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Sample records for lpla lipoate ligases

  1. Global conformational change associated with the two-step reaction catalyzed by Escherichia coli lipoate-protein ligase A.

    PubMed

    Fujiwara, Kazuko; Maita, Nobuo; Hosaka, Harumi; Okamura-Ikeda, Kazuko; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Taniguchi, Hisaaki

    2010-03-26

    Lipoate-protein ligase A (LplA) catalyzes the attachment of lipoic acid to lipoate-dependent enzymes by a two-step reaction: first the lipoate adenylation reaction and, second, the lipoate transfer reaction. We previously determined the crystal structure of Escherichia coli LplA in its unliganded form and a binary complex with lipoic acid (Fujiwara, K., Toma, S., Okamura-Ikeda, K., Motokawa, Y., Nakagawa, A., and Taniguchi, H. (2005) J Biol. Chem. 280, 33645-33651). Here, we report two new LplA structures, LplA.lipoyl-5'-AMP and LplA.octyl-5'-AMP.apoH-protein complexes, which represent the post-lipoate adenylation intermediate state and the pre-lipoate transfer intermediate state, respectively. These structures demonstrate three large scale conformational changes upon completion of the lipoate adenylation reaction: movements of the adenylate-binding and lipoate-binding loops to maintain the lipoyl-5'-AMP reaction intermediate and rotation of the C-terminal domain by about 180 degrees . These changes are prerequisites for LplA to accommodate apoprotein for the second reaction. The Lys(133) residue plays essential roles in both lipoate adenylation and lipoate transfer reactions. Based on structural and kinetic data, we propose a reaction mechanism driven by conformational changes.

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar L2 Can Utilize Exogenous Lipoic Acid through the Action of the Lipoic Acid Ligase LplA1▿

    PubMed Central

    Ramaswamy, Aishwarya V.; Maurelli, Anthony T.

    2010-01-01

    Lipoic acid is an essential protein bound cofactor that is vital for the functioning of several important enzymes involved in central metabolism. Genomes of all sequenced chlamydiae show the presence of two genes encoding lipoic acid ligases and one gene encoding a lipoate synthase. However, the roles of these proteins in lipoic acid utilization or biosynthesis have not yet been characterized. The two distinct lipoic acid ligases in Chlamydia trachomatis serovar L2, LplA1Ct and LplA2Ct (encoded by the open reading frames ctl0537 and ctl0761) display moderate identity with Escherichia coli LplA (30 and 27%, respectively) but possess amino acid sequence motifs that are well conserved among all lipoyl protein ligases. The putative lipoic acid synthase LipACt, encoded by ctl0815, is ca. 43% identical to the E. coli LipA homolog. We demonstrate here the presence of lipoylated proteins in C. trachomatis serovar L2 and show that the lipoic acid ligase LplA1Ct is capable of utilizing exogenous lipoic acid for the lipoylation Therefore, host-derived lipoic acid may be important for intracellular growth and development. Based on genetic complementation in a surrogate host, our study also suggests that the C. trachomatis serovar L2 LipA homolog may not be functional in vivo. PMID:20870766

  3. Lipoic acid metabolism in Escherichia coli: the lplA and lipB genes define redundant pathways for ligation of lipoyl groups to apoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Morris, T W; Reed, K E; Cronan, J E

    1995-01-01

    Lipoic acid is a covalently bound disulfide-containing cofactor required for function of the pyruvate dehydrogenase, alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase, and glycine cleavage enzyme complexes of Escherichia coli. Recently we described the isolation of the lplA locus, the first gene known to encode a lipoyl-protein ligase for the attachment of lipoyl groups to lipoate-dependent apoenzymes (T. W. Morris, K. E. Reed, and J. E. Cronan, Jr., J. Biol. Chem. 269:16091-16100, 1994). Here, we report an unexpected redundancy between the functions of lplA and lipB, a gene previously identified as a putative lipoate biosynthetic locus. First, analysis of lplA null mutants revealed the existence of a second lipoyl ligase enzyme. We found that lplA null mutants displayed no growth defects unless combined with lipA (lipoate synthesis) or lipB mutations and that overexpression of wild-type LplA suppressed lipB null mutations. Assays of growth, transport, lipoyl-protein content, and apoprotein modification demonstrated that lplA encoded a ligase for the incorporation of exogenously supplied lipoate, whereas lipB was required for function of the second lipoyl ligase, which utilizes lipoyl groups generated via endogenous (lipA-mediated) biosynthesis. The lipB-dependent ligase was further shown to cause the accumulation of aberrantly modified octanoyl-proteins in lipoate-deficient cells. Lipoate uptake assays of strains that overproduced lipoate-accepting apoproteins also demonstrated coupling between transport and the subsequent ligation of lipoate to apoprotein by the LplA enzyme. Although mutations in two genes (fadD and fadL) involved in fatty acid failed to affect lipoate utilization, disruption of the smp gene severely decreased lipoate utilization. DNA sequencing of the previously identified slr1 selenolipoate resistance mutation (K. E. Reed, T. W. Morris, and J. E. Cronan, Jr., Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 91:3720-3724, 1994) showed this mutation (now called lplA1) to be a G76S

  4. Structure of a Putative Lipoate Protein Ligase from Thermoplasma acidophilum and the Mechanism of Target Selection for Post-Translational Modification

    SciTech Connect

    McManus,E.; Luisi, B.; Perham, R.

    2006-01-01

    Lipoyl-lysine swinging arms are crucial to the reactions catalysed by the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes. A gene encoding a putative lipoate protein ligase (LplA) of Thermoplasma acidophilum was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein, a monomer of molecular mass 29 kDa, was catalytically inactive. Crystal structures in the absence and presence of bound lipoic acid were solved at 2.1 Angstroms resolution. The protein was found to fall into the a/{beta} class and to be structurally homologous to the catalytic domains of class II aminoacyl-tRNA synthases and biotin protein ligase, BirA. Lipoic acid in LplA was bound in the same position as biotin in BirA. The structure of the T. acidophilum LplA and limited proteolysis of E. coli LplA together highlighted some key features of the post-translational modification. A loop comprising residues 71-79 in the T. acidophilumligase is proposed as interacting with the dithiolane ring of lipoic acid and discriminating against the entry of biotin. A second loop comprising residues 179-193 was disordered in the T. acidophilum structure; tryptic cleavage of the corresponding loop in the E. coli LplA under non-denaturing conditions rendered the enzyme catalytically inactive, emphasizing its importance. The putative LplA of T. acidophilum lacks a C-terminal domain found in its counterparts in E. coli (Gram-negative) or Streptococcus pneumoniae (Gram-positive). A gene encoding a protein that appears to have structural homology to the additional domain in the E. coli and S. pneumoniae enzymes was detected alongside the structural gene encoding the putative LplA in the T. acidophilum genome. It is likely that this protein is required to confer activity on the LplA as currently purified, one protein perhaps catalysing the formation of the obligatory lipoyl-AMP intermediate, and the other transferring the lipoyl group from it to the specific lysine residue in the target protein.

  5. The Streptomyces coelicolor lipoate-protein ligase is a circularly permuted version of the Escherichia coli enzyme composed of discrete interacting domains.

    PubMed

    Cao, Xinyun; Cronan, John E

    2015-03-13

    Lipoate-protein ligases are used to scavenge lipoic acid from the environment and attach the coenzyme to its cognate proteins, which are generally the E2 components of the 2-oxoacid dehydrogenases. The enzymes use ATP to activate lipoate to its adenylate, lipoyl-AMP, which remains tightly bound in the active site. This mixed anhydride is attacked by the ϵ-amino group of a specific lysine present on a highly conserved acceptor protein domain, resulting in the amide-linked coenzyme. The Streptomyces coelicolor genome encodes only a single putative lipoate ligase. However, this protein had only low sequence identity (<25%) to the lipoate ligases of demonstrated activity and appears to be a circularly permuted version of the known lipoate ligase proteins in that the canonical C-terminal domain seems to have been transposed to the N terminus. We tested the activity of this protein both by in vivo complementation of an Escherichia coli ligase-deficient strain and by in vitro assays. Moreover, when the domains were rearranged into a protein that mimicked the arrangement found in the canonical lipoate ligases, the enzyme retained complementation activity. Finally, when the two domains were separated into two proteins, both domain-containing proteins were required for complementation and catalysis of the overall ligase reaction in vitro. However, only the large domain-containing protein was required for transfer of lipoate from the lipoyl-AMP intermediate to the acceptor proteins, whereas both domain-containing proteins were required to form lipoyl-AMP.

  6. Yeast display evolution of a kinetically efficient 13-amino acid substrate for lipoic acid ligase

    PubMed Central

    Puthenveetil, Sujiet; Liu, Daniel S.; White, Katharine A.; Thompson, Samuel; Ting, Alice Y.

    2009-01-01

    E. coli lipoic acid ligase (LplA) catalyzes ATP-dependent covalent ligation of lipoic acid onto specific lysine sidechains of three acceptor proteins involved in oxidative metabolism. Our lab has shown that LplA and engineered mutants can ligate useful small-molecule probes such as alkyl azides (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487) and photocrosslinkers (Angew. Chem Int. Ed Engl. 2008, 47, 7018–7021) in place of lipoic acid, facilitating imaging and proteomic studies. Both to further our understanding of lipoic acid metabolism, and to improve LplA’s utility as a biotechnological platform, we have engineered a novel 13-amino acid peptide substrate for LplA. LplA’s natural protein substrates have a conserved β-hairpin structure, a conformation that is difficult to recapitulate in a peptide, and thus we performed in vitro evolution to engineer the LplA peptide substrate, called “LplA Acceptor Peptide” (LAP). A ~107 library of LAP variants was displayed on the surface of yeast cells, labeled by LplA with either lipoic acid or bromoalkanoic acid, and the most efficiently labeled LAP clones were isolated by fluorescence activated cell sorting. Four rounds of evolution followed by additional rational mutagenesis produced a “LAP2” sequence with a kcat/Km of 0.99 μM−1min−1, >70-fold better than our previous rationally-designed 22-amino acid LAP1 sequence (Nat. Biotechnol. 2007, 25, 1483–1487), and only 8-fold worse than the kcat/Km values of natural lipoate and biotin acceptor proteins. The kinetic improvement over LAP1 allowed us to rapidly label cell surface peptide-fused receptors with quantum dots. PMID:19863063

  7. REL3.0 LPLA Monthly NC

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-05

    ... Forcing Surface Skin Temperature Column Precipitable Water Total Cloud Amount Order Data:  Earthdata Search:  ... ISCCP Data Table SSE Renewable Energy Readme Files:  Readme_3.0_lpla_monthly_nc ...

  8. Lipoate ester multifunctional lubricant additives

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Seven lipoate esters were synthesized by esterification of lipoic acid with different structures of alcohols in the presence of a solid acid catalyst and without solvent. The esters were obtained in good yield, characterized using 1H NMR and GPC; and their physical properties investigated. Four of t...

  9. REL3.0 LPLA DAILY NC

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-10-05

    ... 3.0 Langley Parameterized Longwave Model daily Data in 1x1 Degree NetCDF Format News:  LPLA Project ... Temporal Resolution:  3-hourly averaged by day File Format:  NETCDF Tools:  Search and ...

  10. Lipoate-based imprinted self-assembled molecular thin films for biosensor applications.

    PubMed

    Tappura, Kirsi; Vikholm-Lundin, Inger; Albers, Willem M

    2007-01-15

    Lipoate derivatives were used for the formation of imprinted self-assembled molecular thin films for the recognition of morphine. A large collection of lipoate derivatives was screened by molecular dynamics simulations in various solvents. A set of ligands showing favourable interactions with morphine in aqueous environment was selected for synthesis. Morphine-imprinted layers were then produced on gold substrates in mixed monolayers with morphine added as the template. The binding of ligands and morphine to gold, as well as the association/dissociation of morphine to the formed layers were studied with Surface Plasmon Resonance. Imprinted factors were highly variable and were dependent on ligand/morphine mixing ratio, lipoate derivative and monolayer preparation method. The imprinted factors were as high as 100 and 600 for one of the ligands. The results show that the simulations are able to provide correct information of the relative strengths of the molecular interactions between the ligand and morphine molecules in different solutions. The liquid phase simulations are, however, not able to predict the imprinted factors (i.e. distinguish between specific and non-specific binding), because the specificity is not formed before self-assembly on the surface.

  11. DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S

    2001-05-01

    DNA ligases catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds between juxtaposed 5' phosphate and a 3'-hydroxyl terminus in duplex DNA. This activity can repair single-stranded nicks in duplex DNA and join duplex DNA restriction fragments having either blunt ends or homologous cohesive ends. Two ligases are used for nucleic acid research and their reaction conditions and applications are described in this unit: E. coli ligase and T4 ligase. These enzymes differ in two important properties. One is the source of energy: T4 ligase uses ATP, while E. coli ligase uses NAD. Another important difference is their ability to ligate blunt ends; under normal reaction conditions, only T4 DNA ligase will ligate blunt ends.

  12. Selective cytotoxicity and combined effects of camptothecin or paclitaxel with sodium-R-alpha lipoate on A549 human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Sherif; Gao, Dayuan; Sinko, Patrick J

    2014-01-01

    Nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer and remains the deadliest form of cancer in the United States and worldwide. New therapies are highly sought after to improve outcome. The effect of sodium-R-alpha lipoate on camptothecin- and paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity was evaluated on A549 NSCLC and BEAS-2B "normal" lung epithelial cells. Combination indices (CI) and dose reduction indices (DRI) were investigated by studying the cytotoxicity of sodium-R-alpha lipoate (0-16 mM), camptothecin (0-25 nM) and paclitaxel (0-0.06 nM) alone and in combination. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-Yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium-bromide (MTT) was used to assess cytotoxicity. The combinational cytotoxic effects of sodium-R-alpha lipoate with camptothecin or paclitaxel were analyzed using a simulation of dose effects (CompuSyn® 3.01). The effects of sodium-R-alpha lipoate on camptothecin- and paclitaxel-induced cytotoxicity varied based on concentrations and treatment times. It was found that sodium-R-alpha lipoate wasn't cytotoxic toward BEAS-2B cells at any of the concentrations tested. For A549 cells, CIs [(additive (CI = 1); synergistic (CI < 1); antagonistic (CI < 1)] were lower and DRIs were higher for the camptothecin/sodium-R-alpha-lipoate combination (CI = ∼0.17-1.5; DRI = ∼2.2-22.6) than the paclitaxel/sodium-R-alpha-lipoate combination (CI = ∼0.8-9.9; DRI = ∼0.10-5.8) suggesting that the camptothecin regimen was synergistic and that the addition of sodium-R-alpha lipoate was important for reducing the camptothecin dose and potential for adverse effects.

  13. Studies on the sulfation of cellulose α-lipoate and ability of the sulfated product to stabilize colloidal suspensions of gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Sarbova, Velina; Koschella, Andreas; Cheng, Fei; Kelly, Stephen M; Heinze, Thomas

    2015-06-25

    A versatile method for the synthesis of cellulose α-lipoate with a low degree of substitution (DS) has been developed using N,N-dimethylacetamide (DMA)/LiCl as a solvent and N,N'-carbonyldiimidazole (CDI) as an esterification reagent. The cellulose α-lipoate with DS of α-lipoate groups of 0.26 was converted with sulfur trioxide-pyridine complex in dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as solvent. The sulfation is accompanied by an unexpected partial oxidation of the disulfide moiety leading to the formation of the corresponding stereoisomers of S-oxides. The resulting mixture of water-soluble cellulose α- and β-lipoate sulfate possesses a DS of sulfuric acid half ester groups of 1.78. This cellulose-α/β-lipoate sulfate derivative can be used as an effective stabilizer and solubilizer for the formation of colloidal suspensions of gold nanoparticles formed in situ in aqueous solution. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Multisite clickable modification of proteins using lipoic acid ligase.

    PubMed

    Plaks, Joseph G; Falatach, Rebecca; Kastantin, Mark; Berberich, Jason A; Kaar, Joel L

    2015-06-17

    Approaches that allow bioorthogonal and, in turn, site-specific chemical modification of proteins present considerable opportunities for modulating protein activity and stability. However, the development of such approaches that enable site-selective modification of proteins at multiple positions, including internal sites within a protein, has remained elusive. To overcome this void, we have developed an enzymatic approach for multisite clickable modification based on the incorporation of azide moieties in proteins using lipoic acid ligase (LplA). The ligation of azide moieties to the model protein, green fluorescent protein (GFP), at the N-terminus and two internal sites using lipoic acid ligase was shown to proceed efficiently with near-complete conversion. Modification of the ligated azide groups with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), α-d-mannopyranoside, and palmitic acid resulted in highly homogeneous populations of protein-polymer, protein-sugar, and protein-fatty acid conjugates. The homogeneity of the conjugates was confirmed by mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) and SDS-PAGE electrophoresis. In the case of PEG attachment, which involved the use of strain-promoted azide-alkyne click chemistry, the conjugation reaction resulted in highly homogeneous PEG-GFP conjugates in less than 30 min. As further demonstration of the utility of this approach, ligated GFP was also covalently immobilized on alkyne-terminated self-assembled monolayers. These results underscore the potential of this approach for, among other applications, site-specific multipoint protein PEGylation, glycosylation, fatty acid modification, and protein immobilization.

  15. Novel lipoate-selective membrane sensor for the flow injection determination of alpha-lipoic acid in pharmaceutical preparations and urine.

    PubMed

    Abbas, M N; Radwan, A A

    2008-02-15

    A potentiometric lipoate-selective sensor based on mercuric lipoate ion-pair as a membrane carrier is reported. The electrode was prepared by coating the membrane solution containing PVC, plasticizer, and carrier on the surface of graphite electrode. Influences of the membrane composition, pH, and possible interfering anions were investigated on the response properties of the electrode. The sensor exhibits significantly enhanced response toward lipoate ions over the concentration range 1 x 10(-7) molL(-1) to 1 x 10(-2) molL(-1) with a lower detection limit of (LDL) of 9 x 10(-8) molL(-1) and a slope of -29.4 m V decade(-1), with S.D. of the slope is 0.214 mV. Fast and stable response, good reproducibility, long-term stability, applicability over a pH range of 8.0-9.5 is demonstrated. The sensor has a response time of lipoate from several inorganic and organic anions. The CGE was used in flow injection potentiometry (FIP) and resulted in well defined peaks for lipoate ions with stable baseline, excellent reproducibility and reasonable sampling rate of 30 injections per hour. The proposed sensor has been applied for the direct and FI potentiometric determination of LA in pharmaceutical preparations and urine; and has been also utilized as an indicator electrode for the potentiometric titration of LA.

  16. The effect of the uremic toxin cyanate (CNO⁻) on anaerobic cysteine metabolism and oxidative processes in the rat liver: a protective effect of lipoate.

    PubMed

    Sokołowska, Maria; Niedzielska, Ewa; Iciek, Małgorzata; Bilska, Anna; Lorenc-Koci, Elżbieta; Włodek, Lidia

    2011-07-01

    Chronic renal failure (CRF) patients have an increased plasma level of urea, which can be a source of cyanate. This compound can cause protein carbamoylation thereby changing biological activity of proteins. Therefore, in renal failure patients, cyanate can disturb metabolism and functioning of the liver. This work presents studies demonstrating that the treatment of rats with cyanate alone causes the following changes in the liver: (1) inhibition of rhodanese (TST), cystathionase (CST) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfotransferase (MPST) activities, (2) decrease in sulfane sulfur level (S*), (3) lowering of nonprotein sulfhydryl groups (NPSH) group level, and (4) enhancement of prooxidant processes (rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) and malondialdehyde (MDA) level). This indicates that cyanate inhibits anaerobic cysteine metabolism and shows prooxidant action in the liver. Out of the above-mentioned changes, lipoate administered with cyanate jointly was able to correct MDA, ROS and NPSH levels, and TST activity. It had no significant effect on MPST and CST activities. It indicates that lipoate can prevent prooxidant cyanate action and cyanate-induced TST inhibition. These observations can be promising for CRF patients since lipoate can play a dual role in these patients as an efficient antioxidant defense and a protection against cyanate and cyanide toxicity.

  17. DNA ligase I, the replicative DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howes, Timothy R L; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2012-01-01

    Multiple DNA ligation events are required to join the Okazaki fragments generated during lagging strand DNA synthesis. In eukaryotes, this is primarily carried out by members of the DNA ligase I family. The C-terminal catalytic region of these enzymes is composed of three domains: a DNA binding domain, an adenylation domain and an OB-fold domain. In the absence of DNA, these domains adopt an extended structure but transition into a compact ring structure when they engage a DNA nick, with each of the domains contacting the DNA. The non-catalytic N-terminal region of eukaryotic DNA ligase I is responsible for the specific participation of these enzymes in DNA replication. This proline-rich unstructured region contains the nuclear localization signal and a PCNA interaction motif that is critical for localization to replication foci and efficient joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I initially engages the PCNA trimer via this interaction motif which is located at the extreme N-terminus of this flexible region. It is likely that this facilitates an additional interaction between the DNA binding domain and the PCNA ring. The similar size and shape of the rings formed by the PCNA trimer and the DNA ligase I catalytic region when it engages a DNA nick suggest that these proteins interact to form a double-ring structure during the joining of Okazaki fragments. DNA ligase I also interacts with replication factor C, the factor that loads the PCNA trimeric ring onto DNA. This interaction, which is regulated by phosphorylation of the non-catalytic N-terminus of DNA ligase I, also appears to be critical for DNA replication.

  18. Types of Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Morreale, Francesca Ester; Walden, Helen

    2016-03-24

    Ubiquitination is a post-translational modification of proteins involved in a variety of cellular processes. Ubiquitination requires the sequential action of three enzymes: E1 (ubiquitin-activating enzymes), E2 (ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes), and E3 (ubiquitin ligases). This SnapShot highlights the main types of E3 ubiquitin ligases, which can be classified in three families depending on the presence of characteristic domains and on the mechanism of ubiquitin transfer to the substrate protein.

  19. Prokaryotic DNA ligases unwind superhelical DNA.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, M; van Holde, K; Zlatanova, J

    1996-09-13

    We have studied the effect on DNA topology of binding of prokaryotic DNA ligases (T4 and E. coli) to superhelical or nicked circular DNA. Performing topoisomerase I-mediated relaxation in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase led to a shift in the topoisomer distribution to increasingly more negative values. This result suggested that T4 ligase unwound the DNA and was further substantiated by ligation of nicked circular molecules by E. coli DNA ligase in the presence of increasing amounts of T4 ligase. Such an experiment was possible since the two DNA ligases require different cofactors for enzymatic activity. Performing a similar experiment with reverse partners, using E. coli DNA ligase as ligand, and T4 ligase as sealing agent, we observed that the E. coli enzyme also unwound the DNA. Thus, prokaryotic DNA ligases can be added to an ever-growing list of DNA-binding proteins that unwind the DNA upon binding.

  20. SCF ubiquitin ligase targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagan, Julia K.; Pagano, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Summary The recent clinical successes of inhibitors of the proteasome for the treatment of cancer have highlighted the therapeutic potential of this protein degradation system. Proteasome inhibitors prevent the degradation of numerous proteins, so increased specificity could be achieved by inhibiting the components of the ubiquitin-proteasome system that target specific subsets of proteins for degradation. F-box proteins are the substrate-targeting subunits of SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complexes. Through the degradation of a plethora of diverse substrates, SCF ubiquitin ligases control a large number of processes at the cellular and organismal levels, and their misregulation is implicated in many pathologies. SCF ligases are characterized by a high specificity for their substrates, so they represent promising drug targets. However, the potential for therapeutic manipulation of SCF complexes remains an underdeveloped area. This review will explore and discuss potential strategies to target SCF-mediated biology to treat human diseases. PMID:25394868

  1. DNA ligases as therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Howes, Timothy R.L.; Wiest, Nathaniel E.

    2013-01-01

    During DNA replication, DNA joining events link Okazaki fragments on the lagging strand. In addition, they are required to repair DNA single- and double-strand breaks and to complete repair events initiated by the excision of mismatched and damaged bases. In human cells, there are three genes encoding DNA ligases. These enzymes are ATP-dependent and contain a conserved catalytic region. Biophysical studies have shown that the catalytic region contains three domains that, in the absence of DNA, are in an extended conformation. When the catalytic region engages a DNA nick, it adopts a compact, ring structure around the DNA nick with each of the three domains contacting the DNA. Protein-protein interactions involving the regions flanking the conserved catalytic regions of human DNA ligases play a major role in directing these enzymes to participate in specific DNA transactions. Among the human LIG genes, the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different N- and C-termini. One of these polypeptides is targeted to mitochondria where it plays an essential role in the maintenance of the mitochondrial genome. In the nucleus, DNA ligases I, III and IV have distinct but overlapping functions in DNA replication and repair. Small molecule inhibitors of human DNA ligases have been identified using structure-based approaches. As expected, these inhibitors are cytotoxic and also potentiate the cytotoxicity of DNA damaging agents. The results of preclinical studies with human cancer cell lines and mouse models of human cancer suggest that DNA ligase inhibitors may have utility as anti-cancer agents. PMID:24224145

  2. Cullin RING Ligases: Glommed by Glomulin

    PubMed Central

    Hristova, Ventzislava A.; Stringer, Daniel K.; Weissman, Allan M.

    2012-01-01

    Cullin ring ligases (CRLs) constitute the largest group of RING finger ubiquitin ligases. Two recent studies in Molecular Cell describe glomulin as a CRL1 inhibitor that blocks interactions with its ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) (Duda et al., 2012; Tron et al., 2012). These findings and their significance are discussed. PMID:22883621

  3. DNA looping by a ligase under nanoconfinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidarpour-Roushan, Maedeh; Riehn, Robert

    2013-03-01

    DNA looping is essential for the function and maintenance of genetic information. We have investigated the kinetic evolution of DNA loops (48500 bp) induced by T4 ligase inside a nanofabricated channel system with a channel cross-section of 100x100 nm2, and a few hundred microns channel length. We found that addition of the ligase profoundly alters the behavior of DNA. In particular, ligase acts to stabilize hairpin geometries in which the extended forward and backward arms of the hairpin scan past each other. From the linear density of DNA inside the channel, we deduce that the effective excluded volume vanishes upon addition of T4 ligase and ATP. We conclude that the two strands are effectively stapled together through a large number of weak bonds involving T4 ligase.

  4. Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Conference - targeting E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Jennifer A

    2010-10-01

    The Ubiquitin Drug Discovery and Diagnostics Conference, held in Philadelphia, included topics covering the role of E3 ligases in disease. This conference report highlights selected presentations on E3-E2 ligase interactions, the SCF cyclin F ubiquitin ligase complex, and targeting HectH9 and KF-1 E3 ligases. Pharmaceutical research discussed includes E3 programs from Progenra and efforts to modulate the Parkin ligase at Elan Pharmaceuticals.

  5. Ubiquitin Ligases: Structure, Function, and Regulation.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ning; Shabek, Nitzan

    2017-06-20

    Ubiquitin E3 ligases control every aspect of eukaryotic biology by promoting protein ubiquitination and degradation. At the end of a three-enzyme cascade, ubiquitin ligases mediate the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to specific substrate proteins. Early investigations of E3s of the RING (really interesting new gene) and HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) types shed light on their enzymatic activities, general architectures, and substrate degron-binding modes. Recent studies have provided deeper mechanistic insights into their catalysis, activation, and regulation. In this review, we summarize the current progress in structure-function studies of ubiquitin ligases as well as exciting new discoveries of novel classes of E3s and diverse substrate recognition mechanisms. Our increased understanding of ubiquitin ligase function and regulation has provided the rationale for developing E3-targeting therapeutics for the treatment of human diseases.

  6. DNA and RNA ligases: structural variations and shared mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Pascal, John M

    2008-02-01

    DNA and RNA ligases join 3' OH and 5' PO4 ends in polynucleotide substrates using a three-step reaction mechanism that involves covalent modification of both the ligase enzyme and the polynucleotide substrate with AMP. In the past three years, several polynucleotide ligases have been crystallized in complex with nucleic acid, providing the introductory views of ligase enzymes engaging their substrates. Crystal structures for two ATP-dependent DNA ligases, an NAD+-dependent DNA ligase, and an ATP-dependent RNA ligase demonstrate how ligases utilize the AMP group and their multi-domain architectures to manipulate nucleic acid structure and catalyze the end-joining reaction. Together with unliganded crystal structures of DNA and RNA ligases, a more comprehensive and dynamic understanding of the multi-step ligation reaction mechanism has emerged.

  7. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sachin; McKinnon, Peter J

    2011-07-15

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease.

  8. Disconnecting XRCC1 and DNA ligase III

    PubMed Central

    Katyal, Sachin

    2011-01-01

    DNA strand break repair is essential for the prevention of multiple human diseases, particularly those which feature neuropathology. To further understand the pathogenesis of these syndromes, we recently developed animal models in which the DNA single-strand break repair (SSBR) components, XRCC1 and DNA Ligase III (LIG3), were inactivated in the developing nervous system. Although biochemical evidence suggests that inactivation of XRCC1 and LIG3 should share common biological defects, we found profound phenotypic differences between these two models, implying distinct biological roles for XRCC1 and LIG3 during DNA repair. Rather than a key role in nuclear DNA repair, we found LIG3 function was central to mitochondrial DNA maintenance. Instead, our data indicate that DNA Ligase 1 is the main DNA ligase for XRCC1-mediated DNA repair. These studies refine our understanding of DNA SSBR and the etiology of neurological disease. PMID:21636980

  9. Engineered DNA ligases with improved activities in vitro.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Robert H; Morton, Susan K; Deiderick, Heather; Gerth, Monica L; Paul, Hayden A; Gerber, Ilana; Patel, Ankita; Ellington, Andrew D; Hunicke-Smith, Scott P; Patrick, Wayne M

    2013-07-01

    The DNA ligase from bacteriophage T4 is one of the most widely used enzymes in molecular biology. It has evolved to seal single-stranded nicks in double-stranded DNA, but not to join double-stranded fragments with cohesive or blunt ends. Its poor activity in vitro, particularly with blunt-ended substrates, can lead to failed or sub-optimal experimental outcomes. We have fused T4 DNA ligase to seven different DNA-binding proteins, including eukaryotic transcription factors, bacterial DNA repair proteins and archaeal DNA-binding domains. Representatives from each of these classes improved the activity of T4 DNA ligase, by up to 7-fold, in agarose gel-based screens for cohesive- and blunt-ended fragment joining. Overall, the most active variants were p50-ligase (i.e. NF-κB p50 fused to T4 DNA ligase) and ligase-cTF (T4 DNA ligase fused to an artificial, chimeric transcription factor). Ligase-cTF out-performed T4 DNA ligase by ∼160% in blunt end 'vector + insert' cloning assays, and p50-ligase showed an improvement of a similar magnitude when it was used to construct a library for Illumina sequencing. The activity of the Escherichia coli DNA ligase was also enhanced by fusion to p50. Together, these results suggest that our protein design strategy is a generalizable one for engineering improved DNA ligases.

  10. Identification of a novel motif in DNA ligases exemplified by DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, Caterina; Walker, Sarah A; Odreman, Federico; Vindigni, Alessandro; Doherty, Aidan J; Jeggo, Penny

    2006-07-13

    DNA ligase IV is an essential protein that functions in DNA non-homologous end-joining, the major mechanism that rejoins DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. LIG4 syndrome represents a human disorder caused by mutations in DNA ligase IV that lead to impaired but not ablated activity. Thus far, five conserved motifs in DNA ligases have been identified. We previously reported G469E as a mutational change in a LIG4 syndrome patient. G469 does not lie in any of the previously reported motifs. A sequence comparison between DNA ligases led us to identify residues 468-476 of DNA ligase IV as a further conserved motif, designated motif Va, present in eukaryotic DNA ligases. We carried out mutational analysis of residues within motif Va examining the impact on adenylation, double-stranded ligation, and DNA binding. We interpret our results using the DNA ligase I:DNA crystal structure. Substitution of the glycine at position 468 with an alanine or glutamic acid severely compromises protein activity and stability. Substitution of G469 with an alanine or glutamic acid is better tolerated but still impacts upon activity and protein stability. These finding suggest that G468 and G469 are important for protein stability and provide insight into the hypomorphic nature of the G469E mutation identified in a LIG4 syndrome patient. In contrast, residues 470, 473 and 476 within motif Va can be changed to alanine residues without any impact on DNA binding or adenylation activity. Importantly, however, such mutational changes do impact upon double-stranded ligation activity. Considered in light of the DNA ligase I:DNA crystal structure, our findings suggest that residues 470-476 function as part of a molecular pincer that maintains the DNA in a conformation that is required for ligation.

  11. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-08-21

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246-401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95-G96 and containing 5'-phosphomonoester and 3'-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively.

  12. Partial suppression of bacteriophage T4 ligase mutations by T4 endonuclease II deficiency: role of host ligase.

    PubMed

    Warner, H R

    1971-04-01

    Endonuclease II-deficient, ligase-deficient double mutants of phage T4 induce considerably more deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) synthesis after infection of Escherichia coli B than does the ligase-deficient single mutant. Furthermore, the double mutant can replicate 10 to 15% as well as wild-type T4, whereas the single mutant fails to replicate. When the E. coli host is also deficient in ligase, the double mutant resembles the single mutant. The results indicate that host ligase can substitute for phage ligase when the host DNA is not attacked by the phage-induced endonuclease II.

  13. Ubiquitin ligases and cell cycle control.

    PubMed

    Teixeira, Leonardo K; Reed, Steven I

    2013-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in the sequence of events leading to cell division known as the cell cycle. Not only does ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis constitute a critical component of the core oscillator that drives the cell cycle in all eukaryotes, it is also central to the mechanisms that ensure that the integrity of the genome is maintained. These functions are primarily carried out by two families of E3 ubiquitin ligases, the Skp/cullin/F-box-containing and anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome complexes. However, beyond those functions associated with regulation of central cell cycle events, many peripheral cell cycle-related processes rely on ubiquitylation for signaling, homeostasis, and dynamicity, involving additional types of ubiquitin ligases and regulators. We are only beginning to understand the diversity and complexity of this regulation.

  14. Protein Neddylation: Beyond Cullin-RING Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Enchev, Radoslav I.; Schulman, Brenda A.; Peter, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    NEDD8 is a ubiquitin-like protein that activates the largest ubiquitin E3 ligase family, the cullin RING ligases. Many non-cullin neddylation targets have been proposed in recent years. However, overexpression of exogenous NEDD8 can trigger NEDD8 conjugation through the ubiquitylation machinery, which makes validating potential NEDD8 targets challenging. Here we re-evaluate these studies in light of the current understanding of the neddylation pathway, and suggest criteria for the identification of genuine neddylation substrates under homeostatic conditions. We describe the biological processes that might be regulated by non-cullin neddylation, and the utility of neddylation inhibitors for research and as potential therapies. Understanding the biological significance of non-cullin neddylation is an exciting research prospect primed to reveal fundamental insights. PMID:25531226

  15. DNA ligase IV syndrome; a review.

    PubMed

    Altmann, Thomas; Gennery, Andrew R

    2016-10-07

    DNA ligase IV deficiency is a rare primary immunodeficiency, LIG4 syndrome, often associated with other systemic features. DNA ligase IV is part of the non-homologous end joining mechanism, required to repair DNA double stranded breaks. Ubiquitously expressed, it is required to prevent mutagenesis and apoptosis, which can result from DNA double strand breakage caused by intracellular events such as DNA replication and meiosis or extracellular events including damage by reactive oxygen species and ionising radiation.Within developing lymphocytes, DNA ligase IV is required to repair programmed DNA double stranded breaks induced during lymphocyte receptor development.Patients with hypomorphic mutations in LIG4 present with a range of phenotypes, from normal to severe combined immunodeficiency. All, however, manifest sensitivity to ionising radiation. Commonly associated features include primordial growth failure with severe microcephaly and a spectrum of learning difficulties, marrow hypoplasia and a predisposition to lymphoid malignancy. Diagnostic investigations include immunophenotyping, and testing for radiosensitivity. Some patients present with microcephaly as a predominant feature, but seemingly normal immunity. Treatment is mainly supportive, although haematopoietic stem cell transplantation has been used in a few cases.

  16. Viroid RNA redirects host DNA ligase 1 to act as an RNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Nohales, María-Ángeles; Flores, Ricardo; Daròs, José-Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Viroids are a unique class of noncoding RNAs: composed of only a circular, single-stranded molecule of 246–401 nt, they manage to replicate, move, circumvent host defenses, and frequently induce disease in higher plants. Viroids replicate through an RNA-to-RNA rolling-circle mechanism consisting of transcription of oligomeric viroid RNA intermediates, cleavage to unit-length strands, and circularization. Though the host RNA polymerase II (redirected to accept RNA templates) mediates RNA synthesis and a type-III RNase presumably cleavage of Potato spindle tuber viroid (PSTVd) and closely related members of the family Pospiviroidae, the host enzyme catalyzing the final circularization step, has remained elusive. In this study we propose that PSTVd subverts host DNA ligase 1, converting it to an RNA ligase, for the final step. To support this hypothesis, we show that the tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L.) DNA ligase 1 specifically and efficiently catalyzes circularization of the genuine PSTVd monomeric linear replication intermediate opened at position G95–G96 and containing 5′-phosphomonoester and 3′-hydroxyl terminal groups. Moreover, we also show a decreased PSTVd accumulation and a reduced ratio of monomeric circular to total monomeric PSTVd forms in Nicotiana benthamiana Domin plants in which the endogenous DNA ligase 1 was silenced. Thus, in a remarkable example of parasitic strategy, viroids reprogram for their replication the template and substrate specificity of a DNA-dependent RNA polymerase and a DNA ligase to act as RNA-dependent RNA polymerase and RNA ligase, respectively. PMID:22869737

  17. Identification and characterization of novel ligase I inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Monica; Kumar, Sujeet; Goldsmith, Gunaseelan; Srivastava, Mrinal; Elango, Santhini; Shameem, Mohammad; Bannerjee, Dibyendu; Choudhary, Bibha; Karki, Subhas S; Raghavan, Sathees C

    2017-02-01

    The terminal step of ligation of single and/or double-strand breaks during physiological processes such as DNA replication, repair and recombination requires participation of DNA ligases in all mammals. DNA Ligase I has been well characterised to play vital roles during these processes. Considering the indispensable role of DNA Ligase I, a therapeutic strategy to impede proliferation of cancer cells is by using specific small molecule inhibitors against it. In the present study, we have designed and chemically synthesised putative DNA Ligase I inhibitors. Based on various biochemical and biophysical screening approaches, we identify two prospective DNA Ligase I inhibitors, SCR17 and SCR21. Both the inhibitors blocked ligation of nicks on DNA in a concentration-dependent manner, when catalysed by cell-free extracts or purified Ligase I. Docking studies in conjunction with biolayer interferometry and gel shift assays revealed that both SCR17 and SCR21 can bind to Ligase I, particularly to the DNA Binding Domain of Ligase I with KD values in nanomolar range. The inhibitors did not show significant affinity towards DNA Ligase III and DNA Ligase IV. Further, addition of Ligase I could restore the joining, when the inhibitors were treated with testicular cell-free extracts. Ex vivo studies using multiple assays showed that even though cell death was limited in the presence of inhibitors in cancer cells, their proliferation was compromised. Hence, we identify two promising DNA Ligase I inhibitors, which can be used in biochemical and cellular assays, and could be further modified and optimised to target cancer cells. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Reinvestigation of DNA ligase I in axolotl and Pleurodeles development.

    PubMed Central

    Aoufouchi, S; Hardy, S; Prigent, C; Philippe, M; Thiebaud, P

    1991-01-01

    We have recently shown that the exclusion process causing the replacement of DNA ligases II by DNA ligase I in amphibian eggs after fertilization does not occur in the case of Xenopus laevis [Hardy, S., Aoufouchi, S., Thiebaud, P., and Prigent, C., (1991) Nucleic Acids Res. 19, 701-705]. Since this result is in contradiction with the situation reported in axolotl and Pleurodeles we decided to reinvestigate such results in both species. Three different approaches have been used: (1) the substrate specificity of DNA ligase I; (2) the DNA ligase-AMP adduct reaction and (3) the immunological detection using antibodies raised against the X.laevis DNA ligase I. Our results clearly demonstrate that DNA ligase I activity is associated with a single polypeptide which is present in oocyte, unfertilized egg and embryo of both amphibians. Therefore, the hypothesis of a change in DNA ligase forms, resulting from an expression of the DNA ligase I gene in axolotl and Pleurodeles early development must be rejected. We also show that, in contradiction with published data, the unfertilized sea urchin egg contains a DNA ligase activity able to join blunt ended DNA molecules. Images PMID:1886765

  19. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology

    PubMed Central

    Chambers, Cecilia R.; Patrick, Wayne M.

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area. PMID:26494982

  20. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization.

    PubMed

    Francis, Dailia B; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-09-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620-800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Archaeal Nucleic Acid Ligases and Their Potential in Biotechnology.

    PubMed

    Chambers, Cecilia R; Patrick, Wayne M

    2015-01-01

    With their ability to catalyse the formation of phosphodiester linkages, DNA ligases and RNA ligases are essential tools for many protocols in molecular biology and biotechnology. Currently, the nucleic acid ligases from bacteriophage T4 are used extensively in these protocols. In this review, we argue that the nucleic acid ligases from Archaea represent a largely untapped pool of enzymes with diverse and potentially favourable properties for new and emerging biotechnological applications. We summarise the current state of knowledge on archaeal DNA and RNA ligases, which makes apparent the relative scarcity of information on in vitro activities that are of most relevance to biotechnologists (such as the ability to join blunt- or cohesive-ended, double-stranded DNA fragments). We highlight the existing biotechnological applications of archaeal DNA ligases and RNA ligases. Finally, we draw attention to recent experiments in which protein engineering was used to modify the activities of the DNA ligase from Pyrococcus furiosus and the RNA ligase from Methanothermobacter thermautotrophicus, thus demonstrating the potential for further work in this area.

  2. DNA Ligase IV regulates XRCC4 nuclear localization

    PubMed Central

    Francis, Dailia B.; Kozlov, Mikhail; Chavez, Jose; Chu, Jennifer; Malu, Shruti; Hanna, Mary; Cortes, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    DNA Ligase IV, along with its interacting partner XRCC4, are essential for repairing DNA double strand breaks by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). Together, they complete the final ligation step resolving the DNA break. Ligase IV is regulated by XRCC4 and XLF. However, the mechanism(s) by which Ligase IV control the NHEJ reaction and other NHEJ factor(s) remains poorly characterized. Here, we show that a C-terminal region of Ligase IV (aa 620 to 800), which encompasses a NLS, the BRCT I, and the XRCC4 interacting region (XIR), is essential for nuclear localization of its co-factor XRCC4. In Ligase IV deficient cells, XRCC4 showed deregulated localization remaining in the cytosol even after induction of DNA double strand breaks. DNA Ligase IV was also required for efficient localization of XLF into the nucleus. Additionally, human fibroblasts that harbor hypomorphic mutations within the Ligase IV gene displayed decreased levels of XRCC4 protein, implicating that DNA Ligase IV is also regulating XRCC4 stability. Our results provide evidence for a role of DNA Ligase IV in controlling the cellular localization and protein levels of XRCC4. PMID:24984242

  3. Cellular DNA ligase I is recruited to cytoplasmic vaccinia virus factories and masks the role of the vaccinia ligase in viral DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Paran, Nir; De Silva, Frank S; Senkevich, Tatiana G; Moss, Bernard

    2009-12-17

    Vaccinia virus (VACV) encodes DNA polymerase and additional proteins that enable cytoplasmic replication. We confirmed the ability of VACV DNA ligase mutants to replicate and tested the hypothesis that cellular ligases compensate for loss of viral gene expression. RNA silencing of human DNA ligase I expression and a small molecule inhibitor of human DNA ligase I [corrected] severely reduced replication of viral DNA in cells infected with VACV ligase-deficient mutants, indicating that the cellular enzyme plays a complementary role. Replication of ligase-deficient VACV was greatly reduced and delayed in resting primary cells, correlating with initial low levels of ligase I and subsequent viral induction and localization of ligase I in virus factories. These studies indicate that DNA ligation is essential for poxvirus replication and explain the ability of ligase deletion mutants to replicate in dividing cells but exhibit decreased pathogenicity in mice. Encoding its own ligase might allow VACV to "jump-start" DNA synthesis.

  4. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases

    PubMed Central

    Riley, B.E.; Lougheed, J.C.; Callaway, K.; Velasquez, M.; Brecht, E.; Nguyen, L.; Shaler, T.; Walker, D.; Yang, Y.; Regnstrom, K.; Diep, L.; Zhang, Z.; Chiou, S.; Bova, M.; Artis, D.R.; Yao, N.; Baker, J.; Yednock, T.; Johnston, J.A.

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson’s disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed ‘RING/HECT hybrid’ enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin’s cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein. PMID:23770887

  5. Structure and function of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase reveals aspects of RING and HECT ligases.

    PubMed

    Riley, B E; Lougheed, J C; Callaway, K; Velasquez, M; Brecht, E; Nguyen, L; Shaler, T; Walker, D; Yang, Y; Regnstrom, K; Diep, L; Zhang, Z; Chiou, S; Bova, M; Artis, D R; Yao, N; Baker, J; Yednock, T; Johnston, J A

    2013-01-01

    Parkin is a RING-between-RING E3 ligase that functions in the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to specific substrates, and mutations in Parkin are linked to Parkinson's disease, cancer and mycobacterial infection. The RING-between-RING family of E3 ligases are suggested to function with a canonical RING domain and a catalytic cysteine residue usually restricted to HECT E3 ligases, thus termed 'RING/HECT hybrid' enzymes. Here we present the 1.58 Å structure of Parkin-R0RBR, revealing the fold architecture for the four RING domains, and several unpredicted interfaces. Examination of the Parkin active site suggests a catalytic network consisting of C431 and H433. In cells, mutation of C431 eliminates Parkin-catalysed degradation of mitochondria, and capture of an ubiquitin oxyester confirms C431 as Parkin's cellular active site. Our data confirm that Parkin is a RING/HECT hybrid, and provide the first crystal structure of an RING-between-RING E3 ligase at atomic resolution, providing insight into this disease-related protein.

  6. Origin and diversification of TRIM ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Marín, Ignacio

    2012-01-01

    Most proteins of the TRIM family (also known as RBCC family) are ubiquitin ligases that share a peculiar protein structure, characterized by including an N-terminal RING finger domain closely followed by one or two B-boxes. Additional protein domains found at their C termini have been used to classify TRIM proteins into classes. TRIMs are involved in multiple cellular processes and many of them are essential components of the innate immunity system of animal species. In humans, it has been shown that mutations in several TRIM-encoding genes lead to diverse genetic diseases and contribute to several types of cancer. They had been hitherto detected only in animals. In this work, by comprehensively analyzing the available diversity of TRIM and TRIM-like protein sequences and evaluating their evolutionary patterns, an improved classification of the TRIM family is obtained. Members of one of the TRIM subfamilies defined, called Subfamily A, turn to be present not only in animals, but also in many other eukaryotes, such as fungi, apusozoans, alveolates, excavates and plants. The rest of subfamilies are animal-specific and several of them originated only recently. Subfamily A proteins are characterized by containing a MATH domain, suggesting a potential evolutionary connection between TRIM proteins and a different type of ubiquitin ligases, known as TRAFs, which contain quite similar MATH domains. These results indicate that the TRIM family emerged much earlier than so far thought and contribute to our understanding of its origin and diversification. The structural and evolutionary links with the TRAF family of ubiquitin ligases can be experimentally explored to determine whether functional connections also exist.

  7. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Barbara C; de Wilt, Leonie HAM; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2013-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. Therefore, E3 ubiquitin ligases play an essential role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. E3 ubiquitin ligases are often found overexpressed in human cancers, including lung cancer, and their deregulation has been shown to contribute to cancer development. However, the lack of specific inhibitors in clinical trials is a major issue in targeting E3 ubiquitin ligases with currently only one E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor being tested in the clinical setting. In this review, we focus on E3 ubiquitin ligases that have been found deregulated in lung cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the processes in which they are involved and evaluate them as potential anti-cancer targets. By better understanding the mechanisms by which E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate biological processes and their exact role in carcinogenesis, we can improve the development of specific E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors and pave the way for novel treatment strategies for cancer patients. PMID:23936758

  8. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Snoek, Barbara C; de Wilt, Leonie Ham; Jansen, Gerrit; Peters, Godefridus J

    2013-08-10

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. Therefore, E3 ubiquitin ligases play an essential role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, proliferation and apoptosis. E3 ubiquitin ligases are often found overexpressed in human cancers, including lung cancer, and their deregulation has been shown to contribute to cancer development. However, the lack of specific inhibitors in clinical trials is a major issue in targeting E3 ubiquitin ligases with currently only one E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitor being tested in the clinical setting. In this review, we focus on E3 ubiquitin ligases that have been found deregulated in lung cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the processes in which they are involved and evaluate them as potential anti-cancer targets. By better understanding the mechanisms by which E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate biological processes and their exact role in carcinogenesis, we can improve the development of specific E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors and pave the way for novel treatment strategies for cancer patients.

  9. Human DNA ligases: a comprehensive new look for cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Singh, Deependra Kumar; Krishna, Shagun; Chandra, Sharat; Shameem, Mohammad; Deshmukh, Amit Laxmikant; Banerjee, Dibyendu

    2014-05-01

    Living organisms belonging to all three domains of life, viz., eubacteria, archaeabacteria, and eukaryotes encode one or more DNA ligases. DNA ligases are indispensable in various DNA repair and replication processes and a deficiency or an inhibition of their activity can lead to accumulation of DNA damage and strand breaks. DNA damage, specially strand breaks at unsustainable levels can lead to replication block and/or cell death. DNA ligases as potential anticancer targets have been realized only recently. There is enough rationale to suggest that ligases have a tremendous potential for novel therapeutics including anticancer and antibacterial therapy, specially when the world is facing acute problems of drug resistance and chemotherapy failure, with an immediate need for new therapeutic targets. Here, we review the current state of the art in the development of human ligase inhibitors, their structures, molecular mechanisms, physiological effects, and their potential in future cancer therapy. Citing examples, we focus on strategies for improving the activity and specificity of existing and novel inhibitors by using structure-based rational approaches. In the end, we describe potential new sites on the ligase I protein that can be targeted for the development of novel inhibitors. This is the first comprehensive review to compile all known human ligase inhibitors and to provide a rationale for the further development of ligase inhibitors for cancer therapy. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Specific Inhibition of the Eubacterial DNA Ligase by Arylamino Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Ciarrocchi, Giovanni; MacPhee, Donald G.; Deady, Les W.; Tilley, Leann

    1999-01-01

    All known DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester linkage between adjacent termini in double-stranded DNA via very similar mechanisms. The ligase family can, however, be divided into two classes: eubacterial ligases, which require NAD+ as a cofactor, and other ligases, from viruses, archaea, and eukaryotes, which use ATP. Drugs that discriminate between DNA ligases from different sources may have antieubacterial activity. We now report that a group of arylamino compounds, including some commonly used antimalarial and anti-inflammatory drugs and a novel series of bisquinoline compounds, are specific inhibitors of eubacterial DNA ligases. Members of this group of inhibitors have different heterocyclic ring systems with a common amino side chain in which the two nitrogens are separated by four carbon atoms. The potency, but not the specificity of action, is influenced by the DNA-binding characteristics of the inhibitor, and the inhibition is noncompetitive with respect to NAD+. The arylamino compounds appear to target eubacterial DNA ligase in vivo, since a Salmonella Lig− strain that has been rescued with the ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase is less sensitive than the parental Salmonella strain. PMID:10543760

  11. Archaeal RNA ligase from thermoccocus kodakarensis for template dependent ligation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2017-01-02

    Nicking-sealing RNA ligases play a significant biological role in host defense and cellular repair, and have become an important molecular tool in biomedical engineering. Due to the propensity for RNA to form secondary structures, RNA modifying enzymes with elevated optimum temperatures are highly desired. Current characterized double stranded RNA ligases, such as the bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 2, while possessing good template dependency, are not active at elevated temperatures. The few characterized RNA ligases from thermophiles exhibit high template independency. We synthesize and characterize here, KOD RNA ligase (KOD1Rnl), a thermostable and template dependent RNA ligase from the archaeon, Thermoccocus Kodakarensis. We disclose that a 13 time reduction in template independent ligation can be achieved with the addition of a single stranded DNase, such as RecJ. We also elucidate the effects of the presence of blood proteins on the activity of KOD1Rnl. Template dependent and thermostable RNA ligases, such as KOD RNA ligase, can be utilized in RNA detection, modification and sequencing.

  12. Expression and biochemical characterization of Plasmodium falciparum DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Buguliskis, Jeffrey S; Casta, Louis J; Butz, Charles E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Taraschi, Theodore F

    2007-10-01

    We report that Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) encodes a 912 amino acid ATP-dependent DNA ligase. Protein sequence analysis of Pf DNA ligase I indicates a strong sequence similarity, particularly in the C-terminal region, to DNA ligase I homologues. The activity of recombinant Pf DNA ligase I (PfLigI) was investigated using protein expressed in HEK293 cells. The PfLigI gene product is approximately 94kDa and catalyzes phosphodiester bond formation on a singly nicked DNA substrate. The enzyme is most active at alkaline pH (8.5) and with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+) and ATP as cofactors. Kinetic studies of PfLigI revealed that the enzyme has similar substrate affinity (K(m) 2.6nM) as compared to human DNA ligase I and k(cat) (2.3x10(-3)s(-1)) and k(cat)/K(m) (8.8x10(5)M(-1)s(-1)) which are similar to other ATP-dependent DNA ligases. PfLigI was able to join RNA-DNA substrates only when the RNA sequence was upstream of the nick, confirming that it is DNA ligase I and has no associated DNA ligase III like activity.

  13. Role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Hou, Ya-Chao; Deng, Jing-Yu

    2015-01-21

    E3 ubiquitin ligases have an important role in carcinogenesis and include a large family of proteins that catalyze the ubiquitination of many protein substrates for targeted degradation by the 26S proteasome. So far, E3 ubiquitin ligases have been reported to have a role in a variety of biological processes including cell cycle regulation, cell proliferation, and apoptosis. Recently, several kinds of E3 ubiquitin ligases were demonstrated to be generally highly expressed in gastric cancer (GC) tissues and to contribute to carcinogenesis. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge and information about the clinical significance of E3 ubiquitin ligases in GC. Bortezomib, a proteasome inhibitor, encouraged the evaluation of other components of the ubiquitin proteasome system for pharmaceutical intervention. The clinical value of novel treatment strategies targeting aberrant E3 ubiquitin ligases for GC are discussed in the review.

  14. KF-1 Ubiquitin Ligase: An Anxiety Suppressor.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-05-01

    Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1(-/-) mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. It is surmised that KF-1 degrades some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1(-/-) mice may be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds.

  15. KF-1 Ubiquitin Ligase: An Anxiety Suppressor

    PubMed Central

    Hashimoto-Gotoh, Tamotsu; Iwabe, Naoyuki; Tsujimura, Atsushi; Takao, Keizo; Miyakawa, Tsuyoshi

    2009-01-01

    Anxiety is an instinct that may have developed to promote adaptive survival by evading unnecessary danger. However, excessive anxiety is disruptive and can be a basic disorder of other psychiatric diseases such as depression. The KF-1, a ubiquitin ligase located on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), may prevent excessive anxiety; kf-1−/− mice exhibit selectively elevated anxiety-like behavior against light or heights. It is surmised that KF-1 degrades some target proteins, responsible for promoting anxiety, through the ER-associated degradation pathway, similar to Parkin in Parkinson's disease (PD). Parkin, another ER-ubiquitin ligase, prevents the degeneration of dopaminergic neurons by degrading the target proteins responsible for PD. Molecular phylogenetic studies have revealed that the prototype of kf-1 appeared in the very early phase of animal evolution but was lost, unlike parkin, in the lineage leading up to Drosophila. Therefore, kf-1−/− mice may be a powerful tool for elucidating the molecular mechanisms involved in emotional regulation, and for screening novel anxiolytic/antidepressant compounds. PMID:19753093

  16. [Novel L-amino acid ligases catalyzing oligopeptide synthesis].

    PubMed

    Kino, Kuniki

    2010-11-01

    L-Amino acid ligase (EC 6.3.2.28) is a microbial enzyme catalyzing formation of an alpha-peptide bond from unprotected L-amino acids in an ATP-dependent manner. The YwfE protein from Bacillus subtilis 168 was the first reported L-amino acid ligase, and it synthesizes various dipeptides. Thereafter, several L-amino acid ligases were newly obtained by in silico analysis using the ATP-grasp motif. But these L-amino acid ligases synthesize only dipeptide and no longer peptide. A novel L-amino acid ligase capable of catalyzing oligopeptide synthesis is required to increase the variety of peptides. We have previously found a new member of L-amino acid ligase, RizA, from B. subtilis NBRC3134, a microorganism that produces the peptide-antibiotic rhizocticin. We newly found that a gene at approximately 9 kbp upstream of rizA encoded a novel L-amino acid ligase RizB. Recombinant RizB synthesized homo-oligomers of branched-chain amino acids consisting of 2 to 5 amino acids, and also synthesized various heteropeptides. RizB is the first reported L-amino acid ligase that catalyzes oligopeptide synthesis. In addition, we obtained L-amino acid ligases showing oligopeptide synthesis activities by in silico analysis using BLAST, which is a set of similarity search programs. These L-amino acid ligases showed low similarity in amino acid sequence, but commonly used branched-chain amino acids, such as RizB, as substrates. Furthermore, the spr0969 protein of Streptococcus pneumoniae synthesized longer peptides than those synthesized by RizB, and the BAD_1200 protein of Bifidobacteria adolescentis showed higher activity toward aromatic amino acids than toward branched-chain ones.

  17. Expression, purification and biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, You; Xie, Juan-Juan; Han, Zhong; Liu, Jian-Hua; Liu, Xi-Peng

    2013-02-01

    We describe the biochemical characterization of Methanocaldococcus jannaschii (M. jannaschii) DNA ligase and its potential application in single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping. The recombinant M. jannaschii DNA ligase is an ATP-dependent ligase. The ligase activity was dependent on metal ions of Mg(2+) and Mn(2+). The optimal concentrations of ATP cofactor and Mg(2+) ion were 0.01-2 and 10 mM, respectively. The optimal pH value for DNA ligation was 8.5. High concentrations of NaCl inhibited DNA ligation. The effects of mismatches on joining short oligonucleotides by M. jannaschii DNA ligase were fully characterized. The mismatches at the first position 5' to the nick inhibited ligation more than those at the first position 3' to the nick. The mismatches at other positions 5' to the nick (3rd to 7th sites) exhibited less inhibition on ligation. However, the introduction of a C/C mismatch at the third position 5' to the nick could completely inhibit the ligation of the terminal-mismatched nick of an oligonucleotide duplex by M. jannaschii DNA ligase. Therefore, introducing an additional mismatch at the third position 5' to the SNP site is a more effective approach in genotyping by M. jannaschii DNA ligase.

  18. DNA ligase I is not essential for mammalian cell viability.

    PubMed

    Han, Li; Masani, Shahnaz; Hsieh, Chih-lin; Yu, Kefei

    2014-04-24

    Of the three DNA ligases present in all vertebrates, DNA ligase I (Lig1) has been considered essential for ligating Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and thereby essential for cell viability. Here, we report the striking finding that a Lig1-null murine B cell line is viable. Surprisingly, the Lig1-null cells exhibit normal proliferation and normal immunoglobulin heavy chain class switch recombination and are not hypersensitive to a wide variety of DNA damaging agents. These findings demonstrate that Lig1 is not absolutely required for cellular DNA replication and repair and that either Lig3 or Lig4 can substitute for the role of Lig1 in joining Okazaki fragments. The establishment of a Lig1-null cell line will greatly facilitate the characterization of DNA ligase function in mammalian cells, but the finding alone profoundly reprioritizes the role of ligase I in DNA replication, repair, and recombination.

  19. Alternative Okazaki Fragment Ligation Pathway by DNA Ligase III.

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Hiroshi; Iliakis, George

    2015-06-23

    Higher eukaryotes have three types of DNA ligases: DNA ligase 1 (Lig1), DNA ligase 3 (Lig3) and DNA ligase 4 (Lig4). While Lig1 and Lig4 are present in all eukaryotes from yeast to human, Lig3 appears sporadically in evolution and is uniformly present only in vertebrates. In the classical, textbook view, Lig1 catalyzes Okazaki-fragment ligation at the DNA replication fork and the ligation steps of long-patch base-excision repair (BER), homologous recombination repair (HRR) and nucleotide excision repair (NER). Lig4 is responsible for DNA ligation at DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) by the classical, DNA-PKcs-dependent pathway of non-homologous end joining (C-NHEJ). Lig3 is implicated in a short-patch base excision repair (BER) pathway, in single strand break repair in the nucleus, and in all ligation requirements of the DNA metabolism in mitochondria. In this scenario, Lig1 and Lig4 feature as the major DNA ligases serving the most essential ligation needs of the cell, while Lig3 serves in the cell nucleus only minor repair roles. Notably, recent systematic studies in the chicken B cell line, DT40, involving constitutive and conditional knockouts of all three DNA ligases individually, as well as of combinations thereof, demonstrate that the current view must be revised. Results demonstrate that Lig1 deficient cells proliferate efficiently. Even Lig1/Lig4 double knockout cells show long-term viability and proliferate actively, demonstrating that, at least in DT40, Lig3 can perform all ligation reactions of the cellular DNA metabolism as sole DNA ligase. Indeed, in the absence of Lig1, Lig3 can efficiently support semi-conservative DNA replication via an alternative Okazaki-fragment ligation pathway. In addition, Lig3 can back up NHEJ in the absence of Lig4, and can support NER and HRR in the absence of Lig1. Supporting observations are available in less elaborate genetic models in mouse cells. Collectively, these observations raise Lig3 from a niche-ligase to a

  20. DNA ligases ensure fidelity by interrogating minor groove contacts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pingfang; Burdzy, Artur; Sowers, Lawrence C

    2004-01-01

    DNA ligases, found in both prokaryotes and eukaryotes, covalently link the 3'-hydroxyl and 5'-phosphate ends of duplex DNA segments. This reaction represents a completion step for DNA replication, repair and recombination. It is well established that ligases are sensitive to mispairs present on the 3' side of the ligase junction, but tolerant of mispairs on the 5' side. While such discrimination would increase the overall accuracy of DNA replication and repair, the mechanisms by which this fidelity is accomplished are as yet unknown. In this paper, we present the results of experiments with Tth ligase from Thermus thermophilus HB8 and a series of nucleoside analogs in which the mechanism of discrimination has been probed. Using a series of purine analogs substituted in the 2 and 6 positions, we establish that the apparent base pair geometry is much more important than relative base pair stability and that major groove contacts are of little importance. This result is further confirmed using 5-fluorouracil (FU) mispaired with guanine. At neutral pH, the FU:G mispair on the 3' side of a ligase junction is predominantly in a neutral wobble configuration and is poorly ligated. Increasing the solution pH increases the proportion of an ionized base pair approximating Watson-Crick geometry, substantially increasing the relative ligation efficiency. These results suggest that the ligase could distinguish Watson-Crick from mispaired geometry by probing the hydrogen bond acceptors present in the minor groove as has been proposed for DNA polymerases. The significance of minor groove hydrogen bonding interactions is confirmed with both Tth and T4 DNA ligases upon examination of base pairs containing the pyrimidine shape analog, difluorotoluene (DFT). Although DFT paired with adenine approximates Watson-Crick geometry, a minor groove hydrogen bond acceptor is lost. Consistent with this hypothesis, we observe that DFT-containing base pairs inhibit ligation when on the 3' side of

  1. Regulation of lipid droplet turnover by ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Alberts, Philipp; Rotin, Daniela

    2010-07-19

    Mutation of the protein spartin is a cause of one form of spastic paraplegia. Spartin interacts with ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family, and a recent report in BMC Biology now shows that it acts as an adaptor to recruit and activate the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 onto lipid droplets, leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of droplet-associated proteins. A deficiency of spartin apparently causes lipid droplets to accumulate.

  2. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Neurobiological Mechanisms: Development to Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Arun; Joshi, Vibhuti; Amanullah, Ayeman; Mishra, Ribhav; Arora, Naina; Prasad, Amit; Mishra, Amit

    2017-01-01

    Cells regularly synthesize new proteins to replace old or damaged proteins. Deposition of various aberrant proteins in specific brain regions leads to neurodegeneration and aging. The cellular protein quality control system develop various defense mechanisms against the accumulation of misfolded and aggregated proteins. The mechanisms underlying the selective recognition of specific crucial protein or misfolded proteins are majorly governed by quality control E3 ubiquitin ligases mediated through ubiquitin-proteasome system. Few known E3 ubiquitin ligases have shown prominent neurodevelopmental functions, but their interactions with different developmental proteins play critical roles in neurodevelopmental disorders. Several questions are yet to be understood properly. How E3 ubiquitin ligases determine the specificity and regulate degradation of a particular substrate involved in neuronal proliferation and differentiation is certainly the one, which needs detailed investigations. Another important question is how neurodevelopmental E3 ubiquitin ligases specifically differentiate between their versatile range of substrates and timing of their functional modulations during different phases of development. The premise of this article is to understand how few E3 ubiquitin ligases sense major molecular events, which are crucial for human brain development from its early embryonic stages to throughout adolescence period. A better understanding of these few E3 ubiquitin ligases and their interactions with other potential proteins will provide invaluable insight into disease mechanisms to approach toward therapeutic interventions. PMID:28579943

  3. DNA ligase and the pyridine nucleotide cycle in Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Park, U E; Olivera, B M; Hughes, K T; Roth, J R; Hillyard, D R

    1989-01-01

    Bacterial DNA ligases use NAD as an energy source. In this study we addressed two questions about these enzymes. First, what is the physiological consequence of completely removing the NAD-dependent enzyme and replacing it with an ATP-dependent DNA ligase? We constructed Salmonella typhimurium strains in which the endogenous NAD-dependent DNA ligase activity was inactivated by an insertion mutation and the ATP-dependent enzyme from bacteriophage T4 was provided by a cloned phage gene. Such strains were physiologically indistinguishable from the wild type, even under conditions of UV irradiation or treatment with alkylating agents. These results suggest that specific functional interactions between DNA ligase and other replication and repair enzymes may be unimportant under the conditions tested. Second, the importance of DNA ligation as the initiating event of the bacterial pyridine nucleotide cycle was critically assessed in these mutant strains. Surprisingly, our results indicate that DNA ligation makes a minimal contribution to the pyridine nucleotide cycle; the Salmonella strains with only an ATP-dependent ligase had the same NAD turnover rates as the wild-type strain with an NAD-dependent ligase. However, we found that NAD turnover was significantly decreased under anaerobic conditions. We suggest that most intracellular pyridine nucleotide breakdown occurs in a process that protects the cell against oxygen damage but involves a biochemical mechanism other than DNA ligation. Images PMID:2649488

  4. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, Nn-bis-(5-deoxy-α-d-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the µM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents. PMID:16361267

  5. Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent DNA ligase is selectively inhibited by glycosylamines compared with human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Dube, Divya; Tewari, Neetu; Dwivedi, Namrata; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-01-01

    DNA ligases are important enzymes which catalyze the joining of nicks between adjacent bases of double-stranded DNA. NAD+-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) are essential in bacteria and are absent in humans. They have therefore been identified as novel, validated and attractive drug targets. Using virtual screening against an in-house database of compounds and our recently determined crystal structure of the NAD+ binding domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigA, we have identified N1, N(n)-bis-(5-deoxy-alpha-D-xylofuranosylated) diamines as a novel class of inhibitors for this enzyme. Assays involving M.tuberculosis LigA, T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I show that these compounds specifically inhibit LigA from M.tuberculosis. In vitro kinetic and inhibition assays demonstrate that the compounds compete with NAD+ for binding and inhibit enzyme activity with IC50 values in the microM range. Docking studies rationalize the observed specificities and show that among several glycofuranosylated diamines, bis xylofuranosylated diamines with aminoalkyl and 1, 3-phenylene carbamoyl spacers mimic the binding modes of NAD+ with the enzyme. Assays involving LigA-deficient bacterial strains show that in vivo inhibition of ligase by the compounds causes the observed antibacterial activities. They also demonstrate that the compounds exhibit in vivo specificity for LigA over ATP-dependent ligase. This class of inhibitors holds out the promise of rational development of new anti-tubercular agents.

  6. Dysregulation of ubiquitin ligases in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ronai, Ze’ev A.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligases are critical components of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), which governs fundamental processes regulating normal cellular homeostasis, metabolism, and cell cycle in response to external stress signals and DNA damage. Among multiple steps of the UPS system required to regulate protein ubiquitination and stability, UBLs define specificity, as they recognize and interact with substrates in a temporally- and spatially-regulated manner. Such interactions are required for substrate modification by ubiquitin chains, which marks proteins for recognition and degradation by the proteasome, or alters their subcellular localization or assembly into functional complexes. UBLs are often deregulated in cancer, altering substrate availability or activity in a manner that can promote cellular transformation. Such deregulation can occur at the epigenetic, genomic, or post-translational levels. Alterations in UBL can be used to predict their contributions, affecting tumor suppressors or oncogenes in select tumors. Better understanding of mechanisms underlying UBL expression and activities is expected to drive the development of next generation modulators that can serve as novel therapeutic modalities. This review summarizes our current understanding of UBL deregulation in cancer and highlights novel opportunities for therapeutic interventions. PMID:26690337

  7. A Self-Replicating Ligase Ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Natasha; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    A self-replicating molecule directs the covalent assembly of component molecules to form a product that is of identical composition to the parent. When the newly formed product also is able to direct the assembly of product molecules, the self-replicating system can be termed autocatalytic. A self-replicating system was developed based on a ribozyme that catalyzes the assembly of additional copies of Itself through an RNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reaction. The R3C ligase ribozyme was redesigned so that it would ligate two substrates to generate an exact copy of itself, which then would behave in a similar manner. This self-replicating system depends on the catalytic nature of the RNA for the generation of copies. A linear dependence was observed between the initial rate of formation of new copies and the starting concentration of ribozyme, consistent with exponential growth. The autocatalytic rate constant was 0.011 per min, whereas the initial rate of reaction in the absence of pre-existing ribozyme was only 3.3 x 10(exp -11) M per min. Exponential growth was limited, however, because newly formed ribozyme molecules had greater difficulty forming a productive complex with the two substrates. Further optimization of the system may lead to the sustained exponential growth of ribozymes that undergo self-replication.

  8. A Self-Replicating Ligase Ribozyme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Natasha; Joyce, Gerald F.

    2002-01-01

    A self-replicating molecule directs the covalent assembly of component molecules to form a product that is of identical composition to the parent. When the newly formed product also is able to direct the assembly of product molecules, the self-replicating system can be termed autocatalytic. A self-replicating system was developed based on a ribozyme that catalyzes the assembly of additional copies of Itself through an RNA-catalyzed RNA ligation reaction. The R3C ligase ribozyme was redesigned so that it would ligate two substrates to generate an exact copy of itself, which then would behave in a similar manner. This self-replicating system depends on the catalytic nature of the RNA for the generation of copies. A linear dependence was observed between the initial rate of formation of new copies and the starting concentration of ribozyme, consistent with exponential growth. The autocatalytic rate constant was 0.011 per min, whereas the initial rate of reaction in the absence of pre-existing ribozyme was only 3.3 x 10(exp -11) M per min. Exponential growth was limited, however, because newly formed ribozyme molecules had greater difficulty forming a productive complex with the two substrates. Further optimization of the system may lead to the sustained exponential growth of ribozymes that undergo self-replication.

  9. Polynucleotide 3'-terminal phosphate modifications by RNA and DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; McReynolds, Larry A

    2014-11-28

    RNA and DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl ends of nucleic acids. In this work, we describe the ability of the thermophilic RNA ligase MthRnl from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum to recognize and modify the 3'-terminal phosphate of RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This ligase can use an RNA 3'p substrate to generate an RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate or convert DNA3'p to ssDNA(3')pp(5')A. An RNA ligase from the Thermus scotoductus bacteriophage TS2126 and a predicted T4 Rnl1-like protein from Thermovibrio ammonificans, TVa, were also able to adenylate ssDNA 3'p. These modifications of RNA and DNA 3'-phosphates are similar to the activities of RtcA, an RNA 3'-phosphate cyclase. The initial step involves adenylation of the enzyme by ATP, which is then transferred to either RNA 3'p or DNA 3'p to generate the adenylated intermediate. For RNA (3')pp(5')A, the third step involves attack of the adjacent 2' hydroxyl to generate the RNA 2',3'-cyclic phosphate. These steps are analogous to those in classical 5' phosphate ligation. MthRnl and TS2126 RNA ligases were not able to modify a 3'p in nicked double-stranded DNA. However, T4 DNA ligase and RtcA can use 3'-phosphorylated nicks in double-stranded DNA to produce a 3'-adenylated product. These 3'-terminal phosphate-adenylated intermediates are substrates for deadenylation by yeast 5'Deadenylase. Our findings that classic ligases can duplicate the adenylation and phosphate cyclization activity of RtcA suggests that they have an essential role in metabolism of nucleic acids with 3'-terminal phosphates. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Antagonistic roles of ubiquitin ligase HEI10 and SUMO ligase RNF212 regulate meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Huanyu; Prasada Rao, H B D; Yang, Ye; Fong, Jared H; Cloutier, Jeffrey M; Deacon, Dekker C; Nagel, Kathryn E; Swartz, Rebecca K; Strong, Edward; Holloway, J Kim; Cohen, Paula E; Schimenti, John; Ward, Jeremy; Hunter, Neil

    2014-02-01

    Crossover recombination facilitates the accurate segregation of homologous chromosomes during meiosis. In mammals, poorly characterized regulatory processes ensure that every pair of chromosomes obtains at least one crossover, even though most recombination sites yield non-crossovers. Designation of crossovers involves selective localization of the SUMO ligase RNF212 to a minority of recombination sites, where it stabilizes pertinent factors such as MutSγ (ref. 4). Here we show that the ubiquitin ligase HEI10 (also called CCNB1IP1) is essential for this crossover/non-crossover differentiation process. In HEI10-deficient mice, RNF212 localizes to most recombination sites, and dissociation of both RNF212 and MutSγ from chromosomes is blocked. Consequently, recombination is impeded, and crossing over fails. In wild-type mice, HEI10 accumulates at designated crossover sites, suggesting that it also has a late role in implementing crossing over. As with RNF212, dosage sensitivity for HEI10 indicates that it is a limiting factor for crossing over. We suggest that SUMO and ubiquitin have antagonistic roles during meiotic recombination that are balanced to effect differential stabilization of recombination factors at crossover and non-crossover sites.

  11. Substrates of IAP ubiquitin ligases identified with a designed orthogonal E3 ligase, the NEDDylator.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Min; Guan, Shenheng; Wang, Haopeng; Burlingame, Alma L; Wells, James A

    2013-01-24

    Inhibitors of Apoptosis Protein (IAPs) are guardian ubiquitin ligases that keep classic proapoptotic proteins in check. Systematic identification of additional IAP substrates is challenged by the heterogeneity and sheer number of ubiquitinated proteins (>5,000). Here we report a powerful catalytic tagging tool, the NEDDylator, which fuses a NEDD8 E2-conjugating enzyme, Ubc12, to the ubiquitin ligase, XIAP or cIAP1. This permits transfer of the rare ubiquitin homolog NEDD8 to the ubiquitin E3 substrates, allowing them to be efficiently purified for LC-MS/MS identification. We have identified >50 potential IAP substrates of both cytosolic and mitochondrial origin that bear hallmark N-terminal IAP binding motifs. These substrates include the recently discovered protein phosphatase PGAM5, which we show is proteolytically processed, accumulates in cytosol during apoptosis, and sensitizes cells to death. These studies reveal mechanisms and antagonistic partners for specific IAPs, and provide a powerful technology for labeling binding partners in transient protein-protein complexes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Substrates of IAP ubiquitin ligases identified with a designed orthogonal E3 ligase, the NEDDylator

    PubMed Central

    Zhuang, Min; Guan, Shenheng; Wang, Haopeng; Burlingame, Alma L.; Wells, James A.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Inhibitors of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) are guardian ubiquitin ligases that keep classic pro-apoptotic proteins in check. Systematic identification of additional IAP substrates is challenged by the heterogeneity and sheer number of ubiquitinated proteins (>5000). Here we report a powerful catalytic tagging tool, the NEDDylator, which fuses a NEDD8 E2 conjugating enzyme, Ubc12, to the ubiquitin ligase, XIAP or cIAP1. This permits transfer of the rare ubiquitin homolog NEDD8 to the ubiquitin E3 substrates allowing them to be efficiently purified for LC/MS/MS identification. We have identified >50 potential IAP substrates of both cytosolic and mitochondrial origin that bear hallmark N-terminal IAP binding motifs. These substrates include the recently discovered protein phosphatase, PGAM5, which we show is proteolytically processed, accumulates in cytosol during apoptosis, and sensitizes cells to death. These studies reveal mechanisms and antagonistic partners for specific IAPs, and provide a powerful technology for labeling binding partners in transient protein-protein complexes. PMID:23201124

  13. Human DNA ligases I and III, but not ligase IV, are required for microhomology-mediated end joining of DNA double-strand breaks.

    PubMed

    Liang, Li; Deng, Li; Nguyen, Son C; Zhao, Xin; Maulion, Christopher D; Shao, Changshun; Tischfield, Jay A

    2008-06-01

    DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination are two distinct pathways of DNA double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. Biochemical and genetic studies showed that DNA ends can also be joined via microhomology-mediated end joining (MHEJ), especially when proteins responsible for NHEJ, such as Ku, are reduced or absent. While it has been known that Ku-dependent NHEJ requires DNA ligase IV, it is unclear which DNA ligase(s) is required for Ku-independent MHEJ. In this study, we used a cell-free assay to determine the roles of DNA ligases I, III and IV in MHEJ and NHEJ. We found that siRNA mediated down-regulation of DNA ligase I or ligase III in human HTD114 cells led to impaired end joining that was mediated by 2-, 3- or 10-bp microhomology. In addition, nuclear extract from human fibroblasts harboring a mutation in DNA ligase I displayed reduced MHEJ activity. Furthermore, treatment of HTD114 nuclear extracts with an antibody against DNA ligase I or III also significantly reduced MHEJ. These data indicate that DNA ligases I and III are required in MHEJ. DNA ligase IV, on the contrary, is not required in MHEJ but facilitates Ku-dependent NHEJ. Therefore, MHEJ and NHEJ require different DNA ligases.

  14. Mammalian DNA ligase III: Molecular cloning, chromosomal localization, and expression in spermatocytes undergoing meiotic recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jingwen; Danehower, S.; Besterman, J.M.; Husain, I.

    1995-10-01

    Three biochemically distinct DNA ligase activities have been identified in mammalian cell extracts. We have recently purified DNA ligase II and DNA ligase III to near homogeneity from bovine liver and testis tissue, respectively. Amino acid sequencing studies indicated that these enzymes are encoded by the same gene. In the present study, human and murine cDNA clones encoding DNA ligase III were isolated with probes based on the peptide sequences. The human DNA ligase III cDNA encodes a polypeptide of 862 amino acids, whose sequence is more closely related to those of the DNA ligases encoded by poxviruses than to replicative DNA ligases, such as human DNA ligase I. In vitro transcription and translation of the cDNA produced a catalytically active DNA ligase similar in size and substrate specificity to the purified bovine enzyme. The DNA ligase III gene was localized to human chromosome 17, which eliminated this gene as a candidate for the cancer-prone disease Bloom syndrome that is associated with DNA joining abnormalities. DNA ligase III is ubiquitously expressed at low levels, except in the testes, in which the steady-state levels of DNA ligase III mRNA are at least 10-fold higher than those detected in other tissues and cells. Since DNA ligase I mRNA is also present at high levels in the testes, we examined the expression of the DNA ligase genes during spermatogenesis. DNA ligase I mRNA expression correlated with the contribution of proliferating supermatogonia cells to the testes, in agreement with the previously defined role of this enzyme in DNA replications. In contrast, elevated levels of DNA ligase III mRNA were observed in primary supermatocytes undergoing recombination prior to the first meiotic division. Therefore, we suggest that DNA ligase III seals DNA strand breaks that arise during the process of meiotic recombination in germ cells and as a consequence of DNA damage in somatic cells. 62 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Exploring the biological and chemical complexity of the ligases.

    PubMed

    Holliday, Gemma L; Rahman, Syed Asad; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M

    2014-05-15

    Using a novel method to map and cluster chemical reactions, we have re-examined the chemistry of the ligases [Enzyme Commission (EC) Class 6] and their associated protein families in detail. The type of bond formed by the ligase can be automatically extracted from the equation of the reaction, replicating the EC subclass division. However, this subclass division hides considerable complexities, especially for the C-N forming ligases, which fall into at least three distinct types. The lower levels of the EC classification for ligases are somewhat arbitrary in their definition and add little to understanding their chemistry or evolution. By comparing the multi-domain architecture of the enzymes and using sequence similarity networks, we examined the links between overall reaction and evolution of the ligases. These show that, whilst many enzymes that perform the same overall chemistry group together, both convergent (similar function, different ancestral lineage) and divergent (different function, common ancestor) evolution of function are observed. However, a common theme is that a single conserved domain (often the nucleoside triphosphate binding domain) is combined with ancillary domains that provide the variation in substrate binding and function. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  16. Exploring the Biological and Chemical Complexity of the Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Holliday, Gemma L.; Rahman, Syed Asad; Furnham, Nicholas; Thornton, Janet M.

    2014-01-01

    Using a novel method to map and cluster chemical reactions, we have re-examined the chemistry of the ligases [Enzyme Commission (EC) Class 6] and their associated protein families in detail. The type of bond formed by the ligase can be automatically extracted from the equation of the reaction, replicating the EC subclass division. However, this subclass division hides considerable complexities, especially for the C–N forming ligases, which fall into at least three distinct types. The lower levels of the EC classification for ligases are somewhat arbitrary in their definition and add little to understanding their chemistry or evolution. By comparing the multi-domain architecture of the enzymes and using sequence similarity networks, we examined the links between overall reaction and evolution of the ligases. These show that, whilst many enzymes that perform the same overall chemistry group together, both convergent (similar function, different ancestral lineage) and divergent (different function, common ancestor) evolution of function are observed. However, a common theme is that a single conserved domain (often the nucleoside triphosphate binding domain) is combined with ancillary domains that provide the variation in substrate binding and function. PMID:24657765

  17. Biochemical characterization of the DNA ligase I from Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Felix, Cesar S; Pastor-Palacios, Guillermo; Cardenas, Helios; Azuara-Liceaga, Elisa; Brieba, Luis G

    2010-11-01

    DNA ligases play an essential role in DNA replication and repair. Herein, we report the cloning and biochemical characterization of DNA ligase I from the protozoan parasite Entamoeba histolytica (EhDNAligI). EhDNAligI is an ATP-dependent DNA ligase of 685 amino acids with 35% identity to human DNA ligase I. This report shows that heterologous expressed EhDNAligI is able to perform the three conserved steps of a DNA ligation reaction: adenylation, binding to a 5'-phosphorylated nicked DNA substrate and sealing of the nick. EhDNAligI is strongly inhibited by NaCl and displays optimal activity at pH 7.5. EhDNAligI uses Mn2+ or Mg2+ as metal cofactors and ATP as nucleotide cofactor. EhDNAligI has a nicked DNA binding constant of 6.6microM and follows Michaelis-Menten steady-state kinetics with a K(m) ATP of 64nM and a k(cat) of 2.4min(-1). Accordingly to its properties as a family I DNA ligase, EhDNAligI is able to ligate a RNA strand upstream of a nucleic acid nick, but not in the downstream or the template position. We propose that EhDNAligI is involved in sealing DNA nicks during lagging strand synthesis and may have a role in base excision repair in E. histolytica.

  18. One-step assay for the quantification of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Franke, Steffi; Kreisig, Thomas; Buettner, Karin; Zuchner, Thole

    2015-02-01

    As one of the most commonly used enzyme in molecular biology, the T4 DNA ligase presents an important tool for the manipulation of DNA. T4 DNA ligase activity measurements are based on the use of radioactivity or rather labor-intense procedures including gel-based analysis. We therefore established a homogeneous T4 DNA ligase assay utilizing a specifically designed fluorescein- and dark quencher-labeled DNA molecule. Upon ligation of both DNA molecules, a quenching occurs and the fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing ligase concentrations. The assay allows a sensitive and precise quantification (CV, 4.6-5.5 %) of T4 DNA ligase activities and showed a high specificity when tested against other ligases of related and different species. Most importantly, this T4 DNA ligase assay requires only one working and incubation step before measurement can take place at room temperature and may therefore offer an interesting alternative to existing, more laborious ligase assays.

  19. Bacteria-host relationship: ubiquitin ligases as weapons of invasion

    PubMed Central

    Maculins, Timurs; Fiskin, Evgenij; Bhogaraju, Sagar; Dikic, Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Eukaryotic cells utilize the ubiquitin (Ub) system for maintaining a balanced functioning of cellular pathways. Although the Ub system is exclusive to eukaryotes, prokaryotic bacteria have developed an armory of Ub ligase enzymes that are capable of employing the Ub systems of various hosts, ranging from plant to animal cells. These enzymes have been acquired through the evolution and can be classified into three main classes, RING (really interesting new gene), HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxyl terminus) and NEL (novel E3 ligases). In this review we describe the roles played by different classes of bacterial Ub ligases in infection and pathogenicity. We also provide an overview of the different mechanisms by which bacteria mimic specific components of the host Ub system and outline the gaps in our current understanding of their functions. Additionally, we discuss approaches and experimental tools for validating this class of enzymes as potential novel antibacterial therapy targets. PMID:26964724

  20. Regulation of Parkin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Walden, Helen; Martinez-Torres, R Julio

    2012-09-01

    Parkin is an E3 ubiquitin ligase mutated in autosomal recessive juvenile Parkinson's disease. In addition, it is a putative tumour suppressor, and has roles outside its enzymatic activity. It is critical for mitochondrial clearance through mitophagy, and is an essential protein in most eukaryotes. As such, it is a tightly controlled protein, regulated through an array of external interactions with multiple proteins, posttranslational modifications including phosphorylation and S-nitrosylation, and self-regulation through internal associations. In this review, we highlight some of the recent studies into Parkin regulation and discuss future challenges for gaining a full molecular understanding of the regulation of Parkin E3 ligase activity.

  1. Regulation of lipid droplet turnover by ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Mutation of the protein spartin is a cause of one form of spastic paraplegia. Spartin interacts with ubiquitin ligases of the Nedd4 family, and a recent report in BMC Biology now shows that it acts as an adaptor to recruit and activate the ubiquitin ligase AIP4 onto lipid droplets, leading to the ubiquitination and degradation of droplet-associated proteins. A deficiency of spartin apparently causes lipid droplets to accumulate. See research article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/72/ PMID:20646264

  2. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene.

    PubMed

    Tomkinson, Alan E; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-12-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Structure and function of the DNA ligases encoded by the mammalian LIG3 gene

    PubMed Central

    Tomkinson, Alan E.; Sallmyr, Annahita

    2013-01-01

    Among the mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases (LIG), the LIG3 gene is unique in that it encodes multiple DNA ligase polypeptides with different cellular functions. Notably, this nuclear gene encodes the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and so is essential for this organelle. In the nucleus, there is significant functional redundancy between DNA ligase IIIα and DNA ligase I in excision repair. In addition, DNA ligase IIIα is essential for DNA replication in the absence of the replicative DNA ligase, DNA ligase I. DNA ligase IIIα is a component of an alternative non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway for DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair that is more active when the major DNA ligase IV-dependent pathway is defective. Unlike its other nuclear functions, the role of DNA ligase IIIα in alternative NHEJ is independent of its nuclear partner protein, X-ray repair cross-complementing protein 1 (XRCC1). DNA ligase IIIα is frequently overexpressed in cancer cells, acting as a biomarker for increased dependence upon alternative NHEJ for DSB repair and it is a promising novel therapeutic target. PMID:24013086

  4. Comparative genomic analysis reveals 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase complex lipoylation correlation with aerobiosis in archaea.

    PubMed

    Borziak, Kirill; Posner, Mareike G; Upadhyay, Abhishek; Danson, Michael J; Bagby, Stefan; Dorus, Steve

    2014-01-01

    Metagenomic analyses have advanced our understanding of ecological microbial diversity, but to what extent can metagenomic data be used to predict the metabolic capacity of difficult-to-study organisms and their abiotic environmental interactions? We tackle this question, using a comparative genomic approach, by considering the molecular basis of aerobiosis within archaea. Lipoylation, the covalent attachment of lipoic acid to 2-oxoacid dehydrogenase multienzyme complexes (OADHCs), is essential for metabolism in aerobic bacteria and eukarya. Lipoylation is catalysed either by lipoate protein ligase (LplA), which in archaea is typically encoded by two genes (LplA-N and LplA-C), or by a lipoyl(octanoyl) transferase (LipB or LipM) plus a lipoic acid synthetase (LipA). Does the genomic presence of lipoylation and OADHC genes across archaea from diverse habitats correlate with aerobiosis? First, analyses of 11,826 biotin protein ligase (BPL)-LplA-LipB transferase family members and 147 archaeal genomes identified 85 species with lipoylation capabilities and provided support for multiple ancestral acquisitions of lipoylation pathways during archaeal evolution. Second, with the exception of the Sulfolobales order, the majority of species possessing lipoylation systems exclusively retain LplA, or either LipB or LipM, consistent with archaeal genome streamlining. Third, obligate anaerobic archaea display widespread loss of lipoylation and OADHC genes. Conversely, a high level of correspondence is observed between aerobiosis and the presence of LplA/LipB/LipM, LipA and OADHC E2, consistent with the role of lipoylation in aerobic metabolism. This correspondence between OADHC lipoylation capacity and aerobiosis indicates that genomic pathway profiling in archaea is informative and that well characterized pathways may be predictive in relation to abiotic conditions in difficult-to-study extremophiles. Given the highly variable retention of gene repertoires across the archaea

  5. The Role of Ubiquitin Ligases in Cardiac Disease

    PubMed Central

    Willis, Monte S.; Bevilacqua, Ariana; Pulinilkunnil, Thomas; Kienesberger, Petra; Tannu, Manasi; Patterson, Cam

    2014-01-01

    Rigorous surveillance of protein quality control is essential for the maintenance of normal cardiac function, while the dysregulation of protein turnover is present in a diverse array of common cardiac diseases. Central to the protein quality control found in all cells is the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS). The UPS plays a critical role in protein trafficking, cellular signaling, and most prominently, protein degradation. As ubiquitin ligases (E3s) control the specificity of the UPS, their description in the cardiomyocyte has highlighted how ubiquitin ligases are critical to the turnover and function of the sarcomere complex, responsible for the heart’s required continuous contraction. In this review, we provide an overview of the UPS, highlighting a comprehensive overview of the cardiac ubiquitin ligases identified to date. We then focus on recent studies of new cardiac ubiquitin ligases outlining their novel roles in protein turnover, cellular signaling, and the regulation of mitochondrial dynamics and receptor turnover in the pathophysiology of cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac atrophy, myocardial infarction, and heart failure. PMID:24262338

  6. Cell cycle regulatory E3 ubiquitin ligases as anticancer targets.

    PubMed

    Pray, Todd R; Parlati, Francesco; Huang, Jianing; Wong, Brian R; Payan, Donald G; Bennett, Mark K; Issakani, Sarkiz Daniel; Molineaux, Susan; Demo, Susan D

    2002-12-01

    Disregulation of the cell cycle and proliferation play key roles in cellular transformation and tumorigenesis. Such processes are intimately tied to the concentration, localization and activity of enzymes, adapters, receptors, and structural proteins in cells. Ubiquitination of these cellular regulatory proteins, governed by specific enzymes in the ubiquitin (Ub) conjugation cascade, has profound effects on their various functions, most commonly through proteasome targeting and degradation. This review will focus on a variety of E3 Ub ligases as potential oncology drug targets, with particular emphasis on the role of these molecules in the regulation of stability, localization, and activity of key proteins such as tumor suppressors and oncoproteins. E3 ubiquitin ligases that have established roles in cell cycle and apoptosis, such as the anaphase-promoting complex (APC), the Skp-1-Cul1-F-box class, and the murine double minute 2 (MDM2) protein, in addition to more recently discovered E3 ubiquitin ligases which may be similarly important in tumorigenesis, (e.g. Smurf family, CHFR, and Efp), will be discussed. We will present evidence to support E3 ligases as good biological targets in the development of anticancer therapeutics and address challenges in drug discovery for these targets.

  7. Cullin E3 Ligase Activity Is Required for Myoblast Differentiation.

    PubMed

    Blondelle, Jordan; Shapiro, Paige; Domenighetti, Andrea A; Lange, Stephan

    2017-04-07

    The role of cullin E3-ubiquitin ligases for muscle homeostasis is best known during muscle atrophy, as the cullin-1 substrate adaptor atrogin-1 is among the most well-characterized muscle atrogins. We investigated whether cullin activity was also crucial during terminal myoblast differentiation and aggregation of acetylcholine receptors for the establishment of neuromuscular junctions in vitro. The activity of cullin E3-ligases is modulated through post-translational modification with the small ubiquitin-like modifier nedd8. Using either the Nae1 inhibitor MLN4924 (Pevonedistat) or siRNA against nedd8 in early or late stages of differentiation on C2C12 myoblasts, and primary satellite cells from mouse and human, we show that cullin E3-ligase activity is necessary for each step of the muscle cell differentiation program in vitro. We further investigate known transcriptional repressors for terminal muscle differentiation, namely ZBTB38, Bhlhe41, and Id1. Due to their identified roles for terminal muscle differentiation, we hypothesize that the accumulation of these potential cullin E3-ligase substrates may be partially responsible for the observed phenotype. MLN4924 is currently undergoing clinical trials in cancer patients, and our experiments highlight concerns on the homeostasis and regenerative capacity of muscles in these patients who often experience cachexia.

  8. Ubiquitylation-dependent oligomerization regulates activity of Nedd4 ligases.

    PubMed

    Attali, Ilan; Tobelaim, William Sam; Persaud, Avinash; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Mashahreh, Bayan; Levin-Kravets, Olga; Keren-Kaplan, Tal; Pilzer, Inbar; Kupiec, Martin; Wiener, Reuven; Wolf, Dieter A; Rotin, Daniela; Prag, Gali

    2017-02-15

    Ubiquitylation controls protein function and degradation. Therefore, ubiquitin ligases need to be tightly controlled. We discovered an evolutionarily conserved allosteric restraint mechanism for Nedd4 ligases and demonstrated its function with diverse substrates: the yeast soluble proteins Rpn10 and Rvs167, and the human receptor tyrosine kinase FGFR1 and cardiac IKS potassium channel. We found that a potential trimerization interface is structurally blocked by the HECT domain α1-helix, which further undergoes ubiquitylation on a conserved lysine residue. Genetic, bioinformatics, biochemical and biophysical data show that attraction between this α1-conjugated ubiquitin and the HECT ubiquitin-binding patch pulls the α1-helix out of the interface, thereby promoting trimerization. Strikingly, trimerization renders the ligase inactive. Arginine substitution of the ubiquitylated lysine impairs this inactivation mechanism and results in unrestrained FGFR1 ubiquitylation in cells. Similarly, electrophysiological data and TIRF microscopy show that NEDD4 unrestrained mutant constitutively downregulates the IKS channel, thus confirming the functional importance of E3-ligase autoinhibition.

  9. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining.

    PubMed

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-02-02

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4(-/-) cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ.

  10. Pharmacophore-based screening and identification of novel human ligase I inhibitors with potential anticancer activity.

    PubMed

    Krishna, Shagun; Singh, Deependra Kumar; Meena, Sanjeev; Datta, Dipak; Siddiqi, Mohammad Imran; Banerjee, Dibyendu

    2014-03-24

    Human DNA ligases are enzymes that are indispensable for DNA replication and repair processes. Among the three human ligases, ligase I is attributed to the ligation of thousands of Okazaki fragments that are formed during lagging strand synthesis during DNA replication. Blocking ligation therefore can lead to the accumulation of thousands of single strands and subsequently double strand breaks in the DNA, which is lethal for the cells. The reports of the high expression level of ligase I protein in several cancer cells (versus the low ligase expression level and the low rate of division of most normal cells in the adult body) support the belief that ligase I inhibitors can target cancer cells specifically with minimum side effects to normal cells. Recent publications showing exciting data for a ligase IV inhibitor exhibiting antitumor activity in mouse models also strengthens the argument for ligases as valid antitumor targets. Keeping this in view, we performed a pharmacophore-based screening for potential ligase inhibitors in the Maybridge small molecule library and procured some of the top-ranking compounds for enzyme-based and cell-based in vitro screening. We report here the identification of novel ligase I inhibitors with potential anticancer activity against a colon cancer cell line.

  11. Systematic approaches to identify E3 ligase substrates

    PubMed Central

    Iconomou, Mary; Saunders, Darren N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein ubiquitylation is a widespread post-translational modification, regulating cellular signalling with many outcomes, such as protein degradation, endocytosis, cell cycle progression, DNA repair and transcription. E3 ligases are a critical component of the ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS), determining the substrate specificity of the cascade by the covalent attachment of ubiquitin to substrate proteins. Currently, there are over 600 putative E3 ligases, but many are poorly characterized, particularly with respect to individual protein substrates. Here, we highlight systematic approaches to identify and validate UPS targets and discuss how they are underpinning rapid advances in our understanding of the biochemistry and biology of the UPS. The integration of novel tools, model systems and methods for target identification is driving significant interest in drug development, targeting various aspects of UPS function and advancing the understanding of a diverse range of disease processes. PMID:27834739

  12. Splint ligation of RNA with T4 DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kershaw, Christopher J.; O’Keefe, Raymond T.

    2014-01-01

    Splint ligation of RNA, whereby specific RNA molecules are ligated together, can be carried out using T4 DNA ligase and a bridging DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the RNAs. This method takes advantage of the property of T4 DNA ligase to join RNA molecules when they are in an RNA:DNA hybrid. Splint ligation is a useful tool for the introduction of modified nucleotides into RNA molecules, insertion of a radiolabel into a specific position within an RNA and for the assembly of smaller synthetic RNAs into longer RNA molecules. Such modifications enable a wide range of experiments to be carried out with the modified RNA including structural studies, co-immunoprecipitations, and the ability to map sites of RNA:RNA and RNA:protein interactions. PMID:23065567

  13. TRIM proteins as RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Kazuhiro; Inoue, Satoshi

    2012-01-01

    The tripartite motif(TRIM) proteins harboring the RING finger, B-box and coiled-coil (RBCC) domain motifs form a large protein family. The members of this family are involved in various biological processes, including growth, differentiation, apoptosis and transcription and also in diseases and oncogenesis. Recent studies have revealed that TRIM proteins play key roles in innate antiviral immunity. An accumulating body of evidence has demonstrated that some TRIM proteins function as E3 ubiquitin ligases in specific ubiquitin-mediated protein degradation pathways; however, the precise mechanisms underlying this function have not been fully elucidated. In this chapter, we focus on the TRIM family of proteins specially with regard to E3 ligase.

  14. Rapid Assembly of DNA via Ligase Cycling Reaction (LCR).

    PubMed

    Chandran, Sunil

    2017-01-01

    The assembly of multiple DNA parts into a larger DNA construct is a requirement in most synthetic biology laboratories. Here we describe a method for the efficient, high-throughput, assembly of DNA utilizing the ligase chain reaction (LCR). The LCR method utilizes non-overlapping DNA parts that are ligated together with the guidance of bridging oligos. Using this method, we have successfully assembled up to 20 DNA parts in a single reaction or DNA constructs up to 26 kb in size.

  15. Signaling-mediated control of ubiquitin ligases in endocytosis.

    PubMed

    Polo, Simona

    2012-03-15

    Ubiquitin-dependent regulation of endocytosis plays an important part in the control of signal transduction, and a critical issue in the understanding of signal transduction therefore relates to regulation of ubiquitination in the endocytic pathway. We discuss here what is known of the mechanisms by which signaling controls the activity of the ubiquitin ligases that specifically recognize the targets of ubiquitination on the endocytic pathway, and suggest alternative mechanisms that deserve experimental investigation.

  16. ATM kinase activity modulates ITCH E3-ubiquitin ligase activity

    PubMed Central

    Santini, Simonetta; Stagni, Venturina; Giambruno, Roberto; Fianco, Giulia; Di Benedetto, Anna; Mottolese, Marcella; Pellegrini, Manuela; Barilà, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Ataxia Telangiectasia Mutated (ATM) kinase, a central regulator of the DNA damage response regulates the activity of several E3-ubiquitin ligases and the ubiquitination-proteasome system is a consistent target of ATM. ITCH is an E3-ubiquitin ligase that modulates the ubiquitination of several targets, therefore participating to the regulation of several cellular responses, among which the DNA damage response, TNFα, Notch and Hedgehog signalling and T cell development. Here we uncover ATM as a novel positive modulator of ITCH E3-ubiquitin ligase activity. A single residue on ITCH protein, S161, which is part of an ATM SQ consensus motif, is required for ATM-dependent activation of ITCH. ATM activity enhances ITCH enzymatic activity, which in turn drives the ubiquitination and degradation of c-FLIP-L and c-Jun, previously identified as ITCH substrates. Importantly, Atm deficient mice show resistance to hepatocyte cell death, similarly to Itch deficient animals, providing in vivo genetic evidence for this circuit. Our data identify ITCH as a novel component of the ATM-dependent signaling pathway and suggest that the impairment of the correct functionality of ITCH caused by Atm deficiency may contribute to the complex clinical features linked to Ataxia Telangiectasia. PMID:23435430

  17. Cullin E3 Ligases and Their Rewiring by Viral Factors

    PubMed Central

    Mahon, Cathal; Krogan, Nevan J.; Craik, Charles S.; Pick, Elah

    2014-01-01

    The ability of viruses to subvert host pathways is central in disease pathogenesis. Over the past decade, a critical role for the Ubiquitin Proteasome System (UPS) in counteracting host immune factors during viral infection has emerged. This counteraction is commonly achieved by the expression of viral proteins capable of sequestering host ubiquitin E3 ligases and their regulators. In particular, many viruses hijack members of the Cullin-RING E3 Ligase (CRL) family. Viruses interact in many ways with CRLs in order to impact their ligase activity; one key recurring interaction involves re-directing CRL complexes to degrade host targets that are otherwise not degraded within host cells. Removal of host immune factors by this mechanism creates a more amenable cellular environment for viral propagation. To date, a small number of target host factors have been identified, many of which are degraded via a CRL-proteasome pathway. Substantial effort within the field is ongoing to uncover the identities of further host proteins targeted in this fashion and the underlying mechanisms driving their turnover by the UPS. Elucidation of these targets and mechanisms will provide appealing anti-viral therapeutic opportunities. This review is focused on the many methods used by viruses to perturb host CRLs, focusing on substrate sequestration and viral regulation of E3 activity. PMID:25314029

  18. C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    Highlights: •Chromatin binding of XRCC4 is dependent on the presence of DNA ligase IV. •C-terminal region of DNA ligase IV alone can recruit itself and XRCC4 to chromatin. •Two BRCT domains of DNA ligase IV are essential for the chromatin binding of XRCC4. -- Abstract: DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  19. Ligase I and ligase III mediate the DNA double-strand break ligation in alternative end-joining

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Guangqing; Duan, Jinzhi; Shu, Sheng; Wang, Xuxiang; Gao, Linlin; Guo, Jing; Zhang, Yu

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), one of the most harmful types of DNA damage, are repaired by homologous repair (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ). Surprisingly, in cells deficient for core classic NHEJ factors such as DNA ligase IV (Lig4), substantial end-joining activities have been observed in various situations, suggesting the existence of alternative end-joining (A-EJ) activities. Several putative A-EJ factors have been proposed, although results are mostly controversial. By using a clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9) system, we generated mouse CH12F3 cell lines in which, in addition to Lig4, either Lig1 or nuclear Lig3, representing the cells containing a single DNA ligase (Lig3 or Lig1, respectively) in their nucleus, was completely ablated. Surprisingly, we found that both Lig1- and Lig3-containing complexes could efficiently catalyze A-EJ for class switching recombination (CSR) in the IgH locus and chromosomal deletions between DSBs generated by CRISPR/Cas9 in cis-chromosomes. However, only deletion of nuclear Lig3, but not Lig1, could significantly reduce the interchromosomal translocations in Lig4−/− cells, suggesting the unique role of Lig3 in catalyzing chromosome translocation. Additional sequence analysis of chromosome translocation junction microhomology revealed the specificity of different ligase-containing complexes. The data suggested the existence of multiple DNA ligase-containing complexes in A-EJ. PMID:26787905

  20. PIASxα ligase enhances SUMO1 modification of PTEN protein as a SUMO E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Weibin; Chen, Yifan; Wang, Shuya; Hu, Ningguang; Cao, Zhengyi; Wang, Wengong; Tong, Tanjun; Zhang, Xiaowei

    2014-02-07

    The tumor suppressor PTEN plays a critical role in the regulation of multiple cellular processes that include survival, cell cycle, proliferation, and apoptosis. PTEN is frequently mutated or deleted in various human cancer cells to promote tumorigenesis. PTEN is regulated by SUMOylation, but the SUMO E3 ligase involved in the SUMOylation of PTEN remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that PIASxα is a SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN. PIASxα physically interacted with PTEN both in vitro and in vivo. Their interaction depended on the integrity of phosphatase and C2 domains of PTEN and the region of PIASxα comprising residues 134-347. PIASxα enhanced PTEN protein stability by reducing PTEN ubiquitination, whereas the mutation of PTEN SUMO1 conjugation sites neutralized the effect of PIASxα on PTEN protein half-life. Functionally, PIASxα, as a potential tumor suppressor, negatively regulated the PI3K-Akt pathway through stabilizing PTEN protein. Overexpression of PIASxα led to G0/G1 cell cycle arrest, thus triggering cell proliferation inhibition and tumor suppression, whereas PIASxα knockdown or deficiency in catalytic activity abolished the inhibition. Together our studies suggest that PIASxα is a novel SUMO E3 ligase for PTEN, and it positively regulates PTEN protein level in tumor suppression.

  1. Successful Conversion of the Bacillus subtilis BirA Group II Biotin Protein Ligase into a Group I Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Henke, Sarah K.; Cronan, John E.

    2014-01-01

    Group II biotin protein ligases (BPLs) are characterized by the presence of an N-terminal DNA binding domain that allows transcriptional regulation of biotin biosynthetic and transport genes whereas Group I BPLs lack this N-terminal domain. The Bacillus subtilis BPL, BirA, is classified as a Group II BPL based on sequence predictions of an N-terminal helix-turn-helix motif and mutational alteration of its regulatory properties. We report evidence that B. subtilis BirA is a Group II BPL that regulates transcription at three genomic sites: bioWAFDBI, yuiG and yhfUTS. Moreover, unlike the paradigm Group II BPL, E. coli BirA, the N-terminal DNA binding domain can be deleted from Bacillus subtilis BirA without adverse effects on its ligase function. This is the first example of successful conversion of a Group II BPL to a Group I BPL with retention of full ligase activity. PMID:24816803

  2. Itch WW Domains Inhibit Its E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity by Blocking E2-E3 Ligase Trans-thiolation.

    PubMed

    Riling, Christopher; Kamadurai, Hari; Kumar, Suresh; O'Leary, Claire E; Wu, Kuen-Phon; Manion, Erica E; Ying, Mingjie; Schulman, Brenda A; Oliver, Paula M

    2015-09-25

    Nedd4-family E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate an array of biologic processes. Autoinhibition maintains these catalytic ligases in an inactive state through several mechanisms. However, although some Nedd4 family members are activated by binding to Nedd4 family-interacting proteins (Ndfips), how binding activates E3 function remains unclear. Our data reveal how these two regulatory processes are linked functionally. In the absence of Ndfip1, the Nedd4 family member Itch can bind an E2 but cannot accept ubiquitin onto its catalytic cysteine. This is because Itch is autoinhibited by an intramolecular interaction between its HECT (homologous to the E6-AP carboxy terminus domain) and two central WW domains. Ndfip1 binds these WW domains to release the HECT, allowing trans-thiolation and Itch catalytic activity. This molecular switch also regulates the closely related family member WWP2. Importantly, multiple PY motifs are required for Ndfip1 to activate Itch, functionally distinguishing Ndfips from single PY-containing substrates. These data establish a novel mechanism for control of the function of a subfamily of Nedd4 E3 ligases at the level of E2-E3 trans-thiolation.

  3. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 proteins associate in a complex and colocalize at replication factories.

    PubMed

    Vago, Riccardo; Leva, Valentina; Biamonti, Giuseppe; Montecucco, Alessandra

    2009-08-15

    DNA ligase I is the main DNA ligase activity involved in eukaryotic DNA replication acting in the joining of Okazaki fragments. This enzyme is also implicated in nucleotide excision repair and in the long-patch base excision repair while its role in the recombinational repair pathways is poorly understood. DNA ligase I is phosphorylated during cell cycle at several serine and threonine residues that regulate its participation in different DNA transactions by modulating the interaction with different protein partners. Here we use an antibody-based array method to identify novel DNA ligase-interacting partners. We show that DNA ligase I participates in several multiprotein complexes with proteins involved in DNA replication and repair, cell cycle control, and protein modification. In particular we demonstrate that DNA ligase I complexes with Nbs1, a core component of the MRN complex critical for detection, processing and repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. The analysis of epitope tagged DNA ligase I mutants demonstrates that the association is mediated by the catalytic fragment of the enzyme. DNA ligase I and Nbs1 colocalize at replication factories during unperturbed replication and after treatment with DNA damaging agents. Since MRN complex is involved in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks by homologous recombination at stalled replication forks our data support the notion that DNA ligase I participates in homology dependent pathways that deal with replication-associated lesions generated when replication fork encounters DNA damage.

  4. Heterogeneity of mammalian DNA ligase detected on activity and DNA sequencing gels.

    PubMed Central

    Mezzina, M; Sarasin, A; Politi, N; Bertazzoni, U

    1984-01-01

    A new method to detect DNA ligase activity in situ after NaDodSO4 polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis has been developed. After renaturation of active polypeptides the ligase reaction occurs in situ by incubating the intact gel in the presence of Mg++ and ATP. Further treatment with alkaline phosphatase removes the unligated 5'-32P-end of oligo (dT) used as a substrate and active polypeptides having ligase activity are identified by autoradiography. Analysis on DNA sequencing gels of the oligo (dT) reaction products present in the activity bands ensures that the radioactive material detected in activity gels or in standard in vitro ligase assays corresponds unambiguously to a ligase activity. Using these methods, we have analysed the purified phage T4 DNA ligase, and the activities present in crude extracts and in purified fractions from monkey kidney (CV1-P) cells. The purified T4 enzyme yields one or two active peptides with Mr values of 60,000 and 70,000. Crude extracts from CV1-P cells contain several polypeptides having DNA ligase activity. Partial purification of these extracts shows that DNA ligase I isolated from hydroxylapatite column is enriched in polypeptides with Mr 200,000, 150,000 and 120,000, while DNA ligase II is enriched in those with Mr 60,000 and 70,000. Images PMID:6377238

  5. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA–RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Lohman, Gregory J. S.; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Cantor, Eric J.; Evans, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10−3 s−1 and KM < 1 nM at 25°C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5′-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a KM ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn2+, but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5′-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3′ side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA. PMID:24203707

  6. Escherichia coli DNA ligase B may mitigate damage from oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Bodine, Truston J; Evangelista, Michael A; Chang, Huan Ting; Ayoub, Christopher A; Samuel, Buck S; Sucgang, Richard; Zechiedrich, Lynn

    2017-01-01

    Escherichia coli encodes two DNA ligases, ligase A, which is essential under normal laboratory growth conditions, and ligase B, which is not. Here we report potential functions of ligase B. We found that across the entire Enterobacteriaceae family, ligase B is highly conserved in both amino acid identity and synteny with genes associated with oxidative stress. Deletion of ligB sensitized E. coli to specific DNA damaging agents and antibiotics resulted in a weak mutator phenotype, and decreased biofilm formation. Overexpression of ligB caused a dramatic extension of lag phase that eventually resumed normal growth. The ligase function of ligase B was not required to mediate the extended lag phase, as overexpression of a ligase-deficient ligB mutant also blocked growth. Overexpression of ligB during logarithmic growth caused an immediate block of cell growth and DNA replication, and death of about half of cells. These data support a potential role for ligase B in the base excision repair pathway or the mismatch repair pathway.

  7. Efficient DNA ligation in DNA-RNA hybrid helices by Chlorella virus DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Zhang, Yinhua; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Cantor, Eric J; Evans, Thomas C

    2014-02-01

    Single-stranded DNA molecules (ssDNA) annealed to an RNA splint are notoriously poor substrates for DNA ligases. Herein we report the unexpectedly efficient ligation of RNA-splinted DNA by Chlorella virus DNA ligase (PBCV-1 DNA ligase). PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated ssDNA splinted by RNA with kcat ≈ 8 x 10(-3) s(-1) and K(M) < 1 nM at 25 °C under conditions where T4 DNA ligase produced only 5'-adenylylated DNA with a 20-fold lower kcat and a K(M) ≈ 300 nM. The rate of ligation increased with addition of Mn(2+), but was strongly inhibited by concentrations of NaCl >100 mM. Abortive adenylylation was suppressed at low ATP concentrations (<100 µM) and pH >8, leading to increased product yields. The ligation reaction was rapid for a broad range of substrate sequences, but was relatively slower for substrates with a 5'-phosphorylated dC or dG residue on the 3' side of the ligation junction. Nevertheless, PBCV-1 DNA ligase ligated all sequences tested with 10-fold less enzyme and 15-fold shorter incubation times than required when using T4 DNA ligase. Furthermore, this ligase was used in a ligation-based detection assay system to show increased sensitivity over T4 DNA ligase in the specific detection of a target mRNA.

  8. T4 DNA ligase is more than an effective trap of cyclized dsDNA.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Chongli; Lou, Xiong Wen; Rhoades, Elizabeth; Chen, Huimin; Archer, Lynden A

    2007-01-01

    T4 DNA ligase is used in standard cyclization assays to trap double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in low-probability, cyclic or highly bent conformations. The cyclization probability, deduced from the relative yield of cyclized product, can be used in conjunction with statistical mechanical models to extract the bending stiffness of dsDNA. By inserting the base analog 2-aminopurine (2-AP) at designated positions in 89 bp and 94 bp dsDNA fragments, we find that T4 DNA ligase can have a previously unknown effect. Specifically, we observe that addition of T4 ligase to dsDNA in proportions comparable to what is used in the cyclization assay leads to a significant increase in fluorescence from 2-AP. This effect is believed to originate from stabilization of local base-pair opening by formation of transient DNA-ligase complexes. Non-specific binding of T4 ligase to dsDNA is also confirmed using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) experiments, which reveal a systematic reduction of dsDNA diffusivity in the presence of ligase. ATP competes with regular DNA for non-covalent binding to the T4 ligase and is found to significantly reduce DNA-ligase complexation. For short dsDNA fragments, however, the population of DNA-ligase complexes at typical ATP concentrations used in DNA cyclization studies is determined to be large enough to dominate the cyclization reaction.

  9. Defining interactions between DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Hsin-Ling; Yannone, Steven M.; Chen, David J.

    2001-04-10

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells. DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK), ligase IV, and XRCC4 are all critical components of the NHEJ repair pathway. DNA-PK is composed of a heterodimeric DNA-binding component, Ku, and a large catalytic subunit, DNA-PKcs. Ligase IV and XRCC4 associate to form a multimeric complex that is also essential for NHEJ. DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4 interact at DNA termini which results in stimulated ligase activity. Here we define interactions between the components of these two essential complexes, DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4. We find that ligase IV/XRCC4 associates with DNA-PK in a DNA-independent manner. The specific protein-protein interactions that mediate the interaction between these two complexes are further identified. Direct physical interactions between ligase IV and Ku as well as between XRCC4 and DNA-PKcs are shown. No direct interactions are observed between ligase IV and DNA-PKcs or between XRCC4 and Ku. Our data defines the specific protein pairs involved in the association of DNA-PK and ligase IV/XRCC4, and suggests a molecular mechanism for coordinating the assembly of the DNA repair complex at DNA breaks.

  10. Tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives can specifically target bacterial DNA ligases and can distinguish them from human DNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Nisha; Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Hajela, Kanchan; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-21

    DNA ligases are critical components for DNA metabolism in all organisms. NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases (LigA) found exclusively in bacteria and certain entomopoxviruses are drawing increasing attention as therapeutic targets as they differ in their cofactor requirement from ATP-dependent eukaryotic homologs. Due to the similarities in the cofactor binding sites of the two classes of DNA ligases, it is necessary to find determinants that can distinguish between them for the exploitation of LigA as an anti-bacterial target. In the present endeavour, we have synthesized and evaluated a series of tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives for their ability to distinguish between bacterial and human DNA ligases. The in vivo inhibition assays that employed LigA deficient E. coli GR501 and S. typhimurium LT2 bacterial strains, rescued by ATP-dependent T4 DNA ligase or Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase (Mtb LigA), respectively, showed that the compounds can specifically inhibit bacterial LigA. The in vitro enzyme inhibition assays using purified MtbLigA, human DNA ligase I & T4 DNA ligase showed specific inhibition of MtbLigA at low micromolar range. Our results demonstrate that tricyclic dihydrobenzoxazepine and tetracyclic indole derivatives can distinguish between bacterial and human DNA ligases by ∼5-folds. In silico docking and enzyme inhibition assays identified that the compounds bind to the cofactor binding site and compete with the cofactor. Ethidium bromide displacement and gel-shift assays showed that the inhibitors do not exhibit any unwanted general interactions with the substrate DNA. These results set the stage for the detailed exploration of this compound class for development as antibacterials.

  11. Human DNA Ligase I Interacts with and Is Targeted for Degradation by the DCAF7 Specificity Factor of the Cul4-DDB1 Ubiquitin Ligase Complex.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhimin; Liao, Zhongping; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Yang, Austin; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-10-14

    The synthesis, processing, and joining of Okazaki fragments during DNA replication is complex, requiring the sequential action of a large number of proteins. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, interacts with and coordinates the activity of several DNA replication proteins, including the enzymes flap endonuclease 1 (FEN-1) and DNA ligase I that complete the processing and joining of Okazaki fragments, respectively. Although it is evident that maintaining the appropriate relative stoichiometry of FEN-1 and DNA ligase I, which compete for binding to proliferating cell nuclear antigen, is critical to prevent genomic instability, little is known about how the steady state levels of DNA replication proteins are regulated, in particular the proteolytic mechanisms involved in their turnover. Because DNA ligase I has been reported to be ubiquitylated, we used a proteomic approach to map ubiquitylation sites and screen for DNA ligase I-associated E3 ubiquitin ligases. We identified three ubiquitylated lysine residues and showed that DNA ligase I interacts with and is targeted for ubiquitylation by DCAF7, a specificity factor for the Cul4-DDB1 complex. Notably, knockdown of DCAF7 reduced the degradation of DNA ligase I in response to inhibition of proliferation and replacement of ubiquitylated lysine residues reduced the in vitro ubiquitylation of DNA ligase I by Cul4-DDB1 and DCAF7. In contrast, a different E3 ubiquitin ligase regulates FEN-1 turnover. Thus, although the expression of many of the genes encoding DNA replication proteins is coordinately regulated, our studies reveal that different mechanisms are involved in the turnover of these proteins. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  12. DNA-ligase activities appear normal in the CHO mutant EM9.

    PubMed

    Chan, J Y; Thompson, L H; Becker, F F

    1984-01-01

    The Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) mutant strain EM9 was previously shown to be hypersensitive to killing by ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS) and methyl methanesulfonate (MMS), to have a 12-fold increased baseline incidence of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCE), and to be defective in rejoining DNA strand breaks after treatment with EMS, MMS, or X-rays. A study was performed to determine if the primary biochemical defect might be a DNA ligase. DNA-ligase activities were assayed and compared after separation of the multiple forms of ligase by AcA 34 gel-filtration chromatography of total cellular extracts. In EM9 cells the levels of the presumptive replicative forms, DNA ligase Ia (480 kd) and ligase Ib (240 kd) were about 50% and 60%, respectively, of those in the parental AA8 cells, whereas DNA ligase II (80 kd) was unaltered in EM9 . In a phenotypic revertant line ( 9R1 ) ligases Ia, Ib and II levels were 35%, 37% and 100%, respectively, of those in AA8 . The reduced levels of ligases Ia and Ib in EM9 and 9R1 cells are apparently not related directly to the mutant phenotype and may be attributable to the somewhat slower growth rates of these strains compared with those of AA8 . To determine if the repair defect in EM9 might reside in the ability to induce DNA-ligase activity after treatment with a DNA-damaging agent, AA8 and EM9 cells were treated with MMS at 30 micrograms/ml for 60 min before preparing fractions for ligase assays. Under these conditions the activities of ligases Ia and Ib decreases 70-80% in both cell lines, but ligase II increased 2.0- and 2.6-fold, respectively, in AA8 and EM9 . As a further test of defective ligase activities in EM9 , assays were performed in the presence of 0.1 M NaCl or after heating the fractions for 10 min at 50 degrees C. Although all 3 forms of ligase showed altered activity under both of these conditions, there were no significant differences between EM9 and AA8 cells. These data combined with the above results provide strong

  13. SCR7 is neither a selective nor a potent inhibitor of human DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Greco, George E; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Brooks, Rhys C; Lu, Zhengfei; Lieber, Michael R; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-07-01

    DNA ligases are attractive therapeutics because of their involvement in completing the repair of almost all types of DNA damage. A series of DNA ligase inhibitors with differing selectivity for the three human DNA ligases were identified using a structure-based approach with one of these inhibitors being used to inhibit abnormal DNA ligase IIIα-dependent repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB)s in breast cancer, neuroblastoma and leukemia cell lines. Raghavan and colleagues reported the characterization of a derivative of one of the previously identified DNA ligase inhibitors, which they called SCR7 (designated SCR7-R in our experiments using SCR7). SCR7 appeared to show increased selectivity for DNA ligase IV, inhibit the repair of DSBs by the DNA ligase IV-dependent non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) pathway, reduce tumor growth, and increase the efficacy of DSB-inducing therapeutic modalities in mouse xenografts. In attempting to synthesize SCR7, we encountered problems with the synthesis procedures and discovered discrepancies in its reported structure. We determined the structure of a sample of SCR7 and a related compound, SCR7-G, that is the major product generated by the published synthesis procedure for SCR7. We also found that SCR7-G has the same structure as the compound (SCR7-X) available from a commercial vendor (XcessBio). The various SCR7 preparations had similar activity in DNA ligation assay assays, exhibiting greater activity against DNA ligases I and III than DNA ligase IV. Furthermore, SCR7-R failed to inhibit DNA ligase IV-dependent V(D)J recombination in a cell-based assay. Based on our results, we conclude that SCR7 and the SCR7 derivatives are neither selective nor potent inhibitors of DNA ligase IV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Rational design of human DNA ligase inhibitors that target cellular DNA replication and repair.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Zhong, Shijun; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Ellenberger, Tom; Wilson, Gerald M; MacKerell, Alexander D; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2008-05-01

    Based on the crystal structure of human DNA ligase I complexed with nicked DNA, computer-aided drug design was used to identify compounds in a database of 1.5 million commercially available low molecular weight chemicals that were predicted to bind to a DNA-binding pocket within the DNA-binding domain of DNA ligase I, thereby inhibiting DNA joining. Ten of 192 candidates specifically inhibited purified human DNA ligase I. Notably, a subset of these compounds was also active against the other human DNA ligases. Three compounds that differed in their specificity for the three human DNA ligases were analyzed further. L82 inhibited DNA ligase I, L67 inhibited DNA ligases I and III, and L189 inhibited DNA ligases I, III, and IV in DNA joining assays with purified proteins and in cell extract assays of DNA replication, base excision repair, and nonhomologous end-joining. L67 and L189 are simple competitive inhibitors with respect to nicked DNA, whereas L82 is an uncompetitive inhibitor that stabilized complex formation between DNA ligase I and nicked DNA. In cell culture assays, L82 was cytostatic whereas L67 and L189 were cytotoxic. Concordant with their ability to inhibit DNA repair in vitro, subtoxic concentrations of L67 and L189 significantly increased the cytotoxicity of DNA-damaging agents. Interestingly, the ligase inhibitors specifically sensitized cancer cells to DNA damage. Thus, these novel human DNA ligase inhibitors will not only provide insights into the cellular function of these enzymes but also serve as lead compounds for the development of anticancer agents.

  15. Unique ligation properties of eukaryotic NAD+-dependent DNA ligase from Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jing; Tong, Jie; Feng, Hong; Huang, Jianmin; Afonso, Claudio L; Rock, Dan L; Barany, Francis; Cao, Weiguo

    2004-09-01

    The eukaryotic Melanoplus sanguinipes entomopoxvirus (MsEPV) genome reveals a homologous sequence to eubacterial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+))-dependent DNA ligases [J. Virol. 73 (1999) 533]. This 522-amino acid open reading frame (ORF) contains all conserved nucleotidyl transferase motifs but lacks the zinc finger motif and BRCT domain found in conventional eubacterial NAD(+) ligases. Nevertheless, cloned MsEPV ligase seals DNA nicks in a NAD(+)-dependent fashion, while adenosine 5'-monophosphate (ATP) cannot serve as an adenylation cofactor. The ligation activity of MsEPV ligase requires Mg(2+) or Mn(2+). MsEPV ligase seals sticky ends efficiently, but has little activity on 1-nucleotide gap or blunt-ended DNA substrates even in the presence of polyethylene glycol. In comparison, bacterial NAD(+)-dependent ligases seal blunt-ended DNA substrates in the presence of polyethylene glycol. MsEPV DNA ligase readily joins DNA nicks with mismatches at either side of the nick junction, except for mismatches at the nick junction containing an A base in the template strand (A/A, G/A, and C/A). MsEPV NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase can join DNA probes on RNA templates, a unique property that distinguishes this enzyme from other conventional bacterial NAD(+) DNA ligases. T4 ATP-dependent DNA ligase shows no detectable mismatch ligation at the 3' side of the nick but substantial 5' T/G mismatch ligation on an RNA template. In contrast, MsEPV ligase joins mismatches at the 3' side of the nick more frequently than at the 5' side of the nick on an RNA template. The complementary specificities of these two enzymes suggest alternative primer design for genomic profiling approaches that use allele-specific detection directly from RNA transcripts.

  16. Cullin-RING Ligases as Attractive Anti-cancer Targets

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) promotes the timely degradation of short-lived proteins with key regulatory roles in a vast array of biological processes, such as cell cycle progression, oncogenesis and genome integrity. Thus, abnormal regulation of UPS disrupts the protein homeostasis and causes many human diseases, particularly cancer. Indeed, the FDA approval of bortezomib, the first class of general proteasome inhibitor, for the treatment of multiple myeloma, demonstrated that the UPS can be an attractive anti-cancer target. However, normal cell toxicity associated with bortezomib, resulting from global inhibition of protein degradation, promotes the focus of drug discovery efforts on targeting enzymes upstream of the proteasome for better specificity. E3 ubiquitin ligases, particularly those known to be activated in human cancer, become an attractive choice. Cullin-RING Ligases (CRLs) with multiple components are the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and are responsible for ubiquitination of ~20% of cellular proteins degraded through UPS. Activity of CRLs is dynamically regulated and requires the RING component and cullin neddylation. In this review, we will introduce the UPS and CRL E3s and discuss the biological processes regulated by each of eight CRLs through substrate degradation. We will further discuss how cullin neddylation controls CRL activity, and how CRLs are being validated as the attractive cancer targets by abrogating the RING component through genetic means and by inhibiting cullin neddylation via MLN4924, a small molecule indirect inhibitor of CRLs, currently in several Phase I clinical trials. Finally, we will discuss current efforts and future perspectives on the development of additional inhibitors of CRLs by targeting E2 and/or E3 of cullin neddylation and CRL-mediated ubiquitination as potential anti-cancer agents. PMID:23151137

  17. Parkin-phosphoubiquitin complex reveals cryptic ubiquitin-binding site required for RBR ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Atul; Chaugule, Viduth K; Condos, Tara E C; Barber, Kathryn R; Johnson, Clare; Toth, Rachel; Sundaramoorthy, Ramasubramanian; Knebel, Axel; Shaw, Gary S; Walden, Helen

    2017-05-01

    RING-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligases are a class of ubiquitin ligases distinct from RING or HECT E3 ligases. An important RBR ligase is Parkin, mutations in which lead to early-onset hereditary Parkinsonism. Parkin and other RBR ligases share a catalytic RBR module but are usually autoinhibited and activated via distinct mechanisms. Recent insights into Parkin regulation predict large, unknown conformational changes during Parkin activation. However, current data on active RBR ligases reflect the absence of regulatory domains. Therefore, it remains unclear how individual RBR ligases are activated, and whether they share a common mechanism. We now report the crystal structure of a human Parkin-phosphoubiquitin complex, which shows that phosphoubiquitin binding induces movement in the 'in-between RING' (IBR) domain to reveal a cryptic ubiquitin-binding site. Mutation of this site negatively affects Parkin's activity. Furthermore, ubiquitin binding promotes cooperation between Parkin molecules, which suggests a role for interdomain association in the RBR ligase mechanism.

  18. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases as Molecular Targets in Human Oral Cancers.

    PubMed

    Masumoto, Kazuma; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is involved in various biological processes. Several oncogenic E3 ligases target tumor suppressor proteins for ubiquitin-mediated degradation. Alternatively, some other E3 ligases play as a tumor suppressor specifically targeting oncogene products. Deregulation of these E3 ligases induces unbalance between oncogenic signal and tumor suppressor pathway and leads to cellular transformation, tumor growth and metastasis in various human malignancies including oral, and head and neck cancers. Facilitated degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27(Kip1) has been observed in oral, and head and neck cancers, and is correlated with their poor prognosis. SCF(Skp2), KPC complex, Pirh2 and CRL4(DDB2-Artemis) have been reported as E3 ligases targeting p27(Kip1) for degradation. In oral cancers, it is reported that overexpression of Skp2 and Pirh2 is associated with poor prognosis. Thus, chemical inhibitors against these E3 ligases are applicable for oral cancer therapy. Some potential compounds that inhibit E3 ligase activity of SCF(Skp2) have been reported. Moreover, the HECT-type E3 ligase WWP family and Smurf1 are also involved in the development and growth of human oral cancers. Therefore, small molecule inhibitors against HECT-type E3 ligases are discussed as anti-oral cancer drugs.

  19. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S; Griffor, Matt

    2009-11-01

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD(+)-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  20. Structure of the adenylation domain of NAD[superscript +]-dependent DNA ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Seungil; Chang, Jeanne S.; Griffor, Matt; Pfizer

    2010-09-17

    DNA ligase catalyzes phosphodiester-bond formation between immediately adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3''-hydroxyl groups in double-stranded DNA and plays a central role in many cellular and biochemical processes, including DNA replication, repair and recombination. Bacterial NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligases have been extensively characterized as potential antibacterial targets because of their essentiality and their structural distinction from human ATP-dependent DNA ligases. The high-resolution structure of the adenylation domain of Staphylococcus aureus NAD{sup +}-dependent DNA ligase establishes the conserved domain architecture with other bacterial adenylation domains. Two apo crystal structures revealed that the active site possesses the preformed NAD{sup +}-binding pocket and the 'C2 tunnel' lined with hydrophobic residues: Leu80, Phe224, Leu287, Phe295 and Trp302. The C2 tunnel is unique to bacterial DNA ligases and the Leu80 side chain at the mouth of the tunnel points inside the tunnel and forms a narrow funnel in the S. aureus DNA ligase structure. Taken together with other DNA ligase structures, the S. aureus DNA ligase structure provides a basis for a more integrated understanding of substrate recognition and catalysis and will be also be of help in the development of small-molecule inhibitors.

  1. A design principle underlying the paradoxical roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Daewon; Kim, Minjin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important cellular components that determine the specificity of proteolysis in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, an increasing number of studies have indicated that E3 ubiquitin ligases also participate in transcription. Intrigued by the apparently paradoxical functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in both proteolysis and transcriptional activation, we investigated the underlying design principles using mathematical modeling. We found that the antagonistic functions integrated in E3 ubiquitin ligases can prevent any undesirable sustained activation of downstream genes when E3 ubiquitin ligases are destabilized by unexpected perturbations. Interestingly, this design principle of the system is similar to the operational principle of a safety interlock device in engineering systems, which prevents a system from abnormal operation unless stability is guaranteed. PMID:24994517

  2. Selective multifaceted E3 ubiquitin ligases barricade extreme defense: Potential therapeutic targets for neurodegeneration and ageing.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Chhangani, Deepak; Mishra, Ribhav; Mishra, Amit

    2015-11-01

    Efficient and regular performance of Ubiquitin Proteasome System and Autophagy continuously eliminate deleterious accumulation of nonnative protiens. In cellular quality control system, E3 ubiquitin ligases are significant employees for defense mechanism against abnormal toxic proteins. Few findings indicate that lack of functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases can be a causative factor of neurodevelopmental disorders, neurodegeneration, cancer and ageing. However, the detailed molecular pathomechanism implying E3 ubiquitin ligases in cellular functions in multifactorial disease conditions are not well understood. This article systematically represents the unique characteristics, molecular nature, and recent developments in the knowledge of neurobiological functions of few crucial E3 ubiquitin ligases. Here, we review recent literature on the roles of E6-AP, HRD1 and ITCH E3 ubiquitin ligases in the neuro-pathobiological mechanisms, with precise focus on the processes of neurodegeneration, and thereby propose new lines of potential targets for therapeutic interventions.

  3. Signal-induced disassembly of the SCF ubiquitin ligase complex by Cdc48/p97

    PubMed Central

    Yen, James L.; Flick, Karin; Papagiannis, Christie V.; Mathur, Radhika; Tyrrell, An; Ouni, Ikram; Kaake, Robyn M.; Huang, Lan; Kaiser, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Summary A large group of E3 ubiquitin ligases is formed by the multisubunit SCF complex, whose core complex (Rbx1/Cul1-Cdc53/Skp1) binds one of many substrate recruiting F-box proteins to form an array of SCF ligases with diverse substrate specificities. It has long been thought that ubiquitylation by SCF ligases is regulated at the level of substrate binding. Here we describe an alternative mechanism of SCF regulation by active dissociation of the F-box subunit. We show that cadmium stress induces selective recruitment of the AAA+ ATPase Cdc48/p97 to catalyze dissociation of the F-box subunit from the yeast SCFMet30 ligase to block substrate ubiquitylation and trigger downstream events. Our results not only provide an additional layer of ubiquitin ligase regulation but also suggest that targeted, signal-dependent dissociation of multisubunit enzyme complexes is an important mechanism in control of enzyme function. PMID:23000173

  4. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Tanabe, Maiko; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures. PMID:26508902

  5. Influence of polyethylene glycol on the ligation reaction with calf thymus DNA ligases I and II.

    PubMed

    Teraoka, H; Tsukada, K

    1987-01-01

    High concentrations of the nonspecific macromolecule polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) enabled DNA ligases I and II from calf thymus to catalyze intermolecular blunt-end ligation of duplex DNA. Intermolecular cohesive-end ligation with these enzymes was markedly stimulated in the presence of 10-16% (w/v) PEG 6000. The effect of PEG 6000 (4-16%) on the sealing of single-stranded breaks in duplex DNA with DNA ligases I and II was not appreciably stimulatory but rather inhibitory. PEG 6000 (15%) enhanced more twofold the rate of DNA ligase II-AMP complex formation, but moderately suppressed the rate of formation of DNA ligase 1-AMP complex. Polyamines and KCl inhibited blunt-end and cohesive-end ligations with DNA ligases I and II in the presence of PEG 6000.

  6. From Structure-Function Analyses to Protein Engineering for Practical Applications of DNA Ligase.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Maiko; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Nishida, Hirokazu

    2015-01-01

    DNA ligases are indispensable in all living cells and ubiquitous in all organs. DNA ligases are broadly utilized in molecular biology research fields, such as genetic engineering and DNA sequencing technologies. Here we review the utilization of DNA ligases in a variety of in vitro gene manipulations, developed over the past several decades. During this period, fewer protein engineering attempts for DNA ligases have been made, as compared to those for DNA polymerases. We summarize the recent progress in the elucidation of the DNA ligation mechanisms obtained from the tertiary structures solved thus far, in each step of the ligation reaction scheme. We also present some examples of engineered DNA ligases, developed from the viewpoint of their three-dimensional structures.

  7. Cloning, overexpression and nucleotide sequence of a thermostable DNA ligase-encoding gene.

    PubMed

    Barany, F; Gelfand, D H

    1991-12-20

    Thermostable DNA ligase has been harnessed for the detection of single-base genetic diseases using the ligase chain reaction [Barany, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 88 (1991) 189-193]. The Thermus thermophilus (Tth) DNA ligase-encoding gene (ligT) was cloned in Escherichia coli by genetic complementation of a ligts 7 defect in an E. coli host. Nucleotide sequence analysis of the gene revealed a single chain of 676 amino acid residues with 47% identity to the E. coli ligase. Under phoA promoter control, Tth ligase was overproduced to greater than 10% of E. coli cellular proteins. Adenylated and deadenylated forms of the purified enzyme were distinguished by apparent molecular weights of 81 kDa and 78 kDa, respectively, after separation via sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis.

  8. Rejoining of DNA strand breaks by T4 DNA ligase in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, T; Edreira, A; Piñero, J

    2002-06-01

    We have tested the ability of T4 DNA ligase to rejoin radiation-induced DNA strand breaks in living hamster cells (CHO-K1, EM9, xrs-5). T4 DNA ligase was introduced into cells by electroporation prior to x-irradiation. Single- and double-strand breaks were measured by the alkaline comet assay technique, and double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated by the pulsed-field gel electrophoresis method. In the comet assay, the three cell lines showed reduced tail moments following pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase, both directly after irradiation and after repair incubation for 4 h. Similarly, the results obtained from pulsed-field gel electrophoresis showed reduced DSB frequencies after pretreatment with T4 DNA ligase. We conclude that exogeneous T4 ligase contributes to rejoining of radiation-induced strand breaks.

  9. A design principle underlying the paradoxical roles of E3 ubiquitin ligases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Daewon; Kim, Minjin; Cho, Kwang-Hyun

    2014-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases are important cellular components that determine the specificity of proteolysis in the ubiquitin-proteasome system. However, an increasing number of studies have indicated that E3 ubiquitin ligases also participate in transcription. Intrigued by the apparently paradoxical functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in both proteolysis and transcriptional activation, we investigated the underlying design principles using mathematical modeling. We found that the antagonistic functions integrated in E3 ubiquitin ligases can prevent any undesirable sustained activation of downstream genes when E3 ubiquitin ligases are destabilized by unexpected perturbations. Interestingly, this design principle of the system is similar to the operational principle of a safety interlock device in engineering systems, which prevents a system from abnormal operation unless stability is guaranteed.

  10. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in eukaryotic histone H3

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    BirA ligase, a prokaryotic ortholog of human holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS), is known to biotinylate proteins. Here, we tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase may also catalyze biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would render recombinant BirA ligase a useful surrogate for HCS in stud...

  11. Enzyme-regulated activation of DNAzyme: a novel strategy for a label-free colorimetric DNA ligase assay and ligase-based biosensing.

    PubMed

    He, Kaiyu; Li, Wang; Nie, Zhou; Huang, Yan; Liu, Zhuoliang; Nie, Lihua; Yao, Shouzhuo

    2012-03-26

    The DNA nick repair catalyzed by DNA ligase is significant for fundamental life processes, such as the replication, repair, and recombination of nucleic acids. Here, we have employed ligase to regulate DNAzyme activity and developed a homogeneous, colorimetric, label-free and DNAzyme-based strategy to detect DNA ligase activity. This novel strategy relies on the ligation-trigged activation or production of horseradish peroxidase mimicking DNAzyme that catalyzes the generation of a color change signal; this results in a colorimetric assay of DNA ligase activity. Using T4 DNA ligase as a model, we have proposed two approaches to demonstrate the validity of the DNAzyme strategy. The first approach utilizes an allosteric hairpin-DNAzyme probe specifically responsive to DNA ligation; this approach has a wide detection range from 0.2 to 40 U mL(-1) and a detection limit of 0.2 U mL(-1). Furthermore, the approach was adapted to probe nucleic acid phosphorylation and single nucleotide mismatch. The second approach employs a "split DNA machine" to produce numerous DNAzymes after being reassembled by DNA ligase; this greatly enhances the detection sensitivity by a signal amplification cascade to achieve a detection limit of 0.01 U mL(-1).

  12. Nucleostemin stabilizes ARF by inhibiting the ubiquitin ligase ULF.

    PubMed

    Lo, D; Zhang, Y; Dai, M-S; Sun, X-X; Zeng, S X; Lu, H

    2015-03-26

    Upregulated expression of nucleolar GTPase nucleostemin (NS) has been associated with increased cellular proliferation potential and tumor malignancy during cancer development. Recent reports attribute the growth regulatory effects of NS protein to its role in facilitating ribosome production. However, the oncogenic potential of NS remains unclear, as imbalanced levels of NS have been reported to exert growth inhibitory effect by modulating p53 tumor-suppressor activity. It also remains in questions if aberrant NS levels might have a p53-independent role in regulation of cell proliferation and growth. In this study, we performed affinity purification and mass spectrometry analysis to explore protein-protein interactions influencing NS growth regulatory properties independently of p53 tumor suppressor. We identified the alternative reading frame (ARF) protein as a key protein associating with NS and further verified the interaction through in vitro and in vivo assays. We demonstrated that NS is able to regulate cell cycle progression by regulating the stability of the ARF tumor suppressor. Furthermore, overexpression of NS suppressed ARF polyubiquitination by its E3 ligase Ubiquitin Ligase for ARF and elongated its half-life, whereas knockdown of NS led to the decrease of ARF levels. Also, we found that NS can enhance NPM stabilization of ARF. Thus, we propose that in the absence of p53, ARF can be stabilized by NS and nucleophosmin to serve as an alternative tumor-suppressor surveillance, preventing potential cellular transformation resulting from the growth-inducing effects of NS overexpression.

  13. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed Central

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-01-01

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis. PMID:10582239

  14. SCF ubiquitin protein ligases and phosphorylation-dependent proteolysis.

    PubMed

    Willems, A R; Goh, T; Taylor, L; Chernushevich, I; Shevchenko, A; Tyers, M

    1999-09-29

    Many key activators and inhibitors of cell division are targeted for degradation by a recently described family of E3 ubiquitin protein ligases termed Skp1-Cdc53-F-box protein (SCF) complexes. SCF complexes physically link substrate proteins to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34, which catalyses substrate ubiquitination, leading to subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. SCF complexes contain a variable subunit called an F-box protein that confers substrate specificity on an invariant core complex composed of the subunits Cdc34, Skp1 and Cdc53. Here, we review the substrates and pathways regulated by the yeast F-box proteins Cdc4, Grr1 and Met30. The concepts of SCF ubiquitin ligase function are illustrated by analysis of the degradation pathway for the G1 cyclin Cln2. Through mass spectrometric analysis of Cdc53 associated proteins, we have identified three novel F-box proteins that appear to participate in SCF-like complexes. As many F-box proteins can be found in sequence databases, it appears that a host of cellular pathways will be regulated by SCF-dependent proteolysis.

  15. A novel ubiquitin ligase is deficient in Fanconi anemia.

    PubMed

    Meetei, Amom Ruhikanta; de Winter, Johan P; Medhurst, Annette L; Wallisch, Michael; Waisfisz, Quinten; van de Vrugt, Henri J; Oostra, Anneke B; Yan, Zhijiang; Ling, Chen; Bishop, Colin E; Hoatlin, Maureen E; Joenje, Hans; Wang, Weidong

    2003-10-01

    Fanconi anemia is a recessively inherited disease characterized by congenital defects, bone marrow failure and cancer susceptibility. Cells from individuals with Fanconi anemia are highly sensitive to DNA-crosslinking drugs, such as mitomycin C (MMC). Fanconi anemia proteins function in a DNA damage response pathway involving breast cancer susceptibility gene products, BRCA1 and BRCA2 (refs. 1,2). A key step in this pathway is monoubiquitination of FANCD2, resulting in the redistribution of FANCD2 to nuclear foci containing BRCA1 (ref. 3). The underlying mechanism is unclear because the five Fanconi anemia proteins known to be required for this ubiquitination have no recognizable ubiquitin ligase motifs. Here we report a new component of a Fanconi anemia protein complex, called PHF9, which possesses E3 ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and is essential for FANCD2 monoubiquitination in vivo. Because PHF9 is defective in a cell line derived from an individual with Fanconi anemia, we conclude that PHF9 (also called FANCL) represents a novel Fanconi anemia complementation group (FA-L). Our data suggest that PHF9 has a crucial role in the Fanconi anemia pathway as the likely catalytic subunit required for monoubiquitination of FANCD2.

  16. Reconciling Ligase Ribozyme Activity with Fatty Acid Vesicle Stability

    PubMed Central

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2014-01-01

    The “RNA world” and the “Lipid world” theories for the origin of cellular life are often considered incompatible due to the differences in the environmental conditions at which they can emerge. One obstacle resides in the conflicting requirements for divalent metal ions, in particular Mg2+, with respect to optimal ribozyme activity, fatty acid vesicle stability and protection against RNA strand cleavage. Here, we report on the activity of a short L1 ligase ribozyme in the presence of myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles at varying concentrations of Mg2+. The ligation rate is significantly lower at low-Mg2+ conditions. However, the loss of activity is overcompensated by the increased stability of RNA leading to a larger amount of intact ligated substrate after long reaction periods. Combining RNA ligation assays with fatty acid vesicles we found that MA vesicles made of 5 mM amphiphile are stable and do not impair ligase ribozyme activity in the presence of approximately 2 mM Mg2+. These results provide a scenario in which catalytic RNA and primordial membrane assembly can coexist in the same environment. PMID:25513761

  17. Directed evolution of the substrate specificity of biotin ligase.

    PubMed

    Lu, Wei-Cheng; Levy, Matthew; Kincaid, Rodney; Ellington, Andrew D

    2014-06-01

    We have developed selection scheme for directing the evolution of Escherichia coli biotin protein ligase (BPL) via in vitro compartmentalization, and have used this scheme to alter the substrate specificity of the ligase towards the utilization of the biotin analogue desthiobiotin. In this scheme, a peptide substrate (BAP) was conjugated to a DNA library encoding BirA, emulsified such that there was a single template per compartment, and protein variants were transcribed and translated in vitro. Those variants that could efficiently desthiobiotinylate their corresponding peptide:DNA conjugate were subsequently captured and amplified. Following just six rounds of selection and amplification several variants that demonstrated higher activity with desthiobiotin were identified. The best variants from Round 6, BirA6-40 and BirA6-47 , showed 17-fold and 10-fold higher activity, respectively, their abilities to use desthiobiotin as a substrate. While selected enzymes contained a number of substitutions, a single mutation, M157T, proved sufficient to provide much greater activity with desthiobiotin. Further characterization of BirA6-40 and the single substitution variant BirAM157T revealed that they had twoto threefold higher kcat values for desthiobiotin. These variants had also lost much of their ability to utilize biotin, resulting in orthogonal enzymes that in conjunction with streptavidin variants that can utilize desthiobiotin may prove to be of great use in developing additional, robust conjugation handles for a variety of biological and biotechnological applications.

  18. DNA ligase III and DNA ligase IV carry out genetically distinct forms of end joining in human somatic cells.

    PubMed

    Oh, Sehyun; Harvey, Adam; Zimbric, Jacob; Wang, Yongbao; Nguyen, Thanh; Jackson, Pauline J; Hendrickson, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    Ku-dependent C-NHEJ (classic non-homologous end joining) is the primary DNA EJing (end joining) repair pathway in mammals. Recently, an additional EJing repair pathway (A-NHEJ; alternative-NHEJ) has been described. Currently, the mechanism of A-NHEJ is obscure although a dependency on LIGIII (DNA ligase III) is often implicated. To test the requirement for LIGIII in A-NHEJ we constructed a LIGIII conditionally-null human cell line using gene targeting. Nuclear EJing activity appeared unaffected by a deficiency in LIGIII as, surprisingly, so were random gene targeting integration events. In contrast, LIGIII was required for mitochondrial function and this defined the gene's essential activity. Human Ku:LIGIII and Ku:LIGIV (DNA ligase IV) double knockout cell lines, however, demonstrated that LIGIII is required for the enhanced A-NHEJ activity that is observed in Ku-deficient cells. Most unexpectedly, however, the majority of EJing events remained LIGIV-dependent. In conclusion, although human LIGIII has an essential function in mitochondrial maintenance, it is dispensable for most types of nuclear DSB repair, except for the A-NHEJ events that are normally suppressed by Ku. Moreover, we describe that a robust Ku-independent, LIGIV-dependent repair pathway exists in human somatic cells.

  19. Human DNA ligase III recognizes DNA ends by dynamic switching between two DNA-bound states.

    PubMed

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A; Tomkinson, Alan E; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-07-27

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a "jackknife model" in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  20. Human DNA Ligase III Recognizes DNA Ends by Dynamic Switching between Two DNA-Bound States

    SciTech Connect

    Cotner-Gohara, Elizabeth; Kim, In-Kwon; Hammel, Michal; Tainer, John A.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2010-09-13

    Human DNA ligase III has essential functions in nuclear and mitochondrial DNA replication and repair and contains a PARP-like zinc finger (ZnF) that increases the extent of DNA nick joining and intermolecular DNA ligation, yet the bases for ligase III specificity and structural variation among human ligases are not understood. Here combined crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering results reveal dynamic switching between two nick-binding components of ligase III: the ZnF-DNA binding domain (DBD) forms a crescent-shaped surface used for DNA end recognition which switches to a ring formed by the nucleotidyl transferase (NTase) and OB-fold (OBD) domains for catalysis. Structural and mutational analyses indicate that high flexibility and distinct DNA binding domain features in ligase III assist both nick sensing and the transition from nick sensing by the ZnF to nick joining by the catalytic core. The collective results support a 'jackknife model' in which the ZnF loads ligase III onto nicked DNA and conformational changes deliver DNA into the active site. This work has implications for the biological specificity of DNA ligases and functions of PARP-like zinc fingers.

  1. ATM mediates oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha.

    PubMed

    Dong, Zhiwan; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2006-01-01

    Among the three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases, only the LIG3 gene does not have a homolog in lower eukaryotes. In somatic mammalian cells, the nuclear form of DNA ligase IIIalpha forms a stable complex with the DNA repair protein XRCC1 that is also found only in higher eukaryotes. Recent studies have shown that XRCC1 participates in S phase-specific DNA repair pathways independently of DNA ligase IIIalpha and is constitutively phosphorylated by casein kinase II. In this study we demonstrate that DNA ligase IIIalpha, unlike XRCC1, is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Specifically, DNA ligase IIIalpha is phosphorylated on Ser123 by the cell division cycle kinase Cdk2 beginning early in S phase and continuing into M phase. Interestingly, treatment of S phase cells with agents that cause oxygen free radicals induces the dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha. This oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIalpha is dependent upon the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase and appears to involve inhibition of Cdk2 and probably activation of a phosphatase.

  2. ATM mediates oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhiwan; Tomkinson, Alan E.

    2006-01-01

    Among the three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases, only the LIG3 gene does not have a homolog in lower eukaryotes. In somatic mammalian cells, the nuclear form of DNA ligase IIIα forms a stable complex with the DNA repair protein XRCC1 that is also found only in higher eukaryotes. Recent studies have shown that XRCC1 participates in S phase-specific DNA repair pathways independently of DNA ligase IIIα and is constitutively phosphorylated by casein kinase II. In this study we demonstrate that DNA ligase IIIα, unlike XRCC1, is phosphorylated in a cell cycle-dependent manner. Specifically, DNA ligase IIIα is phosphorylated on Ser123 by the cell division cycle kinase Cdk2 beginning early in S phase and continuing into M phase. Interestingly, treatment of S phase cells with agents that cause oxygen free radicals induces the dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα. This oxidative stress-induced dephosphorylation of DNA ligase IIIα is dependent upon the ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) kinase and appears to involve inhibition of Cdk2 and probably activation of a phosphatase. PMID:17040896

  3. SUMOylation regulates the homologous to E6-AP carboxyl terminus (HECT) ubiquitin ligase Rsp5p.

    PubMed

    Novoselova, Tatiana Vladislavovna; Rose, Ruth-Sarah; Marks, Helen Margaret; Sullivan, James Andrew

    2013-04-12

    The post-translational modifiers ubiquitin and small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) regulate numerous critical signaling pathways and are key to controlling the cellular fate of proteins in eukaryotes. The attachment of ubiquitin and SUMO involves distinct, but related, machinery. However, it is now apparent that many substrates can be modified by both ubiquitin and SUMO and that some regulatory interaction takes place between the respective attachment machinery. Here, we demonstrate that the Saccharomyces cerevisiae ubiquitin ligase Rsp5p, a member of the highly conserved Nedd4 family of ubiquitin ligases, is SUMOylated in vivo. We further show that Rsp5p SUMOylation is mediated by the SUMO ligases Siz1p and Siz2p, members of the conserved family of PIAS SUMO ligases that are, in turn, substrates for Rsp5p-mediated ubiquitylation. Our experiments show that SUMOylated Rsp5p has reduced ubiquitin ligase activity, and similarly, ubiquitylated Siz1p demonstrates reduced SUMO ligase activity leading to respective changes in both ubiquitin-mediated sorting of the manganese transporter Smf1p and polySUMO chain formation. This reciprocal regulation of these highly conserved ligases represents an exciting and previously unidentified system of cross talk between the ubiquitin and SUMO systems.

  4. Acetaminophen-induced liver injury is attenuated in male glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Botta, Dianne; Shi, Shengli; White, Collin C; Dabrowski, Michael J; Keener, Cassie L; Srinouanprachanh, Sengkeo L; Farin, Federico M; Ware, Carol B; Ladiges, Warren C; Pierce, Robert H; Fausto, Nelson; Kavanagh, Terrance J

    2006-09-29

    Acetaminophen overdose is a leading cause of drug-related acute liver failure in the United States. Glutathione, a tripeptide antioxidant protects cells against oxidative damage from reactive oxygen species and plays a crucial role in the detoxification of xenobiotics, including acetaminophen. Glutathione is synthesized in a two-step enzymatic reaction. Glutamate-cysteine ligase carries out the rate-limiting and first step in glutathione synthesis. We have generated C57Bl/6 mice that conditionally overexpress glutamate-cysteine ligase, and report here their resistance to acetaminophen-induced liver injury. Indices of liver injury included histopathology and serum alanine aminotransferase activity. Male transgenic mice induced to overexpress glutamate-cysteine ligase exhibited resistance to acetaminophen-induced liver injury when compared with acetaminophen-treated male mice carrying, but not expressing glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenes, or to female glutamate-cysteine ligase transgenic mice. We conclude that glutamate-cysteine ligase activity is an important factor in determining acetaminophen-induced liver injury in C57Bl/6 male mice. Because people are known to vary in their glutamate-cysteine ligase activity, this enzyme may also be an important determinant of sensitivity to acetaminophen-induced liver injury in humans.

  5. Purification and characterization of benzoate-coenzyme A ligase and 2-aminobenzoate-coenzyme A ligases from a denitrifying Pseudomonas sp.

    PubMed Central

    Altenschmidt, U; Oswald, B; Fuchs, G

    1991-01-01

    The enzymes catalyzing the formation of coenzyme A (CoA) thioesters of benzoate and 2-aminobenzoate were studied in a denitrifying Pseudomonas sp. anaerobically grown with these aromatic acids and nitrate as sole carbon and energy sources. Three different rather specific aromatic acyl-CoA ligases, E1, E2, and E3, were found which catalyze the formation of CoA thioesters of benzoate, fluorobenzoates, and 2-aminobenzoate. ATP is cleaved into AMP and pyrophosphate. The enzymes were purified, their N-terminal amino acid sequences were determined, and their catalytic and molecular properties were studied. Cells anaerobically grown on benzoate and nitrate contain one CoA ligase (AMP forming) for benzoic acid (E1). It is a homodimer of Mr 120,000 which prefers benzoate as a substrate but shows some activity also with 2-aminobenzoate and fluorobenzoates, although with lower Km. Cells anaerobically grown on 2-aminobenzoate and nitrate contain three different CoA ligases for aromatic acids. The first one is identical with benzoate-CoA ligase (E1). The second enzyme is a 2-aminobenzoate-CoA ligase (E2). It is a monomer of Mr 60,000 which prefers 2-aminobenzoate but also activates benzoate, fluorobenzoates and, less effectively, 2-methylbenzoate, with lower affinities to the latter substrates. The enzymes E1 and E2 have similar activity levels; a third minor CoA ligase activity is due to a different 2-aminobenzoate-CoA ligase. The enzyme (E3) is a monomer of Mr, 65,000 which 2-aminobenzoate pathway (U. Altenschmidt, C. Eckerskorn, and G. Fuchs, Eur. J. Biochem. 194:647-653, 1990); apparently, it is not completely repressed under anaerobic conditions and therefore also is induced to a small extent by 2-aminobenzoate under anaerobic growth conditions. Images PMID:1885526

  6. The Ubiquitin Ligase Hul5 Promotes Proteasomal Processivity▿

    PubMed Central

    Aviram, Sharon; Kornitzer, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    The 26S proteasome is a large cytoplasmic protease that degrades polyubiquitinated proteins to short peptides in a processive manner. The proteasome 19S regulatory subcomplex tethers the target protein via its polyubiquitin adduct and unfolds the target polypeptide, which is then threaded into the proteolytic site-containing 20S subcomplex. Hul5 is a 19S subcomplex-associated ubiquitin ligase that elongates ubiquitin chains on proteasome-bound substrates. We isolated hul5Δ as a mutation with which fusions of an unstable cyclin to stable reporter proteins accumulate as partially processed products. These products appear transiently in the wild type but are strongly stabilized in 19S ATPase mutants and in the hul5Δ mutant, supporting a role for the ATPase subunits in the unfolding of proteasome substrates before insertion into the catalytic cavity and suggesting a role for Hul5 in the processive degradation of proteins that are stalled on the proteasome. PMID:20008553

  7. Building and remodelling Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lydeard, John R; Schulman, Brenda A; Harper, J Wade

    2013-01-01

    Cullin–RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRLs) control a plethora of biological pathways through targeted ubiquitylation of signalling proteins. These modular assemblies use substrate receptor modules to recruit specific targets. Recent efforts have focused on understanding the mechanisms that control the activity state of CRLs through dynamic alterations in CRL architecture. Central to these processes are cycles of cullin neddylation and deneddylation, as well as exchange of substrate receptor modules to re-sculpt the CRL landscape, thereby responding to the cellular requirements to turn over distinct proteins in different contexts. This review is focused on how CRLs are dynamically controlled with an emphasis on how cullin neddylation cycles are integrated with receptor exchange. PMID:24232186

  8. The Gp78 ubiquitin ligase: probing endoplasmic reticulum complexity.

    PubMed

    St Pierre, Pascal; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-02-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) has been classically divided, based on electron microscopy analysis, into parallel ribosome-studded rough ER sheets and a tubular smooth ER network. Recent studies have identified molecular constituents of the ER, the reticulons and DP1, that drive ER tubule formation and whose expression determines expression of ER sheets and tubules and thereby rough and smooth ER. However, segregation of the ER into only two domains remains simplistic and multiple functionally distinct ER domains necessarily exist. In this review, we will discuss the sub-organization of the ER in different domains focusing on the localization and role of the gp78 ubiquitin ligase in the mitochondria-associated smooth ER and on the evidence for a quality control ERAD domain.

  9. Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 promotes ovarian tumor growth.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jianguo; Meng, Ying; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Mao, Ming

    2015-05-20

    Ubiquitin E3 ligase MARCH7 is involved in T cell proliferation and neuronal development. We found that expression of MARCH7 was higher in ovarian cancer tissues than normal ovarian tissues. Silencing MARCH7 decreased cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Ectopic expression of MARCH7 increased cell proliferation, migration and invasion. Silencing MARCH7 prevented ovarian cancer growth in mice. Silencing MARCH7 inhibited NFkB and Wnt/β-catenin pathway. In agreement, ectopically expressed MARCH7 activated NFkB and Wnt/β-catenin pathways. Finally, MARCH7 was regulated by miR-101. Thus, MARCH7 is oncogenic and a potential target (oncotarget) for ovarian cancer therapy.

  10. Mur Ligase Inhibitors as Anti-bacterials: A Comprehensive Review.

    PubMed

    Sangshetti, Jaiprakash N; Joshi, Suyog S; Patil, Rajendra H; Shinde, Devanand B

    2017-02-14

    Exploring a new target for antibacterial drug discovery has gained much attention because of the emergence of Multidrug Resistance (MDR) strains of bacteria. To overcome this problem the development of novel antibacterial was considered as highest priority task and was one of the biggest challenges since multiple factors were involved. The bacterial peptidoglycan biosynthetic pathway has been well documented in the last few years and has been found to be an imperative source for the development of novel antibacterial agents with high target specificity as they are essential for bacterial survival and have no homologs in humans. We have therefore reviewed the process of peptidoglycan biosynthesis which involves various steps like formation of UDP-N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc), UDP-N-acetylmuramic acid (MurNAc) and lipid intermediates (Lipid I and Lipid II) which are controlled by various enzymes like GlmS, GlmM, GlmU enzyme, followed by Mur Ligases (MurA-MurF) and finally by MraY and MurG respectively. These four amide ligases MurC-MurF can be used as the source for the development of novel multi-target antibacterial agents as they shared and conserved amino acid regions, catalytic mechanisms and structural features. This review begins with the need for novel antibacterial agents and challenges in their development even after the development of bacterial genomic studies. An overview of the peptidoglycan monomer formation, as a source of disparity in this process is presented, followed by detailed discussion of structural and functional aspects of all Mur enzymes and different chemical classes of their inhibitors along with their SAR studies and inhibitory potential. This review finally emphasizes on different patents and novel Mur inhibitors in the development phase. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  11. Tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4 activates its ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Avinash; Alberts, Philipp; Mari, Sara; Tong, Jiefei; Murchie, Ryan; Maspero, Elena; Safi, Frozan; Moran, Michael F; Polo, Simona; Rotin, Daniela

    2014-10-07

    Ligand binding to the receptor tyrosine kinase fibroblast growth factor (FGF) receptor 1 (FGFR1) causes dimerization and activation by transphosphorylation of tyrosine residues in the kinase domain. FGFR1 is ubiquitylated by the E3 ligase NEDD4 (also known as NEDD4-1), which promotes FGFR1 internalization and degradation. Although phosphorylation of FGFR1 is required for NEDD4-dependent endocytosis, NEDD4 directly binds to a nonphosphorylated region of FGFR1. We found that activation of FGFR1 led to activation of c-Src kinase-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of NEDD4, enhancing the ubiquitin ligase activity of NEDD4. Using mass spectrometry, we identified several FGF-dependent phosphorylated tyrosines in NEDD4, including Tyr(43) in the C2 domain and Tyr(585) in the HECT domain. Mutating these tyrosines to phenylalanine to prevent phosphorylation inhibited FGF-dependent NEDD4 activity and FGFR1 endocytosis and enhanced cell proliferation. Mutating the tyrosines to glutamic acid to mimic phosphorylation enhanced NEDD4 activity. Moreover, the NEDD4 C2 domain bound the HECT domain, and the presence of phosphomimetic mutations inhibited this interaction, suggesting that phosphorylation of NEDD4 relieves an inhibitory intra- or intermolecular interaction. Accordingly, activation of FGFR1 was not required for activation of NEDD4 that lacked its C2 domain. Activation of c-Src by epidermal growth factor (EGF) also promoted tyrosine phosphorylation and enhanced the activity of NEDD4. Thus, we identified a feedback mechanism by which receptor tyrosine kinases promote catalytic activation of NEDD4 and that may represent a mechanism of receptor crosstalk. Copyright © 2014, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Lutz, Lindy M.; Pace, Chandler R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. IMPORTANCE The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin

  13. Rotavirus NSP1 Associates with Components of the Cullin RING Ligase Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Lindy M; Pace, Chandler R; Arnold, Michelle M

    2016-07-01

    The rotavirus nonstructural protein NSP1 acts as an antagonist of the host antiviral response by inducing degradation of key proteins required to activate interferon (IFN) production. Protein degradation induced by NSP1 is dependent on the proteasome, and the presence of a RING domain near the N terminus has led to the hypothesis that NSP1 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase. To examine this hypothesis, pulldown assays were performed, followed by mass spectrometry to identify components of the host ubiquitination machinery that associate with NSP1. Multiple components of cullin RING ligases (CRLs), which are essential multisubunit ubiquitination complexes, were identified in association with NSP1. The mass spectrometry was validated in both transfected and infected cells to show that the NSP1 proteins from different strains of rotavirus associated with key components of CRL complexes, most notably the cullin scaffolding proteins Cul3 and Cul1. In vitro binding assays using purified proteins confirmed that NSP1 specifically interacted with Cul3 and that the N-terminal region of Cul3 was responsible for binding to NSP1. To test if NSP1 used CRL3 to induce degradation of the target protein IRF3 or β-TrCP, Cul3 levels were knocked down using a small interfering RNA (siRNA) approach. Unexpectedly, loss of Cul3 did not rescue IRF3 or β-TrCP from degradation in infected cells. The results indicate that, rather than actively using CRL complexes to induce degradation of target proteins required for IFN production, NSP1 may use cullin-containing complexes to prevent another cellular activity. The ubiquitin-proteasome pathway plays an important regulatory role in numerous cellular functions, and many viruses have evolved mechanisms to exploit or manipulate this pathway to enhance replication and spread. Rotavirus, a major cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children that causes approximately 420,000 deaths worldwide each year, utilizes the ubiquitin-proteasome system to subvert

  14. Synthesis of bisphosphonate derivatives of ATP by T4 DNA ligase, ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1) and other ligases.

    PubMed

    Günther Sillero, María A; de Diego, Anabel; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2008-05-15

    T4 DNA ligase and the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1), catalyze the synthesis of ATP beta,gamma-bisphosphonate derivatives. Concerning T4 DNA ligase: (i) etidronate (pC(OH)(CH(3))p) displaced the AMP moiety of the complex E-AMP in a concentration dependent manner; (ii) the K(m) values and the rate of synthesis k(cat) (s(-1)), determined for the following compounds were, respectively: etidronate, 0.73+/-0.09 mM and (70+/-10)x10(-3) s(-1); clodronate (pCCl(2)p), 0.08+/-0.01 mM and (4.1+/-0.3)x10(-3) s(-1); methylenebisphosphonate (pCH(2)p), 0.024+/-0.001 mM and (0.6+/-0.1)x10(-3) s(-1); tripolyphosphate (P(3)) (in the synthesis of adenosine 5'-tetraphosphate, p(4)A), 1.30+/-0.30 mM and (6.2+/-1.1)x10(-3) s(-1); (iii) in the presence of GTP and ATP, inhibition of the synthesis of Ap(4)G was observed with clodronate but not with pamidronate (pC(OH)(CH(2)-CH(2)-NH(3))p). Concerning the ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1): methylenebisphosphonate was the only bisphosphonate, out of the ones tested, that served as substrate for the synthesis of an ATP derivative (K(m)=0.36+/-0.09 mM and k(cat)=0.15+/-0.02 s(-1)). None of the above bisphosphonates were substrates of the reaction catalyzed by luciferase or by acyl-CoA synthetase. The ability of acetyl-CoA synthetase to use methylenebisphosphonate as substrate depended on the commercial source of the enzyme. In our view this report widens our knowledge of the enzymes able to metabolize bisphosphonates, a therapeutic tool widely used in the treatment of osteoporosis.

  15. Essential Roles of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in p53 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sane, Sanam; Rezvani, Khosrow

    2017-01-01

    The ubiquitination pathway and proteasomal degradation machinery dominantly regulate p53 tumor suppressor protein stability, localization, and functions in both normal and cancerous cells. Selective E3 ubiquitin ligases dominantly regulate protein levels and activities of p53 in a large range of physiological conditions and in response to cellular changes induced by exogenous and endogenous stresses. The regulation of p53’s functions by E3 ubiquitin ligases is a complex process that can lead to positive or negative regulation of p53 protein in a context- and cell type-dependent manner. Accessory proteins bind and modulate E3 ubiquitin ligases, adding yet another layer of regulatory control for p53 and its downstream functions. This review provides a comprehensive understanding of p53 regulation by selective E3 ubiquitin ligases and their potential to be considered as a new class of biomarkers and therapeutic targets in diverse types of cancers. PMID:28218667

  16. Structural Basis for Nick Recognition by a Minimal Pluripotent DNA Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Nair,P.; Nandakumar, J.; Smith, P.; Odell, M.; Lima, C.; Shuman, S.

    2007-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase, the smallest eukaryotic ligase known, has pluripotent biological activity and an intrinsic nick-sensing function, despite having none of the accessory domains found in cellular ligases. A 2.3-{angstrom} crystal structure of the Chlorella virus ligase-AMP intermediate bound to duplex DNA containing a 3'-OH-5'-PO{sub 4} nick reveals a new mode of DNA envelopment, in which a short surface loop emanating from the OB domain forms a {beta}-hairpin 'latch' that inserts into the DNA major groove flanking the nick. A network of interactions with the 3'-OH and 5'-PO{sub 4} termini in the active site illuminates the DNA adenylylation mechanism and the crucial roles of AMP in nick sensing and catalysis. Addition of a divalent cation triggered nick sealing in crystallo, establishing that the nick complex is a bona fide intermediate in the DNA repair pathway.

  17. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.

  18. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivón, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; Goldman, Peter J.; Deerinck, Thomas J.; Yao, Jennifer Z.; Richardson, Douglas; Phipps, William S.; Ye, Anne Z.; Ellisman, Mark H.; Drennan, Catherine L.; Baker, David; Ting, Alice Y.

    2014-01-01

    Chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of the intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies. PMID:25313043

  19. Computational design of a red fluorophore ligase for site-specific protein labeling in living cells

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Daniel S.; Nivon, Lucas G.; Richter, Florian; ...

    2014-10-13

    In this study, chemical fluorophores offer tremendous size and photophysical advantages over fluorescent proteins but are much more challenging to target to specific cellular proteins. Here, we used Rosetta-based computation to design a fluorophore ligase that accepts the red dye resorufin, starting from Escherichia coli lipoic acid ligase. X-ray crystallography showed that the design closely matched the experimental structure. Resorufin ligase catalyzed the site-specific and covalent attachment of resorufin to various cellular proteins genetically fused to a 13-aa recognition peptide in multiple mammalian cell lines and in primary cultured neurons. We used resorufin ligase to perform superresolution imaging of themore » intermediate filament protein vimentin by stimulated emission depletion and electron microscopies. This work illustrates the power of Rosetta for major redesign of enzyme specificity and introduces a tool for minimally invasive, highly specific imaging of cellular proteins by both conventional and superresolution microscopies.« less

  20. Mechanism of replication machinery assembly as revealed by the DNA ligase-PCNA-DNA complex architecture.

    PubMed

    Mayanagi, Kouta; Kiyonari, Shinichi; Saito, Mihoko; Shirai, Tsuyoshi; Ishino, Yoshizumi; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-03-24

    The 3D structure of the ternary complex, consisting of DNA ligase, the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) clamp, and DNA, was investigated by single-particle analysis. This report presents the structural view, where the crescent-shaped DNA ligase with 3 distinct domains surrounds the central DNA duplex, encircled by the closed PCNA ring, thus forming a double-layer structure with dual contacts between the 2 proteins. The relative orientations of the DNA ligase domains, which remarkably differ from those of the known crystal structures, suggest that a large domain rearrangement occurs upon ternary complex formation. A second contact was found between the PCNA ring and the middle adenylation domain of the DNA ligase. Notably, the map revealed a substantial DNA tilt from the PCNA ring axis. This structure allows us to propose a switching mechanism for the replication factors operating on the PCNA ring.

  1. Prokaryotic BirA ligase biotinylates K4, K9, K18 and K23 in histone H3.

    PubMed

    Kobza, Keyna; Sarath, Gautam; Zempleni, Janos

    2008-04-30

    BirA ligase is a prokaryotic ortholog of holocarboxylase synthetase (HCS) that can biotinylate proteins. This study tested the hypothesis that BirA ligase catalyzes the biotinylation of eukaryotic histones. If so, this would mean that recombinant BirA ligase is a useful surrogate for HCS in studies of histone biotinylation. The biological activity of recombinant BirA ligase was confirmed by enzymatic biotinylation of p67. In particular, it was found that BirA ligase biotinylated both calf thymus histone H1 and human bulk histone extracts. Incubation of recombinant BirA ligase with H3-based synthetic peptides showed that lysines 4, 9, 18, and 23 in histone H3 are the targets for the biotinylation by BirA ligase. Modification of the peptides (e.g., serine phosphorylation) affected the subsequent biotinylation by BirA ligase, suggesting crosstalk between modifications. In conclusion, this study suggests that prokaryotic BirA ligase is a promiscuous enzyme and biotinylates eukaryotic histones. Moreover the biotinylation of histones by BirA ligase is consistent with the proposed role of human HCS in chromatin.

  2. A conserved physical and functional interaction between the cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader and DNA ligase I of eukaryotes.

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Levin, David S; Varkey, Johnson; Post, Sean; Bermudez, Vladimir P; Hurwitz, Jerard; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2007-08-03

    DNA ligase I joins Okazaki fragments during DNA replication and completes certain excision repair pathways. The participation of DNA ligase I in these transactions is directed by physical and functional interactions with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, a DNA sliding clamp, and, replication factor C (RFC), the clamp loader. Here we show that DNA ligase I also interacts with the hRad17 subunit of the hRad17-RFC cell cycle checkpoint clamp loader, and with each of the subunits of its DNA sliding clamp, the heterotrimeric hRad9-hRad1-hHus1 complex. In contrast to the inhibitory effect of RFC, hRad17-RFC stimulates joining by DNA ligase I. Similar results were obtained with the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae proteins indicating that the interaction between the replicative DNA ligase and checkpoint clamp is conserved in eukaryotes. Notably, we show that hRad17 preferentially interacts with and specifically stimulates dephosphorylated DNA ligase I. Moreover, there is an increased association between DNA ligase I and hRad17 in S phase following DNA damage and replication blockage that occurs concomitantly with DNA damage-induced dephosphorylation of chromatin-associated DNA ligase I. Thus, our results suggest that the in vivo interaction between DNA ligase I and the checkpoint clamp loader is regulated by post-translational modification of DNA ligase I.

  3. Mutational analysis of Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase reveals regions critical for interaction with KREPA2.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Vaibhav; Sen, Rajashree; Moshiri, Houtan; Salavati, Reza

    2015-01-01

    The Trypanosoma brucei parasite causes the vector-borne disease African sleeping sickness. Mitochondrial mRNAs of T. brucei undergo posttranscriptional RNA editing to make mature, functional mRNAs. The final step of this process is catalyzed by the essential ligase, T. brucei RNA Editing Ligase 1 (TbREL1) and the closely related T. brucei RNA Editing Ligase 2 (TbREL2). While other ligases such as T7 DNA ligase have both a catalytic and an oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding (OB)-fold domain, T. brucei RNA editing ligases contain only the catalytic domain. The OB-fold domain, which is required for interaction with the substrate RNA, is provided in trans by KREPA2 (for TbREL1) and KREPA1 (for TbREL2). KREPA2 enhancement of TbREL1 ligase activity is presumed to occur via an OB-fold-mediated increase in substrate specificity and catalysis. We characterized the interaction between TbREL1 and KREPA2 in vitro using full-length, truncated, and point-mutated ligases. As previously shown, our data indicate strong, specific stimulation of TbREL1 catalytic activity by KREPA2. We narrowed the region of contact to the final 59 C-terminal residues of TbREL1. Specifically, the TbREL1 C-terminal KWKE (441-444) sequence appear to coordinate the KREPA2-mediated enhancement of TbREL1 activities. N-terminal residues F206, T264 and Y275 are crucial for the overall activity of TbREL1, particularly for F206, a mutation of this residue also disrupts KREPA2 interaction. Thus, we have identified the critical TbREL1 regions and amino acids that mediate the KREPA2 interaction.

  4. Comprehensive database of human E3 ubiquitin ligases: application to aquaporin-2 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Medvar, Barbara; Raghuram, Viswanathan; Pisitkun, Trairak; Sarkar, Abhijit

    2016-01-01

    Aquaporin-2 (AQP2) is regulated in part via vasopressin-mediated changes in protein half-life that are in turn dependent on AQP2 ubiquitination. Here we addressed the question, “What E3 ubiquitin ligase is most likely to be responsible for AQP2 ubiquitination?” using large-scale data integration based on Bayes' rule. The first step was to bioinformatically identify all E3 ligase genes coded by the human genome. The 377 E3 ubiquitin ligases identified in the human genome, consisting predominant of HECT, RING, and U-box proteins, have been used to create a publically accessible and downloadable online database (https://hpcwebapps.cit.nih.gov/ESBL/Database/E3-ligases/). We also curated a second database of E3 ligase accessory proteins that included BTB domain proteins, cullins, SOCS-box proteins, and F-box proteins. Using Bayes' theorem to integrate information from multiple large-scale proteomic and transcriptomic datasets, we ranked these 377 E3 ligases with respect to their probability of interaction with AQP2. Application of Bayes' rule identified the E3 ligases most likely to interact with AQP2 as (in order of probability): NEDD4 and NEDD4L (tied for first), AMFR, STUB1, ITCH, ZFPL1. Significantly, the two E3 ligases tied for top rank have also been studied extensively in the reductionist literature as regulatory proteins in renal tubule epithelia. The concordance of conclusions from reductionist and systems-level data provides strong motivation for further studies of the roles of NEDD4 and NEDD4L in the regulation of AQP2 protein turnover. PMID:27199454

  5. Identification of three oligo-/polysaccharide-specific ligases in Yersinia enterocolitica.

    PubMed

    Pinta, Elise; Li, Zhilin; Batzilla, Julia; Pajunen, Maria; Kasanen, Tiina; Rabsztyn, Kamila; Rakin, Alexander; Skurnik, Mikael

    2012-01-01

    In lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis of gram-negative bacteria the lipid A-core oligosaccharide (LA-core) and O-polysaccharide (O-PS) biosynthesis pathways proceed separately and converge in periplasmic space where the waaL-encoded ligase joins O-PS onto LA-core. Enterobacterial common antigen (ECA) biosynthesis follows that of O-PS except that ECA is usually ligated to phosphatidylglycerol (PG) and only rarely to LA-core. In Yersinia enterocolitica serotype O:3 LPS is composed of LA-inner core (IC) onto which a homopolymeric O-PS, a hexasaccharide called outer core (OC), and/or ECA are ligated. We found that an individual O:3 LPS molecule carries either OC or O-PS substitution but not both. Related to this, we identified three genes in Y. enterocolitica O:3 that all expressed O-PS ligase activity in the Escherichia coliΔwaaL mutant. The LPS phenotypes of Y. enterocolitica O:3 single, double and triple ligase mutants indicated that two of ligases, named as WaaL(os) and WaaL(ps) , had a preferred substrate specificity for OC and O-PS, respectively, although with some promiscuity between the ligases; the third ligase named as WaaL(xs) was not involved in LPS or ECA biosynthesis. In Y. enterocolitica O:8 the WaaL(os) homologue (Ye1727) ligated a single pentasaccharide O-unit to LA-IC suggesting that in both Y. enterocolitica O:3 and O:8 WaaL(os) is an oligosaccharide (OS)-specific ligase. Finally, Yersinia pestis and Y. pseudotuberculosis carry only the waaL(ps) gene, while either waaL(os) or waaL(xs) or both are additionally present in other Yersinia species. This is the first report on the presence of three different oligo-/polysaccharide-specific ligases in a single bacterium. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  6. Three-dimensional structure model and predicted ATP interaction rewiring of a deviant RNA ligase 2.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Sandrine; Noutahi, Emmanuel; Lamoureux, Guillaume; Burger, Gertraud

    2015-10-09

    RNA ligases 2 are scarce and scattered across the tree of life. Two members of this family are well studied: the mitochondrial RNA editing ligase from the parasitic trypanosomes (Kinetoplastea), a promising drug target, and bacteriophage T4 RNA ligase 2, a workhorse in molecular biology. Here we report the identification of a divergent RNA ligase 2 (DpRNL) from Diplonema papillatum (Diplonemea), a member of the kinetoplastids' sister group. We identified DpRNL with methods based on sensitive hidden Markov Model. Then, using homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations, we established a three dimensional structure model of DpRNL complexed with ATP and Mg2+. The 3D model of Diplonema was compared with available crystal structures from Trypanosoma brucei, bacteriophage T4, and two archaeans. Interaction of DpRNL with ATP is predicted to involve double π-stacking, which has not been reported before in RNA ligases. This particular contact would shift the orientation of ATP and have considerable consequences on the interaction network of amino acids in the catalytic pocket. We postulate that certain canonical amino acids assume different functional roles in DpRNL compared to structurally homologous residues in other RNA ligases 2, a reassignment indicative of constructive neutral evolution. Finally, both structure comparison and phylogenetic analysis show that DpRNL is not specifically related to RNA ligases from trypanosomes, suggesting a unique adaptation of the latter for RNA editing, after the split of diplonemids and kinetoplastids. Homology modeling and molecular dynamics simulations strongly suggest that DpRNL is an RNA ligase 2. The predicted innovative reshaping of DpRNL's catalytic pocket is worthwhile to be tested experimentally.

  7. Fragment-based discovery of 6-azaindazoles as inhibitors of bacterial DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Howard, Steven; Amin, Nader; Benowitz, Andrew B; Chiarparin, Elisabetta; Cui, Haifeng; Deng, Xiaodong; Heightman, Tom D; Holmes, David J; Hopkins, Anna; Huang, Jianzhong; Jin, Qi; Kreatsoulas, Constantine; Martin, Agnes C L; Massey, Frances; McCloskey, Lynn; Mortenson, Paul N; Pathuri, Puja; Tisi, Dominic; Williams, Pamela A

    2013-12-12

    Herein we describe the application of fragment-based drug design to bacterial DNA ligase. X-ray crystallography was used to guide structure-based optimization of a fragment-screening hit to give novel, nanomolar, AMP-competitive inhibitors. The lead compound 13 showed antibacterial activity across a range of pathogens. Data to demonstrate mode of action was provided using a strain of S. aureus, engineered to overexpress DNA ligase.

  8. Deubiquitinase FAM/USP9X Interacts with the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase SMURF1 Protein and Protects It from Ligase Activity-dependent Self-degradation

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Yang; Avello, Monika; Schirle, Markus; McWhinnie, Elizabeth; Feng, Yan; Bric-Furlong, Eva; Wilson, Christopher; Nathans, Robin; Zhang, Jing; Kirschner, Marc W.; Huang, Shih-Min A.; Cong, Feng

    2013-01-01

    Ubiquitination is an essential post-translational modification that mediates diverse cellular functions. SMAD-specific E3 ubiquitin protein ligase 1 (SMURF1) belongs to the Nedd4 family of HECT ubiquitin ligases that directly catalyzes ubiquitin conjugation onto diverse substrates. As a result, SMURF1 regulates a great variety of cellular physiologies including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, cell migration, and planar cell polarity. Structurally, SMURF1 consists of a C2 domain, two WW domain repeats, and a catalytic HECT domain essential for its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity. This modular architecture allows for interactions with other proteins, which are either substrates or adaptors of SMURF1. Despite the increasing number of SMURF1 substrates identified, current knowledge regarding regulatory proteins and their modes of action on controlling SMURF1 activity is still limited. In this study, we employed quantitative mass spectrometry to analyze SMURF1-associated cellular complexes, and identified the deubiquitinase FAM/USP9X as a novel interacting protein for SMURF1. Through domain mapping study, we found the second WW domain of SMURF1 and the carboxyl terminus of USP9X critical for this interaction. SMURF1 is autoubiquitinated through its intrinsic HECT E3 ligase activity, and is degraded by the proteasome. USP9X association antagonizes this activity, resulting in deubiquitination and stabilization of SMURF1. In MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells, SMURF1 expression is elevated and is required for cellular motility. USP9X stabilizes endogenous SMURF1 in MDA-MB-231 cells. Depletion of USP9X led to down-regulation of SMURF1 and significantly impaired cellular migration. Taken together, our data reveal USP9X as an important regulatory protein of SMURF1 and suggest that the association between deubiquitinase and E3 ligase may serve as a common strategy to control the cellular protein dynamics through modulating E3 ligase stability. PMID:23184937

  9. Discovery and design of DNA and RNA ligase inhibitors in infectious microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Robert V.; Amaro, Rommie E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Members of the nucleotidyltransferase superfamily known as DNA and RNA ligases carry out the enzymatic process of polynucleotide ligation. These guardians of genomic integrity share a three-step ligation mechanism, as well as common core structural elements. Both DNA and RNA ligases have experienced a surge of recent interest as chemotherapeutic targets for the treatment of a range of diseases, including bacterial infection, cancer, and the diseases caused by the protozoan parasites known as trypanosomes. Objective In this review, we will focus on efforts targeting pathogenic microorganisms; specifically, bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligases, which are promising broad-spectrum antibiotic targets, and ATP-dependent RNA editing ligases from Trypanosoma brucei, the species responsible for the devastating neurodegenerative disease, African sleeping sickness. Conclusion High quality crystal structures of both NAD+-dependent DNA ligase and the Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligase have facilitated the development of a number of promising leads. For both targets, further progress will require surmounting permeability issues and improving selectivity and affinity. PMID:20354588

  10. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-11-17

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia-reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair.

  11. Structure and two-metal mechanism of a eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-01-01

    ATP-dependent RNA ligases are agents of RNA repair that join 3′-OH and 5′-PO4 RNA ends. Naegleria gruberi RNA ligase (NgrRnl) exemplifies a family of RNA nick-sealing enzymes found in bacteria, viruses, and eukarya. Crystal structures of NgrRnl at three discrete steps along the reaction pathway—covalent ligase-(lysyl-Nζ)–AMP•Mn2+ intermediate; ligase•ATP•(Mn2+)2 Michaelis complex; and ligase•Mn2+ complex—highlight a two-metal mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer, whereby (i) an enzyme-bound “catalytic” metal coordination complex lowers the pKa of the lysine nucleophile and stabilizes the transition state of the ATP α phosphate; and (ii) a second metal coordination complex bridges the β- and γ-phosphates. The NgrRnl N domain is a distinctively embellished oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold that engages the γ-phosphate and associated metal complex and orients the pyrophosphate leaving group for in-line catalysis with stereochemical inversion at the AMP phosphate. The unique domain architecture of NgrRnl fortifies the theme that RNA ligases have evolved many times, and independently, by fusions of a shared nucleotidyltransferase domain to structurally diverse flanking modules. The mechanistic insights to lysine adenylylation gained from the NgrRnl structures are likely to apply broadly to the covalent nucleotidyltransferase superfamily of RNA ligases, DNA ligases, and RNA capping enzymes. PMID:26512110

  12. E3 ubiquitin ligase: A potential regulator in fibrosis and systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Xiao-Lei; Zhang, Li; Duan, Yu; Wang, Yu-Jie; Zhao, Jiu-Hua; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease characterized by fibrosis in the skin and internal organs. The pathogenesis of SSc is not completely understood until now. Recently, many studies have focused on the role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in organ fibrosis. However, the possible regulatory mechanisms of E3 ubiquitin ligases in fibrosis and SSc are not well documented. In this review, we summarized that E3 ubiquitin ligases regulated fibrosis through ubiquitin-mediated degradation of TGF-β/Smad signaling pathway. Moreover, E3 ubiquitin ligases participated in regulating fibrosis by other methods, such as inducing epithelial transition to mesenchymal cell, enhancing the production of TGF-β and protecting activated hepatic stellate cells from apoptosis. However, the specific regulatory mechanisms of E3 ubiquitin ligases in scleroderma is still not fully understood. There are more works to be done to specify the mechanism of E3 ubiquitin ligases in regulation of fibrosis in SSc. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Peptide and small molecule inhibitors of HECT-type ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Mund, Thomas; Lewis, Michael J; Maslen, Sarah; Pelham, Hugh R

    2014-11-25

    The human genome encodes several hundred E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING domains, and around 28 containing HECT domains. These enzymes catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from E2 enzyme thioesters to a huge range of substrates and play crucial roles in many cellular functions. This makes them attractive potential therapeutic targets. However, they have proven difficult to inhibit: very few good inhibitors exist for RING domain ligases, and none have been described for HECT ligases. Here we show that bicyclic peptides isolated by phage display [Heinis C, Rutherford T, Freund S, Winter G (2009) Nat Chem Biol. 5(7):502-507] can target the E2 binding sites on the HECT domains of Smurf2, Nedd4, Mule/Huwe1, and WWP1, and thus act as specific inhibitors of these enzymes in vitro. By screening for displacement of one of these peptides from Smurf2, we were able to identify a small molecule, heclin (HECT ligase inhibitor), which inhibits several HECT ligases in tissue culture cells. In vitro, heclin does not block E2 binding but causes a conformational change that results in oxidation of the active site Cys. This demonstrates that HECT domains are potentially druggable and provides molecules that may be of experimental use. Heclin kills HEK293 cells growing in culture, consistent with an essential role for HECT ligase activity in mammalian cells.

  14. Structure and two-metal mechanism of a eukaryal nick-sealing RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Unciuleac, Mihaela-Carmen; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart

    2015-11-10

    ATP-dependent RNA ligases are agents of RNA repair that join 3'-OH and 5'-PO4 RNA ends. Naegleria gruberi RNA ligase (NgrRnl) exemplifies a family of RNA nick-sealing enzymes found in bacteria, viruses, and eukarya. Crystal structures of NgrRnl at three discrete steps along the reaction pathway-covalent ligase-(lysyl-Nζ)-AMP•Mn(2+) intermediate; ligase•ATP•(Mn(2+))2 Michaelis complex; and ligase•Mn(2+) complex-highlight a two-metal mechanism of nucleotidyl transfer, whereby (i) an enzyme-bound "catalytic" metal coordination complex lowers the pKa of the lysine nucleophile and stabilizes the transition state of the ATP α phosphate; and (ii) a second metal coordination complex bridges the β- and γ-phosphates. The NgrRnl N domain is a distinctively embellished oligonucleotide-binding (OB) fold that engages the γ-phosphate and associated metal complex and orients the pyrophosphate leaving group for in-line catalysis with stereochemical inversion at the AMP phosphate. The unique domain architecture of NgrRnl fortifies the theme that RNA ligases have evolved many times, and independently, by fusions of a shared nucleotidyltransferase domain to structurally diverse flanking modules. The mechanistic insights to lysine adenylylation gained from the NgrRnl structures are likely to apply broadly to the covalent nucleotidyltransferase superfamily of RNA ligases, DNA ligases, and RNA capping enzymes.

  15. Lithium promotes DNA stability and survival of ischemic retinal neurocytes by upregulating DNA ligase IV

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Wu, Nandan; Tian, Sijia; Li, Fan; Hu, Huan; Chen, Pei; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Xu, Lijun; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Zhao; Ge, Jian; Yu, Keming; Zhuang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Neurons display genomic fragility and show fragmented DNA in pathological degeneration. A failure to repair DNA breaks may result in cell death or apoptosis. Lithium protects retinal neurocytes following nutrient deprivation or partial nerve crush, but the underlying mechanisms are not well defined. Here we demonstrate that pretreatment with lithium protects retinal neurocytes from ischemia-induced damage and enhances light response in rat retina following ischemia–reperfusion injury. Moreover, we found that DNA nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair is implicated in this process because in ischemic retinal neurocytes, lithium significantly reduces the number of γ-H2AX foci (well-characterized markers of DNA double-strand breaks in situ) and increases the DNA ligase IV expression level. Furthermore, we also demonstrate that nuclear respiratory factor 1 (Nrf-1) and phosphorylated cyclic AMP-response element binding protein-1 (P-CREB1) bind to ligase IV promoter to cause upregulation of ligase IV in neurocytes. The ischemic upregulation of Nrf-1 and lithium-induced increase of P-CREB1 cooperate to promote transcription of ligase IV. Short hairpin RNAs against Nrf-1 and CREB1 could significantly inhibit the increase in promoter activity and expression of ligase IV observed in the control oligos following lithium treatment in retinal neurocytes. More importantly, ischemic stimulation triggers the expression of ligase IV. Taken together, our results thus reveal a novel mechanism that lithium offers neuroprotection from ischemia-induced damage by enhancing DNA NHEJ repair. PMID:27853172

  16. Cloning, molecular characterization and expression of a DNA-ligase from a new bacteriophage: Phax1.

    PubMed

    Setayesh, Neda; Sabouri-Shahrbabak, Saleheh; Bakherad, Hamid; Sepehrizadeh, Zargham

    2013-12-01

    DNA ligases join 3' hydroxyl and 5' phosphate ends in double stranded DNA and are necessary for maintaining the integrity of genome. The gene encoding a new Escherichia phage (Phax1) DNA ligase was cloned and sequenced. The gene contains an open reading frame with 1,428 base pairs, encoding 475 amino acid residues. Alignment of the entire amino acid sequence showed that Phax1 DNA ligase has a high degree of sequence homology with ligases from Escherichia (vB_EcoM_CBA120), Salmonella (PhiSH19 and SFP10), Shigella (phiSboM-AG3), and Deftia (phiW-14) phages. The Phax1 DNA ligase gene was expressed under the control of the T7lac promoter on the pET-16b (+) in Escherichia coli Rossetta gami. The enzyme was then homogeneously purified by a metal affinity column. Enzymatic activity of the recombinant DNA ligase was assayed by an in-house PCR-based method.

  17. Defects in DNA ligase I trigger PCNA ubiquitylation at Lys 107.

    PubMed

    Das-Bradoo, Sapna; Nguyen, Hai Dang; Wood, Jamie L; Ricke, Robin M; Haworth, Justin C; Bielinsky, Anja-Katrin

    2010-01-01

    In all eukaryotes, the ligation of newly synthesized DNA, also known as Okazaki fragments, is catalysed by DNA ligase I (ref. 1). An individual with a DNA ligase I deficiency exhibits growth retardation, sunlight sensitivity and severe immunosuppression, probably due to accumulation of DNA damage. Surprisingly, not much is known about the DNA damage response (DDR) in DNA ligase I-deficient cells. As DNA replication and DDR pathways are highly conserved in eukaryotes, we used Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system to address this issue. We uncovered a new pathway, which facilitates ubiquitylation at Lys 107 of proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA). Unlike ubiquitylation at Lys 164 of PCNA in response to UV irradiation, which triggers translesion synthesis, modification of Lys 107 is not dependent on the ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2) Rad6 (ref. 4) nor the ubiquitin ligase (E3) Rad18 (ref. 5), but requires the E2 variant Mms2 (ref. 6) in conjunction with Ubc4 (ref. 7) and the E3 Rad5 (Refs 8, 9). Surprisingly, DNA ligase I-deficient S. cerevisiae cdc9-1 cells that carry a PCNAK107R mutation are inviable, because they cannot activate a robust DDR. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitylation of PCNA in response to DNA ligase I deficiency is conserved in humans, yet the lysine residue that is modified remains to be determined. We propose that PCNA ubiquitylation provides a 'DNA damage code' that allows cells to categorize different types of defects that arise during DNA replication.

  18. A high-throughput fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based assay for DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Shapiro, Adam B; Eakin, Ann E; Walkup, Grant K; Rivin, Olga

    2011-06-01

    DNA ligase is the enzyme that catalyzes the formation of the backbone phosphodiester bond between the 5'-PO(4) and 3'-OH of adjacent DNA nucleotides at single-stranded nicks. These nicks occur between Okazaki fragments during replication of the lagging strand of the DNA as well as during DNA repair and recombination. As essential enzymes for DNA replication, the NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases of pathogenic bacteria are potential targets for the development of antibacterial drugs. For the purposes of drug discovery, a high-throughput assay for DNA ligase activity is invaluable. This article describes a straightforward, fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based DNA ligase assay that is well suited for high-throughput screening for DNA ligase inhibitors as well as for use in enzyme kinetics studies. Its use is demonstrated for measurement of the steady-state kinetic constants of Haemophilus influenzae NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase and for measurement of the potency of an inhibitor of this enzyme.

  19. Base-modified NAD and AMP derivatives and their activity against bacterial DNA ligases.

    PubMed

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Cominetti, Marco M D; Butt, Julea N; Field, Robert A; Bowater, Richard P; Wagner, Gerd K

    2015-06-14

    We report the chemical synthesis and conformational analysis of a collection of 2-, 6- and 8-substituted derivatives of β-NAD(+) and AMP, and their biochemical evaluation against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases from Escherichia coli and Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Bacterial DNA ligases are validated anti-microbial targets, and new strategies for their inhibition are therefore of considerable scientific and practical interest. Our study includes several pairs of β-NAD(+) and AMP derivatives with the same substitution pattern at the adenine base. This has enabled the first direct comparison of co-substrate and inhibitor behaviour against bacterial DNA ligases. Our results suggest that an additional substituent in position 6 or 8 of the adenine base in β-NAD(+) is detrimental for activity as either co-substrate or inhibitor. In contrast, substituents in position 2 are not only tolerated, but appear to give rise to a new mode of inhibition, which targets the conformational changes these DNA ligases undergo during catalysis. Using a molecular modelling approach, we highlight that these findings have important implications for our understanding of ligase mechanism and inhibition, and may provide a promising starting point for the rational design of a new class of inhibitors against NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligases.

  20. Recombinant expression and purification of an ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Aliivibrio salmonicida.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Pedersen, Hege

    2014-05-01

    The genome of the psychrophilic fish-pathogen Aliivibrio salmonicida encodes a putative ATP-dependent DNA ligase in addition to a housekeeping NAD-dependent enzyme. In order to study the structure and activity of the ATP dependent ligase in vitro we have undertaken its recombinant production and purification from an Escherichia coli based expression system. Expression and purification of this protein presented two significant challenges. First, the gene product was moderately toxic to E. coli cells, second it was necessary to remove the large amounts of E. coli DNA present in bacterial lysates without contamination of the protein preparation by nucleases which might interfere with future assaying. The toxicity problem was overcome by fusion of the putative ligase to large solubility tags such as maltose-binding protein (MBP) or Glutathione-S-transferase (GST), and DNA was removed by treatment with a nuclease which could be inhibited by reducing agents. As the A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase gene encodes a predicted leader peptide, both the full-length and mature forms of the protein were produced. Both possessed ATP-dependent DNA ligase activity, but the truncated form was significantly more active. Here we detail the first reported production, purification and preliminary characterization of active A. salmonicida ATP-dependent DNA ligase.

  1. Activation of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Parkin.

    PubMed

    Caulfield, Thomas R; Fiesel, Fabienne C; Springer, Wolfdieter

    2015-04-01

    The PINK1 (phosphatase and tensin homologue-induced putative kinase 1)/Parkin-dependent mitochondrial quality control pathway mediates the clearance of damaged organelles, but appears to be disrupted in Parkinson's disease (PD) [Springer and Kahle (2011) Autophagy 7, 266-278]. Upon mitochondrial stress, PINK1 activates the E3 ubiquitin (Ub) ligase Parkin through phosphorylation of the Ub-like (UBL) domain of Parkin and of the small modifier Ub itself at a conserved residue [Sauvé and Gehring (2014) Cell Res. 24, 1025-1026]. Recently resolved partial crystal structures of Parkin showed a 'closed', auto-inhibited conformation, consistent with its notoriously weak enzymatic activity at steady state [Wauer and Komander (2013) EMBO J. 32, 2099-2112; Riley et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1982; Trempe et al. (2013) Science 340, 1451-1455; Spratt et al. (2013) Nat. Commun. 4, 1983]. It has thus become clear that Parkin must undergo major structural rearrangements in order to unleash its catalytic functions. Recent published findings derived from X-ray structures and molecular modelling present a complete structural model of human Parkin at an all-atom resolution [Caulfield et al. (2014) PLoS Comput. Biol. 10, e1003935]. The results of the combined in silico simulations-based and experimental assay-based study indicates that PINK1-dependent Ser65 phosphorylation of Parkin is required for its activation and triggering of 'opening' conformations. Indeed, the obtained structures showed a sequential release of Parkin's intertwined domains and allowed docking of an Ub-charged E2 coenzyme, which could enable its enzymatic activity. In addition, using cell-based screening, select E2 enzymes that redundantly, cooperatively or antagonistically regulate Parkin's activation and/or enzymatic functions at different stages of the mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy) process were identified [Fiesel et al. (2014) J. Cell Sci. 127, 3488-3504]. Other work that aims to pin-point the particular

  2. Screening for E3-Ubiquitin ligase inhibitors: challenges and opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Landré, Vivien; Rotblat, Barak; Melino, Sonia; Bernassola, Francesca; Melino, Gerry

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitin proteasome system (UPS) plays a role in the regulation of most cellular pathways, and its deregulation has been implicated in a wide range of human pathologies that include cancer, neurodegenerative and immunological disorders and viral infections. Targeting the UPS by small molecular regulators thus provides an opportunity for the development of therapeutics for the treatment of several diseases. The proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib was approved for treatment of hematologic malignancies by the FDA in 2003, becoming the first drug targeting the ubiquitin proteasome system in the clinic. Development of drugs targeting specific components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, however, has lagged behind, mainly due to the complexity of the ubiquitination reaction and its outcomes. However, significant advances have been made in recent years in understanding the molecular nature of the ubiquitination system and the vast variety of cellular signals that it produces. Additionally, improvement of screening methods, both in vitro and in silico, have led to the discovery of a number of compounds targeting components of the ubiquitin proteasome system, and some of these have now entered clinical trials. Here, we discuss the current state of drug discovery targeting E3 ligases and the opportunities and challenges that it provides. PMID:25237759

  3. Role of the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7 in cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yabin; Li, Gang

    2012-06-01

    Fbw7 is a member of F-box family proteins, which constitute one subunit of Skp1, Cul1, and F-box protein (SCF) ubiquitin ligase complex. SCF(Fbw7) targets a set of well-known oncoproteins, including c-Myc, cyclin E, Notch, c-Jun, and Mcl-1, for ubiquitylation and degradation. Fbw7 provides specificity of the ubiquitylation of these substrate proteins via recognition of a consensus phosphorylated degron. Through regulation of several important proteins, Fbw7 controls diverse cellular processes, including cell-cycle progression, cell proliferation, differentiation, DNA damage response, maintenance of genomic stability, and neural cell stemness. As reduced Fbw7 expression level and loss-of-function mutations are found in a wide range of human cancers, Fbw7 is generally considered as a tumor suppressor. However, the exact mechanisms underlying Fbw7-induced tumor suppression is unclear. This review focuses on regulation network, biological functions, and genetic alteration of Fbw7 in connection with its role in cancer development.

  4. Biotin Protein Ligase Is a Target for New Antibacterials

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jiage; Paparella, Ashleigh S.; Booker, Grant W.; Polyak, Steven W.; Abell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    There is a desperate need for novel antibiotic classes to combat the rise of drug resistant pathogenic bacteria, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Inhibitors of the essential metabolic enzyme biotin protein ligase (BPL) represent a promising drug target for new antibacterials. Structural and biochemical studies on the BPL from S. aureus have paved the way for the design and development of new antibacterial chemotherapeutics. BPL employs an ordered ligand binding mechanism for the synthesis of the reaction intermediate biotinyl-5′-AMP from substrates biotin and ATP. Here we review the structure and catalytic mechanism of the target enzyme, along with an overview of chemical analogues of biotin and biotinyl-5′-AMP as BPL inhibitors reported to date. Of particular promise are studies to replace the labile phosphoroanhydride linker present in biotinyl-5′-AMP with alternative bioisosteres. A novel in situ click approach using a mutant of S. aureus BPL as a template for the synthesis of triazole-based inhibitors is also presented. These approaches can be widely applied to BPLs from other bacteria, as well as other closely related metabolic enzymes and antibacterial drug targets. PMID:27463729

  5. Structural basis of tubulin tyrosination by tubulin tyrosine ligase

    PubMed Central

    Prota, Andrea E.; Magiera, Maria M.; Kuijpers, Marijn; Bargsten, Katja; Frey, Daniel; Wieser, Mara; Jaussi, Rolf; Hoogenraad, Casper C.; Kammerer, Richard A.; Janke, Carsten

    2013-01-01

    Tubulin tyrosine ligase (TTL) catalyzes the post-translational retyrosination of detyrosinated α-tubulin. Despite the indispensable role of TTL in cell and organism development, its molecular mechanism of action is poorly understood. By solving crystal structures of TTL in complex with tubulin, we here demonstrate that TTL binds to the α and β subunits of tubulin and recognizes the curved conformation of the dimer. Biochemical and cellular assays revealed that specific tubulin dimer recognition controls the activity of the enzyme, and as a consequence, neuronal development. The TTL–tubulin structure further illustrates how the enzyme binds the functionally crucial C-terminal tail sequence of α-tubulin and how this interaction catalyzes the tyrosination reaction. It also reveals how TTL discriminates between α- and β-tubulin, and between different post-translationally modified forms of α-tubulin. Together, our data suggest that TTL has specifically evolved to recognize and modify tubulin, thus highlighting a fundamental role of the evolutionary conserved tubulin tyrosination cycle in regulating the microtubule cytoskeleton. PMID:23358242

  6. Prebiotic Factors Influencing the Activity of a Ligase Ribozyme.

    PubMed

    Anella, Fabrizio; Danelon, Christophe

    2017-04-06

    An RNA-lipid origin of life scenario provides a plausible route for compartmentalized replication of an informational polymer and subsequent division of the container. However, a full narrative to form such RNA protocells implies that catalytic RNA molecules, called ribozymes, can operate in the presence of self-assembled vesicles composed of prebiotically relevant constituents, such as fatty acids. Hereby, we subjected a newly engineered truncated variant of the L1 ligase ribozyme, named tL1, to various environmental conditions that may have prevailed on the early Earth with the objective to find a set of control parameters enabling both tL1-catalyzed ligation and formation of stable myristoleic acid (MA) vesicles. The separate and concurrent effects of temperature, concentrations of Mg(2+), MA, polyethylene glycol and various solutes were investigated. The most favorable condition tested consists of 100 mM NaCl, 1 mM Mg(2+), 5 mM MA, and 4 °C temperature, whereas the addition of Mg(2+)-chelating solutes, such as citrate, tRNAs, aspartic acid, and nucleoside triphosphates severely inhibits the reaction. These results further solidify the RNA-lipid world hypothesis and stress the importance of using a systems chemistry approach whereby a wide range of prebiotic factors interfacing with ribozymes are considered.

  7. UHRF2, another E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53

    SciTech Connect

    Bai, Lu; Wang, Xiaohui; Jin, Fangmin; Yang, Yan; Qian, Guanhua; Duan, Changzhu

    2012-09-07

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 associates with p53 in vivo and in vitro. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 interacts with p53 through its SRA/YDG domain. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer UHRF2 ubiquitinates p53 in vivo and in vitro. -- Abstract: UHRF2, ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 2, is a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is involved in cell cycle and epigenetic regulation. UHRF2 interacts with multiple cell cycle proteins, including cyclins (A2, B1, D1, and E1), CDK2, and pRb; moreover, UHRF2 could ubiquitinate cyclin D1 and cyclin E1. Also, UHRF2 has been shown to be implicated in epigenetic regulation by associating with DNMTs, G9a, HDAC1, H3K9me2/3 and hemi-methylated DNA. We found that UHRF2 associates with tumor suppressor protein p53, and p53 is ubiquitinated by UHRF2 in vivo and in vitro. Given that both UHRF2 and p53 are involved in cell cycle regulation, this study may suggest a novel signaling pathway on cell proliferation.

  8. The ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 coordinates gastrointestinal secretory cell maturation

    PubMed Central

    Capoccia, Benjamin J.; Jin, Ramon U.; Kong, Young-Yun; Peek, Richard M.; Fassan, Matteo; Rugge, Massimo; Mills, Jason C.

    2013-01-01

    After cell fate specification, differentiating cells must amplify the specific subcellular features required for their specialized function. How cells regulate such subcellular scaling is a fundamental unanswered question. Here, we show that the E3 ubiquitin ligase Mindbomb 1 (MIB1) is required for the apical secretory apparatus established by gastric zymogenic cells as they differentiate from their progenitors. When Mib1 was deleted, death-associated protein kinase–1 (DAPK1) was rerouted to the cell base, microtubule-associated protein 1B (MAP1B) was dephosphorylated, and the apical vesicles that normally support mature secretory granules were dispersed. Consequently, secretory granules did not mature. The transcription factor MIST1 bound the first intron of Mib1 and regulated its expression. We further showed that loss of MIB1 and dismantling of the apical secretory apparatus was the earliest quantifiable aberration in zymogenic cells undergoing transition to a precancerous metaplastic state in mouse and human stomach. Our results reveal a mechanistic pathway by which cells can scale up a specific, specialized subcellular compartment to alter function during differentiation and scale it down during disease. PMID:23478405

  9. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A.; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E.; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S.; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P.; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-01-01

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3′s cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1’s conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2–E3 interface through small-molecule modulators. PMID:27001857

  10. Identification of Erwinia stewartii by a ligase chain reaction assay.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, W J; Wiedmann, M; Dillard, H R; Batt, C A

    1994-01-01

    A PCR-coupled ligase chain reaction (LCR) assay was developed to distinguish the plant pathogenic bacterium Erwinia stewartii from other erwiniae. This new technique allows discrimination to the species level on the basis of a single-base-pair difference in the 16S rRNA gene which is unique to E. stewartii. Portions of the 16S rRNA genes of E. stewartii and the closely related Erwinia herbicola were sequenced. From comparison of the two 16S rRNA gene regions, two primer pairs were constructed such that only E. stewartii DNA gave a product in the LCR assay. The ligated product was separated from the radioactively labelled primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and visualized by autoradiography. Twenty-four different Erwinia species and strains were tested by PCR-coupled LCR to verify the specificity of the assay, and only E. stewartii strains gave a positive reaction. In addition, infected and healthy plant material was also assayed. E. stewartii was detected in infected plant material, even when large populations of epiphytic bacteria were present. No enrichment was necessary for detection of the pathogen in corn leaves. This assay has potential as a diagnostic technique for the detection of E. stewartii in infected plant and vector material. Images PMID:7509585

  11. SUMO E3 ligase activity of TRIM proteins.

    PubMed

    Chu, Y; Yang, X

    2011-03-03

    SUMOylation governs numerous cellular processes and is essential to most eukaryotic life. Despite increasing recognition of the importance of this process, an extremely limited number of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) protein ligases (E3s) have been identified. Here we show that at least some members of the functionally diverse tripartite motif (TRIM) superfamily are SUMO E3s. These TRIM proteins bind both the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and substrates and strongly enhance transfer of SUMOs from Ubc9 to these substrates. Among the substrates of TRIM SUMO E3s are the tumor suppressor p53 and its principal antagonist Mdm2. The E3 activity depends on the TRIM motif, suggesting it to be the first widespread SUMO E3 motif. Given the large number of TRIM proteins, our results may greatly expand the identified SUMO E3s. Furthermore, TRIM E3 activity may be an important contributor to SUMOylation specificity and the versatile functions of TRIM proteins.

  12. Suramin inhibits cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kenneth; Chong, Robert A; Yu, Qing; Bai, Jin; Spratt, Donald E; Ching, Kevin; Lee, Chan; Miao, Haibin; Tappin, Inger; Hurwitz, Jerard; Zheng, Ning; Shaw, Gary S; Sun, Yi; Felsenfeld, Dan P; Sanchez, Roberto; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pan, Zhen-Qiang

    2016-04-05

    Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases (CRL) control a myriad of biological processes by directing numerous protein substrates for proteasomal degradation. Key to CRL activity is the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Cdc34 through electrostatic interactions between E3's cullin conserved basic canyon and the acidic C terminus of the E2 enzyme. This report demonstrates that a small-molecule compound, suramin, can inhibit CRL activity by disrupting its ability to recruit Cdc34. Suramin, an antitrypansomal drug that also possesses antitumor activity, was identified here through a fluorescence-based high-throughput screen as an inhibitor of ubiquitination. Suramin was shown to target cullin 1's conserved basic canyon and to block its binding to Cdc34. Suramin inhibits the activity of a variety of CRL complexes containing cullin 2, 3, and 4A. When introduced into cells, suramin induced accumulation of CRL substrates. These observations help develop a strategy of regulating ubiquitination by targeting an E2-E3 interface through small-molecule modulators.

  13. Design of a microfabricated device for ligase detection reaction (LDR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Dwhyte O.; Maha, Amit; Wang, Yun; Soper, Steven A.; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Murphy, Michael C.

    2003-12-01

    The objective was to design and manufacture a microscale Ligase Detection Reaction (LDR) device for detection of cancer-associated rare gene mutations. The LDR module will be incorporated with other devices such as a Continuous Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction (CFRCR) unit and a Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) chip in a modular lab-on-a-chip technology. During LDR, devloped by Francis Barany, several primers are mixed with the analyte, exposed to a thermal cycle consisting of two steps of 95°C and 65°C for 20 cycles, and cooled to 0°C. The first step in the design was to determine if the baseline time for the LDR reaction could be reduced from the 2 1/2 hours required for the orignal reaction. Experiments have shown that it is posssible to obtain useable product from the LDR after 40 minutes, a 75% reduction, before going to the microscale, which should allow further improvements. Due to the extensive mixing needed prior to the reaction a set of alternative diffusion mixers was identified and microfabricated to determine which geometry was the most effective. Simulations of the thermal response of the device were done using finite element analysis (FEA) to compare to experimental results. The required temperature profile will be obtained by using resistive heaters and thermoelectric modules. A prototype LDR device was laid out based on the results of the studies.

  14. Design of a microfabricated device for ligase detection reaction (LDR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barrett, Dwhyte O.; Maha, Amit; Wang, Yun; Soper, Steven A.; Nikitopoulos, Dimitris E.; Murphy, Michael C.

    2004-01-01

    The objective was to design and manufacture a microscale Ligase Detection Reaction (LDR) device for detection of cancer-associated rare gene mutations. The LDR module will be incorporated with other devices such as a Continuous Flow Polymerase Chain Reaction (CFRCR) unit and a Capillary Electrophoresis (CE) chip in a modular lab-on-a-chip technology. During LDR, devloped by Francis Barany, several primers are mixed with the analyte, exposed to a thermal cycle consisting of two steps of 95°C and 65°C for 20 cycles, and cooled to 0°C. The first step in the design was to determine if the baseline time for the LDR reaction could be reduced from the 2½ hours required for the orignal reaction. Experiments have shown that it is posssible to obtain useable product from the LDR after 40 minutes, a 75% reduction, before going to the microscale, which should allow further improvements. Due to the extensive mixing needed prior to the reaction a set of alternative diffusion mixers was identified and microfabricated to determine which geometry was the most effective. Simulations of the thermal response of the device were done using finite element analysis (FEA) to compare to experimental results. The required temperature profile will be obtained by using resistive heaters and thermoelectric modules. A prototype LDR device was laid out based on the results of the studies.

  15. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  16. Ubiquitin-protein ligases in muscle wasting: multiple parallel pathways?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lecker, Stewart H.; Goldberg, A. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: Studies in a wide variety of animal models of muscle wasting have led to the concept that increased protein breakdown via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway is responsible for the loss of muscle mass seen as muscle atrophy. The complexity of the ubiquitination apparatus has hampered our understanding of how this pathway is activated in atrophying muscles and which ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes in muscle are responsible. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent experiments have shown that two newly identified ubiquitin-protein ligases (E3s), atrogin-1/MAFbx and MURF-1, are critical in the development of muscle atrophy. Other in-vitro studies also implicated E2(14k) and E3alpha, of the N-end rule pathway, as playing an important role in the process. SUMMARY: It seems likely that multiple pathways of ubiquitin conjugation are activated in parallel in atrophying muscle, perhaps to target for degradation specific classes of muscle proteins. The emerging challenge will be to define the protein targets for, as well as inhibitors of, these E3s.

  17. A conserved regulatory mechanism in bifunctional biotin protein ligases.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jingheng; Beckett, Dorothy

    2017-08-01

    Class II bifunctional biotin protein ligases (BirA), which catalyze post-translational biotinylation and repress transcription initiation, are broadly distributed in eubacteria and archaea. However, it is unclear if these proteins all share the same molecular mechanism of transcription regulation. In Escherichia coli the corepressor biotinoyl-5'-AMP (bio-5'-AMP), which is also the intermediate in biotin transfer, promotes operator binding and resulting transcription repression by enhancing BirA dimerization. Like E. coli BirA (EcBirA), Staphylococcus aureus, and Bacillus subtilis BirA (Sa and BsBirA) repress transcription in vivo in a biotin-dependent manner. In this work, sedimentation equilibrium measurements were performed to investigate the molecular basis of this biotin-responsive transcription regulation. The results reveal that, as observed for EcBirA, Sa, and BsBirA dimerization reactions are significantly enhanced by bio-5'-AMP binding. Thus, the molecular mechanism of the Biotin Regulatory System is conserved in the biotin repressors from these three organisms. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  18. Mechanism of auxin perception by the TIR1 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xu; Calderon-Villalobos, Luz Irina A; Sharon, Michal; Zheng, Changxue; Robinson, Carol V; Estelle, Mark; Zheng, Ning

    2007-04-05

    Auxin is a pivotal plant hormone that controls many aspects of plant growth and development. Perceived by a small family of F-box proteins including transport inhibitor response 1 (TIR1), auxin regulates gene expression by promoting SCF ubiquitin-ligase-catalysed degradation of the Aux/IAA transcription repressors, but how the TIR1 F-box protein senses and becomes activated by auxin remains unclear. Here we present the crystal structures of the Arabidopsis TIR1-ASK1 complex, free and in complexes with three different auxin compounds and an Aux/IAA substrate peptide. These structures show that the leucine-rich repeat domain of TIR1 contains an unexpected inositol hexakisphosphate co-factor and recognizes auxin and the Aux/IAA polypeptide substrate through a single surface pocket. Anchored to the base of the TIR1 pocket, auxin binds to a partially promiscuous site, which can also accommodate various auxin analogues. Docked on top of auxin, the Aux/IAA substrate peptide occupies the rest of the TIR1 pocket and completely encloses the hormone-binding site. By filling in a hydrophobic cavity at the protein interface, auxin enhances the TIR1-substrate interactions by acting as a 'molecular glue'. Our results establish the first structural model of a plant hormone receptor.

  19. Molecular and immunological characterization of DNA ligase IV deficiency.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jinqiu; Tang, Wenjing; An, Yunfei; Tang, Maozhi; Wu, Junfeng; Qin, Tao; Zhao, Xiaodong

    2016-02-01

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) deficiency is an extremely rare autosomal recessive primary immunodeficiency disease caused by the LIG4 mutation. To date, fewer than 30 cases of patients have been reported worldwide. No reversion mutations have been previously identified in LIG4. This study enrolled seven Chinese patients with LIG4 deficiency who presented with combined immunodeficiency, microcephaly, and growth retardation. One patient (P1) acquired non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Four patients had impaired T cell proliferation function and skewed T cell receptor diversity. Five novel mutations in LIG4 and a potential hotspot mutation (c.833G>T; p.R278L) in the Chinese population were identified. TA cloning analysis of T cells, NK cells, granulocytes, and oral mucosa cells in P6 revealed wild-type clones and clones that contained both maternally and paternally inherited mutations, indicating possible somatic reversion which need further investigation since no functional or protein assays were possible for all the patients died and no cell lines were available.

  20. A conformational switch regulates the ubiquitin ligase HUWE1

    PubMed Central

    Sander, Bodo; Xu, Wenshan; Eilers, Martin; Popov, Nikita; Lorenz, Sonja

    2017-01-01

    The human ubiquitin ligase HUWE1 has key roles in tumorigenesis, yet it is unkown how its activity is regulated. We present the crystal structure of a C-terminal part of HUWE1, including the catalytic domain, and reveal an asymmetric auto-inhibited dimer. We show that HUWE1 dimerizes in solution and self-associates in cells, and that both occurs through the crystallographic dimer interface. We demonstrate that HUWE1 is inhibited in cells and that it can be activated by disruption of the dimer interface. We identify a conserved segment in HUWE1 that counteracts dimer formation by associating with the dimerization region intramolecularly. Our studies reveal, intriguingly, that the tumor suppressor p14ARF binds to this segment and may thus shift the conformational equilibrium of HUWE1 toward the inactive state. We propose a model, in which the activity of HUWE1 underlies conformational control in response to physiological cues—a mechanism that may be exploited for cancer therapy. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.21036.001 PMID:28193319

  1. The α2 helix in the DNA ligase IV BRCT-1 domain is required for targeted degradation of ligase IV during adenovirus infection.

    PubMed

    Gilson, Timra; Greer, Amy E; Vindigni, Alessandro; Ketner, Gary; Hanakahi, Leslyn A

    2012-07-05

    In adenovirus E4 mutant infections, viral DNAs form concatemers through a process that requires host Non-homologous End Joining (NHEJ) proteins including DNA Ligase IV (LigIV). Adenovirus proteins E4 34k and E1b 55k form the substrate-selection component of an E3 ubiquitin ligase and prevent concatenation by targeting LigIV for proteasomal degradation. The mechanisms and sites involved in targeting this and other E3 ligase substrates generally are poorly-understood. Through genetic analysis, we identified the α2 helix of one LigIV BRCT domain (BRCT-1) as essential for adenovirus-mediated degradation. Replacement of the BRCT domain of DNA ligase III (LigIII), which is resistant to degradation, with LigIV BRCT-1 does not promote degradation. A humanized mouse LigIV that possesses a BRCT-1 α2 helix identical to the human protein, like its parent, is also resistant to adenovirus-mediated degradation. Thus, both the BRCT-1 α2 helix and an element outside BRCT-1 are required for adenovirus-mediated degradation of LigIV.

  2. Endoplasmic Reticulum Exit of Golgi-resident Defective for SREBP Cleavage (Dsc) E3 Ligase Complex Requires Its Activity.

    PubMed

    Raychaudhuri, Sumana; Espenshade, Peter J

    2015-06-05

    Layers of quality control ensure proper protein folding and complex formation prior to exit from the endoplasmic reticulum. The fission yeast Dsc E3 ligase is a Golgi-localized complex required for sterol regulatory element-binding protein (SREBP) transcription factor activation that shows architectural similarity to endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation E3 ligases. The Dsc E3 ligase consists of five integral membrane proteins (Dsc1-Dsc5) and functionally interacts with the conserved AAA-ATPase Cdc48. Utilizing an in vitro ubiquitination assay, we demonstrated that Dsc1 has ubiquitin E3 ligase activity that requires the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme Ubc4. Mutations that specifically block Dsc1-Ubc4 interaction prevent SREBP cleavage, indicating that SREBP activation requires Dsc E3 ligase activity. Surprisingly, Golgi localization of the Dsc E3 ligase complex also requires Dsc1 E3 ligase activity. Analysis of Dsc E3 ligase complex formation, glycosylation, and localization indicated that Dsc1 E3 ligase activity is specifically required for endoplasmic reticulum exit of the complex. These results define enzyme activity-dependent sorting as an autoregulatory mechanism for protein trafficking.

  3. RBR E3 ubiquitin ligases: new structures, new insights, new questions

    PubMed Central

    Spratt, Donald E.; Walden, Helen; Shaw, Gary S.

    2014-01-01

    The RBR (RING-BetweenRING-RING) or TRIAD [two RING fingers and a DRIL (double RING finger linked)] E3 ubiquitin ligases comprise a group of 12 complex multidomain enzymes. This unique family of E3 ligases includes parkin, whose dysfunction is linked to the pathogenesis of early-onset Parkinson's disease, and HOIP (HOIL-1-interacting protein) and HOIL-1 (haem-oxidized IRP2 ubiquitin ligase 1), members of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). The RBR E3 ligases share common features with both the larger RING and HECT (homologous with E6-associated protein C-terminus) E3 ligase families, directly catalysing ubiquitin transfer from an intrinsic catalytic cysteine housed in the C-terminal domain, as well as recruiting thioester-bound E2 enzymes via a RING domain. Recent three-dimensional structures and biochemical findings of the RBRs have revealed novel protein domain folds not previously envisioned and some surprising modes of regulation that have raised many questions. This has required renaming two of the domains in the RBR E3 ligases to more accurately reflect their structures and functions: the C-terminal Rcat (required-for-catalysis) domain, essential for catalytic activity, and a central BRcat (benign-catalytic) domain that adopts the same fold as the Rcat, but lacks a catalytic cysteine residue and ubiquitination activity. The present review discusses how three-dimensional structures of RBR (RING1-BRcat-Rcat) E3 ligases have provided new insights into our understanding of the biochemical mechanisms of these important enzymes in ubiquitin biology. PMID:24576094

  4. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A

    2016-07-27

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR(®) Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4-6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  5. Circulating E3 ligases are novel and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Han, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Cai-Xia; Hua, Qi; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Nan; Yang, Yan-Zong; Du, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitin ligase (E3) is a decisive element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is the main pathway for intracellular protein turnover. Recently, circulating E3 ligases have been increasingly considered as cancer biomarkers. In the present study, we aimed to determine if cardiac-specific E3 ligases in circulation can serve as novel predictors for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By screening and verifying their tissue expression patterns with microarray and real-time PCR analysis, six of 261 E3 ligases, including cardiac-specific Rnf207 and cardiac- and muscle-enriched Fbxo32/atrogin-1, Trim54/MuRF3, Trim63/MuRF1, Kbtbd10/KLHL41, Asb11 and Asb2 in mouse heart, were selected for the present study. In the AMI rats, the levels of five E3 ligases including Rnf207, Fbxo32, Trim54, Trim63 and Kbtbd10 in the plasma were significantly increased compared with control animals. Especially, the plasma levels of Rnf207 was markedly increased at 1 h, peaked at 3 h and decreased at 6–24 h after ligation. Further evaluation of E3 ligases in AMI patients confirmed that plasma Rnf207 level increased significantly compared with that in healthy people and patients without AMI, and showed a similar time course to that in AMI rats. Simultaneously, plasma level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was measured by ELISA assays. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that Rnf207 showed a similar sensitivity and specificity to the classic biomarker troponin I for diagnosis of AMI. Increased cardiac-specific E3 ligase Rnf207 in plasma may be a novel and sensitive biomarkers for AMI in humans. PMID:25599194

  6. Rapid Time Scale Analysis of T4 DNA Ligase-DNA Binding.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Robert J; Jurkiw, Thomas J; Evans, Thomas C; Lohman, Gregory J S

    2017-02-28

    DNA ligases, essential to both in vivo genome integrity and in vitro molecular biology, catalyze phosphodiester bond formation between adjacent 3'-OH and 5'-phosphorylated termini in dsDNA. This reaction requires enzyme self-adenylylation, using ATP or NAD(+) as a cofactor, and AMP release concomitant with phosphodiester bond formation. In this study, we present the first fast time scale binding kinetics of T4 DNA ligase to both nicked substrate DNA (nDNA) and product-equivalent non-nicked dsDNA, as well as binding and release kinetics of AMP. The described assays utilized a fluorescein-dT labeled DNA substrate as a reporter for ligase·DNA interactions via stopped-flow fluorescence spectroscopy. The analysis revealed that binding to nDNA by the active adenylylated ligase occurs in two steps, an initial rapid association equilibrium followed by a transition to a second bound state prior to catalysis. Furthermore, the ligase binds and dissociates from nicked and nonsubstrate dsDNA rapidly with initial association affinities on the order of 100 nM regardless of enzyme adenylylation state. DNA binding occurs through a two-step mechanism in all cases, confirming prior proposals of transient binding followed by a transition to a productive ligase·nDNA (Lig·nDNA) conformation but suggesting that weaker nonproductive "closed" complexes are formed as well. These observations demonstrate the mechanistic underpinnings of competitive inhibition by rapid binding of nonsubstrate DNA, and of substrate inhibition by blocking of the self-adenylylation reaction through nick binding by deadenylylated ligase. Our analysis further reveals that product release is not the rate-determining step in turnover.

  7. Circulating E3 ligases are novel and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Han, Qiu-Yue; Wang, Hong-Xia; Liu, Xiao-Hong; Guo, Cai-Xia; Hua, Qi; Yu, Xiao-Hong; Li, Nan; Yang, Yan-Zong; Du, Jie; Xia, Yun-Long; Li, Hui-Hua

    2015-06-01

    Ubiquitin ligase (E3) is a decisive element of the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which is the main pathway for intracellular protein turnover. Recently, circulating E3 ligases have been increasingly considered as cancer biomarkers. In the present study, we aimed to determine if cardiac-specific E3 ligases in circulation can serve as novel predictors for early diagnosis of acute myocardial infarction (AMI). By screening and verifying their tissue expression patterns with microarray and real-time PCR analysis, six of 261 E3 ligases, including cardiac-specific Rnf207 and cardiac- and muscle-enriched Fbxo32/atrogin-1, Trim54/MuRF3, Trim63/MuRF1, Kbtbd10/KLHL41, Asb11 and Asb2 in mouse heart, were selected for the present study. In the AMI rats, the levels of five E3 ligases including Rnf207, Fbxo32, Trim54, Trim63 and Kbtbd10 in the plasma were significantly increased compared with control animals. Especially, the plasma levels of Rnf207 was markedly increased at 1 h, peaked at 3 h and decreased at 6-24 h after ligation. Further evaluation of E3 ligases in AMI patients confirmed that plasma Rnf207 level increased significantly compared with that in healthy people and patients without AMI, and showed a similar time course to that in AMI rats. Simultaneously, plasma level of cardiac troponin I (cTnI) was measured by ELISA assays. Finally, receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analysis indicated that Rnf207 showed a similar sensitivity and specificity to the classic biomarker troponin I for diagnosis of AMI. Increased cardiac-specific E3 ligase Rnf207 in plasma may be a novel and sensitive biomarkers for AMI in humans.

  8. Sensitive and specific miRNA detection method using SplintR Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jingmin; Vaud, Sophie; Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; Posfai, Janos; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2016-01-01

    We describe a simple, specific and sensitive microRNA (miRNA) detection method that utilizes Chlorella virus DNA ligase (SplintR® Ligase). This two-step method involves ligation of adjacent DNA oligonucleotides hybridized to a miRNA followed by real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). SplintR Ligase is 100X faster than either T4 DNA Ligase or T4 RNA Ligase 2 for RNA splinted DNA ligation. Only a 4–6 bp overlap between a DNA probe and miRNA was required for efficient ligation by SplintR Ligase. This property allows more flexibility in designing miRNA-specific ligation probes than methods that use reverse transcriptase for cDNA synthesis of miRNA. The qPCR SplintR ligation assay is sensitive; it can detect a few thousand molecules of miR-122. For miR-122 detection the SplintR qPCR assay, using a FAM labeled double quenched DNA probe, was at least 40× more sensitive than the TaqMan assay. The SplintR method, when coupled with NextGen sequencing, allowed multiplex detection of miRNAs from brain, kidney, testis and liver. The SplintR qPCR assay is specific; individual let-7 miRNAs that differ by one nucleotide are detected. The rapid kinetics and ability to ligate DNA probes hybridized to RNA with short complementary sequences makes SplintR Ligase a useful enzyme for miRNA detection. PMID:27154271

  9. C-Terminal region of DNA ligase IV drives XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to chromatin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Sicheng; Liu, Xunyue; Kamdar, Radhika Pankaj; Wanotayan, Rujira; Sharma, Mukesh Kumar; Adachi, Noritaka; Matsumoto, Yoshihisa

    2013-09-20

    DNA ligase IV (LIG4) and XRCC4 form a complex to ligate two DNA ends at the final step of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair through non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ). It is not fully understood how these proteins are recruited to DSBs. We recently demonstrated radiation-induced chromatin binding of XRCC4 by biochemical fractionation using detergent Nonidet P-40. In the present study, we examined the role of LIG4 in the recruitment of XRCC4/LIG4 complex to chromatin. The chromatin binding of XRCC4 was dependent on the presence of LIG4. The mutations in two BRCT domains (W725R and W893R, respectively) of LIG4 reduced the chromatin binding of LIG4 and XRCC4. The C-terminal fragment of LIG4 (LIG4-CT) without N-terminal catalytic domains could bind to chromatin with XRCC4. LIG4-CT with W725R or W893R mutation could bind to chromatin but could not support the chromatin binding of XRCC4. The ability of C-terminal region of LIG4 to interact with chromatin might provide us with an insight into the mechanisms of DSB repair through NHEJ.

  10. Inhibitors of ubiquitin E3 ligase as potential new antimalarial drug leads.

    PubMed

    Jain, Jagrati; Jain, Surendra K; Walker, Larry A; Tekwani, Babu L

    2017-06-02

    Protein ubiquitylation is an important post-translational regulation, which has been shown to be necessary for life cycle progression and survival of Plasmodium falciparum. Ubiquitin is a highly conserved 76 amino acid polypeptide, which attaches covalently to target proteins through combined action of three classes of enzymes namely, the ubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme (E2) and ubiquitin-protein ligase (E3). Ubiquitin E1 and E2 are highly conserved within eukaryotes. However, the P. falciparum E3 ligase is substantially variable and divergent compared to the homologs from other eukaryotes, which make the E3 ligase a parasite-specific target. A set of selected E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors was tested in vitro against a chloroquine-sensitive P. falciparum D6 strain (PfD6) and a chloroquine-resistant P. falciparum W2 strain (PfW2). The inhibitors were also tested against Vero and transformed THP1 cells for cytotoxicity. The lead antimalarial E3 ubiquitin ligase inhibitors were further evaluated for the stage-specific antimalarial action and effects on cellular development of P. falciparum in vitro. Statistics analysis was done by two-way ANOVA followed by Tukey and Sidak multiple comparison test using GraphPad Prism 6. E3 ligase inhibitors namely, JNJ 26854165, HLI 373 and Nutlin 3 showed prominent antimalarial activity against PfD6 and PfW2. These inhibitors were considerably less cytotoxic to mammalian Vero cells. JNJ 26854165, HLI 373 and Nutlin 3 blocked the development of P. falciparum parasite at the trophozoite and schizont stages, resulting in accumulation of distorted trophozoites and immature schizonts. Interruption of trophozoites and schizont maturation by the antimalarial E3 ligase inhibitors suggest the role of ubiquitin/proteasome functions in the intraerythrocytic development of malaria parasite. The ubiquitin/proteasome functions may be critical for schizont maturation. Further investigations on the lead E3 ligase

  11. TIP120A associates with cullins and modulates ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Min, Kyoeng-Woo; Hwang, Ji-Won; Lee, Jong-Sik; Park, Yoon; Tamura, Taka-aki; Yoon, Jong-Bok

    2003-05-02

    The cullin-containing ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligases (E3s) play an important role in regulating the abundance of key proteins involved in cellular processes such as cell cycle and cytokine signaling. They have multisubunit modular structures in which substrate recognition and the catalysis of ubiquitination are carried out by distinct polypeptides. In a search for proteins involved in regulation of cullin-containing E3 ubiquitin ligases we immunopurified CUL4B-containing complex from HeLa cells and identified TIP120A as an associated protein by mass spectrometry. Immunoprecipitation of cullins revealed that all cullins tested specifically interacted with TIP120A. Reciprocal immunoaffinity purification of TIP120A confirmed the stable interaction of TIP120A with cullin family proteins. TIP120A formed a complex with CUL1 and Rbx1, but interfered with the binding of Skp1 and F-box proteins to CUL1. TIP120A greatly reduced the ubiquitination of phosphorylated IkappaBalpha by SCF(beta-TrCP) ubiquitin ligase. These results suggest that TIP120A functions as a negative regulator of SCF E3 ubiquitin ligases and may modulate other cullin ligases in a similar fashion.

  12. A palmitoylated RING finger ubiquitin ligase and its homologue in the brain membranes.

    PubMed

    Araki, Kazuaki; Kawamura, Meiko; Suzuki, Toshiaki; Matsuda, Noriyuki; Kanbe, Daiji; Ishii, Kyoko; Ichikawa, Tomio; Kumanishi, Toshiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Nawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-08-01

    Ubiquitin (Ub) ligation is implicated in active protein metabolism and subcellular trafficking and its impairment is involved in various neurologic diseases. In rat brain, we identified two novel Ub ligases, Momo and Sakura, carrying double zinc finger motif and RING finger domain. Momo expression is enriched in the brain gray matter and testis, and Sakura expression is more widely detected in the brain white matter as well as in many peripheral organs. Both proteins associate with the cell membranes of neuronal and/or glial cells. We examined their Ub ligase activity in vivo and in vitro using viral expression vectors carrying myc-tagged Momo and Sakura. Overexpression of either Momo or Sakura in mixed cortical cultures increased total polyubiquitination levels. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that the combination of Momo and UbcH4 and H5c, or of Sakura and UbcH4, H5c and H6 is required for the reaction. Deletion mutagenesis suggested that the E3 Ub ligase activity of Momo and Sakura depended on their C-terminal domains containing RING finger structure, while their N-terminal domains influenced their membrane association. In agreement, Sakura associating with the membrane was specifically palmitoylated. Although the molecular targets of their Ub ligation remain to be identified, these findings imply a novel function of the palmitoylated E3 Ub ligase(s).

  13. An integrated bioinformatics platform for investigating the human E3 ubiquitin ligase-substrate interaction network.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Xie, Ping; Lu, Liang; Wang, Jian; Diao, Lihong; Liu, Zhongyang; Guo, Feifei; He, Yangzhige; Liu, Yuan; Huang, Qin; Liang, Han; Li, Dong; He, Fuchu

    2017-08-24

    The ubiquitination mediated by ubiquitin activating enzyme (E1), ubiquitin conjugating enzyme (E2), and ubiquitin ligase (E3) cascade is crucial to protein degradation, transcription regulation, and cell signaling in eukaryotic cells. The high specificity of ubiquitination is regulated by the interaction between E3 ubiquitin ligases and their target substrates. Unfortunately, the landscape of human E3-substrate network has not been systematically uncovered. Therefore, there is an urgent need to develop a high-throughput and efficient strategy to identify the E3-substrate interaction. To address this challenge, we develop a computational model based on multiple types of heterogeneous biological evidence to investigate the human E3-substrate interactions. Furthermore, we provide UbiBrowser as an integrated bioinformatics platform to predict and present the proteome-wide human E3-substrate interaction network ( http://ubibrowser.ncpsb.org ).Protein stability modulation by E3 ubiquitin ligases is an important layer of functional regulation, but screening for E3 ligase-substrate interactions is time-consuming and costly. Here, the authors take an in silico naïve Bayesian classifier approach to integrate multiple lines of evidence for E3-substrate prediction, enabling prediction of the proteome-wide human E3 ligase interaction network.

  14. Assembly of the Elongin A Ubiquitin Ligase Is Regulated by Genotoxic and Other Stresses*

    PubMed Central

    Weems, Juston C.; Slaughter, Brian D.; Unruh, Jay R.; Hall, Shawn M.; McLaird, Merry B.; Gilmore, Joshua M.; Washburn, Michael P.; Florens, Laurence; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Conaway, Joan W.; Conaway, Ronald C.

    2015-01-01

    Elongin A performs dual functions in cells as a component of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) transcription elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that has been shown to target Pol II stalled at sites of DNA damage. Here we investigate the mechanism(s) governing conversion of the Elongin complex from its elongation factor to its ubiquitin ligase form. We report the discovery that assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase is a tightly regulated process. In unstressed cells, Elongin A is predominately present as part of Pol II elongation factor Elongin. Assembly of Elongin A into the ubiquitin ligase is strongly induced by genotoxic stress; by transcriptional stresses that lead to accumulation of stalled Pol II; and by other stimuli, including endoplasmic reticulum and nutrient stress and retinoic acid signaling, that activate Elongin A-dependent transcription. Taken together, our findings shed new light on mechanisms that control the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and suggest that it may play a role in Elongin A-dependent transcription. PMID:25878247

  15. Inhibition of human DNA ligase I activity by zinc and cadmium and the fidelity of ligation.

    PubMed

    Yang, S W; Becker, F F; Chan, J Y

    1996-01-01

    Heavy metals, including zinc (Zn) and cadmium (Cd), are potentially important genotoxic agents in our environment. Here we report that human DNA ligase I, the major form of the enzyme in replicative cells, is a target for Zn and Cd ions. ZnCl2 at 0.8 mM caused complete inhibition of DNA ligase I activity, whereas only 0.04 mM CdCl2 was required to achieve a similar effect. Both metals affected all three steps of the reaction, namely, the formation of ligase-AMP intermediate, the transfer of the AMP to DNA and the ligation reaction that succeeds the formation of the AMP-DNA complex. Unlike F-ara-ATP and the natural protein inhibitor of DNA ligase-I, these metals may affect different domains of the enzyme. Moreover, these metal ions did not increase the rate of misligation of F-ara-A-modified DNA or mismatched DNA substrates, but considerable misligation was observed for the T:C mispairing. These data support the notion of high fidelity of the human DNA ligases and that the major action of these metal ions on the enzyme is their inhibitory function.

  16. A high-throughput assay for the comprehensive profiling of DNA ligase fidelity.

    PubMed

    Lohman, Gregory J S; Bauer, Robert J; Nichols, Nicole M; Mazzola, Laurie; Bybee, Joanna; Rivizzigno, Danielle; Cantin, Elizabeth; Evans, Thomas C

    2016-01-29

    DNA ligases have broad application in molecular biology, from traditional cloning methods to modern synthetic biology and molecular diagnostics protocols. Ligation-based detection of polynucleotide sequences can be achieved by the ligation of probe oligonucleotides when annealed to a complementary target sequence. In order to achieve a high sensitivity and low background, the ligase must efficiently join correctly base-paired substrates, while discriminating against the ligation of substrates containing even one mismatched base pair. In the current study, we report the use of capillary electrophoresis to rapidly generate mismatch fidelity profiles that interrogate all 256 possible base-pair combinations at a ligation junction in a single experiment. Rapid screening of ligase fidelity in a 96-well plate format has allowed the study of ligase fidelity in unprecedented depth. As an example of this new method, herein we report the ligation fidelity of Thermus thermophilus DNA ligase at a range of temperatures, buffer pH and monovalent cation strength. This screen allows the selection of reaction conditions that maximize fidelity without sacrificing activity, while generating a profile of specific mismatches that ligate detectably under each set of conditions. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  17. Exploring Peptide Ligase Orthologs in Actinobacteria-Discovery of Pseudopeptide Natural Products, Ketomemicins.

    PubMed

    Ogasawara, Yasushi; Kawata, Junpei; Noike, Motoyoshi; Satoh, Yasuharu; Furihata, Kazuo; Dairi, Tohru

    2016-06-17

    We recently identified a novel peptide ligase (PGM1), an ATP-grasp-ligase, that catalyzes amide bond formation between (S)-2-(3,5-dihydroxy-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-guanidinoacetic acid and ribosomally supplied oligopeptides in pheganomycin biosynthesis. This was the first example of an ATP-grasp-ligase utilizing peptides as nucleophiles. To explore the potential of this type of enzyme, we performed a BLAST search and identified many orthologs. The orthologs of Streptomyces mobaraensis, Salinispora tropica, and Micromonospora sp. were found in similar gene clusters consisting of six genes. To probe the functions of these genes, we heterologously expressed each of the clusters in Streptomyces lividans and detected novel and structurally similar pseudotripeptides in the broth of all transformants. Moreover, a recombinant PGM1 ortholog of Micromonospora sp. was demonstrated to be a novel dipeptide ligase catalyzing amide bond formation between amidino-arginine and dipeptides to yield tripeptides; this is the first report of a peptide ligase utilizing dipeptides as nucleophiles.

  18. Structural and Functional Interaction Between the Human DNA Repair Proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, P.; Meesala, S; Dauvillier, S; Modesti, M; Andres, S; Huang, Y; Sekiguchi, J; Calsou, P; Salles, B; Junop, M

    2009-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  19. Structural and functional interaction between the human DNA repair proteins DNA ligase IV and XRCC4.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peï-Yu; Frit, Philippe; Meesala, SriLakshmi; Dauvillier, Stéphanie; Modesti, Mauro; Andres, Sara N; Huang, Ying; Sekiguchi, JoAnn; Calsou, Patrick; Salles, Bernard; Junop, Murray S

    2009-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining represents the major pathway used by human cells to repair DNA double-strand breaks. It relies on the XRCC4/DNA ligase IV complex to reseal DNA strands. Here we report the high-resolution crystal structure of human XRCC4 bound to the carboxy-terminal tandem BRCT repeat of DNA ligase IV. The structure differs from the homologous Saccharomyces cerevisiae complex and reveals an extensive DNA ligase IV binding interface formed by a helix-loop-helix structure within the inter-BRCT linker region, as well as significant interactions involving the second BRCT domain, which induces a kink in the tail region of XRCC4. We further demonstrate that interaction with the second BRCT domain of DNA ligase IV is necessary for stable binding to XRCC4 in cells, as well as to achieve efficient dominant-negative effects resulting in radiosensitization after ectopic overexpression of DNA ligase IV fragments in human fibroblasts. Together our findings provide unanticipated insight for understanding the physical and functional architecture of the nonhomologous end-joining ligation complex.

  20. Overview of the membrane-associated RING-CH (MARCH) E3 ligase family.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Johannes; Bakke, Oddmund; Morth, J Preben

    2017-09-25

    E3 ligases are critical checkpoints for protein ubiquitination, a signal that often results in protein sorting and degradation but has also been linked to regulation of transcription and DNA repair. In line with their key role in cellular trafficking and cell-cycle control, malfunction of E3 ligases is often linked to human disease. Thus, they have emerged as prime drug targets. However, the molecular basis of action of membrane-bound E3 ligases is still unknown. Here, we review the current knowledge on the membrane-embedded MARCH E3 ligases (MARCH-1-6,7,8,11) with a focus on how the transmembrane regions can contribute via GxxxG-motifs to the selection and recognition of other membrane proteins as substrates for ubiquitination. Further understanding of the molecular parameters that govern target protein recognition of MARCH E3 ligases will contribute to development of strategies for therapeutic regulation of MARCH-induced ubiquitination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. ATLs and BTLs, plant-specific and general eukaryotic structurally-related E3 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2014-02-01

    Major components of the ubiquitin proteasome system are the enzymes that operate on the transfer of ubiquitin to selected target substrate, known as ubiquitin ligases. The RING finger is a domain that is present in key classes of ubiquitin ligases. This domain coordinates the interaction with a suitable E2 conjugase and the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 to protein targets. Additional domains coupled to the same polypeptide are important for modulating the function of these ubiquitin ligases. Plants contain several types of E3 ubiquitin ligases that in many cases have expanded as multigene families. Some families are specific to the plant lineage, whereas others may have a common ancestor among plants and other eukaryotic lineages. Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATLs) and BCA2 zinc finger ATLs (BTLs) are two families of ubiquitin ligases that share some common structural features. These are intronless genes that encode a highly related RING finger domain, and yet during evolutionary history, their mode of gene expansion and function is rather different. In each of these two families, the co-occurrence of transmembrane helices or C2/C2 (BZF finger) domains with a selected variation on the RING finger has been subjected to strong selection pressure in order to preserve their unique domain architectures during evolution.

  2. High-Throughput Sequencing Reveals Circular Substrates for an Archaeal RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Becker, Hubert F; Heliou, Alice; Djaout, Kamel; Lestini, Roxane; Regnier, Mireille; Myllykallio, Hannu

    2017-03-09

    It is only recently that the abundant presence of circular RNAs (circRNAs) in all kingdoms of Life, including the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus abyssi, has emerged. This led us to investigate the physiological significance of a previously observed weak intramolecular ligation activity of Pab1020 RNA ligase. Here we demonstrate that this enzyme, despite sharing significant sequence similarity with DNA ligases, is indeed an RNA-specific polynucleotide ligase efficiently acting on physiologically significant substrates. Using a combination of RNA immunoprecipitation assays and RNA-seq, our genome-wide studies revealed 133 individual circRNA loci in P. abyssi. The large majority of these loci interacted with Pab1020 in cells and circularization of selected C/D Box and 5S rRNA transcripts was confirmed biochemically. Altogether these studies revealed that Pab1020 is required for RNA circularization. Our results further suggest the functional speciation of an ancestral NTase domain and/or DNA ligase towards RNA ligase activity and prompt for further characterization of the widespread functions of circular RNAs in prokaryotes. Detailed insight into the cellular substrates of Pab1020 may facilitate the development of new biotechnological applications e.g. in ligation of preadenylated adaptors to RNA molecules.

  3. Glutathione synthetase homologs encode α-l-glutamate ligases for methanogenic coenzyme F420 and tetrahydrosarcinapterin biosyntheses

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Xu, Huimin; Graham, David E.; White, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Proteins in the ATP-grasp superfamily of amide bond-forming ligases have evolved to function in a number of unrelated biosynthetic pathways. Previously identified homologs encoding glutathione synthetase, d-alanine:d-alanine ligase and the bacterial ribosomal protein S6:glutamate ligase have been vertically inherited within certain organismal lineages. Although members of this specificity-diverse superfamily share a common reaction mechanism, the nonoverlapping set of amino acid and peptide substrates recognized by each family provided few clues as to their evolutionary history. Two members of this family have been identified in the hyperthermophilic marine archaeon Methanococcus jannaschii and shown to catalyze the final reactions in two coenzyme biosynthetic pathways. The MJ0620 (mptN) locus encodes a tetrahydromethanopterin:α-l-glutamate ligase that forms tetrahydrosarcinapterin, a single carbon-carrying coenzyme. The MJ1001 (cofF) locus encodes a γ-F420-2:α-l-glutamate ligase, which caps the γ-glutamyl tail of the hydride carrier coenzyme F420. These two genes share a common ancestor with the ribosomal protein S6:glutamate ligase and a putative α-aminoadipate ligase, defining the first group of ATP-grasp enzymes with a shared amino acid substrate specificity. As in glutathione biosynthesis, two unrelated amino acid ligases catalyze sequential reactions in coenzyme F420 polyglutamate formation: a γ-glutamyl ligase adds 1–3 l-glutamate residues and the ATP-grasp-type ligase described here caps the chain with a single α-linked l-glutamate residue. The analogous pathways for glutathione, F420, folate, and murein peptide biosyntheses illustrate convergent evolution of nonribosomal peptide biosynthesis through the recruitment of single-step amino acid ligases. PMID:12909715

  4. Identification and Validation of Human DNA Ligase Inhibitors Using Computer-Aided Drug Design

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Shijun; Chen, Xi; Zhu, Xiao; Dziegielewska, Barbara; Bachman, Kurtis E.; Ellenberger, Tom; Ballin, Jeff D.; Wilson, Gerald M.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; MacKerell, Alexander D.

    2009-01-01

    Linking together of DNA strands by DNA ligases is essential for DNA replication and repair. Since many therapies used to treat cancer act by causing DNA damage, there is growing interest in the development of DNA repair inhibitors. Accordingly, virtual database screening and experimental evaluation were applied to identify inhibitors of human DNA ligase I (hLigI). When a DNA binding site within the DNA binding domain (DBD) of hLigI was targeted, more than 1 million compounds were screened from which 192 were chosen for experimental evaluation. In DNA joining assays, 10 compounds specifically inhibited hLigI, 5 of which also inhibited the proliferation of cultured human cell lines. Analysis of the 10 active compounds revealed the utility of including multiple protein conformations and chemical clustering in the virtual screening procedure. The identified ligase inhibitors are structurally diverse and have druglike physical and molecular characteristics making them ideal for further drug development studies. PMID:18630893

  5. Structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from Bacillus anthracis (BA4489)

    SciTech Connect

    Meier, Christoph; Carter, Lester G.; Winter, Graeme; Owens, Ray J.; Stuart, David I.; Esnouf, Robert M.

    2007-03-01

    The structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase from B. anthracis determined by X-ray crystallography at a resolution of 1.6 Å is described. Bacillus anthracis is a spore-forming bacterium and the causative agent of the disease anthrax. The Oxford Protein Production Facility has been targeting proteins from B. anthracis in order to develop high-throughput technologies within the Structural Proteomics in Europe project. As part of this work, the structure of 5-formyltetrahydrofolate cyclo-ligase (BA4489) has been determined by X-ray crystallography to 1.6 Å resolution. The structure, solved in complex with magnesium-ion-bound ADP and phosphate, gives a detailed picture of the proposed catalytic mechanism of the enzyme. Chemical differences from other cyclo-ligase structures close to the active site that could be exploited to design specific inhibitors are also highlighted.

  6. A Bacterial Inhibitor of Host Programmed Cell Death Defenses is an E3 Ubiquitin Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Janjusevic,R.; Abramovitch, R.; Martin, G.; Stebbins, C.

    2005-01-01

    The Pseudomonas syringae protein AvrPtoB is translocated into plant cells, where it inhibits immunity-associated programmed cell death (PCD). The structure of a C-terminal domain of AvrPtoB that is essential for anti-PCD activity reveals an unexpected homology to the U-box and RING-finger components of eukaryotic E3 ubiquitin ligases, and we show that AvrPtoB has ubiquitin ligase activity. Mutation of conserved residues involved in the binding of E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes abolishes this activity in vitro, as well as anti-PCD activity in tomato leaves, which dramatically decreases virulence. These results show that Pseudomonas syringae uses a mimic of host E3 ubiquitin ligases to inactivate plant defenses.

  7. Butelase 1 is an Asx-specific ligase enabling peptide macrocyclization and synthesis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang K T; Wang, Shujing; Qiu, Yibo; Hemu, Xinya; Lian, Yilong; Tam, James P

    2014-09-01

    Proteases are ubiquitous in nature, whereas naturally occurring peptide ligases, enzymes catalyzing the reverse reactions of proteases, are rare occurrences. Here we describe the discovery of butelase 1, to our knowledge the first asparagine/aspartate (Asx) peptide ligase to be reported. This highly efficient enzyme was isolated from Clitoria ternatea, a cyclic peptide-producing medicinal plant. Butelase 1 shares 71% sequence identity and the same catalytic triad with legumain proteases but does not hydrolyze the protease substrate of legumain. Instead, butelase 1 cyclizes various peptides of plant and animal origin with yields greater than 95%. With Kcat values of up to 17 s(-1) and catalytic efficiencies as high as 542,000 M(-1) s(-1), butelase 1 is the fastest peptide ligase known. Notably, butelase 1 also displays broad specificity for the N-terminal amino acids of the peptide substrate, thus providing a new tool for C terminus-specific intermolecular peptide ligations.

  8. The transcription factor Krox20 is an E3 ligase that sumoylates its Nab coregulators

    PubMed Central

    García-Gutiérrez, Pablo; Juárez-Vicente, Francisco; Gallardo-Chamizo, Francisco; Charnay, Patrick; García-Domínguez, Mario

    2011-01-01

    Covalent attachment of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) to proteins regulates many processes in the eukaryotic cell. This reaction is similar to ubiquitination and usually requires an E3 ligase for substrate modification. However, only a few SUMO ligases have been described so far, which frequently facilitate sumoylation by bringing together the SUMO-conjugating enzyme Ubc9 and the target protein. Ubc9 is an interaction partner of the transcription factor Krox20, a key regulator of hindbrain development. Here, we show that Krox20 functions as a SUMO ligase for its coregulators—the Nab proteins—and that Nab sumoylation negatively modulates Krox20 transcriptional activity in vivo. PMID:21836637

  9. Discrimination of Listeria monocytogenes from other Listeria species by ligase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Wiedmann, M; Czajka, J; Barany, F; Batt, C A

    1992-01-01

    A ligase chain reaction assay based on a single-base-pair difference in the V9 region of the 16S rRNA gene (16S rDNA) was developed to distinguish between Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species. For this purpose, two pairs of primers were designed, with one primer of each pair being radioactively labeled. The ligated product was separated from the primers by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis and then detected by autoradiography. To achieve a higher sensitivity, the 16S rDNA was initially amplified by polymerase chain reaction prior to the ligase chain reaction. The ligase chain reaction was tested on 19 different Listeria species and strains and proved to be a highly specific diagnostic method for the detection of L. monocytogenes. Images PMID:1482171

  10. Single-crystal growth and characterization of LiGaSe2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuriyama, K.; Nozaki, T.

    1981-10-01

    Single crystals of a new ternary lithium chalcogenide LiGaSe2 were grown by an improved directional solidification technique. The typical as-grown crystal has dimensions of about 4 mm cubed and shows a transparent light yellow color. We infer that LiGaSe2 crystallizes in the β-NaFeO2 structure having an orthorhombic unit cell (a = 6.833 Å, b = 8.227 Å, and c = 6.541 Å) by powder x-ray diffraction. The melting point was determined by differential thermal analysis to be 846 °C. The energy band gap of LiGaSe2 at room temperature was determined by optical reflectance measurements to be 3.65 eV.

  11. Composition, Roles, and Regulation of Cullin-Based Ubiquitin E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Christina M.; Gray, William M.; Mooney, Sutton; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2014-01-01

    Due to their sessile nature, plants depend on flexible regulatory systems that allow them to adequately regulate developmental and physiological processes in context with environmental cues. The ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which targets a great number of proteins for degradation, is cellular tool that provides the necessary flexibility to accomplish this task. Ubiquitin E3 ligases provide the needed specificity to the pathway by selectively binding to particular substrates and facilitating their ubiquitylation. The largest group of E3 ligases known in plants is represented by CULLIN-REALLY INTERESTING NEW GENE (RING) E3 ligases (CRLs). In recent years, a great amount of knowledge has been generated to reveal the critical roles of these enzymes across all aspects of plant life. This review provides an overview of the different classes of CRLs in plants, their specific complex compositions, the variety of biological processes they control, and the regulatory steps that can affect their activities. PMID:25505853

  12. TRIAD1 and HHARI bind to and are activated by distinct neddylated Cullin-RING ligase complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kelsall, Ian R; Duda, David M; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Hofmann, Kay; Knebel, Axel; Langevin, Frédéric; Wood, Nicola; Wightman, Melanie; Schulman, Brenda A; Alpi, Arno F

    2013-01-01

    RING (Really Interesting New Gene)-in-between-RING (RBR) enzymes are a distinct class of E3 ubiquitin ligases possessing a cluster of three zinc-binding domains that cooperate to catalyse ubiquitin transfer. The regulation and biological function for most members of the RBR ligases is not known, and all RBR E3s characterized to date are auto-inhibited for in vitro ubiquitylation. Here, we show that TRIAD1 and HHARI, two members of the Ariadne subfamily ligases, associate with distinct neddylated Cullin-RING ligase (CRL) complexes. In comparison to the modest E3 ligase activity displayed by isolated TRIAD1 or HHARI, binding of the cognate neddylated CRL to TRIAD1 or HHARI greatly stimulates RBR ligase activity in vitro, as determined by auto-ubiquitylation, their ability to stimulate dissociation of a thioester-linked UBCH7∼ubiquitin intermediate, and reactivity with ubiquitin-vinyl methyl ester. Moreover, genetic evidence shows that RBR ligase activity impacts both the levels and activities of neddylated CRLs in vivo. Cumulatively, our work proposes a conserved mechanism of CRL-induced Ariadne RBR ligase activation and further suggests a reciprocal role of this special class of RBRs as regulators of distinct CRLs. PMID:24076655

  13. TRIAD1 and HHARI bind to and are activated by distinct neddylated Cullin-RING ligase complexes.

    PubMed

    Kelsall, Ian R; Duda, David M; Olszewski, Jennifer L; Hofmann, Kay; Knebel, Axel; Langevin, Frédéric; Wood, Nicola; Wightman, Melanie; Schulman, Brenda A; Alpi, Arno F

    2013-10-30

    RING (Really Interesting New Gene)-in-between-RING (RBR) enzymes are a distinct class of E3 ubiquitin ligases possessing a cluster of three zinc-binding domains that cooperate to catalyse ubiquitin transfer. The regulation and biological function for most members of the RBR ligases is not known, and all RBR E3s characterized to date are auto-inhibited for in vitro ubiquitylation. Here, we show that TRIAD1 and HHARI, two members of the Ariadne subfamily ligases, associate with distinct neddylated Cullin-RING ligase (CRL) complexes. In comparison to the modest E3 ligase activity displayed by isolated TRIAD1 or HHARI, binding of the cognate neddylated CRL to TRIAD1 or HHARI greatly stimulates RBR ligase activity in vitro, as determined by auto-ubiquitylation, their ability to stimulate dissociation of a thioester-linked UBCH7∼ubiquitin intermediate, and reactivity with ubiquitin-vinyl methyl ester. Moreover, genetic evidence shows that RBR ligase activity impacts both the levels and activities of neddylated CRLs in vivo. Cumulatively, our work proposes a conserved mechanism of CRL-induced Ariadne RBR ligase activation and further suggests a reciprocal role of this special class of RBRs as regulators of distinct CRLs.

  14. Knockdown of DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 by RNA interference inhibits herpes simplex virus type I DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Muylaert, Isabella; Elias, Per

    2007-04-13

    Herpes simplex virus has a linear double-stranded DNA genome with directly repeated terminal sequences needed for cleavage and packaging of replicated DNA. In infected cells, linear genomes rapidly become endless. It is currently a matter of discussion whether the endless genomes are circles supporting rolling circle replication or arise by recombination of linear genomes forming concatemers. Here, we have examined the role of mammalian DNA ligases in the herpes simplex virus, type I (HSV-1) life cycle by employing RNA interference (RNAi) in human 1BR.3.N fibroblasts. We find that RNAi-mediated knockdown of DNA ligase IV and its co-factor XRCC4 causes a hundred-fold reduction of virus yield, a small plaque phenotype, and reduced DNA synthesis. The effect is specific because RNAi against DNA ligase I or DNA ligase III fail to reduce HSV-1 replication. Furthermore, RNAi against DNA ligase IV and XRCC4 does not affect replication of adenovirus. In addition, high multiplicity infections of HSV-1 in human DNA ligase IV-deficient cells reveal a pronounced delay of production of infectious virus. Finally, we demonstrate that formation of endless genomes is inhibited by RNAi-mediated depletion of DNA ligase IV and XRCC4. Our results suggests that DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 serves an important role in the replication cycle of herpes viruses and is likely to be required for the formation of the endless genomes early during productive infection.

  15. Broad nucleotide cofactor specificity of DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Hyperthermus butylicus and its evolutionary significance.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jun-Hwan; Lee, Kang-Keun; Sun, Younguk; Seo, Gang-Jin; Cho, Sung Suk; Kwon, Suk Hyung; Kwon, Suk-Tae

    2013-05-01

    The nucleotide cofactor specificity of the DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic crenarchaeon Hyperthermus butylicus (Hbu) was studied to investigate the evolutionary relationship of DNA ligases. The Hbu DNA ligase gene was expressed under control of the T7lac promoter of pTARG in Escherichia coli BL21-CodonPlus(DE3)-RIL. The expressed enzyme was purified using the IMPACT™-CN system (intein-mediated purification with an affinity chitin-binding tag) and cation-ion (Arg-tag) chromatography. The optimal temperature for Hbu DNA ligase activity was 75 °C, and the optimal pH was 8.0 in Tris-HCl. The activity was highly dependent on MgCl2 or MnCl2 with maximal activity above 5 mM MgCl2 and 2 mM MnCl2. Notably, Hbu DNA ligase can use ADP and GTP in addition to ATP. The broad nucleotide cofactor specificity of Hbu DNA ligase might exemplify an undifferentiated ancestral stage in the evolution of DNA ligases. This study provides new evidence for possible evolutionary relationships among DNA ligases.

  16. Poly (ADP-Ribose) Polymerase is Involved in the Repair of DNA Damage Due to Sulfur Mustard by a Mechanism Other Than DNA Ligase I Activation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-16

    agents including sulfur mustard (SM). We observed concurrent activation of PARP and DNA ligase in SM-exposed human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK...Previous reports from other laboratories suggested that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. In humans, there are three distinct...DNA ligases, I, II and IV of which DNA ligase I participates in DNA replication and repair. By metabolically labeling HEK using 3H-adenosine

  17. Biochemical and structural characterization of DNA ligases from bacteria and archaea

    PubMed Central

    Pergolizzi, Giulia; Wagner, Gerd K.; Bowater, Richard P.

    2016-01-01

    DNA ligases are enzymes that seal breaks in the backbones of DNA, leading to them being essential for the survival of all organisms. DNA ligases have been studied from many different types of cells and organisms and shown to have diverse sizes and sequences, with well conserved specific sequences that are required for enzymatic activity. A significant number of DNA ligases have been isolated or prepared in recombinant forms and, here, we review their biochemical and structural characterization. All DNA ligases contain an essential lysine that transfers an adenylate group from a co-factor to the 5′-phosphate of the DNA end that will ultimately be joined to the 3′-hydroxyl of the neighbouring DNA strand. The essential DNA ligases in bacteria use β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (β-NAD+) as their co-factor whereas those that are essential in other cells use adenosine-5′-triphosphate (ATP) as their co-factor. This observation suggests that the essential bacterial enzyme could be targeted by novel antibiotics and the complex molecular structure of β-NAD+ affords multiple opportunities for chemical modification. Several recent studies have synthesized novel derivatives and their biological activity against a range of DNA ligases has been evaluated as inhibitors for drug discovery and/or non-natural substrates for biochemical applications. Here, we review the recent advances that herald new opportunities to alter the biochemical activities of these important enzymes. The recent development of modified derivatives of nucleotides highlights that the continued combination of structural, biochemical and biophysical techniques will be useful in targeting these essential cellular enzymes. PMID:27582505

  18. Electron microscopy visualization of DNA-protein complexes formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV.

    PubMed

    Grob, Patricia; Zhang, Teri T; Hannah, Ryan; Yang, Hui; Hefferin, Melissa L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-02

    The repair of DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs) is essential for cell viability and genome stability. Aberrant repair of DSBs has been linked with cancer predisposition and aging. During the repair of DSBs by non-homologous end joining (NHEJ), DNA ends are brought together, processed and then joined. In eukaryotes, this repair pathway is initiated by the binding of the ring-shaped Ku heterodimer and completed by DNA ligase IV. The DNA ligase IV complex, DNA ligase IV/XRRC4 in humans and Dnl4/Lif1 in yeast, is recruited to DNA ends in vitro and in vivo by an interaction with Ku and, in yeast, Dnl4/Lif1 stabilizes the binding of yKu to in vivo DSBs. Here we have analyzed the interactions of these functionally conserved eukaryotic NHEJ factors with DNA by electron microscopy. As expected, the ring-shaped Ku complex bound stably and specifically to DNA ends at physiological salt concentrations. At a ratio of 1 Ku molecule per DNA end, the majority of DNA ends were occupied by a single Ku complex with no significant formation of linear DNA multimers or circular loops. Both Dnl4/Lif1 and DNA ligase IV/XRCC4 formed complexes with Ku-bound DNA ends, resulting in intra- and intermolecular DNA end bridging, even with non-ligatable DNA ends. Together, these studies, which provide the first visualization of the conserved complex formed by Ku and DNA ligase IV at juxtaposed DNA ends by electron microscopy, suggest that the DNA ligase IV complex mediates end-bridging by engaging two Ku-bound DNA ends.

  19. Genetic evidence for an additional function of phage T4 gene 32 protein: interaction with ligase.

    PubMed

    Mosig, G; Breschkin, A M

    1975-04-01

    Gene 32 of bacteriophage T4 is essential for DNA replication, recombination, and repair. In an attempt to clarify the role of the corresponding gene product, we have looked for mutations that specifically inactivate one but not all of its functions and for compensating suppressor mutations in other genes. Here we describe a gene 32 ts mutant that does not produce progeny, but in contrast to an am mutant investigated by others, is capable of some primary and secondary DNA replication and of forming "joint" recombinational intermediates after infection of Escherichia coli B at the restrictive temperature. However, parental and progeny DNA strands are not ligated to covalently linked "recombinant" molecules, and single strands of vegetative DNA do not exceed unit length. Progeny production as well as capacity for covalent linkage in this gene 32 ts mutant are partially restored by additional rII mutations. Suppression by rII depends on functioning host ligase [EC 6.5.1.2; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming, NMN-forming)]. This gene 32 ts mutation (unlike some others) in turn suppresses the characteristic plaque morphology of rII mutants. We conclude that gene 32 protein, in addition to its role in DNA replication and in the formation of "joint" recombinational intermediates, interacts with T4 ligase [EC 6.5.1.1; poly(deoxyribonucleotide):poly(deoxyribonucleotide) ligase (AMP-forming)] when recombining DNA strands are covalently linked. The protein of the mutant that we describe here is mainly defective in this interaction, thus inactivating T4 ligase in recombination. Suppressing rII mutations facilitate substitution of host ligase. There is suggestive evidence that these interactions occur at the membrane.

  20. The E3 Ligase CHIP: Insights into Its Structure and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Indranil; Ghosh, Mrinal K.

    2014-01-01

    The carboxy-terminus of Hsc70 interacting protein (CHIP) is a cochaperone E3 ligase containing three tandem repeats of tetratricopeptide (TPR) motifs and a C-terminal U-box domain separated by a charged coiled-coil region. CHIP is known to function as a central quality control E3 ligase and regulates several proteins involved in a myriad of physiological and pathological processes. Recent studies have highlighted varied regulatory mechanisms operating on the activity of CHIP which is crucial for cellular homeostasis. In this review article, we give a concise account of our current knowledge on the biochemistry and regulation of CHIP. PMID:24868554

  1. Biochemical Properties and Biological Function of a Monofunctional Microbial Biotin Protein Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Daniels, Kyle G.; Beckett, Dorothy

    2010-01-01

    Biotin protein ligases constitute a family of enzymes that catalyze biotin linkage to biotin-dependent carboxylases. In bacteria these enzymes are functionally divided into two classes; the monofunctional enzymes that only catalyze biotin addition and the bifunctional enzymes that also bind to DNA to regulate transcription initiation. Biochemical and biophysical studies of the bifunctional Escherichia coli ligase suggest that several properties of the enzyme have evolved to support its additional regulatory role. Included among these properties are the order of substrate binding and linkage between oligomeric state and ligand binding. PMID:20499837

  2. Bioinformatics analysis identifies several intrinsically disordered human E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Sofie V.; Lindorff-Larsen, Kresten; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus

    2016-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system targets misfolded proteins for degradation. Since the accumulation of such proteins is potentially harmful for the cell, their prompt removal is important. E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases mediate substrate ubiquitination by bringing together the substrate with an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, which transfers ubiquitin to the substrate. For misfolded proteins, substrate recognition is generally delegated to molecular chaperones that subsequently interact with specific E3 ligases. An important exception is San1, a yeast E3 ligase. San1 harbors extensive regions of intrinsic disorder, which provide both conformational flexibility and sites for direct recognition of misfolded targets of vastly different conformations. So far, no mammalian ortholog of San1 is known, nor is it clear whether other E3 ligases utilize disordered regions for substrate recognition. Here, we conduct a bioinformatics analysis to examine >600 human and S. cerevisiae E3 ligases to identify enzymes that are similar to San1 in terms of function and/or mechanism of substrate recognition. An initial sequence-based database search was found to detect candidates primarily based on the homology of their ordered regions, and did not capture the unique disorder patterns that encode the functional mechanism of San1. However, by searching specifically for key features of the San1 sequence, such as long regions of intrinsic disorder embedded with short stretches predicted to be suitable for substrate interaction, we identified several E3 ligases with these characteristics. Our initial analysis revealed that another remarkable trait of San1 is shared with several candidate E3 ligases: long stretches of complete lysine suppression, which in San1 limits auto-ubiquitination. We encode these characteristic features into a San1 similarity-score, and present a set of proteins that are plausible candidates as San1 counterparts in humans. In conclusion, our work indicates that San1 is

  3. Ubiquitination of E3 ligases: self-regulation of the ubiquitin system via proteolytic and non-proteolytic mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    de Bie, P; Ciechanover, A

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin modification of many cellular proteins targets them for proteasomal degradation, but in addition can also serve non-proteolytic functions. Over the last years, a significant progress has been made in our understanding of how modification of the substrates of the ubiquitin system is regulated. However, little is known on how the ubiquitin system that is comprised of ∼1500 components is regulated. Here, we discuss how the biggest subfamily within the system, that of the E3 ubiquitin ligases that endow the system with its high specificity towards the numerous substrates, is regulated and in particular via self-regulation mediated by ubiquitin modification. Ligases can be targeted for degradation in a self-catalyzed manner, or through modification mediated by an external ligase(s). In addition, non-proteolytic functions of self-ubiquitination, for example activation of the ligase, of E3s are discussed. PMID:21372847

  4. TRIM E3 ligases in HIV infection: can these intrinsic immunity factors be harnessed for novel vaccines or therapies?

    PubMed

    Ndung'u, Thumbi

    2011-01-01

    Tripartite motif-containing (TRIM) E3 ligases are a recently identified family of proteins with potent antiviral activity in mammalian cells. The prototype TRIM E3 ligase, TRIM5α was initially identified as a species-specific antiviral restriction factor but subsequent studies suggest some antiviral activity by several TRIM E3 ligases in human cells. However, the mechanisms of antiviral activity by these proteins and their transcriptional, translational and post-translational regulation are poorly understood. Furthermore, the contribution of TRIM E3 ligases to relative resistance or viral control in vivo is largely unknown. Emerging data from our laboratory and other groups suggests that these proteins may have antiviral activity in vivo and contribute to HIV pathogenesis. Considering the significant difficulties so far encountered in developing an effective HIV vaccine and with the use of antiretroviral therapies, it will be important to further investigate the potential of TRIM E3 ligases as novel prophylactics or therapies.

  5. Regulation of the CRL4(Cdt2) ubiquitin ligase and cell-cycle exit by the SCF(Fbxo11) ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Mario; Duan, Shanshan; Jeong, Yeon-Tae; Horn, Moritz; Saraf, Anita; Florens, Laurence; Washburn, Michael P; Antebi, Adam; Pagano, Michele

    2013-03-28

    F-box proteins and DCAF proteins are the substrate binding subunits of the Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein (SCF) and Cul4-RING protein ligase (CRL4) ubiquitin ligase complexes, respectively. Using affinity purification and mass spectrometry, we determined that the F-box protein FBXO11 interacts with CDT2, a DCAF protein that controls cell-cycle progression, and recruits CDT2 to the SCF(FBXO11)complex to promote its proteasomal degradation. In contrast to most SCF substrates, which exhibit phosphodegron-dependent binding to F-box proteins, CDK-mediated phosphorylation of Thr464 present in the CDT2 degron inhibits recognition by FBXO11. Finally, our results show that the functional interaction between FBXO11 and CDT2 is evolutionary conserved from worms to humans and plays an important role in regulating the timing of cell-cycle exit. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Partial complementation of a DNA ligase I deficiency by DNA ligase III and its impact on cell survival and telomere stability in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Le Chalony, Catherine; Hoffschir, Françoise; Gauthier, Laurent R; Gross, Julia; Biard, Denis S; Boussin, François D; Pennaneach, Vincent

    2012-09-01

    DNA ligase I (LigI) plays a central role in the joining of strand interruptions during replication and repair. In our current study, we provide evidence that DNA ligase III (LigIII) and XRCC1, which form a complex that functions in single-strand break repair, are required for the proliferation of mammalian LigI-depleted cells. We show from our data that in cells with either dysfunctional LigI activity or depleted of this enzyme, both LigIII and XRCC1 are retained on the chromatin and accumulate at replication foci. We also demonstrate that the LigI and LigIII proteins cooperate to inhibit sister chromatid exchanges but that only LigI prevents telomere sister fusions. Taken together, these results suggest that in cells with dysfunctional LigI, LigIII contributes to the ligation of replication intermediates but not to the prevention of telomeric instability.

  7. Evolution of DNA ligases of Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA viruses of eukaryotes: a case of hidden complexity

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Eukaryotic Nucleo-Cytoplasmic Large DNA Viruses (NCLDV) encode most if not all of the enzymes involved in their DNA replication. It has been inferred that genes for these enzymes were already present in the last common ancestor of the NCLDV. However, the details of the evolution of these genes that bear on the complexity of the putative ancestral NCLDV and on the evolutionary relationships between viruses and their hosts are not well understood. Results Phylogenetic analysis of the ATP-dependent and NAD-dependent DNA ligases encoded by the NCLDV reveals an unexpectedly complex evolutionary history. The NAD-dependent ligases are encoded only by a minority of NCLDV (including mimiviruses, some iridoviruses and entomopoxviruses) but phylogenetic analysis clearly indicated that all viral NAD-dependent ligases are monophyletic. Combined with the topology of the NCLDV tree derived by consensus of trees for universally conserved genes suggests that this enzyme was represented in the ancestral NCLDV. Phylogenetic analysis of ATP-dependent ligases that are encoded by chordopoxviruses, most of the phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus failed to demonstrate monophyly and instead revealed an unexpectedly complex evolutionary trajectory. The ligases of the majority of phycodnaviruses and Marseillevirus seem to have evolved from bacteriophage or bacterial homologs; the ligase of one phycodnavirus, Emiliana huxlei virus, belongs to the eukaryotic DNA ligase I branch; and ligases of chordopoxviruses unequivocally cluster with eukaryotic DNA ligase III. Conclusions Examination of phyletic patterns and phylogenetic analysis of DNA ligases of the NCLDV suggest that the common ancestor of the extant NCLDV encoded an NAD-dependent ligase that most likely was acquired from a bacteriophage at the early stages of evolution of eukaryotes. By contrast, ATP-dependent ligases from different prokaryotic and eukaryotic sources displaced the ancestral NAD-dependent ligase at different

  8. SILENCING OF 4-COUMARATE-CoA LIGASE IN PINUS RADIATA, A CONIFEROUS GYMNOSPERM

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The enzyme 4-coumarate-CoA ligase (4CL) is involved in the general phenylpropanoid pathway and provides monolignol precursors such as p-coumaroyl-CoA, ultimately for the biosynthesis of lignin. Recombinant studies designed to assess the role of 4CL in the lignification process have focused on angios...

  9. THE ROLE OF E3 LIGASES IN THE UBIQUITIN-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF SPERMATOGENESIS*

    PubMed Central

    Richburg, John H.; Myers, Jessica L.; Bratton, Shawn B.

    2014-01-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins is a post-translational modification that was first described as a means to target misfolded or unwanted proteins for degradation by the proteasome. It is now appreciated that the ubiquitination of proteins also serves as a mechanism to modify protein function and cellular functions such as protein trafficking, cell signaling, DNA repair, chromatin modifications, cell-cycle progression and cell death. The ubiquitination of proteins occurs through the hierarchal transfer of ubiquitin from an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and finally to an E3 ubiquitin ligase that transfers the ubiquitin to its target protein. It is the final E3 ubiquitin ligase that confers the substrate specificity for ubiquitination and is the focus of this review. Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process by which spermatogonial stem cells undergo mitotic proliferation and expansion of the diploid spermatogonial population, differentiate into spermatocytes and progress through two meiotic divisions to produce haploid spermatids that proceed through a final morphogenesis to generate mature spermatozoa. The ubiquitination of proteins in the cells of the testis occurs in many of the processes required for the progression of mature spermatozoa. Since it is the E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes the target protein and provides the specificity and selectivity for ubiquitination, this review highlights known examples of E3 ligases in the testis and the differing roles that they play in maintaining functional spermatogenesis. PMID:24632385

  10. Control of cullin-ring ubiquitin ligase activity by nedd8.

    PubMed

    Deshaies, Raymond J; Emberley, Ethan D; Saha, Anjanabha

    2010-01-01

    The Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) family, which may number as many as 350 different enzymes, has an enormous impact on cellular regulation. CRL enzymes regulate cell biology by conjugating ubiquitin onto target proteins that are involved in a multitude of processes. In most cases this leads to degradation of the target, but in some cases CRL-dependent ubiquitination acts as a switch to activate or repress target function. The ubiquitin ligase activity of CRLs is controlled by cycles of attachment and removal of the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8. Conjugation of Nedd8 onto the cullin subunit of CRLs promotes assembly of an intact CRL complex and switches on ubiquitin ligase activity. Conversely, removal of Nedd8 switches off ubiquitin ligase activity and initiates CRL disassembly. Continuous maintenance of CRL function in vivo requires the activities of both the Nedd8-conjugating and deconjugating enzymes, pointing to a critical role of complex dynamics in CRL function. Here, we review how the Nedd8 cycle controls CRL activity and how perturbations of this cycle can lead to disease.

  11. The role of E3 ligases in the ubiquitin-dependent regulation of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Richburg, John H; Myers, Jessica L; Bratton, Shawn B

    2014-06-01

    The ubiquitination of proteins is a post-translational modification that was first described as a means to target misfolded or unwanted proteins for degradation by the proteasome. It is now appreciated that the ubiquitination of proteins also serves as a mechanism to modify protein function and cellular functions such as protein trafficking, cell signaling, DNA repair, chromatin modifications, cell-cycle progression and cell death. The ubiquitination of proteins occurs through the hierarchal transfer of ubiquitin from an E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme to an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and finally to an E3 ubiquitin ligase that transfers the ubiquitin to its target protein. It is the final E3 ubiquitin ligase that confers the substrate specificity for ubiquitination and is the focus of this review. Spermatogenesis is a complex and highly regulated process by which spermatogonial stem cells undergo mitotic proliferation and expansion of the diploid spermatogonial population, differentiate into spermatocytes and progress through two meiotic divisions to produce haploid spermatids that proceed through a final morphogenesis to generate mature spermatozoa. The ubiquitination of proteins in the cells of the testis occurs in many of the processes required for the progression of mature spermatozoa. Since it is the E3 ubiquitin ligase that recognizes the target protein and provides the specificity and selectivity for ubiquitination, this review highlights known examples of E3 ligases in the testis and the differing roles that they play in maintaining functional spermatogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Role of deoxyribonucleic acid ligase in a doxyribonucleic acid membrane fraction extracted from pneumococci.

    PubMed Central

    Greene, M; Firshein, W

    1976-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ligase has been detected in a DNA membrane fraction extracted from Pneumococcus. The specific activity of the enzyme in this fraction is 10-fold greater than in the remaining cell extract. It remains firmly bound (with other enzymes) to the complex after a purification procedure in which a considerable percentage of the macromolecules are dissociated. The ligase acts in two ways in the DNA membrane fraction in vitro. One, it catalyzes the linkage of small-molecular-weight pieces of newly synthesized DNA into heavier-molecular-weight DNA strands as shown by others (M Gellert, 1976; R. Okazaki, A. Sugino, S. Hirose, T. Okazaki, Y. Imae, R. Kainuma-Kuroda, T. Ogawa, M. Arisawa, and Y. Kurosowa, 1973; B. Olivera and I. Lehman, 14; and A. Sugino, S. Hirose, and R. Okazaki, 1972) and, two, it protects DNA from degradation by deoxyribonucleases. This latter effect is due to a competition between the ability of the nucleases to degrade DNA and the ability of DNA ligase to seal the nicks produced by these degradative enzymes. The ligase acts cooperatively with other enzymes in the DNA membrane fraction to synthesize DNA. PMID:4433

  13. It Takes 15 to Tango: Making Sense of the Many Ubiquitin Ligases of p53.

    PubMed

    Love, Ian M; Grossman, Steven R

    2012-03-01

    The transcription factor p53 regulates numerous cellular processes to guard against tumorigenesis. Cell-cycle inhibition, apoptosis, and autophagy are all regulated by p53 in a cell- and context-specific manner, underscoring the need for p53 activity to be kept low in most circumstances. p53 is kept in check primarily through its regulated ubiquitination and degradation by a number of different factors, whose contributions may reflect complex context-specific needs to restrain p53 activity. Chief among these E3 ubiquitin ligases in p53 homeostasis is the ubiquitously expressed proto-oncogene MDM2, whose loss renders vertebrates unable to limit p53 activity, resulting in early embryonic lethality. MDM2 has been validated as a critical, universal E3 ubiquitin ligase for p53 in numerous tissues and organisms to date, but additional E3 ligases have also been identified for p53 whose contribution to p53 activity is unclear. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in our knowledge regarding how p53 activity is apparently controlled by a multitude of ubiquitin ligases beyond MDM2.

  14. Peroxisomal lignoceroyl-CoA ligase deficiency in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy and adrenomyeloneuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Lazo, O.; Contreras, M.; Hashmi, M.; Stanley, W.; Irazu, C.; Singh, I. )

    1988-10-01

    The authors previously reported that in childhood adrenoleukodystrophy (C-ALD) and adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN), the peroxisomal {beta}-oxidation system for very long chain fatty acids is defective. To further define the defect in these two forms of X chromosome-linked ALD, they examined the oxidation of (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceric acid (n-tetracosanoic acid, C24:0) and (1-{sup 14}C)lignoceroyl-CoA (substrates for the first and second steps of {beta}-oxidation, respectively). The oxidation rates of lignoceric acid in C-ALD and AMN were 43% and 36% of control values, respectively, whereas the oxidation rate of lignoceroyl-CoA was 109% (C-ALD) and 106% (AMN) of control values, respectively. These results suggest that lignoceroyl-CoA ligase activity may be impaired in C-ALD and AMN. To identify the specific enzymatic deficiency and its subcellular localization in C-ALD and AMN, they established a modified procedure for the subcellular fractionation of cultured skin fibroblasts. Determination of acyl-CoA ligase activities provided direct evidence that lignoceroyl-CoA ligase is deficient in peroxisomes while it is normal in mitochondria and microsomes. These data clearly demonstrate that the pathognomonic accumulation of very long chain fatty acids in C-ALD and AMN is due to a deficiency of peroxisomal very long chain (lignoceric acid) acyl-CoA ligase.

  15. Crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from Streptococcus mutans

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yong-Zhi; Sheng, Yu; Li, Lan-Fen; Tang, De-Wei; Liu, Xiang-Yu; Zhao, Xiaojun; Liang, Yu-He Su, Xiao-Dong

    2007-09-01

    A potential target for antibiotic drug design, d-alanine-d-alanine ligase from S. mutans, was expressed in E. coli, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data were collected to 2.4 Å resolution. d-Alanine-d-alanine ligase is encoded by the gene ddl (SMU-599) in Streptococcus mutans. This ligase plays a very important role in cell-wall biosynthesis and may be a potential target for drug design. To study the structure and function of this ligase, the gene ddl was amplified from S. mutans genomic DNA and cloned into the expression vector pET28a. The protein was expressed in soluble form in Escherichia coli strain BL21 (DE3). Homogeneous protein was obtained using a two-step procedure consisting of Ni{sup 2+}-chelating and size-exclusion chromatography. Purified protein was crystallized and the cube-shaped crystal diffracted to 2.4 Å. The crystal belongs to space group P3{sub 1}21 or P3{sub 2}21, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 79.50, c = 108.97 Å. There is one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  16. Inhibitors of ubiquitin E3 ligase as potential new antimalarial drug leads

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin/proteasome pathway is the principal system for degradation of proteins in eukaryotes. Ubiquitin is a highly conserved polypeptide that covalently attaches to target proteins through the combined action ofubiquitin-activating enzyme (E1), conjugating enzyme (E2) and a protein ligase (E...

  17. Single-stranded DNA library preparation from highly degraded DNA using T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Gansauge, Marie-Theres; Gerber, Tobias; Glocke, Isabelle; Korlević, Petra; Lippik, Laurin; Nagel, Sarah; Riehl, Lara Maria; Schmidt, Anna; Meyer, Matthias

    2017-01-23

    DNA library preparation for high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA usually involves ligation of adapters to double-stranded DNA fragments. However, for highly degraded DNA, especially ancient DNA, library preparation has been found to be more efficient if each of the two DNA strands are converted into library molecules separately. We present a new method for single-stranded library preparation, ssDNA2.0, which is based on single-stranded DNA ligation with T4 DNA ligase utilizing a splinter oligonucleotide with a stretch of random bases hybridized to a 3' biotinylated donor oligonucleotide. A thorough evaluation of this ligation scheme shows that single-stranded DNA can be ligated to adapter oligonucleotides in higher concentration than with CircLigase (an RNA ligase that was previously chosen for end-to-end ligation in single-stranded library preparation) and that biases in ligation can be minimized when choosing splinters with 7 or 8 random nucleotides. We show that ssDNA2.0 tolerates higher quantities of input DNA than CircLigase-based library preparation, is less costly and better compatible with automation. We also provide an in-depth comparison of library preparation methods on degraded DNA from various sources. Most strikingly, we find that single-stranded library preparation increases library yields from tissues stored in formalin for many years by several orders of magnitude.

  18. The TRC8 E3 ligase ubiquitinates MHC class I molecules before dislocation from the ER

    PubMed Central

    Stagg, Helen R.; Thomas, Mair; van den Boomen, Dick; Wiertz, Emmanuel J.H.J.; Drabkin, Harry A.; Gemmill, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    The US2 and US11 gene products of human cytomegalovirus promote viral evasion by hijacking the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)–associated degradation (ERAD) pathway. US2 and US11 initiate dislocation of newly translocated major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) from the ER to the cytosol for proteasome-mediated degradation, thereby decreasing cell surface MHC I. Despite being instrumental in elucidating the mammalian ERAD pathway, the responsible E3 ligase or ligases remain unknown. Using a functional small interfering RNA library screen, we now identify TRC8 (translocation in renal carcinoma, chromosome 8 gene), an ER-resident E3 ligase previously implicated as a hereditary kidney cancer gene, as required for US2-mediated MHC I ubiquitination. Depletion of TRC8 prevents MHC I ubiquitination and dislocation by US2 and restores cell surface MHC I. TRC8 forms an integral part of a novel multiprotein ER complex that contains MHC I, US2, and signal peptide peptidase. Our data show that the TRC8 E3 ligase is required for MHC I dislocation from the ER and identify a new complex associated with mammalian ERAD. PMID:19720873

  19. ZRF1 mediates remodeling of E3 ligases at DNA lesion sites during nucleotide excision repair

    PubMed Central

    Gracheva, Ekaterina; Chitale, Shalaka; Wilhelm, Thomas; Rapp, Alexander; Byrne, Jonathan; Stadler, Jens; Medina, Rebeca; Cardoso, M. Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Faithful DNA repair is essential to maintain genome integrity. Ultraviolet (UV) irradiation elicits both the recruitment of DNA repair factors and the deposition of histone marks such as monoubiquitylation of histone H2A at lesion sites. Here, we report how a ubiquitin E3 ligase complex specific to DNA repair is remodeled at lesion sites in the global genome nucleotide excision repair (GG-NER) pathway. Monoubiquitylation of histone H2A (H2A-ubiquitin) is catalyzed predominantly by a novel E3 ligase complex consisting of DDB2, DDB1, CUL4B, and RING1B (UV–RING1B complex) that acts early during lesion recognition. The H2A-ubiquitin binding protein ZRF1 mediates remodeling of this E3 ligase complex directly at the DNA lesion site, causing the assembly of the UV–DDB–CUL4A E3 ligase complex (DDB1–DDB2–CUL4A-RBX1). ZRF1 is an essential factor in GG-NER, and its function at damaged chromatin sites is linked to damage recognition factor XPC. Overall, the results shed light on the interplay between epigenetic and DNA repair recognition factors at DNA lesion sites. PMID:27091446

  20. USP19-Mediated Deubiquitination Facilitates the Stabilization of HRD1 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Harada, Kumi; Kato, Masako; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-01-01

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded and unfolded proteins are eliminated by a process called ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in order to maintain cell homeostasis. In the ERAD pathway, several ER-localized E3 ubiquitin ligases target ERAD substrate proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. However, little is known about how the functions of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases are regulated. Recently, USP19, an ER-anchored deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of ERAD. In this study, HRD1, an ERAD ubiquitin ligase, is shown to be a novel substrate for USP19. We demonstrate that USP19 rescues HRD1 from proteasomal degradation by deubiquitination of K48-linked ubiquitin chains. In addition, the altered expression of USP19 affects the steady-state levels of HRD1. These results suggest that USP19 regulates the stability of HRD1 and provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases. PMID:27827840

  1. A Ubiquitin Ligase Complex Regulates Caspase Activation During Sperm Differentiation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Arama, Eli; Bader, Maya; Rieckhof, Gabrielle E; Steller, Hermann

    2007-01-01

    In both insects and mammals, spermatids eliminate their bulk cytoplasm as they undergo terminal differentiation. In Drosophila, this process of dramatic cellular remodeling requires apoptotic proteins, including caspases. To gain further insight into the regulation of caspases, we screened a large collection of sterile male flies for mutants that block effector caspase activation at the onset of spermatid individualization. Here, we describe the identification and characterization of a testis-specific, Cullin-3–dependent ubiquitin ligase complex that is required for caspase activation in spermatids. Mutations in either a testis-specific isoform of Cullin-3 (Cul3Testis), the small RING protein Roc1b, or a Drosophila orthologue of the mammalian BTB-Kelch protein Klhl10 all reduce or eliminate effector caspase activation in spermatids. Importantly, all three genes encode proteins that can physically interact to form a ubiquitin ligase complex. Roc1b binds to the catalytic core of Cullin-3, and Klhl10 binds specifically to a unique testis-specific N-terminal Cullin-3 (TeNC) domain of Cul3Testis that is required for activation of effector caspase in spermatids. Finally, the BIR domain region of the giant inhibitor of apoptosis–like protein dBruce is sufficient to bind to Klhl10, which is consistent with the idea that dBruce is a substrate for the Cullin-3-based E3-ligase complex. These findings reveal a novel role of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases in caspase regulation. PMID:17880263

  2. Identification of dynamical hinge points of the L1 ligase molecular switch

    PubMed Central

    Giambaşu, George M.; Lee, Tai-Sung; Sosa, Carlos P.; Robertson, Michael P.; Scott, William G.; York, Darrin M.

    2010-01-01

    The L1 ligase is an in vitro selected ribozyme that uses a noncanonically base-paired ligation site to catalyze regioselectively and regiospecifically the 5′ to 3′ phosphodiester bond ligation, a reaction relevant to origin of life hypotheses that invoke an RNA world scenario. The L1 ligase crystal structure revealed two different conformational states that were proposed to represent the active and inactive forms. It remains an open question as to what degree these two conformers persist as stable conformational intermediates in solution, and along what pathway are they able to interconvert. To explore these questions, we have performed a series of molecular dynamics simulations in explicit solvent of the inactive–active conformational switch in L1 ligase. Four simulations were performed departing from both conformers in both the reactant and product states, in addition to a simulation where local unfolding in the active state was induced. From these simulations, along with crystallographic data, a set of four virtual torsion angles that span two evolutionarily conserved and restricted regions were identified as dynamical hinge points in the conformational switch transition. The ligation site visits three distinct states characterized by hydrogen bond patterns that are correlated with the formation of specific contacts that may promote catalysis. The insights gained from these simulations contribute to a more detailed understanding of the coupled catalytic/conformational switch mechanism of L1 ligase that may facilitate the design and engineering of new catalytic riboswitches. PMID:20167653

  3. Small Molecule Inhibitors of the Interaction Between the E3 Ligase VHL and HIF1α

    PubMed Central

    Buckley, Dennis L.; Gustafson, Jeffrey L.; Van Molle, Inge; Roth, Anke G.; Tae, Hyun Seop; Gareiss, Peter C.; Jorgensen, William L.; Ciulli, Alessio

    2012-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases, such as the therapeutically relevant VHL, are challenging targets for traditional medicinal chemistry, as their modulation requires targeting protein-protein interactions. We report novel small-molecule inhibitors of the interaction between VHL and its molecular target HIF1α, a transcription factor involved in oxygen sensing. PMID:23065727

  4. High-Throughput Screening of HECT E3 Ubiquitin Ligases Using UbFluor.

    PubMed

    Foote, Peter K; Krist, David T; Statsyuk, Alexander V

    2017-09-14

    HECT E3 ubiquitin ligases are responsible for many human disease phenotypes and are promising drug targets; however, screening assays for HECT E3 inhibitors are inherently complex, requiring upstream E1 and E2 enzymes as well as ubiquitin, ATP, and detection reagents. Intermediate ubiquitin thioesters and a complex mixture of polyubiquitin products provide further opportunities for off-target inhibition and increase the complexity of the assay. UbFluor is a novel ubiquitin thioester that bypasses the E1 and E2 enzymes and undergoes direct transthiolation with HECT E3 ligases. The release of fluorophore upon transthiolation allows fluorescence polarization detection of HECT E3 activity. In the presence of inhibitors, HECT E3 activity is ablated, and thus no reaction and no change in FP are observed. This assay has been adapted for high-throughput screening of small molecules against HECT E3 ligases, and its utility has been proven in the discovery of HECT E3 ligase inhibitors. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. USP19-Mediated Deubiquitination Facilitates the Stabilization of HRD1 Ubiquitin Ligase.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kumi; Kato, Masako; Nakamura, Nobuhiro

    2016-11-02

    In the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), misfolded and unfolded proteins are eliminated by a process called ER-associated protein degradation (ERAD) in order to maintain cell homeostasis. In the ERAD pathway, several ER-localized E3 ubiquitin ligases target ERAD substrate proteins for ubiquitination and subsequent proteasomal degradation. However, little is known about how the functions of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases are regulated. Recently, USP19, an ER-anchored deubiquitinating enzyme (DUB), has been suggested to be involved in the regulation of ERAD. In this study, HRD1, an ERAD ubiquitin ligase, is shown to be a novel substrate for USP19. We demonstrate that USP19 rescues HRD1 from proteasomal degradation by deubiquitination of K48-linked ubiquitin chains. In addition, the altered expression of USP19 affects the steady-state levels of HRD1. These results suggest that USP19 regulates the stability of HRD1 and provide insight into the regulatory mechanism of the ERAD ubiquitin ligases.

  6. Structure and mechanism of an aspartimide-dependent peptide ligase in human legumain.

    PubMed

    Dall, Elfriede; Fegg, Julia C; Briza, Peter; Brandstetter, Hans

    2015-03-02

    Peptide ligases expand the repertoire of genetically encoded protein architectures by synthesizing new peptide bonds, energetically driven by ATP or NTPs. Here, we report the discovery of a genuine ligase activity in human legumain (AEP) which has important roles in immunity and tumor progression that were believed to be due to its established cysteine protease activity. Defying dogma, the ligase reaction is independent of the catalytic cysteine but exploits an endogenous energy reservoir that results from the conversion of a conserved aspartate to a metastable aspartimide. Legumain's dual protease-ligase activities are pH- and thus localization controlled, dominating at acidic and neutral pH, respectively. Their relevance includes reversible on-off switching of cystatin inhibitors and enzyme (in)activation, and may affect the generation of three-dimensional MHC epitopes. The aspartate-aspartimide (succinimide) pair represents a new paradigm of coupling endergonic reactions in ATP-scarce environments. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA. This is an open access article under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits use, distribution and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

  7. Characterization and Promoter Analysis of a Cotton Ring-Type Ubiquitin Ligase (E3) Gene

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A cotton fiber cDNA, GhRING1, and its corresponding gene have been cloned and characterized. The GhRING1 gene encodes a RING-type ubiquitin ligase (E3) containing 337 amino acids (aa). The GhRING1 protein contains a RING finger motif with conserved cysteine and histine residues at the C-terminus a...

  8. Discovery of bacterial NAD+-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: optimization of antibacterial activity.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Huynh, Hoan; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Albert, Robert; Cavero-Tomas, Marta; Chen, Brendan; Harang, Jenna; Loch, James T; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Zhao, Shannon; Liu, Ce-Feng; Mills, Scott D

    2011-08-01

    Optimization of adenosine analog inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. Antibacterial activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and Staphylococcus aureus was improved by modification of the 2-position substituent on the adenine ring and 3'- and 5'-substituents on the ribose. Compounds with logD values 1.5-2.5 maximized potency and maintained drug-like physical properties.

  9. Membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase ATL15 functions in sugar-responsive growth regulation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Aoyama, Shoki; Terada, Saki; Sanagi, Miho; Hasegawa, Yoko; Lu, Yu; Morita, Yoshie; Chiba, Yukako; Sato, Takeo; Yamaguchi, Junji

    2017-09-09

    Ubiquitin ligases play important roles in regulating various cellular processes by modulating the protein function of specific ubiquitination targets. The Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL) family is a group of plant-specific RING-type ubiquitin ligases that localize to membranes via their N-terminal transmembrane-like domains. To date, 91 ATL isoforms have been identified in the Arabidopsis genome, with several ATLs reported to be involved in regulating plant responses to environmental stresses. However, the functions of most ATLs remain unknown. This study, involving transcriptome database analysis, identifies ATL15 as a sugar responsive ATL gene in Arabidopsis. ATL15 expression was rapidly down-regulated in the presence of sugar. The ATL15 protein showed ubiquitin ligase activity in vitro and localized to plasma membrane and endomembrane compartments. Further genetic analyses demonstrated that the atl15 knockout mutants are insensitive to high glucose concentrations, whereas ATL15 overexpression depresses plant growth. In addition, endogenous glucose and starch amounts were reciprocally affected in the atl15 knockout mutants and the ATL15 overexpressors. These results suggest that ATL15 protein plays a significant role as a membrane-localized ubiquitin ligase that regulates sugar-responsive plant growth in Arabidopsis. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  11. In vitro selection of optimal DNA substrates for T4 RNA ligase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 RNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligated about 10 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly, the majority of the selected sequences approximated a well-defined consensus sequence.

  12. Single-stranded DNA library preparation from highly degraded DNA using T4 DNA ligase

    PubMed Central

    Gerber, Tobias; Glocke, Isabelle; Korlević, Petra; Lippik, Laurin; Nagel, Sarah; Riehl, Lara Maria; Schmidt, Anna

    2017-01-01

    Abstract DNA library preparation for high-throughput sequencing of genomic DNA usually involves ligation of adapters to double-stranded DNA fragments. However, for highly degraded DNA, especially ancient DNA, library preparation has been found to be more efficient if each of the two DNA strands are converted into library molecules separately. We present a new method for single-stranded library preparation, ssDNA2.0, which is based on single-stranded DNA ligation with T4 DNA ligase utilizing a splinter oligonucleotide with a stretch of random bases hybridized to a 3΄ biotinylated donor oligonucleotide. A thorough evaluation of this ligation scheme shows that single-stranded DNA can be ligated to adapter oligonucleotides in higher concentration than with CircLigase (an RNA ligase that was previously chosen for end-to-end ligation in single-stranded library preparation) and that biases in ligation can be minimized when choosing splinters with 7 or 8 random nucleotides. We show that ssDNA2.0 tolerates higher quantities of input DNA than CircLigase-based library preparation, is less costly and better compatible with automation. We also provide an in-depth comparison of library preparation methods on degraded DNA from various sources. Most strikingly, we find that single-stranded library preparation increases library yields from tissues stored in formalin for many years by several orders of magnitude. PMID:28119419

  13. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; Kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-08-08

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp.

  14. Effective interaction studies for inhibition of DNA ligase protein from Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Vijayalakshmi, Periyasamy; Daisy, Pitchai

    2015-02-01

    Staphylococcus aureus has been recognized as an important human pathogen for more than 100 years. It is among the most important causative agent of human infections in the twenty-first century. DNA ligase is the main protein responsible for the replication of S. aureus. In order to control the replication mechanism, DNA ligase is a successive drug target, hence we have chosen this protein for this study. We performed virtual screening using ZINC database for identification of potent inhibitor against DNA ligase. Based on the scoring methods, we have selected best five compounds from the ZINC database. In order to improve the accuracy, selected compounds were subjected into Quantum Polarized Ligand Docking (QPLD) docking, for which the results showed high docking score, compared to glide docking score. QPLD is more accurate as it includes charges in the scoring function, which was not available in the glide docking. Binding energy calculation results also indicated that selected compounds have good binding capacity with the target protein. In addition, these compounds on screening have good absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion and toxicity property. In this study, we identified few compounds that particularly work against DNA ligase protein, having better interaction phenomenon and it would help further the experimental analysis.

  15. Effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide on ligation capability of T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Bin; Tong, Zhaoxue; Zhao, Guojie; Mu, Runqing; Shang, Hong; Guan, Yifu

    2014-09-01

    To further understand the ligation mechanism, effects of 2'-O-methyl nucleotide (2'-OMeN) on the T4 DNA ligation efficiency were investigated. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer assay was used to monitor the nick-joining process by T4 DNA ligase. Results showed that substitutions at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick decreased the ligation efficiency by 48.7% ± 6.7% and 70.6% ± 4.0%, respectively. Substitutions at both 5'- and 3'-ends decreased the ligation efficiency by 76.6% ± 1.3%. Corresponding kinetic parameters, Vmax, Km, and kcat, have been determined in each case by using the Michaelis-Menten equation. The kinetic data showed that the 2'-OMeN substitutions reduced the maximal initial velocity and increased the Michaelis constant of T4 DNA ligase. Mismatches at 5'- and 3'-ends of the nick have also shown different influences on the ligation. Results here showed that the sugar pucker conformation at 3'-end impairs the ligation efficiency more profoundly than that at 5'-end. Different concentrations of Mg(2+), Ca(2+), K(+), Na(+), and ATP were also demonstrated to affect the T4 DNA ligase activity. These results enriched our knowledge about the effects of 2'-OMeN substitutions on the T4 DNA ligase.

  16. Structural insight into β-Clamp and its interaction with DNA Ligase in Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Preeti; Tarique, Khaja Faisal; Mazumder, Mohit; Rehman, Syed Arif Abdul; kumari, Nilima; Gourinath, Samudrala

    2016-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori, a gram-negative and microaerophilic bacterium, is the major cause of chronic gastritis, gastric ulcers and gastric cancer. Owing to its central role, DNA replication machinery has emerged as a prime target for the development of antimicrobial drugs. Here, we report 2Å structure of β-clamp from H. pylori (Hpβ-clamp), which is one of the critical components of DNA polymerase III. Despite of similarity in the overall fold of eubacterial β-clamp structures, some distinct features in DNA interacting loops exists that have not been reported previously. The in silico prediction identified the potential binders of β-clamp such as alpha subunit of DNA pol III and DNA ligase with identification of β-clamp binding regions in them and validated by SPR studies. Hpβ-clamp interacts with DNA ligase in micromolar binding affinity. Moreover, we have successfully determined the co-crystal structure of β-clamp with peptide from DNA ligase (not reported earlier in prokaryotes) revealing the region from ligase that interacts with β-clamp. PMID:27499105

  17. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases.

    PubMed

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-08-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes.

  18. The prolific ATL family of RING-H2 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Guzmán, Plinio

    2012-01-01

    An abundant class of E3 ubiquitin ligases encodes the RING-finger domain. The RING finger binds to the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and brings together both the E2 and substrate. It is predicted that 477 RING finger E3 ligases exist in Arabidopsis thaliana. A particular family among them, named Arabidopsis Tóxicos en Levadura (ATL), consists of 91 members that contain the RING-H2 variation and a hydrophobic domain located at the N-terminal end. Transmembrane E3 ligases are important in several biological processes. For instance, some transmembrane RING finger E3 ligases are main participants in the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway that targets misfolded proteins. Functional analysis of a number of ATLs has shown that some of them regulate distinct pathways in plants. Several ATLs have been shown to participate in defense responses, while others play a role in the regulation of the carbon/nitrogen response during post-germinative seedling growth transition, in the regulation of cell death during root development, in endosperm development, or in the transition to flowering under short day conditions. The ATL family has also been instrumental in evolution studies for showing how gene families are expanded in plant genomes. PMID:22827943

  19. Polynucleotide 3′-terminal Phosphate Modifications by RNA and DNA Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Zhelkovsky, Alexander M.; McReynolds, Larry A.

    2014-01-01

    RNA and DNA ligases catalyze the formation of a phosphodiester bond between the 5′-phosphate and 3′-hydroxyl ends of nucleic acids. In this work, we describe the ability of the thermophilic RNA ligase MthRnl from Methanobacterium thermoautotrophicum to recognize and modify the 3′-terminal phosphate of RNA and single-stranded DNA (ssDNA). This ligase can use an RNA 3′p substrate to generate an RNA 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate or convert DNA3′p to ssDNA3′pp5′A. An RNA ligase from the Thermus scotoductus bacteriophage TS2126 and a predicted T4 Rnl1-like protein from Thermovibrio ammonificans, TVa, were also able to adenylate ssDNA 3′p. These modifications of RNA and DNA 3′-phosphates are similar to the activities of RtcA, an RNA 3′-phosphate cyclase. The initial step involves adenylation of the enzyme by ATP, which is then transferred to either RNA 3′p or DNA 3′p to generate the adenylated intermediate. For RNA 3′pp5′A, the third step involves attack of the adjacent 2′ hydroxyl to generate the RNA 2′,3′-cyclic phosphate. These steps are analogous to those in classical 5′ phosphate ligation. MthRnl and TS2126 RNA ligases were not able to modify a 3′p in nicked double-stranded DNA. However, T4 DNA ligase and RtcA can use 3′-phosphorylated nicks in double-stranded DNA to produce a 3′-adenylated product. These 3′-terminal phosphate-adenylated intermediates are substrates for deadenylation by yeast 5′Deadenylase. Our findings that classic ligases can duplicate the adenylation and phosphate cyclization activity of RtcA suggests that they have an essential role in metabolism of nucleic acids with 3′-terminal phosphates. PMID:25324547

  20. Novel E3 Ubiquitin Ligases That Regulate Histone Protein Levels in the Budding Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Rakesh Kumar; Gonzalez, Melanie; Kabbaj, Marie-Helene Miquel; Gunjan, Akash

    2012-01-01

    Core histone proteins are essential for packaging the genomic DNA into chromatin in all eukaryotes. Since multiple genes encode these histone proteins, there is potential for generating more histones than what is required for chromatin assembly. The positively charged histones have a very high affinity for negatively charged molecules such as DNA, and any excess of histone proteins results in deleterious effects on genomic stability and cell viability. Hence, histone levels are known to be tightly regulated via transcriptional, posttranscriptional and posttranslational mechanisms. We have previously elucidated the posttranslational regulation of histone protein levels by the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway involving the E2 ubiquitin conjugating enzymes Ubc4/5 and the HECT (Homologous to E6-AP C-Terminus) domain containing E3 ligase Tom1 in the budding yeast. Here we report the identification of four additional E3 ligases containing the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains that are involved in the ubiquitylation and subsequent degradation of excess histones in yeast. These E3 ligases are Pep5, Snt2 as well as two previously uncharacterized Open Reading Frames (ORFs) YKR017C and YDR266C that we have named Hel1 and Hel2 (for Histone E3 Ligases) respectively. Mutants lacking these E3 ligases are sensitive to histone overexpression as they fail to degrade excess histones and accumulate high levels of endogenous histones on histone chaperones. Co-immunoprecipitation assays showed that these E3 ligases interact with the major E2 enzyme Ubc4 that is involved in the degradation related ubiquitylation of histones. Using mutagenesis we further demonstrate that the RING domains of Hel1, Hel2 and Snt2 are required for histone regulation. Lastly, mutants corresponding to Hel1, Hel2 and Pep5 are sensitive to replication inhibitors. Overall, our results highlight the importance of posttranslational histone regulatory mechanisms that employ multiple E3 ubiquitin ligases

  1. Role of SKP1-CUL1-F-box-protein (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligases in skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-03-20

    Many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell death depend precisely on the timely synthesis and degradation of key regulatory proteins. While protein synthesis can be regulated at multiple levels, protein degradation is mainly controlled by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), which consists of two distinct steps: (1) ubiquitylation of targeted protein by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and E3 ubiquitin ligase, and (2) subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Among all E3 ubiquitin ligases, the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ligases are the largest family and are responsible for the turnover of many key regulatory proteins. Aberrant regulation of SCF E3 ligases is associated with various human diseases, such as cancers, including skin cancer. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of all currently published data to define a promoting role of SCF E3 ligases in the development of skin cancer. The future directions in this area of research are also discussed with an ultimate goal to develop small molecule inhibitors of SCF E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of human skin cancer. Furthermore, altered components or substrates of SCF E3 ligases may also be developed as the biomarkers for early diagnosis or predicting prognosis. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  2. Role of SKP1-CUL1-F-Box-Protein (SCF) E3 Ubiquitin Ligases in Skin Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chuan-Ming; Wei, Wenyi; Sun, Yi

    2013-01-01

    Many biological processes such as cell proliferation, differentiation, and cell death depend precisely on the timely synthesis and degradation of key regulatory proteins. While protein synthesis can be regulated at multiple levels, protein degradation is mainly controlled by the ubiquitin—proteasome system (UPS), which consists of two distinct steps: (1) ubiquitylation of targeted protein by E1 ubiquitin-activating enzyme, E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and E3 ubiquitin ligase, and (2) subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome. Among all E3 ubiquitin ligases, the SCF (SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein) E3 ligases are the largest family and are responsible for the turnover of many key regulatory proteins. Aberrant regulation of SCF E3 ligases is associated with various human diseases, such as cancers, including skin cancer. In this review, we provide a comprehensive overview of all currently published data to define a promoting role of SCF E3 ligases in the development of skin cancer. The future directions in this area of research are also discussed with an ultimate goal to develop small molecule inhibitors of SCF E3 ligases as a novel approach for the treatment of human skin cancer. Furthermore, altered components or substrates of SCF E3 ligases may also be developed as the biomarkers for early diagnosis or predicting prognosis. PMID:23522382

  3. Use of adenylate kinase as a solubility tag for high level expression of T4 DNA ligase in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xinxin; Huang, Anliang; Luo, Dan; Liu, Haipeng; Han, Huzi; Xu, Yang; Liang, Peng

    2015-05-01

    The discovery of T4 DNA ligase in 1960s was pivotal in the spread of molecular biotechnology. The enzyme has become ubiquitous for recombinant DNA routinely practiced in biomedical research around the globe. Great efforts have been made to express and purify T4 DNA ligase to meet the world demand, yet over-expression of soluble T4 DNA ligase in E. coli has been difficult. Here we explore the use of adenylate kinase to enhance T4 DNA ligase expression and its downstream purification. E.coli adenylate kinase, which can be expressed in active form at high level, was fused to the N-terminus of T4 DNA ligase. The resulting His-tagged AK-T4 DNA ligase fusion protein was greatly over-expressed in E. coli, and readily purified to near homogeneity via two purification steps consisting of Blue Sepharose and Ni-NTA chromatography. The purified AK-T4 DNA ligase not only is fully active for DNA ligation, but also can use ADP in addition to ATP as energy source since adenylate kinase converts ADP to ATP and AMP. Thus adenylate kinase may be used as a solubility tag to facilitate recombinant protein expression as well as their downstream purification. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. A novel interaction between DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma plays an essential role in mitochondrial DNA stability.

    PubMed

    De, Ananya; Campbell, Colin

    2007-02-15

    The data in the present study show that DNA polymerase gamma and DNA ligase III interact in mitochondrial protein extracts from cultured HT1080 cells. An interaction was also observed between the two recombinant proteins in vitro. Expression of catalytically inert versions of DNA ligase III that bind DNA polymerase gamma was associated with reduced mitochondrial DNA copy number and integrity. In contrast, overexpression of wild-type DNA ligase III had no effect on mitochondrial DNA copy number or integrity. Experiments revealed that wild-type DNA ligase III facilitates the interaction of DNA polymerase gamma with a nicked DNA substrate in vitro, and that the zinc finger domain of DNA ligase III is required for this activity. Mitochondrial protein extracts prepared from cells overexpressing a DNA ligase III protein that lacked the zinc finger domain had reduced base excision repair activity compared with extracts from cells overexpressing the wild-type protein. These data support the interpretation that the interaction of DNA ligase III and DNA polymerase gamma is required for proper maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome.

  5. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-07-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline.

  6. Necdin Promotes Ubiquitin-Dependent Degradation of PIAS1 SUMO E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Gur, Ibrahim; Fujiwara, Kazushiro; Hasegawa, Koichi; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki

    2014-01-01

    Necdin, a pleiotropic protein that promotes differentiation and survival of mammalian neurons, is a member of MAGE (melanoma antigen) family proteins that share a highly conserved MAGE homology domain. Several MAGE proteins interact with ubiquitin E3 ligases and modulate their activities. However, it remains unknown whether MAGE family proteins interact with SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) E3 ligases such as PIAS (protein inhibitor of activated STAT) family, Nsmce2/Mms21 and Cbx4/Pc2. In the present study, we examined whether necdin interacts with these SUMO E3 ligases. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis revealed that necdin, MAGED1, MAGEF1 and MAGEL2 bound to PIAS1 but not to Nsmce2 or Cbx4. These SUMO E3 ligases bound to MAGEA1 but failed to interact with necdin-like 2/MAGEG1. Necdin bound to PIAS1 central domains that are highly conserved among PIAS family proteins and suppressed PIAS1-dependent sumoylation of the substrates STAT1 and PML (promyelocytic leukemia protein). Remarkably, necdin promoted degradation of PIAS1 via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway. In transfected HEK293A cells, amino- and carboxyl-terminally truncated mutants of PIAS1 bound to necdin but failed to undergo necdin-dependent ubiquitination. Both PIAS1 and necdin were associated with the nuclear matrix, where the PIAS1 terminal deletion mutants failed to localize, implying that the nuclear matrix is indispensable for necdin-dependent ubiquitination of PIAS1. Our data suggest that necdin suppresses PIAS1 both by inhibiting SUMO E3 ligase activity and by promoting ubiquitin-dependent degradation. PMID:24911587

  7. The substrate binding domains of human SIAH E3 ubiquitin ligases are now crystal clear

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zhongduo; Hou, Feng; Harding, Rachel; Huang, Xinyi; Dong, Aiping; Walker, John R.; Tong, Yufeng

    2017-01-01

    Seven in absentia homologs (SIAHs) comprise a family of highly conserved E3 ubiquitin ligases that play an important role in regulating signalling pathways in tumorigenesis, including the DNA damage repair and hypoxia response pathways. SIAH1 and SIAH2 have been found to function as a tumour repressor and a proto-oncogene, respectively, despite the high sequence identity of their substrate binding domains (SBDs). Ubiquitin-specific protease USP19 is a deubiquitinase that forms a complex with SIAHs and counteracts the ligase function. Much effort has been made to find selective inhibitors of the SIAHs E3 ligases. Menadione was reported to inhibit SIAH2 specifically. We used X-ray crystallography, peptide array, bioinformatic analysis, and biophysical techniques to characterize the structure and interaction of SIAHs with deubiquitinases and literature reported compounds. We solved the crystal structures of SIAH1 in complex with a USP19 peptide and of the apo form SIAH2. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the SIAH/USP19 complex is conserved in evolution. We demonstrated that menadione destabilizes both SIAH1 and SIAH2 non-specifically through covalent modification. The SBDs of SIAH E3 ligases are structurally similar with a subtle stability difference. USP19 is the only deubiquitinase that directly binds to SIAHs through the substrate binding pocket. Menadione is not a specific inhibitor for SIAH2. The crystallographic models provide structural insights into the substrate binding of the SIAH family E3 ubiquitin ligases that are critically involved in regulating cancer-related pathways. Our results suggest caution should be taken when using menadione as a specific SIAH2 inhibitor.

  8. A systems-wide screen identifies substrates of the SCFβTrCP ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Low, Teck Yew; Peng, Mao; Magliozzi, Roberto; Mohammed, Shabaz; Guardavaccaro, Daniele; Heck, Albert J R

    2014-12-16

    Cellular proteins are degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) in a precise and timely fashion. Such precision is conferred by the high substrate specificity of ubiquitin ligases. Identification of substrates of ubiquitin ligases is crucial not only to unravel the molecular mechanisms by which the UPS controls protein degradation but also for drug discovery purposes because many established UPS substrates are implicated in disease. We developed a combined bioinformatics and affinity purification-mass spectrometry (AP-MS) workflow for the system-wide identification of substrates of SCF(βTrCP), a member of the SCF family of ubiquitin ligases. These ubiquitin ligases are characterized by a multisubunit architecture typically consisting of the invariable subunits Rbx1, Cul1, and Skp1 and one of 69 F-box proteins. The F-box protein of this member of the family is βTrCP. SCF(βTrCP) binds, through the WD40 repeats of βTrCP, to the DpSGXX(X)pS diphosphorylated motif in its substrates. We recovered 27 previously reported SCF(βTrCP) substrates, of which 22 were verified by two independent statistical protocols, thereby confirming the reliability of this approach. In addition to known substrates, we identified 221 proteins that contained the DpSGXX(X)pS motif and also interacted specifically with the WD40 repeats of βTrCP. Thus, with SCF(βTrCP), as the example, we showed that integration of structural information, AP-MS, and degron motif mining constitutes an effective method to screen for substrates of ubiquitin ligases.

  9. The EEL-1 ubiquitin ligase promotes DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Ross, A J; Li, M; Yu, B; Gao, M X; Derry, W B

    2011-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases target a growing number of pro- and anti-apoptotic proteins, including tumour suppressor p53, caspases, and the Bcl-2 family. The core apoptosis pathway is well conserved between mammals and Caenorhabditis elegans, but the extent to which ubiquitin ligases regulate apoptotic cell death is not known. To investigate the role of E3 ligases in apoptosis, we inhibited 108 of the 165 predicted E3 ubiquitin ligase genes by RNA interference and quantified apoptosis in the C. elegans germline after genotoxic stress. From this screen, we identified the homologous to E6-associated protein C terminus-domain E3 ligase EEL-1 as a positive regulator of apoptosis. Intriguingly, the human homologue of EEL-1, Huwe1/ARF-BP1/Mule/HectH9, has been reported to possess both pro- and anti-apoptotic functions through its ability to stimulate Mcl-1 and p53 degradation, respectively. Here, we demonstrate that eel-1 is required to promote DNA damage-induced germ cell apoptosis, but does not have a role in physiological germ cell apoptosis or developmental apoptosis in somatic tissue. Furthermore, eel-1 acts in parallel to the p53-like gene cep-1 and intersects the core apoptosis pathway upstream of the Bcl-2/Mcl-1 orthologue ced-9. Although ee1-1 mutants exhibit hypersensitivity to genotoxic stress they do not appear to be defective in DNA repair, suggesting a distinct role for EEL-1 in promoting damage-induced apoptosis in the germline. PMID:21233842

  10. Identifying the ERAD ubiquitin E3 ligases for viral and cellular targeting of MHC class I.

    PubMed

    van den Boomen, D J H; Lehner, P J

    2015-12-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) US2 and US11 gene products hijack mammalian ER-associated degradation (ERAD) to induce rapid degradation of major histocompatibility class I (MHC-I) molecules. The rate-limiting step in this pathway is thought to be the polyubiquitination of MHC-I by distinct host ERAD E3 ubiquitin ligases. TRC8 was identified as the ligase responsible for US2-mediated MHC-I degradation and shown to be required for the cleavage-dependent degradation of some tail-anchored proteins. In addition to MHC-I, plasma membrane profiling identified further immune receptors, which are also substrates for the US2/TRC8 complex. These include at least six α integrins, the coagulation factor thrombomodulin and the NK cell ligand CD112. US2's use of specific HCMV-encoded adaptors makes it an adaptable viral degradation hub. US11-mediated degradation is MHC-I-specific and genetic screens have identified TMEM129, an uncharacterised RING-C2 E3 ligase, as responsible for US11-mediated degradation. In a unique auto-regulatory loop, US11 readily responds to changes in cellular expression of MHC-I. Free US11 either rebinds more MHC-I or is itself degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L E3 ligase complex. While virally encoded US2 and US11 appropriate mammalian ERAD, the MHC-I complex also undergoes stringent cellular quality control and misfolded MHC-I is degraded by the HRD1/SEL1L complex. We discuss the identification and central role of E3 ubiquitin ligases in ER quality control and viral degradation of the MHC-I chain. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  11. T4 RNA Ligase 2 truncated active site mutants: improved tools for RNA analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background T4 RNA ligases 1 and 2 are useful tools for RNA analysis. Their use upstream of RNA analyses such as high-throughput RNA sequencing and microarrays has recently increased their importance. The truncated form of T4 RNA ligase 2, comprising amino acids 1-249 (T4 Rnl2tr), is an attractive tool for attachment of adapters or labels to RNA 3'-ends. Compared to T4 RNA ligase 1, T4 Rnl2tr has a decreased ability to ligate 5'-PO4 ends in single-stranded RNA ligations, and compared to the full-length T4 Rnl2, the T4 Rnl2tr has an increased activity for joining 5'-adenylated adapters to RNA 3'-ends. The combination of these properties allows adapter attachment to RNA 3'-ends with reduced circularization and concatemerization of substrate RNA. Results With the aim of further reducing unwanted side ligation products, we substituted active site residues, known to be important for adenylyltransferase steps of the ligation reaction, in the context of T4 Rnl2tr. We characterized the variant ligases for the formation of unwanted ligation side products and for activity in the strand-joining reaction. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that lysine 227 is a key residue facilitating adenylyl transfer from adenylated ligation donor substrates to the ligase. This reversal of the second step of the ligation reaction correlates with the formation of unwanted ligation products. Thus, T4 Rn2tr mutants containing the K227Q mutation are useful for reducing undesired ligation products. We furthermore report optimal conditions for the use of these improved T4 Rnl2tr variants. PMID:21722378

  12. A network of ubiquitin ligases is important for the dynamics of misfolded protein aggregates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Saini, Jagdeep; Caplan, Avrom J

    2012-07-06

    Quality control ubiquitin ligases promote degradation of misfolded proteins by the proteasome. If the capacity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system is exceeded, then misfolded proteins accumulate in aggregates that are cleared by the autophagic system. To identify components of the ubiquitin/proteasome system that protect against aggregation, we analyzed a GFP-tagged protein kinase, Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP, in yeast strains deleted for 14 different ubiquitin ligases. We show that deletion of almost all of these ligases affected the proteostatic balance in untreated cells such that Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP aggregation was changed significantly compared with the levels found in wild type cells. By contrast, aggregation was increased significantly in only six E3 deletion strains when Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP folding was impaired due to inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with geldanamycin. The increase in aggregation of Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP due to deletion of UBR1 and UFD4 was partially suppressed by deletion of UBR2 due to up-regulation of Rpn4, which controls proteasome activity. Deletion of UBR1 in combination with LTN1, UFD4, or DOA10 led to a marked hypersensitivity to azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, suggesting some redundancy in the networks of quality control ubiquitin ligases. Finally, we show that Ubr1 promotes clearance of protein aggregates when the autophagic system is inactivated. These results provide insight into the mechanics by which ubiquitin ligases cooperate and provide feedback regulation in the clearance of misfolded proteins.

  13. Saccharomyces cerevisiae DNA ligase IV supports imprecise end joining independently of its catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Chiruvella, Kishore K; Liang, Zhuobin; Birkeland, Shanda R; Basrur, Venkatesha; Wilson, Thomas E

    2013-06-01

    DNA ligase IV (Dnl4 in budding yeast) is a specialized ligase used in non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although point and truncation mutations arise in the human ligase IV syndrome, the roles of Dnl4 in DSB repair have mainly been examined using gene deletions. Here, Dnl4 catalytic point mutants were generated that were severely defective in auto-adenylation in vitro and NHEJ activity in vivo, despite being hyper-recruited to DSBs and supporting wild-type levels of Lif1 interaction and assembly of a Ku- and Lif1-containing complex at DSBs. Interestingly, residual levels of especially imprecise NHEJ were markedly higher in a deletion-based assay with Dnl4 catalytic mutants than with a gene deletion strain, suggesting a role of DSB-bound Dnl4 in supporting a mode of NHEJ catalyzed by a different ligase. Similarly, next generation sequencing of repair joints in a distinct single-DSB assay showed that dnl4-K466A mutation conferred a significantly different imprecise joining profile than wild-type Dnl4 and that such repair was rarely observed in the absence of Dnl4. Enrichment of DNA ligase I (Cdc9 in yeast) at DSBs was observed in wild-type as well as dnl4 point mutant strains, with both Dnl4 and Cdc9 disappearing from DSBs upon 5' resection that was unimpeded by the presence of catalytically inactive Dnl4. These findings indicate that Dnl4 can promote mutagenic end joining independently of its catalytic activity, likely by a mechanism that involves Cdc9.

  14. Iduna is a poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR)-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase that regulates DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ho Chul; Lee, Yun-Il; Shin, Joo-Ho; Andrabi, Shaida A.; Chi, Zhikai; Gagné, Jean-Philippe; Lee, Yunjong; Ko, Han Seok; Lee, Byoung Dae; Poirier, Guy G.; Dawson, Valina L.; Dawson, Ted M.

    2011-01-01

    Ubiquitin mediated protein degradation is crucial for regulation of cell signaling and protein quality control. Poly(ADP-ribose) (PAR) is a cell-signaling molecule that mediates changes in protein function through binding at PAR binding sites. Here we characterize the PAR binding protein, Iduna, and show that it is a PAR-dependent ubiquitin E3 ligase. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity requires PAR binding because point mutations at Y156A and R157A eliminate Iduna’s PAR binding and Iduna’s E3 ligase activity. Iduna’s E3 ligase activity also requires an intact really interesting new gene (RING) domain because Iduna possessing point mutations at either H54A or C60A is devoid of ubiquitination activity. Tandem affinity purification reveals that Iduna binds to a number of proteins that are either PARsylated or bind PAR including PAR polymerase-1, 2 (PARP1, 2), nucleolin, DNA ligase III, KU70, KU86, XRCC1, and histones. PAR binding to Iduna activates its E3 ligase function, and PAR binding is required for Iduna ubiquitination of PARP1, XRCC1, DNA ligase III, and KU70. Iduna’s PAR-dependent ubiquitination of PARP1 targets it for proteasomal degradation. Via PAR binding and ubiquitin E3 ligase activity, Iduna protects against cell death induced by the DNA damaging agent N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and rescues cells from G1 arrest and promotes cell survival after γ-irradiation. Moreover, Iduna facilitates DNA repair by reducing apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites after MNNG exposure and facilitates DNA repair following γ-irradiation as assessed by the comet assay. These results define Iduna as a PAR-dependent E3 ligase that regulates cell survival and DNA repair. PMID:21825151

  15. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation.

    PubMed

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K; Ware, Carl F; Mace, Peter D; Riedl, Stefan J

    2016-01-28

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signalling and function. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate. The RING-between-RING (RBR) family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases. The RBR family includes Parkin and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the LUBAC (linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex). While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall auto-inhibited forms are available, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely unknown. Here we present the first structure, to our knowledge, of the fully active human HOIP RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of auto-inhibited RBRs. HOIP RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centres ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, three distinct helix-IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~ubiquitin conjugate and, surprisingly, an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases.

  16. Structure of a HOIP/E2~ubiquitin complex reveals RBR E3 ligase mechanism and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Lechtenberg, Bernhard C.; Rajput, Akhil; Sanishvili, Ruslan; Dobaczewska, Małgorzata K.; Ware, Carl F.; Mace, Peter D.; Riedl, Stefan J.

    2015-01-01

    Ubiquitination is a central process affecting all facets of cellular signaling and function1. A critical step in ubiquitination is the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme to a substrate or a growing ubiquitin chain, which is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. RING-type E3 ligases typically facilitate the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 directly to the substrate2,3. The RBR family of RING-type E3 ligases, however, breaks this paradigm by forming a covalent intermediate with ubiquitin similarly to HECT-type E3 ligases4–6. The RBR family includes Parkin4 and HOIP, the central catalytic factor of the linear ubiquitin chain assembly complex (LUBAC)7. While structural insights into the RBR E3 ligases Parkin and HHARI in their overall autoinhibited forms are available8–13, no structures exist of intact fully active RBR E3 ligases or any of their complexes. Thus, the RBR mechanism of action has remained largely enigmatic. Here we present the first structure of the fully active HOIP-RBR in its transfer complex with an E2~ubiquitin conjugate, which elucidates the intricate nature of RBR E3 ligases. The active HOIP-RBR adopts a conformation markedly different from that of autoinhibited RBRs. HOIP-RBR binds the E2~ubiquitin conjugate in an elongated fashion, with the E2 and E3 catalytic centers ideally aligned for ubiquitin transfer, which structurally both requires and enables a HECT-like mechanism. In addition, surprisingly, three distinct helix–IBR-fold motifs inherent to RBRs form ubiquitin-binding regions that engage the activated ubiquitin of the E2~Ub conjugate as well as an additional regulatory ubiquitin molecule. The features uncovered reveal critical states of the HOIP-RBR E3 ligase cycle, and comparison with Parkin and HHARI suggests a general mechanism for RBR E3 ligases. PMID:26789245

  17. Identification of candidate substrates for the Golgi Tul1 E3 ligase using quantitative diGly proteomics in yeast.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zongtian; Kim, Min-Sik; Pandey, Akhilesh; Espenshade, Peter J

    2014-11-01

    Maintenance of protein homeostasis is essential for cellular survival. Central to this regulation are mechanisms of protein quality control in which misfolded proteins are recognized and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. One well-studied protein quality control pathway requires endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-resident, multi-subunit E3 ubiquitin ligases that function in ER-associated degradation. Using fission yeast, our lab identified the Golgi Dsc E3 ligase as required for proteolytic activation of fungal sterol regulatory element-binding protein transcription factors. The Dsc E3 ligase contains five integral membrane subunits and structurally resembles ER-associated degradation E3 ligases. Saccharomyces cerevisiae codes for homologs of Dsc E3 ligase subunits, including the Dsc1 E3 ligase homolog Tul1 that functions in Golgi protein quality control. Interestingly, S. cerevisiae lacks sterol regulatory element-binding protein homologs, indicating that novel Tul1 E3 ligase substrates exist. Here, we show that the S. cerevisiae Tul1 E3 ligase consists of Tul1, Dsc2, Dsc3, and Ubx3 and define Tul1 complex architecture. Tul1 E3 ligase function required each subunit as judged by vacuolar sorting of the artificial substrate Pep12D. Genetic studies demonstrated that Tul1 E3 ligase was required in cells lacking the multivesicular body pathway and under conditions of ubiquitin depletion. To identify candidate substrates, we performed quantitative diGly proteomics using stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture to survey ubiquitylation in wild-type and tul1Δ cells. We identified 3116 non-redundant ubiquitylation sites, including 10 sites in candidate substrates. Quantitative proteomics found 4.5% of quantified proteins (53/1172) to be differentially expressed in tul1Δ cells. Correcting the diGly dataset for these differences increased the number of Tul1-dependent ubiquitylation sites. Together, our data demonstrate that the Tul1 E3 ligase functions in

  18. An alternative splicing event which occurs in mouse pachytene spermatocytes generates a form of DNA ligase III with distinct biochemical properties that may function in meiotic recombination.

    PubMed Central

    Mackey, Z B; Ramos, W; Levin, D S; Walter, C A; McCarrey, J R; Tomkinson, A E

    1997-01-01

    Three mammalian genes encoding DNA ligases have been identified. However, the role of each of these enzymes in mammalian DNA metabolism has not been established. In this study, we show that two forms of mammalian DNA ligase III, alpha and beta, are produced by a conserved tissue-specific alternative splicing mechanism involving exons encoding the C termini of the polypeptides. DNA ligase III-alpha cDNA, which encodes a 103-kDa polypeptide, is expressed in all tissues and cells, whereas DNA ligase III-beta cDNA, which encodes a 96-kDa polypeptide, is expressed only in the testis. During male germ cell differentiation, elevated expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA is restricted, beginning only in the latter stages of meiotic prophase and ending in the round spermatid stage. In 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta, the C-terminal 77 amino acids of DNA ligase III-alpha are replaced by a different 17- to 18-amino acid sequence. As reported previously, the 103-kDa DNA ligase III-alpha interacts with the DNA strand break repair protein encoded by the human XRCC1 gene. In contrast, the 96-kDa DNA ligase III-beta does not interact with XRCC1, indicating that DNA ligase III-beta may play a role in cellular functions distinct from the DNA repair pathways involving the DNA ligase III-alpha x XRCC1 complex. The distinct biochemical properties of DNA ligase III-beta, in combination with the tissue- and cell-type-specific expression of DNA ligase III-beta mRNA, suggest that this form of DNA ligase III is specifically involved in the completion of homologous recombination events that occur during meiotic prophase. PMID:9001252

  19. Parkin is a component of an SCF-like ubiquitin ligase complex and protects postmitotic neurons from kainate excitotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Staropoli, John F; McDermott, Caroline; Martinat, Cécile; Schulman, Brenda; Demireva, Elena; Abeliovich, Asa

    2003-03-06

    Mutations in parkin, which encodes a RING domain protein associated with ubiquitin ligase activity, lead to autosomal recessive Parkinson's disease characterized by midbrain dopamine neuron loss. Here we show that parkin functions in a multiprotein ubiquitin ligase complex that includes the F-box/WD repeat protein hSel-10 and Cullin-1. HSel-10 serves to target the parkin ubiquitin ligase activity to cyclin E, an hSel-10-interacting protein previously implicated in the regulation of neuronal apoptosis. Consistent with the notion that cyclin E is a substrate of the parkin ubiquitin ligase complex, parkin deficiency potentiates the accumulation of cyclin E in cultured postmitotic neurons exposed to the glutamatergic excitotoxin kainate and promotes their apoptosis. Furthermore, parkin overexpression attenuates the accumulation of cyclin E in toxin-treated primary neurons, including midbrain dopamine neurons, and protects them from apoptosis.

  20. Novel method for screening of radioprotective agents providing protection to DNA ligase against gamma radiation induced damage.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Saurabh; Malhotra, Poonam; Gupta, Ashutosh K; Singh, Praveen K; Mishra, Anil K; Javed, Saleem; Kumar, Raj

    2014-02-01

    A simple, sensitive and novel method was developed to screen out potential agents able to protect functional activity of DNA ligase against gamma irradiation-induced damage. Repeatability, authenticity and sensitivity of the method was verified by analyzing DNA ligase protecting activities of well-known radioprotectors such as amifostine, trolox, melatonin, semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) and an antioxidant gallic acid in extremely low concentration (1 μg/reaction). Two different sets (Set A and B) of T4 DNA ligase (1 unit/set) were prepared. Set 'A' (negative control) was exposed to different doses (3-5 kGy) of gamma radiation in the absence of radioprotective compounds. Set B (test) was exposed to similar doses of gamma radiation in the presence of radioprotective compounds. Following irradiation, DNA ligase was mixed with λ DNA (250 ng) pre-digested with Hind III restriction endonuclease. Ligation reaction was performed in both sets simultaneously at 22°C for 20 min and reaction product was analyzed using agarose gel electrophoresis. Complete DNA ligation was observed in samples where DNA ligase was irradiated in the presence of radioprotectective compounds, i.e., amifostine, trolox, melatonin and a natural radioprotector semiquinone glucoside derivative (SQGD) individually, while, functional impairment in ligation activity of DNA ligase was evident in samples in which DNA ligase was irradiated in the absence of a radioprotective compound. The current method was able to provide significant input to screen out radioprotective compounds able to protect DNA ligase functional activity against gamma radiation-induced functional impairment.

  1. Identification of HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase family genes involved in stem cell regulation and regeneration in planarians.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Jordana M; Nisperos, Sean V; Weeks, Joi; Ghulam, Mahjoobah; Marín, Ignacio; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-08-15

    E3 ubiquitin ligases constitute a large family of enzymes that modify specific proteins by covalently attaching ubiquitin polypeptides. This post-translational modification can serve to regulate protein function or longevity. In spite of their importance in cell physiology, the biological roles of most ubiquitin ligases remain poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the function of the HECT domain family of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell biology and tissue regeneration in planarians. Using bioinformatic searches, we identified 17 HECT E3 genes that are expressed in the Schmidtea mediterranea genome. Whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments showed that HECT genes were expressed in diverse tissues and most were expressed in the stem cell population (neoblasts) or in their progeny. To investigate the function of all HECT E3 ligases, we inhibited their expression using RNA interference (RNAi) and determined that orthologs of huwe1, wwp1, and trip12 had roles in tissue regeneration. We show that huwe1 RNAi knockdown led to a significant expansion of the neoblast population and death by lysis. Further, our experiments showed that wwp1 was necessary for both neoblast and intestinal tissue homeostasis as well as uncovered an unexpected role of trip12 in posterior tissue specification. Taken together, our data provide insights into the roles of HECT E3 ligases in tissue regeneration and demonstrate that planarians will be a useful model to evaluate the functions of E3 ubiquitin ligases in stem cell regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Efficient in situ detection of mRNAs using the Chlorella virus DNA ligase for padlock probe ligation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Nils; Meier, Matthias

    2017-02-01

    Padlock probes are single-stranded DNA molecules that are circularized upon hybridization to their target sequence by a DNA ligase. In the following, the circulated padlock probes are amplified and detected with fluorescently labeled probes complementary to the amplification product. The hallmark of padlock probe assays is a high detection specificity gained by the ligation reaction. Concomitantly, the ligation reaction is the largest drawback for a quantitative in situ detection of mRNAs due to the low affinities of common DNA or RNA ligases to RNA-DNA duplex strands. Therefore, current protocols require that mRNAs be reverse transcribed to DNA before detection with padlock probes. Recently, it was found that the DNA ligase from Paramecium bursaria Chlorella virus 1 (PBCV-1) is able to efficiently ligate RNA-splinted DNA. Hence, we designed a padlock probe assay for direct in situ detection of mRNAs using the PBCV-1 DNA ligase. Experimental single-cell data were used to optimize and characterize the efficiency of mRNA detection with padlock probes. Our results demonstrate that the PBCV-1 DNA ligase overcomes the efficiency limitation of current protocols for direct in situ mRNA detection, making the PBCV-1 DNA ligase an attractive tool to simplify in situ ligation sequencing applications. © 2017 Schneider and Meier; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  3. Functional characterization of EI24-induced autophagy in the degradation of RING-domain E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Devkota, Sushil; Jeong, Hyobin; Kim, Yunmi; Ali, Muhammad; Roh, Jae-il; Hwang, Daehee; Lee, Han-Woong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Historically, the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) and autophagy pathways were believed to be independent; however, recent data indicate that these pathways engage in crosstalk. To date, the players mediating this crosstalk have been elusive. Here, we show experimentally that EI24 (EI24, autophagy associated transmembrane protein), a key component of basal macroautophagy/autophagy, degrades 14 physiologically important E3 ligases with a RING (really interesting new gene) domain, whereas 5 other ligases were not degraded. Based on the degradation results, we built a statistical model that predicts the RING E3 ligases targeted by EI24 using partial least squares discriminant analysis. Of 381 RING E3 ligases examined computationally, our model predicted 161 EI24 targets. Those targets are primarily involved in transcription, proteolysis, cellular bioenergetics, and apoptosis and regulated by TP53 and MTOR signaling. Collectively, our work demonstrates that EI24 is an essential player in UPS-autophagy crosstalk via degradation of RING E3 ligases. These results indicate a paradigm shift regarding the fate of E3 ligases. PMID:27541728

  4. Enzyme-adenylate structure of a bacterial ATP-dependent DNA ligase with a minimized DNA-binding surface.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Adele; Rothweiler, Ulli; Leiros, Hanna Kirsti Schrøder

    2014-11-01

    DNA ligases are a structurally diverse class of enzymes which share a common catalytic core and seal breaks in the phosphodiester backbone of double-stranded DNA via an adenylated intermediate. Here, the structure and activity of a recombinantly produced ATP-dependent DNA ligase from the bacterium Psychromonas sp. strain SP041 is described. This minimal-type ligase, like its close homologues, is able to ligate singly nicked double-stranded DNA with high efficiency and to join cohesive-ended and blunt-ended substrates to a more limited extent. The 1.65 Å resolution crystal structure of the enzyme-adenylate complex reveals no unstructured loops or segments, and suggests that this enzyme binds the DNA without requiring full encirclement of the DNA duplex. This is in contrast to previously characterized minimal DNA ligases from viruses, which use flexible loop regions for DNA interaction. The Psychromonas sp. enzyme is the first structure available for the minimal type of bacterial DNA ligases and is the smallest DNA ligase to be crystallized to date.

  5. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53

    PubMed Central

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-01-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53. PMID:21597459

  6. E3 ubiquitin ligase Hades negatively regulates the exonuclear function of p53.

    PubMed

    Jung, J H; Bae, S; Lee, J Y; Woo, S R; Cha, H J; Yoon, Y; Suh, K-S; Lee, S-J; Park, I-C; Jin, Y-W; Lee, K-H; An, S; Lee, J H

    2011-12-01

    Following DNA damage, p53 translocates to the cytoplasm and mitochondria, where it triggers transcription-independent apoptosis by binding to Bcl-2 family proteins. However, little is known about how this exonuclear function of p53 is regulated. Here, we identify and characterize a p53-interacting protein called Hades, an E3 ligase that interacts with p53 in the mitochondria. Hades reduces p53 stability via a mechanism that requires its RING-finger domain with ubiquitin ligase activity. Hades polyubiquitinates p53 in vitro independent of Mdm2 and targets a critical lysine residue in p53 (lysine 24) distinct from those targeted by Mdm2. Hades inhibits a p53-dependent mitochondrial cell death pathway by inhibiting p53 and Bcl-2 interactions. These findings show that Hades-mediated p53 ubiquitination is a novel mechanism for negatively regulating the exonuclear function of p53.

  7. Structure of a RING E3 ligase and ubiquitin-loaded E2 primed for catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Plechanovová, Anna; Jaffray, Ellis; Tatham, Michael H.; Naismith, James H.; Hay, Ronald T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Ubiquitin modification is mediated by a large family of specificity determining ubiquitin E3 ligases. To facilitate ubiquitin transfer, RING E3 ligases bind both substrate and a ubiquitin E2 conjugating enzyme linked to ubiquitin via a thioester bond, but the mechanism of transfer has remained elusive. Here we report the crystal structure of the dimeric RING of RNF4 in complex with E2 (UbcH5a) linked by an isopeptide bond to ubiquitin. While the E2 contacts a single protomer of the RING, ubiquitin is folded back onto the E2 by contacts from both RING protomers. The C-terminal tail of ubiquitin is locked into an active site groove on the E2 by an intricate network of interactions, resulting in changes at the E2 active site. This arrangement is primed for catalysis as it can deprotonate the incoming substrate lysine residue and stabilise the consequent tetrahedral transition state intermediate. PMID:22842904

  8. WWP2 ubiquitin ligase and its isoforms: new biological insight and promising disease targets.

    PubMed

    Chantry, Andrew

    2011-08-01

    A number of recent papers on the WWP2 E3 ubiquitin ligase and two novel WWP2 isoforms have revealed important biological insight and disease-specific functions, and also impacted on our understanding of ubiquitin ligases in cell cycle regulation, apoptosis and differentiation. Gene knockout studies suggest a developmental role for WWP2 in chondrogenesis via mechanisms involving cartilage-specific transcription factors. Furthermore, WWP2 isoforms have been shown to selectively target oncogenic signaling pathways linked to both the pTEN tumour suppressor and the TGFβ/Smad signaling pathway. Here, it is suggested that WWP2 isoforms have now emerged as central physiological regulators as well as promising new disease targets, and that the challenge ahead is to now develop highly selective WWP2 inhibitors with utility in cartilage disease such as osteoarthritis and as new anticancer strategies.

  9. Hijacking the Host Ubiquitin Pathway: Structural Strategies of Bacterial E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Hicks, Stuart W.; Galán, Jorge E.

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ubiquitinylation of proteins is a critical mechanism in regulating numerous eukaryotic cellular processes including cell cycle progression, inflammatory response, and vesicular trafficking. Given the importance of ubiquitinylation, it is not surprising that several pathogenic bacteria have developed strategies to exploit various stages of the ubiquitin pathway for their own benefit. One such strategy is the delivery of bacterial ‘effector’ proteins into the host cell cytosol, which mimic the activities of components of the host ubiquitin pathway. Recent studies have highlighted a number of bacterial effectors that functionally mimic the activity of eukaryotic E3 ubiquitin ligases, including a novel structural class of bacterial E3 ligases that provides a striking example of convergent evolution. PMID:20036613

  10. Mutation detection using ligase chain reaction in passivated silicon-glass microchips and microchip capillary electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Lou, Xing Jian; Panaro, Nicholas J; Wilding, Peter; Fortina, Paolo; Kricka, Larry J

    2004-09-01

    The ligase chain reaction (LCR) following PCR is one of the most sensitive and specific methods for detecting mutations, especially single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Performing LCR in microchips remains a challenge because of the inhibitory effect of the internal surfaces of silicon-glass microchips. We have tested a dynamic polymer-based surface passivation method for LCR conducted in oxide-coated silicon-glass microchips. The combination of polyvinylpyrrolidone 40 (PVP-40) at 0.75% (w/v) with an excess of the ligase produced successful LCR in the silicon-glass microchips, with yields of ligated primers comparable to reactions performed in conventional reaction tubes. Ligated primers were detected and quantified simply and conveniently using microchip capillary electrophoresis.

  11. Regulation of DNA topoisomerase IIalpha stability by the ECV ubiquitin ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jisoo; Kim, Yong-Il; Tomida, Akihiro; Choi, Cheol-Hee

    2009-11-06

    In this study, we attempted to elucidate the E3 ubiquitin ligase for topo IIalpha. When cullins and VHL were ectopically expressed in HT1080 and HEK293T cells, topo IIalpha was degraded most prominently in cullin 2- and VHL-expressing cells. Cullin 2 and the beta domain (aa 114-123) of VHL, a subunit of the ECV (Elongin B/C-cullin 2-VHL protein) complex, specifically interact with the ATPase domain of topo IIalpha. We identified that topo IIalpha associated with endogenous Elongin C. In HT1080 cells co-transfected with deletion mutants of topo IIalpha GRDD (glucose-regulated destruction domain) and VHL, topo IIalpha was degraded by VHL expression. These results demonstrate that ECV acts as E3 ubiquitin ligase targeting GRDD-independent topo IIalpha to the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway.

  12. TRIMmunity: The roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity

    PubMed Central

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A.

    2014-01-01

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM-family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, sub-cellular localization, and in cell-type specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research. PMID:24333484

  13. RING finger palmitoylation of the endoplasmic reticulum Gp78 E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Fairbank, Maria; Huang, Kun; El-Husseini, Alaa; Nabi, Ivan R

    2012-07-30

    Gp78 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase within the endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation pathway. We show that Flag-tagged gp78 undergoes sulfhydryl cysteine palmitoylation (S-palmitoylation) within the RING finger motif, responsible for its ubiquitin ligase activity. Screening of 19 palmitoyl acyl transferases (PATs) identified five that increased gp78 RING finger palmitoylation. Endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-localized Myc-DHHC6 overexpression promoted the peripheral ER distribution of Flag-gp78 while RING finger mutation and the palmitoylation inhibitor 2-bromopalmitate restricted gp78 to the central ER. Palmitoylation of RING finger cysteines therefore regulates gp78 distribution to the peripheral ER. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase is involved in the virulence of Streptococcus suis serotype 2.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Chengkun; Xu, Jiali; Shi, Guolin; Zhao, Xigong; Ren, Sujing; Li, Jinquan; Chen, Huanchun; Bei, Weicheng

    2016-09-01

    Streptococcus suis is an emerging zoonotic pathogen that causes severe infections in pigs and humans. However, the pathogenesis of S. suis remains unclear. The present study targeted a putative virulence-associated factor (fhs, encoding the formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase) of S. suis. To investigate the role of fhs in the virulence potential of S. suis serotype 2, an fhs deletion mutant (Δfhs) and the corresponding complementation strain (CΔfhs) were generated. The Δfhs mutant displayed similar growth compared to that of the wild-type and complementation strains. Using murine and pig infection models, we demonstrated for the first time that the formate-tetrahydrofolate ligase is required for the full virulence of S. suis 2. Our findings provide a new insight into the pathogenesis of S. suis 2.

  15. The COP9 signalosome and cullin-RING ligases in the heart

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xuejun; Martin, Douglas S

    2015-01-01

    Alteration of ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) mediated protein degradation has been implicated in the progression from a large subset of heart disease to congestive heart failure, rendering it extremely important to elucidate the cellular and molecular mechanism by which the UPS is regulated. Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs) represent the largest family of ubiquitin ligases crucial for UPS-dependent proteolysis. Serving as a cullin deneddylase, the COP9 signalosome (CSN) regulates the activity and assembly of CRLs. In the past several years, emerging studies have begun to unveil the role of the CSN and some of the CRLs in cardiomyocytes or the heart under physiological and pathological conditions. This review article will highlight and analyze these recent progresses and provide the author’s perspective on the future directions for this research field. PMID:26064789

  16. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Pendini, Nicole R.; Polyak, Steve W.; Booker, Grant W.; Wallace, John C.; Wilce, Matthew C. J.

    2008-01-01

    Biotin protein ligase from Staphylococcus aureus catalyses the biotinylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and pyruvate carboxylase. Recombinant biotin protein ligase from S. aureus has been cloned, expressed and purified. Crystals were grown using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method using PEG 8000 as the precipitant at 295 K. X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.3 Å resolution from crystals using synchrotron X-ray radiation at 100 K. The diffraction was consistent with the tetragonal space group P42212, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 93.665, c = 131.95. PMID:18540065

  17. Identification of TRIM22 as a RING finger E3 ubiquitin ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Duan Zhijian; Gao Bo; Xu Wei; Xiong Sidong

    2008-09-26

    TRIM22, a member of the TRIM family proteins which contain RING finger, B-box, and coiled-coil domains, has been reported as a transcriptional regulator and involved in various cellular processes. In this study, the E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, a novel property of TRIM22, was demonstrated. It was found that TRIM22 underwent self-ubiquitylation in vitro in combination with the E2 enzyme UbcH5B and the ubiquitylation was dependent on its RING finger domain. Further evidences showed that TRIM22 could also be self-ubiquitylated in vivo. Importantly, TRIM22 was conjugated with poly-ubiquitin chains and stabilized by the proteasome inhibitor in 293T cells, suggesting that TRIM22 targeted itself for proteasomal degradation through the poly-ubiquitylation. We also found that TRIM22 was located in the nucleus, indicating that TRIM22 might function as a nuclear E3 ubiquitin ligase.

  18. TRIMmunity: the roles of the TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligase family in innate antiviral immunity.

    PubMed

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Versteeg, Gijs A

    2014-03-20

    Tripartite motif (TRIM) proteins have been implicated in multiple cellular functions, including antiviral activity. Research efforts so far indicate that the antiviral activity of TRIMs relies, for the most part, on their function as E3-ubiquitin ligases. A substantial number of the TRIM family members have been demonstrated to mediate innate immune cell signal transduction and subsequent cytokine induction. In addition, a subset of TRIMs has been shown to restrict viral replication by directly targeting viral proteins. Although the body of work on the cellular roles of TRIM E3-ubiquitin ligases has rapidly grown over the last years, many aspects of their molecular workings and multi-functionality remain unclear. The antiviral function of many TRIMs seems to be conferred by specific isoforms, by sub-cellular localization and in cell-type-specific contexts. Here we review recent findings on TRIM antiviral functions, current limitations and an outlook for future research.

  19. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is an LC3-interactive protein and regulates autophagy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Childress, Chandra; Shaw Iv, John H; Peng, Ke; Shao, Genbao; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2017-01-13

    The MAP1LC3/LC3 family plays an essential role in autophagosomal biogenesis and transport. In this report, we show that the HECT family E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 interacts with LC3 and is involved in autophagosomal biogenesis. NEDD4 binds to LC3 through a conserved WXXL LC3-binding motif in a region between the C2 and the WW2 domains. Knockdown of NEDD4 impaired starvation- or rapamycin-induced activation of autophagy and autophagosomal biogenesis and caused aggregates of the LC3 puncta colocalized with endoplasmic reticulum membrane markers. Electron microscopy observed gigantic deformed mitochondria in NEDD4 knockdown cells, suggesting that NEDD4 might function in mitophagy. Furthermore, SQSTM1 is ubiquitinated by NEDD4 while LC3 functions as an activator of NEDD4 ligase activity. Taken together, our studies define an important role of NEDD4 in regulation of autophagy.

  20. Purification of histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase from E. coli.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing S; Unrau, Peter J

    2002-12-01

    Here we report the construction of a histidine-tagged T4 RNA ligase expression plasmid (pRHT4). The construct, when overexpressed in BL21 (DE3) cells, allows the preparation of large quantities of T4 RNA ligase in high purity using only a single purification column. The histidine affinity tag does not inhibit enzyme function, and we were able to purify 1-3 mg pure protein/g cell pellet. A simple purification procedure ensures that the enzyme is de-adenylated to levels comparable to those found for many commercial preparations. The purified protein has very low levels of RNase contamination and functioned normally in a variety of activity assays.

  1. An improved smaller biotin ligase for BioID proximity labeling

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae In; Jensen, Samuel C.; Noble, Kyle A.; KC, Birendra; Roux, Kenneth H.; Motamedchaboki, Khatereh; Roux, Kyle J.

    2016-01-01

    The BioID method uses a promiscuous biotin ligase to detect protein–protein associations as well as proximate proteins in living cells. Here we report improvements to the BioID method centered on BioID2, a substantially smaller promiscuous biotin ligase. BioID2 enables more-selective targeting of fusion proteins, requires less biotin supplementation, and exhibits enhanced labeling of proximate proteins. Thus BioID2 improves the efficiency of screening for protein–protein associations. We also demonstrate that the biotinylation range of BioID2 can be considerably modulated using flexible linkers, thus enabling application-specific adjustment of the biotin-labeling radius. PMID:26912792

  2. The E3 ubiquitin ligase RNF185 facilitates the cGAS-mediated innate immune response

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Zhongshi; Mao, Zhaomin; Tang, Yijun; Kong, Xiufang; Li, Senlin; Cui, Ye; Liu, Heng; Zhang, Lele; Zhang, Xiaojie; Jiang, Lindi; Zhou, Qin

    2017-01-01

    The cyclic GMP-AMP synthase (cGAS), upon cytosolic DNA stimulation, catalyzes the formation of the second messenger 2′3′-cGAMP, which then binds to stimulator of interferon genes (STING) and activates downstream signaling. It remains to be elucidated how the cGAS enzymatic activity is modulated dynamically. Here, we reported that the ER ubiquitin ligase RNF185 interacted with cGAS during HSV-1 infection. Ectopic-expression or knockdown of RNF185 respectively enhanced or impaired the IRF3-responsive gene expression. Mechanistically, RNF185 specifically catalyzed the K27-linked poly-ubiquitination of cGAS, which promoted its enzymatic activity. Additionally, Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE) patients displayed elevated expression of RNF185 mRNA. Collectively, this study uncovers RNF185 as the first E3 ubiquitin ligase of cGAS, shedding light on the regulation of cGAS activity in innate immune responses. PMID:28273161

  3. Regulation of Caenorhabditis elegans lifespan by a proteasomal E3 ligase complex

    PubMed Central

    Ghazi, Arjumand; Henis-Korenblit, Sivan; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2007-01-01

    The proteasome maintains cellular homeostasis by degrading oxidized and damaged proteins, a function known to be impaired during aging. The proteasome also acts in a regulatory capacity through E3 ligases to mediate the spatially and temporally controlled breakdown of specific proteins that impact biological processes. We have identified components of a Skp1-Cul1-F-Box E3 ligase complex that are required for the extended lifespan of Caenorhabditis elegans insulin/insulin-like growth factor-1-signaling (IIS) mutants. The CUL-1 complex functions in postmitotic, adult somatic tissues of IIS mutants to enhance longevity. Reducing IIS function leads to the nuclear accumulation of the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor, which extends lifespan by regulating downstream longevity genes. These CUL-1 complex genes act, at least in part, by promoting the transcriptional activity of DAF-16/FOXO. Together, our findings describe a role for an important cellular pathway, the proteasomal pathway, in the genetic determination of lifespan. PMID:17392428

  4. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Differentiation Regulated by a Single Ubiquitin Ligase: Substrate Complex

    PubMed Central

    Reavie, Linsey; Gatta, Giusy Della; Crusio, Kelly; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Buckley, Shannon M.; Thompson, Benjamin; Lee, Eugine; Gao, Jie; Bredemeyer, Andrea L.; Helmink, Beth A.; Zavadil, Jiri; Sleckman, Barry P.; Palomero, Teresa; Ferrando, Adolfo; Aifantis, Iannis

    2009-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation is regulated by cell-intrinsic and extrinsic cues. In addition to transcriptional regulation, post-translational regulation may also control HSC differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we visualized ubiquitin-regulated protein stability of a single transcription factor, c-Myc. The stability of c-Myc protein was instructive of HSC quiescence and c-Myc protein abundance was controlled by the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7. Fine changes in stability of c-Myc protein regulated the HSC “gene expression signature”. Using whole genome genomic approaches, we identified specific regulators of HSC function that are directly controlled by c-Myc binding, however adult HSCs and embryonic stem cells sense and interpret distinctly c-Myc regulated gene expression. These studies show a ubiquitin ligase substrate pair can orchestrate the molecular program of HSC differentiation. PMID:20081848

  5. Regulation of hematopoietic stem cell differentiation by a single ubiquitin ligase-substrate complex.

    PubMed

    Reavie, Linsey; Della Gatta, Giusy; Crusio, Kelly; Aranda-Orgilles, Beatriz; Buckley, Shannon M; Thompson, Benjamin; Lee, Eugine; Gao, Jie; Bredemeyer, Andrea L; Helmink, Beth A; Zavadil, Jiri; Sleckman, Barry P; Palomero, Teresa; Ferrando, Adolfo; Aifantis, Iannis

    2010-03-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) differentiation is regulated by cell-intrinsic and cell-extrinsic cues. In addition to transcriptional regulation, post-translational regulation may also control HSC differentiation. To test this hypothesis, we visualized the ubiquitin-regulated protein stability of a single transcription factor, c-Myc. The stability of c-Myc protein was indicative of HSC quiescence, and c-Myc protein abundance was controlled by the ubiquitin ligase Fbw7. Fine changes in the stability of c-Myc protein regulated the HSC gene-expression signature. Using whole-genome genomic approaches, we identified specific regulators of HSC function directly controlled by c-Myc binding; however, adult HSCs and embryonic stem cells sensed and interpreted c-Myc-regulated gene expression in distinct ways. Our studies show that a ubiquitin ligase-substrate pair can orchestrate the molecular program of HSC differentiation.

  6. The interplay between DSL proteins and ubiquitin ligases in Notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Pitsouli, Chrysoula; Delidakis, Christos

    2005-09-01

    Lateral inhibition is a pattern refining process that generates single neural precursors from a field of equipotent cells and is mediated via Notch signaling. Of the two Notch ligands Delta and Serrate, only the former was thought to participate in this process. We now show that macrochaete lateral inhibition involves both Delta and Serrate. In this context, Serrate interacts with Neuralized, a ubiquitin ligase that was heretofore thought to act only on Delta. Neuralized physically associates with Serrate and stimulates its endocytosis and signaling activity. We also characterize a mutation in mib1, a Drosophila homolog of mind bomb, another Delta-targeting ubiquitin ligase from zebrafish. Mib1 affects the signaling activity of Delta and Serrate in both lateral inhibition and wing dorsoventral boundary formation. Simultaneous absence of neuralized and mib1 completely abolishes Notch signaling in both aforementioned contexts, making it likely that ubiquitination is a prerequisite for Delta/Serrate signaling.

  7. Neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish by a large AAA+ ATPase/ubiquitin ligase, mysterin/RNF213

    PubMed Central

    Kotani, Yuri; Morito, Daisuke; Yamazaki, Satoru; Ogino, Kazutoyo; Kawakami, Koichi; Takashima, Seiji; Hirata, Hiromi; Nagata, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Mysterin (also known as RNF213) is a huge intracellular protein with two AAA+ ATPase modules and a RING finger ubiquitin ligase domain. Mysterin was originally isolated as a significant risk factor for the cryptogenic cerebrovascular disorder moyamoya disease, and was found to be involved in physiological angiogenesis in zebrafish. However, the function and the physiological significance of mysterin in other than blood vessels remain largely unknown, although mysterin is ubiquitously expressed in animal tissues. In this study, we performed antisense-mediated suppression of a mysterin orthologue in zebrafish larvae and revealed that mysterin-deficient larvae showed significant reduction in fast myofibrils and immature projection of primary motoneurons, leading to severe motor deficits. Fast muscle-specific restoration of mysterin expression cancelled these phenotypes, and interestingly both AAA+ ATPase and ubiquitin ligase activities of mysterin were indispensable for proper fast muscle formation, demonstrating an essential role of mysterin and its enzymatic activities in the neuromuscular regulation in zebrafish. PMID:26530008

  8. Structurally complex and highly active RNA ligases derived from random RNA sequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ekland, E. H.; Szostak, J. W.; Bartel, D. P.

    1995-01-01

    Seven families of RNA ligases, previously isolated from random RNA sequences, fall into three classes on the basis of secondary structure and regiospecificity of ligation. Two of the three classes of ribozymes have been engineered to act as true enzymes, catalyzing the multiple-turnover transformation of substrates into products. The most complex of these ribozymes has a minimal catalytic domain of 93 nucleotides. An optimized version of this ribozyme has a kcat exceeding one per second, a value far greater than that of most natural RNA catalysts and approaching that of comparable protein enzymes. The fact that such a large and complex ligase emerged from a very limited sampling of sequence space implies the existence of a large number of distinct RNA structures of equivalent complexity and activity.

  9. Restoration by T4 ligase of DNA sequences sensitive to "flush" cleaving restriction enzyme.

    PubMed

    Mottes, M; Morandi, C; Cremaschi, S; Sgaramella, V

    1977-07-01

    Fouteen "flush"-ended segments originate from the action of the restriction endonuclease Hae III of Haemophilus aegiptius on the DNA of the colicinogenic factor ColE 1 (A. Oka and M. Takanami, Nature, 264, 191, 1976). They are joined by the T4 polynucleotide ligase. The reaction can be monitored by gel electrophoresis, electron microscopy and resistance to phosphatase of the 5'-32P labelled ends. The joined products are a random recombination of the original segments, and can be cleaved by the same Hae III endonuclease to restore the exact electrophoretic pattern of the Hae III-cut ColE 1 DNA. In a properly diluted mixture of 5'-32P segments treated with T4 ligase, the level of phosphatase resistance is very close to the frequency of circle-formation as determined by electron microscopy: thus, the joining of the "flush"-ends involves the formation of circular structures covalently closed in both strands.

  10. Aminoacyl-coenzyme A synthesis catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, Martijn J; Jekel, Peter A; Wijma, Hein J; Bovenberg, Roel A L; Janssen, Dick B

    2011-03-23

    Coenzyme A ligases play an important role in metabolism by catalyzing the activation of carboxylic acids. In this study we describe the synthesis of aminoacyl-coenzyme As (CoAs) catalyzed by a CoA ligase from Penicillium chrysogenum. The enzyme accepted medium-chain length fatty acids as the best substrates, but the proteinogenic amino acids L-phenylalanine and L-tyrosine, as well as the non-proteinogenic amino acids D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine and (R)- and (S)-β-phenylalanine were also accepted. Of these amino acids, the highest activity was found for (R)-β-phenylalanine, forming (R)-β-phenylalanyl-CoA. Homology modeling suggested that alanine 312 is part of the active site cavity, and mutagenesis (A312G) yielded a variant that has an enhanced catalytic efficiency with β-phenylalanines and D-α-phenylalanine.

  11. ITCH E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Interacts with Ebola Virus VP40 To Regulate Budding

    PubMed Central

    Han, Ziying; Sagum, Cari A.; Bedford, Mark T.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Sudol, Marius

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Ebola virus (EBOV) and Marburg virus (MARV) belong to the Filoviridae family and can cause outbreaks of severe hemorrhagic fever, with high mortality rates in humans. The EBOV VP40 (eVP40) and MARV VP40 (mVP40) matrix proteins play a central role in virion assembly and egress, such that independent expression of VP40 leads to the production and egress of virus-like particles (VLPs) that accurately mimic the budding of infectious virus. Late (L) budding domains of eVP40 recruit host proteins (e.g., Tsg101, Nedd4, and Alix) that are important for efficient virus egress and spread. For example, the PPxY-type L domain of eVP40 and mVP40 recruits the host Nedd4 E3 ubiquitin ligase via its WW domains to facilitate budding. Here we sought to identify additional WW domain host interactors and demonstrate that the PPxY L domain motif of eVP40 interacts specifically with the WW domain of the host E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH. ITCH, like Nedd4, is a member of the HECT class of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and the resultant physical and functional interaction with eVP40 facilitates VLP and virus budding. Identification of this novel eVP40 interactor highlights the functional interplay between cellular E3 ligases, ubiquitination, and regulation of VP40-mediated egress. IMPORTANCE The unprecedented magnitude and scope of the recent 2014-2015 EBOV outbreak in West Africa and its emergence here in the United States and other countries underscore the critical need for a better understanding of the biology and pathogenesis of this emerging pathogen. We have identified a novel and functional EBOV VP40 interactor, ITCH, that regulates VP40-mediated egress. This virus-host interaction may represent a new target for our previously identified small-molecule inhibitors of virus egress. PMID:27489272

  12. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  13. Substrate Trapping Proteomics Reveals Targets of the βTrCP2/FBXW11 Ubiquitin Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tai Young; Siesser, Priscila F.; Rossman, Kent L.; Goldfarb, Dennis; Mackinnon, Kathryn; Yan, Feng; Yi, XianHua; MacCoss, Michael J.; Moon, Randall T.; Der, Channing J.

    2014-01-01

    Defining the full complement of substrates for each ubiquitin ligase remains an important challenge. Improvements in mass spectrometry instrumentation and computation and in protein biochemistry methods have resulted in several new methods for ubiquitin ligase substrate identification. Here we used the parallel adapter capture (PAC) proteomics approach to study βTrCP2/FBXW11, a substrate adaptor for the SKP1–CUL1–F-box (SCF) E3 ubiquitin ligase complex. The processivity of the ubiquitylation reaction necessitates transient physical interactions between FBXW11 and its substrates, thus making biochemical purification of FBXW11-bound substrates difficult. Using the PAC-based approach, we inhibited the proteasome to “trap” ubiquitylated substrates on the SCFFBXW11 E3 complex. Comparative mass spectrometry analysis of immunopurified FBXW11 protein complexes before and after proteasome inhibition revealed 21 known and 23 putatively novel substrates. In focused studies, we found that SCFFBXW11 bound, polyubiquitylated, and destabilized RAPGEF2, a guanine nucleotide exchange factor that activates the small GTPase RAP1. High RAPGEF2 protein levels promoted cell-cell fusion and, consequently, multinucleation. Surprisingly, this occurred independently of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor (GEF) catalytic activity and of the presence of RAP1. Our data establish new functions for RAPGEF2 that may contribute to aneuploidy in cancer. More broadly, this report supports the continued use of substrate trapping proteomics to comprehensively define targets for E3 ubiquitin ligases. All proteomic data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001062. PMID:25332235

  14. Biotin protein ligase from Corynebacterium glutamicum: role for growth and L: -lysine production.

    PubMed

    Peters-Wendisch, P; Stansen, K C; Götker, S; Wendisch, V F

    2012-03-01

    Corynebacterium glutamicum is a biotin auxotrophic Gram-positive bacterium that is used for large-scale production of amino acids, especially of L-glutamate and L-lysine. It is known that biotin limitation triggers L-glutamate production and that L-lysine production can be increased by enhancing the activity of pyruvate carboxylase, one of two biotin-dependent proteins of C. glutamicum. The gene cg0814 (accession number YP_225000) has been annotated to code for putative biotin protein ligase BirA, but the protein has not yet been characterized. A discontinuous enzyme assay of biotin protein ligase activity was established using a 105aa peptide corresponding to the carboxyterminus of the biotin carboxylase/biotin carboxyl carrier protein subunit AccBC of the acetyl CoA carboxylase from C. glutamicum as acceptor substrate. Biotinylation of this biotin acceptor peptide was revealed with crude extracts of a strain overexpressing the birA gene and was shown to be ATP dependent. Thus, birA from C. glutamicum codes for a functional biotin protein ligase (EC 6.3.4.15). The gene birA from C. glutamicum was overexpressed and the transcriptome was compared with the control strain revealing no significant gene expression changes of the bio-genes. However, biotin protein ligase overproduction increased the level of the biotin-containing protein pyruvate carboxylase and entailed a significant growth advantage in glucose minimal medium. Moreover, birA overexpression resulted in a twofold higher L-lysine yield on glucose as compared with the control strain.

  15. Structure of RizA, an L-amino-acid ligase from Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Kagawa, Wataru; Arai, Toshinobu; Ishikura, Shun; Kino, Kuniki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2015-09-01

    RizA is an L-amino-acid ligase from Bacillus subtilis that participates in the biosynthesis of rhizocticin, an oligopeptide antibiotic. The substrate-free form of RizA has been crystallized and the structure was solved at 2.8 Å resolution. The amino-acid-binding site appears to be capable of accommodating multiple amino acids, consistent with previous biochemical studies.

  16. Structural Studies of Trypanosoma brucei RNA Editing Ligases and Their Binding Partner Proteins.

    PubMed

    Shaneh, Alireza; Purisima, Enrico O; Salavati, Reza; Sulea, Traian

    2016-04-26

    To study the mechanism of ligating nicked RNA strands, we conducted molecular dynamics simulations of Trypanosoma brucei RNA editing ligases L1 and L2 complexed with double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) fragments. In each resulting model, a Mg(2+) ion coordinates the 5'-PO4 of the nicked nucleotide and the 3'-OH of the terminal nucleotide for a nucleophilic reaction consistent with the postulated step 3 chemistry of the ligation mechanism. Moreover, coordination of the 3'-OH to the Mg(2+) ion may lower its pKa, thereby rendering it a more effective nucleophile as an oxyanion. Thus, Mg(2+) may play a twofold role: bringing the reactants into the proximity of each other and activating the nucleophile. We also conducted solvated interaction energy calculations to explore whether ligation specificities can be correlated to ligase-dsRNA binding affinity changes. The calculated dsRNA binding affinities are stronger for both L1 and L2 when the terminal nucleotide is changed from cytosine to guanine, in line with their experimentally measured ligation specificities. Because the ligation mechanism is also influenced by interactions of the ligase with partner proteins from the editosome subcomplex, we also modeled the structure of the RNA-bound L2 in complex with the oligonucleotide binding (OB) domain of largest editosome interacting protein A1. The resulting L2-dsRNA-A1 model, which is consistent with mutagenesis and binding data recorded to date, provides the first atomic-level glimpse of plausible interactions around the RNA ligation site in the presence of an OB domain presented in-trans to a nucleic acid ligase.

  17. Discovery of bacterial NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase inhibitors: improvements in clearance of adenosine series.

    PubMed

    Stokes, Suzanne S; Gowravaram, Madhusudhan; Huynh, Hoan; Lu, Min; Mullen, George B; Chen, Brendan; Albert, Robert; O'Shea, Thomas J; Rooney, Michael T; Hu, Haiqing; Newman, Joseph V; Mills, Scott D

    2012-01-01

    Optimization of clearance of adenosine inhibitors of bacterial NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase is discussed. To reduce Cytochrome P-450-mediated metabolic clearance, many strategies were explored; however, most modifications resulted in compounds with reduced antibacterial activity and/or unchanged total clearance. The alkyl side chains of the 2-cycloalkoxyadenosines were fluorinated, and compounds with moderate antibacterial activity and favorable pharmacokinetic properties in rat and dog were identified.

  18. Unexpected substrate specificity of T4 DNA ligase revealed by in vitro selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harada, Kazuo; Orgel, Leslie E.

    1993-01-01

    We have used in vitro selection techniques to characterize DNA sequences that are ligated efficiently by T4 DNA ligase. We find that the ensemble of selected sequences ligates about 50 times as efficiently as the random mixture of sequences used as the input for selection. Surprisingly many of the selected sequences failed to produce a match at or close to the ligation junction. None of the 20 selected oligomers that we sequenced produced a match two bases upstream from the ligation junction.

  19. Ligation reaction specificities of an NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from the hyperthermophile Aquifex aeolicus.

    PubMed

    Tong, J; Barany, F; Cao, W

    2000-03-15

    An NAD(+)-dependent DNA ligase from the hyperthermophilic bacterium Aquifex aeolicus was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity. The enzyme is most active in slightly alkaline pH conditions with either Mg(2+)or Mn(2+)as the metal cofactor. Ca(2+)and Ni(2+)mainly support formation of DNA-adenylate intermediates. The catalytic cycle is characterized by a low k (cat)value of 2 min(-1)with concomitant accumulation of the DNA - adenylate intermediate when Mg(2+)is used as the metal cofactor. The ligation rates of matched substrates vary by up to 4-fold, but exhibit a general trend of T/A < or = G/C < C/G < A/T on both the 3'- and 5'-side of the nick. Consistent with previous studies on Thermus ligases, this Aquifex ligase exhibits greater discrimination against a mismatched base pair on the 3'-side of the nick junction. The requirement of 3' complementarity for a ligation reaction is reaffirmed by results from 1 nt insertions on either the 3'- or 5'-side of the nick. Furthermore, most of the unligatable 3' mismatched base pairs prohibit formation of the DNA-adenylate intermediate, indicating that the substrate adenylation step is also a control point for ligation fidelity. Unlike previously studied ATP ligases, gapped substrates cannot be ligated and intermediate accumulation is minimal, suggesting that complete elimination of base pair complementarity on one side of the nick affects substrate adenylation on the 5'-side of the nick junction. Relationships among metal cofactors, ligation products and intermediate, and ligation fidelity are discussed.

  20. A plant DNA ligase is an important determinant of seed longevity.

    PubMed

    Waterworth, Wanda M; Masnavi, Ghzaleh; Bhardwaj, Rajni M; Jiang, Qing; Bray, Clifford M; West, Christopher E

    2010-09-01

    DNA repair is important for maintaining genome integrity. In plants, DNA damage accumulated in the embryo of seeds is repaired early in imbibition, and is important for germination performance and seed longevity. An essential step in most repair pathways is the DNA ligase-mediated rejoining of single- and double-strand breaks. Eukaryotes possess multiple DNA ligase enzymes, each having distinct roles in cellular metabolism. Here, we report the characterization of DNA LIGASE VI, which is only found in plant species. The primary structure of this ligase shows a unique N-terminal region that contains a β-CASP motif, which is found in a number of repair proteins, including the DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair factor Artemis. Phenotypic analysis revealed a delay in the germination of atlig6 mutants compared with wild-type lines, and this delay becomes markedly exacerbated in the presence of the genotoxin menadione. Arabidopsis atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display significant hypersensitivity to controlled seed ageing, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seed viability relative to wild-type lines. In addition, atlig6 and atlig6 atlig4 mutants display increased sensitivity to low-temperature stress, resulting in delayed germination and reduced seedling vigour upon transfer to standard growth conditions. Seeds display a rapid transcriptional DNA DSB response, which is activated in the earliest stages of water imbibition, providing evidence for the accumulation of cytotoxic DSBs in the quiescent seed. These results implicate AtLIG6 and AtLIG4 as major determinants of Arabidopsis seed quality and longevity.

  1. DNA ligase III promotes alternative nonhomologous end-joining during chromosomal translocation formation.

    PubMed

    Simsek, Deniz; Brunet, Erika; Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J; Gregory, Philip D; Holmes, Michael C; Jasin, Maria

    2011-06-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1.

  2. Nanobody-targeted E3-ubiquitin ligase complex degrades nuclear proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ju Shin, Yeong; Kyun Park, Seung; Jung Jung, Yoo; Na Kim, Ye; Sung Kim, Ki; Kyu Park, Ok; Kwon, Seung-Hae; Ho Jeon, Sung; Trinh, Le A.; Fraser, Scott E.; Kee, Yun; Joon Hwang, Byung

    2015-01-01

    Targeted protein degradation is a powerful tool in determining the function of specific proteins or protein complexes. We fused nanobodies to SPOP, an adaptor protein of the Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase complex, resulting in rapid ubiquitination and subsequent proteasome-dependent degradation of specific nuclear proteins in mammalian cells and zebrafish embryos. This approach is easily modifiable, as substrate specificity is conferred by an antibody domain that can be adapted to target virtually any protein. PMID:26373678

  3. DNA Ligase III Promotes Alternative Nonhomologous End-Joining during Chromosomal Translocation Formation

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunnie Yan-Wai; Katyal, Sachin; Gao, Yankun; McKinnon, Peter J.; Lou, Jacqueline; Zhang, Lei; Li, James; Rebar, Edward J.; Gregory, Philip D.; Holmes, Michael C.; Jasin, Maria

    2011-01-01

    Nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) is the primary DNA repair pathway thought to underlie chromosomal translocations and other genomic rearrangements in somatic cells. The canonical NHEJ pathway, including DNA ligase IV (Lig4), suppresses genomic instability and chromosomal translocations, leading to the notion that a poorly defined, alternative NHEJ (alt-NHEJ) pathway generates these rearrangements. Here, we investigate the DNA ligase requirement of chromosomal translocation formation in mouse cells. Mammals have two other DNA ligases, Lig1 and Lig3, in addition to Lig4. As deletion of Lig3 results in cellular lethality due to its requirement in mitochondria, we used recently developed cell lines deficient in nuclear Lig3 but rescued for mitochondrial DNA ligase activity. Further, zinc finger endonucleases were used to generate DNA breaks at endogenous loci to induce translocations. Unlike with Lig4 deficiency, which causes an increase in translocation frequency, translocations are reduced in frequency in the absence of Lig3. Residual translocations in Lig3-deficient cells do not show a bias toward use of pre-existing microhomology at the breakpoint junctions, unlike either wild-type or Lig4-deficient cells, consistent with the notion that alt-NHEJ is impaired with Lig3 loss. By contrast, Lig1 depletion in otherwise wild-type cells does not reduce translocations or affect microhomology use. However, translocations are further reduced in Lig3-deficient cells upon Lig1 knockdown, suggesting the existence of two alt-NHEJ pathways, one that is biased toward microhomology use and requires Lig3 and a back-up pathway which does not depend on microhomology and utilizes Lig1. PMID:21655080

  4. Proteolytic regulation of metabolic enzymes by E3 ubiquitin ligase complexes: lessons from yeast.

    PubMed

    Nakatsukasa, Kunio; Okumura, Fumihiko; Kamura, Takumi

    2015-01-01

    Eukaryotic organisms use diverse mechanisms to control metabolic rates in response to changes in the internal and/or external environment. Fine metabolic control is a highly responsive, energy-saving process that is mediated by allosteric inhibition/activation and/or reversible modification of preexisting metabolic enzymes. In contrast, coarse metabolic control is a relatively long-term and expensive process that involves modulating the level of metabolic enzymes. Coarse metabolic control can be achieved through the degradation of metabolic enzymes by the ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS), in which substrates are specifically ubiquitinated by an E3 ubiquitin ligase and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Here, we review select multi-protein E3 ligase complexes that directly regulate metabolic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The first part of the review focuses on the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membrane-associated Hrd1 and Doa10 E3 ligase complexes. In addition to their primary roles in the ER-associated degradation pathway that eliminates misfolded proteins, recent quantitative proteomic analyses identified native substrates of Hrd1 and Doa10 in the sterol synthesis pathway. The second part focuses on the SCF (Skp1-Cul1-F-box protein) complex, an abundant prototypical multi-protein E3 ligase complex. While the best-known roles of the SCF complex are in the regulation of the cell cycle and transcription, accumulating evidence indicates that the SCF complex also modulates carbon metabolism pathways. The increasing number of metabolic enzymes whose stability is directly regulated by the UPS underscores the importance of the proteolytic regulation of metabolic processes for the acclimation of cells to environmental changes.

  5. Structure And Function of the Yeast U-Box-Containing Ubiquitin Ligase Ufd2p

    SciTech Connect

    Tu, D.; Li, W.; Ye, Y.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-04

    Proteins conjugated by Lys-48-linked polyubiquitin chains are preferred substrates of the eukaryotic proteasome. Polyubiquitination requires an activating enzyme (E1), a conjugating enzyme (E2), and a ligase (E3). Occasionally, these enzymes only assemble short ubiquitin oligomers, and their extension to full length involves a ubiquitin elongating factor termed E4. Ufd2p, as the first E4 identified to date, is involved in the degradation of misfolded proteins of the endoplasmic reticulum and of a ubiquitin-{beta}-GAL fusion substrate in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The mechanism of action of Ufd2p is unknown. Here we describe the crystal structure of the full-length yeast Ufd2p protein. Ufd2p has an elongated shape consisting of several irregular Armadillo-like repeats with two helical hairpins protruding from it and a U-box domain flexibly attached to its C terminus. The U-box of Ufd2p has a fold similar to that of the RING (Really Interesting New Gene) domain that is present in certain ubiquitin ligases. Accordingly, Ufd2p has all of the hallmarks of a RING finger-containing ubiquitin ligase: it associates with its cognate E2 Ubc4p via its U-box domain and catalyzes the transfer of ubiquitin from the E2 active site to Ufd2p itself or to an acceptor ubiquitin molecule to form unanchored diubiquitin oligomers. Thus, Ufd2p can function as a bona fide E3 ubiquitin ligase to promote ubiquitin chain elongation on a substrate.

  6. Structure of a BMI-1-Ring1B Polycomb Group Ubiquitin Ligase Complex

    SciTech Connect

    Li,Z.; Cao, R.; Wang, M.; Myers, M.; Zhang, Y.; Xu, R.

    2006-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins Bmi-1 and Ring1B are core subunits of the PRC1 complex which plays important roles in the regulation of Hox gene expression, X-chromosome inactivation, tumorigenesis and stem cell self-renewal. The RING finger protein Ring1B is an E3 ligase that participates in the ubiquitination of lysine 119 of histone H2A, and the binding of Bmi-1 stimulates the E3 ligase activity. We have mapped the regions of Bmi-1 and Ring1B required for efficient ubiquitin transfer and determined a 2.5 Angstroms structure of the Bmi-1-Ring1B core domain complex. The structure reveals that Ring1B 'hugs' Bmi-1 through extensive RING domain contacts and its N-terminal tail wraps around Bmi-1. The two regions of interaction have a synergistic effect on the E3 ligase activity. Our analyses suggest a model where the Bmi-1-Ring1B complex stabilizes the interaction between the E2 enzyme and the nucleosomal substrate to allow efficient ubiquitin transfer.

  7. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R.; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-01-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains and that thalidomide blocks the formation of CRBN-ubiquitin conjugates. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitinated CRBN is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines such as MM1.S, OPM2, and U266 with thalidomide (100 μM) and its structural analog lenalidomide (10 μM) results in stabilization of CRBN and elevation of CRBN protein levels. This in turn leads to the reduced level of CRBN target proteins and enhances the sensitivity of human multiple myeloma cells to IMiDs. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which thalidomide and its analogs modulate the CRBN function in cells. Through inhibition of CRBN ubiquitination, thalidomide and its analogs allow CRBN to accumulate, leading to the increased cullin-4 RING E3 ligase-mediated degradation of target proteins.—Liu, Y., Huang, X., He, X., Zhou, Y., Jiang, X., Chen-Kiang, S., Jaffrey, S. R., Xu, G. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function. PMID:26231201

  8. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining

    PubMed Central

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L.; Tomkinson, Alan E.; Tainer, John A.; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation. PMID:26130724

  9. UBXD7 binds multiple ubiquitin ligases and implicates p97 in HIF1alpha turnover.

    PubMed

    Alexandru, Gabriela; Graumann, Johannes; Smith, Geoffrey T; Kolawa, Natalie J; Fang, Ruihua; Deshaies, Raymond J

    2008-09-05

    p97 is an ATP-dependent chaperone that plays an important role in endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation but whose connections to turnover of soluble proteins remain sparse. Binding of p97 to substrates is mediated by cofactors that contain ubiquitin-binding domains. We employed "network proteomics" to show that p97 assembles with all of the 13 mammalian UBX-domain proteins. The UBX proteins that bind ubiquitin conjugates also interact with dozens of E3 ubiquitin ligases, only one of which had been previously linked to p97. In particular, UBXD7 links p97 to the ubiquitin ligase CUL2/VHL and its substrate hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha (HIF1alpha). Depletion of p97 leads to accumulation of endogenous HIF1alpha and increased expression of a HIF1alpha target gene. The large number of ubiquitin ligases found associated with UBX proteins suggests that p97 plays a far broader role than previously anticipated in the global regulation of protein turnover.

  10. Structural basis for catalytic activation by the human ZNF451 SUMO E3 ligase

    DOE PAGES

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Pichler, Andrea; Lima, Christopher D.

    2015-11-02

    E3 protein ligases enhance transfer of ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins from E2 conjugating enzymes to substrates by stabilizing the thioester-charged E2~Ubl in a closed configuration optimally aligned for nucleophilic attack. In this paper, we report biochemical and structural data that define the N-terminal domain of the Homo sapiens ZNF451 as the catalytic module for SUMO E3 ligase activity. The ZNF451 catalytic module contains tandem SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) bridged by a Pro-Leu-Arg-Pro (PLRP) motif. The first SIM and PLRP motif engage thioester-charged E2~SUMO while the next SIM binds a second molecule of SUMO bound to the back side of E2. We showmore » that ZNF451 is SUMO2 specific and that SUMO modification of ZNF451 may contribute to activity by providing a second molecule of SUMO that interacts with E2. Finally, our results are consistent with ZNF451 functioning as a bona fide SUMO E3 ligase.« less

  11. E3 Ubiquitin Ligase RLIM Negatively Regulates c-Myc Transcriptional Activity and Restrains Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lan; Cai, Hao; Zhu, Jingjing; Yu, Long

    2016-01-01

    RNF12/RLIM is a RING domain-containing E3 ubiquitin ligase whose function has only begun to be elucidated recently. Although RLIM was reported to play important roles in some biological processes such as imprinted X-chromosome inactivation and regulation of TGF-β pathway etc., other functions of RLIM are largely unknown. Here, we identified RLIM as a novel E3 ubiquitin ligase for c-Myc, one of the most frequently deregulated oncoproteins in human cancers. RLIM associates with c-Myc in vivo and in vitro independently of the E3 ligase activity of RLIM. Moreover, RLIM promotes the polyubiquitination of c-Myc protein independently of Ser62 and Thr58 phosphorylation of c-Myc. However, RLIM-mediated ubiquitination does not affect c-Myc stability. Instead, RLIM inhibits the transcriptional activity of c-Myc through which RLIM restrains cell proliferation. Our results suggest that RLIM may function as a tumor suppressor by controlling the activity of c-Myc oncoprotein. PMID:27684546

  12. Structural basis for catalytic activation by the human ZNF451 SUMO E3 ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Cappadocia, Laurent; Pichler, Andrea; Lima, Christopher D.

    2015-11-02

    E3 protein ligases enhance transfer of ubiquitin-like (Ubl) proteins from E2 conjugating enzymes to substrates by stabilizing the thioester-charged E2~Ubl in a closed configuration optimally aligned for nucleophilic attack. In this paper, we report biochemical and structural data that define the N-terminal domain of the Homo sapiens ZNF451 as the catalytic module for SUMO E3 ligase activity. The ZNF451 catalytic module contains tandem SUMO-interaction motifs (SIMs) bridged by a Pro-Leu-Arg-Pro (PLRP) motif. The first SIM and PLRP motif engage thioester-charged E2~SUMO while the next SIM binds a second molecule of SUMO bound to the back side of E2. We show that ZNF451 is SUMO2 specific and that SUMO modification of ZNF451 may contribute to activity by providing a second molecule of SUMO that interacts with E2. Finally, our results are consistent with ZNF451 functioning as a bona fide SUMO E3 ligase.

  13. Functional analysis of the mammalian RNA ligase for IRE1 in the unfolded protein response.

    PubMed

    Poothong, Juthakorn; Tirasophon, Witoon; Kaufman, Randal J

    2017-04-30

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is a conserved signalling pathway activated on the accumulation of unfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), termed ER stress. Upon ER stress, HAC1/XBP1 undergoes exon/intron-specific excision by inositol requiring enzyme 1 (IRE1) to remove an intron and liberate the 5' and 3' exons. In yeast, the 5' and 3' HAC1 exons are subsequently ligated by tRNA ligase (Rlg1p), whereas XBP1 ligation in mammalian cells is catalysed by a recently identified ligase, RtcB. In the present study, RNA ligase activity of the human RtcB (hRtcB) involved in the unconventional splicing of XBP1/HAC1 mRNA was explored in an rlg1-100 mutant yeast strain. Distinct from Escherichia coli RtcB and Rlg1p, expression of hRtcB alone inefficiently complemented HAC1/XBP1 splicing and the hRtcB cofactor (archease) was required to promote enzymatic activity of hRtcB to catalyse RNA ligation.

  14. Fluorogenic DNA ligase and base excision repair enzyme assays using substrates labeled with single fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Nikiforov, Theo T; Roman, Steven

    2015-05-15

    Continuing our work on fluorogenic substrates labeled with single fluorophores for nucleic acid modifying enzymes, here we describe the development of such substrates for DNA ligases and some base excision repair enzymes. These substrates are hairpin-type synthetic DNA molecules with a single fluorophore located on a base close to the 3' ends, an arrangement that results in strong fluorescence quenching. When such substrates are subjected to an enzymatic reaction, the position of the dyes relative to that end of the molecules is altered, resulting in significant fluorescence intensity changes. The ligase substrates described here were 5' phosphorylated and either blunt-ended or carrying short, self-complementary single-stranded 5' extensions. The ligation reactions resulted in the covalent joining of the ends of the molecules, decreasing the quenching effect of the terminal bases on the dyes. To generate fluorogenic substrates for the base excision repair enzymes formamido-pyrimidine-DNA glycosylase (FPG), human 8-oxo-G DNA glycosylase/AP lyase (hOGG1), endonuclease IV (EndoIV), and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), we introduced abasic sites or a modified nucleotide, 8-oxo-dG, at such positions that their enzymatic excision would result in the release of a short fluorescent fragment. This was also accompanied by strong fluorescence increases. Overall fluorescence changes ranged from approximately 4-fold (ligase reactions) to more than 20-fold (base excision repair reactions).

  15. Identification of Arabidopsis MYB56 as a novel substrate for CRL3(BPM) E3 ligases.

    PubMed

    Chen, Liyuan; Bernhardt, Anne; Lee, JooHyun; Hellmann, Hanjo

    2015-02-01

    Controlled stability of proteins is a highly efficient mechanism to direct diverse processes in living cells. A key regulatory system for protein stability is given by the ubiquitin proteasome pathway, which uses E3 ligases to mark specific proteins for degradation. In this work, MYB56 is identified as a novel target of a CULLIN3 (CUL3)-based E3 ligase. Its stability depends on the presence of MATH-BTB/POZ (BPM) proteins, which function as substrate adaptors to the E3 ligase. Genetic studies have indicated that MYB56 is a negative regulator of flowering, while BPMs positively affect this developmental program. The interaction between BPMs and MYB56 occurs at the promoter of FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT), a key regulator in initiating flowering in Arabidopsis, and results in instability of MYB56. Overall the work establishes MYB transcription factors as substrates of BPM proteins, and provides novel information on components that participate in controlling flowering time in plants.

  16. Identification of the ubiquitin-protein ligase that recognizes oxidized IRP2.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Koji; Ishikawa, Haruto; Megumi, Yuzuru; Tokunaga, Fuminori; Kanie, Masato; Rouault, Tracey A; Morishima, Isao; Minato, Nagahiro; Ishimori, Koichiro; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2003-04-01

    The ubiquitin system is involved in several basic cellular functions. Ubiquitination is carried out by a cascade of three reactions catalysed by the E1, E2 and E3 enzymes. Among these, the E3 ubiquitin-protein ligases have a pivotal role in determining the specificity of the system by recognizing the target substrates through defined targeting motifs. Although RING finger proteins constitute an important family of E3 ligases, only a few post-transcriptional modifications, including phosphorylation, proline hydroxylation and glycosylation, are known to function as recognition signals for E3. Iron regulatory protein 2 (IRP2), a modulator of iron metabolism, is regulated by iron-induced ubiquitination and degradation. Here we show that the RING finger protein HOIL-1 functions as an E3 ligase for oxidized IRP2, suggesting that oxidation is a specific recognition signal for ubiquitination. The oxidation of IRP2 is generated by haem, which binds to IRP2 in iron-rich cells, and by oxygen, indicating that the iron sensing of IRP2 depends on the synthesis and availability of haem.

  17. Multiple roles of Rbx1 in the VBC-Cul2 ubiquitin ligase complex.

    PubMed

    Megumi, Yuzuru; Miyauchi, Yasuhiro; Sakurai, Hitomi; Nobeyama, Hiroyuki; Lorick, Kevin; Nakamura, Eijiro; Chiba, Tomoki; Tanaka, Keiji; Weissman, Allan M; Kirisako, Takayoshi; Ogawa, Osamu; Iwai, Kazuhiro

    2005-07-01

    The importance of the ubiquitin system largely depends on ubiquitin ligases, E3s, as they determine the specificity of the system. Rbx1/ROC1/Hrt1, a RING finger protein, functions as an important component of the cullin-containing SCF and VBC-Cul2 ligases. Modification of cullins by NEDD8 (NEDDylation), has been shown to be essential for the E3 activity of both SCF and VBC-Cul2, and it was suggested that Rbx1 acts as the E3 for cullin NEDDylation. RING finger is composed of eight cysteine and histidine residues that bind to zinc ions. Rbx1 is a highly evolutionarily conserved protein; however, the eighth coordination residue in its RING finger is aspartate (D97) rather than cysteine. Substitution of D97 with each of the other 19 amino acids demonstrates that aspartate is superior to cysteine in cullin NEDDylation. Interestingly, however, different D97 mutants demonstrate different activities towards 6 cullins tested. Importantly, we were able to discriminate between the NEDDylating activity of Rbx1 and its involvement in the ubiquitylation reaction within the context of VBC-Cul2. Moreover, while Rbx1 is not involved in governing the stability of SCF, Rbx1 mutants destabilize VBC-Cul2. Taken together, these results indicate that various mechanisms regulate both the activities and the stability of cullin-based ligases.

  18. Human DNA ligase III bridges two DNA ends to promote specific intermolecular DNA end joining.

    PubMed

    Kukshal, Vandna; Kim, In-Kwon; Hura, Gregory L; Tomkinson, Alan E; Tainer, John A; Ellenberger, Tom

    2015-08-18

    Mammalian DNA ligase III (LigIII) functions in both nuclear and mitochondrial DNA metabolism. In the nucleus, LigIII has functional redundancy with DNA ligase I whereas LigIII is the only mitochondrial DNA ligase and is essential for the survival of cells dependent upon oxidative respiration. The unique LigIII zinc finger (ZnF) domain is not required for catalytic activity but senses DNA strand breaks and stimulates intermolecular ligation of two DNAs by an unknown mechanism. Consistent with this activity, LigIII acts in an alternative pathway of DNA double strand break repair that buttresses canonical non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and is manifest in NHEJ-defective cancer cells, but how LigIII acts in joining intermolecular DNA ends versus nick ligation is unclear. To investigate how LigIII efficiently joins two DNAs, we developed a real-time, fluorescence-based assay of DNA bridging suitable for high-throughput screening. On a nicked duplex DNA substrate, the results reveal binding competition between the ZnF and the oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide-binding domain, one of three domains constituting the LigIII catalytic core. In contrast, these domains collaborate and are essential for formation of a DNA-bridging intermediate by adenylated LigIII that positions a pair of blunt-ended duplex DNAs for efficient and specific intermolecular ligation.

  19. Goliath family E3 ligases regulate the recycling endosome pathway via VAMP3 ubiquitylation.

    PubMed

    Yamazaki, Yasuo; Schönherr, Christina; Varshney, Gaurav K; Dogru, Murat; Hallberg, Bengt; Palmer, Ruth H

    2013-02-20

    Diverse cellular processes depend on endocytosis, intracellular vesicle trafficking, sorting and exocytosis, processes regulated post-transcriptionally by modifications such as phosphorylation and ubiquitylation. In addition to sorting to the lysosome, cargo is recycled to the plasma membrane via recycling endosomes. Here, we describe a role of the goliath gene family of protease-associated (PA) domain E3 ligases in regulating recycling endosome trafficking. The two Drosophila members of this family--Goliath and Godzilla(CG10277)--are located on endosomes, and both ectopic expression and loss-of-function lead to the accumulation of Rab5-positive giant endosomes. Furthermore, the human homologue RNF167 exhibits similar behaviour. We show that the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion attachment protein receptor (SNARE) protein VAMP3 is a target of these ubiquitin ligases, and that recycling endosome trafficking is abrogated in response to their activity. Furthermore, mutation of the Godzilla ubiquitylation target lysines on VAMP3 abrogates the formation of enlarged endosomes induced by either Godzilla or RNF167. Thus, Goliath ubiquitin ligases play a novel role in regulating recycling endosome trafficking via ubiquitylation of the VAMP3 SNARE protein.

  20. Structure of the DDB1-CRBN E3 ubiquitin ligase in complex with thalidomide.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Eric S; Böhm, Kerstin; Lydeard, John R; Yang, Haidi; Stadler, Michael B; Cavadini, Simone; Nagel, Jane; Serluca, Fabrizio; Acker, Vincent; Lingaraju, Gondichatnahalli M; Tichkule, Ritesh B; Schebesta, Michael; Forrester, William C; Schirle, Markus; Hassiepen, Ulrich; Ottl, Johannes; Hild, Marc; Beckwith, Rohan E J; Harper, J Wade; Jenkins, Jeremy L; Thomä, Nicolas H

    2014-08-07

    In the 1950s, the drug thalidomide, administered as a sedative to pregnant women, led to the birth of thousands of children with multiple defects. Despite the teratogenicity of thalidomide and its derivatives lenalidomide and pomalidomide, these immunomodulatory drugs (IMiDs) recently emerged as effective treatments for multiple myeloma and 5q-deletion-associated dysplasia. IMiDs target the E3 ubiquitin ligase CUL4-RBX1-DDB1-CRBN (known as CRL4(CRBN)) and promote the ubiquitination of the IKAROS family transcription factors IKZF1 and IKZF3 by CRL4(CRBN). Here we present crystal structures of the DDB1-CRBN complex bound to thalidomide, lenalidomide and pomalidomide. The structure establishes that CRBN is a substrate receptor within CRL4(CRBN) and enantioselectively binds IMiDs. Using an unbiased screen, we identified the homeobox transcription factor MEIS2 as an endogenous substrate of CRL4(CRBN). Our studies suggest that IMiDs block endogenous substrates (MEIS2) from binding to CRL4(CRBN) while the ligase complex is recruiting IKZF1 or IKZF3 for degradation. This dual activity implies that small molecules can modulate an E3 ubiquitin ligase and thereby upregulate or downregulate the ubiquitination of proteins.

  1. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Crowder, Justin J.; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T.; Fults, Eric S.; Buchanan, Bryce W.; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G.; Rubenstein, Eric M.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3′-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane. PMID:26055716

  2. Functional role of TRIM E3 ligase oligomerization and regulation of catalytic activity.

    PubMed

    Koliopoulos, Marios G; Esposito, Diego; Christodoulou, Evangelos; Taylor, Ian A; Rittinger, Katrin

    2016-06-01

    TRIM E3 ubiquitin ligases regulate a wide variety of cellular processes and are particularly important during innate immune signalling events. They are characterized by a conserved tripartite motif in their N-terminal portion which comprises a canonical RING domain, one or two B-box domains and a coiled-coil region that mediates ligase dimerization. Self-association via the coiled-coil has been suggested to be crucial for catalytic activity of TRIMs; however, the precise molecular mechanism underlying this observation remains elusive. Here, we provide a detailed characterization of the TRIM ligases TRIM25 and TRIM32 and show how their oligomeric state is linked to catalytic activity. The crystal structure of a complex between the TRIM25 RING domain and an ubiquitin-loaded E2 identifies the structural and mechanistic features that promote a closed E2~Ub conformation to activate the thioester for ubiquitin transfer allowing us to propose a model for the regulation of activity in the full-length protein. Our data reveal an unexpected diversity in the self-association mechanism of TRIMs that might be crucial for their biological function.

  3. Tuning BRCA1 and BARD1 activity to investigate RING ubiquitin ligase mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Mikaela D; Duncan, Emily D; Coronado, Ernesto; DaRosa, Paul A; Pruneda, Jonathan N; Brzovic, Peter S; Klevit, Rachel E

    2017-03-01

    The tumor-suppressor protein BRCA1 works with BARD1 to catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin onto protein substrates. The N-terminal regions of BRCA1 and BARD1 that contain their RING domains are responsible for dimerization and ubiquitin ligase activity. This activity is a common feature among hundreds of human RING domain-containing proteins. RING domains bind and activate E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes to promote ubiquitin transfer to substrates. We show that the identity of residues at specific positions in the RING domain can tune activity levels up or down. We report substitutions that create a structurally intact BRCA1/BARD1 heterodimer that is inactive in vitro with all E2 enzymes. Other substitutions in BRCA1 or BARD1 RING domains result in hyperactivity, revealing that both proteins have evolved attenuated activity. Loss of attenuation results in decreased product specificity, providing a rationale for why nature has tuned BRCA1 activity. The ability to tune BRCA1 provides powerful tools for understanding its biological functions and provides a basis to assess mechanisms for rescuing the activity of cancer-associated variations. Beyond the applicability to BRCA1, we show the identity of residues at tuning positions that can be used to predict and modulate the activity of an unrelated RING E3 ligase. These findings provide valuable insights into understanding the mechanism and function of RING E3 ligases like BRCA1. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. In vitro reconstitution demonstrates the cell wall ligase activity of LCP proteins.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Kaitlin; Matano, Leigh M; Qiao, Yuan; Kahne, Daniel; Walker, Suzanne

    2017-04-01

    Sacculus is a peptidoglycan (PG) matrix that protects bacteria from osmotic lysis. In Gram-positive organisms, the sacculus is densely functionalized with glycopolymers important for survival, but the way in which assembly occurs is not known. In Staphylococcus aureus, three LCP (LytR-CpsA-Psr) family members have been implicated in attaching the major glycopolymer wall teichoic acid (WTA) to PG, but ligase activity has not been demonstrated for these or any other LCP proteins. Using WTA and PG substrates produced chemoenzymatically, we show that all three proteins can transfer WTA precursors to nascent PGs, establishing that LCP proteins are PG-glycopolymer ligases. Although all S. aureus LCP proteins have the capacity to attach WTA to PG, we show that their cellular functions are not redundant. Strains lacking lcpA have phenotypes similar to those of WTA-null strains, indicating that this is the most important WTA ligase. This work provides a foundation for studying how LCP enzymes participate in cell wall assembly.

  5. Crystal growth in LiGaSe2 for semiconductor radiation detection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stowe, A. C.; Woodward, J.; Tupitsyn, E.; Rowe, E.; Wiggins, B.; Matei, L.; Bhattacharya, P.; Burger, A.

    2013-09-01

    Lithium containing AIBIIICVI semiconductors are being considered as alternative materials for room temperature neutron detection. Materials such as LiGaSe2 have been synthesized for non-linear optical applications; however, when the crystal is grown enriched in the 6Li isotope, it is possible to imagine a radiation detector. A nuclear reaction occurs with 6Li, which can be detected within the semiconductor crystal. As such, high quality crystals are required, which have few defects which prohibit charge collection. One of the primary challenges in growing a high quality crystal is the reactivity of lithium metal. Vacuum purified lithium metal was therefore reacted with gallium to form LiGa as an intermediate to LiGaSe2 synthesis. Vertical and horizontal Bridgman growth was then conducted to determine the optimal growth conditions. Vertical Bridgman growth resulted in more pure crystals. Annealing in lithium metal vapor reduced crystal defects and improved optical and electrical properties of the subsequent LiGaSe2 crystal.

  6. Ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 binds to connexin43 by a phosphorylation-modulated process.

    PubMed

    Leykauf, Kerstin; Salek, Mojibrahman; Bomke, Jörg; Frech, Matthias; Lehmann, Wolf-Dieter; Dürst, Matthias; Alonso, Angel

    2006-09-01

    Connexin43 is degraded by the proteasomal as well as the lysosomal pathway with ubiquitin playing a role in both degradation pathways. So far, no ubiquitin protein ligase has been identified for any of the connexins. By using pull-down assays, here we show binding of a ubiquitin protein ligase, Nedd4, to the C-terminus of connexin43. This observation was confirmed in vivo by coimmunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence, showing colocalization of Nedd4 and connexin43. Binding of Nedd4 to its interaction partners is generally carried out by its WW domains. Our results indicate that the interaction with connexin43 occurs through all three WW domains of Nedd4. Furthermore, whereas WW1 and WW2 domains mainly interact with the unphosphorylated form of connexin43, WW3 binds phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms equally. In addition, using the surface plasmon resonance approach we show that only the WW2 domain binds to the PY motif located at the C-terminus of connexin43. Suppression of Nedd4 expression with siRNA resulted in an accumulation of gap junction plaques at the plasma membrane, suggesting an involvement of the ubiquitin protein ligase Nedd4 in gap junction internalization.

  7. Disinhibition of the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase WWP2 by polymerized Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Mund, Thomas; Graeb, Michael; Mieszczanek, Juliusz; Gammons, Melissa; Pelham, Hugh R. B.; Bienz, Mariann

    2015-01-01

    Dishevelled is a pivot in Wnt signal transduction, controlling both β-catenin-dependent transcription to specify proliferative cell fates, and cell polarity and other non-nuclear events in post-mitotic cells. In response to Wnt signals, or when present at high levels, Dishevelled forms signalosomes by dynamic polymerization. Its levels are controlled by ubiquitylation, mediated by various ubiquitin ligases, including NEDD4 family members that bind to a conserved PPxY motif in Dishevelled (mammalian Dvl1–3). Here, we show that Dvl2 binds to the ubiquitin ligase WWP2 and unlocks its ligase activity from autoinhibition. This disinhibition of WWP2 depends on several features of Dvl2 including its PPxY motif and to a lesser extent its DEP domain, but crucially on the ability of Dvl2 to polymerize, indicating that WWP2 is activated in Wnt signalosomes. We show that Notch intracellular domains are substrates for Dvl-activated WWP2 and their transcriptional activity is consequently reduced, providing a molecular mechanism for cross-talk between Wnt and Notch signalling. These regulatory interactions are conserved in Drosophila whose WWP2 orthologue, Suppressor-of-deltex, downregulates Notch signalling upon activation by Dishevelled in developing wing tissue. Attentuation of Notch signalling by Dishevelled signalosomes could be important during the transition of cells from the proliferative to the post-mitotic state. PMID:26701932

  8. The SCF Slimb ubiquitin ligase regulates Plk4/Sak levels to block centriole reduplication.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Gregory C; Rusan, Nasser M; Roberts, David M; Peifer, Mark; Rogers, Stephen L

    2009-01-26

    Restricting centriole duplication to once per cell cycle is critical for chromosome segregation and genomic stability, but the mechanisms underlying this block to reduplication are unclear. Genetic analyses have suggested an involvement for Skp/Cullin/F box (SCF)-class ubiquitin ligases in this process. In this study, we describe a mechanism to prevent centriole reduplication in Drosophila melanogaster whereby the SCF E3 ubiquitin ligase in complex with the F-box protein Slimb mediates proteolytic degradation of the centrosomal regulatory kinase Plk4. We identified SCF(Slimb) as a regulator of centriole duplication via an RNA interference (RNAi) screen of Cullin-based ubiquitin ligases. We found that Plk4 binds to Slimb and is an SCF(Slimb) target. Both Slimb and Plk4 localize to centrioles, with Plk4 levels highest at mitosis and absent during S phase. Using a Plk4 Slimb-binding mutant and Slimb RNAi, we show that Slimb regulates Plk4 localization to centrioles during interphase, thus regulating centriole number and ensuring the block to centriole reduplication.

  9. Rkr1/Ltn1 Ubiquitin Ligase-mediated Degradation of Translationally Stalled Endoplasmic Reticulum Proteins.

    PubMed

    Crowder, Justin J; Geigges, Marco; Gibson, Ryan T; Fults, Eric S; Buchanan, Bryce W; Sachs, Nadine; Schink, Andrea; Kreft, Stefan G; Rubenstein, Eric M

    2015-07-24

    Aberrant nonstop proteins arise from translation of mRNA molecules beyond the coding sequence into the 3'-untranslated region. If a stop codon is not encountered, translation continues into the poly(A) tail, resulting in C-terminal appendage of a polylysine tract and a terminally stalled ribosome. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the ubiquitin ligase Rkr1/Ltn1 has been implicated in the proteasomal degradation of soluble cytosolic nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. Rkr1 is essential for cellular fitness under conditions associated with increased prevalence of nonstop proteins. Mutation of the mammalian homolog causes significant neurological pathology, suggesting broad physiological significance of ribosome-associated quality control. It is not known whether and how soluble or transmembrane nonstop and translationally stalled proteins targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) are detected and degraded. We generated and characterized model soluble and transmembrane ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins. We found that these proteins are indeed subject to proteasomal degradation. We tested three candidate ubiquitin ligases (Rkr1 and ER-associated Doa10 and Hrd1) for roles in regulating abundance of these proteins. Our results indicate that Rkr1 plays the primary role in targeting the tested model ER-targeted nonstop and translationally stalled proteins for degradation. These data expand the catalog of Rkr1 substrates and highlight a previously unappreciated role for this ubiquitin ligase at the ER membrane.

  10. Auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 Enhances Its Substrate Ubiquitin Ligase Activity*

    PubMed Central

    Ranaweera, Ruchira S.; Yang, Xiaolu

    2013-01-01

    The RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase Mdm2 is the master regulator of the tumor suppressor p53. It targets p53 for proteasomal degradation, restraining the potent activity of p53 and enabling cell survival and proliferation. Like most E3 ligases, Mdm2 can also ubiquitinate itself. How Mdm2 auto-ubiquitination may influence its substrate ubiquitin ligase activity is undefined. Here we show that auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 is an activating event. Mdm2 that has been conjugated to polyubiquitin chains, but not to single ubiquitins, exhibits substantially enhanced activity to polyubiquitinate p53. Mechanistically, auto-ubiquitination of Mdm2 facilitates the recruitment of the E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme. This occurs through noncovalent interactions between the ubiquitin chains on Mdm2 and the ubiquitin binding domain on E2s. Mutations that diminish the noncovalent interactions render auto-ubiquitination unable to stimulate Mdm2 substrate E3 activity. These results suggest a model in which polyubiquitin chains on an E3 increase the local concentration of E2 enzymes and permit the processivity of substrate ubiquitination. They also support the notion that autocatalysis may be a prevalent mode for turning on the activity of latent enzymes. PMID:23671280

  11. RNF38 encodes a nuclear ubiquitin protein ligase that modifies p53

    SciTech Connect

    Sheren, Jamie E.; Kassenbrock, C. Kenneth

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •RNF38 is shown to be a nuclear protein with a bipartite nuclear localization signal. •RNF38 protein is purified and shown to have ubiquitin protein ligase (E3) activity. •We show that RNF38 binds p53 and can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro. •Overexpression of RNF38 increases p53 ubiquitination in HEK293T cells. •Overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells alters p53 localization. -- Abstract: The RNF38 gene encodes a RING finger protein of unknown function. Here we demonstrate that RNF38 is a functional ubiquitin protein ligase (E3). We show that RNF38 isoform 1 is localized to the nucleus by a bipartite nuclear localization sequence (NLS). We confirm that RNF38 is a binding partner of p53 and demonstrate that RNF38 can ubiquitinate p53 in vitro and in vivo. Finally, we show that overexpression of RNF38 in HEK293T cells results in relocalization of p53 to discrete foci associated with PML nuclear bodies. These results suggest RNF38 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that may play a role in regulating p53.

  12. MAGE-RING Protein Complexes Comprise a Family of E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Doyle, Jennifer M.; Gao, Jinlan; Wang, Jiawei; Yang, Maojun; Potts, Patrick Ryan

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY The melanoma antigen (MAGE) family consists of more than 60 genes, many of which are cancer-testis antigens that are highly expressed in cancer and play a critical role in tumorigenesis. However, the biochemical and cellular functions of this enigmatic family of proteins have remained elusive. Here, we identify really interesting new gene (RING) domain proteins as binding partners for MAGE family proteins. Multiple MAGE family proteins bind E3 RING ubiquitin ligases with specificity. The crystal structure of one of these MAGE-RING complexes, MAGE-G1-NSE1, reveals structural insights into MAGE family proteins and their interaction with E3 RING ubiquitin ligases. Biochemical and cellular assays demonstrate that MAGE proteins enhance the ubiquitin ligase activity of RING domain proteins. For example, MAGE-C2-TRIM28 is shown to target p53 for degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner, consistent with its tumorigenic functions. These findings define a biochemical and cellular function for the MAGE protein family. PMID:20864041

  13. Understanding and Engineering Thermostability in DNA Ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519.

    PubMed

    Modarres, Hassan Pezeshgi; Dorokhov, Boris D; Popov, Vladimir O; Ravin, Nikolai V; Skryabin, Konstantin G; Dal Peraro, Matteo

    2015-05-19

    The physical chemical principles underlying enzymatic thermostability are keys to understand the way evolution has shaped proteins to adapt to a broad range of temperatures. Understanding the molecular determinants at the basis of protein thermostability is also an important factor for engineering more thermoresistant enzymes to be used in the industrial setting, such as, for instance, DNA ligases, which are important for DNA replication and repair and have been long used in molecular biology and biotechnology. Here, we first address the origin of thermostability in the thermophilic DNA ligase from archaeon Thermococcus sp. 1519 and identify thermosensitive regions using molecular modeling and simulations. In addition, we predict mutations that can enhance thermostability of the enzyme through bioinformatics analyses. We show that thermosensitive regions of this enzyme are stabilized at higher temperatures by optimization of charged groups on the surface, and we predict that thermostability can be further increased by further optimization of the network among these charged groups. Engineering this DNA ligase by introducing selected mutations (i.e., A287K, G304D, S364I, and A387K) eventually produced a significant and additive increase in the half-life of the enzyme when compared to that of the wild type.

  14. TRAIP is a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase that protects genome stability after replication stress

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Saskia; Smedegaard, Stine; Nakamura, Kyosuke; Mortuza, Gulnahar B.; Räschle, Markus; Ibañez de Opakua, Alain; Oka, Yasuyoshi; Feng, Yunpeng; Blanco, Francisco J.; Mann, Matthias; Montoya, Guillermo; Groth, Anja; Bekker-Jensen, Simon

    2016-01-01

    Cellular genomes are highly vulnerable to perturbations to chromosomal DNA replication. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), the processivity factor for DNA replication, plays a central role as a platform for recruitment of genome surveillance and DNA repair factors to replication forks, allowing cells to mitigate the threats to genome stability posed by replication stress. We identify the E3 ubiquitin ligase TRAIP as a new factor at active and stressed replication forks that directly interacts with PCNA via a conserved PCNA-interacting peptide (PIP) box motif. We show that TRAIP promotes ATR-dependent checkpoint signaling in human cells by facilitating the generation of RPA-bound single-stranded DNA regions upon replication stress in a manner that critically requires its E3 ligase activity and is potentiated by the PIP box. Consequently, loss of TRAIP function leads to enhanced chromosomal instability and decreased cell survival after replication stress. These findings establish TRAIP as a PCNA-binding ubiquitin ligase with an important role in protecting genome integrity after obstacles to DNA replication. PMID:26711499

  15. Mechanistic Details of Glutathione Biosynthesis Revealed by Crystal Structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae Glutamate Cysteine Ligase

    SciTech Connect

    Biterova, Ekaterina I.; Barycki, Joseph J.

    2009-12-01

    Glutathione is a thiol-disulfide exchange peptide critical for buffering oxidative or chemical stress, and an essential cofactor in several biosynthesis and detoxification pathways. The rate-limiting step in its de novo biosynthesis is catalyzed by glutamate cysteine ligase, a broadly expressed enzyme for which limited structural information is available in higher eukaryotic species. Structural data are critical to the understanding of clinical glutathione deficiency, as well as rational design of enzyme modulators that could impact human disease progression. Here, we have determined the structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae glutamate cysteine ligase (ScGCL) in the presence of glutamate and MgCl{sub 2} (2.1 {angstrom}; R = 18.2%, R{sub free} = 21.9%), and in complex with glutamate, MgCl{sub 2}, and ADP (2.7 {angstrom}; R = 19.0%, R{sub free} = 24.2%). Inspection of these structures reveals an unusual binding pocket for the {alpha}-carboxylate of the glutamate substrate and an ATP-independent Mg{sup 2+} coordination site, clarifying the Mg{sup 2+} dependence of the enzymatic reaction. The ScGCL structures were further used to generate a credible homology model of the catalytic subunit of human glutamate cysteine ligase (hGCLC). Examination of the hGCLC model suggests that post-translational modifications of cysteine residues may be involved in the regulation of enzymatic activity, and elucidates the molecular basis of glutathione deficiency associated with patient hGCLC mutations.

  16. E3 Ubiquitin Ligases: Ubiquitous Actors in Plant Development and Abiotic Stress Responses.

    PubMed

    Shu, Kai; Yang, Wenyu

    2017-09-01

    Understanding the precise regulatory mechanisms of plant development and stress responses at the post-translational level is currently a topic of intensive research. Protein ubiquitination, including the sequential performances of ubiquitin-activating (E1), ubiquitin-conjugating (E2) and ubiquitin ligase (E3) enzymes, is a refined post-translational modification ubiquitous in all eukaryotes. Plants are an integral part of our ecosystem and, as sessile organisms, the ability to perceive internal and external signals and to adapt well to various environmental challenges is crucial for their survival. Over recent decades, extensive studies have demonstrated that protein ubiquitination plays key roles in multiple plant developmental stages (e.g. seed dormancy and germination, root growth, flowering time control, self-incompatibility and chloroplast development) and several abiotic stress responses (e.g. drought and high salinity), by regulating the abundance, activities or subcellular localizations of a variety of regulatory polypeptides and enzymes. Importantly, diverse E3 ligases are involved in these regulatory pathways by mediating phytohormone and light signaling or other pathways. In this updated review, we mainly summarize recent advances in our understanding of the regulatory roles of protein ubiquitination in plant development and plant-environment interactions, and primarily focus on different types of E3 ligases because they play critical roles in determining substrate specificity. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Mechanism of CRL4Cdt2, a PCNA-dependent E3 ubiquitin ligase

    PubMed Central

    Havens, Courtney G.; Walter, Johannes C.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell cycle transitions are driven by E3 ubiquitin ligases that catalyze the ubiquitylation and destruction of specific protein targets. For example, the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C) promotes the exit from mitosis via destruction of securin and mitotic cyclins, whereas CRL1Skp2 allows entry into S phase by targeting the destruction of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor p27. Recently, an E3 ubiquitin ligase called CRL4Cdt2 has been characterized, which couples proteolysis to DNA synthesis via an unusual mechanism that involves display of substrate degrons on the DNA polymerase processivity factor PCNA. Through its destruction of Cdt1, p21, and Set8, CRL4Cdt2 has emerged as a master regulator that prevents rereplication in S phase. In addition, it also targets other factors such as E2F and DNA polymerase η. In this review, we discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanism of substrate recognition by CRL4Cdt2 and how this E3 ligase helps to maintain genome integrity. PMID:21828267

  18. Post-Transcriptional Coordination of the Arabidopsis Iron Deficiency Response is Partially Dependent on the E3 Ligases RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1) and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2)*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, I-Chun; Tsai, Huei-Hsuan; Cheng, Ya-Tan; Wen, Tuan-Nan; Buckhout, Thomas J.; Schmidt, Wolfgang

    2015-01-01

    Acclimation to changing environmental conditions is mediated by proteins, the abundance of which is carefully tuned by an elaborate interplay of DNA-templated and post-transcriptional processes. To dissect the mechanisms that control and mediate cellular iron homeostasis, we conducted quantitative high-resolution iTRAQ proteomics and microarray-based transcriptomic profiling of iron-deficient Arabidopsis thaliana plants. A total of 13,706 and 12,124 proteins was identified with a quadrupole-Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer in roots and leaves, respectively. This deep proteomic coverage allowed accurate estimates of post-transcriptional regulation in response to iron deficiency. Similarly regulated transcripts were detected in only 13% (roots) and 11% (leaves) of the 886 proteins that differentially accumulated between iron-sufficient and iron-deficient plants, indicating that the majority of the iron-responsive proteins was post-transcriptionally regulated. Mutants harboring defects in the RING DOMAIN LIGASE1 (RGLG1)1 and RING DOMAIN LIGASE2 (RGLG2) showed a pleiotropic phenotype that resembled iron-deficient plants with reduced trichome density and the formation of branched root hairs. Proteomic and transcriptomic profiling of rglg1 rglg2 double mutants revealed that the functional RGLG protein is required for the regulation of a large set of iron-responsive proteins including the coordinated expression of ribosomal proteins. This integrative analysis provides a detailed catalog of post-transcriptionally regulated proteins and allows the concept of a chiefly transcriptionally regulated iron deficiency response to be revisited. Protein data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD002126. PMID:26253232

  19. NAD+-dependent DNA Ligase (Rv3014c) from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Crystal structure of the adenylation domain and identification of novel inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Sandeep Kumar; Tripathi, Rama Pati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2005-08-26

    DNA ligases utilize either ATP or NAD+ as cofactors to catalyze the formation of phosphodiester bonds in nicked DNA. Those utilizing NAD+ are attractive drug targets because of the unique cofactor requirement for ligase activity. We report here the crystal structure of the adenylation domain of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD+-dependent ligase with bound AMP. The adenosine nucleoside moiety of AMP adopts a syn-conformation. The structure also captures a new spatial disposition between the two subdomains of the adenylation domain. Based on the crystal structure and an in-house compound library, we have identified a novel class of inhibitors for the enzyme using in silico docking calculations. The glycosyl ureide-based inhibitors were able to distinguish between NAD+- and ATP-dependent ligases as evidenced by in vitro assays using T4 ligase and human DNA ligase I. Moreover, assays involving an Escherichia coli strain harboring a temperature-sensitive ligase mutant and a ligase-deficient Salmonella typhimurium strain suggested that the bactericidal activity of the inhibitors is due to inhibition of the essential ligase enzyme. The results can be used as the basis for rational design of novel antibacterial agents.

  20. Electronic structure and optical properties of noncentrosymmetric LiGaSe2: Experimental measurements and DFT band structure calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentyev, A. A.; Gabrelian, B. V.; Vu, V. T.; Ananchenko, L. N.; Isaenko, L. I.; Yelisseyev, A. P.; Khyzhun, O. Y.

    2017-04-01

    We report on measurements of X-ray photoelectron (XP) spectra for pristine and Ar+ ion-irradiated surfaces of LiGaSe2 single crystal grown by Bridgman-Stockbarger method. Electronic structure of the LiGaSe2 compound is studied from a theoretical and experimental viewpoint. In particular, total and partial densities of states of LiGaSe2 are investigated by density functional theory (DFT) calculations employing the augmented plane wave + local orbitals (APW + lo) method and they are verified by data of X-ray spectroscopy measurements. The DFT calculations indicate that the main contributors to the valence band of LiGaSe2 are the Se 4p states, which contribute mainly at the top and in the upper portion of the valence band, with also essential contributions of these states in the lower portion of the band. Other substantial contributions to the valence band of LiGaSe2 emerge from the Ga 4s and Ga 4p states contributing mainly at the lower ant upper portions of the valence band, respectively. With respect to the conduction band, the calculations indicate that its bottom is composed mainly from contributions of the unoccupied Ga s and Se p states. The present calculations are confirmed experimentally when comparing the XP valence-band spectrum of the LiGaS2 single crystal on a common energy scale with the X-ray emission bands representing the energy distribution of the Ga 4p and Se 4p states. Measurements of the fundamental absorption edges at room temperature reveal that bandgap value, Eg, of LiGaSe2 is equal to 3.47 eV and the Eg value increases up to 3.66 eV when decreasing temperature to 80 K. The main optical characteristics of the LiGaSe2 compound are clarified by the DFT calculations.

  1. Overexpression of a Soybean Ariadne-Like Ubiquitin Ligase Gene GmARI1 Enhances Aluminum Tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaolian; Wang, Ning; Chen, Pei; Gao, Mengmeng; Liu, Juge; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Tuanjie; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2014-01-01

    Ariadne (ARI) subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers) proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2–4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress. PMID:25364908

  2. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications.

    PubMed

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-12-15

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1-CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy.

  3. A family of Salmonella virulence factors functions as a distinct class of autoregulated E3 ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Quezada, Cindy M.; Hicks, Stuart W.; Galán, Jorge E.; Stebbins, C. Erec

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E3 ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E3 Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E3 ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function. PMID:19273841

  4. The role and mechanism of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer and its potential therapy implications

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Youzhou; Yan, Fan; Ren, Xiubao

    2015-01-01

    CRLs (Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligases) are the largest E3 ligase family in eukaryotes, which ubiquitinate a wide range of substrates involved in cell cycle regulation, signal transduction, transcriptional regulation, DNA damage response, genomic integrity, tumor suppression and embryonic development. CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase, as one member of CRLs family, consists of a RING finger domain protein, cullin4 (CUL4) scaffold protein and DDB1–CUL4 associated substrate receptors. The CUL4 subfamily includes two members, CUL4A and CUL4B, which share extensively sequence identity and functional redundancy. Aberrant expression of CUL4 has been found in a majority of tumors. Given the significance of CUL4 in cancer, understanding its detailed aspects of pathogenesis of human malignancy would have significant value for the treatment of cancer. Here, the work provides an overview to address the role of CRL4 E3 ubiquitin ligase in cancer development and progression, and discuss the possible mechanisms of CRL4 ligase involving in many cellular processes associated with tumor. Finally, we discuss its potential value in cancer therapy. PMID:26460955

  5. A Family of Salmonella Virulence Factors Functions as a Distinct Class of Autoregulated E3 Ubiquitin Ligases

    SciTech Connect

    Quezada, C.; Hicks, S; Galan, J; Stebbins, C

    2009-01-01

    Processes as diverse as receptor binding and signaling, cytoskeletal dynamics, and programmed cell death are manipulated by mimics of host proteins encoded by pathogenic bacteria. We show here that the Salmonella virulence factor SspH2 belongs to a growing class of bacterial effector proteins that harness and subvert the eukaryotic ubiquitination pathway. This virulence protein possesses ubiquitination activity that depends on a conserved cysteine residue. A crystal structure of SspH2 reveals a canonical leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domain that interacts with a unique E{sub 3} ligase [which we have termed NEL for Novel E{sub 3} Ligase] C-terminal fold unrelated to previously observed HECT or RING-finger E{sub 3} ligases. Moreover, the LRR domain sequesters the catalytic cysteine residue contained in the NEL domain, and we suggest a mechanism for activation of the ligase requiring a substantial conformational change to release the catalytic domain for function. We also show that the N-terminal domain targets SspH2 to the apical plasma membrane of polarized epithelial cells and propose a model whereby binding of the LRR to proteins at the target site releases the ligase domain for site-specific function.

  6. Naphthalimides Selectively Inhibit the Activity of Bacterial, Replicative DNA Ligases and Display Bactericidal Effects against Tubercle Bacilli.

    PubMed

    Korycka-Machala, Malgorzata; Nowosielski, Marcin; Kuron, Aneta; Rykowski, Sebastian; Olejniczak, Agnieszka; Hoffmann, Marcin; Dziadek, Jaroslaw

    2017-01-17

    The DNA ligases, enzymes that seal breaks in the backbones of DNA, are essential for all organisms, however bacterial ligases essential for DNA replication use β-nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide as their co-factor, whereas those that are essential in eukaryotes and viruses use adenosine-5'-triphosphate. This fact leads to the conclusion that NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligases in bacteria could be targeted by their co-factor specific inhibitors. The development of novel alternative medical strategies, including new drugs, are a top priority focus areas for tuberculosis research due to an increase in the number of multi-drug resistant as well as totally drug resistant tubercle bacilli strains. Here, through the use of a virtual high-throughput screen and manual inspection of the top 200 records, 23 compounds were selected for in vitro studies. The selected compounds were evaluated in respect to their Mycobacterium tuberculosis NAD⁺ DNA ligase inhibitory effect by a newly developed assay based on Genetic Analyzer 3500 Sequencer. The most effective agents (e.g., pinafide, mitonafide) inhibited the activity of M. tuberculosis NAD⁺-dependent DNA ligase A at concentrations of 50 µM. At the same time, the ATP-dependent (phage) DNA LigT₄ was unaffected by the agents at concentrations up to 2 mM. The selected compounds appeared to also be active against actively growing tubercle bacilli in concentrations as low as 15 µM.

  7. Cockayne syndrome B protein regulates recruitment of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Weems, Juston C; Slaughter, Brian D; Unruh, Jay R; Boeing, Stefan; Hall, Shawn M; McLaird, Merry B; Yasukawa, Takashi; Aso, Teijiro; Svejstrup, Jesper Q; Conaway, Joan W; Conaway, Ronald C

    2017-04-21

    Elongin A performs dual functions as the transcriptionally active subunit of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) elongation factor Elongin and as the substrate recognition subunit of a Cullin-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase that ubiquitylates Pol II in response to DNA damage. Assembly of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and its recruitment to sites of DNA damage is a tightly regulated process induced by DNA-damaging agents and α-amanitin, a drug that induces Pol II stalling. In this study, we demonstrate (i) that Elongin A and the ubiquitin ligase subunit CUL5 associate in cells with the Cockayne syndrome B (CSB) protein and (ii) that this interaction is also induced by DNA-damaging agents and α-amanitin. In addition, we present evidence that the CSB protein promotes stable recruitment of the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase to sites of DNA damage. Our findings are consistent with the model that the Elongin A ubiquitin ligase and the CSB protein function together in a common pathway in response to Pol II stalling and DNA damage. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519 displays a new arrangement of the OB-fold domain.

    PubMed

    Petrova, T; Bezsudnova, E Y; Boyko, K M; Mardanov, A V; Polyakov, K M; Volkov, V V; Kozin, M; Ravin, N V; Shabalin, I G; Skryabin, K G; Stekhanova, T N; Kovalchuk, M V; Popov, V O

    2012-12-01

    DNA ligases join single-strand breaks in double-stranded DNA by catalyzing the formation of a phosphodiester bond between adjacent 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini. Their function is essential for maintaining genome integrity in the replication, recombination and repair of DNA. High flexibility is important for the function of DNA ligase molecules. Two types of overall conformations of archaeal DNA ligase that depend on the relative position of the OB-fold domain have previously been revealed: closed and open extended conformations. The structure of ATP-dependent DNA ligase from Thermococcus sp. 1519 (LigTh1519) in the crystalline state determined at a resolution of 3.02 Å shows a new relative arrangement of the OB-fold domain which is intermediate between the positions of this domain in the closed and the open extended conformations of previously determined archaeal DNA ligases. However, small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) measurements indicate that in solution the LigTh1519 molecule adopts either an open extended conformation or both an intermediate and an open extended conformation with the open extended conformation being dominant.

  9. Overexpression of a soybean ariadne-like ubiquitin ligase gene GmARI1 enhances aluminum tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolian; Wang, Ning; Chen, Pei; Gao, Mengmeng; Liu, Juge; Wang, Yufeng; Zhao, Tuanjie; Li, Yan; Gai, Junyi

    2014-01-01

    Ariadne (ARI) subfamily of RBR (Ring Between Ring fingers) proteins have been found as a group of putative E3 ubiquitin ligases containing RING (Really Interesting New Gene) finger domains in fruitfly, mouse, human and Arabidopsis. Recent studies showed several RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligases play important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses, but the function of ARI in plants is largely unknown. In this study, an ariadne-like E3 ubiquitin ligase gene was isolated from soybean, Glycine max (L.) Merr., and designated as GmARI1. It encodes a predicted protein of 586 amino acids with a RBR supra-domain. Subcellular localization studies using Arabidopsis protoplast cells indicated GmARI protein was located in nucleus. The expression of GmARI1 in soybean roots was induced as early as 2-4 h after simulated stress treatments such as aluminum, which coincided with the fact of aluminum toxicity firstly and mainly acting on plant roots. In vitro ubiquitination assay showed GmARI1 protein has E3 ligase activity. Overexpression of GmARI1 significantly enhanced the aluminum tolerance of transgenic Arabidopsis. These findings suggest that GmARI1 encodes a RBR type E3 ligase, which may play important roles in plant tolerance to aluminum stress.

  10. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRIM32 regulates myoblast proliferation by controlling turnover of NDRG2.

    PubMed

    Mokhonova, Ekaterina I; Avliyakulov, Nuraly K; Kramerova, Irina; Kudryashova, Elena; Haykinson, Michael J; Spencer, Melissa J

    2015-05-15

    Limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2H is caused by mutations in the gene encoding the E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32. Previously, we generated and characterized a Trim32 knockout mouse (T32KO) that displays both neurogenic and myopathic features. The myopathy in these mice is attributable to impaired muscle growth, associated with satellite cell senescence and premature sarcopenia. This satellite cell senescence is due to accumulation of the SUMO ligase PIASy, a substrate of TRIM32. The goal of this investigation was to identify additional substrates of TRIM32 using 2D fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE) in order to further explore its role in skeletal muscle. Because TRIM32 is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, we reasoned that TRIM32's substrates would accumulate in its absence. 2D-DIGE identified 19 proteins that accumulate in muscles from the T32KO mouse. We focused on two of these proteins, NDRG2 and TRIM72, due to their putative roles in myoblast proliferation and myogenesis. Follow-up analysis confirmed that both proteins were ubiquitinated by TRIM32 in vitro; however, only NDRG2 accumulated in skeletal muscle and myoblasts in the absence of TRIM32. NDRG2 overexpression in myoblasts led to reduced cell proliferation and delayed cell cycle withdrawal during differentiation. Thus, we identified NDRG2 as a novel target for TRIM32; these findings further corroborate the hypothesis that TRIM32 is involved in control of myogenic cells proliferation and differentiation. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. The HERC2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for embryonic development and regulates motor coordination.

    PubMed

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Hadjebi, Ouadah; Pedrazza, Leonardo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Langa, Francina; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Duran, Joan; de Anta, Josep Maria; Alcántara, Soledad; Ruiz, Rocio; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Aguilar-Montilla, Francisco J; Carrión, Ángel M; Armengol, Jose Angel; Baple, Emma; Crosby, Andrew H; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-08-30

    A mutation in the HERC2 gene has been linked to a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to the Angelman syndrome. This gene codifies a protein with ubiquitin ligase activity that regulates the activity of tumor protein p53 and is involved in important cellular processes such as DNA repair, cell cycle, cancer, and iron metabolism. Despite the critical role of HERC2 in these physiological and pathological processes, little is known about its relevance in vivo. Here, we described a mouse with targeted inactivation of the Herc2 gene. Homozygous mice were not viable. Distinct from other ubiquitin ligases that interact with p53, such as MDM2 or MDM4, p53 depletion did not rescue the lethality of homozygous mice. The HERC2 protein levels were reduced by approximately one-half in heterozygous mice. Consequently, HERC2 activities, including ubiquitin ligase and stimulation of p53 activity, were lower in heterozygous mice. A decrease in HERC2 activities was also observed in human skin fibroblasts from individuals with an Angelman-like syndrome that express an unstable mutant protein of HERC2. Behavioural analysis of heterozygous mice identified an impaired motor synchronization with normal neuromuscular function. This effect was not observed in p53 knockout mice, indicating that a mechanism independent of p53 activity is involved. Morphological analysis showed the presence of HERC2 in Purkinje cells and a specific loss of these neurons in the cerebella of heterozygous mice. In these animals, an increase of autophagosomes and lysosomes was observed. Our findings establish a crucial role of HERC2 in embryonic development and motor coordination.

  12. Targeting Neddylation Pathways to Inactivate Cullin-RING Ligases for Anticancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Morgan, Meredith A.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Protein neddylation is catalyzed by an E1 NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE), an E2 NEDD8-conjugating enzyme, and an E3 NEDD8 ligase. Known physiological substrates of neddylation are cullin family members. Cullin neddylation leads to activation of cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), the largest family of E3 ubiquitin ligases responsible for ubiquitylation and degradation of many key signaling/regulatory proteins. Thus, through modulating CRLs, neddylation regulates many biological processes, including cell cycle progression, signal transduction, and tumorigenesis. Given that NEDD8 is overexpressed and CRLs are abnormally activated in many human cancers, targeting protein neddylation, in general, and cullin neddylation, in particular, appears to be an attractive anticancer approach. Recent Advances: MLN4924, a small molecule inhibitor of NAE, was discovered that inactivates CRLs and causes accumulation of CRL substrates to suppress tumor cell growth both in vitro and in vivo. Promising preclinical results advanced MLN4924 to several clinical trials for anticancer therapy. Critical Issues: In preclinical settings, MLN4924 effectively suppresses tumor cell growth by inducing apoptosis, senescence, and autophagy, and causes sensitization to chemoradiation therapies in a cellular context-dependent manner. Signal molecules that determine the cell fate upon MLN4924 treatment, however, remain elusive. Cancer cells develop MLN4924 resistance by selecting target mutations. Future Directions: In the clinical side, several Phase 1b trials are under way to determine the safety and efficacy of MLN4924, acting alone or in combination with conventional chemotherapy, against human solid tumors. In the preclinical side, the efforts are being made to develop additional neddylation inhibitors by targeting NEDD8 E2s and E3s. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 2383–2400. PMID:24410571

  13. Targeting the mTOR-DEPTOR Pathway by CRL E3 Ubiquitin Ligases: Therapeutic Application1

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yongchao; Sun, Yi

    2012-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), an evolutionarily conserved serine/threonine protein kinase, integrates both intracellular and extracellular signals and serves as a central regulator of cell metabolism, growth, proliferation, survival, and autophagy. The mTOR pathway is frequently activated in many human cancers, mainly resulting from alterations in the upstream regulators, such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation, PTEN loss or dysregulation of mTOR-negative regulators (e.g., TSC1/2), leading to uncontrolled proliferation. Thus, inhibiting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways is widely considered as an effective approach for targeted cancer therapy. Recently, we and others found that DEPTOR, a naturally occurring inhibitor of both mTORC1 and mTORC2, was degraded by SCF (Skp1-Cullin-F box proteins) E3 ubiquitin ligase, the founding member of cullin-RING-ligases (CRLs), resulting in mTOR activation and cell proliferation. In addition to DEPTOR, previous studies have demonstrated that several other negative regulators of mTOR pathway are also substrates of CRL/SCF E3s. Thus, targeting CRL/SCF E3s is expected to cause the accumulation of these mTOR signal inhibitors to effectively block the mTOR pathway. In this review, we will discuss mTOR signaling pathway, how DEPTOR regulates mTOR/AKT axis, thus acting as a tumor suppressor or oncogene in some cases, how DEPTOR is ubiquitinated and degraded by SCFβ-TrCP E3, and how MLN4924, a small-molecule indirect inhibitor of CRL/SCF E3 ligases through blocking cullin neddylation, might be useful as a novel approach of mTOR pathway targeting for cancer therapy. PMID:22745582

  14. UbFluor: A Mechanism-Based Probe for HECT E3 Ligases

    PubMed Central

    Krist, David T.; Park, Sungjin; Boneh, Galyah H.; Rice, Sarah E.; Statsyuk, Alexander V.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous to E6AP Carboxyl Terminus E3 ubiquitin ligases (HECT, ~28 known) are genetically implicated in cancer, neurological, hypertensive, and autoimmune disorders, and are potential drug targets to treat these diseases. The major bottleneck in the field of HECT E3s is a lack of simple assays to quantify the enzymatic activity of these enzymes in the presence of small molecules. Typical assays require E1, E2, HECT E3, ubiquitin (Ub), ATP and additional reagents to detect the resulting free poly-ubiquitin chains. To address this need, we developed UbFluor, a fluorescent thioester conjugate between the C-terminus of Ub and fluorescein-thiol (Fluor-SH). UbFluor is a mechanism-based probe that undergoes a direct transthiolation reaction with the catalytic cysteine of the model HECT E3 ligase Rsp5, producing the catalytically active Rsp5~Ub (~ indicates thioester) accompanied by release of Fluor-SH. The kinetics of this two-component reaction can be easily monitored with real-time fluorescence polarization (FP) assays. Importantly, UbFluor eliminates the need to use SDS-PAGE, ATP, E1, E2 enzymes, and extra poly-ubiquitin chain detection reagents. Although the developed system lacks ATP, E1 and E2 enzymes, we show that UbFluor can recapitulate the native ubiquitination reaction by detecting and quantifying defects in transthiolation and isopeptide ligation of Rsp5 HECT E3 alanine mutants. Based on our findings, we show that UbFluor can be utilized to conduct high-throughput screens (HTS) of small molecules against HECT ligases. PMID:27482366

  15. The Ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 is essential for oligopeptide utilization in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Kitamura, Kenji; Nakase, Mai; Tohda, Hideki; Takegawa, Kaoru

    2012-03-01

    Uptake of extracellular oligopeptides in yeast is mediated mainly by specific transporters of the peptide transporter (PTR) and oligopeptide transporter (OPT) families. Here, we investigated the role of potential peptide transporters in the yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Utilization of naturally occurring dipeptides required only Ptr2/SPBC13A2.04c and none of the other 3 OPT proteins (Isp4, Pgt1, and Opt3), whereas only Isp4 was indispensable for tetrapeptide utilization. Both Ptr2 and Isp4 localized to the cell surface, but under rich nutrient conditions Isp4 localized in the Golgi apparatus through the function of the ubiquitin ligase Pub1. Furthermore, the ubiquitin ligase Ubr11 played a significant role in oligopeptide utilization. The mRNA levels of both the ptr2 and isp4 genes were significantly reduced in ubr11Δ cells, and the dipeptide utilization defect in the ubr11Δ mutant was rescued by the forced expression of Ptr2. Consistent with its role in transcriptional regulation of peptide transporter genes, the Ubr11 protein was accumulated in the nucleus. Unlike the situation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the oligopeptide utilization defect in the S. pombe ubr11Δ mutant was not rescued by inactivation of the Tup11/12 transcriptional corepressors, suggesting that the requirement for the Ubr ubiquitin ligase in the upregulation of peptide transporter mRNA levels is conserved in both yeasts; however, the actual mechanism underlying the control appears to be different. We also found that the peptidomimetic proteasome inhibitor MG132 was still operative in a strain lacking all known PTR and OPT peptide transporters. Therefore, irrespective of its peptide-like structure, MG132 is carried into cells independently of the representative peptide transporters.

  16. Control of Amino Acid Homeostasis by a Ubiquitin Ligase-Coactivator Protein Complex.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Damian; Chapiro, Sonia M; Pratelli, Réjane; Yu, Shi; Jia, Weitao; Leary, Julie; Pilot, Guillaume; Callis, Judy

    2017-03-03

    Intercellular amino acid transport is essential for the growth of all multicellular organisms, and its dysregulation is implicated in developmental disorders. By an unknown mechanism, amino acid efflux is stimulated in plants by overexpression of a membrane-localized protein (GLUTAMINE DUMPER 1 (GDU1)) that requires a ubiquitin ligase (LOSS OF GDU 2 (LOG2). Here we further explore the physiological consequences of the interaction between these two proteins. LOG2 ubiquitin ligase activity is necessary for GDU1-dependent tolerance to exogenous amino acids, and LOG2 self-ubiquitination was markedly stimulated by the GDU1 cytosolic domain, suggesting that GDU1 functions as an adaptor or coactivator of amino acid exporter(s). However, other consequences more typical of a ligase-substrate relationship are observed: disruption of the LOG2 gene increased the in vivo half-life of GDU1, mass spectrometry confirmed that LOG2 ubiquitinates GDU1 at cytosolic lysines, and GDU1 protein levels decreased upon co-expression with active, but not enzymatically inactive LOG2. Altogether these data indicate LOG2 negatively regulates GDU1 protein accumulation by a mechanism dependent upon cytosolic GDU1 lysines. Although GDU1-lysine substituted protein exhibited diminished in vivo ubiquitination, overexpression of GDU1 lysine mutants still conferred amino acid tolerance in a LOG2-dependent manner, consistent with GDU1 being both a substrate and facilitator of LOG2 function. From these data, we offer a model in which GDU1 activates LOG2 to stimulate amino acid export, a process that could be negatively regulated by GDU1 ubiquitination and LOG2 self-ubiquitination.

  17. TRIM37 is a new histone H2A ubiquitin ligase and breast cancer oncoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Bhatnagar, Sanchita; Gazin, Claude; Chamberlain, Lynn; Ou, Jianhong; Zhu, Xiaochun; Tushir, Jogender S.; Virbasius, Ching-Man; Lin, Ling; Zhu, Lihua J.; Wajapeyee, Narendra; Green, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The TRIM37 (or MUL) gene is located in the 17q23 chromosomal region, which is amplified in up to ~40% of breast cancers1. TRIM37 contains a RING finger domain, a hallmark of E3 ubiquitin ligases2, but its protein substrate(s) is unknown. Here we report that TRIM37 mono-ubiquitinates histone H2A, a chromatin modification associated with transcriptional repression3. We find that in human breast cancer cell lines containing amplified 17q23, TRIM37 is upregulated and, reciprocally, the major H2A ubiquitin ligase RNF23,4 (also called RING1B) is downregulated. Genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP)-chip experiments in 17q23-amplified breast cancer cells identified many genes, including multiple tumour suppressors, whose promoters were bound by TRIM37 and enriched for ubiquitinated H2A (H2A-ub). However, unlike RNF2, which is a subunit of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)3–5, we find that TRIM37 associates with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). TRIM37, PRC2 and PRC1 are co-bound to specific target genes resulting in their transcriptional silencing. RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated knockdown of TRIM37 results in loss of H2A-ub, dissociation of PRC1 and PRC2 from target promoters, and transcriptional reactivation of silenced genes. Knockdown of TRIM37 in human breast cancer cells containing amplified 17q23 substantially decreases tumour growth in mouse xenografts. Conversely, ectopic expression of TRIM37 renders non-transformed cells tumorigenic. Collectively, our results reveal TRIM37 as an oncogenic H2A ubiquitin ligase that is overexpressed in a subset of breast cancers and promotes transformation by facilitating silencing of tumour suppressors and other genes. PMID:25470042

  18. Aβ-Induced Synaptic Alterations Require the E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Nedd4-1.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elizabeth M; Scudder, Samantha L; Goo, Marisa S; Patrick, Gentry N

    2016-02-03

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a neurodegenerative disease in which patients experience progressive cognitive decline. A wealth of evidence suggests that this cognitive impairment results from synaptic dysfunction in affected brain regions caused by cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into the pathogenic peptide amyloid-β (Aβ). Specifically, it has been shown that Aβ decreases surface AMPARs, dendritic spine density, and synaptic strength, and also alters synaptic plasticity. The precise molecular mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for ubiquitination in Aβ-induced synaptic dysfunction in cultured rat neurons. We find that Aβ promotes the ubiquitination of AMPARs, as well as the redistribution and recruitment of Nedd4-1, a HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase we previously demonstrated to target AMPARs for ubiquitination and degradation. Strikingly, we show that Nedd4-1 is required for Aβ-induced reductions in surface AMPARs, synaptic strength, and dendritic spine density. Our findings, therefore, indicate an important role for Nedd4-1 and ubiquitin in the synaptic alterations induced by Aβ. Synaptic changes in Alzheimer's disease (AD) include surface AMPAR loss, which can weaken synapses. In a cell culture model of AD, we found that AMPAR loss correlates with increased AMPAR ubiquitination. In addition, the ubiquitin ligase Nedd4-1, known to ubiquitinate AMPARs, is recruited to synapses in response to Aβ. Strikingly, reducing Nedd4-1 levels in this model prevented surface AMPAR loss and synaptic weakening. These findings suggest that, in AD, Nedd4-1 may ubiquitinate AMPARs to promote their internalization and weaken synaptic strength, similar to what occurs in Nedd4-1's established role in homeostatic synaptic scaling. This is the first demonstration of Aβ-mediated control of a ubiquitin ligase to regulate surface AMPAR expression. Copyright © 2016 the authors 0270-6474/16/361590-06$15.00/0.

  19. E2 conjugating enzyme selectivity and requirements for function of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Soss, Sarah E; Yue, Yuanyuan; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Chazin, Walter J

    2011-06-17

    The transfer of ubiquitin (Ub) to a substrate protein requires a cascade of E1 activating, E2 conjugating, and E3 ligating enzymes. E3 Ub ligases containing U-box and RING domains bind both E2∼Ub conjugates and substrates to facilitate transfer of the Ub molecule. Although the overall mode of action of E3 ligases is well established, many of the mechanistic details that determine the outcome of ubiquitination are poorly understood. CHIP (carboxyl terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein) is a U-box E3 ligase that serves as a co-chaperone to heat shock proteins and is critical for the regulation of unfolded proteins in the cytosol. We have performed a systematic analysis of the interactions of CHIP with E2 conjugating enzymes and found that only a subset bind and function. Moreover, some E2 enzymes function in pairs to create products that neither create individually. Characterization of the products of these reactions showed that different E2 enzymes produce different ubiquitination products, i.e. that E2 determines the outcome of Ub transfer. Site-directed mutagenesis on the E2 enzymes Ube2D1 and Ube2L3 (UbcH5a and UbcH7) established that an SPA motif in loop 7 of E2 is required for binding to CHIP but is not sufficient for activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate and consequent ubiquitination activity. These data support the proposal that the E2 SPA motif provides specificity for binding to CHIP, whereas activation of the E2∼Ub conjugate is derived from other molecular determinants.

  20. CREB SUMOylation by the E3 ligase PIAS1 enhances spatial memory.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yan-Chu; Hsu, Wei-Lun; Ma, Yun-Li; Tai, Derek J C; Lee, Eminy H Y

    2014-07-16

    cAMP-responsive element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation and signaling plays an important role in long-term memory formation, but other posttranslational modifications of CREB are less known. Here, we found that CREB1Δ, the short isoform of CREB, could be sumoylated by the small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) E3 ligase protein inhibitor of activated STAT1 (PIAS1) at Lys271 and Lys290 and PIAS1 SUMOylation of CREB1Δ increased the expression level of CREB1Δ. CREB1Δ could also be sumoylated by other PIAS family proteins, but not by the E3 ligases RanBP2 and Pc2 or by the E2 ligase Ubc9. Furthermore, water maze training increased the level of endogenous CREB SUMOylation in rat CA1 neurons determined by in vitro SUMOylation assay, but this effect was not observed in other brain areas. Moreover, transduction of Lenti-CREBWT to rat CA1 area facilitated, whereas transduction of Lenti-CREB double sumo-mutant (CREBK271RK290R) impaired, spatial learning and memory performance. Transduction of Lenti-CREBWT-SUMO1 fusion vector to rat CA1 area showed a more significant effect in enhancing spatial learning and memory and CREB SUMOylation. Lenti-CREBWT transduction increased, whereas Lenti-CREBK271RK290R transduction decreased, CREB DNA binding to the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (bdnf) promoter and decreased bdnf mRNA expression. Knock-down of PIAS1 expression in CA1 area by PIAS1 siRNA transfection impaired spatial learning and memory and decreased endogenous CREB SUMOylation. In addition, CREB SUMOylation was CREB phosphorylation dependent and lasted longer. Therefore, CREB phosphorylation may be responsible for signal transduction during the early phase of long-term memory formation, whereas CREB SUMOylation sustains long-term memory.

  1. The Ubiquitin Ligase ASB4 Promotes Trophoblast Differentiation through the Degradation of ID2

    PubMed Central

    Townley-Tilson, W. H. Davin; Wu, Yaxu; Ferguson, James E.; Patterson, Cam

    2014-01-01

    Vascularization of the placenta is a critical developmental process that ensures fetal viability. Although the vascular health of the placenta affects both maternal and fetal well being, relatively little is known about the early stages of placental vascular development. The ubiquitin ligase Ankyrin repeat, SOCS box-containing 4 (ASB4) promotes embryonic stem cell differentiation to vascular lineages and is highly expressed early in placental development. The transcriptional regulator Inhibitor of DNA binding 2 (ID2) negatively regulates vascular differentiation during development and is a target of many ubiquitin ligases. Due to their overlapping spatiotemporal expression pattern in the placenta and contrasting effects on vascular differentiation, we investigated whether ASB4 regulates ID2 through its ligase activity in the placenta and whether this activity mediates vascular differentiation. In mouse placentas, ASB4 expression is restricted to a subset of cells that express both stem cell and endothelial markers. Placentas that lack Asb4 display immature vascular patterning and retain expression of placental progenitor markers, including ID2 expression. Using JAR placental cells, we determined that ASB4 ubiquitinates and represses ID2 expression in a proteasome-dependent fashion. Expression of ASB4 in JAR cells and primary isolated trophoblast stem cells promotes the expression of differentiation markers. In functional endothelial co-culture assays, JAR cells ectopically expressing ASB4 increased endothelial cell turnover and stabilized endothelial tube formation, both of which are hallmarks of vascular differentiation within the placenta. Co-transfection of a degradation-resistant Id2 mutant with Asb4 inhibits both differentiation and functional responses. Lastly, deletion of Asb4 in mice induces a pathology that phenocopies human pre-eclampsia, including hypertension and proteinuria in late-stage pregnant females. These results indicate that ASB4 mediates

  2. Structure-Function Analysis of the OB and Latch Domains of Chlorella Virus DNA Ligase*

    PubMed Central

    Samai, Poulami; Shuman, Stewart

    2011-01-01

    Chlorella virus DNA ligase (ChVLig) is a minimized eukaryal ATP-dependent DNA sealing enzyme with an intrinsic nick-sensing function. ChVLig consists of three structural domains, nucleotidyltransferase (NTase), OB-fold, and latch, that envelop the nicked DNA as a C-shaped protein clamp. The OB domain engages the DNA minor groove on the face of the duplex behind the nick, and it makes contacts to amino acids in the NTase domain surrounding the ligase active site. The latch module occupies the DNA major groove flanking the nick. Residues at the tip of the latch contact the NTase domain to close the ligase clamp. Here we performed a structure-guided mutational analysis of the OB and latch domains. Alanine scanning defined seven individual amino acids as essential in vivo (Lys-274, Arg-285, Phe-286, and Val-288 in the OB domain; Asn-214, Phe-215, and Tyr-217 in the latch), after which structure-activity relations were clarified by conservative substitutions. Biochemical tests of the composite nick sealing reaction and of each of the three chemical steps of the ligation pathway highlighted the importance of Arg-285 and Phe-286 in the catalysis of the DNA adenylylation and phosphodiester synthesis reactions. Phe-286 interacts with the nick 5′-phosphate nucleotide and the 3′-OH base pair and distorts the DNA helical conformation at the nick. Arg-285 is a key component of the OB-NTase interface, where it forms a salt bridge to the essential Asp-29 side chain, which is imputed to coordinate divalent metal catalysts during the nick sealing steps. PMID:21527793

  3. The HERC2 ubiquitin ligase is essential for embryonic development and regulates motor coordination

    PubMed Central

    Cubillos-Rojas, Monica; Schneider, Taiane; Hadjebi, Ouadah; Pedrazza, Leonardo; de Oliveira, Jarbas Rodrigues; Langa, Francina; Guénet, Jean-Louis; Duran, Joan; de Anta, Josep Maria; Alcántara, Soledad; Ruiz, Rocio; Pérez-Villegas, Eva María; Aguilar, Francisco J.; Carrión, Ángel M.; Armengol, Jose Angel; Baple, Emma; Crosby, Andrew H.; Bartrons, Ramon; Ventura, Francesc; Rosa, Jose Luis

    2016-01-01

    A mutation in the HERC2 gene has been linked to a severe neurodevelopmental disorder with similarities to the Angelman syndrome. This gene codifies a protein with ubiquitin ligase activity that regulates the activity of tumor protein p53 and is involved in important cellular processes such as DNA repair, cell cycle, cancer, and iron metabolism. Despite the critical role of HERC2 in these physiological and pathological processes, little is known about its relevance in vivo. Here, we described a mouse with targeted inactivation of the Herc2 gene. Homozygous mice were not viable. Distinct from other ubiquitin ligases that interact with p53, such as MDM2 or MDM4, p53 depletion did not rescue the lethality of homozygous mice. The HERC2 protein levels were reduced by approximately one-half in heterozygous mice. Consequently, HERC2 activities, including ubiquitin ligase and stimulation of p53 activity, were lower in heterozygous mice. A decrease in HERC2 activities was also observed in human skin fibroblasts from individuals with an Angelman-like syndrome that express an unstable mutant protein of HERC2. Behavioural analysis of heterozygous mice identified an impaired motor synchronization with normal neuromuscular function. This effect was not observed in p53 knockout mice, indicating that a mechanism independent of p53 activity is involved. Morphological analysis showed the presence of HERC2 in Purkinje cells and a specific loss of these neurons in the cerebella of heterozygous mice. In these animals, an increase of autophagosomes and lysosomes was observed. Our findings establish a crucial role of HERC2 in embryonic development and motor coordination. PMID:27528230

  4. DD-ligases as a potential target for antibiotics: past, present and future.

    PubMed

    Tytgat, I; Colacino, E; Tulkens, P M; Poupaert, J H; Prévost, M; Van Bambeke, F

    2009-01-01

    DD-ligases catalyze the synthesis of the D-Ala-D-Ala and D-Ala-D-Ser dipeptides or the D Ala-D-Lac depsipeptide in an early step of peptidoglycan synthesis. Their function is essential for bacterial growth and specific to bacteria, making them attractive targets for the development of novel antibiotics. This review examines the biochemical and structural features of these enzymes and presents the main families of inhibitors described so far. Over the last 20 years, 7 structures of DD-ligases have been solved by X-ray crystallography, giving a detailed view of the general topology of the active site and of the residues in the catalytic pocket that play a central role in substrate recognition. This has paved the way to the rational design of inhibitors, which can be classified as (i) analogues of substrates, (ii) analogues of the product of the reaction, (iii) analogues of the transition state, and (iv) original scaffolds discovered by screening or by rational computer-aided design. The three first strategies have led to molecules that are polar by nature and have therefore poor access to their cytosolic target. The fourth one is potentially most promising as it yields more diverse structures. The most active molecules show affinity constants in the microM range, but microbiological evaluation remains scarce (typical MIC 1-8 mg/L for the tested compounds). These data strongly suggest targeting DD-ligases is a promising approach for discovery of new antibiotics. Future research should, however, aim at finding more potent inhibitors endowed with the appropriate pharmacokinetic properties that ensure access to their intracellular target.

  5. Ku stimulation of DNA ligase IV-dependent ligation requires inward movement along the DNA molecule.

    PubMed

    Kysela, Boris; Doherty, Aidan J; Chovanec, Miroslav; Stiff, Thomas; Ameer-Beg, Simon M; Vojnovic, Borivoj; Girard, Pierre-Marie; Jeggo, Penny A

    2003-06-20

    The DNA ligase IV.XRCC4 complex (LX) functions in DNA non-homologous-end joining, the main pathway for double-strand break repair in mammalian cells. We show that, in contrast to ligation by T4 ligase, the efficiency of LX ligation of double-stranded (ds) ends is critically dependent upon the length of the DNA substrate. The effect is specific for ds ligation, and LX/DNA binding is not influenced by the substrate length. Ku stimulates LX ligation at concentrations resulting in 1-2 Ku molecules bound per substrate, whereas multiply Ku-bound DNA molecules inhibit ds ligation. The combined footprint of DNA with Ku and LX bound is the sum of each individual footprint suggesting that the two complexes are located in tandem at the DNA end. Inhibition of Ku translocation by the presence of cis-platinum adducts on the DNA substrate severely inhibits ligation by LX. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer analysis using fluorophore-labeled Ku and DNA molecules showed that, as expected, Ku makes close contact with the DNA end and that addition of LX can disrupt this close contact. Finally, we show that recruitment of LX by Ku is impaired in an adenylation-defective mutant providing further evidence that LX interacts directly with the DNA end, possibly via the 5'-phosphate as shown for prokaryotic ligases. Taken together, our results suggest that, when LX binds to a Ku-bound DNA molecule, it causes inward translocation of Ku and that freedom to move inward on the DNA is essential to Ku stimulation of LX activity.

  6. Viral modulators of cullin RING ubiquitin ligases: culling the host defense.

    PubMed

    Barry, Michele; Früh, Klaus

    2006-05-16

    Cullin RING ubiquitin ligases (CRULs) are found in all eukaryotes and play an essential role in targeting proteins for ubiquitin-mediated destruction, thus regulating a plethora of cellular processes. Viruses manipulate CRULs by redirecting this destruction machinery to eliminate unwanted host cell proteins, thus allowing viruses to slip past host immune barriers. Depending on the host organism, virus-modified CRULs can perform an amazing range of tasks, including the elimination of crucial signal transduction molecules in the human interferon pathway and suppression of virus-induced gene silencing in plants. This Perspective summarizes recent advances in our understanding of how viral proteins manipulate the function of CRULs.

  7. Heterocyclic acyl-phosphate bioisostere-based inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus biotin protein ligase.

    PubMed

    Tieu, William; Jarrad, Angie M; Paparella, Ashleigh S; Keeling, Kelly A; Soares da Costa, Tatiana P; Wallace, John C; Booker, Grant W; Polyak, Steven W; Abell, Andrew D

    2014-10-01

    Inhibitors of Staphylococcus aureus biotin protein ligase (SaBPL) are generated by replacing the acyl phosphate group of biotinyl-5'-AMP with either a 1,2,3-triazole (see 5/10a/10b) or a 1,2,4-oxadiazole (see 7) bioisostere. Importantly, the inhibitors are inactive against the human BPL. The nature of the 5-substituent in the component benzoxazolone of the optimum 1,2,3-triazole series is critical to activity, where this group binds in the ATP binding pocket of the enzyme. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pathogenic Role of the CRL4 Ubiquitin Ligase in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Zhou, Pengbo

    2012-01-01

    The cullin 4-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) family employs multiple DDB1–CUL4 associated factors substrate receptors to direct the degradation of proteins involved in a wide spectrum of cellular functions. Aberrant expression of the cullin 4A (CUL4A) gene is found in many tumor types, while mutations of the cullin 4B (CUL4B) gene are causally associated with human X-linked mental retardation. This focused review will summarize our current knowledge of the two CUL4 family members in the pathogenesis of human malignancy and neuronal disease, and discuss their potential as new targets for cancer prevention and therapeutic intervention. PMID:22649780

  9. Control of cell growth by the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Skaar, Jeffrey R.; Pagano, Michele

    2009-01-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays key roles in the control of cell growth. The cell cycle in particular is highly regulated by the functions of the SCF and APC/C ubiquitin ligases, and perturbation of their function can result in tumorigenesis. Although the SCF and APC/C complexes are well-established in growth control pathways, many aspects of their function remain unknown. Recent studies have shed light on the mechanism of SCF-mediated ubiquitination and new functions for the SCF complex and APC/C. Our expanding understanding of the roles of the SCF and APC/C complexes highlight the potential for targeted molecular therapies. PMID:19775879

  10. Primary structure and genetic organization of phage T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Armstrong, J; Brown, R S; Tsugita, A

    1983-01-01

    The primary structure of phage T4 DNA ligase has been determined by DNA sequencing of a cloned restriction fragment containing its gene, and partial amino acid sequence analysis of the protein. The molecule has a Mr of 55,230, and contains 487 amino acids. The DNA sequence may also encode all of one and parts of two other, hitherto unidentified, T4 proteins. The four genes are closely packed, with overlaps between terminator and initiator codons of adjacent genes. Potential terminator and promoter sites for transcription are located within the coding sequence of one of the genes. PMID:6314278

  11. Effects of DNA-binding drugs on T4 DNA ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Montecucco, A; Pedrali-Noy, G; Spadari, S; Lestingi, M; Ciarrocchi, G

    1990-01-01

    A number of DNA intercalating and externally binding drugs have been found to inhibit nick sealing, cohesive and blunt end ligation, AMP-dependent DNA topoisomerization and EDTA-induced DNA nicking mediated by bacteriophage T4 DNA ligase. The inhibition seems to arise from drug-substrate interaction so that formation of active DNA-Mg2(+)-AMP-enzyme complex is impaired while assembled and active complexes are not disturbed by drug binding to the substrate. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 4. Fig. 5. PMID:2156493

  12. Structural insight into SUMO chain recognition and manipulation by the ubiquitin ligase RNF4

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingqi; Plechanovová, Anna; Simpson, Peter; Marchant, Jan; Leidecker, Orsolya; Kraatz, Sebastian; Hay, Ronald T.; Matthews, Steve J.

    2014-01-01

    The small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) can form polymeric chains that are important signals in cellular processes such as meiosis, genome maintenance and stress response. The SUMO-targeted ubiquitin ligase RNF4 engages with SUMO chains on linked substrates and catalyses their ubiquitination, which targets substrates for proteasomal degradation. Here we use a segmental labelling approach combined with solution nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and biochemical characterization to reveal how RNF4 manipulates the conformation of the SUMO chain, thereby facilitating optimal delivery of the distal SUMO domain for ubiquitin transfer. PMID:24969970

  13. Expression in Escherichia coli, purification and characterization of LRSAM1, a LRR and RING domain E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yanmin; Bian, Weixiang; Zhang, Yuan; Li, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    LRSAM1 is a typical RING-finger E3 ubiquitin ligase that plays an important role in many processes. The expression and purification of LRSAM1 from Escherichiacoli had not yet been reported. Here, strategies to clone, express and purify recombinant LRSAM1 in E. coli cells were developed. LRSAM1 was expressed with high yield as inclusion bodies and successfully recovered in soluble form by subsequent denaturation and renaturation steps. Refolded LRSAM1 was directly purified through two steps of ammonium sulfate precipitation, resulting in a purity of up to 95% and a yield of about 6 mg/L bacterial culture. Purified recombinant LRSAM1 exhibited a pH-dependent E3 ligase activity. Its ligase activity was RING-finger domain-dependent, and its ubiquitination favors K6-, K27-, K29- and K48-linkages in cooperation with UbcH5-type E2 enzymes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Hairpin DNA probe based surface plasmon resonance biosensor used for the activity assay of E. coli DNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Luan, Qingfen; Xue, Ying; Yao, Xin; Lu, Wu

    2010-02-01

    Using hairpin DNA probe self-structure change during DNA ligation process, a sensitive, label-free and simple method of E. coli DNA ligase assay via a home-built high-resolution surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument was developed. The DNA ligation process was monitored in real-time and the effects of single-base mutation on the DNA ligation process were investigated. Then an assay of E. coli DNA ligase was completed with a lower detection limit (0.6 nM), wider concentration range and better reproducibility. Moreover, the influence of Quinacrine on the activity of E. coli DNA ligase was also studied, which demonstrated that our method was useful for drug screening.

  15. Properties of bacteriophage T4 mutants defective in gene 30 (deoxyribonucleic acid ligase) and the rII gene.

    PubMed

    Karam, J D; Barker, B

    1971-02-01

    In Escherichia coli K-12 strains infected with phage T4 which is defective in gene 30 [deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) ligase] and in the rII gene (product unknown), near normal levels of DNA and viable phage were produced. Growth of such T4 ligase-rII double mutants was less efficient in E. coli B strains which show the "rapidlysis" phenotype of rII mutations. In pulse-chase experiments coupled with temperature shifts and with inhibition of DNA synthesis, it was observed that DNA synthesized by gene 30-defective phage is more susceptible to breakdown in vivo when the phage is carrying a wild-type rII gene. Breakdown was delayed or inhibited by continued DNA synthesis. Mutations of the rII gene decreased but did not completely abolish the breakdown. T4 ligase-rII double mutants had normal sensitivity to ultraviolet irradiation.

  16. DNA Ligase I is an In Vivo Substrate of DNA-Dependent Protein Kinase and is Activated by Phosphorylation in Response to DNA Double-Strand Breaks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    anlysis. to the procedure described by Malanga and Althaus (8). Gel Electrophoresis and A utoradiography. Immunopre- DNA Ligase and Protein Assays. DNA...by casein kinase 11, EMBO J. 11, 2925-2933. In conclusion, we have demonstrated that DNA ligase I 8. Malanga , M., and Althaus, F. R. (1994) Poly (ADP

  17. DNA Ligase C1 Mediates the LigD-Independent Nonhomologous End-Joining Pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis

    PubMed Central

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa

    2014-01-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3′ phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. PMID:24957619

  18. DNA ligase C1 mediates the LigD-independent nonhomologous end-joining pathway of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Bhattarai, Hitesh; Gupta, Richa; Glickman, Michael S

    2014-10-01

    Nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) is a recently described bacterial DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway that has been best characterized for mycobacteria. NHEJ can religate transformed linear plasmids, repair ionizing radiation (IR)-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells, and seal I-SceI-induced chromosomal DSBs. The core components of the mycobacterial NHEJ machinery are the DNA end binding protein Ku and the polyfunctional DNA ligase LigD. LigD has three autonomous enzymatic modules: ATP-dependent DNA ligase (LIG), DNA/RNA polymerase (POL), and 3' phosphoesterase (PE). Although genetic ablation of ku or ligD abolishes NHEJ and sensitizes nonreplicating cells to ionizing radiation, selective ablation of the ligase activity of LigD in vivo only mildly impairs NHEJ of linearized plasmids, indicating that an additional DNA ligase can support NHEJ. Additionally, the in vivo role of the POL and PE domains in NHEJ is unclear. Here we define a LigD ligase-independent NHEJ pathway in Mycobacterium smegmatis that requires the ATP-dependent DNA ligase LigC1 and the POL domain of LigD. Mycobacterium tuberculosis LigC can also support this backup NHEJ pathway. We also demonstrate that, although dispensable for efficient plasmid NHEJ, the activities of the POL and PE domains are required for repair of IR-induced DSBs in nonreplicating cells. These findings define the genetic requirements for a LigD-independent NHEJ pathway in mycobacteria and demonstrate that all enzymatic functions of the LigD protein participate in NHEJ in vivo. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. In vivo biotinylation of bacterial magnetic particles by a truncated form of Escherichia coli biotin ligase and biotin acceptor peptide.

    PubMed

    Maeda, Yoshiaki; Yoshino, Tomoko; Matsunaga, Tadashi

    2010-09-01

    Escherichia coli biotin ligase can attach biotin molecules to a lysine residue of biotin acceptor peptide (BAP), and biotinylation of particular BAP-fused proteins in cells was carried out by coexpression of E. coli biotin ligase (in vivo biotinylation). This in vivo biotinylation technology has been applied for protein purification, analysis of protein localization, and protein-protein interaction in eukaryotic cells, while such studies have not been reported in bacterial cells. In this study, in vivo biotinylation of bacterial magnetic particles (BacMPs) synthesized by Magnetospirillum magneticum AMB-1 was attempted by heterologous expression of E. coli biotin ligase. To biotinylate BacMPs in vivo, BAP was fused to a BacMP surface protein, Mms13, and E. coli biotin ligase was simultaneously expressed in the truncated form lacking the DNA-binding domain. This truncation-based approach permitted the growth of AMB-1 transformants when biotin ligase was heterologously expressed. In vivo biotinylation of BAP on BacMPs was confirmed using an alkaline phosphatase-conjugated antibiotin antibody. The biotinylated BAP-displaying BacMPs were then exposed to streptavidin by simple mixing. The streptavidin-binding capacity of BacMPs biotinylated in vivo was 35-fold greater than that of BacMPs biotinylated in vitro, where BAP-displaying BacMPs purified from bacterial cells were biotinylated by being mixed with E. coli biotin ligase. This study describes not only a simple method to produce biotinylated nanomagnetic particles but also a possible expansion of in vivo biotinylation technology for bacterial investigation.

  20. Constitutively active Cullin-RING-Ligases fail to rescue loss of NEDD8 conjugation in Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed

    Girdwood, David; Robertson, Morag; Gordon, Colin

    2012-05-21

    In fission yeast, the only known essential function of Ned8p is the modification of the cullin, Pcu1p, and subsequent Cullin-RING-Ligase (CRL) activation and substrate ubiquitination. We show here that a functional Pcu1p mutant, deleted for its C-terminal autoinhibitory domain, which negates the requirement of neddylation for ligase activity, is unable to rescue the loss of neddylation. These findings suggest that the neddylation of non-cullin substrate(s) are required for Schizosaccharomyces pombe viability. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Regulation of RNF144A E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity by Self-association through Its Transmembrane Domain.

    PubMed

    Ho, Shiuh-Rong; Lee, Yu-Ju; Lin, Weei-Chin

    2015-09-18

    RNF144A, an E3 ubiquitin ligase for DNA-dependent protein kinase catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs), can promote DNA damage-induced cell apoptosis. Here we characterize an important regulation of RNF144A through its transmembrane (TM) domain. The TM domain of RNF144A is highly conserved among species. Deletion of the TM domain abolishes its membrane localization and also significantly reduces its ubiquitin ligase activity. Further evidence shows that the TM domain is required for RNF144A self-association and that the self-association may be partially mediated through a classic GXXXG interaction motif. A mutant RNF144A-G252L/G256L (in the G(252)XXXG(256) motif) preserves membrane localization but is defective in self-association and ubiquitin ligase activity. On the other hand, a membrane localization loss mutant of RNF144A still retains self-association and E3 ligase activity, which can be blocked by additional G252L/G256L mutations. Therefore, our data demonstrate that the TM domain of RNF144A has at least two independent roles, membrane localization and E3 ligase activation, to regulate its physiological function. This regulatory mechanism may be applicable to other RBR (RING1-IBR-RING2) E3 ubiquitin ligases because, first, RNF144B also self-associates. Second, all five TM-containing RBR E3 ligases, including RNF144A and RNF144B, RNF19A/Dorfin, RNF19B, and RNF217, have the RBR-TM(GXXXG) superstructure. Mutations of the GXXXG motifs in RNF144A and RNF217 have also be found in human cancers, including a G252D mutation of RNF144A. Interestingly, RNF144A-G252D still preserves self-association and ubiquitin ligase activity but loses membrane localization and is turned over rapidly. In conclusion, both proper membrane localization and self-association are important for RNF144A function. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. The accessibility of thiophosphorylated groups in DNA fragments to the enzymatic activity of ligases and restriction endonuclease Bbs I.

    PubMed

    Schenk, J A; Heymann, S; Micheel, B

    1995-08-01

    The aim of this paper was to test the possibility to ligate and hydrolyse DNA sequences containing thiomodified ends and bonds. T4 DNA ligase was shown to ligate DNA fragments regardless of whether it contains phosphorylated or thiophosphorylated 5'-end. But the cleavage of an internally thiomodified phosphodiester bond was found to be totally inhibited when using the non-palindromic restrictase Bbs I. The special properties of this restriction endonuclease should allow the development of an oriented cloning strategy when combined with T4 ligase and a thiophosphorylation of DNA fragments.

  3. Inhibition of SCF ubiquitin ligases by engineered ubiquitin variants that target the Cul1 binding site on the Skp1–F-box interface

    SciTech Connect

    Gorelik, Maryna; Orlicky, Stephen; Sartori, Maria A.; Tang, Xiaojing; Marcon, Edyta; Kurinov, Igor; Greenblatt, Jack F.; Tyers, Mike; Moffat, Jason; Sicheri, Frank; Sidhu, Sachdev S.

    2016-03-14

    The ubiquitin proteasome components are often misregulated in numerous diseases, encouraging the search for drug targets and inhibitors. E3 ligases that specify ubiquitination targets are of particular interest. Multimeric Skp1–Cul1–F-box (SCF) E3 ligases constitute one of the largest E3 families connected to every cellular process and multiple diseases; however, their characterization as therapeutic targets is impeded by functional diversity and poor characterization of its members. Herein we describe a strategy to inhibit SCF E3 ligases using engineered ubiquitin-based binders. We identify a previously uncharacterized inhibitory site and design ubiquitin-based libraries targeting this site. Our strategy to target SCF E3 ligases with small-molecule–like agents will have broad applications for basic research and drug development relating to SCF E3 ligase function.

  4. Synthesis of ATP derivatives of compounds of the mevalonate pathway (isopentenyl di- and triphosphate; geranyl di- and triphosphate, farnesyl di- and triphosphate, and dimethylallyl diphosphate) catalyzed by T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase and other ligases Potential relationship with the effect of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Sillero, Maria A Günther; de Diego, Anabel; Tavares, Janeth E F; Silva, Joana A D Catanho da; Pérez-Zúñiga, Francisco J; Sillero, Antonio

    2009-08-15

    Compounds of the mevalonate pathway containing a terminal di- or triphosphate (mev-PP or mev-PPP) were tested as substrates of several enzyme ligases (T4 RNA ligase, T4 DNA ligase, firefly luciferase and other ligases) for the synthesis of ATP derivatives of the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA type. T4 RNA ligase, in the presence of ATP and the substrates: geranyl, farnesyl or isopentenyl triphosphates, and geranyl, farnesyl, dimethylallyl or isopentenyl diphosphates, all at 0.3 mM concentration, catalyzed the synthesis of the corresponding ATP derivatives at a relative rate of activity of: 7.6+/-1.4 mU/mg or 100%; 39%; 42%; 24%; 18%; 12% and 6%, respectively. Inhibition (%) of the synthesis by excess of substrate (0.8 mM vs. 0.3 mM) was observed with farnesyl diphosphate (99%); farnesyl triphosphate (96%) and geranyl triphosphate (32%). V(max), K(m), K(cat) and K(cat)/K(m) values were also determined. The K(cat)/K(m) values calculated were for: farnesyl triphosphate, 166; geranyl triphosphate, 52.2; farnesyl diphosphate, 12.1; geranyl diphosphate, 8.6; isopentenyl triphosphate, 6.7; dimethylallyl diphosphate, 3.1 and isopentenyl diphosphate, 0.9. Similar results were obtained with T4 DNA ligase. The above-mentioned compounds were also substrates of firefly luciferase synthesizing the mev-pppA or mev-ppppA derivatives. In our hands, neither the acyl- or acetyl-CoA synthetases nor the ubiquiting activating enzyme (E1) catalyzed the synthesis of ATP derivatives of these compounds. The results here presented could be related with the mechanism of action of bisphosphonates on osteoclasts or tumor cells.

  5. New Insights into the RNA-Binding and E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activities of Roquins

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Fan, Lixin; Hou, Feng; Dong, Aiping; Wang, Yun-Xing; Tong, Yufeng

    2015-01-01

    Roquins are a family of highly conserved RNA-binding proteins that also contain a RING-type E3 ubiquitin ligase domain. They repress constitutive decay elements containing mRNAs and play a critical role in RNA homeostasis and immunological self-tolerance. Here we present the crystal structures of the RNA-binding region of Roquin paralog RC3H2 in both apo- and RNA-bound forms. The RNA-binding region has a bipartite architecture composed of ROQ and HEPN domains, and can bind to stem-loop and double-stranded RNAs simultaneously. The two domains undergo a large orientation change to accommodate RNA duplex binding. We profiled E2 ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes that pair with Roquins and found that RC3H1 and RC3H2 interact with two sets of overlapping but not identical E2 enzymes to drive the assembly of polyubiquitin chains of different linkages. Crystal structures, small-angle X-ray scattering, and E2 profiling revealed that while the two paralogs are highly homologous, RC3H2 and RC3H1 are different in their structures and functions. We also demonstrated that RNA duplex binding to RC3H2 cross-talks with its E3 ubiquitin ligase function using an in vitro auto-ubiquitination assay. PMID:26489670

  6. Regulation of 2-oxoglutarate (alpha-ketoglutarate) dehydrogenase stability by the RING finger ubiquitin ligase Siah.

    PubMed

    Habelhah, Hasem; Laine, Aaron; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Tempst, Paul; Gershwin, M Eric; Bowtell, David D L; Ronai, Ze'ev

    2004-12-17

    The 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex (OGHDC) (also known as the alpha-ketoglutarate dehydrogenase complex) is a rate-limiting enzyme in the mitochondrial Krebs cycle. Here we report that the RING finger ubiquitin-protein isopeptide ligase Siah2 binds to and targets OGDHC-E2 for ubiquitination-dependent degradation. OGDHC-E2 expression and activity are elevated in Siah2(-/-) cells compared with Siah2(+)(/)(+) cells. Deletion of the mitochondrial targeting sequence of OGDHC-E2 results in its cytoplasmic localization and rapid proteasome-dependent degradation in Siah2(+)(/)(+) but not in Siah2(-/-) cells. Significantly, because of its overexpression or disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential, the release of OGDHC-E2 from mitochondria to the cytoplasm also results in its concomitant degradation. The role of the Siah family of ligases in the regulation of OGDHC-E2 stability is expected to take place under pathological conditions in which the levels of OGDHC-E2 are altered.

  7. Smurf E3 ubiquitin ligases at the cross roads of oncogenesis and tumor suppression.

    PubMed

    David, Diana; Nair, S Asha; Pillai, M Radhakrishna

    2013-01-01

    Smad ubiquitin regulatory factors (Smurfs) belong to the HECT- family of E3 ubiquitin ligases and comprise mainly of two members, Smurf1 and Smurf2. Initially, Smurfs have been implicated in determining the competence of cells to respond to TGF-β/BMP signaling pathway. Nevertheless, the intrinsic catalytic activity has extended the repertoire of Smurf substrates beyond the TGF-β/BMP super family expanding its realm further to epigenetic modifications of histones governing the chromatin landscape. Through regulation of a large number of proteins in multiple cellular compartments, Smurfs regulate diverse cellular processes, including cell-cycle progression, cell proliferation, differentiation, DNA damage response, maintenance of genomic stability, and metastasis. As the genomic ablation of Smurfs leads to global changes in histone modifications and predisposition to a wide spectrum of tumors, Smurfs are also considered to have a novel tumor suppressor function. This review focuses on regulation network and biological functions of Smurfs in connection with its role in cancer progression. By providing a portrait of their protein targets, we intend to link the substrate specificity of Smurfs with their contribution to tumorigenesis. Since the regulation and biological functions of Smurfs are quite complex, understanding the oncogenic potential of these E3 ubiquitin ligases may facilitate the development of mechanism-based drugs in cancer treatment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Characterization of the role of COP9 signalosome in regulating cullin E3 ubiquitin ligase activity.

    PubMed

    Choo, Yin Yin; Boh, Boon Kim; Lou, Jessica Jie Wei; Eng, Jolane; Leck, Yee Chin; Anders, Benjamin; Smith, Peter G; Hagen, Thilo

    2011-12-01

    Cullin RING ligases (CRLs) are the largest family of cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases and mediate polyubiquitination of a number of cellular substrates. CRLs are activated via the covalent modification of the cullin protein with the ubiquitin-like protein Nedd8. This results in a conformational change in the cullin carboxy terminus that facilitates the ubiquitin transfer onto the substrate. COP9 signalosome (CSN)-mediated cullin deneddylation is essential for CRL activity in vivo. However, the mechanism through which CSN promotes CRL activity in vivo is currently unclear. In this paper, we provide evidence that cullin deneddylation is not intrinsically coupled to substrate polyubiquitination as part of the CRL activation cycle. Furthermore, inhibiting substrate-receptor autoubiquitination is unlikely to account for the major mechanism through which CSN regulates CRL activity. CSN also did not affect recruitment of the substrate-receptor SPOP to Cul3, suggesting it may not function to facilitate the exchange of Cul3 substrate receptors. Our results indicate that CSN binds preferentially to CRLs in the neddylation-induced, active conformation. Binding of the CSN complex to active CRLs may recruit CSN-associated proteins important for CRL regulation. The deneddylating activity of CSN would subsequently promote its own dissociation to allow progression through the CRL activation cycle.

  9. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wan Yin; Goh, Germaine; Chia, Joanne; Boey, Adrian; Gunko, Natalia V; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC's regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC's action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase.

  10. [The applications of thermostable ligase chain reaction in facilitating DNA recombination].

    PubMed

    Xiangda, Zhou; Xiao, Song; Cong, Huai; Haiyan, Sun; Hongyan, Chen; Daru, Lu

    2016-02-01

    The traditional Type Ⅱ restriction enzyme-based method is restricted by the purification steps, and therefore, cannot be applied to specific DNA assembly in chaotic system. To solve this problem, Thermostable Ligase Chain Reaction (TLCR) was introduced in the process of DNA assembly and capture. This technique combines the feature of thermostable DNA ligase and sequence specific oligo ligation template, "Helper", to achieve specific assembly of target fragments and exponential increase of products in multiple thermocyclings. Two plasmid construction experiments were carried out in order to test the feasibility and practical performance of TLCR. One was that, TLCR was used to specifically capture a 1.5 kb fragment into vector from an unpurified chaotic system which contained 7 different sizes of fragments. The results showed that the capturing accuracy was around 80%, which proved the feasibility and accuracy of using TLCR to specific assembly of DNA fragments in a complicated mixed system. In the other experiment, TLCR was used to capture two fragments (total length was 27 kb) from Hind Ⅲ digestion of Lambda genome into vector by order. The results also showed an accuracy of around 80%. As demonstrated in the results, TLCR can simplify the process of DNA recombination experiments and is suitable for the assembly of multiple and large DNA fragments. This technique can provide convenience to biological experiments.

  11. The Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 Regulates Obesity-induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Gail; Carter, Lauren E.; Newman, Susan; Burk, David H.; Manuel, Justin; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic, low-grade adipose tissue inflammation associated with adipocyte hypertrophy is an important link in the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance. Although ubiquitin ligases regulate inflammatory processes, the role of these enzymes in metabolically driven adipose tissue inflammation is relatively unexplored. Herein, we examined the effect of the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 on obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation. Methods Wild-type and Siah2KO mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 16 weeks. Indirect calorimetry, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance were assayed along with glucose and insulin levels. Gene and protein expression, immunohistochemistry, adipocyte size distribution and lipolysis were also analyzed. Results Enlarged adipocytes in obese Siah2KO mice are not associated with obesity-induced insulin resistance. Proinflammatory gene expression, stress kinase signaling, fibrosis and crown-like structures are reduced in the Siah2KO adipose tissue and Siah2KO adipocytes are more responsive to insulin-dependent inhibition of lipolysis. Loss of Siah2 increases expression of PPARγ target genes involved in lipid metabolism and decreases expression of proinflammatory adipokines regulated by PPARγ. Conclusions Siah2 links adipocyte hypertrophy with adipocyte dysfunction and recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells to adipose tissue. Selective regulation of PPARγ activity is a Siah2-mediated mechanism contributing to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:26380945

  12. Structural basis of DNA ligase IV-Artemis interaction in nonhomologous end-joining.

    PubMed

    De Ioannes, Pablo; Malu, Shruti; Cortes, Patricia; Aggarwal, Aneel K

    2012-12-27

    DNA ligase IV (LigIV) and Artemis are central components of the nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) machinery that is required for V(D)J recombination and the maintenance of genomic integrity in mammalian cells. We report here crystal structures of the LigIV DNA binding domain (DBD) in both its apo form and in complex with a peptide derived from the Artemis C-terminal region. We show that LigIV interacts with Artemis through an extended hydrophobic surface. In particular, we find that the helix α2 in LigIV-DBD is longer than in other mammalian ligases and presents residues that specifically interact with the Artemis peptide, which adopts a partially helical conformation on binding. Mutations of key residues on the LigIV-DBD hydrophobic surface abolish the interaction. Together, our results provide structural insights into the specificity of the LigIV-Artemis interaction and how the enzymatic activities of the two proteins may be coordinated during NHEJ. Copyright © 2012 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direct Proximity Tagging of Small Molecule Protein Targets Using an Engineered NEDD8 Ligase.

    PubMed

    Hill, Zachary B; Pollock, Samuel B; Zhuang, Min; Wells, James A

    2016-10-12

    Identifying the protein targets of bioactive small molecules remains a major problem in the discovery of new chemical probes and therapeutics. While activity-based probes and photo-cross-linkers have had success in identifying protein targets of small molecules, each technique has limitations. Here we describe a method for direct proximity tagging of proteins that bind small molecules. We engineered a promiscuous ligase based on the NEDD8 conjugating enzyme, Ubc12, which can be covalently linked to a small molecule of interest. When target proteins bind the small molecule, they are directly labeled on surface lysines with a biotinylated derivative of the small ubiquitin homologue, NEDD8. This unique covalent tag can then be used to identify the small molecule binding proteins. Utilizing the drug dasatinib, we have shown that dasatinib-directed NEDDylation occurs for known endogenous protein binders in complex cell lysates. In addition, we have been able to improve NEDDylation efficiency through rational mutagenesis. Finally, we have shown that affinity-directed NEDDylation can be applied to two other protein-ligand interactions beyond kinases. Proximity tagging using this engineered ligase requires direct binding of the target and, thus, provides a useful and orthogonal approach to facilitate small molecule target identification.

  14. Ubiquitin ligase ITCH recruitment suppresses the aggregation and cellular toxicity of cytoplasmic misfolded proteins

    PubMed Central

    Chhangani, Deepak; Upadhyay, Arun; Amanullah, Ayeman; Joshi, Vibhuti; Mishra, Amit

    2014-01-01

    The protein quality control (QC) system protects cells against cellular toxicity induced by misfolded proteins and maintains overall cellular fitness. Inefficient clearance of or failure to degrade damaged proteins causes several diseases, especially age-linked neurodegenerative disorders. Attenuation of misfolded protein degradation under severe stress conditions leads to the rapid over-accumulation of toxic proteinaceous aggregates in the cytoplasmic compartment. However, the precise cytoplasmic quality control degradation mechanism is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that the Nedd4-like E3 ubiquitin ligase ITCH specifically interacts with mutant bona fide misfolded proteins and colocalizes with their perinuclear aggregates. In a cell culture model, we demonstrate ITCH recruitment by cytoplasmic inclusions containing polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin or ataxin-3 proteins. Transient overexpression of ITCH dramatically induced the degradation of thermally denatured misfolded luciferase protein. Partial depletion of ITCH increased the rate of aggregate formation and cell death generated by expanded polyglutamine proteins. Finally, we demonstrate that overexpression of ITCH alleviates the cytotoxic potential of expanded polyglutamine proteins and reduces aggregation. These observations indicate that ITCH is involved in the cytosolic quality control pathway and may help to explain how abnormal proteins are targeted by QC ubiquitin-protein ligases. PMID:24865853

  15. SpyLigase peptide–peptide ligation polymerizes affibodies to enhance magnetic cancer cell capture

    PubMed Central

    Fierer, Jacob O.; Veggiani, Gianluca; Howarth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Individual proteins can now often be modified with atomic precision, but there are still major obstacles to connecting proteins into larger assemblies. To direct protein assembly, ideally, peptide tags would be used, providing the minimal perturbation to protein function. However, binding to peptides is generally weak, so assemblies are unstable over time and disassemble with force or harsh conditions. We have recently developed an irreversible protein–peptide interaction (SpyTag/SpyCatcher), based on a protein domain from Streptococcus pyogenes, that locks itself together via spontaneous isopeptide bond formation. Here we develop irreversible peptide–peptide interaction, through redesign of this domain and genetic dissection into three parts: a protein domain termed SpyLigase, which now ligates two peptide tags to each other. All components expressed efficiently in Escherichia coli and peptide tags were reactive at the N terminus, at the C terminus, or at internal sites. Peptide–peptide ligation enabled covalent and site-specific polymerization of affibodies or antibodies against the tumor markers epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and HER2. Magnetic capture of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is one of the most promising approaches to improve cancer prognosis and management, but CTC capture is limited by inefficient recovery of cells expressing low levels of tumor antigen. SpyLigase-assembled protein polymers made possible the isolation of cancerous cells expressing lower levels of tumor antigen and should have general application in enhancing molecular capture. PMID:24639550

  16. The E3 Ligase CHIP Mediates p21 Degradation to Maintain Radioresistance.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Kuntal; Sarkar, Sukumar; Du, Kangping; Brautigan, David L; Abbas, Tarek; Larner, James M

    2017-06-01

    Lung cancer resists radiotherapy, making it one of the deadliest forms of cancer. Here, we show that human lung cancer cell lines can be rendered sensitive to ionizing radiation (IR) by RNAi knockdown of C-terminus of Hsc70-interacting protein (CHIP/STUB1), a U-box-type E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets a number of stress-induced proteins. Mechanistically, ubiquitin-dependent degradation of the cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor, p21 protein, is reduced by CHIP knockdown, leading to enhanced senescence of cells in response to exposure to IR. Cellular senescence and sensitivity to IR is prevented by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated deletion of the p21 gene (CDKN1A) in CHIP knockdown cells. Conversely, overexpression of CHIP potentiates p21 degradation and promotes greater radioresistance of lung cancer cells. In vitro and cell-based assays demonstrate that p21 is a novel and direct ubiquitylation substrate of CHIP that also requires the CHIP-associated chaperone HSP70. These data reveal that the inhibition of the E3 ubiquitin ligase CHIP promotes radiosensitivity, thus suggesting a novel strategy for the treatment of lung cancer.Implications: The CHIP-HSP70-p21 ubiquitylation/degradation axis identified here could be exploited to enhance the efficacy of radiotherapy in patients with non-small cell lung cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 15(6); 651-9. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  17. Aurora Kinase A Promotes AR Degradation via the E3 Ligase CHIP.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Sukumar; Brautigan, David L; Larner, James M

    2017-08-01

    Reducing the levels of the androgen receptor (AR) is one of the most viable approaches to combat castration-resistant prostate cancer. Previously, we observed that proteasomal-dependent degradation of AR in response to 2-methoxyestradiol (2-ME) depends primarily on the E3 ligase C-terminus of HSP70-interacting protein (STUB1/CHIP). Here, 2-ME stimulation activates CHIP by phosphorylation via Aurora kinase A (AURKA). Aurora A kinase inhibitors and RNAi knockdown of Aurora A transcript selectively blocked CHIP phosphorylation and AR degradation. Aurora A kinase is activated by 2-ME in the S-phase as well as during mitosis, and phosphorylates CHIP at S273. Prostate cancer cells expressing an S273A mutant of CHIP have attenuated AR degradation upon 2-ME treatment compared with cells expressing wild-type CHIP, supporting the idea that CHIP phosphorylation by Aurora A activates its E3 ligase activity for the AR. These results reveal a novel 2-ME→Aurora A→CHIP→AR pathway that promotes AR degradation via the proteasome that may offer novel therapeutic opportunities for prostate cancer. Mol Cancer Res; 15(8); 1063-72. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  18. Cleavage of 3'-terminal adenosine by archaeal ATP-dependent RNA ligase.

    PubMed

    Yoshinari, Shigeo; Liu, Yancheng; Gollnick, Paul; Ho, C Kiong

    2017-09-14

    Methanothermobacter thermoautotrophicus RNA ligase (MthRnl) catalyzes formation of phosphodiester bonds between the 5'-phosphate and 3'-hydroxyl termini of single-stranded RNAs. It can also react with RNA with a 3'-phosphate end to generate a 2',3'-cyclic phosphate. Here, we show that MthRnl can additionally remove adenosine from the 3'-terminus of the RNA to produce 3'-deadenylated RNA, RNA(3'-rA). This 3'-deadenylation activity is metal-dependent and requires a 2'-hydroxyl at both the terminal adenosine and the penultimate nucleoside. Residues that contact the ATP/AMP in the MthRnl crystal structures are essential for the 3'-deadenylation activity, suggesting that 3'-adenosine may occupy the ATP-binding pocket. The 3'-end of cleaved RNA(3'-rA) consists of 2',3'-cyclic phosphate which protects RNA(3'-rA) from ligation and further deadenylation. These findings suggest that ATP-dependent RNA ligase may act on a specific set of 3'-adenylated RNAs to regulate their processing and downstream biological events.

  19. Reversible phosphorylation controls the activity of cyclosome-associated cyclin-ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Lahav-Baratz, S; Sudakin, V; Ruderman, J V; Hershko, A

    1995-01-01

    Cyclin B/cdc2 is responsible both for driving cells into mitosis and for activating the ubiquitin-dependent degradation of mitotic cyclins near the end of mitosis, an event required for the completion of mitosis and entry into interphase of the next cell cycle. Previous work with cell-free extracts of rapidly dividing clam embryos has identified two specific components required for the ubiquitination of mitotic cyclins: E2-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin carrier protein that is constitutively active during the cell cycle, and E3-C, a cyclin-selective ubiquitin ligase that purifies as part of a approximately 1500-kDa complex, termed the cyclosome, and which is active only near the end of mitosis. Here, we have separated the cyclosome from its ultimate upstream activator, cdc2. The mitotic, active form of the cyclosome can be inactivated by incubation with a partially purified, endogenous okadaic acid-sensitive phosphatase; addition of cdc2 restores activity to the cyclosome after a lag that reproduces that seen previously in intact cells and in crude extracts. These results demonstrate that activity of cyclin-ubiquitin ligase is controlled by reversible phosphorylation of the cyclosome complex. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7568122

  20. Ubiquitination on nonlysine residues by a viral E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed

    Cadwell, Ken; Coscoy, Laurent

    2005-07-01

    Ubiquitination controls a broad range of cellular functions. The last step of the ubiquitination pathway is regulated by enzyme type 3 (E3) ubiquitin ligases. E3 enzymes are responsible for substrate specificity and catalyze the formation of an isopeptide bond between a lysine residue of the substrate (or the N terminus of the substrate) and ubiquitin. MIR1 and MIR2 are two E3 ubiquitin ligases encoded by Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus that mediate the ubiquitination of major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules and subsequent internalization. Here, we found that MIR1, but not MIR2, promoted down-regulation of MHC I molecules lacking lysine residues in their intracytoplasmic domain. In the presence of MIR1, these MHC I molecules were ubiquitinated, and their association with ubiquitin was sensitive to beta2-mercaptoethanol, unlike lysine-ubiquitin bonds. This form of ubiquitination required a cysteine residue in the intracytoplasmic tail of MHC I molecules. An MHC I molecule containing a single cysteine residue in an artificial glycine and alanine intracytoplasmic domain was endocytosed and degraded in the presence of MIR1. Thus, ubiquitination can occur on proteins lacking accessible lysines or an accessible N terminus.

  1. Adenylylation of small RNA sequencing adapters using the TS2126 RNA ligase I.

    PubMed

    Lama, Lodoe; Ryan, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    Many high-throughput small RNA next-generation sequencing protocols use 5' preadenylylated DNA oligonucleotide adapters during cDNA library preparation. Preadenylylation of the DNA adapter's 5' end frees from ATP-dependence the ligation of the adapter to RNA collections, thereby avoiding ATP-dependent side reactions. However, preadenylylation of the DNA adapters can be costly and difficult. The currently available method for chemical adenylylation of DNA adapters is inefficient and uses techniques not typically practiced in laboratories profiling cellular RNA expression. An alternative enzymatic method using a commercial RNA ligase was recently introduced, but this enzyme works best as a stoichiometric adenylylating reagent rather than a catalyst and can therefore prove costly when several variant adapters are needed or during scale-up or high-throughput adenylylation procedures. Here, we describe a simple, scalable, and highly efficient method for the 5' adenylylation of DNA oligonucleotides using the thermostable RNA ligase 1 from bacteriophage TS2126. Adapters with 3' blocking groups are adenylylated at >95% yield at catalytic enzyme-to-adapter ratios and need not be gel purified before ligation to RNA acceptors. Experimental conditions are also reported that enable DNA adapters with free 3' ends to be 5' adenylylated at >90% efficiency. © 2015 Lama and Ryan; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  2. SVIP regulates Z variant alpha-1 antitrypsin retro-translocation by inhibiting ubiquitin ligase gp78

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Nazli; Wang, Rejean liqun; Marek, George; Krotova, Karina; Kirst, Mariana; Liu, Chen; Rouhani, Farshid; Brantly, Mark

    2017-01-01

    Alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) is an inherited disorder characterized by early-onset emphysema and liver disease. The most common disease-causing mutation is a single amino acid substitution (Glu/Lys) at amino acid 342 of the mature protein, resulting in disruption of the 290–342 salt bridge (an electrophoretic abnormality defining the mutation [Z allele, or ZAAT]), protein misfolding, polymerization, and accumulation in the endoplasmic reticulum of hepatocytes and monocytes. The Z allele causes a toxic gain of function, and the E3 ubiquitin ligase gp78 promotes degradation and increased solubility of endogenous ZAAT. We hypothesized that the accumulation of ZAAT is influenced by modulation of gp78 E3 ligase and SVIP (small VCP-interacting protein) interaction with p97/VCP in ZAAT-expressing hepatocytes. We showed that the SVIP inhibitory effect on ERAD due to overexpression causes the accumulation of ZAAT in a human Z hepatocyte–like cell line (AT01). Overexpression of gp78, as well as SVIP suppression, induces gp78-VCP/p97 interaction in AT01 cells. This interaction leads to retro-translocation of ZAAT and reduction of the SVIP inhibitory role in ERAD. In this context, overexpression of gp78 or SVIP suppression may eliminate the toxic gain of function associated with polymerization of ZAAT, thus providing a potential new therapeutic approach to the treatment of AATD. PMID:28301499

  3. Genomic and Phenomic Screens for Flower Related RING Type Ubiquitin E3 Ligases in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Pavicic, Mirko; Mouhu, Katriina; Wang, Feng; Bilicka, Marcelina; Chovanček, Erik; Himanen, Kristiina

    2017-01-01

    Flowering time control integrates endogenous as well as environmental signals to promote flower development. The pathways and molecular networks involved are complex and integrate many modes of signal transduction. In plants ubiquitin mediated protein degradation pathway has been proposed to be as important mode of signaling as phosphorylation and transcription. To systematically study the role of ubiquitin signaling in the molecular regulation of flowering we have taken a genomic approach to identify flower related Ubiquitin Proteasome System components. As a large and versatile gene family the RING type ubiquitin E3 ligases were chosen as targets of the genomic screen. The complete list of Arabidopsis RING E3 ligases were retrieved and verified in the Arabidopsis genome v11 and their differential expression was used for their categorization into flower organs or developmental stages. Known regulators of flowering time or floral organ development were identified in these categories through literature search and representative mutants for each category were purchased for functional characterization by growth and morphological phenotyping. To this end, a workflow was developed for high throughput phenotypic screening of growth, morphology and flowering of nearly a thousand Arabidopsis plants in one experimental round. PMID:28400782

  4. Protein-protein interactions involved in the recognition of p27 by E3 ubiquitin ligase.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Kui; Belunis, Charles; Chu, Wei; Weber, David; Podlaski, Frank; Huang, Kuo-Sen; Reed, Steven I; Vassilev, Lyubomir T

    2003-01-01

    The p27(Kip1) protein is a potent cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, the level of which is decreased in many common human cancers as a result of enhanced ubiquitin-dependent degradation. The multiprotein complex SCF(Skp2) has been identified as the ubiquitin ligase that targets p27, but the functional interactions within this complex are not well understood. One component, the F-box protein Skp2, binds p27 when the latter is phosphorylated on Thr(187), thus providing substrate specificity for the ligase. Recently, we and others have shown that the small cell cycle regulatory protein Cks1 plays a critical role in p27 ubiquitination by increasing the binding affinity of Skp2 for p27. Here we report the development of a homogeneous time-resolved fluorescence assay that allows the quantification of the molecular interactions between human recombinant Skp2, Cks1 and a p27-derived peptide phosphorylated on Thr(187). Using this assay, we have determined the dissociation constant of the Skp2-Cks1 complex (K(d) 140 +/- 14 nM) and have shown that Skp2 binds phosphorylated p27 peptide with high affinity only in the presence of Cks1 (K(d) 37 +/- 2 nM). Cks1 does not bind directly to the p27 phosphopeptide or to Skp1, which confirms its suggested role as an allosteric effector of Skp2. PMID:12529174

  5. Deficiency in ubiquitin ligase TRIM2 causes accumulation of neurofilament light chain and neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Balastik, Martin; Ferraguti, Francesco; Pires-da Silva, André; Lee, Tae Ho; Alvarez-Bolado, Gonzalo; Lu, Kun Ping; Gruss, Peter

    2008-01-01

    TRIM RING finger proteins have been shown to play an important role in cancerogenesis, in the pathogenesis of some human hereditary disorders, and in the defense against viral infection, but the function of the majority of TRIM proteins remains unknown. Here, we show that TRIM RING finger protein TRIM2, highly expressed in the nervous system, is an UbcH5a-dependent ubiquitin ligase. We further demonstrate that TRIM2 binds to neurofilament light subunit (NF-L) and regulates NF-L ubiquitination. Additionally, we show that mice deficient in TRIM2 have increased NF-L level in axons and NF-L-filled axonal swellings in cerebellum, retina, spinal cord, and cerebral cortex. The axonopathy is followed by progressive neurodegeneration accompanied by juvenile-onset tremor and ataxia. Our results demonstrate that TRIM2 is an ubiquitin ligase and point to a mechanism regulating NF-L metabolism through an ubiquitination pathway that, if deregulated, triggers neurodegeneration. PMID:18687884

  6. Detection and Quantification of MicroRNAs by Ligase-Assisted Sandwich Hybridization on a Microarray.

    PubMed

    Iizuka, Ryo; Ueno, Taro; Funatsu, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular microRNAs (miRNAs) in body fluids have been identified as promising biomarkers for different human diseases. The high-throughput, multiplexed detection and quantification of these miRNAs are highly beneficial for the rapid and accurate diagnosis of diseases. Here, we developed a simple and convenient microarray-based technique, named ligase-assisted sandwich hybridization (LASH), for the detection and quantification of miRNAs. The LASH assay involves the hybridization of capture and detection probe pairs with the target miRNA to form a double-stranded structure which is then nick-sealed by T4 DNA ligase. Using this assay, we successfully demonstrated the multiplexed detection and quantification of different miRNAs in total RNA samples derived from blood obtained within 3 h. Here, we provide a detailed protocol for the LASH assay to detect a specific miRNA, as a model for the detection and quantification of extracellular miRNAs.

  7. RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in ubiquitination of Arabidopsis thaliana proliferating cell nuclear antigen.

    PubMed

    Strzalka, Wojciech; Bartnicki, Filip; Pels, Katarzyna; Jakubowska, Agata; Tsurimoto, Toshiki; Tanaka, Katsunori

    2013-02-01

    The proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) is post-translationally modified by ubiquitin in yeast and mammalian cells. It is widely accepted that in yeast mono- and polyubiquitinated PCNA is involved in distinct pathways of DNA postreplication repair. This study showed an interaction between plant ubiquitin and PCNA in the plant cell. Using different approaches, it was demonstrated that Arabidopsis RAD5a ubiquitin ligase is involved in the post-translational modification of plant PCNA. A detailed analysis of the properties of selected Arabidopsis ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (AtUBC) has shown that a plant homologue of yeast RAD6 (AtUBC2) is sufficient to monoubiquitinate AtPCNA in the absence of ubiquitin ligase. Using different combinations of selected AtUBC proteins together with AtRAD5a, it was demonstrated that plants have potential to use different pathways to ubiquitinate PCNA. The analysis of Arabidopsis PCNA1 and PCNA2 did not demonstrate substantial differences in the ubiquitination pattern between these two proteins. The major ubiquitination target of Arabidopsis PCNA, conserved in eukaryotes, is lysine 164. Taken together, the presented results clearly demonstrate the involvement of Arabidopsis UBC and RAD5a proteins in the ubiquitination of plant PCNA at lysine 164. The data show the complexity of the plant ubiquitination system and open new questions about its regulation in the plant cell.

  8. PEX2 is the E3 ubiquitin ligase required for pexophagy during starvation

    PubMed Central

    Sargent, Graeme; van Zutphen, Tim; Shatseva, Tatiana; Zhang, Ling; Di Giovanni, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Peroxisomes are metabolic organelles necessary for anabolic and catabolic lipid reactions whose numbers are highly dynamic based on the metabolic need of the cells. One mechanism to regulate peroxisome numbers is through an autophagic process called pexophagy. In mammalian cells, ubiquitination of peroxisomal membrane proteins signals pexophagy; however, the E3 ligase responsible for mediating ubiquitination is not known. Here, we report that the peroxisomal E3 ubiquitin ligase peroxin 2 (PEX2) is the causative agent for mammalian pexophagy. Expression of PEX2 leads to gross ubiquitination of peroxisomes and degradation of peroxisomes in an NBR1-dependent autophagic process. We identify PEX5 and PMP70 as substrates of PEX2 that are ubiquitinated during amino acid starvation. We also find that PEX2 expression is up-regulated during both amino acid starvation and rapamycin treatment, suggesting that the mTORC1 pathway regulates pexophagy by regulating PEX2 expression levels. Finally, we validate our findings in vivo using an animal model. PMID:27597759

  9. Highly sensitive electrochemical aptasensor based on a ligase-assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed degradation reaction.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Hu, Suisui; Zhong, Weidong; Wu, Jiguang; Shen, Zhongming; Chen, Zhong; Li, Genxi

    2014-05-28

    In this paper, we have proposed a new electrochemical aptasensor based on a novel ligase-assisted Exo III-catalyzed degradation reaction (LAECDR), which consists of DNA ligase-catalyzed ligation of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA) with an extension strand (E-strand) and Exo III-catalyzed selective degradation of probe DNA, by using an improved target-induced strand displacement strategy. As a result of LAECDR, methylene blue (MB)-labeled mononucleotides can be released from the 3'-terminal of probe DNA and captured by cucurbit[7]uril-functionalized electrode to induce noticeable electrochemical response. Nevertheless, in the presence of the target protein, thrombin, the TBA that is partially complementary to probe DNA is preferentially binding with the target protein, thereby inhibiting LAECDR from taking place. The remaining intact probe DNA will prevent the terminal-attached MB from approaching to the electrode surface due to strong electrostatic repulsion, so the electrochemical response will be changed by thrombin. By tracing the electrochemical response of adsorbed MB, our aptasensor can exhibit high sensitivity for thrombin detection with a wide linear range from 100 fM to 1 nM and an extremely low detection limit of 33 fM, which can also easily distinguish thrombin in the complex serum samples with high specificity. Therefore, our aptasensor might have great potential in clinical applications in the future.

  10. Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps (UBAITs) identify E3 ligase binding partners.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Hazel F; Lyon, Nancy; Leung, Justin W; Agarwal, Poonam; Swaim, Caleb D; Miller, Kyle M; Huibregtse, Jon M

    2015-12-01

    We describe a new class of reagents for identifying substrates, adaptors, and regulators of HECT and RING E3s. UBAITs (Ubiquitin-Activated Interaction Traps) are E3-ubiquitin fusion proteins and, in an E1- and E2-dependent manner, the C-terminal ubiquitin moiety forms an amide linkage to proteins that interact with the E3, enabling covalent co-purification of the E3 with partner proteins. We designed UBAITs for both HECT (Rsp5, Itch) and RING (Psh1, RNF126, RNF168) E3s. For HECT E3s, trapping of interacting proteins occurred in vitro either through an E3 thioester-linked lariat intermediate or through an E2 thioester intermediate, and both WT and active-site mutant UBAITs trapped known interacting proteins in yeast and human cells. Yeast Psh1 and human RNF126 and RNF168 UBAITs also trapped known interacting proteins when expressed in cells. Human RNF168 is a key mediator of ubiquitin signaling that promotes DNA double-strand break repair. Using the RNF168 UBAIT, we identify H2AZ--a histone protein involved in DNA repair--as a new target of this E3 ligase. These results demonstrate that UBAITs represent powerful tools for profiling a wide range of ubiquitin ligases.

  11. Ubiquitination and regulation of AURKA identifies a hypoxia-independent E3 ligase activity of VHL.

    PubMed

    Hasanov, E; Chen, G; Chowdhury, P; Weldon, J; Ding, Z; Jonasch, E; Sen, S; Walker, C L; Dere, R

    2017-01-23

    The hypoxia-regulated tumor-suppressor von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) is an E3 ligase that recognizes its substrates as part of an oxygen-dependent prolyl hydroxylase (PHD) reaction, with hypoxia-inducible factor α (HIFα) being its most notable substrate. Here we report that VHL has an equally important function distinct from its hypoxia-regulated activity. We find that Aurora kinase A (AURKA) is a novel, hypoxia-independent target for VHL ubiquitination. In contrast to its hypoxia-regulated activity, VHL mono-, rather than poly-ubiquitinates AURKA, in a PHD-independent reaction targeting AURKA for degradation in quiescent cells, where degradation of AURKA is required to maintain the primary cilium. Tumor-associated variants of VHL differentiate between these two functions, as a pathogenic VHL mutant that retains intrinsic ability to ubiquitinate HIFα is unable to ubiquitinate AURKA. Together, these data identify VHL as an E3 ligase with important cellular functions under both normoxic and hypoxic conditions.Oncogene advance online publication, 23 January 2017; doi:10.1038/onc.2016.495.

  12. An Arabidopsis SUMO E3 Ligase, SIZ1, Negatively Regulates Photomorphogenesis by Promoting COP1 Activity.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiao-Li; Niu, De; Hu, Zi-Liang; Kim, Dae Heon; Jin, Yin Hua; Cai, Bin; Liu, Peng; Miura, Kenji; Yun, Dae-Jin; Kim, Woe-Yeon; Lin, Rongcheng; Jin, Jing Bo

    2016-04-01

    COP1 (CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 1), a ubiquitin E3 ligase, is a central negative regulator of photomorphogenesis. However, how COP1 activity is regulated by post-translational modifications remains largely unknown. Here we show that SUMO (small ubiquitin-like modifier) modification enhances COP1 activity. Loss-of-function siz1 mutant seedlings exhibit a weak constitutive photomorphogenic phenotype. SIZ1 physically interacts with COP1 and mediates the sumoylation of COP1. A K193R substitution in COP1 blocks its SUMO modification and reduces COP1 activity in vitro and in planta. Consistently, COP1 activity is reduced in siz1 and the level of HY5, a COP1 target protein, is increased in siz1. Sumoylated COP1 may exhibits higher transubiquitination activity than does non-sumoylated COP1, but SIZ1-mediated SUMO modification does not affect COP1 dimerization, COP1-HY5 interaction, and nuclear accumulation of COP1. Interestingly, prolonged light exposure reduces the sumoylation level of COP1, and COP1 mediates the ubiquitination and degradation of SIZ1. These regulatory mechanisms may maintain the homeostasis of COP1 activity, ensuing proper photomorphogenic development in changing light environment. Our genetic and biochemical studies identify a function for SIZ1 in photomorphogenesis and reveal a novel SUMO-regulated ubiquitin ligase, COP1, in plants.

  13. Detection of low abundant mutations in DNA using single-molecule FRET and ligase detection reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wabuyele, Musundi B.; Farquar, Hannah; Stryjewski, Wieslaw J.; Hammer, Robert P.; Soper, Steven A.; Cheng, Yu-Wei; Barany, Francis

    2003-06-01

    New strategies for analyzing molecular signatures of disease states in real time using single pair fluorescence resonance energy transfer (spFRET) were developed to rapidly detect point mutations in unamplified genomic DNA (DNA diagnostics). The assay was carried out using allele-specific primers, which flanked the point mutation in the target gene fragment and were ligated using a thremostable ligase enzyme only when the genomic DNA carried this mutation (ligase detection reaction, LDR). We coupled LDR with spFRET to identify a single base mutation in codon 12 of a K-ras oncogene that has high diagnostic value for colorectal cancers. A simple diode laser-based fluorescence system capable of interrogating single fluorescent molecules undergoing FRET was used to detect photon bursts generated from the MB probes formed upon ligation. We demonstrated the ability to rapidly discriminate single base differences in heterogeneous populations having as little as 600 copies of human genomic DNA without PCR amplification. Single base difference in the K-ras gene was discriminated in less than 5 min at a frequency of 1 mutant DNA per 10 normals using only a single LDR thermal cycle of genomic DNA. Real time analyses of point mutations were also performed in PMMA microfluidic device.

  14. Targeting quantum dots to surface proteins in living cells with biotin ligase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howarth, Mark; Takao, Keizo; Hayashi, Yasunori; Ting, Alice Y.

    2005-05-01

    Escherichia coli biotin ligase site-specifically biotinylates a lysine side chain within a 15-amino acid acceptor peptide (AP) sequence. We show that mammalian cell surface proteins tagged with AP can be biotinylated by biotin ligase added to the medium, while endogenous proteins remain unmodified. The biotin group then serves as a handle for targeting streptavidin-conjugated quantum dots (QDs). This labeling method helps to address the two major deficiencies of antibody-based labeling, which is currently the most common method for targeting QDs to cells: the size of the QD conjugate after antibody attachment and the instability of many antibody-antigen interactions. To demonstrate the versatility of our method, we targeted QDs to cell surface cyan fluorescent protein and epidermal growth factor receptor in HeLa cells and to -amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionate (AMPA) receptors in neurons. Labeling requires only 2 min, is extremely specific for the AP-tagged protein, and is highly sensitive. We performed time-lapse imaging of single QDs bound to AMPA receptors in neurons, and we compared the trafficking of different AMPA receptor subunits by using two-color pulse-chase labeling. BirA | labeling | streptavidin | glutamate receptor | single molecule

  15. The Ubiquitin Ligase CBLC Maintains the Network Organization of the Golgi Apparatus

    PubMed Central

    Chia, Joanne; Boey, Adrian; Gunko, Natalia V.; Bard, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    The Golgi apparatus plays a pivotal role in the sorting and post-translational modifications of secreted and membrane proteins. In mammalian cells, the Golgi is organized in stacks of cisternae linked together to form a network with a ribbon shape. Regulation of Golgi ribbon formation is poorly understood. Here we find in an image-based RNAi screen that depletion of the ubiquitin-ligase CBLC induces Golgi fragmentation. Depletions of the close homologues CBL and CBLB do not induce any visible defects. In CBLC-depleted cells, Golgi stacks appear relatively unperturbed at both the light and electron microscopy levels, suggesting that CBLC controls mostly network organization. CBLC partially localizes on Golgi membranes and this localization is enhanced after activation of the SRC kinase. Inhibition of SRC reverts CBLC depletion effects, suggesting interplay between the two. CBLC’s regulation of Golgi network requires its ubiquitin ligase activity. However, SRC levels are not significantly affected by CBLC, and CBLC knockdown does not phenocopy SRC activation, suggesting that CBLC’s action at the Golgi is not direct downregulation of SRC. Altogether, our results demonstrate a role of CBLC in regulating Golgi ribbon by antagonizing the SRC tyrosine kinase. PMID:26393512

  16. Defective in Mitotic Arrest 1 (Dma1) Ubiquitin Ligase Controls G1 Cyclin Degradation*

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Ortega, Sara; Bru, Samuel; Ricco, Natalia; Ramírez, Sara; Casals, Núria; Jiménez, Javier; Isasa, Marta; Crosas, Bernat; Clotet, Josep

    2013-01-01

    Progression through the G1 phase of the cell cycle is controlled by diverse cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) that might be associated to numerous cyclin isoforms. Given such complexity, regulation of cyclin degradation should be crucial for coordinating progression through the cell cycle. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, SCF is the only E3 ligase known to date to be involved in G1 cyclin degradation. Here, we report the design of a genetic screening that uncovered Dma1 as another E3 ligase that targets G1 cyclins in yeast. We show that the cyclin Pcl1 is ubiquitinated in vitro and in vivo by Dma1, and accordingly, is stabilized in dma1 mutants. We demonstrate that Pcl1 must be phosphorylated by its own CDK to efficiently interact with Dma1 and undergo degradation. A nonphosphorylatable version of Pcl1 accumulates throughout the cell cycle, demonstrating the physiological relevance of the proposed mechanism. Finally, we present evidence that the levels of Pcl1 and Cln2 are independently controlled in response to nutrient availability. This new previously unknown mechanism for G1 cyclin degradation that we report here could help elucidate the specific roles of the redundant CDK-cyclin complexes in G1. PMID:23264631

  17. E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 regulates peroxisome biogenesis in Arabidopsis

    DOE PAGES

    Pan, Ronghui; Satkovich, John; Hu, Jianping

    2016-10-31

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous eukaryotic organelles that play pivotal roles in a suite of metabolic processes and often act coordinately with other organelles, such as chloroplasts and mitochondria. Peroxisomes import proteins to the peroxisome matrix by peroxins (PEX proteins), but how the function of the PEX proteins is regulated is poorly understood. In this study, we identified the Arabidopsis RING (really interesting new gene) type E3 ubiquitin ligase SP1 [suppressor of plastid protein import locus 1 (ppi1) 1] as a peroxisome membrane protein with a regulatory role in peroxisome protein import. SP1 interacts physically with the two components of the peroxisomemore » protein docking complex PEX13–PEX14 and the (RING)-finger peroxin PEX2. Loss of SP1 function suppresses defects of the pex14-2 and pex13-1 mutants, and SP1 is involved in the degradation of PEX13 and possibly PEX14 and all three RING peroxins. An in vivo ubiquitination assay showed that SP1 has the ability to promote PEX13 ubiquitination. Our study has revealed that, in addition to its previously reported function in chloroplast biogenesis, SP1 plays a role in peroxisome biogenesis. The same E3 ubiquitin ligase promotes the destabilization of components of two distinct protein-import machineries, indicating that degradation of organelle biogenesis factors by the ubiquitin–proteasome system may constitute an important regulatory mechanism in coordinating the biogenesis of metabolically linked organelles in eukaryotes.« less

  18. Huwe1 ubiquitin ligase is essential to synchronize neuronal and glial differentiation in the developing cerebellum

    PubMed Central

    D’Arca, Domenico; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Wenming; Ramirez-Martinez, Nadya C.; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna

    2010-01-01

    We have generated a knockout mouse strain in which the gene coding for the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 has been inactivated in cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) and radial glia. These mice have a high rate of postnatal lethality and profound cerebellar abnormalities. The external granule layer of the cerebellum, which contains CGNPs, is expanded and displays aberrant proliferation and impaired differentiation of the progenitor cell population. The uncontrolled proliferation of the CGNPs is associated with accumulation of the N-Myc oncoprotein, a substrate of Huwe1, and con-sequent activation of the signaling events downstream to N-Myc. Furthermore, loss of Huwe1 in Bergmann glia leads to extensive disorganization of this cell population with layering aberrations, severe granule neuron migration defects, and persistence of ectopic clusters of granule neurons in the external granule layer. Our findings uncover an unexpected role for Huwe1 in regulating Berg-mann glia differentiation and indicate that this ubiquitin ligase orchestrates the programming of the neural progenitors that give rise to neurons and glia in the cerebellum. PMID:20231446

  19. Huwe1 ubiquitin ligase is essential to synchronize neuronal and glial differentiation in the developing cerebellum.

    PubMed

    D'Arca, Domenico; Zhao, Xudong; Xu, Wenming; Ramirez-Martinez, Nadya C; Iavarone, Antonio; Lasorella, Anna

    2010-03-30

    We have generated a knockout mouse strain in which the gene coding for the ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 has been inactivated in cerebellar granule neuron precursors (CGNPs) and radial glia. These mice have a high rate of postnatal lethality and profound cerebellar abnormalities. The external granule layer of the cerebellum, which contains CGNPs, is expanded and displays aberrant proliferation and impaired differentiation of the progenitor cell population. The uncontrolled proliferation of the CGNPs is associated with accumulation of the N-Myc oncoprotein, a substrate of Huwe1, and con-sequent activation of the signaling events downstream to N-Myc. Furthermore, loss of Huwe1 in Bergmann glia leads to extensive disorganization of this cell population with layering aberrations, severe granule neuron migration defects, and persistence of ectopic clusters of granule neurons in the external granule layer. Our findings uncover an unexpected role for Huwe1 in regulating Berg-mann glia differentiation and indicate that this ubiquitin ligase orchestrates the programming of the neural progenitors that give rise to neurons and glia in the cerebellum.

  20. The bacterial effector Cif interferes with SCF ubiquitin ligase function by inhibiting deneddylation of Cullin1.

    PubMed

    Morikawa, Hanako; Kim, Minsoo; Mimuro, Hitomi; Punginelli, Claire; Koyama, Tomohiro; Nagai, Shinya; Miyawaki, Atsushi; Iwai, Kazuhiro; Sasakawa, Chihiro

    2010-10-15

    Cycle inhibiting factor (Cif) is one of the effectors delivered into epithelial cells by enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) via the type III secretion system (TTSS). Cif family proteins, which inhibit host cell-cycle progression via mechanisms not yet precisely understood, are highly conserved among EPEC, EHEC, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Photorhabdus luminescens and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Levels of several proteins relevant to cell-cycle progression are modulated by Cullin-RING ligases (CRLs), which in turn are activated by conjugation and deconjugation of NEDD8 to Cullins. Here we show that Cif interacts with NEDD8 and interferes with SCF (Skp1-Cullin1-F-box protein) complex ubiquitin ligase function. We found that neddylated Cullin family proteins accumulated and ubiquitination of p27 decreased in cells infected with EPEC. Consequently, Cif stabilized SCF substrates such as CyclinD1, Cdt1, and p27, and caused G1 cell-cycle arrest. Using time-lapse-imaging of fluorescent ubiquitination-based cell-cycle indicator (Fucci)-expressing cells, we were able to monitor cell-cycle progression during EPEC infection and confirmed the arrest of infected cells at G1. Our in vitro and in vivo data show that Cif-NEDD8 interaction inhibits deneddylation of Cullins, suppresses CRL activity and induces G1 arrest. We thus conclude that the bacterial effector Cif interferes with neddylation-mediated cell-cycle control. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Early Origin and Evolution of the Angelman Syndrome Ubiquitin Ligase Gene Ube3a

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Masaaki

    2017-01-01

    The human Ube3a gene encodes an E3 ubiquitin ligase and exhibits brain-specific genomic imprinting. Genetic abnormalities that affect the maternal copy of this gene cause the neurodevelopmental disorder Angelman syndrome (AS), which is characterized by severe mental retardation, speech impairment, seizure, ataxia and some unique behavioral phenotypes. In this review article, I highlight the evolution of the Ube3a gene and its imprinting to provide evolutionary insights into AS. Recent comparative genomic studies have revealed that Ube3a is most phylogenetically similar to HECTD2 among the human HECT (homologous to the E6AP carboxyl terminus) family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, and its distant evolutionary origin can be traced to common ancestors of fungi and animals. Moreover, a gene more similar to Ube3a than HECTD2 is found in a range of eukaryotes from amoebozoans to basal metazoans, but is lost in later lineages. Unlike in mice and humans, Ube3a expression is biallelic in birds, monotremes, marsupials and insects. The imprinting domain that governs maternal expression of Ube3a was formed from non-imprinted elements following multiple chromosomal rearrangements after diversification of marsupials and placental mammals. Hence, the evolutionary origins of Ube3a date from long before the emergence of the nervous system, although its imprinted expression was acquired relatively recently. These observations suggest that exogenous expression and functional analyses of ancient Ube3a orthologs in mammalian neurons will facilitate the evolutionary understanding of AS. PMID:28326016

  2. Inhibiting Mitochondrial DNA Ligase IIIα Activates Caspase 1-Dependent Apoptosis in Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Sallmyr, Annahita; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Roginskaya, Vera; Van Houten, Bennett; Tomkinson, Alan E

    2016-09-15

    Elevated levels of DNA ligase IIIα (LigIIIα) have been identified as a biomarker of an alteration in DNA repair in cancer cells that confers hypersensitivity to a LigIIIα inhibitor, L67, in combination with a poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase inhibitor. Because LigIIIα functions in the nucleus and mitochondria, we examined the effect of L67 on these organelles. Here, we show that, although the DNA ligase inhibitor selectively targets mitochondria, cancer and nonmalignant cells respond differently to disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism. Inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα in cancer cells resulted in abnormal mitochondrial morphology, reduced levels of mitochondrial DNA, and increased levels of mitochondrially generated reactive oxygen species that caused nuclear DNA damage. In contrast, these effects did not occur in nonmalignant cells. Furthermore, inhibition of mitochondrial LigIIIα activated a caspase 1-dependent apoptotic pathway, which is known to be part of inflammatory responses induced by pathogenic microorganisms in cancer, but not nonmalignant cells. These results demonstrate that the disruption of mitochondrial DNA metabolism elicits different responses in nonmalignant and cancer cells and suggests that the abnormal response in cancer cells may be exploited in the development of novel therapeutic strategies that selectively target cancer cells. Cancer Res; 76(18); 5431-41. ©2016 AACR. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. High sensitivity EndoV mutation scanning through real-time ligase proofreading.

    PubMed

    Pincas, Hanna; Pingle, Maneesh R; Huang, Jianmin; Lao, Kaiqin; Paty, Philip B; Friedman, Alan M; Barany, Francis

    2004-10-28

    The ability to associate mutations in cancer genes with the disease and its subtypes is critical for understanding oncogenesis and identifying biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. A two-step mutation scanning method that sequentially used endonuclease V (EndoV) to nick at mismatches and DNA ligase to reseal incorrectly or nonspecifically nicked sites was previously developed in our laboratory. Herein we report an optimized single-step assay that enables ligase to proofread EndoV cleavage in real-time under a compromise between buffer conditions. Real-time proofreading results in a dramatic reduction of background cleavage. A universal PCR strategy that employs both unlabeled gene-specific primers and labeled universal primers, allows for multiplexed gene amplification and precludes amplification of primer dimers. Internally labeled PCR primers eliminate EndoV cleavage at the 5' terminus, enabling high-throughput capillary electrophoresis readout. Furthermore, signal intensity is increased and artifacts are reduced by generating heteroduplexes containing only one of the two possible mismatches (e.g. either A/C or G/T). The single-step assay improves sensitivity to 1:50 and 1:100 (mutant:wild type) for unknown mutations in the p53 and K-ras genes, respectively, opening prospects as an early detection tool.

  4. Single-particle EM reveals extensive conformational variability of the Ltn1 E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Lyumkis, Dmitry; Doamekpor, Selom K; Bengtson, Mario H; Lee, Joong-Won; Toro, Tasha B; Petroski, Matthew D; Lima, Christopher D; Potter, Clinton S; Carragher, Bridget; Joazeiro, Claudio A P

    2013-01-29

    Ltn1 is a 180-kDa E3 ubiquitin ligase that associates with ribosomes and marks certain aberrant, translationally arrested nascent polypeptide chains for proteasomal degradation. In addition to its evolutionarily conserved large size, Ltn1 is characterized by the presence of a conserved N terminus, HEAT/ARM repeats predicted to comprise the majority of the protein, and a C-terminal catalytic RING domain, although the protein's exact structure is unknown. We used numerous single-particle EM strategies to characterize Ltn1's structure based on negative stain and vitreous ice data. Two-dimensional classifications and subsequent 3D reconstructions of electron density maps show that Ltn1 has an elongated form and presents a continuum of conformational states about two flexible hinge regions, whereas its overall architecture is reminiscent of multisubunit cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase complexes. We propose a model of Ltn1 function based on its conformational variability and flexibility that describes how these features may play a role in cotranslational protein quality control.

  5. The role of the E3 ligase Not4 in cotranslational quality control

    PubMed Central

    Panasenko, Olesya O.

    2014-01-01

    Cotranslational quality control (QC) is the mechanism by which the cell checks the integrity of newly synthesized proteins and mRNAs. In the event of mistakes these molecules are degraded. The Ccr4-Not complex has been proposed to play a role in this process. It contains both deadenylation and ubiquitination activities, thus it may target both aberrant proteins and mRNAs. Deadenylation is the first step in mRNA degradation. In yeast it is performed by the Ccr4 subunit of the Ccr4-Not complex. Another complex subunit, namely Not4, is a RING E3 ligase and it provides the ubiquitination activity of the complex. It was found associated with translating ribosomes. Thus, it has been suggested that Not4 is involved in ribosome-associated ubiquitination and degradation of aberrant peptides. However, several other E3 ligases have been associated with peptide ubiquitination on the ribosome and the relevance of Not4 in this process remains unclear. In this review we summarize the recent data and suggest a role for Not4 in cotranslational protein QC. PMID:24904641

  6. DNA Damage Regulates UHRF1 Stability via the SCFβ-TrCP E3 Ligase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hao; Ma, Honghui; Inuzuka, Hiroyuki; Diao, Jianbo; Lan, Fei; Shi, Yujiang Geno; Wei, Wenyi

    2013-01-01

    UHRF1 (ubiquitin-like, with PHD and RING finger domains 1) is a critical epigenetic player involved in the maintenance of DNA methylation patterns during DNA replication. Dysregulation of the UHRF1 level is implicated in cancer onset, metastasis, and tumor recurrence. Previous studies demonstrated that UHRF1 can be stabilized through USP7-mediated deubiquitylation, but the mechanism through which UHRF1 is ubiquitylated is still unknown. Here we show that proteasomal degradation of UHRF1 is mediated by the SCFβ-TrCP E3 ligase. Through bioinformatic and mutagenesis studies, we identified a functional DSG degron in the UHRF1 N terminus that is necessary for UHRF1 stability regulation. We further show that UHRF1 physically interacts with β-TrCP1 in a manner dependent on phosphorylation of serine 108 (S108UHRF1) within the DSG degron. Furthermore, we demonstrate that S108UHRF1 phosphorylation is catalyzed by casein kinase 1 delta (CK1δ) and is important for the recognition of UHRF1 by SCFβ-TrCP. Importantly, we demonstrate that UHRF1 degradation is accelerated in response to DNA damage, coincident with enhanced S108UHRF1 phosphorylation. Taken together, our data identify SCFβ-TrCP as a bona fide UHRF1 E3 ligase important for regulating UHRF1 steady-state levels both under normal conditions and in response to DNA damage. PMID:23297342

  7. Blocking an N-terminal acetylation-dependent protein interaction inhibits an E3 ligase.

    PubMed

    Scott, Daniel C; Hammill, Jared T; Min, Jaeki; Rhee, David Y; Connelly, Michele; Sviderskiy, Vladislav O; Bhasin, Deepak; Chen, Yizhe; Ong, Su-Sien; Chai, Sergio C; Goktug, Asli N; Huang, Guochang; Monda, Julie K; Low, Jonathan; Kim, Ho Shin; Paulo, Joao A; Cannon, Joe R; Shelat, Anang A; Chen, Taosheng; Kelsall, Ian R; Alpi, Arno F; Pagala, Vishwajeeth; Wang, Xusheng; Peng, Junmin; Singh, Bhuvanesh; Harper, J Wade; Schulman, Brenda A; Guy, R Kip

    2017-08-01

    N-terminal acetylation is an abundant modification influencing protein functions. Because ∼80% of mammalian cytosolic proteins are N-terminally acetylated, this modification is potentially an untapped target for chemical control of their functions. Structural studies have revealed that, like lysine acetylation, N-terminal acetylation converts a positively charged amine into a hydrophobic handle that mediates protein interactions; hence, this modification may be a druggable target. We report the development of chemical probes targeting the N-terminal acetylation-dependent interaction between an E2 conjugating enzyme (UBE2M or UBC12) and DCN1 (DCUN1D1), a subunit of a multiprotein E3 ligase for the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8. The inhibitors are highly selective with respect to other protein acetyl-amide-binding sites, inhibit NEDD8 ligation in vitro and in cells, and suppress anchorage-independent growth of a cell line with DCN1 amplification. Overall, our data demonstrate that N-terminal acetyl-dependent protein interactions are druggable targets and provide insights into targeting multiprotein E2-E3 ligases.

  8. Probes of Ubiquitin E3 ligases distinguish different stages of Parkin activation

    PubMed Central

    Pao, Kuan-Chuan; Stanley, Mathew; Han, Cong; Lai, Yu-Chiang; Murphy, Paul; Balk, Kristin; Wood, Nicola T.; Corti, Olga; Corvol, Jean-Christophe; Muqit, Miratul M.K.; Virdee, Satpal

    2016-01-01

    E3 ligases represent an important class of enzymes, yet there are currently no chemical probes to profile their activity. We develop a new class of activity-based probe by reengineering of a ubiquitin-charged E2 conjugating enzyme and demonstrate their utility by profiling the transthiolation activity of the RING-in-between-RING (RBR) E3 ligase Parkin in vitro and in cellular extracts. Our study provides valuable insight into the roles, and cellular hierarchy, of distinct phosphorylation events in Parkin activation. We also profile Parkin patient disease-associated mutations and strikingly demonstrate that they largely mediate their effect by altering transthiolation activity. Furthermore, our probes enable direct and quantitative measurement of endogenous Parkin activity revealing that endogenous Parkin is activated in neuronal cell lines (≥75 %) in response to mitochondrial depolarization. This new technology also holds promise as a novel biomarker of PINK1-Parkin signalling as demonstrated by compatibility with Parkinson’s disease patient-derived samples. PMID:26928937

  9. A complex ligase ribozyme evolved in vitro from a group I ribozyme domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, L.; Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Like most proteins, complex RNA molecules often are modular objects made up of distinct structural and functional domains. The component domains of a protein can associate in alternative combinations to form molecules with different functions. These observations raise the possibility that complex RNAs also can be assembled from preexisting structural and functional domains. To test this hypothesis, an in vitro evolution procedure was used to isolate a previously undescribed class of complex ligase ribozymes, starting from a pool of 10(16) different RNA molecules that contained a constant region derived from a large structural domain that occurs within self-splicing group I ribozymes. Attached to this constant region were three hypervariable regions, totaling 85 nucleotides, that gave rise to the catalytic motif within the evolved catalysts. The ligase ribozymes catalyze formation of a 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage between adjacent template-bound oligonucleotides, one bearing a 3' hydroxyl and the other a 5' triphosphate. Ligation occurs in the context of a Watson-Crick duplex, with a catalytic rate of 0.26 min(-1) under optimal conditions. The constant region is essential for catalytic activity and appears to retain the tertiary structure of the group I ribozyme. This work demonstrates that complex RNA molecules, like their protein counterparts, can share common structural domains while exhibiting distinct catalytic functions.

  10. Characterization of the mammalian family of DCN-type NEDD8 E3 ligases

    PubMed Central

    Keuss, Matthew J.; Thomas, Yann; Mcarthur, Robin; Wood, Nicola T.; Knebel, Axel; Kurz, Thimo

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cullin-RING ligases (CRL) are ubiquitin E3 enzymes that bind substrates through variable substrate receptor proteins and are activated by attachment of the ubiquitin-like protein NEDD8 to the cullin subunit. DCNs are NEDD8 E3 ligases that promote neddylation. Mammalian cells express five DCN-like (DCNL) proteins but little is known about their specific functions or interaction partners. We found that DCNLs form stable stoichiometric complexes with CAND1 and cullins that can only be neddylated in the presence of a substrate adaptor. These CAND–cullin–DCNL complexes might represent ‘reserve’ CRLs that can be rapidly activated when needed. We further found that all DCNLs interact with most cullin subtypes, but that they are probably responsible for the neddylation of different subpopulations of any given cullin. This is consistent with the fact that the subcellular localization of DCNLs in tissue culture cells differs and that they show unique tissue-specific expression patterns in mice. Thus, the specificity between DCNL-type NEDD8 E3 enzymes and their cullin substrates is only apparent in well-defined physiological contexts and related to their subcellular distribution and restricted expression. PMID:26906416

  11. A complex ligase ribozyme evolved in vitro from a group I ribozyme domain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaeger, L.; Wright, M. C.; Joyce, G. F.; Bada, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1999-01-01

    Like most proteins, complex RNA molecules often are modular objects made up of distinct structural and functional domains. The component domains of a protein can associate in alternative combinations to form molecules with different functions. These observations raise the possibility that complex RNAs also can be assembled from preexisting structural and functional domains. To test this hypothesis, an in vitro evolution procedure was used to isolate a previously undescribed class of complex ligase ribozymes, starting from a pool of 10(16) different RNA molecules that contained a constant region derived from a large structural domain that occurs within self-splicing group I ribozymes. Attached to this constant region were three hypervariable regions, totaling 85 nucleotides, that gave rise to the catalytic motif within the evolved catalysts. The ligase ribozymes catalyze formation of a 3',5'-phosphodiester linkage between adjacent template-bound oligonucleotides, one bearing a 3' hydroxyl and the other a 5' triphosphate. Ligation occurs in the context of a Watson-Crick duplex, with a catalytic rate of 0.26 min(-1) under optimal conditions. The constant region is essential for catalytic activity and appears to retain the tertiary structure of the group I ribozyme. This work demonstrates that complex RNA molecules, like their protein counterparts, can share common structural domains while exhibiting distinct catalytic functions.

  12. A novel effect of thalidomide and its analogs: suppression of cereblon ubiquitination enhances ubiquitin ligase function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaobin; Huang, Xiangao; He, Xian; Zhou, Yanqing; Jiang, Xiaogang; Chen-Kiang, Selina; Jaffrey, Samie R; Xu, Guoqiang

    2015-12-01

    The immunomodulatory drug (IMiD) thalidomide and its structural analogs lenalidomide and pomalidomide are highly effective in treating clinical indications. Thalidomide binds to cereblon (CRBN), a substrate receptor of the cullin-4 really interesting new gene (RING) E3 ligase complex. Here, we examine the effect of thalidomide and its analogs on CRBN ubiquitination and its functions in human cell lines. We find that the ubiquitin modification of CRBN includes K48-linked polyubiquitin chains and that thalidomide blocks the formation of CRBN-ubiquitin conjugates. Furthermore, we show that ubiquitinated CRBN is targeted for proteasomal degradation. Treatment of human myeloma cell lines such as MM1.S, OPM2, and U266 with thalidomide (100 μM) and its structural analog lenalidomide (10 μM) results in stabilization of CRBN and elevation of CRBN protein levels. This in turn leads to the reduced level of CRBN target proteins and enhances the sensitivity of human multiple myeloma cells to IMiDs. Our results reveal a novel mechanism by which thalidomide and its analogs modulate the CRBN function in cells. Through inhibition of CRBN ubiquitination, thalidomide and its analogs allow CRBN to accumulate, leading to the increased cullin-4 RING E3 ligase-mediated degradation of target proteins.

  13. Gp78 E3 Ubiquitin Ligase: Essential Functions and Contributions in Proteostasis

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Vibhuti; Upadhyay, Arun; Kumar, Amit; Mishra, Amit

    2017-01-01

    As per the requirement of metabolism and fitness, normal cellular functions are controlled by several proteins, and their interactive molecular and signaling events at multiple levels. Protein quality control (PQC) mechanisms ensure the correct folding and proper utilization of these proteins to avoid their misfolding and aggregation. To maintain the optimum environment of complex proteome PQC system employs various E3 ubiquitin ligases for the selective degradation of aberrant proteins. Glycoprotein 78 (Gp78) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase that prevents multifactorial deleterious accumulation of different misfolded proteins via endoplasmic reticulum-associated degradation (ERAD). However, the precise role of Gp78 under stress conditions to avoid bulk misfolded aggregation is unclear, which can act as a crucial resource to establish the dynamic nature of the proteome. Present article systematically explains the detailed molecular characterization of Gp78 and also addresses its various cellular physiological functions, which could be crucial to achieving protein homeostasis. Here, we comprehensively represent the current findings of Gp78, which shows its PQC roles in different physiological functions and diseases; and thereby propose novel opportunities to better understand the unsolved questions for therapeutic interventions linked with different protein misfolding disorders.

  14. Deficiency for the ubiquitin ligase UBE3B in a blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual-disability syndrome.

    PubMed

    Basel-Vanagaite, Lina; Dallapiccola, Bruno; Ramirez-Solis, Ramiro; Segref, Alexandra; Thiele, Holger; Edwards, Andrew; Arends, Mark J; Miró, Xavier; White, Jacqueline K; Désir, Julie; Abramowicz, Marc; Dentici, Maria Lisa; Lepri, Francesca; Hofmann, Kay; Har-Zahav, Adi; Ryder, Edward; Karp, Natasha A; Estabel, Jeanne; Gerdin, Anna-Karin B; Podrini, Christine; Ingham, Neil J; Altmüller, Janine; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Frommolt, Peter; Abdelhak, Sonia; Pasmanik-Chor, Metsada; Konen, Osnat; Kelley, Richard I; Shohat, Mordechai; Nürnberg, Peter; Flint, Jonathan; Steel, Karen P; Hoppe, Thorsten; Kubisch, Christian; Adams, David J; Borck, Guntram

    2012-12-07

    Ubiquitination plays a crucial role in neurodevelopment as exemplified by Angelman syndrome, which is caused by genetic alterations of the ubiquitin ligase-encoding UBE3A gene. Although the function of UBE3A has been widely studied, little is known about its paralog UBE3B. By using exome and capillary sequencing, we here identify biallelic UBE3B mutations in four patients from three unrelated families presenting an autosomal-recessive blepharophimosis-ptosis-intellectual-disability syndrome characterized by developmental delay, growth retardation with a small head circumference, facial dysmorphisms, and low cholesterol levels. UBE3B encodes an uncharacterized E3 ubiquitin ligase. The identified UBE3B variants include one frameshift and two splice-site mutations as well as a missense substitution affecting the highly conserved HECT domain. Disruption of mouse Ube3b leads to reduced viability and recapitulates key aspects of the human disorder, such as reduced weight and brain size and a downregulation of cholesterol synthesis. We establish that the probable Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of UBE3B, oxi-1, functions in the ubiquitin/proteasome system in vivo and is especially required under oxidative stress conditions. Our data reveal the pleiotropic effects of UBE3B deficiency and reinforce the physiological importance of ubiquitination in neuronal development and function in mammals.

  15. Poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) is essential for sulfur mustard-induced DNA damage repair, but has no role in DNA ligase activation.

    PubMed

    Bhat, K Ramachandra; Benton, Betty J; Ray, Radharaman

    2006-01-01

    Concurrent activation of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and DNA ligase was observed in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK) exposed to the DNA alkylating compound sulfur mustard (SM), suggesting that DNA ligase activation could be due to its modification by PARP. Using HEK, intracellular 3H-labeled NAD+ (3H-adenine) was metabolically generated and then these cells were exposed to SM (1 mM). DNA ligase I isolated from these cells was not 3H-labeled, indicating that DNA ligase I is not a substrate for (ADP-ribosyl)ation by PARP. In HEK, when PARP was inhibited by 3-amino benzamide (3-AB, 2 mM), SM-activated DNA ligase had a half-life that was four-fold higher than that observed in the absence of 3-AB. These results suggest that DNA repair requires PARP, and that DNA ligase remains activated until DNA damage repair is complete. The results show that in SM-exposed HEK, DNA ligase I is activated by phosphorylation catalysed by DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK). Therefore, the role of PARP in DNA repair is other than that of DNA ligase I activation. By using the DNA ligase I phosphorylation assay and decreasing PARP chemically as well as by PARP anti-sense mRNA expression in the cells, it was confirmed that PARP does not modify DNA ligase I. In conclusion, it is proposed that PARP is essential for efficient DNA repair; however, PARP participates in DNA repair by altering the chromosomal structure to make the DNA damage site(s) accessible to the repair enzymes.

  16. The G1 phase E3 ubiquitin ligase TRUSS that gets deregulated in human cancers is a novel substrate of the S-phase E3 ubiquitin ligase Skp2.

    PubMed

    Jamal, Azfar; Swarnalatha, Manickavinayaham; Sultana, Sarwat; Joshi, Prashant; Panda, Subrat K; Kumar, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    E3 ubiquitin ligases have been implicated in the ubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of several key regulators of cell cycle. Owing to their pleotropic behavior, E3 ubiquitin ligases are tightly regulated both at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The E3 ubiquitin ligase TRUSS (tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated ubiquitous scaffolding and signaling protein) which negatively regulates c-Myc, are found down-regulated in most human cancer cell lines. However, the mechanism of regulation of intracellular levels of TRUSS remains elusive. Here we show that TRUSS is expressed majorly during the G1 phase of cell cycle and its level starts to decline with the expression of S-phase specific E3 ligase Skp2. Enforced expression of Skp2 led to a marked increase in the ubiquitination of TRUSS after its phosphorylation by GSK3β and followed by rapid proteolytic degradation. Our co-immunoprecipitation studies suggested a direct interaction between Skp2 and TRUSS through the LRR motif of Skp2. Interestingly, the human tumor samples that exhibited elevated expression of Skp2, showed relatively poor expression of TRUSS. Further, enforced expression of HBx, the oncoprotein of Hepatitis B virus which is known to stabilize c-Myc and enhance its oncogenic potential, led to the intracellular accumulation of TRUSS as well as c-Myc. Apparently, HBx also interacted with TRUSS which negatively impacted the TRUSS-c-Myc and TRUSS-Skp2 interactions leading to stabilization of TRUSS. Thus, the present study suggests that TRUSS is a novel substrate of E3 ligase Skp2 and that disruption of TRUSS-Skp2 interaction by viral oncoproteins could lead to pathophysiological sequelae.

  17. Heterologous expression of rice SUMO E3 ligase (OsSIZ1) enhances drought and heat tolerance in transgenic cotton

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The Arabidopsis gene AtSIZ1 encodes a SUMO E3 ligase that plays important roles in plant response to abiotic stresses such as drought, heat, cold, salt, and nutrient starvation. Loss of function in AtSIZ1 leads to increased sensitivity to drought, heat, and salt stresses, whereas overexpression of t...

  18. LiGaSe2 optical parametric oscillator pumped by a Q-switched Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vedenyapin, V.; Boyko, A.; Kolker, D.; Isaenko, L.; Lobanov, S.; Kostyukova, N.; Yelisseyev, A.; Zondy, J.-J.; Petrov, V.

    2016-11-01

    Optical parametric oscillation is demonstrated for the first time with the chalcogenide nonlinear crystal LiGaSe2 pumped by a nanosecond Nd:YAG laser. Angle tuning provides coverage of the 4.8-9.9 µm spectral range in the mid-IR by idler pulses.

  19. Improvement of DNA adenylation using T4 DNA ligase with a template strand and a strategically mismatched acceptor strand

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Maha P.; Baum, Dana A.; Silverman, Scott K.

    2008-01-01

    DNA with a 5′-adenylpyrophosphoryl cap (5′-adenylated DNA; AppDNA) is an activated form of DNA that is the biochemical intermediate of the reactions catalyzed by DNA ligase, RNA ligase, polynucleotide kinase, and other nucleic acid modifying enzymes. 5′-Adenylated DNA is also useful for in vitro selection experiments. Efficient preparation of 5′-adenylated DNA is therefore desirable for several biochemical applications. Here we have developed a DNA adenylation procedure that uses T4 DNA ligase and is more reliable than a previously reported approach that used the 5′-phosphorylated donor DNA substrate to be adenylated, a DNA template, and ATP but no acceptor strand. Our improved DNA adenylation procedure uses the above components as well as an acceptor strand that has a strategically chosen C-T acceptor-template mismatch directly adjacent to the adenylation site. This mismatch permits adenylation of the donor DNA substrate but largely suppresses subsequent ligation of the donor with the acceptor, as assayed on nine different DNA substrates that collectively have all four DNA nucleotides represented at each of the first two positions. The new DNA adenylation procedure is successful using either laboratory-prepared or commercial T4 DNA ligase and works well on the preparative (2 nmol) scale for all nine of the test DNA substrates. PMID:18022669

  20. High throughput screening for inhibitors of the HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase ITCH identifies antidepressant drugs as regulators of autophagy.

    PubMed

    Rossi, M; Rotblat, B; Ansell, K; Amelio, I; Caraglia, M; Misso, G; Bernassola, F; Cavasotto, C N; Knight, R A; Ciechanover, A; Melino, G

    2014-05-01

    Inhibition of distinct ubiquitin E3 ligases might represent a powerful therapeutic tool. ITCH is a HECT domain-containing E3 ligase that promotes the ubiquitylation and degradation of several proteins, including p73, p63, c-Jun, JunB, Notch and c-FLIP, thus affecting cell fate. Accordingly, ITCH depletion potentiates the effect of chemotherapeutic drugs, revealing ITCH as a potential pharmacological target in cancer therapy. Using high throughput screening of ITCH auto-ubiquitylation, we identified several putative ITCH inhibitors, one of which is clomipramine--a clinically useful antidepressant drug. Previously, we have shown that clomipramine inhibits autophagy by blocking autophagolysosomal fluxes and thus could potentiate chemotherapy in vitro. Here, we found that clomipramine specifically blocks ITCH auto-ubiquitylation, as well as p73 ubiquitylation. By screening structural homologs of clomipramine, we identified several ITCH inhibitors and putative molecular moieties that are essential for ITCH inhibition. Treating a panel of breast, prostate and bladder cancer cell lines with clomipramine, or its homologs, we found that they reduce cancer cell growth, and synergize with gemcitabine or mitomycin in killing cancer cells by blocking autophagy. We also discuss a potential mechanism of inhibition. Together, our study (i) demonstrates the feasibility of using high throughput screening to identify E3 ligase inhibitors and (ii) provides insight into how clomipramine and its structural homologs might interfere with ITCH and other HECT E3 ligase catalytic activity in (iii) potentiating chemotherapy by regulating autophagic fluxes. These results may have direct clinical applications.

  1. Comparison of substrate specificity of the ubiquitin ligases Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 using proteome arrays.

    PubMed

    Persaud, Avinash; Alberts, Philipp; Amsen, Eva M; Xiong, Xuejian; Wasmuth, James; Saadon, Zachary; Fladd, Chris; Parkinson, John; Rotin, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Target recognition by the ubiquitin system is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Nedd4 family members are E3 ligases comprised of a C2 domain, 2-4 WW domains that bind PY motifs (L/PPxY) and a ubiquitin ligase HECT domain. The nine Nedd4 family proteins in mammals include two close relatives: Nedd4 (Nedd4-1) and Nedd4L (Nedd4-2), but their global substrate recognition or differences in substrate specificity are unknown. We performed in vitro ubiquitylation and binding assays of human Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2, and rat-Nedd4-1, using protein microarrays spotted with approximately 8200 human proteins. Top hits (substrates) for the ubiquitylation and binding assays mostly contain PY motifs. Although several substrates were recognized by both Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2, others were specific to only one, with several Tyr kinases preferred by Nedd4-1 and some ion channels by Nedd4-2; this was subsequently validated in vivo. Accordingly, Nedd4-1 knockdown or knockout in cells led to sustained signalling via some of its substrate Tyr kinases (e.g. FGFR), suggesting Nedd4-1 suppresses their signalling. These results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying substrates and deciphering substrate specificity of mammalian E3 ligases.

  2. Comparison of substrate specificity of the ubiquitin ligases Nedd4 and Nedd4-2 using proteome arrays

    PubMed Central

    Persaud, Avinash; Alberts, Philipp; Amsen, Eva M; Xiong, Xuejian; Wasmuth, James; Saadon, Zachary; Fladd, Chris; Parkinson, John; Rotin, Daniela

    2009-01-01

    Target recognition by the ubiquitin system is mediated by E3 ubiquitin ligases. Nedd4 family members are E3 ligases comprised of a C2 domain, 2–4 WW domains that bind PY motifs (L/PPxY) and a ubiquitin ligase HECT domain. The nine Nedd4 family proteins in mammals include two close relatives: Nedd4 (Nedd4-1) and Nedd4L (Nedd4-2), but their global substrate recognition or differences in substrate specificity are unknown. We performed in vitro ubiquitylation and binding assays of human Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2, and rat-Nedd4-1, using protein microarrays spotted with ∼8200 human proteins. Top hits (substrates) for the ubiquitylation and binding assays mostly contain PY motifs. Although several substrates were recognized by both Nedd4-1 and Nedd4-2, others were specific to only one, with several Tyr kinases preferred by Nedd4-1 and some ion channels by Nedd4-2; this was subsequently validated in vivo. Accordingly, Nedd4-1 knockdown or knockout in cells led to sustained signalling via some of its substrate Tyr kinases (e.g. FGFR), suggesting Nedd4-1 suppresses their signalling. These results demonstrate the feasibility of identifying substrates and deciphering substrate specificity of mammalian E3 ligases. PMID:19953087

  3. [Clinical and laboratory studies on four Chinese patients with succinate-CoA ligase deficiency noticed by mild methylmalonic aciduria].

    PubMed

    Liu, Y P; Li, X Y; Ding, Y; Wang, Q; Song, J Q; Zhang, Y; Li, D X; Qin, Y P; Yang, Y L

    2016-05-01

    To study the clinical and genetic features of the patients with secondary methylmalonic aciduria due to succinate-CoA ligase deficiency. From February 2011 to April 2014, 4 Chinese patients with succinate-CoA ligase deficiency and mild methylmalonic aciduria were enrolled in this study. The clinical course, biochemical features, brain MRI findings, and mutations were analyzed. Four patients presented with severe psychomotor retardation, hypotonia, seizures, feeding problems and failure to thrive from the age of one day to 6 months. Three of them had intractable epilepsies. One had hearing defect. Mild methylmalonic aciduria was detected by elevated urine methylmalonic acid and blood propionylcarnitine at the age of 6 months to 2 years and 8 months. Five mutations, c. 550G>A, c. 751C>T, c. 809A>C, c. 961C>G and c. 826-2A>G in SUCLG1 of three patients were identified. On SUCLA2, one novel mutation, c. 970C>T, was found in one patient. After treatment, the disease in all four patients was improved. Four Chinese patients with succinyl-CoA ligase deficiency caused by SUCLG1 and SUCLA2 mutations were noticed by mild methylmalonic aciduria and diagnosed using high-throughput genomic sequencing. Succinate-CoA ligase deficiency is a rare cause of methylmalonic aciduria. Biochemical and gene studies are necessary for the differential diagnoses.

  4. The MLLE domain of the ubiquitin ligase UBR5 binds to its catalytic domain to regulate substrate binding.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Escobar, Juliana; Matta-Camacho, Edna; Kozlov, Guennadi; Gehring, Kalle

    2015-09-11

    E3 ubiquitin ligases catalyze the transfer of ubiquitin from an E2-conjugating enzyme to a substrate. UBR5, homologous to the E6AP C terminus (HECT)-type E3 ligase, mediates the ubiquitination of proteins involved in translation regulation, DNA damage response, and gluconeogenesis. In addition, UBR5 functions in a ligase-independent manner by prompting protein/protein interactions without ubiquitination of the binding partner. Despite recent functional studies, the mechanisms involved in substrate recognition and selective ubiquitination of its binding partners remain elusive. The C terminus of UBR5 harbors the HECT catalytic domain and an adjacent MLLE domain. MLLE domains mediate protein/protein interactions through the binding of a conserved peptide motif, termed PAM2. Here, we characterize the binding properties of the UBR5 MLLE domain to PAM2 peptides from Paip1 and GW182. The crystal structure with a Paip1 PAM2 peptide reveals the network of hydrophobic and ionic interactions that drive binding. In addition, we identify a novel interaction of the MLLE domain with the adjacent HECT domain mediated by a PAM2-like sequence. Our results confirm the role of the MLLE domain of UBR5 in substrate recruitment and suggest a potential role in regulating UBR5 ligase activity. © 2015 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  5. Efficient ligase 3-dependent microhomology-mediated end joining repair of DNA double-strand breaks in zebrafish embryos.

    PubMed

    He, Mu-Dan; Zhang, Feng-Hua; Wang, Hua-Lin; Wang, Hou-Peng; Zhu, Zuo-Yan; Sun, Yong-Hua

    2015-10-01

    DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair is of considerable importance for genomic integrity. Homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) are considered as two major mechanistically distinct pathways involved in repairing DSBs. In recent years, another DSB repair pathway, namely, microhomology-mediated end joining (MMEJ), has received increasing attention. MMEJ is generally believed to utilize an alternative mechanism to repair DSBs when NHEJ and other mechanisms fail. In this study, we utilized zebrafish as an in vivo model to study DSB repair and demonstrated that efficient MMEJ repair occurred in the zebrafish genome when DSBs were induced using TALEN (transcription activator-like effector nuclease) or CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats)/Cas9 technologies. The wide existence of MMEJ repair events in zebrafish embryos was further demonstrated via the injection of several in vitro-designed exogenous MMEJ reporters. Interestingly, the inhibition of endogenous ligase 4 activity significantly increased MMEJ frequency, and the inhibition of ligase 3 activity severely decreased MMEJ activity. These results suggest that MMEJ in zebrafish is dependent on ligase 3 but independent of ligase 4. This study will enhance our understanding of the mechanisms of MMEJ in vivo and facilitate inducing desirable mutations via DSB-induced repair. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A Simple Template-Dependent Ligase Ribozyme as the RNA Replicase Emerging First in the RNA World

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Wentao; Yu, Chunwu; Zhang, Wentao; Hu, Jiming

    2010-05-01

    The "RNA world" hypothesis has offered a framework for both experimental and theoretical work in the field of the origin of life. An important concern about the hypothesis is how the RNA world could originate. It has long been speculated that a template-dependent RNA synthetase ribozyme, which catalyzed its own replication (thus, an "RNA replicase"), should have emerged first. However, experimental searches for such a replicase have so far been unsuccessful. This is primarily because of the large sequence length of candidate ribozymes, which mainly work in a polymerase-like way. Here, we propose that the replicase that emerged first would be a simple template-dependent ligase ribozyme, which loosely binds to template RNA and has a relatively low efficiency of catalyzing the formation of phosphodiester bonds between adjacently aligned nucleotides or oligonucleotides. We conducted a computer simulation to support this proposal and considered the factors that might affect the emergence of the ribozyme based on the parameter analysis in the simulation. We conclude that (1) a template-dependent ligase may be more likely than a template-dependent polymerase as an early replicase in the emergence of RNA-based replication; (2) such a ligase ribozyme could emerge and be stable against parasites under a broad range of parameters in our model; (3) the conditions shown to favor the initial appearance of a template-dependent ligase ribozyme do not favor its spread.

  7. Purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of the biotin–protein ligase from Pyrococcus horikoshii OT3

    SciTech Connect

    Bagautdinov, Bagautdin; Kuroishi, Chizu; Sugahara, Mitsuaki; Kunishima, Naoki

    2005-02-01

    The biotin–protein ligase from P. horikoshii OT3 was overexpressed, purified, crystallized and cocrystallized with biotin, ADP and biotinyl-5′-AMP. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1} and diffract to beyond 1.6 Å resolution.

  8. Sorghum Brown midrib 2 (Bmr2) gene encodes the major 4-coumarate Coenzyme A ligase involved in lignin synthesis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Successful modification of plant cell wall composition without compromising plant integrity is dependent on being able to modify the expression of specific genes, but can be very challenging when the target genes are members of multigene families. 4-Coumarate:CoA ligase (4CL) catalyzes the formatio...

  9. Involvement of DNA ligase III and ribonuclease H1 in mitochondrial DNA replication in cultured human cells.

    PubMed

    Ruhanen, Heini; Ushakov, Kathy; Yasukawa, Takehiro

    2011-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis operates in mammalian mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) replication, but the factors involved in lagging strand synthesis are largely uncharacterised. We investigated the effect of knockdown of the candidate proteins in cultured human cells under conditions where mtDNA appears to replicate chiefly via coupled leading and lagging strand DNA synthesis to restore the copy number of mtDNA to normal levels after transient mtDNA depletion. DNA ligase III knockdown attenuated the recovery of mtDNA copy number and appeared to cause single strand nicks in replicating mtDNA molecules, suggesting the involvement of DNA ligase III in Okazaki fragment ligation in human mitochondria. Knockdown of ribonuclease (RNase) H1 completely prevented the mtDNA copy number restoration, and replication intermediates with increased single strand nicks were readily observed. On the other hand, knockdown of neither flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1) nor DNA2 affected mtDNA replication. These findings imply that RNase H1 is indispensable for the progression of mtDNA synthesis through removing RNA primers from Okazaki fragments. In the nucleus, Okazaki fragments are ligated by DNA ligase I, and the RNase H2 is involved in Okazaki fragment processing. This study thus proposes that the mitochondrial replication system utilises distinct proteins, DNA ligase III and RNase H1, for Okazaki fragment maturation.

  10. Regulation of 4CL, encoding 4-coumarate: coenzyme A ligase, expression in kenaf under diverse stress conditions

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We cloned the full length 4CL ortholog encoding 4-coumarate: coenzymeA ligase from kenaf (Hibiscus cannabiuns) using degenerate primers and RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends) systems. The 4CL is a key regulatory enzyme of the phenylpropanoid pathway that regulates the activation of cinnamic ac...

  11. Characterization of a novel RING-type ubiquitin E3 ligase GhRING2 differentially expressed in cotton fiber

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The ubiquitin-proteasome proteolysis pathway is responsible for the degradation of abnormal and short-lived proteins to regulate many important biochemical activities in eukaryotes. By employing affymetrix microarray analysis, we have identified a novel ubiquitin ligase E3 gene GhRING2 that is diffe...

  12. Latency-Associated Nuclear Antigen E3 Ubiquitin Ligase Activity Impacts Gammaherpesvirus-Driven Germinal Center B Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Cerqueira, Sofia A; Tan, Min; Li, Shijun; Juillard, Franceline; McVey, Colin E; Kaye, Kenneth M; Simas, J Pedro

    2016-09-01

    Viruses have evolved mechanisms to hijack components of cellular E3 ubiquitin ligases, thus modulating the ubiquitination pathway. However, the biological relevance of such mechanisms for viral pathogenesis in vivo remains largely unknown. Here, we utilized murid herpesvirus 4 (MuHV-4) infection of mice as a model system to address the role of MuHV-4 latency-associated nuclear antigen (mLANA) E3 ligase activity in gammaherpesvirus latent infection. We show that specific mutations in the mLANA SOCS box (V199A, V199A/L202A, or P203A/P206A) disrupted mLANA's ability to recruit Elongin C and Cullin 5, thereby impairing the formation of the Elongin BC/Cullin 5/SOCS (EC5S(mLANA)) complex and mLANA's E3 ligase activity on host NF-κB and Myc. Although these mutations resulted in considerably reduced mLANA binding to viral terminal repeat DNA as assessed by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA), the mutations did not disrupt mLANA's ability to mediate episome persistence. In vivo, MuHV-4 recombinant viruses bearing these mLANA SOCS box mutations exhibited a deficit in latency amplification in germinal center (GC) B cells. These findings demonstrate that the E3 ligase activity of mLANA contributes to gammaherpesvirus-driven GC B cell proliferation. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of viral E3 ligase activity through targeting SOCS box motifs is a putative strategy to control gammaherpesvirus-driven lymphoproliferation and associated disease. The gammaherpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) and Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) cause lifelong persistent infection and play causative roles in several human malignancies. Colonization of B cells is crucial for virus persistence, and access to the B cell compartment is gained by virus-driven proliferation in germinal center (GC) B cells. Infection of B cells is predominantly latent, with the viral genome persisting as a multicopy episome and expressing only a small subset of viral genes. Here, we focused on

  13. The pineal gland: A model for adrenergic modulation of ubiquitin ligases

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wenjun; Reiter, Russel J.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction A recent study of the pineal gland of t