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Sample records for lowest-lying baryon masses

  1. Masses of doubly and triply charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Ke-Wei; Chen, Bing; Guo, Xin-Heng

    2015-10-01

    Until now, the first reported doubly charmed baryon Ξcc +(3520 ) is still a puzzle. It was discovered and confirmed by SELEX collaboration, but not confirmed by LHCb, BABAR, BELLE, FOCUS, or any other collaboration. In the present paper, by employing Regge phenomenology, we first express the mass of the ground state (L =0 ) doubly charmed baryon Ωcc *+ as a function of masses of the well established light baryons and singly charmed baryons. Inserting the recent experimental data, the mass of Ωcc *+ is given to be 3809 ±36 MeV , which is independent of any unobservable parameters. Then, with the quadratic mass relations, we calculate the masses of the ground state triply charmed baryon Ωcc c ++ and doubly charmed baryons Ξcc (*)++, Ξcc (*)+ , and Ωcc + [the mass of Ξcc + is determined as 3520-40+41 MeV , which agrees with the mass of Ξcc +(3520 ) ]. The isospin splitting MΞcc ++-MΞcc +=0.4 ±0.3 MeV . After that, masses of the orbitally excited (L =1 , 2, 3) doubly and triply charmed baryons are estimated. The results are reasonable comparing with those extracted in many other approaches. We suggest more efforts to study doubly and triply charmed baryons both theoretically and experimentally, not only for the abundance of baryon spectra, but also for numerically examining whether the linear mass relations or the quadratic mass relations are realized in nature. Our predictions are useful for the discovery of unobserved doubly and triply charmed baryon states and the JP assignment of these states.

  2. The baryonic mass function of galaxies.

    PubMed

    Read, J I; Trentham, Neil

    2005-12-15

    In the Big Bang about 5% of the mass that was created was in the form of normal baryonic matter (neutrons and protons). Of this about 10% ended up in galaxies in the form of stars or of gas (that can be in molecules, can be atomic, or can be ionized). In this work, we measure the baryonic mass function of galaxies, which describes how the baryonic mass is distributed within galaxies of different types (e.g. spiral or elliptical) and of different sizes. This can provide useful constraints on our current cosmology, convolved with our understanding of how galaxies form. This work relies on various large astronomical surveys, e.g. the optical Sloan Digital Sky Survey (to observe stars) and the HIPASS radio survey (to observe atomic gas). We then perform an integral over our mass function to determine the cosmological density of baryons in galaxies: Omega(b,gal)=0.0035. Most of these baryons are in stars: Omega(*)=0.0028. Only about 20% are in gas. The error on the quantities, as determined from the range obtained between different methods, is ca 10%; systematic errors may be much larger. Most (ca 90%) of the baryons in the Universe are not in galaxies. They probably exist in a warm/hot intergalactic medium. Searching for direct observational evidence and deeper theoretical understanding for this will form one of the major challenges for astronomy in the next decade.

  3. Baryon Spectroscopy and the Origin of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Klempt, Eberhard

    2010-08-05

    The proton mass arises from spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry and the formation of constituent quarks. Their dynamics cannot be tested by proton tomography but only by studying excited baryons. However, the number of excited baryons is much smaller than expected within quark models; even worse, the existence of many known states has been challenged in a recent analysis which includes - compared to older analyses - high-precision data from meson factories. Hence {pi}N elastic scattering data do not provide a well-founded starting point of any phenomenological analysis of the baryon excitation spectrum. Photoproduction experiments now start to fill in this hole. Often, they confirm the old findings and even suggest a few new states. These results encourage attempts to compare the pattern of observed baryon resonances with predictions from quark models, from models generating baryons dynamically from meson-nucleon scattering amplitudes, from models based on gravitational theories, and with the conjecture that chiral symmetry may be restored at high excitation energies. Best agreement is found with a simple mass formula derived within AdS/QCD. Consequences for our understanding of QCD are discussed as well as experiments which may help to decide on the validity of models.

  4. Baryon-meson mass inequality

    SciTech Connect

    Nussinov, S.

    1983-12-05

    It is suggested that the inequality m/sub B/>(3/2)m/sub M/ is a rigorous result in quantum chromodynamics. The analog for a (q/sub 1/. . .q/sub N/) baryon in SU(N) is m/sub B/>((1/2)N)m/sub M/. The inequality is proved for weak coupling and a version of the strong-coupling expansion where a separation H/sub q//sub 1/q/sub 2/q/sub 3/ = H/sub 12/+H/sub 23/+H/sub 31/ of the problem can be achieved. Implications for quantum chromodynamics and composite models are briefly discussed.

  5. Ultrafast dynamics of the lowest-lying neutral states in carbon dioxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, Travis W.; Champenois, Elio G.; Cryan, James P.; Shivaram, Niranjan; Yang, Chan-Shan; Belkacem, Ali

    2017-02-01

    We present a study of the ultrafast dissociation dynamics of the lowest-lying electronic excited states in CO2 by using ultraviolet (UV) and extreme-ultraviolet (XUV) pulses from high-order harmonic generation. We observe two primary dissociation channels: a direct dissociation channel along the Π1g electronically excited manifold, and a second channel which results from the mixing of electronic states. The direct dissociation channel is found to have a lifetime which is shorter than our experimental resolution, whereas the second channel has a significantly longer lifetime of nearly 200 fs. In this long-lived channel we observe a beating of the vibrational populations with a period of ˜133 fs.

  6. Skyrmions, half-skyrmions and nucleon mass in dense baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Liang; Harada, Masayasu; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, Yongseok; Rho, Mannque

    2014-04-01

    We explore the hadron properties in dense baryonic matter in a unified way by using a Skyrme model constructed with an effective Lagrangian which includes the ρ and ω vector mesons as hidden gauge bosons and is valid up to O(p4) in chiral expansion including the homogeneous Wess-Zumino terms. With the two input values of pion decay constant and the lowest lying vector meson mass which can be fixed in free space, all the other low energy constants in the effective Lagrangian are determined by their master formulas derived from holographic QCD models, which allows us to study the baryonic matter properties with no additional free parameters and thus without ambiguities. We find that the ω field that figures in the homogeneous Wess-Zumino term plays a crucial role in the skyrmion structure and its matter properties. The most striking and intriguing observation is that the pion decay constant that smoothly drops with increasing density in the Skyrmion phase stops decreasing at n1/2 at which the skyrmions in medium fractionize into half-skyrmions and remains nearly constant in the half-skyrmion phase. In accordance with the large Nc consideration, the baryon mass also stays non-scaling in the half-skyrmion phase. This feature is supported by the nuclear effective field theory with the parameters of the Lagrangian scaling modified at the skyrmion-half-skyrmion phase transition. Our exploration also uncovers the crucial role of the ω meson in multi-baryon systems as well as in the structure of a single skyrmion.

  7. a Relativistic Calculation of Baryon Masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giammarco, Joseph Michael

    1990-01-01

    We calculate ground state baryon masses using a saddle-point variational (SPV) method, which permits us the use of fully relativistic 4-component Dirac spinors without the need for positive energy projection operators. This variational approach has been shown to work in the relativistic domain for one particle in an external potential (Dirac equation). We have extended its use to the relativistic 3-body Breit equation. Our procedure is as follows: we pick a trial wave function having the appropriate spin, flavor and color dependence. This can be accomplished with a non-symmetric relativistic spatial wave function having two different size parameters if the the first two quarks are always chosen to be identical. We than calculate an energy eigenvalue for the particle state and vary the parameters in our wave function to search for a "saddle-point". We minimize the energy with respect to the two size parameters and maximize with respect to two parameters that measure the contribution from the negative-energy states. This gives the baryon's mass as a function of four input parameters: the masses of the up, down and strange quarks (m_{u=d },m_{s}), and the strength of the coupling constants for the potentials ( alpha_{s},mu). We do this for the eight Baryon ground states and fit these to experimental data. This fit gives the values of the input parameters. For the potentials we use a coulombic term to represent one-gluon exchange and a linear term for confinement. For both terms we include a retardation term required by relativity. We also add delta function and spin-spin terms to account for the large contribution of the coulomb interaction at the origin. The results we obtain from our SPV method are in good agreement with experimental data. The actual search for the saddle-point parameters and the fitting of the quark masses and the values of the coupling strengths was done on a CDC Cyber 860.

  8. Ground and lowest-lying electronic states of CoN. A multiconfigurational study.

    PubMed

    Gobbo, João Paulo; Borin, Antonio Carlos

    2006-12-28

    The lowest-lying X1Sigma+, a3Phi, b3II, c5Delta, A1Phi, and B1II electronic states of CoN have been investigated at the ab initio MRCI and MS-CASPT2 levels, with extended atomic basis sets and inclusion of scalar relativistic effects. Among the singlet states, the A1Phi and B1II states have been described for the first time. Potential energy curves, excitation energies, spectroscopic constants, and bonding character for all states are reported. Comparison with other early transition-metal nitrides (ScN, TiN, VN, and CrN), isoelectronic (NiC) and isovalent (RhN and IrN) species has been made, besides analyzing the B1II <=> X1+ electronic transition in terms of Franck-Condon factors, Einstein coefficients, and radiative lifetimes. At both levels of theory, the following energetic order has been obtained: X1Sigma+, a3Phi, b3II, c5Delta, A1Phi, and B1II, with good agreement with experimental results. In contrast, previous DFT and MRCI calculations predicted the ground state to be the 5Delta state.

  9. Lattice studies of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    David Richards

    2004-10-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances, and describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons. Finally, I discuss direct probes of the quark and gluon structure of baryons through the lattice measurement of the moments of quark distributions and of Generalized Parton Distributions.

  10. Proton collisional excitation in the lowest lying 3P terms of ions in the Be and Mg isoelectronic sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landman, D. A.; Brown, T.

    1979-01-01

    Proton collisional excitation cross sections and rate constants are presented for transitions between the 3P(J) fine-structure levels of the lowest-lying sp configurations in a number of astrophysically important ions belonging to the Be and Mg isoelectronic sequences. The calculations were made by direct integration of the Schroedinger equation resulting from semiclassical Coulomb excitation theory. The cross sections and rate constants for the 3P(J) transitions in the lowest-lying P(2) configurations are expected to be similar to those for the corresponding sp configuration transitions, and this is illustrated for C III. For the high-temperature ion Ca XVII alpha particle excitation is shown to be unimportant for situations involving ordinary values of the He/H abundance ratio. A simple, but apparently accurate method for determining certain radial integrals for low-lying excited configurations is proposed.

  11. Masses and axial currents of the doubly charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Feng; Liu, Zhan-Wei; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2015-05-01

    The chiral dynamics of the doubly heavy baryons is solely governed by the light quark. In this paper, we have derived the chiral corrections to the mass of the doubly heavy baryons up to N3LO . The mass splitting of Ξc c and Ωc c at the N2LO depends on one unknown low energy constant c7. By fitting the lattice masses of Ξc c(3520 ), we estimate the mass of Ωc c to be around 3.726 GeV. Moreover, we have also performed a systematical analysis of the chiral corrections to the axial currents and axial charges of the doubly heavy baryons. The chiral structure and analytical expressions will be very useful to the chiral extrapolations of the future lattice QCD simulations of the doubly heavy baryons.

  12. Mass spectra and Regge trajectories of , , and baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Zalak; Thakkar, Kaushal; Rai, Ajay Kumar; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2016-12-01

    We calculate the mass spectra of the singly charmed baryons (, , and ) using the hypercentral constituent quark model (hCQM). The hyper color Coulomb plus linear potential is used to calculate the masses of positive (up to ) and negative (up to ) parity excited states. The spin-spin, spin-orbital and tensor interaction terms are also incorporated for mass spectra. We have compared our results with other theoretical and lattice QCD predictions for each baryon. Moreover, the known experimental results are also reasonably close to our predicted masses. By using the radial and orbital excitation, we construct Regge trajectories for the baryons in the (n, M2) plane and find their slopes and intercepts. Other properties of these baryons, like magnetic moments, radiative transitions and radiative decay widths, are also calculated successfully. Supported in part (A. K. Rai) by DST, India (SERB Fast Track Scheme SR/FTP/PS-152/2012)

  13. Lowest lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} vibrational states in Pb, Sn, and Ni isotopes in relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari, A.; Ring, P.

    2006-11-15

    The excitation energies and electric multipole decay rates of the lowest lying 2{sup +} and 3{sup -} vibrational states in Pb, Sn, and Ni nuclei are calculated following relativistic quasiparticle random-phase approximation formalism based on the relativistic Hartree-Bogoliubov mean field. Two sets of Lagrangian parameters, NL1 and NL3, are used to investigate the effect of the nuclear force. Overall there is good agreement with the available experimental data for a wide range of mass numbers considered here, and the NL3 set seems to be a better choice. However, strictly speaking, these studies point toward the need of a new set of force parameters that could produce more realistic single-particle levels, at least in vicinity of the Fermi surface, of a wide range of nuclear masses.

  14. Excited state mass spectra of doubly heavy Ξ baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Zalak; Rai, Ajay Kumar

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, the mass spectra are obtained for doubly heavy Ξ baryons, namely, Ξ _{cc}+, Ξ _{cc}^{++}, Ξ _{bb}-, Ξ _{bb}0, Ξ _{bc}0 and Ξ _{bc}+. These baryons consist of two heavy quarks ( cc, bb, and bc) with a light ( d or u) quark. The ground, radial, and orbital states are calculated in the framework of the hypercentral constituent quark model with Coulomb plus linear potential. Our results are also compared with other predictions, thus, the average possible range of excited states masses of these Ξ baryons can be determined. The study of the Regge trajectories is performed in ( n, M2) and ( J, M2) planes and their slopes and intercepts are also determined. Lastly, the ground state magnetic moments of these doubly heavy baryons are also calculated.

  15. Finite volume effects in the chiral extrapolation of baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Bavontaweepanya, R.; Kobdaj, C.; Schwarz, K.

    2014-09-01

    We perform an analysis of the QCD lattice data on the baryon octet and decuplet masses based on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian. The baryon self-energies are computed in a finite volume at next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order (N3LO), where the dependence on the physical meson and baryon masses is kept. The number of free parameters is reduced significantly down to 12 by relying on large-Nc sum rules. Altogether we describe accurately more than 220 data points from six different lattice groups, BMW, PACS-CS, HSC, LHPC, QCDSF-UKQCD and NPLQCD. Values for all counterterms relevant at N3LO are predicted. In particular we extract a pion-nucleon sigma term of 39-1+2 MeV and a strangeness sigma term of the nucleon of σsN=84-4+28 MeV. The flavor SU(3) chiral limit of the baryon octet and decuplet masses is determined with (802±4) and (1103±6) MeV. Detailed predictions for the baryon masses as currently evaluated by the ETM lattice QCD group are made.

  16. Estimates of isospin breaking contributions to baryon masses

    SciTech Connect

    Ha, Phuoc

    2007-10-01

    We estimate the isospin breaking contributions to the baryon masses which we analyzed recently using a loop expansion in the heavy-baryon chiral effective field theory. To one loop, the isospin breaking corrections come from the effects of the d, u quark mass difference, the Coulomb and magnetic moment interactions, and effective point interactions attributable to color-magnetic effects. The addition of the first meson loop corrections introduces new structure. We estimate the resulting low-energy, long-range contributions to the mass splittings by regularizing the loop integrals using connections to dynamical models for finite-size baryons. We find that the resulting contributions to the isospin breaking corrections are of the right general size, have the correct sign pattern, and agree with the experimental values within the margin of error.

  17. Masses of doubly charmed baryons in the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Zhi-Feng; Vacas, M. J. Vicente

    2016-05-01

    In this work, we investigate the mass corrections of the doubly charmed baryons up to N2L O in the extended-on-mass-shell (EOMS) renormalization scheme, comparing with the results of heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. We find that the terms from the heavy baryon approach are a subset of those obtained in the EOMS scheme. By fitting the lattice data, we can determine the parameters m ˜, α , c1 and c7 from the Lagrangian, while in the heavy baryon approach no information on c1 can be obtained from the baryons mass. Correspondingly, the masses of mΞcc and mΩcc are predicted, in the EOMS scheme, extrapolating the results from different values of the charm quark and the pion masses of the lattice QCD calculations.

  18. Excited State Mass Spectra of Ω0 c Baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shah, Z.; Thakkar, K.; Rai, A. K.; Vinodkumar, P. C.

    2016-10-01

    We have calculated the radial and orbital excited states of singly charmed baryon Oc using the Hypercentral Constituent Quark Model (hCQM). The confinement potential is assumed as coulomb plus power potential (CPP V ). The ground state and excited state masses are determined with and with out first order correction to the potential. Furthermore, we plot graph between Mass(M) → Potential Index(v). Our calculated results are in good agreement with experimental and other theoretical predictions.

  19. Vacuum Ultraviolet Spectroscopy of the Lowest-Lying Electronic State in Sub-Critical and Supercritical Water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin, Timothy W.; Janik, Ireneusz; Bartels, David M.; Chipman, Dan

    2016-06-01

    We report vacuum ultraviolet absorption spectra for the lowest-lying electronic state of high-temperature and supercritical water, where spectra were measured from room temperature up to the critical temperature, and as a function of density above the critical temperature. Spectra are seen to redshift with increasing temperature, demonstrating gradual breakdown of the hydrogen bond network. Above the critical temperature, tuning the density gives direct insight into the extent of hydrogen bonding in the supercritical regime. The known gas-phase monomer spectrum can be duplicated in the low-density limit, with negligible contribution from hydrogen bonding. With increasing density, the spectrum blue shifts as small water clusters form, increasing the number of hydrogen bonds lowering the ground-state energy. The presence of vibrational structure inherent to the lowest-density gas-phase limit spectrum gradually diminishes with increasing density, giving a reasonable measure of the extent of water monomers having unperturbed electronic structure as a function of density.

  20. Heavy Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Winston Roberts; Muslema Pervin

    2007-11-14

    A quark model is applied to the spectrum of baryons containing heavy quarks. The model gives masses for the known heavy baryons that are in agreement with experiment, but for the doubly-charmed baryon $\\Xi_{cc}$, the model prediction is too heavy. Mixing between the $\\Xi_Q$ and $\\Xi_Q^\\prime$ states is examined and is found to be small for the lowest lying states. In contrast with this, mixing between the $\\Xi_{bc}$ and $\\Xi_{bc}^\\prime$ states is found to be large, and the implication of this mixing for properties of these states is briefly discussed. We also examine heavy-quark spin-symmetry multiplets, and find that many states in the model can be placed in such multiplets.

  1. Baryon Masses and Hadronic Decay Widths with Explicit Pionic Contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, R. A.; Canton, L.; Plessas, W.; Schweiger, W.

    2017-03-01

    We report results from studies of baryon ground and resonant states by taking explicit mesonic degrees of freedom into account. We are following a relativistic coupled-channels approach relying on a Poincaré-invariant mass operator in matrix form. Generally, it corresponds to a bare particle that is coupled to a number of further mesonic channels. Here we present results, where the bare particle is either a bare nucleon or a bare Delta coupled to pion-nucleon and pion-Delta channels, respectively. For the pion-baryon vertices we employ coupling constants and form factors from different models in the literature. From the mass-operator eigenvalue equation we obtain the pion-dressing effects on the nucleon mass as well as the mass and pion-decay width of the Delta. The dressed masses become smaller than the bare ones, and a finite width of the Delta is naturally generated. The results are relevant for the construction of constituent-quark models for baryons, which have so far not included explicit mesonic degrees of freedom, but have rather relied on three-quark configurations only.

  2. BARYONS MATTER: WHY LUMINOUS SATELLITE GALAXIES HAVE REDUCED CENTRAL MASSES

    SciTech Connect

    Zolotov, Adi; Dekel, Avishai; Brooks, Alyson M.; Willman, Beth; Governato, Fabio; Quinn, Tom; Pontzen, Andrew; Christensen, Charlotte; Wadsley, James

    2012-12-10

    Using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamical simulations of Milky Way-massed disk galaxies, we demonstrate that supernovae feedback and tidal stripping lower the central masses of bright (-15 < M{sub V} < -8) satellite galaxies. These simulations resolve high-density regions, comparable to giant molecular clouds, where stars form. This resolution allows us to adopt a prescription for H{sub 2} formation and destruction that ties star formation to the presence of shielded, molecular gas. Before infall, supernova feedback from the clumpy, bursty star formation captured by this physically motivated model leads to reduced dark matter (DM) densities and shallower inner density profiles in the massive satellite progenitors (M{sub vir} {>=} 10{sup 9} M{sub Sun }, M{sub *} {>=} 10{sup 7} M{sub Sun }) compared with DM-only simulations. The progenitors of the lower mass satellites are unable to maintain bursty star formation histories, due to both heating at reionization and gas loss from initial star-forming events, preserving the steep inner density profile predicted by DM-only simulations. After infall, gas stripping from satellites reduces the total central masses of satellites simulated with DM+baryons relative to DM-only satellites. Additionally, enhanced tidal stripping after infall due to the baryonic disk acts to further reduce the central DM densities of the luminous satellites. Satellites that enter with cored DM halos are particularly vulnerable to the tidal effects of the disk, exacerbating the discrepancy in the central masses predicted by baryon+DM and DM-only simulations. We show that DM-only simulations, which neglect the highly non-adiabatic evolution of baryons described in this work, produce denser satellites with larger central velocities. We provide a simple correction to the central DM mass predicted for satellites by DM-only simulations. We conclude that DM-only simulations should be used with great caution when interpreting kinematic observations

  3. Observation and mass measurement of the baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carrillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-08-03

    We report the observation and measurement of the mass of the bottom, strange baryon Xi(b)- through the decay chain Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, where J/psi-->mu+mu-, Xi- -->Lambdapi-, and Lambda-->ppi-. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 6.6 x 10(-15), or 7.7 Gaussian standard deviations. The Xi(b)- mass is measured to be 5792.9+/-2.5(stat) +/- 1.7(syst) MeV/c2.

  4. Negative-Parity Baryon Masses Using O(a)-improved Fermion Action

    SciTech Connect

    M. Gockeler; R. Horsley; D. Pleiter; P.E.L. Rakow; G. Schierholz; C.M. Maynard; D.G. Richards

    2001-06-01

    We present a calculation of the mass of the lowest-lying negative-parity J=1/2{sup {minus}} state in quenched QCD. Results are obtained using a non-perturbatively {Omicron}(a)-improved clover fermion action, and a splitting found between the masses of the nucleon, and its parity partner. The calculation is performed on two lattice volumes, and at three lattice spacings, enabling a study of both finite-volume and finite lattice-spacing uncertainties. A comparison is made with results obtained using the unimproved Wilson fermion action.

  5. The different baryonic Tully-Fisher relations at low masses.

    PubMed

    Brook, Chris B; Santos-Santos, Isabel; Stinson, Greg

    2016-06-11

    We compare the Baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) of simulations and observations of galaxies ranging from dwarfs to spirals, using various measures of rotational velocity Vrot. We explore the BTFR when measuring Vrot at the flat part of the rotation curve, Vflat, at the extent of H i gas, Vlast, and using 20 per cent (W20) and 50 per cent (W50) of the width of H i line profiles. We also compare with the maximum circular velocity of the parent halo, [Formula: see text], within dark matter only simulations. The different BTFRs increasingly diverge as galaxy mass decreases. Using Vlast one obtains a power law over four orders of magnitude in baryonic mass, with slope similar to the observed BTFR. Measuring Vflat gives similar results as Vlast when galaxies with rising rotation curves are excluded. However, higher rotation velocities would be found for low-mass galaxies if the cold gas extended far enough for Vrot to reach a maximum. W20 gives a similar slope as Vlast but with slightly lower values of Vrot for low-mass galaxies, although this may depend on the extent of the gas in your galaxy sample. W50 bends away from these other relations towards low velocities at low masses. By contrast, [Formula: see text] bends towards high velocities for low-mass galaxies, as cold gas does not extend out to the radius at which haloes reach [Formula: see text]. Our study highlights the need for careful comparisons between observations and models: one needs to be consistent about the particular method of measuring Vrot, and precise about the radius at which velocities are measured.

  6. Charmed baryon isodoublet mass splitting in quantum chromodynamics revitalized

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, S. N.; Sinha, S. M.; Rahman, M.; Kim, D. Y.

    1989-02-01

    We calculate the isodoublet mass splitting of charmed baryons in the quark model in QCD, which includes the relativistic correction and the explicit use of running QCD coupling constants with flavors. The model was applied and tested in the past for the calculations of isodoublet mass splittings of several hadrons. Our theoretical result ( Δmth( Σc++- Σc0)≅1.5±0.2 MeV) is in agteement with the recent experimental result ( Δmex( Σc++- Σc0)=1.2±0.7±0.3 MeV) by the ARGUS Collaboration at the DORIS II storage ring.

  7. MASS-DEPENDENT BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATION SIGNAL AND HALO BIAS

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Qiao; Zhan Hu

    2013-05-10

    We characterize the baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) feature in halo two-point statistics using N-body simulations. We find that nonlinear damping of the BAO signal is less severe for halos in the mass range we investigate than for dark matter. The amount of damping depends weakly on the halo mass. The correlation functions show a mass-dependent drop of the halo clustering bias below roughly 90 h {sup -1} Mpc, which coincides with the scale of the BAO trough. The drop of bias is 4% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} and reduces to roughly 2% for halos with mass M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun }. In contrast, halo biases in simulations without BAO change more smoothly around 90 h {sup -1} Mpc. In Fourier space, the bias of M > 10{sup 14} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases smoothly by 11% from wavenumber k = 0.012 h Mpc{sup -1} to 0.2 h Mpc{sup -1}, whereas that of M > 10{sup 13} h {sup -1} M{sub Sun} halos decreases by less than 4% over the same range. By comparing the halo biases in pairs of otherwise identical simulations, one with and the other without BAO, we also observe a modulation of the halo bias. These results suggest that precise calibrations of the mass-dependent BAO signal and scale-dependent bias on large scales would be needed for interpreting precise measurements of the two-point statistics of clusters or massive galaxies in the future.

  8. Quark-mass dependence of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-02-01

    We perform a chiral extrapolation of the baryon octet and decuplet masses in a relativistic formulation of chiral perturbation theory. A partial summation is assumed as implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop diagrams. Upon a chiral expansion, our results are consistent with strict chiral perturbation theory at the next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order. All counter terms are correlated by a large-Nc operator analysis. Our results are confronted with recent results of unquenched three-flavor lattice simulations. We adjust the parameter set to the pion-mass dependence of the nucleon and omega masses as computed by the BMW Collaboration and predict the pion-mass dependence of the remaining baryon octet and decuplet states. The current lattice simulations can be described accurately and smoothly up to pion masses of about 600 MeV. In particular, we recover the recent results of the HSC without any further adjustments.

  9. RESOLVE and ECO: The Halo Mass-dependent Shape of Galaxy Stellar and Baryonic Mass Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Kathleen D.; Kannappan, Sheila J.; Stark, David V.; Moffett, Amanda J.; Berlind, Andreas A.; Norris, Mark A.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we present galaxy stellar and baryonic (stars plus cold gas) mass functions (SMF and BMF) and their halo mass dependence for two volume-limited data sets. The first, RESOLVE-B, coincides with the Stripe 82 footprint and is extremely complete down to baryonic mass M bary ˜ 109.1 M ⊙, probing the gas-rich dwarf regime below M bary ˜ 1010 M ⊙. The second, ECO, covers a ˜40× larger volume (containing RESOLVE-A) and is complete to M bary ˜ 109.4 M ⊙. To construct the SMF and BMF we implement a new “cross-bin sampling” technique with Monte Carlo sampling from the full likelihood distributions of stellar or baryonic mass. Our SMFs exhibit the “plateau” feature starting below M star ˜ 1010 M ⊙ that has been described in prior work. However, the BMF fills in this feature and rises as a straight power law below ˜1010 M ⊙, as gas-dominated galaxies become the majority of the population. Nonetheless, the low-mass slope of the BMF is not as steep as that of the theoretical dark matter halo MF. Moreover, we assign group halo masses by abundance matching, finding that the SMF and BMF, separated into four physically motivated halo mass regimes, reveal complex structure underlying the simple shape of the overall MFs. In particular, the satellite MFs are depressed below the central galaxy MF “humps” in groups with mass <1013.5 M ⊙ yet rise steeply in clusters. Our results suggest that satellite destruction and stripping are active from the point of nascent group formation. We show that the key role of groups in shaping MFs enables reconstruction of a given survey’s SMF or BMF based on its group halo mass distribution.

  10. NIHAO VII: Predictions for the galactic baryon budget in dwarf to Milky Way mass haloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Liang; Dutton, Aaron A.; Stinson, Gregory S.; Macciò, Andrea V.; Gutcke, Thales; Kang, Xi

    2017-01-01

    We use the NIHAO galaxy formation simulations to make predictions for the baryonic budget in present day galaxies ranging from dwarf (M_{200} ˜ 10^{10} M_{⊙}) to Milky Way (M_{200} ˜ 10^{12} M_{⊙}) masses. The sample is made of 88 independent high resolution cosmological zoom-in simulations. NIHAO galaxies reproduce key properties of observed galaxies, such as the stellar mass vs halo mass and cold gas vs stellar mass relations. Thus they make plausible predictions for the baryon budget. We present the mass fractions of stars, cold gas (T < 104K), cool gas (104 < T < 105K), warm-hot gas (105 < T < 5 × 106K), and hot gas (T>5 × 106K), inside the virial radius, R200. Compared to the predicted baryon mass, using the dark halo mass and the universal baryon fraction, fb ≡ Ωb/Ωm = 0.15, we find that all of our haloes are missing baryons. The missing mass has been relocated past 2 virial radii, and cool gas dominates the corona at low mass (M_{200} ≲ 3 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}) while the warm-hot gas dominates at high mass (M_{200} ≳ 3 × 10^{11} M_{⊙}). Haloes of mass M_{200} ˜ 10^{10}M_{⊙} are missing ˜90% of their baryons. More massive haloes (M_{200} ˜ 10^{12}M_{⊙}) retain a higher fraction of their baryons, with ˜30% missing, consistent with recent observational estimates. Moreover, these more massive haloes reproduce the observed fraction of cold, warm-hot and hot gas. The fraction of cool gas we predict (0.11 ± 0.06) is significantly lower than the observation from COS-HALOs (0.3-0.47), but agrees with the alternative analysis of Stern et al. (2016).

  11. Mass and magnetic dipole moment of negative-parity heavy baryons with spin-3/2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Sundu, H.

    2017-01-01

    We calculate the mass and residue of the heavy spin-3/2 negative-parity baryons with single heavy bottom or charm quark by use of a two-point correlation function. We use the obtained results to investigate the diagonal radiative transitions among the baryons under consideration. In particular, we compute corresponding transition form factors via light cone QCD sum rules, which are then used to obtain the magnetic dipole moments of the heavy spin-3/2 negative-parity baryons. We remove the pollutions coming from the positive-parity spin-3/2 and positive/negative-parity spin-1/2 baryons by constructing sum rules for different Lorentz structures. We compare the results obtained with the existing theoretical predictions.

  12. SU(2) and SU(3) chiral perturbation theory analyses on baryon masses in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Ishikawa, K.-I.; Okawa, M.; Ishizuka, N.; Kuramashi, Y.; Taniguchi, Y.; Ukawa, A.; Yoshie, T.; Izubuchi, T.; Kadoh, D.; Namekawa, Y.; Ukita, N.; Kanaya, K.

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the quark mass dependence of baryon masses in 2+1 flavor lattice QCD using SU(3) heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory up to one-loop order. The baryon mass data used for the analyses are obtained for the degenerate up-down quark mass of 3 to 24 MeV and two choices of the strange quark mass around the physical value. We find that the SU(3) chiral expansion fails to describe both the octet and the decuplet baryon data if phenomenological values are employed for the meson-baryon couplings. The SU(2) case is also examined for the nucleon. We observe that higher order terms are controlled only around the physical point. We also evaluate finite size effects using SU(3) heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory, finding small values of order 1% even at the physical point.

  13. Analysis of the [53, l=2] Baryon Masses in the 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    J.L. Goity; C.L. Schat; N.N. Scoccola

    2003-03-01

    The mass spectrum of the [56,{ell}=2] baryons is studied in the 1/N{sub c} expansion up to and including {Omicron}(1/N{sub c}) effects with SU(3) symmetry breaking implemented to first order. A total of eighteen mass relations result, several of which are tested with the available data.

  14. On the consistency of recent QCD lattice data of the baryon ground-state masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, M. F. M.; Semke, A.

    2012-11-01

    In our recent analysis of lattice data of the BMW, LHPC and PACS-CS groups we determined a parameter set of the chiral Lagrangian that allows a simultaneous description of the baryon octet and decuplet masses as measured by those lattice groups. The results on the baryon spectrum of the HSC group were recovered accurately without their inclusion into our six parameter fit. We show that the same parameter set provides an accurate reproduction of the recent results of the QCDSF-UKQCD group probing the baryon masses at quite different quark masses. This shows a remarkable consistency amongst the different lattice simulations. With even more accurate lattice data in the near future it will become feasible to determine all low-energy parameters relevant at N3LO.

  15. ON THE BARYONIC CONTENTS OF LOW-MASS GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.

    2012-08-01

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is an important observational constraint on cosmological and galactic models. However, it is critical to keep in mind that in observations only stars and molecular and atomic gas are counted, while the contribution of the ionized gas is almost universally missed. The ionized gas is, however, expected to be present in the gaseous disks of dwarf galaxies simply because they are exposed to the cosmic ionizing background and to the stellar radiation that manages to escape from the central regions of the galactic disks into their outer layers. Such an expectation is, indeed, born out both by cosmological numerical simulations and by simple analytical models.

  16. On the baryonic contents of low mass galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y

    2012-07-16

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation is an important observational constraint on cosmological and galactic models. However, it is critical to keep in mind that in observations only stars, molecular, and atomic gas are counted, while the contribution of the ionized gas is almost universally missed. The ionized gas is, however, expected to be present in the gaseous disks of dwarf galaxies simply because they are exposed to the cosmic ionizing background and to the stellar radiation that manages to escape from the central regions of the galactic disks into their outer layers. Such an expectation is, indeed, born out both by cosmological numerical simulations and by simple analytical models.

  17. Constraint of Baryon Asymmetry on Grand Unified Theories and X-X Mass Splitting Scenario for Baryon Number Generation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Sanjeev Kant

    An important constraint on Grand Unified Theories (GUTs) is the correct estimate of Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (BAU), in the standard scenario and with a conventional energy-temperature behavior. This is proportional to the intrinsic maximal CP-violation at superhigh energies, which as the lore goes barely accounts for the observed baryon -to-entropy ratio. This is further controlled by some global features: a global symmetry, if broken inadequately, can unduely suppress our estimate and the problem is how to overwhelm the suppression. Illustrated variously, this possibility of the group-theoretical constraint is also contrasted with that of a dynamical constraint. We focus our attention on a specific constraint, that arising from the broken group-C invariance (C = Charge-conjugation), note its implications on neutrino mass and examine, in particular, how to overwhelm the resulting suppression by splitting the mass of the decaying scalar X from its charge conjugate X('c) in an SO(10) theory with Witten's mechanism for neutrino mass. This possibility of X-X('c) mass-splitting was envisaged in our previous general study (with Haber and Segre) whose important conclusions are reviewed: some general observations on spontaneously unbroken C-invariance and a solution to the problem of BAU, in spontaneously broken C-invariant theories, by allowing no overlap between the contributions form the free-decays of X-X(' )and X('c) -X('c) pairs through (nu)-N('c) mass splitting >(, )10('10) GeV, or/and, when X X('c), through X-X('c) mass splitting >(, )m (X). Only the following details are now added. As examples of GUTs with uniquely defined C, we give the maximal and the minimal (single-family) unification schemes based on SU(16) and SO(10) respectively. We discuss in detail the X-X('c) mass splitting scenario with(' )X-X(X('c)-X('c)) belonging to the (6, 3, 1)(,+2) ((6, 1, 3)(,-2)) subcomponent of the 120 of SO(10). In addition to explicitizing the mass-splitting, we

  18. The impact of baryons on massive galaxy clusters: halo structure and cluster mass estimates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henson, Monique A.; Barnes, David J.; Kay, Scott T.; McCarthy, Ian G.; Schaye, Joop

    2017-03-01

    We use the BAHAMAS (BAryons and HAloes of MAssive Systems) and MACSIS (MAssive ClusterS and Intercluster Structures) hydrodynamic simulations to quantify the impact of baryons on the mass distribution and dynamics of massive galaxy clusters, as well as the bias in X-ray and weak lensing mass estimates. These simulations use the subgrid physics models calibrated in the BAHAMAS project, which include feedback from both supernovae and active galactic nuclei. They form a cluster population covering almost two orders of magnitude in mass, with more than 3500 clusters with masses greater than 1014 M⊙ at z = 0. We start by characterizing the clusters in terms of their spin, shape and density profile, before considering the bias in both weak lensing and hydrostatic mass estimates. Whilst including baryonic effects leads to more spherical, centrally concentrated clusters, the median weak lensing mass bias is unaffected by the presence of baryons. In both the dark matter only and hydrodynamic simulations, the weak lensing measurements underestimate cluster masses by ≈10 per cent for clusters with M200 ≤ 1015 M⊙ and this bias tends to zero at higher masses. We also consider the hydrostatic bias when using both the true density and temperature profiles, and those derived from X-ray spectroscopy. When using spectroscopic temperatures and densities, the hydrostatic bias decreases as a function of mass, leading to a bias of ≈40 per cent for clusters with M500 ≥ 1015 M⊙. This is due to the presence of cooler gas in the cluster outskirts. Using mass weighted temperatures and the true density profile reduces this bias to 5-15 per cent.

  19. Baryon Spectroscopy and Operator Construction in Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; I. Sato; S. Wallace; R. Edwards; D. Richards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U. Heller; C. Morningstar

    2004-07-01

    This talk describes progress at understanding the properties of the nucleon and its excitations from lattice QCD. I begin with a review of recent lattice results for the lowest-lying states of the excited baryon spectrum. The need to approach physical values of the light quark masses is emphasized, enabling the effects of the pion cloud to be revealed. I then outline the development of techniques that will enable the extraction of the masses of the higher resonances. I will describe how such calculations provide insight into the structure of the hadrons, and enable comparison both with experiment, and with QCD-inspired pictures of hadron structure, such as calculations in the limit of large N{sub c}.

  20. Lowest-lying even-parity {\\bar{B}}_s mesons: heavy-quark spin-flavor symmetry, chiral dynamics, and constituent quark-model bare masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albaladejo, M.; Fernandez-Soler, P.; Nieves, J.; Ortega, P. G.

    2017-03-01

    The discovery of the D^*_{s0}(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) resonances in the charmed-strange meson spectra revealed that formerly successful constituent quark models lose predictability in the vicinity of two-meson thresholds. The emergence of non-negligible effects due to meson loops requires an explicit evaluation of the interplay between Q{\\bar{q}} and (Q{\\bar{q}})(q{\\bar{q}}) Fock components. In contrast to the c{\\bar{s}} sector, there is no experimental evidence of J^P=0^+,1^+ bottom-strange states yet. Motivated by recent lattice studies, in this work the heavy-quark partners of the D_{s0}^*(2317) and D_{s1}(2460) states are analyzed within a heavy meson chiral unitary scheme. As a novelty, the coupling between the constituent quark-model P-wave {\\bar{B}}_s scalar and axial mesons and the {\\bar{B}}^{(*)}K channels is incorporated employing an effective interaction, consistent with heavy-quark spin symmetry, constrained by the lattice energy levels.

  1. Consistency between SU(3) and SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory for the nucleon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Xiu-Lei; Alvarez-Ruso, L.; Geng, Li-Sheng; Ledwig, Tim; Meng, Jie; Vicente Vacas, M. J.

    2017-03-01

    Treating the strange quark mass as a heavy scale compared to the light quark mass, we perform a matching of the nucleon mass in the SU(3) sector to the two-flavor case in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. The validity of the 19 low-energy constants appearing in the octet baryon masses up to next-to-next-to-next-to-leading order [1] is supported by comparing the effective parameters (the combinations of the 19 couplings) with the corresponding low-energy constants in the SU(2) sector [2]. In addition, it is shown that the dependence of the effective parameters and the pion-nucleon sigma term on the strange quark mass is relatively weak around its physical value, thus providing support to the assumption made in Ref. [2] that the SU(2) baryon chiral perturbation theory can be applied to study nf = 2 + 1 lattice QCD simulations as long as the strange quark mass is close to its physical value.

  2. Delta-baryon mass in a covariant Faddeev approach

    SciTech Connect

    Nicmorus, D.; Eichmann, G.; Krassnigg, A.; Alkofer, R.

    2009-09-01

    We present a calculation of the three-quark core contribution to the mass of the {delta} resonance in a Poincare-covariant Faddeev framework. A consistent setup for the dressed-quark propagator, the quark-quark and quark-'diquark' interactions is used, where all the ingredients are solutions of their respective Dyson-Schwinger or Bethe-Salpeter equations in rainbow-ladder truncation. We discuss the evolution of the {delta} mass with the current-quark mass and compare to the previously obtained mass of the nucleon.

  3. Dispersive estimate of the electromagnetic charge symmetry violation in the octet baryon masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erben, F. B.; Shanahan, P. E.; Thomas, A. W.; Young, R. D.

    2014-12-01

    We explore the electromagnetic contribution to the charge symmetry breaking in the octet baryon masses using a subtracted dispersion relation based on the Cottingham formula. For the proton-neutron mass splitting we report a minor revision of the recent analysis of Walker-Loud, Carlson, and Miller [Phys. Rev. Lett. 108, 232301 (2012), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.108.232301]. For the electromagnetic structure of the hyperons we constrain our analysis, where possible, by a combination of lattice QCD and SU(3) symmetry-breaking estimates. The results for the baryon mass splittings are found to be compatible with recent lattice QCD +QED determinations. The uncertainties in the dispersive analysis are dominated by the lack of knowledge of the hyperon inelastic structure.

  4. Octet baryon masses and sigma terms from an SU(3) chiral extrapolation

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Ross; Thomas, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    We analyze the consequences of the remarkable new results for octet baryon masses calculated in 2+1- avour lattice QCD using a low-order expansion about the SU(3) chiral limit. We demonstrate that, even though the simulation results are clearly beyond the power-counting regime, the description of the lattice results by a low-order expansion can be significantly improved by allowing the regularisation scale of the effective field theory to be determined by the lattice data itself. The model dependence of our analysis is demonstrated to be small compared with the present statistical precision. In addition to the extrapolation of the absolute values of the baryon masses, this analysis provides a method to solve the difficult problem of fine-tuning the strange-quark mass. We also report a determination of the sigma terms for all of the octet baryons, including an accurate value of the pion-nucleon sigma term and the first determination of the strangeness sigma term based on 2+1-flavour l

  5. Baryons and their Effects on Planes of Satellites Around Milky Way-Mass Galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sheehan H.

    2017-01-01

    Both the Milky Way and Andromeda have thin, coherently rotating planes of satellites. In this study I try to find similar satellite planes around four different Milky Way-mass simulations, each run both as dark matter-only and with baryons included. In all halos I am able to identify a planar configuration that significantly maximizes the number of satellites that are members of a plane. The member satellites that make up this maximum plane are consistently different between the dark matter-only and baryonic versions of the same run. In the baryonic runs, satellites are more likely to be destroyed through interactions with the disk, and substructure tends to infall later. Hence, studying satellite planes in dark matter-only simulations is misleading, because they will be composed of different satellite members than those that would exist if baryons were included. Additionally, baryonic runs tend to have less radially concentrated satellite distributions. Since all planes pass through the center of the galaxy, it is much harder to create a plane containing a large number of satellites from a random distribution if the satellites have a low radial concentration. Andromeda’s low radial satellite concentration is possibly a key reason behind why the plane in Andromeda is highly significant. Despite this, when co-rotation is considered, none of the satellite planes identified for the simulated galaxies are as statistically significant as the observed planes around the Milky Way and Andromeda. I will then show that co-rotation in our satellite planes can be attributed to how the satellites are accreted through filaments from the cosmic web. When two sets of opposing filaments contribute, coherent planes are more likely to form, when there are no well-defined filaments, there is a lack of coherent satellite rotation.

  6. The low-mass end of the baryonic Tully-Fisher relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sales, Laura V.; Navarro, Julio F.; Oman, Kyle; Fattahi, Azadeh; Ferrero, Ismael; Abadi, Mario; Bower, Richard; Crain, Robert A.; Frenk, Carlos S.; Sawala, Till; Schaller, Matthieu; Schaye, Joop; Theuns, Tom; White, Simon D. M.

    2017-01-01

    The scaling of disc galaxy rotation velocity with baryonic mass (the `baryonic Tully-Fisher' relation, BTF) has long confounded galaxy formation models. It is steeper than the M ∝ V3 scaling relating halo virial masses and circular velocities and its zero-point implies that galaxies comprise a very small fraction of available baryons. Such low galaxy formation efficiencies may, in principle, be explained by winds driven by evolving stars, but the tightness of the BTF relation argues against the substantial scatter expected from such a vigorous feedback mechanism. We use the APOSTLE/EAGLE simulations to show that the BTF relation is well reproduced in Λcold dark matter (CDM) simulations that match the size and number of galaxies as a function of stellar mass. In such models, galaxy rotation velocities are proportional to halo virial velocity and the steep velocity-mass dependence results from the decline in galaxy formation efficiency with decreasing halo mass needed to reconcile the CDM halo mass function with the galaxy luminosity function. The scatter in the simulated BTF is smaller than observed, even when considering all simulated galaxies and not just rotationally supported ones. The simulations predict that the BTF should become increasingly steep at the faint end, although the velocity scatter at fixed mass should remain small. Observed galaxies with rotation speeds below ˜40 km s-1 seem to deviate from this prediction. We discuss observational biases and modelling uncertainties that may help to explain this disagreement in the context of ΛCDM models of dwarf galaxy formation.

  7. Evolution of Mass and Velocity Field in the Cosmic Web: Comparison between Baryonic and Dark Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Weishan; Feng, Long-Long

    2017-03-01

    We investigate the evolution of the cosmic web since z = 5 in grid-based cosmological hydrodynamical simulations, focusing on the mass and velocity fields of both baryonic and cold dark matter. The tidal tensor of density is used as the main method for web identification, with λ th = 0.2–1.2. The evolution trends in baryonic and dark matter are similar, although moderate differences are observed. Sheets appear early, and their large-scale pattern may have been set up by z = 3. In terms of mass, filaments supersede sheets as the primary collapsing structures from z ∼ 2–3. Tenuous filaments assembled with each other to form prominent ones at z < 2. In accordance with the construction of the frame of the sheets, the cosmic divergence velocity, v div, was already well-developed above 2–3 Mpc by z = 3. Afterwards, the curl velocity, v curl, grew dramatically along with the rising of filaments, becoming comparable to v div, for <2–3 Mpc at z = 0. The scaling of v curl can be described by the hierarchical turbulence model. The alignment between the vorticity and the eigenvectors of the shear tensor in the baryonic matter field resembles that in the dark matter field, and is even moderately stronger between {\\boldsymbol{ω }} and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}1, and ω and {{\\boldsymbol{e}}}3. Compared with dark matter, there is slightly less baryonic matter found residing in filaments and clusters, and its vorticity developed more significantly below 2–3 Mpc. These differences may be underestimated because of the limited resolution and lack of star formation in our simulation. The impact of the change of dominant structures in overdense regions at z ∼ 2–3 on galaxy formation and evolution is shortly discussed.

  8. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain the $\\pi BB'$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.

  9. Using baryon octet magnetic moments and masses to fix the pion cloud contribution

    DOE PAGES

    Franz L. Gross; Ramalho, Gilberto T. F.; Tsushima, Kazuo

    2010-05-12

    In this study, using SU(3) symmetry to constrain themore » $$\\pi BB'$$ couplings, assuming SU(3) breaking comes only from one-loop pion cloud contributions, and using the the covariant spectator theory to describe the photon coupling to the quark core, we show how the experimental masses and magnetic moments of the baryon octet can be used to set a model independent constraint on the strength of the pion cloud contributions to the octet, and hence the nucleon, form factors at $Q^2=0$.« less

  10. Dense baryonic matter in the hidden local symmetry approach: Half-skyrmions and nucleon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Liang; Harada, Masayasu; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, Yongseok; Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque

    2013-07-01

    Hadron properties in dense medium are treated in a unified way in a skyrmion model constructed with an effective Lagrangian, in which the ρ and ω vector mesons are introduced as hidden gauge bosons, valid up to O(p4) terms in chiral expansion including the homogeneous Wess-Zumino terms. All the low energy constants of the Lagrangian—apart from the pion decay constant and the vector meson mass—are fixed by the master formula derived from the relation between the five-dimensional holographic QCD and the four-dimensional hidden local symmetry Lagrangian. This Lagrangian allows one to pin down the density n1/2 at which the skyrmions in medium fractionize into half-skyrmions, bringing in a drastic change in the equation of state of dense baryonic matter. We find that the U(1) field that figures in the Chern-Simons term in the five-dimensional holographic QCD action or equivalently the ω field in the homogeneous Wess-Zumino term in the dimensionally reduced hidden local symmetry action plays a crucial role in the half-skyrmion phase. The importance of the ω degree of freedom may be connected to what happens in the instanton structure of elementary baryon noticed in holographic QCD. The most striking and intriguing in what is found in the model is that the pion decay constant that smoothly drops with increasing density in the skyrmion phase stops decreasing at n1/2 and remains nearly constant in the half-skyrmion phase. In accordance with the large Nc consideration, the baryon mass also stays nonscaling in the half-skyrmion phase. This feature which is reminiscent of the parity-doublet baryon model with a chirally invariant mass m0 is supported by the nuclear effective field theory with the parameters of the Lagrangian scaling modified at the skyrmion-half-skyrmion phase transition. It also matches with one-loop renormalization group analysis based on hidden local symmetry. A link between a nonvanishing m0 and the origin of nucleon mass distinctive from

  11. Baryon mass splittings and strong CP violation in SU(3) chiral perturbation theory

    DOE PAGES

    de Vries, Jordy; Mereghetti, Emanuele; Walker-Loud, Andre P.

    2015-10-08

    We study SU(3) flavor breaking corrections to the relation between the octet baryon masses and the nucleon-meson CP-violating interactions induced by the QCD theta term. We also work within the framework of SU(3) chiral perturbation theory and work through next-to-next-to-leading order in the SU(3) chiral expansion, which is O(m2q). At lowest order, the CP-odd couplings induced by the QCD θ- term are determined by mass splittings of the baryon octet, the classic result of Crewther et al. We show that for each isospin-invariant CP-violating nucleon-meson interaction there exists one relation which is respected by loop corrections up to the ordermore » we work, while other leading-order relations are violated. With these relations we extract a precise value of the pion-nucleon coupling g-0 by using recent lattice QCD evaluations of the proton-neutron mass splitting. Additionally, we derive semi-precise values for CP-violating coupling constants between heavier mesons and nucleons and discuss their phenomenological impact on electric dipole moments of nucleons and nuclei.« less

  12. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-07-18

    Using a proton-proton collision data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb(-1) collected by LHCb at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV, about 3800 Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-), Ξ(c)(+)) → pK(-)π(+) signal decays are reconstructed. From this sample, the first measurement of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon lifetime is made, relative to that of the Λ(b)(0) baryon. The mass differences M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) and M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) are also measured with precision more than 4 times better than the current world averages. The resulting values are τ(Ξ(b)(0))/τ(Λ)(b)(0)) = 1.006 ± 0.018 ± 0.010,M(Ξ(b)(0))-M(Λ(b)(0)) = 172.44 ± 0.39 ± 0.17 MeV/c(2),M(Ξ(c)(+))-M(Λ(c)(+)) = 181.51 ± 0.14 ± 0.10 MeV/c(2),where the first uncertainty is statistical and the second is systematic. The relative rate of Ξ(b)(0) to Λ(b)(0) baryon production is measured to be f(Ξ)(b)(0))/f(Λ)(b)(0))B(Ξ(b)(0) → Ξ(c)(+)π(-))/B(Λ(b)(0) → Λ(c)(+)π(-))B(Ξ(c)(+) → pK(-)π(+))/B(Λ(c)(+) → pK(-)}π(+)) = (1.88 ± 0.04 ± 0.03) × 10(-2),where the first factor is the ratio of fragmentation fractions, b → Ξ(b)(0) relative to b → Λ(b)(0). Relative production rates as functions of transverse momentum and pseudorapidity are also presented.

  13. Baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis in a neutrino mass model with complex scaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Rome; Chakraborty, Mainak; Roy, Probir; Ghosal, Ambar

    2017-03-01

    Baryogenesis via leptogenesis is investigated in a specific model of light neutrino masses and mixing angles. The latter was proposed on the basis of an assumed complex-extended scaling property of the neutrino Majorana mass matrix Mν, derived with a type-1 seesaw from a Dirac mass matrix mD and a heavy singlet neutrino Majorana mass matrix MR. One of its important features, highlighted here, is that there is a common source of the origin of a nonzero θ13 and the CP violating lepton asymmetry through the imaginary part of mD. The model predicted CP violation to be maximal for the Dirac type and vanishing for the Majorana type. We assume strongly hierarchical mass eigenvalues for MR. The leptonic CP asymmetry parameter εα1 mm with lepton flavor α, originating from the decays of the lightest of the heavy neutrinos N1 (of mass M1) at a temperature T ~ M1, is what matters here with the lepton asymmetries, originating from the decays of N2,3, being washed out. The light leptonic and heavy neutrino number densities (normalized to the entropy density) are evolved via Boltzmann equations down to electroweak temperatures to yield a baryon asymmetry through sphaleronic transitions. The effects of flavored vs. unflavored leptogenesis in the three mass regimes (1) M1 < 109 GeV, (2) 109 GeV < M1 < 1012 GeV and (3) M1 > 1012 GeV are numerically worked out for both a normal and an inverted mass ordering of the light neutrinos. Corresponding results on the baryon asymmetry of the universe are obtained, displayed and discussed. For values close to the best-fit points of the input neutrino mass and mixing parameters, obtained from neutrino oscillation experiments, successful baryogenesis is achieved for the mass regime (2) and a normal mass ordering of the light neutrinos with a nonzero θ13 playing a crucial role. However, the other possibility of an inverted mass ordering for the same mass regime, though disfavored, cannot be excluded. A discussion is also given on the

  14. Baryons in the relativistic jets of the stellar-mass black-hole candidate 4U 1630-47.

    PubMed

    Trigo, María Díaz; Miller-Jones, James C A; Migliari, Simone; Broderick, Jess W; Tzioumis, Tasso

    2013-12-12

    Accreting black holes are known to power relativistic jets, both in stellar-mass binary systems and at the centres of galaxies. The power carried away by the jets, and, hence, the feedback they provide to their surroundings, depends strongly on their composition. Jets containing a baryonic component should carry significantly more energy than electron-positron jets. Energetic considerations and circular-polarization measurements have provided conflicting circumstantial evidence for the presence or absence of baryons in jets, and the only system in which they have been unequivocally detected is the peculiar X-ray binary SS 433 (refs 4, 5). Here we report the detection of Doppler-shifted X-ray emission lines from a more typical black-hole candidate X-ray binary, 4U 1630-47, coincident with the reappearance of radio emission from the jets of the source. We argue that these lines arise from baryonic matter in a jet travelling at approximately two-thirds the speed of light, thereby establishing the presence of baryons in the jet. Such baryonic jets are more likely to be powered by the accretion disk than by the spin of the black hole, and if the baryons can be accelerated to relativistic speeds, the jets should be strong sources of γ-rays and neutrino emission.

  15. Occam's razor in lepton mass matrices: The sign of the universe's baryon asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaneta, Yuya; Shimizu, Yusuke; Tanimoto, Morimitsu; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss the neutrino mass matrix based on the Occam's-razor approach in the framework of the seesaw mechanism. We impose four zeros in the Dirac neutrino mass matrix, which give the minimum number of parameters needed for the observed neutrino masses and lepton mixing angles, while the charged lepton mass matrix and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix are taken as real diagonal ones. The low-energy neutrino mass matrix has only seven physical parameters. We show successful predictions for the mixing angle θ_{13} and the CP-violating phase δ_CP with the normal mass hierarchy of neutrinos by using the experimental data on the neutrino mass-squared differences, the mixing angles θ_{12} and θ_{23}. The most favored region of sinθ_{13} is around 0.13-0.15, which is completely consistent with the observed value. The CP-violating phase δ_CP is favored to be close to ± π/2. We also discuss the Majorana phases as well as the effective neutrino mass for the neutrinoless double-beta decay m_{ee}, which is around 7-8 meV. It is extremely remarkable that we can perform a "complete experiment" to determine the low-energy neutrino mass matrix, since we have only seven physical parameters in the neutrino mass matrix. In particular, two CP-violating phases in the neutrino mass matrix are directly given by two CP-violating phases at high energy. Thus, assuming leptogenesis, we can determine the sign of the cosmic baryon in the universe from the low-energy experiments for the neutrino mass matrix.

  16. Measurement of the Λ(b)(0), Ξ (b)(-), and Ω(b((-) Baryon masses.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nisar, S; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-05-03

    Bottom baryons decaying to a J/ψ meson and a hyperon are reconstructed using 1.0 fb(-1) of data collected in 2011 with the LHCb detector. Significant Λ(b)(0) → J/ψΛ, Ξ(b((-) → J/ψΞ(-) and Ω(b)(-) → J/ψΩ(-) signals are observed and the corresponding masses are measured to be M(Λ(b)(0))=5619.53 ± 0.13(stat.) ± 0.45(syst.) MeV/c(2), M(Ξ(b)(-)) = 5795.8 ± 0.9(stat.) ± 0.4(syst.) MeV/c(2), M(Ω(b)(-)) = 6046.0 ± 2.2(stat.) ± 0.5(syst.) MeV/c(2) , while the differences with respect to the Λ(b)(0) mass are M(Ξ(b)(-))-M(Λ(b)(0))=176.2 ± 0.9(stat.) ± 0.1(syst.) MeV/c(2), M(Ω(b)(-))-M(Λ(b)(0))=426.4 ± 2.2(stat.) ± 0.4(syst.) MeV/c(2). These are the most precise mass measurements of the Λ(b)(0), Ξ(b)(-) and Ω(b)(-) baryons to date. Averaging the above Λ(b)(0) mass measurement with that published by LHCb using 35 pb(-1) of data collected in 2010 yields M(Λ(b)(0)) = 5619.44 ± 0.13(stat.)± 0.38(syst.) MeV/c(2).

  17. Understanding The Baryonic Cycle: Confronting Galaxy Physics With The Mass; Metallicity Relation And Dust Content Of Galaxies Over Cosmic Time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Popping, Gergö; Somerville, Rachel; Galametz, Maud

    2016-09-01

    The mass-metallicity relation combines the star formation, metal enrichment, feedback, and baryon accretion history of galaxies and acts as a superb probe of the cycle of baryons through galaxies. Reproducing its cosmic evolution is a stringent constraint on models of galaxy formation. I will present new cosmological models of galaxy formation that include various ejective and preventive feedback schemes and detailed chemical evolution and dust chemistry models. I will present the impact of the different feedback schemes on the evolution of the mass;metallicity relation, compare my predictions with observations, and discuss how this comparison helps us constrain the galaxy physics acting on the baryonic cycle. I will further show that proper accounting for dust emphasizes a serious caveat in our understanding of galaxy formation. Galaxies are too metal enriched at early times.

  18. The role of baryons in creating statistically significant planes of satellites around Milky Way-mass galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Sheehan H.; Brooks, Alyson M.; Christensen, Charlotte R.

    2017-04-01

    We investigate whether the inclusion of baryonic physics influences the formation of thin, coherently rotating planes of satellites such as those seen around the Milky Way and Andromeda. For four Milky Way-mass simulations, each run both as dark matter-only and with baryons included, we are able to identify a planar configuration that significantly maximizes the number of plane satellite members. The maximum plane member satellites are consistently different between the dark matter-only and baryonic versions of the same run due to the fact that satellites are both more likely to be destroyed and to infall later in the baryonic runs. Hence, studying satellite planes in dark matter-only simulations is misleading, because they will be composed of different satellite members than those that would exist if baryons were included. Additionally, the destruction of satellites in the baryonic runs leads to less radially concentrated satellite distributions, a result that is critical to making planes that are statistically significant compared to a random distribution. Since all planes pass through the centre of the galaxy, it is much harder to create a plane of a given height from a random distribution if the satellites have a low radial concentration. We identify Andromeda's low radial satellite concentration as a key reason why the plane in Andromeda is highly significant. Despite this, when corotation is considered, none of the satellite planes identified for the simulated galaxies are as statistically significant as the observed planes around the Milky Way and Andromeda, even in the baryonic runs.

  19. Precision measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ξb⁻ baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R F; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurin, B; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schubiger, M; Schune, M-H; 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Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2014-12-12

    We report on measurements of the mass and lifetime of the Ξ(b)⁻ baryon using about 1800 Ξ(b)⁻ decays reconstructed in a proton-proton collision data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb⁻¹ collected by the LHCb experiment. The decays are reconstructed in the Ξ(b)⁻→Ξ(c)⁰π⁻, Ξ(c)⁰→pK⁻K⁻π⁺ channel and the mass and lifetime are measured using the Λ(b)⁰→Λ(c)⁺π⁻ mode as a reference. We measure M(Ξ(b)⁻)-M(Λ(b)⁰)=178.36±0.46±0.16  MeV/c², (τ(Ξ(b)⁻)/τ(Λ(b)⁰)=1.089±0.026±0.011, where the uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. These results lead to a factor of 2 better precision on the Ξ(b)⁻ mass and lifetime compared to previous best measurements, and are consistent with theoretical expectations.

  20. An ab initio study on the four electronically lowest-lying states of CH 2 using the state-averaged complete active space second-order configuration interaction method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F., III

    1997-12-01

    Four electronically lowest-lying ( X˜ 3B 1, ã 1A 1, b˜ 1B 1, and c˜ 1A 1) states of CH 2 have been investigated systematically using ab initio electronic structure theory. Complete active space (CAS) self-consistent-field (SCF) second-order configuration interaction (SOCI) and state-averaged (SA) CASSCF-SOCI levels of theory have been employed. The CASSCF reference wave function was constructed by minimizing the total energy of a specified state, while the SACASSCF reference wave function was obtained by minimizing the equally weighted total energy of the four ( X˜ 3B 1, ã 1A 1, b˜ 1B 1, and c˜ 1A 1) states. The third excited state ( c˜ 1A 1 or 2 1A 1) is of particular theoretical interest because it is represented by the second root of CASSCF and SOCI Hamiltonian matrices. Theoretical treatments of states not the lowest of their symmetry require special attention due to their tendency of variational collapse to the lower-lying state(s). For these four lowest-lying states total energies and physical properties including dipole moments, harmonic vibrational frequencies, and associated infrared (IR) intensities were determined and compared with the results from the configuration interaction with single and double excitations (CISD) method and available experimental values. The CASSCF-SOCI method should provide the most reliable energetics and physical properties in the present study owing to its fully variational nature in the molecular orbital (MO) and CI spaces for a given state. It is demonstrated that the SACASSCF-SOCI wave functions produce results which are quite consistent with those from the CASSCF-SOCI method. Thus significantly increased application of the SACASSCF-SOCI method to the excited states of a wide variety of molecular systems is expected.

  1. LOW-MASS SUPPRESSION OF THE SATELLITE LUMINOSITY FUNCTION DUE TO THE SUPERSONIC BARYON-COLD-DARK-MATTER RELATIVE VELOCITY

    SciTech Connect

    Bovy, Jo; Dvorkin, Cora

    2013-05-01

    We study the effect of the supersonic baryon-cold-dark-matter (CDM) flow, which has recently been shown to have a large effect on structure formation during the dark ages 10 {approx}< z {approx}< 1000, on the abundance of luminous, low-mass satellite galaxies around galaxies like the Milky Way. As the supersonic baryon-CDM flow significantly suppresses both the number of halos formed and the amount of baryons accreted onto such halos of masses 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 10{sup 8} at z {approx}> 10, a large effect results on the stellar luminosity function before reionization. As halos of these masses are believed to have very little star formation after reionization due to the effects of photoheating by the ultraviolet background, this effect persists to the present day. We calculate that the number of low-mass 10{sup 6} < M{sub halo}/M{sub Sun} < 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 7} halos that host luminous satellite galaxies today is typically suppressed by 50%, with values ranging up to 90% in regions where the initial supersonic velocity is high. We show that this previously ignored cosmological effect resolves some of the tension between the observed and predicted number of low-mass satellites in the Milky Way, reducing the need for other mass-dependent star-formation suppression before reionization.

  2. The effect of baryons on the variance and the skewness of the mass distribution in the Universe at small scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guillet, T.; Teyssier, R.; Colombi, S.

    2010-06-01

    We study the dissipative effects of baryon physics on cosmic statistics at small scales using a cosmological simulation of a (50Mpch-1)3 volume of universe. The MareNostrum simulation was performed using the adaptive mesh refinement (AMR) code RAMSES, and includes most of the physical ingredients which are part of the current theory of galaxy formation, such as metal-dependent cooling and UV heating, subgrid modelling of the interstellar medium, star formation and supernova feedback. We reran the same initial conditions for a dark matter only universe, as a reference point for baryon-free cosmic statistics. In this paper, we present the measured small-scale amplification of σ2 and S3 due to baryonic physics and their interpretation in the framework of the halo model. As shown in recent studies, the effect of baryons on the matter power spectrum can be accounted for at scales k <~ 10hMpc-1 by modifying the halo concentration parameter. We propose to extend this result by using a composite halo profile, which is a linear combination of a Navarro, Frenk and White profile for the dark matter component and an exponential disc profile mimicking the baryonic component at the heart of the halo. This halo profile form is physically motivated and depends on two parameters, the mass fraction f d of baryons in the disc and the ratio λd of the disc's characteristic scale to the halo's virial radius. We find this composite profile to reproduce both the small-scale variance and skewness boosts measured in the simulation up to k ~ 102hMpc-1 for physically meaningful values of the parameters f d and λd. Although simulations like the one presented here usually suffer from various problems when compared to observations, our modified halo model could be used as a fitting model to improve the determination of cosmological parameters from weak lensing convergence spectra and skewness measurements.

  3. Measurement of the mass and lifetime of the Ωb- baryon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baker, S.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Boubdir, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chobanova, V.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Dijkstra, H.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Garsed, P. J.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianı, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Lyu, X.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valat, S.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    A proton-proton collision data sample, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1 collected by LHCb at √{s }=7 and 8 TeV, is used to reconstruct 63 ±9 Ωb-→Ωc0π-, Ωc0→p K-K-π+ decays. Using the Ξb-→Ξc0π-, Ξc0→p K-K-π+ decay mode for calibration, the lifetime ratio and the absolute lifetime of the Ωb- baryon are measured to be τΩb-/τΞb-=1.11 ±0.16 ±0.03 , τΩb-=1.78 ±0.26 ±0.05 ±0.06 ps , where the uncertainties are statistical, systematic and from the calibration mode (for τΩb- only). A measurement is also made of the mass difference, mΩb--mΞb-, and the corresponding Ωb- mass, which yields mΩb--mΞb-=247.4 ±3.2 ±0.5 MeV /c2 , mΩb-=6045.1 ±3.2 ±0.5 ±0.6 MeV /c2 . These results are consistent with previous measurements.

  4. The Gell-Mann - Okubo Mass Relation among Baryons from Fully-Dynamical, Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinos Orginos; Silas Beane; Martin Savage

    2007-10-01

    We explore the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation among the octet baryons using fully-dynamical, mixed-action (domain-wall on rooted-staggered) lattice QCD calculations at a lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.125 fm and pion masses of m{sub pi} {approx} 290 MeV, 350 MeV, 490 MeV and 590 MeV. Deviations from the Gell-Mann - Okubo mass relation are found to be small at each quark mass.

  5. X-ray gas mass fraction in the Shapley Supercluster and its implication on the cosmological baryon-density parameter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Makino, Nobuyoshi; Suto, Yasushi

    1993-04-01

    We estimated the X-ray gas mass of the clusters in the Shapley Supercluster by improving a previous estimate based on the extrapolation from the Coma data. Our estimate of the X-ray gas mass in the Shapley Supercluster, which depends on h50 and beta (a power-law index characterizing the gas density profile around a cluster), turned out to be a factor of 2-4 times smaller than the previous value. We then considered its implication on the baryon density parameter in the universe. Our estimates from the the Shapley Supercluster region are consistent with the predicted range according to the standard big-bang nucleosynthesis model if the universe is open for h50 = 2.0, or if the universe is flat (Omega(0) = 1.0), but with a substantial fraction of (non-baryonic) dark matter existing in intercluster space for h50 = 1.0.

  6. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons using effective quark masses in a chiral constituent quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girdhar, Aarti; Dahiya, Harleen; Randhawa, Monika

    2015-08-01

    The magnetic moments of JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have been calculated in the chiral constituent quark model (χ CQM ) with explicit results for the contribution coming from the valence quark polarizations, sea quark polarizations, and their orbital angular momentum. Since the JP=3/2+ decuplet baryons have short lifetimes, the experimental information about them is limited. The χ CQM has important implications for chiral symmetry breaking as well as SU(3) symmetry breaking since it works in the region between the QCD confinement scale and the chiral symmetry breaking scale. The predictions in the model not only give a satisfactory fit when compared with the experimental data but also show improvement over the other models. The effect of the confinement on quark masses has also been discussed in detail and the results of χ CQM are found to improve further with the inclusion of effective quark masses.

  7. Massive compact halo objects viewed from a cosmological perspective: contribution to the baryonic mass density of the universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fields, Brian D.; Freese, Katherine; Graff, David S.

    1998-09-01

    We estimate the contribution of massive compact halo objects (MACHOs) and their stellar progenitors to the mass density of the Universe. If the MACHOs that have been detected reside in the halo of our Galaxy, then a simple extrapolation of the Galactic population (out to 50 kpc) of MACHOs to cosmic scales gives a cosmic density ϱMACHO=(1-5)×10 9hM⊙Mpc -3, which in terms of the critical density corresponds to Ω MACHO = (0.0036-0.017)h -1. Should the MACHO halo extend out to much further than 50 kpc, then Ω MACHO would only be larger. Such a mass density is comparable to the cosmic baryon density implied by Big Bang nucleosynthesis. If we take the central values of the estimates, then MACHOs dominate the baryonic content of the Universe today, with Ω MACHO/Ω B˜0.7 h . However, the cumulative uncertainties in the density determinations only require that Ω MACHO/Ω B ≥ 1/6hf gal', where the fraction of galaxies that contain MACHOs fgal>;0.17 and h is the Hubble constant in units of 100 km s -1 Mpc -1. Our best estimate for Ω MACHO is hard to reconcile with the current best estimates of the baryonic content of the intergalactic medium indicated by measurements of the Lyman-α forest; however, measurements of Ω Lyα are at present uncertain, so that such a comparison may be premature. If the MACHOs are white dwarfs resulting from a single burst of star formation (without recycling), then their main sequence progenitors would have been at least twice more massive: Ω ∗ = (0.007-0.034)h -1. Thus, far too much gaseous baryonic material would remain in the Galaxy unless there is a Galactic wind to eject it. Indeed a MACHO population of white dwarfs and the gas ejected from their main sequence progenitors accounts for a significant fraction of all baryons. This fact must be taken into account when attempting to dilute the chemical by-products of such a large population of intermediate mass stars. We stress the difficulty of reconciling the MACHO mass budget

  8. Baryonic B Decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    In this talk the decays of B-mesons into baryons are discussed. Large mass of B-meson makes possible the decays of the type B → baryon (+mesons). Experimental observations and measurements of these decays at B-factories Belle and BaBar have stimulate the development of theoretical models in this field. We briefly review the experimental results together with the current theoretical models which describe baryonic B decays.

  9. Observation of a Charmed Baryon Decaying to D;{0}p at a Mass Near 2.94 GeV/c;{2}.

    PubMed

    Aubert, B; Barate, R; Bona, M; Boutigny, D; Couderc, F; Karyotakis, Y; Lees, J P; Poireau, V; Tisserand, V; Zghiche, A; Grauges, E; Palano, A; Pappagallo, M; Chen, J C; Qi, N D; Rong, G; Wang, P; Zhu, Y S; Eigen, G; Ofte, I; Stugu, B; Abrams, G S; Battaglia, M; Brown, D N; Button-Schafer, J; Cahn, R N; Charles, E; Day, C T; Gill, M S; Groysman, Y; Jacobsen, R G; Kadyk, J A; Kerth, L T; Kolomensky, Yu G; Kukartsev, G; Lynch, G; Mir, L M; Oddone, P J; Orimoto, T J; Pripstein, M; Roe, N A; Ronan, M T; Wenzel, W A; Barrett, M; Ford, K E; Harrison, T J; Hart, A J; Hawkes, C M; Morgan, S E; Watson, A T; Goetzen, K; Held, T; Koch, H; Lewandowski, B; Pelizaeus, M; Peters, K; Schroeder, T; Steinke, M; Boyd, J T; Burke, J P; Cottingham, W N; Walker, D; Cuhadar-Donszelmann, T; Fulsom, B G; Hearty, C; Knecht, N S; Mattison, T S; McKenna, J A; Khan, A; Kyberd, P; Saleem, M; Teodorescu, L; Blinov, V E; Bukin, A D; Druzhinin, V P; Golubev, V B; Onuchin, A P; Serednyakov, S I; Skovpen, Yu I; Solodov, E P; Yu Todyshev, K; Best, D S; Bondioli, M; Bruinsma, M; Chao, M; Curry, S; Eschrich, I; Kirkby, D; Lankford, A J; Lund, P; Mandelkern, M; Mommsen, R K; Roethel, W; Stoker, D P; Abachi, S; Buchanan, C; Foulkes, S D; Gary, J W; Long, O; Shen, B C; Wang, K; Zhang, L; Hadavand, H K; Hill, E J; Paar, H P; Rahatlou, S; Sharma, V; Berryhill, J W; Campagnari, C; Cunha, A; Dahmes, B; Hong, T M; Kovalskyi, D; Richman, J D; Beck, T W; Eisner, A M; Flacco, C J; Heusch, C A; Kroseberg, J; Lockman, W S; Nesom, G; Schalk, T; Schumm, B A; Seiden, A; Spradlin, P; Williams, D C; Wilson, M G; Albert, J; Chen, E; Dvoretskii, A; Hitlin, D G; Narsky, I; Piatenko, T; Porter, F C; Ryd, A; Samuel, A; Andreassen, R; Mancinelli, G; Meadows, B T; Sokoloff, M D; Blanc, F; Bloom, P C; Chen, S; Ford, W T; Hirschauer, J F; Kreisel, A; Nauenberg, U; Olivas, A; Ruddick, W O; Smith, J G; Ulmer, K A; Wagner, S R; Zhang, J; Chen, A; Eckhart, E A; Soffer, A; Toki, W H; Wilson, R J; Winklmeier, F; Zeng, Q; Altenburg, D D; Feltresi, E; Hauke, A; Jasper, H; Spaan, B; Brandt, T; Klose, V; Lacker, H M; Mader, W F; Nogowski, R; Petzold, A; Schubert, J; Schubert, K R; Schwierz, R; Sundermann, J E; Volk, A; Bernard, D; Bonneaud, G R; Grenier, P; Latour, E; Thiebaux, Ch; Verderi, M; Bard, D J; Clark, P J; Gradl, W; Muheim, F; Playfer, S; Robertson, A I; Xie, Y; Andreotti, M; Bettoni, D; Bozzi, C; Calabrese, R; Cibinetto, G; Luppi, E; Negrini, M; Petrella, A; Piemontese, L; Prencipe, E; Anulli, F; Baldini-Ferroli, R; Calcaterra, A; de Sangro, R; Finocchiaro, G; Pacetti, S; Patteri, P; Peruzzi, I M; Piccolo, M; Rama, M; Zallo, A; Buzzo, A; Capra, R; Contri, R; Lo Vetere, M; Macri, M M; Monge, M R; Passaggio, S; Patrignani, C; Robutti, E; Santroni, A; Tosi, S; Brandenburg, G; Chaisanguanthum, K S; Morii, M; Wu, J; Dubitzky, R S; Marks, J; Schenk, S; Uwer, U; Bhimji, W; Bowerman, D A; Dauncey, P D; Egede, U; Flack, R L; Gaillard, J R; Nash, J A; Nikolich, M B; Panduro Vazquez, W; Chai, X; Charles, M J; Mallik, U; Meyer, N T; Ziegler, V; Cochran, J; Crawley, H B; Dong, L; Eyges, V; Meyer, W T; Prell, S; Rosenberg, E I; Rubin, A E; Gristan, A V; Fritsch, M; Schott, G; Arnaud, N; Davier, M; Grosdidier, G; Höcker, A; Le Diberder, F; Lepeltier, V; Lutz, A M; Oyanguren, A; Pruvot, S; Rodier, S; Roudeau, P; Schune, M H; Stocchi, A; Wang, W F; Wormser, G; Cheng, C H; Lange, D J; Wright, D M; Chavez, C A; Forster, I J; Fry, J R; Gabathuler, E; Gamet, R; George, K A; Hutchcroft, D E; Payne, D J; Schofield, K C; Touramanis, C; Bevan, A J; Di Lodovico, F; Menges, W; Sacco, R; Brown, C L; Cowan, G; Flaecher, H U; Hopkins, D A; Jackson, P S; McMahon, T R; Ricciardi, S; Salvatore, F; Brown, D N; Davis, C L; Allison, J; Barlow, N R; Barlow, R J; Chia, Y M; Edgar, C L; Kelly, M P; Lafferty, G D; Naisbit, M T; Williams, J C; Yi, J I; Chen, C; Hulsbergen, W D; Jawahery, A; Lae, C K; Roberts, D A; Simi, G; Blaylock, G; Dallapiccola, C; Hertzbach, S S; Li, X; Moore, T B; Saremi, S; Staengle, H; Willocq, S Y; Cowan, R; Koeneke, K; Sciolla, G; Sekula, S J; Spitznagel, M; Taylor, F; Yamamoto, R K; Kim, H; Patel, P M; Potter, C T; Robertson, S H; Lazzaro, A; Lombardo, V; Palombo, F; Bauer, J M; Cremaldi, L; Eschenburg, V; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Reidy, J; Sanders, D A; Summers, D J; Zhao, H W; Brunet, S; Côté, D; Simard, M; Taras, P; Viaud, F B; Nicholson, H; Cavallo, N; De Nardo, G; Del Re, D; Fabozzi, F; Gatto, C; Lista, L; Monorchio, D; Paolucci, P; Piccolo, D; Sciacca, C; Baak, M; Bulten, H; Raven, G; Snoek, H L; Jessop, C P; Losecco, J M; Allmendinger, T; Benelli, G; Gan, K K; Honscheid, K; Hufnagel, D; Jackson, P D; Kagan, H; Kass, R; Pulliam, T; Rahimi, A M; Ter-Antonyan, R; Wong, Q K; Blout, N L; Brau, J; Frey, R; Igonkina, O; Lu, M; Rahmat, R; Sinev, N B; Strom, D; Strube, J; Torrence, E; Galeazzi, F; Gaz, A; Margoni, M; Morandin, M; Pompili, A; Posocco, M; Rotondo, M; Simonetto, F; Stroili, R; Voci, C; Benayoun, M; Chauveau, J; David, P; Del Buono, L; de la Vaissière, Ch; Hamon, O; Hartfiel, B L; John, M J J; Leruste, Ph; Malclès, J; Ocariz, J; Roos, L; Therin, G; Behera, P K; Gladney, L; Panetta, J; Biasini, M; Covarelli, R; Pioppi, M; Angelini, C; Batignani, G; Bettarini, S; Bucci, F; Calderini, G; Carpinelli, M; Cenci, R; Forti, F; Giorgi, M A; Lusiani, A; Marchiori, G; Mazur, M A; Morganti, M; Neri, N; Paoloni, E; Rizzo, G; Walsh, J; Haire, M; Judd, D; Wagoner, D E; Biesiada, J; Danielson, N; Elmer, P; Lau, Y P; Lu, C; Olsen, J; Smith, A J S; Telnov, A V; Bellini, F; Cavoto, G; D'Orazio, A; Di Marco, E; Faccini, R; Ferrarotto, F; Ferroni, F; Gaspero, M; Li Gioi, L; Mazzoni, M A; Morganti, S; Piredda, G; Polci, F; Safai Tehrani, F; Voena, C; Ebert, M; Schröder, H; Waldi, R; Adye, T; De Groot, N; Franek, B; Olaiya, E O; Wilson, F F; Emery, S; Gaidot, A; Ganzhur, S F; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Kozanecki, W; Legendre, M; Mayer, B; Vasseur, G; Yèche, Ch; Zito, M; Park, W; Purohit, M V; Weidemann, A W; Wilson, J R; Allen, M T; Aston, D; Bartoldus, R; Bechtle, P; Berger, N; Boyarski, A M; Claus, R; Coleman, J P; Convery, M R; Cristinziani, M; Dingfelder, J C; Dong, D; Dorfan, J; Dubois-Felsmann, G P; Dujmic, D; Dunwoodie, W; Field, R C; Glanzman, T; Gowdy, S J; Graham, M T; Halyo, V; Hast, C; Hyrn'ova, T; Innes, W R; Kelsey, M H; Kim, P; Kocian, M L; Leith, D W G S; Li, S; Libby, J; Luitz, S; Luth, V; Lynch, H L; Macfarlane, D B; Marsiske, H; Messner, R; Muller, D R; O'grady, C P; Ozcan, V E; Perazzo, A; Perl, M; Ratcliff, B N; Roodman, A; Salnikov, A A; Schindler, R H; Schwiening, J; Snyder, A; Stelzer, J; Su, D; Sullivan, M K; Suzuki, K; Swain, S K; Thompson, J M; Va'vra, J; van Bakel, N; Weaver, M; Weinstein, A J R; Wisniewski, W J; Wittgen, M; Wright, D H; Yarritu, A K; Yi, K; Young, C C; Burchat, P R; Edwards, A J; Majewski, S A; Petersen, B A; Roat, C; Wilden, L; Ahmed, S; Alam, M S; Bula, R; Ernst, J A; Jain, V; Pan, B; Saeed, M A; Wappler, F R; Zain, S B; Bugg, W; Krishnamurthy, M; Spanier, S M; Eckmann, R; Ritchie, J L; Satpathy, A; Schilling, C J; Schwitters, R F; Izen, J M; Kitayama, I; Lou, X C; Ye, S; Bianchi, F; Gallo, F; Gamba, D; Bomben, M; Bosisio, L; Cartaro, C; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Dittongo, S; Grancagnolo, S; Lanceri, L; Vitale, L; Azzolini, V; Martinez-Vidal, F; Banerjee, Sw; Bhuyan, B; Brown, C M; Fortin, D; Hamano, K; Kowalewski, R; Nugent, I M; Roney, J M; Sobie, R J; Back, J J; Harrison, P F; Latham, T E; Mohanty, G B; Band, H R; Chen, X; Cheng, B; Dasu, S; Datta, M; Eichenbaum, A M; Flood, K T; Hollar, J J; Johnson, J R; Kutter, P E; Li, H; Liu, R; Mellado, B; Mihalyi, A; Mohapatra, A K; Pan, Y; Pierini, M; Prepost, R; Tan, P; Wu, S L; Yu, Z; Neal, H

    2007-01-05

    A search for charmed baryons decaying to D(0)p reveals two states: the Lambdac(2880)+ baryon and a previously unobserved state at a mass of [2939.8+/-1.3(stat)+/-1.0(syst)] MeV/c2 and with an intrinsic width of [17.5+/-5.2(stat)+/-5.9(syst)] MeV. Consistent and significant signals are observed for the K(-)pi(+) and K(-)pi(+)pi(-)pi(+) decay modes of the D0 in 287 fb(-1) annihilation data recorded by the BABAR detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. There is no evidence in the D+p spectrum of doubly charged partners. The mass and intrinsic width of the Lambdac(2880)+ baryon and relative yield of the two baryons are also measured.

  10. Helicity Amplitudes and Electromagnetic Decays of Strange Baryon Resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Cauteren, T.; Ryckebusch, J.; Metsch, B. C.; Petry, H. R.

    2006-06-01

    We present results for the helicity amplitudes of the lowest-lying hyperon resonances Y*, computed within the framework of the Bonn constituent-quark model, which is based on the Bethe-Salpeter approach1-3. The seven parameters entering the model are fitted against the best known baryon masses4. Accordingly, the results for the helicity amplitudes are genuine predictions. Some hyperon resonances are seen to couple more strongly to a virtual photon with finite Q2 than to a real photon. Other Y*'s, such as the S01(1670) Λ resonance or the S11 (1620) Σ resonance, have large electromagnetic decay widths and couple very strongly to real photons. The negatively-charged and neutral members of a Σ* triplet may couple only moderately to the Σ(1193), while the positively-charged member of the same Σ* triplet displays a relatively large coupling to the Σ+(1193) state. This illustrates the necessity of investigating all isospin channels in order to obtain a complete picture of the hyperon spectrum.

  11. Consistent analysis of the masses and decays of the [70, 1-] baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2012-04-01

    We apply the 1/Nc expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of the masses and decays of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70, 1-]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of these quantities. We find θ1 = 0.40(8) and θ3 = 2.81(10). These values are compatible with those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  12. The lowest-lying electronic singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces for the HNO-NOH system: energetics, unimolecular rate constants, tunneling and kinetic isotope effects for the isomerization and dissociation reactions.

    PubMed

    Bozkaya, Uğur; Turney, Justin M; Yamaguchi, Yukio; Schaefer, Henry F

    2012-04-28

    The lowest-lying electronic singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces (PES) for the HNO-NOH system have been investigated employing high level ab initio quantum chemical methods. The reaction energies and barriers have been predicted for two isomerization and four dissociation reactions. Total energies are extrapolated to the complete basis set limit applying focal point analyses. Anharmonic zero-point vibrational energies, diagonal Born-Oppenheimer corrections, relativistic effects, and core correlation corrections are also taken into account. On the singlet PES, the (1)HNO → (1)NOH endothermicity including all corrections is predicted to be 42.23 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1). For the barrierless decomposition of (1)HNO to H + NO, the dissociation energy is estimated to be 47.48 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1). For (1)NOH → H + NO, the reaction endothermicity and barrier are 5.25 ± 0.2 and 7.88 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1). On the triplet PES the reaction energy and barrier including all corrections are predicted to be 7.73 ± 0.2 and 39.31 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) for the isomerization reaction (3)HNO → (3)NOH. For the triplet dissociation reaction (to H + NO) the corresponding results are 29.03 ± 0.2 and 32.41 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1). Analogous results are 21.30 ± 0.2 and 33.67 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) for the dissociation reaction of (3)NOH (to H + NO). Unimolecular rate constants for the isomerization and dissociation reactions were obtained utilizing kinetic modeling methods. The tunneling and kinetic isotope effects are also investigated for these reactions. The adiabatic singlet-triplet energy splittings are predicted to be 18.45 ± 0.2 and 16.05 ± 0.2 kcal mol(-1) for HNO and NOH, respectively. Kinetic analyses based on solution of simultaneous first-order ordinary-differential rate equations demonstrate that the singlet NOH molecule will be difficult to prepare at room temperature, while the triplet NOH molecule is viable with respect to isomerization and dissociation reactions up to

  13. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbers $N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$ and $\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $J^{P}=1^{+}$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.

  14. The effects of baryon physics, black holes and active galactic nucleus feedback on the mass distribution in clusters of galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martizzi, Davide; Teyssier, Romain; Moore, Ben; Wentz, Tina

    2012-06-01

    The spatial distribution of matter in clusters of galaxies is mainly determined by the dominant dark matter component; however, physical processes involving baryonic matter are able to modify it significantly. We analyse a set of 500 pc resolution cosmological simulations of a cluster of galaxies with mass comparable to Virgo, performed with the AMR code RAMSES. We compare the mass density profiles of the dark, stellar and gaseous matter components of the cluster that result from different assumptions for the subgrid baryonic physics and galaxy formation processes. First, the prediction of a gravity-only N-body simulation is compared to that of a hydrodynamical simulation with standard galaxy formation recipes, and then all results are compared to a hydrodynamical simulation which includes thermal active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback from supermassive black holes (SMBHs). We find the usual effects of overcooling and adiabatic contraction in the run with standard galaxy formation physics, but very different results are found when implementing SMBHs and AGN feedback. Star formation is strongly quenched, producing lower stellar densities throughout the cluster, and much less cold gas is available for star formation at low redshifts. At redshift z= 0 we find a flat density core of radius 10 kpc in both the dark and stellar matter density profiles. We speculate on the possible formation mechanisms able to produce such cores and we conclude that they can be produced through the coupling of different processes: (I) dynamical friction from the decay of black hole orbits during galaxy mergers; (II) AGN-driven gas outflows producing fluctuations of the gravitational potential causing the removal of collisionless matter from the central region of the cluster; (III) adiabatic expansion in response to the slow expulsion of gas from the central region of the cluster during the quiescent mode of AGN activity.

  15. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Vijande, J.; Valcarce, A.; Fernandez, F.; Garcilazo, H.

    2006-02-11

    We study the mass spectrum of baryons with two and three charmed quarks. For double charm baryons the spin splitting is found to be smaller than standard quark-model potential predictions. This splitting is not influenced either by the particular form of the confining potential or by the regularization taken for the contact term of the spin-spin potential. We consistently predict the spectra for triply charmed baryons.

  16. Observation of a Charmed Baryon Decaying to D0 p at a Mass Near 2.94 GeV/c2

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-03-29

    A search for charmed baryons decaying to D{sup 0}p reveals two states: the {Lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} baryon and a previously unobserved state at a mass of [2939.8 {+-} 1.3 (stat.) {+-} 1.0 (syst.)] MeV/c{sup 2} and with an intrinsic width of [17.5 {+-} 5.2 (stat.) {+-} 5.9 (syst.)] MeV. Consistent and significant signals are observed for the K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} decay modes of the D{sup 0} in 287 fb{sup -1} annihilation data recorded by the BABAR detector at a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV. There is no evidence in the D{sup +}p spectrum of doubly-charged partners. The mass and intrinsic width of the {Lambda}{sub c}(2880){sup +} baryon and relative yield of the two baryons are also measured.

  17. The baryonic susceptibility near critical temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Lin Shu

    2010-08-05

    We discuss the role of quarks and baryons near the QCD phase transition. The former is modelled in the spirit of PNJL model, while the latter is splitted into two classes: 'stringy' and 'non-stringy' baryons. We represent the non-stringy baryons by a sum over the resonance on equal footing, and obtain the density of states of stringy baryons from string inspired model at finite-T. Our model produce a rise and fall of baryonic contribution to the susceptibility, which is in qualitative agreement with lattice results. We also discuss the chiral effect on the baryonic mass and susceptibility.

  18. Baryon and chiral symmetry breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Gorsky, A.; Krikun, A.

    2014-07-23

    We briefly review the generalized Skyrmion model for the baryon recently suggested by us. It takes into account the tower of vector and axial mesons as well as the chiral symmetry breaking. The generalized Skyrmion model provides the qualitative explanation of the Ioffe’s formula for the baryon mass.

  19. ROSAT observations of quiescent low mass disk galaxies: No evidence of baryonic blow out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Eriksen, James; Schombert, James M.

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that galactic winds associated with star formation in low mass disk galaxies can be an effective means of relocating cold disk gas to a warm tenuous halo, we have obtained long exposure ROSAT Position Sensitive Proportional Counter (PSPC) observations of three such galaxies. The sensitivity of the PSPC to the presence of an extended, approximately 0.15 KEV halo of 10(exp 9) solar mass of gas, is quite high for the exposure times we used. We failed to detect this halo in all three cases and the observed x-ray luminosity of the galaxy is two orders of magnitude less than the hypothetical case in which the mass of gas that has been expelled by previous generations of star formation is equal to the stellar mass of the galaxy itself. This limit is much less than the actual mass of cold gas in these galaxies. Thus, we were unable to verify directly the presence of significant galactic winds in these three galaxies either because they are not operative, because their halos are not sufficiently massive to aid in the retention of this gas, or because the amount of injected gas is just a small percentage of the cold disk gas. If the latter reason is emblematic of low mass galaxies then we would not expect the detection of halos. We also report here the serendipitous detection of Abell 1560, a distance class 7 cluster of unknown redshift.

  20. ROSAT Observations of Low Mass Disk Galaxies: No Evidence of Baryonic Blow Out

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bothun, Gregory D.; Eriksen, James

    1994-01-01

    To test the hypothesis that galctic winds associated with star formation in low mass disk galaxies can be an effective means of relocating cold disk gas to a warm tenuous halo, we have obtained long exposure ROSAT PSPC observations of three such galaxies.

  1. The COS-Halos survey: physical conditions and baryonic mass in the low-redshift circumgalactic medium

    SciTech Connect

    Werk, Jessica K.; Prochaska, J. Xavier; Tejos, Nicolas; Tripp, Todd M.; Katz, Neal; Lehner, Nicolas; O'Meara, John M.; Ford, Amanda Brady; Oppenheimer, Benjamin D.; Davé, Romeel; Weinberg, David H.

    2014-09-01

    We analyze the physical conditions of the cool, photoionized (T ∼10{sup 4} K) circumgalactic medium (CGM) using the COS-Halos suite of gas column density measurements for 44 gaseous halos within 160 kpc of L ∼ L* galaxies at z ∼ 0.2. These data are well described by simple photoionization models, with the gas highly ionized (n {sub H} {sub II}/n {sub H} ≳ 99%) by the extragalactic ultraviolet background. Scaling by estimates for the virial radius, R {sub vir}, we show that the ionization state (tracked by the dimensionless ionization parameter, U) increases with distance from the host galaxy. The ionization parameters imply a decreasing volume density profile n {sub H} = (10{sup –4.2±0.25})(R/R {sub vir}){sup –0.8±0.3}. Our derived gas volume densities are several orders of magnitude lower than predictions from standard two-phase models with a cool medium in pressure equilibrium with a hot, coronal medium expected in virialized halos at this mass scale. Applying the ionization corrections to the H I column densities, we estimate a lower limit to the cool gas mass M{sub CGM}{sup cool}>6.5×10{sup 10} M {sub ☉} for the volume within R < R {sub vir}. Allowing for an additional warm-hot, O VI-traced phase, the CGM accounts for at least half of the baryons purported to be missing from dark matter halos at the 10{sup 12} M {sub ☉} scale.

  2. Hybrid baryons in QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Dudek, Jozef J.; Edwards, Robert G.

    2012-03-21

    In this study, we present the first comprehensive study of hybrid baryons using lattice QCD methods. Using a large basis of composite QCD interpolating fields we extract an extensive spectrum of baryon states and isolate those of hybrid character using their relatively large overlap onto operators which sample gluonic excitations. We consider the spectrum of Nucleon and Delta states at several quark masses finding a set of positive parity hybrid baryons with quantum numbersmore » $$N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{1/2^+},\\,N_{3/2^+},\\, N_{3/2^+},\\,N_{5/2^+},\\,$$ and $$\\Delta_{1/2^+},\\, \\Delta_{3/2^+}$$ at an energy scale above the first band of `conventional' excited positive parity baryons. This pattern of states is compatible with a color octet gluonic excitation having $$J^{P}=1^{+}$$ as previously reported in the hybrid meson sector and with a comparable energy scale for the excitation, suggesting a common bound-state construction for hybrid mesons and baryons.« less

  3. Baryonic Spectroscopy at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang

    Based on 106 million Ψ(3686) events collected with BESIII detector at BEPCII, some results on excited baryons from the partial wave analysis are presented. In the decay of ψ(3686) to pbar{p}π 0, two new baryonic excited states, Jpc = 1/2 + N(2300) and Jpc = 5/2 - N(2570) are significant, and additional 5 well known N* excited states are observed. In ψ(3686) to pbar{p}η , an excited-nucleon state N(1535) is dominant. In ψ(3686) to K - Λ bar{Ξ} + + c.c., two hyperons Ξ(1690) and Ξ(1820) are observed. In ψ(3686) to Λ bar{Σ }π + c.c., some excited strange baryons bar{Λ }* and Σ* are measured on the Σ+π- and Λπ- mass spectra.

  4. Holographic Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Piljin

    We review baryons in the D4-D8 holographic model of low energy QCD, with the large Nc and the large't Hooft coupling limit. The baryon is identified with a bulk soliton of a unit Pontryagin number, which from the four-dimensional viewpoint translates to a modified Skyrmion dressed by condensates of spin one mesons. We explore classical properties and find that the baryon in the holographic limit is amenable to an effective field theory description. We also present a simple method to capture all leading and subleading interactions in the 1/Nc and the derivative expansions. An infinitely predictive model of baryon-meson interactions is thus derived, although one may trust results only for low energy processes, given various approximations in the bulk. We showcase a few comparisons to experiments, such as the leading axial couplings to pions, the leading vector-like coupling, and a qualitative prediction of the electromagnetic vector dominance that involves the entire tower of vector mesons.

  5. Decay properties of double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-08-05

    We study the semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  6. Excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    The status of the theory of the low-energy approach to hadron structure is reviewed briefly by surveying a few relevant models. A few examples of tests needed to sort out the predictions of different models pertaining to the quark-gluon structure of hadrons are discussed, and given the resulting physics objectives, a few experimental options for excited baryon research at CFBAF are suggested. (LEW)

  7. Excitations of strange bottom baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woloshyn, R. M.

    2016-09-01

    The ground-state and first-excited-state masses of Ωb and Ω_{bb} baryons are calculated in lattice QCD using dynamical 2 + 1 flavour gauge fields. A set of baryon operators employing different combinations of smeared quark fields was used in the framework of the variational method. Results for radial excitation energies were confirmed by carrying out a supplementary multiexponential fitting analysis. Comparison is made with quark model calculations.

  8. Baryon mass splittings and strong CP violation in SU(3) chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    de Vries, Jordy; Mereghetti, Emanuele; Walker-Loud, Andre P.

    2015-10-08

    We study SU(3) flavor breaking corrections to the relation between the octet baryon masses and the nucleon-meson CP-violating interactions induced by the QCD theta term. We also work within the framework of SU(3) chiral perturbation theory and work through next-to-next-to-leading order in the SU(3) chiral expansion, which is O(m2q). At lowest order, the CP-odd couplings induced by the QCD θ- term are determined by mass splittings of the baryon octet, the classic result of Crewther et al. We show that for each isospin-invariant CP-violating nucleon-meson interaction there exists one relation which is respected by loop corrections up to the order we work, while other leading-order relations are violated. With these relations we extract a precise value of the pion-nucleon coupling g-0 by using recent lattice QCD evaluations of the proton-neutron mass splitting. Additionally, we derive semi-precise values for CP-violating coupling constants between heavier mesons and nucleons and discuss their phenomenological impact on electric dipole moments of nucleons and nuclei.

  9. Description of ligand field splitting in terms of density functional theory: Split levels of the lowest-lying subterms of the 4f{sup n{minus}1}6s{sup 2} (n=3{endash}14) configurations in lanthanide monofluorides LnF (Ln=Pr{endash}Yb)

    SciTech Connect

    Ren, J.; Whangbo, M.; Dai, D.; Li, L.

    1998-05-01

    The split levels associated with the lowest-lying subterms of the 4f{sup n{minus}1}6s{sup 2} (n=3{endash}14) configurations of lanthanide monofluorides LnF (Ln=Pr{endash}Yb) were calculated by employing the combined ligand field and density functional theory (CLDT) method recently proposed. The 288 calculated split levels are in excellent agreement with experiment and hence shows that the CLDT method can accurately reproduce the low-lying electronic excited states of lanthanide compounds. To quantitatively describe the low-lying electronic states of a lanthanide compound, therefore, the effective ligand potential must include the Coulomb and exchange-correlation potentials of the compound as well as the pseudopotentials of the ligands. {copyright} {ital 1998 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Searching for the missing baryons in clusters

    PubMed Central

    Rasheed, Bilhuda; Bahcall, Neta; Bode, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Observations of clusters of galaxies suggest that they contain fewer baryons (gas plus stars) than the cosmic baryon fraction. This “missing baryon” puzzle is especially surprising for the most massive clusters, which are expected to be representative of the cosmic matter content of the universe (baryons and dark matter). Here we show that the baryons may not actually be missing from clusters, but rather are extended to larger radii than typically observed. The baryon deficiency is typically observed in the central regions of clusters (∼0.5 the virial radius). However, the observed gas-density profile is significantly shallower than the mass-density profile, implying that the gas is more extended than the mass and that the gas fraction increases with radius. We use the observed density profiles of gas and mass in clusters to extrapolate the measured baryon fraction as a function of radius and as a function of cluster mass. We find that the baryon fraction reaches the cosmic value near the virial radius for all groups and clusters above . This suggests that the baryons are not missing, they are simply located in cluster outskirts. Heating processes (such as shock-heating of the intracluster gas, supernovae, and Active Galactic Nuclei feedback) likely contribute to this expanded distribution. Upcoming observations should be able to detect these baryons. PMID:21321229

  11. Partial Decay Widths of Negative Parity Baryons in the 1/N{sub c} Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, Emiliano; Scoccola, Norberto; Jayalath, Chandala; Goity, Jose

    2013-04-01

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  12. Partial decay widths of negative parity baryons in the 1/N{sub c} expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, N. N.; Jayalath, C. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2013-03-25

    The partial decay widths of lowest lying negative parity baryons belonging to the 70-plet of SU(6) are analyzed in the framework of the 1/N{sub c} expansion. The channels considered are those with single pseudoscalar meson emission. The analysis is carried out to sub-leading order in 1/N{sub c} and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. Conclusions about the magnitude of SU(3) breaking effects along with predictions for some unknown or poorly determined partial decay widths of known resonances are given.

  13. Mass spectra of the heavy baryons {lambda}{sub Q} and {sigma}{sub Q}{sup (*)} from QCD sum rules

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Jianrong; Huang Mingqiu

    2008-05-01

    We use QCD sum rule approach to calculate the masses of the ground-state {lambda}{sub Q} and {sigma}{sub Q}{sup (*)} baryons. Contributions of the operators up to dimension six are included in operator product expansion. The resulting heavy baryonic masses from the calculations are m{sub {lambda}{sub b}}=5.69{+-}0.13 GeV, and m{sub {lambda}{sub c}}=2.31{+-}0.19 GeV for {lambda}{sub Q}; m{sub {sigma}{sub b}}=5.73{+-}0.21 GeV, m{sub {sigma}{sub b}}{sub *}=5.81{+-}0.19 GeV, m{sub {sigma}{sub c}}=2.40{+-}0.31 GeV and m{sub {sigma}{sub c}}{sub *}=2.56{+-}0.24 GeV for {sigma}{sub Q}{sup (*)}, respectively, which are in good agreement with the experimental values.

  14. Stochastic isocurvature baryon fluctuations, baryon diffusion, and primordial nucleosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Kurki-Suonio, H.; Jedamzik, K.; Mathews, G.J.

    1997-04-01

    We examine effects on primordial nucleosynthesis from a truly random, one-dimensional spatial distribution in the baryon-to-photon ratio ({eta}). We generate stochastic fluctuation spectra characterized by different spectral indices and rms fluctuation amplitudes. For the first time we explicitly calculate the effects of baryon diffusion on the nucleosynthesis yields of such stochastic fluctuations. We also consider the collapse instability of large mass scale inhomogeneities. Our results are generally applicable to any primordial mechanism producing fluctuations in {eta} which can be characterized by a spectral index. In particular, these results apply to primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuation (PIB) models. The amplitudes of fluctuations that are scale-invariant in baryon fluctuation (PIB) models. The amplitudes of fluctuations that are scale-invariant in baryon density are found to be severely constrained by primordial nucleosynthesis. However, when the {eta} distribution is characterized by decreasing fluctuation amplitudes with increasing length scale, surprisingly large fluctuation amplitudes on the baryon diffusion scale are allowed. {copyright} {ital 1997} {ital The American Astronomical Society}

  15. Progress towards understanding baryon resonances

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker; Roberts, Winston

    2013-07-01

    The composite nature of baryons manifests itself in the existence of a rich spectrum of excited states, in particular in the important mass region 1?2 GeV for the light-flavoured baryons. The properties of these resonances can be identified by systematic investigations using electromagnetic and strong probes, primarily with beams of electrons, photons, and pions. After decades of research, the fundamental degrees of freedom underlying the baryon excitation spectrum are still poorly understood. The search for hitherto undiscovered but predicted resonances continues at many laboratories around the world. Recent results from photo- and electroproduction experiments provide intriguing indications for new states and shed light on the structure of some of the known nucleon excitations. The continuing study of available data sets with consideration of new observables and improved analysis tools have also called into question some of the earlier findings in baryon spectroscopy. Other breakthrough measurements have been performed in the heavy-baryon sector, which has seen a fruitful period in recent years, in particular at the B factories and the Tevatron. First results from the large hadron collider indicate rapid progress in the field of bottom baryons. In this review, we discuss the recent experimental progress and give an overview of theoretical approaches.

  16. Baryon semileptonic decays: the Mexican contribution

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Martinez, Alfonso

    2006-09-25

    We give a detailed account of the techniques to compute radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays developed over the years by Mexican collaborations. We explain how the method works by obtaining an expression for the Dalitz plot of semileptonic decays of polarized baryons including radiative corrections to order O({alpha}q/{pi}M1), where q is the four-momentum transfer and M1 is the mass of the decaying baryon. From here we compute the totally integrated spin angular asymmetry coefficient of the emitted baryon and compare its value with other results.

  17. Excited baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matagne, N.; Stancu, Fl.

    2012-04-01

    We briefly describe the 1/Nc expansion method for studying baryon masses. Two approaches of the large Nc excited baryons have been proposed so far. The first one, based on the Hartree picture, treats the baryon as a ground state core and an excited quark and the second one, suggested recently, considers the baryon globally, without decoupling the system. The masses of excited states of mixed orbital symmetry of nonstrange and strange baryons belonging to the lowest [70, -] multiplet are calculated in the 1/Nc expansion to order 1/Nc with the new method which allows to considerably reduce the number of linearly independent operators entering the mass formula. The status of the resonance Λ(1405) is discussed.

  18. Results and Frontiers in Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Bulava, John; Morningstar, Colin; Edwards, Robert; Richards, David; Fleming, George; Juge, K. Jimmy; Lichtl, Adam C.; Mathur, Nilmani; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2007-10-26

    The Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration (LHPC) baryon spectroscopy effort is reviewed. To date the LHPC has performed exploratory Lattice QCD calculations of the low-lying spectrum of Nucleon and Delta baryons. These calculations demonstrate the effectiveness of our method by obtaining the masses of an unprecedented number of excited states with definite quantum numbers. Future work of the project is outlined.

  19. Spin-flavor composition of excited baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernando, Ishara; Goity, Jose

    2015-10-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1 /Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU (6) × O (3) , where the [ 56 ,lP =0+ ] ground state and excited baryons, and the [ 56 ,2+ ] and [ 70 ,1- ] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to O 1 /Nc and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. Predictions for physically unknown states for each multiplet are obtained. From the quark-mass dependence of the coefficients in the baryon mass formulas an increasingly simpler picture of the spin-flavor composition of the baryons is observed with increasing pion mass (equivalently, increasing mu , d masses), as measured by the number of significant mass operators. This work was supported in part by DOE Contract No. DE-AC05-06OR23177 under which JSA operates the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility (J. L. G.), and by the NSF (USA) through Grant PHY-0855789 and PHY-1307413 (I. P. F and J. L. G).

  20. Baryon Regge Trajectories and the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Matagne, Nicolas

    2008-12-01

    Baryon Regge trajectories are discussed in the light of the 1/Nc expansion. The approximate dynamical symmetry SU(6)x O(3) is used to identify the spin-flavor singlet component of baryon masses. By fitting to the known baryon spectrum, this component is shown to produce distinct Regge trajectories for SU(6) 56- and 70-plets which are remarkably linear.

  1. Predictions for Excited Strange Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, Ishara P.; Goity, Jose L.

    2016-04-01

    An assessment is made of predictions for excited hyperon masses which follow from flavor symmetry and consistency with a 1/N c expansion of QCD. Such predictions are based on presently established baryonic resonances. Low lying hyperon resonances which do not seem to fit into the proposed scheme are discussed.

  2. Electromagnetic properties of baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Ledwig, T.; Pascalutsa, V.; Vanderhaeghen, M.; Martin-Camalich, J.

    2011-10-21

    We discuss the chiral behavior of the nucleon and {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic properties within the framework of a SU(2) covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory. Our one-loop calculation is complete to the order p{sup 3} and p{sup 4}/{Delta} with {Delta} as the {Delta}(1232)-nucleon energy gap. We show that the magnetic moment of a resonance can be defined by the linear energy shift only when an additional relation between the involved masses and the applied magnetic field strength is fulfilled. Singularities and cusps in the pion mass dependence of the {Delta}(1232) electromagnetic moments reflect a non-fulfillment. We show results for the pion mass dependence of the nucleon iso-vector electromagnetic quantities and present preliminary results for finite volume effects on the iso-vector anomalous magnetic moment.

  3. Superconformal Baryon-Meson Symmetry and Light-Front Holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Dosch, Hans Guenter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-04-10

    We construct an effective QCD light-front Hamiltonian for both mesons and baryons in the chiral limit based on the generalized supercharges of a superconformal graded algebra. The superconformal construction is shown to be equivalent to a semi-classical approximation to light-front QCD and its embedding in AdS space. The specific breaking of conformal invariance inside the graded algebra uniquely determines the effective confinement potential. The generalized supercharges connect the baryon and meson spectra to each other in a remarkable manner. In particular, the π/b1 Regge trajectory is identified as the superpartner of the nucleon trajectory. However, the lowest-lying state on this trajectory, the π-meson is massless in the chiral limit and has no supersymmetric partner.

  4. Superconformal Baryon-Meson Symmetry and Light-Front Holographic QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Dosch, Hans Guenter; de Teramond, Guy F.; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-04-10

    We construct an effective QCD light-front Hamiltonian for both mesons and baryons in the chiral limit based on the generalized supercharges of a superconformal graded algebra. The superconformal construction is shown to be equivalent to a semi-classical approximation to light-front QCD and its embedding in AdS space. The specific breaking of conformal invariance inside the graded algebra uniquely determines the effective confinement potential. The generalized supercharges connect the baryon and meson spectra to each other in a remarkable manner. In particular, the π/b1 Regge trajectory is identified as the superpartner of the nucleon trajectory. However, the lowest-lying state on thismore » trajectory, the π-meson is massless in the chiral limit and has no supersymmetric partner.« less

  5. Some Like it Hot: Linking Diffuse X-Ray Luminosity, Baryonic Mass, and Star Formation Rate in Compact Groups of Galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Mulchaey, John S.; Walker, Lisa May; Brandt, Willian N.; Charlton, Jane C.; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L(x-T) and (L(x-sigma), even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and Hi masses are great than or equal to 10(sup (11.3) solar mass are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 micron star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due togas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  6. Heavy baryons - Recent and very new results

    SciTech Connect

    Peter S Cooper

    2003-01-15

    Recent results on observations, properties and decay modes of the charmed and beauty baryons will be reviewed. Candidates for several new high mass states which include a cleanly-identified daughter {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} baryon are seen in data from the SELEX experiment at Fermilab. These states are candidates for doubly-charmed baryons: a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup ++} state and a {Xi}{sub cc}{sup +} state. These candidates are more than 5{sigma} signals in each case at masses of 3520 and 3460 MeV respectively.

  7. Strangeness in the baryon ground states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semke, A.; Lutz, M. F. M.

    2012-10-01

    We compute the strangeness content of the baryon octet and decuplet states based on an analysis of recent lattice simulations of the BMW, PACS, LHPC and HSC groups for the pion-mass dependence of the baryon masses. Our results rely on the relativistic chiral Lagrangian and large-Nc sum rule estimates of the counter terms relevant for the baryon masses at N3LO. A partial summation is implied by the use of physical baryon and meson masses in the one-loop contributions to the baryon self energies. A simultaneous description of the lattice results of the BMW, LHPC, PACS and HSC groups is achieved. From a global fit we determine the axial coupling constants F ≃ 0.45 and D ≃ 0.80 in agreement with their values extracted from semi-leptonic decays of the baryons. Moreover, various flavor symmetric limits of baron octet and decuplet masses as obtained by the QCDSF-UKQCD group are recovered. We predict the pion- and strangeness sigma terms and the pion-mass dependence of the octet and decuplet ground states at different strange quark masses.

  8. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Solovieva, E. I.

    2015-12-15

    Apresent-day classification of charmed baryons is presented, a quark model for ground states is briefly described, and the energy levels of excited states are analyzed. In addition, a survey of experimentally observed states of charmed baryons is given.

  9. Some like it hot: Linking diffuse X-ray luminosity, baryonic mass, and star formation rate in compact groups of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Desjardins, Tyler D.; Gallagher, Sarah C.; Hornschemeier, Ann E.; Tzanavaris, Panayiotis; Walker, Lisa May; Johnson, Kelsey E.; Brandt, William N.; Charlton, Jane C.

    2014-08-01

    We present an analysis of the diffuse X-ray emission in 19 compact groups (CGs) of galaxies observed with Chandra. The hottest, most X-ray luminous CGs agree well with the galaxy cluster X-ray scaling relations in L{sub X} -T and L{sub X} -σ, even in CGs where the hot gas is associated with only the brightest galaxy. Using Spitzer photometry, we compute stellar masses and classify Hickson CGs 19, 22, 40, and 42, and RSCGs 32, 44, and 86 as fossil groups using a new definition for fossil systems that includes a broader range of masses. We find that CGs with total stellar and H I masses ≳ 10{sup 11.3} M{sub ☉} are often X-ray luminous, while lower-mass CGs only sometimes exhibit faint, localized X-ray emission. Additionally, we compare the diffuse X-ray luminosity against both the total UV and 24 μm star formation rates of each CG and optical colors of the most massive galaxy in each of the CGs. The most X-ray luminous CGs have the lowest star formation rates, likely because there is no cold gas available for star formation, either because the majority of the baryons in these CGs are in stars or the X-ray halo, or due to gas stripping from the galaxies in CGs with hot halos. Finally, the optical colors that trace recent star formation histories of the most massive group galaxies do not correlate with the X-ray luminosities of the CGs, indicating that perhaps the current state of the X-ray halos is independent of the recent history of stellar mass assembly in the most massive galaxies.

  10. Precombination Cloud Collapse and Baryonic Dark Matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogan, Craig J.

    1993-01-01

    A simple spherical model of dense baryon clouds in the hot big bang 'strongly nonlinear primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuations' is reviewed and used to describe the dependence of cloud behavior on the model parameters, baryon mass, and initial over-density. Gravitational collapse of clouds before and during recombination is considered including radiation diffusion and trapping, remnant type and mass, and effects on linear large-scale fluctuation modes. Sufficiently dense clouds collapse early into black holes with a minimum mass of approx. 1 solar mass, which behave dynamically like collisionless cold dark matter. Clouds below a critical over-density, however, delay collapse until recombination, remaining until then dynamically coupled to the radiation like ordinary diffuse baryons, and possibly producing remnants of other kinds and lower mass. The mean density in either type of baryonic remnant is unconstrained by observed element abundances. However, mixed or unmixed spatial variations in abundance may survive in the diffuse baryon and produce observable departures from standard predictions.

  11. Radiative corrections in baryon semileptonic decays with the emission of a polarized baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, R.

    2010-07-29

    We present an overview of the calculation of radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. We discuss both charged and neutral decaying baryons, restricted to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot. Our analysis is specialized to cover two possible scenarios: The center-of-mass frames of the emitted and the decaying baryons. We have accounted for terms up to order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum-transfer and M{sup 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglected terms of order ({alpha}/{pi})(q/M{sub 1}){sup n} for n{>=}1. The expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for model-independent experimental analyses.

  12. Baryon onset in a magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Haber, Alexander; Preis, Florian; Schmitt, Andreas

    2016-01-22

    The critical baryon chemical potential for the onset of nuclear matter is a function of the vacuum mass and the binding energy. Both quantities are affected by an external magnetic field. We show within two relativistic mean-field models – including magnetic catalysis, but omitting the anomalous magnetic moment – that a magnetic field increases both the vacuum mass and the binding energy. For sufficiently large magnetic fields, the effect on the vacuum mass dominates and as a result the critical baryon chemical potential is increased.

  13. Heavy flavor baryon states at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Seidel, Sally; /New Mexico U.

    2011-08-01

    Precision measurements of the masses and widths of the bottom baryon resonances {Sigma}{sub b} and {Sigma}*{sub b} and charm baryons {Lambda}{sub c}(2595), {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), {Sigma}{sub c}(2455), and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) are reported. A new measurement of {Lambda}{sub b} production is described. The studies include the first measurement of the widths and isospin mass splittings of the members of the {Sigma}{sub b} family. The charm baryons are examined through their strong decays to the {Lambda}{sub c} ground state, and measurements of their mass differences relative to the ground state, and corresponding decay widths, are reported. The data were collected by the CDF and D0 detectors for 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions during Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron.

  14. The baryon content of the Cosmic Web

    PubMed Central

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-01-01

    Big-Bang nucleosynthesis indicates that baryons account for 5% of the Universe’s total energy content[1]. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two[2,3]. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not yet condensed into virialised halos, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web: a low-density plasma at temperature 105–107 K known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium (WHIM)[3,4,5,6]. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars[7,8,9,10] and hot gas between interacting clusters[11,12,13,14]. These observations were however unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of ten-million-degree gas associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster[15] were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we reveal hot gas structures that are coherent over 8 Mpc scales. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10% of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. PMID:26632589

  15. Chiral Lagrangian for baryons in the 1/Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Elizabeth

    1996-03-01

    A 1/Nc expansion of the chiral Lagrangian for baryons is formulated and used to study the low-energy dynamics of baryons interacting with the pion nonet π, K, η, and η' in a combined expansion in chiral symmetry breaking and 1/Nc. Strong CP violation is included. The chiral Lagrangian correctly implements nonet symmetry and contracted spin-flavor symmetry for baryons in the large Nc limit. The implications of nonet symmetry for low-energy baryon-pion interactions are described in detail. The procedure for calculating nonanalytic pion-loop corrections to baryon amplitudes in the 1/Nc expansion for finite Nc is explained. Flavor-27 baryon mass splittings are calculated at leading order in chiral perturbation theory as an example.

  16. Baryon superfluids in AdS/CFT with flavor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoyos, Carlos; Itsios, Georgios; Vasilakis, Orestis

    2017-01-01

    Baryonic matter is notoriously difficult to deal with in the large-N limit, as baryons become operators of very large dimension with N fields in the fundamental representation. This issue is also present in gauge/gravity duals as baryons are described by very heavy localized objects. There are however alternative large-N extrapolations of QCD where small baryonic operators exist and can be treated on an equal footing to mesons. We explore the possibility of turning on a finite density of "light" baryons in a theory with a hadronic mass gap using a gauge/gravity construction based on the D3/D7 intersection. We find a novel phase with spontaneous breaking of baryon symmetry at zero temperature.

  17. Precision Holographic Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Yi Piljin

    2011-10-21

    We overview a holographic QCD based on the D4-D8 string theory model, with emphasis on baryons and nucleon-meson interactions thereof. Baryons are realized as holographic images of Skyrmions, but with much qualitative changes. This allows us to derive, without adjustable parameters, couplings of baryons to the entire tower of spin one mesons and also to pseudoscalar mesons. We find some surprisingly good match against empirical values for nucleons, in particular. Tensor couplings to all axial-vectors and iso-singlet vectors all vanish, while, for {rho} mesons, tensor couplings are found to be dominant. We close with various cautionary comments and speculations.

  18. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations, as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.

  19. Baryon spin-flavor structure from an analysis of lattice QCD results of the baryon spectrum

    DOE PAGES

    Fernando, I. P.; Goity, J. L.

    2015-02-01

    The excited baryon masses are analyzed in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion using the available physical masses and also the masses obtained in lattice QCD for different quark masses. The baryon states are organized into irreducible representations of SU(6) x O(3), where the [56,lP=0⁺] ground state and excited baryons, and the [56,2+] and [70}},1-] excited states are analyzed. The analyses are carried out to order O(1/Nc) and first order in the quark masses. The issue of state identifications is discussed. Numerous parameter independent mass relations result at those orders, among them the well known Gell-Mann-Okubo and Equal Spacing relations,more » as well as additional relations involving baryons with different spins. It is observed that such relations are satisfied at the expected level of precision. The main conclusion of the analysis is that qualitatively the dominant physical effects are similar for the physical and the lattice QCD baryons.« less

  20. Production and decay of charmed baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosaka, Atsushi; Hiyama, Emiko; Kim, SangHo; Kim, Hyun-Chul; Nagahiro, Hideko; Noumi, Hiroyuki; Oka, Makoto; Shirotori, Kotaro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yasui, Shigehiro

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, we discuss reactions involving charmed baryons to explore their unique features. A well known phenomenon, the separation of the two internal motions of the ρ and λ types of a three-quark system is revisited. First we discuss the mass spectrum of low lying excitations as function of the heavy quark mass, smoothly connecting the SU (3) and heavy quark limits. The properties of these modes can be tested in the production and decay reactions of the baryons. For production, we consider a one step process which excites dominantly λ modes. We find abundant production rates for some of the excited states. For decay, we study a pion emission process which provides a clean tool to test the structure of heavy quark systems due to the well controlled low energy dynamics of pions and quarks. Both production and decay of charmed baryons are issues for future experiments at J-PARC.

  1. Charm Baryon Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chistov, R.

    2016-02-01

    B-factories Belle and BaBar during its operation made not only measurements connected with B-meson decays but also numerous observation and measurements in charm physics. In particular, their results on charm baryon decays and spectroscopy have enlarged and enriched the current picture of heavy flavour hadrons. In this talk we overview current status of charm baryons and their excited states.

  2. Baryonic Distributions in Galaxy Dark Matter Halos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richards, Emily E.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the role and significance of dark matter in the evolution of baryonic components (i.e., conversion of the gaseous disk into stars) is a critical aspect for realistic models of galaxy evolution. In an effort to address fundamental questions regarding the growth and distribution of stellar disks in dark matter halos in a statistical manner, we have undertaken a project correlating structural properties and star formation activity with the dark matter properties of the host galaxy. The project uses a statistical sample of 45 nearby galaxies which are optimally suited for rotation curve decomposition analysis. The dataset includes deep Spitzer 3.6μm images to trace the stellar distribution, neutral and ionized gas rotation curves to trace the total mass distribution, and optical images to examine the dominant stellar populations. Using a sub-set of galaxies from the full sample, we find that the distribution of the baryonic mass relative to the total mass is roughly self-similar in more massive galaxies when normalized by the average stellar disk scale length measured at 3.6μm. We additionally observe an emerging trend between total baryonic mass and the radius at which the total mass distribution transitions from baryon-dominated to dark matter-dominated. However, we find no significant correlation between the distribution of dark matter and structural properties of the stellar disk, such as changes in color or star formation activity.

  3. Octet Baryon Electromagnetic Form Factors in a Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Gilberto Ramalho, Kazuo Tsushima

    2011-09-01

    We study the octet baryon electromagnetic properties by applying the covariant spectator quark model, and provide covariant parametrization that can be used to study baryon electromagnetic reactions. While we use the lattice QCD data in the large pion mass regime (small pion cloud effects) to determine the parameters of the model in the valence quark sector, we use the nucleon physical and octet baryon magnetic moment data to parameterize the pion cloud contributions. The valence quark contributions for the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors are estimated by extrapolating the lattice parametrization in the large pion mass regime to the physical regime. As for the pion cloud contributions, we parameterize them in a covariant, phenomenological manner, combined with SU(3) symmetry. We also discuss the impact of the pion cloud effects on the octet baryon electromagnetic form factors and their radii.

  4. Spectroscopy of charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-01-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of singly, doubly and triply charmed baryons by using dynamical lattice QCD. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses.

  5. Primordial nucleosynthesis and primoridal isocurvature baryon fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Mathews, G.T.; Kurki-Suonio, Hannu; Jedamzik, K.

    1995-10-01

    Recently, there has been interest in inflation-generated cosmological primordial isocurvature baryon fluctuation (PIB) models as a means to account for the large scale clustering of galaxies. However, the extension of the isocurvature fluctuations contained in such models to the mass scales of nucleosynthesis would imply large stochastic fluctuations in baryon-to-photon ratio during the epoch of primordial nucleosynthesis. We discuss constraints on the spectral index and rms amplitude of such fluctuations based upon the computed light element abundances. Our calculations include nuclear reaction networks in up to 40,000 zones in which stockastic fluctuations are spatially resolved. The effects of baryon diffusion among the fluctuations are also explicitly coupled and followed during nucleosynthesis. We confirm that the fluctuations must be significantly damped compared to a straight-forward extension of the cosmological PIB models.

  6. Charmed Bottom Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-01

    The spectrum of doubly and triply heavy baryons remains experimentally unexplored to a large extent. Although the detection of such heavy particle states may lie beyond the reach of exper- iments for some time, it is interesting compute this spectrum from QCD and compare results between lattice calculations and continuum theoretical models. Several lattice calculations ex- ist for both doubly and triply charmed as well as doubly and triply bottom baryons. Here, we present preliminary results from the first lattice calculation of doubly and triply heavy baryons including both charm and bottom quarks. We use domain wall fermions for 2+1 flavors (up down and strange) of sea and valence quarks, a relativistic heavy quark action for the charm quarks, and non-relativistic QCD for the heavier bottom quarks. We present preliminary results for the ground state spectrum.

  7. Baryons and chiral symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Keh-Fei

    The relevance of chiral symmetry in baryons is highlighted in three examples in the nucleon spectroscopy and structure. The first one is the importance of chiral dynamics in understanding the Roper resonance. The second one is the role of chiral symmetry in the lattice calculation of πNσ term and strangeness. The third one is the role of chiral U(1) anomaly in the anomalous Ward identity in evaluating the quark spin and the quark orbital angular momentum. Finally, the chiral effective theory for baryons is discussed.

  8. Light baryons and their excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Fischer, Christian S.; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios

    2016-11-01

    We study ground states and excitations of light octet and decuplet baryons within the framework of Dyson-Schwinger and Faddeev equations. We improve upon similar approaches by explicitly taking into account the momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. We perform calculations in both the three-body Faddeev framework and the quark-diquark approximation in order to assess the impact of the latter on the spectrum. Our results indicate that both approaches agree well with each other. The resulting spectra furthermore agree one-to-one with experiment, provided well-known deficiencies of the rainbow-ladder approximation are compensated for. We also discuss the mass evolution of the Roper and the excited Δ with varying pion mass and analyze the internal structure in terms of their partial wave decompositions.

  9. Baryons and QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nathan Isgur

    1997-03-01

    The author presents an idiosyncratic view of baryons which calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD. He advocates a treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of q pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections.

  10. Inflating with baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    We present a field theory solution to the eta problem. By making the inflaton field the phase of a baryon of SU( N c ) supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory we show that all operators that usually spoil the flatness of the inflationary potential are absent. Our solution naturally generalizes to non-supersymmetric theories.

  11. Problems in baryon spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Capstick, S.

    1994-04-01

    Current issues and problems in the physics of ground- and excited-state baryons are considered, and are classified into those which should be resolved by CEBAF in its present form, and those which may require CEBAF to undergo an energy upgrade to 8 GeV or more. Recent theoretical developments designed to address these problems are outlined.

  12. Spontaneous baryogenesis without baryon isocurvature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Simone, Andrea; Kobayashi, Takeshi

    2017-02-01

    We propose a new class of spontaneous baryogenesis models that does not produce baryon isocurvature perturbations. The baryon chemical potential in these models is independent of the field value of the baryon-generating scalar, hence the scalar field fluctuations are blocked from propagating into the baryon isocurvature. We demonstrate this mechanism in simple examples where spontaneous baryogenesis is driven by a non-canonical scalar field. The suppression of the baryon isocurvature allows spontaneous baryogenesis to be compatible even with high-scale inflation.

  13. Semileptonic decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2009-08-01

    We study the semileptonic decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. We present complete results on transition form factors between double-heavy baryons for finite values of the heavy quark/baryon masses and in the heavy quark symmetry limit, which is valid at and close to zero recoil. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit.

  14. Baryons with functional methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, Christian S.

    2017-01-01

    We summarise recent results on the spectrum of ground-state and excited baryons and their form factors in the framework of functional methods. As an improvement upon similar approaches we explicitly take into account the underlying momentum-dependent dynamics of the quark-gluon interaction that leads to dynamical chiral symmetry breaking. For light octet and decuplet baryons we find a spectrum in very good agreement with experiment, including the level ordering between the positive- and negative-parity nucleon states. Comparing the three-body framework with the quark-diquark approximation, we do not find significant differences in the spectrum for those states that have been calculated in both frameworks. This situation is different in the electromagnetic form factor of the Δ, which may serve to distinguish both pictures by comparison with experiment and lattice QCD.

  15. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; ...

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physicalmore » pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.« less

  16. Charmed bottom baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Zachary S.; Detmold, William; Meinel, Stefan; Orginos, Kostas

    2014-11-19

    In this study, we calculate the masses of baryons containing one, two, or three heavy quarks using lattice QCD. We consider all possible combinations of charm and bottom quarks, and compute a total of 36 different states with JP = 1/2+ and JP = 3/2+. We use domain-wall fermions for the up, down, and strange quarks, a relativistic heavy-quark action for the charm quarks, and nonrelativistic QCD for the bottom quarks. Our analysis includes results from two different lattice spacings and seven different pion masses. We perform extrapolations of the baryon masses to the continuum limit and to the physical pion mass using SU(4|2) heavy-hadron chiral perturbation theory including 1/mQ and finite-volume effects. For the 14 singly heavy baryons that have already been observed, our results agree with the experimental values within the uncertainties. We compare our predictions for the hitherto unobserved states with other lattice calculations and quark-model studies.

  17. Missing baryonic resonances in the Hagedorn spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Man Lo, Pok; Marczenko, Michał; Redlich, Krzysztof; Sasaki, Chihiro

    2016-08-01

    The hadronic medium of QCD is modeled as a gas of point-like hadrons, with its composition determined by the Hagedorn mass spectrum. The spectrum consists of a discrete and a continuous part. The former is determined by the experimentally confirmed resonances tabulated by the Particle Data Group (PDG), while the latter can be extracted from the existing lattice data. This formulation of the hadron resonance gas (HRG) provides a transparent framework to relate the fluctuation of conserved charges as calculated in the lattice QCD approach to the particle content of the medium. A comparison of the two approaches shows that the equation of state is well described by the standard HRG model, which includes only a discrete spectrum of known hadrons. The corresponding description in the strange sector, however, shows clear discrepancies, thus a continuous spectrum is added to incorporate the effect of missing resonances. We propose a method to extract the strange-baryon spectrum from the lattice data. The result is consistent with the trend set by the unconfirmed strange baryons resonances listed by the PDG, suggesting that most of the missing interaction strength for the strange baryons reside in the | S| = 1 sector. This scenario is also supported by recent lattice calculations, and might be important in the energy region covered by the NICA accelerator in Dubna, where in the heavy-ion collisions, baryons are the dominating degrees of freedom in the final state.

  18. Baryons in holographic QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-01

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8¯ multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8¯ holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and ρ mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large Nc, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and ρ-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the ρ-meson profile G˜(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without ρ mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and ρ mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant ρ-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  19. Baryons in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2007-04-15

    We study baryons in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D-brane system. In holographic QCD, the baryon appears as a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in a four-dimensional effective theory of mesons. We call this topological soliton brane-induced Skyrmion. Some review of D4/D8/D8 holographic QCD is presented from the viewpoints of recent hadron physics and QCD phenomenologies. A four-dimensional effective theory with pions and {rho} mesons is uniquely derived from the non-Abelian Dirac-Born-Infeld (DBI) action of D8 brane with D4 supergravity background at the leading order of large N{sub c}, without small amplitude expansion of meson fields to discuss chiral solitons. For the hedgehog configuration of pion and {rho}-meson fields, we derive the energy functional and the Euler-Lagrange equation of brane-induced Skyrmion from the meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. Performing the numerical calculation, we obtain the soliton solution and figure out the pion profile F(r) and the {rho}-meson profile G-tilde(r) of the brane-induced Skyrmion with its total energy, energy density distribution, and root-mean-square radius. These results are compared with the experimental quantities of baryons and also with the profiles of standard Skyrmion without {rho} mesons. We analyze interaction terms of pions and {rho} mesons in brane-induced Skyrmion, and find a significant {rho}-meson component appearing in the core region of a baryon.

  20. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    SciTech Connect

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-24

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  1. Strangeness S = -3 and -4 baryon-baryon interactions in chiral EFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haidenbauer, Johann

    2011-10-01

    I report on recent progress in the description of baryon-baryon systems within chiral effective field theory. In particular, I discuss results for the strangeness S = -3 to -4 baryon-baryon systems, obtained to leading order.

  2. Two Baryons with Twisted Boundary Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Briceno, Raul; Davoudi, Zohreh; Luu, Thomas; Savage, Martin

    2014-04-01

    The quantization condition for two particle systems with arbitrary number of two-body open coupled-channels, spin and masses in a finite cubic volume is presented. The condition presented is in agreement with all previous studies of two-body systems in a finite volume. The result is fully relativistic and holds for all momenta below inelastic thresholds and is exact up to exponential volume corrections that are governed by m{sub {pi}} L, where m{sub {pi}} is the pion mass and L is the spatial extent of my box. Its implication for the studies of coupled-channel baryon-baryon systems is discussed, and the necessary tools for implementing the formalism are review.

  3. High statistics analysis using anisotropic clover lattices: (III) Baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Lin, H; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2010-01-19

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L{sup 3} {approx} (2.5 fm){sup 3}, and a spatial lattice spacing of b {approx} 0.123 fm. Luescher's method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The isospin-3/2 N{Sigma} interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the {sup 3}S{sub 1} channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N{Lambda} interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is {Lambda}{Lambda}, indicating that the {Lambda}{Lambda} interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting is explored. In particular, focus is placed on the window of time slices for which the signal-to-noise ratio does not degrade exponentially, as this provides the opportunity to extract quantitative information about multi-baryon systems.

  4. Is Baryon Number Conserved?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pati, Jogesh C.; Salam, Abdus

    We suggest that baryon-number conservation may not be absolute and that an integrally charged quark may disintegrate into two leptons and an antilepton with a coupling strength G Bmp2≲ 10-9. On the other hand, if quarks are much heavier than low-lying hadrons, the decay of a three-quark system like the proton is highly forbidden (proton lifetime ≳ 1028 y). Motivation for these ideas appears to arise within a unified theory of hadrons and leptons and their gauge interactions. We emphasize the consequences of such a possibility for real quark searches.

  5. Theoretical investigation of the lowest-lying electronic structure of LuI molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.; Taher, F.; Magnier, S.

    2014-01-01

    CASSCF/MRCI calculations using Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets for both Lu and I atoms, have been performed for the first 22 electronic states in the representation 2s+1Λ(±) for the LuI molecule. This investigation included the corresponding 43 molecular states in the representation Ω(±) when taking the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in consideration. Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) have been displayed. Spectroscopic constants Te, ωe, ωeχe, Be and the internuclear distance Re have been calculated for the ground state and for the low-lying electronic states situated below 40,410 cm-1 and for their corresponding components with SOC. The transition dipolar moments between states have been given at the minimum position Re = 2.75 Å of the ground state X1Σ+. The calculated set of singlet and triplet states provides a theoretical prediction for more than 19 yet unobserved electronic states.

  6. Exotic Baryon Resonances in the Skyrme Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diakonov, Dmitri; Petrov, Victor

    We outline how one can understand the Skyrme model from the modern perspective. We review the quantization of the SU(3) rotations of the Skyrmion, leading to the exotic baryons that cannot be made of three quarks. It is shown that in the limit of large number of colors the lowest-mass exotic baryons can be studied from the kaon-Skyrmion scattering amplitudes, an approach known after Callan and Klebanov. We follow this approach and find, both analytically and numerically, a strong Θ+ resonance in the scattering amplitude that is traced to the rotational mode. The Skyrme model does predict an exotic resonance Θ+ but grossly overestimates the width. To understand better the factors affecting the width, it is computed by several methods giving, however, identical results. In particular, we show that insofar as the width is small, it can be found from the transition axial constant. The physics leading to a narrow Θ+ resonance is briefly reviewed and affirmed.

  7. Baryon stopping probes deconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolschin, Georg

    2016-08-01

    Stopping and baryon transport in central relativistic Pb + Pb and Au + Au collisions are reconsidered with the aim to find indications for the transition from hadronic to partonic processes. At energies reached at the CERN Super Proton Synchrotron ( √{s_{NN}} = 6.3-17.3 GeV) and at RHIC (62.4 GeV) the fragmentation-peak positions as obtained from the data depend linearly on the beam rapidity and are in agreement with earlier results from a QCD-based approach that accounts for gluon saturation. No discontinuities in the net-proton fragmentation peak positions occur in the expected transition region from partons to hadrons at 6-10GeV. In contrast, the mean rapidity loss is predicted to depend linearly on the beam rapidity only at high energies beyond the RHIC scale. The combination of both results offers a clue for the transition from hard partonic to soft hadronic processes in baryon stopping. NICA results could corroborate these findings.

  8. Holographic Baryons and Instanton Crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaplunovsky, Vadim; Melnikov, Dmitry; Sonnenschein, Jacob

    In a wide class of holographic models, like the one proposed by Sakai and Sugimoto, baryons can be approximated by instantons of non-abelian gauge fields that live on the world-volume of flavor D-branes. In the leading order, those are just the Yang-Mills instantons, whose solutions can be constructed from the celebrated ADHM construction. This fact can be used to study various properties of baryons in the holographic limit. In particular, one can attempt to construct a holographic description of the cold dense nuclear matter phase of baryons. It can be argued that holographic baryons in such a regime are necessarily in a solid crystalline phase. In this review we summarize the known results on the construction and phases of crystals of the holographic baryons.

  9. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (III) Baryon-Baryon Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Silas Beane; Detmold, William; Lin, Huey-Wen; Luu, Thomas C.; Orginos, Kostas; Savage, Martin; Torok, Aaron M.; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-03-01

    Low-energy baryon-baryon interactions are calculated in a high-statistics lattice QCD study on a single ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations at a pion mass of m_pi ~ 390 MeV, a spatial volume of L^3 ~ (2.5 fm)^3, and a spatial lattice spacing of b ~ 0.123 fm. Luscher’s method is used to extract nucleon-nucleon, hyperon-nucleon and hyperon-hyperon scattering phase shifts at one momentum from the one- and two-baryon ground-state energies in the lattice volume. The N-Sigma interactions are found to be highly spin-dependent, and the interaction in the ^3 S _1 channel is found to be strong. In contrast, the N-Lambda interactions are found to be spin-independent, within the uncertainties of the calculation, consistent with the absence of one-pion-exchange. The only channel for which a negative energy-shift is found is Lambda-Lambda, indicating that the Lambda-Lambda interaction is attractive, as anticipated from model-dependent discussions regarding the H-dibaryon. The NN scattering lengths are found to be small, clearly indicating the absence of any fine-tuning in the NN-sector at this pion mass. This is consistent with our previous Lattice QCD calculation of the NN interactions. The behavior of the signal-to-noise ratio in the baryon-baryon correlation functions, and in the ratio of correlation functions that yields the ground-state energy splitting

  10. Spectrum and Structure of Excited Baryons with CLAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burkert, Volker D.

    2017-01-01

    In this contribution I discuss recent results in light quark baryon spectroscopy involving CLAS data and higher level analysis results from the partial wave analysis by the Bonn-Gatchina group. New baryon states were discovered largely based on the open strangeness production channels γp → K+Λ and γp → K+Σ0. The data illustrate the great potential of the kaon-hyperon channel in the discovery of higher mass baryon resonances in s-channel production. Other channels with discovery potential, such as γp → pω and γp → ϕp are also discussed. In the second part I will demonstrate on data the sensitivity of meson electroproduction to expose the active degrees of freedom underlying resonance transitions as a function of the probed distance scale. For several of the prominent excited states in the lower mass range the short distance behavior is described by a core of three dressed-quarks with running quark mass, and meson-baryon contributions make up significant parts of the excitation strength at large distances. Finally, I give an outlook of baryon resonance physics at the 12 GeV CEBAF electron accelerator. Talk presented at the CRC-16 Symposium, Bonn University, June 6-9, 2016.

  11. Accessing baryon to meson transition distribution amplitudes in meson production in association with a high invariant mass lepton pair at GSI-FAIR with P¯ANDA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansberg, J. P.; Pire, B.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.; Szymanowski, L.

    2012-12-01

    Nucleon-antinucleon annihilation into a near backward- (or forward-) produced meson and a high invariant mass lepton pair admits a factorized description in terms of antinucleon (or nucleon) distribution amplitudes and nucleon-to-meson (or antinucleon-to-meson) transition distribution amplitudes. We estimate the cross section of backward (and forward) pion and η-meson production in association with a high invariant mass lepton pair for the kinematical conditions of GSI-FAIR. The cross sections are found to be large enough to be measured with the P¯ANDA detector. Interesting phenomenological applications of the approach are thus expected.

  12. Staggered heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2008-03-01

    Although taste violations significantly affect the results of staggered calculations of pseudoscalar and heavy-light mesonic quantities, those entering staggered calculations of baryonic quantities have not been quantified. Here I develop staggered chiral perturbation theory in the light-quark baryon sector by mapping the Symanzik action into heavy baryon chiral perturbation theory. For 2+1 dynamical quark flavors, the masses of flavor-symmetric nucleons are calculated to third order in partially quenched and fully dynamical staggered chiral perturbation theory. To this order the expansion includes the leading chiral logarithms, which come from loops with virtual decuplet-like states, as well as terms of O(m{sub {pi}}{sup 3}), which come from loops with virtual octet-like states. Taste violations enter through the meson propagators in loops and tree-level terms of O(a{sup 2}). The pattern of taste symmetry breaking and the resulting degeneracies and mixings are discussed in detail. The resulting chiral forms are appropriate to lattice results obtained with operators already in use and could be used to study the restoration of taste symmetry in the continuum limit. I assume that the fourth root of the fermion determinant can be incorporated in staggered chiral perturbation theory using the replica method.

  13. Baryon number violation and a new electroweak interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Chernodub, M. N.; Niemi, Antti J.

    2009-04-01

    We introduce a new supercurrent in the electroweak sector of the standard model. Its interaction with the hypergauge field influences the mass of the Z boson but has no effect on the W{sup {+-}} boson masses. In the leptonic sector it affects the numerical value of the vector and axial coupling constants between neutral currents and the Z boson, and a comparison with experimental values yields an upper bound to the strength of the coupling between the supercurrent and the hypergauge field. In the baryonic sector the supercurrent gives a new contribution to the anomaly equation for baryon number current. As a consequence it may have an effect on baryogenesis.

  14. Properties of Doubly Heavy Baryons in the Relativistic Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, D.; Faustov, R.N.; Galkin, V.O.; Martynenko, A.P.

    2005-05-01

    Mass spectra and semileptonic decay rates of baryons consisting of two heavy (b or c) and one light quark are calculated in the framework of the relativistic quark model. The doubly heavy baryons are treated in the quark-diquark approximation. The ground and excited states of both the diquark and quark-diquark bound systems are considered. The quark-diquark potential is constructed. The light quark is treated completely relativistically, while the expansion in the inverse heavy-quark mass is used. The weak transition amplitudes of heavy diquarks bb and bc going, respectively, to bc and cc are explicitly expressed through the overlap integrals of the diquark wave functions in the whole accessible kinematic range. The relativistic baryon wave functions of the quark-diquark bound system are used for the calculation of the decay matrix elements, the Isgur-Wise function, and decay rates in the heavy-quark limit.

  15. Excited baryons from Bayesian priors and overlap fermions

    SciTech Connect

    F.X. Lee; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; J.B. Zhang

    2003-05-01

    Using the constrained-fitting method based on Bayesian priors, we extract the masses of the two lowest states of octet and decouplet baryons with both parities. The calculation is done on quenched 163 x 28 lattices of a = 0.2 fm using an improved gauge action and overlap fermions, with the pion mass as low as 180 MeV. The Roper state N(1440)+ is clearly observed for the first time as the 1st-excited state of the nucleon from the standard interpolating field. Together with other baryons, our preliminary results indicate that the level-ordering of the low-lying baryon states on the lattice is largely consistent with experiment. The realization is helped by cross-overs between the excited + and - states in the region of mp 300 to 400 MeV.

  16. Baryonic Operators for Lattice Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    R. Edwards; R. Fiebig; G. Fleming; U.M. Heller; C. Morningstar; D. Richards; I. Sato; S. Wallace

    2004-03-01

    The construction of baryonic operators for determining the N* excitation spectrum is discussed. The operators are designed with one eye towards maximizing overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, and the other eye towards minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark propagators. Issues related to spin identification are outlined. Although we focus on tri-quark baryon operators, the construction method is applicable to both mesons and penta-quark operators.

  17. Shedding light on baryonic dark matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silk, Joseph

    1991-01-01

    Halo dark matter, if it is baryonic, may plausibly consist of compact stellar remnants. Jeans mass clouds containing 10 to the 6th to 10 to the 8th solar masses could have efficiently formed stars in the early universe and could plausibly have generated, for a suitably top-heavy stellar initial mass function, a high abundance of neutron stars as well as a small admixture of long-lived low mass stars. Within the resulting clusters of dark remnants, which eventually are tidally disrupted when halos eventually form, captures of neutron stars by nondegenerate stars resulted in formation of close binaries. These evolve to produce, by the present epoch, an observable X-ray signal associated with dark matter aggregations in galaxy cluster cores.

  18. Baryon Loaded Relativistic Blast Waves in Supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Ray, Alak

    2011-03-01

    We provide a new analytic blast wave solution which generalizes the Blandford-McKee solution to arbitrary ejecta masses and Lorentz factors. Until recently relativistic supernovae have been discovered only through their association with long-duration gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). The blast waves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra-relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows, as the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept-up mass. The recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, opens up the possibility of highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free-expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We compute the synchrotron emission from relativistic electrons in the shock amplified magnetic field. This models the radio emission from the circumstellar interaction of a CEDEX. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow. We discuss the effect of baryon loading on the dynamics and observational manifestations of a CEDEX. In particular, our predicted angular size of SN 2009bb is consistent with very long baseline interferometric (VLBI) upper limits on day 85, but is presently resolvable on VLBI angular scales, since the relativistic ejecta is still in the nearly free-expansion phase.

  19. Radiative corrections to the Dalitz plot of charged and neutral baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged lepton

    SciTech Connect

    Manriquez, J. J. Torres; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Garcia, A.

    2008-07-02

    Because of the near future work of the NA48 experimental group, we have calculated the radiative corrections (RC) to the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons. This work covers the two cases, charged and neutral decaying baryons, and it is restricted to the so called three body region of the Dalitz plot. Also it is specialized at the c.m. frame of the emitted baryon. We consider terms up to ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup 0}, where q is the momentum transfer and M{sub 1} is the mass of the decaying baryon, and neglect terms of the order ({alpha}/ product )(q/M{sub 1}){sup n}, n = 1,2,.... The analytical expressions displayed are ready to obtain numerical results, suitable for a model-independent experimental analysis.

  20. Discriminating Majorana neutrino textures in light of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borah, Manikanta; Borah, Debasish; Das, Mrinal Kumar

    2015-06-01

    We study all possible texture zeros in the Majorana neutrino mass matrix which are allowed from neutrino oscillation as well as cosmology data when the charged lepton mass matrix is assumed to take the diagonal form. In the case of one-zero texture, we write down the Majorana phases which are assumed to be equal and the lightest neutrino mass as a function of the Dirac C P phase. In the case of two-zero texture, we numerically evaluate all the three C P phases and lightest neutrino mass by solving four real constraint equations. We then constrain texture zero mass matrices from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry through the mechanism of leptogenesis by assuming the Dirac neutrino mass matrix to be diagonal. Adopting a type I seesaw framework, we consider the C P -violating out of equilibrium decay of the lightest right-handed neutrino as the source of lepton asymmetry. Apart from discriminating between the texture zero mass matrices and light neutrino mass hierarchy, we also constrain the Dirac and Majorana C P phases so that the observed baryon asymmetry can be produced. In two-zero texture, we further constrain the diagonal form of the Dirac neutrino mass matrix from the requirement of producing correct baryon asymmetry.

  1. Why baryons matter: The kinematics of dwarf spheroidal satellites

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Zolotov, Adi E-mail: zolotov@physics.huji.ac.il

    2014-05-10

    We use high-resolution cosmological simulations of Milky Way (MW) mass galaxies that include both baryons and dark matter (DM) to show that baryonic physics (energetic feedback from supernovae and subsequent tidal stripping) significantly reduces the DM mass in the central regions of luminous satellite galaxies. The reduced central masses of the simulated satellites reproduce the observed internal dynamics of MW and M31 satellites as a function of luminosity. We use these realistic satellites to update predictions for the observed velocity and luminosity functions of satellites around MW-mass galaxies when baryonic effects are accounted for. We also predict that field dwarf galaxies in the same luminosity range as the MW classical satellites should not exhibit velocities as low as the satellites because the field dwarfs do not experience tidal stripping. Additionally, the early formation times of the satellites compared to field galaxies at the same luminosity may be apparent in the star formation histories of the two populations. Including baryonic physics in cold dark matter (CDM) models naturally explains the observed low DM densities in the MWs dwarf spheroidal population. Our simulations therefore resolve the tension between kinematics predicted in CDM theory and observations of satellites, without invoking alternative forms of DM.

  2. Halo Density Reduction by Baryonic Settling?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardel, J. R.; Sellwood, J. A.

    2009-02-01

    We test the proposal by El-Zant et al. that the dark matter density of halos could be reduced through dynamical friction acting on heavy baryonic clumps in the early stages of galaxy formation. Using N-body simulations, we confirm that the inner halo density cusp is flattened to 0.2 of the halo break radius by the settling of a single clump of mass gsim0.5% of the halo mass. We also find that an ensemble of 50 clumps, each having masses gsim0.2%, can flatten the cusp to almost the halo break radius on a timescale of ~9 Gyr, for a Navarro-Frenk-White profile halo of concentration 15. We summarize some of the difficulties that need to be overcome if this mechanism is to resolve the apparent conflict between the observed inner densities of galaxy halos and the predictions of ΛCDM.

  3. Spectroscopy of triply charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; ...

    2014-10-14

    The spectrum of excitations of triply-charmed baryons is computed using lattice QCD including dynamical light quark fields. The spectrum obtained has baryonic states with well-defined total spin up to 7/2 and the low-lying states closely resemble the expectation from models with an SU(6) x O(3) symmetry. As a result, energy splittings between extracted states, including those due to spin-orbit coupling in the heavy quark limit are computed and compared against data at other quark masses.

  4. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2015-05-06

    This study presents the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 16³ × 128, with inverse spacing in temporal direction at⁻¹=5.67(4) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3)F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU(6)×O(3) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  5. Spectroscopy of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael; Hadron Spectrum Collaboration

    2015-05-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly charmed baryons from lattice QCD with dynamical quark fields. Calculations are performed on anisotropic lattices of size 1 63×128 , with inverse spacing in temporal direction at-1=5.67 (4 ) GeV and with a pion mass of about 390 MeV. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice yet which retain a memory of their continuum analogues are used. These operators transform as irreducible representations of SU(3 ) F symmetry for flavor, SU(4) symmetry for Dirac spins of quarks and O(3) for spatial symmetry. The distillation method is utilized to generate baryon correlation functions which are analyzed using the variational fitting method to extract excited states. The lattice spectra obtained have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7 /2 and the pattern of low-lying states does not support the diquark picture for doubly charmed baryons. On the contrary the calculated spectra are remarkably similar to the expectations from models with an SU (6 )×O (3 ) symmetry. Various spin-dependent energy splittings between the extracted states are also evaluated.

  6. Quark-Pauli effects in three octet-baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamoto, C.; Suzuki, Y.

    2016-09-01

    To sustain a neutron star with about two times the solar mass, multibaryons including hyperons are expected to produce repulsive effects in the interior of its high-baryon-density region. To examine possible quark-Pauli repulsion among the baryons, we solve the eigenvalue problem of the quark antisymmetrizer for three octet-baryons that are described by most compact spatial configurations. We find that the Pauli blocking effect is weak in the Λ n n system, while it is strong in the Σ-n n system. The appearance of the Σ- hyperon is suppressed in the neutron star interior but no quark-Pauli repulsion effectively works for the Λ hyperon.

  7. Measurement of b-Baryons with the CDF II detector

    SciTech Connect

    Heuser, Joachim; /Karlsruhe U., EKP

    2007-10-01

    We report the observation of new bottom baryon states. The most recent result is the observation of the baryon {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Xi}{sup -}. The significance of the signal corresponds to 7.7{sigma} and the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 5792.9{+-}2.5(stat.){+-}1.7(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. In addition we observe four resonances in the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{pi}{sup {+-}} spectra, consistent with the bottom baryons {Sigma}{sub b}{sup (*){+-}}. All observations are in agreement with theoretical expectations.

  8. Impact of finite density on spectroscopic parameters of decuplet baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2016-12-01

    The decuplet baryons, Δ , Σ*, Ξ*, and Ω-, are studied in nuclear matter by using the in-medium QCD sum rules. By fixing the three-momentum of the particles under consideration at the rest frame of the medium, the negative energy contributions are removed. It is obtained that the parameters of the Δ baryon are more affected by the medium against the Ω- state, containing three strange quarks, whose mass and residue are not considerably affected by the medium. We also find the vector and scalar self-energies of these baryons in nuclear matter. By the recent progresses at the P ¯ ANDA experiment at the FAIR and NICA facility, it may be possible to study the in-medium properties of such states, even the multistrange Ξ* and Ω- systems, in the near future.

  9. Strange Baryon Physics in Full Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin

    2007-11-01

    Strange baryon spectra and form factors are key probes to study excited nuclear matter. The use of lattice QCD allows us to test the strength of the Standard Model by calculating strange baryon quantities from first principles.

  10. Density-dependent effective baryon-baryon interaction from chiral three-baryon forces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petschauer, Stefan; Haidenbauer, Johann; Kaiser, Norbert; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Weise, Wolfram

    2017-01-01

    A density-dependent effective potential for the baryon-baryon interaction in the presence of the (hyper)nuclear medium is constructed, based on the leading (irreducible) three-baryon forces derived within SU(3) chiral effective field theory. We evaluate the contributions from three classes: contact terms, one-pion exchange and two-pion exchange. In the strangeness-zero sector we recover the known result for the in-medium nucleon-nucleon interaction. Explicit expressions for the ΛN in-medium potential in (asymmetric) nuclear matter are presented. Our results are suitable for implementation into calculations of (hyper)nuclear matter. In order to estimate the low-energy constants of the leading three-baryon forces we introduce the decuplet baryons as explicit degrees of freedom and construct the relevant terms in the minimal non-relativistic Lagrangian. With these, the constants are estimated through decuplet saturation. Utilizing this approximation we provide numerical results for the effect of the three-body force in symmetric nuclear matter and pure neutron matter on the ΛN interaction. A moderate repulsion that increases with density is found in comparison to the free ΛN interaction.

  11. A Baryonic Solution to the Missing Satellites Problem

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem

  12. A BARYONIC SOLUTION TO THE MISSING SATELLITES PROBLEM

    SciTech Connect

    Brooks, Alyson M.; Kuhlen, Michael; Zolotov, Adi; Hooper, Dan E-mail: mqk@astro.berkeley.edu E-mail: dhooper@fnal.gov

    2013-03-01

    It has been demonstrated that the inclusion of baryonic physics can alter the dark matter densities in the centers of low-mass galaxies, making the central dark matter slope more shallow than predicted in pure cold dark matter simulations. This flattening of the dark matter profile can occur in the most luminous subhalos around Milky Way mass galaxies. Zolotov et al. have suggested a correction to be applied to the central masses of dark matter-only satellites in order to mimic the affect of (1) the flattening of the dark matter cusp due to supernova feedback in luminous satellites and (2) enhanced tidal stripping due to the presence of a baryonic disk. In this paper, we apply this correction to the z = 0 subhalo masses from the high resolution, dark matter-only Via Lactea II (VL2) simulation, and find that the number of massive subhalos is dramatically reduced. After adopting a stellar mass to halo mass relationship for the VL2 halos, and identifying subhalos that are (1) likely to be destroyed by stripping and (2) likely to have star formation suppressed by photo-heating, we find that the number of massive, luminous satellites around a Milky Way mass galaxy is in agreement with the number of observed satellites around the Milky Way or M31. We conclude that baryonic processes have the potential to solve the missing satellites problem.

  13. Brane-induced Skyrmion on S{sup 3}: Baryonic matter in holographic QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Nawa, Kanabu; Suganuma, Hideo; Kojo, Toru

    2009-01-15

    We study baryonic matter in holographic QCD with D4/D8/D8 multi-D brane system in type IIA superstring theory. The baryon is described as the 'brane-induced Skyrmion', which is a topologically nontrivial chiral soliton in the four-dimensional meson effective action induced by holographic QCD. We employ the ''truncated-resonance model'' approach for the baryon analysis, including pion and {rho} meson fields below the ultraviolet cutoff scale M{sub KK}{approx}1 GeV, to keep the holographic duality with QCD. We describe the baryonic matter in large N{sub c} as single brane-induced Skyrmion on the three-dimensional closed manifold S{sup 3} with finite radius R. The interactions between baryons are simulated by the curvature of the closed manifold S{sup 3}, and the decrease of the size of S{sup 3} represents the increase of the total baryon-number density in the medium in this modeling. We investigate the energy density, the field configuration, the mass and the root-mean-square radius of single baryon on S{sup 3} as the function of its radius R. We find a new picture of 'pion dominance' near the critical density in the baryonic matter, where all the (axial) vector meson fields disappear and only the pion fields survive. We also find the swelling phenomena of the baryons as the precursor of the deconfinement, and propose the mechanism of the swelling in the general context of QCD. The properties of the deconfinement and the chiral symmetry restoration in the baryonic matter are examined by taking the proper order parameters. We also compare our truncated-resonance model with another instanton description of the baryon in holographic QCD, considering the role of cutoff scale M{sub KK}.

  14. Charm Baryon Studies at BaBar

    SciTech Connect

    Ziegler, V.; /Iowa U.

    2006-04-21

    The authors present a precision measurement of the mass of the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and studies of the production and decay of the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} and {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} charm baryons using data collected by the BABAR experiment. To keep the systematic uncertainty as low as possible, the {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} mass measurement is performed using the low Q-value decays, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Sigma}{sup 0} K{sub S}{sup 0}K{sup +}. Several hadronic final states involving an {Omega}{sup -} and a {Xi}{sup -} hyperon are analyzed to reconstruct the {Xi}{sub c}{sup 0} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}.

  15. Baryons with Ginsparg-Wilson quarks in a staggered sea

    SciTech Connect

    Tiburzi, Brian C.

    2005-11-01

    We determine the masses and magnetic moments of the octet baryons in chiral perturbation theory formulated for a mixed lattice action of Ginsparg-Wilson valence quarks and staggered sea quarks. Taste-symmetry breaking does not occur at next-to-leading order in the combined lattice spacing and chiral expansion. Expressions derived for masses and magnetic moments are required for addressing lattice artifacts in mixed-action simulations of these observables.

  16. Symétries et nomenclature des baryons: Proposition d'une nouvelle nomenclature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Landry, Gaëtan

    Baryons, such as protons and neutrons, are matter particles made of three quarks. Their current nomenclature is based on the concept of isospin, introduced by Werner Heisenberg in 1932 to explain the similarity between the masses of protons and neutrons, as well as the similarity of their behaviour under the strong interaction. It is a refinement of a nomenclature designed in 1964, before the acceptance of the quark model, for light baryons. A historical review of baryon physics before the advent of the quark model is given to understand the motivations behind the light baryon nomenclature. Then, an overview of the quark model is given to understand the extensions done to this nomenclature in 1986, as well as to understand the physics of baryons and of properties such as isospin and flavour quantum numbers. Since baryon properties are in general explained by the quark model, a nomenclature based on isospin leads to several issues of physics and of clarity. To resolve these issues, the concepts of isospin and mass groups are generalized to all flavours of quarks, the Gell-Mann--Okubo formalism is extended to generalized mass groups, and a baryon nomenclature based on the quark model, reflecting modern knowledge, is proposed.

  17. THE SLOPE OF THE BARYONIC TULLY-FISHER RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gurovich, Sebastian; Freeman, Kenneth; Jerjen, Helmut; Staveley-Smith, Lister; Puerari, Ivanio

    2010-09-15

    We present the results of a baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) study for a local sample of relatively isolated disk galaxies. We derive a BTFR with a slope near 3 measured over about 4 dex in baryon mass for our combined H I and bright spiral disk samples. This BTFR is significantly flatter and has less scatter than the TFR (stellar mass only) with its slope near 4 reported for other samples and studies. A BTFR slope near 3 is in better agreement with the expected slope from simple {Lambda}CDM cosmological simulations that include both stellar and gas baryons. The scatter in the TFR/BTFR appears to depend on W{sub 20}: galaxies that rotate slower have more scatter. The atomic gas-to-stars ratio shows a break near W{sub 20} = 250 km s{sup -1} probably associated with a change in star formation efficiency. In contrast, the absence of such a break in the BTFR suggests that this relation was probably set at the main epoch of baryon dissipation rather than as a product of later galactic evolution.

  18. Staggered baryon operators with flavor SU(3) quantum numbers

    SciTech Connect

    Bailey, Jon A.

    2007-06-01

    The construction of the first baryon operators for staggered lattice QCD exploited the taste symmetry to emulate physical quark flavor; contemporary 2+1 flavor simulations explicitly include three physical quark flavors and necessitate interpreting a valence sector with 12 quarks. After discussing expected features of the resulting baryon spectrum, I consider the spectra of operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS, the direct product of flavor SU(3){sub F} and the geometrical time-slice group of the 1-flavor staggered theory. I then describe the construction of a set of maximally local baryon operators transforming irreducibly under SU(3){sub F}xGTS and enumerate this set. In principle, the operators listed here could be used to extract the masses of all the lightest spin-(1/2) and spin-(3/2) baryon resonances of staggered QCD. Using appropriate operators from this set in partially quenched simulations should allow for particularly clean 2+1 flavor calculations of the masses of the nucleon, {delta}, {sigma}*, {xi}*, and {omega}{sup -}.

  19. A Study of Double-Charm and Charm-Strange Baryons inElectron-Positron Annihilations

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Adam J.; /SLAC

    2007-10-15

    In this dissertation I describe a study of double-charm and charm-strange baryons based on data collected with the BABAR Detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. In this study I search for new baryons and make precise measurements of their properties and decay modes. I seek to verify and expand upon double-charm and charm-strange baryon observations made by other experiments. The BABAR Detector is used to measure subatomic particles that are produced at the PEP-II storage rings. I analyze approximately 300 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events in a search for the production of double-charm baryons. I search for the double-charm baryons {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} (containing the quarks ccd) and {Xi}{sup ++}{sub cc} (ccu) in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +} and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}, respectively. No statistically significant signals for their production are found, and upper limits on their production are determined. Statistically significant signals for excited charm-strange baryons are observed with my analysis of approximately 500 million e+e- {yields} c{bar c} events. The charged charm-strange baryons {Xi}{sub c}(2970){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +} are found in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, the same decay mode used in the {Xi}{sup +}{sub cc} search. The neutral charm-strange baryon {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup 0} is observed in decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}. I also search for excited charm-strange baryon decays to {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sub 8}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Lambda}{sup +}{sub c}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. No significant charm-strange baryon signals a f h these decay modes. For each excited charm-strange baryon state that I observe, I measure its mass, natural width (lifetime), and production rate. The properties of these excited charm-strange baryons and their

  20. Doubly heavy baryons and quark-diquark symmetry in quenched and partially quenched chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas Mehen; Brian C. Tiburzi

    2006-07-17

    We extend the chiral Lagrangian with heavy quark-diquark symmetry to quenched and partially quenched theories. These theories are used to derive formulae for the chiral extrapolation of masses and hyperfine splittings of doubly heavy baryons in lattice QCD simulations. A quark-diquark symmetry prediction for the hyperfine splittings of heavy mesons and doubly heavy baryons is rather insensitive to chiral corrections in both quenched and partially quenched QCD. Extrapolation formulae for the doubly heavy baryon electromagnetic transition moments are also determined for the partially quenched theory.

  1. Heavy-Baryon Spectroscopy from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Huey-Wen Lin, Saul D. Cohen, Liuming Liu, Nilmani Mathur, Konstantinos Orginos, Andre Walker-Loud

    2011-01-01

    We use a four-dimensional lattice calculation of the full-QCD (quantum chromodynamics, the non-abliean gauge theory of the strong interactions of quarks and gluons) path integrals needed to determine the masses of the charmed and bottom baryons. In the charm sector, our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematics, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we found the isospin-averaged mass to be $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $3665\\pm17\\pm14^{+0}_{-78}$ MeV. We predict the mass of the (isospin-averaged) spin-1/2 $\\Omega_{cc}$ to be $3763\\pm19\\pm26^{+13}_{-79}$ {MeV}. In the bottom sector, our results are also in agreement with experimental observations and other lattice calculations within our statistical and systematic errors. In particular, we find the mass of the $\\Omega_b$ to be consistent with the recent CDF measurement. We also predict the mass for the as yet unobserved $\\Xi^\\prime_b$ to be 5955(27) MeV.

  2. The status of pentaquark baryons

    SciTech Connect

    V.D. Burkert

    2006-06-01

    The status of the search for peritaquark baryon states is reviewed in light of new results from the first two dedicated experiments from CLAS at Jefferson Lab and of new analyses from several labs on the Theta^+(1540). Evidence for and against the heavier pentaquark states, the Xi(1862) and the Theta^0_c(3100) observed at CERN and at HERA, respectively, are also discussed. I conclude that the evidence against the latter two heavier pentaquark baryons is rapidly increasing making their existence highly questionable. I also conclude that the evidence for the Theta^+ state has significantly eroded with the recent CLAS results, and just leaves room for a possible state with an intrinsic width of Gamma < 0.5 MeV. Preliminary new evidence from various experiments will be discussed as well.

  3. Strange Baryon to Meson Ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuautle, Eleazar; Ayala, Alejandro

    2014-05-01

    We present a model to compute baryon and meson transverse momentum distributions, and their ratios, in relativistic heavy-ion collisions. The model allows to compute the probability to form colorless bound states of either two or three quarks as functions of the evolving density during the collision. The qualitative differences of the baryon to meson ratio for different collision energies and for different particle species can be associated to the different density dependent probabilities and to the combinatorial factors which in turn depend on whether the quarks forming the bound states are heavy or light. We compare to experimental data and show that we obtain a good description up to intermediate values of pt.

  4. A BARYONIC EFFECT ON THE MERGER TIMESCALE OF GALAXY CLUSTERS

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Congyao; Yu, Qingjuan; Lu, Youjun

    2016-04-01

    Accurate estimation of the merger timescales of galaxy clusters is important for understanding the cluster merger process and further understanding the formation and evolution of the large-scale structure of the universe. In this paper, we explore a baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters by using hydrodynamical simulations. We find that the baryons play an important role in accelerating the merger process. The merger timescale decreases upon increasing the gas fraction of galaxy clusters. For example, the merger timescale is shortened by a factor of up to 3 for merging clusters with gas fractions of 0.15, compared with the timescale obtained with 0 gas fractions. The baryonic effect is significant for a wide range of merger parameters and is particularly more significant for nearly head-on mergers and high merging velocities. The baryonic effect on the merger timescale of galaxy clusters is expected to have an impact on the structure formation in the universe, such as the cluster mass function and massive substructures in galaxy clusters, and a bias of “no-gas” may exist in the results obtained from the dark matter-only cosmological simulations.

  5. Baryons and the Borromeo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, Craig D.; Segovia, Jorge

    2016-11-01

    The kernels in the tangible matter of our everyday experience are composed of light quarks. At least, they are light classically; but they don't remain light. Dynamical effects within the Standard Model of Particle Physics change them in remarkable ways, so that in some configurations they appear nearly massless, but in others possess masses on the scale of light nuclei. Modern experiment and theory are exposing the mechanisms responsible for these remarkable transformations. The rewards are great if we can combine the emerging sketches into an accurate picture of confinement, which is such a singular feature of the Standard Model; and looming larger amongst the emerging ideas is a perspective that leads to a Borromean picture of the proton and its excited states.

  6. A new method to quantify the effects of baryons on the matter power spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, Aurel; Teyssier, Romain E-mail: teyssier@physik.uzh.ch

    2015-12-01

    Future large-scale galaxy surveys have the potential to become leading probes for cosmology provided the influence of baryons on the total mass distribution is understood well enough. As hydrodynamical simulations strongly depend on details in the feedback implementations, no unique and robust predictions for baryonic effects currently exist. In this paper we propose a baryonic correction model that modifies the density field of dark-matter-only N-body simulations to mimic the effects of baryons from any underlying adopted feedback recipe. The model assumes haloes to consist of 4 components: 1- hot gas in hydrostatical equilibrium, 2- ejected gas from feedback processes, 3- central galaxy stars, and 4- adiabatically relaxed dark matter, which all modify the initial dark-matter-only density profiles. These altered profiles allow to define a displacement field for particles in N-body simulations and to modify the total density field accordingly. The main advantage of the baryonic correction model is to connect the total matter density field to the observable distribution of gas and stars in haloes, making it possible to parametrise baryonic effects on the matter power spectrum. We show that the most crucial quantities are the mass fraction of ejected gas and its corresponding ejection radius. The former controls how strongly baryons suppress the power spectrum, while the latter provides a measure of the scale where baryonic effects become important. A comparison with X-ray and Sunyaev-Zel'dovich cluster observations suggests that baryons suppress wave modes above k∼0.5 h/Mpc with a maximum suppression of 10-25 percent around k∼ 2 h/Mpc. More detailed observations of the gas in the outskirts of groups and clusters are required to decrease the large uncertainties of these numbers.

  7. Cascade ({xi}) Physics: a New Approach to Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Nefkens, B. M. K.

    2006-11-17

    Cascade hyperons have two special characteristics, which are particularly valuable as experimental and theoretical tools: cascades have strangeness minus two and their widths are quite narrow compared to the N* and {delta}+ resonances. The narrow width allows the detection by the missing mass or invariant mass techniques. The makeup of the cascade states is two ''massive'' strange and one light quark, this makes them much more amendable to Lattice Gauge calculations. Using the well established Flavor Symmetry of QCD we can use a comparison of the Cascades with the N* and {delta}* resonances to make a conclusive search for the 'Unseen Resonances' of the quark model, for Hybrid Baryons, Meson-Baryon Bound States and other Exotica. We can investigate the flavor dependence of confinement: is the string tension between two strange quarks the same as between two down quarks?.

  8. Baryons in QCDAS at large Nc: A roundabout approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Thomas D.; Shafer, Daniel L.; Lebed, Richard F.

    2010-02-01

    QCDAS, a variant of large Nc QCD in which quarks transform under the color two-index antisymmetric representation, reduces to standard QCD at Nc=3 and provides an alternative to the usual large Nc extrapolation that uses fundamental representation quarks. Previous strong plausibility arguments assert that the QCDAS baryon mass scales as Nc2; however, the complicated combinatoric problem associated with quarks carrying two color indices impeded a complete demonstration. We develop a diagrammatic technique to solve this problem. The key ingredient is the introduction of an effective multigluon vertex: a “traffic circle” or roundabout diagram. We show that arbitrarily complicated diagrams can be reduced to simple ones with the same leading Nc scaling using this device, and that the leading contribution to baryon mass does, in fact, scale as Nc2.

  9. Flavor violation in Higgs-boson couplings to baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bagchi, B. ); Niyogi, S. )

    1992-06-01

    The 1/2{sup +} baryon mass spectrum is studied to determine the {ital {bar u}u}, {ital {bar d}d}, and {ital {bar s}s} contents in the nucleon. We find that higher-order symmetry-breaking terms in the mass operator are necessary to estimate {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar u}u}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle}, {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar d}d}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle}, and {l angle}{ital p}{vert bar}{ital {bar s}s}{vert bar}{ital p}{r angle} in a self-consistent way. We also assess the scalar (pseudoscalar) Higgs-boson couplings to baryons.

  10. Properties of Baryons from Bonn-Gatchina Partial Wave Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarantsev, Andrey

    The recent results from the Bonn-Gatchinal partial wave analysis are reported. The analysis includes a large number of new pseudoscalar meson photoproduction data taken with polarized beam and target. The analysis also includes the information about photoproduction of vector mesons, which reveals resonant signals at masses above 2 GeV. The impact of the new data on spectrum of baryons and their properties is discussed.

  11. Evolution of the baryon asymmetry through the electroweak crossover in the presence of a helical magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Kohei; Long, Andrew J.

    2016-12-01

    We elaborate upon the model of baryogenesis from decaying magnetic helicity by focusing on the evolution of the baryon number and magnetic field through the Standard Model electroweak crossover. The baryon asymmetry is determined by a competition between the helical hypermagnetic field, which sources baryon number, and the electroweak sphaleron, which tends to wash out baryon number. At the electroweak crossover, both of these processes become inactive; the hypermagnetic field is converted into an electromagnetic field, which does not source baryon number, and the weak gauge boson masses grow, suppressing the electroweak sphaleron reaction. An accurate prediction of the relic baryon asymmetry requires a careful treatment of the crossover. We extend our previous study [K. Kamada and A. J. Long, Phys. Rev. D 94, 063501 (2016)], taking into account the gradual conversion of the hypermagnetic into the electromagnetic field. If the conversion is not completed by the time of sphaleron freeze-out, as both analytic and numerical studies suggest, the relic baryon asymmetry is enhanced compared to previous calculations. The observed baryon asymmetry of the Universe can be obtained for a primordial magnetic field that has a present-day field strength and coherence length of B0˜10-17 G and λ0˜10-3 pc and a positive helicity. For larger B0 the baryon asymmetry is overproduced, which may be in conflict with blazar observations that provide evidence for an intergalactic magnetic field of strength B0≳10-14 - 16 G .

  12. The chiral model of Sakai-Sugimoto at finite baryon density

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Keun-Young; Sin, Sang-Jin; Zahed, Ismail

    2008-01-01

    In the context of holographic QCD we analyze Sakai-Sugimoto's chiral model at finite baryon density and zero temperature. The baryon number density is introduced through compact D4 wrapping S4 at the tip of D8-D8-bar. Each baryon acts as a chiral point-like source distributed uniformly over Bbb R3, and leads a non-vanishing U(1)V potential on the brane. For fixed baryon charge density nB we analyze the energy density and pressure using the canonical formalism. The baryonic matter with point like sources is always in the spontaneously broken phase of chiral symmetry, whatever the density. The point-like nature of the sources and large Nc cause the matter to be repulsive as all baryon interactions are omega mediated. Through the induced DBI action on D8-D8-bar, we study the effects of the fixed baryon charge density nB on the pion and vector meson masses and couplings. Issues related to vector dominance in matter in the context of holographic QCD are also discussed.

  13. Hadronic molecules in the heavy baryon spectrum

    SciTech Connect

    Entem, D. R.; Fernández, F.; Ortega, P. G.

    2016-01-22

    We study possible baryon molecules in the non-strange heavy baryon spectrum. We include configurations with a heavy-meson and a light baryon. We find several structures, in particular we can understand the Λ{sub c}(2940) as a D*N molecule with J{sup P} = 3/2{sup −} quantum numbers. We also find D{sup (*)}Δ candidates for the recently discovered X{sub c}(3250) resonance.

  14. Baryon asymmetry, inflation and squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Bambah, Bindu A. . E-mail: bbsp@uohyd.ernet.in; Chaitanya, K.V.S. Shiv; Mukku, C.

    2007-04-15

    We use the general formalism of squeezed rotated states to calculate baryon asymmetry in the wake of inflation through parametric amplification. We base our analysis on a B and CP violating Lagrangian in an isotropically expanding universe. The B and CP violating terms originate from the coupling of complex fields with non-zero baryon number to a complex background inflaton field. We show that a differential amplification of particle and antiparticle modes gives rise to baryon asymmetry.

  15. Towards precision spectroscopy of baryonic resonances

    DOE PAGES

    Doring, Michael; Mai, Maxim; Ronchen, Deborah

    2017-01-26

    Recent progress in baryon spectroscopy is reviewed. In a common effort, various groups have analyzed a set of new high-precision polarization observables from ELSA. The Julich-Bonn group has finalized the analysis of pion-induced meson-baryon production, the potoproduction of pions and eta mesons, and (almost) the KΛ final state. Lastly, as data become preciser, statistical aspects in the analysis of excited baryons become increasingly relevant and several advances in this direction are proposed.

  16. Study of ψ(3770) decaying to baryon anti-baryon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Li-Gang

    2016-05-01

    To study the decays of ψ (3770) going to baryon anti-baryon pairs (B B bar), all available experiments of measuring the cross sections of e+e- → B B bar at center-of-mass energy ranging from 3.0 GeV to 3.9 GeV are combined. To relate the baryon octets, a model based on the SU(3) flavor symmetry is used and the SU(3) breaking effects are also considered. Assuming the electric and magnetic form factors are equal (|GE | = |GM |), a global fit including the interference between the QED process and the resonant process is performed. The branching fraction of ψ (3770) → B B bar is determined to be (2.4 ± 0.8 ± 0.3) ×10-5, (1.7 ± 0.6 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (4.5 ± 0.9 ± 0.1) ×10-5, (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5, and (2.0 ± 0.7 ± 0.1) ×10-5 for B = p , Λ ,Σ+ ,Σ0 ,Ξ- and Ξ0, respectively, where the first uncertainty is from the global fit and the second uncertainty is the systematic uncertainty due to the assumption |GE | = |GM |. They are at least one order of magnitude larger than a simple scaling of the branching fraction of J / ψ / ψ (3686) → B B bar .

  17. The baryonic Tully-Fisher relationship for S{sup 4}G galaxies and the 'condensed' baryon fraction of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene; Sorce, Jenny; Gadotti, D. A.; Gil de Paz, A.; Hinz, J. L.; Menéndez-Delmestre, K.; Regan, M. W.; Seibert, M.; Athanassoula, E.; Bosma, A.; and others

    2014-06-01

    We combine data from the Spitzer Survey for Stellar Structure in Galaxies, a recently calibrated empirical stellar mass estimator from Eskew et al., and an extensive database of H I spectral line profiles to examine the baryonic Tully-Fisher (BTF) relation. We find (1) that the BTF has lower scatter than the classic Tully-Fisher (TF) relation and is better described as a linear relationship, confirming similar previous results, (2) that the inclusion of a radial scale in the BTF decreases the scatter but only modestly, as seen previously for the TF relation, and (3) that the slope of the BTF, which we find to be 3.5 ± 0.2 (Δlog M {sub baryon}/Δlog v{sub c} ), implies that on average a nearly constant fraction (∼0.4) of all baryons expected to be in a halo are 'condensed' onto the central region of rotationally supported galaxies. The condensed baryon fraction, M {sub baryon}/M {sub total}, is, to our measurement precision, nearly independent of galaxy circular velocity (our sample spans circular velocities, v {sub c} , between 60 and 250 km s{sup –1}, but is extended to v{sub c} ∼ 10 km s{sup –1} using data from the literature). The observed galaxy-to-galaxy scatter in this fraction is generally ≤ a factor of 2 despite fairly liberal selection criteria. These results imply that cooling and heating processes, such as cold versus hot accretion, mass loss due to stellar winds, and active galactic nucleus driven feedback, to the degree that they affect the global galactic properties involved in the BTF, are independent of halo mass for galaxies with 10 < v{sub c} < 250 km s{sup –1} and typically introduce no more than a factor of two range in the resulting M {sub baryon}/M {sub total}. Recent simulations by Aumer et al. of a small sample of disk galaxies are in excellent agreement with our data, suggesting that current simulations are capable of reproducing the global properties of individual disk galaxies. More detailed comparison to models using the

  18. Results on Charm Baryon Spectroscopy from Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Felix

    2011-05-01

    Due to an excellent mass resolution and a large amount of available data, the CDF experiment, located at the Tevatron proton-antiproton accelerator, allows the precise measurement of spectroscopic properties, like mass and decay width, of a variety of states. This was exploited to examine the first orbital excitations of the {Lambda}{sub c} baryon, the resonances {Lambda}{sub c}(2595) and {Lambda}{sub c}(2625), in the decay channel {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, as well as the {Lambda}{sub c} spin excitations {Sigma}{sub c}(2455) and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520) in its decays to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} and {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {pi}{sup -} final states in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.2 fb{sup -1}. We present measurements of the mass differences with respect to the {Lambda}{sub c} and the decay widths of these states, using significantly higher statistics than previous experiments.

  19. Composite bosonic baryon dark matter on the lattice: SU(4) baryon spectrum and the effective Higgs interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Berkowitz, E.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Kiskis, J.; Lin, M. F.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Voronov, G.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Kribs, G. D.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2014-05-01

    We present the spectrum of baryons in SU(4) gauge theory with fundamental fermion constituents, which is of significant interest for composite dark matter model building. We first compare the spectra and properties of baryons in SU(3) and SU(4) gauge theories (in which they are fermionic and bosonic, respectively) and then compute the cross section for direct detection of dark matter via Higgs boson exchange for TeV-scale composite dark matter arising from a confining SU(4) gauge sector. Comparison with the latest LUX results leads to tight bounds on the fraction of the mass of the constituent fermion that may arise from electroweak symmetry breaking. Lattice calculations of the dark matter mass spectrum and the Higgs-dark-matter coupling are performed on quenched 163×32, 323×64, 483×96, and 643×128 lattices with three different lattice spacings, using Wilson fermions with moderate to large pseudoscalar meson masses. Our results lay a foundation for future analytic and numerical studies of composite baryonic dark matter.

  20. Dark Galaxies and Lost Baryons (IAU S244)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Jonathan I.; Disney, Michael J.

    2008-05-01

    Preface; Conference prelims; The HI that barked in the night M. J. Disney; The detection of dark galaxies in blind HI surveys J. I. Davies; Red haloes of galaxies - reservoirs of baryonic dark matter? E. Zackrisson, N. Bergvall, C. Flynn, G. Ostlin, G. Micheva and B. Baldwell; Constraints on dark and visible mass in galaxies from strong gravitational lensing S. Dye and S. Warren; Lost baryons at low redshift S. Mathur, F. Nicastro and R. Williams; Observed properties of dark matter on small spatial scales R. Wyse and G. Gilmore; The mass distribution in spiral galaxies P. Salucci; Connecting lost baryons and dark galaxies via QSO absorption lines T. Tripp; ALFALFA: HI cosmology in the local universe R. Giovanelli; The ALFALFA search for (almost) dark galaxies across the HI mass function M. Haynes; HI clouds detected towards Virgo with the Arecibo Legacy Fast ALFA Survey B. Kent; Cosmic variance in the HI mass function S. Schneider; The Arecibo Galaxy Environments Survey - potential for finding dark galaxies and results so far R. Minchin et al.; Free-floating HI clouds in the M81 group E. Brinks, F. Walter and E. Skillman; Where are the stars in dark galaxies J. Rosenberg, J. Salzer and J. Cannon; The halo by halo missing baryon problem S. McGaugh; The local void is really empty R. Tully; Voids in the local volume: a limit on appearance of a galaxy in a dark matter halo A. Tikhonov and A. Klypin; Dim baryons in the cosmic web C. Impey; A census of baryons in galaxy clusters and groups A. Gonzalez, D. Zaritsky and A. Zabludo; Statistical properties of the intercluster light from SDSS image stacking S. Zibetti; QSO strong gravitational lensing and the detection of dark halos A. Maccio; Strong gravitational lensing: bright galaxies and lost dark-matter L. Koopmans; Mapping the distribution of luminous and dark matter in strong lensing galaxies I. Ferreras, P. Saha, L. Williams and S. Burles; Tidal debris posing as dark galaxies P. Duc, F. Bournaud and E. Brinks

  1. BRYNTRN: A baryon transport model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Townsend, Lawrence W.; Nealy, John E.; Chun, Sang Y.; Hong, B. S.; Buck, Warren W.; Lamkin, S. L.; Ganapol, Barry D.; Khan, Ferdous; Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1989-01-01

    The development of an interaction data base and a numerical solution to the transport of baryons through an arbitrary shield material based on a straight ahead approximation of the Boltzmann equation are described. The code is most accurate for continuous energy boundary values, but gives reasonable results for discrete spectra at the boundary using even a relatively coarse energy grid (30 points) and large spatial increments (1 cm in H2O). The resulting computer code is self-contained, efficient and ready to use. The code requires only a very small fraction of the computer resources required for Monte Carlo codes.

  2. Isospin Splittings of Doubly Heavy Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; Guo, Feng-Kun; Hanhart, Christoph; Meissner, Ulf-G.; /Julich, Forschungszentrum /JCHP, Julich /IAS, Julich /Bonn U., HISKP /Bonn U.

    2011-08-18

    The SELEX Collaboration has reported a very large isospin splitting of doubly charmed baryons. We show that this effect would imply that the doubly charmed baryons are very compact. One intriguing possibility is that such baryons have a linear geometry Q-q-Q where the light quark q oscillates between the two heavy quarks Q, analogous to a linear molecule such as carbon dioxide. However, using conventional arguments, the size of a heavy-light hadron is expected to be around 0.5 fm, much larger than the size needed to explain the observed large isospin splitting. Assuming the distance between two heavy quarks is much smaller than that between the light quark and a heavy one, the doubly heavy baryons are related to the heavy mesons via heavy quark-diquark symmetry. Based on this symmetry, we predict the isospin splittings for doubly heavy baryons including {Xi}{sub cc}, {Xi}{sub bb} and {Xi}{sub bc}. The prediction for the {Xi}{sub cc} is much smaller than the SELEX value. On the other hand, the {Xi}{sub bb} baryons are predicted to have an isospin splitting as large as (6.3 {+-} 1.7) MeV. An experimental study of doubly bottomed baryons is therefore very important to better understand the structure of baryons with heavy quarks.

  3. Baryon and lepton violation in astrophysics.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, E. W.

    The cosmological and astrophysical significance of baryon and lepton number violating process is the subject of this paper. The possibility of baryon-number violating processes in the electroweak transition in the early universe is reviewed. The implications of lepton-number violation via Nambu-Goldstone bosons are discussed in detail.

  4. Baryon spectroscopy and the omega minus

    SciTech Connect

    Samios, N.P.

    1994-12-31

    In this report, I will mainly discuss baryon resonances with emphasis on the discovery of the {Omega}{sup {minus}}. However, for completeness, I will also present some data on the meson resonances which together with the baryons led to the uncovering of the SU(3) symmetry of particles and ultimately to the concept of quarks.

  5. Two potential quark models for double heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Puchkov, A. M.; Kozhedub, A. V.

    2016-01-22

    Baryons containing two heavy quarks (QQ{sup ′} q) are treated in the Born-Oppenheimer approximation. Two non-relativistic potential models are proposed, in which the Schrödinger equation admits a separation of variables in prolate and oblate spheroidal coordinates, respectively. In the first model, the potential is equal to the sum of Coulomb potentials of the two heavy quarks, separated from each other by a distance - R and linear potential of confinement. In the second model the center distance parameter R is assumed to be purely imaginary. In this case, the potential is defined by the two-sheeted mapping with singularities being concentrated on a circle rather than at separate points. Thus, in the first model diquark appears as a segment, and in the second - as a circle. In this paper we calculate the mass spectrum of double heavy baryons in both models, and compare it with previous results.

  6. Observation of the Heavy Baryons Sigma b and Sigma b*.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Abulencia, A; Adelman, J; Affolder, T; Akimoto, T; Albrow, M G; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Anikeev, K; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Aoki, M; Apollinari, G; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Azzi-Bacchetta, P; Azzurri, P; Bacchetta, N; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Baroiant, S; Bartsch, V; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Belloni, A; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Beringer, J; Berry, T; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bolla, G; Bolshov, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carillo, S; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, I; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Choudalakis, G; Chuang, S H; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Cilijak, M; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Coca, M; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Cooper, B; Copic, K; Cordelli, M; Cortiana, G; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; DaRonco, S; Datta, M; D'Auria, S; Davies, T; Dagenhart, D; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lentdecker, G; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Delli Paoli, F; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; De Pedis, D; Derwent, P F; Di Giovanni, G P; Dionisi, C; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Dörr, C; Donati, S; Dong, P; Donini, J; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Efron, J; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, I; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Forrester, S; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garberson, F; Garfinkel, A F; Gay, C; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Giagu, S; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Goldstein, J; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, K; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamilton, A; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Handler, R; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harper, S; Harr, R F; Harris, R M; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hauser, J; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heijboer, A; Heinemann, B; Heinrich, J; Henderson, C; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Holloway, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Huffman, B T; Hughes, R E; Husemann, U; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; Iyutin, B; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeans, D; Jeon, E J; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kemp, Y; Kephart, R; Kerzel, U; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Klute, M; Knuteson, B; Ko, B R; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kraan, A C; Kraus, J; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kubo, T; Kuhlmann, S E; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kusakabe, Y; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lai, S; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, J; Lee, J; Lee, Y J; Lee, S W; Lefèvre, R; Leonardo, N; Leone, S; Levy, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C; Lin, C S; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Loreti, M; Lu, R-S; Lucchesi, D; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lyons, L; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Lytken, E; Mack, P; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maki, T; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marginean, R; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, M; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Maruyama, T; Mastrandrea, P; Masubuchi, T; Matsunaga, H; Mattson, M E; Mazini, R; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzemer, S; Menzione, A; Merkel, P; Mesropian, C; Messina, A; Miao, T; Miladinovic, N; Miles, J; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyamoto, A; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mohr, B; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Mumford, R; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagano, A; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Necula, V; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Oldeman, R; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramonov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Piedra, J; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Portell, X; Poukhov, O; Pounder, N; Prakoshyn, F; Pronko, A; Proudfoot, J; Ptohos, F; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Reisert, B; Rekovic, V; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Salamanna, G; Saltó, O; Santi, L; Sarkar, S; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savard, P; Savoy-Navarro, A; Scheidle, T; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scott, A L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shapiro, M D; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Sherman, D; Shimojima, M; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Sidoti, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soderberg, M; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Spalding, J; Spinella, F; Spreitzer, T; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; Staveris-Polykalas, A; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Stuart, D; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Sun, H; Suslov, I; Suzuki, T; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Terashi, K; Tesarek, R J; Thom, J; Thompson, A S; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Tiwari, V; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Tourneur, S; Trischuk, W; Tsuno, S; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Vallecorsa, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vazquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Veramendi, G; Veszpremi, V; Vidal, M; Vidal, R; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vine, T; Vogel, M; Vollrath, I; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Würthwein, F; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, J; Wagner, W; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wynne, S M; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yamashita, T; Yang, C; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanello, L; Zanetti, A; Zaw, I; Zhang, X; Zhou, J; Zucchelli, S

    2007-11-16

    We report an observation of new bottom baryons produced in pp collisions at the Tevatron. Using 1.1 fb(-1) of data collected by the CDF II detector, we observe four Lambda b 0 pi+/- resonances in the fully reconstructed decay mode Lambda b 0-->Lambda c + pi-, where Lambda c+-->pK* pi+. We interpret these states as the Sigma b(*)+/- baryons and measure the following masses: m Sigma b+=5807.8 -2.2 +2.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, m Sigma b- =5815.2+/-1.0(stat.)+/-1.7(syst.) MeV/c2, and m(Sigma b*)-m(Sigma b)=21.2-1.9 +2.0(stat.)-0.3+0.4(syst.) MeV/c2.

  7. Baryon Spectroscopy Through Partial-Wave Analysis and Meson Photoproduction

    SciTech Connect

    Manley, D. Mark

    2016-09-08

    The principal goal of this project is the experimental and phenomenological study of baryon spectroscopy. The PI's group consists of himself and three graduate students. This final report summarizes research activities by the PI's group during the period 03/01/2015 to 08/14/2016. During this period, the PI co-authored 11 published journal papers and one proceedings article and presented three invited talks. The PI's general interest is the investigation of the baryon resonance spectrum up to masses of ~ 2 GeV. More detail is given on two research projects: Neutral Kaon Photoproduction and Partial-Wave Analyses of γp → η p, γn → η n, and γp → K⁺ Λ.

  8. Baryon symmetric big bang cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    Both the quantum theory and Einsteins theory of special relativity lead to the supposition that matter and antimatter were produced in equal quantities during the big bang. It is noted that local matter/antimatter asymmetries may be reconciled with universal symmetry by assuming (1) a slight imbalance of matter over antimatter in the early universe, annihilation, and a subsequent remainder of matter; (2) localized regions of excess for one or the other type of matter as an initial condition; and (3) an extremely dense, high temperature state with zero net baryon number; i.e., matter/antimatter symmetry. Attention is given to the third assumption, which is the simplest and the most in keeping with current knowledge of the cosmos, especially as pertains the universality of 3 K background radiation. Mechanisms of galaxy formation are discussed, whereby matter and antimatter might have collided and annihilated each other, or have coexisted (and continue to coexist) at vast distances. It is pointed out that baryon symmetric big bang cosmology could probably be proved if an antinucleus could be detected in cosmic radiation.

  9. First observation of a baryonic Bc+ decay.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cojocariu, L; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, Rf; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gavrilov, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Giani', S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Heß, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lowdon, P; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; Dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szilard, D; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2014-10-10

    A baryonic decay of the B(c)(+) meson, B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+), is observed for the first time, with a significance of 7.3 standard deviations, in pp collision data collected with the LHCb detector and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0 fb(-1) taken at center-of-mass energies of 7 and 8 TeV. With the B(c)(+) → J/ψπ(+) decay as the normalization channel, the ratio of branching fractions is measured to be B(B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+))/B(B(c)(+) → J/ψπ(+)) = 0.143(-0.034)(+0.039)(stat) ± 0.013(syst). The mass of the B(c)(+) meson is determined as M(B(c)(+) = 6274.0 ± 1.8(stat) ± 0.4(syst) MeV/c(2), using the B(c)(+) → J/ψppπ(+) channel.

  10. Including the {delta}(1232) resonance in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Hacker, C.; Wies, N.; Scherer, S.; Gegelia, J.

    2005-11-01

    Baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit {delta}(1232) degrees of freedom is considered. The most general interactions of pions, nucleons, and {delta} consistent with all underlying symmetries as well as with the constraint structure of higher-spin fields are constructed. By use of the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme, a manifestly Lorentz-invariant effective-field theory with a systematic power counting is obtained. As applications, we discuss the mass of the nucleon, the pion-nucleon {sigma} term, and the pole of the {delta} propagator.

  11. Stealth dark matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X.-Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.; Lattice Strong Dynamics LSD Collaboration

    2015-10-01

    We present a new model of stealth dark matter: a composite baryonic scalar of an S U (ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND≥4 . All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to S U (4 ), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB≳300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. We briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  12. A scenario of heavy but visible baryonic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huo, Ran; Matsumoto, Shigeki; Tsai, Yue-Lin Sming; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2016-09-01

    We consider a model in which dark matter is a composite baryon of a dark sector governed by SU(3) gauge theory, with vector-like quarks also charged under U(1) Y . The model provides simple answer to the dark matter stability problem: it is a result of the accidental dark baryon number conservation. And with an analogy to QCD, all physical quantities of the dark matter can be calculated by rescaling the QCD experimental results. According to the thermal freeze-out mechanism the mass of the dark matter is predicted to be O(100) TeV in order to achieve a correct relic abundance. Such heavy dark matter is in general hard for detection due to small dark matter number density in the universe. However, dark baryon number in our model is not necessarily strictly preserved thanks to operators suppressed by the Planck scale, and such decay operator results in a decay lifetime marginal to the current detection bound. We show our model with O({10}^{27}) s dark matter decay life time can explain the AMS-02 anti-proton data, if it is experimentally interpreted as an access, although some theoretical uncertainty may weaken its significance. We also investigate other phenomena of this model such as the extragalactic gamma ray and neutrino signatures.

  13. The XXL Survey. XIII. Baryon content of the bright cluster sample

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.; Ettori, S.; Coupon, J.; Gastaldello, F.; Pierre, M.; Melin, J.-B.; Le Brun, A. M. C.; McCarthy, I. G.; Adami, C.; Chiappetti, L.; Faccioli, L.; Giles, P.; Lavoie, S.; Lefèvre, J. P.; Lieu, M.; Mantz, A.; Maughan, B.; McGee, S.; Pacaud, F.; Paltani, S.; Sadibekova, T.; Smith, G. P.; Ziparo, F.

    2016-06-01

    Traditionally, galaxy clusters have been expected to retain all the material accreted since their formation epoch. For this reason, their matter content should be representative of the Universe as a whole, and thus their baryon fraction should be close to the Universal baryon fraction Ωb/ Ωm. We make use of the sample of the 100 brightest galaxy clusters discovered in the XXL Survey to investigate the fraction of baryons in the form of hot gas and stars in the cluster population. Since it spans a wide range of mass (1013-1015 M⊙) and redshift (0.05-1.1) and benefits from a large set of multiwavelength data, the XXL-100-GC sample is ideal for measuring the global baryon budget of massive halos. We measure the gas masses of the detected halos and use a mass-temperature relation directly calibrated using weak-lensing measurements for a subset of XXL clusters to estimate the halo mass. We find that the weak-lensing calibrated gas fraction of XXL-100-GC clusters is substantially lower than was found in previous studies using hydrostatic masses. Our best-fit relation between gas fraction and mass reads fgas,500 = 0.055-0.006+0.007(M500/1014 M⊙)0.21-0.10+0.11. The baryon budget of galaxy clusters therefore falls short of the Universal baryon fraction by about a factor of two at r500,MT. Our measurements require a hydrostatic bias 1-b = MX/MWL = 0.72-0.07+0.08 to match the gas fraction obtained using lensing and hydrostatic equilibrium, which holds independently of the instrument considered. Comparing our gas fraction measurements with the expectations from numerical simulations, we find that our results favour an extreme feedback scheme in which a significant fraction of the baryons are expelled from the cores of halos. This model is, however, in contrast with the thermodynamical properties of observed halos, which might suggest that weak-lensing masses are overestimated. In light of these results, we note that a mass bias 1-b = 0.58 as required to reconcile Planck

  14. Forming supermassive black holes by accreting dark and baryon matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jian; Shen, Yue; Lou, Yu-Qing; Zhang, Shuangnan

    2006-01-01

    Given a large-scale mixture of self-interacting dark matter (SIDM) particles and baryon matter distributed in the early Universe, we advance here a two-phase accretion scenario for forming supermassive black holes (SMBHs) with masses around ~109Msolar at high redshifts z(>~6). The first phase is conceived to involve a rapid quasi-spherical and quasi-steady Bondi accretion of mainly SIDM particles embedded with baryon matter on to seed black holes (BHs) created at redshifts z<~ 30 by the first generation of massive Population III stars; this earlier phase rapidly gives birth to significantly enlarged seed BH masses of during z~ 20-15, where σ0 is the cross-section per unit mass of SIDM particles and Cs is the velocity dispersion in the SIDM halo referred to as an effective `sound speed'. The second phase of BH mass growth is envisaged to proceed primarily via baryon accretion, eventually leading to SMBH masses of MBH~ 109Msolar such SMBHs may form either by z~ 6 for a sustained accretion at the Eddington limit or later at lower z for sub-Eddington mean accretion rates. In between these two phases, there is a transitional yet sustained diffusively limited accretion of SIDM particles which in an eventual steady state would be much lower than the accretion rates of the two main phases. We intend to account for the reported detections of a few SMBHs at early epochs, e.g. Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) 1148+5251 and so forth, without necessarily resorting to either super-Eddington baryon accretion or very frequent BH merging processes. Only extremely massive dark SIDM haloes associated with rare peaks of density fluctuations in the early Universe may harbour such early SMBHs or quasars. Observational consequences are discussed. During the final stage of accumulating a SMBH mass, violent feedback in circumnuclear environs of a galactic nucleus leads to the central bulge formation and gives rise to the familiar empirical MBH-σb correlation inferred for nearby normal

  15. Holographic heavy ion collisions with baryon charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casalderrey-Solana, Jorge; Mateos, David; van der Schee, Wilke; Triana, Miquel

    2016-09-01

    We numerically simulate collisions of charged shockwaves in Einstein-Maxwell theory in anti-de Sitter space as a toy model of heavy ion collisions with non-zero baryon charge. The stress tensor and the baryon current become well described by charged hydrodynamics at roughly the same time. The effect of the charge density on generic observables is typically no larger than 15%. We find significant stopping of the baryon charge and compare our results with those in heavy ion collision experiments.

  16. More About the Light Baryon Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot

    2017-03-01

    We discuss the light baryon spectrum obtained from a recent quark-diquark calculation, implementing non-pointlike diquarks that are self-consistently calculated from their Bethe-Salpeter equations. We examine the orbital angular momentum content in the baryons' rest frame and highlight the fact that baryons carry all possible values of L compatible with their spin, without the restriction P=(-1)^L which is only valid nonrelativistically. We furthermore investigate the meaning of complex conjugate eigenvalues of Bethe-Salpeter equations, their possible connection with `anomalous' states, and we propose a method to eliminate them from the spectrum.

  17. Mass distributions in disk galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinsson, Thomas; Verheijen, Marc; Bershady, Matthew; Westfall, Kyle; Andersen, David; Swaters, Rob

    2017-03-01

    We present results on luminous and dark matter mass distributions in disk galaxies from the DiskMass Survey. As expected for normal disk galaxies, stars dominate the baryonic mass budget in the inner region of the disk; however, at about four optical scale lengths (hR ) the atomic gas starts to become the dominant contributor. Unexpectedly, we find the total baryon to dark-matter fraction within a galaxy stays nearly constant with radius from 1hR out to at least 6hR , with a baryon fraction of 15-50% among galaxies. On average, only one third of the mass within 2.2hR in a disk galaxy is baryonic and these baryons appear to have had only a minor effect on the distribution of the dark matter.

  18. Search for Popcorn Mesons in Events with Two Charmed Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hartfiel, Brandon; /SLAC

    2006-07-07

    The physics of this note is divided into two parts. The first part measures the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} {pi}kp continuum momentum spectrum at a center of mass energy of 10.54 GeV/c. The data sample consists of 15,400 {Lambda}{sub c} baryons from 9.46 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity. With more than 13 times more data than the best previous measurement, we are able to exclude some of the simpler, one parameter fragmentation functions. In the second part, we add the {Lambda}{sub c} {yields} K{sup 0}p mode, and look for events with a {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} and a {bar {Lambda}}{sub c}{sup -} in order to look for ''popcorn'' mesons formed between the baryon and antibaryon. We add on-resonance data, with a kinematic cut to eliminate background from B decays, as well as BaBar run 3 and 4 data to increase the total data size to 219.70 fb{sup -1}. We find 619 events after background subtraction. After a subtraction of 1.06 {+-} .09 charged pions coming from decays of known resonances to {Lambda}{sub c} + {eta}{pi}, we are left with 2.63 {+-} .21 additional charged pions in each of these events. This is significantly higher than the .5 popcorn mesons per baryon pair used in the current tuning of Pythia 6.2, the most widely used Monte Carlo generator. The extra mesons we find appear to be the first direct evidence of popcorn mesons, although some of them could be arising from hypothetical unresolved, unobserved charmed baryon resonances contributing decay mesons to our data. To contribute a significant fraction, this hypothesis requires a large number of such broad unresolved states and seems unlikely, but can not be completely excluded.

  19. Is the cygnet the quintessential baryon?

    PubMed Central

    Segal, I E

    1991-01-01

    The apparently new hadron-like particle ("cygnet") indicated by cosmic ray observations on certain neutron stars is predicted to be a spin 1/2 fermion of magnetic moment and charge 0 and lifetime infinity. This derives from the natural identification of the cygnet with the one hitherto unobserved fundamental fermion of chronometric particle theory, the x or "exon", which plays the role of a quintessential baryon. The "partons" are represented by the other fundamental fermions, consisting of e, nue, and numu; e.g., n = x + e+ + e-, p = x + e+ + nue. With further empirical assignments, chronometric theory has a potential for explaining diverse phenomena, such as mixing in the neutral kaon complex and the nature of the higher electrons. Its fundamental fermion and boson fields transform indecomposably under its symmetry group, the conformal group G. Theoretical elementary particles transforming irreducibly under G derive as successive quotients in a maximal chain of invariant subspaces. Mass fixing by Mach's principle breaks the symmetry down to microscopically observed covariance with respect to the Poincare group P0. The resulting representation is normally irreducible, but splits in the case of the K0 into two P0-irreducible components that are mixed by the excess of the chronometric over the relativistic energy ("gravity"), which provides a "superweak" force that may be explanatory of CP violation. PMID:11607152

  20. Gas-Rich Mergers in LCDM: Disk Survivability and the Baryonic Assembly of Galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, Kyle R.; Bullock, James S.; Wechsler, Risa H.; Maller, Ariyeh H.; /New York City Coll. Tech.

    2009-08-03

    We use N-body simulations and observationally-normalized relations between dark matter halo mass, stellar mass, and cold gas mass to derive robust expectations about the baryonic content of major mergers out to redshift z {approx} 2. First, we find that the majority of major mergers (m/M > 0.3) experienced by Milky Way size dark matter halos should have been gas-rich, and that gas-rich mergers are increasingly common at high redshift. Though the frequency of major mergers into galaxy halos in our simulations greatly exceeds the observed late-type galaxy fraction, the frequency of gas-poor major mergers is consistent with the observed fraction of bulge-dominated galaxies across the halo mass range M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11} - 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}}. These results lend support to the conjecture that mergers with high baryonic gas fractions play an important role in building and/or preserving disk galaxies in the universe. Secondly, we find that there is a transition mass below which a galaxy's past major mergers were primarily gas-rich and above which they were gas poor. The associated stellar mass scale corresponds closely to that marking the observed bimodal division between blue, star-forming, disk-dominated systems and red, bulge-dominated systems with old populations. Finally, we find that the overall fraction of a galaxy's cold baryons deposited directly via major mergers is substantial. Approximately 30% of the cold baryonic material in M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 10} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 11.5} M{sub {circle_dot}}) galaxies is accreted as cold gas in major mergers. For more massive galaxies with M{sub star} {approx} 10{sup 11} M{sub {circle_dot}} (M{sub DM} {approx} 10{sup 13} M{sub {circle_dot}} the fraction of baryons amassed in mergers is even higher, {approx} 50%, but most of these accreted baryons are delivered directly in the form of stars. This baryonic mass deposition is almost unavoidable, and provides a limit on

  1. Nucleon and Delta axial-vector couplings in 1/N{sub c}-Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose Luis; Calle Cordon, Alvaro

    2013-08-01

    In this contribution, baryon axial-vector couplings are studied in the framework of the combined 1/N{sub c} and chiral expansions. This framework is implemented on the basis of the emergent spin-flavor symmetry in baryons at large N{sub c} and HBChPT, and linking both expansions ({xi}-expansion), where 1/N{sub c} is taken to be a quantity order p. The study is carried out including one-loop contributions, which corresponds to order xi to the third for baryon masses and order {xi} square for the axial couplings.

  2. Suppression of Baryon Diffusion and Transport in a Baryon Rich Strongly Coupled Quark-Gluon Plasma.

    PubMed

    Rougemont, Romulo; Noronha, Jorge; Noronha-Hostler, Jacquelyn

    2015-11-13

    Five dimensional black hole solutions that describe the QCD crossover transition seen in (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD calculations at zero and nonzero baryon densities are used to obtain predictions for the baryon susceptibility, baryon conductivity, baryon diffusion constant, and thermal conductivity of the strongly coupled quark-gluon plasma in the range of temperatures 130  MeV≤T≤300  MeV and baryon chemical potentials 0≤μ(B)≤400  MeV. Diffusive transport is predicted to be suppressed in this region of the QCD phase diagram, which is consistent with the existence of a critical end point at larger baryon densities. We also calculate the fourth-order baryon susceptibility at zero baryon chemical potential and find quantitative agreement with recent lattice results. The baryon transport coefficients computed in this Letter can be readily implemented in state-of-the-art hydrodynamic codes used to investigate the dense QGP currently produced at RHIC's low energy beam scan.

  3. Baryonic matter perturbations in decaying vacuum cosmology

    SciTech Connect

    Marttens, R.F. vom; Zimdahl, W.; Hipólito-Ricaldi, W.S. E-mail: wiliam.ricaldi@ufes.br

    2014-08-01

    We consider the perturbation dynamics for the cosmic baryon fluid and determine the corresponding power spectrum for a Λ(t)CDM model in which a cosmological term decays into dark matter linearly with the Hubble rate. The model is tested by a joint analysis of data from supernovae of type Ia (SNIa) (Constitution and Union 2.1), baryonic acoustic oscillations (BAO), the position of the first peak of the anisotropy spectrum of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) and large-scale-structure (LSS) data (SDSS DR7). While the homogeneous and isotropic background dynamics is only marginally influenced by the baryons, there are modifications on the perturbative level if a separately conserved baryon fluid is included. Considering the present baryon fraction as a free parameter, we reproduce the observed abundance of the order of 5% independently of the dark-matter abundance which is of the order of 32% for this model. Generally, the concordance between background and perturbation dynamics is improved if baryons are explicitly taken into account.

  4. Observation of an Exotic Baryon with S=+1 in Photoproduction from the Proton

    SciTech Connect

    Valery Kubarovsky; Lei Guo; Dennis Weygand; Paul Stoler; Marco Battaglieri; Raffaella De Vita; Gary Adams; Ji Li; Mina Nozar; Carlos Salgado; Pawel Ambrozewicz; Eric Anciant; Marco Anghinolfi; Burin Asavapibhop; Gerard Audit; Thierry Auger; Harutyun AVAKIAN; Hovhannes Baghdasaryan; Jacques Ball; Steve Barrow

    2004-01-01

    The reaction {gamma}p {yields} {pi}{sup +} K{sup -} K{sup +}n was studied at Jefferson Lab using a tagged photon beam with an energy range of 3-5.47 GeV. A narrow baryon state with strangeness S = +1 and mass M = 1555 {+-} 10 MeV/c{sup 2} was observed in the nK{sup +} invariant mass spectrum. The peak's width is consistent with the CLAS resolution (FWHM = 26 MeV/c{sup 2}), and its statistical significance is 7.8 {+-} 1.0 {sigma}. A baryon with positive strangeness has exotic structure and cannot be described in the framework of the naive constituent quark model. The mass of the observed state is consistent with the mass predicted by a chiral soliton model for the {Theta}{sup +} baryon. In addition, the pK{sup +} invariant mass distribution was analyzed in the reaction {gamma} p {yields} K{sup -} K{sup +}p with high statistics in search of doubly-charged exotic baryon states. No resonance structures were found in this spectrum.

  5. Self Interacting Dark Matter and Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fry, Alexander B.; Governato, Fabio; Pontzen, Andrew; Quinn, Thomas R.

    2015-01-01

    Self Interacting Dark Matter (SIDM) is a cosmologically consistent alternative theory to Cold Dark Matter (CDM). SIDM is motivated as a solution to solve problems of the CDM model on small scales including the core/cusp problem, the missing satellites, and halo triaxiality. Each of these problems has secular astrophysical solutions, however taken together and along with suggestions from dark matter (DM) particle physics it is interesting to place constraints on how strong a self interaction would have to be for us to observe it and conversely the null hypothesis of whether we can rule out SIDM. We use high resolution cosmological simulations to compare evolution of stellar populations and (DM) components of dwarf galaxies. Our advanced smooth particle hydrodynamics N-body simulations combine SIDM with baryon physics including star formation, feedback recipes, metal line cooling, UV background, and thermal diffusion that eliminates artificial surface gas tension. We find for a constant SIDM cross section of 2 cm2 g-1 that DM interactions alone are not significant enough to create cores in dwarf galaxies and for low mass (Vpeak= 25 km s-1) galaxies the introduction of SIDM fails to decrease the DM central density. Our simulations with star formation feedback are in good agreement with observational estimates of Local Group dwarfs. The lower mass (below 108 M⊙) halos have inefficient SF, late formation time, and less DM interactions thus small field halos in CDM and SIDM remain cuspy. We conclude that constant cross section SIDM of 2 cm2 g-1 would be close to unobservable in dwarf galaxies and yet at the same time this cross section is already larger than some observational constraints found in larger (higher velocity) systems. We conclude that to differentiate between SIDM and CDM in an observationally detectable and astrophysically consistent manner a velocity dependent cross section that peaks for halos with small peak velocities will be necessary.

  6. Disentanglement of Electromagnetic Baryon Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadasivan, Daniel; Doring, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Through recent advances in experimental techniques, the precise extraction of the spectrum of baryonic resonances and their properties becomes possible. Helicity couplings at the resonance pole are fundamental parameters describing the electromagnetic properties of resonances and enabling the comparison of theoretical models with data. We have extracted them from experiments carried out at Jefferson Lab and other facilities using a multipole analysis within the Julich-Bonn framework. Special attention has been paid to the uncertainties and correlations of helicity couplings. Using the world data on the reaction γp -> ηp , we have calculated, for the first time, the covariance matrix. Our results are useful in several ways. They quantify uncertainties but also correlations of helicity couplings. Second, they can tell us quantitatively how useful a given polarization measurement is. Third, they can tell us how the measurement of a new observable would constrain and disentangle the resonance properties which could be helpful in the design of new experiments. Finally, on the subject of the missing resonance problem, model selection techniques and statistical tests allow us to quantify the significance of whether a resonance exists. Supported by NSF CAREER Grant No. PHY-1452055, NSF PIF Grant No. 1415459, by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics under contract DE-AC05-06OR23177, and by Research Center Julich through the HPC grant jikp07.

  7. Observation of a new Ξb baryon.

    PubMed

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    2012-06-22

    The observation of a new b baryon via its strong decay into Ξ(b)(-) π(+) (plus charge conjugates) is reported. The measurement uses a data sample of pp collisions at sqrt[s] = 7 TeV collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.3 fb(-1). The known Ξ(b)(-) baryon is reconstructed via the decay chain Ξ(b)(-) → J/ψΞ(-) → μ(+) μ(-) Λ(0) π(-), with Λ(0) → pπ(-). A peak is observed in the distribution of the difference between the mass of the Ξ(b)(-) π(+) system and the sum of the masses of the Ξ(b)(-) and π(+), with a significance exceeding 5 standard deviations. The mass difference of the peak is 14.84 ± 0.74(stat) ± 0.28(syst) MeV. The new state most likely corresponds to the J(P) = 3/2(+) companion of the Ξ(b).

  8. D -wave charmed and bottomed baryons from QCD sum rules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hua-Xing; Mao, Qiang; Hosaka, Atsushi; Liu, Xiang; Zhu, Shi-Lin

    2016-12-01

    We study the D -wave charmed baryons of S U (3 ) flavor 3¯ F using the method of QCD sum rules in the framework of heavy quark effective theory. We find that the Λc(2880 ), Ξc(3055 ), and Ξc(3080 ) can be well described by the D -wave S U (3 ) 3¯F charmed baryon multiplets of JP=3 /2+ and 5 /2+, which contain two λ -mode orbital excitations; i.e., the Λc(2880 ) has JP=5 /2+, and the Ξc(3055 ) and Ξc(3080 ) have JP=3 /2+ and 5 /2+, respectively. Our results also suggest that the Λc(2880 ) has a partner state, the Λc(3 /2+) of JP=3 /2+. Its mass is around 2.8 1-0.18+0.33 GeV , and the mass difference between it and the Λc(2880 ) is 2 8-24+45 MeV . We also evaluate the masses of their bottom partners.

  9. Dark and baryonic matter in the MareNostrum Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottlöber, S.; Yepes, G.; Khalatyan, A.; Sevilla, R.; Turchaninov, V.

    2006-11-01

    We report some results from one of the largest hydrodynamical cosmological simulations of large scale structures that has been done up to date. The MareNostrum Universe SPH simulation consists of 2 billion particles (2 × 10243) in a cubic box of 500 h-1 Mpc on a side. This simulation has been done in the MareNostrum parallel supercomputer at the Barcelona SuperComputer Center. Due to the large simulated volume and good mass resolution, our simulated catalog of dark matter halos comprises more than half a million objects with masses larger than a typical Milky Way galaxy halo. From this dataset we have studied several statistical properties such as the halo mass function, the distribution of shapes of dark and gas components within halos, the baryon fraction, cumulative void volume etc. This simulation is particularly useful to study the large scale distribution of baryons in the universe as a function of temperature and density. In this paper we also show the time evolution of the gas fractions at large scales.

  10. Search for doubly charmed baryons and study of charmed strange baryons at Belle

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, Y.; Iijima, T.; Adachi, I.; Aihara, H.; Asner, D. M.; Aushev, T.; Bakich, A. M.; Bala, A.; Ban, Y.; Bhardwaj, V.; Bhuyan, B.; Bobrov, A.; Bonvicini, G.; Bozek, A.; Bračko, M.; Browder, T. E.; Červenkov, D.; Chekelian, V.; Chen, A.; Cheon, B. G.; Chilikin, K.; Chistov, R.; Cho, K.; Chobanova, V.; Choi, Y.; Cinabro, D.; Dalseno, J.; Danilov, M.; Doležal, Z.; Drásal, Z.; Drutskoy, A.; Dutta, D.; Dutta, K.; Eidelman, S.; Farhat, H.; Fast, J. E.; Ferber, T.; Gaur, V.; Gabyshev, N.; Ganguly, S.; Garmash, A.; Gillard, R.; Goh, Y. M.; Golob, B.; Haba, J.; Hayasaka, K.; Hayashii, H.; He, X. H.; Horii, Y.; Hoshi, Y.; Hou, W. -S.; Hsiung, Y. B.; Inami, K.; Ishikawa, A.; Iwasaki, Y.; Iwashita, T.; Jaegle, I.; Julius, T.; Kang, J. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kiesling, C.; Kim, D. Y.; Kim, H. J.; Kim, J. B.; Kim, J. H.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, Y. J.; Klucar, J.; Ko, B. R.; Kodyš, P.; Korpar, S.; Krokovny, P.; Kuhr, T.; Kuzmin, A.; Kwon, Y. -J.; Lee, S. -H.; Li, J.; Li, Y.; Li Gioi, L.; Libby, J.; Liu, Y.; Liventsev, D.; Matvienko, D.; Miyabayashi, K.; Miyata, H.; Mizuk, R.; Moll, A.; Muramatsu, N.; Mussa, R.; Nagasaka, Y.; Nakano, E.; Nakao, M.; Nakazawa, H.; Nayak, M.; Nedelkovska, E.; Ng, C.; Niiyama, M.; Nisar, N. K.; Nishida, S.; Nitoh, O.; Ogawa, S.; Okuno, S.; Pakhlov, P.; Pakhlova, G.; Park, C. W.; Park, H.; Park, H. K.; Pedlar, T. K.; Peng, T.; Pestotnik, R.; Petrič, M.; Piilonen, L. E.; Ritter, M.; Röhrken, M.; Rostomyan, A.; Sahoo, H.; Saito, T.; Sakai, Y.; Sandilya, S.; Santelj, L.; Sanuki, T.; Savinov, V.; Schneider, O.; Schnell, G.; Schwanda, C.; Semmler, D.; Senyo, K.; Seon, O.; Shapkin, M.; Shen, C. P.; Shibata, T. -A.; Shiu, J. -G.; Shwartz, B.; Sibidanov, A.; Sohn, Y. -S.; Sokolov, A.; Solovieva, E.; Stanič, S.; Starič, M.; Steder, M.; Sumihama, M.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Tamponi, U.; Tanida, K.; Tatishvili, G.; Teramoto, Y.; Uchida, M.; Uehara, S.; Uglov, T.; Unno, Y.; Uno, S.; Van Hulse, C.; Vanhoefer, P.; Varner, G.; Vinokurova, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Wagner, M. N.; Wang, C. H.; Wang, M. -Z.; Wang, P.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Williams, K. M.; Won, E.; Yamashita, Y.; Yashchenko, S.; Zhang, Z. P.; Zhilich, V.; Zhulanov, V.; Zupanc, A.

    2014-03-17

    We report results of a study of doubly charmed baryons and charmed strange baryons. The analysis is performed using a 980 fb-1 data sample collected with the Belle detector at the KEKB asymmetric-energy e+e- collider.

  11. Conformal symmetry and light flavor baryon spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirchbach, M.; Compean, C. B.

    2010-08-01

    The degeneracy among parity pairs systematically observed in the N and Δ spectra is interpreted to hint on a possible conformal symmetry realization in the light flavor baryon sector in line with AdS5/CFT4. The case is made by showing that all the observed N and Δ resonances with masses below 2500 MeV distribute fairly well each over the first levels of a unitary representation of the conformal group, a representation that covers the spectrum of a quark-diquark system, placed directly on a conformally compactified Minkowski spacetime, R1⊗S3, as approached from the AdS5 cone. The free geodesic motion on the S3 manifold is described by means of the scalar conformal equation there, which is of the Klein-Gordon-type. The equation is then gauged by the curved Coulomb potential that has the form of a cotangent function. Conformal symmetry is not exact, this because the gauge potential slightly modifies the conformal centrifugal barrier of the free geodesic motion. Thanks to this, the degeneracy between P11-S11 pairs from same level is relaxed, while the remaining states belonging to same level remain practically degenerate. The model describes the correct mass ordering in the P11-S11 pairs through the spectra as a combined effect of the above conformal symmetry breaking, on the one side, and a parity change of the diquark from a scalar at low masses, to a pseudoscalar at higher masses, on the other. The quality of the wave functions is illustrated by calculations of realistic mean square charge radii and electric charge form factors on the examples of the proton, and the protonic P11(1440), and S11(1535) resonances. The scheme also allows for a prediction of the dressing function of an effective instantaneous gluon propagator from the Fourier transform of the gauge potential. We find a dressing function that is finite in the infrared and tends to zero at infinity.

  12. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web.

    PubMed

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, HuanYuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-03

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe's total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 10(5)-10(7) kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 10(7) kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster's gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  13. Warm-hot baryons comprise 5-10 per cent of filaments in the cosmic web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, Dominique; Jauzac, Mathilde; Shan, Huanyuan; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Erben, Thomas; Israel, Holger; Jullo, Eric; Klein, Matthias; Massey, Richard; Richard, Johan; Tchernin, Céline

    2015-12-01

    Observations of the cosmic microwave background indicate that baryons account for 5 per cent of the Universe’s total energy content. In the local Universe, the census of all observed baryons falls short of this estimate by a factor of two. Cosmological simulations indicate that the missing baryons have not condensed into virialized haloes, but reside throughout the filaments of the cosmic web (where matter density is larger than average) as a low-density plasma at temperatures of 105-107 kelvin, known as the warm-hot intergalactic medium. There have been previous claims of the detection of warm-hot baryons along the line of sight to distant blazars and of hot gas between interacting clusters. These observations were, however, unable to trace the large-scale filamentary structure, or to estimate the total amount of warm-hot baryons in a representative volume of the Universe. Here we report X-ray observations of filamentary structures of gas at 107 kelvin associated with the galaxy cluster Abell 2744. Previous observations of this cluster were unable to resolve and remove coincidental X-ray point sources. After subtracting these, we find hot gas structures that are coherent over scales of 8 megaparsecs. The filaments coincide with over-densities of galaxies and dark matter, with 5-10 per cent of their mass in baryonic gas. This gas has been heated up by the cluster’s gravitational pull and is now feeding its core. Our findings strengthen evidence for a picture of the Universe in which a large fraction of the missing baryons reside in the filaments of the cosmic web.

  14. Pion-nucleon scattering in covariant baryon chiral perturbation theory with explicit Delta resonances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, De-Liang; Siemens, D.; Bernard, V.; Epelbaum, E.; Gasparyan, A. M.; Gegelia, J.; Krebs, H.; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2016-05-01

    We present the results of a third order calculation of the pion-nucleon scattering amplitude in a chiral effective field theory with pions, nucleons and delta resonances as explicit degrees of freedom. We work in a manifestly Lorentz invariant formulation of baryon chiral perturbation theory using dimensional regularization and the extended on-mass-shell renormalization scheme. In the delta resonance sector, the on mass-shell renormalization is realized as a complex-mass scheme. By fitting the low-energy constants of the effective Lagrangian to the S- and P -partial waves a satisfactory description of the phase shifts from the analysis of the Roy-Steiner equations is obtained. We predict the phase shifts for the D and F waves and compare them with the results of the analysis of the George Washington University group. The threshold parameters are calculated both in the delta-less and delta-full cases. Based on the determined low-energy constants, we discuss the pion-nucleon sigma term. Additionally, in order to determine the strangeness content of the nucleon, we calculate the octet baryon masses in the presence of decuplet resonances up to next-to-next-to-leading order in SU(3) baryon chiral perturbation theory. The octet baryon sigma terms are predicted as a byproduct of this calculation.

  15. Understanding the internal dynamics of elliptical galaxies without non-baryonic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dabringhausen, J.; Kroupa, P.; Famaey, B.; Fellhauer, M.

    2016-12-01

    Assuming virial equilibrium and Newtonian dynamics, low-mass early-type galaxies have larger velocity dispersions than expected from the amount of baryons they contain. The conventional interpretation of this finding is that their dynamics is dominated by non-baryonic matter. However, there is also strong evidence that many low-mass early-type galaxies formed as tidal dwarf galaxies, which would contain almost no dark matter. Using an extensive catalogue of early-type galaxies, we therefore discuss how the internal dynamics of early-type galaxies in general can be understood by replacing the assumption of non-baryonic dark matter with two alternative assumptions. The first assumption is that Milgromian dynamics (i.e. MOdified Newtonian Dynamics [MOND]) is valid, which changes the effective gravitational force in the weak-field limit. The second assumption is that binary stars affect the observed line-of-sight velocity dispersions. Some moderate discrepancies between observed and predicted velocity dispersions remain also when these effects are implemented. Nevertheless, the observed velocity dispersions in early-type galaxies can then easily be explained without invoking the presence of non-baryonic dark matter in them, but with already documented variations of the galaxy-wide stellar initial mass function and non-equilibrium dynamics in some of the low-mass early-type galaxies.

  16. Observation of excited Λ(b)(0) baryons.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Abellan Beteta, C; Adametz, A; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amhis, Y; Anderson, J; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bates, A; Bauer, C; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Benayoun, M; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blanks, C; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bobrov, A; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Büchler-Germann, A; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Degaudenzi, H; Del Buono, L; Deplano, C; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dickens, J; Dijkstra, H; Diniz Batista, P; Domingo Bonal, F; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisele, F; Eisenhardt, S; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Elsby, D; Esperante Pereira, D; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Fave, V; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garnier, J-C; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gauvin, N; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Harrison, P F; Hartmann, T; He, J; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicks, E; Hoballah, M; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Huston, R S; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Ilten, P; Imong, J; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jahjah Hussein, M; Jans, E; Jansen, F; Jaton, P; Jean-Marie, B; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Keaveney, J; Kenyon, I R; Kerzel, U; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kim, Y M; Knecht, M; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kruzelecki, K; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Li, L; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Lieng, M; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; von Loeben, J; Lopes, J H; Lopez Asamar, E; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Luisier, J; Mac Raighne, A; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Magnin, J; Malde, S; Mamunur, R M D; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mangiafave, N; Marconi, U; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martin, L; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Massafferri, A; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Matveev, M; Maurice, E; Maynard, B; Mazurov, A; McCarthy, J; McGregor, G; McNulty, R; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Merkel, J; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Mylroie-Smith, J; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Pal, B K; Palacios, J; Palano, A; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perego, D L; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pessina, G; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pie Valls, B; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Plackett, R; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, E; Rodrigues, F; Rodriguez Perez, P; Rogers, G J; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Rosello, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salzmann, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santinelli, R; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schleich, S; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, M; Sobczak, K; Soler, F J P; Solomin, A; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Swientek, S; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Videau, I; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Visniakov, J; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wishahi, J; Witek, M; Witzeling, W; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, F; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2012-10-26

    Using pp collision data corresponding to 1.0 fb(-1) integrated luminosity collected by the LHCb detector, two narrow states are observed in the Λ(b)(0)π(+)π(-) spectrum with masses 5911.97±0.12(stat)±0.02(syst)±0.66(Λ(b)(0) mass) MeV/c(2) and 5919.77±0.08(stat)±0.02(syst)±0.66(Λ(b)(0) mass) MeV/c(2). The significances of the observations are 5.2 and 10.2 standard deviations, respectively. These states are interpreted as the orbitally excited Λ(b)(0) baryons, Λ(b)(*0)(5912) and Λ(b)(*0)(5920).

  17. Investigation of light baryons in a three-body quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2017-02-01

    We present a three-body quark model based on hypercentral approach for investigating the internal structure of light baryons. The analytically obtained energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the three-body problem have been used in the calculations of the mass spectrum of light baryons and electromagnetic elastic form factors of nucleon. The magnetic moments and charge radii of nucleon have also been calculated. We have compared the evaluated observables with experimental data and it has been shown that the present model provides a good description of the observed resonances.

  18. Systematic study of baryons in a three-body quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslanzadeh, M.; Rajabi, A. A.

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the structure of baryons within a three-body quark model based on hypercentral approach. We considered an SU(6)-invariant potential consisting of the well-known "Coulomb-plus-linear" potential plus some multipole interactions as V ( x) ∝ x - n with n > 2. Then, through an analytical solution, we obtained the energy eigenvalues and eigenfunctions of the three-body problem and evaluated some observables such as the mass spectrum of light baryons and both the electromagnetic elastic form factors, and the charge radii of nucleons. We compared our results with the experimental data and showed that the present model provides a good description of the observed resonances.

  19. Isospin splittings in the light-baryon octet from lattice QCD and QED.

    PubMed

    Borsanyi, Sz; Dürr, S; Fodor, Z; Frison, J; Hoelbling, C; Katz, S D; Krieg, S; Kurth, Th; Lellouch, L; Lippert, Th; Portelli, A; Ramos, A; Sastre, A; Szabo, K

    2013-12-20

    While electromagnetic and up-down quark mass difference effects on octet baryon masses are very small, they have important consequences. The stability of the hydrogen atom against beta decay is a prominent example. Here, we include these effects by adding them to valence quarks in a lattice QCD calculation based on Nf=2+1 simulations with five lattice spacings down to 0.054 fm, lattice sizes up to 6 fm, and average up-down quark masses all the way down to their physical value. This allows us to gain control over all systematic errors, except for the one associated with neglecting electromagnetism in the sea. We compute the octet baryon isomultiplet mass splittings, as well as the individual contributions from electromagnetism and the up-down quark mass difference. Our results for the total splittings are in good agreement with experiment.

  20. Strongly baryon-dominated disk galaxies at the peak of galaxy formation ten billion years ago

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genzel, R.; Schreiber, N. M. Förster; Übler, H.; Lang, P.; Naab, T.; Bender, R.; Tacconi, L. J.; Wisnioski, E.; Wuyts, S.; Alexander, T.; Beifiori, A.; Belli, S.; Brammer, G.; Burkert, A.; Carollo, C. M.; Chan, J.; Davies, R.; Fossati, M.; Galametz, A.; Genel, S.; Gerhard, O.; Lutz, D.; Mendel, J. T.; Momcheva, I.; Nelson, E. J.; Renzini, A.; Saglia, R.; Sternberg, A.; Tacchella, S.; Tadaki, K.; Wilman, D.

    2017-03-01

    In the cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies—stars and gas—are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark-matter halo. In the local (low-redshift) Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius—a hallmark of the dark-matter model. Comparisons between the dynamical mass, inferred from these velocities in rotational equilibrium, and the sum of the stellar and cold-gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation ten billion years ago, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon fractions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (owing to the chosen stellar initial-mass function and the calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves (showing rotation velocity as a function of disk radius) for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of a combination of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon-dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early

  1. Strongly baryon-dominated disk galaxies at the peak of galaxy formation ten billion years ago.

    PubMed

    Genzel, R; Schreiber, N M Förster; Übler, H; Lang, P; Naab, T; Bender, R; Tacconi, L J; Wisnioski, E; Wuyts, S; Alexander, T; Beifiori, A; Belli, S; Brammer, G; Burkert, A; Carollo, C M; Chan, J; Davies, R; Fossati, M; Galametz, A; Genel, S; Gerhard, O; Lutz, D; Mendel, J T; Momcheva, I; Nelson, E J; Renzini, A; Saglia, R; Sternberg, A; Tacchella, S; Tadaki, K; Wilman, D

    2017-03-15

    In the cold dark matter cosmology, the baryonic components of galaxies-stars and gas-are thought to be mixed with and embedded in non-baryonic and non-relativistic dark matter, which dominates the total mass of the galaxy and its dark-matter halo. In the local (low-redshift) Universe, the mass of dark matter within a galactic disk increases with disk radius, becoming appreciable and then dominant in the outer, baryonic regions of the disks of star-forming galaxies. This results in rotation velocities of the visible matter within the disk that are constant or increasing with disk radius-a hallmark of the dark-matter model. Comparisons between the dynamical mass, inferred from these velocities in rotational equilibrium, and the sum of the stellar and cold-gas mass at the peak epoch of galaxy formation ten billion years ago, inferred from ancillary data, suggest high baryon fractions in the inner, star-forming regions of the disks. Although this implied baryon fraction may be larger than in the local Universe, the systematic uncertainties (owing to the chosen stellar initial-mass function and the calibration of gas masses) render such comparisons inconclusive in terms of the mass of dark matter. Here we report rotation curves (showing rotation velocity as a function of disk radius) for the outer disks of six massive star-forming galaxies, and find that the rotation velocities are not constant, but decrease with radius. We propose that this trend arises because of a combination of two main factors: first, a large fraction of the massive high-redshift galaxy population was strongly baryon-dominated, with dark matter playing a smaller part than in the local Universe; and second, the large velocity dispersion in high-redshift disks introduces a substantial pressure term that leads to a decrease in rotation velocity with increasing radius. The effect of both factors appears to increase with redshift. Qualitatively, the observations suggest that baryons in the early (high

  2. Q-balls of clusterized baryonic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mişicu, Ş.; Mishustin, I. N.; Greiner, W.

    2017-01-01

    Properties of baryonic matter made of nucleons and α-particles are studied within a relativistic mean-field (RMF) model. The Lagrangian describing the relativistic field ϕ of α-particles is allowed to contain also self-interaction terms. Various types of RMF parametrizations are employed to calculate the energy of α-particles embedded in the baryonic matter. We first consider baryonic systems with small admixtures of α-particles and calculate the energy spectrum as a function of baryon density. Then we turn to the case of pure α-matter and derive once again the energy spectrum, this time as a function of α-particle density, with and without quartic self-interaction. In the second part of the paper, we focus on the ground-state properties (energy per particle, radii of the spherical lumps made of α-particles) of charge neutralized Q-balls formed of baryonic α-particles for the case of linear σ and ω fields and nonlinear (quartic+sextic) self-interactions of the ϕ field.

  3. Athena and the Missing Baryons in a Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicastro, Fabrizio; Kaastra, Jelle; Finoguenov, Alexis

    Baryons are missing at all astronomical scales in the Universe, from galaxies to the large scales of structure formation and the Universe as a whole. Hydro-dynamical simulations for the formation of structures, tend to reconcile the different 'missing-baryon' problems and predict that most of the baryonic matter of the Universe is hiding in a hot and tenuous gaseous phase (dubbed the 'Warm-Hot Intergalactic Medium, or WHIM), surrounding virialized structures and more at large in the low-redshift inter-galactic space. The only way to secure the detection of this important and highly elusive baryonic component of the Universe, to constrain its physical, chemical and dynamical states, and so to measure its cosmological mass density, is by observing the intergalactic medium with instruments characterized by large collecting areas at the energies at which these baryons are supposed to shine, the soft X-ray band, and spectral resolution sufficient to resolve the weak emission and absorption lines produced by the hot light metals (mainly C, O, Ne) in the WHIM. The X-IFU of Athena, with its 2 m2 effective area at 1 keV and its superb 2.5 eV spectral resolution, will be a powerful WHIM machine. Here I will first summarize the current state of the art and will then focus on the large impulse that Athena will provide for such a rich and still relatively unexplored field of research.

  4. Baryon spectrum from superconformal quantum mechanics and its light-front holographic embedding

    DOE PAGES

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-27

    We describe the observed light-baryon spectrum by extending superconformal quantum mechanics to the light front and its embedding in AdS space. This procedure uniquely determines the confinement potential for arbitrary half-integer spin. To this end, we show that fermionic wave equations in AdS space are dual to light-front supersymmetric quantum-mechanical bound-state equations in physical space-time. The specific breaking of conformal invariance explains hadronic properties common to light mesons and baryons, such as the observed mass pattern in the radial and orbital excitations, from the spectrum generating algebra. Lastly, the holographic embedding in AdS also explains distinctive and systematic features, suchmore » as the spin-J degeneracy for states with the same orbital angular momentum, observed in the light-baryon spectrum.« less

  5. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Cole, Philip L.

    2007-10-26

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  6. The Need for Polarization for Extracting Baryon Resonances and the NSTAR Program at CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    P.L. Cole

    2007-10-01

    We report on the NSTAR program in Hall B of JLab on using polarization observables to extract parameters of baryon resonances. The scientific purpose of the program is to improve the understanding of the underlying quark degrees of freedom, especially in the higher resonance regions, where we expect to uncover many of missing baryon resonances that mainly decay through multi-meson channels. With the high-quality beam of circularly- and linearly-polarized photons onto unpolarized and polarized proton and deteurium targets, and coupled with the nearly complete solid angle coverage of CLAS, we will extract the differential cross sections and associated polarization observables obtained by the photoproduction of vector mesons and kaons at center of mass energies of 1.7 to 2.2 GeV. The paper will primarily present the photon beam aspects of the excited baryon program.

  7. Big-bang nucleosynthesis and the baryon density of the universe.

    PubMed

    Copi, C J; Schramm, D N; Turner, M S

    1995-01-13

    For almost 30 years, the predictions of big-bang nucleosynthesis have been used to test the big-bang model to within a fraction of a second of the bang. The agreement between the predicted and observed abundances of deuterium, helium-3, helium-4, and lithium-7 confirms the standard cosmology model and allows accurate determination of the baryon density, between 1.7 x 10(-31) and 4.1 x 10(-31) grams per cubic centimeter (corresponding to about 1 to 15 percent of the critical density). This measurement of the density of ordinary matter is pivotal to the establishment of two dark-matter problems: (i) most of the baryons are dark, and (ii) if the total mass density is greater than about 15 percent of the critical density, as many determinations indicate, the bulk of the dark matter must be "non-baryonic," composed of elementary particles left from the earliest moments.

  8. Applications of AdS/QCD and Light-Front Holography to Baryon Physics

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Teramond, Guy F.; /Costa Rica U.

    2011-08-22

    The correspondence between theories in anti-de Sitter space and field theories in physical space-time leads to an analytic, semiclassical model for strongly-coupled QCD which has scale invariance at short distances and color confinement at large distances. These equations, for both mesons and baryons, give a very good representation of the observed hadronic spectrum, including a zero mass pion. Light-front holography allows hadronic amplitudes in the AdS fifth dimension to be mapped to frame-independent light-front wavefunctions of hadrons in physical space-time, thus providing a relativistic description of hadrons at the amplitude level. The meson and baryon wavefunctions derived from light-front holography and AdS/QCD also have remarkable phenomenological features, including predictions for the electromagnetic form factors and decay constants. The approach can be systematically improved using light-front Hamiltonian methods. Some novel features of QCD for baryon physics are also discussed.

  9. Baryon spectrum from superconformal quantum mechanics and its light-front holographic embedding

    SciTech Connect

    de Teramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Gunter; Brodsky, Stanley J.

    2015-02-27

    We describe the observed light-baryon spectrum by extending superconformal quantum mechanics to the light front and its embedding in AdS space. This procedure uniquely determines the confinement potential for arbitrary half-integer spin. To this end, we show that fermionic wave equations in AdS space are dual to light-front supersymmetric quantum-mechanical bound-state equations in physical space-time. The specific breaking of conformal invariance explains hadronic properties common to light mesons and baryons, such as the observed mass pattern in the radial and orbital excitations, from the spectrum generating algebra. Lastly, the holographic embedding in AdS also explains distinctive and systematic features, such as the spin-J degeneracy for states with the same orbital angular momentum, observed in the light-baryon spectrum.

  10. Semileptonic decays of Λ _c baryons in the relativistic quark model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faustov, R. N.; Galkin, V. O.

    2016-11-01

    Motivated by recent experimental progress in studying weak decays of the Λ _c baryon we investigate its semileptonic decays in the framework of the relativistic quark model based on the quasipotential approach with the QCD-motivated potential. The form factors of the Λ _c→ Λ lν _l and Λ _c→ nlν _l decays are calculated in the whole accessible kinematical region without extrapolations and additional model assumptions. Relativistic effects are systematically taken into account including transformations of baryon wave functions from the rest to moving reference frame and contributions of the intermediate negative-energy states. Baryon wave functions found in the previous mass spectrum calculations are used for the numerical evaluation. Comprehensive predictions for decay rates, asymmetries and polarization parameters are given. They agree well with available experimental data.

  11. Precision measurement of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Adrover, C; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Baesso, C; Balagura, V; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Bauer, Th; Bay, A; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brambach, T; van den Brand, J; Bressieux, J; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brook, N H; Brown, H; Burducea, I; Bursche, A; Busetto, G; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Callot, O; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Camboni, A; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carranza-Mejia, H; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casse, G; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chen, P; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Ciba, K; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coca, C; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bonis, I; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Di Canto, A; Dijkstra, H; Dogaru, M; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; van Eijk, D; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Fardell, G; Farinelli, C; Farry, S; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Furcas, S; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; Garofoli, J; Garosi, P; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gaspar, C; Gauld, R; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gorbounov, P; Gordon, H; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; Hartmann, T; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hicheur, A; Hicks, E; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hopchev, P; Hulsbergen, W; Hunt, P; Huse, T; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Iakovenko, V; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Kaballo, M; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Keune, A; Khanji, B; Kochebina, O; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kozlinskiy, A; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanciotti, E; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leo, S; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Li Gioi, L; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Liu, B; Liu, G; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lopez-March, N; Lu, H; Lucchesi, D; Luisier, J; Luo, H; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Maratas, J; Marconi, U; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martens, A; Martín Sánchez, A; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Maurice, E; Mazurov, A; Mc Skelly, B; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Moran, D; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Mountain, R; Mous, I; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Muresan, R; Muryn, B; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Nomerotski, A; Novoselov, A; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Oggero, S; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palczewski, T; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrick, G N; Patrignani, C; Pavel-Nicorescu, C; Pazos Alvarez, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perez Trigo, E; Pérez-Calero Yzquierdo, A; Perret, P; Perrin-Terrin, M; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Pessina, G; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Phan, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Polok, G; Poluektov, A; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Powell, A; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redford, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, A; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Roa Romero, D A; Robbe, P; Roberts, D A; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Sabatino, G; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Sannino, M; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sapunov, M; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Savrie, M; Savrina, D; Schaack, P; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Seco, M; Semennikov, A; Senderowska, K; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shatalov, P; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, O; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Sirendi, M; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Sparkes, A; Spradlin, P; Stagni, F; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Subbiah, V K; Sun, L; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Teodorescu, E; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Tolk, S; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Urner, D; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Van Dijk, M; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voß, C; Voss, H; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Webber, A D; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wicht, J; Wiechczynski, J; Wiedner, D; Wiggers, L; Wilkinson, G; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wu, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Yang, Z; Young, R; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, F; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L; Zvyagin, A

    2013-09-06

    The ratio of the Λb(0) baryon lifetime to that of the B(0) meson is measured using 1.0  fb(-1) of integrated luminosity in 7 TeV center-of-mass energy pp collisions at the LHC. The Λb(0) baryon is observed for the first time in the decay mode Λb(0)→J/ψpK-, while the B(0) meson decay used is the well known B(0)→J/ψπ+ K- mode, where the π+ K- mass is consistent with that of the K(*0)(892) meson. The ratio of lifetimes is measured to be 0.976±0.012±0.006, in agreement with theoretical expectations based on the heavy quark expansion. Using previous determinations of the B(0) meson lifetime, the Λb(0) lifetime is found to be 1.482±0.018±0.012  ps. In both cases, the first uncertainty is statistical and the second systematic.

  12. Baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, D.

    2016-06-01

    We are carrying out a panchromatic observing program to study the baryon content and dynamic state of galaxy clusters. In this talk, I will present results primarily from XMM-Newton observations of optically-selected clusters in the redshift range of 0.1-0.4. These clusters are selected because of their fortuitous alignment with background far-UV-bright QSOs, which thus allows for Ly-alpha and O VI absorption line spectroscopy with HST/COS, probing physical processes of the evolving intracluster medium, freshly accreted from the intergalactic medium and/or stripped out of individual galaxies, as well as the gaseous halos of individual cluster galaxies. Interestingly, such clusters tend to be dynamically young and often consist of merging subcluster pairs at similar redshifts. These subclusters themselves typically show substantial substructures, including strongly distorted radio lobes, as well as large position offsets between the diffuse X-ray centroids and the brightest galaxies. A comparison of the hot gas and stellar masses of each cluster with the expected cosmological baryonic mass fraction indicates a significant room for other gas components. I will also briefly examine the limitations of both optically and X-ray selected clusters, as well as how they may be used in a complementary fashion.

  13. Afterglows of Mildly Relativistic Supernovae: Baryon Loaded Blastwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborti, Sayan; Ray, Alak

    2011-08-01

    Relativistic supernovae have been discovered until recently only through their association with long duration Gamma Ray Bursts (GRB). As the ejecta mass is negligible in comparison to the swept up mass, the blastwaves of such explosions are well described by the Blandford-McKee (in the ultra relativistic regime) and Sedov-Taylor (in the non-relativistic regime) solutions during their afterglows. However, the recent discovery of the relativistic supernova SN 2009bb, without a detected GRB, has indicated the possibility of highly baryon loaded mildly relativistic outflows which remains in nearly free expansion phase during the radio afterglow. In this work, we consider the dynamics and emission from a massive, relativistic shell, launched by a Central Engine Driven EXplosion (CEDEX), decelerating adiabatically due to its collision with the pre-explosion circumstellar wind profile of the progenitor. We show that this model explains the observed radio evolution of the prototypical SN 2009bb and demonstrate that SN 2009bb had a highly baryon loaded, mildly relativistic outflow.

  14. Angular momentum properties of haloes and their baryon content in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zjupa, Jolanta; Springel, Volker

    2017-04-01

    The angular momentum properties of virialized dark matter haloes have been measured with good statistics in collisionless N-body simulations, but an equally accurate analysis of the baryonic spin is still missing. We employ the Illustris simulation suite, one of the first simulations of galaxy formation with full hydrodynamics that produces a realistic galaxy population in a sizeable volume, to quantify the baryonic spin properties for more than ∼320 000 haloes. We first compare the systematic differences between different spin parameter and halo definitions, and the impact of sample selection criteria on the derived properties. We confirm that dark-matter-only haloes exhibit a close to self-similar spin distribution in mass and redshift of lognormal form. However, the physics of galaxy formation radically changes the baryonic spin distribution. While the dark matter component remains largely unaffected, strong trends with mass and redshift appear for the spin of diffuse gas and the formed stellar component. With time, the baryons staying bound to the halo develop a misalignment of their spin vector with respect to dark matter, and increase their specific angular momentum by a factor of ∼1.3 in the non-radiative case and ∼1.8 in the full physics setup at z = 0. We show that this enhancement in baryonic spin can be explained by the combined effect of specific angular momentum transfer from dark matter on to gas during mergers and from feedback expelling low specific angular momentum gas from the halo. Our results challenge certain models for spin evolution and underline the significant changes induced by baryonic physics in the structure of haloes.

  15. Spectroscopy of doubly and triply-charmed baryons from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanath, M.; Edwards, Robert G.; Mathur, Nilmani; Peardon, Michael

    2013-11-01

    We present the ground and excited state spectra of doubly and triply-charmed baryons by using lattice QCD with dynamical clover fermions. A large set of baryonic operators that respect the symmetries of the lattice and are obtained after subduction from their continuum analogues are utilized. Using novel computational techniques correlation functions of these operators are generated and the variational method is exploited to extract excited states. The lattice spectra that we obtain have baryonic states with well-defined total spins up to 7/2 and the low lying states remarkably resemble the expectations of quantum numbers from SU(6) Ⓧ O(3) symmetry. Various energy splittings between the extracted states, including splittings due to hyperfine as well as spin-orbit coupling, are considered and those are also compared against similar energy splittings at other quark masses. Using those splittings for doubly-charmed baryons, and taking input of experimental Bc meson mass, we predict the mass splittings of B*c-Bc to be about 80 ± 8 MeV and mΩccb=8050±10 MeV.

  16. The Baryon Census in a Multiphase Intergalactic Medium: 30% of the Baryons May Still be Missing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shull, J. Michael; Smith, Britton D.; Danforth, Charles W.

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain ~10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Lyα forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 105-6 K traced by O VI λ1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z ⊙) and ionization fractions (f H I , f O VI ). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z ⊙)f O VI ≈ (0.015)(N O VI /1014 cm-2)0.70, with an N O VI -weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Lyα forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z)3 increase in absorber density, the (1 + z)4.4 rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Lyα forest (28% ± 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Lyα absorbers (25% ± 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% ± 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% ± 13%. Our simulations suggest that ~15% reside in hotter WHIM (T >= 106 K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Lyα and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N H I >= 1012.0 cm-2, N O VI >= 1012.5 cm-2, N O VII >= 1014.5 cm-2, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  17. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    SciTech Connect

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; Fleming, G. T.; Jin, X. -Y.; Kiskis, J.; Kribs, G. D.; Neil, E. T.; Osborn, J. C.; Rebbi, C.; Rinaldi, E.; Schaich, D.; Schroeder, C.; Syritsyn, S.; Vranas, P.; Weinberg, E.; Witzel, O.

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements, basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.

  18. Stealth Dark Matter: Dark scalar baryons through the Higgs portal

    DOE PAGES

    Appelquist, T.; Brower, R. C.; Buchoff, M. I.; ...

    2015-10-23

    We present a new model of "Stealth Dark Matter": a composite baryonic scalar of an SU(ND) strongly coupled theory with even ND ≥ 4. All mass scales are technically natural, and dark matter stability is automatic without imposing an additional discrete or global symmetry. Constituent fermions transform in vectorlike representations of the electroweak group that permit both electroweak-breaking and electroweak-preserving mass terms. This gives a tunable coupling of stealth dark matter to the Higgs boson independent of the dark matter mass itself. We specialize to SU(4), and investigate the constraints on the model from dark meson decay, electroweak precision measurements,more » basic collider limits, and spin-independent direct detection scattering through Higgs exchange. We exploit our earlier lattice simulations that determined the composite spectrum as well as the effective Higgs coupling of stealth dark matter in order to place bounds from direct detection, excluding constituent fermions with dominantly electroweak-breaking masses. A lower bound on the dark baryon mass mB ≳ 300 GeV is obtained from the indirect requirement that the lightest dark meson not be observable at LEP II. Furthermore, we briefly survey some intriguing properties of stealth dark matter that are worthy of future study, including collider studies of dark meson production and decay; indirect detection signals from annihilation; relic abundance estimates for both symmetric and asymmetric mechanisms; and direct detection through electromagnetic polarizability, a detailed study of which will appear in a companion paper.« less

  19. Strong decays of excited baryons in Large Nc QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Goity, Jose; Scoccola, Norberto

    2007-02-01

    We present the analysis of the strong decays widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  20. Observation of the Ωb- baryon and measurement of the properties of the Ξb- and Ωb- baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartsch, V.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Beringer, J.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bolla, G.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burke, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Choudalakis, G.; Chuang, S. H.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Cordelli, M.; Cortiana, G.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Derwent, P. F.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; Dionisi, C.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Donini, J.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Efron, J.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Genser, K.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, K.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harper, S.; Harr, R. F.; Harris, R. M.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heijboer, A.; Heinrich, J.; Henderson, C.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Huffman, B. T.; Hughes, R. E.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Knuteson, B.; Ko, B. R.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kubo, T.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-S.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Loreti, M.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Luci, C.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lyons, L.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maki, T.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Maruyama, T.; Mastrandrea, P.; Masubuchi, T.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Merkel, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Mumford, R.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Nagano, A.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Necula, V.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramonov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poukhov, O.; Pounder, N.; Prakoshyn, F.; Pronko, A.; Proudfoot, J.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Saltó, O.; Santi, L.; Sarkar, S.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Spreitzer, T.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Suzuki, T.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Terashi, K.; Tesarek, R.; Thom, J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Vallecorsa, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vidal, R.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vine, T.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Xie, S.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanello, L.; Zanetti, A.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2009-10-01

    We report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon Ωb- through the decay chain Ωb-→J/ψΩ-, where J/ψ→μ+μ-, Ω-→ΛK-, and Λ→pπ-, using 4.2fb-1 of data from pp¯ collisions at s=1.96TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0×10-8, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The Ωb- mass is measured to be 6054.4±6.8(stat)±0.9(syst)MeV/c2. The lifetime of the Ωb- baryon is measured to be 1.13-0.40+0.53(stat)±0.02(syst)ps. In addition, for the Ξb- baryon we measure a mass of 5790.9±2.6(stat)±0.8(syst)MeV/c2 and a lifetime of 1.56-0.25+0.27(stat)±0.02(syst)ps. Under the assumption that the Ξb- and Ωb- are produced with similar kinematic distributions to the Λb0 baryon, we find (σ(Ξb-)B(Ξb-→J/ψΞ-))/(σ(Λb0)B(Λb0→J/ψΛ))=0.167-0.025+0.037(stat)±0.012(syst) and (σ(Ωb-)B(Ωb-→J/ψΩ-))/(σ(Λb0)B(Λb0→J/ψΛ))=0.045-0.012+0.017(stat)±0.004(syst) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20GeV/c.

  1. Observational tests of Baryon symmetric cosmology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1982-01-01

    Observational evidence for Baryon symmetric (matter/antimatter) cosmology and future observational tests are reviewed. The most significant consequences of Baryon symmetric cosmology lie in the prediction of an observable cosmic background of gamma radiation from the decay of pi(0)-mesons produced in nucleon-antinucleon annihilations. Equations for the prediction of the amma ray background spectrum for the case of high redshifts are presented. The theoretical and observational plots of the background spectrum are shown to be in good agreement. Measurement of cosmic ray antiprotons and the use of high energy neutrino astronomy to look for antimatter elsewhere in the universe are also addressed.

  2. Exciting baryons: Now and in the future

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pennington, M. R.

    2012-04-01

    This is the final talk of NSTAR2011 conference. It is not a summary talk, but rather a looking forward to what still needs to be done in excited baryon physics. In particular, we need to hone our tools connecting experimental inputs with QCD. At present we rely on models that often have doubtful connections with the underlying theory, and this needs to be dramatically improved, if we are to reach definitive conclusions about the relevant degrees of freedom of excited baryons. Conclusions that we want to have by NSTAR2021.

  3. Probing the Baryon Cycle in Galaxy Outskirts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davé, Romeel

    2017-03-01

    Galaxies are born and grow within a cosmic ecosystem, in which they receive material from surrounding intergalactic gas via gravitationally-driven inflows and expel material via powerful galactic outflows. These processes, collectively referred to as the baryon cycle, are increasingly believed to govern galaxy growth over cosmic time. I discuss new insights on the baryon cycle using analytic models and hydrodynamical simulations of galaxy evolution, particularly emphasizing how galaxy outskirts are the prime locale within which to observe these processes in action by examining observational tracers such as rest-ultraviolet absorption lines and the neutral and molecular gas content of galaxies.

  4. Study of B-Meson Decays to Final States with a Single Charm Baryon

    SciTech Connect

    Majewski, Stephanie A.

    2007-08-01

    A study of B-meson decays to final states with a single charm baryon is presented based on data recorded by the BABAR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. Although the B meson is the lightest bottom-flavored meson, it is heavy enough to decay to a baryon made of three quarks and an antibaryon made of three antiquarks. By studying the baryonic weak decays of the B meson, we can investigate baryon production mechanisms in heavy meson decays. In particular, we measure the rates of the decays B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- and $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. Comparing these rates, we confirm an observed trend in baryonic B decays that the decay with the lower energy release, B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π-, is favored over $\\bar{B}$0 → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$. The dynamics of the baryon-antibaryon (Λ+c$\\bar{p}$) system in the three-body decay also provide insight into baryon-antibaryon production mechanisms. The B- → Λ+c$\\bar{p}$π- system is a laboratory for searches for excited #c baryon states; we observe the resonant decays B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ and B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$. This is the first observation of the decay B- → Σc(2800) 0$\\bar{p}$; however, the mass of the observed #c(2800)0 state is inconsistent with previous measurements. Finally, we examine the angular distribution of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ decays and measure the spin of the B- → Σc(2455) 0$\\bar{p}$ baryon to be J = 1/2, as predicted by the quark model.

  5. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibrated physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species,

  6. Cosmological implications of baryon acoustic oscillation measurements

    DOE PAGES

    Aubourg, Eric

    2015-12-01

    Here, we derive constraints on cosmological parameters and tests of dark energy models from the combination of baryon acoustic oscillation (BAO) measurements with cosmic microwave background (CMB) data and a recent reanalysis of Type Ia supernova (SN) data. Particularly, we take advantage of high-precision BAO measurements from galaxy clustering and the Lyman-α forest (LyaF) in the SDSS-III Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS). Treating the BAO scale as an uncalibrated standard ruler, BAO data alone yield a high confidence detection of dark energy; in combination with the CMB angular acoustic scale they further imply a nearly flat universe. Adding the CMB-calibratedmore » physical scale of the sound horizon, the combination of BAO and SN data into an “inverse distance ladder” yields a measurement of H0=67.3±1.1 km s-1 Mpc-1, with 1.7% precision. This measurement assumes standard prerecombination physics but is insensitive to assumptions about dark energy or space curvature, so agreement with CMB-based estimates that assume a flat ΛCDM cosmology is an important corroboration of this minimal cosmological model. For constant dark energy (Λ), our BAO+SN+CMB combination yields matter density Ωm=0.301±0.008 and curvature Ωk=-0.003±0.003. When we allow more general forms of evolving dark energy, the BAO+SN+CMB parameter constraints are always consistent with flat ΛCDM values at ≈1σ. And while the overall χ2 of model fits is satisfactory, the LyaF BAO measurements are in moderate (2–2.5σ) tension with model predictions. Models with early dark energy that tracks the dominant energy component at high redshift remain consistent with our expansion history constraints, and they yield a higher H0 and lower matter clustering amplitude, improving agreement with some low redshift observations. Expansion history alone yields an upper limit on the summed mass of neutrino species, Σmν<0.56 eV (95% confidence), improving to Σmν<0.25 eV if we include

  7. Missing metals and baryons in galaxies: Clues from our Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anjali; Mathur, Smita

    2016-06-01

    It is well-known that most galaxies are missing most of their baryonic mass. Perhaps more surprisingly, they also seem to be missing most of their metals. Our Milky Way galaxy, like other nearby galaxies, is missing most of its baryons. Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation suggest that the missing baryonic mass should reside in the circum-galactic medium (CGM), in a warm-hot gas phase at temperatures between one million and 10 million K. Although theoretical models predict the existence of the warm-hot gas in the CGM, detecting and characterizing the diffuse CGM has been difficult. At the expected temperatures the baryons are in the form of highly ionized plasma, observable in soft X-rays. A combination of absorption and emission studies at soft X-ray energies is required to fully characterize this warm-hot CGM. Recently, combining the Chandra observations of OVII and OVIII absorption lines and XMM-Newton and Suzaku measurements of the Galactic halo emission measure, we found that there is a huge reservoir of ionized gas around the Milky Way, with the mass of over 2 billion solar masses and the radius of over 100 kpc.I will present Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations probing our Milky Way halo in absorption and emission. Our results show that the Milky Way halo contains a huge reservoir of warm-hot gas that may account for a large fraction of missing baryons and metals. I'll review current status of this field, discuss implications of our results to models of galaxy formation and evolution and outline paths for future progress.

  8. Missing metals and baryons in galaxies: Clues from our Milky Way

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anjali

    2016-04-01

    It is well-known that most galaxies are missing most of their baryonic mass. Perhaps more surprisingly, they also seem to be missing most of their metals. Our Milky Way galaxy, like other nearby galaxies, is missing most of its baryons. Cosmological simulations of galaxy formation suggest that the missing baryonic mass should reside in the circum-galactic medium (CGM), in a warm-hot gas phase at temperatures between one million and 10 million K. Although theoretical models predict the existence of the warm-hot gas in the CGM, detecting and characterizing the diffuse CGM has been difficult. At the expected temperatures the baryons are in the form of highly ionized plasma, observable in soft X-rays. A combination of absorption and emission studies at soft X-ray energies is required to fully characterize this warm-hot CGM. Recently, combining the Chandra observations of OVII and OVIII absorption lines and XMM-Newton and Suzaku measurements of the Galactic halo emission measure, we found that there is a huge reservoir of ionized gas around the Milky Way, with the mass of over 2 billion solar masses and the radius of over 100 kpc.I will present Chandra, XMM-Newton and Suzaku observations probing our Milky Way halo in absorption and emission. Our results show that the Milky Way halo contains a huge reservoir of warm-hot gas that may account for a large fraction of missing baryons and metals. I'll review current status of this field, discuss implications of our results to models of galaxy formation and evolution and outline paths for future progress.

  9. Strangeness -2 and -3 Baryons in a Constituent Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts

    2007-09-19

    We apply a quark model developed in earlier work to the spectrum of baryons with strangeness -2 and -3. The model describes a number of well-established baryons successfully, and application to cascade baryons allows the quantum numbers of some known states to be deduced.

  10. The baryonic self similarity of dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Alard, C.

    2014-06-20

    The cosmological simulations indicates that dark matter halos have specific self-similar properties. However, the halo similarity is affected by the baryonic feedback. By using momentum-driven winds as a model to represent the baryon feedback, an equilibrium condition is derived which directly implies the emergence of a new type of similarity. The new self-similar solution has constant acceleration at a reference radius for both dark matter and baryons. This model receives strong support from the observations of galaxies. The new self-similar properties imply that the total acceleration at larger distances is scale-free, the transition between the dark matter and baryons dominated regime occurs at a constant acceleration, and the maximum amplitude of the velocity curve at larger distances is proportional to M {sup 1/4}. These results demonstrate that this self-similar model is consistent with the basics of modified Newtonian dynamics (MOND) phenomenology. In agreement with the observations, the coincidence between the self-similar model and MOND breaks at the scale of clusters of galaxies. Some numerical experiments show that the behavior of the density near the origin is closely approximated by a Einasto profile.

  11. The CMU Baryon Amplitude Analysis Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellis, Matt

    2007-05-01

    The PWA group at Carnegie Mellon University has developed a comprehensive approach and analysis package for the purpose of extracting the amplitudes for photoproduced baryon resonances. The end goal is to identify any missing resonances that are predicted by the constituent quark model, but not definitively observed in experiments. The data comes from the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab.

  12. Weak radiative baryonic decays of B mesons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2004-11-01

    Weak radiative baryonic B decays B{yields}B{sub 1}B{sub 2}-bar{gamma} are studied under the assumption of the short-distance b{yields}s{gamma} electromagnetic penguin transition dominance. The relations among the decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  13. Beauty baryon decays: a theoretical overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yu-Ming

    2014-11-01

    I overview the theoretical status and recent progress on the calculations of beauty baryon decays focusing on the QCD aspects of the exclusive semi-leptonic Λb → plμ decay at large recoil and theoretical challenges of radiative and electro-weak penguin decays Λb → Λγ,Λl+l-.

  14. On the nature of the baryon asymmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1984-01-01

    Whether the baryon asymmetry in the universe is a locally varying or universally fixed number is examined with focus on the existence of a possible matter antimatter domain structure in the universe arising from a GUT with spontaneous CP symmetry breaking. Theoretical considerations and observational data and astrophysical tests relating to this fundamental question are reviewed.

  15. Parity doubling of nucléons, Delta and Omega baryons across the deconfinement phase transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aarts, Gert; Allton, Chris; De Boni, Davide; Hands, Simon; Praki, Chrisanthi; Jäger, Benjamin; Skullerud, Jon-Ivar

    2017-03-01

    In this work we analyse positive- and negative-parity channels for the nucleón (spin 1/2 octet), Δ and Ω baryons (spin 3/2 decuplet) using lattice QCD. In Nature, at zero temperature, chiral symmetry is spontaneously broken, causing positive- and negative-parity ground states to have different masses. However, chiral symmetry is expected to be restored (for massless quarks) around the crossover temperature, implying that the two opposite parity channels should become degenerate. Here we study what happens in a temperature range which includes both the hadronic and the quark gluon plasma (QGP) phase. By analysing the correlation and spectral functions via exponential fits and the Maximum Entropy Method respectively, we have found parity doubling for the nucleon and Δ baryon channels in the QGP phase. For the Ω baryon we see a clear signal of parity doubling at the crossover temperature, which is however not complete, due to the nonzero strange quark mass. Moreover, in-medium effects in the hadronic phase are evident for all three baryons, in particular for the negative-parity ground states. This might have implications for the hadron resonance gas model. In this work we used the FASTSUM anisotropic Nf = 2 + 1 ensembles.

  16. Cosmological baryon and lepton number in the presence of electroweak fermion-number violation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harvey, Jeffrey A.; Turner, Michael S.

    1990-01-01

    In the presence of rapid fermion-number violation due to nonperturbative electroweak effects certain relations between the baryon number of the Universe and the lepton numbers of the Universe are predicted. In some cases the electron-neutrino asymmetry is exactly specified in terms of the baryon asymmetry. Without introducing new particles, beyond the usual quarks and leptons, it is necessary that the Universe possess a nonzero value of B - L prior to the epoch of fermion-number violation if baryon and lepton asymmetries are to survive. Contrary to intuition, even though electroweak processes violate B + L, a nonzero value of B + L persists after the epoch of rapid fermion-number violation. If the standard model is extended to include lepton-number violation, for example through Majorana neutrino masses, then electroweak processes will reduce the baryon number to zero even in the presence of an initial B - L unless 20 M(sub L) approximately greater than the square root of (T(sub B - L) m(sub P1)) where M(sub L) sets the scale of lepton number violation and T(sub B - L) is the temperature at which a B - L asymmetry is produced. In many models this implies that neutrinos must be so light that they cannot contribute appreciably to the mass density of the Universe.

  17. Observation of the Ξ(b)(0) baryon.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Álvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Appel, J A; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Auerbach, B; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauce, M; Bauer, G; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Bland, K R; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brigliadori, L; Brisuda, A; Bromberg, C; Brucken, E; Bucciantonio, M; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clarke, C; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Dagenhart, D; d'Ascenzo, N; Datta, M; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; Devoto, F; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, M; Dorigo, T; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Eppig, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Funakoshi, Y; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerchtein, E; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldin, D; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Hamaguchi, A; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hocker, A; Hopkins, W; Horn, D; Hou, S; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussain, N; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Karchin, P E; Kasmi, A; Kato, Y; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirby, M; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leo, S; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Limosani, A; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, Q; Liu, T; Lockwitz, S; Loginov, A; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Mitra, A; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Ortolan, L; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Paramonov, A A; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pilot, J; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Rescigno, M; Riddick, T; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rubbo, F; Ruffini, F; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Sakurai, Y; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Saveliev, V; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sissakian, A; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stancari, M; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Sudo, Y; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Takemasa, K; Takeuchi, Y; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Trovato, M; Tu, Y; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; Varganov, A; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vizán, J; Vogel, M; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R L; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Wick, F; Williams, H H; Wilson, J S; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Wu, Z; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, T; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W-M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2011-09-02

    The observation of the bottom, strange baryon Ξ(b)(0) through the decay chain Ξ(b)(0)→Ξ(c)(+)π-, where ΞΞ(c)(+)→Ξ- π+ π+, Ξ-→Λπ-, and Λ→pπ-, is reported by using data corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 4.2  fb(-1) from pp collisions at square root(s)=1.96  TeV recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal of 25.3(-5.4)(+5.6) candidates is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 3.6×10(-12), corresponding to 6.8 gaussian standard deviations. The Ξ(b)(0) mass is measured to be 5787.8±5.0(stat)±1.3(syst)  MeV/c2. In addition, the Ξ(b)- baryon is observed through the process Ξ(b)-→Ξ(c)(0)π-, where Ξ(c)(0)→Ξ- π+, Ξ-→Λπ-, and Λ→pπ-.

  18. Magnetic moments of negative parity baryons in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2014-03-01

    Using the most general form of the interpolating current for the octet baryons, the magnetic moments of the negative-parity baryons are calculated within the light-cone sum rules. The contributions coming from diagonal transitions of the positive-parity baryons and also from a nondiagonal transition between positive- and negative-parity baryons are eliminated by considering the combinations of different sum rules corresponding to the different Lorentz structures. A comparison of our results on magnetic moments of the negative-parity baryons with the other approaches existing in the literature is presented.

  19. Magnetic moments of JP=3/2- baryons in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliev, T. M.; Savcı, M.

    2014-12-01

    The magnetic moments of the low lying, negative parity, spin-3 /2 baryons, including the Λ* baryon, are calculated within the light cone QCD sum rules method. The contributions coming from the positive parity, spin-3 /2 baryons, as well as from the positive and negative parity spin-1 /2 baryons are eliminated by constructing combinations of various invariant amplitudes corresponding to the coefficients of the different Lorentz structures. We also present the results for the magnetic moments of the positive parity, spin-3 /2 baryons.

  20. Flavor structure of Λ baryons from lattice QCD: From strange to charm quarks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gubler, Philipp; Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2016-12-01

    We study Λ baryons of spin-parity 1/2± with either a strange or charm valence quark in full 2 +1 flavor lattice QCD. Multiple S U (3 ) singlet and octet operators are employed to generate the desired single baryon states on the lattice. Via the variational method, the couplings of these states to the different operators provide information about the flavor structure of the Λ baryons. We make use of the gauge configurations of the PACS-CS Collaboration and chirally extrapolate the results for the masses and S U (3 ) flavor components to the physical point. We furthermore gradually change the hopping parameter of the heaviest quark from strange to charm to study how the properties of the Λ baryons evolve as a function of the heavy quark mass. It is found that the baryon energy levels increase almost linearly with the quark mass. Meanwhile, the flavor structure of most of the states remains stable, with the exception of the lowest 1/2- state, which changes from a flavor singlet Λ to a Λc state with singlet and octet components of comparable size. Finally, we discuss whether our findings can be interpreted with the help of a simple quark model and find that the negative-parity Λc states can be naturally explained as diquark excitations of the light u and d quarks. On the other hand, the quark-model picture does not appear to be adequate for the negative-parity Λ states, suggesting the importance of other degrees of freedom to describe them.

  1. Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Quigg, Chris

    2007-12-05

    In the classical physics we inherited from Isaac Newton, mass does not arise, it simply is. The mass of a classical object is the sum of the masses of its parts. Albert Einstein showed that the mass of a body is a measure of its energy content, inviting us to consider the origins of mass. The protons we accelerate at Fermilab are prime examples of Einsteinian matter: nearly all of their mass arises from stored energy. Missing mass led to the discovery of the noble gases, and a new form of missing mass leads us to the notion of dark matter. Starting with a brief guided tour of the meanings of mass, the colloquium will explore the multiple origins of mass. We will see how far we have come toward understanding mass, and survey the issues that guide our research today.

  2. Decay widths of ground-state and excited {Xi}{sub b} baryons in a nonrelativistic quark model

    SciTech Connect

    Limphirat, Ayut; Kobdaj, Chinorat; Suebka, Prasart; Yan, Yupeng

    2010-11-15

    Decay processes of ground and excited bottom baryons are studied in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} nonrelativistic quark model with all model parameters fixed in the sector of light quarks. Using as an input the recent mass of {Xi}{sub b} and the theoretical masses of {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}, narrow decay widths are predicted for the ground-state bottom baryons {Xi}{sub b}{sup *} and {Xi}{sub b}{sup '}. The work predicts large decay widths, about 100 MeV for the {rho}-type orbital excitation states of {Xi}{sub b}.

  3. The extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: a cosmological forecast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Gong-Bo; Wang, Yuting; Ross, Ashley J.; Shandera, Sarah; Percival, Will J.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Myers, Adam D.; Brownstein, Joel R.; Comparat, Johan; Delubac, Timothée; Gao, Pengyuan; Hojjati, Alireza; Koyama, Kazuya; McBride, Cameron K.; Meza, Andrés; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Palanque-Delabrouille, Nathalie; Pogosian, Levon; Prada, Francisco; Rossi, Graziano; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Tao, Charling; Wang, Dandan; Yèche, Christophe; Zhang, Hanyu; Zhang, Yuecheng; Zhou, Xu; Zhu, Fangzhou; Zou, Hu

    2016-04-01

    We present a science forecast for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) survey. Focusing on discrete tracers, we forecast the expected accuracy of the baryonic acoustic oscillation (BAO), the redshift-space distortion (RSD) measurements, the fNL parameter quantifying the primordial non-Gaussianity, the dark energy and modified gravity parameters. We also use the line-of-sight clustering in the Lyman α forest to constrain the total neutrino mass. We find that eBOSS luminous red galaxies, emission line galaxies and clustering quasars can achieve a precision of 1, 2.2 and 1.6 per cent, respectively, for spherically averaged BAO distance measurements. Using the same samples, the constraint on fσ8 is expected to be 2.5, 3.3 and 2.8 per cent, respectively. For primordial non-Gaussianity, eBOSS alone can reach an accuracy of σ(fNL) ˜ 10-15. eBOSS can at most improve the dark energy figure of merit by a factor of 3 for the Chevallier-Polarski-Linder parametrization, and can well constrain three eigenmodes for the general equation-of-state parameter. eBOSS can also significantly improve constraints on modified gravity parameters by providing the RSD information, which is highly complementary to constraints obtained from weak lensing measurements. A principal component analysis shows that eBOSS can measure the eigenmodes of the effective Newton's constant to 2 per cent precision; this is a factor of 10 improvement over that achievable without eBOSS. Finally, we derive the eBOSS constraint (combined with Planck, Dark Energy Survey and BOSS) on the total neutrino mass, σ(Σmν) = 0.03 eV (68 per cent CL), which in principle makes it possible to distinguish between the two scenarios of neutrino mass hierarchies.

  4. Observation of Λ b 0 → ψ(2S)pK- and Λ b 0 → J/ ψπ + π -pK- decays and a measurement of the Λ b 0 baryon mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Abellán Beteta, C.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Alvarez Cartelle, P.; Alves, A. A.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Andreassi, G.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Aquines Gutierrez, O.; Archilli, F.; d'Argent, P.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Bellee, V.; Belloli, N.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Betti, F.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bifani, S.; Billoir, P.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borgheresi, A.; Borghi, S.; Borisyak, M.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Buchanan, E.; Burr, C.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Carvalho Akiba, K.; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Castillo Garcia, L.; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chatzikonstantinidis, G.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Cid Vidal, X.; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Cruz Torres, M.; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dall'Occo, E.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; De Aguiar Francisco, O.; De Bruyn, K.; De Capua, S.; De Cian, M.; De Miranda, J. M.; De Paula, L.; De Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Demmer, M.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Dosil Suárez, A.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dungs, K.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Fazzini, D.; Ferguson, D.; Fernandez Albor, V.; Ferrari, F.; Ferreira Rodrigues, F.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fleuret, F.; Fohl, K.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forshaw, D. C.; Forty, R.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; García Pardiñas, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Girard, O. G.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Grabalosa Gándara, M.; Graciani Diaz, R.; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadavizadeh, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Heister, A.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Hernando Morata, J. A.; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hongming, L.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hushchyn, M.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kecke, M.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khairullin, E.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Kirn, T.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Kozeiha, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Krzemien, W.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kuonen, A. K.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Lemos Cid, E.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Liu, X.; Loh, D.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lucchesi, D.; Lucio Martinez, M.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Lusardi, N.; Lusiani, A.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Marin Benito, C.; Marino, P.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martin, M.; Martinelli, M.; Martinez Santos, D.; Martinez Vidal, F.; Martins Tostes, D.; Massacrier, L. M.; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Melnychuk, D.; Merk, M.; Merli, A.; Michielin, E.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Molina Rodriguez, J.; Monroy, I. A.; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A. B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, D.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nandi, A.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Nieswand, S.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Osorio Rodrigues, B.; Otalora Goicochea, J. M.; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Pappenheimer, C.; Parker, W.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Pepe Altarelli, M.; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Picatoste Olloqui, E.; Pietrzyk, B.; Pikies, M.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Piucci, A.; Playfer, S.; Plo Casasus, M.; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Puig Navarro, A.; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rama, M.; Ramos Pernas, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; dos Reis, A. C.; Renaudin, V.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rives Molina, V.; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Rodriguez Lopez, J. A.; Rodriguez Perez, P.; Rogozhnikov, A.; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Romero Vidal, A.; Ronayne, J. W.; Rotondo, M.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz Valls, P.; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Saitta, B.; Salustino Guimaraes, V.; Sanchez Mayordomo, C.; Sanmartin Sedes, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santamarina Rios, C.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schael, S.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schubiger, M.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sergi, A.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Silva de Oliveira, L.; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, I. T.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza De Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Stefkova, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tayduganov, A.; Tekampe, T.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Traill, M.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Vazquez Gomez, R.; Vazquez Regueiro, P.; Vázquez Sierra, C.; Vecchi, S.; van Veghel, M.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Vieites Diaz, M.; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Volkov, V.; Vollhardt, A.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wicht, J.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Williams, T.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wraight, K.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yin, H.; Yu, J.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zheng, Y.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.; Zhukov, V.; Zucchelli, S.

    2016-05-01

    The decays Λ b 0 → ψ(2S)pK- and Λ b 0 → J/ ψπ + π -pK- are observed in a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3 fb-1, collected in proton-proton collisions at 7 and 8 TeV centre-of-mass energies by the LHCb detector. The ψ(2S) mesons are reconstructed through the decay modes ψ(2S) → μ+μ- and ψ(2S) → J/ψ π + π -.

  5. C P -violating baryon oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKeen, David; Nelson, Ann E.

    2016-10-01

    We enumerate the conditions necessary for C P violation to be manifest in n -n ¯ oscillations and build a simple model that can give rise to such effects. We discuss a possible connection between neutron oscillations and dark matter, provided the mass of the latter lies between mp-me and mp+me. We apply our results to a possible baryogenesis scenario involving C P violation in the oscillations of the Ξ0.

  6. A Study of Excited Charm-Strange Baryons withEvidence for new Baryons Xi_c(3055)+ and Xi_c(3123)+

    SciTech Connect

    Collaboration, The BABAR; Aubert, B.

    2007-10-30

    We present a study of excited charm-strange baryon states produced in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilations at or near a center-of-mass energy of 10.58 GeV, in a data sample with an integrated luminosity of 384 fb{sup -1} recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e+e storage rings at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. We study strong decays of charm-strange baryons to {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sub S}{sup 0}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}K{sup -}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}. This study confirms the existence of the states {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +}, {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup +}, and {Xi}{sub c}(3077){sup -}, with a more accurate determination of the {Xi}{sub c}(2980){sup +} mass and width. We also present evidence for two new states, {Xi}{sub c}(3055){sup +} and {Xi}{sub c}(3123){sup +}, decaying through the intermediate resonant modes {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}K{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub c}(2520){sup ++}K{sup -}, respectively. For each of these baryons, we measure the yield in each final state, determine the statistical significance, and calculate the product of the production cross-section and branching fractions. We also measure the masses and widths of these excited charm-strange baryons.

  7. Estimation of ground state pentaquark masses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, K.; Ritjoho, N.; Srisuphaphon, S.; Yan, Y.

    2014-04-01

    Permutation groups are applied to analyze the symmetries of multiquark systems and wave functions of pentaquark states are constructed systematically in the language of Yamanouchi basis. We estimate the mass of baryons in the constituent quark model with one-gluon-exchange interaction, assuming that baryons consist of the q3 component as well as the q4/line q pentaquark component.

  8. Halo Microlensing and Dark Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crotts, A. P. S.

    1993-12-01

    (While Pierce lectures review past accomplishments, customarily, this talk concerns efforts which we have pursued for some years and which are now reaching fruition. We present elsewhere at this meeting results from research cited for the Prize.) Dark matter exists in the halos of spiral galaxies, and the least radical alternative for its identity is normal matter produced by primordial nucleosynthesis. This matter could easily be hidden in large, condensed objects. Paczynski pointed out in 1986 that if condensations of Galactic halo matter are sufficiently massive, they will produce detectable amplification of background starlight by gravitational lensing. Several groups recently reported possible detections of this effect after surveying large numbers of stars in the Galactic Bulge and LMC. The connection between these events and massive, dark halos is unclear and likely to remain so for some time, given the rate at which they are detected. Following Paczynski's realization, we stressed that a much higher event rate, a statistical control sample, sensitivity to a much broader mass range, and modulation of the predicted lensing rate with galactocentric distance can all be realized by a different experiment: observing the halo of M31 (and the Galaxy) using stars in M31. In some ways, M31 is a more difficult target than the LMC or the Bulge, given the faintness of its stars, but our observations in 1991 and 1993 indicate that these problems have been surmounted. We can detect stellar variability even under extremely crowded conditions like those in M31's inner disk, and can monitor a sufficient number of stars to study halo lensing. We present results from our initial survey which indicates that the required sensitivity can be reached to confirm or reject the hypothesis that sub-solar masses like those detected in our Galaxy make up the missing spiral galaxy mass. It is possible that we may use the data already obtained (and still being analyzed) to place

  9. Skyrmion black hole hair: Conservation of baryon number by black holes and observable manifestations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvali, Gia; Gußmann, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    We show that the existence of black holes with classical skyrmion hair invalidates standard proofs that global charges, such as the baryon number, cannot be conserved by a black hole. By carefully analyzing the standard arguments based on a Gedankenexperiment in which a black hole is seemingly-unable to return the baryon number that it swallowed, we identify inconsistencies in this reasoning, which does not take into the account neither the existence of skyrmion black holes nor the baryon/skyrmion correspondence. We then perform a refined Gedankenexperiment by incorporating the new knowledge and show that no contradiction with conservation of baryon number takes place at any stage of black hole evolution. Our analysis also indicates no conflict between semi-classical black holes and the existence of baryonic gauge interaction arbitrarily-weaker than gravity. Next, we study classical cross sections of a minimally-coupled massless probe scalar field scattered by a skyrmion black hole. We investigate how the skyrmion hair manifests itself by comparing this cross section with the analogous cross section caused by a Schwarzschild black hole which has the same ADM mass as the skyrmion black hole. Here we find an order-one difference in the positions of the characteristic peaks in the cross sections. The peaks are shifted to smaller scattering angles when the skyrmion hair is present. This comes from the fact that the skyrmion hair changes the near horizon geometry of the black hole when compared to a Schwarzschild black hole with same ADM mass. We keep the study of this second aspect general so that the qualitative results which we obtain can also be applied to black holes with classical hair of different kind.

  10. Can the Baryon Asymmetry Arise From Initial Conditions?

    SciTech Connect

    Krnjaic, Gordan

    2016-06-16

    In this letter, we quantify the challenge of explaining the baryon asymmetry using initial conditions in a universe that undergoes inflation. Contrary to lore, we find that such an explanation is possible if net $B-L$ number is stored in a light bosonic field with hyper-Planckian initial displacement and a delicately chosen field velocity prior to inflation. However, such a construction may require extremely tuned coupling constants to ensure that this asymmetry is viably communicated to the Standard Model after reheating; the large field displacement required to overcome inflationary dilution must not induce masses for Standard Model particles or generate dangerous washout processes. While these features are inelegant, this counterexample nonetheless shows that there is no theorem against such an explanation. We also comment on potential observables in the double $\\beta$-decay spectrum and on model variations that may allow for more natural realizations.

  11. Observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab-.

    PubMed

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Galea, C F; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Geng, W; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, F; Guo, J; Gutierrez, G; Gutierrez, P; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Harder, K; Harel, A; Hauptman, J M; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Johnston, D; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Kajfasz, E; Kalk, J M; Karmanov, D; Kasper, P A; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Komissarov, E V; Konrath, J-P; Kozelov, A V; Kraus, J; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kuzmin, V A; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lellouch, J; Li, J; Li, L; Li, Q Z; Lietti, S M; Lim, J K; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Luna, R; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, A; Meyer, J; Mitrevski, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nogima, H; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Orduna, J; Oshima, N; Osman, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perfilov, M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Rich, P; Rieger, J; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Rominsky, M; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Sanghi, B; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schliephake, T; Schlobohm, S; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Snow, G R; Snow, J; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, E; Strauss, M; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Torchiani, I; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, L; Uvarov, S; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vasilyev, I A; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Vilanova, D; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Voutilainen, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, G; Weber, M; Welty-Rieger, L; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Williams, M; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yang, W-C; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yin, H; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Zeitnitz, C; Zelitch, S; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2008-12-05

    We report the observation of the doubly strange b baryon Omegab- in the decay channel Omegab(-)-->J/psiOmega-, with J/psi-->mu+mu(-) and Omega(-)-->LambdaK(-)-->(ppi-)K-, in pp collisions at sqrt[s]=1.96 TeV. Using approximately 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected with the D0 detector at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, we observe 17.8+/-4.9(stat)+/-0.8(syst) Omegab- signal events at a mass of 6.165+/-0.010(stat)+/-0.013(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.4sigma, corresponding to a probability of 6.7 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation.

  12. Observation of the Omega(b)- Baryon and Measurement of the Properties of the Xi(b)- and Omega(b)- Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, Jahred A.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, Jaroslav; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-05-01

    The authors report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +} {mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p {pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0 x 10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. In addition, for the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon they measure a mass of 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps.

  13. THE BARYON CENSUS IN A MULTIPHASE INTERGALACTIC MEDIUM: 30% OF THE BARYONS MAY STILL BE MISSING

    SciTech Connect

    Shull, J. Michael; Danforth, Charles W.; Smith, Britton D. E-mail: smit1685@msu.edu

    2012-11-01

    Although galaxies, groups, and clusters contain {approx}10% of the baryons, many more reside in the photoionized and shocked-heated intergalactic medium (IGM) and in the circumgalactic medium (CGM). We update the baryon census in the (H I) Ly{alpha} forest and warm-hot IGM (WHIM) at 10{sup 5-6} K traced by O VI {lambda}1032, 1038 absorption. From Enzo cosmological simulations of heating, cooling, and metal transport, we improve the H I and O VI baryon surveys using spatially averaged corrections for metallicity (Z/Z {sub Sun }) and ionization fractions (f {sub HI}, f {sub OVI}). Statistically, the O VI correction product correlates with column density, (Z/Z {sub Sun })f {sub OVI} Almost-Equal-To (0.015)(N {sub OVI}/10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}){sup 0.70}, with an N {sub OVI}-weighted mean of 0.01, which doubles previous estimates of WHIM baryon content. We also update the Ly{alpha} forest contribution to baryon density out to z = 0.4, correcting for the (1 + z){sup 3} increase in absorber density, the (1 + z){sup 4.4} rise in photoionizing background, and cosmological proper length dl/dz. We find substantial baryon fractions in the photoionized Ly{alpha} forest (28% {+-} 11%) and WHIM traced by O VI and broad-Ly{alpha} absorbers (25% {+-} 8%). The collapsed phase (galaxies, groups, clusters, CGM) contains 18% {+-} 4%, leaving an apparent baryon shortfall of 29% {+-} 13%. Our simulations suggest that {approx}15% reside in hotter WHIM (T {>=} 10{sup 6} K). Additional baryons could be detected in weaker Ly{alpha} and O VI absorbers. Further progress requires higher-precision baryon surveys of weak absorbers, down to minimum column densities N {sub HI} {>=} 10{sup 12.0} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVI} {>=} 10{sup 12.5} cm{sup -2}, N {sub OVII} {>=} 10{sup 14.5} cm{sup -2}, using high signal-to-noise data from high-resolution UV and X-ray spectrographs.

  14. An Unquenched Quark Model of Baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Bijker, Roelof; Santopinto, Elena

    2007-10-26

    We present the formalism for a new generation of unquenched quark models for baryons in which the effects of quark-antiquark pairs are taken into account in an explicit form via a microscopic, QCD-inspired, quark-antiquark creation mechanism. The present approach is an extension of the fiux-tube breaking model of Geiger and Isgur in which now the contribution of quark-antiquark pairs can be studied for any inital baryon, for any fiavor of the qq-bar pair (not only ss-bar but also uu-bar and dd-bar) and for arbitrary hadron wave functions. The method is illustrated with an application to the spin of the proton and the flavor asymmetry of the nucleon sea.

  15. Baryonic States in QCD From Gauge/String Duality at Large N{sub C}

    SciTech Connect

    De Teramond, G.

    2004-09-08

    We have computed the baryon spectrum in the framework of {Nu} = 4 super-conformal Yang-Mills theory using AdS/CFT duality. Baryons are included in the theory by adding an open string sector, corresponding to quarks in the fundamental representation of {Nu} = 4. The hadron mass scale is introduced by imposing boundary conditions at the AdS{sub 5} coordinate r{sub 0} = {Lambda}{sub QCD} R{sup 2}, which is the only parameter. The quantum numbers of each baryon, are identified by matching the fall-off of the string wavefunction {Psi}(x,r) at the asymptotic 3+1 boundary to the operator dimension of the lowest three-quark Fock state, subject to appropriate boundary conditions. Higher Fock states are matched quanta to quanta with quantum fluctuations of the bulk geometry about the AdS background. We limit our discussion to massless quarks. The resulting four-dimensional spectrum displays a remarkable resemblance to the physical baryon spectrum of QCD, including the suppression of spin-orbit interactions.

  16. The baryon vector current in the combined chiral and 1/Nc expansions

    SciTech Connect

    Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Goity, Jose L

    2014-12-01

    The baryon vector current is computed at one-loop order in large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory, where Nc is the number of colors. Loop graphs with octet and decuplet intermediate states are systematically incorporated into the analysis and the effects of the decuplet-octet mass difference and SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking are accounted for. There are large-Nc cancellations between different one-loop graphs as a consequence of the large-Nc spin-flavor symmetry of QCD baryons. The results are compared against the available experimental data through several fits in order to extract information about the unknown parameters. The large-Nc baryon chiral perturbation theory predictions are in very good agreement both with the expectations from the 1/Nc expansion and with the experimental data. The effect of SU(3) flavor symmetry breaking for the |Delta S|=1 vector current form factors f1(0) results in a reduction by a few percent with respect to the corresponding SU(3) symmetric values.

  17. Understanding the baryon and meson spectra

    SciTech Connect

    Pennington, Michael R.

    2013-10-01

    A brief overview is given of what we know of the baryon and meson spectra, with a focus on what are the key internal degrees of freedom and how these relate to strong coupling QCD. The challenges, experimental, theoretical and phenomenological, for the future are outlined, with particular reference to a program at Jefferson Lab to extract hadronic states in which glue unambiguously contributes to their quantum numbers.

  18. Baryon spectroscopy with polarization observables from CLAS

    SciTech Connect

    Strauch, Steffen

    2016-08-01

    Meson photoproduction is an important tool in the study of baryon resonances. The spectrum of broad and overlapping nucleon excitations can be greatly clarified by use of polarization observables. The N* program at Jefferson Lab with the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) includes experimental studies with linearly and circularly polarized tagged photon beams, longitudinally and transversely polarized nucleon targets, and recoil polarizations. An overview of these experimental studies and recent results will be given.

  19. Verification of the Bjorken-Xu inequality for Baryonic Isgur-Wise functions

    SciTech Connect

    Anikin, I.V.; Ivanov, M.A.; Lyubovitskij, V.E.

    1995-12-01

    Heavy A{sub Q} and {summation}{sub Q} baryons (Q = b, c) are considered as three-quark systems within the quark-confinement model in the limit of infinitely large heavy-quark masses (Isgur-Wise limit). Analysis of the infrared regime for the heavy-quark propagator is based on the fact (known, for example, from the effective theory of heavy quarks) that, in the Isgur-Wise limit, a heavy quark is near its mass shell. The infrapropagator of Abelian theory is used for a first approximation to the heavy-quark propagator. Baryonic Isgur-Wise functions are calculated. It is shown that the form factors of the semileptonic decay {summation}{sub b} {yields} {summation}{sub c}l{bar v}{sub l} satisfy the model-independent Bjorken-Xu inequality. 40 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Will Detmold, William Detmold, Konstantinos Orginos, Aaron Torok, Silas R Beane, Thomas C Luu, Assumpta Parreno, Martin Savage, Andre Walker-Loud

    2010-04-01

    The $\\pi^+\\Sigma^+$, $\\pi^+\\Xi^0$ , $K^+p$, $K^+n$, and $K^0 \\Xi^0$ scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find $a_{\\pi^+\\Sigma^+} = ?0.197 ± 0.017$ fm, and $a_{\\pi^+\\Xi^0} = ?0.098 0.017$ fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  1. Massive black holes and light-element nucleosynthesis in a baryonic universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gnedin, Nickolay Y.; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.; Rees, Martin J.

    1995-01-01

    We reexamine the model proposed by Gnedin & Ostriker (1992) in which Jeans mass black holes (M(sub BH) approximately = 10(exp 6) solar mass) form shortly after decoupling. There is no nonbaryonic dark matter in this model, but we examine the possibility that Omega(sub b) is considerably larger than given by normal nucleosynthesis. Here we allow for the fact that much of the high baryon-to-photon ratio material will collapse leaving the universe of remaining material with light-element abundances more in accord with the residual baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -2)) than with Omega(sub 0) and the initial baryonic density (approximately = 10(exp -1)). We find that no reasonable model can be made with random-phase density fluctuations, if the power on scales smaller than 10(exp 6) solar mass is as large as expected. However, phase-correlated models of the type that might occur in connection with topological singularities can be made with Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.013 +/- 0.001, 0.15 approximately less than Omega(sub 0) approximately less than 0.4, which are either flat (Omega(sub lambda) = 1 - Omega(sub 0)) or open (Omega(sub lambda) = 0) and which satisfy all the observational constraints which we apply, including the large baryon-to-total mass ratio found in the X-ray clusters. The remnant baryon density is thus close to that obtained in the standard picture (Omega(sub b) h(exp 2) = 0.0125 +/- 0.0025; Walker et al. 1991). The spectral index implied for fluctuations in the baryonic isocurvature scenario, -1 less than m less than 0, is in the range expected by other arguments based on large-scale structure and microwave fluctuation constraints. The dark matter in this picture is in the form of massive black holes. Accretion onto them at early epochs releases high-energy photons which significantly heat and reionize the universe. But photodissociation does not materially change light-element abundances. A typical model gives bar-y approximately = 1 x 10(exp -5

  2. Recent results on the meson and baryon spectrum from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohler, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Recent lattice results on the meson and baryon spectrum with a focus on the determination of hadronic resonance masses and widths using a combined basis of single-hadron and hadron-hadron interpolating fields are reviewed. These mostly exploratory calculations differ from traditional lattice QCD spectrum calculations for states stable under QCD, where calculations with a full uncertainty estimate are already routinely performed. Progress and challenges in these calculations are highlighted.

  3. On the Pentaquark Candidates Pc+(4380) and Pc+(4450) within the Soliton Picture of Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scoccola, N. N.; Riska, D. O.; Rho, Mannque

    Using the bound state version of the topological soliton model for the baryons we show that the existence of a bound (or quasi-bound) D-soliton state leads to the possibility of having hidden charm pentaquarks with quantum numbers and masses, which are compatible with those of the candidates recently reported by the LHCb experiment. The implications of heavy quark symmetry are elaborated.

  4. Baryons as Fock states of 3,5,... Quarks

    SciTech Connect

    Dmitri Diakonov; Victor Petrov

    2004-09-01

    We present a generating functional producing quark wave functions of all Fock states in the octet, decuplet and antidecuplet baryons in the mean field approximation, both in the rest and infinite momentum frames. In particular, for the usual octet and decuplet baryons we get the SU(6)-symmetric wave functions for their 3-quark component but with specific corrections from relativism and from additional quark-antiquark pairs. For the exotic antidecuplet baryons we obtain the 5-quark wave function.

  5. Strong Decays of Heavy Baryons in the {sup 3}P{sub 0} Model

    SciTech Connect

    Eakins, B.; Roberts, W.

    2010-08-05

    The results of a recent quark model for the spectrum of heavy baryons are presented. Comparison of the experimental spectrum with the model masses allow the quantum numbers of a number of experimental states to be inferred. However, the quantum numbers of a number of the experimental states remain ambiguous, as more than one model state is predicted to have a mass similar to the experimental mass. This ambiguity can be removed by examining other properties of the states, such as their hadronic decays. Future work on these strong decays is outlined.

  6. Baryonic Content in the Warm-Hot IGM at Low Redshift

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonneborn, George; Shull, M.; Danforth, C.; Moos, W.

    2007-01-01

    Baryons are 4.5% of the universe's mass/energy density; only 10% of these are in stars, galaxies, and clusters. At low-redshift 90% of baryons are in the IGM, 30% in Ly-alpha forest, but most are in hot gas (10(exp 5-7) K) produced by shocks during structure formation. O VI 1032-38 A are the best tracers of this gas. The distribution of O VI absorbers observed by FUSE rises as N(sup -2+/-0.2, down to 10(exp 13)/sq cm. Integrated to logN=13, 7% of baryons reside in the O VI-bearing IGM at 10% solar metallicity, T approx. 10(exp 5.5) K. At redshift z<0.1 metals have been transported less than 800/h kpc from L* galaxies and 200/h kpc from 0.1 L* galaxies. The steepness of dN/dz means that low-N absorbers contribute an equal mass of hot IGM as higher N gas. The total mass of O VI-bearing gas in the IGM depends on determining the turnover in dN/dz at low N(O VI). Future observations by FUSE are needed to reach lower N and to reduce the uncertainty in the dN/dz power law.

  7. The impact of AGN feedback and baryonic cooling on galaxy clusters as gravitational lenses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mead, James M. G.; King, Lindsay J.; Sijacki, Debora; Leonard, Adrienne; Puchwein, Ewald; McCarthy, Ian G.

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the impact of active galactic nucleus (AGN) feedback on the gravitational lensing properties of a sample of galaxy clusters with masses in the range 1014-1015 Msolar, using state-of-the-art simulations. Adopting a ray-tracing algorithm, we compute the cross-section of giant arcs from clusters simulated with dark matter (DM) only physics, DM plus gas with cooling and star formation (CSF) and DM plus gas with cooling, star formation and AGN feedback (CSFBH). Once AGN feedback is included, baryonic physics boosts the strong-lensing cross-section by much less than previously estimated using clusters simulated with only CSF. For a cluster with a virial mass of 7.4 × 1014 Msolar, inclusion of baryonic physics without feedback can boost the cross-section by as much as a factor of 3, in agreement with previous studies, whereas once AGN feedback is included this maximal figure falls to a factor of 2 at most. Typically, clusters simulated with DM and CSFBH physics have similar cross-sections for the production of giant arcs. We also investigate how baryonic physics affects the weak-lensing properties of the simulated clusters by fitting NFW profiles to synthetic weak-lensing data sets using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo approach, and by performing non-parametric mass reconstructions. Without the inclusion of AGN feedback, measured concentration parameters can be much larger than those obtained with AGN feedback, which are similar to the DM-only case.

  8. Dense baryonic matter in conformally-compensated hidden local symmetry: Vector manifestation and chiral symmetry restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yong-Liang; Harada, Masayasu; Lee, Hyun Kyu; Oh, Yongseok; Park, Byung-Yoon; Rho, Mannque

    2014-08-01

    We find that, when the dilaton is implemented as a (pseudo-)Nambu-Goldstone boson using a conformal compensator or "conformon" in a hidden gauge symmetric Lagrangian written to O(p4) from which baryons arise as solitons, namely, skyrmions, the vector manifestation and chiral symmetry restoration at high density predicted in hidden local symmetry theory—which is consistent with Brown-Rho scaling—are lost or sent to infinite density. It is shown that they can be restored if in medium the behavior of the ω field is taken to deviate from that of the ρ meson in such a way that the flavor U(2) symmetry is strongly broken at increasing density. The hitherto unexposed crucial role of the ω meson in the structure of elementary baryon and multibaryon systems is uncovered in this work. In the state of half-skyrmions to which the skyrmions transform at a density n1/2≳n0 (where n0 is the normal nuclear matter density), characterized by the vanishing (space averaged) quark condensate but nonzero pion decay constant, the nucleon mass remains more or less constant at a value ≳60% of the vacuum value, indicating a large component of the nucleon mass that is not associated with the spontaneous breaking of chiral symmetry. We discuss its connection to the chiral-invariant mass m0 that figures in the parity-doublet baryon model.

  9. Precision cosmology and the density of baryons in the universe.

    PubMed

    Kaplinghat, M; Turner, M S

    2001-01-15

    Big-bang nucleosynthesis (BBN) and cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropy measurements give independent, accurate measurements of the baryon density and can test the framework of the standard cosmology. Early CMB data are consistent with the long-standing conclusion from BBN that baryons constitute a small fraction of matter in the Universe, but may indicate a slightly higher value for the baryon density. We clarify precisely what the two methods determine and point out that differing values for the baryon density can indicate either an inconsistency or physics beyond the standard models of cosmology and particle physics. We discuss other signatures of the new physics in CMB anisotropy.

  10. Radiative decays of double heavy baryons in a relativistic constituent three-quark model including hyperfine mixing effects

    SciTech Connect

    Branz, Tanja; Faessler, Amand; Gutsche, Thomas; Lyubovitskij, Valery E.; Oexl, Bettina; Ivanov, Mikhail A.; Koerner, Juergen G.

    2010-06-01

    We study flavor-conserving radiative decays of double-heavy baryons using a manifestly Lorentz covariant constituent three-quark model. Decay rates are calculated and compared to each other in the full theory, keeping masses finite, and also in the heavy quark limit. We discuss in some detail hyperfine mixing effects.

  11. Efficient construction of mock catalogs for baryon acoustic oscillation surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sunayama, Tomomi; Padmanabhan, Nikhil; Heitmann, Katrin; Habib, Salman; Rangel, Esteban

    2016-05-01

    Precision measurements of the large scale structure of the Universe require large numbers of high fidelity mock catalogs to accurately assess, and account for, the presence of systematic effects. We introduce and test a scheme for generating mock catalogs rapidly using suitably derated N-body simulations. Our aim is to reproduce the large scale structure and the gross properties of dark matter halos with high accuracy, while sacrificing the details of the halo's internal structure. By adjusting global and local time-steps in an N-body code, we demonstrate that we recover halo masses to better than 0.5% and the power spectrum to better than 1% both in real and redshift space for k=1hMpc-1, while requiring a factor of 4 less CPU time. We also calibrate the redshift spacing of outputs required to generate simulated light cones. We find that outputs separated by Δ z=0.05 allow us to interpolate particle positions and velocities to reproduce the real and redshift space power spectra to better than 1% (out to k=1hMpc-1). We apply these ideas to generate a suite of simulations spanning a range of cosmologies, motivated by the Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (BOSS) but broadly applicable to future large scale structure surveys including eBOSS and DESI. As an initial demonstration of the utility of such simulations, we calibrate the shift in the baryonic acoustic oscillation peak position as a function of galaxy bias with higher precision than has been possible so far. This paper also serves to document the simulations, which we make publicly available.

  12. Semileptonic Decays of Heavy Omega Baryons in a Quark Model

    SciTech Connect

    Muslema Pervin; Winston Roberts; Simon Capstick

    2006-03-24

    The semileptonic decays of {Omega}{sub c} and {Omega}{sub b} are treated in the framework of a constituent quark model developed in a previous paper on the semileptonic decays of heavy {Lambda} baryons. Analytic results for the form factors for the decays to ground states and a number of excited states are evaluated. For {Omega}{sub b} to {Omega}{sub c} the form factors obtained are shown to satisfy the relations predicted at leading order in the heavy-quark effective theory at the non-recoil point. A modified fit of nonrelativistic and semirelativistic Hamiltonians generates configuration-mixed baryon wave functions from the known masses and the measured {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +} {yields} {Lambda}e{sup +}{nu} rate, with wave functions expanded in both harmonic oscillator and Sturmian bases. Decay rates of {Omega}{sub b} to pairs of ground and excited {Omega}{sub c} states related by heavy-quark symmetry calculated using these configuration-mixed wave functions are in the ratios expected from heavy-quark effective theory, to a good approximation. Our predictions for the semileptonic elastic branching fraction of {Omega}{sub Q} vary minimally within the models we use. We obtain an average value of (84 {+-} 2%) for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Xi}{sup (*)} decays to ground states, and 91% for the fraction of {Omega}{sub c} {yields} {Omega}{sup (*)} decays to the ground state {Omega}. The elastic fraction of {Omega}{sub b} {yields} {Omega}{sub c} ranges from about 50% calculated with the two harmonic-oscillator models, to about 67% calculated with the two Sturmian models.

  13. Observation of two new Ξ(b)(-) baryon resonances.

    PubMed

    Aaij, R; Adeva, B; Adinolfi, M; Affolder, A; Ajaltouni, Z; Akar, S; Albrecht, J; Alessio, F; Alexander, M; Ali, S; Alkhazov, G; Alvarez Cartelle, P; Alves, A A; Amato, S; Amerio, S; Amhis, Y; An, L; Anderlini, L; Anderson, J; Andreassen, R; Andreotti, M; Andrews, J E; Appleby, R B; Aquines Gutierrez, O; Archilli, F; Artamonov, A; Artuso, M; Aslanides, E; Auriemma, G; Baalouch, M; Bachmann, S; Back, J J; Badalov, A; Baesso, C; Baldini, W; Barlow, R J; Barschel, C; Barsuk, S; Barter, W; Batozskaya, V; Battista, V; Bay, A; Beaucourt, L; Beddow, J; Bedeschi, F; Bediaga, I; Belogurov, S; Belous, K; Belyaev, I; Ben-Haim, E; Bencivenni, G; Benson, S; Benton, J; Berezhnoy, A; Bernet, R; Bertolin, A; Bettler, M-O; van Beuzekom, M; Bien, A; Bifani, S; Bird, T; Bizzeti, A; Bjørnstad, P M; Blake, T; Blanc, F; Blouw, J; Blusk, S; Bocci, V; Bondar, A; Bondar, N; Bonivento, W; Borghi, S; Borgia, A; Borsato, M; Bowcock, T J V; Bowen, E; Bozzi, C; Brett, D; Britsch, M; Britton, T; Brodzicka, J; Brook, N H; Bursche, A; Buytaert, J; Cadeddu, S; Calabrese, R; Calvi, M; Calvo Gomez, M; Campana, P; Campora Perez, D; Capriotti, L; Carbone, A; Carboni, G; Cardinale, R; Cardini, A; Carson, L; Carvalho Akiba, K; Casanova Mohr, R C M; Casse, G; Cassina, L; Castillo Garcia, L; Cattaneo, M; Cauet, Ch; Cenci, R; Charles, M; Charpentier, Ph; Chefdeville, M; Chen, S; Cheung, S-F; Chiapolini, N; Chrzaszcz, M; Cid Vidal, X; Ciezarek, G; Clarke, P E L; Clemencic, M; Cliff, H V; Closier, J; Coco, V; Cogan, J; Cogneras, E; Cogoni, V; Cojocariu, L; Collazuol, G; Collins, P; Comerma-Montells, A; Contu, A; Cook, A; Coombes, M; Coquereau, S; Corti, G; Corvo, M; Counts, I; Couturier, B; Cowan, G A; Craik, D C; Crocombe, A C; Cruz Torres, M; Cunliffe, S; Currie, R; D'Ambrosio, C; Dalseno, J; David, P; David, P N Y; Davis, A; De Bruyn, K; De Capua, S; De Cian, M; De Miranda, J M; De Paula, L; De Silva, W; De Simone, P; Dean, C-T; Decamp, D; Deckenhoff, M; Del Buono, L; Déléage, N; Derkach, D; Deschamps, O; Dettori, F; Dey, B; Di Canto, A; Di Domenico, A; Dijkstra, H; Donleavy, S; Dordei, F; Dorigo, M; Dosil Suárez, A; Dossett, D; Dovbnya, A; Dreimanis, K; Dujany, G; Dupertuis, F; Durante, P; Dzhelyadin, R; Dziurda, A; Dzyuba, A; Easo, S; Egede, U; Egorychev, V; Eidelman, S; Eisenhardt, S; Eitschberger, U; Ekelhof, R; Eklund, L; El Rifai, I; Elsasser, Ch; Ely, S; Esen, S; Evans, H-M; Evans, T; Falabella, A; Färber, C; Farinelli, C; Farley, N; Farry, S; Fay, R; Ferguson, D; Fernandez Albor, V; Ferreira Rodrigues, F; Ferro-Luzzi, M; Filippov, S; Fiore, M; Fiorini, M; Firlej, M; Fitzpatrick, C; Fiutowski, T; Fol, P; Fontana, M; Fontanelli, F; Forty, R; Francisco, O; Frank, M; Frei, C; Frosini, M; Fu, J; Furfaro, E; Gallas Torreira, A; Galli, D; Gallorini, S; Gambetta, S; Gandelman, M; Gandini, P; Gao, Y; García Pardiñas, J; Garofoli, J; Garra Tico, J; Garrido, L; Gascon, D; Gaspar, C; Gastaldi, U; Gauld, R; Gavardi, L; Gazzoni, G; Geraci, A; Gersabeck, E; Gersabeck, M; Gershon, T; Ghez, Ph; Gianelle, A; Gianì, S; Gibson, V; Giubega, L; Gligorov, V V; Göbel, C; Golubkov, D; Golutvin, A; Gomes, A; Gotti, C; Grabalosa Gándara, M; Graciani Diaz, R; Granado Cardoso, L A; Graugés, E; Graverini, E; Graziani, G; Grecu, A; Greening, E; Gregson, S; Griffith, P; Grillo, L; Grünberg, O; Gui, B; Gushchin, E; Guz, Yu; Gys, T; Hadjivasiliou, C; Haefeli, G; Haen, C; Haines, S C; Hall, S; Hamilton, B; Hampson, T; Han, X; Hansmann-Menzemer, S; Harnew, N; Harnew, S T; Harrison, J; He, J; Head, T; Heijne, V; Hennessy, K; Henrard, P; Henry, L; Hernando Morata, J A; van Herwijnen, E; Hess, M; Hicheur, A; Hill, D; Hoballah, M; Hombach, C; Hulsbergen, W; Hussain, N; Hutchcroft, D; Hynds, D; Idzik, M; Ilten, P; Jacobsson, R; Jaeger, A; Jalocha, J; Jans, E; Jaton, P; Jawahery, A; Jing, F; John, M; Johnson, D; Jones, C R; Joram, C; Jost, B; Jurik, N; Kandybei, S; Kanso, W; Karacson, M; Karbach, T M; Karodia, S; Kelsey, M; Kenyon, I R; Ketel, T; Khanji, B; Khurewathanakul, C; Klaver, S; Klimaszewski, K; Kochebina, O; Kolpin, M; Komarov, I; Koopman, R F; Koppenburg, P; Korolev, M; Kravchuk, L; Kreplin, K; Kreps, M; Krocker, G; Krokovny, P; Kruse, F; Kucewicz, W; Kucharczyk, M; Kudryavtsev, V; Kurek, K; Kvaratskheliya, T; La Thi, V N; Lacarrere, D; Lafferty, G; Lai, A; Lambert, D; Lambert, R W; Lanfranchi, G; Langenbruch, C; Langhans, B; Latham, T; Lazzeroni, C; Le Gac, R; van Leerdam, J; Lees, J-P; Lefèvre, R; Leflat, A; Lefrançois, J; Leroy, O; Lesiak, T; Leverington, B; Li, Y; Likhomanenko, T; Liles, M; Lindner, R; Linn, C; Lionetto, F; Liu, B; Lohn, S; Longstaff, I; Lopes, J H; Lowdon, P; Lucchesi, D; Luo, H; Lupato, A; Luppi, E; Lupton, O; Machefert, F; Machikhiliyan, I V; Maciuc, F; Maev, O; Malde, S; Malinin, A; Manca, G; Mancinelli, G; Mapelli, A; Maratas, J; Marchand, J F; Marconi, U; Marin Benito, C; Marino, P; Märki, R; Marks, J; Martellotti, G; Martinelli, M; Martinez Santos, D; Martinez Vidal, F; Martins Tostes, D; Massafferri, A; Matev, R; Mathe, Z; Matteuzzi, C; Mazurov, A; McCann, M; McCarthy, J; McNab, A; McNulty, R; McSkelly, B; Meadows, B; Meier, F; Meissner, M; Merk, M; Milanes, D A; Minard, M-N; Moggi, N; Molina Rodriguez, J; Monteil, S; Morandin, M; Morawski, P; Mordà, A; Morello, M J; Moron, J; Morris, A-B; Mountain, R; Muheim, F; Müller, K; Mussini, M; Muster, B; Naik, P; Nakada, T; Nandakumar, R; Nasteva, I; Needham, M; Neri, N; Neubert, S; Neufeld, N; Neuner, M; Nguyen, A D; Nguyen, T D; Nguyen-Mau, C; Nicol, M; Niess, V; Niet, R; Nikitin, N; Nikodem, T; Novoselov, A; O'Hanlon, D P; Oblakowska-Mucha, A; Obraztsov, V; Ogilvy, S; Okhrimenko, O; Oldeman, R; Onderwater, C J G; Orlandea, M; Otalora Goicochea, J M; Otto, A; Owen, P; Oyanguren, A; Pal, B K; Palano, A; Palombo, F; Palutan, M; Panman, J; Papanestis, A; Pappagallo, M; Pappalardo, L L; Parkes, C; Parkinson, C J; Passaleva, G; Patel, G D; Patel, M; Patrignani, C; Pearce, A; Pellegrino, A; Penso, G; Pepe Altarelli, M; Perazzini, S; Perret, P; Pescatore, L; Pesen, E; Petridis, K; Petrolini, A; Picatoste Olloqui, E; Pietrzyk, B; Pilař, T; Pinci, D; Pistone, A; Playfer, S; Plo Casasus, M; Polci, F; Poluektov, A; Polyakov, I; Polycarpo, E; Popov, A; Popov, D; Popovici, B; Potterat, C; Price, E; Price, J D; Prisciandaro, J; Pritchard, A; Prouve, C; Pugatch, V; Puig Navarro, A; Punzi, G; Qian, W; Rachwal, B; Rademacker, J H; Rakotomiaramanana, B; Rama, M; Rangel, M S; Raniuk, I; Rauschmayr, N; Raven, G; Redi, F; Reichert, S; Reid, M M; dos Reis, A C; Ricciardi, S; Richards, S; Rihl, M; Rinnert, K; Rives Molina, V; Robbe, P; Rodrigues, A B; Rodrigues, E; Rodriguez Perez, P; Roiser, S; Romanovsky, V; Romero Vidal, A; Rotondo, M; Rouvinet, J; Ruf, T; Ruiz, H; Ruiz Valls, P; Saborido Silva, J J; Sagidova, N; Sail, P; Saitta, B; Salustino Guimaraes, V; Sanchez Mayordomo, C; Sanmartin Sedes, B; Santacesaria, R; Santamarina Rios, C; Santovetti, E; Sarti, A; Satriano, C; Satta, A; Saunders, D M; Savrina, D; Schiller, M; Schindler, H; Schlupp, M; Schmelling, M; Schmidt, B; Schneider, O; Schopper, A; Schune, M-H; Schwemmer, R; Sciascia, B; Sciubba, A; Semennikov, A; Sepp, I; Serra, N; Serrano, J; Sestini, L; Seyfert, P; Shapkin, M; Shapoval, I; Shcheglov, Y; Shears, T; Shekhtman, L; Shevchenko, V; Shires, A; Silva Coutinho, R; Simi, G; Sirendi, M; Skidmore, N; Skillicorn, I; Skwarnicki, T; Smith, N A; Smith, E; Smith, E; Smith, J; Smith, M; Snoek, H; Sokoloff, M D; Soler, F J P; Soomro, F; Souza, D; Souza De Paula, B; Spaan, B; Spradlin, P; Sridharan, S; Stagni, F; Stahl, M; Stahl, S; Steinkamp, O; Stenyakin, O; Sterpka, F; Stevenson, S; Stoica, S; Stone, S; Storaci, B; Stracka, S; Straticiuc, M; Straumann, U; Stroili, R; Sun, L; Sutcliffe, W; Swientek, K; Swientek, S; Syropoulos, V; Szczekowski, M; Szczypka, P; Szumlak, T; T'Jampens, S; Teklishyn, M; Tellarini, G; Teubert, F; Thomas, C; Thomas, E; van Tilburg, J; Tisserand, V; Tobin, M; Todd, J; Tolk, S; Tomassetti, L; Tonelli, D; Topp-Joergensen, S; Torr, N; Tournefier, E; Tourneur, S; Tran, M T; Tresch, M; Trisovic, A; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Tsopelas, P; Tuning, N; Ubeda Garcia, M; Ukleja, A; Ustyuzhanin, A; Uwer, U; Vacca, C; Vagnoni, V; Valenti, G; Vallier, A; Vazquez Gomez, R; Vazquez Regueiro, P; Vázquez Sierra, C; Vecchi, S; Velthuis, J J; Veltri, M; Veneziano, G; Vesterinen, M; Viana Barbosa, J V V B; Viaud, B; Vieira, D; Vieites Diaz, M; Vilasis-Cardona, X; Vollhardt, A; Volyanskyy, D; Voong, D; Vorobyev, A; Vorobyev, V; Voss, C; de Vries, J A; Waldi, R; Wallace, C; Wallace, R; Walsh, J; Wandernoth, S; Wang, J; Ward, D R; Watson, N K; Websdale, D; Whitehead, M; Wiedner, D; Wilkinson, G; Wilkinson, M; Williams, M P; Williams, M; Wilschut, H W; Wilson, F F; Wimberley, J; Wishahi, J; Wislicki, W; Witek, M; Wormser, G; Wotton, S A; Wright, S; Wyllie, K; Xie, Y; Xing, Z; Xu, Z; Yang, Z; Yuan, X; Yushchenko, O; Zangoli, M; Zavertyaev, M; Zhang, L; Zhang, W C; Zhang, Y; Zhelezov, A; Zhokhov, A; Zhong, L

    2015-02-13

    Two structures are observed close to the kinematic threshold in the Ξ(b)(0)π(-) mass spectrum in a sample of proton-proton collision data, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.0  fb(-1), recorded by the LHCb experiment. In the quark model, two baryonic resonances with quark content bds are expected in this mass region: the spin-parity J(P)=(1/2)(+) and J(P)=(3/2)(+) states, denoted Ξ(b)('-) and Ξ(b)(*-). Interpreting the structures as these resonances, we measure the mass differences and the width of the heavier state to be m(Ξ(b)('-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=3.653±0.018±0.006  MeV/c(2), m(Ξ(b)(*-))-m(Ξ(b)(0))-m(π(-))=23.96±0.12±0.06  MeV/c(2), Γ(Ξ(b)(*-))=1.65±0.31±0.10  MeV, where the first and second uncertainties are statistical and systematic, respectively. The width of the lighter state is consistent with zero, and we place an upper limit of Γ(Ξ(b)('-))<0.08  MeV at 95% confidence level. Relative production rates of these states are also reported.

  14. Robust PCA and MIC statistics of baryons in early minihaloes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Souza, R. S.; Maio, U.; Biffi, V.; Ciardi, B.

    2014-05-01

    We present a novel approach, based on robust principal components analysis (RPCA) and maximal information coefficient (MIC), to study the redshift dependence of halo baryonic properties. Our data are composed of a set of different physical quantities for primordial minihaloes: dark matter mass (Mdm), gas mass (Mgas), stellar mass (Mstar), molecular fraction (xmol), metallicity (Z), star formation rate (SFR) and temperature. We find that Mdm and Mgas are dominant factors for variance, particularly at high redshift. Nonetheless, with the emergence of the first stars and subsequent feedback mechanisms, xmol, SFR and Z start to have a more dominant role. Standard PCA gives three principal components (PCs) capable to explain more than 97 per cent of the data variance at any redshift (two PCs usually accounting for no less than 92 per cent), whilst the first PC from the RPCA analysis explains no less than 84 per cent of the total variance in the entire redshift range (with two PCs explaining ≳95 per cent anytime). Our analysis also suggests that all the gaseous properties have a stronger correlation with Mgas than with Mdm, while Mgas has a deeper correlation with xmol than with Z or SFR. This indicates the crucial role of gas molecular content to initiate star formation and consequent metal pollution from Population III and Population II/I regimes in primordial galaxies. Finally, a comparison between MIC and Spearman correlation coefficient shows that the former is a more reliable indicator when halo properties are weakly correlated.

  15. Magnetic monopole interactions: shell structure of meson and baryon states

    SciTech Connect

    Akers, D.

    1986-12-01

    It is suggested that a low-mass magnetic monopole of Dirac charge g = (137/2)e may be interacting with a c-quark's magnetic dipole moment to produce Zeeman splitting of meson states. The mass M/sub 0/ = 2397 MeV of the monopole is in contrast to the 10/sup 16/-GeV monopoles of grand unification theories (GUT). It is shown that shell structure of energy E/sub n/ = M/sub 0/ + 1/4nM/sub 0/... exists for meson states. The presence of symmetric meson states leads to the identification of the shell structure. The possible existence of the 2397-MeV magnetic monopole is shown to quantize quark masses in agreement with calculations of quantum chromodynamics (QCD). From the shell structure of meson states, the existence of two new mesons is predicted: eta(1814 +/- 50 MeV) with I/sup G/(J/sup PC/) = 0/sup +/(0/sup - +/) and eta/sub c/ (3907 +/- 100 MeV) with J/sup PC/ = 0/sup - +/. The presence of shell structure for baryon states is shown.

  16. HYPERACCRETING BLACK HOLE AS GAMMA-RAY BURST CENTRAL ENGINE. I. BARYON LOADING IN GAMMA-RAY BURST JETS

    SciTech Connect

    Lei Weihua; Zhang Bing; Liang Enwei E-mail: zhang@physics.unlv.edu

    2013-03-10

    A hyperaccreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate for the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon-loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by {nu} {nu}-bar -annihilation or by the Blandford-Znajek (BZ) mechanism. We consider baryon loading from a neutrino-driven wind launched from a neutrino-cooling-dominated accretion flow. For a magnetically dominated BZ jet, we consider neutron drifting from the magnetic wall surrounding the jet and subsequent positron capture and proton-neutron inelastic collisions. The minimum baryon loads in both types of jet are calculated. We find that in both cases a more luminous jet tends to be more baryon poor. A neutrino-driven ''fireball'' is typically ''dirtier'' than a magnetically dominated jet, while a magnetically dominated jet can be much cleaner. Both models have the right scaling to interpret the empirical {Gamma}-L{sub iso} relation discovered recently. Since some neutrino-driven jets have too much baryon loading as compared with the data, we suggest that at least a good fraction of GRBs should have a magnetically dominated central engine.

  17. Baryon Resonances in the Strangeness Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Ju-Jun; Wang, En; Wu, Jia-Jun

    We have studied the N*(2120), Δ*(1940), and the possible Σ*(1380) resonances in the γp → K+Λ(1520), pp → nK+Σ(1385), and Λp → Λpπ0 reactions within the resonance model and the effective Lagrangian approach. It is shown that when the contributions from these baryonic states were considered, the current experimental measurement could be well reproduced. In addition, we also demonstrate that the angular distributions provide direct information of these reactions, which could be useful for the investigation of those states and may be tested by future experiments.

  18. Flavour Oscillations in Dense Baryonic Matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filip, Peter

    2017-01-01

    We suggest that fast neutral meson oscillations may occur in a dense baryonic matter, which can influence the balance of s/¯s quarks in the nucleus-nucleus and proton-nucleus interactions, if primordial multiplicities of neutral K 0, mesons are sufficiently asymmetrical. The phenomenon can occur even if CP symmetry is fully conserved, and it may be responsible for the enhanced sub-threshold production of multi-strange hyperons observed in the low-energy A+A and p+A interactions.

  19. Limits to the primordial helium abundance in the baryon-inhomogeneous big bang

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mathews, G. J.; Schramm, D. N.; Meyer, B. S.

    1993-01-01

    The parameter space for baryon inhomogeneous big bang models is explored with the goal of determining the minimum helium abundance obtainable in such models while still satisfying the other light-element constraints. We find that the constraint of (D + He-3)/H less than 10 exp -4 restricts the primordial helium mass fraction from baryon-inhomogeneous big bang models to be greater than 0.231 even for a scenario which optimizes the effects of the inhomogeneities and destroys the excess lithium production. Thus, this modification to the standard big bang as well as the standard homogeneous big bang model itself would be falsifiable by observation if the primordial He-4 abundance were observed to be less than 0.231. Furthermore, a present upper limit to the observed helium mass fraction of Y(obs)(p) less than 0.24 implies that the maximum baryon-to-photon ratio allowable in the inhomogeneous models corresponds to eta less than 2.3 x 10 exp -9 (omega(b) h-squared less than 0.088) even if all conditions are optimized.

  20. Scalar and vector self-energies of heavy baryons in nuclear medium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizi, K.; Er, N.; Sundu, H.

    2017-04-01

    The in-medium sum rules are employed to calculate the shifts in the mass and residue as well as the scalar and vector self-energies of the heavy ΛQ ,ΣQ and ΞQ baryons, with Q being b or c quark. The maximum shift in mass due to nuclear matter belongs to the Σc baryon and it is found to be ΔmΣc = - 936 MeV. In the case of residue, it is obtained that the residue of Σb baryon is maximally affected by the nuclear medium with the shift ΔλΣb = - 0.014 GeV3. The scalar and vector self-energies are found to be ΣΛbS = 653 MeV, ΣΣbS = - 614 MeV, ΣΞbS = - 17 MeV, ΣΛcS = 272 MeV, ΣΣcS = - 936 MeV, ΣΞcS = - 5 MeV and ΣΛbν = 436 ± 148 MeV, ΣΣbν = 382 ± 129 MeV, ΣΞbν = 15 ± 5 MeV, ΣΛcν = 151 ± 45 MeV, ΣΣcν = 486 ± 144 MeV and ΣΞcν = 1.391 ± 0.529 MeV.

  1. Baryon-Baryon Interaction in a Chiral-Quark Mean - Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Fernando Javier

    The nontopological soliton solution of a chirally invariant Lagrangian which incorporates the linear (sigma) -model BB84,KR84 is used as a model for Baryons. The nucleon-nucleon interaction is modeled by the interaction of two such solitons. The soliton-soliton interaction is calculated adiabatically by extremizing the energy of the two-soliton system subject to the constraint that the inter-soliton separation is fixed. The fields and wavefunctions are expanded in a two-center harmonic oscillator basis thus permitting essentially arbitrary tri-axial deformations. The hedgehog form is imposed on the spin-isospin wavefunction of the solitons. The isospin (or spin) of the two solitons may be quantized along different directions thus introducing a dependence in the energy on the relative orientation of the quantization axes. This permits the extraction of a low energy effective NN potential by an approximate method. An OBE calculation between identical undeformed solitons shows that the pion form factor is quite soft. It also suggests that the mass ((TURN)550 MeV) of the (sigma) -meson, responsible for intermediate range attraction in the central potential of phenomenological meson-exchange models, is a consequence of the coupling of a heavier (sigma) -meson with lighter pions. The Euler-Lagrange equations for the six-quark system are solved approximately using a variational method. The solutions exhibit a dynamical boundary which divides the NN interaction into two domains, an exterior domain where the solitons maintain their identity and the six-quark system is appropriately described as two distinct solitons, and an interior domain where the system is more appropriately described as a single highly deformed soliton. The boundary occurs sharply for critical inter-soliton separations in the range 0.8 - 0.1 fm. The even parity interior solution and the critical separation are shown to be consistent with the energy independence of the F-matrix at low energy in the

  2. Baryon chiral perturbation theory extended beyond the low-energy region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epelbaum, E.; Gegelia, J.; Meißner, Ulf-G.; Yao, De-Liang

    2015-10-01

    We consider an extension of the one-nucleon sector of baryon chiral perturbation theory beyond the low-energy region. The applicability of this approach for higher energies is restricted to small scattering angles, i.e. the kinematical region, where the quark structure of hadrons cannot be resolved. The main idea is to re-arrange the low-energy effective Lagrangian according to a new power counting and to exploit the freedom of the choice of the renormalization condition for loop diagrams. We generalize the extended on-mass-shell scheme for the one-nucleon sector of baryon chiral perturbation theory by choosing a sliding scale, that is, we expand the physical amplitudes around kinematical points beyond the threshold. This requires the introduction of complex-valued renormalized coupling constants, which can be either extracted from experimental data, or calculated using the renormalization group evolution of coupling constants fixed in threshold region.

  3. The impact of baryonic matter on gravitational lensing by galaxy clusters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Brandyn E.; King, Lindsay; Applegate, Douglas; McCarthy, Ian

    2017-01-01

    Since the bulk of the matter comprising galaxy clusters exists in the form of dark matter, gravitational N-body simulations have historically been an effective way to investigate large scale structure formation and the astrophysics of galaxy clusters. However, upcoming telescopes such as the Large Synoptic Survey Telescope are expected to have lower systematic errors than older generations, reducing measurement uncertainties and requiring that astrophysicists better quantify the impact of baryonic matter on the cluster lensing signal. Here we outline the effects of baryonic processes on cluster density profiles and on weak lensing mass and concentration estimates. Our analysis is done using clusters grown in the suite of cosmological hydrodynamical simulations known as cosmo-OWLS.

  4. Equilibrium model constraints on baryon cycling across cosmic time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitra, Sourav; Davé, Romeel; Finlator, Kristian

    2015-09-01

    Galaxies strongly self-regulate their growth via energetic feedback from stars, supernovae, and black holes, but these processes are among the least understood aspects of galaxy formation theory. We present an analytic galaxy evolution model that directly constrains such feedback processes from observed galaxy scaling relations. The equilibrium model, which is broadly valid for star-forming central galaxies that dominate cosmic star formation, is based on the ansatz that galaxies live in a slowly evolving equilibrium between inflows, outflows, and star formation. Using a Bayesian Monte Carlo Markov chain approach, we constrain our model to match observed galaxy scaling relations between stellar mass and halo mass, star formation rate, and metallicity from 0 < z < 2. A good fit (χ2 ≈ 1.6) is achieved with eight free parameters. We further show that constraining our model to any two of the three data sets also produces a fit to the third that is within reasonable systematic uncertainties. The resulting best-fitting parameters that describe baryon cycling suggest galactic outflow scalings intermediate between energy and momentum-driven winds, a weak dependence of wind recycling time on mass, and a quenching mass scale that evolves modestly upwards with redshift. This model further predicts a stellar mass-star formation rate relation that is in good agreement with observations to z ˜ 6. Our results suggest that this simple analytic framework captures the basic physical processes required to model the mean evolution of stars and metals in galaxies, despite not incorporating many canonical ingredients of galaxy formation models such as merging or disc formation.

  5. Baryogenesis from baryon-number-violating scalar interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowes, J. P.; Volkas, R. R.

    1997-03-01

    In the following work we consider the possibility of explaining the observed baryon-number asymmetry in the universe from simple baryon-number-violating modifications, involving massive scalar bosons, to the standard model. In these cases baryon-number violation is mediated through a combination of Yukawa and scalar self-coupling interactions. Starting with a previously compiled catalogue of baryon-number-violating extensions of the standard model, we identify the minimal subsets which can induce a B-L asymmetry and thus be immune to sphaleron washout. For each of these models, we identify the region of parameter space that leads to the production of a baryon number asymmetry of the correct order of magnitude.

  6. A Giant Warm Baryonic Halo for the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Max; Lieu, Richard; Joy, Marshall K.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma cluster unveil a very large-scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well know radiation from the hot intra-cluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central cluster regions through lower-sensitivity EUVE and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.5 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled non-thermally, but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission at warm temperatures. The mass of this plasma is at least on par with that of the hot X-ray emitting plasma, and significantly more massive if the plasma resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict greater than 50 percent by mass of today's baryons reside in warm-hot filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  7. Helioseismology with long-range dark matter-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Lopes, Ilídio; Panci, Paolo; Silk, Joseph E-mail: panci@iap.fr

    2014-11-10

    Assuming the existence of a primordial asymmetry in the dark sector, we study how long-range dark matter (DM)-baryon interactions, induced by the kinetic mixing of a new U(1) gauge boson and a photon, affect the evolution of the Sun and, in turn, the sound speed the profile obtained from helioseismology. Thanks to the explicit dependence on the exchanged momenta in the differential cross section (Rutherford-like scattering), we find that DM particles with a mass of ∼10 GeV, kinetic mixing parameter of the order of 10{sup –9}, and a mediator with a mass smaller than a few MeV improve the agreement between the best solar model and the helioseismic data without being excluded by direct detection experiments. In particular, the LUX detector will soon be able to either constrain or confirm our best-fit solar model in the presence of a dark sector with long-range interactions that reconcile helioseismology with thermal neutrino results.

  8. Testing for three-body quark forces in L = 1 excited baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Pirjol, Dan; Schat, Carlos

    2010-11-12

    We discuss the matching of the quark model to the effective mass operator of the 1/N{sub c} expansion using the permutation group S{sub N}. As an illustration of the general procedure we perform the matching of the Isgur-Karl model for the spectrum of the negative parity L = 1 excited baryons. Assuming the most general two-body quark Hamiltonian, we derive two correlations among the masses and mixing angles of these states which should hold in any quark model. These correlations constrain the mixing angles and can be used to test for the presence of three-body quark forces.

  9. Observation of an Exotic S = +1 Baryon in Exclusive Photoproduction from the Deuteron

    SciTech Connect

    Stepan Stepanyan; Kenneth Hicks; Daniel Carman; Evgueni Pasyuk; Reinhard Schumacher; Elton Smith; David Tedeschi; Luminita Todor

    2003-12-19

    In an exclusive measurement of the reaction {gamma}d {yields} K{sup +} K{sup -} p n, a narrow peak that can be attributed to an exotic baryon with strangeness S = +1 is seen in the K{sup +}n invariant mass spectrum. The peak is at 1542 {+-} 5 MeV/c{sup 2} with a measured width of 21 MeV/c{sup 2} FWHM, equivalent to the experimental invariant mass resolution. The statistical significance of the peak is 5.3 {+-} 0.5 {sigma} for a Gaussian peak shape on top of a smooth background.

  10. Some Consequences of the Baryonic Dark Matter Population

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schild, Rudolph E.

    2005-04-01

    Microlensed double-image quasars have sent a consistent message that the baryonic dark matter consists of a dark population of free-roaming planet mass objects. This population has long been predicted to have formed at the time of recombination, 300,000 years after the Big Bang, when the primordial plasma changed to neutral atoms with an attendant large increase in viscosity of the primordial matter. Following a very brief review of the observational basis for this conclusion and some alternative explanations, we review some probable effects of this population. After the particles formed by the usual gravitational condensation - void separation process, they collapsed on a 100 million year Kelvin-Helmholz time scale, and started their inevitable cooling process. Although not yet satisfactorily modeled, this process should have caused significant evaporation of primordial gas and taken them through the condensation and freezing points of hydrogen on their way to the 2.73 K temperature of the present universe. At the 20 K freezing point they should have frozen from the outside in, creating tremendous crushing central pressures that would have easily produced the rocky cores of planets and Kuiper-Oort cloud objects mysteriously over-abundant in the present solar system. The mystery of how did the universe become re-ionized by a Pop III that should have been seen at redshifts 6 to 8, now under scrutiny from direct spectroscopic observation, is cleanly side-stepped. Probably 99% of the baryonic matter in the universe was sequestered away in the dark matter bodies and does not need to be re-ionized for the universe to have its present transparency in the far ultraviolet. And the Dark Energy mystery will evaporate when it is understood how this population reduces the transparency of the universe. It is probably not a coincidence that the "self replenishing dust" model that explains the HST supernova brightness deficits closely matches the known dependence of extinction

  11. Meson/Baryon/Tetraquark Supersymmetry from Superconformal Algebra and Light-Front Holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter Lorcé, Cédric

    Superconformal algebra leads to remarkable connections between the masses of mesons and baryons of the same parity - supersymmetric relations between the bosonic and fermionic bound states of QCD. Supercharges connect the mesonic eigenstates to their baryonic superpartners, where the mesons have internal angular momentum one unit higher than the baryons: LM = LB + 1. The dynamics of the superpartner hadrons also match; for example, the power-law fall-off of the form factors are the same for the mesonic and baryonic superpartners, in agreement with twist counting rules. An effective supersymmetric light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks can be constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. This procedure also generates a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique quark-confining light-front potential for light hadrons in agreement with the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach and light-front holography. Only one mass parameter ? appears; it sets the confinement mass scale, a universal value for the slope of all Regge trajectories, the nonzero mass of the proton and other hadrons in the chiral limit, as well as the length scale which underlies their structure. The mass for the pion eigenstate vanishes in the chiral limit. When one includes the constituent quark masses using the Feynman-Hellman theorem, the predictions are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadronic spectra. Our analysis can be consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K* and ø meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ*, Ξ and Ξ* baryons. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass-squared of the light hadrons can be expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition of contributions from the constituent kinetic

  12. Meson/baryon/tetraquark supersymmetry from superconformal algebra and light-front holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodsky, Stanley J.; de Téramond, Guy F.; Dosch, Hans Günter; Lorcé, Cédric

    2016-07-01

    Superconformal algebra leads to remarkable connections between the masses of mesons and baryons of the same parity — supersymmetric relations between the bosonic and fermionic bound states of QCD. Supercharges connect the mesonic eigenstates to their baryonic superpartners, where the mesons have internal angular momentum one unit higher than the baryons: LM = LB + 1. The dynamics of the superpartner hadrons also match; for example, the power-law fall-off of the form factors are the same for the mesonic and baryonic superpartners, in agreement with twist counting rules. An effective supersymmetric light-front Hamiltonian for hadrons composed of light quarks can be constructed by embedding superconformal quantum mechanics into AdS space. This procedure also generates a spin-spin interaction between the hadronic constituents. A specific breaking of conformal symmetry inside the graded algebra determines a unique quark-confining light-front potential for light hadrons in agreement with the soft-wall AdS/QCD approach and light-front holography. Only one mass parameter λ appears; it sets the confinement mass scale, a universal value for the slope of all Regge trajectories, the nonzero mass of the proton and other hadrons in the chiral limit, as well as the length scale which underlies their structure. The mass for the pion eigenstate vanishes in the chiral limit. When one includes the constituent quark masses using the Feynman-Hellman theorem, the predictions are consistent with the empirical features of the light-quark hadronic spectra. Our analysis can be consistently applied to the excitation spectra of the π, ρ, K, K∗ and ϕ meson families as well as to the N, Δ, Λ, Σ, Σ∗, Ξ and Ξ∗ baryons. We also predict the existence of tetraquarks which are degenerate in mass with baryons with the same angular momentum. The mass-squared of the light hadrons can be expressed in a universal and frame-independent decomposition of contributions from the constituent

  13. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Savage, M; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-05-05

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m{sub {pi}} {approx} 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = 3877.9 {+-} 6.9 {+-} 9.2 {+-} 3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of {delta}E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} = E{sub {Xi}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0}n} - 2M{sub {Xi}{sup 0}} - M{sub n} = 4.6 {+-} 5.0 {+-} 7.9 {+-} 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  14. High Statistics Analysis using Anisotropic Clover Lattices: (II) Three-Baryon Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Andre Walker-Loud, Will Detmold, William Detmold, Aaron Torok, Konstantinos Orginos, Silas Beane, Tom Luu, Martin Savage, Assumpta Parreno

    2009-10-01

    We present the results of an exploratory Lattice QCD calculation of three-baryon systems through a high-statistics study of one ensemble of anisotropic clover gauge-field configurations with a pion mass of m_\\pi ~ 390 MeV. Because of the computational cost of the necessary contractions, we focus on correlation functions generated by interpolating-operators with the quantum numbers of the $\\Xi^0\\Xi^0 n$ system, one of the least demanding three baryon systems in terms of the number of contractions. We find that the ground state of this system has an energy of E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}= 3877.9\\pm 6.9\\pm 9.2\\pm3.3 MeV corresponding to an energy-shift due to interactions of \\delta E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}=E_{\\Xi^0\\Xi^0n}-2M_{\\Xi^0} -M_n=4.6\\pm 5.0\\pm 7.9\\pm 4.2 MeV. There are a significant number of time-slices in the three-baryon correlation function for which the signal-to-noise ratio is only slowly degrading with time. This is in contrast to the exponential degradation of the signal-to-noise ratio that is observed at larger times, and is due to the suppressed overlap of the source and sink interpolating-operators that are associated with the variance of the three-baryon correlation function onto the lightest eigenstates in the lattice volume (mesonic systems). As one of the motivations for this area of exploration is the calculation of the structure and reactions of light nuclei, we also present initial results for a system with the quantum numbers of the triton (pnn). This present work establishes a path to multi-baryon systems, and shows that Lattice QCD calculations of the properties and interactions of systems containing four and five baryons are now within sight.

  15. nd Scattering Observables Derived from the Quark-Model Baryon-Baryon Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Fukukawa, K.

    2010-05-12

    We solve the nd scattering in the Faddeev formalism, employing the NN sector of the quark-model baryon-baryon interaction fss2. The energy-dependence of the NN interaction, inherent to the (3q)-(3q) resonating-group formulation, is eliminated by the standard off-shell transformation utilizing the 1/sq root(N) factor, where N is the normalization kernel for the (3q)-(3q) system. This procedure yields an extra nonlocality, whose effect is very important to reproduce all the scattering observables below E{sub n}<=65 MeV. The different off-shell properties from the standard meson-exchange potentials, related to the non-locality of the quark-exchange kernel, yields appreciable effects to the differential cross sections and polarization observables of the nd elastic scattering, which are usually attributed to the specific properties of three-body forces.

  16. Mirage in temporal correlation functions for baryon-baryon interactions in lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iritani, T.; Doi, T.; Aoki, S.; Gongyo, S.; Hatsuda, T.; Ikeda, Y.; Inoue, T.; Ishii, N.; Murano, K.; Nemura, H.; Sasaki, K.

    2016-10-01

    Single state saturation of the temporal correlation function is a key condition to extract physical observables such as energies and matrix elements of hadrons from lattice QCD simulations. A method commonly employed to check the saturation is to seek for a plateau of the observables for large Euclidean time. Identifying the plateau in the cases having nearby states, however, is non-trivial and one may even be misled by a fake plateau. Such a situation takes place typically for a system with two or more baryons. In this study, we demonstrate explicitly the danger from a possible fake plateau in the temporal correlation functions mainly for two baryons (ΞΞ and N N ), and three and four baryons (3He and 4He) as well, employing (2+1)-flavor lattice QCD at m π = 0 .51GeV on four lattice volumes with L = 2.9, 3.6, 4.3 and 5.8 fm. Caution is required when drawing conclusions about the bound N N , 3 N and 4 N systems based only on the standard plateau fitting of the temporal correlation functions. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  17. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    DOE PAGES

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; ...

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting ofmore » levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.« less

  18. Quantum Operator Design for Lattice Baryon Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Lichtl, Adam

    2006-09-07

    A previously-proposed method of constructing spatially-extended gauge-invariant three-quark operators for use in Monte Carlo lattice QCD calculations is tested, and a methodology for using these operators to extract the energies of a large number of baryon states is developed. This work is part of a long-term project undertaken by the Lattice Hadron Physics Collaboration to carry out a first-principles calculation of the low-lying spectrum of QCD. The operators are assemblages of smeared and gauge-covariantly-displaced quark fields having a definite flavor structure. The importance of using smeared fields is dramatically demonstrated. It is found that quark field smearing greatly reduces the couplings to the unwanted high-lying short-wavelength modes, while gauge field smearing drastically reduces the statistical noise in the extended operators.

  19. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the GM, GE, and GC form factors for the Δ (1232 ) resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to Q2=5 GeV2 . We also explore the E /M and S /M ratios as functions of Q2. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  20. Measurements of baryon form factors at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cui

    2016-08-01

    The momentum transfer dependence of the electromagnetic form factors is an important probe of the structure of hadrons at different scales. Using data samples collected with the BESIII detector at the BEPCII collider, we study the process of e+e- → pp¯ at 12 c.m. energies from 2232.4 to 3671.0 MeV. The Born cross section at these energy points are measured as well as the corresponding effective electromagnetic form factors. Furthermore, the ratio of electric to magnetic form factors, |GE/GM | and |GM | are measured at the c.m. energies where the data samples are the largest. We also report preliminary results of e+e- → ˄˄̅, which is analysed with the same method. Moreover, future prospects of the measurement of baryon electromagnetic form factors from a unique high luminosity data scan by BESIII, are given.

  1. Excited state baryon spectroscopy from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Robert G. Edwards; Dudek, Jozef J.; Richards, David G.; Wallace, Stephen J.

    2011-10-31

    Here, we present a calculation of the Nucleon and Delta excited state spectrum on dynamical anisotropic clover lattices. A method for operator construction is introduced that allows for the reliable identification of the continuum spins of baryon states, overcoming the reduced symmetry of the cubic lattice. Using this method, we are able to determine a spectrum of single-particle states for spins up to and including $J = 7/2$, of both parities, the first time this has been achieved in a lattice calculation. We find a spectrum of states identifiable as admixtures of $SU(6) Ⓧ O(3)$ representations and a counting of levels that is consistent with the non-relativistic $qqq$ constituent quark model. This dense spectrum is incompatible with quark-diquark model solutions to the "missing resonance problem" and shows no signs of parity doubling of states.

  2. Baryon transition form factors at the pole

    SciTech Connect

    Tiator, L.; Döring, M.; Workman, R. L.; Hadžimehmedović, M.; Osmanović, H.; Omerović, R.; Stahov, J.; Švarc, A.

    2016-12-01

    Electromagnetic resonance properties are uniquely defined at the pole and do not depend on the separation of the resonance from background or the decay channel. Photon-nucleon branching ratios are nowadays often quoted at the pole, and we generalize the considerations to the case of virtual photons. We derive and compare relations for nucleon to baryon transition form factors both for the Breit-Wigner and the pole positions. Using the MAID2007 and SAID SM08 partial wave analyses of pion electroproduction data, we compare the $G_M$, $G_E$, and $G_C$ form factors for the $\\Delta(1232)$ resonance excitation at the Breit-Wigner resonance and pole positions up to $Q^2=5$ GeV$^2$. We also explore the $E/M$ and $S/M$ ratios as functions of $Q^2$. For pole and residue extraction, we apply the Laurent + Pietarinen method.

  3. Leptogenesis and gravity: Baryon asymmetry without decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDonald, J. I.; Shore, G. M.

    2017-03-01

    A popular class of theories attributes the matter-antimatter asymmetry of the Universe to CP-violating decays of super-heavy BSM particles in the Early Universe. Recently, we discovered a new source of leptogenesis in these models, namely that the same Yukawa phases which provide the CP violation for decays, combined with curved-spacetime loop effects, lead to an entirely new gravitational mechanism for generating an asymmetry, driven by the expansion of the Universe and independent of the departure of the heavy particles from equilibrium. In this Letter, we build on previous work by analysing the full Boltzmann equation, exploring the full parameter space of the theory and studying the time-evolution of the asymmetry. Remarkably, we find regions of parameter space where decays play no part at all, and where the baryon asymmetry of the Universe is determined solely by gravitational effects.

  4. Towards an optimal reconstruction of baryon oscillations

    SciTech Connect

    Tassev, Svetlin; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2012-10-01

    The Baryon Acoustic Oscillations (BAO) in the large-scale structure of the universe leave a distinct peak in the two-point correlation function of the matter distribution. That acoustic peak is smeared and shifted by bulk flows and non-linear evolution. However, it has been shown that it is still possible to sharpen the peak and remove its shift by undoing the effects of the bulk flows. We propose an improvement to the standard acoustic peak reconstruction. Contrary to the standard approach, the new scheme has no free parameters, treats the large-scale modes consistently, and uses optimal filters to extract the BAO information. At redshift of zero, the reconstructed linear matter power spectrum leads to a markedly improved sharpening of the reconstructed acoustic peak compared to standard reconstruction.

  5. Cluster outskirts and the missing baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eckert, D.

    2016-06-01

    Galaxy clusters are located at the crossroads of intergalactic filaments and are still forming through the continuous merging and accretion of smaller structures from the surrounding cosmic web. Deep, wide-field X-ray studies of the outskirts of the most massive clusters bring us valuable insight into the processes leading to the growth of cosmic structures. In addition, cluster outskirts are privileged sites to search for the missing baryons, which are thought to reside within the filaments of the cosmic web. I will present the XMM cluster outskirts project, a VLP that aims at mapping the outskirts of 13 nearby clusters. Based on the results obtained with this program, I will then explore ideas to exploit the capabilities of XMM during the next decade.

  6. The Compressed Baryonic Matter Experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heuser, J. M.

    2011-04-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment is being planned at the international research centre FAIR, under realization next to the GSI laboratory in Darmstadt, Germany. Its physics programme addresses the QCD phase diagram in the region of highest net baryon densities. Of particular interest are the expected first order phase transition from partonic to hadronic matter, ending in a critical point, and modifications of hadron properties in the dense medium as a signal of chiral symmetry restoration. Laid out as a fixed-target experiment at the synchrotrons SIS-100/SIS-300, providing magnetic bending power of 100 and 300 T/m, the CBM detector will record both proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions at beam energies up to 45A GeV. Hadronic, leptonic and photonic observables have to be measured with large acceptance. The nuclear interaction rates will reach up to 10 MHz to measure extremely rare probes like charm near threshold. Two versions of the experiment are being studied, optimized for either electron-hadron or muon identification, combined with silicon detector based charged-particle tracking and micro-vertex detection. The research programme will start at SIS-100 with ion beams between 2 and 11A GeV, and protons up to energies of 29 GeV using the HADES detector and an initial configuration of the CBM experiment. The CBM physics requires the development of novel detector systems, trigger and data acquisition concepts as well as innovative real-time reconstruction techniques. Progress with feasibility studies of the experiment and the development of its detector systems are discussed.

  7. Strange baryons in a chiral quark-meson model (II). broken SU(3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Judith A.; Birse, Michael C.

    1990-01-01

    The chiral-quark meson model is used to study baryon properties with realistic breaking of SU(3). The symmetry breaking is assumed to be strong, so that a random phase approximation (RPA) can be used. In this the strange baryons are described as excitations built on the hedgehog soliton and have an excitation energy of 315 MeV. Other properties of strange baryons are obtained by an approximate spin-isospin projection from the RPA wave function. The magnetic moments agree reasonably well with experiment, but the deviations from the experimental values suggest that the method is valid for the case of rather stronger symmetry breaking than is realistic. The dependence of the RPA energy on the magnitude of the symmetry breaking is examined, and found to be strongly nonlinear for realistic values. This supports the idea that a large πN sigma commutator need not imply a large strange-quark content in the proton. For reasonable values of the scalar meson masses the strange-quark condensate is found to be less than 5% of the total, at the mean-field level. We also estimate the contribution to the condensate from RPA correlations. Within a one-mode approximation we find these to be very small, ˜2%.

  8. Astrophysical constraints on dark-matter Q -balls in the presence of baryon-violating operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotner, Eric; Kusenko, Alexander

    2016-12-01

    Supersymmetric extensions of the standard model predict the existence of nontopological solitons, Q -balls. Assuming the standard cosmological history preceded by inflation, Q -balls can form in the early universe and can make up the dark matter. The relatively large masses of such dark-matter particles imply a low number density, making direct detection very challenging. The strongest limits come from the existence of neutron stars because, if a baryonic Q -ball is captured by a neutron star, the Q -ball can absorb the baryon number releasing energy and eventually destroying a neutron star. However, in the presence of baryon number violating higher-dimensional operators, the growth of a Q -ball inside a neutron star is hampered once the Q -ball reaches a certain size. We reexamine the limits and identify some classes of higher-dimensional operators for which supersymmetric Q -balls can account for dark matter. The present limits leave a wide range of parameters available for dark matter in the form of supersymmetric Q -balls.

  9. Cumulative production of pions by heavy baryonic resonances in proton-nucleus collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motornenko, A.; Gorenstein, M. I.

    2017-02-01

    Pion production in proton-nucleus (p+A) collisions outside the kinematical boundary of proton-nucleon (p+N) reactions and the so-called cumulative effect are studied. Restrictions from energy-momentum conservation of the energy of pions emitted in the backward direction in the target rest frame are analyzed. It is assumed that the cumulative pions are produced in p+A reactions by heavy baryonic resonances. The baryonic resonances are first created in p+N reactions. Due to successive collisions with nuclear nucleons, the masses of these resonances may then increase and, simultaneously, their longitudinal velocities decrease. We also use the ultra relativistic quantum molecular dynamics model to reveal the key role of successive collisions of baryonic resonances with nuclear nucleons for cumulative pion production in p+A reactions. Further experimental studies of cumulative hadron production in p+A reactions at high collision energies are needed to search for heavy hadron-like objects and investigate their properties.

  10. Probing the diffuse baryon distribution with the lensing-tSZ cross-correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Yin-Zhe; Zuntz, Joe; Waerbeke, Ludovic Van; Hinshaw, Gary; Hojjati, Alireza; Scott, Douglas E-mail: waerbeke@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: ahojjati@phas.ubc.ca E-mail: joezuntz@googlemail.com

    2015-09-01

    Approximately half of the Universe's baryons are in a form that has been hard to detect directly. However, the missing component can be traced through the cross-correlation of the thermal Sunyaev-Zeldovich (tSZ) effect with weak gravitational lensing. We build a model for this correlation and use it to constrain the extended baryon component, employing data from the Canada France Hawaii Lensing Survey and the Planck satellite. The measured correlation function is consistent with an isothermal β-model for the halo gas pressure profile, and the 1- and 2-halo terms are both detected at the 4σ level. In addition, we measure the hydrostatic mass bias (1−b)=0.79{sup +0.07}{sub −0.10}, which is consistent with numerical simulation results and the constraints from X-ray observations. The effective temperature of the gas is found to be in the range (7×10{sup 5}–3 ×10{sup 8}) K, with approximately 50% of the baryons appearing to lie beyond the virial radius of the halos, consistent with current expectations for the warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  11. Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 in two-flavor lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, Toru T.; Oka, Makoto

    2010-02-01

    Low-lying {Lambda} baryons with spin 1/2 are analyzed in full (unquenched) lattice QCD. We construct 2x2 cross correlators from flavor SU(3) octet and singlet baryon operators, and diagonalize them so as to extract information of two low-lying states for each parity. The two-flavor CP-PACS gauge configurations are used, which are generated in the renormalization-group improved gauge action and the O(a)-improved quark action. Three different {beta}'s, {beta}=1.80, 1.95, and 2.10, are employed, whose corresponding lattice spacings are a=0.2150, 0.1555, and 0.1076 fm. For each cutoff, we use four hopping parameters, ({kappa}{sub val},{kappa}{sub sea}), which correspond to the pion masses ranging about from 500 MeV to 1.1 GeV. Results indicate that there are two negative-parity {Lambda} states nearly degenerate at around 1.6 GeV, while no state as low as {Lambda}(1405) is observed. By decomposing the flavor components of each state, we find that the lowest (1st-excited) negative-parity state is dominated by flavor-singlet (flavor-octet) component. We also discuss meson-baryon components of each state, which has drawn considerable attention in the context of multiquark pictures of {Lambda}(1405).

  12. Observation of an Excited Charm Baryon Omega^*_C Decaying to Omega^0_C Gamma

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B

    2006-11-15

    The authors report the first observation of an excited singly-charmed baryon {Omega}*{sub c} (css) in the radiative decay {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}{gamma}, where the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryon is reconstructed in the decays to the final states {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup 0}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, and {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +}. This analysis is performed using a dataset of 230.7 fb{sup -1} collected by the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy B Factory at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The mass difference between the {Omega}*{sub c} and the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is measured to be 70.8 {+-} 1.0(stat) {+-} 1.1(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. They also measure the ratio of inclusive production cross sections of {Omega}*{sub c} and {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} in e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation.

  13. Baryon spectroscopy: Recent results from the Crystal Barrel/TAPS experiment at ELSA

    SciTech Connect

    Thoma, U.

    2010-08-05

    To understand the spectrum and the properties of baryon resonances, the CBELSA/TAPS experiment at ELSA investigates the photoproduction of single- and multi-meson final states off the nucleon. In the latter final states baryon cascades via Dp and Dh and also via higher mass baryon resonances are clearly observed. A partial wave analysis based on single and double meson photoproduction data as well as data from other reactions allows a first determination of resonance properties including partial decay widths of various N* and {Delta}* states. Those include also the decays into the different p{pi}{sup 0{pi}0} and p{pi}{sup 0{eta}} decay channels resulting partly in unexpected results. Recently not only single but also double polarisation experiments have been performed, which are absolutelly necessary to resolve ambiguities in the partial wave analyses (PWA) used to extract the resonances from the data; without the measurement of polarisation observables a model-independent PWA will not be possible. Polarisation observables have been investigated using linearly, circularly polarized or unpolarized photons impinging on an longitudinally polarized or unpolarized target. Given the angular coverage of the Crystal-Barrel/TAPS experiment this data cover almost the full angular range and phase space. This data will provide key information for the partial wave analyses and brings us one step closer towards the needed complete experiment.

  14. Structure formation by the fifth force: Segregation of baryons and dark matter

    SciTech Connect

    Li Baojiu; Zhao Hongsheng

    2010-05-15

    In this paper we present the results of N-body simulations with a scalar field coupled differently to cold dark matter (CDM) and baryons. The scalar field potential and coupling function are chosen such that the scalar field acquires a heavy mass in regions with high CDM density and thus behaves like a chameleon. We focus on how the existence of the scalar field affects the formation of nonlinear large-scale structures, and how the different couplings of the scalar field to baryons and CDM particles lead to different distributions and evolutions for these two matter species, both on large scales and inside virialized halos. As expected, the baryon-CDM segregation increases in regions where the fifth force is strong, and little segregation in dense regions. We also introduce an approximation method to identify the virialized halos in coupled scalar field models which takes into account the scalar field coupling and which is easy to implement numerically. It is found that the chameleon nature of the scalar field makes the internal density profiles of halos dependent on the environment in a very nontrivial way.

  15. Introducing the working group on excited baryons at the CEBAF 1986 workshop

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhopadhyay, N.C.

    1986-01-01

    Several important issues related to excited baryons are outlined. These include the questions of why to study electromagnetic excitation of baryons, which excited baryons to study, and what new physics to expect. Also considered are amplitude ambiguities for ..gamma..BB* and theoretical problems of extracting the resonant amplitude. Excited baryons in nuclei and future experiments are considered. (LEW)

  16. Baryon asymmetry from hypermagnetic helicity in dilaton hypercharge electromagnetism

    SciTech Connect

    Bamba, Kazuharu

    2006-12-15

    The generation of the baryon asymmetry of the Universe from the hypermagnetic helicity, the physical interpretation of which is given in terms of hypermagnetic knots, is studied in inflationary cosmology, taking into account the breaking of the conformal invariance of hypercharge electromagnetic fields through both a coupling with the dilaton and with a pseudoscalar field. It is shown that, if the electroweak phase transition is strongly first order and the present amplitude of the generated magnetic fields on the horizon scale is sufficiently large, a baryon asymmetry with a sufficient magnitude to account for the observed baryon-to-entropy ratio can be generated.

  17. Dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the universe.

    PubMed

    Farrar, Glennys R; Zaharijas, Gabrijela

    2006-02-03

    We present a mechanism to generate the baryon asymmetry of the Universe which preserves the net baryon number created in the big bang. If dark matter particles carry baryon number Bx, and sigmaxannih

  18. Negative Parity Baryon Decays in the 1/Nc Expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Chandana Jayalath, Jose L. Goity, Norberto N. Scoccola

    2010-08-01

    The $1/N_c$ expansion of QCD provides a useful framework for phenomenological studies of both ground state and excited baryons. Here, we focus on its application to the excited baryon strong decays via emission of single pseudoscalar meson. The S- and D-wave decay amplitudes of the negative parity baryons in the $[70,1^-]$ of $SU(6)$ are analyzed to subleading order in $1/N_c$ and to first order in SU(3) symmetry breaking. In particular, the SU(3) symmetry breaking is studied in detail through SU(3) breaking decay operators and state mixing.

  19. Medium modifications of baryon properties in nuclear matter and hypernuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, J. S.; Shen, H.

    2013-09-01

    We study the medium modifications of baryon properties in nuclear many-body systems, especially in Λ hypernuclei. The nucleon and the Λ hyperon are described in the Friedberg-Lee model as nontopological solitons which interact through the self-consistent exchange of scalar and vector mesons. The quark degrees of freedom are explicitly considered in the model, so that the medium effects on baryons could be investigated. It is found that the model can provide reasonable descriptions for nuclear matter, finite nuclei, and Λ hypernuclei. The present model predicts a significant increase of the baryon radius in nuclear medium.

  20. A Massive Warm Baryonic Halo in the Coma Cluster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonamente, Massimiliano; Joy, Marshall K.; Lieu, Richard

    2003-01-01

    Several deep PSPC observations of the Coma Cluster reveal a very large scale halo of soft X-ray emission, substantially in excess of the well-known radiation from the hot intracluster medium. The excess emission, previously reported in the central region of the cluster using lower sensitivity Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) and ROSAT data, is now evident out to a radius of 2.6 Mpc, demonstrating that the soft excess radiation from clusters is a phenomenon of cosmological significance. The X-ray spectrum at these large radii cannot be modeled nonthermally but is consistent with the original scenario of thermal emission from warm gas at approx. 10(exp 6) K. The mass of the warm gas is on par with that of the hot X-ray-emitting plasma and significantly more massive if the warm gas resides in low-density filamentary structures. Thus, the data lend vital support to current theories of cosmic evolution, which predict that at low redshift approx. 30%-40% of the baryons reside in warm filaments converging at clusters of galaxies.

  1. Direct observation of the strange b baryon Xib-.

    PubMed

    Abazov, V M; Abbott, B; Abolins, M; Acharya, B S; Adams, M; Adams, T; Aguilo, E; Ahn, S H; Ahsan, M; Alexeev, G D; Alkhazov, G; Alton, A; Alverson, G; Alves, G A; Anastasoaie, M; Ancu, L S; Andeen, T; Anderson, S; Andrieu, B; Anzelc, M S; Arnoud, Y; Arov, M; Arthaud, M; Askew, A; Asman, B; Assis Jesus, A C S; Atramentov, O; Autermann, C; Avila, C; Ay, C; Badaud, F; Baden, A; Bagby, L; Baldin, B; Bandurin, D V; Banerjee, S; Banerjee, P; Barberis, E; Barfuss, A-F; Bargassa, P; Baringer, P; Barreto, J; Bartlett, J F; Bassler, U; Bauer, D; Beale, S; Bean, A; Begalli, M; Begel, M; Belanger-Champagne, C; Bellantoni, L; Bellavance, A; Benitez, J A; Beri, S B; Bernardi, G; Bernhard, R; Berntzon, L; Bertram, I; Besançon, M; Beuselinck, R; Bezzubov, V A; Bhat, P C; Bhatnagar, V; Biscarat, C; Blazey, G; Blekman, F; Blessing, S; Bloch, D; Bloom, K; Boehnlein, A; Boline, D; Bolton, T A; Borissov, G; Bos, K; Bose, T; Brandt, A; Brock, R; Brooijmans, G; Bross, A; Brown, D; Buchanan, N J; Buchholz, D; Buehler, M; Buescher, V; Burdin, S; Burke, S; Burnett, T H; Buszello, C P; Butler, J M; Calfayan, P; Calvet, S; Cammin, J; Caron, S; Carvalho, W; Casey, B C K; Cason, N M; Castilla-Valdez, H; Chakrabarti, S; Chakraborty, D; Chan, K M; Chan, K; Chandra, A; Charles, F; Cheu, E; Chevallier, F; Cho, D K; Choi, S; Choudhary, B; Christofek, L; Christoudias, T; Cihangir, S; Claes, D; Clément, C; Clément, B; Coadou, Y; Cooke, M; Cooper, W E; Corcoran, M; Couderc, F; Cousinou, M-C; Crépé-Renaudin, S; Cutts, D; Cwiok, M; da Motta, H; Das, A; Davies, G; De, K; de Jong, S J; de Jong, P; De La Cruz-Burelo, E; De Oliveira Martins, C; Degenhardt, J D; Déliot, F; Demarteau, M; Demina, R; Denisov, D; Denisov, S P; Desai, S; Diehl, H T; Diesburg, M; Dominguez, A; Dong, H; Dudko, L V; Duflot, L; Dugad, S R; Duggan, D; Duperrin, A; Dyer, J; Dyshkant, A; Eads, M; Edmunds, D; Ellison, J; Elvira, V D; Enari, Y; Eno, S; Ermolov, P; Evans, H; Evdokimov, A; Evdokimov, V N; Ferapontov, A V; Ferbel, T; Fiedler, F; Filthaut, F; Fisher, W; Fisk, H E; Ford, M; Fortner, M; Fox, H; Fu, S; Fuess, S; Gadfort, T; Galea, C F; Gallas, E; Galyaev, E; Garcia, C; Garcia-Bellido, A; Gavrilov, V; Gay, P; Geist, W; Gelé, D; Gerber, C E; Gershtein, Y; Gillberg, D; Ginther, G; Gollub, N; Gómez, B; Goussiou, A; Grannis, P D; Greenlee, H; Greenwood, Z D; Gregores, E M; Grenier, G; Gris, Ph; Grivaz, J-F; Grohsjean, A; Grünendahl, S; Grünewald, M W; Guo, J; Guo, F; Gutierrez, P; Gutierrez, G; Haas, A; Hadley, N J; Haefner, P; Hagopian, S; Haley, J; Hall, I; Hall, R E; Han, L; Hanagaki, K; Hansson, P; Harder, K; Harel, A; Harrington, R; Hauptman, J M; Hauser, R; Hays, J; Hebbeker, T; Hedin, D; Hegeman, J G; Heinmiller, J M; Heinson, A P; Heintz, U; Hensel, C; Herner, K; Hesketh, G; Hildreth, M D; Hirosky, R; Hobbs, J D; Hoeneisen, B; Hoeth, H; Hohlfeld, M; Hong, S J; Hooper, R; Hossain, S; Houben, P; Hu, Y; Hubacek, Z; Hynek, V; Iashvili, I; Illingworth, R; Ito, A S; Jabeen, S; Jaffré, M; Jain, S; Jakobs, K; Jarvis, C; Jesik, R; Johns, K; Johnson, C; Johnson, M; Jonckheere, A; Jonsson, P; Juste, A; Käfer, D; Kahn, S; Kajfasz, E; Kalinin, A M; Kalk, J R; Kalk, J M; Kappler, S; Karmanov, D; Kasper, J; Kasper, P; Katsanos, I; Kau, D; Kaur, R; Kaushik, V; Kehoe, R; Kermiche, S; Khalatyan, N; Khanov, A; Kharchilava, A; Kharzheev, Y M; Khatidze, D; Kim, H; Kim, T J; Kirby, M H; Kirsch, M; Klima, B; Kohli, J M; Konrath, J-P; Kopal, M; Korablev, V M; Kothari, B; Kozelov, A V; Krop, D; Kryemadhi, A; Kuhl, T; Kumar, A; Kunori, S; Kupco, A; Kurca, T; Kvita, J; Lacroix, F; Lam, D; Lammers, S; Landsberg, G; Lazoflores, J; Lebrun, P; Lee, W M; Leflat, A; Lehner, F; Lellouch, J; Lesne, V; Leveque, J; Lewis, P; Li, J; Li, Q Z; Li, L; Lietti, S M; Lima, J G R; Lincoln, D; Linnemann, J; Lipaev, V V; Lipton, R; Liu, Y; Liu, Z; Lobo, L; Lobodenko, A; Lokajicek, M; Lounis, A; Love, P; Lubatti, H J; Lyon, A L; Maciel, A K A; Mackin, D; Madaras, R J; Mättig, P; Magass, C; Magerkurth, A; Makovec, N; Mal, P K; Malbouisson, H B; Malik, S; Malyshev, V L; Mao, H S; Maravin, Y; Martin, B; McCarthy, R; Melnitchouk, A; Mendes, A; Mendoza, L; Mercadante, P G; Merekov, Y P; Merkin, M; Merritt, K W; Meyer, J; Meyer, A; Michaut, M; Millet, T; Mitrevski, J; Molina, J; Mommsen, R K; Mondal, N K; Moore, R W; Moulik, T; Muanza, G S; Mulders, M; Mulhearn, M; Mundal, O; Mundim, L; Nagy, E; Naimuddin, M; Narain, M; Naumann, N A; Neal, H A; Negret, J P; Neustroev, P; Nilsen, H; Nomerotski, A; Novaes, S F; Nunnemann, T; O'Dell, V; O'Neil, D C; Obrant, G; Ochando, C; Onoprienko, D; Oshima, N; Osta, J; Otec, R; Otero y Garzón, G J; Owen, M; Padley, P; Pangilinan, M; Panov, G; Parashar, N; Park, S-J; Park, S K; Parsons, J; Partridge, R; Parua, N; Patwa, A; Pawloski, G; Penning, B; Perea, P M; Peters, K; Peters, Y; Pétroff, P; Petteni, M; Piegaia, R; Piper, J; Pleier, M-A; Podesta-Lerma, P L M; Podstavkov, V M; Pogorelov, Y; Pol, M-E; Polozov, P; Pompos, A; Pope, B G; Popov, A V; Potter, C; Prado da Silva, W L; Prosper, H B; Protopopescu, S; Qian, J; Quadt, A; Quinn, B; Rakitine, A; Rangel, M S; Rani, K J; Ranjan, K; Ratoff, P N; Renkel, P; Reucroft, S; Rich, P; Rijssenbeek, M; Ripp-Baudot, I; Rizatdinova, F; Robinson, S; Rodrigues, R F; Royon, C; Rozhdestvenski, A; Rubinov, P; Ruchti, R; Safronov, G; Sajot, G; Sánchez-Hernández, A; Sanders, M P; Santoro, A; Savage, G; Sawyer, L; Scanlon, T; Schaile, D; Schamberger, R D; Scheglov, Y; Schellman, H; Schieferdecker, P; Schliephake, T; Schmitt, C; Schwanenberger, C; Schwartzman, A; Schwienhorst, R; Sekaric, J; Sengupta, S; Severini, H; Shabalina, E; Shamim, M; Shary, V; Shchukin, A A; Shivpuri, R K; Shpakov, D; Siccardi, V; Simak, V; Sirotenko, V; Skubic, P; Slattery, P; Smirnov, D; Smith, R P; Snow, J; Snow, G R; Snyder, S; Söldner-Rembold, S; Sonnenschein, L; Sopczak, A; Sosebee, M; Soustruznik, K; Souza, M; Spurlock, B; Stark, J; Steele, J; Stolin, V; Stone, A; Stoyanova, D A; Strandberg, J; Strandberg, S; Strang, M A; Strauss, M; Strauss, E; Ströhmer, R; Strom, D; Strovink, M; Stutte, L; Sumowidagdo, S; Svoisky, P; Sznajder, A; Talby, M; Tamburello, P; Tanasijczuk, A; Taylor, W; Telford, P; Temple, J; Tiller, B; Tissandier, F; Titov, M; Tokmenin, V V; Tomoto, M; Toole, T; Torchiani, I; Trefzger, T; Tsybychev, D; Tuchming, B; Tully, C; Tuts, P M; Unalan, R; Uvarov, S; Uvarov, L; Uzunyan, S; Vachon, B; van den Berg, P J; van Eijk, B; Van Kooten, R; van Leeuwen, W M; Varelas, N; Varnes, E W; Vartapetian, A; Vasilyev, I A; Vaupel, M; Verdier, P; Vertogradov, L S; Vertogradova, Y; Verzocchi, M; Villeneuve-Seguier, F; Vint, P; Vokac, P; Von Toerne, E; Voutilainen, M; Vreeswijk, M; Wagner, R; Wahl, H D; Wang, L; Wang, M H L S; Warchol, J; Watts, G; Wayne, M; Weber, M; Weber, G; Weerts, H; Wenger, A; Wermes, N; Wetstein, M; White, A; Wicke, D; Wilson, G W; Wimpenny, S J; Wobisch, M; Wood, D R; Wyatt, T R; Xie, Y; Yacoob, S; Yamada, R; Yan, M; Yasuda, T; Yatsunenko, Y A; Yip, K; Yoo, H D; Youn, S W; Yu, J; Yu, C; Yurkewicz, A; Zatserklyaniy, A; Zeitnitz, C; Zhang, D; Zhao, T; Zhou, B; Zhu, J; Zielinski, M; Zieminska, D; Zieminski, A; Zivkovic, L; Zutshi, V; Zverev, E G

    2007-08-03

    We report the first direct observation of the strange b baryon Xi(b)- (Xi(b)+). We reconstruct the decay Xi(b)- -->J/psiXi-, with J/psi-->mu+mu-, and Xi--->Lambdapi--->ppi-pi- in pp collisions at square root of s =1.96 TeV. Using 1.3 fb(-1) of data collected by the D0 detector, we observe 15.2 +/- 4.4(stat)(-0.4)(+1.9)(syst) Xi(b)- candidates at a mass of 5.774 +/- 0.011(stat) +/- 0.015(syst) GeV. The significance of the observed signal is 5.5 sigma, equivalent to a probability of 3.3 x 10(-8) of it arising from a background fluctuation. Normalizing to the decay Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda, we measure the relative rate sigma(Xi(b-) x B(Xi)b})- -->J/psiXi-)/sigma(Lambda(b)) x B(Lambda(b)-->J/psiLambda) = 0.28+/-0.09(stat)(-0.08)(+0.09)(syst).

  2. The Angular Momentum of Baryons and Dark Matter Halos Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kimm, Taysun; Devriendt, Julien; Slyz, Adrianne; Pichon, Christophe; Kassin, Susan A.; Dubois, Yohan

    2011-01-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that galaxies at high redshift are fed by cold, dense gas filaments, suggesting angular momentum transport by gas differs from that by dark matter. Revisiting this issue using high-resolution cosmological hydrodynamics simulations with adaptive-mesh refinement (AMR), we find that at the time of accretion, gas and dark matter do carry a similar amount of specific angular momentum, but that it is systematically higher than that of the dark matter halo as a whole. At high redshift, freshly accreted gas rapidly streams into the central region of the halo, directly depositing this large amount of angular momentum within a sphere of radius r = 0.1R(sub vir). In contrast, dark matter particles pass through the central region unscathed, and a fraction of them ends up populating the outer regions of the halo (r/R(sub vir) > 0.1), redistributing angular momentum in the process. As a result, large-scale motions of the cosmic web have to be considered as the origin of gas angular momentum rather than its virialised dark matter halo host. This generic result holds for halos of all masses at all redshifts, as radiative cooling ensures that a significant fraction of baryons remain trapped at the centre of the halos. Despite this injection of angular momentum enriched gas, we predict an amount for stellar discs which is in fair agreement with observations at z=0. This arises because the total specific angular momentum of the baryons (gas and stars) remains close to that of dark matter halos. Indeed, our simulations indicate that any differential loss of angular momentum amplitude between the two components is minor even though dark matter halos continuously lose between half and two-thirds of their specific angular momentum modulus as they evolve. In light of our results, a substantial revision of the standard theory of disc formation seems to be required. We propose a new scenario where gas efficiently carries the angular momentum generated

  3. Excited heavy baryons and their symmetries III: Phenomenology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baccouche, Z. Aziza; Chow, Chi-Keung; Cohen, Thomas D.; Gelman, Boris A.

    2001-12-01

    Phenomenological applications of an effective theory of low-lying excited states of charm and bottom isoscalar baryons are discussed at leading and next-to-leading order in the combined heavy-quark and large- Nc expansion. The combined expansion is formulated in terms of the counting parameter λ˜1/ mQ,1/ Nc; the combined expansion is in powers of λ1/2. We work up to next-to-leading order. We obtain model-independent predictions for the excitation energies, the semileptonic form factors and electromagnetic decay rates. At leading order in the combined expansion these observables are given in terms of one phenomenological constant which can be determined from the excitation energy of the first excited state of Λc baryon. At next-to-leading order an additional phenomenological constant is required. The spin-averaged mass of the doublet of the first orbitally excited state of Λb is predicted to be approximately 5920 MeV. It is shown that in the combined limit at leading and next-to-leading order there is only one independent form factor describing Λ b→Λ cℓ ν¯; similarly, Λ b→Λ c∗ℓ ν¯ and Λ b→Λ c1ℓ ν¯ decays are described by a single independent form factor. These form factors are calculated at leading and next-to-leading order in the combined expansion. The value of the Λ b→Λ cℓ ν¯ form factor at zero recoil is predicted to be 0.998 at leading order which is very close to HQET value of unity. The electromagnetic decay rates of the first excited states of Λc and Λb are determined at leading and next-to-leading order. The ratio of radiative decay rates Γ(Λ c∗→Λ cγ)/Γ(Λ b1→Λ bγ) is predicted to be approximately 0.2, greatly different from the heavy-quark effective theory value of unity.

  4. Wavelet analysis of baryon acoustic structures in the galaxy distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnalte-Mur, P.; Labatie, A.; Clerc, N.; Martínez, V. J.; Starck, J.-L.; Lachièze-Rey, M.; Saar, E.; Paredes, S.

    2012-06-01

    Context. Baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO) are imprinted in the density field by acoustic waves travelling in the plasma of the early universe. Their fixed scale can be used as a standard ruler to study the geometry of the universe. Aims: The BAO have been previously detected using correlation functions and power spectra of the galaxy distribution. We present a new method to detect the real-space structures associated with BAO. These baryon acoustic structures are spherical shells of relatively small density contrast, surrounding high density central regions. Methods: We design a specific wavelet adapted to search for shells, and exploit the physics of the process by making use of two different mass tracers, introducing a specific statistic to detect the BAO features. We show the effect of the BAO signal in this new statistic when applied to the Λ - cold dark matter (ΛCDM) model, using an analytical approximation to the transfer function. We confirm the reliability and stability of our method by using cosmological N-body simulations from the MareNostrum Institut de Ciències de l'Espai (MICE). Results: We apply our method to the detection of BAO in a galaxy sample drawn from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). We use the "main" catalogue to trace the shells, and the luminous red galaxies (LRG) as tracers of the high density central regions. Using this new method, we detect, with a high significance, that the LRG in our sample are preferentially located close to the centres of shell-like structures in the density field, with characteristics similar to those expected from BAO. We show that stacking selected shells, we can find their characteristic density profile. Conclusions: We delineate a new feature of the cosmic web, the BAO shells. As these are real spatial structures, the BAO phenomenon can be studied in detail by examining those shells. Full Table 1 is only available at the CDS via anonymous ftp to cdsarc.u-strasbg.fr (130.79.128.5) or via http://cdsarc

  5. Faddeev equation studies of SU{sub f}(3) baryons spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, C.D.; Cahill, R.T.; Tandy, P.C.

    1995-08-01

    The spectroscopy of baryons composed of u, d and s quarks is being studied using a separable approximation to the quark-quark scattering kernel. As in the studies of mesons, the kernel is obtained by using a separable approximation to invert the DSE for the quark propagator. An initial focus of the study is to analyze the importance of diffuse diquark correlations in baryons and to determine accurately the effective mass and radius of these correlations. This Faddeev equation approach, which employs confined, dressed-quark quasi-particles, is a natural framework within which to calculate the {pi}-N {sigma}-term ({sigma}{sub N}) and preliminary results are in good agreement with the experimentally determined value. This indicates that {sigma}{sub N} is simply and directly related to the shift in the nucleon mass due to the nonzero bare quark masses. The approach also provides a straightforward, microscopic understanding of mass-splittings. The Faddeev amplitudes obtained will form the basis for the calculation of scattering observables such as electromagnetic form factors and Compton scattering.

  6. Valence and Ionic Lowest-Lying Electronic States of Isobutyl Formate Studied by High-Resolution Vacuum Ultraviolet Photoabsorption, Photoelectron Spectroscopy, and Ab Initio Calculations.

    PubMed

    Śmiałek, M A; Łabuda, M; Guthmuller, J; Hoffmann, S V; Jones, N C; MacDonald, M A; Zuin, L; Mason, N J; Limão-Vieira, P

    2015-08-13

    The highest resolution vacuum ultraviolet photoabsorption spectrum of isobutyl formate, C5H10O2, yet reported is presented over the energy range 4.5-10.7 eV (275.5-118.0 nm) revealing several new spectral features. Valence and Rydberg transitions and their associated vibronic series observed in the photoabsorption spectrum have been assigned in accordance with new ab initio calculations of the vertical excitation energies and oscillator strengths. Calculations have also been carried out to determine the ionization energies and fine structure of the lowest ionic state of isobutyl formate and are compared with a newly recorded photoelectron spectrum (from 9.0 to 27.0 eV). The value of the first ionization energy was determined to be 10.508 eV (adiabatic) and 10.837 eV (vertical). New vibrational structure is observed in the first photoelectron band, predominantly resulting from C-O and C═O stretches of the molecule. The photoabsorption cross sections have been used to calculate the photolysis lifetime of isobutyl formate in the upper stratosphere (20-50 km), indicating that the hydroxyl radical processes will be the main loss process for isobutyl formate.

  7. Full-dimensional MCTDH/MGPF study of the ground and lowest lying vibrational states of the bihydroxide H3O2(-) complex.

    PubMed

    Peláez, Daniel; Sadri, Keyvan; Meyer, Hans-Dieter

    2014-02-05

    In this study, we present a full-dimensional (9D) quantum dynamical analysis of the lowest vibrational eigenstates of H3O2(-). We have made use of the Multiconfiguration Time-Dependent Hartree method in conjunction with both an analytical and a numerical representation of the Kinetic Energy Operator and the newly developed Multigrid POTFIT [D. Peláez, H.-D. Meyer, J. Chem. Phys. 138 (2013) 014108], an algorithm which performs the transformation of a high-dimensional (up to ~12D) Potential Energy tensor into product form. Many sets of top-down Multigrid POTFIT expansions, differing in the system coordinate definition (valence and Jacobi), as well as in the number of terms in the expansion, have been analyzed. Relaxations for the computation of the ground states energies have been carried out on these potentials, obtaining an excellent overall agreement with accurate previous Diffusion Monte Carlo (DMC) calculations, irrespective of the coordinate choice. The 24 lowest excited vibrational states of H3O2(-) have been computed by Block Relaxation and assigned for the first time. This has been carried out in two different pictures, namely: a 7D reduced dimensional one, in which the OH distances have been frozen at the Potential Energy Surface minimum, and a 9D full-dimensional one. The agreement between both descriptions is remarkable. The following fundamental modes have been characterized: OH torsion, OO stretching, OH wagging, OH rocking, and the elusive bridging H stretching. In particular, we provide a very accurate description of the latter in perfect agreement with experiment.

  8. Studying time-like baryonic transitions with HADES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramstein, B.

    2016-05-01

    Recent results of the HADES collaboration are presented with emphasis on the e+e- production in elementary reactions. Via the Dalitz decay of baryonic resonances (R →Ne+e-), access is given to the time-like electromagnetic structure of baryonic transitions. This process could be measured for the first time for Δ(1232) in pp reactions at 1.25 GeV. At higher energies, the sensitivity of e+e- emission to transition form factors of the Vector Dominance type has been demonstrated. Very recently, experiments with the GSI pion beam started, allowing for more direct studies of baryonic resonances Dalitz decays. In addition, the measurement of hadronic channels provides a new data base for baryon spectroscopy issues, in particular in the 2πN channel.

  9. Penguin diagram dominance in radiative weak decays of bottom baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Kohara, Yoji

    2005-05-01

    Radiative weak decays of antitriplet bottom baryons are studied under the assumption of penguin diagram dominance and flavor-SU(3) (or SU(2)) symmetry. Relations among decay rates of various decay modes are derived.

  10. Differentiating CDM and baryon isocurvature models with 21 cm fluctuations

    SciTech Connect

    Kawasaki, Masahiro; Sekiguchi, Toyokazu; Takahashi, Tomo E-mail: sekiguti@icrr.u-tokyo.ac.jp

    2011-10-01

    We discuss how one can discriminate models with cold dark matter (CDM) and baryon isocurvature fluctuations. Although current observations such as cosmic microwave background (CMB) can severely constrain the fraction of such isocurvature modes in the total density fluctuations, CMB cannot differentiate CDM and baryon ones by the shapes of their power spectra. However, the evolution of CDM and baryon density fluctuations are different for each model, thus it would be possible to discriminate those isocurvature modes by extracting information on the fluctuations of CDM/baryon itself. We discuss that observations of 21 cm fluctuations can in principle differentiate these modes and demonstrate to what extent we can distinguish them with future 21 cm surveys. We show that, when the isocurvature mode has a large blue-tilted initial spectrum, 21 cm surveys can clearly probe the difference.

  11. Color fluxes in the production of doubly heavy baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Baranov, S. P.

    2007-04-15

    The production of doubly heavy baryons in hadron-hadron collisions is considered. A method is proposed for decomposing the respective differential cross section into parts associated with contributions of various color-flux configurations.

  12. Strange form factors of octet and decuplet baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, Soon-Tae

    1999-11-22

    The strange form factors of baryon octet are evaluated, in the chiral models with the general chiral SU(3) group structure, to yield the theoretical predictions comparable to the recent experimental data of SAMPLE Collaboration and to study the spin symmetries. Other model predictions are also briefly reviewed to compare with our results and then the strange form factors of baryon octet and decuplet are predicted.

  13. Magnetic Moments of Delta and Omega- baryons with dynamical clover fermions

    SciTech Connect

    Aubin, Christopher; Orginos, Konstantinos; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2009-01-01

    We calculate the magnetic dipole moment of the Delta(1232) and Omega- baryons with 2+1-flavors of clover fermions on anisotropic lattices using a background magnetic field. This is the first dynamical calculation of these magnetic moments using a background field technique. The calculation for Omega- is done at the physical strange quark mass, with the result in units of the physical nuclear magneton µ_(Omega-) = -1.93(8)(12) (where the first error is statistical and the second is systematic) compared to the experimental number: -2.02(5). The Delta has been studied at three unphysical quark masses, corresponding to pion mass 366, 438, and 548 MeV. The pion-mass dependence is compared with the behavior obtained from chiral effective-field theory.

  14. Bridging Galaxy Dynamics and Baryon Efficiency of 40 EDGE-CALIFA galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalinova, Veselina; Colombo, Dario; Rosolowsky, Erik

    We apply the Jeans Axisymmetric Multi-Gaussian Expansion method to the stellar kinematic maps of 40 Sa-Sd EDGE-CALIFA galaxies and derive their circular velocity curves (CVCs). The CVCs are classified using the Dynamical Classification method developed in Kalinova et al. (2015). We also calculate the observational baryon efficiency, OBE, where M */M b =M */(M *+M HI +M H 2 ) of the galaxies using their stellar mass, total neutral hydrogen mass and total molecular gas from CO luminosities. Slow-rising, Flat and Round-peaked CVC types correspond to specific OBEs, stellar and dark matter (DM) halo mass values, while the Sharp-peaked CVCs span in the whole DM halo mass range of 1011-1014 M ⊙.

  15. Baryon content of massive galaxy clusters at 0.57 < z < 1.33

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, I.; Mohr, J.; McDonald, M.; Bocquet, S.; Ashby, M. L. N.; Bayliss, M.; Benson, B. A.; Bleem, L. E.; Brodwin, M.; Desai, S.; Dietrich, J. P.; Forman, W. R.; Gangkofner, C.; Gonzalez, A. H.; Hennig, C.; Liu, J.; Reichardt, C. L.; Saro, A.; Stalder, B.; Stanford, S. A.; Song, J.; Schrabback, T.; Šuhada, R.; Strazzullo, V.; Zenteno, A.

    2016-01-01

    We study the stellar, brightest cluster galaxy (BCG) and intracluster medium (ICM) masses of 14 South Pole Telescope (SPT) selected galaxy clusters with median redshift z = 0.9 and mass M500 = 6 × 1014 M⊙. We estimate stellar masses for each cluster and BCG using six photometric bands, the ICM mass using X-ray observations and the virial masses using the SPT Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect signature. At z = 0.9, the BCG mass M_{star }^{BCG} constitutes 0.12 ± 0.01 per cent of the halo mass for a 6 × 1014 M⊙ cluster, and this fraction falls as M_{500}^{-0.58± 0.07}. The cluster stellar mass function has a characteristic mass M0 = 1011.0 ± 0.1 M⊙, and the number of galaxies per unit mass in clusters is larger than in the field by a factor of 1.65 ± 0.20. We combine our SPT sample with previously published samples at low redshift and correct to a common initial mass function and for systematic virial mass differences. We then explore mass and redshift trends in the stellar fraction f⋆, the ICM fraction fICM, the collapsed baryon fraction fc and the baryon fraction fb. At a pivot mass of 6 × 1014 M⊙ and redshift z = 0.9, the characteristic values are f⋆ = 1.1 ± 0.1 per cent, fICM = 9.6 ± 0.5 per cent, fc = 10.7 ± 1.1 per cent and fb = 10.7 ± 0.6 per cent. These fractions all vary with cluster mass at high significance, with higher mass clusters having lower f⋆ and fc and higher fICM and fb. When accounting for a 15 per cent systematic virial mass uncertainty, there is no statistically significant redshift trend at fixed mass. Our results support the scenario where clusters grow through accretion from subclusters (higher f⋆, lower fICM) and the field (lower f⋆, higher fICM), balancing to keep f⋆ and fICM approximately constant since z ˜ 0.9.

  16. Dark baryons not in ancient halo white dwarfs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crézé, M.; Mohan, V.; Robin, A. C.; Reylé, C.; McCracken, H. J.; Cuillandre, J.-C.; Le Fèvre, O.; Mellier, Y.

    2004-10-01

    Having ruled out the possibility that stellar objects are the main contributor of the dark matter embedding galaxies, microlensing experiments cannot exclude the hypothesis that a significant fraction of the Milky Way dark halo might be made of MACHOs with masses in the range 0.5-0.8 M⊙. Ancient white dwarfs are generally considered the most plausible candidates for such MACHOs. We report the results of a search for such white dwarfs in a proper motion survey covering a 0.16 sq. deg. field at three epochs at high galactic latitude, and 0.938 sq. deg. at two epochs at intermediate galactic latitude (VIRMOS survey), using the CFH telescope. Both surveys are complete to I = 23, with detection efficiency fading to 0 at I = 24.2. Proper motion data are suitable to separate unambiguously halo white dwarfs identified as belonging to a non rotating system. No candidates were found within the colour-magnitude-proper motion volume where such objects can be safely discriminated from any standard population as well as from possible artefacts. In the same volume, we estimate the maximum white dwarf halo fraction compatible with this observation at different significance levels if the halo is at least 14 gigayears old and under different ad hoc initial mass functions. Our data alone rule out a halo fraction greater than 14 % at a 95% confidence level. Combined with two previous investigations exploring comparable volumes, this pushes the limit below 4 % (95% confidence level) or below 1 % (64% confidence), and implies that if baryonic dark matter is present in galaxy halos, it is not, or is only marginally in the form of faint hydrogen white dwarfs. Based on observations made at Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope (CFHT).

  17. Aspects of excited baryon phenomenology in the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez de Urreta, E. J.; Scoccola, Norberto N.

    2010-11-12

    We report on the application of the 1/N{sub c} expansion of QCD to the description of the properties of non-strange excited baryons belonging to the [70, 1{sup -}]-plet. In particular, we present the results of an improved determination of the corresponding mixing angles obtained by performing a simultaneous fit of masses and strong decay widths. We find {theta}{sub 1} 0.47{+-}0.06 and {theta}{sub 3} = 2.74{+-}0.07. These values are within the range of those determined in previous non-global analyses but have smaller uncertainties.

  18. Observing the Dark Baryons with Planck

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavaux, Guilhem

    2015-08-01

    Planck has offered us an unprecedented view on the early cosmology. However the secondary anisotropy analysis is still not complete though they would give us insights on a totally different part of the history of the Universe. This is the case of the Sunyaev Zel'dovich effects and, in particular, the kinetic component (kSZ) produced by electrons in the halos of galaxies. This effect is sensitive to the electron momentum along the line of sight. Provided the peculiar velocity field is known, it becomes possible to linearly relate the temperature anisotropy to the distribution of baryons around galaxies. I will discuss the detectability prospects, the challenges and the current state of the kSZ analysis based on optimal template fitting on Planck data and futuristic surveys.The kSZ template that I propose are generated based on detailed, statistical, dynamical modeling of the Large Scale structures. The most advanced model involves full Baysian formulation of the formation of Large Scale structure and statistical reconstruction of initial conditions (BORG, Jasche & Wandelt 2013) I will describe these models and how they are related to the kSZ template maps.

  19. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at JLab

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2007-10-26

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  20. The CLAS Excited Baryon Program at Jlab

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2007-10-01

    Nucleons are complex systems of confined quarks and exhibit characteristic spectra of excited states. Highly excited nucleon states are sensitive to details of quark confinement which is poorly understood within Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of strong interactions. Thus, measurements of excited states and the corresponding determination of their properties are needed to come to a better understanding of how confinement works in nucleons. However, the excited states of the nucleon cannot simply be inferred from cleanly separated spectral lines. Quite the contrary, a spectral analysis in nucleon resonance physics is challenging because of the fact that the resonances are broadly overlapping states which decay into a multitude of final states involving mesons and baryons. To provide a consistent and complete picture of an individual nucleon resonance, the various possible production and decay channels must be treated in a multichannel framework that permits separating resonance from background contributions. Very often, resonances reveal themselves more clearly through interference with dominant amplitudes. These interference terms can be isolated via polarization observables. The current CLAS effort is to utilize highly-polarized hydrogen and deuterium targets as well as polarized photon beams toward a complete measurement of a large number of reaction channels.

  1. Quark interchange model of baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Maslow, J.N.

    1983-01-01

    The strong interactions at low energy are traditionally described by meson field theories treating hadrons as point-like particles. Here a mesonic quark interchange model (QIM) is presented which takes into account the finite size of the baryons and the internal quark structure of hadrons. The model incorporates the basic quark-gluon coupling of quantum chromodynamics (QCD) and the MIT bag model for color confinement. Because the quark-gluon coupling constant is large and it is assumed that confinement excludes overlap of hadronic quark bags except at high momenta, a non-perturbative method of nuclear interactions is presented. The QIM allows for exchange of quark quantum numbers at the bag boundary between colliding hadrons mediated at short distances by a gluon exchange between two quarks within the hadronic interior. This generates, via a Fierz transformation, an effective space-like t channel exchange of color singlet (q anti-q) states that can be identified with the low lying meson multiplets. Thus, a one boson exchange (OBE) model is obtained that allows for comparison with traditional phenomenological models of nuclear scattering. Inclusion of strange quarks enables calculation of YN scattering. The NN and YN coupling constants and the nucleon form factors show good agreement with experimental values as do the deuteron low energy data and the NN low energy phase shifts. Thus, the QIM provides a simple model of strong interactions that is chirally invariant, includes confinement and allows for an OBE form of hadronic interaction at low energies and momentum transfers.

  2. Equivalence principle and the baryon acoustic peak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldauf, Tobias; Mirbabayi, Mehrdad; Simonović, Marko; Zaldarriaga, Matias

    2015-08-01

    We study the dominant effect of a long wavelength density perturbation δ (λL) on short distance physics. In the nonrelativistic limit, the result is a uniform acceleration, fixed by the equivalence principle, and typically has no effect on statistical averages due to translational invariance. This same reasoning has been formalized to obtain a "consistency condition" on the cosmological correlation functions. In the presence of a feature, such as the acoustic peak at ℓBAO, this naive expectation breaks down for λL<ℓBAO. We calculate a universal piece of the three-point correlation function in this regime. The same effect is shown to underlie the spread of the acoustic peak, and is calculable to all orders in the long modes. This can be used to improve the result of perturbative calculations—a technique known as "infra-red resummation"—and is explicitly applied to the one-loop calculation of the power spectrum. Finally, the success of baryon acoustic oscillation reconstruction schemes is argued to be another empirical evidence for the validity of the results.

  3. Heavy to light baryon transition form factors

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, X. |; Huang, T. |; Li, Z.

    1996-05-01

    Recently, Stech found form factor relations for heavy to light transitions based on two simple dynamical assumptions for a spectator particle. In this paper we generalize his approach to the case of baryons and find that for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} ({ital Q}={ital b} or {ital c}) only one independent form factor remains in the limit {ital m}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{infinity}. Furthermore, combining with the model of Guo and Kroll we determine both of the two form factors for {Lambda}{sub {ital Q}}{r_arrow}{Lambda} in the heavy quark limit. The results are applied to {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} which is not clarified both theoretically and experimentally. It is found that the branching ratio of {Lambda}{sub {ital b}}{r_arrow}{Lambda}+{ital J}/{psi} is of order 10{sup {minus}5}. {copyright} {ital 1996 The American Physical Society.}

  4. A NEW WAY OF DETECTING INTERGALACTIC BARYONS

    SciTech Connect

    Lieu, Richard; Duan Lingze

    2013-02-01

    For each photon wave packet of extragalactic light, the dispersion by line-of-sight intergalactic plasma causes an increase in the envelope width and a chirp (drift) in the carrier frequency. It is shown that for continuous emission of many temporally overlapping wave packets with random epoch phases such as quasars in the radio band, this in turn leads to quasi-periodic variations in the intensity of the arriving light on timescales between the coherence time (defined as the reciprocal of the bandwidth of frequency selection, taken here as of order 0.01 GHz for radio observations) and the stretched envelope, with most of the fluctuation power on the latter scale which is typically in the millisecond range for intergalactic dispersion. Thus, by monitoring quasar light curves on such short scales, it should be possible to determine the line-of-sight plasma column along the many directions and distances to the various quasars, affording one a three-dimensional picture of the ionized baryons in the near universe.

  5. The Cusp/Core problem: supernovae feedback versus the baryonic clumps and dynamical friction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Popolo, A.; Pace, F.

    2016-05-01

    In the present paper, we compare the predictions of two well known mechanisms considered able to solve the cusp/core problem (a. supernova feedback; b. baryonic clumps-DM interaction) by comparing their theoretical predictions to recent observations of the inner slopes of galaxies with masses ranging from dSphs to normal spirals. We compare the α-V_{rot} and the α-M_{ast} relationships, predicted by the two models with high resolution data coming from Adams et al. (Astrophys. J. 789, 63, 2014), Simon et al. (Astrophys. J. 621, 757, 2005), LITTLE THINGS (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), THINGS dwarves (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 141, 193, 2011a; Oh et al. in Astron. J. 142, 224, 2011b), THINGS spirals (Oh et al. in Astron. J. 149, 180, 2015), Sculptor, Fornax and the Milky Way. The comparison of the theoretical predictions with the complete set of data shows that the two models perform similarly, while when we restrict the analysis to a smaller subsample of higher quality, we show that the method presented in this paper (baryonic clumps-DM interaction) performs better than the one based on supernova feedback. We also show that, contrarily to the first model prediction, dSphs of small mass could have cored profiles. This means that observations of cored inner profiles in dSphs having a stellar mass <106 M_{⊙} not necessarily imply problems for the ΛCDM model.

  6. Hyperaccreting Black Hole as Gamma-Ray Burst Central Engine. I. Baryon Loading in Gamma-Ray Burst Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lei, Wei-Hua; Zhang, Bing; Liang, En-Wei

    2013-03-01

    A hyperaccreting stellar-mass black hole has been long speculated as the best candidate for the central engine of gamma-ray bursts (GRBs). Recent rich observations of GRBs by space missions such as Swift and Fermi pose new constraints on GRB central engine models. In this paper, we study the baryon-loading processes of a GRB jet launched from a black hole central engine. We consider a relativistic jet powered by \

  7. B baryon production and decays and B hadron lifetimes

    SciTech Connect

    Donati, S.; /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we review the most recent results concerning B Baryons at CDF and D0, including the observation and the study of the properties of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Sigma}{sub b}{sup {+-}(*)}, the observation of new {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} decay modes, and a new measurement of the lifetime of the b hadrons in decays with a J/{Psi}. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is observed through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{Psi}{Omega}{sup -}, where J/{Psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} pK{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2}, and the lifetime 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. For the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} the mass is measured 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and the lifetime 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps. A new accurate measurement of the properties of the resonances {Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}, {Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}, {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}, and {Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -} has been performed in 6 fb{sup -1} of data, and the masses have been determined, m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup +}) = 5811.2{sub -0.8}{sup +0.9}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}{sub b}{sup -}) = 5815.5{sub -0.5}{sup +0.6}(stat.) {+-} 1.7(syst.), m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup +}) = 5832.0 {+-} 0.7(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.), and m({Sigma}*{sub b}{sup -}) = 5835.0 {+-} 0.6(stat.) {+-} 1.8(syst.). The {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2595){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}(2625){sup +}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma}{sub c}(2455){sup ++}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}, and {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} {Sigma

  8. Baryon resonance production and dielectron decays in proton-proton collisions at 3.5 GeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agakishiev, G.; Balanda, A.; Belver, D.; Belyaev, A.; Berger-Chen, J. C.; Blanco, A.; Böhmer, M.; Boyard, J. L.; Cabanelas, P.; Chernenko, S.; Dybczak, A.; Epple, E.; Fabbietti, L.; Fateev, O.; Finocchiaro, P.; Fonte, P.; Friese, J.; Fröhlich, I.; Galatyuk, T.; Garzón, J. A.; Gernhäuser, R.; Göbel, K.; Golubeva, M.; González-Dıaz, D.; Guber, F.; Gumberidze, M.; Heinz, T.; Hennino, T.; Holzmann, R.; Ierusalimov, A.; Iori, I.; Ivashkin, A.; Jurkovic, M.; Kämpfer, B.; Karavicheva, T.; Koenig, I.; Koenig, W.; Kolb, B. W.; Kornakov, G.; Kotte, R.; Krása, A.; Krizek, F.; Krücken, R.; Kuc, H.; Kühn, W.; Kugler, A.; Kurepin, A.; Ladygin, V.; Lalik, R.; Lang, S.; Lapidus, K.; Lebedev, A.; Liu, T.; Lopes, L.; Lorenz, M.; Maier, L.; Mangiarotti, A.; Markert, J.; Metag, V.; Michalska, B.; Michel, J.; Müntz, C.; Naumann, L.; Pachmayer, Y. C.; Palka, M.; Parpottas, Y.; Pechenov, V.; Pechenova, O.; Pietraszko, J.; Przygoda, W.; Ramstein, B.; Reshetin, A.; Rustamov, A.; Sadovsky, A.; Salabura, P.; Schmah, A.; Schwab, E.; Siebenson, J.; Sobolev, Yu. G.; Spataro, S.; Spruck, B.; Ströbele, H.; Stroth, J.; Sturm, C.; Tarantola, A.; Teilab, K.; Tlusty, P.; Traxler, M.; Trebacz, R.; Tsertos, H.; Vasiliev, T.; Wagner, V.; Weber, M.; Wendisch, C.; Wüstenfeld, J.; Yurevich, S.; Zanevsky, Y.

    2014-05-01

    We report on baryon resonance production and decay in proton-proton collisions at a kinetic energy of 3.5 GeV based on data measured with HADES. The exclusive channels and as well as are studied simultaneously for the first time. The invariant masses and angular distributions of the pion-nucleon systems were studied and compared to simulations based on a resonance model ansatz assuming saturation of the pion production by an incoherent sum of baryonic resonances ( R with masses < 2 GeV/c2. A very good description of the one-pion production is achieved allowing for an estimate of individual baryon resonance production cross sections which are used as input to calculate the dielectron yields from decays. Two models of the resonance decays into dielectrons are examined assuming a point-like coupling and the dominance of the meson. The results of model calculations are compared to data from the exclusive channel by means of the dielectron and invariant mass distributions.

  9. DISSECTING GALAXY FORMATION. II. COMPARING SUBSTRUCTURE IN PURE DARK MATTER AND BARYONIC MODELS

    SciTech Connect

    Romano-Diaz, Emilio; Shlosman, Isaac; Heller, Clayton; Hoffman, Yehuda

    2010-06-20

    We compare the substructure evolution in pure dark matter (DM) halos with those in the presence of baryons, hereafter PDM and BDM models, respectively. The prime halos have been analyzed in the previous work. Models have been evolved from identical initial conditions which have been constructed by means of the constrained realization method. The BDM model includes star formation and feedback from stellar evolution onto the gas. A comprehensive catalog of subhalo populations has been compiled and individual and statistical properties of subhalos analyzed, including their orbital differences. We find that subhalo population mass functions in PDM and BDM are consistent with a single power law, M {sup {alpha}}{sub sbh}, for each of the models in the mass range of {approx}2 x 10{sup 8} M{sub sun}-2 x 10{sup 11} M{sub sun}. However, we detect a nonnegligible shift between these functions, the time-averaged {alpha} {approx} -0.86 for the PDM and -0.98 for the BDM models. Overall, {alpha} appears to be a nearly constant in time, with variations of {+-}15%. Second, we find that the radial mass distribution of subhalo populations can be approximated by a power law, R{sup {gamma}{sub sbh}} with a steepening that occurs at the radius of a maximal circular velocity, R{sub vmax}, in the prime halos. Here we find that {gamma}{sub sbh} {approx} -1.5 for the PDM and -1 for the BDM models, when averaged over time inside R{sub vmax}. The slope is steeper outside this region and approaches -3. We detect little spatial bias (less than 10%) between the subhalo populations and the DM distribution of the main halos. Also, the subhalo population exhibits much less triaxiality in the presence of baryons, in tandem with the shape of the prime halo. Finally, we find that, counter-intuitively, the BDM population is depleted at a faster rate than the PDM one within the central 30 kpc of the prime halo. The reason for this is that although the baryons provide a substantial glue to the subhalos

  10. VORTICAL MOTIONS OF BARYONIC GAS IN THE COSMIC WEB: GROWTH HISTORY AND SCALING RELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Weishan; Feng, Long-long

    2015-10-01

    The vortical motions of the baryonic gas residing in large-scale structures are investigated by cosmological hydrodynamic simulations. Proceeding in the formation of the cosmic web, the vortical motions of baryonic matter are pumped up by baroclinity in two stages, i.e., the formation of sheets and filaments. The mean curl velocities are about <1, 1–10, 10–150, and 5–50 km s{sup −1} in voids, sheets, filaments, and knots at z = 0, respectively. The scaling of the vortical velocity of gas can be well described by the She–Leveque hierarchical turbulence model in the range of l < 0.65(1.50) h{sup −1} Mpc in a simulation with a box of size 25(100) h{sup −1} Mpc. The fractal Hausdorff dimension of vortical motions, d, revealed by velocity structure functions, is ∼2.1–2.3(∼1.8–2.1). It is slightly larger than the fractal dimension of mass distribution in filaments, D{sup f} ∼ 1.9–2.2, and smaller than the fractal dimension of sheets, D{sup s} ∼ 2.4–2.7. The vortical kinetic energy of baryonic gas is mainly transported by filaments. Both scalings of mass distribution and vortical velocity increments show distinctive transitions at the turning scale of ∼0.65(1.50) h{sup −1} Mpc, which may be closely related to the characteristic radius of density filaments.

  11. Effective field theories of baryons and mesons, or, what do quarks do?

    SciTech Connect

    Keaton, G.L.

    1995-06-26

    This thesis is an attempt to understand the properties of the protons, pions and other hadrons in terms of their fundamental building blocks. In the first chapter the author reviews several of the approaches that have already been developed. The Nambu-Jona-Lasinio model offers the classic example of a derivation of meson properties from a quark Lagrangian. The chiral quark model encodes much of the intuition acquired in recent decades. The author also discusses the non-linear sigma model, the Skyrme model, and the constituent quark model, which is one of the oldest and most successful models. In the constituent quark model, the constituent quark appears to be different from the current quark that appears in the fundamental QCD Lagrangian. Recently it was proposed that the constituent quark is a topological soliton. In chapter 2 the author investigates this soliton, calculating its mass, radius, magnetic moment, color magnetic moment, and spin structure function. Within the approximations used, the magnetic moments and spin structure function cannot simultaneously be made to agree with the constituent quark model. In chapter 3 the author uses a different plan of attack. Rather than trying to model the constituents of the baryon, he begins with an effective field theory of baryons and mesons, with couplings and masses that are simply determined phenomenologically. Meson loop corrections to baryon axial currents are then computed in the 1/N expansion. It is already known that the one-loop corrections are suppressed by a factor 1/N; here it is shown that the two-loop corrections are suppressed by 1/N{sup 2}. To leading order, these corrections are exactly the same as would be calculated in the constituent quark model. This method therefore offers a different approach to the constituent quark.

  12. Baryons, universe and everything in between

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shirley

    2008-06-01

    This thesis is a tour of topics in cosmology, unified by their diversity and pursuits in better understanding of our Universe. The first chapter measures the Integrated Sachs-Wolfe effect as a function of redshift utilizing a large range of large scale structure observations and the cosmic microwave background. We combine the ISW likelihood function with weak lensing of CMB (which is described in Chapter 2) and CMB powerspectrum to constrain the equation of state of dark energy and the curvature of the Universe. The second chapter investigates the correlation of gravitational lensing of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) with several tracers of large-scale structure, and we find evidence for a positive cross-correlation at the 2.5s level. The third chapter explores the statistical properties of Luminous Red Galaxies in a sample of X-ray selected galaxy clusters, including the halo occupation distribution, how Poisson is the satellite distribution of LRGs and the radial profile of LRGs within clusters. The forth chapter explores the idea of using multiplicity of galaxies to understand their merging timescales. We find that (by using the multiplicity function of LRGs in Chapter 3) Massive halos (~ 10 14 M [Special characters omitted.] ) at low redshift have, for example, been bombarded by several ~ 10 13 M [Special characters omitted.] halos throughout their history and these accreted LRGs merge on relatively short timescales (~ 2 Gyr). The fifth chapter presents a new method for generating a template for the kinematic Sunyaev-Zel'dovich effect that can be used to detect the missing baryons. We assessed the feasibility of the method by investigating combinations of differeng galaxy surveys and CMB observations and find that we can detect the gas-momentum kSZ correlation, and thus the ionized gas, at significant signal-to-noise level.

  13. An Increasing Stellar Baryon Fraction in Bright Galaxies at High Redshift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finkelstein, Steven L.; Song, Mimi; Behroozi, Peter; Somerville, Rachel S.; Papovich, Casey; Milosavljević, Miloš; Dekel, Avishai; Narayanan, Desika; Ashby, Matthew L. N.; Cooray, Asantha; Fazio, Giovanni G.; Ferguson, Henry C.; Koekemoer, Anton M.; Salmon, Brett; Willner, S. P.

    2015-12-01

    Recent observations have shown that the characteristic luminosity of the rest-frame ultraviolet (UV) luminosity function does not significantly evolve at 4 < z < 7 and is approximately {M}{UV}*˜ -21. We investigate this apparent non-evolution by examining a sample of 173 bright, MUV < -21 galaxies at z = 4-7, analyzing their stellar populations and host halo masses. Including deep Spitzer/IRAC imaging to constrain the rest-frame optical light, we find that {M}{UV}* galaxies at z = 4-7 have similar stellar masses of log(M/M⊙) = 9.6-9.9 and are thus relatively massive for these high redshifts. However, bright galaxies at z = 4-7 are less massive and have younger inferred ages than similarly bright galaxies at z = 2-3, even though the two populations have similar star formation rates and levels of dust attenuation for a fixed dust-attenuation curve. Matching the abundances of these bright z = 4-7 galaxies to halo mass functions from the Bolshoi ΛCDM simulation implies that the typical halo masses in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies decrease from log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.9 at z = 4 to log(Mh/M⊙) = 11.4 at z = 7. Thus, although we are studying galaxies at a similar stellar mass across multiple redshifts, these galaxies live in lower mass halos at higher redshift. The stellar baryon fraction in ˜ {M}{{UV}}* galaxies in units of the cosmic mean Ωb/Ωm rises from 5.1% at z = 4 to 11.7% at z = 7; this evolution is significant at the ˜3σ level. This rise does not agree with simple expectations of how galaxies grow, and implies that some effect, perhaps a diminishing efficiency of feedback, is allowing a higher fraction of available baryons to be converted into stars at high redshifts.

  14. Structure of charmed baryons studied by pionic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagahiro, Hideko; Yasui, Shigehiro; Hosaka, Atsushi; Oka, Makoto; Noumi, Hiroyuki

    2017-01-01

    We investigate the decays of the charmed baryons aiming at the systematic understanding of hadron internal structures based on the quark model by paying attention to heavy quark symmetry. We evaluate the decay widths from the one-pion emission for the known excited states, Λc*(2595 ), Λc*(2625 ), Λc*(2765 ), Λc*(2880 ), and Λc*(2940 ), as well as for the ground states Σc(2455 ) and Σc*(2520 ). The decay properties of the lower excited charmed baryons are well explained, and several important predictions for higher excited baryons are given. We find that the axial-vector-type coupling of the pion to the light quarks is essential, which is expected from chiral symmetry, to reproduce the decay widths especially of the low-lying Λc* baryons. We emphasize the importance of the branching ratios of Γ (Σc*π )/Γ (Σcπ ) for the study of the nature of higher excited Λc* baryons.

  15. Propagation of heavy baryons in heavy-ion collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Santosh K.; Torres-Rincon, Juan M.; Tolos, Laura; Minissale, Vincenzo; Scardina, Francesco; Greco, Vincenzo

    2016-12-01

    The drag and diffusion coefficients of heavy baryons (Λc and Λb ) in the hadronic phase created in the latter stage of the heavy-ion collisions at RHIC and LHC energies have been evaluated recently. In this work we compute some experimental observables, such as the nuclear suppression factor RA A and the elliptic flow v2 of heavy baryons at RHIC and LHC energies, highlighting the role of the hadronic phase contribution to these observables, which are going to be measured at Run 3 of LHC. For the time evolution of the heavy quarks in the quark and gluon plasma (QGP) and heavy baryons in the hadronic phase, we use the Langevin dynamics. For the hadronization of the heavy quarks to heavy baryons we employ Peterson fragmentation functions. We observe a strong suppression of both the Λc and Λb . We find that the hadronic medium has a sizable impact on the heavy-baryon elliptic flow whereas the impact of hadronic medium rescattering is almost unnoticeable on the nuclear suppression factor. We evaluate the Λc/D ratio at RHIC and LHC. We find that the Λc/D ratio remains unaffected due to the hadronic phase rescattering which enables it as a nobel probe of QGP phase dynamics along with its hadronization.

  16. Measurements of the properties of Λc(2595) , Λc(2625) , Σc(2455) , and Σc(2520) baryons

    DOE PAGES

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; ...

    2011-07-13

    We report measurements of the resonance properties of Λc(2595)+ and Λc(2595)+ baryons in their decays to Λc+π+π- as well as Σc(2455)++,0 and Σc(2455)++,0 baryons in their decays to Λc+π± final states. These measurements are performed using data corresponding to 5.2 fb-1 of integrated luminosity from pp̄ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV, collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron. In addition, exploiting the largest available charmed baryon sample, we measure masses and decay widths with uncertainties comparable to the world averages for Σc states, and significantly smaller uncertainties than the world averages for excited Λc+ states.

  17. Spectrum and Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of Ω baryons from lattice QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jian; Sun, Wei; Chen, Ying; Qiu, Wei-Feng; Gong, Ming; Liu, Chuan; Liu, Yu-Bin; Liu, Zhao-Feng; Ma, Jian-Ping; Zhang, Jian-Bo; CLQCD Collaboration

    2016-04-01

    The Ω baryons with J P = 3/2±, 1/2± are studied on the lattice in the quenched approximation. Their mass levels are ordered as M 3/2+ < M 3/2- ≈ M 1/2- < M 1/2+ , as is expected from the constituent quark model. The mass values are also close to those of the four Ω states observed in experiments. We calculate the Bethe-Salpeter amplitudes of Ω(3/2+) and Ω(1/2+) and find there is a radial node for the Ω(1/2+) Bethe-Salpeter amplitude, which may imply that Ω(1/2+) is an orbital excitation of Ω baryons as a member of the supermultiplet in the SU(6) ⊗ O(3) quark model description. Our results are helpful for identifying the quantum numbers of experimentally observed Ω states. The numerical calculations were carried out on Tianhe-1A at the National Supercomputer Center (NSCC) in Tianjin. Supported by National Science Foundation of China (NSFC) (11105153, 11335001, 11405053), Youth Innovation Promotion Association of CAS, NSFC (11261130311) (CRC 110 by DFG and NSFC)

  18. Meson-Baryon Scattering Lengths from Mixed-Action Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Beane, S; Detmold, W; Luu, T; Orginos, K; Parreno, A; Torok, A; Walker-Loud, A

    2009-06-30

    The {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}, {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}, K{sup +}p, K{sup +}n, {bar K}{sup 0}{Sigma}{sup +}, and {bar K}{sup 0}{Xi}{sup 0} scattering lengths are calculated in mixed-action Lattice QCD with domain-wall valence quarks on the asqtad-improved coarse MILC configurations at four light-quark masses, and at two light-quark masses on the fine MILC configurations. Heavy Baryon Chiral Perturbation Theory with two and three flavors of light quarks is used to perform the chiral extrapolations. We find no convergence for the kaon-baryon processes in the three-flavor chiral expansion. Using the two-flavor chiral expansion, we find a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Sigma}{sup +}} = -0.197 {+-} 0.017 fm, and a{sub {pi}{sup +}{Xi}{sup 0}} = -0.098 {+-} 0.017 fm, where the comprehensive error includes statistical and systematic uncertainties.

  19. The clustering of baryonic matter. I: a halo-model approach

    SciTech Connect

    Fedeli, C.

    2014-04-01

    In this paper I generalize the halo model for the clustering of dark matter in order to produce the power spectra of the two main baryonic matter components in the Universe: stars and hot gas. As a natural extension, this can be also used to describe the clustering of all mass. According to the design of the halo model, the large-scale power spectra of the various matter components are physically connected with the distribution of each component within bound structures and thus, ultimately, with the complete set of physical processes that drive the formation of galaxies and galaxy clusters. Besides being practical for cosmological and parametric studies, the semi-analytic model presented here has also other advantages. Most importantly, it allows one to understand on physical ground what is the relative contribution of each matter component to the total clustering of mass as a function of scale, and thus it opens an interesting new window to infer the distribution of baryons through high precision cosmic shear measurements. This is particularly relevant for future wide-field photometric surveys such as Euclid. In this work the concept of the model and its uncertainties are illustrated in detail, while in a companion paper we use a set of numerical hydrodynamic simulations to show a practical application and to investigate where the model itself needs to be improved.

  20. On the structure of hot gas in haloes: implications for the LX-TX relation and missing baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Prateek; McCourt, Michael; Parrish, Ian J.; Quataert, Eliot

    2012-12-01

    We present one-dimensional models of the hot gas in dark matter haloes, which both predict the existence of cool cores and explain their structure. Our models are directly applicable to semi-analytic models of galaxy formation. We have previously argued that filaments of cold (˜104 K) gas condense out of the intracluster medium (ICM) in hydrostatic and thermal equilibrium when the ratio of the thermal instability time-scale to the free-fall time tTI/tff falls below 5-10. This criterion corresponds to an upper limit on the density of the ICM and motivates a model in which a density core forms wherever tTI/tff ≲ 10. Consistent with observations and numerical simulations, this model predicts larger and more tenuous cores for lower mass haloes - while the core density in a cluster may be as large as ˜0.1 cm-3, the core density in the Galactic halo should not exceed ˜10-4 cm-3. We can also explain the large densities in smaller mass haloes (galactic 'coronae') if we include the contribution of the central galaxy to the gravitational potential. Our models produce a favourable match to the observational X-ray luminosity-temperature (LX-TX) relation. For halo masses ≲1013 M⊙ the core size approaches the virial radius. Thus, most of the baryons in such haloes cannot be in the hot ICM, but either in the form of stars or in the form of hot gas beyond the virial radius. Because of the smaller mass in the ICM and much larger mass available for star formation, the majority of the baryons in low-mass haloes (≲1013 M⊙) can be expelled beyond the virial radius due to supernova feedback. This can account for the baryons 'missing' from low-mass haloes, such as the Galactic halo.

  1. Properties of Weakly-decaying Bottom Baryons, Xi_b^- and Omega_b^-, at CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Behari, Satyajit; Collaboration, for the CDF

    2009-10-01

    We present properties of weakly decaying bottom baryons, {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeVf, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. They report the observation of the {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} {yields} J/{psi}{omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi} {yields} {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {Omega}{sup -} {yields} {Lambda}K{sup -}, and {Lambda} {yields} p{pi}{sup -}. Significance of the observed signal is estimated to be 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass and lifetime are measured to be 6054.4 {+-} 6.8(stat.) {+-} 0.9(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst). ps, respectively. In addition, the mass and lifetime of the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon are measured to be 5790.9 {+-} 2.6(stat.) {+-} 0.8(syst.) MeV/c{sup 2} and 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat.) {+-} 0.02(syst.) ps, respectively. Under the assumption that the {Xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {Omega}{sub b}{sup -} are produced with similar kinematic distributions as the {Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, we measure {sigma}({Xi}{sub b}{sup -}){Beta}({Xi}{sub b}{sup -}) {yields} J/{psi}({Xi}{sup -})/{sigma}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}){Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda}) = 0.167{sub -0.025}{sup +0.037}(stat.) {+-} 0.012(syst.) and {sigma}({omega}{sub b}{sup -}){Beta}({Omega}{sub b}{sup -} J/{psi} {Omega}{sup -})/{sigma}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}){Beta}({Lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}) {yields} J/{psi} {Lambda} = 0.045{sub 0.012}{sup +0.017}(stat.) {+-} 0.004(syst.) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c.

  2. A Slippery Slope: Systematic Uncertainties in the Line Width Baryonic Tully-Fisher Relation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradford, Jeremy D.; Geha, Marla C.; van den Bosch, Frank C.

    2016-11-01

    The baryonic Tully-Fisher relation (BTFR) is both a valuable observational tool and a critical test of galaxy formation theory. We explore the systematic uncertainty in the slope and the scatter of the observed line-width BTFR utilizing homogeneously measured, unresolved H i observations for 930 isolated galaxies. We measure a fiducial relation of {{log}}10 {M}{baryon}=3.24 {{log}}10 {V}{rot} + 3.21 with observed scatter of 0.25 dex over a baryonic mass range of 107.4 to 1011.3 {M}⊙ where {V}{rot} is measured from 20% H i line widths. We then conservatively vary the definitions of {M}{baryon} and {V}{rot}, the sample definition and the linear fitting algorithm. We obtain slopes ranging from 2.64 to 3.53 and scatter measurements ranging from 0.14 to 0.41 dex, indicating a significant systematic uncertainty of 0.25 in the BTFR slope derived from unresolved H i line widths. We next compare our fiducial slope to literature measurements, where reported slopes range from 3.0 to 4.3 and scatter is either unmeasured, immeasurable, or as large as 0.4 dex. Measurements derived from unresolved H i line widths tend to produce slopes of 3.3, while measurements derived strictly from resolved asymptotic rotation velocities tend to produce slopes of 3.9. The single largest factor affecting the BTFR slope is the definition of rotation velocity. The sample definition, the mass range and the linear fitting algorithm also significantly affect the measured BTFR. We find that galaxies in our sample with {V}{rot}\\lt 100 km s-1 are consistent with the line-width BTFR of more massive galaxies, but these galaxies drive most of the observed scatter. It is critical when comparing predictions to an observed BTFR that the rotation velocity definition, the sample selection and the fitting algorithm are similarly defined. We recommend direct statistical comparisons between data sets with commensurable properties as opposed to simply comparing BTFR power-law fits.

  3. On Possible Variation in the Cosmological Baryon Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holder, Gilbert P.; Nollett, Kenneth M.; van Engelen, Alexander

    2010-06-01

    The fraction of matter that is in the form of baryons or dark matter could have spatial fluctuations in the form of baryon-dark matter isocurvature fluctuations. We use big bang nucleosynthesis calculations compared with observed light-element abundances as well as galaxy cluster gas fractions to constrain cosmological variations in the baryon fraction. Light-element abundances constrain spatial variations to be less than 26%-27%, while a sample of "relaxed" galaxy clusters shows spatial variations in gas fractions less than 8%. Larger spatial variations could cause differential screening of the primary cosmic microwave background (CMB) anisotropies, leading to asymmetries in the fluctuations, and ease some tension with the halo-star 7Li abundance. We also show that fluctuations within our allowed bounds can lead to "B-mode" CMB polarization anisotropies at a non-negligible level.

  4. Chiral dynamics of the polarizing fracture functions for baryon production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sivers, Dennis

    2009-04-01

    The concept of spin-directed momentum provides a useful and restrictive framework for describing dynamical mechanisms that can lead to single-spin observables. The value of this framework can be demonstrated by consideration of the polarizing fracture functions, ΔNMB↑/pq(x,z,kTN;Q2), that characterize the production of polarized baryons in the target fragmentation region of semi-inclusive deep-inelastic scattering from an unpolarized target. When Bjorken x is chosen large enough to indicate a hard scattering from a valence quark, the fracture function formalism dynamically selects a quark-diquark basis for baryon structure. Attention to constituent orbital angular momentum in the formation process and its role in contributing to the transverse momentum of the produced baryon illustrates important aspects of the generation of polarization observables.

  5. Magnetic moments of octet baryons and sea antiquark polarizations

    SciTech Connect

    Bartelski, Jan; Tatur, Stanislaw

    2005-01-01

    Using generalized Sehgal equations for magnetic moments of baryon octet and taking into account {sigma}{sup 0}-{lambda} mixing and two particle corrections to independent quark contributions we obtain very good fit using experimental values for errors of such moments. We present sum rules for quark magnetic moments ratios and for integrated spin densities ratios. Because of the SU(3) structure of our equations the results for magnetic moments of quarks and their densities depend on two additional parameters. Using information from deep inelastic scattering and baryon {beta}-decays we discuss the dependence of antiquark polarizations on introduced parameters. For some plausible values of these parameters we show that these polarizations are small if we neglect angular momenta of quarks. Our very good fit to magnetic moments of baryon octet can still be improved by using specific model for angular momentum of quarks.

  6. Counting of oscillatory modes of valence quarks forming qqq baryons for three quark flavors u, d, s

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kabana, Sonia; Minkowski, Peter

    2017-02-01

    We present the unique properties of oscillatory modes of Nfl = 3 light quarks — u, d, s — using the SU(2Nfl = 6) × SO3(L→) broken symmetry classification. L→ =∑n=1NflL→n stands for the space rotation group generated by the sum of the three individual angular momenta of quarks in their c.m. system. The baryonic multiplets are shown to emerge from the picture of oscillating quarks in three space dimensions in the center-of-mass system of the baryons. All oscillatory modes are fully relativistic with a finite number of oscillators and this is forming the unique harmonic oscillator with these properties. The density of states as a function of mass-square is calculated. This estimate is of relevance for the accounting of the missing states of unobserved hadrons, as the here estimated baryonic multiplets include both the observed and the unobserved (or “missing”) hadrons. The estimate is conceptually different from Hagedorn’s model and is based on field theory of QCD.

  7. Decays of excited baryons in the large Nc expansion of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Jose Goity; Norberto Scoccola

    2006-05-06

    We present the analysis of the decay widths of excited baryons in the framework of the 1/Nc expansion of QCD. These studies are performed up to order 1/Nc and include both positive and negative parity excited baryons.

  8. Baryon symmetric big-bang cosmology. [matter-antimatter symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stecker, F. W.

    1978-01-01

    The framework of baryon-symmetric big-bang cosmology offers the greatest potential for deducing the evolution of the universe as a consequence of physical laws and processes with the minimum number of arbitrary assumptions as to initial conditions in the big-bang. In addition, it offers the possibility of explaining the photon-baryon ratio in the universe and how galaxies and galaxy clusters are formed, and also provides the only acceptable explanation at present for the origin of the cosmic gamma ray background radiation.

  9. Baryon as impurity for phase transition in string landscape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasai, Aya; Nakai, Yuichiro; Ookouchi, Yutaka

    2016-06-01

    We consider a decay of a false vacuum in flux compactifications of type IIB string theory and study a catalytic effect for a phase transition induced by a new type of impurities. We concentrate on the large N dual of a D5-brane/anti-D5-brane system which has a rich vacuum structure. We show that D3-branes wrapping the 3-cycles can form a baryon bound state with a monopole. We find that these baryon-like objects can make the lifetime of the metastable vacuum shorter.

  10. The Evolution of Baryons in Cosmic Large Scale Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snedden, Ali; Arielle Phillips, Lara; Mathews, Grant James; Coughlin, Jared; Suh, In-Saeng; Bhattacharya, Aparna

    2015-01-01

    The environments of galaxies play a critical role in their formation and evolution. We study these environments using cosmological simulations with star formation and supernova feedback included. From these simulations, we parse the large scale structure into clusters, filaments and voids using a segmentation algorithm adapted from medical imaging. We trace the star formation history, gas phase and metal evolution of the baryons in the intergalactic medium as function of structure. We find that our algorithm reproduces the baryon fraction in the intracluster medium and that the majority of star formation occurs in cold, dense filaments. We present the consequences this large scale environment has for galactic halos and galaxy evolution.

  11. Light Baryon Spectroscopy using the CLAS Spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Volker Crede

    2011-12-01

    Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. The systematics of the baryon excitation spectrum is important to our understanding of the effective degrees of freedom underlying nucleon matter. High-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining the nucleon and the strong nuclear force. Current experimental efforts with the CLAS spectrometer at Jefferson Laboratory utilize highly-polarized frozen-spin targets in combination with polarized photon beams. The status of the recent double-polarization experiments and some preliminary results are discussed in this contribution.

  12. Baryon number and strangeness: signals of a deconfinedantecedent

    SciTech Connect

    Majumder, A.; Koch, V.; Randrup, J.

    2005-06-29

    The correlation between baryon number and strangeness is used to discern the nature of the deconfined matter produced at vanishing chemical potential in high-energy nuclear collisions at the BNL RHIC. Comparisons of results of various phenomenological models with correlations extracted from lattice QCD calculations suggest that a quasi-particle picture applies. At finite baryon densities, such as those encountered at the CERN SPS, it is demonstrated that the presence of a first-order phase transition and the accompanying development of spinodal decomposition would significantly enhance the number of strangeness carriers and the associated fluctuations.

  13. Holographic vector mesons from spectral functions at finite baryon or isospin density

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Kaminski, Matthias; Rust, Felix

    2008-02-15

    We consider gauge/gravity duality with flavor for the finite-temperature field theory dual of the AdS-Schwarzschild black hole background with embedded D7-brane probes. In particular, we investigate spectral functions at finite baryon density in the black hole phase. We determine the resonance frequencies corresponding to meson-mass peaks as function of the quark mass over temperature ratio. We find that these frequencies have a minimum for a finite value of the quark mass. If the quotient of quark mass and temperature is increased further, the peaks move to larger frequencies. At the same time the peaks narrow, in agreement with the formation of nearly stable vector meson states which exactly reproduce the meson-mass spectrum found at zero temperature. We also calculate the diffusion coefficient, which has finite value for all quark mass to temperature ratios, and exhibits a first-order phase transition. Finally we consider an isospin chemical potential and find that the spectral functions display a resonance peak splitting, similar to the isospin meson-mass splitting observed in effective QCD models.

  14. Collective Baryon Decay and Gravitational Collapse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapline, George; Barbieri, James

    2014-01-01

    While it is widely believed that the gravitational collapse of a sufficiently large mass will lead to a density singularity and an event horizon, we propose that this never happens when quantum effects are taken into account. In particular, we propose that when the conditions become ripe for the formation of a trapped surface, a quantum critical firewall sweeps over the collapsing body, transforming the nucleons in the collapsing matter into a lepton/photon gas together with droplets of a positive vacuum energy. This will happen regardless of the matter density at the time a trapped surface starts to form, and as a result, we predict that at least in all cases of gravitational collapse involving ordinary matter, a large fraction of the rest mass of the collapsing matter will be converted into a burst of neutrinos and γ-rays. We predict that the peak luminosity of these bursts is only weakly dependent on the mass of the collapsing object, and on the order of (ɛq/mPc2)1/4c5/G where ɛq is the mean energy of a nucleon parton and mP is the Planck mass. The duration of the bursts will depend on the mass of the collapsing object; in the case of stellar core collapse, we predict that the duration of both the neutrino and γ-ray bursts will be on the order of 10s.

  15. Baryons:the Promise, the Problems, and the Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Isgur, Nathan

    1995-10-01

    An idiosyncratic view of Baryons '95 that calls for a marriage between quark-based and hadronic models of QCD is presented.A treatment based on valence quark plus glue dominance of hadron structure, with the sea of qq{bar} pairs (in the form of virtual hadron pairs) as important corrections is advocated.

  16. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (2/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  17. The status of the Excited Baryon Analysis Center

    SciTech Connect

    B. Julia-Diaz

    2010-08-01

    The Excited Baryon Analysis Center (EBAC), which is associated with the Theory Group at Jefferson Laboratory, was initiated in 2006. Its main goal is to extract and interpret properties of nucleon resonances (N*) from the world data of meson production reactions induced by pions, photons and electrons. We review the main accomplishments of the center since then and sketch its near future perspectives.

  18. Group-theoretical construction of extended baryon operators

    SciTech Connect

    S. Basak; R. Edwards; R. Fiebig; G. T. Fleming; U. M. Heller; C. Morningstar; D. Richards; I. Sato; S. Wallace

    2004-06-01

    The design and implementation of large sets of spatially extended baryon operators for use in lattice simulations are described. The operators are constructed to maximize overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, while minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark propagators.

  19. Meson-baryon effective chiral Lagrangians at order p4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shao-Zhou; Chen, Qing-Sen; Liu, Yan-Rui

    2017-01-01

    We construct the three-flavor Lorentz-invariant meson-baryon chiral Lagrangians at the order p4, with which a full one-loop investigation may be performed. One obtains 540 independent terms. The processes with the minimal number of mesons and photons to which this order of Lagrangians may contribute are also presented.

  20. Baryon Asymmetry of the Universe (1/2)

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    In two lectures, the following topics will be discussed: (1) Why baryon asymmetry is a problem at all (2) Review of the Sakharov's conditions (3) Why old models based on GUT did not work (4) Electroweak baryogenesis (5) Leptogenesis (6) Connections to the near-future experiments

  1. Leading chiral logarithms for the nucleon mass

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimirov, Alexey A.; Bijnens, Johan

    2016-01-22

    We give a short introduction to the calculation of the leading chiral logarithms, and present the results of the recent evaluation of the LLog series for the nucleon mass within the heavy baryon theory. The presented results are the first example of LLog calculation in the nucleon ChPT. We also discuss some regularities observed in the leading logarithmical series for nucleon mass.

  2. Spin (1/2){sup +}, spin (3/2){sup +}, and transition magnetic moments of low lying and charmed baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Neetika; Dahiya, Harleen; Chatley, P. K.; Gupta, Manmohan

    2010-04-01

    Magnetic moments of the low lying and charmed spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} baryons have been calculated in the SU(4) chiral constituent quark model ({chi}CQM) by including the contribution from cc fluctuations. Explicit calculations have been carried out for the contribution coming from the valence quarks, ''quark sea'' polarizations and their orbital angular momentum. The implications of such a model have also been studied for magnetic moments of the low lying spin (3/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} and (1/2){sup +{yields}}(1/2){sup +} transitions as well as the transitions involving charmed baryons. The predictions of {chi}CQM not only give a satisfactory fit for the baryons where experimental data is available but also show improvement over the other models. In particular, for the case of {mu}(p), {mu}({Sigma}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}), Coleman-Glashow sum rule for the low lying spin (1/2){sup +} baryons and {mu}({Delta}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}) for the low lying spin (3/2){sup +} baryons, we are able to achieve an excellent agreement with data. For the spin (1/2){sup +} and spin (3/2){sup +} charmed baryon magnetic moments, our results are consistent with the predictions of the QCD sum rules, light cone sum rules and spectral sum rules. For the cases where light quarks dominate in the valence structure, the sea and orbital contributions are found to be fairly significant however, they cancel in the right direction to give the correct magnitude of the total magnetic moment. On the other hand, when there is an excess of heavy quarks, the contribution of the quark sea is almost negligible, for example, {mu}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Lambda}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup +}), {mu}({Xi}{sub c}{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}{sup +}), {mu}({Omega}{sup -}), {mu}({Omega}{sub c}*{sup 0}), {mu}({Omega}{sub cc}*{sup +}), and {mu}({Omega}{sub ccc}*{sup ++}). The effects of configuration mixing and quark masses have also been

  3. Thermodynamics of Hot Hadronic Gases at Finite Baryon Densities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albright, Michael Glenn

    In this thesis we investigate equilibrium and nonequilibrium thermodynamic properties of Quantum Chromodynamics (QCD) matter at finite baryon densities. We begin by constructing crossover models for the thermodynamic equation of state. These use switching functions to smoothly interpolate between a hadronic gas model at low energy densities to a perturbative QCD equation of state at high energy densities. We carefully design the switching function to avoid introducing first-, second-, or higher-order phase transitions which lattice QCD indicates are not present at small baryon chemical potentials. We employ three kinds of hadronic models in the crossover constructions, two of which include repulsive interactions via an excluded volume approximation while one model does not. We find that the three crossover models are in excellent agreement with accurate lattice QCD calculations of the equation of state over a wide range of temperatures and baryon chemical potentials. Hence, the crossover models should be very useful for parameterizing the equation of state at finite baryon densities, which is needed to build next-generation hydrodynamic simulations of heavy-ion collisions. We next calculate the speed of sound and baryon number fluctuations predicted by the crossover models. We find that crossover models with hadronic repulsion are most successful at reproducing the lattice results, while the model without repulsion is less successful, and hadron (only) models show poor agreement. We then compare the crossover models to net-proton fluctuation measurements from the STAR Collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The comparisons suggest baryon number fluctuations freeze-out well below the chemical freeze-out temperature. We also search for signs of critical fluctuations in the STAR data, but we find no evidence for them at this time. Finally, we derive kinetic theory formulas for the shear and bulk viscosity and thermal conductivity of hot hadronic

  4. Sharing but not caring: dark matter and the baryon asymmetry of the universe

    SciTech Connect

    Bernal, Nicolás; Fong, Chee Sheng; Fonseca, Nayara

    2016-09-02

    We consider scenarios where Dark Matter (DM) particles carry baryon and/or lepton numbers, which can be defined if there exist operators connecting the dark to the visible sector. As a result, the DM fields become intimately linked to the Standard Model (SM) ones and can be maximally asymmetric just like the ordinary matter. In particular, we discuss minimal scenarios where the DM is a complex scalar or a Dirac fermion coupled to operators with nonzero baryon and/or lepton numbers, and that consist of only SM fields. We consider an initial asymmetry stored in either the SM or the DM sector; the main role of these operators is to properly share the asymmetry between the two sectors, in accordance with observations. After the chemical decoupling, the DM and SM sectors do not care about each other as there is only an ineffective communication between them. Once the DM mass is specified, the Wilson coefficients of these operators are fixed by the requirement of the correct transfer of the asymmetry. We study the phenomenology of this framework at colliders, direct detection and indirect detection experiments. In particular, the LHC phenomenology is very rich and can be tested in different channels such as the two same-sign leptons with two jets, monojet and monojet with a monolepton.

  5. Highlights in light-baryon spectroscopy and searches for gluonic excitations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, Volker

    2016-01-01

    The spectrum of excited hadrons - mesons and baryons - serves as an excellent probe of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The strong coupling however makes QCD challenging. It confines quarks and breaks chiral symmetry, thus providing us with the world of light hadrons. Highly-excited hadronic states are sensitive to the details of quark confinement, which is only poorly understood within QCD. This is the regime of non-perturbative QCD and it is one of the key issues in hadronic physics to identify the corresponding internal degrees of freedom and how they relate to strong coupling QCD. The quark model suggests mesons are made of a constituent quark and an antiquark and baryons consist of three such quarks. QCD predicts other forms of matter. What is the role of glue? Resonances with large gluonic components are predicted as bound states by QCD. The lightest hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers are estimated to have masses in the range from 1 to 2 GeV/c2 and are well in reach of current experimental programs. At Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and other facilities worldwide, the high-energy electron and photon beams present a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing an excellent microscope for examining atomic nuclei and the strong nuclear force.

  6. Highlights in light-baryon spectroscopy and searches for gluonic excitations

    SciTech Connect

    Crede, Volker

    2016-01-22

    The spectrum of excited hadrons - mesons and baryons - serves as an excellent probe of quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. The strong coupling however makes QCD challenging. It confines quarks and breaks chiral symmetry, thus providing us with the world of light hadrons. Highly-excited hadronic states are sensitive to the details of quark confinement, which is only poorly understood within QCD. This is the regime of non-perturbative QCD and it is one of the key issues in hadronic physics to identify the corresponding internal degrees of freedom and how they relate to strong coupling QCD. The quark model suggests mesons are made of a constituent quark and an antiquark and baryons consist of three such quarks. QCD predicts other forms of matter. What is the role of glue? Resonances with large gluonic components are predicted as bound states by QCD. The lightest hybrid mesons with exotic quantum numbers are estimated to have masses in the range from 1 to 2 GeV/c{sup 2} and are well in reach of current experimental programs. At Jefferson Laboratory (JLab) and other facilities worldwide, the high-energy electron and photon beams present a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing an excellent microscope for examining atomic nuclei and the strong nuclear force.

  7. Charmed and strange baryon production in 29 GeV electron positron annihilation

    SciTech Connect

    Klein, S.R.

    1988-06-01

    This dissertation presents measurements of the production rates of baryons with different strangeness and spin. The analyses presented here use data taken with the Mark III detector at the PEP storage ring, operating at a center of mass energy of 29 GeV. The ..xi../sup /minus// production rate is measured to be 0.017 +- 0.004 +- 0.004 per hadronic event, ..cap omega../sup /minus// production is measured to be 0.014 +- 0.006 +- 0.004 per hadronic event, and ..xi..*/sup 0/ production is less than 0.006 per hadronic event at a 90% confidence level. These measurements place strong constraints on models of baryon production. In particular, the unexpectedly high rate of ..cap omega../sup /minus// production is difficult to explain in any diquark based model. Semileptonic ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ decays have also been observed. Because neither the branching ratios nor the production rate are well known, it is difficult to interpret these results. However, they do indicate that the branching ratio for ..lambda../sub c//sup +/ ..-->.. ..lambda..l..nu.. may be higher than previous experimental measurements. 85 refs., 45 figs., 12 tabs.

  8. Strangeness as a probe to baryon-rich QCD matter at NICA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukushima, Kenji

    2016-08-01

    We elucidate a prospect of strangeness fluctuation measurements in the heavy-ion collision at NICA energies. The strangeness fluctuation is sensitive to quark deconfinement. At the same time strangeness has a strong correlation with the baryon number under the condition of vanishing net strangeness, which leads to an enhancement of Λ0, Ξ0, Ξ-, and K+ at high baryon density. The baryon density is maximized around the NICA energies, and strangeness should be an ideal probe to investigate quark deconfinement phenomena of baryon-rich QCD matter created at NICA. We also utilize the hadron resonance gas model to estimate a mixed fluctuation of strangeness and baryon number.

  9. HaloSat: A CubeSat to Map the Distribution of Baryonic Matter in the Galactic Halo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miles, Drew M.

    2016-04-01

    Approximately half of predicted baryonic matter in the Milky Way remains unidentified. One possible explanation for the location of this missing matter is in an extended Galactic halo. HaloSat is a CubeSat that aims to constrain the mass and distribution of the halo’s baryonic matter by obtaining an all-sky map of O VII and O VIII emission in the hot gas associated with the halo of the Milky Way. HaloSat offers an improvement in the quality of measurements of oxygen line emission over existing X-ray observatories and an observation plan dedicated to mapping the hot gas in the Galactic halo. In addition to the missing baryon problem, HaloSat will assign a portion of its observations to the solar wind charge exchange (SWCX) in order to calibrate models of SCWX emission. We present here the current status of HaloSat and the progression of instrument development in anticipation of a 2018 launch.

  10. Observation of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon and measurement of the properties of the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryons

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Maki, T.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Saarikko, H.; Remortel, N. van; Adelman, J.; Brubaker, E.; Fedorko, W. T.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Ketchum, W.; Kim, Y. K.; Krop, D.; Kwang, S.; Lee, H. S.; Paramonov, A. A.; Schmidt, M. A.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.

    2009-10-01

    We report the observation of the bottom, doubly-strange baryon {omega}{sub b}{sup -} through the decay chain {omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -}, where J/{psi}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -}, {omega}{sup -}{yields}{lambda}K{sup -}, and {lambda}{yields}p{pi}{sup -}, using 4.2 fb{sup -1} of data from pp collisions at {radical}(s)=1.96 TeV, and recorded with the Collider Detector at Fermilab. A signal is observed whose probability of arising from a background fluctuation is 4.0x10{sup -8}, or 5.5 Gaussian standard deviations. The {omega}{sub b}{sup -} mass is measured to be 6054.4{+-}6.8(stat){+-}0.9(syst) MeV/c{sup 2}. The lifetime of the {omega}{sub b}{sup -} baryon is measured to be 1.13{sub -0.40}{sup +0.53}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. In addition, for the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} baryon we measure a mass of 5790.9{+-}2.6(stat){+-}0.8(syst) MeV/c{sup 2} and a lifetime of 1.56{sub -0.25}{sup +0.27}(stat){+-}0.02(syst) ps. Under the assumption that the {xi}{sub b}{sup -} and {omega}{sub b}{sup -} are produced with similar kinematic distributions to the {lambda}{sub b}{sup 0} baryon, we find ({sigma}({xi}{sub b}{sup -})B({xi}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{xi}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.167{sub -0.025}{sup +0.037}(stat){+-}0.012(syst) and ({sigma}({omega}{sub b}{sup -})B({omega}{sub b}{sup -}{yields}J/{psi}{omega}{sup -})/{sigma}({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0})B({lambda}{sub b}{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}{lambda}))=0.045{sub -0.012}{sup +0.017}(stat){+-} 0.004(syst) for baryons produced with transverse momentum in the range of 6-20 GeV/c.

  11. Evidence for an exotic S= -2, Q= -2 baryon resonance in proton-proton collisions at the CERN SPS.

    PubMed

    Alt, C; Anticic, T; Baatar, B; Barna, D; Bartke, J; Betev, L; Białkowska, H; Billmeier, A; Blume, C; Boimska, B; Botje, M; Bracinik, J; Bramm, R; Brun, R; Buncić, P; Cerny, V; Christakoglou, P; Chvala, O; Cramer, J G; Csató, P; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, A; Dinkelaker, P; Eckardt, V; Farantatos, G; Filip, P; Flierl, D; Fodor, Z; Foka, P; Freund, P; Friese, V; Gál, J; Gaździcki, M; Georgopoulos, G; Gładysz, E; Hegyi, S; Höhne, C; Kadija, K; Karev, A; Kniege, S; Kolesnikov, V I; Kollegger, T; Korus, R; Kowalski, M; Kraus, I; Kreps, M; van Leeuwen, M; Lévai, P; Litov, L; Makariev, M; Malakhov, A I; Markert, C; Mateev, M; Mayes, B W; Melkumov, G L; Meurer, C; Mischke, A; Mitrovski, M; Molnár, J; Mrówczyński, St; Pálla, G; Panagiotou, A D; Panayotov, D; Perl, K; Petridis, A; Pikna, M; Pinsky, L; Pühlhofer, F; Reid, J G; Renfordt, R; Retyk, W; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rybczyński, M; Rybicki, A; Sandoval, A; Sann, H; Schmitz, N; Seyboth, P; Siklér, F; Sitar, B; Skrzypczak, E; Stefanek, G; Stock, R; Ströbele, H; Susa, T; Szentpétery, I; Sziklai, J; Trainor, T A; Varga, D; Vassiliou, M; Veres, G I; Vesztergombi, G; Vranić, D; Wetzler, A; Włodarczyk, Z; Yoo, I K; Zaranek, J; Zimányi, J

    2004-01-30

    Results of resonance searches in the Xi(-)pi(-), Xi(-)pi(+), Xi;(+)pi(-), and Xi;(+)pi(+) invariant mass spectra in proton-proton collisions at sqrt[s]=17.2 GeV are presented. Evidence is shown for the existence of a narrow Xi(-)pi(-) baryon resonance with mass of 1.862+/-0.002 GeV/c(2) and width below the detector resolution of about 0.018 GeV/c(2). The significance is estimated to be above 4.2sigma. This state is a candidate for the hypothetical exotic Xi(--)(3/2) baryon with S=-2, I=3 / 2, and a quark content of (dsdsū). At the same mass, a peak is observed in the Xi(-)pi(+) spectrum which is a candidate for the Xi(0)(3/2) member of this isospin quartet with a quark content of (dsus[-]d). The corresponding antibaryon spectra also show enhancements at the same invariant mass.

  12. The Entire Virial Radius of the Fossil Cluster RXJ 1159 + 5531. II. Dark Matter and Baryon Fraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buote, David A.; Su, Yuanyuan; Gastaldello, Fabio; Brighenti, Fabrizio

    2016-08-01

    In this second paper on the entire virial region of the relaxed fossil cluster RXJ 1159+5531, we present a hydrostatic analysis of the azimuthally averaged hot intracluster medium (ICM) using the results of Su et al. For a model consisting of ICM, stellar mass from the central galaxy (BCG), and an NFW dark matter (DM) halo, we obtain a good description of the projected radial profiles of ICM emissivity and temperature that yield precise constraints on the total mass profile. The BCG stellar mass component is clearly detected with a K-band stellar mass-to-light ratio, {M}\\star /{L}K=0.61+/- 0.11 {M}⊙ /{L}⊙ , consistent with stellar population synthesis models for a Milky Way initial mass function. We obtain a halo concentration, {c}200=8.4+/- 1.0, and virial mass, {M}200=(7.9+/- 0.6)× {10}13 {M}⊙ . For its mass, the inferred concentration is larger than most relaxed halos produced in cosmological simulations with Planck parameters, consistent with RXJ 1159+5531 forming earlier than the general halo population. The baryon fraction at r 200, {f}{{b,200}}=0.134+/- 0.007, is slightly below the Planck value (0.155) for the universe. However, when we take into account the additional stellar baryons associated with non-central galaxies and the uncertain intracluster light (ICL), {f}{{b,200}} increases by ≈ 0.015, consistent with the cosmic value and therefore no significant baryon loss from the system. The total mass profile is nearly a power law over a large radial range (˜0.2-10 R e ), where the corresponding density slope α obeys the α -{R}e scaling relation for massive early-type galaxies. Performing our analysis in the context of MOND still requires a large DM fraction (85.0 % +/- 2.5 % at r = 100 kpc) similar to that obtained using the standard Newtonian approach. The detection of a plausible stellar BCG mass component distinct from the NFW DM halo in the total gravitational potential suggests that ˜ {10}14 {M}⊙ represents the mass scale above which

  13. Constraints on baryonic dark matter in the Galactic halo and Local Group

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richstone, Douglas; Gould, Andrew; Guhathakurta, Puragra; Flynn, Chris

    1992-01-01

    A four-color method and deep CCD data are used to search for very faint metal-poor stars in the direction of the south Galactic pole. The results make it possible to limit the contribution of ordinary old, metal-poor stars to the dynamical halo of the Galaxy or to the Local Group. The ratio of the mass of the halo to its ordinary starlight must be more than about 2000, unless the halo is very small. For the Local Group, this ratio is greater than about 400. If this local dark matter is baryonic, the process of compact-object formation must produce very few 'impurities' in the form of stars similar to those found in globular clusters. The expected number of unbound stars with MV not greater than 6 within 100 pc of the sun is less than 1 based on the present 90-percent upper limit to the Local Group starlight.

  14. The hidden charm pentaquarks are the hidden color-octet uud baryons?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Sachiko; Takizawa, Makoto

    2017-01-01

    The I (JP) =1/2 (1/2-), 1/2 (3/2-), and 1/2 (5/2-) uudc c ‾ pentaquarks are investigated by the quark cluster model. This model, which reproduces the mass spectra of the color-singlet S-wave q3 baryons and q q ‾ mesons, also enables us to evaluate the quark interaction in the color-octet uud configurations. It is shown that the color-octet isospin-1/2 spin-3/2uud configuration gains an attraction. The uudc c ‾ states with this configuration have structures around the Σc(*)D ‾ (*) thresholds: one bound state, two resonances, and one large cusp are found. We argue that the negative parity pentaquark found by the LHCb experiments may be given by these structures.

  15. Dark matter annihilation in the milky way galaxy: effects of baryonic compression.

    PubMed

    Prada, F; Klypin, A; Flix, J; Martínez, M; Simonneau, E

    2004-12-10

    If the dark matter (DM), which is considered to constitute most of the mass of galaxies, is made of supersymmetric particles, the central region of our Galaxy should emit gamma rays produced by their annihilation. We use detailed models of the Milky Way to make accurate estimates of continuum gamma-ray fluxes. We argue that the most important effect, which was previously neglected, is the compression of the dark matter due to the infall of baryons to the galactic center: it boosts the expected signal by a factor 1000. To illustrate this effect, we computed the expected gamma fluxes in the minimal supergravity scenario. Our models predict that the signal could be detected at high confidence levels by imaging atmospheric C erenkov telescopes assuming that neutralinos make up most of the DM in the Universe.

  16. Generalized polarizabilities of the nucleon in baryon chiral perturbation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lensky, Vadim; Pascalutsa, Vladimir; Vanderhaeghen, Marc

    2017-02-01

    The nucleon generalized polarizabilities (GPs), probed in virtual Compton scattering (VCS), describe the spatial distribution of the polarization density in a nucleon. They are accessed experimentally via the process of electron-proton bremsstrahlung (ep→ epγ ) at electron-beam facilities, such as MIT-Bates, CEBAF (Jefferson Lab), and MAMI (Mainz). We present the calculation of the nucleon GPs and VCS observables at next-to-leading order in baryon chiral perturbation theory (Bχ PT), and confront the results with the empirical information. At this order our results are predictions, in the sense that all the parameters are well known from elsewhere. Within the relatively large uncertainties of our calculation we find good agreement with the experimental observations of VCS and the empirical extractions of the GPs. We find large discrepancies with previous chiral calculations - all done in heavy-baryon χ PT (HBχ PT) - and discuss the differences between Bχ PT and HBχ PT responsible for these discrepancies.

  17. Spinodal instabilities in baryon-rich quark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, Che Ming; Li, Feng

    For quark matter at finite baryon chemical potential, its density develops large fluctuations when it undergoes a first-order phase transition. Based on the Nambu-Jona-Lasinio (NJL) model, we have used the linear response theory to study the growth rate of density fluctuations and its dependence on the wavelength of unstable modes. Using the transport equation derived from the NJL model, we have also studied the time evolution of the unstable modes and the density fluctuations in a baryon-rich quark matter that is confined in a finite volume. Allowing the expansion of the quark matter, we have further studied the survivability of the density fluctuations as the density and temperature of the quark matter decrease. Possible experimental signatures of the density fluctuations have been suggested.

  18. Baryon number dissipation at finite temperature in the standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Mottola, E. ); Raby, S. . Dept. of Physics); Starkman, G. . Dept. of Astronomy)

    1990-01-01

    We analyze the phenomenon of baryon number violation at finite temperature in the standard model, and derive the relaxation rate for the baryon density in the high temperature electroweak plasma. The relaxation rate, {gamma} is given in terms of real time correlation functions of the operator E{center dot}B, and is directly proportional to the sphaleron transition rate, {Gamma}: {gamma} {preceq} n{sub f}{Gamma}/T{sup 3}. Hence it is not instanton suppressed, as claimed by Cohen, Dugan and Manohar (CDM). We show explicitly how this result is consistent with the methods of CDM, once it is recognized that a new anomalous commutator is required in their approach. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  19. CP violation in multibody decays of beauty baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durieux, Gauthier

    2016-10-01

    Beauty baryons are being observed in large numbers in the LHCb detector. The rich kinematic distributions of their multibody decays are therefore becoming accessible and provide us with new opportunities to search for CP violation. We analyse the angular distributions of some three- and four-body decays of spin-1/2 baryons using the Jacob-Wick helicity formalism. The asymmetries that provide access to small differences of CP-odd phases between decay amplitudes of identical CP-even phases are notably discussed. The understanding gained on processes featuring specific resonant intermediate states allows us to establish which asymmetries are relevant for what purpose. It is for instance shown that some CP-odd angular asymmetries measured by the LHCb collaboration in the Λ b → Λ φ → p π K + K - decay are expected to vanish identically.

  20. Exodus: Hidden origin of dark matter and baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unwin, James

    2013-06-01

    We propose a new framework for explaining the proximity of the baryon and dark matter relic densities ΩDM ≈ 5Ω B . The scenario assumes that the number density of the observed dark matter states is generated due to decays from a second hidden sector which simultaneously generates the baryon asymmetry. In contrast to asymmetric dark matter models, the dark matter can be a real scalar or Majorana fermion and thus presents distinct phenomenology. We discuss aspects of model building and general constraints in this framework. Moreover, we argue that this scenario circumvents several of the experimental bounds which significantly constrain typical models of asymmetric dark matter. We present a simple supersymmetric implementation of this mechanism and show that it can be used to obtain the correct dark matter relic density for a bino LSP.

  1. Determination of the quark coupling strength |Vub| using baryonic decays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LHCb Collaboration; Aaij, R.; Adeva, B.; Adinolfi, M.; Affolder, A.; Ajaltouni, Z.; Akar, S.; Albrecht, J.; Alessio, F.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Alkhazov, G.; Cartelle, P. Alvarez; Alves, A. A., Jr.; Amato, S.; Amerio, S.; Amhis, Y.; An, L.; Anderlini, L.; Anderson, J.; Andreotti, M.; Andrews, J. E.; Appleby, R. B.; Gutierrez, O. Aquines; Archilli, F.; Artamonov, A.; Artuso, M.; Aslanides, E.; Auriemma, G.; Baalouch, M.; Bachmann, S.; Back, J. J.; Badalov, A.; Baesso, C.; Baldini, W.; Barlow, R. J.; Barschel, C.; Barsuk, S.; Barter, W.; Batozskaya, V.; Battista, V.; Bay, A.; Beaucourt, L.; Beddow, J.; Bedeschi, F.; Bediaga, I.; Bel, L. J.; Belyaev, I.; Ben-Haim, E.; Bencivenni, G.; Benson, S.; Benton, J.; Berezhnoy, A.; Bernet, R.; Bertolin, A.; Bettler, M.-O.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bien, A.; Bifani, S.; Bird, T.; Birnkraut, A.; Bizzeti, A.; Blake, T.; Blanc, F.; Blouw, J.; Blusk, S.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, A.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Borghi, S.; Borsato, M.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; Bowen, E.; Bozzi, C.; Braun, S.; Brett, D.; Britsch, M.; Britton, T.; Brodzicka, J.; Brook, N. H.; Bursche, A.; Buytaert, J.; Cadeddu, S.; Calabrese, R.; Calvi, M.; Calvo Gomez, M.; Campana, P.; Campora Perez, D.; Capriotti, L.; Carbone, A.; Carboni, G.; Cardinale, R.; Cardini, A.; Carniti, P.; Carson, L.; Akiba, K. Carvalho; Mohr, R. Casanova; Casse, G.; Cassina, L.; Garcia, L. Castillo; Cattaneo, M.; Cauet, Ch.; Cavallero, G.; Cenci, R.; Charles, M.; Charpentier, Ph.; Chefdeville, M.; Chen, S.; Cheung, S.-F.; Chiapolini, N.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Vidal, X. Cid; Ciezarek, G.; Clarke, P. E. L.; Clemencic, M.; Cliff, H. V.; Closier, J.; Coco, V.; Cogan, J.; Cogneras, E.; Cogoni, V.; Cojocariu, L.; Collazuol, G.; Collins, P.; Comerma-Montells, A.; Contu, A.; Cook, A.; Coombes, M.; Coquereau, S.; Corti, G.; Corvo, M.; Couturier, B.; Cowan, G. A.; Craik, D. C.; Crocombe, A.; Torres, M. Cruz; Cunliffe, S.; Currie, R.; D'Ambrosio, C.; Dalseno, J.; David, P. N. Y.; Davis, A.; de Bruyn, K.; de Capua, S.; de Cian, M.; de Miranda, J. M.; de Paula, L.; de Silva, W.; de Simone, P.; Dean, C.-T.; Decamp, D.; Deckenhoff, M.; Del Buono, L.; Déléage, N.; Derkach, D.; Deschamps, O.; Dettori, F.; Dey, B.; di Canto, A.; di Ruscio, F.; Dijkstra, H.; Donleavy, S.; Dordei, F.; Dorigo, M.; Suárez, A. Dosil; Dossett, D.; Dovbnya, A.; Dreimanis, K.; Dufour, L.; Dujany, G.; Dupertuis, F.; Durante, P.; Dzhelyadin, R.; Dziurda, A.; Dzyuba, A.; Easo, S.; Egede, U.; Egorychev, V.; Eidelman, S.; Eisenhardt, S.; Eitschberger, U.; Ekelhof, R.; Eklund, L.; El Rifai, I.; Elsasser, Ch.; Ely, S.; Esen, S.; Evans, H. M.; Evans, T.; Falabella, A.; Färber, C.; Farinelli, C.; Farley, N.; Farry, S.; Fay, R.; Ferguson, D.; Albor, V. Fernandez; Ferrari, F.; Rodrigues, F. Ferreira; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Filippov, S.; Fiore, M.; Fiorini, M.; Firlej, M.; Fitzpatrick, C.; Fiutowski, T.; Fol, P.; Fontana, M.; Fontanelli, F.; Forty, R.; Francisco, O.; Frank, M.; Frei, C.; Frosini, M.; Fu, J.; Furfaro, E.; Gallas Torreira, A.; Galli, D.; Gallorini, S.; Gambetta, S.; Gandelman, M.; Gandini, P.; Gao, Y.; Pardiñas, J. García; Garofoli, J.; Garra Tico, J.; Garrido, L.; Gascon, D.; Gaspar, C.; Gastaldi, U.; Gauld, R.; Gavardi, L.; Gazzoni, G.; Geraci, A.; Gerick, D.; Gersabeck, E.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Ghez, Ph.; Gianelle, A.; Gianì, S.; Gibson, V.; Giubega, L.; Gligorov, V. V.; Göbel, C.; Golubkov, D.; Golutvin, A.; Gomes, A.; Gotti, C.; Gándara, M. Grabalosa; Diaz, R. Graciani; Granado Cardoso, L. A.; Graugés, E.; Graverini, E.; Graziani, G.; Grecu, A.; Greening, E.; Gregson, S.; Griffith, P.; Grillo, L.; Grünberg, O.; Gui, B.; Gushchin, E.; Guz, Yu.; Gys, T.; Hadjivasiliou, C.; Haefeli, G.; Haen, C.; Haines, S. C.; Hall, S.; Hamilton, B.; Hampson, T.; Han, X.; Hansmann-Menzemer, S.; Harnew, N.; Harnew, S. T.; Harrison, J.; He, J.; Head, T.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Henrard, P.; Henry, L.; Morata, J. A. Hernando; van Herwijnen, E.; Heß, M.; Hicheur, A.; Hill, D.; Hoballah, M.; Hombach, C.; Hulsbergen, W.; Humair, T.; Hussain, N.; Hutchcroft, D.; Hynds, D.; Idzik, M.; Ilten, P.; Jacobsson, R.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, J.; Jans, E.; Jawahery, A.; Jing, F.; John, M.; Johnson, D.; Jones, C. R.; Joram, C.; Jost, B.; Jurik, N.; Kandybei, S.; Kanso, W.; Karacson, M.; Karbach, T. M.; Karodia, S.; Kelsey, M.; Kenyon, I. R.; Kenzie, M.; Ketel, T.; Khanji, B.; Khurewathanakul, C.; Klaver, S.; Klimaszewski, K.; Kochebina, O.; Kolpin, M.; Komarov, I.; Koopman, R. F.; Koppenburg, P.; Korolev, M.; Kravchuk, L.; Kreplin, K.; Kreps, M.; Krocker, G.; Krokovny, P.; Kruse, F.; Kucewicz, W.; Kucharczyk, M.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Kurek, K.; Kvaratskheliya, T.; La Thi, V. N.; Lacarrere, D.; Lafferty, G.; Lai, A.; Lambert, D.; Lambert, R. W.; Lanfranchi, G.; Langenbruch, C.; Langhans, B.; Latham, T.; Lazzeroni, C.; Le Gac, R.; van Leerdam, J.; Lees, J.-P.; Lefèvre, R.; Leflat, A.; Lefrançois, J.; Leroy, O.; Lesiak, T.; Leverington, B.; Li, Y.; Likhomanenko, T.; Liles, M.; Lindner, R.; Linn, C.; Lionetto, F.; Liu, B.; Lohn, S.; Longstaff, I.; Lopes, J. H.; Lowdon, P.; Lucchesi, D.; Luo, H.; Lupato, A.; Luppi, E.; Lupton, O.; Machefert, F.; Maciuc, F.; Maev, O.; Maguire, K.; Malde, S.; Malinin, A.; Manca, G.; Mancinelli, G.; Manning, P.; Mapelli, A.; Maratas, J.; Marchand, J. F.; Marconi, U.; Benito, C. Marin; Marino, P.; Märki, R.; Marks, J.; Martellotti, G.; Martinelli, M.; Santos, D. Martinez; Vidal, F. Martinez; Tostes, D. Martins; Massafferri, A.; Matev, R.; Mathad, A.; Mathe, Z.; Matteuzzi, C.; Mauri, A.; Maurin, B.; Mazurov, A.; McCann, M.; McCarthy, J.; McNab, A.; McNulty, R.; Meadows, B.; Meier, F.; Meissner, M.; Merk, M.; Milanes, D. A.; Minard, M.-N.; Mitzel, D. S.; Rodriguez, J. Molina; Monteil, S.; Morandin, M.; Morawski, P.; Mordà, A.; Morello, M. J.; Moron, J.; Morris, A.-B.; Mountain, R.; Muheim, F.; Müller, J.; Müller, K.; Müller, V.; Mussini, M.; Muster, B.; Naik, P.; Nakada, T.; Nandakumar, R.; Nasteva, I.; Needham, M.; Neri, N.; Neubert, S.; Neufeld, N.; Neuner, M.; Nguyen, A. D.; Nguyen, T. D.; Nguyen-Mau, C.; Niess, V.; Niet, R.; Nikitin, N.; Nikodem, T.; Ninci, D.; Novoselov, A.; O'Hanlon, D. P.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Obraztsov, V.; Ogilvy, S.; Okhrimenko, O.; Oldeman, R.; Onderwater, C. J. G.; Rodrigues, B. Osorio; Goicochea, J. M. Otalora; Otto, A.; Owen, P.; Oyanguren, A.; Palano, A.; Palombo, F.; Palutan, M.; Panman, J.; Papanestis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pappalardo, L. L.; Parkes, C.; Passaleva, G.; Patel, G. D.; Patel, M.; Patrignani, C.; Pearce, A.; Pellegrino, A.; Penso, G.; Altarelli, M. Pepe; Perazzini, S.; Perret, P.; Pescatore, L.; Petridis, K.; Petrolini, A.; Petruzzo, M.; Olloqui, E. Picatoste; Pietrzyk, B.; Pilař, T.; Pinci, D.; Pistone, A.; Playfer, S.; Casasus, M. Plo; Poikela, T.; Polci, F.; Poluektov, A.; Polyakov, I.; Polycarpo, E.; Popov, A.; Popov, D.; Popovici, B.; Potterat, C.; Price, E.; Price, J. D.; Prisciandaro, J.; Pritchard, A.; Prouve, C.; Pugatch, V.; Navarro, A. Puig; Punzi, G.; Qian, W.; Quagliani, R.; Rachwal, B.; Rademacker, J. H.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Rama, M.; Rangel, M. S.; Raniuk, I.; Rauschmayr, N.; Raven, G.; Redi, F.; Reichert, S.; Reid, M. M.; Dos Reis, A. C.; Ricciardi, S.; Richards, S.; Rihl, M.; Rinnert, K.; Molina, V. Rives; Robbe, P.; Rodrigues, A. B.; Rodrigues, E.; Lopez, J. A. Rodriguez; Perez, P. Rodriguez; Roiser, S.; Romanovsky, V.; Vidal, A. Romero; Rotondo, M.; Rouvinet, J.; Ruf, T.; Ruiz, H.; Valls, P. Ruiz; Saborido Silva, J. J.; Sagidova, N.; Sail, P.; Saitta, B.; Guimaraes, V. Salustino; Mayordomo, C. Sanchez; Sedes, B. Sanmartin; Santacesaria, R.; Rios, C. Santamarina; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Saunders, D. M.; Savrina, D.; Schiller, M.; Schindler, H.; Schlupp, M.; Schmelling, M.; Schmelzer, T.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, O.; Schopper, A.; Schune, M.-H.; Schwemmer, R.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Semennikov, A.; Sepp, I.; Serra, N.; Serrano, J.; Sestini, L.; Seyfert, P.; Shapkin, M.; Shapoval, I.; Shcheglov, Y.; Shears, T.; Shekhtman, L.; Shevchenko, V.; Shires, A.; Coutinho, R. Silva; Simi, G.; Sirendi, M.; Skidmore, N.; Skillicorn, I.; Skwarnicki, T.; Smith, E.; Smith, E.; Smith, J.; Smith, M.; Snoek, H.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Soler, F. J. P.; Soomro, F.; Souza, D.; Souza de Paula, B.; Spaan, B.; Spradlin, P.; Sridharan, S.; Stagni, F.; Stahl, M.; Stahl, S.; Steinkamp, O.; Stenyakin, O.; Sterpka, F.; Stevenson, S.; Stoica, S.; Stone, S.; Storaci, B.; Stracka, S.; Straticiuc, M.; Straumann, U.; Stroili, R.; Sun, L.; Sutcliffe, W.; Swientek, K.; Swientek, S.; Syropoulos, V.; Szczekowski, M.; Szczypka, P.; Szumlak, T.; T'Jampens, S.; Tekampe, T.; Teklishyn, M.; Tellarini, G.; Teubert, F.; Thomas, C.; Thomas, E.; van Tilburg, J.; Tisserand, V.; Tobin, M.; Todd, J.; Tolk, S.; Tomassetti, L.; Tonelli, D.; Topp-Joergensen, S.; Torr, N.; Tournefier, E.; Tourneur, S.; Trabelsi, K.; Tran, M. T.; Tresch, M.; Trisovic, A.; Tsaregorodtsev, A.; Tsopelas, P.; Tuning, N.; Ukleja, A.; Ustyuzhanin, A.; Uwer, U.; Vacca, C.; Vagnoni, V.; Valenti, G.; Vallier, A.; Gomez, R. Vazquez; Regueiro, P. Vazquez; Sierra, C. Vázquez; Vecchi, S.; Velthuis, J. J.; Veltri, M.; Veneziano, G.; Vesterinen, M.; Barbosa, J. V. Viana; Viaud, B.; Vieira, D.; Diaz, M. Vieites; Vilasis-Cardona, X.; Vollhardt, A.; Volyanskyy, D.; Voong, D.; Vorobyev, A.; Vorobyev, V.; Voß, C.; de Vries, J. A.; Waldi, R.; Wallace, C.; Wallace, R.; Walsh, J.; Wandernoth, S.; Wang, J.; Ward, D. R.; Watson, N. K.; Websdale, D.; Weiden, A.; Whitehead, M.; Wiedner, D.; Wilkinson, G.; Wilkinson, M.; Williams, M.; Williams, M. P.; Williams, M.; Wilson, F. F.; Wimberley, J.; Wishahi, J.; Wislicki, W.; Witek, M.; Wormser, G.; Wotton, S. A.; Wright, S.; Wyllie, K.; Xie, Y.; Xu, Z.; Yang, Z.; Yuan, X.; Yushchenko, O.; Zangoli, M.; Zavertyaev, M.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, Y.; Zhelezov, A.; Zhokhov, A.; Zhong, L.

    2015-09-01

    In the Standard Model of particle physics, the strength of the couplings of the b quark to the u and c quarks, |Vub| and |Vcb|, are governed by the coupling of the quarks to the Higgs boson. Using data from the LHCb experiment at the Large Hadron Collider, the probability for the Λb0 baryon to decay into the p final state relative to the final state is measured. Combined with theoretical calculations of the strong interaction and a previously measured value of |Vcb|, the first |Vub| measurement to use a baryonic decay is performed. This measurement is consistent with previous determinations of |Vub| using B meson decays to specific final states and confirms the existing incompatibility with those using an inclusive sample of final states.

  2. The variation of the baryon-to-photon ratio during different cosmological epochs due to decay and annihilation of dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zavarygin, E. O.; Ivanchik, A. V.

    2015-12-01

    An influence of annihilation and decay of the dark matter particles on the baryon-to-photon ratio has been studied for different cosmological epochs. We consider the different parameter values of the dark matter particles such as mass, annihilation cross section, lifetime and so on. The obtained results are compared with the data which come from the Big Bang nucleosynthesis calculation and from the analysis of the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background radiation. It has been shown that the modern value of the dark matter density ΩCDM = 0.26 is enough to provide the variation of the baryon-to-photon ratio up to Δη/η ∼ 0.01÷1 for decay of the dark matter particles, but it also leads to an excess of the diffuse gamma ray background. We use the observational data on the diffuse gamma ray background in order to determine our constraints on the model of the dark matter particle decay and on the corresponding variation of the baryon-to-photon ratio: Δη/η ≲ 10-5. It has been shown that the variation of the baryon-to-photon ratio caused by the annihilation of the dark matter particles is negligible during the cosmological epochs from Big Bang nucleosynthesis to the present epoch.

  3. The Baryon Number Two System in the Chiral Soliton Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mantovani-Sarti, Valentina; Drago, Alessandro; Vento, Vicente; Park, Byung-Yoon

    2013-03-01

    We study the interaction between two B = 1 states in a chiral soliton model where baryons are described as non-topological solitons. By using the hedgehog solution for the B = 1 states we construct three possible B = 2 configurations to analyze the role of the relative orientation of the hedgehog quills in the dynamics. The strong dependence of the intersoliton interaction on these relative orientations reveals that studies of dense hadronic matter using this model should take into account their implications.

  4. Nuclear matter at high temperature and low net baryonic density

    SciTech Connect

    Costa, R. S.; Duarte, S. B.; Oliveira, J. C. T.; Chiapparini, M.

    2010-11-12

    We study the effect of the {sigma}-{omega} mesons interaction on nucleon-antinucleon matter properties. This interaction is employed in the context of the linear Walecka model to discuss the behavior of this system at high temperature and low net baryonic density regime. The field equations are solved in the relativistic mean-field approximation and our results show that the phase transition pointed out in the literature for this regime is eliminated when the meson interaction are considered.

  5. Prospects for baryon instability search with long-lived isotopes

    SciTech Connect

    Efremenko, Yu.; Bugg, W.; Cohn, H.; Kamyshkov, Yu.; Parker, G.; Plasil, F.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper we consider the possibility of observation of baryon instability processes occurring inside nuclei by searching for the remnants of such processes that could have been accumulated in nature as mm long-lived isotopes. As an example, we discuss here the possible detection of traces of {sup 97}Tc, {sup 98}Tc, and {sup 99}Tc in deep-mined nonradioactive tin ores.

  6. Baryon to meson transition distribution amplitudes and their spectral representation

    SciTech Connect

    Pire, B.; Semenov-Tian-Shansky, K.; Szymanowski, L.

    2011-07-15

    We consider the problem of construction of a spectral representation for nucleon to meson transition distribution amplitudes (TDAs), non-diagonal matrix elements of nonlocal three quark operators between a nucleon and a meson states. We introduce the notion of quadruple distributions and generalize Radyshkin's factorized Ansatz for this issue. Modelling of baryon to meson TDAs in the complete domain of their definition opens the way to quantitative estimates of cross-sections for various hard exclusive reactions.

  7. The riddle of high-energy baryon number violation

    SciTech Connect

    Mattis, M.P.

    1991-09-01

    The exciting possibility that anomalous baryon and lepton number violation might be observable at the next generation of supercolliders is suggested by an instanton calculation due to Ringwald and Espinosa. In these Lectures, the current controversial status of these claims is discussed, and several new technologies designed to analyze this question are reviewed. These technologies should contribute more generally to our understanding of weakly- coupled field theories in the nonperturbative regime where both energies and multiplicities are very large. 61 refs., 35 figs.

  8. Recent Progress in Understanding the Baryon Resonance Spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crede, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Baryons are complex systems of confined quarks and gluons and exhibit the characteristic spectra of excited states. These states are sensitive to the details of quark confinement, which is only poorly understood with quantum chromodynamics (QCD), the fundamental theory of the strong interaction. To gain insight into this complex dynamics, the baryonic excitation spectrum has been studied for many years. The key question remains what are the relevant degrees of freedom for the resonance physics of QCD. Are the so-called constituent quarks the most efficient way to describe reaction amplitudes and the excitation spectrum of QCD with light quarks? To what extent are diquark correlations, gluonic modes or hadronic degrees of freedom important in this physics? In recent years, lattice-QCD has made significant progress toward understanding the spectra of hadrons, reducing statistical uncertainties and employing robust techniques for spin identication. However, a calculation of the physical excited baryon spectrum is still a tough challenge with present computing power. On the experimental side, high-energy electrons and photons are a remarkably clean probe of hadronic matter, providing a microscope for examining atomic nuclei and the strong nuclear force. Significant progress has been achieved with the recent availability of new polarization data, utilizing polarized beams and/or polarized targets at various laboratories worldwide, e.g. Jefferson Lab in the United States. These are important steps toward so-called complete experiments that will allow us to unambiguously determine the scattering amplitudes in the underlying reactions and to identify resonance contributions. In this presentation, I will give an overview of the excited baryon program and I will discuss the current (experimental) status of the nucleon excitation spectrum. Support is acknowledged from the Department of Energy grant #DE-FG02-92ER40735.

  9. Study of Baryon Form Factor at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bingxin

    Using data samples collected with BESIII detector at BEPCII collider, we measure Born cross section of e+e- → pbar{p} at center of mass energies √{s} from 2232.4 to 3671.0 MeV. The effective electromagnetic form factor of the proton is deduced with assumption that electric and magnetic form factors are equal GE = GM . For e+e- → Λ bar{Λ }, the Born cross sections and effective form factors are measured at √{s} = 2.2324, 2.40, 2.80, and 3.08 GeV. It is the first time that e+e- → Λ bar{Λ } process is studied closed to Λ bar{Λ } production threshold, and measured cross section is much larger than phase space expectations, which suggests that something more is at play beyond expected phase space behavior.

  10. Baryons as relativistic three-quark bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichmann, Gernot; Sanchis-Alepuz, Hèlios; Williams, Richard; Alkofer, Reinhard; Fischer, Christian S.

    2016-11-01

    We review the spectrum and electromagnetic properties of baryons described as relativistic three-quark bound states within QCD. The composite nature of baryons results in a rich excitation spectrum, whilst leading to highly non-trivial structural properties explored by the coupling to external (electromagnetic and other) currents. Both present many unsolved problems despite decades of experimental and theoretical research. We discuss the progress in these fields from a theoretical perspective, focusing on nonperturbative QCD as encoded in the functional approach via Dyson-Schwinger and Bethe-Salpeter equations. We give a systematic overview as to how results are obtained in this framework and explain technical connections to lattice QCD. We also discuss the mutual relations to the quark model, which still serves as a reference to distinguish 'expected' from 'unexpected' physics. We confront recent results on the spectrum of non-strange and strange baryons, their form factors and the issues of two-photon processes and Compton scattering determined in the Dyson-Schwinger framework with those of lattice QCD and the available experimental data. The general aim is to identify the underlying physical mechanisms behind the plethora of observable phenomena in terms of the underlying quark and gluon degrees of freedom.

  11. The ep -->e'p eta reaction at and above the S11(1535) baryon resonance.

    PubMed

    Thompson, R; Dytman, S; Kim, K Y; Mueller, J; Adams, G S; Amaryan, M J; Anciant, E; Anghinolfi, M; Asavapibhop, B; Auger, T; Audit, G; Avakian, H; Barrow, S; Battaglieri, M; Beard, K; Bektasoglu, M; Bertozzi, W; Bianchi, N; Biselli, A; Boiarinov, S; Bonner, B E; Briscoe, W J; Brooks, W; Burkert, V D; Calarco, J R; Capitani, G; Carman, D S; Carnahan, B; Cole, P L; Coleman, A; Connelly, J; Cords, D; Corvisiero, P; Crabb, D; Crannell, H; Cummings, J; Day, D; Degtyarenko, P V; Demirchyan, R A; Dennis, L C; Deppman, A; De Sanctis, E; De Vita, R; Dhuga, K S; Djalali, C; Dodge, G E; Doughty, D; Dragovitsch, P; Dugger, M; Eckhause, M; Efremenko, Y V; Egiyan, H; Egiyan, K S; Elouadrhiri, L; Farhi, L; Feuerbach, R J; Ficenec, J; Fissum, K; Freyberger, A; Funsten, H; Gai, M; Gavrilov, V B; Gilfoyle, G P; Giovanetti, K; Gilad, S; Girard, P; Griffioen, K A; Guidal, M; Guillo, M; Gyurjyan, V; Hancock, D; Hardie, J; Heddle, D; Heisenberg, J; Hersman, F W; Hicks, K; Hicks, R S; Holtrop, M; Hyde-Wright, C E; Ito, M M; Jenkins, D; Joo, K; Kane, J; Khandaker, M; Kim, W; Klein, A; Klein, F J; Klusman, M; Kossov, M; Kuhn, S E; Kuang, Y; Laget, J M; Lawrence, D; Leskin, G A; Longhi, A; Loukachine, K; Lucas, M; Magahiz, R; Major, R W; Manak, J J; Marchand, C; Matthews, S K; McAleer, S; McCarthy, J; McNabb, J W; Mecking, B A; Mestayer, M D; Meyer, C A; Minehart, R; Mirazita, M; Miskimen, R; Muccifora, V; Mutchler, G S; Napolitano, J; Niyazov, R A; Ohandjanyan, M S; O'Brien, J T; Opper, A; Patois, Y; Peterson, G A; Philips, S; Pivnyuk, N; Pocanic, D; Pogorelko, O; Polli, E; Preedom, B M; Price, J W; Qin, L M; Raue, B A; Reolon, A R; Riccardi, G; Ricco, G; Ripani, M; Ritchie, B G; Ronchetti, F; Rossi, P; Roudot, F; Rowntree, D; Rubin, P D; Salgado, C W; Sanzone, M; Sapunenko, V; Sarty, A; Sargsyan, M; Schumacher, R A; Shafi, A; Sharabian, Y G; Shaw, J; Shuvalov, S M; Skabelin, A; Smith, T; Smith, C; Smith, E S; Sober, D I; Spraker, M; Stepanyan, S; Stoler, P; Taiuti, M; Taylor, S; Tedeschi, D; Tung, T Y; Vineyard, M F; Vlassov, A; Weller, H; Weinstein, L B; Welsh, R; Weygand, D P; Whisnant, S; Witkowski, M; Wolin, E; Yegneswaran, A; Yun, J; Zhou, Z; Zhao, J

    2001-02-26

    New cross sections for the reaction e p-->e p eta are reported for total center of mass energy W = 1.5--1.86 GeV and invariant momentum transfer Q2 = 0.25--1.5 (GeV/c)(2). This large kinematic range allows extraction of important new information about response functions, photocouplings, and eta N coupling strengths of baryon resonances. Newly observed structure at W approximately 1.65 GeV is shown to come from interference between S and P waves and can be interpreted with known resonances. Improved values are derived for the photon coupling amplitude for the S11(1535) resonance.

  12. Addendum to triton and hypertriton binding energies calculated from SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-02-15

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction obtained by a resonating-group method of two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction that is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  13. Triton and hypertriton binding energies with SU{sub 6} quark-model baryon-baryon interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Fujiwara, Y.; Suzuki, Y.; Kohno, M.; Miyagawa, K.

    2008-04-29

    Previously we calculated the binding energies of the triton and hypertriton, using an SU{sub 6} quark-model interaction which is obtained by a resonating-group method for two baryon clusters. In contrast to the previous calculations employing the energy-dependent interaction kernel, we present new results using a renormalized interaction which is energy-independent and still preserves all the two-baryon data. The new binding energies are slightly smaller than the previous values. In particular the triton binding energy turns out to be 8.14 MeV with a charge-dependence correction of the two-nucleon force, 190 keV, being included. This indicates that the energy to be accounted for by three-body forces is about 350 keV.

  14. Cosmological baryon number domain structure from symmetry-breaking in grand unified field theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big-bang can lead more naturally to a baryon symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  15. Cosmological baryon-number domain structure from symmetry breaking in grand unified field theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.; Stecker, F. W.

    1979-01-01

    It is suggested that grand unified field theories with spontaneous symmetry breaking in the very early big bang can lead more naturally to a baryon-symmetric cosmology with a domain structure than to a totally baryon-asymmetric cosmology. The symmetry is broken in a randomized manner in causally independent domains, favoring neither a baryon nor an antibaryon excess on a universal scale. Arguments in favor of this cosmology and observational tests are discussed.

  16. A dynamics-free lower bound on the mass of our Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaritsky, Dennis; Courtois, Helene

    2017-03-01

    We use a sample of Milky Way (MW) analogues for which we have stellar and disc gas mass measurements, published measurements of halo gas masses of the MW and of similar galaxies, and the well-established value of the cosmological baryon fraction to place a lower bound on the mass of the Galaxy of 7.7 × 1011 M⊙ and estimate that the mass is likely to be ≥1.2 × 1012 M⊙. Although most dynamical analyses yield measurements consistent with these results, several recent studies have advocated for a total mass well below 1012 M⊙. We reject such low-mass estimates because they imply a Galactic baryon matter fraction significantly above the universal value. Convergence between dynamical mass estimates and those based on the baryonic mass is an important milestone in our understanding of galaxies.

  17. Missing baryons traced by the galaxy luminosity density in large-scale WHIM filaments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevalainen, J.; Tempel, E.; Liivamägi, L. J.; Branchini, E.; Roncarelli, M.; Giocoli, C.; Heinämäki, P.; Saar, E.; Tamm, A.; Finoguenov, A.; Nurmi, P.; Bonamente, M.

    2015-11-01

    We propose a new approach to the problem of the missing baryons. Building on the common assumption that the missing baryons are in the form of the warm hot intergalactic medium (WHIM), we also assume here that the galaxy luminosity density can be used as a tracer of the WHIM. This last assumption is supported by our discovery of a significant correlation between the WHIM density and the galaxy luminosity density in recent hydrodynamical simulations. We also found that the percentage of the gas mass in the WHIM phase is substantially higher (by a factor of ~1.6) within large-scale galactic filaments, i.e. ~70%, compared to the average in the full simulation volume of ~0.1 Gpc3. The relation between the WHIM overdensity and the galaxy luminosity overdensity within the galactic filaments is consistent with a linear one: δwhim = 0.7 ± 0.1 × δLD0.9±0.2. We then applied our procedure to the line of sight towards the blazar H2356-309 and found evidence of WHIM that corresponds to the Sculptor Wall (SW) (z ~ 0.03 and log NH = 19.9+ 0.1-0.3) and Pisces-Cetus (PC) superclusters (z ~ 0.06 and log NH = 19.7+ 0.2-0.3), in agreement with the redshifts and column densities of the X-ray absorbers identified recently. This agreement indicates that the galaxy luminosity density and galactic filaments are reliable signposts for the WHIM and that our method is robust for estimating WHIM density. The signal that we detected cannot originate in the halos of nearby galaxies because they cannot account for the high WHIM column densities that our method and X-ray analysis consistently find in the SW and PC superclusters. Appendix A is available in electronic form at http://www.aanda.org

  18. The SDSS-IV extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Overview and early data

    DOE PAGES

    Dawson, Kyle S.

    2016-02-04

    The Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) will conduct novel cosmological observations using the BOSS spectrograph at Apache Point Observatory. Observations will be simultaneous with the Time Domain Spectroscopic Survey (TDSS) designed for variability studies and the Spectroscopic Identification of eROSITA Sources (SPIDERS) program designed for studies of X-ray sources. eBOSS will use four different tracers to measure the distance-redshift relation with baryon acoustic oscillations (BAO). Using more than 250,000 new, spectroscopically confirmed luminous red galaxies at a median redshift z=0.72, we project that eBOSS will yield measurements ofmore » $$d_A(z)$$ to an accuracy of 1.2% and measurements of H(z) to 2.1% when combined with the z>0.6 sample of BOSS galaxies. With ~195,000 new emission line galaxy redshifts, we expect BAO measurements of $$d_A(z)$$ to an accuracy of 3.1% and H(z) to 4.7% at an effective redshift of z= 0.87. A sample of more than 500,000 spectroscopically-confirmed quasars will provide the first BAO distance measurements over the redshift range 0.92.1; these new data will enhance the precision of $$d_A(z)$$ and H(z) by a factor of 1.44 relative to BOSS. Furthermore, eBOSS will provide improved tests of General Relativity on cosmological scales through redshift-space distortion measurements, improved tests for non-Gaussianity in the primordial density field, and new constraints on the summed mass of all neutrino species. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the cosmological goals, spectroscopic target sample, demonstration of spectral quality from early data, and projected cosmological constraints from eBOSS.« less

  19. A Study of Production and Decay of Omega_c^0 Baryons in BABAR

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.; Barate, R.; Boutigny, D.; Couderc, F.; Karyotakis, Y.; Lees, J.P.; Poireau, V.; Tisserand, V.; Zghiche, A.; Grauges, E.; Palano, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Pompili, A.; Chen, J.C.; Qi, N.D.; Rong, G.; Wang, P.; Zhu, Y.S.; Eigen, G.; Ofte, I.; Stugu, B. /University of Bergen, Institute of Physics, N-5007 Bergen, Norway /LBL, Berkeley /UC, Berkeley /Birmingham U. /Ruhr U., Bochum /Bristol U. /British Columbia U. /Brunel U. /Novosibirsk, IYF /UC, Irvine /UCLA /UC, Riverside /UC, San Diego /UC, Santa Barbara /UC, Santa Cruz /Caltech /Cincinnati U. /Colorado U. /Colorado State U. /Dortmund U. /Dresden, Tech. U. /Ecole Polytechnique /Edinburgh U. /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Frascati /Genoa U. /INFN, Genoa /Harvard U. /Heidelberg U. /Imperial Coll., London /Iowa U. /Iowa State U. /Orsay, LAL /LLNL, Livermore /Liverpool U. /Queen Mary, U. of London /Royal Holloway, U. of London /Louisville U. /Manchester U. /Maryland U. /Massachusetts U., Amherst /MIT, LNS /McGill U. /Milan U. /INFN, Milan /Mississippi U. /Montreal U. /Mt. Holyoke Coll. /Naples U. /INFN, Naples /NIKHEF, Amsterdam /Notre Dame U. /Ohio State U. /Oregon U. /Padua U. /INFN, Padua /Paris U., VI-VII /Pennsylvania U. /Perugia U. /INFN, Perugia /Pisa U. /INFN, Pisa /Prairie View A-M /Princeton U. /Rome U. /INFN, Rome /Rostock U. /Rutherford /DAPNIA, Saclay /South Carolina U. /SLAC /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SUNY, Stony Brook /Tennessee U. /Texas U. /Texas U., Dallas /Turin U. /INFN, Turin /Trieste U. /INFN, Trieste /Valencia U., IFIC /Vanderbilt U. /Victoria U. /Wisconsin U., Madison /Yale U.

    2005-09-28

    Production and decay of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is studied with {approx} 230 fb{sup -1} of data recorded with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II e{sup +}e{sup -} asymmetric-energy storage ring at SLAC. The {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} is reconstructed through its decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, {Xi}{sup -}K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +} final states. The invariant mass spectra are presented and the signal yields are extracted. Ratios of branching fractions are measured relative to the {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +} mode {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Xi}{sup -} K{sup -}{pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) = 0.31 {+-} 0.15(stat.) {+-} 0.04(syst.), {Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup -}{pi}{sup +})/{Beta}({Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} {yields} {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}) < 0.30 (90%CL). The momentum spectrum (not corrected for efficiency) of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} baryons is extracted from decays into {Omega}{sup -}{pi}{sup +}, establishing the first observation of {Omega}{sub c}{sup 0} production from B decays.

  20. nIFTy galaxy cluster simulations - IV. Quantifying the influence of baryons on halo properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Weiguang; Power, Chris; Knebe, Alexander; Kay, Scott T.; Sembolini, Federico; Elahi, Pascal J.; Yepes, Gustavo; Pearce, Frazer; Cunnama, Daniel; Beck, Alexander M.; Dalla Vecchia, Claudio; Davé, Romeel; February, Sean; Huang, Shuiyao; Hobbs, Alex; Katz, Neal; McCarthy, Ian G.; Murante, Giuseppe; Perret, Valentin; Puchwein, Ewald; Read, Justin I.; Saro, Alexandro; Teyssier, Romain; Thacker, Robert J.

    2016-06-01

    Building on the initial results of the nIFTy simulated galaxy cluster comparison, we compare and contrast the impact of baryonic physics with a single massive galaxy cluster, run with 11 state-of-the-art codes, spanning adaptive mesh, moving mesh, classic and modern smoothed particle hydrodynamics (SPH) approaches. For each code represented we have a dark-matter-only (DM) and non-radiative (NR) version of the cluster, as well as a full physics (FP) version for a subset of the codes. We compare both radial mass and kinematic profiles, as well as global measures of the cluster (e.g. concentration, spin, shape), in the NR and FP runs with that in the DM runs. Our analysis reveals good consistency ⪅20 per cent) between global properties of the cluster predicted by different codes when integrated quantities are measured within the virial radius R200. However, we see larger differences for quantities within R2500, especially in the FP runs. The radial profiles reveal a diversity, especially in the cluster centre, between the NR runs, which can be understood straightforwardly from the division of codes into classic SPH and non-classic SPH (including the modern SPH, adaptive and moving mesh codes); and between the FP runs, which can also be understood broadly from the division of codes into those that include active galactic nucleus feedback and those that do not. The variation with respect to the median is much larger in the FP runs with different baryonic physics prescriptions than in the NR runs with different hydrodynamics solvers.

  1. Singly and Doubly Charmed $J=1/2$ Baryon Spectrum from Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Liuming Liu; Lin, Huey-Wen; Orginos, Kostas; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2010-05-01

    We compute the masses of the singly and doubly charmed baryons in full QCD using the relativistic Fermilab action for the charm quark. For the light quarks we use domain-wall fermions in the valence sector and improved Kogut-Susskind sea quarks. We use the low-lying charmonium spectrum to tune our heavy-quark action and as a guide to understanding the discretization errors associated with the heavy quark. Our results are in good agreement with experiment within our systematicss, except for the spin-1/2 $\\Xi_{cc}$, for which we predict the isospin averaged mass to be $M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 3665 \\pm17 \\pm14\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV} (here the first uncertainty is statistical, the second systematic and the third an estimate of lattice discretization errors). In addition, we predict the splitting of the (isospin averaged) spin-1/2 $\\O_{cc}$ with the $\\Xi_{cc}$ to be $M_{\\O_{cc}} - M_{\\Xi_{cc}} = 98 \\pm9 \\pm22$~{MeV} (in this mass splitting, the leading discretization errors cancel). This corresponds to a prediction of $M_{\\O_{cc}} = 3763\\pm9\\pm44\\, {}^{+0}_{-35}$~{MeV}.

  2. Radiative corrections to the three-body region of the Dalitz plot of baryon semileptonic decays with angular correlation between polarized emitted baryons and charged leptons: The initial-baryon rest frame case

    SciTech Connect

    Juarez-Leon, C.; Martinez, A.; Neri, M.; Torres, J. J.; Flores-Mendieta, Ruben; Garcia, A.

    2009-03-01

    We complement the results for the radiative corrections to the s-circumflex{sub 2}{center_dot}l-circumflex angular correlation of baryon semileptonic decays of Neri et al.[Phys. Rev. D 78, 054018 (2008)] with the final results in the rest frame of the decaying baryon. In addition, we present an analytical result which was not possible to obtain in Neri et al.'s work.

  3. Future Perspectives on Baryon Form Factor Measurements with BES III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schönning, Karin; Li, Cui

    2017-03-01

    The electromagnetic structure of hadrons, parameterised in terms of electromagnetic form factors, EMFF's, provide a key to the strong interaction. Nucleon EMFF's have been studied rigorously for more than 60 years but the new techniques and larger data samples available at modern facilities have given rise to a renewed interest for the field. Recently, the access to hyperon structure by hyperon time-like EMFF provides an additional dimension. The BEijing Spectrometer (BES III) at the Beijing Electron Positron Collider (BEPC-II) in China is the only running experiment where time-like baryon EMFF's can be studied in the e+e- → BB̅ reaction. The BES III detector is an excellent tool for baryon form factor measurements thanks to its near 4π coverage, precise tracking, PID and calorimetry. All hyperons in the SU(3) spin 1/2 octet and spin 3/2 decuplet are energetically accessible within the BEPC-II energy range. Recent data on proton and Λ hyperon form factors will be presented. Furthermore, a world-leading data sample was collected in 2014-2015 for precision measurements of baryon form factors. In particular, the data will enable a measurement of the relative phase between the electric and the magnetic form factors for Λ and Λc+ and hyperons. The modulus of the phase can be extracted from the hyperon polarisation, which in turn is experimentally accessible via the weak, parity violating decay. Furthermore, from the spin correlation between the outgoing hyperon and antihyperon, the sign of the phase can be extracted. This means that the time-like form factors can be completely determined for the first time. The methods will be outlined and the prospects of the BES III form factor measurements will be given. We will also present a planned upgrade of the BES III detector which is expected to improve future form factor measurements.

  4. Large-scale mass distribution in the Illustris simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haider, M.; Steinhauser, D.; Vogelsberger, M.; Genel, S.; Springel, V.; Torrey, P.; Hernquist, L.

    2016-04-01

    Observations at low redshifts thus far fail to account for all of the baryons expected in the Universe according to cosmological constraints. A large fraction of the baryons presumably resides in a thin and warm-hot medium between the galaxies, where they are difficult to observe due to their low densities and high temperatures. Cosmological simulations of structure formation can be used to verify this picture and provide quantitative predictions for the distribution of mass in different large-scale structure components. Here we study the distribution of baryons and dark matter at different epochs using data from the Illustris simulation. We identify regions of different dark matter density with the primary constituents of large-scale structure, allowing us to measure mass and volume of haloes, filaments and voids. At redshift zero, we find that 49 per cent of the dark matter and 23 per cent of the baryons are within haloes more massive than the resolution limit of 2 × 108 M⊙. The filaments of the cosmic web host a further 45 per cent of the dark matter and 46 per cent of the baryons. The remaining 31 per cent of the baryons reside in voids. The majority of these baryons have been transported there through active galactic nuclei feedback. We note that the feedback model of Illustris is too strong for heavy haloes, therefore it is likely that we are overestimating this amount. Categorizing the baryons according to their density and temperature, we find that 17.8 per cent of them are in a condensed state, 21.6 per cent are present as cold, diffuse gas, and 53.9 per cent are found in the state of a warm-hot intergalactic medium.

  5. Lattice QCD for Baryon Rich Matter - Beyond Taylor Expansions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bornyakov, V.; Boyda, D.; Goy, V.; Molochkov, A.; Nakamura, A.; Nikolaev, A.; Zakharov, V. I.

    2016-12-01

    We discuss our study for exploring the QCD phase diagram based on the lattice QCD. To go beyond the Taylor expansion and to reach higher density regions, we employ the canonical approach. In order to produce lattice data which meet experimental situation as much as possible, we propose a canonical approach with the charge and baryon number. We present our lattice QCD GPU code for this project which employs the clover improved Wilson fermions and Iwasaki gauge action to investigate pure imaginary chemical potential.

  6. Light-Cone Sum Rule Approach for Baryon Form Factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Offen, Nils

    2016-10-01

    We present the state-of-the-art of the light-cone sum rule approach to Baryon form factors. The essence of this approach is that soft Feynman contributions are calculated in terms of small transverse distance quantities using dispersion relations and duality. The form factors are thus expressed in terms of nucleon wave functions at small transverse separations, called distribution amplitudes, without any additional parameters. The distribution amplitudes, therefore, can be extracted from the comparison with the experimental data on form factors and compared to the results of lattice QCD simulations.

  7. Baryon resonances without quarks: A chiral soliton perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Karliner, M.

    1987-03-01

    In many processes involving low momentum transfer it is fruitful to regard the nucleon as a soliton or ''monopole-like'' configuration of the pion field. In particular, within this framework it is possible to obtain detailed predictions for pion-nucleon scattering amplitudes and for properties of baryon resonances. One can also derive model-independent linear relations between scattering amplitudes, such as ..pi..N and anti KN. A short survey of some recent results is given, including comparison with experimental data.

  8. Group theoretical construction of extended baryon operators in lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Subhasish Basak; Robert Edwards; George Fleming; Urs Heller; Colin Morningstar; David Richards; Ikuro Sato; Stephen Wallace

    2005-06-01

    The design and implementation of large sets of spatially-extended, gauge-invariant operators for use in determining the spectrum of baryons in lattice QCD computations are described. Group theoretical projections onto the irreducible representations of the symmetry group of a cubic spatial lattice are used in all isospin channels. The operators are constructed to maximize overlaps with the low-lying states of interest, while minimizing the number of sources needed in computing the required quark pr