acidic sterols in hamsters fed the diets containing capsaicinoids. Similarly, capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could decrease the pad weights of epididymal and prerenal adipose tissues. It was concluded that capsaicinoids but not capsinoids could favorably modulate plasma lipids and possess beneficial vascular activity.

  14. The food matrix and sterol characteristics affect the plasma cholesterol lowering of phytosterol/phytostanol.

    PubMed

    Cusack, Laura Kells; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Volek, Jeff S

    2013-11-01

    Foods with added phytosterols/phytostanols (PS) are recommended to lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) concentrations. Manufacturers have incorporated PS into a variety of common foods. Understanding the cholesterol-lowering impact of the food matrix and the PS characteristics would maximize their success and increase the benefit to consumers. This review systematically examines whether the PS characteristics and the fatty acid composition of foods with added PS affects serum LDL-c. A total of 33 studies published between the years 1998 and 2011 inclusive of 66 individual primary variables (strata) were evaluated. The functional food matrices included margarine, mayonnaise, yogurt, milk, cheese, meat, grain, juice, and chocolate. Consistently, ≥10% reductions in LDL-c were reported when the characteristics of the food matrix included poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids known to lower LDL-c. Also, >10% mean reductions in LDL-c were reported when β-sitostanol and campestanol as well as stanol esters were used. These characteristics allow both low-fat and high-fat foods to successfully incorporate PS and significantly lower LDL-c.

  15. The Food Matrix and Sterol Characteristics Affect the Plasma Cholesterol Lowering of Phytosterol/Phytostanol1

    PubMed Central

    Cusack, Laura Kells; Fernandez, Maria Luz; Volek, Jeff S.

    2013-01-01

    Foods with added phytosterols/phytostanols (PS) are recommended to lower LDL cholesterol (LDL-c) concentrations. Manufacturers have incorporated PS into a variety of common foods. Understanding the cholesterol-lowering impact of the food matrix and the PS characteristics would maximize their success and increase the benefit to consumers. This review systematically examines whether the PS characteristics and the fatty acid composition of foods with added PS affects serum LDL-c. A total of 33 studies published between the years 1998 and 2011 inclusive of 66 individual primary variables (strata) were evaluated. The functional food matrices included margarine, mayonnaise, yogurt, milk, cheese, meat, grain, juice, and chocolate. Consistently, ≥10% reductions in LDL-c were reported when the characteristics of the food matrix included poly- and monounsaturated fatty acids known to lower LDL-c. Also, >10% mean reductions in LDL-c were reported when β-sitostanol and campestanol as well as stanol esters were used. These characteristics allow both low-fat and high-fat foods to successfully incorporate PS and significantly lower LDL-c. PMID:24228192

  16. Cholesterol-lowering nutraceuticals and functional foods.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhen-Yu; Jiao, Rui; Ma, Ka Ying

    2008-10-08

    Epidemiological studies have demonstrated that elevated levels of plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) are the major risk factors for coronary heart disease (CHD), whereas high concentrations of plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) and a low ratio of TC to HDL-C are protective against CHD. A relationship between plasma TC and the risk of CHD is well established at concentrations above 240 mg/dL. In addition to the use of three main classes of cholesterol-lowering medications, including HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors, anion-exchange resins, and fibrates, a nutritionally balanced diet that reduces saturated fat and cholesterol intake has traditionally been the first goal of dietary therapy in lowering plasma TC. In recent years, nutraceuticals and functional foods have attracted much interest as possible alternative therapies for lowering plasma TC, especially for hypercholesterolemia patients, whose blood cholesterol level is marginally high (200-240 mg/dL) but not high enough to warrant the prescription of cholesterol-lowering medications. This review summarizes the findings of recent studies on the production, application, efficacy, and mechanisms of popular cholesterol-lowering nutraceuticals and functional foods.

  17. SEC24A deficiency lowers plasma cholesterol through reduced PCSK9 secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiao-Wei; Wang, He; Bajaj, Kanika; Zhang, Pengcheng; Meng, Zhuo-Xian; Ma, Danjun; Bai, Yongsheng; Liu, Hui-Hui; Adams, Elizabeth; Baines, Andrea; Yu, Genggeng; Sartor, Maureen A; Zhang, Bin; Yi, Zhengping; Lin, Jiandie; Young, Stephen G; Schekman, Randy; Ginsburg, David

    2013-01-01

    The secretory pathway of eukaryotic cells packages cargo proteins into COPII-coated vesicles for transport from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to the Golgi. We now report that complete genetic deficiency for the COPII component SEC24A is compatible with normal survival and development in the mouse, despite the fundamental role of SEC24 in COPII vesicle formation and cargo recruitment. However, these animals exhibit markedly reduced plasma cholesterol, with mutations in Apoe and Ldlr epistatic to Sec24a, suggesting a receptor-mediated lipoprotein clearance mechanism. Consistent with these data, hepatic LDLR levels are up-regulated in SEC24A-deficient cells as a consequence of specific dependence of PCSK9, a negative regulator of LDLR, on SEC24A for efficient exit from the ER. Our findings also identify partial overlap in cargo selectivity between SEC24A and SEC24B, suggesting a previously unappreciated heterogeneity in the recruitment of secretory proteins to the COPII vesicles that extends to soluble as well as trans-membrane cargoes. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00444.001 PMID:23580231

  18. Modifying the fatty acid profile of dairy products through feedlot technology lowers plasma cholesterol of humans consuming the products.

    PubMed

    Noakes, M; Nestel, P J; Clifton, P M

    1996-01-01

    Intake of milk and butter has been clearly associated with higher coronary heart disease rates in different countries and this is likely to be mediated by the hypercholesterolemic effect of dairy fat. Fat-modified dairy products are an innovation involving a technology in which protected unsaturated lipids are fed to ruminants resulting in milk and tissue lipids with reduced saturated fatty acids. We examined the impact of these novel dairy fats on plasma lipids in a human dietary trial. Thirty-three men and women participated in an 8-wk randomized crossover trial comparing fat-modified with conventional dairy products. The trial consisted of a 2-wk low-fat baseline period followed by two 3-wk intervention phases. During the test periods, the fat-modified products resulted in a significant 0.28-mmol/L (4.3%) lowering of total cholesterol (P < 0.001). Most of this decrease was in LDL cholesterol, which decreased by 0.24 mmol/L (P < 0.001) whereas HDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols remained essentially unchanged. This alteration in the fatty acid profile of dairy products, if applied to populations typical of developed Western countries, represents a potential strategy to lower the risk of coronary heart disease without any appreciable change in customary eating patterns.

  19. Partial replacement of saturated fatty acids with almonds or walnuts lowers total plasma cholesterol and low-density-lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Abbey, M; Noakes, M; Belling, G B; Nestel, P J

    1994-05-01

    Sixteen normolipidemic male volunteers aged 41 +/- 9 y (mean +/- SD) consumed a diet providing 36% of energy as fat (92 g fat/d) for 9 wk. A daily supplement of nuts (providing half of the total fat intake) was provided against a common background diet. In the first 3-wk period the background diet was supplemented with raw peanuts (50 g/d), coconut cubes (40 g/d), and a coconut confectionary bar (50 g/d), designed to provide 47 g fat with a ratio of polyunsaturated to monounsaturated to saturated fatty acids (P:M:S) to match the Australian diet (reference diet). During the following 3 wk the background diet was supplemented with monounsaturated fatty acid-rich raw almonds (84 g/d), equivalent to 46 g fat, and during the final 3-wk period the background diet was supplemented with polyunsaturated fatty acid-rich walnuts (68 g/d), equivalent to 46 g fat. Compared with the reference diet there were significant reductions in total and LDL cholesterol, 7% and 10%, respectively, after supplementation with almonds, and 5% and 9%, respectively, after supplementation with walnuts.

  20. Hepatic Gene Expression Related to Lower Plasma Cholesterol in Hamsters Fed High Fat Diets Supplemented with Blueberry Pomace and Extract

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We analyzed plasma lipid profiles, and genes related to cholesterol and bile acid metabolism, and inflammation in livers as well as adipose tissue from Syrian Golden hamsters fed high-fat diets supplemented with blueberry (BB) pomace byproducts including 8% dried whole blueberry peels (BBPWHL), 2% d...

  1. Plasma and hepatic cholesterol-lowering effects of tomato pomace, tomato seed oil and defatted tomato seed in hamsters fed with high-fat diets.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Bartley, Glenn E; Yokoyama, Wallace; Pan, Zhongli; Zhang, Huijuan; Zhang, Ang

    2013-08-15

    The cholesterol-lowering effects of tomato pomace (TP), tomato seed oil (TSO) and defatted tomato seed (DTS) were determined in male Golden Syrian hamsters. Hamsters fed high-fat diets containing 10% TSO or 18% DTS were compared to a diet containing 10% corn oil and 10% microcrystalline cellulose (control 1), 42% TP were compared to 25% microcrystalline cellulose (control 2). TP, TSO and DTS reduced hepatic total cholesterol (TC) content. DTS also lowered plasma TC and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations. Fecal excretion of lipid, bile acid and cholesterol increased in the DTS group compared to control 1. DTS-fed hamsters had higher levels of hepatic CYP7A1, CYP51, ABCB11, and ABCG5 gene expression than control, suggesting both hepatic bile acid and cholesterol synthesis increased due to increased fecal excretion of bile acid and cholesterol. The results suggest that protein, dietary fibre or phenolic compounds in DTS may be responsible for plasma cholesterol decrease.

  2. Effect of potato ethanol residue on rat plasma cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoto; Shinomiya, Noriyuki; Saito, Katsuichi; Noda, Takahiro; Han, Kyu-Ho; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the cholesterol-lowering effect of a potato ethanol residue (PER). The plasma cholesterol levels excluding high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were lower in the rats given a PER-containing diet for 6 weeks than in the control group, whereas the fecal cholesterol levels were higher. These results suggest that PER partially reduced plasma cholesterol levels via excretion of cholesterol into the feces.

  3. Does Glycine max leaves or Garcinia Cambogia promote weight-loss or lower plasma cholesterol in overweight individuals: a randomized control trial.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ji-Eun; Jeon, Seon-Min; Park, Ki Hun; Lee, Woo Song; Jeong, Tae-Sook; McGregor, Robin A; Choi, Myung-Sook

    2011-09-21

    Natural food supplements with high flavonoid content are often claimed to promote weight-loss and lower plasma cholesterol in animal studies, but human studies have been more equivocal. The aim of this study was firstly to determine the effectiveness of natural food supplements containing Glycine max leaves extract (EGML) or Garcinia cambogia extract (GCE) to promote weight-loss and lower plasma cholesterol. Secondly to examine whether these supplements have any beneficial effect on lipid, adipocytokine or antioxidant profiles. Eighty-six overweight subjects (Male:Female = 46:40, age: 20~50 yr, BMI > 23 < 29) were randomly assigned to three groups and administered tablets containing EGML (2 g/day), GCE (2 g/day) or placebo (starch, 2 g/day) for 10 weeks. At baseline and after 10 weeks, body composition, plasma cholesterol and diet were assessed. Blood analysis was also conducted to examine plasma lipoproteins, triglycerides, adipocytokines and antioxidants. EGML and GCE supplementation failed to promote weight-loss or any clinically significant change in %body fat. The EGML group had lower total cholesterol after 10 weeks compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). EGML and GCE had no effect on triglycerides, non-HDL-C, adipocytokines or antioxidants when compared to placebo supplementation. However, HDL-C was higher in the EGML group (p < 0.001) after 10 weeks compared to the placebo group. Ten weeks of EGML or GCE supplementation did not promote weight-loss or lower total cholesterol in overweight individuals consuming their habitual diet. Although, EGML did increase plasma HDL-C levels which is associated with a lower risk of atherosclerosis.

  4. Does Glycine max leaves or Garcinia Cambogia promote weight-loss or lower plasma cholesterol in overweight individuals: a randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Natural food supplements with high flavonoid content are often claimed to promote weight-loss and lower plasma cholesterol in animal studies, but human studies have been more equivocal. The aim of this study was firstly to determine the effectiveness of natural food supplements containing Glycine max leaves extract (EGML) or Garcinia cambogia extract (GCE) to promote weight-loss and lower plasma cholesterol. Secondly to examine whether these supplements have any beneficial effect on lipid, adipocytokine or antioxidant profiles. Methods Eighty-six overweight subjects (Male:Female = 46:40, age: 20~50 yr, BMI > 23 < 29) were randomly assigned to three groups and administered tablets containing EGML (2 g/day), GCE (2 g/day) or placebo (starch, 2 g/day) for 10 weeks. At baseline and after 10 weeks, body composition, plasma cholesterol and diet were assessed. Blood analysis was also conducted to examine plasma lipoproteins, triglycerides, adipocytokines and antioxidants. Results EGML and GCE supplementation failed to promote weight-loss or any clinically significant change in %body fat. The EGML group had lower total cholesterol after 10 weeks compared to the placebo group (p < 0.05). EGML and GCE had no effect on triglycerides, non-HDL-C, adipocytokines or antioxidants when compared to placebo supplementation. However, HDL-C was higher in the EGML group (p < 0.001) after 10 weeks compared to the placebo group. Conclusions Ten weeks of EGML or GCE supplementation did not promote weight-loss or lower total cholesterol in overweight individuals consuming their habitual diet. Although, EGML did increase plasma HDL-C levels which is associated with a lower risk of atherosclerosis. PMID:21936892

  5. Regulation of Plasma Cholesterol by Lipoprotein Receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Michael S.; Kovanen, Petri T.; Goldstein, Joseph L.

    1981-05-01

    The lipoprotein transport system holds the key to understanding the mechanisms by which genes, diet, and hormones interact to regulate the plasma cholesterol level in man. Crucial components of this system are lipoprotein receptors in the liver and extrahepatic tissues that mediate the uptake and degradation of cholesterol-carrying lipoproteins. The number of lipoprotein receptors, and hence the efficiency of disposal of plasma cholesterol, can be increased by cholesterol-lowering drugs. Regulation of lipoprotein receptors can be exploited pharmacologically in the therapy of hypercholesterolemia and atherosclerosis in man.

  6. Gel coating of leaves of the water plant, Brasenia schreberi, lowers plasma cholesterol in hamsters on high fat diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    An edible, gelatinous water-insoluble coating surrounds the young leaves of the water plant, Brasenia schreberi. This mucilage is a polysaccharide of galactose, mannose, fucose and other monosaccharides. In order to determine if this edible gel has cholesterol lowering properties, we fed male hams...

  7. Blueberry anthocyanins at doses of 0.5 and 1 % lowered plasma cholesterol by increasing fecal excretion of acidic and neutral sterols in hamsters fed a cholesterol-enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yintong; Chen, Jingnan; Zuo, Yuanyuan; Ma, Ka Ying; Jiang, Yue; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2013-04-01

    The present study investigated the underlying mechanism associated with the hypocholesterolemic activity of blueberry anthocyanins by examining its effect on fecal sterol excretion and gene expression of major receptors, enzymes, and transporters involved in cholesterol metabolism. Hamsters were divided into three groups and fed a 0.1 % cholesterol diet containing 0 % (CTL), 0.5 % (BL), and 1.0 % (BH) blueberry anthocyanins, respectively, for six weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC), triacylglycerols (TAG), and non-high-density lipoproteins cholesterol (non-HDL-C) were measured using the enzymatic kits, and the gene expression of transporters, enzymes, and receptors involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism was quantified using the quantitative PCR. GC analysis was used to quantify hepatic cholesterol and fecal acidic and neutral sterols. Dietary supplementation of 0.5 and 1.0 % blueberry anthocyanins for 6 weeks decreased plasma TC concentration by 6-12 % in a dose-dependent manner. This was accompanied by increasing the excretion of fecal neutral and acidic sterols by 22-29 % and 41-74 %, respectively. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that incorporation of blueberry anthocyanins into diet down-regulated the genes of NPC1L1, ACAT-2, MTP, and ABCG 8. In addition, blueberry anthocyanins were also able to down-regulate the gene expression of hepatic HMG-CoA reductase. The cholesterol-lowering activity of blueberry anthocyanins was most likely mediated by enhancing the excretion of sterols accompanied with down-regulation on gene expression of intestinal NPC1L1, ACAT-2, MTP, and ABCG 8.

  8. Aronia berry polyphenol consumption reduces plasma total and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol in former smokers without lowering biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress: a randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Xie, Liyang; Vance, Terrence; Kim, Bohkyung; Lee, Sang Gil; Caceres, Christian; Wang, Ying; Hubert, Patrice A; Lee, Ji-Young; Chun, Ock K; Bolling, Bradley W

    2017-01-01

    Former smokers are at increased risk for cardiovascular disease. We hypothesized that dietary aronia polyphenols would reduce biomarkers of cardiovascular disease risk, inflammation, and oxidative stress in former smokers. We also determined the extent these effects were associated with polyphenol bioavailability. A 12-week, randomized, placebo-controlled trial was conducted in 49 healthy adult former smokers (n = 24/placebo, n = 25/aronia) to evaluate if daily consumption of 500 mg aronia extract modulated plasma lipids, blood pressure, biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress, and lipid transport genes of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The primary outcome was change in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) from baseline, and multivariate correlation analysis was performed to determine if changes in lipids were associated with urinary polyphenol excretion. Aronia consumption reduced fasting plasma total cholesterol by 8% (P = .0140), LDL-C by 11% (P = .0285), and LDL receptor protein in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (P = .0036) at 12 weeks compared with the placebo group. Positive changes in the urinary polyphenol metabolites peonidin-3-O-galactoside, 3-(4-hydroxyphenyl) propionic acid, and unmetabolized anthocyanin cyanidin-3-O-galactoside were associated with lower plasma total cholesterol and LDL-C in the aronia group. Aronia consumption did not change blood pressure or biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress. Aronia polyphenols reduced total and LDL-C in former smokers but did not improve biomarkers of oxidative stress and chronic inflammation. The cholesterol-lowering activity of aronia extract was most closely associated with urinary levels of cyanidin-3-O-galactoside and peonidin-3-O-galactoside, its methylated metabolite. This trial was registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT01541826. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Food combinations for cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Harland, Janice I

    2012-12-01

    Reducing elevated LDL-cholesterol is a key public health challenge. There is substantial evidence from randomised controlled trials (RCT) that a number of foods and food components can significantly reduce LDL-cholesterol. Data from RCT have been reviewed to determine whether effects are additive when two or more of these components are consumed together. Typically components, such as plant stanols and sterols, soya protein, β-glucans and tree nuts, when consumed individually at their target rate, reduce LDL-cholesterol by 3-9 %. Improved dietary fat quality, achieved by replacing SFA with unsaturated fat, reduces LDL-cholesterol and can increase HDL-cholesterol, further improving blood lipid profile. It appears that the effect of combining these interventions is largely additive; however, compliance with multiple changes may reduce over time. Food combinations used in ten 'portfolio diet' studies have been reviewed. In clinical efficacy studies of about 1 month where all foods were provided, LDL-cholesterol is reduced by 22-30 %, whereas in community-based studies of >6 months' duration, where dietary advice is the basis of the intervention, reduction in LDL-cholesterol is about 15 %. Inclusion of MUFA into 'portfolio diets' increases HDL-cholesterol, in addition to LDL-cholesterol effects. Compliance with some of these dietary changes can be achieved more easily compared with others. By careful food component selection, appropriate to the individual, the effect of including only two components in the diet with good compliance could be a sustainable 10 % reduction in LDL-cholesterol; this is sufficient to make a substantial impact on cholesterol management and reduce the need for pharmaceutical intervention.

  10. Nutraceutical pill containing berberine versus ezetimibe on plasma lipid pattern in hypercholesterolemic subjects and its additive effect in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia on stable cholesterol-lowering treatment

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Although statins (STs) are drugs of first choice in hypercholesterolemic patients, especially in those at high cardiovascular risk, some of them are intolerant to STs or refuse treatment with these drugs. In view of this, we have evaluated the lipid-lowering effect of a nutraceutical pill containing berberine (BBR) and of ezetimibe, as alternative treatments, in monotherapy or in combination, in 228 subjects with primary hypercholesterolemia (HCH), with history of STs intolerance or refusing STs treatment. In addition, since PCSK9 was found up-regulated by STs dampening their effect through an LDL receptors (LDLRs) degradation, and BBR suppressed PCSK9 expression in cellular studies, we supplemented the stable lipid-lowering therapy of 30 genotype-confirmed Familial Hypercholesterolemia heterozygotes (HeFH) with BBR, searching for a further plasma cholesterol reduction. Plasma lipid pattern was evaluated at baseline and during treatments. Results In HCH subjects the nutraceutical pill resulted more effective than EZE in lowering LDL cholesterol (−31.7% vs −25.4%, P < 0.001) and better tolerated. On treatment, LDL-C level below 3.36 mmol/L (≤130 mg/dl) was observed in 28.9% of subjects treated with the nutraceutical pill and 11.8% of those treated with EZE (P <0.007). In the group treated with EZE the subjects carrying the G allele of the g.1679 C > G silent polymorphism of NPC1L1 gene showed a higher response to EZE than homozygous for the common allele (GG + CG: LDL-C −29.4±5.0%, CC −23.6±6.5%, P <0.001). Combined treatment with these drugs was as effective as STs in moderate doses (LDL cholesterol −37%, triglycerides −23%). In HeFH patients the addition of BBR resulted in LDL cholesterol reductions inversely related to those induced by the stable therapy (r = −0.617, P <0.0001), with mean 10.5% further decrease. Conclusions The alternative treatments tested in our HCH subjects were rather effective and safe. The findings in

  11. Potential role of nonstatin cholesterol lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Trapani, Laura; Segatto, Marco; Ascenzi, Paolo; Pallottini, Valentina

    2011-11-01

    Although statins, 3β-hydroxy-3β-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGR) inhibitors, have revolutionized the management of cardiovascular diseases by lowering serum low density lipoproteins, many patients suffer from their side effects. Whether the statin side effects are related to their intrinsic toxicity or to the decrease of HMGR main isoprenoid end products, which are essential compounds for cell viability, is still debated. In addition to HMGR, the key and rate limiting step of cholesterol synthesis, many enzymes are involved in this multi-step pathway whose inhibition could be taken into account for a "nonstatin approach" in the management of hypercholesterolemia. In particular, due to their unique position downstream from HMGR, the inhibition of squalene synthase, farnesyl diphosphate farnesyltransferase (FDFT1), squalene epoxidase (SQLE), and oxidosqualene cyclase:lanosterol synthase (OSC) should decrease plasma levels of cholesterol without affecting ubiquinone, dolichol, and isoprenoid metabolism. Thus, although FDFT1, SQLE and OSC are little studied, they should be considered as perspective targets for the development of novel drugs against hypercholesterolemia. Here, structure-function relationships of FDFT1, SQLE, and OSC are reviewed highlighting the advantages that the downstream inhibition of HMGR could provide when compared to the statin-based therapy.

  12. Genetic therapies to lower cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Khoo, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    This review surveys the state-of-the-art in genetic therapies for familial hypercholesterolaemia (FH), caused most commonly by mutations in the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene. FH manifests as highly elevated low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels and consequently accelerated atherosclerosis. Modern pharmacological therapies for FH are insufficiently efficacious to prevent premature cardiovascular disease, can cause significant adverse effects and can be expensive. Genetic therapies for FH have been mooted since the mid 1990s but gene replacement strategies using viral vectors have so far been unsuccessful. Other strategies involve knocking down the expression of Apolipoprotein B100 (APOB100) and the protease PCSK9 which designates LDLR for degradation. The antisense oligonucleotide mipomersen, which knocks down APOB100, is currently marketed (with restrictions) in the USA, but is not approved in Europe due to its adverse effects. To address this problem, we have devised a novel therapeutic concept, APO-skip, which is based on modulation of APOB splicing, and which has the potential to deliver a cost-effective, efficacious and safe therapy for FH.

  13. Plasma and hepatic cholesterol-lowering in hamsters by tomato pomace, tomato seed oil and defatted tomato seed supplemented in high fat diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We determined the cholesterol-lowering effects of tomato pomace (TP), a byproduct of tomato processing, and its components such as tomato seed oil (TSO) and defatted tomato seed (DTS) in hamsters, a widely used animal model for cholesterol metabolism. Male Syrian Golden hamsters were fed high-fat di...

  14. Effect of ezetimibe on plasma cholesterol levels, cholesterol absorption and secretion of biliary cholesterol in laboratory opossums with high and low responses to dietary cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Jeannie; Kushwaha, Rampratap S.; VandeBerg, Jane F.; VandeBerg, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Partially inbred lines of laboratory opossums differ in plasma LDL cholesterol concentration and cholesterol absorption on a high cholesterol diet. The aim of the present studies was to determine whether ezetimibe inhibits cholesterol absorption and eliminates the differences in plasma cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol metabolism between high and low responders on a high cholesterol diet. Initially, we determined that the optimum dose of ezetimibe was 5 mg/kg/day, and treated six high and six low responding opossums with this dose (with equal numbers of controls) for 3 weeks while opossums consumed a high cholesterol and low fat (HCLF) diet. Plasma and LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly (P<0.05) in treated but not in untreated high responding opossums. Plasma cholesterol concentrations of untreated low responders increased slightly (P<0.05) but not in treated low responders. Percent cholesterol absorption was significantly higher in untreated high responders than in other groups. Livers from high responders with or without treatment were significantly (P <0.01) heavier than livers from low responders with or without treatment. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P<0.05) higher than in low responders with or without treatment (P<0.001). The gall bladder bile cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P<0.05) lower than in other groups. A decrease in biliary cholesterol in low responders treated with ezetimibe was associated with a decrease in hepatic expression of ABCG5 and ABCG8. These studies suggest that ezetimibe decreases plasma cholesterol levels in high responders mainly by decreasing cholesterol absorption and increasing biliary cholesterol concentrations. Since ezetimibe’s target is NPC1L1 and NPC1L1 is expressed in the intestine of opossums, its effect on cholesterol absorption may be mediated by inhibiting NPC1L1 function in the intestine. PMID

  15. Effect of ezetimibe on plasma cholesterol levels, cholesterol absorption, and secretion of biliary cholesterol in laboratory opossums with high and low responses to dietary cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Chan, Jeannie; Kushwaha, Rampratap S; Vandeberg, Jane F; Vandeberg, John L

    2008-12-01

    Partially inbred lines of laboratory opossums differ in plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration and cholesterol absorption on a high-cholesterol diet. The aim of the present studies was to determine whether ezetimibe inhibits cholesterol absorption and eliminates the differences in plasma cholesterol and hepatic cholesterol metabolism between high and low responders on a high-cholesterol diet. Initially, we determined that the optimum dose of ezetimibe was 5 mg/(kg d) and treated 6 high- and 6 low-responding opossums with this dose (with equal numbers of controls) for 3 weeks while the opossums consumed a high-cholesterol and low-fat diet. Plasma and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations decreased significantly (P < .05) in treated but not in untreated high-responding opossums. Plasma cholesterol concentrations increased slightly (P < .05) in untreated low responders but not in treated low responders. The percentage of cholesterol absorption was significantly higher in untreated high responders than in other groups. Livers from high responders with or without treatment were significantly (P < .01) heavier than livers from low responders with or without treatment. Hepatic cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) higher than those in low responders with or without treatment (P < .001). The gall bladder bile cholesterol concentrations in untreated high responders were significantly (P < .05) lower than those in other groups. A decrease in biliary cholesterol in low responders treated with ezetimibe was associated with a decrease in hepatic expression of ABCG5 and ABCG8. These studies suggest that ezetimibe decreases plasma cholesterol levels in high responders mainly by decreasing cholesterol absorption and increasing biliary cholesterol concentrations. Because ezetimibe's target is NPC1L1 and NPC1L1 is expressed in the intestine of opossums, its effect on cholesterol absorption may be mediated

  16. Cholesterol-lowering effect of plant sterols.

    PubMed

    AbuMweis, Suhad S; Jones, Peter J H

    2008-12-01

    Plant sterols are plant components that have a chemical structure similar to cholesterol except for the addition of an extra methyl or ethyl group; however, plant sterol absorption in humans is considerably less than that of cholesterol. In fact, plant sterols reduce cholesterol absorption and thus reduce circulating levels of cholesterol. Earlier studies that have tested the efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol-lowering agents incorporated plant sterols into fat spreads. Later on, plant sterols were added to other food matrices, including juices, nonfat beverages, milk and yogurt, cheese, meat, croissants and muffins, and cereal and chocolate bars. The beneficial physiologic effects of plant sterols could be further enhanced by combining them with other beneficial substances, such as olive and fish oils, fibers, and soy proteins, or with exercise. The addition of plant sterols to the diet is suggested by health experts as a safe and effective way to reduce the risk of coronary heart disease.

  17. A novel high-amylose barley cultivar (Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya 292) lowers plasma cholesterol and alters indices of large-bowel fermentation in pigs.

    PubMed

    Bird, Anthony R; Jackson, Michelle; King, Roger A; Davies, Debra A; Usher, Sylvia; Topping, David L

    2004-10-01

    Hordeum vulgare var. Himalaya 292 is a new barley cultivar with altered starch synthesis and less total starch but more amylose, resistant starch (RS) and total and soluble NSP including beta-glucan. To determine its nutritional potential, young pigs were fed diets containing stabilised wholegrain flours from either Himalaya 292, Namoi (a commercial barley), wheat bran or oat bran at equivalent dietary NSP concentrations for 21 d. Serum total cholesterol was significantly lowered by the Himalaya 292 diet relative to wheat bran, indicating that Himalaya 292 retained its hypocholesterolaemic potential. In all groups SCFA concentrations were highest in the proximal colon and decreased towards the rectum. Digesta pH was lowest in the proximal colon and highest in the distal colon. Large-bowel and faecal pH were significantly lower in the pigs fed the barley and oat diets, indicating greater bacterial fermentation. Caecal and proximal colonic pH was lowest and SCFA pools highest in the pigs fed Himalaya 292. Total and individual SCFA were lowest in the mid- and distal colon of the pigs fed Himalaya 292 or oat bran. These data suggest the presence of more RS in Himalaya 292 and suggest that its fermentation was rapid relative to transit. Differences in faecal and large-bowel anaerobic, aerobic, coliform and lactic acid bacteria were relatively small, indicating a lack of a specific prebiotic action. These data support the potential of this novel barley cultivar to improve health through plasma cholesterol reduction and increased large-bowel SCFA production.

  18. Dietary cholesterol and plasma lipoprotein profiles: Randomized controlled trials

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Early work suggested that dietary cholesterol increased plasma total cholesterol concentrations in humans. Given the relationship between elevated plasma cholesterol concentrations and cardiovascular disease risk, dietary guidelines have consistently recommended limiting food sources of cholesterol....

  19. Garbanzo diet lowers cholesterol in hamsters

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cholesterol-lowering potential of diets with 22% protein from Chickpea (Cicer arietinum, European variety of Garbanzo, Kabuli Chana), Bengal gram (Cicer arietinum, Asian variety of Garbanzo, Desi Chana, smaller in size, yellow to black color), lentils, soy protein isolate, hydrolyzed salmon protein...

  20. Plasma Cholesterol-Lowering Activity of Lard Functionalized with Mushroom Extracts Is Independent of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 Protein and ABC Sterol Transporter Gene Expression in Hypercholesterolemic Mice.

    PubMed

    Caz, Víctor; Gil-Ramírez, Alicia; Santamaría, Mónica; Tabernero, María; Soler-Rivas, Cristina; Martín-Hernández, Roberto; Marín, Francisco R; Reglero, Guillermo; Largo, Carlota

    2016-03-02

    Interest in food matrices supplemented with mushrooms as hypocholesterolemic functional foods is increasing. This study was to (i) investigate the hypocholesterolemic activity of lard functionalized with mushroom extracts (LF) including fungal β-glucans, water-soluble polysaccharides, or ergosterol and (ii) examine the LF influence on transcriptional mechanisms involved in cholesterol metabolism. mRNA levels of 17 cholesterol-related genes were evaluated in jejunum, cecum, and liver of high cholesterol-fed mice. The four tested LFs decreased plasma cholesterol by 22-42%, HDLc by 18-40%, and LDLc by 27-51%, and two of them increased mRNA levels of jejunal Npc1l1 and Abcg5 and hepatic Npc1l1. mRNA levels of other cholesterol-related genes were unchanged. These findings suggest that LF may have potential as a dietary supplement for counteracting diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and could be a source for the development of novel cholesterol-lowering functional foods. However, the cholesterol-lowering effect was unrelated to transcriptional changes, suggesting that post-transcriptional mechanisms could be involved.

  1. An Immunomodulating Fatty Acid Analogue Targeting Mitochondria Exerts Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect beyond Plasma Cholesterol-Lowering Activity in apoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    Parolini, Cinzia; Bjørndal, Bodil; Holm, Sverre; Bohov, Pavol; Halvorsen, Bente; Brattelid, Trond; Manzini, Stefano; Ganzetti, Giulia S.; Dellera, Federica; Nygård, Ottar K.; Aukrust, Pål; Sirtori, Cesare R.; Chiesa, Giulia; Berge, Rolf K.

    2013-01-01

    Tetradecylthioacetic acid (TTA) is a hypolipidemic antioxidant with immunomodulating properties involving activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) and proliferation of mitochondria. This study aimed to penetrate the effect of TTA on the development of atherosclerotic lesions in apolipoprotein (apo)-E-/- mice fed a high-fat diet containing 0.3% TTA for 12 weeks. These mice displayed a significantly less atherosclerotic development vs control. Plasma cholesterol was increased by TTA administration and triacylglycerol (TAG) levels in plasma and liver were decreased by TTA supplementation, the latter, probably due to increased mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation and reduced lipogenesis. TTA administration also changed the fatty acid composition in the heart, and the amount of arachidonic acid (ARA) and eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was reduced and increased, respectively. The heart mRNA expression of inducible nitric oxidase (NOS)-2 was decreased in TTA-treated mice, whereas the mRNA level of catalase was increased. Finally, reduced plasma levels of inflammatory mediators as IL-1α, IL-6, IL-17, TNF-α and IFN-γ were detected in TTA-treated mice. These data show that TTA reduces atherosclerosis in apoE-/- mice and modulates risk factors related to atherosclerotic disorders. TTA probably acts at both systemic and vascular levels in a manner independent of changes in plasma cholesterol, and triggers TAG catabolism through improved mitochondrial function. PMID:24324736

  2. The thyroid hormone mimetic compound KB2115 lowers plasma LDL cholesterol and stimulates bile acid synthesis without cardiac effects in humans.

    PubMed

    Berkenstam, Anders; Kristensen, Jens; Mellström, Karin; Carlsson, Bo; Malm, Johan; Rehnmark, Stefan; Garg, Neeraj; Andersson, Carl Magnus; Rudling, Mats; Sjöberg, Folke; Angelin, Bo; Baxter, John D

    2008-01-15

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease is a major problem despite the availability of drugs that influence major risk factors. New treatments are needed, and there is growing interest in therapies that may have multiple actions. Thyroid hormone modulates several cardiovascular risk factors and delays atherosclerosis progression in humans. However, use of thyroid hormone is limited by side effects, especially in the heart. To overcome this limitation, pharmacologically selective thyromimetics that mimic metabolic effects of thyroid hormone and bypass side effects are under development. In animal models, such thyromimetics have been shown to stimulate cholesterol elimination through LDL and HDL pathways and decrease body weight without eliciting side effects. We report here studies on a selective thyromimetic [KB2115; (3-[[3,5-dibromo-4-[4-hydroxy-3-(1-methylethyl)-phenoxy]-phenyl]-amino]-3-oxopropanoic acid)] in humans. In moderately overweight and hypercholesterolemic subjects KB2115 was found to be safe and well tolerated and elicited up to a 40% lowering of total and LDL cholesterol after 14 days of treatment. Bile acid synthesis was stimulated without evidence of increased cholesterol production, indicating that KB2115 induced net cholesterol excretion. KB2115 did not provoke detectable effects on the heart, suggesting that the pharmacological selectivity observed in animal models translates to humans. Thus, selective thyromimetics deserve further study as agents to treat dyslipidemia and other risk factors for atherosclerosis.

  3. Heat-moisture treatment of high-amylose corn starch increases dietary fiber content and lowers plasma cholesterol in ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Liu, X; Ogawa, H; Ando, R; Nakakuki, T; Kishida, T; Ebihara, K

    2007-11-01

    The effect of dietary high-amylose corn starch (HACS) of varying dietary fiber (DF) content on plasma cholesterol was examined in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. Gelatinized normal corn starch (G-CS) was used as a reference. OVX rats were fed a fiber-free purified diet containing G-CS, HACS, gelatinized high-amylose corn starch (G-HACS), or heat-moisture treated HACS (HM-HACS) at 400 g starch/kg diet for 21 d. The DF content of G-CS, HACS, G-HACS, and HM-HACS measured by the AOAC method was 0.1, 19.3, 2.4, and 64.5 g/100 g, respectively. The dry weight of cecal contents, cecal wall weight, the amount of short chain fatty acids in cecal contents, the amount of bile acids in small intestinal contents, and fecal excretion of neutral sterols increased logarithmically with increasing DF, while total plasma cholesterol concentration decreased. On the other hand, hepatic CYP7A1 activity, fecal dry weight, and fecal excretion of bile acids increased linearly with increasing DF, while body weight gain decreased. The hypocholesterolemic effect of HACS in OVX-rats appeared to be more effective by heat-moisture treatment.

  4. Cholesterol-Lowering Activity of Tartary Buckwheat Protein.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chengnan; Zhang, Rui; Li, Yuk Man; Liang, Ning; Zhao, Yimin; Zhu, Hanyue; He, Zouyan; Liu, Jianhui; Hao, Wangjun; Jiao, Rui; Ma, Ka Ying; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2017-03-08

    Previous research has shown that Tartary buckwheat flour is capable of reducing plasma cholesterol. The present study was to examine the effect of rutin and Tartary buckwheat protein on plasma total cholesterol (TC) in hypercholesterolemia hamsters. In the first animal experiment, 40 male hamsters were divided into four groups fed either the control diet or one of the three experimental diets containing 8.2 mmol rutin, 8.2 mmol quercetin, or 2.5 g kg(-1) cholestyramine, respectively. Results showed that only cholestyramine but not rutin and its aglycone quercetin decreased plasma TC, which suggested that rutin was not the active ingredient responsible for plasma TC-lowering activity of Tartary buckwheat flour. In the second animal experiment, 45 male hamsters were divided into five groups fed either the control diet or one of the four experimental diets containing 24% Tartary buckwheat protein, 24% rice protein, 24% wheat protein, or 5 g kg(-1) cholestyramine, respectively. Tartary buckwheat protein reduced plasma TC more effectively than cholestyramine (45% versus 37%), while rice and wheat proteins only reduced plasma TC by 10-13%. Tartary buckwheat protein caused 108% increase in the fecal excretion of total neutral sterols and 263% increase in the fecal excretion of total acidic sterols. real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting analyses showed that Tartary buckwheat protein affected the gene expression of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1-like protein 1 (NPC1L1), acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), and ATP binding cassette transporters 5 and 8 (ABCG5/8) in a down trend, whereas it increased the gene expression of hepatic cholesterol-7α -hydroxylase (CYP7A1). It was concluded that Tartary buckwheat protein was at least one of the active ingredients in Tartary buckwheat flour to lower plasma TC, mainly mediated by enhancing the excretion of bile acids via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 and also by inhibiting the absorption of dietary

  5. Cholesterol-lowering activity of soy-derived glyceollins in the golden Syrian hamster model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haiqiu; Xie, Zhuohong; Boue, Stephen M; Bhatnagar, Deepak; Yokoyama, Wallace; Yu, Liangli Lucy; Wang, Thomas T Y

    2013-06-19

    Hypercholesterolemia is one of the major factors contributing to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), which is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Consumption of soy foods has been recognized to lower the risk of CVD, and phytochemicals in soy are believed to contribute to the health benefits. Glyceollin is one of the candidate phytochemicals synthesized in stressed soy that may account for many unique biological activities. In this study, the in vivo cholesterol-lowering effect of glyceollins was investigated. Male golden Syrian hamsters were fed diets including (1) 36 kcal% fat diet, (2) 36 kcal% fat diet containing 250 mg/kg diet glyceollins, or (3) chow for 28 days. Hepatic cholesterol esters and free cholesterol, hepatic total lipid content, plasma lipoproteins, fecal bile acid, fecal total cholesterol, and cholesterol metabolism related gene expressions were measured. Glyceollin supplementation led to significant reduction of plasma VLDL, hepatic cholesterol esters, and total lipid content. Consistent with changes in circulating cholesterol, glyceollin supplementation also altered expression of the genes related to cholesterol metabolism in the liver. In contrast, no change in plasma LDL and HDL, fecal bile acid, or cholesterol content was observed. The cholesterol-lowering effect of glyceollins appeared not to go through the increase of bile excretion. These results supported glyceollins' role as novel soy-derived cholesterol-lowering phytochemicals that may contribute to soy's health effects.

  6. Effect of dietary cholesterol and plant sterol consumption on plasma lipid responsiveness and cholesterol trafficking in healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Alphonse, Peter A S; Ramprasath, Vanu; Jones, Peter J H

    2017-01-01

    Dietary cholesterol and plant sterols differentially modulate cholesterol kinetics and circulating cholesterol. Understanding how healthy individuals with their inherent variabilities in cholesterol trafficking respond to such dietary sterols will aid in improving strategies for effective cholesterol lowering and alleviation of CVD risk. The objectives of this study were to assess plasma lipid responsiveness to dietary cholesterol v. plant sterol consumption, and to determine the response in rates of cholesterol absorption and synthesis to each sterol using stable isotope approaches in healthy individuals. A randomised, double-blinded, crossover, placebo-controlled clinical trial (n 49) with three treatment phases of 4-week duration were conducted in a Manitoba Hutterite population. During each phase, participants consumed one of the three treatments as a milkshake containing 600 mg/d dietary cholesterol, 2 g/d plant sterols or a control after breakfast meal. Plasma lipid profile was determined and cholesterol absorption and synthesis were measured by oral administration of [3, 4-13C] cholesterol and 2H-labelled water, respectively. Dietary cholesterol consumption increased total (0·16 (sem 0·06) mmol/l, P=0·0179) and HDL-cholesterol (0·08 (sem 0·03) mmol/l, P=0·0216) concentrations with no changes in cholesterol absorption or synthesis. Plant sterol consumption failed to reduce LDL-cholesterol concentrations despite showing a reduction (6 %, P=0·0004) in cholesterol absorption. An over-compensatory reciprocal increase in cholesterol synthesis (36 %, P=0·0026) corresponding to a small reduction in absorption was observed with plant sterol consumption, possibly resulting in reduced LDL-cholesterol lowering efficacy of plant sterols. These data suggest that inter-individual variability in cholesterol trafficking mechanisms may profoundly impact plasma lipid responses to dietary sterols in healthy individuals.

  7. Cholesterol-Lowering Supplements: Lower Your Numbers without Prescription Medication

    MedlinePlus

    ... cholesterol and LDL cholesterol May cause nausea, indigestion, gas, diarrhea or constipation; may be ineffective if you take ezetimibe (Zetia), a prescription cholesterol medication Soy protein as a substitute for other high-fat protein sources May reduce ...

  8. The cis-9,trans-11 isomer of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) lowers plasma triglyceride and raises HDL cholesterol concentrations but does not suppress aortic atherosclerosis in diabetic apoE-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Nestel, Paul; Fujii, Akihiko; Allen, Terri

    2006-12-01

    Reduction in atherosclerosis has been reported in experimental animals fed mixtures of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA). In this study, the major naturally occurring CLA isomer (cis-9,trans-11) was tested in an atherosclerosis-prone mouse model. In a model of insulin deficient apoE deficient mice, 16 animals were fed for 20 weeks with supplemental CLA (09.%, w/w) and compared with a similar number of mice of this phenotype. A control comparison was made of metabolic changes in non-diabetic apoE deficient mice that develop little atherosclerosis over 20 weeks. At 20 weeks, plasma lipids were measured and aortic atherosclerosis quantified by Sudan staining in the arch, thoracic and abdominal segments. The diabetic apoE deficient mice developed marked dyslipidemia, primarily as cholesterol-enriched chylomicron and VLDL-sized lipoproteins and atherosclerosis in the aortic arch. However, there were no significant differences between CLA fed and non-CLA fed mice in either phenotype in plasma cholesterol concentration (in diabetic: 29.4+/-7.7 and 29.5+/-5.9 mmol/L, respectively) or in the area of aortic arch atherosclerosis (in diabetic: 24.8+/-10.3 and 27.6+/-7.7%, respectively). However, among diabetic mice the triglyceride concentration in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins was significantly lower in those fed CLA (for plasma 2.2+/-0.8 to 1.1+/-0.3 mmol/L; P<0.001), a significant difference that was seen also in the non-diabetic mice in which HDL cholesterol increased significantly with CLA (0.35+/-0.12-0.56+/-0.15 mmol/L). In this atherosclerosis-prone model, the diabetic apoE deficient mouse, supplemental 0.9% CLA (cis-9,trans-11) failed to reduce the severity of aortic atherosclerosis, although plasma triglyceride concentration was substantially lowered and HDL cholesterol raised.

  9. Improvements in cholesterol-related knowledge and behavior and plasma cholesterol levels in youths during the 1980s.

    PubMed

    Frank, E; Winkleby, M; Fortmann, S P; Rockhill, B; Farquhar, J W

    1993-01-01

    This article examines cholesterol-related knowledge, cholesterol-related behaviors, and plasma cholesterol levels in 12-24-year-olds, using data collected from four community-based cross-sectional surveys conducted 1979-1980, 1981-1982, 1985-1986, and 1989-1990. Participants included 1,552 individuals from randomly sampled households in two control cities (San Luis Obispo and Modesto, California) of the Stanford Five-City Project. Over the eleven-year study period, cholesterol-related knowledge improved in both control cities (P < .0002). Cholesterol-related behavior (P < .0003) and plasma cholesterol levels (P < .002) significantly improved only in San Luis Obispo (a college city with more 19-24-year-olds and a better-educated population than Modesto). In general, knowledge and behavior scores and plasma cholesterol levels were lower in these 12-24-year-olds than in 25-74-year-olds, although trends at all ages were similar over time and by demographic variables. Although the cholesterol-related interventions that began in the mid-1980s primarily targeted adults, these 12-24-year-olds' cholesterol-related knowledge improved (as did, to a lesser extent, their cholesterol-related behavior and plasma cholesterol levels). These findings have implications for upcoming youth-related cholesterol interventions.

  10. Cholesterol lowering benefits of soy and linseed enriched foods.

    PubMed

    Ridges, L; Sunderland, R; Moerman, K; Meyer, B; Astheimer, L; Howe, P

    2001-01-01

    Foods such as breads and breakfast cereals enriched with a combination of soy protein (soy grits and/or soy flour) and whole linseed are gaining popularity. Regular consumption of either whole grains or soy protein can lower risk factors for coronary heart disease. Furthermore, linseed is a rich source of the omega-3 fatty acid. alpha-linolenic acid (LNA), with purported cardiovascular benefits. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of daily consumption of soy and linseed containing foods and Canola (as an added source of LNA) on plasma lipid concentrations in 20 mildly hypercholesterolaemic postmenopausal women. Fasted blood samples were taken initially and after 3 and 8 weeks to assay plasma lipids and both plasma and erythrocyte membrane fatty acids. Urinary isoflavones were also measured. Data from 18 subjects were used for analysis. Plasma total, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentrations fell significantly (10, 12.5 and 12%, respectively) within 3 weeks. Although attenuated, there were still significant reductions in total and non-HDL cholesterol (5 and 6.5%, respectively) after 8 weeks of intervention. These reductions were associated with increases in urinary isoflavone excretion. This pilot study indicates that regular inclusion of foods containing soy and linseed in the diet may improve plasma lipids in subjects with hypercholesterolaemia.

  11. Cholesterol Asymmetry in Synaptic Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Wood, W. Gibson; Igbavboa, Urule; Müller, Walter E.; Eckert, Gunter P.

    2010-01-01

    Lipids are essential for the structural and functional integrity of membranes. Membrane lipids are not randomly distributed but are localized in different domains. A common characteristic of these membrane domains is their association with cholesterol. Lipid rafts and caveolae are examples of cholesterol enriched domains, which have attracted keen interest. However, two other important cholesterol domains are the exofacial and cytofacial leaflets of the plasma membrane. The two leaflets that make up the bilayer differ in their fluidity, electrical charge, lipid distribution, and active sites of certain proteins. The synaptic plasma membrane (SPM) cytofacial leaflet contains over 85% of the total SPM cholesterol as compared with the exofacial leaflet. This asymmetric distribution of cholesterol is not fixed or immobile but can be modified by different conditions in vivo: 1) chronic ethanol consumption; 2) statins; 3) aging; and 4) apoE isoform. Several potential candidates have been proposed as mechanisms involved in regulation of SPM cholesterol asymmetry: apoE, low-density-lipoprotein receptor, sterol carrier protein-2, fatty acid binding proteins, polyunsaturated fatty acids, p-glycoprotein and caveolin-1. This review examines cholesterol asymmetry in SPM, potential mechanisms of regulation and impact on membrane structure and function. PMID:21214553

  12. Injected phytosterols/stanols suppress plasma cholesterol levels in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Vanstone, C A.; Raeini-Sarjaz, M; Jones, P J.H.

    2001-10-01

    Although plant sterols are known to suppress intestinal cholesterol absorption, whether plasma and hepatic lipid levels are influenced through non-gut related internal mechanisms has not been established. To examine this question 50 male hamsters were divided into 5 groups and fed semi-purified diets containing 20% energy as fat and 0.25% (w/w) cholesterol ad libitum for 60 days. The control group (i) received diet alone, while four additional groups consumed the diet plus one of four equivalent phytosterol mixtures (5 mg/kg/day) given either as (ii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols mixed with diet (oralSA), (iii) tall oil phytosterols/stanols subcutaneously injected (subSA), (iv) soybean oil phytosterols alone mixed with diet (oralSE), or (v) soybean oil subcutaneous injected phytosterols alone (subSE). The control group and both orally supplemented groups also received placebo subcutaneous sham injections. Neither food consumption, body weight, nor liver weight differed across treatment groups. Subcutaneous administration of SA and SE decreased plasma total cholesterol levels by 21% and 23% (p < 0.0001) and non-apolipoprotein-A cholesterol concentrations by 22% and 15% (p < 0.0002), respectively, compared to control. HDL cholesterol and TG concentrations remained unchanged across all groups, except for a decline of 25% (p < 0.0001) in HDL concentration in the subSE group versus control. Plasma campesterol levels were lower (p < 0.05) in the subSA group relative to all other groups. Plasma campesterol:cholesterol and campesterol:sitosterol ratios were, however, higher (p < 0.0001) for both the oral and subSE groups. Hepatic cholesterol levels were higher (p < 0.0001) in the oral and subSE phytosterol groups by 30% and 31%, respectively, relative to control. We conclude that low doses of subcutaneously administered plant sterols reduce circulating cholesterol levels through mechanisms other than inhibiting intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  13. The transport of cholesterol through the plasma in normal man.

    PubMed

    Myant, N B

    1983-09-30

    This review includes a brief account of the routes of entry of cholesterol into the plasma by (a) secretion of lipoproteins and (b) uptake of tissue free cholesterol by lipoproteins in the interstitial fluid, the metabolic transformation undergone by cholesterol within the plasma, with particular reference to the esterification of plasma free cholesterol by lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase and the redistribution of esterified cholesterol from high-density to low-density and very-low-density lipoprotein, and the routes by which cholesterol is removed from the plasma by bulk transport. The review end with a balance sheet showing the approximate amounts of cholesterol entering and leaving the plasma by different routes.

  14. Statins: Are These Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Right for You?

    MedlinePlus

    Statins: Are these cholesterol-lowering drugs right for you? Find out whether your risk factors for heart disease make you a ... risk prediction. In addition to your cholesterol numbers, these risk calculators also ask about your age, race, ...

  15. Cholesterol-lowering drugs: science and marketing.

    PubMed

    Garattini, Livio; Padula, Anna

    2017-02-01

    Long-term use of statin therapy is essential to obtain clinical benefits, but adherence is often suboptimal and some patients are also reported to fail because of 'statin resistance'. The identification of PCSK9 as a key factor in the LDL clearance pathway has led to the development of new monoclonal antibodies. Here we critically review the economic evaluations published in Europe and focused on statins. We searched the PubMed database to select the studies published from July 2006 to June 2016 and finally selected 19 articles. Overall, the majority of studies were conducted from a third-party payer's viewpoint and recurred to modelling. Most studies were sponsored by industry and funding seemed to play a pivotal role in the study design. Patients resistant to LDL-C level reduction were considered only in a few studies. The place in therapy of the new class of biologic should be considered a kind of 'third line' for cholesterol-lowering, after patients have failed with restricted dietary regimens and then with current drug therapies. Otherwise they could result in hardly sustainable expenses even for developed countries.

  16. Serum cholesterol reduction by feeding a high-cholesterol diet containing a lower-molecular-weight polyphenol fraction from peanut skin.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Tomoko; Inoue, Naoko; Shimizu-Ibuka, Akiko; Tadaishi, Miki; Takita, Toshichika; Arai, Soichi; Mura, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    Feeding a high-cholesterol diet with a water-soluble peanut skin polyphenol fraction to rats reduced their plasma cholesterol level, with an increase in fecal cholesterol excretion. The hypocholesterolemic effect was greater with the lower-molecular-weight rather than higher-molecular-weight polyphenol fraction. This effect was possibly due to some oligomeric polyphenols which reduced the solubility of dietary cholesterol in intestinal bile acid-emulsified micelles.

  17. Dietary flaxseed independently lowers circulating cholesterol and lowers it beyond the effects of cholesterol-lowering medications alone in patients with peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    Edel, Andrea L; Rodriguez-Leyva, Delfin; Maddaford, Thane G; Caligiuri, Stephanie Pb; Austria, J Alejandro; Weighell, Wendy; Guzman, Randolph; Aliani, Michel; Pierce, Grant N

    2015-04-01

    Dietary flaxseed lowers cholesterol in healthy subjects with mild biomarkers of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The aim was to investigate the effects of dietary flaxseed on plasma cholesterol in a patient population with clinically significant CVD and in those administered cholesterol-lowering medications (CLMs), primarily statins. This double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial examined the effects of a diet supplemented for 12 mo with foods that contained either 30 g of milled flaxseed [milled flaxseed treatment (FX) group; n = 58] or 30 g of whole wheat [placebo (PL) group; n = 52] in a patient population with peripheral artery disease (PAD). Plasma lipids were measured at 0, 1, 6, and 12 mo. Dietary flaxseed in PAD patients resulted in a 15% reduction in circulating LDL cholesterol as early as 1 mo into the trial (P = 0.05). The concentration in the FX group (2.1 ± 0.10 mmol/L) tended to be less than in the PL group (2.5 ± 0.2 mmol/L) at 6 mo (P = 0.12), but not at 12 mo (P = 0.33). Total cholesterol also tended to be lower in the FX group than in the PL group at 1 mo (11%, P = 0.05) and 6 mo (11%, P = 0.07), but not at 12 mo (P = 0.24). In a subgroup of patients taking flaxseed and CLM (n = 36), LDL-cholesterol concentrations were lowered by 8.5% ± 3.0% compared with baseline after 12 mo. This differed from the PL + CLM subgroup (n = 26), which increased by 3.0% ± 4.4% (P = 0.030) to a final concentration of 2.2 ± 0.1 mmol/L. Milled flaxseed lowers total and LDL cholesterol in patients with PAD and has additional LDL-cholesterol-lowering capabilities when used in conjunction with CLMs. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00781950. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  18. Gender effects of tall oil versus soybean phytosterols as cholesterol-lowering agents in hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ntanios, F Y; MacDougall, D E; Jones, P J

    1998-01-01

    To examine the effect of gender on the mechanisms of action of phytosterols extracted from tall oil (TO) and soybean (SB) on cholesterol and phytosterol metabolism, male and female hamsters were fed cholesterol-enriched diets containing 0.5 or 1% (w/w) TO or SB phytosterols for 90 days. Plasma lipoprotein cholesterol profile and tissue phytosterol and cholesterol biosynthesis levels were determined. Mean plasma total-cholesterol level in females fed 1% (w/w) SB was reduced (p<0.05) by 44%, while in males it was lowered (p<0.05) by 25% compared with their respective controls. Moreover, mean plasma total-cholesterol level was reduced (p<0.05) in male hamsters by -31% and female hamsters by -32% when fed 1% (w/w) TO. Cholesterol biosynthesis was higher (p<0.05) by twofold in groups fed TO at 0.5 and 1% (w/w) concentrations, compared with SB. Hamsters fed TO at 0.5 and 1% (w/w) levels also had higher (p<0.05) hepatic and enterocytic campesterol contents than SB-fed animals. These findings demonstrate gender differences in cholesterol metabolism in TO- and SB-fed hamsters. The results suggest that TO, conversely to SB phytosterol, is a more effective cholesterol-lowering agent in male, but not as much in female, hamsters, over a feeding period of 90 days.

  19. Naturally derived micelles for rapid in vitro screening of potential cholesterol-lowering bioactives.

    PubMed

    Kirana, Chandra; Rogers, Paul F; Bennett, Louise E; Abeywardena, Mahinda Y; Patten, Glen S

    2005-06-01

    A high plasma cholesterol level, especially low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, indicates increased risk of cardiovascular diseases. Plasma cholesterol levels are influenced by diet and cholesterol biosynthesis, uptake, and secretion. Cholesterol uptake involves solubilization into complex phospholipid spherical bodies termed micelles that facilitate the transport of lipids through the gut brush border membrane into enterocytes. In vitro assays reported to date to determine potential cholesterol-lowering effects of various compounds require artificial micelle preparations that are elaborate and time-consuming to prepare. The aims of this study were to compare the efficacy of artificially prepared micelles with naturally derived micelles from pig's bile and to test their ability to assess potential inhibitors of cholesterol uptake. The suitability of pig's bile-derived micelles was tested both at the level of the micelle and at cellular uptake using cultured Caco-2 cells. Known cholesterol uptake inhibitors at the micelle (green tea catechins) and at the Caco-2 cell (beta-lactoglobulin-derived peptide, IIAEK) were used as reference inhibitory compounds. It was concluded that pig's bile was a rapid, reproducible, convenient, and cost-effective source of micelles for cholesterol micelle solubility and cellular uptake assay systems and is suitable for screening purposes focused on identifying potential cholesterol-lowering agents.

  20. Human plasma lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase

    SciTech Connect

    Jauhiainen, M.; Stevenson, K.J.; Dolphin, P.J.

    1988-05-15

    Lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) is a plasma enzyme which catalyzes the transacylation of the fatty acid at the sn-2 position of lecithin to cholesterol forming lysolecithin and cholesteryl ester. The substrates for and products of this reaction are present within the plasma lipoproteins upon which the enzyme acts to form the majority of cholesteryl ester in human plasma. The authors proposed a covalent catalytic mechanism of action for LCAT in which serine and histidine residues mediate lecithin cleavage and two cysteine residues cholesterol esterification. With the aid of sulfhydryl reactive trivalent organoarsenical compounds which are specific for vicinal thiols they have probed the geometry of the catalytic site. They conclude that the two catalytic cysteine residues of LCAT (Cys/sup 31/ and Cys /sup 184/) are vicinal with a calculated distance between their sulfur atoms of 3.50-3.62 A. The additional residue alkylated by teh bifunctional reagent is within the catalytic site and may represent a previously identified catalytic serine or histidine residue.

  1. Role of cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) in nutrigenetics and pharmacogenetics of cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Hubacek, Jaroslav A; Bobkova, Dagmar

    2006-01-01

    The relationship between dietary composition/cholesterol-lowering therapy and final plasma lipid levels is to some extent genetically determined. It is clear that these responses are under polygenic control, with multiple variants in many genes participating in the total effect (and with each gene contributing a relatively small effect). Using different experimental approaches, several candidate genes have been analyzed to date.Interesting and consistent results have been published recently regarding the A-204C promoter variant in the cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) gene. CYP7A1 is a rate-limiting enzyme in bile acid synthesis and therefore plays an important role in maintaining cholesterol homeostasis. CYP7A1-204CC homozygotes have the greatest decrease in total cholesterol level in response to dietary changes in different types of dietary intervention studies. In contrast, one study has reported that the effect of statins in lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol levels was slightly greater in -204AA homozygotes. The CYP7A1 A-204C variant accounts for a significant proportion of the genetic predisposition of the response of plasma cholesterol levels.

  2. The Expected Cardiovascular Benefit of Plasma Cholesterol Lowering with or Without LDL-C Targets in Healthy Individuals at Higher Cardiovascular Risk.

    PubMed

    Cesena, Fernando Henpin Yue; Laurinavicius, Antonio Gabriele; Valente, Viviane A; Conceição, Raquel D; Santos, Raul D; Bittencourt, Marcio S

    2017-06-01

    There is controversy whether management of blood cholesterol should be based or not on LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c) target concentrations. To compare the estimated impact of different lipid-lowering strategies, based or not on LDL-c targets, on the risk of major cardiovascular events in a population with higher cardiovascular risk. We included consecutive individuals undergoing a routine health screening in a single center who had a 10-year risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) ≥ 7.5% (pooled cohort equations, ACC/AHA, 2013). For each individual, we simulated two strategies based on LDL-c target (≤ 100 mg/dL [Starget-100] or ≤ 70 mg/dL [Starget-70]) and two strategies based on percent LDL-c reduction (30% [S30%] or 50% [S50%]). In 1,897 subjects (57 ± 7 years, 96% men, 10-year ASCVD risk 13.7 ± 7.1%), LDL-c would be lowered from 141 ± 33 mg/dL to 99 ± 23 mg/dL in S30%, 71 ± 16 mg/dL in S50%, 98 ± 9 mg/dL in Starget-100, and 70 ± 2 mg/dL in Starget-70. Ten-year ASCVD risk would be reduced to 8.8 ± 4.8% in S50% and 8.9 ± 5.2 in Starget-70. The number of major cardiovascular events prevented in 10 years per 1,000 individuals would be 32 in S30%, 31 in Starget-100, 49 in S50%, and 48 in Starget-70. Compared with Starget-70, S50% would prevent more events in the lower LDL-c tertile and fewer events in the higher LDL-c tertile. The more aggressive lipid-lowering approaches simulated in this study, based on LDL-c target or percent reduction, may potentially prevent approximately 50% more hard cardiovascular events in the population compared with the less intensive treatments. Baseline LDL-c determines which strategy (based or not on LDL-c target) is more appropriate at the individual level. Há controvérsias sobre se o controle do colesterol plasmático deve ou não se basear em metas de concentração de colesterol LDL (LDL-c). Comparar o impacto estimado de diferentes estratégias hipolipemiantes, baseadas ou não em metas de LDL-c, sobre o

  3. Dietary oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) accelerates plasma cholesterol turnover in hypercholesterolaemic rat.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Ozdín, O; Mikus, M

    1995-01-01

    The effect of adding 5% powdered oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) during 12 weeks on kinetic parameters of cholesterol metabolism was studied in male rats (Wistar, initial body weight 85 g) fed a semisynthetic diet containing 0.3% of cholesterol. The plasma cholesterol decay curve (examined for the final 29 days of the experiment after a single dose of cholesterol-4-14C) was evaluated by mathematical analysis using a two-pool model of plasma cholesterol metabolism. The oyster mushroom in the diet reduced the half-times of both exponentials resulting in lower calculated values (by 28%) of total entry of cholesterol into the body cholesterol pool (absorption+endogenous synthesis) and lower sizes of both pools (with slower and faster cholesterol exchange). The rate of cholesterol exchange between the pools was enhanced and the rate of total clearance of cholesterol from the system (metabolic turnover rate of cholesterol i.e. the rate of degradation and excretion of cholesterol from the organism) was enhanced by 50%. The oyster mushroom diet effectively prevented the progress of hypercholesterolaemia (decrease by 38%) and cholesterol accumulation in liver (decrease by 25%) that were induced by the cholesterol diet.

  4. The perspective on cholesterol-lowering mechanisms of probiotics.

    PubMed

    Ishimwe, Nestor; Daliri, Eric B; Lee, Byong H; Fang, Fang; Du, Guocheng

    2015-01-01

    The use of probiotics as food components combats not only cardiovascular diseases but also many gastrointestinal tract disorders. Their health benefits along with their increased global market have interested scientists for better formulation and appropriate administration to the consumers. However, the lack of clear elucidation of their cholesterol-lowering mechanisms has complicated their proper dosage and administration to the beneficiaries. In this review, proposed mechanisms of cholesterol reduction such as deconjugation of bile via bile salt hydrolase activity, binding of cholesterol to probiotic cellular surface and incorporation into their cell membrane, production of SCFAs from oligosaccharides, coprecipitation of cholesterol with deconjugated bile, and cholesterol conversion to coprostanol have been discussed. Also, hypocholesterolemic effects on human- and animal-trial results, commonly used probiotics and synbiotics with effect on serum cholesterol regulation, types of bile salt hydrolase genes, and substrate specificities have been discussed.

  5. Differences in synthesis and absorption of cholesterol of two effective lipid-lowering therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kasmas, S.H.; Izar, M.C.; França, C.N.; Ramos, S.C.; Moreira, F.T.; Helfenstein, T.; Moreno, R.A.; Borges, N.C.; Figueiredo-Neto, A.M.; Fonseca, F.A.

    2012-01-01

    Effective statin therapy is associated with a marked reduction of cardiovascular events. However, the explanation for full benefits obtained for LDL cholesterol targets by combined lipid-lowering therapy is controversial. Our study compared the effects of two equally effective lipid-lowering strategies on markers of cholesterol synthesis and absorption. A prospective, open label, randomized, parallel design study, with blinded endpoints, included 116 subjects. We compared the effects of a 12-week treatment with 40 mg rosuvastatin or the combination of 40 mg simvastatin/10 mg ezetimibe on markers of cholesterol absorption (campesterol and β-sitosterol), synthesis (desmosterol), and their ratios to cholesterol. Both therapies similarly decreased total and LDL cholesterol, triglycerides and apolipoprotein B, and increased apolipoprotein A1 (P < 0.05 vs baseline for all). Simvastatin/ezetimibe increased plasma desmosterol (P = 0.012 vs baseline), and decreased campesterol and β-sitosterol (P < 0.0001 vs baseline for both), with higher desmosterol (P = 0.007) and lower campesterol and β-sitosterol compared to rosuvastatin, (P < 0.0001, for both). In addition, rosuvastatin increased the ratios of these markers to cholesterol (P < 0.002 vs baseline for all), whereas simvastatin/ezetimibe significantly decreased the campesterol/cholesterol ratio (P = 0.008 vs baseline) and tripled the desmosterol/cholesterol ratio (P < 0.0001 vs baseline). The campesterol/cholesterol and β-sitosterol/cholesterol ratios were lower, whereas the desmosterol/cholesterol ratio was higher in patients receiving simvastatin/ezetimibe (P < 0.0001 vs rosuvastatin, for all). Pronounced differences in markers of cholesterol absorption and synthesis were observed between two equally effective lipid-lowering strategies. PMID:22801416

  6. Red algal cellular biomass lowers circulating cholesterol concentrations in Syrian golden hamsters consuming hypercholesterolaemic diets.

    PubMed

    Harding, Scott V; Zhao, Hai Lin; Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Day, Anthony G; Dillon, Harrison F; Jain, Deepak; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-09-01

    Preliminary evidence suggests that consumption of Porphyridium cruentum (PC) biomass results in hypocholesterolaemic effects; however, mechanisms responsible have not been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to determine whether PC biomass lowers circulating cholesterol concentrations, dose dependently, in hamsters fed hypercholesterolaemic diets for 28 d and determine whether cholesterol biosynthesis is affected. Biomass added to diets at 2.5, 5 and 10% resulted in 14, 38 and 53% reductions (P < 0.001) in total plasma cholesterol, respectively, compared with a control diet. Similarly, non-HDL-cholesterol concentrations in the 5 and 10% PC groups were reduced (P < 0.001) 28 and 45%, respectively, v. controls. These effects were unrelated to cholesterol fractional synthesis rate (FSR), as this did not differ between either treatment or control animals. PC consumption had no effect on food intake, plasma glucose concentrations or energy expenditure, but percentage of body fat was lower (P < 0.001) in the 5 and 10% PC groups compared with controls. These data show that PC reduces total plasma cholesterol and non-HDL-cholesterol when incorporated into the diet at levels as low as 2.5%. The mechanism of action for this reduction may be related to increased excretion since food intakes and cholesterol FSR were not reduced in the animals receiving the PC. In conclusion, the use of PC biomass reduces circulating cholesterol, dose dependently, in hypercholesterolaemic hamsters but not via reductions in cholesterol FSR. There is potential for the use of this biomass as a functional ingredient to aid in the management of blood cholesterol concentrations.

  7. The combined use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and cholesterol-lowering bread spreads: health behavior data from Finland.

    PubMed

    de Jong, Nynke; Simojoki, Meri; Laatikainen, Tiina; Tapanainen, Heli; Valsta, Liisa; Lahti-Koski, Marjaana; Uutela, Antti; Vartiainen, Erkki

    2004-11-01

    Cholesterol-lowering drugs may metabolically interact with cholesterol-lowering bread spreads. This study analyses the prevalence of use of drugs, bread spreads or the combination of both in people aware of their high/elevated cholesterol level, and compares users of the three therapies on health behavior and demographics. Participants (9581, 25-74 years) from The National FINRISK 2002 Study filled out a questionnaire on demographics and health (related) issues. Blood samples, blood pressure, body weight and height were measured. Of those who reported to have a high cholesterol level (31% of the study population), 19% used cholesterol-lowering drugs, 11% used cholesterol-lowering bread spreads and 5% combined both therapies. On a population level, only 1% jointly used a drug and bread spread therapy. The combination was used by especially highly educated people and those having a healthy diet. Combining a cholesterol-lowering drug with a bread spread regimen is relatively rare, even among those being aware of their high cholesterol levels. The combined usage was most frequent among 'the better off'. Public health risks of a metabolic interaction between both therapies may not be of major importance yet, but future follow-up is recommended.

  8. Effect of dietary cholesterol and fat on cell cholesterol transfer to postprandial plasma in hyperlipidemic men.

    PubMed

    Sutherland, Wayne H F; de Jong, Sylvia A; Walker, Robert J

    2007-10-01

    Postprandial chylomicrons are potent ultimate acceptors of cell membrane cholesterol and are believed to accelerate reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). We compared the effects of meals rich in polyunsaturated fat (PUFA) and either high (605 mg) or low (151 mg) in cholesterol and a meal rich in dairy fat (DF) in the form of cream on net in vitro transport of red blood cell (RBC) membrane cholesterol to 4 and 6 h postprandial plasma in eight normotriglyceridemic (NTG-H) and eight hypertriglyceridemic (HTG-H) men with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. In HTG-H men, cell cholesterol accumulation in 6-h postprandial plasma was significantly (P = 0.02) less after the PUFA-HC meal compared with the other meals. The significant (P < 0.001) increase in cell plus endogenous cholesterol accumulation in the triglyceride-rich lipoprotein (TRL) fraction of 4 h postprandial plasma incubated with RBC was significantly (P = 0.007) higher after the PUFA-HC meal compared with DF meal in HTG-H men. In NTG-H men, cholesterol accumulation in plasma and plasma lipoproteins in the presence and absence of RBC was not significantly affected by the type of meal ingested. These data suggest that addition of large amounts of cholesterol to a PUFA meal may impair diffusion-mediated transport of cell membrane cholesterol to postprandial plasma and that replacing DF with PUFA in a meal increases postprandial lipemia and may potentially increase cholesterol accumulation in atherogenic postprandial TRL in HTG-H men.

  9. Cholesterol-lowering effect of allicin on hypercholesterolemic ICR mice.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yin; He, Zhuojin; Shen, Xiuying; Xu, Xiaolu; Fan, Jie; Wu, Shaohua; Zhang, Deyong

    2012-01-01

    Allicin was discussed as an active compound with regard to the beneficial effects of garlic in atherosclerosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the cholesterol-lowering properties of allicin. In order to examine its effects on hypercholesterolemia in male ICR mice, this compound with doses of 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg body weight was given orally daily for 12 weeks. Changes in body weight and daily food intake were measured regularly during the experimental period. Final contents of serum cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, and hepatic cholesterol storage were determined. Following a 12-week experimental period, the body weights of allicin-fed mice were less than those of control mice on a high-cholesterol diet by 38.24 ± 7.94% (P < 0.0001) with 5 mg/kg allicin, 39.28 ± 5.03% (P < 0.0001) with 10 mg/kg allicin, and 41.18 ± 5.00% (P < 0.0001) with 20 mg/kg allicin, respectively. A decrease in daily food consumption was also noted in most of the treated animals. Meanwhile, allicin showed a favorable effect in reducing blood cholesterol, triglycerides, and glucose levels and caused a significant decrease in lowering the hepatic cholesterol storage. Accordingly, both in vivo and in vitro results demonstrated a potential value of allicin as a pronounced cholesterol-lowering candidate, providing protection against the onset of atherosclerosis.

  10. Polymorphisms in the CD36 gene modulate the ability of fish oil supplements to lower fasting plasma triacyl glycerol and raise HDL cholesterol concentrations in healthy middle-aged men.

    PubMed

    Madden, Jacqueline; Carrero, Juan J; Brunner, Andreas; Dastur, Neville; Shearman, Cliff P; Calder, Philip C; Grimble, Robert F

    2008-06-01

    Five SNPs in the CD36 gene, 25444G>A, 27645del>ins, 30294G>C, -31118G>A and -33137A>G in haplotypic combinations, link to fasting plasma NEFA concentrations. Fish oil lowers TAG concentrations. The influence of CD36 SNPs on hypotriglyceridemic effects is unknown. The study examines how four of the SNPs modify the effects of fish oil on fasting plasma TAG, NEFA, glucose LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations in 111 healthy, middle-aged, Caucasian men. Subjects consumed habitual diets while taking 6g MaxEPA daily for 12 weeks. TAG decreased from 1.48 mol/l to 0.11 mmol/l, and glucose and HDL rose from 5.92 to 0.15 mmol/l and from 1.27 to 0.04 mmol/l, respectively, irrespective of genotype. NEFA was unaffected. Significant falls in TAG only occurred in individuals with the GG variant of the 25444, 30294, -31118 or -33137 SNPs. The TAG-lowering effects may be via stimulation of CD36 activity in extrahepatic tissue in individuals with the GG variants of these SNPs.

  11. Neurotensin and substance P: differential effects on plasma cholesterol levels in conscious ovariectomized rats.

    PubMed

    Raju, K; Vijayan, E

    1981-08-01

    Circulating plasma cholesterol levels were measured in conscious ovariectomized rats, bearing an indwelling silastic catheter in the external jugular vein, after intravenous (i.v.) pulse injection of 100 microliter 0.9% NaCl containing varying doses of neurotensin and/or substance P. Control injections of saline or decapeptide LH-RH or phosphate buffer did not modify plasma cholesterol levels. 10 or 20 micrograms doses of neurotensin produced a significant and dose-related increase in plasma cholesterol levels while similar doses of substance P had an opposite effect and induced a significant decline in plasma cholesterol levels in ovariectomized rats. 4-APP, a drug which selectively inhibits hepatic secretion of lipoproteins, significantly lowers plasma cholesterol to levels comparable to those produced by substance P. 4-APP and substance P induced hypocholesterolemia was readily reversed by a single dose of neurotensin. These findings indicate that neurotensin acts to increase circulating cholesterol levels and substance P antagonizes this hypercholesterolemic effect of neurotensin presumably by acting at some step in cholesterol transport. Reversal of the inhibitory effects of 4-APP and substance P on blood cholesterol by neurotensin may be through its action on hepatic secretion of lipoproteins, since 4-APP is known to lower circulating cholesterol by its specific action on hepatic secretion of lipoproteins.

  12. Enzymic determination of plasma cholesterol on discrete automatic analysers.

    PubMed

    Nobbs, B T; Smith, J M; Walker, A W

    1977-09-01

    Enzymic procedures for the determination of plasma cholesterol, using cholesterol esterase and cholesterol oxidase, have been adapted to the Vickers D-300, Vickers M,-300, and Vitatron AKES discrete analysers. The results obtained by these methods have been compared to those obtained by manual and continuous flow Liebermann-Burchard methods. The enzymic methods were found to be accurate, precise and of adequate sensitivity.

  13. Increased cholesterol efflux from cultured fibroblasts to plasma from hypertriglyceridemic type 2 diabetic patients: roles of pre beta-HDL, phospholipid transfer protein and cholesterol esterification.

    PubMed

    de Vries, R; Groen, A K; Perton, F G; Dallinga-Thie, G M; van Wijland, M J A; Dikkeschei, L D; Wolffenbuttel, B H R; van Tol, A; Dullaart, R P F

    2008-02-01

    We tested whether hypertriglyceridemia associated with type 2 diabetes mellitus is accompanied by alterations in pre beta-HDL, which are considered to be initial acceptors of cell-derived cholesterol, and by changes in the ability of plasma to promote cellular cholesterol efflux. In 28 hypertriglyceridemic and 56 normotriglyceridemic type 2 diabetic patients, and in 56 control subjects, we determined plasma lipids, HDL cholesterol and phospholipids, plasma pre beta-HDL and pre beta-HDL formation, phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) activity, plasma cholesterol esterification (EST) and cholesteryl ester transfer (CET) and the ability of plasma to stimulate cholesterol efflux out of cultured human fibroblasts. HDL cholesterol and HDL phospholipids were lower, whereas plasma PLTP activity, EST and CET were higher in hypertriglyceridemic diabetic patients than in the other groups. Pre beta-HDL levels and pre beta-HDL formation were unaltered, although the relative amount of pre beta-HDL (expressed as % of total plasma apo A-I) was increased in hypertriglyeridemic diabetic patients. Cellular cholesterol efflux to plasma from hypertriglyceridemic diabetic patients was increased compared to efflux to normotriglyceridemic diabetic and control plasma, but efflux to normotriglyceridemic diabetic and control plasma did not differ. Multiple linear regression analysis demonstrated that cellular cholesterol efflux to plasma was positively and independently related to pre beta-HDL formation, PLTP activity and EST (multiple r=0.48), but not to the diabetic state. In conclusion, cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts to normotriglyceridemic diabetic plasma is unchanged. Efflux to hypertriglyceridemic diabetic plasma is enhanced, in association with increased plasma PLTP activity and cholesterol esterification. Unaltered pre beta-HDL formation in diabetic hypertriglyceridemia, despite low apo A-I, could contribute to maintenance of cholesterol efflux.

  14. Adeno-Associated Virus Serotype 8 Gene Therapy Leads to Significant Lowering of Plasma Cholesterol Levels in Humanized Mouse Models of Homozygous and Heterozygous Familial Hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Kassim, Sadik H.; Li, Hui; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Lagor, William; Jacobs, Frank; Billheimer, Jeffrey; Rader, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) is a life-threatening genetic disease caused by mutations in the gene encoding low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR). As a bridge to clinical trials, we generated a “humanized” mouse model lacking LDLR and apolipoprotein B (ApoB) mRNA editing catalytic polypeptide-1 (APOBEC-1) expression and expressing a human ApoB100 transgene in order to permit more authentic simulation of in vivo interactions between the clinical transgene product, human LDLR (hLDLR), and its endogenous ligand, human ApoB100. On a chow diet, the humanized LDLR-deficient mice have substantial hypercholesterolemia and a lipoprotein phenotype more closely resembling human homozygous FH (hoFH) than in previous mouse models of FH. On injection of an adeno-associated virus serotype 8 (AAV8) vector encoding the human LDLR cDNA, significant correction of hypercholesterolemia was realized at doses as low as 1.5×1011 genome copies (GC)/kg. Given that some patients with heterozygous FH (heFH) cannot be adequately treated with current therapy, we then extended our studies to similarly “humanized” mice that were heterozygous for LDLR deficiency, and that have a lipoprotein phenotype resembling heterozygous FH. Injection of AAV8-hLDLR brought about significant reduction in total and LDL cholesterol at doses as low as 5×1011 GC/kg. Collectively, these data demonstrate the safety and efficacy of the liver-specific AAV8-hLDLR vector in the treatment of humanized mice modeling both hoFH and heFH. PMID:22985273

  15. Unrefined and refined black raspberry seed oils significantly lower triglycerides and moderately affect cholesterol metabolism in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Wolford, Kate A; Carden, Trevor J; Hwang, Keum Taek; Carr, Timothy P

    2011-09-01

    Unrefined and refined black raspberry seed oils (RSOs) were examined for their lipid-modulating effects in male Syrian hamsters fed high-cholesterol (0.12% g/g), high-fat (9% g/g) diets. Hamsters fed the refined and the unrefined RSO diets had equivalently lower plasma total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol in comparison with the atherogenic coconut oil diet. The unrefined RSO treatment group did not differ in liver total and esterified cholesterol from the coconut oil-fed control animals, but the refined RSO resulted in significantly elevated liver total and esterified cholesterol concentrations. The unrefined RSO diets significantly lowered plasma triglycerides (46%; P=.0126) in comparison with the coconut oil diet, whereas the refined RSO only tended to lower plasma triglyceride (29%; P=.1630). Liver triglyceride concentrations were lower in the unrefined (46%; P=.0002) and refined (36%; P=.0005) RSO-fed animals than the coconut oil group, with the unrefined RSO diet eliciting a lower concentration than the soybean oil diet. Both RSOs demonstrated a null or moderate effect on cholesterol metabolism despite enrichment in linoleic acid, significantly lowering HDL cholesterol but not non-HDL cholesterol. Dramatically, both RSOs significantly reduced hypertriglyceridemia, most likely due to enrichment in α-linolenic acid. As a terrestrial source of α-linolenic acid, black RSOs, both refined and unrefined, provide a promising alternative to fish oil supplementation in management of hypertriglyceridemia, as demonstrated in hamsters fed high levels of dietary triglyceride and cholesterol.

  16. Fasting reduces plasma proprotein convertase, subtilisin/kexin type 9 and cholesterol biosynthesis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Browning, Jeffrey D.; Horton, Jay D.

    2010-01-01

    Proprotein convertase, subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9), a key regulator of plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-c) and cardiovascular risk, is produced in liver and secreted into plasma where it binds hepatic LDL receptors (LDLR), leading to their degradation. PCSK9 is transcriptionally activated by sterol response element-binding protein (SREBP)-2, a transcription factor that also activates all genes for cholesterol synthesis as well as the LDLR. Here we investigated the relationship between plasma PCSK9 levels and the lathosterol-to-cholesterol ratio, a marker of cholesterol biosynthesis, in 18 healthy subjects during a 48 h fast. In all individuals, plasma PCSK9 levels declined steadily during the fasting period, reaching a nadir at 36 h that was ∼58% lower than levels measured in the fed state (P < 0.001). Similarly, the lathosterol-to-cholesterol ratio declined in parallel with plasma PCSK9 concentrations during the fast, reaching a nadir at 36 h that was ∼28% lower than that measured in the fed state (P = 0.024). In summary, fasting has a marked effect on plasma PCSK9 concentrations, which is mirrored by measures of cholesterol synthesis in humans. Inasmuch as cholesterol synthesis and PCSK9 are both regulated by SREBP-2, these results suggest that plasma PCSK9 levels may serve as a surrogate marker of hepatic SREBP-2 activity in humans. PMID:20716520

  17. [Lowering LDL-cholesterol: the lower the better?

    PubMed

    Bots, M L

    2017-01-01

    There is still a debate about the optimal LDL level to achieve with pharmacological treatment. Some support the 'the lower, the better' approach, others support 'a level less than 2.5 mmol/l suffices'. Two recent JAMA papers lend support to both views. So what to believe? The issue is whether those with an achieved low LDL level (< 1.8 mmol/l) carry a lower vascular risk than those with an LDL between 1.8 and 2.5 mmol/l. To study this, both groups need to be identical with respect to all other factors that determine the risk, and therefore only differ in their respective LDL levels. So it is all about adjustment for confounding. One paper (shows no benefit for a LDL level lower than 2.5 mmol/l) is based on individual participant information, allowing for optimal adjustment. The other paper (shows the lower, the better) is based on mean levels of trial groups, and cannot adequately adjust for confounding. These examples demonstrate that study design is very important.

  18. Cholesterol-lowering probiotics as potential biotherapeutics for metabolic diseases.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Rajesh; Hemalatha, R; Verma, Vinod; Kumar, Ashok; Chakraborty, Chaitali; Singh, Birbal; Marotta, Francesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2012-01-01

    cholesterol into the cellular membrane, deconjugation of bile via bile salt hydrolase, coprecipitation of cholesterol with deconjugated bile, binding action of bile by fibre, and production of short-chain fatty acids by oligosaccharides. The present paper reviews the mechanisms of action of anti-cholesterolemic potential of probiotic microorganisms and probiotic food products, with the aim of lowering the risks of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases.

  19. Cholesterol-Lowering Probiotics as Potential Biotherapeutics for Metabolic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manoj; Nagpal, Ravinder; Kumar, Rajesh; Hemalatha, R.; Verma, Vinod; Kumar, Ashok; Chakraborty, Chaitali; Singh, Birbal; Marotta, Francesco; Jain, Shalini; Yadav, Hariom

    2012-01-01

    cholesterol into the cellular membrane, deconjugation of bile via bile salt hydrolase, coprecipitation of cholesterol with deconjugated bile, binding action of bile by fibre, and production of short-chain fatty acids by oligosaccharides. The present paper reviews the mechanisms of action of anti-cholesterolemic potential of probiotic microorganisms and probiotic food products, with the aim of lowering the risks of cardiovascular and coronary heart diseases. PMID:22611376

  20. Algal sterols are as effective as β-sitosterol in reducing plasma cholesterol concentration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jingnan; Jiao, Rui; Jiang, Yue; Bi, Yanlan; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2014-01-22

    The present study examined the cholesterol-lowering activity of sterol extract (SE) derived from alga Schizochytrium sp. and its interaction with gene expression of transporters, receptors, and enzymes involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism. GC-MS analyses found that SE was a mixture of various sterols including lathosterol, ergosterol, stigmasterol, 24-ethylcholesta-5,7,22-trienol, stigmasta-7,24(24(1))-dien-3β-ol, and cholesterol. Results showed that SE at doses of 0.06 and 0.30 g/kg diet were able to decrease plasma cholesterol concentration by 19.5 and 34%, respectively, compared with the control, in hamsters maintained on a 0.1% high-cholesterol diet. SE at a dose of 0.30 g/kg diet was as effective as β-sitosterol in reducing plasma total cholesterol (TC). SE-induced reduction in plasma TC was accompanied by down-regulation of intestinal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2) and hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and up-regulation of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor. Addition of SE to the diet increased the excretion of total fecal sterols. It was concluded that SE possessed the same cholesterol-lowering activity as β-sitosterol and the underlying mechanisms were mediated by increasing sterol excretion and decreasing cholesterol absorption and synthesis.

  1. Step by Step: Eating To Lower Your High Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet offers advice for adults who want to lower their blood cholesterol level. The first section, "What You Need To Know about High Blood Cholesterol," discusses blood cholesterol and why it matters, what cholesterol numbers mean, and what affects blood cholesterol levels. Section 2, "What You Need To Do To Lower Blood…

  2. Step by Step: Eating To Lower Your High Blood Cholesterol. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Heart, Lung, and Blood Inst. (DHHS/NIH), Bethesda, MD.

    This booklet offers advice for adults who want to lower their blood cholesterol level. The first section, "What You Need To Know about High Blood Cholesterol," discusses blood cholesterol and why it matters, what cholesterol numbers mean, and what affects blood cholesterol levels. Section 2, "What You Need To Do To Lower Blood…

  3. RHOA is a modulator of the cholesterol-lowering effects of statin.

    PubMed

    Medina, Marisa W; Theusch, Elizabeth; Naidoo, Devesh; Bauzon, Frederick; Stevens, Kristen; Mangravite, Lara M; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Krauss, Ronald M

    2012-01-01

    Although statin drugs are generally efficacious for lowering plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, there is considerable variability in response. To identify candidate genes that may contribute to this variation, we used an unbiased genome-wide filter approach that was applied to 10,149 genes expressed in immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 480 participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenomics (CAP) clinical trial of simvastatin. The criteria for identification of candidates included genes whose statin-induced changes in expression were correlated with change in expression of HMGCR, a key regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism and the target of statin inhibition. This analysis yielded 45 genes, from which RHOA was selected for follow-up because it has been found to participate in mediating the pleiotropic but not the lipid-lowering effects of statin treatment. RHOA knock-down in hepatoma cell lines reduced HMGCR, LDLR, and SREBF2 mRNA expression and increased intracellular cholesterol ester content as well as apolipoprotein B (APOB) concentrations in the conditioned media. Furthermore, inter-individual variation in statin-induced RHOA mRNA expression measured in vitro in CAP LCLs was correlated with the changes in plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and APOB induced by simvastatin treatment (40 mg/d for 6 wk) of the individuals from whom these cell lines were derived. Moreover, the minor allele of rs11716445, a SNP located in a novel cryptic RHOA exon, dramatically increased inclusion of the exon in RHOA transcripts during splicing and was associated with a smaller LDL-cholesterol reduction in response to statin treatment in 1,886 participants from the CAP and Pravastatin Inflamation and CRP Evaluation (PRINCE; pravastatin 40 mg/d) statin clinical trials. Thus, an unbiased filter approach based on transcriptome-wide profiling identified RHOA as a gene contributing to variation in LDL-cholesterol response to statin, illustrating the

  4. Three pools of plasma membrane cholesterol and their relation to cholesterol homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Das, Akash; Brown, Michael S; Anderson, Donald D; Goldstein, Joseph L; Radhakrishnan, Arun

    2014-01-01

    When human fibroblasts take up plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL), its cholesterol is liberated in lysosomes and eventually reaches the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) where it inhibits cholesterol synthesis by blocking activation of SREBPs. This feedback protects against cholesterol overaccumulation in the plasma membrane (PM). But how does ER know whether PM is saturated with cholesterol? In this study, we define three pools of PM cholesterol: (1) a pool accessible to bind 125I-PFO*, a mutant form of bacterial Perfringolysin O, which binds cholesterol in membranes; (2) a sphingomyelin(SM)-sequestered pool that binds 125I-PFO* only after SM is destroyed by sphingomyelinase; and (3) a residual pool that does not bind 125I-PFO* even after sphingomyelinase treatment. When LDL-derived cholesterol leaves lysosomes, it expands PM's PFO-accessible pool and, after a short lag, it also increases the ER's PFO-accessible regulatory pool. This regulatory mechanism allows cells to ensure optimal cholesterol levels in PM while avoiding cholesterol overaccumulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02882.001 PMID:24920391

  5. Cholesterol-lowering properties of different pectin types in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic men and women.

    PubMed

    Brouns, F; Theuwissen, E; Adam, A; Bell, M; Berger, A; Mensink, R P

    2012-05-01

    Viscous fibers typically reduce total cholesterol (TC) by 3-7% in humans. The cholesterol-lowering properties of the viscous fiber pectin may depend on its physico-chemical properties (viscosity, molecular weight (MW) and degree of esterification (DE)), but these are not typically described in publications, nor required by European Food Safety Authority (EFSA) with respect to its generic pectin cholesterol-lowering claim. Here, different sources and types of well-characterized pectin were evaluated in humans. Cross-over studies were completed in mildly hyper-cholesterolemic persons receiving either 15 g/day pectin or cellulose with food for 4 weeks. Relative low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (LDL-C) lowering was as follows: citrus pectin DE-70=apple pectin DE-70 (7-10% reduction versus control)>apple pectin DE-35=citrus pectin DE-35>OPF (orange pulp fiber) DE-70 and low-MW pectin DE-70>citrus DE-0. In a subsequent 3-week trial with 6 g/day pectin, citrus DE-70 and high MW pectin DE-70 reduced LDL-C 6-7% versus control (without changes in TC). In both studies, high DE and high MW were important for cholesterol lowering. Source may also be important as citrus and apple DE-70 pectin were more effective than OPF DE-70 pectin. Pectin did not affect inflammatory markers high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) nor plasma homocysteine. Pectin source and type (DE and MW) affect cholesterol lowering. The EFSA pectin cholesterol-lowering claim should require a minimum level of characterization, including DE and MW.

  6. Plasma plant sterols serve as poor markers of cholesterol absorption in man[S

    PubMed Central

    Jakulj, Lily; Mohammed, Hussein; van Dijk, Theo H.; Boer, Theo; Turner, Scott; Groen, Albert K.; Vissers, Maud N.; Stroes, Erik S. G.

    2013-01-01

    The validation of the use of plasma plant sterols as a marker of cholesterol absorption is frail. Nevertheless, plant sterol concentrations are routinely used to describe treatment-induced changes in cholesterol absorption. Their use has also been advocated as a clinical tool to tailor cholesterol-lowering therapy. Prior to wider implementation, however, the validity of plant sterols as absorption markers needs solid evaluation. Therefore, we compared plasma plant sterol concentrations to gold-standard stable isotope-determined cholesterol absorption. Plasma campesterol/TC concentrations (camp/TC) were measured in a population of 175 mildly hypercholesterolemic individuals (age: 59.7 ± 5.6 years; BMI: 25.5 ± 2.9kg/m2; LDL-C: 4.01 ± 0.56 mmol/l). We compared cholesterol absorption according to the plasma dual-isotope method in subjects with the highest camp/TC concentrations (N = 41, camp/TC: 2.14 ± 0.68 μg/mg) and the lowest camp/TC concentrations (N = 39, camp/TC: 0.97 ± 0.22 μg/mg). Fractional cholesterol absorption did not differ between the groups (24 ± 12% versus 25 ± 16%, P = 0.60), nor was it associated with plasma camp/TC concentrations in the total population of 80 individuals (β = 0.13; P = 0.30, adjusted for BMI and plasma triglycerides). Our findings do not support a relation between plasma plant sterol concentrations and true cholesterol absorption and, therefore, do not favor the use of these sterols as markers of cholesterol absorption. This bears direct consequences for the interpretation of earlier studies, as well as for future studies targeting intestinal regulation of cholesterol metabolism. PMID:23178226

  7. CHOLESTEROL HOMEOSTASIS AND THE ESCAPE TENDENCY (ACTIVITY) OF PLASMA MEMBRANE CHOLESTEROL

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Steck, Theodore L.

    2008-01-01

    We review evidence that sterols can form stoichiometric complexes with certain bilayer phospholipids, and sphingomyelin in particular. These complexes appear to be the basis for the formation of condensed and ordered liquid phases, (micro)domains and/or rafts in both artificial and biological membranes. The sterol content of a membrane can exceed the complexing capacity of its phospholipids. The excess, uncomplexed membrane sterol molecules have a relatively high escape tendency, also referred to as fugacity or chemical activity (and, here, simply activity). Cholesterol is also activated when certain membrane intercalating amphipaths displace it from the phospholipid complexes. Active cholesterol projects from the bilayer and is therefore highly susceptible to attack by cholesterol oxidase. Similarly, active cholesterol rapidly exits the plasma membrane to extracellular acceptors such as cyclodextrin and high-density lipoproteins. For the same reason, the pool of cholesterol in the ER (endoplasmic reticulum) increases sharply when cell surface cholesterol is incremented above the physiological set-point; i.e., equivalence with the complexing phospholipids. As a result, the escape tendency of the excess cholesterol not only returns the plasma membrane bilayer to its set point but also serves as a feedback signal to intracellular homeostatic elements to down-regulate cholesterol accretion. PMID:18423408

  8. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies.

    PubMed Central

    Revis, N W; McCauley, P; Bull, R; Holdsworth, G

    1986-01-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increases in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. For example, after 3 months of exposure to deionized water or water containing 15 ppm monochloramine, plasma cholesterol was 1266 +/- 172 and 2049 +/- 212 mg/dl, respectively, a difference of 783 mg/dl. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. We suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract. PMID:3456597

  9. GCG-rich tea catechins are effective in lowering cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in hyperlipidemic rats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Min; Kim, Chae Wook; Kim, Jung Kee; Shin, Hyun Jung; Baik, Joo Hyun

    2008-05-01

    The (-)-gallocatechin gallate (GCG) concentration in some tea beverages can account for as much as 50% of the total catechins, as a result of sterilization. The present study aims to examine the effects of GCG-rich tea catechins on hyperlipidemic rats and the mechanisms associated with regulating cholesterol metabolism in the liver. By performing heat epimerization of (-)-epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), we manufactured a mixture of catechins that had a GCG content of approximately 50% (w/w). In sucrose-rich diet-induced hyperlipidemic rats, the GCG-rich tea catechins exhibited strong activity in reducing plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations. Furthermore, the hepatic cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations that had increased as a result of the sucrose-rich diet were reduced due to GCG-rich tea catechins consumption. In order to investigate the hyperlipidemic mechanism of GCG-rich tea catechins, we examined the hepatic expressions of LDL receptor and HMG-CoA reductase in hyperlipidemic rats. We further evaluated the action of purified GCG on LDL receptor activity, which is a key contributor to the regulation of cholesterol concentrations. We found that purified GCG increased LDL receptor protein level and activity to a greater extent than EGCG. In conclusion, our study indicates that GCG-rich tea catechins in tea beverages may be effective in preventing hyperlipidemia by lowering plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations.

  10. ACAT inhibitors: the search for novel cholesterol lowering agents.

    PubMed

    Pal, Palash; Gandhi, Hardik; Giridhar, Rajani; Yadav, Mange Ram

    2013-06-01

    Increased level of serum cholesterol (hyperlipidemia) is the most significant risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. Cholesterol levels are affected by factors such as rate of endogenous cholesterol synthesis, biliary cholesterol excretion and dietary cholesterol absorption. Acyl CoA: Cholesterol O-acyl transferases (ACAT) are a small family of enzymes that catalyze cholesterol esterification and cholesterol absorption in intestinal mucosal cells and maintain the cholesterol homeostasis in the blood. Inhibition of the ACAT enzymes is one of the attractive targets to treat hyperlipidemia. Literature survey shows that structurally diverse compounds possess ACAT inhibitory properties. In this review, a comprehensive presentation of the literature on diverse ACAT inhibitors has been given.

  11. Prospective multicentre study of the effect of voluntary plasmapheresis on plasma cholesterol levels in donors

    PubMed Central

    Rosa-Bray, M; Wisdom, C; Wada, S; Johnson, BR; Grifols-Roura, V; Grifols-Lucas, V

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives LDL apheresis is used to treat patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia, and low-volume plasmapheresis for plasma donation may similarly lower cholesterol levels in some donors. This study was designed to assess the effect of plasmapheresis on total, LDL and HDL cholesterol levels in a plasma donor population. Materials and Methods This was a prospective, unblinded longitudinal cohort study in which a blood sample was obtained for analysis before each donation. Data from 663 donors were analysed using a multivariable repeated measures regression model with a general estimating equations approach with changes in cholesterol as the primary outcome measure. Results The model predicted a significant decrease in total and LDL cholesterol for both genders and all baseline cholesterol levels (P < 0·01). The greatest total cholesterol decreases (women, −46·8 mg/dL; men, −32·2 mg/dL) were associated with high baseline levels and 2–4 days between donations. Small but statistically significant increases (P ≤ 0·01) in HDL cholesterol were predicted for donors with low baseline levels. Conclusions These results suggest that, in donors with elevated baseline cholesterol levels, total and LDL cholesterol levels may decrease during routine voluntary plasmapheresis. PMID:23517282

  12. Different palm oil preparations reduce plasma cholesterol concentrations and aortic cholesterol accumulation compared to coconut oil in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas A; Nicolosi, Robert J; Kotyla, Timothy; Sundram, Kalyana; Kritchevsky, David

    2005-10-01

    Several studies have reported on the effect of refined, bleached and deodorized palm oil (RBD-PO) incorporation into the diet on blood cholesterol concentrations and on the development of atherosclerosis. However, very little work has been reported on the influence of red palm oil (RPO), which is higher in carotenoid and tocopherol content than RBD-PO. Thus, we studied the influence of RPO, RBD-PO and a RBD-PO plus red palm oil extract (reconstituted RBD-PO) on plasma cholesterol concentrations and aortic accumulation vs. hamsters fed coconut oil. Forty-eight F1B Golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) (BioBreeders, Watertown, MA) were group housed (three/cage) in hanging polystyrene cages with bedding in an air-conditioned facility maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle. The hamsters were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) containing 10% coconut oil and 0.1% cholesterol for 2 weeks at which time they were bled after an overnight fast and segregated into four groups of 12 with similar plasma cholesterol concentrations. Group 1 continued on the HCD, Group 2 was fed the HCD containing 10% RPO in place of coconut oil, Group 3 was fed the HCD containing 10% RBD-PO in place of coconut oil and Group 4 was fed the HCD with 10% reconstituted RBD-PO for an additional 10 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) and non-high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C) (very low- and low-density lipoprotein) concentrations were significantly lower in the hamsters fed the RPO (-42% and -48%), RBD-PO (-32% and -36%) and the reconstituted RBD-PO (-37% and -41%) compared to the coconut oil-fed hamsters. Plasma HDL-C concentrations were significantly higher by 14% and 31% in hamsters fed the RBD-PO and RPO compared to the coconut oil-fed hamsters. Plasma triglyceride (TG) concentrations were significantly lower in hamsters fed RBD-PO (-32%) and the reconstituted RBD-PO (-31%) compared to the coconut oil-fed hamsters. The plasma gamma-tocopherol concentrations were higher

  13. Cholesterol-lowering benefits of oat-containing cereal in Hispanic americans.

    PubMed

    Karmally, Wahida; Montez, Maria G; Palmas, Walter; Martinez, Wendy; Branstetter, Anita; Ramakrishnan, Rajasekhar; Holleran, Steve F; Haffner, Steven M; Ginsberg, Henry N

    2005-06-01

    This randomized, controlled trial of cholesterol lowering by an oat bran cereal containing beta glucan vs a corn cereal without soluble fiber in Hispanic Americans was conducted for 11 weeks. One-hundred fifty-two men and women, ages 30 to 70 years, with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels between 120 and 190 mg/dL and triglycerides <400 mg/dL were included. After eating a National Cholesterol Education Program Step 1 diet for 5 weeks, subjects were randomly assigned to the corn or the oat cereal for the next 6 weeks. The daily dose of beta glucan was 3 g. Consumption of oat cereal was associated with a reduction in plasma levels of both total cholesterol (-10.9+/-21.6 mg/dL; -4.5%) and LDL-C (-9.4+/-20.3 mg/dL; -5.3%). Consumption of corn cereal did not affect either total cholesterol (+1.2+/-18.3 mg/dL; 1.1%) or LDL-C (+1.2+/-17.5 mg/dL; 2.2%). Differences between the effects of the two cereals on total cholesterol and LDL-C were significant, P =.0003 and P =.0007, respectively.

  14. Effect of decreased plasma cholesterol by atorvastatin treatment on erythrocyte mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Uyuklu, Mehmet; Meiselman, Herbert J; Baskurt, Oguz K

    2007-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitors (statins) are the most commonly used cholesterol-lowering drugs, with recent clinical trends usually aimed at achieving the lowest possible plasma cholesterol levels. Although the effects of increased plasma cholesterol have been previously reported, it is not obvious how very low plasma cholesterol levels would affect membrane composition and the deformability of red blood cells (RBC). The present study investigated the effects of hypocholesterolemia achieved by atorvastatin therapy on RBC membrane and mechanical properties in guinea pigs fed a normal diet. Two groups of animals were used (atorvastatin-treated, n=12; control n=12), and atorvastatin given orally in isotonic phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) at a dose of 20 mg/kg/day for a 21-day period. Our results indicate that the atorvastatin-treated group had significantly lower plasma total cholesterol (17.42+/-1.70 mg/dl), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (5.25+/-2.22 mg/dl) and triglycerides (42.60+/-3.78 mg/dl) than the control group (34.08+/-1.72, 21.17+/-1.41 and 60.64+/-2.43 mg/dl, respectively). In addition, membrane cholesterol content was lower (p<0.0001) and phospholipid content higher (p<0.0001) in the atorvastatin-treated group, thus decreasing the cholesterol to phospholipid ratio; a significant enhancement in sodium-potassium-ATPase activity also occurred. However, in spite the marked changes of plasma and RBC membrane composition, there was no change of RBC deformability. Note that although our results indicate no adverse rheological alterations, extension of our findings to humans requires caution.

  15. Increased plasma cholesterol esterification by LCAT reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis in SR-BI knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Thacker, Seth G; Rousset, Xavier; Esmail, Safiya; Zarzour, Abdalrahman; Jin, Xueting; Collins, Heidi L; Sampson, Maureen; Stonik, John; Demosky, Stephen; Malide, Daniela A; Freeman, Lita; Vaisman, Boris L; Kruth, Howard S; Adelman, Steven J; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-07-01

    LCAT, a plasma enzyme that esterifies cholesterol, has been proposed to play an antiatherogenic role, but animal and epidemiologic studies have yielded conflicting results. To gain insight into LCAT and the role of free cholesterol (FC) in atherosclerosis, we examined the effect of LCAT over- and underexpression in diet-induced atherosclerosis in scavenger receptor class B member I-deficient [Scarab(-/-)] mice, which have a secondary defect in cholesterol esterification. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-null [Lcat(-/-)] mice had a decrease in HDL-cholesterol and a high plasma ratio of FC/total cholesterol (TC) (0.88 ± 0.033) and a marked increase in VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C) on a high-fat diet. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-transgenic (Tg) mice had lower levels of VLDL-C and a normal plasma FC/TC ratio (0.28 ± 0.005). Plasma from Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also showed an increase in cholesterol esterification during in vitro cholesterol efflux, but increased esterification did not appear to affect the overall rate of cholesterol efflux or hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Scarab(-/-)×LCAT-Tg mice also displayed a 51% decrease in aortic sinus atherosclerosis compared with Scarab(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). In summary, we demonstrate that increased cholesterol esterification by LCAT is atheroprotective, most likely through its ability to increase HDL levels and decrease pro-atherogenic apoB-containing lipoprotein particles.

  16. Effects of lowering LDL cholesterol on progression of kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J

    2014-08-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD. Copyright © 2014 by the American Society of Nephrology.

  17. Effects of Lowering LDL Cholesterol on Progression of Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Haynes, Richard; Lewis, David; Emberson, Jonathan; Reith, Christina; Agodoa, Lawrence; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan C.; de Zeeuw, Dick; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Fellström, Bengt; Levin, Adeera; Wheeler, David C.; Walker, Rob; Herrington, William G.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Baigent, Colin; Landray, Martin J.; Reith, Christina; Emberson, Jonathan; Wheeler, David C.; Tomson, Charles; Wanner, Christoph; Krane, Vera; Cass, Alan; Craig, Jonathan; Neal, Bruce; Jiang, Lixin; Hooi, Lai Seong; Levin, Adeera; Agodoa, Lawrence; Gaziano, Mike; Kasiske, Bertram; Walker, Rob; Massy, Ziad A.; Feldt-Rasmussen, Bo; Krairittichai, Udom; Ophascharoensuk, Vuddidhej; Fellström, Bengt; Holdaas, Hallvard; Tesar, Vladimir; Wiecek, Andrzej; Grobbee, Diederick; de Zeeuw, Dick; Grönhagen-Riska, Carola; Dasgupta, Tanaji; Lewis, David; Herrington, Will; Mafham, Marion; Majoni, William; Wallendszus, Karl; Grimm, Richard; Pedersen, Terje; Tobert, Jonathan; Armitage, Jane; Baxter, Alex; Bray, Christopher; Chen, Yiping; Chen, Zhengming; Hill, Michael; Knott, Carol; Parish, Sarah; Simpson, David; Sleight, Peter; Young, Alan; Collins, Rory

    2014-01-01

    Lowering LDL cholesterol reduces the risk of developing atherosclerotic events in CKD, but the effects of such treatment on progression of kidney disease remain uncertain. Here, 6245 participants with CKD (not on dialysis) were randomly assigned to simvastatin (20 mg) plus ezetimibe (10 mg) daily or matching placebo. The main prespecified renal outcome was ESRD (defined as the initiation of maintenance dialysis or kidney transplantation). During 4.8 years of follow-up, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe resulted in an average LDL cholesterol difference (SEM) of 0.96 (0.02) mmol/L compared with placebo. There was a nonsignificant 3% reduction in the incidence of ESRD (1057 [33.9%] cases with simvastatin plus ezetimibe versus 1084 [34.6%] cases with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.89 to 1.05; P=0.41). Similarly, allocation to simvastatin plus ezetimibe had no significant effect on the prespecified tertiary outcomes of ESRD or death (1477 [47.4%] events with treatment versus 1513 [48.3%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.97; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.04; P=0.34) or ESRD or doubling of baseline creatinine (1189 [38.2%] events with treatment versus 1257 [40.2%] events with placebo; rate ratio, 0.93; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.01; P=0.09). Exploratory analyses also showed no significant effect on the rate of change in eGFR. Lowering LDL cholesterol by 1 mmol/L did not slow kidney disease progression within 5 years in a wide range of patients with CKD. PMID:24790178

  18. Lipid-lowering effects of methanolic extract of Vernonia amygdalina leaves in rats fed on high cholesterol diet

    PubMed Central

    Adaramoye, Oluwatosin A; Akintayo, Olajumoke; Achem, Jonah; Fafunso, Michael A

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the lipid-lowering effects of methanolic extract of Vernonia amygdalina (VA) leaves in rats fed an high cholesterol diet, and compared with a standard hypolipidemic drug, Questran (Qu). The effects of VA on the lipid profile were assessed by measuring the levels of total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, lipid peroxidation (LPO), phospholipid, and glutathione (GSH) in the plasma and liver of the rats. Administration of cholesterol at a dose of 30 mg/0.3 ml, five times in a week for nine consecutive weeks resulted in a significant increase (p < 0.05) in plasma and post mitochondrial fraction (PMF) cholesterol levels by 33% and 55%, respectively. However, treatment with extract of VA at doses of 100 and 200 mg/kg caused a dose dependent reduction in the plasma and PMF cholesterol by 20%, 23% and 23%, 29%, respectively. Similar reduction in cholesterol levels was obtained in Qu-treated rats. Furthermore, VA at 200 mg/kg decreased the plasma and PMF LDL-cholesterol levels by 23% and 49%, and also decreased plasma and PMF triglyceride levels by 29% and 28%, respectively. Also, VA at 100 and 200 mg/kg caused a dose-dependent increase in plasma HDL-cholesterol levels by 41% and 59%, respectively. However, there were no significant differences (p > 0.05) in the PMF HDL-cholesterol and phospholipid levels of the treated rats when compared to hypercholesterolemic rats. There were significant decreases (p < 0.05) in the LPO levels of extract-treated rats. Precisely, VA at 100 and 200 mg/kg decreased the levels of plasma and PMF LPO by 38%, 42% and 35%, 45%, respectively. In addition, VA augmented the cholesterol-induced decrease in PMF glutathione levels of the rats. Taken together, these results suggest the lipid-lowering effects of VA and, probably serve as a new potential natural product for the treatment of hyperlipidemia. PMID:18629374

  19. A Cholesterol-Lowering Gene Maps to Chromosome 13q

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Hans; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Busjahn, Andreas; Avi, Liat Ben; Bähring, Sylvia; Baron, Heike; Heath, Simon C.; Uhlmann, Regina; Faulhaber, Hans-Dieter; Shpitzen, Shoshi; Aydin, Atakan; Reshef, Ayeleth; Rosenthal, Magda; Eliav, Osnat; Mühl, Astrid; Lowe, Adam; Schurr, Danny; Harats, Dror; Jeschke, Evi; Friedlander, Yechiel; Schuster, Herbert; Luft, Friedrich C.; Leitersdorf, Eran

    2000-01-01

    Summary A cholesterol-lowering gene has been postulated from familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) families having heterozygous persons with normal LDL levels and homozygous individuals with LDL levels similar to those in persons with heterozygous FH. We studied such a family with FH that also had members without FH and with lower-than-normal LDL levels. We performed linkage analyses and identified a locus at 13q, defined by markers D13S156 and D13S158. FASTLINK and GENEHUNTER yielded LOD scores >5 and >4, respectively, whereas an affected-sib-pair analysis gave a peak multipoint LOD score of 4.8, corresponding to a P value of 1.26×10-6. A multipoint quantitative-trait-locus (QTL) linkage analysis with maximum-likelihood binomial QTL verified this locus as a QTL for LDL levels. To test the relevance of this QTL in an independent normal population, we studied MZ and DZ twin subjects. An MZ-DZ comparison confirmed genetic variance with regard to lipid concentrations. We then performed an identity-by-descent linkage analysis on the DZ twins, with markers at the 13q locus. We found strong evidence for linkage at this locus with LDL (P<.0002), HDL (P<.004), total cholesterol (P<.0002), and body-mass index (P<.0001). These data provide support for the existence of a new gene influencing lipid concentrations in humans. PMID:10631147

  20. Mechanisms of cholesterol and saturated fatty acid lowering by Quillaja saponaria extract, studied by in vitro digestion model.

    PubMed

    Vinarova, Liliya; Vinarov, Zahari; Damyanova, Borislava; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai; Stoyanov, Simeon

    2015-04-01

    Quillaja saponin extracts are known to reduce plasma cholesterol levels in humans. Here we study the mechanism of this effect with Quillaja Dry saponin extract (QD). In vitro model of triglyceride lipolysis is used to quantify the effect of QD on the solubilization of cholesterol and of the lipolysis products (fatty acids and monoglycerides) in the dietary mixed micelles (DMM). We found that QD extract decreases significantly both the cholesterol (from 80% to 20%) and saturated fatty acids (SFA, from 70% to 10%) solubilised in DMM. Series of dedicated experiments prove that QD may act by two mechanisms: (1) direct precipitation of cholesterol and (2) displacement of cholesterol from the DMM. Both mechanisms lead to increased cholesterol precipitation and, thus, render cholesterol bio-inaccessible. We prove also that the saponin molecules are not the active component of QD, because highly purified Quillaja extract with very similar saponin composition does not exhibit cholesterol-lowering or SFA-lowering effect. The effect of QD extract on cholesterol solubilisation is most probably caused by the high-molecular weight polyphenol molecules, present in this extract. The reduced SFA solubilisation is caused by Ca(2+) ions of relatively high concentration (1.25 wt%), also present in QD extract, which precipitate the fatty acids into calcium soaps.

  1. RHOA Is a Modulator of the Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Statin

    PubMed Central

    Medina, Marisa W.; Theusch, Elizabeth; Naidoo, Devesh; Bauzon, Frederick; Stevens, Kristen; Mangravite, Lara M.; Kuang, Yu-Lin; Krauss, Ronald M.

    2012-01-01

    Although statin drugs are generally efficacious for lowering plasma LDL-cholesterol levels, there is considerable variability in response. To identify candidate genes that may contribute to this variation, we used an unbiased genome-wide filter approach that was applied to 10,149 genes expressed in immortalized lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from 480 participants of the Cholesterol and Pharmacogenomics (CAP) clinical trial of simvastatin. The criteria for identification of candidates included genes whose statin-induced changes in expression were correlated with change in expression of HMGCR, a key regulator of cellular cholesterol metabolism and the target of statin inhibition. This analysis yielded 45 genes, from which RHOA was selected for follow-up because it has been found to participate in mediating the pleiotropic but not the lipid-lowering effects of statin treatment. RHOA knock-down in hepatoma cell lines reduced HMGCR, LDLR, and SREBF2 mRNA expression and increased intracellular cholesterol ester content as well as apolipoprotein B (APOB) concentrations in the conditioned media. Furthermore, inter-individual variation in statin-induced RHOA mRNA expression measured in vitro in CAP LCLs was correlated with the changes in plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, and APOB induced by simvastatin treatment (40 mg/d for 6 wk) of the individuals from whom these cell lines were derived. Moreover, the minor allele of rs11716445, a SNP located in a novel cryptic RHOA exon, dramatically increased inclusion of the exon in RHOA transcripts during splicing and was associated with a smaller LDL-cholesterol reduction in response to statin treatment in 1,886 participants from the CAP and Pravastatin Inflamation and CRP Evaluation (PRINCE; pravastatin 40 mg/d) statin clinical trials. Thus, an unbiased filter approach based on transcriptome-wide profiling identified RHOA as a gene contributing to variation in LDL-cholesterol response to statin, illustrating the

  2. Cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin is associated with down-regulation on genes of sterol transporters involved in cholesterol absorption.

    PubMed

    Liang, Yin Tong; Chen, Jingnan; Jiao, Rui; Peng, Cheng; Zuo, Yuanyuan; Lei, Lin; Liu, Yuwei; Wang, Xiaobo; Ma, Ka Ying; Huang, Yu; Chen, Zhen-Yu

    2015-03-25

    Sesame seed is rich in sesamin. The present study was to (i) investigate the plasma cholesterol-lowering activity of dietary sesamin and (ii) examine the interaction of dietary sesamin with the gene expression of sterol transporters, enzymes, receptors, and proteins involved in cholesterol metabolism. Thirty hamsters were divided into three groups fed the control diet (CON) or one of two experimental diets containing 0.2% (SL) and 0.5% (SH) sesamin, respectively, for 6 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels in hamsters given the CON, SL, and SH diets were 6.62 ± 0.40, 5.32 ± 0.40, and 5.00 ± 0.44 mmol/L, respectively, indicating dietary sesamin could reduce plasma TC in a dose-dependent manner. Similarly, the excretion of total fecal neutral sterols was dose-dependently increased with the amounts of sesamin in diets (CON, 2.65 ± 0.57; SL, 4.30 ± 0.65; and SH, 5.84 ± 1.27 μmol/day). Addition of sesamin into diets was associated with down-regulation of mRNA of intestinal Niemann-Pick C1 like 1 protein (NPC1L1), acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase 2 (ACAT2), microsomal triacylglycerol transport protein (MTP), and ATP-binding cassette transporters subfamily G members 5 and 8 (ABCG5 and ABCG8). Results also showed that dietary sesamin could up-regulate hepatic cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), whereas it down-regulated hepatic 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-CoA (HMG-CoA) reductase and liver X receptor alpha (LXRα). It was concluded that the cholesterol-lowering activity of sesamin was mediated by promoting the fecal excretion of sterols and modulating the genes involved in cholesterol absorption and metabolism.

  3. Relationship of drinking water disinfectants to plasma cholesterol and thyroid hormone levels in experimental studies

    SciTech Connect

    Revis, N.W.; McCauley, P.; Bull, R.; Holdsworth, G.

    1986-03-01

    The effects of drinking water containing 2 or 15 ppm chlorine (pH 6.5 and 8.5), chlorine dioxide, and monochloramine on thyroid function and plasma cholesterol were studied because previous investigators have reported cardiovascular abnormalities in experimental animals exposed to chlorinated water. Plasma thyroxine (T4) levels, as compared to controls, were significantly decreased in pigeons fed a normal or high-cholesterol diet and drinking water containing these drinking water disinfectants at a concentration of 15 ppm (the exception was chlorine at pH 6.5) for 3 months. In most of the treatment groups, T4 levels were significantly lower following the exposure to drinking water containing the 2 ppm dose. Increase in plasma cholesterol were frequently observed in the groups with lower T4 levels. This association was most evident in pigeons fed the high-cholesterol diet and exposed to these disinfectants at a dose of 15 ppm. The factor(s) associated with the effect of these disinfectants on plasma T4 and cholesterol is not known. The authors suggest however that these effects are probably mediated by products formed when these disinfectants react with organic matter in the upper gastrointestinal tract.

  4. Effect of Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1 on plasma cholesterol levels in diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Song, M; Park, S; Lee, H; Min, B; Jung, S; Park, S; Kim, E; Oh, S

    2015-03-01

    We investigated the probiotic properties of Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1, such as acid resistance, bile tolerance, adherence to HT-29 cells, and cholesterol assimilation activity. In an animal study, 7-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were fed a normal diet, a high-fat diet (HFD), or an HFD with L. acidophilus NS1 (ca. 1.0×10(8) cfu/mL) for 10 wk. Total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly lower in mice fed an HFD with L. acidophilus NS1 than in those fed an HFD only, whereas high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were similar between these 2 groups. To understand the mechanism of the cholesterol-lowering effect of L. acidophilus NS1 on the HFD-mediated increase in plasma cholesterol levels, we determined mRNA levels of genes involved in cholesterol homeostasis in the liver. Expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 (Srebp2) and LDL receptor (Ldlr) in the liver was dramatically reduced in mice fed a HFD compared with those fed a normal diet. When L. acidophilus NS1 was administered orally to HFD-fed mice, an HFD-induced suppression of Srebp2 and Ldlr expression in the liver was abolished. These results suggest that the oral administration of L. acidophilus NS1 to mice fed an HFD increased the expression of Srebp2 and Ldlr in the liver, which was inhibited by high fat intake, thus leading to a decrease in plasma cholesterol levels. Lactobacillus acidophilus NS1 could be a useful probiotic microorganism for cholesterol-lowering dairy products and the improvement of hyperlipidemia and hepatic lipid metabolism. Copyright © 2015 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Effect of cholesterol transport inhibitors on steroidogenesis and plasma membrane cholesterol transport in cultured MA-10 Leydig tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Nagy, L; Freeman, D A

    1990-05-01

    These studies were directed toward understanding the cellular actions of inhibitor drugs that affect steroidogenesis and cholesterol transport. We investigated the microfilament inhibitor cytochalasin-D, the microtubule inhibitor colchicine, the calmodulin antagonist trifluoperazine, and the inhibitor of acidic vesicle function nigericin. We found that all of these compounds caused dose-dependent inhibition of progesterone synthesis in the MA-10 cells. Each compound also inhibited (Bu)2cAMP-stimulated pregnenolone synthesis, indicating that each inhibited a fundamental process required for steroidogenesis. Each compound was next evaluated for inhibitory actions on cholesterol transport to and from the plasma membrane. On the basis of inhibitor sensitivity, two different categories of cholesterol transport were defined. Transport of newly synthesized or low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from the cell interior to the plasma membrane was inhibitor insensitive. Plasma membrane cholesterol internalization, however, was sensitive to all of the inhibitors and did not result because of any drug effect on the acyl-coenzyme-A-cholesterol acyl transferase. Cycling of cholesteryl ester-derived cholesterol through the plasma membrane appeared to occur before its use for steroidogenesis. Thus, inhibition of plasma membrane internalization would prevent utilization of both plasma membrane cholesterol and cholesteryl ester-derived cholesterol, the two major substrate sources for steroid hormone synthesis. Consistent with this interpretation was the finding that inhibition of plasma membrane cholesterol internalization by each inhibitor paralleled the inhibitor's effect on steroidogenesis.

  6. Some observations on the cholesterol esterifying and cholesterol ester hydrolyzing activities in dog plasma.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, K; Kamo-Yamada, F; Cho, S; Sugano, M

    1980-05-01

    Cholesterol esterification and cholesterol ester hydrolysis in dog plasma were investigated. Esterification proceeded linearly for 60 min, and the amounts of cholesterol esterified were in the range of 0.13-0.18 mumol/ml/h. No change of acyl composition had occurred in newly formed cholesterol esters during incubation. With the addition of Na taurocholate (10 mM), complete inhibition of the esterifying activity and maximal activation of the hydrolase activity were observed. Approximately 50% of cholesterol esters present in plasma was hydrolyzed in 10 min of incubation, and the reaction was completed within 60 min. The maximal rate of hydrolysis was estimated to be 4.0-5.4 mumol/ml/h, and polyunsaturated esters were hydrolyzed more rapidly than saturated ones. The esterifying activity was detected in high density (HDL) and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL), while the hydrolytic activity was found only in VHDL. Each lipoprotein fraction served as a good substrate for hydrolysis, while HDL was the sole substrate for esterification. The optimal pH of the hydrolytic activity in VHDL lay in a broad range between 6.8 and 7.2 and the apparent Km was determined as 12.5 x 10(-3) mM for cholesteryl oleate.

  7. Global marketing of cholesterol-lowering drugs as therapy.

    PubMed

    Elimimian, Jonathan U; Gilmore, James M; Singletary, Tony J

    2006-01-01

    Pharmaceutical marketing services (PMS) are a key component of pharmaceutical companies' marketing strategies in that they create links between the pharmaceutical company and the physician. They are is also a link between physician and patients locally and globally. PMS discussed in this paper provide various services from tangible to intangible products in order to increase the physicians and pharmacists prescribing activities of their treatment modalities. Given the high cost of recruiting, training, and supporting PMS global marketing efforts, it is important for PMS channels to understand the significance of pharmaceutical multinational companies to ascribe to prescription drug services provided in Thailand. This created the unique marketing environment for the pharmaceutical companies. This study examines whether there is a gap in the existing cholesterol-lowering medication prescribed by physicians in Thailand and the newly introduced brand to the U.S. market. The degree of the new product adoption is analyzed through physician prescription frequency and records. Results of the study indicate there is significant improvement in the health conditions of the users of the new cholesterol medication among Thailand patients. Physicians in Thailand were, however, faced with competing brands in the market due to aggressiveness of advertising and promotion by multinational pharmaceutical marketing and manufacturers Associations. Perceived value and benefit to users were significant outcome of the study. More diagnostic and prescriptive research is recommended to cover Southeast Asia and other parts of the developing countries.

  8. Cholesterol-lowering effect of N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)linoleamide (melinamide) in cholesterol-fed diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Matsubara, K; Matsuzawa, Y; Jiao, S; Kihara, S; Takama, T; Nakamura, T; Tokunaga, K; Kubo, M; Tarui, S

    1988-08-01

    Cholesterol loading of diabetic rats is known to induce marked hyperlipoproteinaemia, and we have reported that enhancement of the activity of intestinal acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT), one of the key enzymes involved in cholesterol absorption, might play an important role in the development of hypercholesterolaemia in these animals. In the present study, we have shown that treatment with N-(alpha-methylbenzyl)linoleamide (melinamide), a new hypocholesterolaemic drug, caused a substantial decrease of the enhanced intestinal ACAT activity in diabetic rats, but did not affect intestinal cholesterol esterase activity. Furthermore, marked improvement of hypercholesterolaemia in cholesterol-fed diabetic rats occurred concomitantly with the drug treatment. These results suggest that intestinal ACAT activity is closely related to the serum cholesterol level in diabetic rats, and show that melinamide lowers intestinal ACAT activity.

  9. Effects of gender and gonadectomy on growth and plasma cholesterol levels in pigs

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nam-Young; Kim, Kyu-Il

    2009-01-01

    We conducted two studies to determine the effect of gender, gonadectomy (GDX) on growth and plasma cholesterol levels in pigs. In experiment 1, five sham-operated and five GDX female Landrace pigs (26 kg) were allowed to have free access to water and feed up to market weight (approximately 100 kg). Body weight and feed consumption were recorded biweekly, and daily body weight gain, daily feed intake and feed efficiency (gain/feed) were calculated during the feeding period. In experiment 2, 10 male (26 kg) and 10 female (26 kg) Landrace pigs were used; five male and five female pigs were assigned to sham-operated or GDX. Pigs were allowed to have free access to water and a diet without added cholesterol (Table 1) until they were 6 months old (male 104 and female 98 kg) and thereafter they were fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (Table 1) containing 0.5% cholesterol and 0.1% cholate for 10 days. GDX of female pigs increased average daily gain (P<0.05), compared with their sham-operated counterparts during the growing-finishing period, but had no effect (P>0.05) on feed efficiency. Plasma cholesterol levels in pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet for 10 days were much higher (P<0.05) in females than in males (161 vs 104 mg/100 mL plasma), and were increased by GDX only in male pigs. HDL-cholesterol/LDL+VLDL-cholesterol ratio appeared to be higher in males than in females, and was not influenced by GDX in either sex. Results suggested that the lower growth rate of female pigs than their male counterparts is attributable to the ovarian activity, and the lower plasma cholesterol level in male than in female pigs fed a hypercholesterolemic diet is due to the testicular activity. PMID:20016700

  10. Deficient Cholesterol Esterification in Plasma of apoc2 Knockout Zebrafish and Familial Chylomicronemia Patients.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Gaudet, Daniel; Miller, Yury I

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory cofactor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the major enzyme catalyzing plasma triglyceride hydrolysis. We have created an apoc2 knockout zebrafish model, which mimics the familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) in human patients with a defect in the APOC2 or LPL gene. In this study, we measured plasma levels of free cholesterol (FC) and cholesterol esters (CE) and found that apoc2 mutant zebrafish have a significantly higher FC to CE ratio (FC/CE), when compared to the wild type. Feeding apoc2 mutant zebrafish a low-fat diet reduced triglyceride levels but not the FC/CE ratio. In situ hybridization and qPCR results demonstrated that the hepatic expression of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (lcat), the enzyme responsible for esterifying plasma FC to CE, and of apolipoprotein A-I, a major protein component of HDL, were dramatically decreased in apoc2 mutants. Furthermore, the FC/CE ratio was significantly increased in the whole plasma and in a chylomicron-depleted fraction of human FCS patients. The FCS plasma LCAT activity was significantly lower than that of healthy controls. In summary, this study, using a zebrafish model and human patient samples, reports for the first time the defect in plasma cholesterol esterification associated with LPL deficiency.

  11. Deficient Cholesterol Esterification in Plasma of apoc2 Knockout Zebrafish and Familial Chylomicronemia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chao; Gaudet, Daniel; Miller, Yury I.

    2017-01-01

    Hypertriglyceridemia is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Apolipoprotein C-II (APOC2) is an obligatory cofactor for lipoprotein lipase (LPL), the major enzyme catalyzing plasma triglyceride hydrolysis. We have created an apoc2 knockout zebrafish model, which mimics the familial chylomicronemia syndrome (FCS) in human patients with a defect in the APOC2 or LPL gene. In this study, we measured plasma levels of free cholesterol (FC) and cholesterol esters (CE) and found that apoc2 mutant zebrafish have a significantly higher FC to CE ratio (FC/CE), when compared to the wild type. Feeding apoc2 mutant zebrafish a low-fat diet reduced triglyceride levels but not the FC/CE ratio. In situ hybridization and qPCR results demonstrated that the hepatic expression of lecithin-cholesterol acyltransferase (lcat), the enzyme responsible for esterifying plasma FC to CE, and of apolipoprotein A-I, a major protein component of HDL, were dramatically decreased in apoc2 mutants. Furthermore, the FC/CE ratio was significantly increased in the whole plasma and in a chylomicron-depleted fraction of human FCS patients. The FCS plasma LCAT activity was significantly lower than that of healthy controls. In summary, this study, using a zebrafish model and human patient samples, reports for the first time the defect in plasma cholesterol esterification associated with LPL deficiency. PMID:28107429

  12. Short-term administration of tall oil phytosterols improves plasma lipid profiles in subjects with different cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Jones, P J; Howell, T; MacDougall, D E; Feng, J Y; Parsons, W

    1998-06-01

    To assess the short-term cholesterol-lowering potential of sitostanol-containing tall oil plant sterols, 22 subjects consumed fixed-food diets over two 10-day periods with or without 21.2 mg/kg body weight/d tall oil phytosterols (sitosterol 62%, sitostanol 21%, campesterol 16%, and campestanol 1%) in a randomized crossover study design. On day 10 of each diet, plasma lipoprotein cholesterol levels, plasma phytosterol concentrations, and cholesterol biosynthesis rates were determined. Total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were lower (P < .01) after administration of tall oil phytosterol (4.7 +/- 0.3 and 3.0 +/- 0.3 mmol/L, respectively) versus placebo (5.0 +/- 0.3 and 3.2 +/- 0.3 mmol/L, respectively). Tall oil treatment had no effect on the plasma high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol level (1.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) versus placebo (1.1 +/- 0.1 mmol/L). Similarly, plasma triglyceride (TG) levels did not differ between tall oil (1.3 +/- 0.2 mmol/L) and placebo (1.4 +/- 0.2 mmol/L) treatments. Plasma campesterol (15.8 +/- 3.7 mmol/mol cholesterol) and sitosterol (6.0 +/- 2.1 mmol/mol cholesterol) levels were not different after tall oil treatment versus placebo treatment (15.4 +/- 2.3 and 6.4 +/- 2.0 mmol/mol cholesterol, respectively). Plasma sitostanol levels were essentially undetectable. No difference was observed in cholesterol biosynthesis between tall oil (0.045 +/- 0.004 pools/d) and placebo (0.034 +/- 0.004 pools/d) treatments; however, the effect of treatments in subjects with different cholesterol levels varied. In subjects with lower cholesterol values, the red blood cell cholesterol fractional synthesis rate (FSR) increased from 0.0291 +/- 0.0054 pools/d after placebo to 0.0509 +/- 0.0049 pools/d (P < .05) after phytosterol treatment. In subjects with higher cholesterol values, the red blood cell cholesterol FSR did not change significantly after treatment. These results demonstrate the short-term efficacy of tall

  13. Red wine prevents the postprandial increase in plasma cholesterol oxidation products: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Natella, F; Macone, A; Ramberti, A; Forte, M; Mattivi, F; Matarese, R M; Scaccini, C

    2011-06-28

    Moderate wine consumption has been shown to lower cardiovascular risk. One of the mechanisms could involve the control of postprandial hyperlipaemia, a well-defined risk factor for atherosclerosis, reasonably by reducing the absorption of lipid oxidised species from the meal. The objective of the present study was to investigate whether wine consumption with the meal is able to reduce the postprandial increase in plasma lipid hydroperoxides and cholesterol oxidation products, in human subjects. In two different study sessions, twelve healthy volunteers consumed the same test meal rich in oxidised and oxidisable lipids (a double cheeseburger), with 300 ml of water (control) or with 300 ml of red wine (wine). The postprandial plasma concentration of cholesterol oxidation products was measured by GC-MS. The control meal induced a significant increase in the plasma concentration of lipid hydroperoxides and of two cholesterol oxidation products, 7-β-hydroxycholesterol and 7-ketocholesterol. The postprandial increase in lipid hydroperoxides and cholesterol oxidation products was fully prevented by wine when consumed with the meal. In conclusion, the present study provides evidence that consumption of wine with the meal could prevent the postprandial increase in plasma cholesterol oxidation products.

  14. Plant sterol-fortified orange juice effectively lowers cholesterol levels in mildly hypercholesterolemic healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Devaraj, Sridevi; Jialal, Ishwarlal; Vega-López, Sonia

    2004-03-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for coronary artery disease. Therapeutic lifestyle changes include dietary modifications such as inclusion of phytosterols, which effectively lowers low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in margarines and other fats. Their effectiveness in nonfat moieties is not yet established. The aim of this study was to examine if phytosterols alter the plasma lipoprotein profile when incorporated into nonfat orange juice. After a 2-week run-in phase with orange juice, 72 mildly hypercholesterolemic healthy subjects were randomized to receive either placebo orange juice (placebo OJ) or plant sterol-fortified orange juice (sterol OJ) (2g/d) for 8 weeks. Fasting blood was obtained at baseline, after 2 weeks of OJ, and after 8 weeks of placebo/sterol-OJ supplementation. Sterol OJ supplementation significantly decreased total (7.2%), LDL (12.4%), and non-high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol (7.8%) compared with baseline and compared with placebo OJ (P<0.01). Apolipoprotein B levels were significantly decreased (9.5%) with sterol OJ. There were no significant changes in HDL cholesterol or triglycerides with the sterol OJ. While folate and B12 levels significantly increased, homocysteine levels were unchanged. Orange juice fortified with plant sterols are effective in reducing LDL cholesterol and could easily be incorporated into the therapeutic lifestyle changes dietary regimen.

  15. Supplementation of hydroxypropyl methylcellulose into yeast leavened all-whole grain barley bread potentiates cholesterol-lowering effect.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Turowski, Maciej; Anderson, W H Kerr; Young, Scott A; Kim, Yookyung; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2011-07-27

    We investigated in Syrian Golden hamsters the biological impact and its underlying mechanism of single whole grain breads supplemented with 2-3% hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC), a semisynthetic viscous soluble dietary fiber (SDF) as a substitute for gluten. Hamsters were fed high-fat diets supplemented with 48-65% (w/w) differently ground, freeze-dried single grain breads including whole grain wheat, barley, barley supplemented with HPMC, debranned oat, and oat supplemented with HPMC which were compared to a diet containing microcrystalline cellulose (control). All single grain breads significantly lowered plasma LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared to the control. Enrichment with HPMC further lowered plasma and hepatic cholesterol concentrations. Despite the reduced molecular weight of naturally occurring soluble (1--->3),(1--->4)-β-d-glucan (β-glucan) caused by the bread-making process, whole grain barley breads downregulated hepatic expression of CYP7A1 and HMG-CoAR genes that are responsible for bile acid and cholesterol synthesis, suggesting a possible role of bioactive compounds such as short-chain fatty acids and phenolic compounds from barley bread. Barley bread enriched with HPMC downregulated expression of ABCG5 gene. Taken together, it appears that distinctive modulation of synthesis and excretion of hepatic cholesterol and bile acid contributes to the cholesterol-lowering properties of whole grain barley breads and breads enriched with HPMC. These data suggests that alternative whole grain breads supplemented with HPMC may provide consumers with a staple food that can assist in cholesterol management.

  16. Modulation of adhesion molecules by cholesterol-lowering therapy in mononuclear cells from hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Cerda, Alvaro; Rodrigues, Alice Cristina; Alves, Camila; Genvigir, Fabiana Dalla Vecchia; Fajardo, Cristina Moreno; Dorea, Egidio Lima; Gusukuma, Maria Cecilia; Pinto, Gelba Almeida; Hirata, Mario Hiroyuki; Hirata, Rosario Dominguez Crespo

    2015-08-01

    Cholesterol-lowering therapy has been related with several pleiotropic effects including anti-inflammatory action in vascular endothelium; however, their influence on monocyte adhesion molecules is poorly described. To investigate the effect of inhibitors of synthesis (statins) and absorption (ezetimibe) of cholesterol on expression of adhesion molecules L-selectin, PSGL-1, VLA-4, LFA-1, and Mac-1 in mononuclear cells in vivo and in vitro using THP-1 cells. The influence of simvastatin (10 mg/day), ezetimibe (10 mg/day), and their combination (10 mg each/day) on mRNA expression of adhesion molecules was analyzed in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from hypercholesterolemics. The effects of atorvastatin, simvastatin, and ezetimibe on mRNA and protein expression of adhesion molecules were also evaluated in THP-1 cells. Simvastatin/ezetimibe combination, but not the monotherapies, reduced the mRNA expression of the PSGL-1, LFA-1, and Mac-1 genes in PBMC from hypercholesterolemics. Total and LDL cholesterol in serum correlated with PSGL-1 mRNA expression, whereas HDL cholesterol negatively correlated with mRNA levels of L-selectin and VLA-4 genes (P < 0.05). Plasma hsCRP was also correlated with mRNA levels of VLA-4, LFA-1, and Mac-1 (P < 0.05). Atorvastatin and simvastatin at 10 μM reduced mRNA and protein expression of L-selectin, PSGL-1, and VLA-4 in THP-1 cells (P < 0.05). Cholesterol-lowering therapy modulates gene expression of adhesion molecules in PBMC from hypercholesterolemics and THP-1 cells. Simvastatin/ezetimibe combination gives more benefits by reducing to a larger extent the expression of adhesion molecules in mononuclear cells. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Cholesterol Lowering in Intermediate-Risk Persons without Cardiovascular Disease.

    PubMed

    Yusuf, Salim; Bosch, Jackie; Dagenais, Gilles; Zhu, Jun; Xavier, Denis; Liu, Lisheng; Pais, Prem; López-Jaramillo, Patricio; Leiter, Lawrence A; Dans, Antonio; Avezum, Alvaro; Piegas, Leopoldo S; Parkhomenko, Alexander; Keltai, Katalin; Keltai, Matyas; Sliwa, Karen; Peters, Ron J G; Held, Claes; Chazova, Irina; Yusoff, Khalid; Lewis, Basil S; Jansky, Petr; Khunti, Kamlesh; Toff, William D; Reid, Christopher M; Varigos, John; Sanchez-Vallejo, Gregorio; McKelvie, Robert; Pogue, Janice; Jung, Hyejung; Gao, Peggy; Diaz, Rafael; Lonn, Eva

    2016-05-26

    Previous trials have shown that the use of statins to lower cholesterol reduces the risk of cardiovascular events among persons without cardiovascular disease. Those trials have involved persons with elevated lipid levels or inflammatory markers and involved mainly white persons. It is unclear whether the benefits of statins can be extended to an intermediate-risk, ethnically diverse population without cardiovascular disease. In one comparison from a 2-by-2 factorial trial, we randomly assigned 12,705 participants in 21 countries who did not have cardiovascular disease and were at intermediate risk to receive rosuvastatin at a dose of 10 mg per day or placebo. The first coprimary outcome was the composite of death from cardiovascular causes, nonfatal myocardial infarction, or nonfatal stroke, and the second coprimary outcome additionally included revascularization, heart failure, and resuscitated cardiac arrest. The median follow-up was 5.6 years. The overall mean low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level was 26.5% lower in the rosuvastatin group than in the placebo group. The first coprimary outcome occurred in 235 participants (3.7%) in the rosuvastatin group and in 304 participants (4.8%) in the placebo group (hazard ratio, 0.76; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.64 to 0.91; P=0.002). The results for the second coprimary outcome were consistent with the results for the first (occurring in 277 participants [4.4%] in the rosuvastatin group and in 363 participants [5.7%] in the placebo group; hazard ratio, 0.75; 95% CI, 0.64 to 0.88; P<0.001). The results were also consistent in subgroups defined according to cardiovascular risk at baseline, lipid level, C-reactive protein level, blood pressure, and race or ethnic group. In the rosuvastatin group, there was no excess of diabetes or cancers, but there was an excess of cataract surgery (in 3.8% of the participants, vs. 3.1% in the placebo group; P=0.02) and muscle symptoms (in 5.8% of the participants, vs. 4.7% in the

  18. Cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in view of bile acid pathway of resveratrol and resveratrol-glucuronides

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major...

  19. The cholesterol lowering property of coriander seeds (Coriandrum sativum): mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Dhanapakiam, P; Joseph, J Mini; Ramaswamy, V K; Moorthi, M; Kumar, A Senthil

    2008-01-01

    Coriandrum sativum (Coriander) has been documented as a traditional treatment for cholesterol and diabetes patients. In the present study, coriander seeds incorporated into diet and the effect of the administration of coriander seeds on the metabolism of lipids was studied in rats, fed with high fat diet and added cholesterol. The seeds had a significant hypolipidemic action. In the experimental group of rats (tissue) the level of total cholesterol and triglycerides increased significantly There was significant increase in beta-hydroxy, beta-methyl glutaryl CoA reductase and plasma lecithin cholesterol acyl transferase activity were noted in the experimental group. The level of low density lipoprotein (LDL) + very low density lipoprotein (VLDL) cholesterol decreased while that of high density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol increased in the experimental group compared to the control group. The increased activity of plasma LCAT enhanced degradation of cholesterol to fecal bile acids and neutral sterols appeared to account for its hypocholesterolemic effect.

  20. Phytosterol stearate esters elicit similar responses on plasma lipids and cholesterol absorption but different responses on fecal neutral sterol excretion and hepatic free cholesterol in male Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ash, Mark M; Hang, Jiliang; Dussault, Patrick H; Carr, Timothy P

    2011-07-01

    The dietary impact of specific phytosterols incorporated into phytosterol fatty acid esters has not been elucidated. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that phytosterol esters containing different sterol moieties (sitosterol, sitostanol, or stigmasterol) but the same fatty acid moiety (stearic acid) produce different effects on cholesterol metabolism. Male Syrian hamsters were fed sitosterol, sitostanol, and stigmasterol stearate esters (25 g/kg diet) in an atherogenic diet containing cholesterol (1.2 g/kg) and coconut oil (80 g/kg). The phytosterol stearates produced no decrease in cholesterol absorption or plasma non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol despite a reduction in liver free cholesterol in hamsters fed both sitosterol and sitostanol stearate diets. In addition, sitosterol stearate significantly increased fecal esterified and total neutral sterol excretion. Stigmasterol stearate did not differ from control in neutral sterol excretion, plasma lipids, or hepatic lipid concentration. Sitosterol stearate demonstrated the highest level of net intestinal hydrolysis, whereas sitostanol and stigmasterol stearate equivalently demonstrated the lowest. The cholesterol-lowering effect in liver-but not plasma-and the limited presence of fecal free sterols indicate that intact (unhydrolyzed) phytosterol stearates may impact cholesterol metabolism by mechanisms unrelated to the role of free phytosterols. The consumption of phytosterol esters at 2.5% of the diet elicited only modest impacts on cholesterol metabolism, although sitosterol stearate had a slightly greater therapeutic impact by lowering liver free cholesterol and increasing esterified and total neutral sterol fecal excretion, possibly due to a greater level of intestinal hydrolysis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Non-significance of plasma total cholesterol in the occurrence of occupational accidents.

    PubMed

    Bursey, R G

    1992-02-01

    A recent review of cholesterol lowering intervention trials has demonstrated an increased mortality from non-illness events, including accidents. This study examines 410 middle-aged men with regards to plasma total cholesterol levels and the occurrence of minor factory accidents. There was no significant difference in mean cholesterol concentrations between those who had reported a factory accident, and those who had not, over a 2 year period; 5.7 mmol/l (SD, 0.98 mmol/l) and 5.73 mmol/l (SD, 1.06 mmol/l) respectively. The 19 men who had sustained an occupational injury of significant severity to result in absence from work did not have a mean plasma total cholesterol level which differed appreciably from any of the other subjects, their mean being 5.66 mmol/l (SD, 1:18 mmol/l). Plasma total cholesterol in itself is not participating in the occurrence of accidents in this occupational group.

  2. Cholesterol lowering effects of nuts compared with a Canola oil enriched cereal of similar fat composition.

    PubMed

    Chisholm, A; Mc Auley, K; Mann, J; Williams, S; Skeaff, M

    2005-08-01

    Small quantities of nuts protect against subsequent cardiovascular risk. There is speculation that the cholesterol lowering effect associated with nut consumption arises primarily from the fatty acid composition of nuts but may be caused by some other component. To evaluate this possibility we compared the effect of various nuts, against a Canola oil based cereal with a comparable fatty acid profile, on lipids, lipoproteins and fatty acids to determine whether the fatty acid profile of nuts explains their cholesterol lowering effects. Twenty-eight men and women with mean (s.d.) levels of total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol of 6.0 (1.1) mmol/L, and 4.1 (1.0) mmol/L, respectively and a mean body mass index (BMI) of 26.9 (3.2) kg/m2 took part in a randomised cross over trial. For two periods of six weeks, separated by a four-week washout, participants were asked to consume a low saturated fat diet, which included either 30 g/d nuts (nut diet) or one serving of a cereal containing Canola oil (cereal diet). There were no significant differences in the lipids, lipoproteins, plasma fatty acids or other variables between the two diets at the end of the study. Total cholesterol (TC) and low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were lower on both experimental diets than at baseline, 0.51 mmol/L and 0.40 mmol/L (p<0.001, p<0.01), respectively on the nut diet and 0.42 mmol/L and 0.37 mmol/L (p<0.001, p<0.01), respectively on the cereal diet. A 30 g serving of nuts, or a serving of a Canola oil enriched cereal with a similar fatty acid composition reduced total and LDL cholesterol to a similar extent when consumed as part of a lipid lowering diet. Results suggest that foods with a similar fatty acid composition to nuts can produce comparable decreases in lipoprotein mediated cardiovascular risk.

  3. High density lipoprotein plasma fractions inhibit aortic fatty streaks in cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Badimon, J J; Badimon, L; Galvez, A; Dische, R; Fuster, V

    1989-03-01

    The effects of in vivo administration of high density lipoprotein-very high density lipoprotein (HDL-VHDL) on the development of aortic fatty streaks were studied in cholesterol-fed rabbits. The rabbits received a 0.5% cholesterol-rich diet for 8 weeks. During this period, the HDL-VHDL group was intravenously administered with 50 mg/week of homologous HDL-VHDL protein; the control group received normal saline (0.9% NaCl). HDL-VHDL fraction was obtained at density range 1.063 to 1.25 gm/ml by ultracentrifugation of normal rabbit plasma. Along the study, plasma lipid levels followed a similar profile in both groups. At the completion of the study, atherosclerotic-like lipid-rich lesions covered 37.9 +/- 6% (X +/- SEM) of the intimal aortic surface in the control group, and 14.9 +/- 2.1% in the treated group (p less than 0.001). The values of total and free cholesterol, esterified cholesterol, and phospholipids deposited within vessel wall were significantly lower in the aortas of the HDL-VHDL treated group than those in the control group. Cholesterol accumulation in the livers was also significantly lower (p less than 0.01) in the treated group than in the control. We concluded that administration of homologous HDL-VHDL lipoprotein fraction to cholesterol-fed rabbits, dramatically inhibited the extent of aortic fatty streaks and lowered lipid deposition in the arterial wall and liver without modification of the plasma lipid levels.

  4. Plasma cholesterol and triglycerides in heroin addicts.

    PubMed

    Maccari, S; Bassi, C; Zanoni, P; Plancher, A C

    1991-12-31

    We examined total cholesterolemia, triglyceridemia, high density lipoproteins- (HDL) cholesterolemia, apolipoproteins A1 and B, body mass index, albuminemia and alanine aminotransferase in 60 heroin addicts. After comparing 23 control subjects with the heroin addicts the result was that the latter have significantly lower mean values of total cholesterolemia and of HDL-cholesterolemia and higher values of triglyceridemia. They also have significantly higher prevalences of cases of hypocholesterolemia and of hypo-HDL-cholesterolemia. Within the addict group there is no linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and body mass index; there is, however, an inverse linear correlation between total cholesterolemia and alanine aminotransferase. Therefore, the alterations found in the lipid pattern of heroin addicts are not due to malnutrition but hypothetically to liver diseases which are frequent in these patients.

  5. VARIATIONS IN THE PLASMA CHOLESTEROL AND CHOLESTEROL ESTER CONTENT IN HOG CHOLERA

    PubMed Central

    Shope, Richard E.

    1930-01-01

    1. The plasma cholesterol and cholesterol ester content of swine, experimentally infected with hog cholera, exhibit a regular succession of changes. During the period of incubation of the disease, for 3 or more days following inoculation with hog cholera virus, hypocholesterolemia prevails. This is followed by a period of hypercholesterolemia which is coincident with the onset of the clinical manifestations of the disease. The hypercholesterolemia after persisting for from 4 to 7 days, gives way to a second period of hypocholesterolemia more marked and more prolonged than that observed immediately after inoculation. In the experiments of the present work this second period lasted 8 and 11 days in the 2 animals surviving long enough for the study of it and was followed by a second period of hypercholesterolemia. In the one animal surviving this period for 8 days a third period of irregular and fluctuating hypocholesterolemia set in. 2. A comparison with the results in other acute infections indicates that hog cholera is unique in showing alternating periods of hypocholesterolemia and hypercholesterolemia. 3. A normal hog inoculated with Bacillus suisepticus rapidly developed the typical marked hypocholesterolemia whereas an animal infected with hog cholera and then inoculated with B. suisepticus failed to show the decrease in plasma cholesterol content. PMID:19869682

  6. Cholesterol: Top Five Foods to Lower Your Numbers

    MedlinePlus

    ... doctor about how much you should take. Walnuts, almonds and other tree nuts can improve blood cholesterol. ... grams) a day of most nuts, such as almonds, hazelnuts, peanuts, pecans, some pine nuts, pistachio nuts ...

  7. Cholesterol lowering in low density lipoprotein receptor knockout mice overexpressing apolipoprotein E.

    PubMed Central

    Osuga, J; Yonemoto, M; Yamada, N; Shimano, H; Yagyu, H; Ohashi, K; Harada, K; Kamei, T; Yazaki, Y; Ishibashi, S

    1998-01-01

    Apo E is a key molecule in the lipoprotein metabolism; thus, genetic manipulation of apo E may prove useful in the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. To test the feasibility of this idea, we have generated low density lipoprotein receptor (LDLR) knockout mice that overexpress the rat apo E transgene (ETg+/+:LDLRKO), and compared their plasma lipoprotein profiles with those of nonexpressing LDLR knockout mice (ETg-/-:LDLRKO). On a normal chow diet, the mean plasma cholesterol level of ETg+/+:LDLRKO mice was significantly lower than that of ETg-/-:LDLRKO mice (189 versus 240 mg/dl, P < 0. 01). The LDL fraction was selectively reduced in the ETg+/+:LDLRKO mice. Despite the challenge with an atherogenic diet, cholesterol lowering was persistently observed and fatty streak lesions in the aortic sinus were significantly suppressed in the mice overexpressing apo E. These results imply that stimulation of hepatic production of apo E may be used as a promising adjunctive therapy for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. PMID:9664080

  8. Cholesterol-lowering effect of spreads enriched with microcrystalline plant sterols in hypercholesterolemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Christiansen, L I; Lähteenmäki, P L; Mannelin, M R; Seppänen-Laakso, T E; Hiltunen, R V; Yliruusi, J K

    2001-04-01

    Plant sterols have been shown to reduce serum lipid concentrations. The effectiveness is highly dependent on the physical state of the plant sterols. By means of a new crystallizing method, plant sterols can be added into dietary fats and oils homogeneously. In this fat ingredient, plant sterols are in a microcrystalline form. We investigated the cholesterol-lowering effect and possible side effects of vegetable oil-based spreads fortified with two different doses of microcrystalline plant sterols. This double-blind randomized, placebo-controlled study consisted of a 6-wk run-in and a 6-month experimental period. During the run-in period, all 155 hypercholesterolemic subjects received rapeseed oil-based control spread. In the beginning of the experimental period subjects were randomly assigned into one of three experimental groups. The control group continued to use control spread, and the two test groups used spreads with added plant sterols of either 1.5 g/d or 3.0 g/d. The subjects consumed test spreads as a part of their normal diet without any restrictions in lifestyle and diet. Plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly reduced by 7.5-11.6% (0.46-0.62 mmol/1) in groups consuming margarine enriched with free plant sterols, compared with the control group. The effects were similar between the two groups consuming either 1.5g or 3.0 g plant sterols per day. No effect on HDL-cholesterol or triacylglycerol concentrations occurred. The test spreads did not induce any adverse effects in blood clinical chemistry, hematology or decreases in serum concentrations of lipid soluble vitamins. Microcrystalline plant sterols are effective in lowering serum total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations without obvious side effects. The daily dose of 1.5 g plant sterols is enough to reach the maximum effect.

  9. Toward individualized cholesterol-lowering treatment in end-stage renal disease.

    PubMed

    Silbernagel, Guenther; Baumgartner, Iris; Wanner, Christoph; März, Winfried

    2014-03-01

    There is broad evidence that lowering low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol will reduce cardiovascular risk. However, in patients on maintenance hemodialysis treatment, lowering LDL cholesterol is not as effective in preventing cardiovascular complications as in the general population. Cholesterol is either endogenously synthesized or absorbed from the intestine. It has been suggested that the benefit of using statins to prevent atherosclerotic complications is less pronounced in people with high absorption of cholesterol. Recent data indicate that patients on hemodialysis have high absorption of cholesterol. Therefore, these patients may benefit from dietary counseling to reduce cholesterol intake, from functional foods containing plant sterols and stanols, and from drugs that interfere with intestinal absorption of sterols (i.e., ezetimibe, bile acid resins, and sevelamer). This review discusses cholesterol homeostasis and the perspective of personalized treatment of hypercholesterolemia in hemodialysis. Copyright © 2014 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Cholesterol-lowering potential in human subjects of fat from pigs fed rapeseed oil.

    PubMed

    Sandström, B; Bügel, S; Lauridsen, C; Nielsen, F; Jensen, C; Skibsted, L H

    2000-08-01

    The possibility of achieving blood-lipid-lowering characteristics of pig fat by increasing the content of unsaturated fat in pig feed was evaluated. Three pig feeding regimens were applied: basal feed (no added fat or vitamin E), basal feed + rapeseed oil (60 g/kg feed), and basal feed + rapeseed oil (60 g/kg) + vitamin E (200 mg/kg). Meat and meat products from the three pig groups were incorporated into diets providing 86 g pig fat/10 MJ. The diets were served to twelve healthy human male subjects for 3 weeks each in a randomised crossover design. The diets prepared from pigs fed rapeseed oil had a lower content of saturated fatty acids (approximately 9 v. 11% of energy) and a higher content of polyunsaturated fatty acids (approximately 6 v. 4% of energy) than the diet prepared from pigs fed the basal feed. Diets based on fat from pigs fed the rapeseed oil resulted in significantly lower (approximately 4%, P = 0.019) total serum cholesterol concentration compared with the diet from pigs fed the basal feed. No differences were observed in LDL-, HDL- or VLDL-cholesterol, or in triacylglycerol or VLDL-triacylglycerol concentrations. Addition of vitamin E to the pig feed resulted in only a minor increase in vitamin E content in the human subjects' diet and the vitamin E content was low in all three pig diets. Plasma vitamin E concentration in the human subjects at the end of the period with diets from pigs fed rapeseed oil without vitamin E was significantly lower (P = 0.04) than in the other two diet periods. In conclusion, an increased content of rapeseed oil in pig feed changes the fatty acid composition of the pig fat in a way that has a potential to reduce blood cholesterol concentrations in human subjects. However, intake of pig fat with a higher content of unsaturated fatty acids needs to be matched by a higher dietary intake of vitamin E.

  11. Glycaemic control influences the relationship between plasma PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Laugier-Robiolle, Stéphanie; Vergès, Bruno; Le Bras, Maëlle; Gand, Elise; Bouillet, Benjamin; Saulnier, Pierre-Jean; Le May, Cédric; Pichelin, Matthieu; Maréchaud, Richard; Petit, Jean-Michel; Hadjadj, Samy; Cariou, Bertrand

    2017-03-01

    Pro-protein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a critical regulator of LDL cholesterol metabolism. Little is known, however, about the regulation of PCSK9 in patients with type 1 diabetes (T1D). In the present study, we aimed to determine the relationship between circulating PCSK9 and metabolic variables in T1D. Plasma PCSK9 levels were measured in 195 people with T1D (mean age 38.8 years, mean diabetes duration 17.2 years, mean glycated haemoglobin [HbA1c] 8.3%), who were free of any lipid-lowering agent. Plasma PCSK9 was positively correlated with LDL cholesterol (P = .0007), triglycerides (P = .004), apolipoprotein B (P = .005), HbA1c (P = .003), systolic (P = .003) and diastolic (P = .001) blood pressure and body mass index (0.02). In multivariate analysis, PCSK9 concentration was independently associated with HbA1c (P = .02) and LDL cholesterol (P = .03). After classifying patients according to HbA1c tertile, the correlation between PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol was only observed in the highest tertile (P = .0006; Rho = 0.43), whereas no correlation was found in the lowest and intermediate tertiles. This study suggests that good glycaemic control abolishes the positive relationship between PCSK9 and LDL cholesterol in patients with T1D; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain to be established.

  12. Dietary copper in excess of nutritional requirement reduces plasma and breast muscle cholesterol of chickens.

    PubMed

    Bakalli, R I; Pesti, G M; Ragland, W L; Konjufca, V

    1995-02-01

    Male commercial broiler strain chickens were fed from hatching to 42 d of age either a control diet (based on corn and soybean meal) or the control diet supplemented with 250 mg copper/kg diet from cupric sulfate pentahydrate (for 35 or 42 d). Hypocholesterolemia (11.8% reduction) and decreased breast muscle cholesterol (20.4% reduction) were observed in copper-supplemented birds. There was a slight increase (P > .05) in breast muscle copper (14.5%), and all levels were very low (< .5 mg/kg). Feeding copper for 42 vs 35 d resulted in lower levels of cholesterol in the plasma (12.9 vs 10.8% reduction) and breast muscle (24.6 vs 16.2% reduction). Very similar results were found in two additional experiments in which hypocholesterolemia and reduced breast muscle cholesterol were associated with reduced plasma triglycerides and blood reduced glutathione. It is well known that hypercholesterolemia is a symptom of dietary copper deficiency. The data presented here indicate that blood and breast muscle cholesterol are inversely related to dietary copper in excess of the dietary requirement for maximal growth. The cholesterol content of the edible muscle tissue of broiler chickens can be reduced by approximately 25% after feeding a supranormal level of copper for 42 d without altering the growth of the chickens or substantially increasing the copper content of the edible meat.

  13. A cholesterol-lowering VLP vaccine that targets PCSK9.

    PubMed

    Crossey, Erin; Amar, Marcelo J A; Sampson, Maureen; Peabody, Julianne; Schiller, John T; Chackerian, Bryce; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-10-26

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a secretory protein that controls cholesterol homeostasis by enhancing endosomal and lysosomal degradation of the low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R). Mutations that cause increased activity of PCSK9 are associated with hypercholesterolemia, atherosclerosis and early cardiovascular disease (CVD), whereas individuals with loss-of-function mutations in PCSK9 are apparently healthy but are hypocholesterolemic and have a dramatically decreased risk of CVD. In this study, we generated virus-like particle (VLP)-based vaccines targeting PCSK9. Mice and macaques vaccinated with bacteriophage VLPs displaying PCSK9-derived peptides developed high titer IgG antibodies that bound to circulating PCSK9. Vaccination was associated with significant reductions in total cholesterol, free cholesterol, phospholipids, and triglycerides. A vaccine targeting PCSK9 may, therefore, be an attractive alternative to monoclonal antibody-based therapies.

  14. Use and outcomes of a cholesterol-lowering intervention for rural elderly subjects.

    PubMed

    Ives, D G; Kuller, L H; Traven, N D

    1993-01-01

    Few studies have evaluated the efficacy of cholesterol-lowering interventions in a community setting and have included a control or comparison group. As part of a preventive health demonstration project in rural Pennsylvania, Medicare beneficiaries underwent cholesterol screening to identify high-risk individuals with serum cholesterol levels > or = 240 mg/dL. These high-risk individuals were randomized to a cholesterol-lowering intervention through either local hospitals or physicians' offices or to a control group. Baseline and follow-up serum cholesterol levels collected two to three years later were compared according to service location (hospital versus physician's office), intervention attendance, degree of participation, baseline heart disease history, and cholesterol-lowering medication use at follow-up. Serum cholesterol levels decreased between 5.7% and 6.6% in the hospital-based and physician-based groups, as well as in a control group not offered the intervention. Participation rates did not differ between treatment groups, nor did participation affect serum cholesterol levels. Attendance level and heart disease history were not associated with a greater decrease in serum cholesterol levels. Individuals reporting cholesterol-lowering drug use at follow-up had significantly higher baseline serum cholesterol levels and a significantly greater decrease in total serum cholesterol (P < .0001) than those not on medication. Both nonpharmacological (diet) and pharmacological (drug) interventions will reduce serum cholesterol levels and heart attack risk. The study results suggest that, at least for older individuals, the impact of nonpharmacological interventions on the community is minimal. We conclude that only very aggressive treatment will significantly loser serum cholesterol levels in older individuals at risk for heart attack.

  15. Simultaneous Determination of Oxysterols, Cholesterol and 25-Hydroxy-Vitamin D3 in Human Plasma by LC-UV-MS

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Rohini; Iyer, Vignesh; Khare, Prachi; Bodziak, Mary Lou; Badgett, Darlene; Zivadinov, Robert; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Rideout, Todd C.; Ramanathan, Murali; Browne, Richard W.

    2015-01-01

    Background Oxysterols are promising biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases that are linked with cholesterol and vitamin D metabolism. There is an unmet need for methods capable of sensitive, and simultaneous quantitation of multiple oxysterols, vitamin D and cholesterol pathway biomarkers. Methods A method for simultaneous determination of 5 major oxysterols, 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and cholesterol in human plasma was developed. Total oxysterols were prepared by room temperature saponification followed by solid phase extraction from plasma spiked with deuterated internal standards. Oxysterols were resolved by reverse phase HPLC using a methanol/water/0.1% formic acid gradient. Oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 were detected with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode; in-series photodiode array detection at 204nm was used for cholesterol. Method validation studies were performed. Oxysterol levels in 220 plasma samples from healthy control subjects, multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders patients were quantitated. Results Our method quantitated 5 oxysterols, cholesterol and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 from 200 μL plasma in 35 minutes. Recoveries were >85% for all analytes and internal standards. The limits of detection were 3-10 ng/mL for oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and 1 μg/mL for simultaneous detection of cholesterol. Analytical imprecision was <10 %CV for 24(S)-, 25-, 27-, 7α-hydroxycholesterol (HC) and cholesterol and ≤15 % for 7-keto-cholesterol. Multiple Sclerosis and other neurological disorder patients had lower 27-hydroxycholesterol levels compared to controls whereas 7α-hydroxycholesterol was lower specifically in Multiple Sclerosis. Conclusion The method is suitable for measuring plasma oxysterols levels in human health and disease. Analysis of human plasma indicates that the oxysterol, bile acid precursors 7α-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are lower in Multiple Sclerosis and

  16. Simultaneous determination of oxysterols, cholesterol and 25-hydroxy-vitamin D3 in human plasma by LC-UV-MS.

    PubMed

    Narayanaswamy, Rohini; Iyer, Vignesh; Khare, Prachi; Bodziak, Mary Lou; Badgett, Darlene; Zivadinov, Robert; Weinstock-Guttman, Bianca; Rideout, Todd C; Ramanathan, Murali; Browne, Richard W

    2015-01-01

    Oxysterols are promising biomarkers of neurodegenerative diseases that are linked with cholesterol and vitamin D metabolism. There is an unmet need for methods capable of sensitive, and simultaneous quantitation of multiple oxysterols, vitamin D and cholesterol pathway biomarkers. A method for simultaneous determination of 5 major oxysterols, 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and cholesterol in human plasma was developed. Total oxysterols were prepared by room temperature saponification followed by solid phase extraction from plasma spiked with deuterated internal standards. Oxysterols were resolved by reverse phase HPLC using a methanol/water/0.1% formic acid gradient. Oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 were detected with atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry in positive ion mode; in-series photodiode array detection at 204nm was used for cholesterol. Method validation studies were performed. Oxysterol levels in 220 plasma samples from healthy control subjects, multiple sclerosis and other neurological disorders patients were quantitated. Our method quantitated 5 oxysterols, cholesterol and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 from 200 μL plasma in 35 minutes. Recoveries were >85% for all analytes and internal standards. The limits of detection were 3-10 ng/mL for oxysterols and 25-hydroxy vitamin D3 and 1 μg/mL for simultaneous detection of cholesterol. Analytical imprecision was <10 %CV for 24(S)-, 25-, 27-, 7α-hydroxycholesterol (HC) and cholesterol and ≤15 % for 7-keto-cholesterol. Multiple Sclerosis and other neurological disorder patients had lower 27-hydroxycholesterol levels compared to controls whereas 7α-hydroxycholesterol was lower specifically in Multiple Sclerosis. The method is suitable for measuring plasma oxysterols levels in human health and disease. Analysis of human plasma indicates that the oxysterol, bile acid precursors 7α-hydroxycholesterol and 27-hydroxycholesterol are lower in Multiple Sclerosis and may serve as potential biomarkers of

  17. Increased plasma cholesterol esterification by LCAT reduces diet-induced atherosclerosis in SR-BI knockout mice[S

    PubMed Central

    Thacker, Seth G.; Rousset, Xavier; Esmail, Safiya; Zarzour, Abdalrahman; Jin, Xueting; Collins, Heidi L.; Sampson, Maureen; Stonik, John; Demosky, Stephen; Malide, Daniela A.; Freeman, Lita; Vaisman, Boris L.; Kruth, Howard S.; Adelman, Steven J.; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    LCAT, a plasma enzyme that esterifies cholesterol, has been proposed to play an antiatherogenic role, but animal and epidemiologic studies have yielded conflicting results. To gain insight into LCAT and the role of free cholesterol (FC) in atherosclerosis, we examined the effect of LCAT over- and underexpression in diet-induced atherosclerosis in scavenger receptor class B member I-deficient [Scarab(−/−)] mice, which have a secondary defect in cholesterol esterification. Scarab(−/−)×LCAT-null [Lcat(−/−)] mice had a decrease in HDL-cholesterol and a high plasma ratio of FC/total cholesterol (TC) (0.88 ± 0.033) and a marked increase in VLDL-cholesterol (VLDL-C) on a high-fat diet. Scarab(−/−)×LCAT-transgenic (Tg) mice had lower levels of VLDL-C and a normal plasma FC/TC ratio (0.28 ± 0.005). Plasma from Scarab(−/−)×LCAT-Tg mice also showed an increase in cholesterol esterification during in vitro cholesterol efflux, but increased esterification did not appear to affect the overall rate of cholesterol efflux or hepatic uptake of cholesterol. Scarab(−/−)×LCAT-Tg mice also displayed a 51% decrease in aortic sinus atherosclerosis compared with Scarab(−/−) mice (P < 0.05). In summary, we demonstrate that increased cholesterol esterification by LCAT is atheroprotective, most likely through its ability to increase HDL levels and decrease pro-atherogenic apoB-containing lipoprotein particles. PMID:25964513

  18. Cholesterol-Lowering Effects and Mechanisms in View of Bile Acid Pathway of Resveratrol and Resveratrol Glucuronides.

    PubMed

    Shao, Dongyan; Wang, Yilin; Huang, Qingsheng; Shi, Junling; Yang, Hui; Pan, Zhongli; Jin, Mingliang; Zhao, Haobin; Xu, Xiaoguang

    2016-10-13

    Resveratrol (Res) was previously reported to be capable of lowering plasma TC and LDL-C. The mechanism behind Res is not clearly understood, although it is presumed to have an effect on bile acid metabolism in the liver: a significant way in eliminating cholesterol from the body. As one of the major metabolites of Res in the liver, resveratrol glucuronides (Gres) is suspected to also contribute to the overall cholestrol-lowering activity of Res, which needs to be studied. In this research, when HepG2 steatosis hepatic cells were treated with Res and Gres at different concentration levels, Res and Gres showed similar activity in lowering cellular TC content. The presence of Res and Gres caused a significant increase in hepatic CYP7A1 and BSEP, indicating the increase in the synthesis and efflux of bile acids, respectively. The reduction of HMG-CoAR tied to a decrease in de novo synthesis of cholesterol and the increase of ABCG5 suggested the increase of direct efflux of cholesterol. All above variations reduced the hepatic cholesterol level, which triggered the significant enhancement of LDLR, illustrating the improvement of clearance of LDL-C from the plasma and prevention of atherosclerosis. Overall, this study demonstrated both Res and Gres might have capabilities in lowering hepatic cholesterol through increasing in the synthesis and efflux of bile acids, and decreasing in synthesis and increasing in the efflux of cholesterol. Gres would have preferred potential than Res because of its lower cytotoxicity, which indicated that the action of the metabolites should also be considered in the future studies. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. The cholesterol-lowering effects of oat varieties based on their difference in the composition of proteins and lipids.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lina; Tong, Li-Tao; Liu, Liya; Zhong, Kui; Qiu, Ju; Zhou, Sumei

    2014-12-05

    The aim of present study is to investigate the hypocholesterolemic effects of the oat components other than the β-glucan in rats fed with a hypercholesterolemic diet. Four-week-old male Wister rats were divided into 6 groups of 7 rats each with similar mean body weights and serum cholesterol concentrations. Rats were fed with the experimental diets containing 10% oats flour for 30 days. Food intake was recorded and monitored everyday to ensure the similar contents of protein, starch, lipid and cellulose in all groups. The lipids levels in serum, liver, and faeces were determined. The plasma total cholesterol concentrations in different oat groups were significantly reduced compared with the control group, and the effects were different among oat groups. The decrease extent of plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations increased with the increase of the proteins and lipids contents. Moreover, liver total cholesterol and cholesterol ester contents were markedly decreased. The fecal bile acids concentrations in the oat groups were significantly increased. Oat proteins had lower Lysine/Arginin (0.59 ~ 0.66) and Methionin/Glycine (0.27 ~ 0.35) ratio than casein (Lysine/Arginin, 2.33; Methionin/Glycine, 1.51). Oat lipids contained higher contents of total Vitamin E and plant sterols than that in soybean oil. These results indicated that dietary oat improved hypercholesterolemia by increasing the excretions of fecal bile acids, and this improvement was not only related to β-glucan, but also attributed to the lipids and proteins. Oat proteins decreased serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol contents due to their low Lysine/Arginin and Methionin/Glycine ratio. The co-existence of oleic acid, linoleic, vitamin E, or plant sterols accounted for the hypocholesterolemic properties of oat lipids.

  20. Rice bran oil and oryzanol reduce plasma lipid and lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations and aortic cholesterol ester accumulation to a greater extent than ferulic acid in hypercholesterolemic hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas A; Nicolosi, Robert J; Woolfrey, Benjamin; Kritchevsky, David

    2007-02-01

    Our laboratory has reported that the hypolipidemic effect of rice bran oil (RBO) is not entirely explained by its fatty acid composition. Because RBO has a greater content of the unsaponifiables, which also lower cholesterol compared to most vegetable oils, we wanted to know whether oryzanol or ferulic acid, two major unsaponifiables in RBO, has a greater cholesterol-lowering activity. Forty-eight F(1)B Golden Syrian hamsters (Mesocricetus auratus) (BioBreeders, Watertown, MA) were group housed (three per cage) in cages with bedding in an air-conditioned facility maintained on a 12-h light/dark cycle. The hamsters were fed a chow-based hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) containing 10% coconut oil and 0.1% cholesterol for 2 weeks, at which time they were bled after an overnight fast (16 h) and segregated into 4 groups of 12 with similar plasma cholesterol concentrations. Group 1 (control) continued on the HCD, group 2 was fed the HCD containing 10% RBO in place of coconut oil, group 3 was fed the HCD plus 0.5% ferulic acid and group 4 was fed the HCD plus 0.5% oryzanol for an additional 10 weeks. After 10 weeks on the diets, plasma total cholesterol (TC) and non-high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) (very low- and low-density lipoprotein) concentrations were significantly lower in the RBO (-64% and -70%, respectively), the ferulic acid (-22% and -24%, respectively) and the oryzanol (-70% and -77%, respectively) diets compared to control. Plasma TC and non-HDL-C concentrations were also significantly lower in the RBO (-53% and -61%, respectively) and oryzanol (-61% and -70%, respectively) diets compared to the ferulic acid. Compared to control and ferulic acid, plasma HDL-C concentrations were significantly higher in the RBO (10% and 20%, respectively) and oryzanol (13% and 24%, respectively) diets. The ferulic acid diet had significantly lower plasma HDL-C concentrations compared to the control (-9%). The RBO and oryzanol diets were significantly lower for

  1. Randomised controlled trial of the effect of long-term selenium supplementation on plasma cholesterol in an elderly Danish population.

    PubMed

    Cold, Frederik; Winther, Kristian H; Pastor-Barriuso, Roberto; Rayman, Margaret P; Guallar, Eliseo; Nybo, Mads; Griffin, Bruce A; Stranges, Saverio; Cold, Søren

    2015-12-14

    Although cross-sectional studies have shown a positive association between Se and cholesterol concentrations, a recent randomised controlled trial in 501 elderly UK individuals of relatively low-Se status found that Se supplementation for 6 months lowered total plasma cholesterol. The Danish PRECISE (PREvention of Cancer by Intervention with Selenium) pilot study (ClinicalTrials.gov ID: NCT01819649) was a 5-year randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled trial with four groups (allocation ratio 1:1:1:1). Men and women aged 60-74 years (n 491) were randomised to 100 (n 124), 200 (n 122) or 300 (n 119) μg Se-enriched yeast or matching placebo-yeast tablets (n 126) daily for 5 years. A total of 468 participants continued the study for 6 months and 361 participants, equally distributed across treatment groups, continued for 5 years. Plasma samples were analysed for total and HDL-cholesterol and for total Se concentrations at baseline, 6 months and 5 years. The effect of different doses of Se supplementation on plasma lipid and Se concentrations was estimated by using linear mixed models. Plasma Se concentration increased significantly and dose-dependently in the intervention groups after 6 months and 5 years. Total cholesterol decreased significantly both in the intervention groups and in the placebo group after 6 months and 5 years, with small and nonsignificant differences in changes in plasma concentration of total cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL-cholesterol and total:HDL-cholesterol ratio between intervention and placebo groups. The effect of long-term supplementation with Se on plasma cholesterol concentrations or its sub-fractions did not differ significantly from placebo in this elderly population.

  2. Reduced and high molecular weight barley beta-glucans decrease plasma total and non-HDL-cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic Syrian golden hamsters.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thomas A; Nicolosi, Robert J; Delaney, Bryan; Chadwell, Kim; Moolchandani, Vikas; Kotyla, Timothy; Ponduru, Sridevi; Zheng, Guo-Hua; Hess, Richard; Knutson, Nathan; Curry, Leslie; Kolberg, Lore; Goulson, Melanie; Ostergren, Karen

    2004-10-01

    Consumption of concentrated barley beta-glucan lowers plasma cholesterol because of its soluble dietary fiber nature. The role of molecular weight (MW) in lowering serum cholesterol is not well established. Prior studies showed that enzymatic degradation of beta-glucan eliminates the cholesterol-lowering activity; however, these studies did not evaluate the MW of the beta-glucan. The current study was conducted to evaluate whether barley beta-glucan concentrates, partially hydrolyzed to reduce MW, possess cholesterol-lowering and antiatherogenic activities. The reduced MW fraction was compared with a high MW beta-glucan concentrate from the same barley flour. Concentrated beta-glucan preparations were evaluated in Syrian Golden F(1)B hamsters fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (HCD) with cholesterol, hydrogenated coconut oil, and cellulose. After 2 wk, hamsters were fed HCD or diets that contained high or reduced MW beta-glucan at a concentration of 8 g/100 g at the expense of cellulose. Decreases in plasma total cholesterol (TC) and non-HDL-cholesterol (non-HDL-C) concentrations occurred in the hamsters fed reduced MW and high MW beta-glucan diets. Plasma HDL-C concentrations did not differ. HCD-fed hamsters had higher plasma triglyceride concentrations. Liver TC, free cholesterol, and cholesterol ester concentrations did not differ. Aortic cholesterol ester concentrations were lower in the reduced MW beta-glucan-fed hamsters. Consumption of either high or reduced MW beta-glucan increased concentrations of fecal total neutral sterols and coprostanol, a cholesterol derivative. Fecal excretion of cholesterol was greater than in HCD-fed hamsters only in those fed the reduced MW beta-glucan. Study results demonstrate that the cholesterol-lowering activity of barley beta-glucan may occur at both lower and higher MW.

  3. Cholesterol-lowering interventions and stroke: Insights from IMPROVE-IT.

    PubMed

    De Caterina, Raffaele; Salvatore, Tanya; Marchioli, Roberto

    2016-05-01

    The relationship of cholesterol with stroke is much less clear than its relationship with myocardial infarction, thus confounding the interpretation of results with cholesterol-lowering trials. Because for long time the only lipid-lowering intervention reducing stroke was statins, it has been actually argued that reduction in stroke found in statin trials is not due to statins' ability to reduce LDL cholesterol, but to other "pleiotropic" effects, unrelated to cholesterol lowering. In re-analyzing the relationship of cholesterol lowering versus changes in the risk of stroke in a meta-regression of all cholesterol-lowering interventions, including also non-statin interventions, we had previously reached the opposite conclusion: that some reduction in stroke has to be expected proportional to cholesterol reduction. We had predicted that a 1% reduction of total cholesterol-no matter by what intervention produced-was associated with a 0.8% relative risk reduction of stroke. Data from the recently published Improved Reduction of Outcomes: Vytorin Efficacy International Trial (IMPROVE-IT) now offer a clear proof of this concept, demonstrating that pure cholesterol lowering, as obtained with ezetimibe, plays an important role in reducing stroke. IMPROVE-IT data, showing a 13.3% reduction in total cholesterol at one year in association with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.86 for total stroke during the trial, are very closely aligned with the relative risk of 0.90 predicted on the basis of the totality of lipid lowering interventions. These data are important to predict stroke outcomes in currently ongoing trials now testing PCSK9 or cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors.

  4. Plasma cholesterol reduction by defatted soy ontjom (fermented with Neurospora intermedia) in rats fed a cholesterol-free diet.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, M

    2000-02-01

    To popularize defatted soy ontjom (DSB-ontjom, soy product fermented with Neurospora intermedia) as a new food, I examined the plasma cholesterol-reducing effects of DSB-ontjom and DSB in rats fed cholesterol-free diets and compared the efficiencies of these effects. DSB-ontjom greatly reduced the plasma cholesterol level and increased fecal steroid excretion as compared to DSB. DSB-ontjom was rich in pepsin-resistant protein having a high bile acid binding capacity and was abundant in isoflavone-aglycones, especially daizein. The dietary fiber (DF) of DSB-ontjom stimulated the production of short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs) by intestinal microflora. The effect of DSB-ontjom on plasma cholesterol reduction was attributed to the collaborative effects of pepsin-resistant-protein, isoflavone-aglycones and SCFA-producing DF in DSB-ontjom.

  5. Plant sterols and stanols as cholesterol-lowering ingredients in functional foods.

    PubMed

    Kamal-Eldin, Afaf; Moazzami, Ali

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews developments related to the use of plant sterols and stanols as cholesterol-lowering ingredients in foods and nutraceuticals preparations. Plant sterols and stanols are extracted from the deodorizer distillates of vegetable oil refining and from tall oil, a by-product of paper pulping industry. Plant sterols/stanols inhibit cholesterol absorption possibly by competitively inhibiting its incorporation into the mixed micelles in the small intestine although other mechanisms can not be excluded. Daily consumption of 1-2 grams of plant sterols or stanols was shown to cause 10-20% reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL cholesterol). Combinations of plant sterols/stanols with certain lipid-lowering ingredients were shown to potentate their cholesterol-lowering effects and, in some cases, add triacylglycerol-lowering effects. In this article, patents based information is also discussed.

  6. Effect of breast-feeding on plasma cholesterol and weight in young adults.

    PubMed

    Marmot, M G; Page, C M; Atkins, E; Douglas, J W

    1980-09-01

    The relation between breast-feeding and plasma cholesterol level in adult life was examined in a longitudinal study of a sample of people born in 1946. One hundred and seventy-two subjects whose breast-feeding history had been recorded during infancy were examined when they were 32 years old. Women who had been breast-fed had significantly lower mean plasma cholesterol than women who had been bottle-fed (5.4 mmol/l compared with 5.9 mmol/l). For men the difference was smaller and not significant. An unexpected finding was the higher mean weight and skinfold thickness in men who had been breast-fed. These results support the hypothesis that factors acting very early in life affect the risk of disease in adults.

  7. Evaluation of Cholesterol-lowering Activity of Standardized Extract of Mangifera indica in Albino Wistar Rats

    PubMed Central

    Gururaja, G. M.; Mundkinajeddu, Deepak; Kumar, A. Senthil; Dethe, Shekhar Michael; Allan, J. Joshua; Agarwal, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: Cholesterol lowering activity of Mangifera indica L. has been determined by earlier researchers and kernel, leaf and bark have shown significant activity. However, the specific cholesterol lowering activity of leaf methanol extract has not been determined. Materials and Methods: The present study involved evaluation of cholesterol lowering potential of methanol extract of M. indica leaves using high cholesterol diet model in albino Wistar rats. The acute oral toxicity at a dose of 5000 mg/ kg body weight was also determined in female albino Wistar rats. Phytoconstituents Iriflophenone 3-C-β-D-glucoside and mangiferin were quantified in methanol extracts of different varieties of mango leaves using high performance liquid chromatography. Results and Discussion: Significant cholesterol lowering activity was observed with methanol extract of M. indica leaves, at dose of 90 mg/kg body weight in rats and it was also found to be safe at dose of 5000 mg/kg rat body. Iriflophenone 3-C-β-D-glucoside and mangiferin were found to be in the range of 1.2 to 2.8% w/w and 3.9 to 4.6% w/w, respectively which along with 3 β taraxerol and other sterols could be contributing to the cholesterol lowering activity of mango leaves extract. Conclusions: The phytosterols rich extract of Mangifera indica leaves is a good source of nutraceutical ingredient that have the potential to lower serum cholesterol levels. SUMMARY The Mangifera indica leaves methanolic extract showed significant cholesterol lowering activity in high cholesterol diet induced hypercholesterolaemia model in rats when evaluated at a dose of 90 mg/kg rat body weight. The extract was found to contain Iriflophenone 3-C-β-D-glucoside and mangiferin which along with 3 β taraxerol and other sterols could be contributing to the cholesterol lowering activity. PMID:28250649

  8. The cholesterol-lowering effect of coconut flakes in humans with moderately raised serum cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Trinidad, Trinidad P; Loyola, Anacleta S; Mallillin, Aida C; Valdez, Divinagracia H; Askali, Faridah C; Castillo, Joan C; Resaba, Rosario L; Masa, Dina B

    2004-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of coconut flakes on serum cholesterol levels of humans with moderately raised serum cholesterol in 21 subjects. The serum total cholesterol of subjects differed and ranged from 259 to 283 mg/dL. The study was conducted in a double-blind randomized crossover design on a 14-week period, consisting of four 2-week experimental periods, with each experimental period separated by a 2-week washout period. The test foods were as follows: corn flakes as the control food, oat bran flakes as the reference food, and corn flakes with 15% and 25% dietary fiber from coconut flakes (made from coconut flour production). Results showed a significant percent reduction in serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol (in mg/dL) for all test foods, except for corn flakes, as follows: oat bran flakes, 8.4 +/- 1.4 and 8.8 +/- 6.0, respectively; 15% coconut flakes, 6.9 +/- 1.1 and 11.0 +/- 4.0, respectively; and 25% coconut flakes, 10.8 +/- 1.3 and 9.2 +/- 5.4, respectively. Serum triglycerides were significantly reduced for all test foods: corn flakes, 14.5 +/- 6.3%; oat bran flakes, 22.7 +/- 2.9%; 15% coconut flakes, 19.3 +/- 5.7%; and 25% coconut flakes, 21.8 +/- 6.0%. Only 60% of the subjects were considered for serum triglycerides reduction (serum triglycerides >170 mg/dL). In conclusion, both 15% and 25% coconut flakes reduced serum total and LDL cholesterol and serum triglycerides of humans with moderately raised serum cholesterol levels. Coconut flour is a good source of both soluble and insoluble dietary fiber, and both types of fiber may have significant role in the reduction of the above lipid biomarker. To our knowledge, this is the first study conducted to show a relationship between dietary fiber from a coconut by-product and a lipid biomarker. Results from this study serves as a good basis in the development of coconut flakes/flour as a functional food, justifying the increased production of coconut and coconut by-products.

  9. Racial Differences in the Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Statin

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Ryo; Daida, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    Statin treatment to reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is associated with the prevention of cardiovascular events in Western patients. Similar results have been reported in studies conducted in Japan. However, the dose of statins and the degree of LDL-C reduction achieved with statins are different between Asian and Western patients. In addition, there are limited data regarding racial differences in response to statins. In this review, racial differences between Asians and Westerners in response to statins are described. PMID:27733728

  10. High incidence of reduced plasma HDL cholesterol in diabetic patients treated with rosiglitazone and fibrate.

    PubMed

    Keidar, Shlomo; Guttmann, Hadassa; Stam, Tamar; Fishman, Ilana; Shapira, Chen

    2007-11-01

    A paradoxical plasma HDL-Cholesterol (HDL-C) reducing effect following combined fibrate and thiazolidinediones (TZDs) therapy was recently reported in occasional cases. As HDL-C level is inversely related to cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk, we have studied the incidence of reduced HDL-C level following mono- and combined therapy with these drugs in a large diabetic population. This study was designed as a retrospective 5-year study. Lipid profile records of 54 000 diabetic patients were searched for transient reduction of HDL-C to levels lower than 17 mg/dL, which was correlated with fibrates and/or TZD treatment. Transient reduction in plasma HDL-C to values lower than 17 mg/dL was observed in 0.02% (2/11 175) of the patients treated with fibrates alone, none of the rosiglitazone-treated patients (0/3213) and in 1.39% (9/649) of patients treated with combination of fibrate and TZD. HDL-C lowering effect was reversible upon stopping either fibrate or rosiglitazone and in some patients it occurred within 2 weeks. In two of the patients, the effect was dose-dependent. Severe reduction in plasma HDL-C is not rare when TZD and fibrates are co-administrated to diabetic hyperlipidemic patients. As low plasma HDL cholesterol is a risk factor for CVD, the physician should be alert to this phenomenon.

  11. Evidence for a cholesterol transport pathway from lysosomes to endoplasmic reticulum that is independent of the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Underwood, K W; Jacobs, N L; Howley, A; Liscum, L

    1998-02-13

    We have studied the movement of low density lipoprotein (LDL)-derived cholesterol in cultured Chinese hamster ovary cells. Our hypothesis is that when LDL cholesterol is effluxed from lysosomes, the bulk of LDL cholesterol is mobilized to the plasma membrane, while another pathway delivers LDL cholesterol from lysosomes to acyl-CoA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) in the endoplasmic reticulum. Three lines of evidence support this model. First, LDL cholesterol transport to ACAT can be blocked without inhibiting the movement of cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membrane or from plasma membrane to endoplasmic reticulum. Second, LDL cholesterol transport to ACAT is normal in a Chinese hamster ovary mutant with defective plasma membrane-to-ACAT movement. Third, LDL cholesterol is not diluted by the plasma membrane cholesterol pool before reaching ACAT. Our evidence supports a vesicular model of cholesterol transport from lysosomes to the endoplasmic reticulum that is independent of the plasma membrane.

  12. Prazosin lowers plasma triglyceride concentration in rats: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Reaven, G M; Dall'Aglio, E

    1982-01-01

    Prazosin was administered by intraperitoneal injection (0.3 or 3.0 mg/kg) to normal chow-fed male rats for 14 days. Mean +/- SEM plasma triglyceride levels were lower (p less than 0.001) in the prazosin-treated rats (74 +/- 12 mg/dl and 72 +/- 9 mg/dl) than in saline-injected control rats (115 +/- 11 mg/dl). This effect was associated with commensurate reductions in very low density lipoprotein-triglyceride secretion in prazosin-treated rats. No changes were noted in either plasma total or high density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. In addition, prazosin was capable of reducing by approximately 50% the elevation in plasma triglyceride concentration produced by a high glucose diet in control rats. The mechanism of the observed effect of prazosin on very low density lipoprotein metabolism in the rat remains to be defined.

  13. Functions of Cholesterol and the Cholesterol Bilayer Domain Specific to the Fiber-Cell Plasma Membrane of the Eye Lens

    PubMed Central

    Subczynski, Witold K.; Raguz, Marija; Widomska, Justyna; Mainali, Laxman; Konovalov, Alexey

    2012-01-01

    The most unique feature of the eye lens fiber-cell plasma membrane is its extremely high cholesterol content. Cholesterol saturates the bulk phospholipid bilayer and induces formation of immiscible cholesterol bilayer domains (CBDs) within the membrane. Our results (based on EPR spin-labeling experiments with lens-lipid membranes), along with a literature search, have allowed us to identify the significant functions of cholesterol specific to the fiber-cell plasma membrane, which are manifest through cholesterol-membrane interactions. The crucial role is played by the CBD. The presence of the CBD ensures that the surrounding phospholipid bilayer is saturated with cholesterol. The saturating cholesterol content in fiber-cell membranes keeps the bulk physical properties of lens-lipid membranes consistent and independent of changes in phospholipid composition. Thus, the CBD helps to maintain lens-membrane homeostasis when the membrane phospholipid composition changes significantly. The CBD raises the barrier for oxygen transport across the fiber-cell membrane, which should help to maintain a low oxygen concentration in the lens interior. It is hypothesized that the appearance of the CBD in the fiber-cell membrane is controlled by the phospholipid composition of the membrane. Saturation with cholesterol smoothes the phospholipid-bilayer surface, which should decrease light scattering and help to maintain lens transparency. Other functions of cholesterol include formation of hydrophobic and rigidity barriers across the bulk phospholipid-cholesterol domain and formation of hydrophobic channels in the central region of the membrane for transport of small, nonpolar molecules parallel to the membrane surface. In this review, we will provide data supporting these hypotheses. PMID:22207480

  14. The mechanism of lowering cholesterol absorption by calcium studied by using an in vitro digestion model.

    PubMed

    Vinarova, Liliya; Vinarov, Zahari; Tcholakova, Slavka; Denkov, Nikolai D; Stoyanov, Simeon; Lips, Alex

    2016-01-01

    Studies in humans show that a calcium-enriched diet leads to lower cholesterol in blood serum. This phenomenon is usually explained in the literature with a reduced cholesterol absorption in the small intestine. Our study aims to clarify the effect of calcium on the solubilisation of cholesterol and fatty acid in the dietary mixed micelles (DMM), viz. on the bioaccessibility of these lipophilic substances in the gut. We use an in vitro digestion model which mimics very closely the intestinal pH-profile and the composition of the intestinal fluids. We quantified the effects of Ca(2+) concentration on the lipid solubilization for fats and oils with different saturated/unsaturated fatty acid (FA) contents. We found that the increase of calcium significantly decreases the solubilization of cholesterol, FA and MG. Most importantly, we observe a clear positive correlation between the amounts of solubilized cholesterol, on one side, and solubilized free fatty acids and monoglycerides, on the other side. The main conclusion is that Ca(2+) ions strongly affect the bioaccessibility of both cholesterol and saturated FA. Therefore, calcium may decrease the serum cholesterol via two complementary mechanisms: (1) fatty acid precipitation by calcium ions reduces the solubilisation capacity of the DMM, thus decreasing the levels of solubilised (bioaccessible) cholesterol; (2) the observed strong decrease of the bioaccessible saturated FA, in its own turn, may suppress the cholesterol synthesis in the liver.

  15. Effects of Adiposity on Plasma Lipid Response to Reductions in Dietary Saturated Fatty Acids and Cholesterol1

    PubMed Central

    Flock, Michael R.; Green, Michael H.; Kris-Etherton, Penny M.

    2011-01-01

    Dietary SFA and cholesterol are major targets for reducing plasma total and LDL cholesterol as a strategy to decrease cardiovascular disease risk. However, many studies show that excess adiposity attenuates the expected lipid and lipoprotein response to a plasma cholesterol–lowering diet. Diets low in SFA and cholesterol are less effective in improving the lipid profile in obese individuals and in patients with metabolic syndrome. In contrast, lean persons are more responsive to reductions in dietary SFA and cholesterol. Multiple mechanisms likely contribute to the altered plasma lipid responses to dietary changes in individuals with excess adiposity. The greater rate of hepatic cholesterol synthesis in obese individuals suppresses the expression of hepatic LDL receptors (LDLR), thereby reducing hepatic LDL uptake. Insulin resistance develops as a result of adipose-tissue induced inflammation, causing significant changes in enzymes necessary for normal lipid metabolism. In addition, the LDLR-mediated uptake in obesity is attenuated by alterations in neuroendocrine regulation of hormonal secretions (e.g. growth hormone, thyroid hormone, and cortisol) as well as the unique gut microbiota, the latter of which appears to affect lipid absorption. Reducing adipose tissue mass, especially from the abdominal region, is an effective strategy to improve the lipid response to dietary interventions by reducing inflammation, enhancing insulin sensitivity, and improving LDLR binding. Thus, normalizing adipose tissue mass is an important goal for maximizing the diet response to a plasma cholesterol–lowering diet. PMID:22332058

  16. Plasma HDL cholesterol and risk of myocardial infarction: a mendelian randomisation study

    PubMed Central

    Voight, Benjamin F; Peloso, Gina M; Orho-Melander, Marju; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Barbalic, Maja; Jensen, Majken K; Hindy, George; Hólm, Hilma; Ding, Eric L; Johnson, Toby; Schunkert, Heribert; Samani, Nilesh J; Clarke, Robert; Hopewell, Jemma C; Thompson, John F; Li, Mingyao; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Newton-Cheh, Christopher; Musunuru, Kiran; Pirruccello, James P; Saleheen, Danish; Chen, Li; Stewart, Alexandre FR; Schillert, Arne; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thorgeirsson, Gudmundur; Anand, Sonia; Engert, James C; Morgan, Thomas; Spertus, John; Stoll, Monika; Berger, Klaus; Martinelli, Nicola; Girelli, Domenico; McKeown, Pascal P; Patterson, Christopher C; Epstein, Stephen E; Devaney, Joseph; Burnett, Mary-Susan; Mooser, Vincent; Ripatti, Samuli; Surakka, Ida; Nieminen, Markku S; Sinisalo, Juha; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Perola, Markus; Havulinna, Aki; de Faire, Ulf; Gigante, Bruna; Ingelsson, Erik; Zeller, Tanja; Wild, Philipp; de Bakker, Paul I W; Klungel, Olaf H; Maitland-van der Zee, Anke-Hilse; Peters, Bas J M; de Boer, Anthonius; Grobbee, Diederick E; Kamphuisen, Pieter W; Deneer, Vera H M; Elbers, Clara C; Onland-Moret, N Charlotte; Hofker, Marten H; Wijmenga, Cisca; Verschuren, WM Monique; Boer, Jolanda MA; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; Rasheed, Asif; Frossard, Philippe; Demissie, Serkalem; Willer, Cristen; Do, Ron; Ordovas, Jose M; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Boehnke, Michael; Mohlke, Karen L; Daly, Mark J; Guiducci, Candace; Burtt, Noël P; Surti, Aarti; Gonzalez, Elena; Purcell, Shaun; Gabriel, Stacey; Marrugat, Jaume; Peden, John; Erdmann, Jeanette; Diemert, Patrick; Willenborg, Christina; König, Inke R; Fischer, Marcus; Hengstenberg, Christian; Ziegler, Andreas; Buysschaert, Ian; Lambrechts, Diether; Van de Werf, Frans; Fox, Keith A; El Mokhtari, Nour Eddine; Rubin, Diana; Schrezenmeir, Jürgen; Schreiber, Stefan; Schäfer, Arne; Danesh, John; Blankenberg, Stefan; Roberts, Robert; McPherson, Ruth; Watkins, Hugh; Hall, Alistair S; Overvad, Kim; Rimm, Eric; Boerwinkle, Eric; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Cupples, L Adrienne; Reilly, Muredach P; Melander, Olle; Mannucci, Pier M; Ardissino, Diego; Siscovick, David; Elosua, Roberto; Stefansson, Kari; O'Donnell, Christopher J; Salomaa, Veikko; Rader, Daniel J; Peltonen, Leena; Schwartz, Stephen M; Altshuler, David; Kathiresan, Sekar

    2012-01-01

    associated with OR 1·54, 95% CI 1·45–1·63) was concordant with that from genetic score (OR 2·13, 95% CI 1·69–2·69, p=2×10−10). Interpretation Some genetic mechanisms that raise plasma HDL cholesterol do not seem to lower risk of myocardial infarction. These data challenge the concept that raising of plasma HDL cholesterol will uniformly translate into reductions in risk of myocardial infarction. Funding US National Institutes of Health, The Wellcome Trust, European Union, British Heart Foundation, and the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research. PMID:22607825

  17. Cholesterol-lowering effects of probiotics and prebiotics: a review of in vivo and in vitro findings.

    PubMed

    Ooi, Lay-Gaik; Liong, Min-Tze

    2010-06-17

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that promote health benefits upon consumption, while prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients that selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics and/or prebiotics could be used as alternative supplements to exert health benefits, including cholesterol-lowering effects on humans. Past in vivo studies showed that the administration of probiotics and/or prebiotics are effective in improving lipid profiles, including the reduction of serum/plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides or increment of HDL-cholesterol. However, other past studies have also shown that probiotics and prebiotics had insignificant effects on lipid profiles, disputing the hypocholesterolemic claim. Additionally, little information is available on the effective dosage of probiotics and prebiotics needed to exert hypocholesterolemic effects. Probiotics and prebiotics have been suggested to reduce cholesterol via various mechanisms. However, more clinical evidence is needed to strengthen these proposals. Safety issues regarding probiotics and/or prebiotics have also been raised despite their long history of safe use. Although probiotic-mediated infections are rare, several cases of systemic infections caused by probiotics have been reported and the issue of antibiotic resistance has sparked much debate. Prebiotics, classified as food ingredients, are generally considered safe, but overconsumption could cause intestinal discomfort. Conscientious prescription of probiotics and/or prebiotics is crucial, especially when administering to specific high risk groups such as infants, the elderly and the immuno-compromised.

  18. Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Probiotics and Prebiotics: A Review of in Vivo and in Vitro Findings

    PubMed Central

    Ooi, Lay-Gaik; Liong, Min-Tze

    2010-01-01

    Probiotics are live microorganisms that promote health benefits upon consumption, while prebiotics are nondigestible food ingredients that selectively stimulate the growth of beneficial microorganisms in the gastrointestinal tract. Probiotics and/or prebiotics could be used as alternative supplements to exert health benefits, including cholesterol-lowering effects on humans. Past in vivo studies showed that the administration of probiotics and/or prebiotics are effective in improving lipid profiles, including the reduction of serum/plasma total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and triglycerides or increment of HDL-cholesterol. However, other past studies have also shown that probiotics and prebiotics had insignificant effects on lipid profiles, disputing the hypocholesterolemic claim. Additionally, little information is available on the effective dosage of probiotics and prebiotics needed to exert hypocholesterolemic effects. Probiotics and prebiotics have been suggested to reduce cholesterol via various mechanisms. However, more clinical evidence is needed to strengthen these proposals. Safety issues regarding probiotics and/or prebiotics have also been raised despite their long history of safe use. Although probiotic-mediated infections are rare, several cases of systemic infections caused by probiotics have been reported and the issue of antibiotic resistance has sparked much debate. Prebiotics, classified as food ingredients, are generally considered safe, but overconsumption could cause intestinal discomfort. Conscientious prescription of probiotics and/or prebiotics is crucial, especially when administering to specific high risk groups such as infants, the elderly and the immuno-compromised. PMID:20640165

  19. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    SciTech Connect

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.

  20. Sphingolipid domains in the plasma membranes of fibroblasts are not enriched with cholesterol

    DOE PAGES

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; ...

    2013-04-22

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. As a result, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize themore » cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton.« less

  1. Sphingolipid Domains in the Plasma Membranes of Fibroblasts Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Lou, Kaiyan; Hutcheon, Ian D.; Weber, Peter K.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Kraft, Mary L.

    2013-01-01

    The plasma membranes of mammalian cells are widely expected to contain domains that are enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. In this work, we have used high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to directly map the distributions of isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of intact fibroblast cells. Although acute cholesterol depletion reduced sphingolipid domain abundance, cholesterol was evenly distributed throughout the plasma membrane and was not enriched within the sphingolipid domains. Thus, we rule out favorable cholesterol-sphingolipid interactions as dictating plasma membrane organization in fibroblast cells. Because the sphingolipid domains are disrupted by drugs that depolymerize the cells actin cytoskeleton, cholesterol must instead affect the sphingolipid organization via an indirect mechanism that involves the cytoskeleton. PMID:23609440

  2. Interaction of mammalian seminal plasma protein PDC-109 with cholesterol: implications for a putative CRAC domain.

    PubMed

    Scolari, Silvia; Müller, Karin; Bittman, Robert; Herrmann, Andreas; Müller, Peter

    2010-10-26

    Seminal plasma proteins of the fibronectin type II (Fn2) family modulate mammalian spermatogenesis by triggering the release of the lipids phosphatidylcholine and cholesterol from sperm cells. Whereas the specific interaction of these proteins with phosphatidylcholine is well-understood, their selectivity for cholesterol is unknown. To characterize the interaction between the bovine Fn2 protein PDC-109 and cholesterol, we have investigated the effect of PDC-109 on the dynamics of fluorescent cholesterol analogues in lipid vesicles by time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy. The data show that PDC-109 decreases the rotational mobility of cholesterol within the membrane and that the extent of this impact depends on the cholesterol structure, indicating a specific influence of PDC-109 on cholesterol. We propose that the cholesterol recognition/interaction amino acid consensus (CRAC) regions of PDC-109 are involved in the interaction with cholesterol.

  3. AMPK Enhances Insulin-Stimulated GLUT4 Regulation via Lowering Membrane Cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Habegger, Kirk M.; Hoffman, Nolan J.; Ridenour, Colin M.; Brozinick, Joseph T.

    2012-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) enhances glucose transporter GLUT4 regulation. AMPK also suppresses energy-consuming pathways such as cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, recent in vitro and in vivo data suggest that excess membrane cholesterol impairs GLUT4 regulation. Therefore, this study tested whether a beneficial, GLUT4-regulatory aspect of AMPK stimulation involved cholesterol lowering. Using L6 myotubes stably expressing an exofacial myc-epitope-tagged-GLUT4, AMPK stimulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR; 45 min, 1 mm) or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP; 30 min, 200 μm) increased cell surface GLUT4myc labeling by approximately ∼25% (P < 0.05). Insulin (20 min, 100 nm) also increased GLUT4myc labeling by about 50% (P < 0.05), which was further enhanced (∼25%, P < 0.05) by AICAR or DNP. Consistent with AMPK-mediated suppression of cholesterol synthesis, AICAR and DNP decreased membrane cholesterol by 20–25% (P < 0.05). Whereas AMPK knockdown prevented the enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated GLUT4myc labeling by AICAR and DNP, cholesterol replenishment only blocked the AMPK-associated enhancement in insulin action. Cells cultured in a hyperinsulinemic milieu, resembling conditions in vivo that promote the progression/worsening of insulin resistance, displayed an increase in membrane cholesterol. This occurred concomitantly with a loss of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) and defects in GLUT4 regulation by insulin. These derangements were prevented by AMPK stimulation. Examination of skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant Zucker rats revealed a similar elevation in membrane cholesterol and loss of F-actin. Lowering cholesterol to control levels restored F-actin structure and insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, these data suggest a novel aspect of GLUT4 regulation by AMPK involves membrane cholesterol lowering. Moreover, this AMPK-mediated process protected against hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance. PMID

  4. AMPK enhances insulin-stimulated GLUT4 regulation via lowering membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Habegger, Kirk M; Hoffman, Nolan J; Ridenour, Colin M; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2012-05-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) enhances glucose transporter GLUT4 regulation. AMPK also suppresses energy-consuming pathways such as cholesterol synthesis. Interestingly, recent in vitro and in vivo data suggest that excess membrane cholesterol impairs GLUT4 regulation. Therefore, this study tested whether a beneficial, GLUT4-regulatory aspect of AMPK stimulation involved cholesterol lowering. Using L6 myotubes stably expressing an exofacial myc-epitope-tagged-GLUT4, AMPK stimulation by 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-β-d-ribonucleoside (AICAR; 45 min, 1 mm) or 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP; 30 min, 200 μm) increased cell surface GLUT4myc labeling by approximately ≈ 25% (P < 0.05). Insulin (20 min, 100 nm) also increased GLUT4myc labeling by about 50% (P < 0.05), which was further enhanced (≈ 25%, P < 0.05) by AICAR or DNP. Consistent with AMPK-mediated suppression of cholesterol synthesis, AICAR and DNP decreased membrane cholesterol by 20-25% (P < 0.05). Whereas AMPK knockdown prevented the enhanced basal and insulin-stimulated GLUT4myc labeling by AICAR and DNP, cholesterol replenishment only blocked the AMPK-associated enhancement in insulin action. Cells cultured in a hyperinsulinemic milieu, resembling conditions in vivo that promote the progression/worsening of insulin resistance, displayed an increase in membrane cholesterol. This occurred concomitantly with a loss of cortical filamentous actin (F-actin) and defects in GLUT4 regulation by insulin. These derangements were prevented by AMPK stimulation. Examination of skeletal muscle from insulin-resistant Zucker rats revealed a similar elevation in membrane cholesterol and loss of F-actin. Lowering cholesterol to control levels restored F-actin structure and insulin sensitivity. In conclusion, these data suggest a novel aspect of GLUT4 regulation by AMPK involves membrane cholesterol lowering. Moreover, this AMPK-mediated process protected against hyperinsulinemia-induced insulin resistance.

  5. Intestinal epithelial cell caveolin 1 regulates fatty acid and lipoprotein cholesterol plasma levels

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Meng-Chieh; Quinlivan, Vanessa; Anderson, Jennifer L.; Farber, Steven A.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Caveolae and their structural protein caveolin 1 (CAV1) have roles in cellular lipid processing and systemic lipid metabolism. Global deletion of CAV1 in mice results in insulin resistance and increases in atherogenic plasma lipids and cholesterol, but protects from diet-induced obesity and atherosclerosis. Despite the fundamental role of the intestinal epithelia in the regulation of dietary lipid processing and metabolism, the contributions of CAV1 to lipid metabolism in this tissue have never been directly investigated. In this study the cellular dynamics of intestinal Cav1 were visualized in zebrafish and the metabolic contributions of CAV1 were determined with mice lacking CAV1 in intestinal epithelial cells (CAV1IEC-KO). Live imaging of Cav1–GFP and fluorescently labeled caveolae cargos shows localization to the basolateral and lateral enterocyte plasma membrane (PM), suggesting Cav1 mediates transport between enterocytes and the submucosa. CAV1IEC-KO mice are protected from the elevation in circulating fasted low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol associated with a high-fat diet (HFD), but have increased postprandial LDL cholesterol, total free fatty acids (FFAs), palmitoleic acid, and palmitic acid. The increase in circulating FAs in HFD CAV1IEC-KO mice is mirrored by decreased hepatic FAs, suggesting a non-cell-autonomous role for intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 in promoting hepatic FA storage. In conclusion, CAV1 regulates circulating LDL cholesterol and several FA species via the basolateral PM of enterocytes. These results point to intestinal epithelial cell CAV1 as a potential therapeutic target to lower circulating FFAs and LDL cholesterol, as high levels are associated with development of type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease. PMID:28130355

  6. Selective delipidation of plasma HDL enhances reverse cholesterol transport in vivo.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Frank M; Rudel, Lawrence L; Conner, Adam; Akeefe, Hassibullah; Kostner, Gerhard; Baki, Talal; Rothblat, George; de la Llera-Moya, Margarita; Asztalos, Bela; Perlman, Timothy; Zheng, Chunyu; Alaupovic, Petar; Maltais, Jo-Ann B; Brewer, H Bryan

    2009-05-01

    Uptake of cholesterol from peripheral cells by nascent small HDL circulating in plasma is necessary to prevent atherosclerosis. This process, termed reverse cholesterol transport, produces larger cholesterol-rich HDL that transfers its cholesterol to the liver facilitating excretion. Most HDL in plasma is cholesterol-rich. We demonstrate that treating plasma with a novel selective delipidation procedure converts large to small HDL [HDL-selectively delipidated (HDL-sdl)]. HDL-sdl contains several cholesterol-depleted species resembling small alpha, prebeta-1, and other prebeta forms. Selective delipidation markedly increases efficacy of plasma to stimulate ABCA1-mediated cholesterol transfer from monocytic cells to HDL. Plasma from African Green monkeys underwent selective HDL delipidation. The delipidated plasma was reinfused into five monkeys. Prebeta-1-like HDL had a plasma residence time of 8 +/- 6 h and was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL having residence times of 13-14 h. Small alpha-HDL was converted entirely to large alpha-HDL. These findings suggest that selective HDL delipidation activates reverse cholesterol transport, in vivo and in vitro. Treatment with delipidated plasma tended to reduce diet-induced aortic atherosclerosis in monkeys measured by intravascular ultrasound. These findings link the conversion of small to large HDL, in vivo, to improvement in atherosclerosis.

  7. Cholesterol-lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum in vitro, ex vivo, and in hamsters and minipigs

    PubMed Central

    Berger, A; Rein, D; Kratky, E; Monnard, I; Hajjaj, H; Meirim, I; Piguet-Welsch, C; Hauser, J; Mace, K; Niederberger, P

    2004-01-01

    Introduction There has been renewed interest in mushroom medicinal properties. We studied cholesterol lowering properties of Ganoderma lucidum (Gl), a renowned medicinal species. Results Organic fractions containing oxygenated lanosterol derivatives inhibited cholesterol synthesis in T9A4 hepatocytes. In hamsters, 5% Gl did not effect LDL; but decreased total cholesterol (TC) 9.8%, and HDL 11.2%. Gl (2.5 and 5%) had effects on several fecal neutral sterols and bile acids. Both Gl doses reduced hepatic microsomal ex-vivo HMG-CoA reductase activity. In minipigs, 2.5 Gl decreased TC, LDL- and HDL cholesterol 20, 27, and 18%, respectively (P < 0.05); increased fecal cholestanol and coprostanol; and decreased cholate. Conclusions Overall, Gl has potential to reduce LDL cholesterol in vivo through various mechanisms. Next steps are to: fully characterize bioactive components in lipid soluble/insoluble fractions; evaluate bioactivity of isolated fractions; and examine human cholesterol lowering properties. Innovative new cholesterol-lowering foods and medicines containing Gl are envisioned. PMID:14969592

  8. Evidence for Feedback Regulation Following Cholesterol Lowering Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model.

    PubMed

    Masko, Elizabeth M; Alfaqih, Mahmoud A; Solomon, Keith R; Barry, William T; Newgard, Christopher B; Muehlbauer, Michael J; Valilis, Nikolaos A; Phillips, Tameika E; Poulton, Susan H; Freedland, Alexis R; Sun, Stephanie; Dambal, Shweta K; Sanders, Sergio E; Macias, Everardo; Freeman, Michael R; Dewhirst, Mark W; Pizzo, Salvatore V; Freedland, Stephen J

    2017-04-01

    Epidemiologic data suggest cholesterol-lowering drugs may prevent the progression of prostate cancer, but not the incidence of the disease. However, the association of combination therapy in cholesterol reduction on prostate or any cancer is unclear. In this study, we compared the effects of the cholesterol lowering drugs simvastatin and ezetimibe alone or in combination on the growth of LAPC-4 prostate cancer in vivo xenografts. Proliferation assays were conducted by MTS solution and assessed by Student's t-test. 90 male nude mice were placed on a high-cholesterol Western-diet for 7 days then injected subcutaneously with 1 × 10(5) LAPC-4 cells. Two weeks post-injection, mice were randomized to control, 11 mg/kg/day simvastatin, 30 mg/kg ezetimibe, or the combination and sacrificed 42 days post-randomization. We used a generalized linear model with the predictor variables of treatment, time, and treatment by time (i.e., interaction term) with tumor volume as the outcome variable. Total serum and tumor cholesterol were measured. Tumoral RNA was extracted and cDNA synthesized from 1 ug of total RNA for quantitative real-time PCR. Simvastatin directly reduced in vitro prostate cell proliferation in a dose-dependent, cell line-specific manner, but ezetimibe had no effect. In vivo, low continuous dosing of ezetimibe, delivered by food, or simvastatin, delivered via an osmotic pump had no effect on tumor growth compared to control mice. In contrast, dual treatment of simvastatin and ezetimibe accelerated tumor growth. Ezetimibe significantly lowered serum cholesterol by 15%, while simvastatin had no effect. Ezetimibe treatment resulted in higher tumor cholesterol. A sixfold induction of low density lipoprotein receptor mRNA was observed in ezetimibe and the combination with simvastatin versus control tumors. Systemic cholesterol lowering by ezetimibe did not slow tumor growth, nor did the cholesterol independent effects of simvastatin and the combined

  9. Cholesterol-lowering effect of the mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus in hereditary hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Ginter, E; Jurcovicová, M; Kuniak, L

    1991-01-01

    We studied the effect of the edible mushroom Pleurotus ostreatus (4% in diet containing 1% of cholesterol) on serum and liver lipids in female rats with hereditary enhanced sensitivity to alimentary cholesterol. We found that the consumption of the mushroom-containing diet prevented serum cholesterol increase which was manifested at the end of the 4th week of the experiment. At the end of the 7th week of the experiment the cholesterolemia was lowered by almost 40% as compared with control animals kept on the same diet but without the mushroom. The decrease in serum cholesterol levels is a consequence of the decreased cholesterol concentrations of very-low-density lipoproteins and of low-density lipoproteins.

  10. Higher Plasma LDL-Cholesterol is Associated with Preserved Executive and Fine Motor Functions in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Sterling, Nicholas W; Lichtenstein, Maya; Lee, Eun-Young; Lewis, Mechelle M; Evans, Alicia; Eslinger, Paul J; Du, Guangwei; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Kong, Lan; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-05-01

    Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson's disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol - executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol - fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies.

  11. Higher Plasma LDL-Cholesterol is Associated with Preserved Executive and Fine Motor Functions in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Sterling, Nicholas W.; Lichtenstein, Maya; Lee, Eun-Young; Lewis, Mechelle M.; Evans, Alicia; Eslinger, Paul J.; Du, Guangwei; Gao, Xiang; Chen, Honglei; Kong, Lan; Huang, Xuemei

    2016-01-01

    Plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol has been associated both with risk of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and with age-related changes in cognitive function. This prospective study examined the relationship between baseline plasma LDL-cholesterol and cognitive changes in PD and matched Controls. Fasting plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were obtained at baseline from 64 non-demented PD subjects (62.7 ± 7.9 y) and 64 Controls (61.3 ± 6.8 y). Subjects underwent comprehensive neuropsychological testing at baseline, 18-, and 36-months. Linear mixed-effects modeling was used to assess the relationships between baseline LDL-cholesterol levels and longitudinal cognitive changes. At baseline, PD patients had lower scores of fine motor (p<0.0001), executive set shifting (p=0.018), and mental processing speed (p=0.049) compared to Controls. Longitudinally, Controls demonstrated improved fine motor and memory test scores (p=0.044, and p=0.003), whereas PD patients demonstrated significantly accelerated loss in fine motor skill (p=0.002) compared to Controls. Within the PD group, however, higher LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with improved executive set shifting (β=0.003, p<0.001) and fine motor scores (β=0.002, p=0.030) over time. These associations were absent in Controls (p>0.7). The cholesterol - executive set shifting association differed significantly between PDs and Controls (interaction p=0.005), whereas the cholesterol - fine motor association difference did not reach significance (interaction, p=0.104). In summary, higher plasma LDL-cholesterol levels were associated with better executive function and fine motor performance over time in PD, both of which may reflect an effect on nigrostriatal mediation. Confirmation of these results and elucidation of involved mechanisms are warranted, and might lead to feasible therapeutic strategies. PMID:27330838

  12. Probiotics and the BSH-related cholesterol lowering mechanism: a Jekyll and Hyde scenario.

    PubMed

    Choi, Sy-Bing; Lew, Lee-Ching; Yeo, Siok-Koon; Nair Parvathy, Seema; Liong, Min-Tze

    2015-01-01

    Probiotic microorganisms have been documented over the past two decades to play a role in cholesterol-lowering properties via various clinical trials. Several mechanisms have also been proposed and the ability of these microorganisms to deconjugate bile via production of bile salt hydrolase (BSH) has been widely associated with their cholesterol lowering potentials in prevention of hypercholesterolemia. Deconjugated bile salts are more hydrophobic than their conjugated counterparts, thus are less reabsorbed through the intestines resulting in higher excretion into the feces. Replacement of new bile salts from cholesterol as a precursor subsequently leads to decreased serum cholesterol levels. However, some controversies have risen attributed to the activities of deconjugated bile acids that repress the synthesis of bile acids from cholesterol. Deconjugated bile acids have higher binding affinity towards some orphan nuclear receptors namely the farsenoid X receptor (FXR), leading to a suppressed transcription of the enzyme cholesterol 7-alpha hydroxylase (7AH), which is responsible in bile acid synthesis from cholesterol. This notion was further corroborated by our current docking data, which indicated that deconjugated bile acids have higher propensities to bind with the FXR receptor as compared to conjugated bile acids. Bile acids-activated FXR also induces transcription of the IBABP gene, leading to enhanced recycling of bile acids from the intestine back to the liver, which subsequently reduces the need for new bile formation from cholesterol. Possible detrimental effects due to increased deconjugation of bile salts such as malabsorption of lipids, colon carcinogenesis, gallstones formation and altered gut microbial populations, which contribute to other varying gut diseases, were also included in this review. Our current findings and review substantiate the need to look beyond BSH deconjugation as a single factor/mechanism in strain selection for

  13. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    1985-01-01

    We have studied the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane in Chinese hamster ovary cells using a cell fractionation assay. We found that transport is dependent on metabolic energy, but that the maintenance of the high differential concentration of cholesterol in the plasma membrane is not an energy-requiring process. We have tested a variety of inhibitors for their effect on cholesterol transport and found that cytochalasin B, colchicine, monensin, cycloheximide, and NH4Cl did not have any effect. The cholesterol transport process shows a sharp temperature dependence; it ceases at 15 degrees C, whereas cholesterol synthesis continues. When synthesis occurs at 15 degrees C, the newly synthesized cholesterol accumulates in the endoplasmic reticulum and in a low density, lipid-rich vesicle fraction. These results suggest that cholesterol is transported via a vesicular system. PMID:4040520

  14. Essentially All Excess Fibroblast Cholesterol Moves from Plasma Membranes to Intracellular Compartments

    PubMed Central

    Lange, Yvonne; Ye, Jin; Steck, Theodore L.

    2014-01-01

    It has been shown that modestly increasing plasma membrane cholesterol beyond its physiological set point greatly increases the endoplasmic reticulum and mitochondrial pools, thereby eliciting manifold feedback responses that return cell cholesterol to its resting state. The question arises whether this homeostatic mechanism reflects the targeting of cell surface cholesterol to specific intracellular sites or its general equilibration among the organelles. We now show that human fibroblast cholesterol can be increased as much as two-fold from 2-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin without changing the size of the cell surface pool. Rather, essentially all of the added cholesterol disperses rapidly among cytoplasmic membranes, increasing their overall cholesterol content by as much as five-fold. We conclude that the level of plasma membrane cholesterol is normally at capacity and that even small increments above this physiological set point redistribute essentially entirely to intracellular membranes, perhaps down their chemical activity gradients. PMID:25014655

  15. Transport of cholesterol from the endoplasmic reticulum to the plasma membrane is constitutive in CaCo-2 cells and differs from the transport of plasma membrane cholesterol to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Field, F J; Born, E; Murthy, S; Mathur, S N

    1998-02-01

    The transport of newly synthesized cholesterol from its site of synthesis, the endoplasmic reticulum, to the plasma membrane was studied in CaCo-2 cells. The appearance of newly synthesized cholesterol on the cell surface was rapid. By 30 min, 50% of the total labeled cholesterol was observed in the plasma membrane. The arrival of cholesterol at the plasma membrane was independent of new protein synthesis, a functional Golgi apparatus, or microtubular function. Progesterone, verapamil, and trifluoperazine, inhibitors of p-glycoprotein which are known to inhibit cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, reduced the amount of newly synthesized cholesterol reaching the plasma membrane. The p-glycoprotein inhibitors, however, caused the accumulation of sterol intermediates in the plasma membrane, suggesting that sterol trafficking to the plasma membrane remained intact, but that trafficking from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum was disrupted. In contrast, nigericin, another potent inhibitor of cholesterol movement from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum, did not alter the transport of newly synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane. Moreover, promoting cholesterol transport from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum by sphingomyelin hydrolysis or by micellar cholesterol influx did not alter the percent of newly synthesized cholesterol transported to the plasma membrane. Likewise, preventing plasma membrane cholesterol from reaching the endoplasmic reticulum by incubating cells with lysophosphatidylcholine, filipin, or digitonin did not alter the arrival of newly synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane. The results suggest that the amount of cholesterol moving to the plasma membrane from the endoplasmic reticulum is constitutive and regulated at the level of cholesterol synthesis and not at the level of the transport process. The pathways of cholesterol transport to and from the

  16. Improvement of erythrocyte deformability by cholesterol-lowering therapy with pravastatin in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Murakawa, K; Yasunari, K; Yokokawa, K; Horio, T; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1997-03-01

    Erythrocyte deformation is an important regulatory factor of the microcirculation. The present study was designed to examine whether erythrocyte deformability is altered in hypercholesterolemic patients and, if so, whether cholesterol-lowering therapy affects this parameter in these patients. The erythrocyte deformability of 37 hypercholesterolemic patients was evaluated before and after 1 year of therapy with pravastatin, an inhibitor of hepatic hydroxymethyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase, under various shear stresses (4.7, 9.5, 23.6, 47.3, 118.1, and 236.2 dyne/cm2) using laser diffractometry. At study entry, erythrocyte deformability under 4.7 and 9.5 dyne/cm2 shear stress, which is actually observed in human vessels, was reduced compared with that in 20 age-matched normocholesterolemic subjects and was inversely correlated with serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. Pravastatin therapy for 1 year, which reduced serum cholesterol from 288 +/- 28 to 223 +/- 20 mg/dL, significantly improved erythrocyte deformability by approximately 20%. There was a significant relation between the improvement of erythrocyte deformability and the reduction of serum cholesterol or LDL cholesterol. The results suggest that erythrocyte deformability is reduced in hypercholesterolemic patients, and that long-term cholesterol-lowering therapy can improve reduced erythrocyte deformability, which may contribute to the improvement of organ perfusion.

  17. Cholesterol-lowering activity of the major polyphenols in grape seed.

    PubMed

    Ngamukote, Sathaporn; Mäkynen, Kittana; Thilawech, Thavaree; Adisakwattana, Sirichai

    2011-06-17

    The major polyphenols in grape seed have been shown to have beneficial health effects in the prevention of dyslipidemia and cardiovascular diseases. In this present study, we investigated the cholesterol-lowering activity of three major polyphenolic compounds found in grape seed. The results showed that gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin significantly inhibited pancreatic cholesterol esterase in a concentration-dependent manner. Moreover, they bound to taurocholic acid, taurodeoxycholic acid, and glycodeoxycholic acid at levels ranging from 38.6% to 28.2%. At the concentration of 0.2 mg/mL, gallic acid, catechin, and epicatechin reduced the formation of cholesterol micelles 27.26 ± 2.17%, 11.88 ± 0.75%, and 19.49 ± 3.71%, respectively. These findings clearly demonstrate that three major polyphenolic compounds present in a particular grape seed have cholesterol-lowering activity by inhibiting pancreatic cholesterol esterase, binding of bile acids, and reducing solubility of cholesterol in micelles which may result in delayed cholesterol absorption.

  18. Detection of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masami; Shimada, Yukiko; Inomata, Mitsushi; Ohno-Iwashita, Yoshiko . E-mail: iwashita@tmig.or.jp

    2006-12-22

    The C-terminal domain (D4) of perfringolysin O binds selectively to cholesterol in cholesterol-rich microdomains. To address the issue of whether cholesterol-rich microdomains exist in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane, we expressed D4 as a fusion protein with EGFP in MEF cells. More than half of the EGFP-D4 expressed in stable cell clones was bound to membranes in raft fractions. Depletion of membrane cholesterol with {beta}-cyclodextrin reduced the amount of EGFP-D4 localized in raft fractions, confirming EGFP-D4 binding to cholesterol-rich microdomains. Subfractionation of the raft fractions showed most of the EGFP-D4 bound to the plasma membrane rather than to intracellular membranes. Taken together, these results strongly suggest the existence of cholesterol-rich microdomains in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane.

  19. Adding monounsaturated fatty acids to a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods in hypercholesterolemia

    PubMed Central

    Jenkins, David J.A.; Chiavaroli, Laura; Wong, Julia M.W.; Kendall, Cyril; Lewis, Gary F.; Vidgen, Edward; Connelly, Philip W.; Leiter, Lawrence A.; Josse, Robert G.; Lamarche, Benoît

    2010-01-01

    Background Higher intake of monounsaturated fat may raise high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol without raising low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol. We tested whether increasing the monounsaturated fat content of a diet proven effective for lowering LDL cholesterol (dietary portfolio) also modified other risk factors for cardiovascular disease, specifically by increasing HDL cholesterol, lowering serum triglyceride and further reducing the ratio of total to HDL cholesterol. Methods Twenty-four patients with hyperlipidemia consumed a therapeutic diet very low in saturated fat for one month and were then randomly assigned to a dietary portfolio low or high in monounsaturated fatty acid for another month. We supplied participants’ food for the two-month period. Calorie intake was based on Harris–Benedict estimates for energy requirements. Results For patients who consumed the dietary portfolio high in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol rose, whereas for those consuming the dietary portfolio low in monounsaturated fat, HDL cholesterol did not change. The 12.5% treatment difference was significant (0.12 mmol/L, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.05 to 0.21, p = 0.003). The ratio of total to HDL cholesterol was reduced by 6.5% with the diet high in monounsaturated fat relative to the diet low in monounsaturated fat (−0.28, 95% CI −0.59 to −0.04, p = 0.025). Patients consuming the diet high in monounsaturated fat also had significantly higher concentrations of apolipoprotein AI, and their C-reactive protein was significantly lower. No treatment differences were seen for triglycerides, other lipids or body weight, and mean weight loss was similar for the diets high in monounsaturated fat (−0.8 kg) and low in monounsaturated fat (−1.2 kg). Interpretation Monounsaturated fat increased the effectiveness of a cholesterol-lowering dietary portfolio, despite statin-like reductions in LDL cholesterol. The potential benefits for cardiovascular risk were

  20. Study of garlic extracts and fractions on cholesterol plasma levels and vascular reactivity in cholesterol-fed rats.

    PubMed

    Slowing, K; Ganado, P; Sanz, M; Ruiz, E; Tejerina, T

    2001-03-01

    Garlic is known for its pharmacologic and nutritional properties. In previous studies, garlic elicited a reduction in plasma levels of lipids by inhibiting hepatic cholesterol synthesis. The aim of this study was to investigate in an in vivo model the effects of garlic extract and some fractions on cholesterol levels and vascular reactivity in cholesterol-fed rats. Rats were fed a cholesterol-enriched diet for 16 wk and were divided into 10 groups as follows: control and hypercholesterolemic diet groups, 4 groups fed frozen garlic fractions and 4 groups fed raw garlic fractions with different doses. Blood samples were obtained to analyze HDL and LDL cholesterol levels. After treatment, rats were killed. The heart, liver and kidneys were weighed; the aorta was isolated, mounted in organ chambers and vascular reactivity was tested. Plasma concentration of cholesterol was 58 mg/dL (100%) at the beginning of the study and increased to 102 mg/dL (153%; hypercholesterolemic group) at the end of the treatment. Plasma total cholesterol decreased in all groups treated with garlic; moreover, this effect was higher in rats fed raw garlic fractions and extracts. LDL decreased significantly with respect to the hypercholesterolemic group in all groups treated with garlic fractions and extracts (P: < 0.01); however, an increase in HDL was found in those treated with frozen fractions and extracts. The liver:body weight ratio decreased in all treated groups. The relaxing effect of acetylcholine (ACh) was enhanced in arteries contracted with noradrenaline (NE). These data suggest that garlic fractions could prevent diet-induced hypercholesterolemia and vascular alterations in the endothelium-dependent relaxation associated with atherosclerosis.

  1. Supplementation with Aspergillus oryzae-fermented kochujang lowers serum cholesterol in subjects with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ji-Hee; Jung, Eun-Soo; Choi, Eun-Kyung; Jeong, Do-Yeoun; Jo, Seung-Wha; Jin, Jung-Hyun; Lee, Jung-Mi; Park, Byung-Hyun; Chae, Soo-Wan

    2015-06-01

    Kochujang, a traditional fermented red pepper paste, is known for its hypocholesterolemic effect; however, these studies used non-commercial preparations of kochujang. In this study, we examined whether commercially-made kochujang in which Aspergillus oryzae (also known as koji) was used as a microorganism for fermentation has the same cholesterol-lowering effects. Hyperlipidemic subjects (based upon criteria of 110 ∼ 190 mg/dL LDL cholesterol or 200 ∼ 260 mg/dL total cholesterol) who had not been diagnosed with any disease and met the inclusion criteria were recruited for this study. The 30 subjects were randomly divided into either the kochujang (n = 15) or placebo (n = 15) group. All subjects ingested either the kochujang pill (34.5 g/d) or a placebo three times daily during meals for 12 weeks. Outcomes included measurements of efficacy (total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, and triglyceride) and safety (adverse events, laboratory tests, electrocardiogram, and vital signs). In the kochujang-supplemented group, subjects' total cholesterol level significantly decreased (from 215.5 ± 16.1 mg/dL to 194.5 ± 25.4 mg/dL, p = 0.001). LDL-C cholesterol levels were also decreased by kochujang supplementation (from 133.6 ± 14.8 mg/dL to 113.5 ± 23.1 mg/dL); however no significant difference was seen between groups (p = 0.074). There were no statistically significant differences in HDL-cholesterol and triglyceride levels between the supplemented and non-supplemented groups. None of the subjects complained of any adverse effects. These results indicate that A. oryzae-fermented kochujang elicits a significant hypocholesterolemic effect and might be useful for improving blood cholesterol levels in subjects at high risk for cardiovascular disease. NCT01865370. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd and European Society for Clinical Nutrition and Metabolism. All rights reserved.

  2. Cheese intake in large amounts lowers LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with butter intake of equal fat content.

    PubMed

    Hjerpsted, Julie; Leedo, Eva; Tholstrup, Tine

    2011-12-01

    Despite its high content of saturated fatty acids, cheese does not seem to increase plasma total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations when compared with an equivalent intake of fat from butter. This effect may be due to the high calcium content of cheese, which results in a higher excretion of fecal fat. The objective was to compare the effects of diets of equal fat content rich in either hard cheese or butter or a habitual diet on blood pressure and fasting serum blood lipids, C-reactive protein, glucose, and insulin. We also examined whether fecal fat excretion differs with the consumption of cheese or butter. The study was a randomized dietary intervention consisting of two 6-wk crossover periods and a 14-d run-in period during which the subjects consumed their habitual diet. The study included 49 men and women who replaced part of their habitual dietary fat intake with 13% of energy from cheese or butter. After 6 wk, the cheese intervention resulted in lower serum total, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations and higher glucose concentrations than did the butter intervention. Cheese intake did not increase serum total or LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared with the run-in period, during which total fat and saturated fat intakes were lower. Fecal fat excretion did not differ between the cheese and butter periods. Cheese lowers LDL cholesterol when compared with butter intake of equal fat content and does not increase LDL cholesterol compared with a habitual diet. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01140165.

  3. Cholesterol

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the food you eat (such as eggs, meats, and dairy products). Too much cholesterol can have ... fewer foods with saturated fats (such as red meat and most dairy products). Opt for healthier fats, ...

  4. Cholesterol Lowering Effect of Plant Stanol Ester Yoghurt Drinks with Added Camelina Oil

    PubMed Central

    Salo, Pia; Kuusisto, Päivi

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of yoghurt minidrinks containing two doses of plant stanol ester either with or without added camelina oil on the serum cholesterol levels in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. In this randomised, double-blind, parallel group study, 143 subjects consumed a 65 mL minidrink together with a meal daily for four weeks. The minidrink contained 1.6 or 2.0 grams of plant stanols with or without 2 grams of alpha-linolenic acid-rich camelina oil. The placebo minidrink did not contain plant stanols or camelina oil. All plant stanol treated groups showed statistically significant total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol lowering relative to baseline and relative to placebo. Compared to placebo, LDL cholesterol was lowered by 9.4% (p < 0.01) and 8.1% (p < 0.01) with 1.6 g and 2 g plant stanols, respectively. With addition of Camelina oil, 1.6 g plant stanols resulted in 11.0% (p < 0.01) and 2 g plant stanols in 8.4% (p < 0.01) reduction in LDL cholesterol compared to placebo. In conclusion, yoghurt minidrinks with plant stanol ester reduced serum LDL cholesterol significantly and addition of a small amount of camelina oil did not significantly enhance the cholesterol lowering effect. This trial was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov NCT02628990. PMID:26998355

  5. Hemagglutinin Clusters in the Plasma Membrane Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    DOE PAGES

    Wilson, Robert L.; Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; ...

    2015-04-07

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here in this paper, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol andmore » sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane.« less

  6. Hemagglutinin Clusters in the Plasma Membrane Are Not Enriched with Cholesterol and Sphingolipids

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Robert L.; Frisz, Jessica F.; Klitzing, Haley A.; Zimmerberg, Joshua; Weber, Peter K.; Kraft, Mary L.

    2015-01-01

    The clusters of the influenza envelope protein, hemagglutinin, within the plasma membrane are hypothesized to be enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids. Here, we directly tested this hypothesis by using high-resolution secondary ion mass spectrometry to image the distributions of antibody-labeled hemagglutinin and isotope-labeled cholesterol and sphingolipids in the plasma membranes of fibroblast cells that stably express hemagglutinin. We found that the hemagglutinin clusters were neither enriched with cholesterol nor colocalized with sphingolipid domains. Thus, hemagglutinin clustering and localization in the plasma membrane is not controlled by cohesive interactions between hemagglutinin and liquid-ordered domains enriched with cholesterol and sphingolipids, or from specific binding interactions between hemagglutinin, cholesterol, and/or the majority of sphingolipid species in the plasma membrane. PMID:25863057

  7. Hampering Effect of Cholesterol on the Permeation of Reactive Oxygen Species through Phospholipids Bilayer: Possible Explanation for Plasma Cancer Selectivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Paal, Jonas; Verheyen, Claudia; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the ability of cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPS) to selectively induce cell death in cancer cells has been widely established. This selectivity has been assigned to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) created in CAPs. To provide new insights in the search for an explanation for the observed selectivity, we calculate the transfer free energy of multiple ROS across membranes containing a varying amount of cholesterol. The cholesterol fraction is investigated as a selectivity parameter because membranes of cancer cells are known to contain lower fractions of cholesterol compared to healthy cells. We find that cholesterol has a significant effect on the permeation of reactive species across a membrane. Indeed, depending on the specific reactive species, an increasing cholesterol fraction can lead to (i) an increase of the transfer free energy barrier height and width, (ii) the formation of a local free energy minimum in the center of the membrane and (iii) the creation of extra free energy barriers due to the bulky sterol rings. In the context of plasma oncology, these observations suggest that the increased ingress of RONS in cancer cells can be explained by the decreased cholesterol fraction of their cell membrane.

  8. Hampering Effect of Cholesterol on the Permeation of Reactive Oxygen Species through Phospholipids Bilayer: Possible Explanation for Plasma Cancer Selectivity

    PubMed Central

    Van der Paal, Jonas; Verheyen, Claudia; Neyts, Erik C.; Bogaerts, Annemie

    2017-01-01

    In recent years, the ability of cold atmospheric pressure plasmas (CAPS) to selectively induce cell death in cancer cells has been widely established. This selectivity has been assigned to the reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) created in CAPs. To provide new insights in the search for an explanation for the observed selectivity, we calculate the transfer free energy of multiple ROS across membranes containing a varying amount of cholesterol. The cholesterol fraction is investigated as a selectivity parameter because membranes of cancer cells are known to contain lower fractions of cholesterol compared to healthy cells. We find that cholesterol has a significant effect on the permeation of reactive species across a membrane. Indeed, depending on the specific reactive species, an increasing cholesterol fraction can lead to (i) an increase of the transfer free energy barrier height and width, (ii) the formation of a local free energy minimum in the center of the membrane and (iii) the creation of extra free energy barriers due to the bulky sterol rings. In the context of plasma oncology, these observations suggest that the increased ingress of RONS in cancer cells can be explained by the decreased cholesterol fraction of their cell membrane. PMID:28059085

  9. Effects of lactic acid bacteria isolated from fermented mustard on lowering cholesterol

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shu Chen; Chang, Chen Kai; Chan, Shu Chang; Shieh, Jiunn Shiuh; Chiu, Chih Kwang; Duh, Pin-Der

    2014-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the ability of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains isolated from fermented mustard to lower the cholesterol in vitro. Methods The ability of 50 LAB strains isolated from fermented mustard on lowering cholesterol in vitro was determined by modified o-phtshalaldehyde method. The LAB isolates were analyzed for their resistance to acid and bile salt. Strains with lowering cholesterol activity, were determined adherence to Caco-2 cells. Results Strain B0007, B0006 and B0022 assimilated more cholesterol than BCRC10474 and BCRC 17010. The isolated strains showed tolerance to pH 3.0 for 3 h despite variations in the degree of viability and bile-tolerant strains, with more than 108 CFU/mL after incubation for 24 h at 1% oxigall in MRS. In addition, strain B0007 and B0022 identified as Lactobacillus plantarum with 16S rDNA sequences were able to adhere to the Caco-2 cell lines. Conclusions These strains B0007 and B0022 may be potential functional sources for cholesterol-lowering activities as well as adhering to Caco-2 cell lines. PMID:25183271

  10. 1-[4-[4[(4R,5R)-3,3-Dibutyl-7-(dimethylamino)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxido-1-benzothiepin-5-yl]phenoxy]butyl]-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane methanesulfonate (SC-435), an ileal apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter inhibitor alters hepatic cholesterol metabolism and lowers plasma low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol concentrations in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    West, Kristy L; Ramjiganesh, Tripurasundari; Roy, Suheeta; Keller, Bradley T; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2002-10-01

    Male Hartley guinea pigs (10/group) were assigned either to a control diet (no drug treatment) or to diets containing 0.4, 2.2, or 7.3 mg/day of an ileal apical sodium-codependent bile acid transporter (ASBT) inhibitor, 1-[4-[4[(4R,5R)-3,3-dibutyl-7-(dimethylamino)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydro-4-hydroxy-1,1-dioxido-1-benzothiepin-5-yl]phenoxy]butyl]-4-aza-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2] octane methanesulfonate (SC-435). Based on food consumption, guinea pigs received 0, 0.8, 3.7, or 13.4 mg/kg/day of the ASBT inhibitor. The amount of cholesterol in the four diets was maintained at 0.17%, equivalent to 1200 mg/day in the human situation. Guinea pigs treated with 13.4 mg/kg/day SC-435 had 41% lower total cholesterol and 44% lower low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol concentrations compared with control (P < 0.01), whereas no significant differences were observed with either of the lower doses of SC-435. Hepatic cholesterol esters were significantly reduced by 43, 56, and 70% in guinea pigs fed 0.8, 3.7, and 13.4 mg/kg/day of the ASBT inhibitor, respectively (P < 0.01). In addition, the highest dose of the inhibitor resulted in a 42% increase in the number of very low-density lipoprotein (VLDL) triacylglycerol molecules and a larger VLDL diameter compared with controls (P < 0.05). Acyl-CoA cholesterol/acyltransferase activity was 30% lower with the highest dose treatment, whereas cholesterol 7alpha-hydroxylase, the regulatory enzyme of bile acid synthesis, was 30% higher with the highest ASBT inhibitor dose (P < 0.05). Furthermore, bile acid excretion increased 2-fold with the highest dose of SC-435 compared with the control group (P < 0.05). These results suggest that the reduction in total and LDL-cholesterol concentrations by the ASBT inhibitor is a result of alterations in hepatic cholesterol metabolism due to modifications in the enterohepatic circulation of bile acids.

  11. Primary hyperlipidemias in children: effect of plant sterol supplementation on plasma lipids and markers of cholesterol synthesis and absorption.

    PubMed

    Guardamagna, O; Abello, F; Baracco, V; Federici, G; Bertucci, P; Mozzi, A; Mannucci, L; Gnasso, A; Cortese, C

    2011-06-01

    Plant sterols lower serum cholesterol concentration. Available data have confirmed the lipid-lowering efficacy in adults, while there is a relative dearth of data in children and almost exclusively restricted to subjects with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH). Aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy, tolerability and safety of plant sterol supplementation in children with different forms of primary hyperlipidemias. The effect of plant sterol consumption on plasma lipids was evaluated in 32 children with heterozygous FH, 13 children with Familial Combined Hyperlipidemia (FCH) and 13 children with Undefined Hypercholesterolemia (UH) in a 12-week open-label intervention study using plant sterol-enriched yoghurt. Plasma lipids and apolipoproteins were measured by routine methods. Markers of cholesterol synthesis (lathosterol) and absorption (campesterol and sitosterol) were measured by GC-MS. Tolerability and adherence to recommended regimen was very high. A significant reduction was observed in LDL-cholesterol in the three groups (10.7, 14.2 and 16.0% in FH, FCH and UH, respectively). Lathosterol concentrations were unchanged, reflecting a lack of increased synthesis of cholesterol. Of the two absorption markers, only sitosterol showed a slight but significant increase. Daily consumption of plant sterol dairy products favorably changes lipid profile by reducing LDL-cholesterol. To our knowledge, this is the first report of the use of plant sterols-enriched foods in treating children with primary hyperlipidemia such as FCH and UH, likely to be the most frequent form also in the young age in the western populations.

  12. Effects of cholesterol on nano-mechanical properties of the living cell plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Khatibzadeh, Nima; Gupta, Sharad; Farrell, Brenda; Brownell, William E.; Anvari, Bahman

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of membrane cholesterol content on the mechanical properties of cell membranes by using optical tweezers. We pulled membrane tethers from human embryonic kidney cells using single and multi-speed protocols, and obtained time-resolved tether forces. We quantified various mechanical characteristics including the tether equilibrium force, bending modulus, effective membrane viscosity, and plasma membrane-cytoskeleton adhesion energy, and correlated them to the membrane cholesterol level. Decreases in cholesterol concentration were associated with increases in the tether equilibrium force, tether stiffness, and adhesion energy. Tether diameter and effective viscosity increased with increasing cholesterol levels. Disruption of cytoskeletal F-actin significantly changed the tether diameters in both non-cholesterol and cholesterol-manipulated cells, while the effective membrane viscosity was unaffected by F-actin disruption. The findings are relevant to inner ear function where cochlear amplification is altered by changes in membrane cholesterol content. PMID:23227105

  13. Raw Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita) promotes cecal fermentation and reduces plasma non-HDL cholesterol concentration in rats.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Naomichi; Tanabe, Hiroki; Yamamoto, Tatsuro; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2011-01-01

    We examined the effects of raw Chinese yam (Dioscorea opposita), containing resistant starch (RS), on lipid metabolism and cecal fermentation in rats. Raw yam (RY) and boiled yam (BY) contained 33.9% and 6.9% RS, respectively. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a cholesterol-free, control (C) diet supplemented with or without 15 and 30 g of RY or BY/100 g for 3 wk. Plasma total cholesterol concentrations in the tail vein of rats fed the 30% RY diet were significantly lower than in the C group throughout the feeding period. Compared with the C group, non-HDL concentrations in arterial plasma in the 30% RY group was significantly reduced. Liver cholesterol concentration in rats fed the 30% RY diet was significantly higher compared with those fed the C diet. Hepatic cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase mRNA and fecal bile acid excretion were significantly higher in the BY, but not the RY group, compared with the C group. Fecal cholesterol excretion in the 30% RY group was greater compared with the C group. Hepatic microsomal triacylglycerol transfer protein mRNA was significantly lower in the 30% RY group compared with the C group. Cecal pools of acetate, propionate and butyrate were 113-257%, 181-476% and 410-789% greater in the RY group compared with the C group. These results suggest raw yam is effective as a source of RS and facilitates production of short chain fatty acid (SCFA), especially butyrate, in the rat cecum. In addition, RY has a plasma-cholesterol lowering effect, possibly due to the inhibited release of VLDL.

  14. Pleiotropic effects of statins: evidence against benefits beyond LDL-cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Terje R

    2010-01-01

    3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are extremely effective at reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol and have been demonstrated to reduce mortality and the risk of major cardiovascular events in a number of large primary and secondary prevention studies. The linear relationship between LDL-cholesterol and cardiovascular risk suggests statins work solely by reducing LDL-cholesterol, and that ancillary properties do not contribute to cardiovascular risk reduction. In recent years, however, a number of additional non-lipid-lowering, or 'pleiotropic', effects of statins have been suggested to contribute to their efficacy in cardiovascular disease. The first data to suggest that statins may have benefits beyond lipid lowering came from the Heart Protection Study, in which simvastatin reduced mortality and morbidity even in patients with 'normal' LDL-cholesterol levels (2.6 mmol/L or 100 mg/dL). It has since been demonstrated, however, that cardiovascular risk remains high at this LDL concentration, but is substantially reduced in those achieving levels below 2.0 mmol/L (77 mg/dL). Evidence for the pleiotropic effects of statins in heart failure comes largely from retrospective and subgroup analyses of large studies. When statin therapy is compared with placebo, or when high-dose statin therapy is compared with low-dose treatment, a lower incidence of heart failure or hospitalization is observed. Despite promising retrospective data, however, two prospective studies of rosuvastatin in the treatment of patients with New York Heart Association class II-IV heart failure showed no impact on the primary endpoint and only one of the studies showed a lower rate of hospitalization favouring rosuvastatin. A number of small studies has shown evidence for mechanisms of action of statins outside of LDL-cholesterol lowering, including improvements in endothelial function, halting or retardation of atheroma development, reduction

  15. Novel gene-by-environment interactions: APOB and NPC1L1 variants affect the relationship between dietary and total plasma cholesterol[S

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Daniel S.; Burt, Amber A.; Ranchalis, Jane E.; Jarvik, Ella R.; Rosenthal, Elisabeth A.; Hatsukami, Thomas S.; Furlong, Clement E.; Jarvik, Gail P.

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death in developed countries. Plasma cholesterol level is a key risk factor in CVD pathogenesis. Genetic and dietary variation both influence plasma cholesterol; however, little is known about dietary interactions with genetic variants influencing the absorption and transport of dietary cholesterol. We sought to determine whether gut expressed variants predicting plasma cholesterol differentially affected the relationship between dietary and plasma cholesterol levels in 1,128 subjects (772/356 in the discovery/replication cohorts, respectively). Four single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) within three genes (APOB, CETP, and NPC1L1) were significantly associated with plasma cholesterol in the discovery cohort. These were subsequently evaluated for gene-by-environment (GxE) interactions with dietary cholesterol for the prediction of plasma cholesterol, with significant findings tested for replication. Novel GxE interactions were identified and replicated for two variants: rs1042034, an APOB Ser4338Asn missense SNP and rs2072183 (in males only), a synonymous NPC1L1 SNP in linkage disequilibrium with SNPs 5′ of NPC1L1. This study identifies the presence of novel GxE and gender interactions implying that differential gut absorption is the basis for the variant associations with plasma cholesterol. These GxE interactions may account for part of the “missing heritability” not accounted for by genetic associations. PMID:23482652

  16. In vitro and in vivo cholesterol lowering ability of Lactobacillus pentosus KF923750.

    PubMed

    Bendali, F; Kerdouche, K; Hamma-Faradji, S; Drider, D

    2017-03-16

    Lactobacillus pentosus KF923750 was characterised for probiotic related properties and then characterised for cholesterol uptake in vitro as well as in vivo using rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet. The survival percentage of L. pentosus KF923750 was 100% at pH 3, 52.18% at pH 2 and 36.21% at pH 2 plus pepsin. Similarly, this strain appeared resistant to bile (0.1% [98.42%], 0.3% [88.52%], 0.5% [75.60%] and 1% [71.15%]), after 4 h exposure. Moreover, L. pentosus KF923750 controlled growth of Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 through the production of a bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance and anti-adhesive capabilities. L. pentosus KF923750 was non-cytotoxic to eukaryotic cells but sensitive to some antibiotics. Compared with rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet but without L. pentosus KF923750 supplementation, the plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglycerides levels were significantly decreased in L. pentosus KF923750-fed rabbits by 11.54, 16.00 and 18.00%, respectively, with no significant change in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. The histological sections of livers revealed lesions in all the rabbits that were fed a high-cholesterol diet, but these were less pronounced in rabbits ingesting L. pentosus KF923750. This study highlights the potential of lactobacilli, such as L. pentosus KF923750, in the treatment or prevention of hypercholesterolemia.

  17. The effects of lowering serum cholesterol on coronary heart disease risk.

    PubMed

    Rossouw, J E

    1994-01-01

    The clinical trials and angiographic studies of cholesterol lowering have been of decisive importance in persuading scientific and public opinion that elevated serum cholesterol is a causal element in the chain of events leading to CHD and that treatment by diet and drugs is effective in lowering the risk of CHD. The appropriateness of these opinions is well illustrated by the analyses of the combined trials, which show that the clinical event rate can be lowered by about 20% if cholesterol levels are lowered by 10%. The reduced risk for CHD applies to both primary and secondary prevention. Further, the angiographic studies have now demonstrated that vigorous lipid-lowering therapy leads to improvements in the angiographic appearance of coronary vessels, which are accompanied by large reductions in CHD risk. Diet and a variety of drugs appear to modify the risk of CHD. The results of studies using combinations of drugs, for example, bile acid-binding resins with either niacin or hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, are particularly impressive. The primary purpose of treatment remains the reduction of total and LDL cholesterol; however, the possibility of an additional benefit from improving other aspects of the lipid profile (such as raising HDL cholesterol levels) at the same time should not be ignored. In many instances, combinations of drugs are needed to achieve optimal lowering of serum cholesterol or to treat all elements of the disorder. Although the treatment of high-risk but apparently healthy individuals should not be neglected, it would be particularly appropriate to institute intensive diet and combination drug therapy in patients with existing CHD, in view of their high risk of reinfarction if left untreated. The secondary prevention trials provide evidence that clinical events can be reduced in such patients. The angiographic studies strongly suggest that large reductions in cholesterol to much lower levels (in-treatment LDL

  18. Use of cyclodextrins to manipulate plasma membrane cholesterol content: evidence, misconceptions and control strategies

    PubMed Central

    Zidovetzki, Raphael

    2007-01-01

    The physiological importance of cholesterol in the cell plasma membrane has attracted increased attention in recent years. Consequently, the use of methods of controlled manipulation of membrane cholesterol content has also increased sharply, especially as a method of studying putative cholesterol-enriched cell membrane domains (rafts). The most common means of modifying the cholesterol content of cell membranes is the incubation of cells or model membranes with cyclodextrins, a family of compounds, which, due to the presence of relatively hydrophobic cavity, can be used to extract cholesterol from cell membranes. However, the mechanism of this activity of cyclodextrins is not completely established. Moreover, under conditions commonly used for cholesterol extraction, cyclodextrins may remove cholesterol from both raft and non-raft domains of the membrane as well as alter the distribution of cholesterol between plasma and intracellular membranes. In addition, other hydrophobic molecules such as phospholipids may also be extracted from the membranes by cyclodextrins. We review the evidence for the specific and non-specific effects of cyclodextrins and what is known about the mechanisms for cyclodextrin-induced cholesterol and phospholipid extraction. Finally, we discuss useful control strategies that may help to verify that the observed effects are due specifically to cyclodextrin-induced changes in cellular cholesterol. PMID:17493580

  19. Cholesterol-lowering effect of rice bran protein containing bile acid-binding proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jilite; Shimada, Masaya; Kato, Yukina; Kusada, Mio; Nagaoka, Satoshi

    2015-01-01

    Dietary plant protein is well known to reduce serum cholesterol levels. Rice bran is a by-product of rice milling and is a good source of protein. The present study examined whether feeding rats a high-cholesterol diet containing 10% rice bran protein (RBP) for 10 d affected cholesterol metabolism. Rats fed dietary RBP had lower serum total cholesterol levels and increased excretion of fecal steroids, such as cholesterol and bile acids, than those fed dietary casein. In vitro assays showed that RBP strongly bound to taurocholate, and inhibited the micellar solubility of cholesterol, compared with casein. Moreover, the bile acid-binding proteins of the RBP were eluted by a chromatographic column conjugated with cholic acid, and one of them was identified as hypothetical protein OsJ_13801 (NCBI accession No. EAZ29742) using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry analysis. These results suggest that the hypocholesterolemic action of the RBP may be caused by the bile acid-binding proteins.

  20. Plasma cholesterol is related to menstrual status in adolescent girls with eating disorders and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Swenne, Ingemar

    2016-03-01

    This study examined the relationship between plasma cholesterol and circulating triiodothyronine and oestradiol in 561 adolescent girls aged 11-17 with eating disorders. Plasma total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, serum triodothyronine and oestradiol were measured at assessment, and historical weight data were obtained from growth charts provided by the school health services. Cholesterol levels were related to weight change, menstrual status and serum hormones. Plasma total cholesterol levels of >5.0 mmol/L were found in 38% of the 77 girls who were premenarcheal, 32% of the 199 with secondary amenorrhoea and 17% of those who were still menstruating. These cholesterol levels were inversely related to serum oestradiol and triiodothyronine concentrations, but not weight change, in amenorrhoic girls and were positively related to body mass index and inversely related to weight loss and serum triiodothyronine in girls who were still menstruating. Increased plasma total cholesterol was related to amenorrhoea in adolescent girls with eating disorders and weight loss. Oestrogens appeared to mediate the effect of starvation on cholesterol, most effectively in premenarcheal girls. Re-establishing menstruation is an important goal in the treatment of eating disorders, to avoid dyslipidaemia and the risk of future cardiovascular disease. ©2015 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Concordance of diet with the recommended cholesterol lowering diet in patients with coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Erkkilä, A T; Sarkkinen, E S; Koukkunen, H; Kemppainen, A; Lehto, S; Pyörälä, K; Uusitupa, M I

    1998-04-01

    The aim was to examine the concordance of diet with the recommended cholesterol lowering diet in Coronary Heart Disease (CHD) patients receiving usual care. CHD patients were selected for a survey from hospital records at least six months after hospitalization. Four patient groups divided according to the severity of disease were examined in cross-sectional setting. Food records and fatty acid composition of serum lipids were used to assess dietary intake. The study population consisted of 109 patients with coronary bypass grafting, 106 patients with balloon angioplasty, 101 patients with acute myocardial infarction and 99 patients with acute myocardial ischemia. Concordance of the diet with the cholesterol lowering diet was similar in the patient groups. One third of the patients achieved the recommended fat intake and only one fourth achieved the recommended saturated fat intake. Concordance was better in the patients who also used lipid lowering drugs, but previous myocardial infarction did not affect dietary intake of fat and saturated fat. Diabetic or obese patients tended to have a higher intake of saturated fat. Myristic acid in cholesterol esters, triglycerides and phospholipids and also palmitic and linoleic acids in triglycerides were markers of dietary saturated fat intake. Concordance of the diet with the recommended cholesterol lowering diet in CHD patients was moderate. Concordance was not affected by disease severity or previous myocardial infarction and was slightly worse in CHD patients who had diabetes or were obese or did not use lipid lowering drugs.

  2. Nonlinear lower hybrid modeling in tokamak plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Napoli, F.; Schettini, G.; Castaldo, C.; Cesario, R.

    2014-02-12

    We present here new results concerning the nonlinear mechanism underlying the observed spectral broadening produced by parametric instabilities occurring at the edge of tokamak plasmas in present day LHCD (lower hybrid current drive) experiments. Low frequency (LF) ion-sound evanescent modes (quasi-modes) are the main parametric decay channel which drives a nonlinear mode coupling of lower hybrid (LH) waves. The spectrum of the LF fluctuations is calculated here considering the beating of the launched LH wave at the radiofrequency (RF) operating line frequency (pump wave) with the noisy background of the RF power generator. This spectrum is calculated in the frame of the kinetic theory, following a perturbative approach. Numerical solutions of the nonlinear LH wave equation show the evolution of the nonlinear mode coupling in condition of a finite depletion of the pump power. The role of the presence of heavy ions in a Deuterium plasma in mitigating the nonlinear effects is analyzed.

  3. Kefir consumption does not alter plasma lipid levels or cholesterol fractional synthesis rates relative to milk in hyperlipidemic men: a randomized controlled trial [ISRCTN10820810

    PubMed Central

    St-Onge, Marie-Pierre; Farnworth, Edward R; Savard, Tony; Chabot, Denise; Mafu, Akier; Jones, Peter JH

    2002-01-01

    Background Fermented milk products have been shown to affect serum cholesterol concentrations in humans. Kefir, a fermented milk product, has been traditionally consumed for its potential health benefits but has to date not been studied for its hypocholesterolemic properties. Methods Thirteen healthy mildly hypercholesterolemic male subjects consumed a dairy supplement in randomized crossover trial for 2 periods of 4 wk each. Subjects were blinded to the dairy supplement consumed. Blood samples were collected at baseline and after 4 wk of supplementation for measurement of plasma total, low-density lipoprotein, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations, as well as fatty acid profile and cholesterol synthesis rate. Fecal samples were collected at baseline and after 2 and 4 wk of supplementation for determination of fecal short chain fatty acid level and bacterial content. Results Kefir had no effect on total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol or triglyceride concentrations nor on cholesterol fractional synthesis rates after 4 wk of supplementation. No significant change on plasma fatty acid levels was observed with diet. However, both kefir and milk increased (p < 0.05) fecal isobutyric, isovaleric and propionic acids as well as the total amount of fecal short chain fatty acids. Kefir supplementation resulted in increased fecal bacterial content in the majority of the subjects. Conclusions Since kefir consumption did not result in lowered plasma lipid concentrations, the results of this study do not support consumption of kefir as a cholesterol-lowering agent. PMID:11825344

  4. Lathosterol to cholesterol ratio in serum predicts cholesterol lowering response to plant sterol consumption in a dual center, randomized, single-blind placebo controlled trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Benefits of plant sterols (PS) for cholesterol lowering are compromised by large variability in efficacy across individuals. High fractional cholesterol synthesis measured by deuterium incorporation has been associated with non-response to PS consumption; however, prospective studies showing this as...

  5. Cholesterol-lowering drugs inhibit lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein-1 receptor function by membrane raft disruption.

    PubMed

    Matarazzo, Sara; Quitadamo, Maria Chiara; Mango, Ruggiero; Ciccone, Sarah; Novelli, Giuseppe; Biocca, Silvia

    2012-08-01

    Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1), the primary receptor for oxidized low-density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) in endothelial cells, is up-regulated in atherosclerotic lesions. Statins are the principal therapeutic agents for cardiovascular diseases and are known to down-regulate LOX-1 expression. Whether the effect on the LOX-1 receptor is related to statin-mediated cholesterol-lowering activity is unknown. We investigate the requirement of cholesterol for LOX-1-mediated lipid particle internalization, trafficking, and processing and the role of statins as inhibitors of LOX-1 function. Disruption of cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains by acute exposure of cells to methyl-β-cyclodextrin or chronic exposure to different statins (lovastatin and atorvastatin) led to a spatial disorganization of LOX-1 in plasma membranes and a marked loss of specific LOX-1 function in terms of ox-LDL binding and internalization. Subcellular fractionation and immunochemical studies indicate that LOX-1 is naturally present in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and, by cholesterol reduction, the amount of LOX-1 in this fraction is highly decreased (≥60%). In contrast, isoprenylation inhibition had no effect on the distribution and function of LOX-1 receptors. Furthermore, in primary cultures from atherosclerotic human aorta lesions, we confirm the presence of LOX-1 in caveolae-enriched lipid rafts and demonstrate that lovastatin treatment led to down-regulation of LOX-1 in lipid rafts and rescue of the ox-LDL-induced apoptotic phenotype. Taken together, our data reveal a previously unrecognized essential role of membrane cholesterol for LOX-1 receptor activity and suggest that statins protect vascular endothelium against the adverse effect of ox-LDL by disruption of membrane rafts and impairment of LOX-1 receptor function.

  6. Aronia melanocarpa (chokeberry) polyphenol-rich extract improves antioxidant function and reduces total plasma cholesterol in apolipoprotein E knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bohkyung; Ku, Chai Siah; Pham, Tho X; Park, Youngki; Martin, Derek A; Xie, Liyang; Taheri, Rod; Lee, Jiyoung; Bolling, Bradley W

    2013-05-01

    We hypothesized that a polyphenol-rich chokeberry extract (CBE) would modulate hepatic lipid metabolism and improve antioxidant function in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE(-/-)) mice. ApoE(-/-) mice were fed diets containing 15% fat with 0.2% cholesterol alone or supplemented with 0.005% or 0.05% CBE for 4 weeks. CBE polyphenol content was determined by the total phenols, 4-dimethylaminocinnamaldehyde, and ultra high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry methods. The 0.05% CBE diet provided mice with mean daily doses of 1.2 mg gallic acid equivalents of total phenols, 0.19 mg anthocyanins, 0.17 mg phenolic acids, 0.06 mg proanthocyanidins (as catechin-equivalents), and 0.02 mg flavonols. The 0.05% CBE group had 12% less plasma total cholesterol concentrations than the control. Despite the hypocholesterolemic effect of CBE, hepatic mRNA levels of low-density lipoprotein receptor, hydroxyl-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase and cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase in CBE-fed mice were not significantly different from controls. Dietary CBE did not alter hepatic lipid content or the hepatic expression of genes involved in lipogenesis and fatty acid β-oxidation such as fatty acid synthase, carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 and acyl-CoA oxidase. Plasma paraoxonase and catalase activities were significantly increased in mice fed 0.05% CBE. Both CBE diets increased hepatic glutathione peroxidase (GPx) activity but the 0.05% CBE group had 24% less proximal intestine GPx activity relative to controls. Thus, dietary CBE lowered total cholesterol and improved plasma and hepatic antioxidant function at nutritionally-relevant doses in apoE(-/-) mice. Furthermore, the CBE cholesterol-lowering mechanism in apoE(-/-) mice was independent of hepatic expression of genes involved in cholesterol metabolism.

  7. White button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus) lowers blood glucose and cholesterol levels in diabetic and hypercholesterolemic rats.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Sang Chul; Jeong, Yong Tae; Yang, Byung Keun; Islam, Rezuanul; Koyyalamudi, Sundar Rao; Pang, Gerald; Cho, Kai Yip; Song, Chi Hyun

    2010-01-01

    Agaricus bisporus (white button mushroom; WBM) contains high levels of dietary fibers and antioxidants including vitamin C, D, and B(12); folates; and polyphenols that may provide beneficial effects on cardiovascular and diabetic diseases. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that intake of the fruiting bodies of WBM regulates anticholesterolemic and antiglycemic responses in rats fed a hypercholesterolemic diet (0.5% cholesterol; 14% fat) and rats with type 2 diabetes induced by injection of streptozotocin (STZ) (50 mg/kg body weight), respectively. The STZ-induced diabetic male Sprague-Dawley rats fed the Agaricus bisporus powder (ABP; 200 mg/kg of body weight) for 3 weeks had significantly reduced plasma glucose and triglyceride (TG) concentrations (24.7% and 39.1%, respectively), liver enzyme activities, alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase (11.7% and 15.7%, respectively), and liver weight gain (P < .05). In hypercholesterolemic rats, oral feeding of ABP for 4 weeks resulted in a significant decrease in plasma total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) (22.8% and 33.1%, respectively) (P < .05). A similar significant decrease in hepatic cholesterol and TG concentrations was observed (36.2% and 20.8%, respectively) (P < .05). Decrease in TC, LDL, and TG concentrations was accompanied by a significant increase in plasma high-density lipoprotein concentrations. It was concluded that A bisporus mushroom had both hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity in rats.

  8. In vitro cholesterol-lowering properties of Lactobacillus plantarum AN6 isolated from aji-narezushi.

    PubMed

    Kuda, T; Yazaki, T; Ono, M; Takahashi, H; Kimura, B

    2013-09-01

    Aji-narezushi is a traditional lactic acid-fermented fish. In this study, we screened for lactose-utilizing, acidophilic, bile-resistant and cholesterol-lowering lactic acid bacteria (LAB) from aji-narezushi for use as starter strains for fermented foods, as well as for use as probiotics. Of the 301 LAB isolates, 277 fermented lactose, and among these, 171 grew in de Man, Rogosa and Sharpe broth adjusted to pH 3·5. Thirty-four of the isolates were grown in a broth containing 3% (w/v) bile. All of the isolates were lactobacilli. Seven isolates that demonstrated cholesterol-lowering activity in ethanolic solution were selected. All of the isolates were identified as Lactobacillus plantarum. Lactobacillus plantarum AN6 showed the highest cholesterol-lowering activity. AN6 was more resistant to acid, salt and bile than the type strain NBRC15891(T). One-half of the cholesterol-lowering effect remained after boiling AN6 for 10 min. The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) analysis indicated that the content of cell wall polysaccharides in AN6 is higher than ones in the type strain. These results indicate that Lact. plantarum AN6 can be used as a profitable starter organism and probiotic.

  9. Focus Group Assessment of Culturally Specific Cholesterol-Lowering Menus for Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, M.; Coyle, Y.; Kavanaugh, A.; Adams-Huet, B.; Lipsky, P.E.

    2004-01-01

    This study focus tested the acceptability of a set of six 1400 kcal and six 1800 kcal culturally appropriate cholesterol-lowering menus developed for low-income Mexican-Americans with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The focus group, made up of 11 low-income Mexican-American women without SLE, found the menus to be generally culturally valid,…

  10. Components characterization of total tetraploid jiaogulan (Gynostemma pentaphylla) saponin and its cholesterol-lowering properties

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study characterized chemical structures of tetraploid jiaogulan saponins, and investigated their cholesterol-lowering effects and mechanisms in hamsters fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Nine saponins, including five reported for the first time, were obtained from total jiaogulan saponins (TJS) and el...

  11. Fish oil reduces cholesterol and arachidonic acid levels in plasma and lipoproteins from hypercholesterolemic chicks.

    PubMed

    Castillo, M; Amalik, F; Linares, A; García-Peregrín, E

    2000-07-01

    The value of fish oil for prevention and/or treatment of human atherosclerosis has not been fully established. This study shows that replacement of saturated fat in young chick diet with menhaden oil produced a significant reversion of the hypercholesterolemia previously induced by coconut oil feeding. Fish oil also produced a clear decrease of plasma triacylglycerol levels. Coconut oil increased the percentages of 12:0 and 14:0 fatty acids, while menhaden oil increased those of 20:5 n-3 and 22:6 n-3. Percentages of 20:4 n-6, 18:2 n-6 and 18:1 n-9 significantly decreased by fish oil addition to the diet. Total cholesterol, phospholipid and protein contents of high and low density lipoproteins increased by coconut oil feeding. When coconut oil was replaced by menhaden oil, total cholesterol was significantly reduced in high, low and very low density lipoproteins. All chemical components of VLDL were decreased by menhaden oil feeding. Our results show a strong hypocholesterolemic effect of menhaden oil when this fat was supplemented to hypercholesterolemic chicks. The clear decrease found in arachidonic acid content of chick plasma and lipoproteins may contribute to the beneficial effects of fish oil consumption by lowering the production of its derived eicosanoids.

  12. Spreads enriched with three different levels of vegetable oil sterols and the degree of cholesterol lowering in normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Hendriks, H F; Weststrate, J A; van Vliet, T; Meijer, G W

    1999-04-01

    To investigate the dose-response relationship between cholesterol lowering and three different, relatively low intake levels of plant sterols (0.83, 1.61, 3.24 g/d) from spreads. To investigate the effects on lipid-soluble (pro)vitamins. A randomized double-blind placebo controlled balanced incomplete Latin square design using five spreads and four periods. The five study spreads included butter, a commercially available spread and three experimental spreads fortified with three different concentrations of plant sterols. One hundred apparently healthy normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic volunteers participated. Each subject consumed four spreads, each for a period of 3.5 week. Compared to the control spread, total cholesterol decreased by 0.26 (CI: 0.15-0.36), 0.31 (CI: 0.20-0.41) and 0.35 (CI: 0.25-0.46) mmol/L, for daily consumption of 0.83, 1.61 and 3.24 g plant sterols, respectively. For LDL-cholesterol these decreases were 0.20 (CI: 0.10-0.31), 0.26 (CI: 0.15-0.36) and 0.30 (CI: 0.20-0.41). Decreases in the LDL/HDL ratio were 0.13 (CI: 0.04-0.22), 0.16 (CI: 0.07-0.24) and 0.16 (CI: 0.07-0.24) units, respectively. Differences in cholesterol reductions between the plant sterol doses consumed were not statistically significant. Plasma vitamin K1 and 25-OH-vitamin D and lipid standardized plasma lycopene and alpha-tocopherol were not affected by consumption of plant sterol enriched spreads, but lipid standardized plasma (alpha + beta)-carotene concentrations were decreased by about 11 and 19% by daily consumption of 0.83 and 3.24 g plant sterols in spread, respectively. The three relatively low dosages of plant sterols had a significant cholesterol lowering effect ranging from 4.9-6.8%, 6.7-9.9% and 6.5-7.9%, for total, LDL-cholesterol and the LDL/HDL cholesterol ratio, respectively, without substantially affecting lipid soluble (pro)vitamins. No significant differences in cholesterol lowering effect between the three dosages of plant sterols

  13. Lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are associated with Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xuemei; Chen, Honglei; Miller, William C; Mailman, Richard B; Woodard, Jennifer L; Chen, Peter C; Xiang, Dong; Murrow, Richard W; Wang, Yi-Zhe; Poole, Charles

    2007-02-15

    The apolipoprotein E (APOE) epsilon2 allele has been associated with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). We tested the hypothesis that lower LDL-C may be associated with PD. This case-control study used fasting lipid profiles obtained from 124 PD cases and 112 controls. The PD cases were recruited from consecutive cases presenting at our tertiary Movement Disorder Clinic, and the controls were recruited from the spouse populations of the same clinic. Multivariate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated from unconditional logistic regressions, adjusting for age, gender, smoking status, and use of cholesterol-lowering agents. Lower LDL-C concentrations were associated with a higher occurrence of PD. Compared with participants with the highest LDL-C (> or =138 mg/dL), the OR was 2.2 (95% CI = 0.9-5.1) for participants with LDL-C of 115 to 137, 3.5 (95% CI = 1.6-8.1) for LDL-C of 93 to 114, and 2.6 (95% CI = 1.1-5.9) for LDL-C of < or = 92. Interestingly, use of either cholesterol-lowering drugs, or statins alone, was related to lower PD occurrence. Thus, our data provide preliminary evidence that low LDL-C may be associated with higher occurrence of PD, and/or that statin use may lower PD occurrence, either of which finding warrants further investigation.

  14. Cholesterol lowering and mortality: the importance of considering initial level of risk.

    PubMed Central

    Smith, G D; Song, F; Sheldon, T A

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To investigate the level of risk of death from coronary heart disease above which cholesterol lowering treatment produces net benefits. DESIGN--Meta-analysis of results of randomised controlled trials of cholesterol lowering treatments. METHODS--Published and unpublished data from all identified randomised controlled trials of cholesterol lowering treatments with six months or more follow up and with at least one death were included in the meta-analysis. The analyses were stratified by the rate of death from coronary heart disease in the control arms of the trials. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Death from all causes, from coronary heart disease, and from causes other than coronary heart disease. RESULTS--In the pooled analysis, net benefit in terms of total mortality from cholesterol lowering was seen only for trials including patients at very high initial risk of coronary heart disease (odds ratio 0.74; 95% confidence interval 0.60 to 0.92). In a medium risk group no net effect was seen, and in the low risk group there were adverse treatment effects (1.22; 1.06 to 1.42). In a weighted regression analysis a significant (p < 0.001) trend of increasing benefit with increasing initial risk of coronary heart disease was shown. Raised mortality from causes other than coronary heart disease was seen in trials of drug treatment (1.21; 1.05 to 1.39) but not in the trials of non-drug treatments (1.02; 0.88 to 1.19). Cumulative meta-analysis showed that these results seem to have been stable as new trials appeared. CONCLUSION--Currently evaluated cholesterol lowering drugs seem to produce mortality benefits in only a small proportion of patients at very high risk of death from coronary heart disease. Population cholesterol screening could waste resources and even result in net harm in substantial groups of patients. Overall risk of coronary heart disease should be the main focus of clinical guidelines, and a cautious approach to the use of cholesterol lowering drugs

  15. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering in the prevention of CHD: how low should we go?

    PubMed

    Isley, William L

    2006-08-01

    The past 12 years have seen the publication of numerous randomized placebo-controlled studies using statins to lower low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC) to assess the efficacy of cholesterol lowering on cardiovascular events. Initial studies predominantly evaluated mortality or nonfatal myocardial infarctions and coronary heart disease (CHD) death in patients with known or presumed established coronary disease and moderately elevated to very elevated serum cholesterol concentrations. Subsequent investigations studied a broader spectrum of cardiovascular events as a composite primary end point in both primary and secondary prevention strategies in subjects with lower mean entry serum LDLC concentrations. These studies have generally shown a reduction in a composite end point of cardiovascular events, although not necessarily the more restricted end points used in previous studies. Although the LDLC mantra "lower is better" has been popularized in advertising and continuing medical education and suggested as an option in "very high risk" patients by the National Cholesterol Education Program Adult Treatment Panel, the precise target level for LDLC for optimal treatment has not been rigorously defined. Serum LDLC less than 100 mg/dL seems reasonable for patients with known atherosclerosis or at high risk for atherosclerosis (diabetes or presence of multiple risk factors). Serum LDLC less than 70 mg/dL may be a reasonable goal in the setting of acute coronary syndromes, but there are many problems with the data on which this recommendation is made. Furthermore, many advocates of "lower is better" seem oblivious to the potential downsides of more aggressive lipid-lowering therapy. The LDLC target in lower risk primary prevention is less clear. What is obvious is that moderate-dose statin therapy can lower CHD risk in primary prevention and secondary prevention with minimal side effects, and with the imminent availability of several generic statins, with great

  16. Flaxseed dietary fibers lower cholesterol and increase fecal fat excretion, but magnitude of effect depend on food type

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Dietary fibers have been proposed to play a role in cardiovascular risk as well as body weight management. Flaxseeds are a good source of dietary fibers, and a large proportion of these are water-soluble viscous fibers. Method Here, we examine the effect of flaxseed dietary fibers in different food matrices on blood lipids and fecal excretion of fat and energy in a double-blind randomized crossover study with 17 subjects. Three different 7-d diets were tested: a low-fiber control diet (Control), a diet with flaxseed fiber drink (3/day) (Flax drink), and a diet with flaxseed fiber bread (3/day) (Flax bread). Total fat and energy excretion was measured in feces, blood samples were collected before and after each period, and appetite sensation registered 3 times daily before main meals. Results Compared to control, Flax drink lowered fasting total-cholesterol and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15%, respectively, (p < 0.01), whereas Flax bread only produced a reduction of 7 and 9%, respectively (p < 0.05). Fecal fat and energy excretion increased by 50 and 23% with Flax drink consumption compared to control (p < 0.05), but only fecal fat excretion was increased with Flax bread compared to control (p < 0.05). Conclusion Both Flax drink and Flax bread resulted in decreased plasma total and LDL-cholesterol and increased fat excretion, but the food matrix and/or processing may be of importance. Viscous flaxseed dietary fibers may be a useful tool for lowering blood cholesterol and potentially play a role in energy balance. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT00953004 PMID:22305169

  17. Recurring exon deletions in the haptoglobin (HP) gene associate with lower blood cholesterol levels

    PubMed Central

    Boettger, Linda M.; Salem, Rany M.; Handsaker, Robert E.; Peloso, Gina; Kathiresan, Sekar; Hirschhorn, Joel; McCarroll, Steven A.

    2016-01-01

    Two exons of the human haptoglobin (HP) gene exhibit copy number variation that affects HP multimerization and underlies one of the first protein polymorphisms identified in humans. The evolutionary origins and medical significance of this polymorphism have been uncertain. Here we show that this variation has likely arisen from the recurring reversion of an ancient hominin-specific duplication of these exons. Though this polymorphism has been largely invisible to genome-wide genetic studies to date, we describe a way to analyze it by imputation from SNP haplotypes and find among 22,288 individuals that these HP exonic deletions associate with reduced LDL and total cholesterol levels. We show that these deletions, and a SNP that affects HP expression, are the likely drivers of the strong but complex association of cholesterol levels to SNPs near HP. Recurring exonic deletions in the haptoglobin gene likely enhance human health by lowering cholesterol levels in the blood. PMID:26901066

  18. Association between cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers and effects of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin among patients with high risk of coronary heart disease.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing; Ma, Changsheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Miao; Lv, Qiang; Sun, Jiayi; Liu, Jun; Li, Yan; Zhao, Dong

    2013-11-01

    No indices are currently available to facilitate clinicians to identify patients who need either statin monotherapy or statin-ezetimibe combined treatment. We aimed to investigate whether cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers can predict the cholesterol-lowering response to statin. Total 306 statin-naïve patients with high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) were treated with atorvastatin 20 mg/day for 1 month. Cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were measured before and after treatment. Atorvastatin decreased LDL-C by 36.8% (range: decrease of 74.5% to increase of 31.9%). Baseline cholesterol synthesis marker lathosterol and cholesterol absorption marker campesterol codetermined the effect of atorvastatin treatment. The effect of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin was significantly associated with baseline lathosterol levels but modified bidirectionally by baseline campesterol levels. In patients with the highest baseline campesterol levels, atorvastatin treatment decreased cholesterol absorption by 46.1%, which enhanced the effect of LDL-C lowering. Atorvastatin treatment increased cholesterol absorption by 52.3% in those with the lowest baseline campesterol levels, which attenuated the effect of LDL-C reduction. Especially those with the highest lathosterol but the lowest campesterol levels at baseline had significantly less LDL-C reduction than those with the same baseline lathosterol levels but the highest campesterol levels (27.3% versus 42.4%, P = 0.002). These results suggest that combined patterns of cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers, rather than each single marker, are potential predictors of the LDL-C-lowering effects of atorvastatin in high-risk CHD patients.

  19. Association between cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers and effects of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin among patients with high risk of coronary heart disease[S

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Yue; Liu, Jing; Ma, Changsheng; Wang, Wei; Liu, Xiaohui; Wang, Miao; Lv, Qiang; Sun, Jiayi; Liu, Jun; Li, Yan; Zhao, Dong

    2013-01-01

    No indices are currently available to facilitate clinicians to identify patients who need either statin monotherapy or statin-ezetimibe combined treatment. We aimed to investigate whether cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers can predict the cholesterol-lowering response to statin. Total 306 statin-naïve patients with high risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) were treated with atorvastatin 20 mg/day for 1 month. Cholesterol synthesis and absorption markers and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were measured before and after treatment. Atorvastatin decreased LDL-C by 36.8% (range: decrease of 74.5% to increase of 31.9%). Baseline cholesterol synthesis marker lathosterol and cholesterol absorption marker campesterol codetermined the effect of atorvastatin treatment. The effect of cholesterol lowering by atorvastatin was significantly associated with baseline lathosterol levels but modified bidirectionally by baseline campesterol levels. In patients with the highest baseline campesterol levels, atorvastatin treatment decreased cholesterol absorption by 46.1%, which enhanced the effect of LDL-C lowering. Atorvastatin treatment increased cholesterol absorption by 52.3% in those with the lowest baseline campesterol levels, which attenuated the effect of LDL-C reduction. Especially those with the highest lathosterol but the lowest campesterol levels at baseline had significantly less LDL-C reduction than those with the same baseline lathosterol levels but the highest campesterol levels (27.3% versus 42.4%, P = 0.002). These results suggest that combined patterns of cholesterol synthesis/absorption markers, rather than each single marker, are potential predictors of the LDL-C-lowering effects of atorvastatin in high-risk CHD patients. PMID:23964121

  20. Investigation on the lipid- and cholesterol-lowering abilities of biocellulose.

    PubMed

    Chau, Chi-Fai; Yang, Pat; Yu, Chao-Ming; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2008-03-26

    The present study investigated and compared the physicochemical properties as well as the hypolipidemic and hypocholesterolemic effects between plant cellulose and biocellulose. Biocellulose had higher water-holding and cation-exchange capacities than plant cellulose ( approximately 2- and 6-fold, respectively). The results showed that the administration of plant cellulose and biocellulose to hamsters effectively ( P < 0.05) decreased the concentrations of serum triglyceride (by 13.9-55.5%), serum total cholesterol (by 17.4-27.9%), serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (by 41.9-47.9%), liver total lipids (by 6.4-10.3%), and liver cholesterol (by 11.8-16.3%). Feeding plant cellulose and biocellulose also enhanced the excretion of total lipids (144-182%), cholesterol (136-203%), and bile acids (259-479%) in feces. The efficacy of biocellulose in lowering serum lipids and cholesterol in hamsters was significantly higher than that of plant cellulose. These results suggested that biocellulose could be a promising low-calorie bulking ingredient for the development of novel fiber-rich functional foods of different forms such as powder, gelatinous, or shred forms.

  1. Cholesterol transport from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes is inhibited by 3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one.

    PubMed

    Härmälä, A S; Pörn, M I; Mattjus, P; Slotte, J P

    1994-03-24

    The compound U1866A (3 beta-[2-(diethylamino)ethoxy]androst-5-en-17-one) has been shown to inhibit the cellular transfer of low-density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol from lysosomes to plasma membranes (Liscum and Faust (1989) J. Biol. Chem. 264, 11796-806). We have in this study examined the effects of U18666A on cholesterol translocation from plasma membranes to intracellular membranes. Translocation of plasma membrane cholesterol was induced by degradation of plasma membrane sphingomyelin. The sphingomyelinase-induced activation of the acyl-CoA cholesterol acyl transferase (ACAT) reaction was completely inhibited in a dose-dependent manner by U18666A, both in cultured human skin fibroblasts and baby hamster kidney cells. Half-maximal inhibition (within 60 min) was obtained with 0.5-1 microgram/ml of U18666A. A time-course study indicated that the onset of inhibition was rapid (within 10-15 min), and reversible if U18666A was removed from the incubation mixture. Using a cholesterol oxidase assay, we observed that the extent of plasma membrane cholesterol translocation in sphingomyelinase-treated HSF cells was significantly lowered in the presence of U18666A (at 3 micrograms/ml). The effect of U18666A on cholesterol translocation was also fully reversible when the drug was withdrawn. In mouse Leydig tumor cells, labeled to constant specific activity with [3H]cholesterol, the compound U18666A inhibited in a dose-dependent manner the cyclic AMP-stimulated secretion of [3H]steroid hormones. The effects seen with compound U18666A appeared to be specific for this molecule, since another hydrophobic amine, imipramine, did not in our experiments affect cholesterol translocation or ACAT activation. Since different cell types display sensitivity to U18666A in various intracellular cholesterol transfer processes, they appear to have a common U18666A-sensitive regulatory mechanism.

  2. Antidiabetogenic effects of chromium mitigate hyperinsulinemia-induced cellular insulin resistance via correction of plasma membrane cholesterol imbalance.

    PubMed

    Horvath, Emily M; Tackett, Lixuan; McCarthy, Alicia M; Raman, Priya; Brozinick, Joseph T; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S

    2008-04-01

    Previously, we found that a loss of plasma membrane (PM) phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-regulated filamentous actin (F-actin) structure contributes to insulin-induced insulin resistance. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that chromium picolinate (CrPic), a dietary supplement thought to improve glycemic status in insulin-resistant individuals, augments insulin-regulated glucose transport in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes by lowering PM cholesterol. Here, to gain mechanistic understanding of these separate observations, we tested the prediction that CrPic would protect against insulin-induced insulin resistance by improving PM features important in cytoskeletal structure and insulin sensitivity. We found that insulin-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes display elevated PM cholesterol with a reciprocal decrease in PM PIP2. This lipid imbalance and insulin resistance was corrected by the cholesterol-lowering action of CrPic. The PM lipid imbalance did not impair insulin signaling, nor did CrPic amplify insulin signal transduction. In contrast, PM analyses corroborated cholesterol and PIP2 interactions influencing cytoskeletal structure. Because extensive in vitro study documents an essential role for cytoskeletal capacity in insulin-regulated glucose transport, we next evaluated intact skeletal muscle from obese, insulin-resistant Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Because insulin resistance in these animals likely involves multiple mechanisms, findings that cholesterol-lowering restored F-actin cytoskeletal structure and insulin sensitivity to that witnessed in lean control muscle were striking. Also, experiments using methyl-beta-cyclodextrin to shuttle cholesterol into or out of membranes respectively recapitulated the insulin-induced insulin-resistance and protective effects of CrPic on membrane/cytoskeletal interactions and insulin sensitivity. These data predict a PM cholesterol basis for hyperinsulinemia-associated insulin resistance and importantly

  3. Antidiabetogenic Effects of Chromium Mitigate Hyperinsulinemia-Induced Cellular Insulin Resistance via Correction of Plasma Membrane Cholesterol Imbalance

    PubMed Central

    Horvath, Emily M.; Tackett, Lixuan; McCarthy, Alicia M.; Raman, Priya; Brozinick, Joseph T.; Elmendorf, Jeffrey S.

    2008-01-01

    Previously, we found that a loss of plasma membrane (PM) phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2)-regulated filamentous actin (F-actin) structure contributes to insulin-induced insulin resistance. Interestingly, we also demonstrated that chromium picolinate (CrPic), a dietary supplement thought to improve glycemic status in insulin-resistant individuals, augments insulin-regulated glucose transport in insulin-sensitive 3T3-L1 adipocytes by lowering PM cholesterol. Here, to gain mechanistic understanding of these separate observations, we tested the prediction that CrPic would protect against insulin-induced insulin resistance by improving PM features important in cytoskeletal structure and insulin sensitivity. We found that insulin-induced insulin-resistant adipocytes display elevated PM cholesterol with a reciprocal decrease in PM PIP2. This lipid imbalance and insulin resistance was corrected by the cholesterol-lowering action of CrPic. The PM lipid imbalance did not impair insulin signaling, nor did CrPic amplify insulin signal transduction. In contrast, PM analyses corroborated cholesterol and PIP2 interactions influencing cytoskeletal structure. Because extensive in vitro study documents an essential role for cytoskeletal capacity in insulin-regulated glucose transport, we next evaluated intact skeletal muscle from obese, insulin-resistant Zucker (fa/fa) rats. Because insulin resistance in these animals likely involves multiple mechanisms, findings that cholesterol-lowering restored F-actin cytoskeletal structure and insulin sensitivity to that witnessed in lean control muscle were striking. Also, experiments using methyl-β-cyclodextrin to shuttle cholesterol into or out of membranes respectively recapitulated the insulin-induced insulin-resistance and protective effects of CrPic on membrane/cytoskeletal interactions and insulin sensitivity. These data predict a PM cholesterol basis for hyperinsulinemia-associated insulin resistance and importantly

  4. Activation of the Liver X Receptor Stimulates Trans-intestinal Excretion of Plasma Cholesterol*

    PubMed Central

    van der Veen, Jelske N.; van Dijk, Theo H.; Vrins, Carlos L. J.; van Meer, Hester; Havinga, Rick; Bijsterveld, Klaas; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Groen, Albert K.; Kuipers, Folkert

    2009-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that direct intestinal secretion of plasma cholesterol significantly contributes to fecal neutral sterol loss in mice. The physiological relevance of this novel route, which represents a part of the reverse cholesterol transport pathway, has not been directly established in vivo as yet. We have developed a method to quantify the fractional and absolute contributions of several cholesterol fluxes to total fecal neutral sterol loss in vivo in mice, by assessing the kinetics of orally and intravenously administered stable isotopically labeled cholesterol combined with an isotopic approach to assess the fate of de novo synthesized cholesterol. Our results show that trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion significantly contributes to removal of blood-derived free cholesterol in C57Bl6/J mice (33% of 231 μmol/kg/day) and that pharmacological activation of LXR with T0901317 strongly stimulates this pathway (63% of 706 μmol/kg/day). Trans-intestinal cholesterol excretion is impaired in mice lacking Abcg5 (−4%), suggesting that the cholesterol transporting Abcg5/Abcg8 heterodimer is involved in this pathway. Our data demonstrate that intestinal excretion represents a quantitatively important route for fecal removal of neutral sterols independent of biliary secretion in mice. This pathway is sensitive to pharmacological activation of the LXR system. These data support the concept that the intestine substantially contributes to reverse cholesterol transport. PMID:19416968

  5. Hepatic and extrahepatic uptake of HDL-derived plasma cholesterol in exercised and sedentary rats

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanathan, S.; Green, M.H.; Kris-Etherton, P.M.

    1986-03-01

    The present investigation was designed to study high density lipoprotein (HDL)-derived plasma cholesterol (C) turnover in hepatic and extrahepatic tissues of sedentary (S) and exercised (E) rats. 4-week-old Long Evans rats were exercised for 1 hr, 6 days weekly, for a period of 38 weeks, on a motor-driven treadmill at 0.8 mph at a 12% grade. Animals were injected with HDL that was labelled in vitro with /sup 3/H-cholesteryl ester. Serial blood samples and tissues were collected. HDL-C concentration was lower in E vs S rats (23.0 +/- 1.2 and 26.6 +/- 1.9 mg/dl, p < 0.01). While total plasma C was not different, liver C was higher in S vs E rats (8.2 +/- 0.8 and 7.2 +/- 0.5 mg/g). Adrenal C was higher in E vs S rats (29.5 +/- 2.3 and 20.7 +/- 2.3 mg/g, p < 0.01). Multicompartmental analysis of plasma and tissue tracer response led to development of an 8-component model (5 physiological; 3 nonphysiological) that depicted HDL-derived plasma C turnover. Plasma fraction of tracer declined more rapidly in E vs S rats. E rats cleared nonphysiological tracer more rapidly than S rats, but delayed release of tracer into the plasma longer. Fractional rate of tracer uptake into adrenals, liver, testes, and carcass was greater in E rats. There was a greater fractional turnover rate of tracer in adrenals and liver in S vs E rats. Hence HDL-derived plasma C turnover is altered with vigorous exercise.

  6. Chlorogenic acid exhibits cholesterol lowering and fatty liver attenuating properties by up-regulating the gene expression of PPAR-α in hypercholesterolemic rats induced with a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Wan, Chun-Wai; Wong, Candy Ngai-Yan; Pin, Wing-Kwan; Wong, Marcus Ho-Yin; Kwok, Ching-Yee; Chan, Robbie Yat-Kan; Yu, Peter Hoi-Fu; Chan, Shun-Wan

    2013-04-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for the development of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. Natural compounds have been proved to be useful in lowering serum cholesterol to slow down the progression of cardiovascular disease and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. In the present study, the hypocholesterolemic and hepatoprotective effects of the dietary consumption of chlorogenic acid were investigated by monitoring plasma lipid profile (total cholesterol, triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein and low-density lipoprotein) in Sprague-Dawley rats fed with a normal diet, a high-cholesterol diet or a high-cholesterol diet supplemented with chlorogenic acid (1 or 10 mg/kg/day p.o.) for 28 days. Chlorogenic acid markedly altered the increased plasma total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein but decreased high-density lipoprotein induced by a hypercholesterolemic diet with a dose-dependent improvement on both atherogenic index and cardiac risk factor. Lipid depositions in liver were attenuated significantly in hypercholesterolemic animals supplemented with chlorogenic acid. It is postulated that hypocholesterolemic effect is the primary beneficial effect given by chlorogenic acid, which leads to other secondary beneficial effects such as atheroscleroprotective, cardioprotective and hepatoprotective functions. The hypocholesterolemic functions of chlorogenic acid are probably due to the increase in fatty acids unitization in liver via the up-regulation of peroxisome proliferation-activated receptor α mRNA.

  7. Low and moderate-fat plant sterol fortified soymilk in modulation of plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics in subjects with normal to high cholesterol concentrations: report on two randomized crossover studies

    PubMed Central

    Rideout, Todd C; Chan, Yen-Ming; Harding, Scott V; Jones, Peter JH

    2009-01-01

    Background Although consumption of various plant sterol (PS)-enriched beverages is effective in lowering plasma cholesterol, the lipid-lowering potential of PS in a soymilk format has not been investigated thoroughly. Therefore, to evaluate the efficacy of PS-enriched soy beverages on plasma lipids and cholesterol kinetics, we conducted two separate 28 d dietary controlled cross-over studies. In study 1, the cholesterol-lowering efficacy of a low-fat (2 g/serving) PS enriched soy beverage was examined in 33 normal cholesterolemic subjects in comparison with 1% dairy milk. In study 2, we investigated the efficacy of a moderate-fat (3.5 g/serving) PS-enriched soy beverage on plasma cholesterol concentrations and cholesterol kinetic responses in 23 hypercholesterolemic subjects compared with 1% dairy milk. Both the low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk varieties provided 1.95 g PS/d. Endpoint plasma variables were analyzed by repeated-measures ANOVA using baseline values as covariates for plasma lipid measurements. Results In comparison with the 1% dairy milk control, the low-fat soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) total and LDL-cholesterol by 10 and 13%, respectively. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverage reduced (P < 0.05) plasma total and LDL-cholesterol by 12 and 15% respectively. Fasting triglycerides were reduced by 9.4% following consumption of the moderate-fat soy beverage in comparison with the 1% dairy milk. Both low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy varieties reduced (P < 0.05) LDL:HDL and TC:HDL ratios compared with the 1% dairy milk control. Consumption of the moderate-fat PS-enriched soymilk reduced (P < 0.05) cholesterol absorption by 27%, but did not alter cholesterol synthesis in comparison with 1% dairy milk. Conclusion We conclude that, compared to 1% dairy milk, consumption of low and moderate-fat PS-enriched soy beverages represents an effective dietary strategy to reduce circulating lipid concentrations in normal to

  8. All cholesterol-lowering interventions are expected to reduce stroke: Confirmatory data from IMPROVE-IT

    PubMed Central

    De Caterina, Raffaele; Salvatore, Tanya; Marchioli, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    The relationship of cholesterol with stroke is much less clear than its relationship with myocardial infarction, thus confounding the interpretation of results with cholesterol-lowering trials (Di Napoli et al., 2002) [1], (De Caterina et al., 2010) [2]). IMPROVE-IT data ((Cannon et al. 2015) [3]), showing a 13.3% reduction in total cholesterol at one year in association with a hazard ratio (HR) of 0.i86 for total stroke during the trial, are very closely aligned with the relative risk of 0.90 predicted based on the totality of lipid lowering interventions ((De Caterina et al., 2016) [4]). We here provide the data from the original trials used to construct this meta-analysis, with the now added additional data from IMPROVE-IT, well-fitting the previously found meta-regression line. These data are important to predict stroke outcomes in currently ongoing trials now testing PCSK9 or cholesterol ester transfer protein inhibitors. PMID:27222850

  9. Carob pulp preparation rich in insoluble fibre lowers total and LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic patients.

    PubMed

    Zunft, H J F; Lüder, W; Harde, A; Haber, B; Graubaum, H J; Koebnick, C; Grünwald, J

    2003-10-01

    Recently, insoluble fibre from carob pulp has been found to affect blood lipids in animals in a similar manner as soluble dietary fibre. To investigate whether a carob pulp preparation containing high amounts of insoluble fibre has a beneficial effect on serum cholesterol in humans. Volunteers (n = 58) with hypercholesterolemia were recruited to participate in a randomised, double- blind, placebo-controlled and parallel arm clinical study with a 6 week intervention phase. All participants consumed daily both, bread (two servings) and a fruitbar (one serving) either with (n = 29) or without (n = 29) a total amount of 15 g/d of a carob pulp preparation (carob fibre). Serum concentrations of total, LDL and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and after week 4 and 6. The consumption of carob fibre reduced LDL cholesterol by 10.5 +/- 2.2% (p = 0.010). The LDL:HDL cholesterol ratio was marginally decreased by 7.9 +/- 2.2 % in the carob fibre group compared to the placebo group (p = 0.058). Carob fibre consumption also lowered triglycerides in females by 11.3 +/- 4.5% (p = 0.030). Lipid lowering effects were more pronounced in females than in males. Daily consumption of food products enriched with carob fibre shows beneficial effects on human blood lipid profile and may be effective in prevention and treatment of hypercholesterolemia.

  10. Nonesterified phytosterols dissolved and recrystallized in oil reduce plasma cholesterol in gerbils and humans.

    PubMed

    Hayes, K C; Pronczuk, A; Perlman, D

    2004-06-01

    When free phytosterols are adequately heated and then cooled in fat, they recrystallize and are rendered bioavailable for blocking cholesterol absorption. To extend the application of phytosterols to fried foods, the activity of these modified crystals was assessed in 2 experiments with 26 male gerbils fed purified diets containing 0.15 g/100 g cholesterol with or without 0.75 g/100 g free phytosterols. The heat-modified soybean sterols were added directly to the diet (Expt. 1) or as phytosterol-enriched potato chips (Expt. 2). In the gerbil experiments, only the diet containing phytosterols significantly reduced plasma cholesterol (35-48%) and the total cholesterol/HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) ratio (40%), as well as hepatic cholesterol esters (80%). In a subsequent human study, subjects (n = 7) consumed two 28-g servings of tortilla chips fried in oil with or without phytosterols that provided 0 or 1.5 g/d for 4-wk periods in a crossover design (Expt. 3). During consumption of the phytosterol-enriched chips, significant reductions in plasma cholesterol (10%) and LDL cholesterol (15%) were achieved without affecting HDL-C. This novel means of delivering free phytosterols proved to be both functionally efficient and effective.

  11. Effect of dietary fiber on egg yolk, liver, and plasma cholesterol concentrations of the laying hen.

    PubMed

    McNaughton, J L

    1978-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to determine the effect of dietary fiber source and level on egg yolk, liver, and plasma cholesterol concentrations of White Leghorn laying hens. Initially, dietary fiber levels of 2.05, 4.41, 6.68, and 8.79% furnished mainly by sunflower meal were fed to laying hens for 140 days. In the second experiment, alfalfa meal, ground whole oats, sunflower meal, rice mill feed, or wood shavings was added to a corn-soybean meal basal diet to furnish 2.00% added crude fiber and fed to laying hens for 84 days. Yolk cholesterol decreased 4.39, 10.38, and 13.29% by feeding crude dietary fiber levels of 4.41, 6.68, and 8.79%, respectively, to hens as compared to a corn-soybean meal basal diet containing 2.05% crude fiber. Egg yolk cholesterol was significantly decreased by feeding alfalfa meal, oats, sunflower meal, rice mill feed, or wood shavings to laying hens when compared to yolk cholesterol of hens fed the basal diet. The greatest reduction in egg yolk cholesterol was found by feeding either oats or wood shavings. No significant differences were found in plasma cholesterol due to dietary fiber level. Plasma triglycerides decreased and liver cholesterol increased as dietary fiber level increased in diets fed to laying hens. When laying hens were fed alfalfa meal, oats, rice mill feed, or wood shavings, plasma cholesterol significantly decreased. Liver cholesterol increased when hens were fed either alfalfa meal or rice mill feed as the primary fiber source.

  12. Effect of Synthetic Truncated Apolipoprotein C-I Peptide on Plasma Lipoprotein Cholesterol in Nonhuman Primates

    PubMed Central

    Kushwaha, Rampratap S.

    2004-01-01

    The present studies were conducted to determine whether a synthetic truncated apoC-I peptide that inhibits CETP activity in baboons would raise plasma HDL cholesterol levels in nonhuman primates with low HDL levels. We used 2 cynomolgus monkeys and 3 baboons fed a cholesterol- and fat-enriched diet. In cynomolgus monkeys, we injected synthetic truncated apoC-I inhibitor peptide at a dose of 20 mg/kg and, in baboons, at doses of 10, 15, and 20 mg/kg at weekly intervals. Blood samples were collected 3 times a week and VLDL + LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations were measured. In cynomolgus monkeys, administration of the inhibitor peptide caused a rapid decrease in VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations (30%–60%) and an increase in HDL cholesterol concentrations (10%–20%). VLDL + LDL cholesterol concentrations returned to baseline levels in approximately 15 days. In baboons, administration of the synthetic inhibitor peptide caused a decrease in VLDL + LDL cholesterol (20%–60%) and an increase in HDL cholesterol (10%–20%). VLDL + LDL cholesterol returned to baseline levels by day 21, whereas HDL cholesterol concentrations remained elevated for up to 26 days. ApoA-I concentrations increased, whereas apoE and triglyceride concentrations decreased. Subcutaneous and intravenous administrations of the inhibitor peptide had similar effects on LDL and HDL cholesterol concentrations. There was no change in body weight, food consumption, or plasma IgG levels of any baboon during the study. These studies suggest that the truncated apoC-I peptide can be used to raise HDL in humans. PMID:15467157

  13. Clustering and internalization of toxic amylin oligomers in pancreatic cells require plasma membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Trikha, Saurabh; Jeremic, Aleksandar M

    2011-10-14

    Self-assembly of the human pancreatic hormone amylin into toxic oligomers and aggregates is linked to dysfunction of islet β-cells and pathogenesis of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Recent evidence suggests that cholesterol, an essential component of eukaryotic cells membranes, controls amylin aggregation on model membranes. However, the pathophysiological consequence of cholesterol-regulated amylin polymerization on membranes and biochemical mechanisms that protect β-cells from amylin toxicity are poorly understood. Here, we report that plasma membrane (PM) cholesterol plays a key role in molecular recognition, sorting, and internalization of toxic amylin oligomers but not monomers in pancreatic rat insulinoma and human islet cells. Depletion of PM cholesterol or the disruption of the cytoskeleton network inhibits internalization of amylin oligomers, which in turn enhances extracellular oligomer accumulation and potentiates amylin toxicity. Confocal microscopy reveals an increased nucleation of amylin oligomers across the plasma membrane in cholesterol-depleted cells, with a 2-fold increase in cell surface coverage and a 3-fold increase in their number on the PM. Biochemical studies confirm accumulation of amylin oligomers in the medium after depletion of PM cholesterol. Replenishment of PM cholesterol from intracellular cholesterol stores or by the addition of water-soluble cholesterol restores amylin oligomer clustering at the PM and internalization, which consequently diminishes cell surface coverage and toxicity of amylin oligomers. In contrast to oligomers, amylin monomers followed clathrin-dependent endocytosis, which is not sensitive to cholesterol depletion. Our studies identify an actin-mediated and cholesterol-dependent mechanism for selective uptake and clearance of amylin oligomers, impairment of which greatly potentiates amylin toxicity.

  14. Cholesteryl ester transfer activity in hamster plasma: increase by fat and cholesterol rich diets.

    PubMed

    Stein, Y; Dabach, Y; Hollander, G; Stein, O

    1990-01-16

    We investigated the presence of cholesteryl ester transfer activity (CETA) in plasma of hamsters kept on various dietary regimens. In hamsters kept on a regular diet, CETA activity was about 5 units/4 mg protein of d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction of plasma, as compared to about 35 units present in human d greater than 1.21 g/ml fraction. Addition of 15% margarine or butter alone or together with 2% cholesterol resulted in a 2-3-fold increase in plasma CETA. The increase in plasma CETA was correlated with plasma cholesterol levels (r = 0.78; P less than 0.001) and plasma triacylglycerol levels (r = 0.56, P less than 0.001). Hamsters consuming the cholesterol + butter-supplemented diets had the highest plasma CETA, cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels, while CETA in plasma of rats and mice remained nondetectable even after 4 weeks on the diet. The causal relation between hypercholesterolemia, hypertriglyceridemia and evaluation in CETA in hamsters remains to be elucidated.

  15. Effect of aqueous extract of Ajuga iva supplementation on plasma lipid profile and tissue antioxidant status in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Chenni, A; Yahia, D Ait; Boukortt, F O; Prost, J; Lacaille-Dubois, M A; Bouchenak, M

    2007-01-19

    The present study was designed to explore the possible antioxidant and hypolipidemic effects of the aqueous extract of Ajuga iva (0.5% in the diet) in rats fed a high-cholesterol (1%) diet (HCD). The results indicated that the HCD-Ai versus HCD treatment led to many changes in biochemical parameters. They showed a decrease of plasma total cholesterol (TC) and VLDL-cholesterol but an increase of HDL(2)-cholesterol. The triacylglycerol contents were reduced in plasma and in VLDL. The lipid peroxidation determined by TBARS was decreased by 75% in plasma. TBARS in liver, heart and kidneys were highly reduced excepted in the adipose tissue. Ajuga iva treatment enhanced superoxide dismutase activity in liver and kidney. Glutathione reductase activity was lowered in adipose tissue but increased in liver and in kidney. A significant increase was noted in glutathione peroxidase activity in liver, heart and kidney but a low value in adipose tissue was observed. In conclusion, the present study demonstrates that in addition to its potent TG and TC-lowering effects, Ajuga iva is effective in improving the antioxidant status by reducing lipid peroxidation in plasma and tissues and enhancing the antioxidant enzymes in rats fed high-cholesterol diet. Furthermore, Ajuga iva may reduce intestinal cholesterol absorption.

  16. High serum total cholesterol--an indicator for monitoring cholesterol lowering efforts: U.S. adults, 2005-2006.

    PubMed

    Schober, Susan E; Carroll, Margaret D; Lacher, David A; Hirsch, Rosemarie

    2007-12-01

    Elevated serum total cholesterol is a major and modifiable risk factor for heart disease, the lead-ing cause of death in the United States (1,2). Reducing mean total serum cholesterol levels among adults to less than 200 mg/dL and reducing the proportion who have levels of 240 mg/dL or higher to less than 17% are national Healthy People 2010 objectives (3). Age-adjusted mean serum cholesterol levels among adults aged 20-74 years declined from 222 mg/dL in 1960-1962 to 203 mg/dL in 1999-2002 (4). Among adults aged 20 years and older, the percent of the population with high serum total cholesterol levels (240 mg/dL or higher) declined from 20% during 1988-1994 to 17% during 1999-2002 (4). In individual patients, a high serum total cholesterol level indicates a potential increased risk for heart disease, but further evaluation of other risk factors and the specific components of cholesterol provide the basis for determining the need for initiating therapeutic lifestyle changes or treatment with medication (5). Low-density-lipoprotein (LDL) is the cholesterol component associated with arterial blockage, and it is the primary clinical target for cholesterol management. High-density-lipoprotein (HDL) may help to protect individuals from developing heart disease. In populations, comparisons of total cholesterol levels over time can show if population groups are experiencing improvement in cholesterol levels, and knowledge of trends in levels of total cholesterol can help identify subgroups where additional prevention efforts may be needed.

  17. Luminol electrochemiluminescence for the analysis of active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ma, Guangzhong; Zhou, Junyu; Tian, Chunxiu; Jiang, Dechen; Fang, Danjun; Chen, Hongyuan

    2013-04-16

    A luminol electrochemiluminescence assay was reported to analyze active cholesterol at the plasma membrane in single mammalian cells. The cellular membrane cholesterol was activated by the exposure of the cells to low ionic strength buffer or the inhibition of intracellular acyl-coA/cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT). The active membrane cholesterol was reacted with cholesterol oxidase in the solution to generate a peak concentration of hydrogen peroxide on the electrode surface, which induced a measurable luminol electrochemiluminescence. Further treatment of the active cells with mevastatin decreased the active membrane cholesterol resulting in a drop in luminance. No change in the intracellular calcium was observed in the presence of luminol and voltage, which indicated that our analysis process might not interrupt the intracellular cholesterol trafficking. Single cell analysis was performed by placing a pinhole below the electrode so that only one cell was exposed to the photomultiplier tube (PMT). Twelve single cells were analyzed individually, and a large deviation on luminance ratio observed exhibited the cell heterogeneity on the active membrane cholesterol. The smaller deviation on ACAT/HMGCoA inhibited cells than ACAT inhibited cells suggested different inhibition efficiency for sandoz 58035 and mevastatin. The new information obtained from single cell analysis might provide a new insight on the study of intracellular cholesterol trafficking.

  18. Oat β-glucan: physico-chemical characteristics in relation to its blood-glucose and cholesterol-lowering properties.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Ellis, Peter R

    2014-10-01

    The water-soluble, mixed-linkage β-glucan, a form of soluble dietary fibre, is considered the main biologically active component responsible for the capacity of many oat products to lower postprandial glycaemia and fasting plasma cholesterol in human subjects. The present review discusses the physical and chemical properties of oat β-glucan that are considered important predictors of these beneficial metabolic effects. In vitro modelling and animal and human studies have provided compelling evidence showing that the ability of oat β-glucan to increase the viscosity of digesta in the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) is a primary determinant of its blood-glucose and cholesterol-lowering properties. Therefore, the chemical structure, molecular weight (MW), the rate and extent of dissolution and solution rheology of oat β-glucan are key factors in determining the physiological function of oat-containing foods. The structure and properties of oat β-glucan vary between species and varieties of oats, and are also affected by the growing and storage conditions and processing of oat grain. In addition, the extraction and analysis methods may also contribute to the variations in the structure, MW, hydration and solution rheology of β-glucan obtained from different laboratories. Recent work has demonstrated that β-glucan solubility in foods depends on the source of the material and processing conditions; solubility may also be subject to changes during food preparation and storage (such as freezing). In conclusion, both the amount and MW of β-glucan that are solubilised in the GIT need to be considered when assessing the blood-glucose and cholesterol-lowering properties of oat-containing foods.

  19. Opuntia humifusa stems lower blood glucose and cholesterol levels in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Sahng-Wook; Park, Jieun; Son, Yong-Suk

    2011-06-01

    The Opuntia humifusa stem (OHSt) contains high levels of antioxidants including vitamin C, flavonoids, and polyphenols that may prove beneficial in treating diabetes mellitus. The objective of this study was to examine the hypothesis that intake of the OHSt regulates blood glucose levels and hypolipidemic responses in rats with diabetes mellitus induced by injection of streptozotocin. Forty Sprague-Dawley rats (6 weeks of age) were assigned to 5 groups: normal control, rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes mellitus (DM), DM treated with OHSt 150 mg/kg per day, DM treated with OHSt 250 mg/kg per day, and DM treated with OHSt 500 mg/kg per day. Powdered OHSt was suspended in distilled water and administered orally through the sonde once daily. After 7 weeks of treatment, the fasting blood glucose and triglyceride levels of the OHSt groups were significantly lower when compared with the DM group (P < .05). Treatment with the OHSt also resulted in a significant decrease in serum total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .05). Decreases in both total cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol were accompanied by a significant increase in serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .05). Furthermore, levels of alanine aminotransferase and aspartate aminotransferase were significantly lower in the OHSt groups than in the DM group (P < .05). In addition, a significant increase in relative beta cell volume of pancreas was observed in rats treated with 500 mg/kg of OHSt when compared with the untreated DM rats (P < .05). The overall results suggest that the OHSt possesses potential hypoglycemic and hypolipidemic activity in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cholesterol-lowering effect of NK-104, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, in guinea pig model of hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Aoki, T; Yamazaki, H; Suzuki, H; Tamaki, T; Sato, F; Kitahara, M; Saito, Y

    2001-01-01

    Although benefits of statins have been demonstrated even in normolipidemic patients at high risk, the main target of statin therapy is the hypercholesterolemic patient. The aim of this study was to examine the hypocholesterolemic effect of NK-104 ((+)-monocalcium bis((3R,5S,6S)-7-[2-cyclopropyl-4-(4-fluorophenyl)-3-quinolyl]- 3,5-dihydroxy-6-heptenoate), CAS 147526-32-7), a potent 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase inhibitor, and its mechanism of action in hypercholesterolemic animals. In guinea pigs fed a diet containing 15% (w/w) fat rich in laurate for 6 weeks, the liver cholesterol content was markedly increased and plasma total cholesterol (TC), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and LDL-apoB were elevated 4.8, 5.2 and 1.7 times, respectively, compared with normal diet fed animals. These changes were maintained by reduced LDL clearance in the presence of markedly cholesterol-enriched LDL in the plasma. In this model, the LDL-C reduction rates by 0.1, 0.3 and 1 mg/kg of NK-104 orally administered for 2 weeks (from week 4 to week 6), were 11, 27 and 32%, respectively, from controls, being similar in normal guinea pigs previously examined. Those for 3 and 10 mg/kg of atorvastatin (CAS 134523-00-5) were 25 and 39%, respectively. Thus about 10 times higher doses of atorvastatin were required than of NK-104 to cause a similar cholesterol-lowering effect. This reduction of plasma cholesterol was accompanied by an improvement of LDL clearance (24 and 47% increase in fractional catabolic rate by 1 mg/kg of NK-104 and 10 mg/kg of atorvastatin, respectively) and LDL composition. In conclusion, in guinea pig hypercholesterolemia caused by high-laurate diet, NK-104 and atorvastatin lowered plasma cholesterol levels with an improvement of LDL composition and with an increase in LDL clearance, presumably through reduction of the liver cholesterol content, although hepatic cholesterol synthesis might have been markedly suppressed in this model.

  1. Mechanism of hypocholesterolemic effect of oyster mushroom (Pleurotus ostreatus) in rats: reduction of cholesterol absorption and increase of plasma cholesterol removal.

    PubMed

    Bobek, P; Ozdin, L; Kuniak, L

    1994-03-01

    The content of cholesterol in the serum and liver of male Wistar rats fed, for the period of 8 weeks shortly after weaning, a diet containing 0.3% of cholesterol was reduced by 33 and 27% by the addition of 5% of dried oyster mushroom powder. Although the level of serum triacylglycerols was not affected by oyster mushroom, their content in liver of rats on mushroom diet was reduced by 41%. Very-low-density lipoproteins and low-density lipoproteins participated by 55 and 38%, respectively, in the total reduction of serum cholesterol. Cholesterol content in high-density lipoproteins was not significantly affected by oyster mushroom. Cholesterol absorption as determined by dual-isotope plasma ratio method was significantly reduced by 14% with oyster mushroom diet. Similarly, this diet increased by 42% the fractional catabolic rate of cholesterol determined by the analysis of decay curve of [4-14C]cholesterol.

  2. Dose-dependent LDL-cholesterol lowering effect by plant stanol ester consumption: clinical evidence

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Elevated serum lipids are linked to cardiovascular diseases calling for effective therapeutic means to reduce particularly LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels. Plant stanols reduce levels of LDL-C by partly blocking cholesterol absorption. Accordingly the consumption of foods with added plant stanols, typically esterified with vegetable oil fatty acids in commercial food products, are recommended for lowering serum cholesterol levels. A daily intake of 1.5 to 2.4 g of plant stanols has been scientifically evaluated to lower LDL-C by 7 to 10% in different populations, ages and with different diseases. Based on earlier studies, a general understanding is that no further reduction may be achieved in intakes in excess of approximately 2.5 g/day. Recent studies however suggest that plant stanols show a continuous dose–response effect in serum LDL-C lowering. This review discusses the evidence for a dose-effect relationship between plant stanol ester consumption and reduction of LDL-C concentrations with daily intakes of plant stanols of 4 g/day or more. We identified five such studies and the overall data demonstrate a linear dose-effect relationship with the most pertinent LDL-Cholesterol lowering outcome, 18%, achieved by a daily intake of 9 to 10 g of plant stanols. Along with reduction in LDL-C, the studies demonstrated a decrease in cholesterol absorption markers, the serum plant sterol to cholesterol ratios, by increasing the dose of plant stanol intake. None of the studies with daily intakes up to 10 g of plant stanols reported adverse clinical or biochemical effects from plant stanols. In a like manner, the magnitude of decrease in serum antioxidant vitamins was not related to the dose of plant stanols consumed and the differences between plant stanol ester consumers and controls were minor and insignificant or nonexisting. Consumption of plant stanols in high doses is feasible as a range of food products are commercially available for consumption including spreads

  3. Characterization of starter kimchi fermented with Leuconostoc kimchii GJ2 and its cholesterol-lowering effects in rats fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Jo, Se Yeon; Choi, Eun A; Lee, Jae Joon; Chang, Hae Choon

    2015-10-01

    The hypocholesterolemic effects of lactic acid bacteria and kimchi have been demonstrated previously. However, the kimchi fermentation process still relies on naturally present microorganisms. To obtain functional kimchi with consistent quality, we validated the capacity of Leuconostoc kimchii GJ2 as a starter culture to control kimchi fermentation. Moreover, cholesterol-lowering effects of starter kimchi as a health-promoting product were explored. Bacteriocin production by Lc. kimchii GJ2 was highly enhanced in the presence of 5% Lactobacillus sakei NJ1 cell fractions. When kimchi was fermented with bacteriocin-enhanced Lc. kimchii GJ2, Lc. kimchii GJ2 became overwhelmingly predominant (98.3%) at the end of fermentation and maintained its dominance (up to 82%) for 84 days. Growing as well as dead cells of Lc. kimchii GJ2 showed high cholesterol assimilation (in vitro). Rats were fed a high-fat and high-cholesterol diet supplemented with starter kimchi. The results showed that feeding of starter kimchi significantly reduced serum total cholesterol, triglyceride and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Additionally, atherogenic index, cardiac risk factor and triglyceride and total cholesterol levels in liver and epididymal adipose tissue decreased significantly in rats fed starter kimchi. Kimchi fermented with Lc. kimchii GJ2 as a starter culture has efficient cholesterol-lowering effects. © 2014 Society of Chemical Industry.

  4. LDL cholesterol-lowering effects of grape extract used as a dietary supplement on healthy volunteers.

    PubMed

    Yubero, Noemí; Sanz-Buenhombre, Marisa; Guadarrama, Alberto; Villanueva, Sonia; Carrión, Juan M; Larrarte, Eider; Moro, Carlos

    2013-06-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of Eminol®, the polyphenol-rich grape extract supplement (700 mg), on cardiovascular risk and oxidant stress indicators in a sample of volunteers. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial was performed over 56 days and included 60 volunteers. Thirty volunteers took 700 mg of the grape extract, Eminol® (E), and 30 took the placebo (P). On comparison of the results, a decrease in total cholesterol (E: 213.77 ± 4.1 mg/dl and P: 245.57 ± 4.1 mg/dl; p = 0.01) and LDL cholesterol (E: 142.17 ± 3.1 mg/dl and P: 165.13 ± 3.1 mg/dl; p = 0.02) levels as well as an increase in antioxidant capacity (E: 65.63 ± 5.8 μmol TE/mg and P: 57.80 ± 7.7 μmol TE/mg; p < 0.01) and vitamin E (E: 11.46 ± 0.5 μg/ml and P: 9.06 ± 0.5 μg/ml; p = 0.018) was observed. This result indicates that the grape extract Eminol® modulated the lipid profile in terms of cardiovascular risk indicators, lowering total blood cholesterol and LDL cholesterol levels.

  5. Soy β-conglycinin (7S globulin) reduces plasma and liver cholesterol in rats fed hypercholesterolemic diet.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ederlan de Souza; Silva, Maraiza Aparecida; Demonte, Aureluce; Neves, Valdir Augusto

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the comparative hypocholesterolemic effect of soybean 7S fraction in rats fed a high-cholesterol diet. Soybean 7S globulin (β-conglycinin) was administered orally once a day to rats, and the effects were measured after 28 days. Wistar rats were divided into four groups: standard diet (STD) (casein alone), hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet (STD plus 1 g/100 g cholesterol and 0.5 g/100 g cholic acid), HC+7S(1) diet (HC diet plus 200 mg of 7S/kg of body weight/day), and HC+7S(2) diet (HC diet plus 300 mg of 7S/kg of body weight/day). Food intake, weight gain, animals' growth, and feeding efficiency ratio were similar among the STD and three HC groups, indicating that these parameters were not affected by treatments. Animals that had received different doses of soybean 7S globulin had lower total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)/high-density lipoprotein (HDL) ratio in serum and lower levels of hepatic TC and TG than those fed only the HC diet. The atherogenic indexes of HC+7S(1) and HC+7S(2) groups were 40% and 55% lower than that of the HC group, respectively. The results showed that the oral daily administration of β-conglycinin in the diet to HC rats, at between 1.85% and 2.75% of total ingested protein, promotes the reduction of TC, LDL-cholesterol, and TG and an increase in HDL-cholesterol in the plasma, besides a small but significant reduction in cholesterol and TG levels in the liver of the animals as well as a reduced atherogenic index.

  6. Statins increase hepatic cholesterol synthesis and stimulate fecal cholesterol elimination in mice.

    PubMed

    Schonewille, Marleen; de Boer, Jan Freark; Mele, Laura; Wolters, Henk; Bloks, Vincent W; Wolters, Justina C; Kuivenhoven, Jan A; Tietge, Uwe J F; Brufau, Gemma; Groen, Albert K

    2016-08-01

    Statins are competitive inhibitors of HMG-CoA reductase, the rate-limiting enzyme of cholesterol synthesis. Statins reduce plasma cholesterol levels, but whether this is actually caused by inhibition of de novo cholesterol synthesis has not been clearly established. Using three different statins, we investigated the effects on cholesterol metabolism in mice in detail. Surprisingly, direct measurement of whole body cholesterol synthesis revealed that cholesterol synthesis was robustly increased in statin-treated mice. Measurement of organ-specific cholesterol synthesis demonstrated that the liver is predominantly responsible for the increase in cholesterol synthesis. Excess synthesized cholesterol did not accumulate in the plasma, as plasma cholesterol decreased. However, statin treatment led to an increase in cholesterol removal via the feces. Interestingly, enhanced cholesterol excretion in response to rosuvastatin and lovastatin treatment was mainly mediated via biliary cholesterol secretion, whereas atorvastatin mainly stimulated cholesterol removal via the transintestinal cholesterol excretion pathway. Moreover, we show that plasma cholesterol precursor levels do not reflect cholesterol synthesis rates during statin treatment in mice. In conclusion, cholesterol synthesis is paradoxically increased upon statin treatment in mice. However, statins potently stimulate the excretion of cholesterol from the body, which sheds new light on possible mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of statins. Copyright © 2016 by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Impact of buttermilk consumption on plasma lipids and surrogate markers of cholesterol homeostasis in men and women.

    PubMed

    Conway, V; Couture, P; Richard, C; Gauthier, S F; Pouliot, Y; Lamarche, B

    2013-12-01

    Sphingolipids (SL) are important components of the milk fat globule membrane (MFGM) found in buttermilk. While studies in animal models suggest that dietary SL may have cholesterol-lowering properties, data in human are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of buttermilk consumption on plasma lipids and surrogate markers of cholesterol (C) homeostasis in humans. Men and women (n = 34) with serum LDL-C <5.0 mmol/L at screening (mean LDL-C = 3.8 mmol/L) were recruited in this double-blinded randomized crossover placebo controlled study. Their diets were supplemented with 45 g/d of buttermilk and with 45 g/d of a macro/micronutrient matched placebo (4 weeks each in random order). Serum lipid concentrations and surrogate markers of cholesterol homeostasis were measured post diet and compared using mixed models for repeated measures. Consumption of buttermilk led to reduction in serum cholesterol (-3.1%, P = 0.019), LDL-C (-3.1%, P = 0.057) and triacylglycerol (-10.7%, P = 0.007). Buttermilk consumption increased plasma lathosterol concentrations (+12.1%, P = 0.001), but multiple regression analysis indicated that variations in β-sitosterol concentrations (P = 0.002) were the only significant predictor of the LDL-C response to buttermilk consumption. Buttermilk consumption may be associated with reduced cholesterol concentrations in men and women, primarily through inhibition of intestinal absorption of cholesterol. This trial is registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01248026. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Class 2 resistant starches lower plasma and liver lipids and improve mineral retention in rats.

    PubMed

    Lopez, H W; Levrat-Verny, M A; Coudray, C; Besson, C; Krespine, V; Messager, A; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    2001-04-01

    The effects of raw potato starch (RPS) and high amylose corn starch (HAS) on cecal digestion, lipid metabolism and mineral utilization (Ca and Mg) were compared in rats adapted to semipurified diets. The diets provided either 710 g wheat starch/100 g diet (control) alone or 510 g wheat starch/100 g diet plus 200 g resistant starch/100 g (RPS or HAS). Compared with rats fed the control diet, significant cecal hypertrophy (240% after 7 d of the fiber consumption) and short-chain fatty acids accumulation (especially propionic and butyric acids) occurred after both resistant starch diets. Apparent Ca, Mg, Zn, Fe and Cu absorptions were similarly enhanced by RPS and HAS (50, 50, 27, 21 and 90%, respectively). Cholesterol absorption was reduced to 14% of intake in rats fed RPS or HAS compared with 47% absorption in control rats. RPS and HAS were also effective in lowering plasma cholesterol (-31 and -27%, respectively) and triglycerides (-28 and -22%, respectively). There was no effect of the diets on cholesterol in d > 1.040 kg/L lipoproteins (HDL), whereas RPS and HAS depressed cholesterol in d < 1.040 kg/L lipoproteins (especially in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins). Moreover, there were lower concentrations of cholesterol (-50 and -40%, respectively) and triglycerides (-53 and -47%, respectively) in the livers of RPS- and HAS-fed rats. Thus, RPS and HAS have similar effects on intestinal fermentation, mineral utilization and cholesterol metabolism in rats.

  9. PCSK9 inhibition: the dawn of a new age in cholesterol lowering?

    PubMed

    Preiss, David; Mafham, Marion

    2017-03-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is a circulating enzyme of hepatic origin that plays a key role in LDL receptor turnover. Genetic studies have confirmed that individuals with gain-of-function PCSK9 mutations have increased PCSK9 activity, elevated LDL-cholesterol levels and a severe form of familial hypercholesterolaemia. Those with variants leading to reduced PCSK9 have lower LDL-cholesterol levels and a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, and this has led to the development of various strategies aimed at reducing circulating PCSK9. Monoclonal antibodies to PCSK9, given every 2-4 weeks by subcutaneous injection, have been shown to reduce LDL-cholesterol by 50-60% compared with placebo in individuals with and without diabetes. PCSK9 inhibition also reduces lipoprotein(a), an atherogenic lipid particle, by around 20-30%. Major cardiovascular outcome trials for two agents, evolocumab and alirocumab, are expected to report from 2017. These trials involve over 45,000 participants and are likely to include about 15,000 individuals with diabetes. PCSK9-binding adnectins have been employed as an alternative method of removing circulating PCSK9. Small interfering RNA targeting messenger RNA for PCSK9, which acts by reducing hepatic production of PCSK9, is also under investigation. These agents may only need to be given by subcutaneous injection once every 4-6 months. Ongoing trials will determine whether anti-PCSK9 antibody therapy safely reduces cardiovascular risk, although high cost may limit its use. Development of PCSK9-lowering technologies cheaper than monoclonal antibodies will be necessary for large numbers of individuals to benefit from this approach to lowering cholesterol.

  10. Imaging approaches for analysis of cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Wüstner, Daniel; Modzel, Maciej; Lund, Frederik W; Lomholt, Michael A

    2016-09-01

    Cholesterol is an important lipid component of the plasma membrane (PM) of mammalian cells, where it is involved in control of many physiological processes, such as endocytosis, cell migration, cell signalling and surface ruffling. In an attempt to explain these functions of cholesterol, several models have been put forward about cholesterol's lateral and transbilayer organization in the PM. In this article, we review imaging techniques developed over the last two decades for assessing the distribution and dynamics of cholesterol in the PM of mammalian cells. Particular focus is on fluorescence techniques to study the lateral and inter-leaflet distribution of suitable cholesterol analogues in the PM of living cells. We describe also several methods for determining lateral cholesterol dynamics in the PM including fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP), fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), single particle tracking (SPT) and spot variation FCS coupled to stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy. For proper interpretation of such measurements, we provide some background in probe photophysics and diffusion phenomena occurring in cell membranes. In particular, we show the equivalence of the reaction-diffusion approach, as used in FRAP and FCS, and continuous time random walk (CTRW) models, as often invoked in SPT studies. We also discuss mass spectrometry (MS) based imaging of cholesterol in the PM of fixed cells and compare this method with fluorescence imaging of sterols. We conclude that evidence from many experimental techniques converges towards a model of a homogeneous distribution of cholesterol with largely free and unhindered diffusion in both leaflets of the PM.

  11. Particle size reduction effectively enhances the cholesterol-lowering activities of carrot insoluble fiber and cellulose.

    PubMed

    Chou, Sze-Yuan; Chien, Po-Jung; Chau, Chi-Fai

    2008-11-26

    This study investigated and compared the effects of particle size reduction on the cholesterol-lowering activities of carrot insoluble fiber-rich fraction (IFF) and plant cellulose. Our results demonstrated that micronization treatment effectively pulverized the particle sizes of these insoluble fibers to different microsizes. Feeding the micronized insoluble fibers, particularly the micronized carrot IFF, significantly (p < 0.05) improved their abilities in lowering the concentrations of serum triglyceride (18.6-20.0%), serum total cholesterol (15.5-19.5%), and liver lipids (16.7-20.3%) to different extents by means of enhancing (p < 0.05) the excretion of lipids (124-131%), cholesterol (120-135%), and bile acids (130-141%) in feces. These results suggested that particle size was one of the crucial factors in affecting the characteristics and physiological functions of insoluble fibers. Therefore, particle size reduction by micronization might offer the industry an opportunity to improve the physiological functions of insoluble fibers, particularly the carrot IFF, in health food applications.

  12. Serum resistin is related to plasma HDL cholesterol and inversely correlated with LDL cholesterol in diabetic and obese humans.

    PubMed

    Owecki, Maciej; Nikisch, Elżbieta; Miczke, Anna; Pupek-Musialik, Danuta; Sowiński, Jerzy

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol, triglycerides and serum resisistin may all be influenced by diabetes and obesity, but their associations remain unclear. Therefore, we put forward a hypothesis that serum lipids might be parallel to resistin, as they all reflect the metabolic status of obese humans. We measured the concentrations of resistin, total cholesterol (TC), HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and triglycerides (TG) in 134 obese non-diabetic (73 women and 61 men) and 65 obese diabetic (33 women, 32 men) humans, and examined their interrelations. Obesity was defined according to the WHO criterion (BMI, ≥ 30 kg/m²) The presence of diabetes was the only differentiating factor between two groups of frankly obese humans. Non-diabetic vs. diabetic, median and interquartile range, respectively: resistin (ng/mL) 26.08, 16.09 vs. 22.37, 14.54, p=0.736; TC (mmol/L) 5.02, 1.39 vs. 5.16, 1.56, p=0.374; HDL-C (mmol/L): 1.10, 0.41 vs. 1.02, 0.47 p<0.05; LDL-C (mmol/L): 3.00, 1.05 vs. 3.00, 1.30 p=0.978; TG (mmol/L) 1.70, 1.43 vs.1.95, 1.81 p<0.05. To investigate the interrelations between resistin and lipids, a simple regression analysis was used, and the results were for resistin & TC, HDL-C, LDL-C, and TG, respectively: in the whole cohort r=-0.1364, p=0.0670, r=0.1514, p=0.0437, r=-0.2573, p=0.0006, r=0.0434, p=0.5597; in non-diabetics: r=-0.2067, p=0.0213, r=0.1023, p=0.2621, r=-0.2399, p=0.0083 and r=0.0288, p=0.7497; in diabetics r=0.0280, p=0.8360, r=0.2267, p=0.0929, r=-0.2933, p=0.0298, r=0.1349, p=0.3127. In diabetic and non-diabetic subjects the atherogenic LDL cholesterol shows an inverse correlation with resistin, whereas the protective anti-atherosclerotic HDL cholesterol is positively correlated with resistin.

  13. Heart rate variability, overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol in apparently healthy human adults.

    PubMed

    Thayer, Julian F; Fischer, Joachim E

    2013-01-20

    The aim of this study was to assess the relationship between autonomic nervous system activity as indexed by measures of heart rate variability and overnight urinary norepinephrine, and plasma cholesterol levels in a large sample of working adults. The study population comprised 611 apparently healthy employees of an airplane manufacturing plant in Southern Germany. Heart rate variability was calculated as beat-to-beat intervals over the course of one 24-hour weekday measured with an ambulatory ECG recorder. Overnight urine collection and blood samples were also obtained. We found an inverse association between indices of vagally-mediated heart rate variability and plasma levels of total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein (LDL), and the ratio of LDL to high density lipoprotein (HDL) that remained significant in multivariate models after controlling for relevant covariates including norepinephrine. Urinary norepinephrine was not significantly related to any measure of cholesterol in multivariate models. We report here for the first time, in a large sample of healthy human adults, evidence supporting the hypothesis of a clinically relevant inverse relationship between measures of plasma cholesterol and vagally-mediated heart rate variability after controlling for sympathetic nervous system activity. This suggests an important role for the vagal control of plasma cholesterol levels in cardiovascular disease. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Hippocampal volume change in the Alzheimer Disease Cholesterol-Lowering Treatment trial.

    PubMed

    Sparks, D Larry; Lemieux, Susan K; Haut, Marc W; Baxter, Leslie C; Johnson, Sterling C; Sparks, Lisa M; Sampath, Hemalatha; Lopez, Jean E; Sabbagh, Marwan H; Connor, Donald J

    2008-03-01

    Numerous clinical studies suggest a link between elevated cholesterol and increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), and the preponderance of data suggests that statin therapy may reduce the risk of AD later in life. The first clinical investigation of statin therapy in patients with AD, the AD Cholesterol-Lowering Treatment (ADCLT) trial, found that atorvastatin 80 mg/day was associated with improvements relative to placebo on some, but not all, cognitive measures after 6 months and 1 year of therapy. We report here findings from a pilot ADCLT substudy showing a nonsignificant reduction in total hippocampal volume with 1 year of atorvastatin therapy compared with placebo, driven by a highly significant reduction in right hippocampal volume with atorvastatin therapy.

  15. Role of dietary supplements in lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol: a review.

    PubMed

    Nijjar, Prabhjot S; Burke, Frances M; Bloesch, Annette; Rader, Daniel J

    2010-01-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) remains a major source of morbidity and mortality. As the epidemic of obesity, diabetes, and hypertension continues to grow among young adults, the population at risk for atherosclerotic CHD is ever increasing. More than a century of laboratory and human findings link cholesterol levels with a propensity to develop atherosclerosis. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) is the major atherogenic lipoprotein, and numerous clinical trials have shown the efficacy of lowering LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) for reducing CHD risk. New trial data have resulted in LDL-C goals being lowered over time and expansion of the population of patients that are candidates for LDL-lowering therapy to decrease their lifetime risk of CHD. Although statins are relatively safe and well tolerated, there are still significant numbers of patients who cannot tolerate them and many others who only require mild LDL-C reduction and prefer nonprescription alternatives to statin therapy. A number of dietary supplements and functional foods have been suggested to reduce LDL-C levels, but only a few have withstood the rigors of randomized controlled trials. Here we review the evidence in support of dietary supplements and their LDL-C-lowering effects. We also review supplements that, after initial excitement about their purported effect, were not found to lower LDL-C significantly. Copyright © 2010 National Lipid Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Candidate genetic analysis of plasma high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and severity of coronary atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Suet Nee; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet; Todd, Josh; Lombardi, Raffaella; Willerson, James T; Gotto, Antonio M; Ballantyne, Christie M; Marian, AJ

    2009-01-01

    Background Plasma level of high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), a heritable trait, is an important determinant of susceptibility to atherosclerosis. Non-synonymous and regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes implicated in HDL-C synthesis and metabolism are likely to influence plasma HDL-C, apolipoprotein A-I (apo A-I) levels and severity of coronary atherosclerosis. Methods We genotyped 784 unrelated Caucasian individuals from two sets of populations (Lipoprotein and Coronary Atherosclerosis Study- LCAS, N = 333 and TexGen, N = 451) for 94 SNPs in 42 candidate genes by 5' nuclease assays. We tested the distribution of the phenotypes by the Shapiro-Wilk normality test. We used Box-Cox regression to analyze associations of the non-normally distributed phenotypes (plasma HDL-C and apo A-I levels) with the genotypes. We included sex, age, body mass index (BMI), diabetes mellitus (DM), and cigarette smoking as covariates. We calculated the q values as indicators of the false positive discovery rate (FDR). Results Plasma HDL-C levels were associated with sex (higher in females), BMI (inversely), smoking (lower in smokers), DM (lower in those with DM) and SNPs in APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL and LIPC (each q ≤0.01). Likewise, plasma apo A-I levels, available in the LCAS subset, were associated with SNPs in CETP, APOA5, and APOC2 as well as with BMI, sex and age (all q values ≤0.03). The APOA5 variant S19W was also associated with minimal lumen diameter (MLD) of coronary atherosclerotic lesions, a quantitative index of severity of coronary atherosclerosis (q = 0.018); mean number of coronary artery occlusions (p = 0.034) at the baseline and progression of coronary atherosclerosis, as indicated by the loss of MLD. Conclusion Putatively functional variants of APOA2, APOA5, APOC2, CETP, LPL, LIPC and SOAT2 are independent genetic determinants of plasma HDL-C levels. The non-synonymous S19W SNP in APOA5 is also an independent determinant of plasma

  17. Cholesterol concentration in seminal plasma as a predictive tool for quality semen evaluation.

    PubMed

    Beer-Ljubić, B; Aladrović, J; Marenjak, T S; Laskaj, R; Majić-Balić, I; Milinković-Tur, S

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between lipid composition of bovine serum and seminal plasma, seasonality, and semen quality. The experiment was carried out in two groups of Simmental breeding bulls: Group I (ages 2 to 4 yr) and Group II (ages 5 to 10 yr). Blood samples were collected from jugular vein, and bovine semen was sampled with an artificial vagina once per season. Serum concentrations of total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triacylglycerols, nonesterified fatty acids (NEFAs), and lipoprotein electrophoretic patterns were determined. Seminal plasma concentrations of total cholesterol, HDL-C, and LDL-C were assayed. Serum concentration of triacylglycerols in young bulls was significantly higher in winter compared with that in autumn, whereas serum NEFA concentration was significantly higher in autumn compared with that in other seasons. Serum concentration of total cholesterol, LDL-C, and LDL lipoproteins in older bulls was significantly higher in winter than in spring. Seminal plasma concentration of total cholesterol in young bulls was significantly higher in spring compared with that in summer, whereas in older bulls it was significantly higher in winter compared with that in autumn samples. Sperm volume of both groups was significantly higher in summer compared with that in autumn and winter. Sperm motility in young bulls was lowest in summer and differed significantly from the values recorded in other seasons. The changes observed in seminal plasma cholesterol concentration were associated with extracellular lipid use and appeared to be applicable as a biochemical marker of sperm quality.

  18. Cholesterol biosynthesis in normocholesterolemic patients after cholesterol removal by plasmapheresis.

    PubMed

    Feillet, C; Cristol, J P; Michel, F; Kanouni, T; Navarro, R; Navarro, M; Monnier, L; Descomps, B

    1997-01-01

    Plasmapheresis and low-density lipoprotein (LDL)-apheresis are recognized procedures for the treatment of hyperlipidemia resistant to diet and lipid-lowering drugs and provide information on cholesterol synthesis in hypercholesterolemic patients. However, cholesterol synthesis after acute cholesterol removal from plasma has never been investigated in normocholesterolemic patients. In this study, cholesterol synthesis was evaluated in three normocholesterolemic patients by determination of plasma lathosterol, lathosterol-to-cholesterol ratio, and plasma mevalonic acid. In a short-term kinetic study, samples were collected before and after plasmapheresis and every 6 hours during 24 hours. In the second part of the study, cholesterol synthesis was evaluated daily for 3 days. In normocholesterolemic patients, cholesterol returns to basal levels in 3 days. However, cholesterol removal did not result in a significant increase in lathosterol-to-cholesterol ratio or in plasma mevalonic acid, despite a slight increase in lathosterol. In contrast, when repeated plasma exchanges induced a dramatic hypocholesterolemia (< 1 mmol/liter), an acute but transient stimulation of cholesterol synthesis was observed (lathosterol/cholesterol ratio and MVA, respectively, increase from 8.2 to 22.3 and from 28 nmol/liter to 98 nmol/liter). This study shows that cholesterol synthesis is not stimulated by plasmapheresis in normocholesterolemic patients but is enhanced in dramatic hypocholesterolemic patients (< 1 mmol/liter).

  19. Spreads enriched with plant sterols, either esterified 4,4-dimethylsterols or free 4-desmethylsterols, and plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations.

    PubMed

    Sierksma, A; Weststrate, J A; Meijer, G W

    1999-10-01

    In a 9-week study seventy-six healthy adult volunteers with an average age of 44 (SD 11) years, with baseline plasma total cholesterol levels below 8 mmol/l, received in a balanced, double-blind, crossover design, a total of three different table spreads for personal use. Two spreads were fortified either with free (non-esterified) vegetable-oil sterols, mainly from soyabean oil (31 g sterol equivalents/kg; 0.8 g/d) or sheanut-oil sterols (133 g sterol equivalents/kg; 3.3 g/d). One spread was not fortified (control). Average intake of spread was 25 g/d for 3 weeks. None of the spreads induced changes in blood clinical chemistry or haematology. Plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were statistically significantly reduced by 3.8% and 6% (both 0.19 mmol/l) respectively, for the spread enriched with free soyabean-oil sterols compared with the control spread. The spread enriched with sheanut-oil sterols did not lower plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol levels. None of the plant-sterol-enriched spreads affected plasma HDL-cholesterol concentrations. Plasma-lipid-standardized concentrations of alpha- plus beta-carotene were not statistically significantly affected by the soyabean-oil sterol spread in contrast to lipid-standardized plasma lycopene levels which showed a statistically significant decrease (9.5%). These findings indicate that a daily intake of free soyabean-oil sterols as low as 0.8 g added to a spread is effective in lowering blood total- and LDL-cholesterol levels with limited effects on blood carotenoid levels. The lowering in total- and LDL-cholesterol blood levels due to consumption of the vegetable-oil-sterol-enriched spread may be helpful in reducing the risk of CHD for the population.

  20. Indications for lowering LDL cholesterol in rheumatoid arthritis: an unrecognized problem.

    PubMed

    Soubrier, Martin; Zerkak, Djamila; Dougados, Maxime

    2006-09-01

    To evaluate the prevalence of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in whom lowering low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) should be considered in accord with the ATPIII guidelines. The treatment goals are based on the number of risk factors (RF) other than LDL-C. The goal for 0-1 RF is < 160 mg/l, for multiple RF < 130 mg/l, and < 100 mg/l for coronary heart disease (CHD) or CHD risk equivalent (other clinical atherosclerotic diseases and diabetes mellitus). A cross-sectional study was conducted in 145 patients with RA. We recorded the patients' characteristics, the potential risk factors for CHD, and results of lipid profile tests [total cholesterol (TC), high density lipoprotein cholesterol, and LDL-C]. Of the 145 patients recruited, 23 had LDL-C lowering therapy. Of the remaining 122 patients (mean age 54 +/- 15 years), of whom 101 (83%) were women, 109 were taking a disease modifying antirheumatic drug. At the time of the study, disease duration was 12 +/- 10 years. Twenty-seven (22%) of the 122 patients needed lowering of LDL-C. If RA was considered as an additional risk factor or a major risk factor, like diabetes mellitus, 35 patients (29%) and 86 (70%) patients, respectively, needed lowering therapy. Our study shows the high percentage of patients with RA for whom LDL-C intervention should be considered. As cardiovascular morbidity and mortality is increased in patients with RA, it would be useful to determine whether RA should be considered as an independent cardiovascular risk factor or as a major risk factor like diabetes that warrants more aggressive cardiac prevention measures.

  1. Cholesterol and Statins

    MedlinePlus

    ... from you cholesterol is important Cholesterol has a bad rap. In reality, your body needs cholesterol to ... low-cholesterol diet should help lower your LDL (bad cholesterol). If it’s not lowered enough by reducing ...

  2. Targeting PCSK9 as a promising new mechanism for lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Della Badia, Laura A; Elshourbagy, Nabil A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-08-01

    Statins and other lipid-lowering drugs have dominated the market for many years for achievement of recommended levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). However, a substantial number of high-risk patients are unable to achieve the LDL-C goal. Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 (PCSK9) has recently emerged as a new, promising key therapeutic target for hypercholesterolemia. PCSK9 is a protease involved in chaperoning the low-density lipoprotein receptor to the process of degradation. PCSK9 inhibitors and statins effectively lower LDL-C. The PCSK9 inhibitors decrease the degradation of the LDL receptors, whereas statins mainly interfere with the synthetic machinery of cholesterol by inhibiting the key rate limiting enzyme, the HMG CoA reductase. PCSK9 inhibitors are currently being developed as monoclonal antibodies for their primary use in lowering LDL-C. They may be especially useful for patients with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, who at present receive minimal benefit from traditional statin therapy. The monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors, recently granted FDA approval, show the most promising safety and efficacy profile compared to other, newer LDL-C lowering therapies. This review will primarily focus on the safety and efficacy of monoclonal antibody PCSK9 inhibitors in comparison to statins. The review will also address new, alternative PCSK9 targeting drug classes such as small molecules, gene silencing agents, apolipoprotein B antisense oligonucleotides, and microsomal triglyceride transfer protein inhibitors.

  3. The human plasma-metabolome: Reference values in 800 French healthy volunteers; impact of cholesterol, gender and age.

    PubMed

    Trabado, Séverine; Al-Salameh, Abdallah; Croixmarie, Vincent; Masson, Perrine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Fève, Bruno; Colle, Romain; Ripoll, Laurent; Walther, Bernard; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Werner, Erwan; Becquemont, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches are increasingly used to identify new disease biomarkers, yet normal values of many plasma metabolites remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to define the "normal" metabolome in healthy volunteers. We included 800 French volunteers aged between 18 and 86, equally distributed according to sex, free of any medication and considered healthy on the basis of their medical history, clinical examination and standard laboratory tests. We quantified 185 plasma metabolites, including amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and hexose, using tandem mass spectrometry with the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit. Principal components analysis was applied to identify the main factors responsible for metabolome variability and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis was employed to confirm the observed patterns and identify pattern-related metabolites. We established a plasma metabolite reference dataset for 144/185 metabolites. Total blood cholesterol, gender and age were identified as the principal factors explaining metabolome variability. High total blood cholesterol levels were associated with higher plasma sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines concentrations. Compared to women, men had higher concentrations of creatinine, branched-chain amino acids and lysophosphatidylcholines, and lower concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. Elderly healthy subjects had higher sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines plasma levels than young subjects. We established reference human metabolome values in a large and well-defined population of French healthy volunteers. This study provides an essential baseline for defining the "normal" metabolome and its main sources of variation.

  4. The human plasma-metabolome: Reference values in 800 French healthy volunteers; impact of cholesterol, gender and age

    PubMed Central

    Al-Salameh, Abdallah; Croixmarie, Vincent; Masson, Perrine; Corruble, Emmanuelle; Fève, Bruno; Colle, Romain; Ripoll, Laurent; Walther, Bernard; Boursier-Neyret, Claire; Werner, Erwan; Becquemont, Laurent; Chanson, Philippe

    2017-01-01

    Metabolomic approaches are increasingly used to identify new disease biomarkers, yet normal values of many plasma metabolites remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to define the “normal” metabolome in healthy volunteers. We included 800 French volunteers aged between 18 and 86, equally distributed according to sex, free of any medication and considered healthy on the basis of their medical history, clinical examination and standard laboratory tests. We quantified 185 plasma metabolites, including amino acids, biogenic amines, acylcarnitines, phosphatidylcholines, sphingomyelins and hexose, using tandem mass spectrometry with the Biocrates AbsoluteIDQ p180 kit. Principal components analysis was applied to identify the main factors responsible for metabolome variability and orthogonal projection to latent structures analysis was employed to confirm the observed patterns and identify pattern-related metabolites. We established a plasma metabolite reference dataset for 144/185 metabolites. Total blood cholesterol, gender and age were identified as the principal factors explaining metabolome variability. High total blood cholesterol levels were associated with higher plasma sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines concentrations. Compared to women, men had higher concentrations of creatinine, branched-chain amino acids and lysophosphatidylcholines, and lower concentrations of sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines. Elderly healthy subjects had higher sphingomyelins and phosphatidylcholines plasma levels than young subjects. We established reference human metabolome values in a large and well-defined population of French healthy volunteers. This study provides an essential baseline for defining the “normal” metabolome and its main sources of variation. PMID:28278231

  5. The effect of decreased plasma cholesterol concentration on circulatinga mevalonate metabolism in rats.

    PubMed

    Feingold, K R; Wiley, M H; MacRae, G; Siperstein, M D

    1981-08-01

    Circulating mevalonate is metabolized by two mechanisms: the sterol pathways leading to cholesterol and the shunt pathway resulting in CO2 production. The kidney is the chief site of circulating mevalonate metabolism by both pathways. The present study investigated the effect of plasma cholesterol concentration on circulating mevalonate metabolism. 3-Aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidine and Triton WR 1339 were utilized to induce "functional hypocholesterolemia". An enhancement of both renal total nonsaponifiable lipid synthesis (36-43%) and cholesterol synthesis (42%) from circulatinga mevalonate was observed when "functional hypocholesterolemia" was induced by either compound. Hepatic total nonsaponifiable lipid synthesis from circulating mevalonate was not enhanced in the Triton-treated animals, but 4-aminopyrazolo(3,4-d)pyrimidine treatment increased accumulation of total labeled nonsaponifiable lipids and cholesterol. No increase in labeled total nonsaponifiable lipids or cholesterol in the carcass was observed after treatment with wither compound. "Functional hypocholesterolemia" reduced the shunt pathway of circulating mevalonate metabolism by approximately 30%. This reduction occurred in both the renal and extrarenal shunt pathways. These data indicate that plasma cholesterol concentration regulates the in vivo metabolism of circulating mevalonate in that hypocholesterolemia reduces the shunt pathway and stimulates sterologenesis, and effect chiefly localized to athe kidneys.

  6. Should cholesterol-lowering medications be available in Canada without a prescription?

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Shirya

    2007-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) presents an enormous and growing burden on the Canadian health care system. Elevated serum low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels are an established, major risk factor in the development of premature CVD. There is strong evidence that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors, or statins, significantly lower both low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels and CVD risk. However, there is currently a treatment gap, in that a large segment of the population who should be receiving statins due to elevated serum cholesterol levels are not. Individuals at moderate risk of developing CVD represent one large population segment that is currently being undertreated. This group may be a candidate for receiving over-the-counter (OTC) or behind-the-counter (BTC) statins, which may be a suitable primary prevention strategy. Nonetheless, it must be noted that hypercholesterolemia is a complex, chronic condition that must be carefully managed and requires close consultation with a health care practitioner. The advantages and disadvantages of OTC or BTC statin usage must therefore be carefully weighed before any potential introduction of OTC or BTC statins in Canada. PMID:17347688

  7. Relation among the plasma triglyceride/high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentration ratio, insulin resistance, and associated cardio-metabolic risk factors in men and women.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Martin R; Carbajal, Horacio A; Espeche, Walter G; Leiva Sisnieguez, Carlos E; Balbín, Eduardo; Dulbecco, Carlos A; Aizpurúa, Marcelo; Marillet, Alberto G; Reaven, Gerald M

    2012-06-15

    Results of recent studies using the ratio of plasma triglyceride (TG) to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol concentration to identify insulin-resistant patients at increased cardiometabolic risk have emphasized that the cut point used for this purpose will vary with race. Because TG and HDL cholesterol concentrations vary with gender, this analysis was initiated to define gender-specific plasma TG/HDL cholesterol concentration ratios that best identified high-risk subjects among women (n = 1,102) and men (n = 464) of primarily European ancestry. Insulin resistance was defined as the 25% of the population with the highest values for fasting plasma insulin concentration and homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance. Using TG/HDL concentration ratios >2.5 in women and >3.5 in men identified subgroups of men and women that were comparable in terms of insulin resistance and associated cardiometabolic risk, with significantly higher values for fasting plasma insulin, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, blood pressure, body mass index, waist circumference, and glucose and TG concentrations and lower HDL cholesterol concentrations than in women and men below these cut points. The sensitivity and specificity of these gender-specific cut points to identify insulin-resistant subjects were about 40% and about 80%, respectively. In conclusion, the plasma TG/HDL cholesterol concentration ratio that identifies patients who are insulin resistant and at significantly greater cardiometabolic risk varies between men and women.

  8. Association between LDL-cholesterol lowering genetic variants and risk of type 2 diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lotta, Luca A.; Sharp, Stephen. J; Burgess, Stephen; Perry, John R. B.; Stewart, Isobel. D; Willems, Sara M.; Luan, Jian’an; Ardanaz, Eva; Arriola, Larraitz; Balkau, Beverley; Boeing, Heiner; Deloukas, Panos; Forouhi, Nita G; Franks, Paul W; Grioni, Sara; Kaaks, Rudolf; Key, Timothy J; Navarro, Carmen; Nilsson, Peter M; Overvad, Kim; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Quirós, Jose-Ramón; Riboli, Elio; Rolandsson, Olov; Sacerdote, Carlotta; Salamanca, Elena C; Slimani, Nadia; Spijkerman, Annemieke MW; Tjonneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; van der A, Daphne L; van der Schouw, Yvonne T; McCarthy, Mark I.; Barroso, Inês; O’Rahilly, Stephen; Savage, David. B; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia

    2017-01-01

    Importance Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 or HMGCR, encoding the respective molecular targets of ezetimibe and statins, have previously been used as proxies to study the efficacy of these lipid-lowering drugs. Alleles near HMGCR are associated with a higher risk of type 2 diabetes, mimicking the increased incidence of new-onset diabetes associated with statin treatment in randomized clinical trials. It is unknown whether alleles near NPC1L1 are also associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Objective To investigate whether LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1 and other genes encoding current or prospective molecular targets of lipid-lowering therapy (i.e. HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR) are associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes. Design, Setting and Participants The associations with type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease of LDL-lowering genetic variants were investigated in meta-analyses of genetic association studies. Meta-analyses included 50,775 individuals with type 2 diabetes and 270,269 controls including three studies and 60,801 individuals with coronary artery disease and 123,504 controls from a published meta-analysis. Data collection took place in Europe and the United States between 1991 and 2016. Exposure LDL-lowering alleles in or near NPC1L1, HMGCR, PCSK9, ABCG5/G8, LDLR. Main Outcomes and Measures Odds ratio of type 2 diabetes and coronary artery disease. Results LDL-lowering genetic variants at NPC1L1 were inversely associated with coronary artery disease (odds ratio for a genetically-predicted reduction of 1 mmol/L in LDL cholesterol, 0.61; 95% confidence interval, 0.42-0.88; p=0.008) and directly associated with type 2 diabetes (2.42, 1.70-3.43; p<0.001). The odds ratio of type 2 diabetes for PCSK9 genetic variants was 1.19 (95% confidence interval, 1.02-1.38, p=0.03). For a given reduction in LDL cholesterol, genetic variants were associated with a similar reduction in coronary artery

  9. Efflux of cholesterol and phospholipids derived from the haemoglobin-lipid adduct in human red blood cells into plasma.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, Milan; Stanić, Dragana; Baricević, Ivona; Jones, David R; Nedić, Olgica; Niketić, Vesna

    2007-03-01

    The interior of red blood cells (RBCs) contains a variable amount of cholesterol and phospholipids bound to haemoglobin (Hb). This current study was devised to determine if this pool of lipids (termed Hb-Ch) was available for exchange with plasma lipoproteins. We studied the in vitro efflux of lipids from human RBCs into fasting plasma in men with either low (control group) or high Hb-Ch (study group). When plasma was incubated with a two-fold excess of autologous RBCs the plasma cholesterol level increased due to a decrease in the level of cholesterol from the RBC membrane (in the control group) and due to a decrease in the level of cholesterol both from the RBC membrane and the Hb-Ch fraction (in the study group). The loss of Hb-Ch-derived phospholipids during lipid efflux was roughly equal to that of Hb-Ch-derived cholesterol. The loss of RBC cholesterol into plasma high-density lipoproteins (HDL) was more pronounced in our study group and correlated with the loss of cholesterol from Hb-Ch. The Hb-Ch adduct significantly contributes to the lipid efflux from RBCs into plasma. The majority of cholesterol released from Hb-Ch appears in the plasma HDL fraction suggesting that Hb-Ch may play a role in reverse cholesterol transport in vivo.

  10. Plant sterols/stanols as cholesterol lowering agents: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    AbuMweis, Suhad S.; Barake, Roula; Jones, Peter J.H.

    2008-01-01

    Background Consumption of plant sterols has been reported to reduce low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations by 5–15%. Factors that affect plant sterol efficacy are still to be determined. Objectives To more precisely quantify the effect of plant sterol enriched products on LDL cholesterol concentrations than what is reported previously, and to identify and quantify the effects of subjects’ characteristics, food carrier, frequency and time of intake on efficacy of plant sterols as cholesterol lowering agents. Design Fifty-nine eligible randomized clinical trials published from 1992 to 2006 were identified from five databases. Weighted mean effect sizes were calculated for net differences in LDL levels using a random effect model. Results Plant sterol containing products decreased LDL levels by 0.31 mmol/L (95% CI, –0.35 to –0.27, P= < 0.0001) compared with placebo. Between trial heterogeneity was evident (Chi-square test, P = <0.0001) indicating that the observed differences between trial results were unlikely to have been caused by chance. Reductions in LDL levels were greater in individuals with high baseline LDL levels compared with those with normal to borderline baseline LDL levels. Reductions in LDL were greater when plant sterols were incorporated into fat spreads, mayonnaise and salad dressing, milk and yoghurt comparing with other food products such as croissants and muffins, orange juice, non-fat beverages, cereal bars, and chocolate. Plant sterols consumed as a single morning dose did not have a significant effect on LDL cholesterol levels. Conclusion Plant sterol containing products reduced LDL concentrations but the reduction was related to individuals’ baseline LDL levels, food carrier, and frequency and time of intake. PMID:19109655

  11. The cholesterol lowering efficacy of plant stanol ester yoghurt in a Turkish population: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We evaluated the cholesterol lowering efficacy of low-fat spoonable yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters on plasma lipid profiles of Turkish subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Methods Using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, intervention (n = 35) and control (n = 35) groups consumed either 115 g low-fat yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters or placebo yoghurt, respectively, for 4 weeks. Seventy subjects with untreated mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia (aged 23-65 years) were recruited. Changes in the lipid profile, including lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and triglycerides, and anthropometric measurements were monitored at screening, baseline, and at the end of the second, third, and fourth weeks of intervention. The general linear model repeated measures procedure was used to test differences in the repeated continuous variables between study groups. Results Serum total cholesterol (4.6%), LDL cholesterol (6.3%), and non-HDL cholesterol (6.2%) concentrations were reduced significantly from baseline in the plant stanol group compared to the control group (p = 0.007, p = 0.005 and p = 0.005, respectively). A variation in the response of serum total and LDL cholesterol between the subjects in plant stanol group was obtained. No clinically significant change in anthropometrical measurements was observed during the intervention. Conclusions The spoonable low-fat yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters lowered total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol levels in Turkish subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Nevertheless variation in baseline cholesterol levels, genetic predisposition of the subjects and compliance may contribute to a large individual variability. PMID:23786762

  12. The cholesterol lowering efficacy of plant stanol ester yoghurt in a Turkish population: a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Buyuktuncer, Zehra; Fisunoğlu, Mehmet; Guven, Gulay Sain; Unal, Serhat; Besler, Halit Tanju

    2013-06-20

    We evaluated the cholesterol lowering efficacy of low-fat spoonable yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters on plasma lipid profiles of Turkish subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Using a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study design, intervention (n = 35) and control (n = 35) groups consumed either 115 g low-fat yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters or placebo yoghurt, respectively, for 4 weeks. Seventy subjects with untreated mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia (aged 23-65 years) were recruited. Changes in the lipid profile, including lipoproteins, apolipoproteins, and triglycerides, and anthropometric measurements were monitored at screening, baseline, and at the end of the second, third, and fourth weeks of intervention. The general linear model repeated measures procedure was used to test differences in the repeated continuous variables between study groups. Serum total cholesterol (4.6%), LDL cholesterol (6.3%), and non-HDL cholesterol (6.2%) concentrations were reduced significantly from baseline in the plant stanol group compared to the control group (p = 0.007, p = 0.005 and p = 0.005, respectively). A variation in the response of serum total and LDL cholesterol between the subjects in plant stanol group was obtained. No clinically significant change in anthropometrical measurements was observed during the intervention. The spoonable low-fat yoghurt with 1.9 g/d plant stanols as esters lowered total, LDL, and non-HDL cholesterol levels in Turkish subjects with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. Nevertheless variation in baseline cholesterol levels, genetic predisposition of the subjects and compliance may contribute to a large individual variability.

  13. The biological response of cells to nanosecond pulsed electric fields is dependent on plasma membrane cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Cantu, Jody C; Tarango, Melissa; Beier, Hope T; Ibey, Bennett L

    2016-11-01

    Previous work from our laboratory demonstrated nanopore formation in cell membranes following exposure to nanosecond pulsed electric fields (nsPEF). We observed differences in sensitivity to nsPEF in both acute membrane injury and 24h lethality across multiple cells lines. Based on these data, we hypothesize that the biological response of cells to nsPEF is dependent on the physical properties of the plasma membrane (PM), including regional cholesterol content. Results presented in this paper show that depletion of membrane cholesterol disrupts the PM and increases the permeability of cells to small molecules, including propidium iodide and calcium occurring after fewer nsPEF. Additionally, cholesterol depletion concurrently decreases the "dose" of nsPEF required to induce lethality. In summary, the results of the current study suggest that the PM cholesterol composition is an important determinant in the cellular response to nsPEF. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Differential regulation of the lateral mobility of plasma membrane phospholipids by the extracellular matrix and cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Ramprasad, O G; Rangaraj, Nandini; Srinivas, G; Thiery, Jean Paul; Dufour, Sylvie; Pande, Gopal

    2008-05-01

    In this study, we compared qualitative and quantitative changes in the lateral mobility of phospholipid molecules in the plasma membrane of intact cells under various conditions of specific interaction of integrins in the cell membrane with two extracellular matrix (ECM) components viz. fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LN). We found a strong and specific correlation between the lower lateral mobility of phosphatidylcholine (PC) and higher lateral mobility of phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) when cells were expressing high levels of alpha5beta1 integrin and thus were adherent and motile on FN. The interaction between PC and FN in alpha5 integrin expressing cells was aided by the strong affinity of alpha5 integrin to the FN matrix. Cholesterol was involved in regulating the lateral mobility of PC to a great extent and of PE to a lesser extent without affecting the overall microviscosity of the plasma membrane or the distribution of caveolin-marked domains. The distribution and mobility of PC and PE molecules in the lamellipodial regions differed from that in the rest of the membrane and also in the more motile and in the less motile cells. We propose that these differences in distribution of PC and PE in different regions of cell membrane and their respective lateral mobility are observed due to the specific interaction of PC molecules with FN molecules in the ECM. Our results outline a new role of integrin-matrix interactions in the regulation of membrane phospholipid behavior. (c) 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. The relationship between plasma cholesterol, amino acids and acute phase proteins in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Chiarla, C; Giovannini, I; Siegel, J H

    2004-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to correlate degree of hypocholesterolemia to changes in plasma levels of amino acids and other metabolic variables in severely injured septic patients. Measurements included plasma cholesterol, full amino-acidograms, acute phase proteins, complementary variables and blood cell counts. The Fischer plasma molar amino acid ratio (leucine+isoleucine+valine)/(phenylalanine+tyrosine) was calculated. Plasma cholesterol for all measurements (n=145) was 3.1+/-1.1 mmol/L and, upon entry in the study, it was correlated inversely with sepsis severity score (p<0.05). Along the clinical course, changes in cholesterol were clearly paralleled by opposite changes in C-reactive protein, which was the best correlate of cholesterol (r2=0.70, p<0.0001). Furthermore cholesterol was inversely related to phenylalanine, fibrinogen, lactate and white blood cell count, and directly to the Fischer molar amino acid ratio, cystathionine, methionine, glycine and transferrin (r2 between 0.36 and 0.15, p<0.0001 for all). Within this pattern of correlations, cholesterol was also directly related to alkaline phosphatase, which accounted for the effect of cholestasis, when present. For any given value of the other variables, cholesterol increased significantly with increase in alkaline phosphatase (p<0.0001). C-reactive protein (CRP, mg/dl) and alkaline phosphatase (ALKPH, U/L) together in the same regression explained 79% of the variability of cholesterol (CHOL, mmol/L): CHOL=5.90-0.74[Log(e)CRP]+0.004[ALKPH]; multiple r2=0.79, p<0.0001. Inclusion in this regression of other variables did not increase the r2. By using only amino acid variables, the best fit was provided by a regression including the Fischer ratio and cystathionine, which explained 55% of the variability of cholesterol (multiple r2=0.55 p<0.0001), and this result was not improved by the inclusion of other amino acids. These data show that severity of hypocholesterolemia in sepsis is quantifiably related

  16. Chylomicron remnant cholesteryl esters as the major constituent of very low density lipoproteins in plasma of cholesterol-fed rabbits.

    PubMed

    Ross, A C; Zilversmit, D B

    1977-03-01

    Feeding rabbits 500 mg of cholesterol daily for 4 to 15 days greatly increased the concentration of esterified cholesterol in lipoproteins of d less than 1.006 g/ml. The origin of hypercholesterolemic very low density lipoproteins was investigated by monitoring the degradation of labeled lymph chyomicrons administered to normal and cholesterol-fed rabbits. Chylomicrons were labeled in vivo by feeding either 1) [3H]cholesterol and [14C]oleic acid or 2) [14C]cholesterol and [3H]retinyl acetate. After intravenous injection of labeled chylomicrons to recipient rabbits, [14C]triglyceride hydrolysis was equally rapid in normal and cholesterol-fed animals. Normal rabbits rapidly removed from plasma both labeled cholesteryl and retinyl esters, whereas cholesterol-fed rabbits retained nearly 50% of doubly labeled remnants in plasma 25 min after chylomicron injection. Ultracentrifugal separation of plasma into subfractions of very low density lipoproteins showed that chylomicron remnants in cholesterol-fed animals are found among all subclasses of very low density lipoproteins. Analysis of cholesteryl ester specific activity-time curves for the very low density lipoproteins subfraction from hypercholesterolemic plasma showed that nearly all esterified cholesterol in large very low density lipoproteins and approximately 30% of esterified cholesterol in small very low density lipoproteins was derived from chylomicron degradation. Apparently, nearly two-thirds of the esterified cholesterol in total very low density lipoproteins from moderately hypercholesterolemic rabbits is of dietary origin.

  17. Plasma lipoproteins in familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase deficiency: lipid composition and reactivity in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Glomset, John A.; Norum, Kaare R.; King, Weiling

    1970-01-01

    Plasma lipoproteins from patients with familial lecithin:cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) deficiency have been fractioned by preparative ultra-centrifugation and gel filtration and their lipid content and reactivity studied. All of the lipoproteins are abnormal with respect to lipid concentration or relative lipid content. The low density lipoproteins (LDL) and high density lipoproteins (HDL) appear to react normally with partially purified LCAT from normal plasma. Also, the lipids of the very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) and LDL, like those of the corresponding lipoproteins of normal plasma, are indirectly altered by the action of LCAT on normal HDL. Thus, during incubation in vitro VLDL cholesteryl ester is increased and VLDL triglyceride is decreased, as described by others for VLDL from hyperlipemic plasma, and both the unesterified cholesterol and lecithin of the VLDL and LDL are decreased. The patients' VLDL and LDL are abnormal, however, in that they lose unesterified cholesterol and lecithin to normal HDL in the absence of LCAT. Also, the patients' HDL lose these lipids to erythrocyte membranes in the absence of the enzyme. Our results provide further evidence that the abnormal cholesterol and phospholipid composition of the patients' lipoproteins is caused by the LCAT deficiency. They support the postulate that an excess of unesterified cholesterol and lecithin develops as VLDL are converted to LDL and HDL and suggest that in the absence of LCAT this excess lipid distributes among plasma lipoproteins and plasma membranes. They further suggest that LCAT normally reduces this excess lipid through a combination of direct and indirect effects. PMID:5456796

  18. Protein and cholesterol electrophoresis of plasma samples from captive cownose ray (Rhinoptera bonasus).

    PubMed

    Cray, Carolyn; Rodriguez, Marilyn; Field, Cara; McDermott, Alexa; Leppert, Lynda; Clauss, Tonya; Bossart, Gregory D

    2015-11-01

    Our study was undertaken to assess the application of semiautomated methods available at the reference laboratory level for the evaluation of plasma protein and cholesterol via electrophoresis in samples from cownose rays (Rhinoptera bonasus). Three groups of animals were assessed: clinically normal, clinically abnormal, and parasitized with leeches. As reported previously, the albumin band was negligible; the protein electrophoretograms were dominated by a large beta-globulin fraction. While the group of samples from the leech-parasitized rays did not show any large differences, the abnormal group exhibited significantly elevated total solids and cholesterol levels. The latter was related to a significant increase in very low density lipoprotein levels. The results demonstrate the potential application of these laboratory methods in quantitation of plasma proteins and cholesterol fractions in subclass Elasmobranchii.

  19. Gender differences in cholesterol-lowering medication prescribing in peripheral artery disease.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Greenland, Philip; Reed, George; Mazor, Kathleen M; Merriam, Philip A; Graff, Rex; Tao, Huimin; Pagoto, Sherry; Manheim, Larry; Kibbe, Melina R; Ockene, Ira S

    2011-12-01

    Among 320 patients with lower extremity peripheral artery disease (PAD) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels > 70 mg/dl, we determined whether male sex, higher education, and greater self-efficacy for willingness to request therapy from one's physician were associated with increases in LDL-C-lowering medication and achievement of an LDL-C level < 70 mg/dl at 1-year follow-up. Participants were enrolled in a randomized controlled clinical trial to determine whether a telephone counseling intervention can help PAD patients achieve an LDL-C level < 70 mg/dl, compared to usual care and attention control conditions, respectively. Adjusting for age, race, comorbidities, PAD severity, and other covariates, male sex (odds ratio = 3.33, 95% confidence interval = 1.64 to 6.77, p = 0.001) was associated with a higher likelihood of adding cholesterol-lowering medication during follow-up, but was not associated with achieving an LDL-C < 70 mg/dl (odds ratio = 1.09, 95% confidence interval = 0.55 to 2.18). No associations of education level or self-efficacy with study outcomes were identified. In conclusion, male PAD patients with baseline LDL-C levels ≥ 70 mg/dl were more likely to intensify LDL-C-lowering medication during 1-year follow-up than female PAD patients. Despite greater increases in LDL-C-lowering medication among female PAD patients, there was no difference in the degree of LDL-C lowering during the study between men and women with PAD.

  20. Adenovirus-mediated transfer of a gene encoding cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase into hamsters increases hepatic enzyme activity and reduces plasma total and low density lipoprotein cholesterol.

    PubMed Central

    Spady, D K; Cuthbert, J A; Willard, M N; Meidell, R S

    1995-01-01

    Clinical interventions that accelerate conversion of cholesterol to bile acids reduce circulating low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol concentrations. The initial and rate-limiting step in the bile acid biosynthetic pathway is catalyzed by hepatic cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase. To examine the effects of transient primary overexpression of this enzyme on sterol metabolism and lipoprotein transport, we constructed a recombinant adenovirus in which a cDNA encoding rat 7 alpha-hydroxylase is expressed from the human cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter (AdCMV7 alpha). Syrian hamsters administered AdCMV7 alpha intravenously accumulated transgene-specific mRNA in the liver and demonstrated a dose-dependent increase in hepatic microsomal 7 alpha-hydroxylase activity. The increased conversion of cholesterol to bile acids resulted in a compensatory increase in hepatic cholesterol synthesis. In addition, overexpression of 7 alpha-hydroxylase reduced the rate of LDL cholesterol entry into the plasma space and, in animals maintained on a Western-type diet, restored hepatic LDL receptor expression. As a consequence, plasma LDL concentrations fell by approximately 60% in animals maintained on control diet and by approximately 75% in animals consuming a Western-type diet. Plasma high density lipoprotein cholesterol levels were reduced to a lesser degree. These results demonstrate that transient upregulation of bile acid synthesis by direct transfer of a 7 alpha-hydroxylase gene favorably alters circulating lipoprotein profiles and suggest one potential molecular target for genetic strategies aimed at reducing cardiovascular risk. Images PMID:7635963

  1. Effect of frequency of dosing of plant sterols on plasma cholesterol levels and synthesis rate

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective was to compare the effects of plant sterols (PS) consumed as a single dose (single) at breakfast or as three doses consumed with breakfast, lunch and dinner (divided) on plasma lipoprotien levels and cholesterol endogenous fractional synthesis rate (FSR). A randomized, placebo-controll...

  2. ACAT inhibitor pactimibe sulfate (CS-505) reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic lesions by cholesterol-lowering and direct effects in apolipoprotein E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Terasaka, Naoki; Miyazaki, Atsuhiro; Kasanuki, Naomi; Ito, Kayoko; Ubukata, Naoko; Koieyama, Tadashi; Kitayama, Ken; Tanimoto, Tatsuo; Maeda, Naoyuki; Inaba, Toshimori

    2007-02-01

    The objective of the present study was to determine whether a novel acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, pactimibe sulfate (CS-505), could reduce atherosclerotic lesions beyond and independent of the reduction achieved by cholesterol lowering alone from two different types of lesions. (1) Early lesion model. Twelve-week-old apolipoprotein E (apoE)(-/-) mice were treated with 0.03 or 0.1% (w/w) CS-505, 0.1 or 0.3% avasimibe (CI-1011), or 3% cholestyramine for 12 weeks. Each treatment significantly reduced plasma cholesterol by a similar degree (43-48%). The antiatherosclerotic activity of 0.1% CS-505, however, was more efficacious than the effects of the other treatments (90% versus 40-50%). (2) Advanced lesion model. Twenty-four-week-old apoE(-/-) mice were treated with 0.03 or 0.1% CS-505 or 0.1% CI-1011 for 12 weeks. CS-505 at 0.1% revealed enhanced lesion reduction compared with 0.1% CI-1011 (77% versus 54%), whereas the plasma cholesterol-lowering effect of 0.1% CS-505 was almost the same as that of 0.1% CI-1011. Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis demonstrated that CS-505 significantly reduced the number of macrophages and expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, MMP-9, and MMP-13. These data indicate that CS-505 can reduce and stabilize atherosclerotic lesions. This antiatherosclerotic activity is exerted via both cholesterol lowering and direct ACAT inhibition in plaque macrophages.

  3. Peripheral plasma vitamin D and non-HDL cholesterol reflect the severity of cerebral cavernous malformation disease

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Romuald; Khanna, Omaditya; Shenkar, Robert; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Jesselson, Michael; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Gangal, Anupriya; Fam, Maged D; Gibson, Christopher C; Whitehead, Kevin J; Li, Dean Y; Liao, James K; Shi, Changbin; Awad, Issam A

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To correlate cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) disease aggressiveness with peripheral blood biomarkers hypothesized mechanistically. Patients & methods: A prospective case–control study enrolled 43 CCM patients, where 25-(OH) vitamin D, HDL and non-HDL cholesterol, CRP plasma levels and leukocyte ROCK activity were correlated with parameters of disease aggressiveness reflecting chronic and acute domains. Results: Patients with one or more features of chronically aggressive disease (early age at symptom onset, two or more symptomatic bleeds, high lesion burden) had significantly lower 25-(OH) vitamin D and non-HDL cholesterol levels in comparison to patients without these features. Conclusion: Validation of these biomarkers and their potential treatment modulation may influence the clinical care of patients with CCM disease. PMID:26861901

  4. Cost Effectiveness of Statin Drug Therapy in the Lowering of Cholesterol in Patients at Dwight D. Eisenhower Army Medical Center

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-05-01

    effectiveness of Statins 6 INTRODUCTION Conditions Which Prompted the Study Coronary heart disease (CHD) is and most likely will remain the leading cause of...Thompson, S. (1994). By how much and how quickly does reduction in serum cholesterol concentration lower the risk of ischaemic heart disease ...Report Type N/A Dates Covered (from... to) - Title and Subtitle Cost Effectiveness of Statin Drug Therapy in the Lowering of Cholesterol in

  5. Protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS) reduces plasma cholesterol concentrations and atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein E deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet

    PubMed Central

    Sivak, Olena; Darlington, Jerry; Gershkovich, Pavel; Constantinides, Panayiotis P; Wasan, Kishor M

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this work was to assess the effect of chronic administration of protonated nanostructured aluminosilicate (NSAS) on the plasma cholesterol levels and development of atherosclerotic lesions in Apolipoprotein (ApoE) deficient mice fed a high cholesterol and high fat diet. Apolipoprotein E (ApoE) deficient mice were divided into the following treatment groups: protonated NSAS 1.4% (w/w), untreated control and 2% (w/w) stigmastanol mixed with high-cholesterol/high-fat diet. Animals were treated for 12 weeks, blood samples were withdrawn every 4 weeks for determination of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride levels. At the end of the study the aortic roots were harvested for assessment of atherosclerotic lesions. NSAS at 1.4% (w/w) and stigmastanol at 2% (w/w) treatment groups showed significant decreases in plasma cholesterol concentrations at all time points relative to the control animals. The lesion sum area in 1.4% (w/w) NSAS and 2% (w/w) stigmastanol groups were significantly less from the control animals. In conclusion, in this study, the effectiveness of chronic administration of protonated NSAS material in the reduction of plasma cholesterol levels and decrease in development of atherosclerotic lesions was demonstrated in Apo-E deficient mice model. PMID:19638223

  6. Dietary supplementation of chardonnay grape seed flour reduces plasma cholesterol concentration, hepatic steatosis, and abdominal fat content in high-fat diet-induced obese hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyunsook; Bartley, Glenn E; Arvik, Torey; Lipson, Rebecca; Nah, Seung-Yeol; Seo, Kunho; Yokoyama, Wallace

    2014-02-26

    The mechanisms for the hypocholesterolemic and antiobesity effects of grape seed flours derived from white and red winemaking processing were investigated using male Golden Syrian hamsters fed high-fat (HF) diets supplemented with 10% partially defatted grape seed flours from Chardonnay (ChrSd), Cabernet Sauvignon (CabSd), or Syrah (SyrSd) pomace as compared to a HF control diet for 3 weeks. Hamsters fed the ChrSd diet had significantly lowered plasma total-, VLDL-, and LDL-cholesterol concentrations compared to the CabSd, SyrSd, and control diets. The improved plasma cholesterol after ChrSd was correlated with the up-regulation of hepatic genes related to cholesterol (CYP51) and bile acid (CYP7A1) synthesis as well as LDL-cholesterol uptake (LDLR). A reduction of hepatic lipid content was associated with altered expression of the genes related to lipid metabolism. However, fecal total lipid content was not changed. Expression of ileal apical sodium bile acid transporter (ASBT) was not affected by ChrSd, indicating unchanged ileal bile acid reabsorption. The antiobesity effect of the ChrSd diet appears to be related to expression of adipogenesis- and inflammation-related genes in adipose tissue. These findings suggest that flavonoid-rich Chardonnay grape seed flour induced cholesterol-lowering, antiobesity, and anti-inflammatory health benefits and attenuation of hepatic steatosis via regulation of gene expression related to cholesterol, bile acid, and lipid metabolism in liver and adipose tissue.

  7. Plasma hormones, metabolites, milk production, and cholesterol levels in Murrah buffaloes fed with Asparagus racemosus in transition and postpartum period.

    PubMed

    Singh, Surendra Pratap; Mehla, Ram Kumar; Singh, Mahendra

    2012-12-01

    Ten dry and pregnant Murrah buffaloes were selected to investigate the effect of Asparagus racemosus feeding on hormones, metabolites, milk yield, and plasma cholesterol levels. The treatment groups of buffaloes were fed with A. racemosus (shatavari) @ 150 g/day/animal during prepartum and @ 300 g/day/animal during the postpartum period. Blood samples collected on -6, -4, -2-week, day of parturition (0), and +2, +4, and +6-week postpartum were analyzed for plasma total cholesterol, triglycerides, HDL, low-density lipoproteins (LDL), prolactin, cortisol, and blood metabolites. Milk samples collected at weekly intervals (+1, +3, +5, and 7 weeks) were analyzed for total milk fat cholesterol. Prepartum plasma cholesterol concentrations were significantly higher in treatment group over the control (P < 0.05). Mean plasma triglycerides, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, glucose, and nonesterified fatty acid (NEFA) levels varied nonsignificantly between groups. Plasma prolactin and cortisol concentrations were significantly (P < 0.01) more in treatment group than in control group. On day of parturition, plasma prolactin, cortisol, LDL, and plasma total cholesterol were higher (P < 0.01) in treatment group buffaloes in comparison to control group. A. racemosus feeding significantly (P < 0.01) increased plasma prolactin, cortisol (P < 0.01), and milk fat cholesterol (P < 0.05) without affecting total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, glucose, and NEFA concentrations. The buffaloes of treatment group produced more milk (@ 0.526 kg/animal/day) suggesting thereby that A. racemosus is galactopoietic. It was concluded that feeding of A. racemosus increases plasma prolactin and cortisol and decreased plasma total cholesterol and LDL concentration.

  8. Potato pulps lowered the serum cholesterol and triglyceride levels in rats.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Naoto; Ito, Yusaku; Han, Kyu-Ho; Shimada, Ken-ichiro; Sekikawa, Mitsuo; Topping, David L; Bird, Anthony R; Noda, Takahiro; Chiji, Hideyuki; Fukushima, Michihiro

    2006-12-01

    In our previous study, we demonstrated that retrograded starch, a kind of resistant starch, of beans reduced serum lipid levels in rats. In this study, we examined whether retrograded starch in potato pulps could reduce serum lipid concentrations. Rats were given diets containing 15 g of retrograded starch in potato pulps from the Benimaru potato (BM) or Hokkaikogane potato (HK) in a 100 g diet for 4 wk. At the 4th week, the total cholesterol level in the serum in the BM group and serum triglyceride (TG) level in the HK group were significantly lower than those in the control group. In the BM group, the contents of fecal bile acids were significantly higher than those in the control group. On the other hand, in the HK group, the hepatic mRNA level of fatty acid synthase (FAS) was significantly lower than that in the control group. The FAS mRNA level correlated with the mRNA level of sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), a regulator of expression of FAS, positively. These results suggested that BM pulp promoted the excretion of bile acids, which resulted in a low concentration of serum cholesterol. On the other hand, HK pulp inhibited the synthesis of fatty acids at the mRNA levels of FAS and SREBP-1c, which might lead to a reduction of the serum TG level.

  9. Systematic review on evidence of the effectiveness of cholesterol-lowering drugs.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Abhaya; Guyomard, Veronique; Zaman, M Justin S; Rehman, Habib U; Myint, Phyo Kyaw

    2010-06-01

    Coronary heart disease (CHD) is the leading cause of mortality worldwide. With increasingly urbanized lifestyles in developing countries and the aging populations, the major risk factors for CHD such as obesity, diabetes mellitus, and hypercholesterolemia are likely to increase in the future. In the current report, we reviewed the evidence on the effect of cholesterol lowering using pharmacological agents. A PubMed/Medline systematic search was performed over the past 12 years (1998-2009 inclusive) and relevant papers written in the English language were selected. We used key phrases including, "risk factors for hypercholesterolemia," "management of hypercholesterolemia," "guidelines for management of hypercholesterolemia," and "pharmacological management of hypercholesterolemia." There were a total of over 3500 reports. We selected key publications on the effect of cholesterol lowering using different pharmacological agents. Several options exist with regards to pharmacological management of hypercholesterolemia. There is a substantial body of evidence to support the effect of a population shift towards a favorable risk profile, which has huge potential in reducing the burden of CHD globally.

  10. STATINS MORE THAN CHOLESTEROL LOWERING AGENTS IN ALZHEIMER DISEASE: THEIR PLEIOTROPIC FUNCTIONS AS POTENTIAL THERAPEUTIC TARGETS

    PubMed Central

    Barone, Eugenio; Domenico, Fabio Di; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative ad nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. PMID:24231510

  11. Statins more than cholesterol lowering agents in Alzheimer disease: their pleiotropic functions as potential therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Barone, Eugenio; Di Domenico, Fabio; Butterfield, D Allan

    2014-04-15

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder characterized by severe cognitive impairment, inability to perform activities of daily living and mood changes. Statins, long known to be beneficial in conditions where dyslipidemia occurs by lowering serum cholesterol levels, also have been proposed for use in neurodegenerative conditions, including AD. However, it is not clear that the purported effectiveness of statins in neurodegenerative disorders is directly related to cholesterol-lowering effects of these agents; rather, the pleiotropic functions of statins likely play critical roles. The aim of this review is to provide an overview on the new discoveries about the effects of statin therapy on the oxidative and nitrosative stress levels as well as on the modulation of the heme oxygenase/biliverdin reductase (HO/BVR) system in the brain. We propose a novel mechanism of action for atorvastatin which, through the activation of HO/BVR-A system, may contribute to the neuroprotective effects thus suggesting a potential therapeutic role in AD and potentially accounting for the observation of decreased AD incidence with persons on statin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Consumption of tall oil-derived phytosterols in a chocolate matrix significantly decreases plasma total and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    De Graaf, Jacqueline; De Sauvage Nolting, Pernette R W; Van Dam, Marjel; Belsey, Elizabeth M; Kastelein, John J P; Haydn Pritchard, P; Stalenhoef, Anton F H

    2002-11-01

    In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial we evaluated the effect of dietary chocolates enriched with a wood-based phytosterol-phytostanol mixture, containing 18 % (w/w) sitostanol, compared with placebo dietary chocolates in seventy subjects with primary hypercholesterolaemia (total cholesterol levels below 8 mmol/l). For 4 weeks, participants consumed three servings of the phytosterol-enriched chocolate/d that provided 1.8 g unesterified phytosterols/d or a placebo chocolate in conjunction with a low-fat, low-cholesterol diet. Plasma total and LDL-cholesterol levels were statistically significantly reduced by 6.4 % (-0.44 mmol/l) and 10.3 % (-0.49 mmol/l), respectively, after 4 weeks of phytosterol-enriched-chocolate treatment. Plasma HDL-cholesterol and triacylglycerol levels were not affected. Consumption of phytosterol-enriched chocolates significantly increased plasma lathosterol concentration (+20.7 %), reflecting an increased endogenous cholesterol synthesis in response to phytosterol-induced decreased intestinal cholesterol absorption. Furthermore, the chocolates enriched with phytosterols significantly increased both plasma sitosterol (+95.8 %) and campesterol (+64.1 %) levels, compared with the placebo chocolate group. However, the absolute values of plasma sitosterol and campesterol remained within the normal range, that is, below 10 mg/l. The chocolates with phytosterols were palatable and induced no clinical or biochemical side effects. These findings indicate that dietary chocolate enriched with tall oil-derived phytosterols (1.8 g/d) is effective in lowering blood total and LDL-cholesterol levels in subjects with mild hypercholesterolaemia and thus may be helpful in reducing the risk of CHD in these individuals.

  13. Plasma cholesterol-induced lesion networks activated before regression of early, mature, and advanced atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Björkegren, Johan L M; Hägg, Sara; Talukdar, Husain A; Foroughi Asl, Hassan; Jain, Rajeev K; Cedergren, Cecilia; Shang, Ming-Mei; Rossignoli, Aránzazu; Takolander, Rabbe; Melander, Olle; Hamsten, Anders; Michoel, Tom; Skogsberg, Josefin

    2014-02-01

    Plasma cholesterol lowering (PCL) slows and sometimes prevents progression of atherosclerosis and may even lead to regression. Little is known about how molecular processes in the atherosclerotic arterial wall respond to PCL and modify responses to atherosclerosis regression. We studied atherosclerosis regression and global gene expression responses to PCL (≥80%) and to atherosclerosis regression itself in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In atherosclerotic aortic wall from Ldlr(-/-)Apob (100/100) Mttp (flox/flox)Mx1-Cre mice, atherosclerosis regressed after PCL regardless of lesion stage. However, near-complete regression was observed only in mice with early lesions; mice with mature and advanced lesions were left with regression-resistant, relatively unstable plaque remnants. Atherosclerosis genes responding to PCL before regression, unlike those responding to the regression itself, were enriched in inherited risk for coronary artery disease and myocardial infarction, indicating causality. Inference of transcription factor (TF) regulatory networks of these PCL-responsive gene sets revealed largely different networks in early, mature, and advanced lesions. In early lesions, PPARG was identified as a specific master regulator of the PCL-responsive atherosclerosis TF-regulatory network, whereas in mature and advanced lesions, the specific master regulators were MLL5 and SRSF10/XRN2, respectively. In a THP-1 foam cell model of atherosclerosis regression, siRNA targeting of these master regulators activated the time-point-specific TF-regulatory networks and altered the accumulation of cholesterol esters. We conclude that PCL leads to complete atherosclerosis regression only in mice with early lesions. Identified master regulators and related PCL-responsive TF-regulatory networks will be interesting targets to enhance PCL-mediated regression of mature and advanced atherosclerotic lesions.

  14. Effect of a diet high in monounsaturated fat from almonds on plasma cholesterol and lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Spiller, G A; Jenkins, D J; Cragen, L N; Gates, J E; Bosello, O; Berra, K; Rudd, C; Stevenson, M; Superko, R

    1992-04-01

    The effect of almonds as part of a low saturated fat, low cholesterol, high-fiber diet was studied in 26 adults (13 men, 13 women). The baseline diet was modified in a similar way for all subjects by limiting meat, fatty fish, high-fat milk products, eggs, and saturated fat. Grains, beans, vegetables, fruit, and low-fat milk products were the foundation of the diet. During the almond diet period, raw almonds (100 mg/day) supplied 34 g/day of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA), 12 g/day of polyunsaturated fatty acid, and 6 g/day of saturated fatty acid. Almond oil was the only oil allowed for food preparation. There was a rapid and sustained reduction in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol without changes in high-density lipoprotein cholesterol. This was reflected in a total plasma cholesterol decrease from (means +/- SEM) 235 +/- 5.0 at baseline to 215 +/- 5.0 at 3 weeks, and to 214 +/- 5.0 mg/dl at 9 weeks (p less than 0.001). When the consumption of nuts high in MUFA increases the fat content of the diet, reduction rather than elevation of plasma cholesterol has to be expected, possibly due to the MUFA content of these nuts.

  15. [FATTY ACID COMPOSITION OF PHOSPHOLIPIDS AND ESTERIFIED CHOLESTEROL OF THE BLOOD PLASMA OF RABBIT UNDER ARGININE ACUTE PANCREATITIS].

    PubMed

    Hopanenko, O O; Rivis, J F

    2015-01-01

    The content and fatty acid composition of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol were studied in the blood plasma of rabbits under acute arginine pancreatitis and its correction using linseed oil. It is established that the transport and anti-inflammatory functions of blood plasma deteriorates under acute arginine pancreatitis due to a decrease of the content of polyunsaturated fatty acids in phospholipids. The amount of cholesterol esterified with saturated and monounsaturated fatty acids increases in the blood plasma of rabbits. The concentration of phospholipids and esterified cholesterol is normalized and their fatty acid composition is improved in the lipid composition of the blood plasma of rabbits with acute arginine pancreatitis fed with linseed oil.

  16. Thermotropic lipid phase separations in human erythrocyte ghosts and cholesterol-enriched rat liver plasma membranes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, L M; Mobley, P W

    1984-01-01

    Electron spin resonance (ESR) studies of human erythrocyte ghosts labeled with 5-nitroxide stearate, I(12,3), indicate that a temperature-dependent lipid phase separation occurs with a high onset at 38 degrees C. Cooling below 38 degrees C induces I(12,3) clustering. Similar phase separations were previously identified in human platelet and cholesterol-loaded [cholesterol/phospholipid molar ratio (C/P) = 0.85] rat liver plasma membranes [L.M. Gordon et al., 1983; J. Membrane Biol. 76; 139-149]; these were attributed to redistribution of endogenous lipid components such that I(12,3) is excluded from cholesterol-rich domains and tends to reside in cholesterol-poor domains. Further enrichment of rat liver plasma membranes to C/P ratios of 0.94-0.98 creates an "artificial" system equivalent to human erythrocyte ghosts (C/P = 0.90), using such criteria as probe flexibility, temperature dependent I(12,3) clustering; and polarity of the probe environment. Consequently, cholesterol-rich and -poor domains probably exist in both erythrocyte ghosts and high cholesterol liver membranes at physiologic temperatures. The temperature dependence of cold-induced hypertonic lysis of intact human erythrocytes was examined by incubating cells in 0.9 M sucrose for 10 min at 1 degree C intervals between 9 and 46 degrees C (Stage 1), and then subjecting them to 0 degrees C for 10 min (Stage 2). Plots of released hemoglobin are approx. sigmoidal, with no lysis below 18 degrees C and maximal lysis above 40 degrees C. The protective effect of low temperatures during Stage 1 may be due to the formation of cholesterol-rich domains that alter the bilayer distribution and/or conformation of critical membrane-associated proteins.

  17. [Therapy and prevention of coronary heart diseases through lowering of the serum cholesterol levels; third consensus 'Cholesterol'. Consensus Working Group, CBO].

    PubMed

    Simoons, M L; Casparie, A F

    1998-09-19

    For the second time the consensus text for lipid lowering therapy is revised. In angiographic studies it was shown that a decrease in the total cholesterol as well as the low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level results in a reduction of the progression of vascular disease. Furthermore, intervention trials demonstrated that therapy with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors reduces not only both the cardiovascular and total mortality, but also other manifestations of coronary heart disease (CHD). Hypercholesterolaemia is treated with a low-fat diet and normalisation of the weight. For individuals, this might result in a reduction of the risk for myocardial infarction or death and for the population in a decrease of the mean serum cholesterol concentration and the incidence of CHD. The indication for drug therapy is founded on the expected effectiveness to reduce the incidence of (new manifestations of) CHD, which is related to the level of the absolute risk of vascular disease. In persons without known vascular diseases this risk is calculated from the total and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol ratio, age, sex, blood pressure, diabetes mellitus, and smoking. Treatment with cholesterol synthesis inhibitors must be considered in (a) patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia, (b) all patients with a history of myocardial infarction or other symptomatic vascular disease with a total cholesterol concentration above 5.0 mmol/l and a life expectancy of at least five years; (c) persons with a combination of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hypercholesterolaemia and high risk for development of CHD, rising from 25% per 10 years at the age of 40 years to 35-40% per 10 years at the age of 70 years, with a life expectancy of at least five years. If these guidelines are followed, the upper limit of the calculated cost-effectiveness is about Dfl. 40,000 per life year gained. The working group judges this reasonable in comparison with other therapeutic interventions in the

  18. Lower hybrid assisted plasma current ramp-up in ITER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, S. H.; Artaud, J. F.; Basiuk, V.; Bécoulet, A.; Dokuka, V.; Hoang, G. T.; Imbeaux, F.; Khayrutdinov, R. R.; Lister, J. B.; Lukash, V. E.

    2009-06-01

    Lower hybrid (LH) assisted plasma current ramp-up in ITER is demonstrated using a free-boundary full tokamak discharge simulator which combines the DINA-CH and CRONOS codes. LH applied from the initial phase of the plasma current ramp-up increases the safety margins in operating the superconducting poloidal field coils both by reducing resistive ohmic flux consumption and by providing non-inductively driven plasma current. Loss of vertical control associated with high plasma internal inductance is avoided by tailoring the plasma current density profiles. Effects of early LH application on the plasma shape evolution are identified by the free-boundary plasma simulation.

  19. Effect of cigarette smoke and dietary cholesterol on plasma lipoprotein composition

    SciTech Connect

    Hojnacki, J.L.; Mulligan, J.J.; Cluette, J.E.; Kew, R.R.; Stack, D.J.; Huber, G.L.

    1981-01-01

    Pigeons were assigned to four treatment groups: 1) Controls fed a chow diet ad libitum and retained in their cages; 2) Sham pigeons fed a cholesterol-saturated fat diet and exposed to fresh air by the Lorillard smoking machine; 3) Low nicotine-low carbon monoxide (LoLo) animals also fed the cholesterol diet and exposed to low concentrations of cigarette smoke; and 4) High nicotine-high carbon monoxide (HiHi) birds fed the cholesterol diet and subjected to high concentrations of inhalants. Plasma very low density (VLDL), low density (LDL), and high density (HDL) lipoproteins were isolated by density gradient ultracentrifugation. Smoke-related differences appeared in HiHi HDL which contained relatively more free and esterified cholesterol and total lipid, but less total protein than HDL from Sham-smoked pigeons. VLDL from birds exposed to cigarette smoke (LoLo and HiHi) contained relatively more total lipid, but less total protein than VLDL from Sham pigeons. Inhalation smoke produced a marked depression in the HDL2/HDL3 ratio resulting from an increased proportion of the HDL3 subfraction relative to HDL2. Pigeons fed the cholesterol-saturated fat diet circulated HDL with greater free and esterified cholesterol mass than Controls. Diet also altered the type of cholesteryl ester present in HDL with cholesteryl linoleate representing the predominant form in Control pigeons and cholesteryl oleate in cholesterol-fed birds. These results demonstrate that cigarette smoking can mediate alterations in lipoprotein composition independent of changes induced by dietary cholesterol and saturated fat.

  20. Mung bean decreases plasma cholesterol by up-regulation of CYP7A1.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yang; Hao, Liu; Shi, Zhenxing; Wang, Lixia; Cheng, Xuzhen; Wang, Suhua; Ren, Guixing

    2014-06-01

    Our results affirmed that supplementation of 1 or 2% mung bean could decrease plasma total cholesterol and triacylglycerol level. Mung bean increased mRNA 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-glutaryl-coenzyme A reductase. Most importantly, mung bean increased not only the protein level of cholesterol-7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) but also mRNA CYP7A1. It was concluded that the hypocholesterolemic activity of mung bean was most probable mediated by enhancement of bile acid excretion and up-regulation of CYP7A1.

  1. Cholesterol lowering for secondary prevention: What statin dose should we use?

    PubMed Central

    Josan, Kiranbir; McAlister, Finlay A

    2007-01-01

    Over the past decade, 17 large placebo-controlled trials have established that statin therapy lowers LDL cholesterol and prevents cardiovascular events and death in patients with coronary disease or at high risk for atherosclerotic events. Nine trials of higher dose vs. lower dose statins (reporting data from 29,853 patients with coronary artery disease and 486 patients with other indications for statin therapy) have established that higher dose statin therapy is more efficacious than lower dose therapy in reducing myocardial infarctions/coronary death (by 16%) and stroke (by 18%) in patients with coronary disease but only reduces all-cause mortality in patients at high risk for coronary death (such as patients immediately after acute coronary syndrome). Higher dose statins are associated with statistically significantly increased risks of myopathy and elevated transaminases compared to lower dose statins; while relative risks for these outcomes are 1.2 and 4.0, the absolute increases are small (0.5% and 1%). Secondary analyses of these trials using individual patient data and multivariate adjustment will be needed to appropriately examine the incremental benefits of different LDL targets, and trials are needed to determine whether combinations of low dose statins plus other lipid lowering agents may achieve better clinical outcomes than higher dose statin therapy alone. PMID:18078013

  2. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy. PMID:25045281

  3. Lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Bays, Harold E

    2014-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is characterized by hyperglycemia, insulin resistance, and/or progressive loss of β-cell function. T2DM patients are at increased risk of micro- and macrovascular disease, and are often considered as representing an atherosclerotic coronary heart disease (CHD) risk equivalent. Interventions directed at glucose and lipid level control in T2DM patients may reduce micro- and macrovascular disease. The optimal T2DM agent is one that lowers glucose levels with limited risk for hypoglycemia, and with no clinical trial evidence of worsening CHD risk. Lipid-altering drugs should preferably reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apolipoprotein B (apo B) and have evidence that the mechanism of action reduces CHD risk. Statins reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and apo B and have evidence of improving CHD outcomes, and are thus first-line therapy for the treatment of hypercholesterolemia. In patients who do not achieve optimal lipid levels with statin therapy, or who are intolerant to statin therapy, add-on therapy or alternative therapies may be indicated. Additional available agents to treat hypercholesterolemic patients with T2DM include bile acid sequestrants, fibrates, niacin, and ezetimibe. This review discusses the use of these alternative agents to treat hypercholesterolemia in patients with T2DM, either as monotherapy or in combination with statin therapy.

  4. Plant sterol-enriched margarines and reduction of plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations in normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects.

    PubMed

    Weststrate, J A; Meijer, G W

    1998-05-01

    To compare effects on plasma total-, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol concentrations of margarines enriched with different vegetable oil sterols or sitostanol-ester. A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled balanced incomplete Latin square design with five treatments and four periods of 3.5 weeks. Margarines enriched with sterols from soybean, sheanut or ricebran oil or with sitostanol-ester were compared to a non-enriched control margarine. Sterol intake was between 1.5-3.3 g/d. Two thirds of the soybean oil sterols were esterified to fatty acids. Unilever Research Laboratory, Vlaardingen, The Netherlands. One hundred healthy non-obese normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic volunteers aged 45+/-12.8 y, with plasma total cholesterol levels below 8 mmol/L at entry. Plasma lipid, carotenoid and sterol concentrations, blood clinical chemistry and haematology, fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterylesters and food intake. Ninety-five volunteers completed the study. None of the margarines induced adverse changes in blood clinical chemistry, serum total bile acids or haematology. Plasma total- and LDL-cholesterol concentrations were significantly reduced by 8-13% (0.37-0.44 mmol/L) compared to control for margarines enriched in soybean oil sterol-esters or sitostanol-ester. No effect on HDL-cholesterol concentrations occurred. The LDL- to HDL-cholesterol ratio was reduced by 0.37 and 0.33 units for these margarines, respectively. Effects on blood lipids did not differ between normocholesterolaemic and mildly hypercholesterolaemic subjects. Plasma sitosterol and campesterol levels were significantly higher for the soybean oil sterol margarine and significantly lower for the sitostanol-ester margarine compared to control. Dietary intake was very similar across treatments. The fatty acid composition of plasma cholesterylesters confirmed the good compliance to the treatment. All sterol enriched margarines reduced lipid-standardized plasma alpha- plus beta

  5. Characterization of Lactobacillus plantarum Lp27 isolated from Tibetan kefir grains: a potential probiotic bacterium with cholesterol-lowering effects.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ying; Wu, Fei; Wang, Xiaojun; Sui, Yujie; Yang, Longfei; Wang, Jinfeng

    2013-05-01

    Lactobacillus plantarum Lp27 was isolated from Tibetan kefir grains. The Lp27 isolate survived a 3-h incubation at pH 2.0 and grew normally in 0.3% oxgall. In addition, the Lp27 isolate exhibited an adhesion ratio of 9.5 ± 2.5% with Caco-2 cells. Antibiotic susceptibility tests indicated that the Lp27 isolate was sensitive to gentamicin, tetracycline, erythromycin, and chloramphenicol, and was resistant to vancomycin with a minimum inhibitory value of 23µg/mL. The Lp27 isolate inhibited cholesterol absorption through downregulation of Niemann-Pick C1-like 1 (NPC1L1) expression in Caco-2 cells. The Lp27 isolate was fed to hypercholesterolemic rats at a dose of 10(9) cfu/d for 4wk. The Lp27 feeding significantly lowered serum total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglycerides concentrations, but no change was observed in the serum high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations. In addition, liver total cholesterol and triglycerides were decreased in the Lp27-fed group. The expression of NPC1L1 in the duodenum and jejunum was significantly decreased following Lp27 feeding. These results indicate that Lp27 might be an effective cholesterol-lowering probiotic and a possible mechanism for the cholesterol-reducing effects of probiotics. Copyright © 2013 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The relationship between breakfast habits and plasma cholesterol levels in schoolchildren.

    PubMed

    Resnicow, K

    1991-02-01

    The relationship between breakfast habits and plasma total cholesterol (TC) levels was examined in a sample of 530 US schoolchildren ages 9-19. Based on response to a 124-item food checklist, subjects' usual breakfast habits were classified into one of six discrete categories: 1) Skipper, 2) Ready-to-Eat (RTE) cereal with Fiber, 3) Traditional Breakfast, 4) Chips or Sweets, 5) Other RTE, or 6) Mixed Breakfasts. Breakfast skippers, controlling for age, gender, and body mass index, had significantly (p less than 0.05) higher TC levels, 172 mg/dl, than breakfast consumers, 160 mg/dl. Among breakfast eaters, the mean TC of the "Fiber RTE" group was significantly lower (p less than 0.01) than all other breakfast consumers. Usual skippers were less likely to believe in the importance and benefits of breakfast as well as the need to eat foods high in fiber. These findings suggest that encouraging chronic breakfast skippers to modify their dietary habits may improve their nutritional status and possibly reduce their risk for future heart disease.

  7. [Update of planning tables of cholesterol-lowering therapy orientated to achieve LDL therapeutic targets].

    PubMed

    Masana, Luis; Plana, Núria

    2015-01-01

    This is the third update of a planning-table for use in cholesterol-lowering therapy, so as to obtain LDLc objectives. This is an easy to use laptop tool to help choose the best statin or combination therapy (statin plus ezetimibe) depending on the current LDL concentration of the patient, and the LDLc objective to achieve. It is based on a colour code that indicates the drugs that are efficient enough to help patients to achieve their LDL goal. Along with the table, recommendations are given for the best strategy in order to implement the optimal therapy in a maximum of two clinical encounters. Copyright © 2015 Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  8. Cholesterol modulates CFTR confinement in the plasma membrane of primary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Abu-Arish, Asmahan; Pandzic, Elvis; Goepp, Julie; Matthes, Elizabeth; Hanrahan, John W; Wiseman, Paul W

    2015-07-07

    The cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) is a plasma-membrane anion channel that, when mutated, causes the disease cystic fibrosis. Although CFTR has been detected in a detergent-resistant membrane fraction prepared from airway epithelial cells, suggesting that it may partition into cholesterol-rich membrane microdomains (lipid rafts), its compartmentalization has not been demonstrated in intact cells and the influence of microdomains on CFTR lateral mobility is unknown. We used live-cell imaging, spatial image correlation spectroscopy, and k-space image correlation spectroscopy to examine the aggregation state of CFTR and its dynamics both within and outside microdomains in the plasma membrane of primary human bronchial epithelial cells. These studies were also performed during treatments that augment or deplete membrane cholesterol. We found two populations of CFTR molecules that were distinguishable based on their dynamics at the cell surface. One population showed confinement and had slow dynamics that were highly cholesterol dependent. The other, more abundant population was less confined and diffused more rapidly. Treatments that deplete the membrane of cholesterol caused the confined fraction and average number of CFTR molecules per cluster to decrease. Elevating cholesterol had the opposite effect, increasing channel aggregation and the fraction of channels displaying confinement, consistent with CFTR recruitment into cholesterol-rich microdomains with dimensions below the optical resolution limit. Viral infection caused the nanoscale microdomains to fuse into large platforms and reduced CFTR mobility. To our knowledge, these results provide the first biophysical evidence for multiple CFTR populations and have implications for regulation of their surface expression and channel function.

  9. Attitudes and behavior of peripheral arterial disease patients toward influencing their physician's prescription of cholesterol-lowering medication.

    PubMed

    McDermott, Mary M; Mazor, Kathleen M; Reed, George; Pagoto, Sherry; Graff, Rex; Merriam, Philip; Kibbe, Melina; Greenland, Philip; Ockene, Judy; Olendzki, Barbara; Huimin Tao; Ockene, Ira

    2010-04-01

    Among 355 peripheral arterial disease (PAD) patients with low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels > or = 70 mg/dl, we assessed knowledge regarding optimal LDL levels and the importance of LDL-C-lowering therapy. We also assessed PAD participants' behaviors and attitudes regarding their engagement with their physician in treatment decisions for LDL-C lowering. The average baseline LDL-C level of participants was 103.4 mg/dl +/- 30.7 mg/dl. Seventy-six percent of participants were taking at least one cholesterol-lowering medication. Sixty-six percent were unable to define their optimal LDL-C. Only 47% strongly agreed that their own actions and decisions could reduce their LDL-C. Just 29.8% were aware that patients who request specific medications from their physician were more likely to receive them, and 16% had asked their physician whether they should be taking more cholesterol-lowering medication. These findings suggest that further study is needed to identify effective interventions to educate PAD patients and their physicians about the importance of cholesterol-lowering therapy and to encourage PAD patients to participate with their physician in decisions regarding cholesterol-lowering treatment. Clinical Trial Registration - URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique identifier: NCT00217919.

  10. Maternal plasma cholesterol and duration of pregnancy: A prospective cohort study in Ghana.

    PubMed

    Oaks, Brietta M; Stewart, Christine P; Laugero, Kevin D; Adu-Afarwuah, Seth; Lartey, Anna; Vosti, Stephen A; Ashorn, Per; Dewey, Kathryn G

    2017-10-01

    Low plasma cholesterol may be associated with preterm birth; however, results are mixed and limited primarily to high-income countries. Our objective was to determine whether maternal plasma lipid concentrations are associated with pregnancy duration. We performed a nested cohort (n = 320) study of pregnant Ghanaian women enrolled in a randomized controlled trial. Total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride concentrations were analyzed in plasma at ≤20and 36 weeks gestation as continuous variables and also categorized into low, referent, or high (<10th, 10th-90th, >90th percentile). At ≤20 weeks, plasma lipid concentrations were not associated with pregnancy duration. At 36 weeks, total cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were not associated with pregnancy duration. Higher HDL-C at 36 weeks was associated with a longer pregnancy duration (adjusted β-coefficient ± standard error: 0.05 ± 0.02 days mg(-1) /dL, p = .02); pregnancy duration was 5.9 ± 2.0 (mean ± standard error) days shorter among women with low HDL-C compared with the referent group (10th-90th percentile) (p = .02) and 8.6 ± 2.6 days shorter when compared with the high HDL-C group (p = .003). Pregnancy duration was 4.9 ± 2.1 days longer among women with low low-density lipoprotein cholesterol at 36 weeks gestation when compared with the referent group (p = .051). Our data suggest that low HDL-C in the third trimester of pregnancy is associated with a shorter duration of pregnancy in this study population but do not support the hypothesis that low total cholesterol is associated with a shorter pregnancy duration. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Long-Term Safety and Efficacy of Lowering Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol With Statin Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ford, Ian; Murray, Heather; Packard, Chris J.

    2016-01-01

    Background— Extended follow-up of statin-based low-density lipoprotein cholesterol lowering trials improves the understanding of statin safety and efficacy. Examining cumulative cardiovascular events (total burden of disease) gives a better appreciation of the clinical value of statins. This article evaluates the long-term impact of therapy on mortality and cumulative morbidity in a high-risk cohort of men. Methods and Results— The West of Scotland Coronary Prevention Study was a primary prevention trial in 45- to 64-year-old men with high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. A total of 6595 men were randomized to receive pravastatin 40 mg once daily or placebo for an average of 4.9 years. Subsequent linkage to electronic health records permitted analysis of major incident events over 20 years. Post trial statin use was recorded for 5 years after the trial but not for the last 10 years. Men allocated to pravastatin had reduced all-cause mortality (hazard ratio, 0.87; 95% confidence interval, 0.80–0.94; P=0.0007), attributable mainly to a 21% decrease in cardiovascular death (hazard ratio, 0.79; 95% confidence interval, 0.69–0.90; P=0.0004). There was no difference in noncardiovascular or cancer death rates between groups. Cumulative hospitalization event rates were lower in the statin-treated arm: by 18% for any coronary event (P=0.002), by 24% for myocardial infarction (P=0.01), and by 35% for heart failure (P=0.002). There were no significant differences between groups in hospitalization for noncardiovascular causes. Conclusion— Statin treatment for 5 years was associated with a legacy benefit, with improved survival and a substantial reduction in cardiovascular disease outcomes over a 20-year period, supporting the wider adoption of primary prevention strategies. PMID:26864092

  12. Synergetic cholesterol-lowering effects of main alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis in HepG2 cells and hypercholesterolemia hamsters.

    PubMed

    Kou, Shuming; Han, Bing; Wang, Yue; Huang, Tao; He, Kai; Han, Yulong; Zhou, Xia; Ye, Xiaoli; Li, Xuegang

    2016-04-15

    Hyperlipidemia contributes to the progression of cardiovascular diseases. Main alkaloids from Rhizoma Coptidis including berberine (BBR), coptisine (COP), palmatine (PAL), epiberberine (EPI) and jatrorrhizine (JAT), improved dyslipidemia in hypercholesterolemic hamsters to a different degree. In this study, HepG2 cells and hypercholesterolemic hamsters were used to investigate the synergetic cholesterol-lowering efficacy of these five main alkaloids. The cellular lipid and cholesterol accumulation and in HepG2 cells were evaluated by Oil Red O staining and HPLC analysis. LDL receptor, 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl CoA reductase (HMGCR) and cholesterol 7-alpha-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) that involving cholesterol metabolism in HepG2 cells were measured by qRT-PCR, western blot and immunofluorescence analysis. The serum profiles including total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-c), as well as TC and total bile acids (TBA) of feces in hypercholesterolemic hamsters were also measured. As compared to single alkaloids, the combination of five main alkaloids (COM) reduced the lipid and cholesterol accumulation in HepG2 cells more effectively and performed an advantageous effect on controlling TC, TG, LDL-c and HDL-c in hypercholesterolemic hamsters. More effective reduction of TBA and TC levels in feces of hamsters were achieved after the administration of COM. These effects were derived from the up-regulation of LDL receptor and CYP7A1, as well as HMGCR downregulation. Our results demonstrated that COM showed a synergetic cholesterol-lowering efficacy, which was better than single alkaloids and it might be considered as a potential therapy for hypercholesterolemia. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Digital Gene-Expression Profiling Analysis of the Cholesterol-Lowering Effects of Alfalfa Saponin Extract on Laying Hens

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Rui; Liang, Minggen; Zhu, Xiaoyan; Wang, Chengzhang

    2014-01-01

    Background To prevent cardiovascular disease, people are advised to limit their intake of dietary cholesterol to less than 300 mg/day. Egg consumption has been seriously reduced because of the high levels of cholesterol. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the cholesterol-lowering effects of alfalfa saponin extract (ASE) in yolk and the molecular mechanisms underlying these effects using digital gene-expression profiling analysis. Liver and ovary tissues were isolated from laying hens fed with ASE for RNA sequencing. Results The cholesterol content of the yolks of eggs from hens fed 120 mg/kg ASE declined considerably on day 60. Other groups (60, 240, 480 mg/kg ASE group) also showed decreases, but they were not significant. Digital gene expression generated over nine million reads per sample, producing expression data for least 12,384 genes. Among these genes, 110 genes showed greater than normal expression in the liver and 107 genes showed greater than normal expression in the ovary. Cholesterol 7 alpha-hydroxylase (Cyp7a1) and apolipoprotein H (Apoh), which act in the synthesis of bile acid and cholesterol efflux, showed more expression in the livers of hens given dietary ASE supplementation. In the ovary, levels of very low density lipoprotein receptor (Vldlr), apolipoprotein B (Apob), apovitellenin 1 (ApovldlII) and vitellogenin (VtgI, VtgII and VtgIII) in ovary decreased with dietary ASE supplementation. Conclusion Transcriptome analysis revealed that the molecular mechanisms underlying the cholesterol-lowering effects of ASE were partially mediated by enhancement of cholesterol efflux in the liver and this reduced of cholesterol deposition in the ovary. PMID:24886784

  14. Control of Cholesterol Metabolism and Plasma HDL Levels by miRNA-144

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez, Cristina M.; Rotllan, Noemi; Vlassov, Alexander V.; Dávalos, Alberto; Li, Mu; Goedeke, Leigh; Aranda, Juan F.; Cirera-Salinas, Daniel; Araldi, Elisa; Salerno, Alessandro; Wanschel, Amarylis; Zavadil, Jiri; Castrillo, Antonio; Kim, Jungsu; Suárez, Yajaira; Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2013-01-01

    Rationale Foam cell formation due to excessive accumulation of cholesterol by macrophages is a pathological hallmark of atherosclerosis, the major cause of morbidity and mortality in Western societies. Liver X nuclear receptors (LXRs) regulate the expression of the adenosine triphosphate-binding cassette (ABC) transporters, including ABCA1 and ABCG1. ABCA1 and ABCG1 facilitate the efflux of cholesterol from macrophages and regulate high-density lipoprotein (HDL) biogenesis. Increasing evidence supports the role of microRNA (miRNAs) in regulating cholesterol metabolism through ABC transporters. Objective We aimed to identify novel miRNAs that regulate cholesterol metabolism in macrophages stimulated with LXR agonists. Methods and Results To map the miRNA expression signature of macrophages stimulated with LXR agonists, we performed a miRNA profiling microarray analysis in primary mouse peritoneal macrophages stimulated with LXR ligands. We report that LXR ligands increase miR-144 expression in macrophages and mouse livers. Overexpression of miR-144 reduces ABCA1 expression and attenuates cholesterol efflux to ApoA1 in macrophages. Delivery of miR-144 oligonucleotides to mice attenuates ABCA1 expression in the liver, reducing HDL levels. Conversely, silencing of miR-144 in mice increases the expression of ABCA1 and plasma HDL levels. Thus, miR-144 appears to regulate both macrophage cholesterol efflux and HDL biogenesis in the liver. Conclusions 1) miR-144 regulates cholesterol metabolism via suppressing ABCA1 expression; and 2) modulation of miRNAs may represent a potential therapeutical intervention for treating dyslipidemia and atherosclerotic vascular disease. PMID:23519695

  15. Comparison of a dietary portfolio diet of cholesterol-lowering foods and a statin on LDL particle size phenotype in hypercholesterolaemic participants.

    PubMed

    Gigleux, Iris; Jenkins, David J A; Kendall, Cyril W C; Marchie, Augustine; Faulkner, Dorothea A; Wong, Julia M W; de Souza, Russell; Emam, Azadeh; Parker, Tina L; Trautwein, Elke A; Lapsley, Karen G; Connelly, Philip W; Lamarche, Benoît

    2007-12-01

    The effect of diet v. statins on LDL particle size as a risk factor for CVD has not been examined. We compared, in the same subjects, the impact of a dietary portfolio of cholesterol-lowering foods and a statin on LDL size electrophoretic characteristics. Thirty-four hyperlipidaemic subjects completed three 1-month treatments as outpatients in random order: a very-low saturated fat diet (control); the same diet with 20 mg lovastatin; a dietary portfolio high in plant sterols (1 g/4200 kJ), soya proteins (21.4 g/4200 kJ), soluble fibres (9.8 g/4200 kJ) and almonds (14 g/4200 kJ). LDL electrophoretic characteristics were measured by non-denaturing polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis of fasting plasma at 0, 2 and 4 weeks of each treatment. The reductions in plasma LDL-cholesterol levels with the dietary portfolio and with statins were comparable and were largely attributable to reductions in the estimated concentration of cholesterol within the smallest subclass of LDL (portfolio - 0.69 (se 0.10) mmol/l, statin - 0.99 (se 0.10) mmol/l). These were significantly greater (P < 0.01) than changes observed after the control diet ( - 0.17 (se 0.08) mmol/l). Finally, baseline C-reactive protein levels were a significant predictor of the LDL size responsiveness to the dietary portfolio but not to the other treatments. The dietary portfolio, like the statin treatment, had only minor effects on several features of the LDL size phenotype, but the pronounced reduction in cholesterol levels within the small LDL fraction may provide additional cardiovascular benefit over the traditional low-fat diet of National Cholesterol Education Program Step II.

  16. Localized lower hybrid acceleration of ionospheric plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kintner, P. M.; Vago, J.; Chesney, S.; Arnoldy, R. L.; Lynch, K. A.; Pollock, C. J.; Moore, T. E.

    1992-01-01

    Observations of the transverse acceleration of ions in localized regions of intense lower hybrid waves at altitudes near 1000 km in the auroral ionosphere are reported. The acceleration regions are thin filaments with dimensions across geomagnetic field lines of about 50-100 m corresponding to 5-10 thermal ion gyroradii or one hot ion gyroradius. Within the acceleration region lower hybrid waves reach peak-to-peak amplitudes of 100-300 mV/m and ions are accelerated transversely with characteristic energies of the order of 10 eV. These observations are consistent with theories of lower hybrid wave collapse.

  17. Pleiotropic effects of statins: evidence for benefits beyond LDL-cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Marzilli, Mario

    2010-01-01

    Evidence is mounting that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) have a number of pleiotropic effects over and above their lipid-lowering properties in patients with cardiovascular disease and heart failure. In addition to lowering low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels, several studies have shown statins to improve survival and reduce the risk of major cardiovascular events in patients without established cardiovascular disease but with cardiovascular risk factors. Statins have also been shown to have beneficial effects, including a reduction in all-cause mortality, in patients with ischemic and non-ischemic congestive heart failure, and have been associated with a reduced incidence of atrial fibrillation. Furthermore, statins have been associated with improvements in renal function in patients with pre-existing renal disease or the prevention of new-onset renal dysfunction, as well as improvements in lung function in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or age-related decline in lung function. The pleiotropic effects of statins appear to result from improvements in endothelial function, a reduction in inflammatory mediators, a decline in the development of atheroma through the stabilization of atheromatous plaques, and the inhibition of cardiac hypertrophy through an antioxidant mechanism. Long-term statin use may reduce morbidity and mortality rates in a broad range of patients, and most patients at high risk of cardiovascular disease may benefit from statin treatment; however, further data are required to demonstrate conclusively whether these trends are truly independent of the lipid-lowering effects of statins.

  18. Participants' willingness to consume soy foods for lowering cholesterol and receive counselling on cardiovascular disease by nutrition professionals.

    PubMed

    Schryver, Tamara; Smith, Chery

    2006-10-01

    To determine if participants would be interested in consuming soy foods to lower cholesterol in primary and secondary prevention of heart disease, and to identify the role physicians and registered dietitians have in providing dietary advice, about soy foods or other foods, for participants with elevated cholesterol. Qualitative data from 12 focus groups were gathered from a convenience sample of 74 adults, aged 18-91 years, with and without high cholesterol (total cholesterol >200 mg dl(-1)). Participants were recruited from Minneapolis/St. Paul mainstream and natural foods grocery stores. Focus group interviews were taped and transcribed verbatim. Common themes were identified, coded and compared using NVivo computer software. Participants believed diet, lifestyle and genetics were the cause of high cholesterol and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Few participants were aware of the Food and Drug Administration health claim for soy protein, yet many were willing to consume soy as part of lifestyle modification to prevent CVD. They reported preferring food and exercise over medication to treat high cholesterol. Few participants had ever received dietary advice from physicians on treating high cholesterol or CVD, and most doubted the accuracy of such advice. They believed registered dietitians were the most credible source of nutrition counselling and expressed an interest in physician referrals to dietitians. A collaboration and referral system between physicians and registered dietitians could increase CVD patients' consumption of soy foods as a means potentially leading to a reduced risk of heart disease in participants.

  19. Effect of crilvastatin, a new cholesterol lowering agent, on unesterified LDL-cholesterol metabolism into bile salts by rat isolated hepatocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Clerc, T; Sbarra, V; Diaconescu, N; Lafont, H; Jadot, G; Laruelle, C; Chanussot, F

    1995-01-01

    1. The aim of these experiments was to determine the effect of crilvastatin, a new cholesterol lowering agent, on the metabolism of unesterified low density lipoprotein (LDL)-cholesterol by rat freshly isolated hepatocytes. This preclinical model was developed as an alternative to in vivo experiments, to mimic the metabolic effects of a molecule on its target cells and to define optimal conditions for future experimentation on human hepatocytes. 2. Cells were obtained from normolipidaemic or hypercholesterolaemic rats, hypercholesterolaemia was nutritionally induced. Incubations were performed in a medium containing 600 microM taurocholate and 50 microM or 300 microM crilvastatin. 3. This molecule was shown in vitro to be carried by physiological transporters, i.e., albumin-bile salt micellar associations and LDL. Crilvastatin induced a significance increase in the synthesis and secretion by hepatocytes of bile salts resulting from the metabolism of unesterified LDL-cholesterol in both normolipidaemic and hypercholesterolaemic rats. Stimulation involved non-conjugated as well as tauro- and glyco-conjugated bile salts. These findings corroborate preliminary studies showing in vivo that crilvastatin enhances the secretion of bile acids by stimulating the uptake and incorporation of LDL-cholesterol by the liver. PMID:7735689

  20. Molecular mechanism of reverse cholesterol transport: reaction of pre-beta-migrating high-density lipoprotein with plasma lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yasushi; Kotite, Leila; Gan, Yonghong; Spencer, Thomas A; Fielding, Christopher J; Fielding, Phoebe E

    2004-11-23

    A 70-75 kDa high-density lipoprotein (HDL) particle with pre-beta-electrophoretic migration (pre-beta(1)-HDL) has been identified in several studies as an early acceptor of cell-derived cholesterol. However, the further metabolism of this complex has not been determined. Here we sought to identify the mechanism by which cell-derived cholesterol was esterified and converted to mature HDL as part of reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). Human plasma selectively immunodepleted of pre-beta(1)-HDL was used to study factors regulating pre-beta(1)-HDL production. A major role for phospholipid transfer protein (PLTP) in the recycling of pre-beta(1)-HDL was identified. Cholesterol binding, esterification by lecithin/cholesterol acyltransferase (LCAT) and transfer by cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) were measured using (3)H-cholesterol-labeled cell monolayers. LCAT bound to (3)H-free cholesterol (FC)-labeled pre-beta(1)-HDL generated cholesteryl esters at a rate much greater than the rest of HDL. The cholesteryl ester produced in pre-beta(1)-HDL in turn became the preferred substrate of CETP. Selective LCAT-mediated reactivity with pre-beta(1)-HDL represents a novel mechanism increasing the efficiency of RCT.

  1. Modulated expression of genes associated with NO signal transduction contributes to the cholesterol-lowering effect of electro-acupuncture.

    PubMed

    Li, Ling; Tan, Guang-Hong; Zhang, Yi-Zheng

    2012-07-01

    Electro-acupuncture (EA) at Fenglong acupoint (ST40) can lower the levels of serum cholesterol and triacylglycerols. To study the hepatic genes responsible for the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA, suppression subtractive hybridization combined with the switch mechanism at the 5'-end of RNA template cDNA synthesis and long-distance PCR were employed using hepatic tissues from hypercholesterolemia and EA-treated mice. 68 % of the identified genes are involved in metabolism, immune response, and signal transduction pathways. Real-time PCR and western blot indicate that EA at ST40 induces the expression of nNOS and Mt1, two genes involved in NO signal transduction. EA treatment for hypercholesterolemia thus involves the modulation of several biological pathways and provides a physiological link between NO signal transduction and the cholesterol-lowering effect of EA.

  2. Effect of plasma membrane cholesterol depletion on glucose transport regulation in leukemia cells.

    PubMed

    Caliceti, Cristiana; Zambonin, Laura; Prata, Cecilia; Vieceli Dalla Sega, Francesco; Hakim, Gabriele; Hrelia, Silvana; Fiorentini, Diana

    2012-01-01

    GLUT1 is the predominant glucose transporter in leukemia cells, and the modulation of glucose transport activity by cytokines, oncogenes or metabolic stresses is essential for their survival and proliferation. However, the molecular mechanisms allowing to control GLUT1 trafficking and degradation are still under debate. In this study we investigated whether plasma membrane cholesterol depletion plays a role in glucose transport activity in M07e cells, a human megakaryocytic leukemia line. To this purpose, the effect of cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MBCD) on both GLUT1 activity and trafficking was compared to that of the cytokine Stem Cell Factor (SCF). Results show that, like SCF, MBCD led to an increased glucose transport rate and caused a subcellular redistribution of GLUT1, recruiting intracellular transporter molecules to the plasma membrane. Due to the role of caveolae/lipid rafts in GLUT1 stimulation in response to many stimuli, we have also investigated the GLUT1 distribution along the fractions obtained after non ionic detergent treatment and density gradient centrifugation, which was only slightly changed upon MBCD treatment. The data suggest that MBCD exerts its action via a cholesterol-dependent mechanism that ultimately results in augmented GLUT1 translocation. Moreover, cholesterol depletion triggers GLUT1 translocation without the involvement of c-kit signalling pathway, in fact MBCD effect does not involve Akt and PLCγ phosphorylation. These data, together with the observation that the combined MBCD/SCF cell treatment caused an additive effect on glucose uptake, suggest that the action of SCF and MBCD may proceed through two distinct mechanisms, the former following a signalling pathway, and the latter possibly involving a novel cholesterol dependent mechanism.

  3. Trends in high LDL cholesterol, cholesterol-lowering medication use, and dietary saturated-fat intake: United States, 1976-2010.

    PubMed

    Kuklina, Elena V; Carroll, Margaret D; Shaw, Kate M; Hirsch, Rosemarie

    2013-03-01

    From 1976–1980 through 2007–2010, for U.S. adults aged 40–74, a decrease was observed in the prevalence of high LDL–C, as well as an increase in adults using lipid-lowering medications and consuming a diet low in saturated fat. A substantial decline in the prevalence of high LDL–C from 59% to 28% was seen over this same time period. There also were significant increases in the percentage of adults meeting federal dietary guidelines (6) for low dietary saturated-fat intake, from 25% to 42%, between 1976–1980 and 2007–2010; however, no significant changes were observed from 1988–1994 to 2007–2010. Although declines in the proportion of calories from saturated fat have occurred since the 1970s, the average dietary energy intake has increased (7). Use of cholesterol-lowering medication continued to grow steadily, from 5% to 23%, from 1988–1994 to 2007–2010. Despite recent advances in medical treatment, high cholesterol remains a significant public health problem in the United States, with more than one-quarter of adults aged 40–74 having high LDL–C. These findings may provide useful information for evaluation of programs and policy initiatives aimed at reducing the prevalence of high cholesterol in the adult population. All material appearing in this report is in the public domain and may be reproduced or copied without permission; citation as to source, however, is appreciated.

  4. Planar Optical Nanoantennas Resolve Cholesterol-Dependent Nanoscale Heterogeneities in the Plasma Membrane of Living Cells.

    PubMed

    Regmi, Raju; Winkler, Pamina M; Flauraud, Valentin; Borgman, Kyra J E; Manzo, Carlo; Brugger, Jürgen; Rigneault, Hervé; Wenger, Jérôme; García-Parajo, María F

    2017-09-25

    Optical nanoantennas can efficiently confine light into nanoscopic hotspots, enabling single-molecule detection sensitivity at biological relevant conditions. This innovative approach to breach the diffraction limit offers a versatile platform to investigate the dynamics of individual biomolecules in living cell membranes and their partitioning into cholesterol-dependent lipid nanodomains. Here, we present optical nanoantenna arrays with accessible surface hotspots to study the characteristic diffusion dynamics of phosphoethanolamine (PE) and sphingomyelin (SM) in the plasma membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. Fluorescence burst analysis and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy performed on nanoantennas of different gap sizes show that, unlike PE, SM is transiently trapped in cholesterol-enriched nanodomains of 10 nm diameter with short characteristic times around 100 μs. The removal of cholesterol led to the free diffusion of SM, consistent with the dispersion of nanodomains. Our results are consistent with the existence of highly transient and fluctuating nanoscale assemblies enriched by cholesterol and sphingolipids in living cell membranes, also known as lipid rafts. Quantitative data on sphingolipids partitioning into lipid rafts is crucial to understand the spatiotemporal heterogeneous organization of transient molecular complexes on the membrane of living cells at the nanoscale. The proposed technique is fully biocompatible and thus provides various opportunities for biophysics and live cell research to reveal details that remain hidden in confocal diffraction-limited measurements.

  5. 16-Dehydropregnenolone lowers serum cholesterol by up-regulation of CYP7A1 in hyperlipidemic male hamsters.

    PubMed

    Ramakrishna, Rachumallu; Kumar, Durgesh; Bhateria, Manisha; Gaikwad, Anil Nilkanth; Bhatta, Rabi Sankar

    2017-04-01

    16-Dehydropregnenolone (DHP) has been developed and patented as a promising antihyperlipidemic agent by CSIR-Central Drug Research Institute (CSIR-CDRI), India. Although DHP is implicated in controlling cholesterol homeostasis, the mechanism underlying its pharmacological effect in hyperlipidemic disease models is poorly understood. In the present study, we postulated that DHP lowers serum lipids through regulating the key hepatic genes accountable for cholesterol metabolism. The hypothesis was tested on golden Syrian hamsters fed with high-fat diet (HFD) following oral administration of DHP at a dose of 72mg/kg body weight for a period of one week. The serum total cholesterol (TC), triglycerides (TG), low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and total bile acids (TBA) in feces were measured. Real time comparative gene expression studies were performed for CYP7A1, LXRα and PPARα level in liver tissue of hamsters. The results revealed that the DHP profoundly decreased the levels of serum TC, TG, LDL-C and atherogenic index (AI), whilst elevated the HDL-C/TC ratio. Besides, DHP exhibited an anti-hyperlipidemic effect in the HFD induced hyperlipidemic hamsters by means of: (1) up-regulating the gene expression of CYP7A1 encoded cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase, that promotes the catabolism of cholesterol to bile acid; (2) inducing the gene expression of transcription factors LXRα and PPARα; (3) increasing the TBA excretion through feces. Collectively, the findings presented confer the hypolipidemic activity of DHP via up-regulation of hepatic CYP7A1 pathway that promotes cholesterol-to-bile acid conversion and bile acid excretion.

  6. Implementing phytosterols into medical practice as a cholesterol-lowering strategy: overview of efficacy, effectiveness, and safety.

    PubMed

    AbuMweis, Suhad S; Marinangeli, Christopher P F; Frohlich, Jiri; Jones, Peter J H

    2014-10-01

    More than 200 clinical trial reports and several meta-analyses have demonstrated that phytosterols (PSs), natural components of plants, induce clinically relevant reductions in blood low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Here we review data regarding the biochemical effects and potential cardiovascular benefit of PSs as part of the dietary management of dyslipidemia. In addition to discussing the efficacy, effectiveness, and safety of PSs as hypocholesterolemic agents, this review provides an overview of PSs as an adjunctive therapy to cholesterol-lowering pharmaceuticals. Given this lack of evidence regarding the benefits of PSs for reducing cardiovascular end points, this review also discusses the present knowledge that exists about the ability for therapeutic dosages of PSs to confer protection from cardiovascular-related mortality and morbidity. Finally, this review summarizes the factors that affect PS efficacy and the Canadian regulations that govern the use of PSs as cholesterol-lowering agents in foods and supplements.

  7. Preparation of immuno-affinity membranes for cholesterol removal from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Denizli, Adil

    2002-06-05

    Anti-low density lipoprotein antibody (anti-LDL) immobilized polyhydroxyethylmethacrylate (pHEMA) based membrane was prepared for selective removal of cholesterol from hypercholesterolemic human plasma. In order to further increase blood-compatibility, a newly synthesized comonomer, methacryloylamidophenylalanine (MAPA) was included in the membrane formulation. p(HEMA-MAPA) membranes were produced by a photopolymerization and then characterized by swelling tests, SEM and contact angle studies. Blood-compatibility tests were also investigated. The water swelling ratio of the p(HEMA-MAPA) membrane increases significantly (133.2.9%) compared with pHEMA (58%). p(HEMA-MAPA) membranes have large pores around in the range of 5-10 microm. All the clotting times increased when compared with pHEMA membranes. Loss of platelets and leukocytes was very low. The maximum anti-LDL antibody immobilization was achieved around pH 7.0. Immobilization of anti-LDL antibody was 12.6 mg/ml. There was a very low non-specific cholesterol adsorption onto the plain p(HEMA-MAPA) membranes, about 0.36 mg/ml. Anti-LDL antibody immobilized membranes adsorbed in the range of 4.5-7.2 mg cholesterol/ml from hypercholesterolemic human plasma. Up to 95% of the adsorbed LDL antibody was desorbed. The adsorption-desorption cycle was repeated 10 times using the same membrane. There was no significant loss in the adsorption capacity.

  8. Lowering cholesterol in chronic kidney disease: is it safe and effective?

    PubMed

    Wong, Muh Geot; Wanner, Christoph; Knight, John; Perkovic, Vlado

    2015-11-14

    The value of cholesterol lowering in preventing cardiovascular disease has now been established in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD), who are intrinsically at high cardiovascular risk. While data from completed studies has clearly demonstrated substantive benefit of statins in early CKD, the effects in end-stage CKD remain controversial. Recent studies have also suggested that the effects of different statins on the kidney may be heterogeneous, and the safety of high-dose statins in this population remains uncertain. Communications from regulators such as the US Food and Drug Administration concerning potential side effects of statin therapy (particularly memory loss and the risk of diabetes) have created debate in the medical literature and unrest in the public mind about the value of long-term statin therapy for vulnerable patient populations. The evaluation of risks and benefits for this class of agents is critically dependent on baseline risk. This article will review current evidence for the benefits and risks of statin therapy for kidney and cardiovascular disease progression in the CKD population.

  9. Cholesterol and triglycerides lowering activities of caraway fruits in normal and streptozotocin diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Lemhadri, A; Hajji, L; Michel, J-B; Eddouks, M

    2006-07-19

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of single and repeated oral administration of the aqueous extract of Carum carvi L. fruits at a dose of (20mg/kg) on lipid metabolism in normal and streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats (STZ). After a single oral administration, Carum carvi extract produced a significant decrease on triglycerides levels in normal rats (p<0.05). In STZ diabetic rats, cholesterol levels were decreased significantly 6h after Carum carvi treatment (p<0.05). On the other hand, repeated oral administration of Carum carvi extract exhibited a significant hypotriglyceridemic and hypocholesterolemic activities in both normal (p<0.01 and <0.001 respectively) and STZ diabetic rats (p<0.001) 15 days after Carum carvi treatment. We conclude that the aqueous extract of Carum carvi (20mg/kg) exhibits a potent lipid lowering activity in both normal and severe hyperglycemic rats after repeated oral administration of Carum carvi aqueous extract.

  10. Increasing Serum Half-life and Extending Cholesterol Lowering in Vivo by Engineering Antibody with pH-sensitive Binding to PCSK9*

    PubMed Central

    Chaparro-Riggers, Javier; Liang, Hong; DeVay, Rachel M.; Bai, Lanfang; Sutton, Janette E.; Chen, Wei; Geng, Tao; Lindquist, Kevin; Casas, Meritxell Galindo; Boustany, Leila M.; Brown, Colleen L.; Chabot, Jeffrey; Gomes, Bruce; Garzone, Pamela; Rossi, Andrea; Strop, Pavel; Shelton, Dave; Pons, Jaume; Rajpal, Arvind

    2012-01-01

    Target-mediated clearance and high antigen load can hamper the efficacy and dosage of many antibodies. We show for the first time that the mouse, cynomolgus, and human cross-reactive, antagonistic anti-proprotein convertase substilisin kexin type 9 (PCSK9) antibodies J10 and the affinity-matured and humanized J16 exhibit target-mediated clearance, resulting in dose-dependent pharmacokinetic profiles. These antibodies prevent the degradation of low density lipoprotein receptor, thus lowering serum levels of LDL-cholesterol and potently reducing serum cholesterol in mice, and selectively reduce LDL-cholesterol in cynomolgus monkeys. In order to increase the pharmacokinetic and efficacy of this promising therapeutic for hypercholesterolemia, we engineered pH-sensitive binding to mouse, cynomolgus, and human PCSK9 into J16, resulting in J17. This antibody shows prolonged half-life and increased duration of cholesterol lowering in two species in vivo by binding to endogenous PCSK9 in mice and cynomolgus monkeys, respectively. The proposed mechanism of this pH-sensitive antibody is that it binds with high affinity to PCSK9 in the plasma at pH 7.4, whereas the antibody-antigen complex dissociates at the endosomal pH of 5.5–6.0 in order to escape from target-mediated degradation. Additionally, this enables the antibody to bind to another PCSK9 and therefore increase the antigen-binding cycles. Furthermore, we show that this effect is dependent on the neonatal Fc receptor, which rescues the dissociated antibody in the endosome from degradation. Engineered pH-sensitive antibodies may enable less frequent or lower dosing of antibodies hampered by target-mediated clearance and high antigen load. PMID:22294692

  11. Cholesterol-lowering effects of oat β-glucan: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials1234

    PubMed Central

    Beck, Eleanor J; Tosh, Susan; Wolever, Thomas MS

    2014-01-01

    Background: Health claims regarding the cholesterol-lowering effect of soluble fiber from oat products, approved by food standards agencies worldwide, are based on a diet containing ≥3 g/d of oat β-glucan (OBG). Given the number of recently published randomized controlled trials (RCTs), it is important to update the findings of previous meta-analyses. Objective: The objective was to quantify the effect of ≥3 g OBG/d on serum cholesterol concentrations in humans and investigate potential effect modifiers. Design: A meta-analysis was performed on 28 RCTs comparing ≥3 g OBG/d with an appropriate control. Systematic searches were undertaken in PubMed, AGRICOLA, and Scopus between 1 January 1966 and 6 June 2013, plus in-house study reports at CreaNutrition AG. Studies were assessed with regard to inclusion/exclusion criteria, and data were extracted from included studies by reviewers working independently in pairs, reconciling differences by consensus. Estimates of the mean reduction in serum cholesterol from baseline between the OBG and control diets were analyzed by using random-effects meta-analysis models and meta-regression. Results: OBG in doses of ≥3 g/d reduced low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and total cholesterol relative to control by 0.25 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.20, 0.30; P < 0.0001) and 0.30 mmol/L (95% CI: 0.24, 0.35; P < 0.0001), respectively, with some indication of heterogeneity (P = 0.13 and P = 0.067). There was no significant effect of OBG on high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol or triglycerides and no evidence that dose (range across trials: 3.0–12.4 g/d) or duration of treatment (range: 2–12 wk) influenced the results. LDL cholesterol lowering was significantly greater with higher baseline LDL cholesterol. There was a significantly greater effect for both LDL and total cholesterol in subjects with diabetes compared with those without (although based on few studies). Conclusions: Adding ≥3 g OBG/d to the diet reduces LDL and total

  12. Hazelnut oil administration reduces aortic cholesterol accumulation and lipid peroxides in the plasma, liver, and aorta of rabbits fed a high-cholesterol diet.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Aydan; Kanbağli, Oznur; Balkan, Jale; Küçük, Mutlu; Cevikbaş, Uğur; Aykaç-Toker, Gülçin; Berkkan, Hakan; Uysal, Müjdat

    2004-10-01

    Hazelnut oil (HO) is rich in monounsaturated fatty acids and antioxidants. We wanted to investigate the effect of HO on lipid levels and prooxidant-antioxidant status in rabbits fed a high-cholesterol (HC) diet. An HC diet caused significant increases in lipids and lipid peroxide levels in the plasma, liver, and aorta together with histopathological atherosclerotic changes in the aorta. Glutathione levels, glutathione peroxidase, and glutathione transferase activities decreased significantly, but superoxide dismutase activity and vitamin E and C levels remained unchanged in the livers of rabbits following HC diet. HO supplementation reduced plasma, liver, and aorta lipid peroxide levels and aorta cholesterol levels together with amelioration in atherosclerotic lesions in the aortas of rabbits fed an HC diet, without any decreasing effect on cholesterol levels in the plasma or liver. HO did not alter the antioxidant system in the liver in the HC group. Our findings indicate that HO reduced oxidative stress and cholesterol accumulation in the aortas of rabbits fed an HC diet.

  13. Nature's Cholesterol-Lowering Drug: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Lovastatin from Red Yeast Rice-Containing Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazri, Maisarah Mohd; Samat, Farah D.; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Walsh, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice, produced by fermenting the fungus, "Monascus purpureus", on rice ("Oryza sativa" L. gramineae), is commonly used as a dietary supplement. It contains lovastatin, a member of the statin family of compounds, and is licensed for use as a cholesterol-lowering agent. This experiment involves the isolation and structure elucidation of…

  14. Two Years after Molecular Diagnosis of Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Majority on Cholesterol-Lowering Treatment but a Minority Reaches Treatment Goal

    PubMed Central

    Huijgen, Roeland; Kindt, Iris; Verhoeven, Sjoerd B. J.; Sijbrands, Eric J. G.; Vissers, Maud N.; Kastelein, John J. P.; Hutten, Barbara A.

    2010-01-01

    Background The risk of premature cardiovascular disease in patients with familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) can be profoundly reduced by cholesterol-lowering therapy, and current guidelines for FH advocate ambitious low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) goals. In the present study, we determined whether these goals are reflected in current clinical practice once FH has been diagnosed. Methodology/Principal Findings In 2008, we sent questionnaires to all subjects (aged 18–65 years) who were molecularly diagnosed with FH in the year 2006 through the screening program in the Netherlands. Of these 1062 subjects, 781 completed the questionnaire (46% males; mean age: 42±12 years; mean LDL-C at molecular diagnosis (baseline): 4.1±1.3 mmol/L). The number of persons that used cholesterol-lowering therapy increased from 397 (51%) at baseline to 636 (81%) after diagnosis. Mean treated LDL-C levels decreased significantly to 3.2±1.1 mmol/L two years after diagnosis. Only 22% achieved the LDL-C target level of ≤2.5 mmol/L. Conclusions/Significance The proportion of patients using cholesterol-lowering medication was significantly increased after FH diagnosis through genetic cascade screening. The attained LDL-C levels were lower than those reported in previous surveys on medication use in FH, which could reflect the effect of more stringent lipid target levels. However, only a minority of the medication users reached the LDL-C target. PMID:20169164

  15. Nature's Cholesterol-Lowering Drug: Isolation and Structure Elucidation of Lovastatin from Red Yeast Rice-Containing Dietary Supplements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nazri, Maisarah Mohd; Samat, Farah D.; Kavanagh, Pierce V.; Walsh, John J.

    2012-01-01

    Red yeast rice, produced by fermenting the fungus, "Monascus purpureus", on rice ("Oryza sativa" L. gramineae), is commonly used as a dietary supplement. It contains lovastatin, a member of the statin family of compounds, and is licensed for use as a cholesterol-lowering agent. This experiment involves the isolation and structure elucidation of…

  16. A Healthy Balance of Plasma Cholesterol by a Novel Annurca Apple-Based Nutraceutical Formulation: Results of a Randomized Trial

    PubMed Central

    Tenore, Gian Carlo; Caruso, Domenico; Buonomo, Giuseppe; D'Avino, Maria; Campiglia, Pietro; Marinelli, Luciana

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Cardiovascular diseases are nowadays preferential targets of preventive medicine through a straightforward therapy on lipid profile. However, statins, the first-line lipid-lowering drug therapy, specifically act on low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), having a modest effect on plasma high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) concentrations. Today, a number of novel HDL-targeted therapies are emerging, along with unexpected side effects. Thus, novel and possibly safe substances, able to correct impaired lipid profile in humans, are still in great demand. Herein, based on encouraging clinical data, we formulated a nutraceutical product (AppleMetS®, AMS), based on a polyphenolic extract from Annurca apple, and demonstrated that two capsules a day of AMS, after one month, have a LDL-C lowering outcome equivalent to 40 mg of simvastatin or 10 mg of atorvastatin. Nevertheless, different from statin-based therapy, AMS exerted a notable effect on HDL (+49.2%). Based on the trial results, we can assert that AMS formulation could effectively integrate the current therapeutic arsenal to correct impaired lipid profile in humans. Specifically, AMS may be considered a complementary and/or alternative safe substance suitable for the treatment of mildly hypercholesterolemic subjects who do not present occurrence of atheromatous plaques yet. PMID:28296588

  17. Combination diet and exercise interventions for the treatment of dyslipidemia: an effective preliminary strategy to lower cholesterol levels?

    PubMed

    Varady, Krista A; Jones, Peter J H

    2005-08-01

    At present, dyslipidemia is most commonly treated with drug therapy. However, because safety concerns regarding the use of pharmaceutical agents have arisen, a need for alternative nonpharmacological therapies has become increasingly apparent. The National Cholesterol Education Program (NCEP) Adult Treatment Panel III (ATP III) recommends lifestyle therapies, which include a combination of diet and exercise modifications, in place of drug treatment for patients who fall into an intermediate range of coronary heart disease (CHD) risk. This review examined the cholesterol lowering efficacy of the following 2 NCEP-recommended combination therapies: 1) low saturated fat diets combined with exercise, and 2) nutritional supplementation, i.e., fish oil, oat bran, or plant sterol supplementation, combined with exercise, in the treatment of dyslipidemia. Combination therapies are particularly advantageous because diet and exercise elicit complementary effects on lipid profiles. More specifically, diet therapies, with some exceptions, lower total (TC) and LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) concentrations, whereas exercise interventions increase HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) while decreasing triglyceride (TG) levels. With respect to specific interventions, low saturated fat diets combined with exercise lowered TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations by 7-18, 7-15, and 4-18%, respectively, while increasing HDL-C levels by 5-14%. Alternatively, nutritional supplements combined with exercise, decreased TC, LDL-C, and TG concentrations by 8-26, 8-30, and 12-39%, respectively, while increasing HDL-C levels by 2-8%. These findings suggest that combination lifestyle therapies are an efficacious, preliminary means of improving cholesterol levels in those diagnosed with dyslipidemia, and should be implemented in place of drug therapy when cholesterol levels fall just above the normal range.

  18. Normative standards of plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations in Canadians of working age.

    PubMed Central

    Hewitt, D.; Jones, G. J.; Godin, G. J.; McComb, K.; Breckenridge, W. C.; Little, J. A.; Steiner, G.; Mishkel, M. A.; Baillie, J. H.; Martin, R. H.; Gibson, E. S.; Prendergast, W. F.; Parliament, W. J.

    1977-01-01

    Fasting plasma cholesterol and triglyceride concentrations were determined for 6407 working Canadian adults aged 20 to 69 years in Toronto and Hamilton. Means, medians and 5th and 95th percentiles were ascertained from the data for men, women taking oral contraceptives or estrogen preparations, and women not taking such medication. Mean plasma cholesterol values (mg/dL) ranged in men from 168.3 at ages 20 to 24 years to 211.5 at ages 45 to 49 years, and in women using hormone preparations from 180.3 at ages 20 to 24 years to 224.2 at ages 50 to 54 years; corresponding values in women not using these preparations were 164.9 and 220.6. Plasma triglyceride means (mg/dL) ranged in men from 108.7 at ages 20 to 24 years to 166.7 at ages 40 to 44 years, in women using hormone preparations from 115.4 at ages 20 to 24 years to 145.3 at ages 45 to 59 years, and in women not using these preparations from 77.5 at ages 20 to 24 years to 112.4 at ages 50 to 54 years. PMID:912626

  19. Regression of atherosclerotic lesions by high density lipoprotein plasma fraction in the cholesterol-fed rabbit.

    PubMed

    Badimon, J J; Badimon, L; Fuster, V

    1990-04-01

    The effects of homologous plasma HDL and VHDL fractions on established atherosclerotic lesions were studied in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Atherosclerosis was induced by feeding the animals a 0.5% cholesterol-rich diet for 60 d (group 1). Another group of animals were maintained on the same diet for 90 d (group 2). A third group was also fed the same diet for 90 d but received 50 mg HDL-VHDL protein per wk (isolated from normolipemic rabbit plasma) during the last 30 d (group 3). Aortic atherosclerotic involvement at the completion of the study was 34 +/- 4% in group 1, 38.8 +/- 5% in group 2, and 17.8 +/- 4% in group 3 (P less than 0.005). Aortic lipid deposition was also significantly reduced in group 3 compared with group 1 (studied at only 60 d) and group 2. This is the first in vivo, prospective evidence of the antiatherogenic effect of HDL-VHDL against preexisting atherosclerosis. Our results showed that HDL plasma fractions were able to induce regression of established aortic fatty streaks and lipid deposits. Our results suggest that it may be possible not only to inhibit progression but even to reduce established atherosclerotic lesions by HDL administration.

  20. Comparison of cholesterol-lowering efficacy and anti-atherogenic properties of hydrogenated versus non-hydrogenated (Phytrol) tall oil-derived phytosterols in apo E-deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Pritchard, P Haydn; Li, Min; Zamfir, Catalina; Lukic, Tatjana; Novak, Egon; Moghadasian, Mohammed H

    2003-01-01

    The cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherogenic effects of non-hydrogenated (FCP-3P1 containing 69% beta-sitosterol, 16% sitostanol, and 13% campesterol) and hydrogenated (FCP-3P2 containing 77% sitostanol, 11% campestanol, and 8% beta-sitosterol) Phytrol trade mark have been compared in apo E-deficient mice. After consumption of 0.2% (w/w) cholesterol-enriched diet, the elevated plasma cholesterol levels observed in controls was significantly reduced by the addition of either 0.5%, 1% or 2% FCP-3P1 or FCP-3P2 at week 4. Compared to controls, the treatment of 0.5%, 1%, and 2% FCP-3P1 in the diet resulted in reduction in cholesterol concentrations by 33.6%, 46.8% and 52.4% at week 8, respectively, whereas the reduction in plasma cholesterol levels by 0.5%, 1%, and 2% FCP-3P2 was only 20.5%, 38.7% and 31.7% indicating lower cholesterol-lowering effect of the hydrogenated phytosterols at all doses as compared with non-hydrogenated phytosterols (FCP-3P1). By contrast, FCP-3P1 and FCP-3P2 showed comparable non-significant anti-atherogenic properties in treated animals after 14-week treatment. 0.5%, 1%, and 2% FCP-3P1 treated apo E-deficient mice had a mean aortic lesion area that was smaller than controls although the reduction of atherosclerotic lesions did not reach the statistical significance. In conclusion, this study did not show statistically significant differences between hydrogenated and non-hydrogenated plant sterols with regard to their cholesterol-lowering and anti-atherosclerotic properties in apo E-KO mice.

  1. Localization of genes for V+LDL plasma cholesterol levels on two diets in the opossum Monodelphis domestica[S

    PubMed Central

    Kammerer, Candace M.; Rainwater, David L.; Gouin, Nicolas; Jasti, Madhuri; Douglas, Kory C.; Dressen, Amy S.; Ganta, Prasanth; VandeBerg, John L.; Samollow, Paul B.

    2010-01-01

    Plasma cholesterol levels among individuals vary considerably in response to diet. However, the genes that influence this response are largely unknown. Non-HDL (V+LDL) cholesterol levels vary dramatically among gray, short-tailed opossums fed an atherogenic diet, and we previously reported that two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influenced V+LDL cholesterol on two diets. We used hypothesis-free, genome-wide linkage analyses on data from 325 pedigreed opossums and located one QTL for V+LDL cholesterol on the basal diet on opossum chromosome 1q [logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 3.11, genomic P = 0.019] and another QTL for V+LDL on the atherogenic diet (i.e., high levels of cholesterol and fat) on chromosome 8 (LOD = 9.88, genomic P = 5 × 10−9). We then employed a novel strategy involving combined analyses of genomic resources, expression analysis, sequencing, and genotyping to identify candidate genes for the chromosome 8 QTL. A polymorphism in ABCB4 was strongly associated (P = 9 × 10−14) with the plasma V+LDL cholesterol concentrations on the high-cholesterol, high-fat diet. The results of this study indicate that genetic variation in ABCB4, or closely linked genes, is responsible for the dramatic differences among opossums in their V+LDL cholesterol response to an atherogenic diet. PMID:20650928

  2. Localization of genes for V+LDL plasma cholesterol levels on two diets in the opossum Monodelphis domestica.

    PubMed

    Kammerer, Candace M; Rainwater, David L; Gouin, Nicolas; Jasti, Madhuri; Douglas, Kory C; Dressen, Amy S; Ganta, Prasanth; Vandeberg, John L; Samollow, Paul B

    2010-10-01

    Plasma cholesterol levels among individuals vary considerably in response to diet. However, the genes that influence this response are largely unknown. Non-HDL (V+LDL) cholesterol levels vary dramatically among gray, short-tailed opossums fed an atherogenic diet, and we previously reported that two quantitative trait loci (QTLs) influenced V+LDL cholesterol on two diets. We used hypothesis-free, genome-wide linkage analyses on data from 325 pedigreed opossums and located one QTL for V+LDL cholesterol on the basal diet on opossum chromosome 1q [logarithm of the odds (LOD) = 3.11, genomic P = 0.019] and another QTL for V+LDL on the atherogenic diet (i.e., high levels of cholesterol and fat) on chromosome 8 (LOD = 9.88, genomic P = 5 x 10(-9)). We then employed a novel strategy involving combined analyses of genomic resources, expression analysis, sequencing, and genotyping to identify candidate genes for the chromosome 8 QTL. A polymorphism in ABCB4 was strongly associated (P = 9 x 10(-14)) with the plasma V+LDL cholesterol concentrations on the high-cholesterol, high-fat diet. The results of this study indicate that genetic variation in ABCB4, or closely linked genes, is responsible for the dramatic differences among opossums in their V+LDL cholesterol response to an atherogenic diet.

  3. Dietary macronutrients, cholesterol, and sodium and lower urinary tract symptoms in men.

    PubMed

    Maserejian, Nancy Nairi; Giovannucci, Edward L; McKinlay, John B

    2009-05-01

    Little is known about dietary correlates of lower urinary tract symptoms (LUTS). To examine associations between dietary intakes of total energy, carbohydrates, protein, fats, cholesterol, and sodium and LUTS in men. Cross-sectional study of 1545 men aged 30-79 yr in the Boston Area Community Health survey (2002-2005), a random population-based sample. Dietary data were assessed by validated self-administered food frequency questionnaire. LUTS and covariate data were collected during in-person interviews. Primary analyses used multivariate logistic regression. Outcomes were moderate to severe LUTS, storage symptoms, and voiding symptoms as measured by the American Urological Association Symptom Index. Greater total energy intake was associated with higher LUTS symptom score (p(trend)<0.01) and increased likelihood of storage symptoms. No associations were observed with total, saturated, or monounsaturated fat intake or carbohydrates. Men who consumed more protein were less likely to report LUTS, particularly voiding symptoms (quintile 5 vs quintile 1 OR=0.35; 95% CI, 0.17-0.74; p=0.006). Sodium intake had positive linear associations with LUTS (p(trend)=0.01) and storage symptom score (p(trend)=0.004); this finding should be confirmed by studies using biomarkers of sodium exposure. Storage symptoms increased slightly with greater polyunsaturated fat intake (p(trend)=0.006). Data on specific polyunsaturated fats were unavailable. This community-based study of men found that total energy and sodium intake were positively associated with LUTS, whereas greater protein intake was inversely associated with LUTS.

  4. Association between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population.

    PubMed

    Eriksen, Kirsten T; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; McLaughlin, Joseph K; Lipworth, Loren; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are used in a variety of consumer products and have been detected worldwide in human blood. Recent studies mainly of highly exposed populations have indicated that PFOA and PFOS may affect serum cholesterol levels, but the magnitude of the effect may be inconsistent across exposure levels. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between plasma PFOA and PFOS and total cholesterol in a general, middle-aged Danish population. The study population comprised 753 individuals (663 men and 90 women), 50-65 years of age, nested within a Danish cohort of 57,053 participants. Blood samples were taken from all cohort members at enrolment (1993-1997) and stored in a biobank at -150°C. Plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS and serum levels of total cholesterol were measured. The associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol levels were analysed by generalized linear models, both crude and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed statistically significant positive associations between both perfluorinated compounds and total cholesterol, e.g. a 4.4 [95% CI  =  1.1-7.8] higher concentration of total cholesterol (mg/dL) per interquartile range of PFOA plasma level. Sex and prevalent diabetes appeared to modify the association between PFOA and PFOS, respectively, and cholesterol. In conclusion, this study indicated positive associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population, although whether the observed pattern of results reflects a causal association is unclear.

  5. Association between Plasma PFOA and PFOS Levels and Total Cholesterol in a Middle-Aged Danish Population

    PubMed Central

    Eriksen, Kirsten T.; Raaschou-Nielsen, Ole; McLaughlin, Joseph K.; Lipworth, Loren; Tjønneland, Anne; Overvad, Kim; Sørensen, Mette

    2013-01-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) are used in a variety of consumer products and have been detected worldwide in human blood. Recent studies mainly of highly exposed populations have indicated that PFOA and PFOS may affect serum cholesterol levels, but the magnitude of the effect may be inconsistent across exposure levels. The aim of the present cross-sectional study was to investigate the association between plasma PFOA and PFOS and total cholesterol in a general, middle-aged Danish population. The study population comprised 753 individuals (663 men and 90 women), 50–65 years of age, nested within a Danish cohort of 57,053 participants. Blood samples were taken from all cohort members at enrolment (1993–1997) and stored in a biobank at -150°C. Plasma levels of PFOA and PFOS and serum levels of total cholesterol were measured. The associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol levels were analysed by generalized linear models, both crude and adjusted for potential confounders. We observed statistically significant positive associations between both perfluorinated compounds and total cholesterol, e.g. a 4.4 [95% CI  =  1.1–7.8] higher concentration of total cholesterol (mg/dL) per interquartile range of PFOA plasma level. Sex and prevalent diabetes appeared to modify the association between PFOA and PFOS, respectively, and cholesterol. In conclusion, this study indicated positive associations between plasma PFOA and PFOS levels and total cholesterol in a middle-aged Danish population, although whether the observed pattern of results reflects a causal association is unclear. PMID:23441227

  6. Continuum Lowering in Ultrashort Laser-Produced Plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nantel, M.; Buma, T.; Gu, S.; Workman, J.; Maksimchuk, A.; Umstadter, D.

    1997-04-01

    Electrons in a plasma are generally described as either bound or free. The bound electrons occupy the available discrete energy levels in ions, while the free (ionized) electrons lie in the continuum, above the highest available bound state. As the plasma density increases, the ions shed their available bound-state levels from the highest on down and the continuum lowers. As a result, it becomes easier to ionize them and the ionization balance of the plasma is affected. Continuum lowering is a fundamental concept of the atomic physics of high-density plasmas and is of particular importance for work in X-ray lasers, inertial confinement fusion, astrophysics and plasma simulations. We present measurements of continuum lowering in plasmas produced with 100-fs laser pulses focussed on boron wire targets. We used space- and time-resolved XUV spectroscopy to observe the suppression of emission lines originating from high-lying He-like excited levels, and compare this to the theoretically predicted continuum lowering. Electron temperature and electron density diagnostics are obtained with spectroscopic line ratios using the FLY atomic physics package and hydrodynamics simulations.

  7. Xanthohumol lowers body weight and fasting plasma glucose in obese male Zucker fa/fa rats.

    PubMed

    Legette, Leecole L; Luna, Arlyn Y Moreno; Reed, Ralph L; Miranda, Cristobal L; Bobe, Gerd; Proteau, Rosita R; Stevens, Jan F

    2013-07-01

    Obesity contributes to increased risk for several chronic diseases including cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Xanthohumol, a prenylated flavonoid from hops (Humulus lupulus), was tested for efficacy on biomarkers of metabolic syndrome in 4 week old Zucker fa/fa rats, a rodent model of obesity. Rats received daily oral doses of xanthohumol at 0, 1.86, 5.64, and 16.9 mg/kg BW for 6 weeks. All rats were maintained on a high fat (60% kcal) AIN-93G diet for 3 weeks to induce severe obesity followed by a normal AIN-93G (15% kcal fat) diet for the last 3 weeks of the study. Weekly food intake and body weight were recorded. Plasma cholesterol, glucose, insulin, triglyceride, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were assessed using commercial assay kits. Plasma and liver tissue levels of XN and its metabolites were determined by liquid-chromatography tandem mass spectrometry. Plasma and liver tissue levels of xanthohumol were similar between low and medium dose groups and significantly (p<0.05) elevated in the highest dose group. There was a dose-dependent effect on body weight and plasma glucose levels. The highest dose group (n=6) had significantly lower plasma glucose levels compared to the control group (n=6) in male but not female rats. There was also a significant decrease in body weight for male rats in the highest dose group (16.9 mg/kg BW) compared to rats that received no xanthohumol, which was also not seen for female rats. Plasma cholesterol, insulin, triglycerides, and MCP-1 as well as food intake were not affected by treatment. The findings suggest that xanthohumol has beneficial effects on markers of metabolic syndrome.

  8. Cholesterol lowering effect of a soy drink enriched with plant sterols in a French population with moderate hypercholesterolemia.

    PubMed

    Weidner, Christina; Krempf, Michel; Bard, Jean-Marie; Cazaubiel, Murielle; Bell, Doris

    2008-10-06

    Plant sterols are an established non-pharmacological means to reduce total and LDL blood cholesterol concentrations and are therefore recommended for cholesterol management by worldwide-renown health care institutions. Their efficacy has been proven in many types of foods with the majority of trials conducted in spreads or dairy products. As an alternative to dairy products, soy based foods are common throughout the world. Yet, there is little evidence supporting the efficacy of plant sterols in soy-based foods. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of a soy drink enriched with plant sterols on blood lipid profiles in moderately hypercholesterolemic subjects. In a randomized, placebo-controlled double-blind mono-centric study, 50 subjects were assigned to 200 ml of soy drink either enriched with 2.6 g plant sterol esters (1.6 g/d free plant sterol equivalents) or without plant sterols (control) for 8 weeks. Subjects were instructed to maintain stable diet pattern and physical activity. Plasma concentrations of lipids were measured at initial visit, after 4 weeks and after 8 weeks. The primary measurement was the change in LDL cholesterol (LDL-C). Secondary measurements were changes in total cholesterol (TC), non-HDL cholesterol (non-HDL-C), HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) and triglycerides. Regular consumption of the soy drink enriched with plant sterols for 8 weeks significantly reduced LDL- C by 0.29 mmol/l or 7% compared to baseline (p < 0.05). TC and non-HDL-C concentrations decreased by 0.26 mmol/l and 0.31 mmol/l (each p < 0.05), respectively. Mean reductions in total, LDL and non-HDL cholesterol were significantly greater than in the placebo group (p < 0.05). HDL-C and triglycerides were not affected. Compliance was very high (>96%), and products were well tolerated. Daily consumption of a plant sterol-enriched soy drink significantly decreased total, non-HDL and LDL cholesterol and is therefore an interesting and convenient aid in managing mild

  9. Effectiveness of customary use of phytosterol/-stanol enriched margarines on blood cholesterol lowering.

    PubMed

    Wolfs, Marion; de Jong, Nynke; Ocké, Marga C; Verhagen, Hans; Monique Verschuren, W M

    2006-10-01

    Postlaunch monitoring of functional foods can encompass monitoring of effectiveness under conditions of customary use. To this end, the effectiveness of phytosterol/-stanol enriched margarine consumption in free-living conditions was investigated with data from the Dutch "Doetinchem cohort study". In total, 4,505 subjects (aged 26-70 years) were examined in 1994-1998 and re-examined during 1999-2003. A general and a food frequency questionnaire and non-fasting blood samples for total and HDL cholesterol determination were obtained. Subjects were stratified into phytosterol/-stanol enriched margarine users (n = 84) and non-users (n = 4,421) based on the re-examination data, as these margarines were available on the Dutch market from 1999 onwards. Mean spontaneous daily use (g +/- SD) of phytosterol-containing margarine (n = 71) was 15 +/- 8 and of phytostanol-containing margarine (n = 13) 9+/-6. After five years, total blood cholesterol had increased with 0.26 mmol/l in non-users while it had not significantly changed in users. The difference in total blood cholesterol change in users versus non-users was -0.30 mmol/l (p < 0.001). The beneficial effect of the phytosterol/-stanol enriched margarine, used under customary conditions can be characterized as a stabilization of cholesterol levels. This is the first report finding a modest beneficial effect on blood cholesterol level under customary conditions thereby partly confirming findings from clinical trials.

  10. Improved plasma cholesterol levels in men after a nutrition education program at the worksite.

    PubMed

    Baer, J T

    1993-06-01

    Eighty management-level male employees participated in a company-sponsored comprehensive physical that included determination of plasma total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and triglyceride levels and percentage of body fat. After the lipid screening, each employee met with a registered dietitian who explained the results of the lipid analysis and discussed risk factors for coronary heart disease with an emphasis on diet. Seventy employees had a triglyceride level above 5.17 mmol/L and were invited to participate in a nutrition education program. Thirty-three (mean age = 44 years) chose to participate (intervention group); the other 37 (mean age = 35 years) served as controls (control group). Thus, the design of the study was not random. All subjects completed 3-day dietary records before and after the nutrition education program. Nutrition intervention consisted of (a) individualized instruction about the step 1 diet; (b) group sessions (1 hour every 3 months) on eating out, dietary fiber, and maintaining heart healthy behaviors; and (c) individualized follow-up by telephone (one call per month). The results of the year-long program revealed that men in the intervention group decreased dietary intake of energy (2,546 +/- 162 kcal to 2,246 +/- 125 kcal) and cholesterol (444 +/- 5.3 mg to 304 +/- 1.6 mg) and percentage of energy from total fat (38 +/- 3.4% to 31 +/- 2.6%) and protein (24 +/- 3.5% to 20 +/- 2.2%). Their consumption of carbohydrate and dietary fiber increased (38 +/- 2.1% to 45 +/- 2.5% and 8.0 +/- 2.3 g to 23.0 +/- 3.5 g, respectively).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. Per os colchicine administration in cholesterol fed rabbits: Triglycerides lowering effects without affecting atherosclerosis progress.

    PubMed

    Kaminiotis, Vaios Vasileios; Agrogiannis, George; Konstantopoulos, Panagiotis; Androutsopoulou, Vasiliki; Korou, Laskarina Maria; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Dontas, Ismene A; Perrea, Despina; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios C

    2017-09-26

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease that is promoted, among others, by pro-inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β and IL-18 produced by NLRP 3 inflammasome. Development of atherosclerotic lesions is also affected by leptin. Furthermore, inflammasome's action is interfered with other inflammatory diseases, like diabetes. On the other hand, colchicine is reported to act as anti-inflammatory agent inhibiting inflammasome's action and stabilizing atherosclerotic lesions. The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of per os colchicine on the de novo formation of atherosclerotic lesions and on the levels of IL-18, leptin and insulin in cholesterol-fed rabbits. Twenty-three male, 2 months old New Zealand White rabbits, were seperated in 3 groups and were fed with different types of diet for 7 weeks: standard, cholesterol 1% w/w and cholesterol 1% w/w plus colchicine 2 mg/kg body weight. Blood was collected for biochemical measurements and conduction of ELISA for leptin, IL-18 and insulin. Histologic examination of stained with eosin and hematoxylin aorta specimens was performed. Aortic intimal thickness was evaluated using image analysis. The statistical analysis included non-parametric tests: a) paired-sample Wilcoxon test, b) Spearman correlation coefficient and c) Kruscal-Wallis test. Triglerycide levels were decreased in cholesterol plus colchicine group in the end of the experiment (p < 0.05), whereas the cholesterol group had increased levels. No statistical differences were observed in the levels of IL-18, leptin and insulin between groups. Likewise, there was neither any correlation between IL-18, leptin and intima thickness nor between IL-18 and glucose and between leptin and weight. In cholesterol and colchicine group there was a strong positive correlation between IL-18 and insulin levels in the 4th week (r s = .66, n = 10, p < 0.05), whereas in the 7th week this correlation became strong negative (r s = -.86, n = 10, p

  12. Elaidyl-sulfamide, an oleoylethanolamide-modelled PPARα agonist, reduces body weight gain and plasma cholesterol in rats

    PubMed Central

    Decara, Juan Manuel; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Rivera, Patricia; Macias-González, Manuel; Vida, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J.; Serrano, Antonia; Cano, Carolina; Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY We have modelled elaidyl-sulfamide (ES), a sulfamoyl analogue of oleoylethanolamide (OEA). ES is a lipid mediator of satiety that works through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). We have characterised the pharmacological profile of ES (0.3–3 mg/kg body weight) by means of in silico molecular docking to the PPARα receptor, in vitro transcription through PPARα, and in vitro and in vivo administration to obese rats. ES interacts with the binding site of PPARα in a similar way as OEA does, is capable of activating PPARα and also reduces feeding in a dose-dependent manner when administered to food-deprived rats. When ES was given to obese male rats for 7 days, it reduced feeding and weight gain, lowered plasma cholesterol and reduced the plasmatic activity of transaminases, indicating a clear improvement of hepatic function. This pharmacological profile is associated with the modulation of both cholesterol and lipid metabolism regulatory genes, including the sterol response element-binding proteins SREBF1 and SREBF2, and their regulatory proteins INSIG1 and INSIG2, in liver and white adipose tissues. ES treatment induced the expression of thermogenic regulatory genes, including the uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 in brown adipose tissue and UCP3 in white adipose tissue. However, its chronic administration resulted in hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, which represent a constraint for its potential clinical development. PMID:22736460

  13. Elaidyl-sulfamide, an oleoylethanolamide-modelled PPARα agonist, reduces body weight gain and plasma cholesterol in rats.

    PubMed

    Decara, Juan Manuel; Romero-Cuevas, Miguel; Rivera, Patricia; Macias-González, Manuel; Vida, Margarita; Pavón, Francisco J; Serrano, Antonia; Cano, Carolina; Fresno, Nieves; Pérez-Fernández, Ruth; Rodríguez de Fonseca, Fernando; Suárez, Juan

    2012-09-01

    We have modelled elaidyl-sulfamide (ES), a sulfamoyl analogue of oleoylethanolamide (OEA). ES is a lipid mediator of satiety that works through the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor alpha (PPARα). We have characterised the pharmacological profile of ES (0.3-3 mg/kg body weight) by means of in silico molecular docking to the PPARα receptor, in vitro transcription through PPARα, and in vitro and in vivo administration to obese rats. ES interacts with the binding site of PPARα in a similar way as OEA does, is capable of activating PPARα and also reduces feeding in a dose-dependent manner when administered to food-deprived rats. When ES was given to obese male rats for 7 days, it reduced feeding and weight gain, lowered plasma cholesterol and reduced the plasmatic activity of transaminases, indicating a clear improvement of hepatic function. This pharmacological profile is associated with the modulation of both cholesterol and lipid metabolism regulatory genes, including the sterol response element-binding proteins SREBF1 and SREBF2, and their regulatory proteins INSIG1 and INSIG2, in liver and white adipose tissues. ES treatment induced the expression of thermogenic regulatory genes, including the uncoupling proteins UCP1, UCP2 and UCP3 in brown adipose tissue and UCP3 in white adipose tissue. However, its chronic administration resulted in hyperglycaemia and insulin resistance, which represent a constraint for its potential clinical development.

  14. Streptococcal Serum Opacity Factor Increases Hepatocyte Uptake of Human Plasma High Density Lipoprotein-Cholesterol1

    PubMed Central

    Gillard, Baiba K.; Rosales, Corina; Pillai, Biju K.; Lin, Hu Yu; Courtney, Harry S.; Pownall, Henry J.

    2010-01-01

    Serum opacity factor (SOF), a virulence determinant of Streptococcus pyogenes, converts plasma high density lipoproteins (HDL) to three distinct species: lipid-free apolipoprotein (apo) A-I, neo HDL, a small discoidal HDL-like particle, and a large cholesteryl ester-rich microemulsion (CERM), that contains the cholesterol esters (CE) of up to ~400,000 HDL particles and apo E as its major protein. Similar SOF reaction products are obtained with HDL, total plasma lipoproteins and whole plasma. We hypothesized that hepatic uptake of CERM-CE via multiple apo E dependent receptors would be faster than that of HDL-CE. We tested our hypothesis using human hepatoma cells and lipoprotein receptor-specific Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. [3H]CE uptake by HepG2 and Huh7 cells from HDL after SOF treatment, which transfers >90% of HDL-CE to CERM, was respectively 2.4 and 4.5 times faster than from control HDL. CERM-[3H]CE uptake was inhibited by LDL and HDL, suggestive of uptake by both the LDL receptor (LDL-R) and scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Studies in CHO cells specifically expressing LDL-R and SR-BI confirmed CERM-[3H]CE uptake by both receptors. RAP and heparin inhibit CERM-[3H]CE but not HDL-[3H]CE uptake thereby implicating LRP-1 and cell surface proteoglycans in this process. These data demonstrate that SOF treatment of HDL increases CE uptake via multiple hepatic apo E receptors. In so doing, SOF might increase hepatic disposal of plasma cholesterol in a way that is therapeutically useful. PMID:20879789

  15. Plasma proteomic analysis of stable coronary artery disease indicates impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Trayambak; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ahmad, Shadab; Garg, Gaurav; V, Sreenivas; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Seth, Sandeep; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2016-01-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the largest causes of death worldwide yet the traditional risk factors, although useful in identifying people at high risk, lack the desired predictive accuracy. Techniques like quantitative plasma proteomics holds immense potential to identify newer markers and this study (conducted in three phases) was aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in stable CAD patients. In the first (discovery) phase, plasma from CAD cases (angiographically proven) and controls were subjected to iTRAQ based proteomic analysis. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were then validated in the second and third (verification and validation) phases in larger number of (n = 546) samples. After multivariate logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors (age, diet, etc.), four proteins involved in the reverse cholesterol pathway (Apo A1, ApoA4, Apo C1 and albumin) along with diabetes and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with CAD and could account for approximately 88% of the cases as revealed by ROC analysis. The maximum odds ratio was found to be 6.70 for albumin (p < 0.0001), followed by Apo AI (5.07, p < 0.0001), Apo CI (4.03, p = 0.001), and Apo AIV (2.63, p = 0.003). Down-regulation of apolipoproteins and albumin implicates the impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway in CAD. PMID:27350024

  16. Plasma proteomic analysis of stable coronary artery disease indicates impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway.

    PubMed

    Basak, Trayambak; Tanwar, Vinay Singh; Bhardwaj, Gourav; Bhardwaj, Nitin; Ahmad, Shadab; Garg, Gaurav; V, Sreenivas; Karthikeyan, Ganesan; Seth, Sandeep; Sengupta, Shantanu

    2016-06-28

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is one of the largest causes of death worldwide yet the traditional risk factors, although useful in identifying people at high risk, lack the desired predictive accuracy. Techniques like quantitative plasma proteomics holds immense potential to identify newer markers and this study (conducted in three phases) was aimed to identify differentially expressed proteins in stable CAD patients. In the first (discovery) phase, plasma from CAD cases (angiographically proven) and controls were subjected to iTRAQ based proteomic analysis. Proteins found to be differentially expressed were then validated in the second and third (verification and validation) phases in larger number of (n = 546) samples. After multivariate logistic regression adjusting for confounding factors (age, diet, etc.), four proteins involved in the reverse cholesterol pathway (Apo A1, ApoA4, Apo C1 and albumin) along with diabetes and hypertension were found to be significantly associated with CAD and could account for approximately 88% of the cases as revealed by ROC analysis. The maximum odds ratio was found to be 6.70 for albumin (p < 0.0001), followed by Apo AI (5.07, p < 0.0001), Apo CI (4.03, p = 0.001), and Apo AIV (2.63, p = 0.003). Down-regulation of apolipoproteins and albumin implicates the impairment of reverse cholesterol pathway in CAD.

  17. Elevated HDL2-paraoxonase and reduced CETP activity are associated with a dramatically lower ratio of LDL-cholesterol/total cholesterol in a hypercholesterolemic and hypertriglyceridemic patient.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Hye; Park, Jung-Heun; Lee, Sang-Hak; Kim, Jae-Ryong; Cho, Kyung-Hyun

    2010-06-01

    A female patient (64 years of age; body mass index, 26) had a markedly and relatively low low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) level (97 mg/dl) despite high serum total cholesterol (TC) (331 mg/dl) and triacylglyceride levels (307 mg/dl). Since the expected LDL-C was 222 mg/dl, there was a significant difference between the calculation and measurement based on direct enzyme assay. Only 30% of serum cholesterol was associated with LDL-C in this patient. To determine the basis for the markedly low LDL-C/TC ratio, we isolated and analyzed lipoproteins from the patient as well as age- and gender-matched controls. The patient had lowered serum CETP activity and elevated paraoxonase activity with GOT and GPT values in the normal range. The very low-density lipoprotein particles from the patient were larger than those of the controls and enriched with lipid and protein, while the LDL from the patient (LDL-P) had a lower particle number and protein content than the controls. The LDL-P was more resistant to cupric ion-mediated oxidation. HDL2 from the patient (HDL2-P) had highly enhanced paraoxonase activity and antioxidant ability. The patient had a 1.5-fold higher level of apolipoprotein (apo) A-I expression in HDL2. ApoA-I in HDL2 and HDL3 from the patient showed no fragmentation, while the control had fragmented bands (17 and 21 kDa) in the HDL. The HDL2-P also had a larger particle size and greater protein content with less lipid content. HDL3-associated cholesteryl ester transfer protein was reduced in the patient, although the particle size was similar to the controls. In conclusion, a patient who had a markedly lower LDL-C/TC ratio despite hyperlipidemia associated with higher paraoxonase activity, higher apoA-I level and lower CETP activity without fragmentation of apoA-I in the HDL fraction is presented. The enhanced antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity of HDL might contribute to the low LDL-C/TC ratio in this patient.

  18. Enzymatic assessment of cholesterol on electrophoresis gels for estimating HDL size distribution and plasma concentrations of HDL subclasses[S

    PubMed Central

    Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; García-Sánchez, Cynthia; Ávila-Vazzini, Nydia; Carreón-Torres, Elizabeth; Posadas-Romero, Carlos; Vargas-Alarcón, Gilberto; Pérez-Méndez, Oscar

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an enzymatic cholesterol staining method to determine HDL subclasses in a polyacrylamide gradient gel electrophoresis, which further allows staining by protein in the same electrophoresis lane. HDLs from 120 healthy individuals were separated through nondenaturing PAGE. HDLs were stained for cholesterol using an enzymatic semisolid mixture. Once the gels were unstained, they were stained again for proteins with Coomassie blue. The proportions of HDL subclasses were determined by densitometry. HDL subclasses were transformed to concentrations using as reference HDL-cholesterol plasma levels. This method is comparable in linearity and reproducibility to Coomassie blue staining, although it provides quantitative data. As expected, HDL size distribution shifted toward larger particles when determined by cholesterol as compared with protein. With this method, we observed different proportions of HDL subclasses between men and women as compared with Coomassie blue staining. We described a method to determine HDL size distribution by enzymatic cholesterol staining on polyacrylamide gels. The method allows the quantification of the cholesterol plasma concentration of each HDL subclass with the possibility to further stain the protein in the same sample. The combination of HDL staining by cholesterol and protein on electrophoresis gels provides information that may have clinical relevance. PMID:20097938

  19. The Cholesterol-Lowering Effect of Alisol Acetates Based on HMG-CoA Reductase and Its Molecular Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hui; Lu, Cai; Chen, Jun; Gu, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This study measured the impact of alisol B 23-acetate and alisol A 24-acetate, the main active ingredients of the traditional Chinese medicine Alismatis rhizoma, on total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-C), and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of hyperlipidemic mice. The binding of alisol B 23-acetate and alisol A 24-acetate to the key enzyme involved in the metabolism of TC, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutary-coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, was studied using the reagent kit method and the western blotting technique combined with a molecular simulation technique. According to the results, alisol acetates significantly lower the TC, TG, and LDL-C concentrations of hyperlipidemic mice, while raising HDL-C concentrations. Alisol acetates lower HMG-CoA reductase activity in a dose-dependent fashion, both in vivo and in vitro. Neither of these alisol acetates significantly lower the protein expression of HMG-CoA. This suggests that alisol acetates lower the TC level via inhibiting the activity of HMG-CoA reductase by its prototype drug, which may exhibit an inhibition effect via directly and competitively binding to HMG-CoA. The side chain of the alisol acetate was the steering group via molecular simulation. PMID:27872650

  20. The ATP-binding cassette transporter-2 (ABCA2) regulates esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Davis, Warren

    2014-01-01

    The ATP-binding cassette transporters are a large family (~48 genes divided into seven families A-G) of proteins that utilize the energy of ATP-hydrolysis to pump substrates across lipid bilayers against a concentration gradient. The ABC "A" subfamily is comprised of 13 members and transport sterols, phospholipids and bile acids. ABCA2 is the most abundant ABC transporter in human and rodent brain with highest expression in oligodendrocytes, although it is also expressed in neurons. Several groups have studied a possible connection between ABCA2 and Alzheimer's disease as well as early atherosclerosis. ABCA2 expression levels have been associated with changes in cholesterol and sphingolipid metabolism. In this paper, we hypothesized that ABCA2 expression level may regulate esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol by modulation of sphingolipid metabolism. ABCA2 overexpression in N2a neuroblastoma cells was associated with an altered bilayer distribution of the sphingolipid ceramide that inhibited acylCoA:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) activity and cholesterol esterification. In contrast, depletion of endogenous ABCA2 in the rat schwannoma cell line D6P2T increased esterification of plasma membrane cholesterol following treatment with exogenous bacterial sphingomyelinase. These findings suggest that control of ABCA2 expression level may be a key locus of regulation for esterification of plasma membrane-derived cholesterol through modulation of sphingolipid metabolism.

  1. Insoluble carob fiber rich in polyphenols lowers total and LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic sujects.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Roso, Baltasar; Quintela, José C; de la Fuente, Ester; Haya, Javier; Pérez-Olleros, Lourdes

    2010-03-01

    Recently, polyphenols have been found to affect blood lipids in animals in a similar manner as soluble dietary fibre. The aim was to assess whether an insoluble dietary fiber very rich in polyphenols has a beneficial effect on serum lipids in humans. In a double-blind randomized placebo-controlled clinical study with parallel arms, 88 volunteers with hypercholesterolemia were randomly assigned to consume daily either, fiber with insoluble 84% polyphenols 4 g twice a day (n = 43) or placebo (n = 45). Serum total, LDL and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were assessed at baseline and after 4 weeks. The insoluble polyphenols consumption reduced the total cholesterol by 17.8 +/- 6.1% (p < 0.05), LDL cholesterol by 22.5 +/- 8.9% (p < 0.001), LDL: HDL cholesterol ratio by 26.2 +/- 14.3% (p < 0.001) and triglycerides by 16.3 +/- 23.4% (p < 0.05) at the end of the study compared with baseline. No significant differences were found during the study time in the placebo group for the lipid profile. The consumption of fiber very rich in insoluble polyphenols shows beneficial effects on human blood lipid profile and may be effective in prevention and treatment of hyperlipemia.

  2. Whole wheat and triticale flours with differing viscosities stimulate cecal fermentations and lower plasma and hepatic lipids in rats.

    PubMed

    Adam, A; Levrat-Verny, M A; Lopez, H W; Leuillet, M; Demigné, C; Rémésy, C

    2001-06-01

    Whole flours from oat, rye or barley effectively modify digestive fermentation and lipid metabolism, whereas the effectiveness of whole wheat flour has not been established. To address this question, cecal digestion, short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) metabolism and cholesterol metabolism were investigated in four groups of rats fed the following semipurified diets differing in their carbohydrate source: a control diet (purified wheat starch) and three whole cereal flour diets [Valoris wheat (Wv), Soissons wheat (Ws), or Carnac triticale (Tc)]. Wv is particularly viscous and rich in arabinoxylans, and Tc is richer in hemicellulose than wheat. Compared with controls, rats fed the whole-flour diets had enlarged ceca and a moderate acidification of the bulk pH ( approximately 6.4). In these rats, the cecal SCFA pool size was enhanced (P < 0.05), and the SCFA molar ratio reflected propionic/butyric acid-rich fermentations, especially in those fed TC: The portal SCFA concentrations reflected the rise of the acetic and propionic acid pools in the cecum, whereas portal butyric acid remained relatively low, probably reflecting extensive metabolism by the cecal wall. The fecal excretion of total steroids (bile acids + sterols) was markedly enhanced by all of the whole-flour diets, with Wv (+78%) > Tc (+64%) > Ws (+47%). In parallel, there was a significant plasma cholesterol-lowering effect for rats fed Wv (-27%) and Tc (-32%) and a plasma triglyceride-lowering effect (approximately -40%) in all rats fed whole-flour diets (P < 0.05). This effect was observed mainly for triglyceride-rich lipoprotein-cholesterol, whereas HDL cholesterol was unaffected. These results indicate that whole wheat flours can strikingly affect cecal SCFA, especially butyrate, and are effective plasma cholesterol-lowering agents.

  3. Artichoke leaf extract (Cynara scolymus) reduces plasma cholesterol in otherwise healthy hypercholesterolemic adults: a randomized, double blind placebo controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Bundy, Rafe; Walker, Ann F; Middleton, Richard W; Wallis, Carol; Simpson, Hugh C R

    2008-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases are the chief causes of death in the UK, and are associated with high circulating levels of total cholesterol in the plasma. Artichoke leaf extracts (ALEs) have been reported to reduce plasma lipids levels, including total cholesterol, although high quality data is lacking. The objective of this trial was to assess the effect of ALE on plasma lipid levels and general well-being in otherwise healthy adults with mild to moderate hypercholesterolemia. 131 adults were screened for total plasma cholesterol in the range 6.0-8.0 mmol/l, with 75 suitable volunteers randomised onto the trial. Volunteers consumed 1280 mg of a standardised ALE, or matched placebo, daily for 12 weeks. Plasma total cholesterol decreased in the treatment group by an average of 4.2% (from 7.16 (SD 0.62) mmol/l to 6.86 (SD 0.68) mmol/l) and increased in the control group by an average of 1.9% (6.90 (SD 0.49) mmol/l to 7.03 (0.61) mmol/l), the difference between groups being statistically significant (p=0.025). No significant differences between groups were observed for LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol or triglyceride levels. General well-being improved significantly in both the treatment (11%) and control groups (9%) with no significant differences between groups. In conclusion, ALE consumption resulted in a modest but favourable statistically significant difference in total cholesterol after 12 weeks. In comparison with a previous trial, it is suggested that the apparent positive health status of the study population may have contributed to the modesty of the observed response.

  4. Brief Communication: Plasma lipid oxidation predicts atherosclerotic status better than cholesterol in diabetic apolipoprotein E deficient mice.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Karen Ekkelund; Lykkesfeldt, Jens; Raun, Kirsten; Rakipovski, Günaj

    2017-01-01

    Increased levels of oxidative stress have been suggested to play a detrimental role in the development of diabetes-related vascular complications. Here, we investigated whether the concentration of malondialdehyde, a marker of lipid oxidation correlated to the degree of aortic plaque lesions in a proatherogenic diabetic mouse model. Three groups of apolipoprotein E knockout mice were studied for 20 weeks, a control, a streptozotocin-induced diabetic, and a diabetic enalapril-treated group. Enalapril was hypothesized to lower oxidative stress level and thus the plaque burden. Both diabetic groups were significantly different from the control group as they had higher blood glucose, HbA1c, total cholesterol, low-density lipoprotein, very low-density lipoprotein, together with a lower high-density lipoprotein concentration and body weight. Animals in the diabetic group had significantly higher plaque area and plasma malondialdehyde than controls. The two diabetic groups did not differ significantly in any measured characteristic. In summary, there was a positive correlation between plasma malondialdehyde concentration and aorta plaque area in apolipoprotein E knockout. Even though further investigation of the role of lipid oxidation in the development of atherosclerosis is warranted, these results suggest that biomarkers of lipid oxidation may be of value in the evaluation of cardiovascular risk.

  5. Plasma HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides, but not LDL-cholesterol, are associated with insulin secretion in non-diabetic subjects.

    PubMed

    Natali, Andrea; Baldi, Simona; Bonnet, Fabrice; Petrie, John; Trifirò, Silvia; Tricò, Domenico; Mari, Andrea

    2017-04-01

    Experimental data support the notion that lipoproteins might directly affect beta cell function, however clinical data are sparse and inconsistent. We aimed at verifying whether, independently of major confounders, serum lipids are associated with alterations in insulin secretion or clearance non-diabetic subjects. Cross sectional and observational prospective (3.5yrs), multicentre study in which 1016 non-diabetic volunteers aged 30-60yrs. and with a wide range of BMI (20.0-39.9kg/m(2)) were recruited in a setting of University hospital ambulatory care (RISC study). baseline fasting lipids, fasting and OGTT-induced insulin secretion and clearance (measured by glucose and C-peptide modeling), peripheral insulin sensitivity (by the euglycemic clamp). Lipids and OGTT were repeated in 980 subjects after 3.5years. LDL-cholesterol did not show independent associations with fasting or stimulated insulin secretion or clearance. After accounting for potential confounders, HDL-cholesterol displayed negative and triglycerides positive independent associations with fasting and OGTT insulin secretion; neither with insulin clearance. Low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides were associated with an increase in glucose-dependent and a decrease in non-glucose-dependent insulin secretion. Over 3.5years both an HDL-cholesterol decline and a triglycerides rise were associated with an increase in fasting insulin secretion independent of changes in body weight or plasma glucose. LDL-cholesterol does not seem to influence any major determinant of insulin bioavailability while low HDL-cholesterol and high triglycerides might contribute to sustain the abnormalities in insulin secretion that characterize the pre-diabetic state. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Lower levels of total HDL and HDL3 cholesterol are associated with albuminuria in normoalbuminuric Type 1 diabetic patients.

    PubMed

    Bulum, T; Kolaric, B; Duvnjak, L

    2013-09-01

    Previous studies have suggested a positive association between dyslipidemia and chronic kidney disease, but sparse data are available on the relation of lipids and urinary albumin excretion rate (UAE) in normoalbuminuric patients with normal renal function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the associations of serum lipids, including total, LDL, HDL, HDL2, HDL3 cholesterol, and triglyceride levels with UAE in normoalbuminuric Type 1 diabetic (T1D) patients. Study included 313 normoalbuminuric T1D patients with normal renal function and before any interventions with statins, ACE inhibitors or angiotensin II receptor blockers. Subjects were classified as low-normoalbuminuric (UAE<11.0 mg/24h) or high-normoalbuminuric (UAE≥11.0 mg/24h) based on median UAE of at least two 24- h urine collections. Correlations and multiple linear regressions analysis were performed to identify relationships between serum lipids and UAE in normoalbuminuric subjects. Total HDL (p=0.02) and HDL3 cholesterol (p=0.01) levels were higher in low-normoalbuminuric subjects compared to high-normoalbuminuric subjects. In logistic regression analysis, after adjustment for age, sex, BMI, duration of diabetes and HbA1c, lower total HDL and HDL3 cholesterol levels were significantly associated with risk of higher UAE in our normoalbuminuric subjects (p≤0.01), with odds ratios of 0.34 to 0.43. Elevated total HDL and HDL3 cholesterol levels are associated with lower UAE in normoalbuminuric T1D patients. However, whether the detection of elevated total HDL and HDL3 cholesterol levels in T1D patients has protective value for development of microalbuminuria needs to be assessed in further follow-up studies.

  7. Are plant-based diets efficacious in lowering total serum cholesterol and low-density lipoprotein levels?

    PubMed

    Ware, Kathrine M

    2014-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the U.S. and around the globe. A large body of literature accumulated over the past several decades has shown the benefit of lowering serum total cholesterol (TC) and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels to reduce cardiovascular risk. National guidelines suggest therapeutic lifestyle changes, beginning with diet, as a first step toward lowering TC and LDL-C. It has been suggested a plant-based, low fat diet can substantially reduce TC and LDL- C and thereby reduce risk of cardiovascular disease. The purpose of this review is to examine the state of the science regarding the efficacy of plant-based diets in reducing serum TC and LDL-C levels. While results of the research review indicate some benefit, strong evidence supporting the efficacy of plant-based diet in reducing atherogenic lipids is lacking.

  8. Prospective study of malabsorption induced risk of gall stone formation in relation to fall in plasma cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, T I; Andersen, B; Hylander, E; Jensen, L I; Laursen, K; Klein, H C

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between cholesterol in plasma and risk of gall stone formation was investigated in 210 obese patients who underwent jejunoileal bypass surgery and were free of gall stone disease at the time. Among 185, successfully reexamined on average 19 months after surgery, 26 (14%) developed gall stones. The fall in plasma cholesterol after surgery exhibited a U-shaped relation to risk of gall stone formation with a minimum risk around the average fall (2.6 mmol/l). This was confirmed by multivariate logistic regression analysis (p less than 0.01) taking into account other possible determinants. The relation was not significantly dependent on weight loss or ratio between jejunum and ileum left in function. The study suggests that malabsorption induced fall in plasma cholesterol is related to risk of gall stone formation by two oppositely working mechanisms, one enhancing and one reducing the risk.

  9. Omentin-1 plasma levels and cholesterol metabolism in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 1: impact of weight reduction

    PubMed Central

    Lesná, J; Tichá, A; Hyšpler, R; Musil, F; Bláha, V; Sobotka, L; Zadák, Z; Šmahelová, A

    2015-01-01

    Background: Omentin-1 is an anti-inflammatory adipokine produced preferentially by visceral adipose tissue. Plasma levels of omentin-1 are decreased in obesity and other insulin-resistant states. Insulin resistance contributes to the changes of cholesterol synthesis and absorption as well. The aim of this study was to characterise omentin-1 plasma levels in obese patients with diabetes mellitus type 1 during weight reduction, and to elucidate the relationship between cholesterol metabolism and omentin-1. Methods: Plasma levels of omentin-1 were measured in obese type 1 diabetics (n=14, body mass index >30 kg m−2, age 29–62 years) by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (BioVendor). Gas chromatography with flame ionisation detector (Fisons Plc.,) was used to measure squalene and non-cholesterol sterols—markers of cholesterol synthesis and absorption (phase I). Measurements were repeated after 1 month (phase II; 1 week of fasting in the hospital setting and 3 weeks on a diet containing 150 g saccharides per day) and after 1 year (phase III) on a diet with 225 g saccharides per day. Results: Omentin-1 plasma levels were stable during phases I and II, but significantly increased (P<0.001) during phase III. Omentin-1 plasma dynamics were significantly associated with plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein (P=0.005) and triacylglycerols (P=0.01), as well as with lathosterol (P=0.03). Conclusion: Omentin-1 plasma levels significantly increased during the weight reduction programme. Omentin-1 plasma dynamics suggest a close relationship with cholesterol metabolism. PMID:26524638

  10. trans-trans Conjugated linoleic acid enriched soybean oil reduces fatty liver and lowers serum cholesterol in obese zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Gilbert, William; Gadang, Vidya; Proctor, Andrew; Jain, Vishal; Devareddy, Latha

    2011-10-01

    Conjugated linoleic acid (CLA) is a collection of octadecadienoic fatty acids that have been shown to possess numerous health benefits. The CLA used in our study was produced by the photoisomerization of soybean oil and consists of about 20% CLA; this CLA consists of 75% trans-trans (a mixture of t8,t10; t9,t11; t10,t12) isomers. This method could be readily used to increase the CLA content of all soybean oil used as a food ingredient. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of trans-trans CLA-rich soy oil, fed as a dietary supplement, on body composition, dyslipidemia, hepatic steatosis, and markers of glucose control and liver function of obese fa/fa Zucker rats. The trans-trans CLA-rich soy oil lowered the serum cholesterol and low density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels by 41 and 50%, respectively, when compared to obese controls. Trans-trans CLA-rich soy oil supplementation also lowered the liver lipid content significantly (P < 0.05) with a concomitant decrease in the liver weight in the obese rats. In addition, glycated hemoglobin values were improved in the group receiving CLA-enriched soybean oil in comparison to the obese control. PPAR-γ expression in white adipose tissue was unchanged. In conclusion, trans-trans CLA-rich soy oil was effective in lowering total liver lipids and serum cholesterol.

  11. An adhesion-based method for plasma membrane isolation: evaluating cholesterol extraction from cells and their membranes.

    PubMed

    Bezrukov, Ludmila; Blank, Paul S; Polozov, Ivan V; Zimmerberg, Joshua

    2009-11-15

    A method to isolate large quantities of directly accessible plasma membrane from attached cells is presented. The method is based on the adhesion of cells to an adsorbed layer of polylysine on glass plates, followed by hypotonic lysis with ice-cold distilled water and subsequent washing steps. Optimal conditions for coating glass plates and time for cell attachment were established. No additional chemical or mechanical treatments were used. Contamination of the isolated plasma membrane by cell organelles was less than 5%. The method uses inexpensive, commercially available polylysine and reusable glass plates. Plasma membrane preparations can be made in 15 min. Using this method, we determined that methyl-beta-cyclodextrin differentially extracts cholesterol from fibroblast cells and their plasma membranes and that these differences are temperature dependent. Determination of the cholesterol/phospholipid ratio from intact cells does not reflect methyl-beta-cyclodextrin plasma membrane extraction properties.

  12. Effect of plasma fluctuations on lower hybrid current drive

    SciTech Connect

    Peysson, Y.; Decker, J.; Ekedahl, A.; Hillairet, J.; Ohsako, T.

    2011-12-23

    The effect of fluctuations of the electron density at the plasma edge on Lower Hybrid current drive is investigated. It is shown that the lack of robustness of the simulations due to ray stochasticity still remain despite the time averaging resulting from fluctuations.

  13. Analysis of a Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant with defective mobilization of cholesterol from the plasma membrane to the endoplasmic reticulum.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, N L; Andemariam, B; Underwood, K W; Panchalingam, K; Sternberg, D; Kielian, M; Liscum, L

    1997-10-01

    The factors involved in shuttling cholesterol among cellular membranes have not been defined. Using amphotericin B selection, we previously isolated Chinese hamster ovary cell mutants expressing defects in intracellular cholesterol transport. Complementation analysis among seven mutants identified one cell line, mutant 3-6, with a unique defect. The present analysis revealed three key features of mutant 3-6. First, the movement of cholesterol both from the endoplasmic reticulum and through lysosomes to the plasma membrane was normal. However, when intact 3-6 cells were treated with sphingomyelinase, movement of plasma membrane cholesterol to acyl CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase in the endoplasmic reticulum was defective. Cellular cholesterol was mobilized to this enzyme upon activation by 25-hydroxycholesterol. Second, mutant 3-6 did not utilize endogenously synthesized sterol or low density lipoprotein-derived cholesterol for growth as effectively as parental Chinese hamster ovary cells. Finally, despite normal movement of cholesterol to the plasma membrane, mutant 3-6 was amphotericin B resistant. The plasma membrane cholesterol content was normal as assessed by cholesterol oxidase treatment and Semliki Forest virus fusion, which suggests that the 3-6 mutation alters the organization of cholesterol in the plasma membrane. Our characterization of this mutant cell line should facilitate the identification of gene(s) required for this transport pathway.

  14. Lower HDL-cholesterol among healthy middle-aged Japanese-Brazilians in São Paulo compared to Natives and Japanese-Brazilians in Japan.

    PubMed

    Schwingel, Andiara; Nakata, Yoshio; Ito, Lucy S; Chodzko-Zajko, Wojtek J; Shigematsu, Ryosuke; Erb, Christopher T; Souza, Simone M; Oba-Shinjo, Sueli M; Matsuo, Tomoaki; Marie, Suely K N; Tanaka, Kiyoji

    2007-01-01

    Blood lipid levels are determined by a combination of genetic and environmental factors. Higher than average values of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-cholesterol) have been observed in people of Japanese ethnicity. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Japanese immigrants to Brazil and subsequent generations maintain the protective benefits associated with higher levels of HDL-cholesterol, and to examine the potential associations between HDL-cholesterol and a variety of other blood lipids, anthropometric and lifestyle factors. Healthy men and women aged 35 years and older who were Native Japanese (n = 198) or Japanese-Brazilians (JB) living in São Paulo, Brazil (n = 198) and in some Japanese cities (n = 246) were investigated. Anthropometric variables, blood lipids including HDL-cholesterol, and lifestyle factors were assessed. Serum HDL-cholesterol was observed to be lower for JB in São Paulo (both women and men) compared with Natives and JB in Japan. Among the groups, triglycerides, waist circumference, LDL-cholesterol, meat intake, stress, and smoking were observed to be independently negatively associated with HDL-cholesterol, whereas total cholesterol, fish intake, and physical activity were positively associated. Lower levels of HDL-cholesterol among both men and women of JB in São Paulo compared with both other groups were confirmed even after lifestyle adjustments. Our findings highlight the significantly lower levels of HDL-cholesterol among Japanese-Brazilians living in São Paulo city compared to Japanese-Brazilians and Native Japanese residing in Japan. Although several lifestyle factors were found to be significantly associated with HDL-cholesterol, they cannot adequately explain the role of the Brazilian cultural environment on HDL-cholesterol levels.

  15. Ultrafast Diffusion of a Fluorescent Cholesterol Analog in Compartmentalized Plasma Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Hiramoto-Yamaki, Nao; Tanaka, Kenji A K; Suzuki, Kenichi G N; Hirosawa, Koichiro M; Miyahara, Manami S H; Kalay, Ziya; Tanaka, Koichiro; Kasai, Rinshi S; Kusumi, Akihiro; Fujiwara, Takahiro K

    2014-01-01

    Cholesterol distribution and dynamics in the plasma membrane (PM) are poorly understood. The recent development of Bodipy488-conjugated cholesterol molecule (Bdp-Chol) allowed us to study cholesterol behavior in the PM, using single fluorescent-molecule imaging. Surprisingly, in the intact PM, Bdp-Chol diffused at the fastest rate ever found for any molecules in the PM, with a median diffusion coefficient (D) of 3.4 µm2/second, which was ∼10 times greater than that of non-raft phospholipid molecules (0.33 µm2/second), despite Bdp-Chol's probable association with raft domains. Furthermore, Bdp-Chol exhibited no sign of entrapment in time scales longer than 0.5 milliseconds. In the blebbed PM, where actin filaments were largely depleted, Bdp-Chol and Cy3-conjugated dioleoylphosphatidylethanolamine (Cy3-DOPE) diffused at comparable Ds (medians = 5.8 and 6.2 µm2/second, respectively), indicating that the actin-based membrane skeleton reduces the D of Bdp-Chol only by a factor of ∼2 from that in the blebbed PM, whereas it reduces the D of Cy3-DOPE by a factor of ∼20. These results are consistent with the previously proposed model, in which the PM is compartmentalized by the actin-based membrane-skeleton fence and its associated transmembrane picket proteins for the macroscopic diffusion of all of the membrane molecules, and suggest that the probability of Bdp-Chol passing through the compartment boundaries, once it enters the boundary, is ∼10× greater than that of Cy3-DOPE. Since the compartment sizes are greater than those of the putative raft domains, we conclude that raft domains coexist with membrane-skeleton-induced compartments and are contained within them. PMID:24506328

  16. Cholesterol-lowering effect of concentrated pomegranate juice consumption in type II diabetic patients with hyperlipidemia.

    PubMed

    Esmaillzadeh, Ahmad; Tahbaz, Farideh; Gaieni, Iraj; Alavi-Majd, Hamid; Azadbakht, Leila

    2006-05-01

    This study was undertaken to assess the effect of concentrated pomegranate juice consumption on lipid profiles of type II diabetic patients with hyperlipidemia (total cholesterol or triglycerides > or = 200 mg/dL). In this pilot study 22 diabetic patients were recruited from the Iranian Diabetes Society. They were free of any other chronic diseases. The patients were followed for eight weeks to obtain more detailed data about their diet before concentrated pomegranate juice (CPJ) consumption period began. In this pre-study period a 24-hour food recall and a food record (containing flavonoid-rich foodstuffs) were completed every ten days. At the end of the eighth week, anthropometric and biochemical assessments were done. Thereafter the patients consumed 40 g CPJ for eight weeks. During this period, dietary assessment was continued. After completion of the study anthropometric and blood indices were evaluated again. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used for statistical analysis. P-value was considered significant at p < 0.05. There were 14 women (63.6%) and 8 men (36.4%) in this survey. Mean (+/- SD) of age, weight, and duration of diabetes were 52.5 (+/- 5.2) years, 71.5 (+/- 10.3) kg, and 7.9 (+/- 6.6) years, respectively. After consumption of concentrated pomegranate juice significant reductions were seen in total cholesterol (p < 0.006), low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (LDL-c) (p < 0.006), LDL-c/high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-c) (p < 0.001), and total cholesterol/HDL-c (p < 0.001). However there were no significant changes in serum triacylglycerol and HDL-c concentrations. Anthropometric indices, physical activity level, types and doses of oral hypoglycemic agents, and the intake of nutrients and flavonoid-rich foodstuffs did not change during the CPJ consumption period. It is concluded that CPJ consumption could modify heart disease risk factors in these hyperlipidemic patients. Therefore, its inclusion in their diets may be beneficial.

  17. Lower Hybrid Drift in Simulations of Hypersonic Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niehoff, D.; Ashour-Abdalla, M.; Niemann, C.; Schriver, D.; Sotnikov, V. I.; Lapenta, G.

    2014-12-01

    It has been shown experimentally that hypersonic plasma (defined as moving with a bulk flow velocity of more than 5 to 10 times the Mach speed) traveling through a magnetic field will create a diamagnetic cavity, or bubble [1]. At the edge of the bubble, opposing field and density gradients can drive the lower hybrid drift instability [2]. We will explore two and a half dimensional (2 space and 3 velocity dimensions) simulations of hypersonic plasma within a parameter regime motivated by the aforementioned diamagnetic bubble experiments, wherein we find oscillations excited near the lower hybrid frequency propagating perpendicular to the bulk motion of the plasma and the background magnetic field. The simulations are run using the implicit PIC code iPIC3D so that we are able to capture dynamics of the plasma below ion scales, but not be forced to resolve all electron scales [3]. [1] Niemann et al, Phys. Plasmas 20, 012108 (2013) [2] Davidson et al, Phys. Fluids, Vol. 20, No. 2, February 1977 [3] S. Markidis et al, Math. Comput. Simul. (2009), doi 10.1016/j.matcom.2009.08.038

  18. Diet rich in high glucoraphanin broccoli reduces plasma LDL cholesterol: Evidence from randomised controlled trials

    PubMed Central

    Armah, Charlotte N; Derdemezis, Christos; Traka, Maria H; Dainty, Jack R; Doleman, Joanne F; Saha, Shikha; Leung, Wing; Potter, John F; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mithen, Richard F

    2015-01-01

    Scope Cruciferous-rich diets have been associated with reduction in plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), which may be due to the action of isothiocyanates derived from glucosinolates that accumulate in these vegetables. This study tests the hypothesis that a diet rich in high glucoraphanin (HG) broccoli will reduce plasma LDL-C. Methods and results One hundred and thirty volunteers were recruited to two independent double-blind, randomly allocated parallel dietary intervention studies, and were assigned to consume either 400 g standard broccoli or 400 g HG broccoli per week for 12 weeks. Plasma lipids were quantified before and after the intervention. In study 1 (37 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet reduced plasma LDL-C by 7.1% (95% CI: –1.8%, –12.3%, p = 0.011), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 1.8% (95% CI +3.9%, –7.5%, ns). In study 2 (93 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet resulted in a reduction of 5.1% (95% CI: –2.1%, –8.1%, p = 0.001), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 2.5% (95% CI: +0.8%, –5.7%, ns). When data from the two studies were combined the reduction in LDL-C by the HG broccoli was significantly greater than standard broccoli (p = 0.031). Conclusion Evidence from two independent human studies indicates that consumption of high glucoraphanin broccoli significantly reduces plasma LDL-C. PMID:25851421

  19. Diet rich in high glucoraphanin broccoli reduces plasma LDL cholesterol: Evidence from randomised controlled trials.

    PubMed

    Armah, Charlotte N; Derdemezis, Christos; Traka, Maria H; Dainty, Jack R; Doleman, Joanne F; Saha, Shikha; Leung, Wing; Potter, John F; Lovegrove, Julie A; Mithen, Richard F

    2015-05-01

    Cruciferous-rich diets have been associated with reduction in plasma LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C), which may be due to the action of isothiocyanates derived from glucosinolates that accumulate in these vegetables. This study tests the hypothesis that a diet rich in high glucoraphanin (HG) broccoli will reduce plasma LDL-C. One hundred and thirty volunteers were recruited to two independent double-blind, randomly allocated parallel dietary intervention studies, and were assigned to consume either 400 g standard broccoli or 400 g HG broccoli per week for 12 weeks. Plasma lipids were quantified before and after the intervention. In study 1 (37 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet reduced plasma LDL-C by 7.1% (95% CI: -1.8%, -12.3%, p = 0.011), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 1.8% (95% CI +3.9%, -7.5%, ns). In study 2 (93 volunteers), the HG broccoli diet resulted in a reduction of 5.1% (95% CI: -2.1%, -8.1%, p = 0.001), whereas standard broccoli reduced LDL-C by 2.5% (95% CI: +0.8%, -5.7%, ns). When data from the two studies were combined the reduction in LDL-C by the HG broccoli was significantly greater than standard broccoli (p = 0.031). Evidence from two independent human studies indicates that consumption of high glucoraphanin broccoli significantly reduces plasma LDL-C. © 2015 The Authors. Molecular Nutrition & Food Research published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Oxidized Phospholipids Inhibit the Formation of Cholesterol-Dependent Plasma Membrane Nanoplatforms

    PubMed Central

    Brameshuber, Mario; Sevcsik, Eva; Rossboth, Benedikt K.; Manner, Christina; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Peksel, Begüm; Péter, Mária; Török, Zsolt; Hermetter, Albin; Schütz, Gerhard J.

    2016-01-01

    We previously developed a single-molecule microscopy method termed TOCCSL (thinning out clusters while conserving stoichiometry of labeling), which allows for direct imaging of stable nanoscopic platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the plasma membrane. As a consensus raft marker, we chose monomeric GFP linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor to the cell membrane (mGFP-GPI). With this probe, we previously observed cholesterol-dependent homo-association to nanoplatforms diffusing in the plasma membrane of live CHO cells. Here, we report the release of this homo-association upon addition of 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) or 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, two oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) that are typically present in oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein. We found a dose-response relationship for mGFP-GPI nanoplatform disintegration upon addition of POVPC, correlating with the signal of the apoptosis marker Annexin V-Cy3. Similar concentrations of lysolipid showed no effect, indicating that the observed phenomena were not linked to properties of the lipid bilayer itself. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by NB-19 before addition of POVPC completely abolished nanoplatform disintegration by oxPLs. In conclusion, we were able to determine how oxidized lipid species disrupt mGFP-GPI nanoplatforms in the plasma membrane. Our results favor an indirect mechanism involving acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than a direct interaction of oxPLs with nanoplatform constituents. PMID:26745423

  1. Epistasis contributes to the genetic buffering of plasma HDL cholesterol in mice

    PubMed Central

    Churchill, Gary A.

    2010-01-01

    Stressful environmental factors, such as a high-fat diet, can induce responses in the expression of genes that act to maintain physiological homeostasis. We observed variation in plasma concentrations of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol across inbred mouse strains in response to high dietary fat intake. Several strains, including C57BL/6J, have stable levels of plasma HDL independent of diet, whereas other strains, including DBA2/J, show marked changes in plasma HDL. To explore this phenomenon further, we used publicly available data from a C57BL/6J × DBA/2J intercross to identify genetic factors that associate with HDL under high-fat diet conditions. Our analysis identified an epistatic interaction that plays a role in the buffering of HDL levels in C57BL/6J mice, and we have identified Arl4d as a candidate gene that mediates this effect. Structural modeling further elucidates the interaction of genetic factors that contribute to the robustness of HDL in response to high-fat diet in the C57BL/6J strain. PMID:20858711

  2. Cholesterol lowering effect in the gall bladder of dogs by a standardized infusion of Herniaria hirsuta L.

    PubMed

    van Dooren, Ines; Faouzi, My El Abbes; Foubert, Kenn; Theunis, Mart; Pieters, Luc; Cherrah, Yahya; Apers, Sandra

    2015-07-01

    Infusions of Herniaria hirsuta L., Herniaria glabra L. and Herniaria fontanesii J.Gay are well known in Moroccon folk medicine for the treatment of biliary dyskinesia, (uro)lithiasis or as a diuretic. Herniariae Herba which can contain H. glabra and H. hirsuta is known in Europe as an urological drug. To investigate the efficacy of a standardized infusion of Herniaria hirsuta against choleltihiasis, and evaluation of its genotoxicity. An analytical HPLC-UV method to quantify flavonoids and saponins present in the extract of H. hirsuta was developed and validated. An in vivo experiment to evaluate the cholesterol lowering effect of a infusion of H. hirsuta in the gall bladder of dogs was carried out. Dogs were divided into 3 groups i.e. control dogs (CG), dogs treated with ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA) (2×7.35mg/kg body weight/day) and dogs treated with the standardized infusion (HG) (2×48.5mg/kg body weight/day). Dogs were fed a fatty diet during 120 days after which a diet without additional fat was introduced till day 180. Treatment started 30 days after introduction of the fatty diet and lasted till the end of the experiment. A bile and blood sample of each dog was collected every 30 days, after which the concentration of cholesterol was determined. An Ames test was performed according to the OECD-guidelines. The validated HPLC-UV method showed a linear calibration model and an acceptable precision for the total flavonoid content (total content 4.51%) as well as the total saponin content (12.74%). The in vivo experiments already showed a minor difference for bile cholesterol between CG and HG after 30 days of treatment with the infusion, and the difference was more pronounced after 90 days of treatment. Even 30 days after discontinuation of the cholesterol-rich diet a significant difference remained between CG and HG. There was no statistically significant difference in blood cholesterol. The Ames test showed that the infusion of H. hirsuta could be considered

  3. Effects Of Internet-Based Tailored Advice on the Use of Cholesterol-Lowering Interventions: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Li, Stephen CH; Sullivan, David R; Jayne, Kathy; Su, Steve YS; Neal, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a leading risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Despite the availability of proven interventions to lower LDL cholesterol, their use remains subobtimal. Many websites provide interactive, tailored advice on cardiovascular risk in an attempt to help bridge this evidence-practice gap, yet there is little evidence that provision of such a tool is effective in changing practice. Objectives The objective was to define the effects on use of cholesterol-lowering interventions of a consumer-targeted tailored advice website. Methods This was a prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial open to any adult Australian with access to the Internet. A total of 2099 participants were randomized. Of these, 45% were male, the mean age of all participants was 56, and 1385 (66%) self-reported hypercholesterolemia. Follow-up information was obtained for 1945 (93%). Participants completed a brief online questionnaire. Individuals assigned to intervention received immediate, fully automated, personally tailored advice (based on current guidelines) regarding the need for commencement of statin therapy, increased statin therapy in those already on treatment, and nondrug intervention strategies. Control group participants were directed to static Web pages providing general information about cholesterol management. Results The primary outcome was the proportion of participants that commenced or increased use of prescribed cholesterol-lowering therapy. Of the total 2099 randomized participants, 304 (14%) met eligibility criteria for cholesterol-lowering therapy but were not prescribed treatment, and 254 (12%) were prescribed treatment but were not achieving the recommended target level. Treatment was commenced or increased in 64 (6.0%) of the 1062 intervention group participants and 79 (7.6%) of the 1037 control group participants (% difference = -1.6%, 95% confidence interval [CI] -3.75 to 0.57, P = .15). No

  4. The value of surrogate markers to monitor cholesterol absorption, synthesis and bioconversion to bile acids under lipid lowering therapies.

    PubMed

    Stellaard, Frans; von Bergmann, Klaus; Sudhop, Thomas; Lütjohann, Dieter

    2017-05-01

    Regulation of cholesterol (Chol) homeostasis is controlled by three main fluxes, i.e. intestinal absorption, de novo synthesis (ChS) and catabolism, predominantly as bile acid synthesis (BAS). High serum total Chol and LDL-Chol concentrations in particular are considered risk factors and markers for the development of atherosclerosis. Pharmaceutical treatments to lower serum Chol have focused on reducing absorption or ChS and increasing BAS. Monitoring of these three parameters is complex involving isotope techniques, cholesterol balance experiments and advanced mass spectrometry based analysis methods. Surrogate markers were explored that require only one single fasting blood sample collection. These markers were validated in specific, mostly physiological conditions and during statin treatment to inhibit ChS. They were also applied under cholesterol absorption restriction, but were not validated in this condition. We retrospectively evaluated the use of serum campesterol (Camp), sitosterol (Sit) and cholestanol (Cholol) as markers for cholesterol absorption, lathosterol (Lath) as marker for ChS and 7α-hydroxycholesterol (7α-OH-Ch) and 27-hydroxycholesterol (27-OH-Ch) as markers for BAS under conditions of Chol absorption restriction. Additionally, their values were corrected for Chol concentration (R_sterol or oxysterols). Thirty-seven healthy male omnivore subjects were studied under treatments with placebo (PLAC), ezetimibe (EZE) to inhibit cholesterol absorption, simvastatin (SIMVA) to reduce cholesterol synthesis and a combination of both (EZE+SIMVA). Results were compared to those obtained in 18 pure vegetarian subjects (vegans) whose dietary Chol intake is extremely low. Relative or fractional Chol absorption (FrChA) was measured with the continuous feeding stable isotope procedure, ChS and BAS with the cholesterol balance method. The daily Chol intake (DICh) was inventoried and the daily Chol absorption (DACh) calculated. Monitoring cholesterol

  5. Effects of cholesterol on plasma membrane lipid order in MCF-7 cells by two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yixiu; Chen, Jianling; Yang, Hongqin; Wang, Yuhua; Li, Hui; Xie, Shusen

    2014-09-01

    Lipid rafts are cholesterol- and glycosphingolipids- enriched microdomains on plasma membrane surface of mammal cells, involved in a variety of cellular processes. Depleting cholesterol from the plasma membrane by drugs influences the trafficking of lipid raft markers. Optical imaging techniques are powerful tools to study lipid rafts in live cells due to its noninvasive feature. In this study, breast cancer cells MCF-7 were treated with different concentrations of MβCD to deplete cholesterol and an environmentally sensitive fluorescence probe, Laurdan was loaded to image lipid order by two-photon microscopy. The generalized polarization (GP) values were calculated to distinguish the lipid order and disorder phase. GP images and GP distributions of native and cholesterol-depleted MCF-7 cells were obtained. Our results suggest that even at low concentration (0.5 mM) of MβCD, the morphology of the MCF-7 cells changes. Small high GP areas (lipid order phase) decrease more rapidly than low GP areas (lipid disorder phase), indicating that lipid raft structure was altered more severely than nonraft domains. The data demonstrates that cholesterol dramatically affect raft coverage and plasma membrane fluidity in living cells.

  6. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood

    PubMed Central

    Heuck, Claus-Chr.

    2011-01-01

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca++ and Mg++ inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density. PMID:21289994

  7. Polyacrylate adsorbents for the selective adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins from plasma or blood.

    PubMed

    Heuck, Claus-Chr

    2011-01-24

    Polyacrylate (PAA) adsorbents selectively bind low density lipoproteins (LDL) from human plasma and blood, whereas very low density lipoproteins (VLDL) are only minimally adsorbed. The adsorption of cholesterol-rich lipoproteins to PAA adsorbents is related to the molecular weight (mw) of the polyanion ligand. Ca(++) and Mg(++) inhibit the binding of LDL to PAA adsorbents. The chemical composition of the organic hardgels of the adsorbents does not have an influence on adsorption. The selective adsorption of LDL to PAA adsorbents can be explained to result from their low negative surface charge density and the specific colloid-chemical properties of the surface-bound PAA, which do not prevent LDL from binding to charge-like domains of the ligand. By contrast, VLDL and high density lipoproteins (HDL) are repelled from the adsorbents due to their higher negative surface charge density.

  8. Deficiency and supplementation of PUFA in the diet have similar effects on the age-associated changes in rat-plasma cholesterol levels.

    PubMed

    Straniero, Sara; Cavallini, Gabriella; Donati, Alessio; Metelli, Maria Rita; Tamburini, Ilaria; Pietrini, Pietro; Bergamini, Ettore

    2008-12-01

    Levels of plasma cholesterol, particularly LDL cholesterol, increase with increasing age in humans and rodents. Feeding a fish oil-rich diet may exert hypocholesterolemic effects. The aim of this work was to examine the effects of a life-long administration of a PUFA-enriched diet and of a PUFA-deficient diet in male Sprague-Dawley rats on the age-associated increases in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides. Diet had small effects on body-weight, and had dramatic effects on liver phospholipids-fatty acids. Surprisingly, both diets counteracted the age-associated changes in plasma cholesterol and triglycerides similarly and benefits were already visible in adult rats.

  9. Rapid turn-over of plasma membrane sphingomyelin and cholesterol in baby hamster kidney cells after exposure to sphingomyelinase.

    PubMed

    Slotte, J P; Härmälä, A S; Jansson, C; Pörn, M I

    1990-12-14

    Plasma membrane sphingomyelin in baby hamster kidney (BHK-21) cells was hydrolyzed with sphingomyelinase (Staphylococcus aureus) and the effects on membrane cholesterol translocation and the properties of membrane bound adenylate cyclase and Na+/K(+)-ATPase were determined. Exposure of confluent BHK-21 cells to 0.1 U/ml of sphingomyelinase led to the degradation (at 37 degrees C) of about 60% of cell sphingomyelin. No simultaneous hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine occurred. The hydrolysis of sphingomyelin subsequently led to the translocation (within 40 min) of about 50-60% of cell [3H]cholesterol from a cholesterol oxidase susceptible pool to an oxidase resistant compartment. The translocation of [3H]cholesterol from the cell surface to intracellular membranes was accompanied by a paralleled increase in [3H]cholesterol ester formation. When cells were first exposed to sphingomyelinase (to degrade sphingomyelin) and then incubated without the enzyme in serum-free media, the mass of cell sphingomyelin decreased initially (by 60%), but then began to increase and reached control levels within 3-4 h. The rapid re-synthesis of sphingomyelin was accompanied by an equally rapid normalization of cell [3H]cholesterol distribution. The re-formation of cell sphingomyelin also led to a decreased content of cellular [3H]cholesterol esters, indicating that unesterified [3H]cholesterol was pulled out of the cholesterol ester cycle and transported to the cell surface. Exposure of BHK-21 cells to sphingomyelinase further led to a dramatically decreased activity of ouabain-sensitive Na+/K(+)-ATPase, whereas forskolin-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity was not affected. The activity of Na+/K(+)-ATPase returned to normal in parallel with the normalization of cell sphingomyelin mass and cholesterol distribution. We conclude that sphingomyelin has profound effects on the steady-state distribution of cell cholesterol, and that manipulations of cell sphingomyelin levels directly and

  10. L-Carnitine effects on chemical composition of plasma lipoproteins of rabbits fed with normal and high cholesterol diets.

    PubMed

    Diaz, M; Lopez, F; Hernandez, F; Urbina, J A

    2000-06-01

    L-Carnitine plays an important role in the mitochondrial uptake of long-chain fatty acids in mammals. It has recently been shown that this compound has a marked hypo-cholesterolemic effect when used in conjunction with lipid-rich diets. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of L-carnitine on the fatty acid composition of plasma lipoproteins in rabbits fed with different diets. Four different groups were investigated: group I (standard diet), group II (standard diet supplemented with L-carnitine at 80 mg/kg), group III (standard diet supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol), and group IV (standard diet supplemented with 0.5% cholesterol plus L-carnitine at 80 mg/kg). The feeding period was 126 d. Total plasma cholesterol was indistinguishable in groups I and II, but increased nearly 40-fold in group III. This increment was reduced by 50% in group IV. Correspondingly, total cholesterol content in lipoprotein fractions [very low density lipoprotein (VLDL), low density lipoprotein (LDL), high density lipoprotein (HDL) separated by agarose gel chromatography was the same for groups I and II, while for animals fed a cholesterol-rich diet (III) total cholesterol in VLDL + LDL increased nearly 100-fold when compared with groups I and II but, again, the increment was reduced by 50% in group IV. In contrast, total cholesterol in HDL increased only fivefold for both groups III and IV when compared with groups I and II, indicating no effects of L-carnitine on this parameter. The reduction of total cholesterol in VLDL + LDL particles in animals fed a cholesterol-rich diet plus L-carnitine was associated with a marked decrease in the ratio of cholesteryl ester to free cholesterol and a dramatic increase in their phospholipid content; opposite effects were observed for HDL. L-Carnitine induced a marked decrease in the saturated to unsaturated C16 + C18 fatty acid ratio in cholesteryl esters associated with VLDL and LDL from animals fed with both normal and cholesterol

  11. An antibody against the C-terminal domain of PCSK9 lowers LDL cholesterol levels in vivo.

    PubMed

    Schiele, Felix; Park, John; Redemann, Norbert; Luippold, Gerd; Nar, Herbert

    2014-02-20

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) is associated with autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia, a state of elevated levels of LDL (low-density lipoprotein) cholesterol. Autosomal dominant hypercholesterolemia can result in severe implications such as stroke and coronary heart disease. The inhibition of PCSK9 function by therapeutic antibodies that block interaction of PCSK9 with the epidermal growth factor-like repeat A domain of LDL receptor (LDLR) was shown to successfully lower LDL cholesterol levels in clinical studies. Here we present data on the identification, structural and biophysical characterization and in vitro and in vivo pharmacology of a PCSK9 antibody (mAb1). The X-ray structure shows that mAb1 binds the module 1 of the C-terminal domain (CTD) of PCSK9. It blocks access to an area bearing several naturally occurring gain-of-function and loss-of-function mutations. Although the antibody does not inhibit binding of PCSK9 to epidermal growth factor-like repeat A, it partially reverses PCSK9-induced reduction of the LDLR and LDL cholesterol uptake in a cellular assay. mAb1 is also effective in lowering serum levels of LDL cholesterol in cynomolgus monkeys in vivo. Complete loss of PCSK9 is associated with insufficient liver regeneration and increased risk of hepatitis C infections. Blocking of the CTD is sufficient to partially inhibit PCSK9 function. Antibodies binding the CTD of PCSK9 may thus be advantageous in patients that do not tolerate complete inhibition of PCSK9.

  12. Plasma high density lipoprotein is increased in man when low density lipoprotein (LDL) is lowered by LDL-pheresis.

    PubMed Central

    Parker, T S; Gordon, B R; Saal, S D; Rubin, A L; Ahrens, E H

    1986-01-01

    Plasma high density lipoprotein (HDL) concentrations were increased in five hypercholesterolemic normoglyceridemic patients after removal of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL) by LDL-pheresis. In each patient up to 80% of circulating LDL was removed by passing plasma through immunoadsorption columns containing antibody to apolipoprotein B immobilized to Sepharose. Rebound of LDL was slow after the procedure: 5-7 days in four non-familial hypercholesterolemic patients and greater than 14 days in one patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia. Plasma HDL rose above the pretreatment baseline during the interval between treatments in four of the five patients. When treatments were repeated weekly, time-averaged plasma LDL was lowered by 40-70%, while plasma HDL cholesterol and apolipoprotein AI were increased up to 2-fold, depending on the degree of LDL lowering. Plasma HDL concentrations fell back to their baseline values when LDL-pheresis was stopped and rose again when treatment was restarted. Thus, LDL-pheresis may augment the therapeutic effectiveness of LDL lowering by raising plasma HDL levels and the concentration of HDL relative to LDL. PMID:3511474

  13. Cholesterol and F-actin are required for clustering of recycling synaptic vesicle proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane

    PubMed Central

    Dason, Jeffrey S; Smith, Alex J; Marin, Leo; Charlton, Milton P

    2014-01-01

    AbstractSynaptic vesicles (SVs) and their proteins must be recycled for sustained synaptic transmission. We tested the hypothesis that SV cholesterol is required for proper sorting of SV proteins during recycling in live presynaptic terminals. We used the reversible block of endocytosis in the Drosophila temperature-sensitive dynamin mutant shibire-ts1 to trap exocytosed SV proteins, and then examined the effect of experimental treatments on the distribution of these proteins within the presynaptic plasma membrane by confocal microscopy. SV proteins synaptotagmin, vglut and csp were clustered following SV trapping in control experiments but dispersed in samples treated with the cholesterol chelator methyl-β-cyclodextrin to extract SV cholesterol. There was accumulation of phosphatidylinositol (4,5)-bisphosphate (PIP2) in presynaptic terminals following SV trapping and this was reduced following SV cholesterol extraction. Reduced PIP2 accumulation was associated with disrupted accumulation of actin in presynaptic terminals. Similar to vesicular cholesterol extraction, disruption of actin by latrunculin A after SV proteins had been trapped on the plasma membrane resulted in the dispersal of SV proteins and prevented recovery of synaptic transmission due to impaired endocytosis following relief of the endocytic block. Our results demonstrate that vesicular cholesterol is required for aggregation of exocytosed SV proteins in the presynaptic plasma membrane and are consistent with a mechanism involving regulation of PIP2 accumulation and local actin polymerization by cholesterol. Thus, alteration of membrane or SV lipids may affect the ability of synapses to undergo sustained synaptic transmission by compromising the recycling of SV proteins. PMID:24297851

  14. ApoE promotes hepatic selective uptake but not RCT due to increased ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux to plasma.

    PubMed

    Annema, Wijtske; Dikkers, Arne; de Boer, Jan Freark; Gautier, Thomas; Rensen, Patrick C N; Rader, Daniel J; Tietge, Uwe J F

    2012-05-01

    ApoE plays an important role in lipoprotein metabolism. This study investigated the effects of adenovirus-mediated human apoE overexpression (AdhApoE3) on sterol metabolism and in vivo reverse cholesterol transport (RCT). In wild-type mice, AdhApoE3 resulted in decreased HDL cholesterol levels and a shift toward larger HDL in plasma, whereas hepatic cholesterol content increased (P < 0.05). These effects were dependent on scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) as confirmed using SR-BI-deficient mice. Kinetic studies demonstrated increased plasma HDL cholesteryl ester catabolic rates (P < 0.05) and higher hepatic selective uptake of HDL cholesteryl esters in AdhApoE3-injected wild-type mice (P < 0.01). However, biliary and fecal sterol output as well as in vivo macrophage-to-feces RCT studied with (3)H-cholesterol-loaded mouse macrophage foam cells remained unchanged upon human apoE overexpression. Similar results were obtained using hApoE3 overexpression in human CETP transgenic mice. However, blocking ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux from hepatocytes in AdhApoE3-injected mice using probucol increased biliary cholesterol secretion (P < 0.05), fecal neutral sterol excretion (P < 0.05), and in vivo RCT (P < 0.01), specifically within neutral sterols. These combined data demonstrate that systemic apoE overexpression increases i) SR-BI-mediated selective uptake into the liver and ii) ABCA1-mediated efflux of RCT-relevant cholesterol from hepatocytes back to the plasma compartment, thereby resulting in unchanged fecal mass sterol excretion and overall in vivo RCT.

  15. The very-high-density lipoprotein fraction of rabbit plasma is rich in tissue-derived cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Nanjee, M N; Miller, N E

    1991-11-05

    When plasma from rabbits, which several weeks earlier had been infused with [3H]cholesterol, was subjected to equilibrium density gradient ultracentrifugation, the specific radioactivity of cholesterol in the very-high-density lipoprotein (VHDL) fraction (d 1.22-1.32 g/ml) was three to 8-fold greater (mean, 5.5-fold; P less than 0.001) than that in high-density lipoproteins (HDL; d 1.06-1.21 g/ml). On size exclusion chromatography of plasma, no increase in specific radioactivity was seen in particles smaller than HDL. These findings suggest that those apolipoprotein-lipid complexes that dissociate from HDL during ultracentrifugation to form the VHDL fraction contain proportionately more tissue-derived cholesterol than do those that are more tightly bound to HDL.

  16. Both rare and common variants in PCSK9 influence plasma low-density lipoprotein cholesterol level in American Indians.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Ching-Wei; North, Kari E; Tin, Adrienne; Haack, Karin; Franceschini, Nora; Saroja Voruganti, V; Laston, Sandy; Zhang, Ying; Best, Lyle G; MacCluer, Jean W; Beaty, Terri H; Navas-Acien, Ana; Kao, W H Linda; Howard, Barbara V

    2015-02-01

    Elevated LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene have been associated not only with plasma LDL-C concentration, but also with ischemic heart disease. Little is known about the genetic architecture of PCSK9 and its influence on LDL-C in American Indians. We aimed to investigate the genetic architecture in the 1p32 region encompassing PCSK9 and its influence on LDL-C in American Indians. The Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) is a family-based genetic study. Two thousand four hundred fifty eight American Indians from Arizona, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and South Dakota, who were genotyped by Illumina MetaboChip. We genotyped 486 SNPs in a 3.9 Mb region at chromosome 1p32 encompassing PCSK9 in 2458 American Indians. We examined the association between these SNPs and LDL-C. For common variants (MAF ≥ 1%), meta-analysis across the three geographic regions showed common variants in PCSK9 were significantly associated with higher LDL-C. The most significant SNP rs12067569 (MAF = 1.7 %, β = 16.9 ± 3.7, P = 5.9 × 10(-6)) was in complete LD (r(2) = 1) with a nearby missense SNP, rs505151 (E670G) (β = 15.0 ± 3.6, P = 3.6 × 10(-5)). For rare variants (MAF < 1%), rs11591147 (R46L, MAF = 0.9%) was associated with lower LDL-C (β = - 31.1 ± 7.1, P = 1.4 × 10(-5)). The mean (SD) of LDL-C was 76.9 (7.8) and 107.4 (1.0) mg/dL for those with and without the R46L mutation, respectively. One person who was homozygous for R46L had LDL-C levels of 11 mg/dL. In one family, 6 out of 8 members carrying the R46L mutation had LDL-C levels below the lower 10% percentile of LDL-C among all study participants. Both rare and common variants in PCSK9 influence plasma LDL-C levels in American Indians. Follow-up studies may disclose the influence of these mutations on the risk of CVD and responses to cholesterol-lowering medications.

  17. Both Rare and Common Variants in PCSK9 Influence Plasma Low-Density Lipoprotein Cholesterol Level in American Indians

    PubMed Central

    North, Kari E.; Tin, Adrienne; Haack, Karin; Franceschini, Nora; Saroja Voruganti, V.; Laston, Sandy; Zhang, Ying; Best, Lyle G.; MacCluer, Jean W.; Beaty, Terri H.; Kao, W. H. Linda; Howard, Barbara V.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Elevated LDL cholesterol (LDL-C) is an important risk factor for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular disease. Variants in the proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) gene have been associated not only with plasma LDL-C concentration, but also with ischemic heart disease. Little is known about the genetic architecture of PCSK9 and its influence on LDL-C in American Indians. Objective: We aimed to investigate the genetic architecture in the 1p32 region encompassing PCSK9 and its influence on LDL-C in American Indians. Design: The Strong Heart Family Study (SHFS) is a family-based genetic study. Participants: Two thousand four hundred fifty eight American Indians from Arizona, Oklahoma, North Dakota, and South Dakota, who were genotyped by Illumina MetaboChip. Results: We genotyped 486 SNPs in a 3.9 Mb region at chromosome 1p32 encompassing PCSK9 in 2458 American Indians. We examined the association between these SNPs and LDL-C. For common variants (MAF ≥ 1%), meta-analysis across the three geographic regions showed common variants in PCSK9 were significantly associated with higher LDL-C. The most significant SNP rs12067569 (MAF = 1.7 %, β = 16.9 ± 3.7, P = 5.9 × 10−6) was in complete LD (r2 = 1) with a nearby missense SNP, rs505151 (E670G) (β = 15.0 ± 3.6, P = 3.6 × 10−5). For rare variants (MAF < 1%), rs11591147 (R46L, MAF = 0.9%) was associated with lower LDL-C (β = − 31.1 ± 7.1, P = 1.4 × 10−5). The mean (SD) of LDL-C was 76.9 (7.8) and 107.4 (1.0) mg/dL for those with and without the R46L mutation, respectively. One person who was homozygous for R46L had LDL-C levels of 11 mg/dL. In one family, 6 out of 8 members carrying the R46L mutation had LDL-C levels below the lower 10% percentile of LDL-C among all study participants. Conclusions: Both rare and common variants in PCSK9 influence plasma LDL-C levels in American Indians. Follow-up studies may disclose the influence of these mutations on the risk of CVD and responses

  18. Co-Administration of Cholesterol-Lowering Probiotics and Anthraquinone from Cassia obtusifolia L. Ameliorate Non-Alcoholic Fatty Liver.

    PubMed

    Mei, Lu; Tang, Youcai; Li, Ming; Yang, Pingchang; Liu, Zhiqiang; Yuan, Jieli; Zheng, Pengyuan

    2015-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) has become a common liver disease in recent decades. No effective treatment is currently available. Probiotics and natural functional food may be promising therapeutic approaches to this disease. The present study aims to investigate the efficiency of the anthraquinone from Cassia obtusifolia L. (AC) together with cholesterol-lowering probiotics (P) to improve high-fat diet (HFD)-induced NAFLD in rat models and elucidate the underlying mechanism. Cholesterol-lowering probiotics were screened out by MRS-cholesterol broth with ammonium ferric sulfate method. Male Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with HFD and subsequently administered with AC and/or P. Lipid metabolism parameters and fat synthesis related genes in rat liver, as well as the diversity of gut microbiota were evaluated. The results demonstrated that, compared with the NAFLD rat, the serum lipid levels of treated rats were reduced effectively. Besides, cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1), low density lipoprotein receptor (LDL-R) and farnesoid X receptor (FXR) were up-regulated while the expression of 3-hydroxy-3-methyl glutaryl coenzyme A reductase (HMGCR) was reduced. The expression of peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)-α protein was significantly increased while the expression of PPAR-γ and sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) was down-regulated. In addition, compared with HFD group, in AC, P and AC+P group, the expression of intestinal tight-junction protein occludin and zonula occluden-1 (ZO-1) were up-regulated. Furthermore, altered gut microbiota diversity after the treatment of probiotics and AC were analysed. The combination of cholesterol-lowering probiotics and AC possesses a therapeutic effect on NAFLD in rats by up-regulating CYP7A1, LDL-R, FXR mRNA and PPAR-α protein produced in the process of fat metabolism while down-regulating the expression of HMGCR, PPAR-γ and SREBP-1c, and through normalizing the intestinal

  19. CYP7A1-rs3808607 and APOE isoform associate with LDL cholesterol lowering after plant sterol consumption in a randomized clinical trial

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The benefits of plant sterols (PS) for cholesterol lowering are hampered by large heterogeneity across individuals, potentially due to genetic polymorphisms. We investigated the impact of candidate genetic variations on cholesterol response to PS, in a trial which recruited individuals with high or ...

  20. Long-term use of cholesterol-lowering drugs and cancer incidence in a large United States cohort.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Eric J; Newton, Christina C; Thun, Michael J; Gapstur, Susan M

    2011-03-01

    HMG-coA reductase inhibitors, commonly known as statins, account for the great majority of cholesterol-lowering drug use. However, little is known about the association between long-term statin use and incidence of most types of cancers. We examined the association between long-term use of cholesterol-lowering drugs, predominantly statins, and the incidence of ten common cancers, as well as overall cancer incidence, among 133,255 participants (60,059 men and 73,196 women) in the Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort during the period from 1997 to 2007. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression was used to estimate relative risks (RR). Current use status and duration of use were updated during follow-up using information from biennial follow-up questionnaires. Current use of cholesterol-lowering drugs for five or more years was not associated with overall cancer incidence (RR = 0.97, 95% CI = 0.92-1.03), or incidence of prostate, breast, colorectal, lung, bladder, renal cell, or pancreatic cancer but was associated with lower risk of melanoma (RR = 0.79, 95% CI = 0.66-0.96), endometrial cancer (RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94), and non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL; RR = 0.74, 95% CI = 0.62-0.89). These results suggest that long-term use of statins is unlikely to substantially increase or decrease overall cancer risk. However, associations between long-term statin use and risk of endometrial cancer, melanoma, and NHL deserve further investigation.

  1. Garlic Lowers Blood Pressure in Hypertensive Individuals, Regulates Serum Cholesterol, and Stimulates Immunity: An Updated Meta-analysis and Review.

    PubMed

    Ried, Karin

    2016-02-01

    Garlic has been shown to have cardiovascular protective and immunomodulatory properties. We updated a previous meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood pressure and reviewed the effect of garlic on cholesterol and immunity. We searched the Medline database for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) published between 1955 and December 2013 on the effect of garlic preparations on blood pressure. In addition, we reviewed the effect of garlic on cholesterol and immunity. Our updated meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood pressure, which included 20 trials with 970 participants, showed a mean ± SE decrease in systolic blood pressure (SBP) of 5.1 ± 2.2 mm Hg (P < 0.001) and a mean ± SE decrease in diastolic blood pressure (DBP) of 2.5 ± 1.6 mm Hg (P < 0.002) compared with placebo. Subgroup analysis of trials in hypertensive subjects (SBP/DBP ≥140/90 mm Hg) at baseline revealed a larger significant reduction in SBP of 8.7 ± 2.2 mm Hg (P < 0.001; n = 10) and in DBP of 6.1 ± 1.3 mm Hg (P < 0.001; n = 6). A previously published meta-analysis on the effect of garlic on blood lipids, which included 39 primary RCTs and 2300 adults treated for a minimum of 2 wk, suggested garlic to be effective in reducing total and LDL cholesterol by 10% if taken for >2 mo by individuals with slightly elevated concentrations [e.g., total cholesterol >200 mg/dL (>5.5 mmol/L)]. Garlic has immunomodulating effects by increasing macrophage activity, natural killer cells, and the production of T and B cells. Clinical trials have shown garlic to significantly reduce the number, duration, and severity of upper respiratory infections. Our review suggests that garlic supplements have the potential to lower blood pressure in hypertensive individuals, to regulate slightly elevated cholesterol concentrations, and to stimulate the immune system. Garlic supplements are highly tolerated and may be considered as a complementary treatment option for hypertension, slightly elevated cholesterol

  2. Background diet and fat type alters plasma lipoprotein response but not aortic cholesterol accumulation in F1B Golden Syrian hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dillard, Alice; Matthan, Nirupa R; Spartano, Nicole L; Butkowski, Ann E; Lichtenstein, Alice H

    2013-12-01

    Dietary modification alters plasma lipoprotein profiles and atherosclerotic lesion progression in humans and some animal models. Variability in response to diet induced atherosclerosis has been reported in hamsters. Assessed was the interaction between background diet composition and dietary fat type on aortic cholesterol accumulation, lipoprotein profiles, hepatic lipids and selected genes. F1B Golden Syrian hamsters (20/group) were fed (12 weeks) semi-purified or non-purified diets containing either 10 % (w/w) coconut oil or safflower oil and 0.15 % (w/w) cholesterol. The non-purified diets relative to semi-purified diets resulted in significantly higher TC (72 % [percent difference] and 38 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively) and nHDL-C (84 and 61 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively), and lower HDL-C (-47 and -45 %, coconut oil and safflower oil, respectively) concentrations. Plasma triacylglycerol concentrations in the hamsters fed the non-purified coconut oil-supplemented diets were three- to fourfold higher than non-purified safflower oil-supplemented, and both semi-purified diets. With the exception of HDL-C, a significant effect of fat type was observed in TC, nHDL-C and triacylglycerol (all P < 0.05) concentrations. Regardless of diet induced differences in lipoprotein profiles, there was no significant effect on aortic cholesterol accumulation. There was an inverse relationship between plasma nHDL-C and triacylglycerol, and hepatic cholesteryl ester content (P < 0.001). Diet induced differences in hepatic gene transcription (LDL receptor, apoB-100, microsomal transfer protein) were not reflected in protein concentrations. Although hamsters fed non-purified and/or saturated fatty acid-supplemented diets had more atherogenic lipoprotein profiles compared to hamsters fed semi-purified and/or polyunsaturated fatty acid-supplemented diets these differences were not reflected in aortic cholesterol accumulation.

  3. LRP5 and plasma cholesterol levels modulate the canonical Wnt pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Borrell-Pages, Maria; Carolina Romero, July; Badimon, Lina

    2015-08-01

    Inflammation is triggered after invasion or injury to restore homeostasis. Although the activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling is one of the first molecular responses to cellular damage, its role in inflammation is still unclear. It was our hypothesis that the low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-related protein 5 (LRP5) and the canonical Wnt signaling pathway are modulators of inflammatory mechanisms. Wild-type (WT) and LRP5(-/-) mice were fed a hypercholesterolemic (HC) diet to trigger dislipidemia and chronic inflammation. Diets were supplemented with plant sterol esters (PSEs) to induce LDL cholesterol lowering and the reduction of inflammation. HC WT mice showed increased serum cholesterol levels that correlated with increased Lrp5 and Wnt/β-catenin gene expression while in the HC LRP5(-/-) mice Wnt/β-catenin pathway was shut down. Functionally, HC induced pro-inflammatory gene expression in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting an inhibitory role of the Wnt pathway in inflammation. Dietary PSE administration downregulated serum cholesterol levels in WT and LRP5(-/-) mice. Furthermore, in WT mice PSE increased anti-inflammatory genes expression and inhibited Wnt/β-catenin activation. Hepatic gene expression of Vldlr, Lrp2 and Lrp6 was increased after HC feeding in WT mice but not in LRP5(-/-) mice, suggesting a role for these receptors in the clearance of plasmatic lipoproteins. Finally, an antiatherogenic role for LRP5 was demonstrated as HC LRP5(-/-) mice developed larger aortic atherosclerotic lesions than WT mice. Our results show an anti-inflammatory, pro-survival role for LRP5 and the Wnt signaling pathway in peripheral blood leukocytes.

  4. Whole Soy Flour Incorporated into a Muffin and Consumed at 2 Doses of Soy Protein Does Not Lower LDL Cholesterol in a Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial of Hypercholesterolemic Adults.

    PubMed

    Padhi, Emily Mt; Blewett, Heather J; Duncan, Alison M; Guzman, Randolph P; Hawke, Aileen; Seetharaman, Koushik; Tsao, Rong; Wolever, Thomas Ms; Ramdath, D Dan

    2015-12-01

    Soy protein may reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk by lowering LDL cholesterol, but few studies have assessed whether whole soy flour displays a similar effect. The aim of this study was to assess the dose effect of whole soy flour incorporated into muffins on plasma LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic adults. Adults aged 30-70 y (n = 243) with elevated LDL cholesterol (≥3.0 and ≤5.0 mmol/L) were stratified by LDL cholesterol and randomly assigned to consume 2 soy muffins containing 25 g soy protein [high-dose soy (HDS)], 1 soy and 1 wheat muffin containing 12.5 g soy protein and 12.5 g whey protein [low-dose soy (LDS)], or 2 wheat muffins containing 25 g whey protein (control) daily for 6 wk while consuming a self-selected diet. Fasting blood samples were collected at weeks 0, 3, and 6 for analysis of plasma lipids [total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs)], glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and isoflavones. Blood pressures also were measured. Dietary intake was assessed at weeks 0 and 4 with the use of 3 d food records. Treatment effects were assessed with the use of intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation and LDL cholesterol as the primary outcome. In total, 213 (87.6%) participants completed the trial. Participants were primarily Caucasian (83%) and mostly female (63%), with a mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m2) of 28.0 ± 4.6 and systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 122 ± 16 and 77 ± 11 mm Hg, respectively. Despite a dose-dependent increase in plasma isoflavones (P < 0.001), neither HDS nor LDS had a significant effect on LDL cholesterol compared with control (mean ± SEM changes: control, -0.04 ± 0.05 mmol/L; HDS, 0.01 ± 0.05 mmol/L; and LDS, -0.04 ± 0.06 mmol/L). There were no significant treatment effects on total or HDL cholesterol, TGs, CRP, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, blood pressure, or the Framingham 10-y CHD risk score. Consuming 12.5 or 25 g protein from defatted

  5. Whole Soy Flour Incorporated into a Muffin and Consumed at 2 Doses of Soy Protein Does Not Lower LDL Cholesterol in a Randomized, Double-Blind Controlled Trial of Hypercholesterolemic Adults12

    PubMed Central

    Padhi, Emily MT; Blewett, Heather J; Duncan, Alison M; Guzman, Randolph P; Hawke, Aileen; Seetharaman, Koushik; Tsao, Rong; Wolever, Thomas MS; Ramdath, D Dan

    2015-01-01

    Background: Soy protein may reduce coronary heart disease (CHD) risk by lowering LDL cholesterol, but few studies have assessed whether whole soy flour displays a similar effect. Objective: The aim of this study was to assess the dose effect of whole soy flour incorporated into muffins on plasma LDL cholesterol in hypercholesterolemic adults. Methods: Adults aged 30–70 y (n = 243) with elevated LDL cholesterol (≥3.0 and ≤5.0 mmol/L) were stratified by LDL cholesterol and randomly assigned to consume 2 soy muffins containing 25 g soy protein [high-dose soy (HDS)], 1 soy and 1 wheat muffin containing 12.5 g soy protein and 12.5 g whey protein [low-dose soy (LDS)], or 2 wheat muffins containing 25 g whey protein (control) daily for 6 wk while consuming a self-selected diet. Fasting blood samples were collected at weeks 0, 3, and 6 for analysis of plasma lipids [total, LDL, and HDL cholesterol and triglycerides (TGs)], glucose, insulin, C-reactive protein (CRP), and isoflavones. Blood pressures also were measured. Dietary intake was assessed at weeks 0 and 4 with the use of 3 d food records. Treatment effects were assessed with the use of intention-to-treat analysis with multiple imputation and LDL cholesterol as the primary outcome. Results: In total, 213 (87.6%) participants completed the trial. Participants were primarily Caucasian (83%) and mostly female (63%), with a mean ± SD body mass index (in kg/m2) of 28.0 ± 4.6 and systolic and diastolic blood pressures of 122 ± 16 and 77 ± 11 mm Hg, respectively. Despite a dose-dependent increase in plasma isoflavones (P < 0.001), neither HDS nor LDS had a significant effect on LDL cholesterol compared with control (mean ± SEM changes: control, −0.04 ± 0.05 mmol/L; HDS, 0.01 ± 0.05 mmol/L; and LDS, −0.04 ± 0.06 mmol/L). There were no significant treatment effects on total or HDL cholesterol, TGs, CRP, homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance, blood pressure, or the Framingham 10-y CHD risk score

  6. Cholesterol-lowering drugs cause dissolution of cholesterol crystals and disperse Kupffer cell crown-like structures during resolution of NASH

    PubMed Central

    Ioannou, George N.; Van Rooyen, Derrick M.; Savard, Christopher; Haigh, W. Geoffrey; Yeh, Matthew M.; Teoh, Narci C.; Farrell, Geoffrey C.

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol crystals form within hepatocyte lipid droplets in human and experimental nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) and are the focus of crown-like structures (CLSs) of activated Kupffer cells (KCs). Obese, diabetic Alms1 mutant (foz/foz) mice were a fed high-fat (23%) diet containing 0.2% cholesterol for 16 weeks and then assigned to four intervention groups for 8 weeks: a) vehicle control, b) ezetimibe (5 mg/kg/day), c) atorvastatin (20 mg/kg/day), or d) ezetimibe and atorvastatin. Livers of vehicle-treated mice developed fibrosing NASH with abundant cholesterol crystallization within lipid droplets calculated to extend over 3.3% (SD, 2.2%) of liver surface area. Hepatocyte lipid droplets with prominent cholesterol crystallization were surrounded by TNFα-positive (activated) KCs forming CLSs (≥3 per high-power field). KCs that formed CLSs stained positive for NLRP3, implicating activation of the NLRP3 inflammasome in response to cholesterol crystals. In contrast, foz/foz mice treated with ezetimibe and atorvastatin showed near-complete resolution of cholesterol crystals [0.01% (SD, 0.02%) of surface area] and CLSs (0 per high-power field), with amelioration of fibrotic NASH. Ezetimibe or atorvastatin alone had intermediate effects on cholesterol crystallization, CLSs, and NASH. These findings are consistent with a causative link between exposure of hepatocytes and KCs to cholesterol crystals and with the development of NASH possibly mediated by NLRP3 activation. PMID:25520429

  7. Effect of dietary fish oil on fatty acid deposition and expression of cholesterol homeostasis controlling genes in the liver and plasma lipid profile: comparison of two animal models.

    PubMed

    Komprda, T; Rozíková, V; Zamazalová, N; Škultéty, O; Vícenová, M; Trčková, M; Faldyna, M

    2016-10-16

    The objective of the present study was to compare hepatic fatty acid deposition, plasma lipid level and expression of cholesterol homeostasis controlling genes in the liver of rats (Wistar Albino; n = 32) and pigs (Large White × Landrace; n = 32) randomly assigned into two groups of 16 animals each and fed 10 weeks the diet with either 2.5% of fish oil (F; source of eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acid, EPA+DHA) or 2.5% of palm oil (P; high content of saturated fatty acids; control). F-rats deposited in the liver three times less EPA, but 1.3 times more DHA than F-pigs (p < 0.05). Dietary fish oil relative to palm oil increased PPARα and SREBP-2 gene expression much strongly (p < 0.01) in the pig liver in comparison with the rat liver, but expression of Insig-1 and Hmgcr genes in the liver of the F-pigs relative to the expression of these genes in the liver of the P-pigs was substantially lower (p < 0.01 and p < 0.05 respectively) as compared to rats. When plasma lipid concentration in the F-animals was expressed as a ratio of the plasma concentration in the P-counterparts, dietary fish oil decreased HDL cholesterol less (p < 0.01), but LDL cholesterol and triacylglycerols more (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001 respectively) in rats than in pigs: more favourable effect of fish oil on rat plasma lipids in comparison with pigs can therefore be concluded. Concentration of total cholesterol and both its fractions in the rat plasma was negatively correlated (p < 0.01) with hepatic DHA, but also with unsaturated myristic and palmitic acid respectively. It has been concluded that regarding the similarity of the plasma lipid levels to humans, porcine model can be considered superior; however, using this model, dietary fish oil at the tested amount (2.5%) was not able to improve plasma lipid markers in comparison with saturated palm oil.

  8. Metformin lowers plasma triglycerides by promoting VLDL-triglyceride clearance by brown adipose tissue in mice.

    PubMed

    Geerling, Janine J; Boon, Mariëtte R; van der Zon, Gerard C; van den Berg, Sjoerd A A; van den Hoek, Anita M; Lombès, Marc; Princen, Hans M G; Havekes, Louis M; Rensen, Patrick C N; Guigas, Bruno

    2014-03-01

    Metformin is the first-line drug for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Besides its well-characterized antihyperglycemic properties, metformin also lowers plasma VLDL triglyceride (TG). In this study, we investigated the underlying mechanisms in APOE*3-Leiden.CETP mice, a well-established model for human-like lipoprotein metabolism. We found that metformin markedly lowered plasma total cholesterol and TG levels, an effect mostly due to a decrease in VLDL-TG, whereas HDL was slightly increased. Strikingly, metformin did not affect hepatic VLDL-TG production, VLDL particle composition, and hepatic lipid composition but selectively enhanced clearance of glycerol tri[(3)H]oleate-labeled VLDL-like emulsion particles into brown adipose tissue (BAT). BAT mass and lipid droplet content were reduced in metformin-treated mice, pointing to increased BAT activation. In addition, both AMP-activated protein kinase α1 (AMPKα1) expression and activity and HSL and mitochondrial content were increased in BAT. Furthermore, therapeutic concentrations of metformin increased AMPK and HSL activities and promoted lipolysis in T37i differentiated brown adipocytes. Collectively, our results identify BAT as an important player in the TG-lowering effect of metformin by enhancing VLDL-TG uptake, intracellular TG lipolysis, and subsequent mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. Targeting BAT might therefore be considered as a future therapeutic strategy for the treatment of dyslipidemia.

  9. Eligibility for alirocumab or evolocumab treatment in 1090 hypercholesterolemic patients referred to a regional cholesterol treatment center with LDL cholesterol ≥70 mg/dL despite maximal-tolerated LDL-cholesterol-lowering therapy.

    PubMed

    Jetty, Vybhav; Glueck, Charles J; Lee, Kevin; Goldenberg, Naila; Prince, Marloe; Kumar, Ashwin; Goldenberg, Michael; Anand, Ishan; Wang, Ping

    2017-01-01

    Proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 inhibitors, Praluent (alirocumab [ALI]) and Repatha (evolocumab [EVO]) have been approved as adjuncts to the standard-of-care maximal-tolerated dose (MTD) of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDLC)-lowering therapy (LLT), statin therapy, in heterozygous (HeFH) (ALI or EVO) or homozygous (EVO) familial hypercholesterolemia, or clinical atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) where LDLC lowering is insufficient (both). Since LDLC lowering has been revolutionized by ALI and EVO, specialty pharmaceutical pricing models will be applied to a mass market. We applied US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and insurance eligibility criteria for ALI and EVO to 1090 hypercholesterolemic patients serially referred over 3 years who then received ≥2 months maximal-tolerated dose of standard-of-care LDL cholesterol-lowering therapy (MTDLLT) with follow-up LDLC ≥70 mg/dL. MTDLLT did not include ALI or EVO, which had not been commercially approved before completion of this study. Of the 1090 patients, 140 (13%) had HeFH by clinical diagnostic criteria and/or CVD with LDLC >100 mg/dL despite ≥2 months on MTDLLT, meeting FDA insurance criteria for ALI or EVO therapy. Another 51 (5%) patients were statin intolerant, without HeFH or CVD. If 13% of patients with HeFH-CVD and LDLC >100 mg/dL despite MTDLLT are eligible for ALI or EVO, then specialty pharmaceutical pricing models (~$14,300/year) might be used in an estimated 10 million HeFH-CVD patients. Whether the health care savings arising from the anticipated reduction of CVD events by ALI or EVO justify their costs in populations with HeFH-CVD and LDLC >100 mg/dL despite MTDLLT remains to be determined.

  10. Cytotoxic cholesterol is generated by the hydrolysis of cytoplasmic cholesteryl ester and transported to the plasma membrane.

    PubMed

    Kellner-Weibel, G; Geng, Y J; Rothblat, G H

    1999-10-01

    The present study examines the fate and effects of free cholesterol (FC) generated by the hydrolysis of cytoplasmic cholesteryl esters (CE) in model macrophage foam cells. J774 or elicited mouse peritoneal macrophages (MPM) were enriched with CE by incubating with acetylated low density lipoprotein (acLDL) and FC/phospholipid dispersions, thus creating model foam cells. Treatment of the foam cells with the acyl coenzyme-A:cholesterol acyltransferase (ACAT) inhibitor, CP-113,818, in the absence of any extracellular cholesterol acceptors, resulted in cellular toxicity. This was accompanied by an increase in the amount of FC available for oxidation by an exogenous cholesterol oxidase. Furthermore, cellular toxicity was proportional to the size of the oxidase susceptible pool of FC over time. Morphological analysis and in situ DNA fragmentation assay demonstrated the occurrence of apoptosis in the ACAT inhibited cells. Co-treatment with the hydrophobic amine U18666A, an intracellular cholesterol transport inhibitor, led to a dose dependent reduction in cytotoxicity and apoptosis, and blocked the movement of FC into the oxidase susceptible pool. In addition, treating model foam cells with CP-113,818 plus chloroquine, a compound that inhibits the function of acidic vesicles, also diminished cellular toxicity. Staining with the cholesterol binding dye filipin revealed that the macrophages treated with CP-113,818 contained a cholesterol oxidase accessible pool of FC in the plasma membrane. These results suggest that FC generated by the hydrolysis of cytoplasmic CE is transported through acidic vesicles to the plasma membrane, and accumulation of FC in this pool triggers cell death by necrosis and apoptosis.

  11. The effect of lower hybrid waves on JET plasma rotation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nave, M. F. F.; Kirov, K.; Bernardo, J.; Brix, M.; Ferreira, J.; Giroud, C.; Hawkes, N.; Hellsten, T.; Jonsson, T.; Mailloux, J.; Ongena, J.; Parra, F.; Contributors, JET

    2017-03-01

    This paper reports on observations of rotation in JET plasmas with lower hybrid current drive. Lower hybrid (LH) has a clear impact on rotation. The changes in core rotation can be either in the co- or counter-current directions. Experimental features that could determine the direction of rotation were investigated. Changes from co- to counter-rotation as the q-profile evolves from above unity to below unity suggests that magnetic shear could be important. However, LH can drive either co- or counter-rotation in discharges with similar magnetic shear and at the same plasma current. It is not clear if a slightly lower density is significant. A power scan at fixed density, shows a lower hybrid power threshold around 3 MW. For smaller LH powers, counter rotation increases with power, while for larger powers a trend towards co-rotation is found. The estimated counter-torque from the LH waves, would not explain the observed angular frequencies, neither would it explain the observation of co-rotation.

  12. Peptides identified in soybean protein increase plasma cholesterol in mice on hypercholesterolemic diets

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The in vitro micellar cholesterol displacement assay has been used to identify peptides that may potentially reduce cholesterol in vivo. We tested two of these peptides, LPYPR and WGAPSI, derived from soybean protein (SP) that have been reported to displace cholesterol from micelles by feeding them...

  13. Oxidized Phospholipids Inhibit the Formation of Cholesterol-Dependent Plasma Membrane Nanoplatforms.

    PubMed

    Brameshuber, Mario; Sevcsik, Eva; Rossboth, Benedikt K; Manner, Christina; Deigner, Hans-Peter; Peksel, Begüm; Péter, Mária; Török, Zsolt; Hermetter, Albin; Schütz, Gerhard J

    2016-01-05

    We previously developed a single-molecule microscopy method termed TOCCSL (thinning out clusters while conserving stoichiometry of labeling), which allows for direct imaging of stable nanoscopic platforms with raft-like properties diffusing in the plasma membrane. As a consensus raft marker, we chose monomeric GFP linked via a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchor to the cell membrane (mGFP-GPI). With this probe, we previously observed cholesterol-dependent homo-association to nanoplatforms diffusing in the plasma membrane of live CHO cells. Here, we report the release of this homo-association upon addition of 1-palmitoyl-2-(5-oxovaleroyl)-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (POVPC) or 1-palmitoyl-2-glutaroyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, two oxidized phospholipids (oxPLs) that are typically present in oxidatively modified low-density lipoprotein. We found a dose-response relationship for mGFP-GPI nanoplatform disintegration upon addition of POVPC, correlating with the signal of the apoptosis marker Annexin V-Cy3. Similar concentrations of lysolipid showed no effect, indicating that the observed phenomena were not linked to properties of the lipid bilayer itself. Inhibition of acid sphingomyelinase by NB-19 before addition of POVPC completely abolished nanoplatform disintegration by oxPLs. In conclusion, we were able to determine how oxidized lipid species disrupt mGFP-GPI nanoplatforms in the plasma membrane. Our results favor an indirect mechanism involving acid sphingomyelinase activity rather than a direct interaction of oxPLs with nanoplatform constituents. Copyright © 2016 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial

    PubMed Central

    Mietus-Snyder, Michele L.; Shigenaga, Mark K.; Suh, Jung H.; Shenvi, Swapna V.; Lal, Ashutosh; McHugh, Tara; Olson, Don; Lilienstein, Joshua; Krauss, Ronald M.; Gildengoren, Ginny; McCann, Joyce C.; Ames, Bruce N.

    2012-01-01

    Dietary intake modulates disease risk, but little is known how components within food mixtures affect pathophysiology. A low-calorie, high-fiber, fruit-based nutrient-dense bar of defined composition (e.g., vitamins and minerals, fruit polyphenolics, β-glucan, docosahexaenoic acid) appropriate for deconstruction and mechanistic studies is described and evaluated in a pilot trial. The bar was developed in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. Changes in cardiovascular disease and diabetes risk biomarkers were measured after 2 wk twice-daily consumption of the bar, and compared against baseline controls in 25 healthy adults. Plasma HDL-cholesterol (HDL-c) increased 6.2% (P=0.001), due primarily to a 28% increase in large HDL (HDL-L; P<0.0001). Total plasma homocysteine (Hcy) decreased 19% (P=0.017), and glutathione (GSH) increased 20% (P=0.011). The changes in HDL and Hcy are in the direction associated with decreased risk of cardiovascular disease and cognitive decline; increased GSH reflects improved antioxidant defense. Changes in biomarkers linked to insulin resistance and inflammation were not observed. A defined food-based supplement can, within 2 wk, positively impact metabolic biomarkers linked to disease risk. These results lay the groundwork for mechanistic/deconstruction experiments to identify critical bar components and putative synergistic combinations responsible for observed effects.—Mietus-Snyder, M. L., Shigenaga, M. K., Suh, J. H., Shenvi, S. V., Lal, A., McHugh, T., Olson, D., Lilienstein, J., Krauss, R. M., Gildengoren, G., McCann, J. C., Ames, B. N. A nutrient-dense, high-fiber, fruit-based supplement bar increases HDL cholesterol, particularly large HDL, lowers homocysteine, and raises glutathione in a 2-wk trial. PMID:22549511

  15. Plasma obestatin is lower at fasting and not suppressed by insulin in insulin-resistant humans.

    PubMed

    Anderwald-Stadler, Marietta; Krebs, Michael; Promintzer, Miriam; Mandl, Martina; Bischof, Martin G; Nowotny, Peter; Kästenbauer, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Prager, Rudolf; Anderwald, Christian

    2007-11-01

    Obestatin, a recently discovered 23-amino acid peptide, is involved in the regulation of appetite and body weight in antagonistic fashion to ghrelin, both deriving from a common precursor peptide. Ghrelin was shown to be associated with insulin resistance, which may also affect obestatin. We investigated the association between insulin resistance and plasma concentrations of obestatin and ghrelin in nondiabetic individuals with high (IS; n = 18, 13 females and 5 males, age 47 +/- 2 yr, BMI = 25.5 +/- 0.9 kg/m(2)) and low (IR; n = 18, 12 females and 6 males, age 45 +/- 2 yr, P = 0.49, BMI = 27.5 +/- 1.1 kg/m(2), P = 0.17) insulin-stimulated glucose disposal (M), measured by 2-h hyperinsulinemic (40 mU.min(-1).m(-2)) isoglycemic clamp tests. M(100-120 min) was higher in IS (10.7 +/- 0.7) than in IR (4.4 +/- 0.2 mg.min(-1).kg(-1), P < 10(-9)), whereas insulin-dependent suppression of free fatty acids (FFA) in plasma was reduced in IR (71 +/- 6% vs. IS: 82 +/- 5%, P < 0.02). In both groups, plasma ghrelin concentrations were comparable at fasting and similarly reduced by 24-28% during insulin infusion. IR had lower fasting plasma obestatin levels (383 +/- 26 pg/ml vs. IS: 469 +/- 23 pg/ml, P < 0.02). Clamp insulin infusion reduced plasma obestatin to approximately 81% of basal values in IS (P < 0.00002), but not in IR. Fasting plasma obestatin was correlated positively with M (r = 0.34, P = 0.04), HDL cholesterol (r = 0.45, P = 0.01), and plasma ghrelin concentrations (r = 0.80, P < 0.000001) and negatively with measures of adiposity, plasma FFA during clamp (r = -0.42, P < 0.01), and systolic blood pressure (r = -0.33, P < 0.05). In conclusion, fasting plasma concentrations of obestatin, but not of ghrelin, are reduced in insulin resistance and are positively associated with whole body insulin sensitivity in nondiabetic humans. Furthermore, plasma obestatin is reduced by insulin in insulin-sensitive but not in insulin-resistant persons.

  16. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains’ tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25’s growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  17. By how much and how quickly does reduction in serum cholesterol concentration lower risk of ischaemic heart disease?

    PubMed Central

    Law, M. R.; Wald, N. J.; Thompson, S. G.

    1994-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To estimate by how much and how quickly a given reduction in serum cholesterol concentration will reduce the risk of ischaemic heart disease. DESIGN--Data on the incidence of ischaemic heart disease and serum cholesterol concentration were analysed from 10 prospective (cohort) studies, three international studies in different communities, and 28 randomised controlled trials (with mortality data analysed according to allocated treatment to ensure the avoidance of bias). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE--Decrease in incidence of ischaemic heart disease or mortality for a 0.6 mmol/l (about 10%) decrease in serum cholesterol concentration. RESULTS--For men results from the cohort studies showed that a decrease of serum cholesterol concentration of 0.6 mmol/l (about 10%) was associated with a decrease in incidence of ischaemic heart disease of 54% at age 40 years, 39% at age 50, 27% at 60, 20% at 70, and 19% at 80. The combined estimate from the three international studies (for ages 55-64 years) was 38% (95% confidence interval 33% to 42%), somewhat greater than the cohort study estimate of 27%. The reductions in incidence of ischaemic heart disease in the randomised trials (for ages 55-64 years) were 7% (0 to 14%) in the first two years, 22% (15% to 28%) from 2.1-5 years, and 25% (15% to 35%) after five years, the last estimate being close to the estimate of 27% for the long term reduction from the cohort studies. The data for women are limited but indicate a similar effect. CONCLUSIONS--The results from the cohort studies, international comparisons, and clinical trials are remarkably consistent. The cohort studies, based on half a million men and 18,000 ischaemic heart disease events, estimate that a long term reduction in serum cholesterol concentration of 0.6 mmol/l (10%), which can be achieved by moderate dietary change, lowers the risk of ischaemic heart disease by 50% at age 40, falling to 20% at age 70. The randomised trials, based on 45,000 men and 4000

  18. Plant stanol content remains stable during storage of cholesterol-lowering functional foods.

    PubMed

    Nieminen, V; Laakso, P; Kuusisto, P; Niemelä, J; Laitinen, K

    2016-04-01

    Plant stanols reduce the absorption of both dietary and biliary cholesterol. The aim of this study was to examine the stability of plant stanols in the form of plant stanol esters in spreads and biscuits stored under typical storage conditions. The plant stanol content of two commercial margarine-type spreads, containing 35% and 60% absorbable fat, was 6.5 and 6.4 g/100 g after production and remained unaltered when stored at 6 °C for a shelf life of 18 and 22 weeks, respectively. Comparable results were obtained for plant stanol ester ingredient stored under the same conditions and for plant stanol ester-containing biscuits stored at room temperature for up to 74 weeks. Furthermore, the peroxide value and free fatty acids showed that the quality of the food products remained good. The present study demonstrated that plant stanol esters as an ingredient and when added in food products, are stable whilst stored under the appropriate conditions.

  19. On the Toroidal Plasma Rotations Induced by Lower Hybrid Waves

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Xiaoyin; Qin, Hong; Liu, Jian; Fisch, Nathaniel J.

    2012-11-14

    A theoretical model is developed to explain the plasma rotations induced by lower hybrid waves in Alcator C-Mod. In this model, torodial rotations are driven by the Lorentz force on the bulk electron flow across flux surfaces, which is a response of the plasma to the resonant-electron flow across flux surfaces induced by the lower hybrid waves. The flow across flux surfaces of the resonant electrons and the bulk electrons are coupled through the radial electric fi eld initiated by the resonant electrons, and the friction between ions and electrons transfers the toroidal momentum to ions from electrons. An improved quasilinear theory with gyrophase dependent distribution function is developed to calculate the perpendicular resonant-electron flow. Toroidal rotations are determined using a set of fluid equations for bulk electrons and ions, which are solved numerically by a fi nite- difference method. Numerical results agree well with the experimental observations in terms of flow pro file and amplitude. The model explains the strong correlation between torodial flow and internal inductance observed experimentally, and predicts both counter-current and co-current flows, depending on the perpendicular wave vectors of the lower hybrid waves. __________________________________________________