Science.gov

Sample records for lrfd designed steel

  1. Extreme hydrodynamic load calculations for fixed steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Jong, P.R. de; Vugts, J.; Gudmestad, O.T.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses the expected differences between the planned ISO code for design of offshore structures and the present Standard Norwegian Practice (SNP), concerning the extreme hydrodynamic design load calculation for fixed steel space frame structures. Since the ISO code is expected to be similar to the API RP2A LRFD code, the provisions of API RP2A LRFD are used to represent the ISO standard. It should be noted that the new ISO code may include NewWave theory, in addition to the wave theories recommended by the API. Design loads and associated failure probabilities resulting from the application of the code provisions are compared for a typical North Sea structure, the Europipe riser platform 16/11-E.

  2. Probability based earthquake load and resistance factor design criteria for offshore platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Bea, R.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper describes a probability reliability based formulation to determine earthquake Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) parameters for conventional, steel, pile supported, tubular membered platforms that is proposed as a basis for earthquake design criteria and guidelines for offshore platforms that are intended to have worldwide applicability. The formulation is illustrated with application to platforms located in five areas: offshore California, Venezuela (Rio Caribe), the East Coast of Canada, in the Caspian Sea (Azeri), and the Norwegian sector of the North Sea.

  3. Steel shear walls, behavior, modeling and design

    SciTech Connect

    Astaneh-Asl, Abolhassan

    2008-07-08

    In recent years steel shear walls have become one of the more efficient lateral load resisting systems in tall buildings. The basic steel shear wall system consists of a steel plate welded to boundary steel columns and boundary steel beams. In some cases the boundary columns have been concrete-filled steel tubes. Seismic behavior of steel shear wall systems during actual earthquakes and based on laboratory cyclic tests indicates that the systems are quite ductile and can be designed in an economical way to have sufficient stiffness, strength, ductility and energy dissipation capacity to resist seismic effects of strong earthquakes. This paper, after summarizing the past research, presents the results of two tests of an innovative steel shear wall system where the boundary elements are concrete-filled tubes. Then, a review of currently available analytical models of steel shear walls is provided with a discussion of capabilities and limitations of each model. We have observed that the tension only 'strip model', forming the basis of the current AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls, is not capable of predicting the behavior of steel shear walls with length-to-thickness ratio less than about 600 which is the range most common in buildings. The main reasons for such shortcomings of the AISC seismic design provisions for steel shear walls is that it ignores the compression field in the shear walls, which can be significant in typical shear walls. The AISC method also is not capable of incorporating stresses in the shear wall due to overturning moments. A more rational seismic design procedure for design of shear walls proposed in 2000 by the author is summarized in the paper. The design method, based on procedures used for design of steel plate girders, takes into account both tension and compression stress fields and is applicable to all values of length-to-thickness ratios of steel shear walls. The method is also capable of including the effect of

  4. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  5. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  6. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  7. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  8. 49 CFR 192.105 - Design formula for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design formula for steel pipe. 192.105 Section 192... for steel pipe. (a) The design pressure for steel pipe is determined in accordance with the following... § 192.113. T=Temperature derating factor determined in accordance with § 192.115. (b) If steel pipe...

  9. Design principles for advanced carburized bearing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, James Anthony

    Rolling contact fatigue behavior of carburized C69-1 steel was measured and analyzed using an NTN rolling contact fatigue tester. Core precipitation of nanoscale 6 phase in C69-2 steel was measured with 1DAP microanalysis. Precipitation behavior in M50NiL-0.38C was examined using small angle neutron scattering, transmission electron microscopy, one-dimensional atom probe microanalysis, three-dimensional atom probe microanalysis, Vickers microhardness, and ThermoCalc thermodynamic modeling software. Five different carbide phases were tentatively identified as Fe3C, M2C, MC, M6C, and M 23C6. The hardness evolution was modeled with the measured microstructural data and scaled to measured microhardness. A multiphase precipitation model was developed to predict the volume fraction of each phase during tempering. Stress relaxation during tempering of M50NiL-0.38C was shown to be controlled by carbide precipitation kinetics using tensile and split-ring methods. From these experiments design principles for advanced carburized steels were deduced. Because of their role in fatigue nucleation, no primary carbides should be present after solution treatment. A single phase M2C precipitate dispersion should be over-aged to be slightly larger than its peak strength state to avoid cyclic shearing and improve rolling contact fatigue resistance. Other carbide phases can be avoided because they are less efficient strengtheners than the M2C phase. The embrittling sigma phase should be avoided in the low carbon core by reducing the driving force for precipitation. The steel should have some residual austenite in the carburized case after quenching from the solution treatment; this retained austenite should be completely transformed upon a cryogenic treatment after tempering to restore favorable, residual compressive stress in the case.

  10. Surface design methodology - challenge the steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergman, M.; Rosen, B.-G.; Eriksson, L.; Anderberg, C.

    2014-03-01

    The way a product or material is experienced by its user could be different depending on the scenario. It is also well known that different materials and surfaces are used for different purposes. When optimizing materials and surface roughness for a certain something with the intention to improve a product, it is important to obtain not only the physical requirements, but also the user experience and expectations. Laws and requirements of the materials and the surface function, but also the conservative way of thinking about materials and colours characterize the design of medical equipment. The purpose of this paper is to link the technical- and customer requirements of current materials and surface textures in medical environments. By focusing on parts of the theory of Kansei Engineering, improvements of the companys' products are possible. The idea is to find correlations between desired experience or "feeling" for a product, -customer requirements, functional requirements, and product geometrical properties -design parameters, to be implemented on new improved products. To be able to find new materials with the same (or better) technical requirements but a higher level of user stimulation, the current material (stainless steel) and its surface (brushed textures) was used as a reference. The usage of focus groups of experts at the manufacturer lead to a selection of twelve possible new materials for investigation in the project. In collaboration with the topical company for this project, three new materials that fulfil the requirements -easy to clean and anti-bacterial came to be in focus for further investigation in regard to a new design of a washer-disinfector for medical equipment using the Kansei based Clean ability approach CAA.

  11. Design and analysis of prestressed composite steel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Thammasila, D.

    1992-01-01

    This study experimentally and analytically examined the behavior of prestressed composite steel beams. Methods for analysis and design of the prestressed composite steel beams with constant and variable eccentricities based on the load and resistance factor design and the working stress design were formulated. Three specimens were tested under static and cyclic loadings to verify the proposed design methods. The results from the cyclic loadings were used to test the feasibility of the prestressed composite steel beams under actual loading conditions. Finite element models were developed to study the behavior of the prestressed composite steel beams and to ensure the validity of the proposed design methods. The modes of failure of the three specimens tested were crushing of concrete slabs and yielding of steel beams and prestressing tendons. The cyclic loads reduced the ultimate strength of the specimens tested by 7.8 percent. Overall, the proposed design methods for the load and resistance factor design and the working stress design adequately predicted the behavior of the prestressed composite steel beams.

  12. The Metallurgical Design of Steels for Optimum Mechanical Properties

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1945-10-22

    Metal. Eng., 1945. 269. W. B, Jominy and A. L. Boegehold: "A Hardenability lst for Carburizing Steel ", Trans. Arm. Soc. Metals, 26 (1939) 574-606...ESIGN N OF STEELS FOR OPT!MJM "-ECHANI CAL PROPEFW1ES BY (10(6 -JOHN H, [HOL L&O :i0 ., .i CAPT ORD. DEPT. IAN - LEONARD D./.-,,.. ._I- ._JN REPRODUCTION...g.uns, armor, projectiles, and many other ordnance parts is the design of steels and heat treatments that will produce the optimum combination of

  13. Balance fatigue design of cast steel nodes in tubular steel structures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Libin; Jin, Hui; Dong, Haiwei; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cast steel nodes are being increasingly popular in steel structure joint application as their advanced mechanical performances and flexible forms. This kind of joints improves the structural antifatigue capability observably and is expected to be widely used in the structures with fatigue loadings. Cast steel node joint consists of two parts: casting itself and the welds between the node and the steel member. The fatigue resistances of these two parts are very different; the experiment results showed very clearly that the fatigue behavior was governed by the welds in all tested configurations. This paper focuses on the balance fatigue design of these two parts in a cast steel node joint using fracture mechanics and FEM. The defects in castings are simulated by cracks conservatively. The final crack size is decided by the minimum of 90% of the wall thickness and the value deduced by fracture toughness. The allowable initial crack size could be obtained through the integral of Paris equation when the crack propagation life is considered equal to the weld fatigue life; therefore, the two parts in a cast steel node joint will have a balance fatigue life.

  14. Balance Fatigue Design of Cast Steel Nodes in Tubular Steel Structures

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Libin; Jin, Hui; Li, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cast steel nodes are being increasingly popular in steel structure joint application as their advanced mechanical performances and flexible forms. This kind of joints improves the structural antifatigue capability observably and is expected to be widely used in the structures with fatigue loadings. Cast steel node joint consists of two parts: casting itself and the welds between the node and the steel member. The fatigue resistances of these two parts are very different; the experiment results showed very clearly that the fatigue behavior was governed by the welds in all tested configurations. This paper focuses on the balance fatigue design of these two parts in a cast steel node joint using fracture mechanics and FEM. The defects in castings are simulated by cracks conservatively. The final crack size is decided by the minimum of 90% of the wall thickness and the value deduced by fracture toughness. The allowable initial crack size could be obtained through the integral of Paris equation when the crack propagation life is considered equal to the weld fatigue life; therefore, the two parts in a cast steel node joint will have a balance fatigue life. PMID:24163621

  15. Designing high-temperature steels via surface science and thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Cameron T.; Jiang, Zilin; Mathai, Allan; Chung, Yip-Wah

    2016-06-01

    Electricity in many countries such as the US and China is produced by burning fossil fuels in steam-turbine-driven power plants. The efficiency of these power plants can be improved by increasing the operating temperature of the steam generator. In this work, we adopted a combined surface science and computational thermodynamics approach to the design of high-temperature, corrosion-resistant steels for this application. The result is a low-carbon ferritic steel with nanosized transition metal monocarbide precipitates that are thermally stable, as verified by atom probe tomography. High-temperature Vickers hardness measurements demonstrated that these steels maintain their strength for extended periods at 700 °C. We hypothesize that the improved strength of these steels is derived from the semi-coherent interfaces of these thermally stable, nanosized precipitates exerting drag forces on impinging dislocations, thus maintaining strength at elevated temperatures.

  16. Characterization and design of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnelling

    SciTech Connect

    Casanova, P.A.; Rossi, P.C.

    1995-12-31

    A design procedure of steel fiber reinforced shotcrete tunnel linings is proposed. It is based on the analysis of a cracked section. The tensile behavior of shotcrete after cracking is obtained by a uniaxial tension test on cored notched samples. As for usual reinforced concrete structures an interaction diagram (moment-axial load) is determined.

  17. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that:...

  18. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that:...

  19. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that:...

  20. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that:...

  1. 49 CFR 192.111 - Design factor (F) for steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Design factor (F) for steel pipe. 192.111 Section...) for steel pipe. (a) Except as otherwise provided in paragraphs (b), (c), and (d) of this section, the... less must be used in the design formula in § 192.105 for steel pipe in Class 1 locations that:...

  2. Designing of Sub-entry Nozzle for Casting Defect-free Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sen, Anupal; Prasad, B.; Sahu, J. K.; Tiwari, J. N.

    2015-02-01

    Production of defect-free steel is a continuous demand for each & every steel maker. The design of refractories used in steel making process has a vital role on this. Manufacturing of cleaner steel is mostly attributed to the continuous casting process of the steel plant. Defects in steel mainly come from the non-metallic inclusions present in steel that are incorporated during various steel making process. During continuous casting, the main focus is to remove these inclusions to cast defect free steel. The flow pattern of molten steel in the mould plays a vital role in the removal of these impurities. The turbulence of the flowing steel in the mould should be such that more and more impurities will be floated at the meniscus of the mould and they will be captured by the casting powder. But, this turbulence should not be higher enough to capture the particles of casting powder inside the molten steel. So, in order to optimize the turbulent intensity and to get uniform distribution of temperature and velocity in the mould, the design of Sub-entry nozzle (SEN) is very crucial. SEN is used to guide the flow of steel from tundish to mould during continuous casting. The bore configuration and outlet design of SEN along with its immersed depth in the mould determine the flow pattern of steel inside the mould, which is the key factor to produce cleaner steel. This paper focuses on the different designing aspects of SEN to get an optimized and uniform flow of steel in the mould. The designing parameters include bore diameter, bore configuration, port shape, port angle, port dimension, number of ports and immersed depth of SEN inside the mould. Design optimization is done to improve the steel quality by removing the impurities.

  3. Probabilistic life design of refractories for steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Wereszczak, A.A.; Smith, J.D.; Moore, R.E.

    1998-02-01

    The failure probability of magnesia-graphite components was predicted using an established probabilistic life prediction design algorithm. The described algorithm is commonly employed in the design of load-bearing structural ceramics components; however, interest existed for the present study to demonstrate its use and applicability in the design (or failure probability analysis) of arbitrary refractory components. Two components were examined: (1) a 25.4 x 25.4 x 152 mm (1 x 1 by 6 in.) magnesia-graphite prismatic bar subjected to three-point flexure using a 101.6 mm (4 in.) span, and (2) a vertically suspended magnesia-graphite nozzle whose dimensions were 203 O.D. x 101.6 I.D. x 1,524 mm length (8 O.D. x 4 I.D. x 60 in. length). Magnesia-graphite strength data were combined with finite element analysis of the components and an appropriate multiaxial ceramic failure criterion to predict the failure probabilities of each. The latter exercise illustrated how laboratory-generated strength distributions may be used to predict the failure probability of a representative refractory component used in steel casting, while the former provided useful information of strength-dependence on size between two commonly used specimen geometries used for refractory strength tests. The results indicated an approach of probabilistic life design is applicable to refractory component design for the steel casting industry.

  4. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design. Suppl

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, Thomas J. (Compiler); Martin, James J.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005. This supplement contains drawings, analysis, and calculations

  5. Documentation of Stainless Steel Lithium Circuit Test Section Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfroy, T. J.; Martin, J. J.; Stewart, E. T.; Rhys, N. O.

    2010-01-01

    The Early Flight Fission-Test Facilities (EFF-TF) team was tasked by Naval Reactors Prime Contract Team (NRPCT) to design, fabricate, and test an actively pumped lithium (Li) flow circuit. This Li circuit takes advantage of work in progress at the EFF TF on a stainless steel sodium/potassium (NaK) circuit. The effort involved modifying the original stainless steel NaK circuit such that it could be operated with Li in place of NaK. This new design considered freeze/thaw issues and required the addition of an expansion tank and expansion/extrusion volumes in the circuit plumbing. Instrumentation has been specified for Li and circuit heaters have been placed throughout the design to ensure adequate operational temperatures and no uncontrolled freezing of the Li. All major components have been designed and fabricated prior to circuit redesign for Li and were not modified. Basic circuit components include: reactor segment, Li to gas heat exchanger, electromagnetic liquid metal pump, load/drain reservoir, expansion reservoir, instrumentation, and trace heaters. The reactor segment, based on a Los Alamos National Laboratory 100-kW design study with 120 fuel pins, is the only prototypic component in the circuit. However, due to earlier funding constraints, a 37-pin partial-array of the core, including the central three rings of fuel pins (pin and flow path dimensions are the same as those in the full design), was selected for fabrication and test. This Technical Publication summarizes the design and integration of the pumped liquid metal Li flow circuit as of May 1, 2005.

  6. Numerical Design of Drawbeads for Advanced High Strength Steel Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keum, Y. T.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, G. S.

    2010-06-01

    The map for designing the drawbeads used in the stamping dies for advanced high strength steel (AHSS) sheets is numerically investigated and its application is introduced. The bending limit of AHSS sheet is determined from the extreme R/t's obtained simulating numerically the plane-strain process formed by the cylindrical punches and dies with various radii. In addition, the forming allowance defined by the difference between FLC0 and the strain after passing the drawbead, which is observed by the numerical simulation of drawbead pulling test, is computed. Based on the bending limit and forming allowance, the design map for determining the height, width, and shoulder radius of the drawbead which are key parameters in the drawbead design and depend on the restraining force is constructed by aid of the equivalent drawbead model. A drawbead of the stamping die for forming a channel-typed panel is designed by using the design map, and the formability and springback of the panel to be formed are numerically evaluated, from which the availability of the design map is demonstrated.

  7. Materials design data for reduced activation martensitic steel type EUROFER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Alamo, A.; Bedel, L.; Forest, L.; Gentzbittel, J.-M.; Rensman, J.-W.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Schirra, M.; Schmitt, R.; Schneider, H. C.; Petersen, C.; Lancha, A.-M.; Fernandez, P.; Filacchioni, G.; Maday, M. F.; Mergia, K.; Boukos, N.; Baluc; Spätig, P.; Alves, E.; Lucon, E.

    2004-08-01

    Materials design limits derived so far from the data generated in Europe for the reduced activation ferritic/martensitic (RAFM) steel type Eurofer are presented. These data address the short-term needs of the ITER Test Blanket Modules and a DEMOnstration fusion reactor. Products tested include plates, bars, tubes, TIG and EB welds, as well as powder consolidated blocks and solid-solid HIP joints. Effects of thermal ageing and low dose neutron irradiation are also included. Results are sorted and screened according to design code requirements before being introduced in reference databases. From the physical properties databases, variations of magnetic properties, modulus of elasticity, density, thermal conductivity, thermal diffusivity, specific heat, mean and instantaneous linear coefficients of thermal expansion versus temperature are derived. From the tensile and creep properties databases design allowable stresses are derived. From the instrumented Charpy impact and fracture toughness databases, ductile to brittle transition temperature, toughness and behavior of materials in different fracture modes are evaluated. From the fatigue database, total strain range versus number of cycles to failure curves are plotted and used to derive fatigue design curves. Cyclic curves are also derived and compared with monotonic hardening curves. Finally, irradiated and aged materials data are compared to ensure that the safety margins incorporated in unirradiated design limits are not exceeded.

  8. Stablization of Nanotwinned Microstructures in Stainless Steels Through Alloying and Microstructural Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-23

    stable nanotwinned microstructure---high-temperature strength. The long - term goal of this effort is to develop austenitic stainless steels capable of...microstructures. The long - term alloy design strategy focuses on microalloying additions to 1) reduce the stacking fault energy (SFE), enhance twinning formation...15. SUBJECT TERMS materials design, stainless steels , plastic deformation by twinning, computational materials science, experimental characterization

  9. Evaluation of stainless steel cladding for use in current design LWRs. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Strasser, A.; Santucci, J.; Lindquist, K.; Yario, W.; Stern, G.; Goldstein, L.; Joseph, L.

    1982-12-01

    The design of stainless steel-clad LWR fuel and its performance at steady-state, transient, and accident conditions were reviewed. The objective was to evaluate the potential benefits and disadvantages of substituting stainless steel-clad fuel for the currently used Zircaloy-clad fuel. For a large, modern PWR, the technology and the fuel-cycle costs of stainless steel- and Zircaloy-clad fuels were compared.

  10. Euler Teaches a Class in Structural Steel Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boyajian, David M.

    2009-01-01

    Even before steel was a topic of formal study for structural engineers, the brilliant eighteenth century Swiss mathematician and physicist, Leonhard Euler (1707-1783), investigated the theory governing the elastic behaviour of columns, the results of which are incorporated into the American Institute of Steel Construction's (AISC's) Bible: the…

  11. Design Review Report for Concrete Cover Block Replaced by Steel Plate

    SciTech Connect

    JAKA, O.M.

    2000-07-27

    The design for the steel cover plates to replace concrete cover blocks for U-109 was reviewed and approved in a design review meeting. The design for steel plates to replace concrete blocks were reviewed and approved by comparison and similarity with U-109 for the following additional pits: 241-U-105. 241-I-103, 241-Ax-101. 241-A-101, 241-SX-105, 241-S-A, 241-S-C, 241-SX-A.

  12. Influence of Various Material Design Parameters on Deformation Behaviors of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Choi, Kyoo Sil; Soulami, Ayoub; Liu, Wenning N.; Sun, Xin; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2010-11-02

    In this paper, the microstructure-based finite element modeling method is used as a virtual design tool in investigating the respective influence of various material design parameters on the deformation behaviors of transformation induced plasticity (TRIP) steels. For this purpose, the separate effects of several different material design parameters, such as the volume fraction and stability of austenite phase and the strengths of the constituent phases, on the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) and ductility/formability of TRIP steels are quantitatively examined using different representative volume elements (RVEs) representing different TRIP steels. The computational results suggest that higher austenite stability is helpful in enhancing the ductility and formability of TRIP steels by delaying the martensitic transformation to a later stage, whereas increase of austenite volume fraction and/or ferrite strength alone is not beneficial to improve the performance of TRIP steels. The results in this study also indicate that various material design parameters must be adjusted concurrently to develop high performance TRIP steels. For example, the austenite strength should increase over the ferrite strength in order to induce the gradual/smooth martensitic transformation, and the strength disparity between the ferrite and the freshly-formed martensite phases should decrease in order to avoid higher stress/strain concentration along the phase boundaries. The modeling approach and results presented in this paper can be helpful in providing the deformation fundamentals for the development of high performance TRIP steels.

  13. Design criteria for steel tank shells in compression influenced by plate fabrication and welding distortion tolerances

    SciTech Connect

    Knoy, E.C.

    1994-12-31

    For almost 60 years, the design and construction of steel water storage tanks has most commonly been under the requirements of the American Water Works Association Standard D100 `Welded Steel Tanks for Water Storage.` For many years, the criteria for designing conical and double curved members under compression was not precisely defined by the AWWA Standard, as some designers considered the local buckling criteria to only be applicable to cylindrical tubular members. There have been varied opinions concerning design and tolerance philosophy. This paper will give an overview of these philosophies and will tell the importance of meeting these dimensional criteria. the method of calculating allowable deformations and measuring as-built deformations will be shown. Several examples of actual failures and laboratory and computer-simulated testing will be shown, leaving the attendee with a visual message of the importance of complying with the industry-accepted design, assembly, and welding techniques. A discussion of the safety of welded steel structures in public areas will also be included in the presentation. Engineering concern for the adequacy of current standards for the proper design and construction of composite tanks made of reinforced concrete and steel plate will be outlined. The reader will be made aware of the need for proper design, fabrication, and construction of tubular steel plate members subject to compressive loads.

  14. Systems design of high performance stainless steels I. Conceptual and computational design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, C. E.; Olson, G. B.

    2000-10-01

    Application of a systems approach to the computational materials design led to the development of a high performance stainless steel. The systems approach highlighted the integration of processing/structure/property/ performance relations with mechanistic models to achieve desired quantitative property objectives. The mechanistic models applied to the martensitic transformation behavior included the Olson Cohen model for heterogeneous nucleation and the Ghosh Olson solid-solution strengthening model for interfacial mobility. Strengthening theory employed modeling of the coherent M2C precipitation in a BCC matrix, which is initially in a paraequilibrium with cementite condition. The calibration of the M2C coherency used available small-angle neutron scattering (SANS) data to determine a composition-dependent strain energy and a composition-independent interfacial energy. Multicomponent pH-potential diagrams provided an effective tool for evaluating oxide stability. Constrained equilibrium calculations correlated oxide stability to Cr enrichment in the metastable spinel film, allowing more efficient use of alloy Cr content. The composition constraints acquired from multicomponent solidification simulations improved castability. Then integration of the models, using multicomponent thermodynamic and diffusion software programs, enabled the design of a carburizable, secondary-hardening martensitic stainless steel for advanced bearing applications.

  15. Performance-based plastic design method for steel concentric braced frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banihashemi, M. R.; Mirzagoltabar, A. R.; Tavakoli, H. R.

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a performance-based plastic design (PBPD) methodology for the design of steel concentric braced frames. The design base shear is obtained based on energy-work balance equation using pre-selected target drift and yield mechanism. To achieve the intended yield mechanism and behavior, plastic design is applied to detail the frame members. For validity, three baseline frames (3, 6, 9-story) are designed according to AISC (Seismic Provisions for Structural Steel Buildings, American Institute of Steel Construction, Chicago, 2005) seismic provisions (baseline frames). Then, the frames are redesigned based on the PBPD method. These frames are subjected to extensive nonlinear dynamic time-history analyses. The results show that the PBPD frames meet all the intended performance objectives in terms of yield mechanisms and target drifts, whereas the baseline frames show very poor response due to premature brace fractures leading to unacceptably large drifts and instability.

  16. Engineering safety evaluation for 22 ton steel disposal box lifting bail design

    SciTech Connect

    BOEHNKE, W.M.

    1999-11-23

    The objective of this analysis is to design and analyze the lifting bail of the 22 Ton Steel Waste Disposal Box (SWDB). The new design takes the original lifting bail and adds a hinge allowing the top portion of the bail to fold over towards the lid.

  17. Evaluation of Cavitation Erosion Behavior of Commercial Steel Grades Used in the Design of Fluid Machinery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tzanakis, I.; Bolzoni, L.; Eskin, D. G.; Hadfield, M.

    2017-03-01

    The erosion response under cavitation of different steel grades was assessed by studying the erosion rate, the volume removal, the roughness evolution, and the accumulated strain energy. A 20 kHz ultrasonic transducer with a probe diameter of 5 mm and peak-to-peak amplitude of 50 μm was deployed in distilled water to induce damage on the surface of commercial chromium and carbon steel samples. After a relatively short incubation period, cavitation induced the formation of pits, cracks, and craters whose features strongly depended on the hardness and composition of the tested steel. AISI 52100 chromium steel showed the best performance and is, therefore, a promising design candidate for replacing the existing fluid machinery materials that operate within potential cavitating environments.

  18. 75 FR 38593 - Buy America Waiver Notification

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-02

    ... 635.410 requires a domestic manufacturing process for any steel or iron products (including protective... original machinery that meets Federal design code, AASHTO LRFD for Movable Highway Bridge...

  19. Design guidelines for steel-reinforced polymer concrete using resins based on recycled PET

    SciTech Connect

    Rebeiz, K.S.; Fowler, D.W.

    1996-10-01

    Very little research has been done on the structural behavior of steel-reinforced polymer concrete (PC). In all the previous studies, it was generally assumed that the structural behavior of reinforced PC is similar to the structural behavior of reinforced portland cement concrete because both are composite materials consisting of a binder and inorganic aggregates. However, the design equations developed for steel-reinforced portland cement concrete yield very conservative results when applied to reinforced PC. The objective of this paper is to recommend simple, yet effective design guidelines in shear and flexure for steel-reinforced PC. The recommended design procedures are mostly based on test results performed on PC beams using resins based on recycled poly(ethyleneterephthalate), PET, plastic waste (the PET waste is mainly recovered from used beverage bottles). Previous studies have shown that polyester resins based on recycled PET can produce very good quality PC at a potentially lower cost.

  20. Design of controlled rocking steel frames to limit higher mode effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andree Wiebe, Lydell Deighton

    Because conventional seismic force resisting systems rely on yielding of key structural members to limit seismic forces, structural damage is expected after a design-level earthquake. Repairing this damage can be very expensive, if it is possible at all. Researchers have been developing a new family of self-centring systems that avoid structural damage. One such system is a controlled rocking steel frame, which is the subject of this thesis. In a controlled rocking steel frame, the columns of a frame are permitted to uplift from the foundation, and the response is controlled by using a combination of post-tensioning and energy dissipation. Although previous studies have confirmed the viability of this system, they have also shown that rocking does not fully limit the peak seismic forces because of higher mode effects. If a structure is designed to account for these effects, it may be uneconomical, but if it is not designed to account for them, it may be unsafe. The purpose of this thesis is to develop recommendations for the design of controlled rocking steel frames, particularly with regard to higher mode effects. A theoretical framework for understanding higher mode effects is developed, and large-scale shake table testing is used to study the behaviour of a controlled rocking steel frame. Two mechanisms are proposed to mitigate the increase in structural forces due to higher mode effects, and these mechanisms are validated by shake table testing. Numerical modelling of controlled rocking steel frames is shown to become more reliable when higher mode mitigation mechanisms are used to limit the seismic response. In the final chapters, the thesis proposes and validates a new methodology for the limit states design of controlled rocking steel frames.

  1. Estimation of Cyclic Interstory Drift Capacity of Steel Framed Structures and Future Applications for Seismic Design

    PubMed Central

    Bojórquez, Edén; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Ruiz, Sonia E.; Terán-Gilmore, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have been devoted to calibrate damage indices for steel and reinforced concrete members with the purpose of overcoming some of the shortcomings of the parameters currently used during seismic design. Nevertheless, there is a challenge to study and calibrate the use of such indices for the practical structural evaluation of complex structures. In this paper, an energy-based damage model for multidegree-of-freedom (MDOF) steel framed structures that accounts explicitly for the effects of cumulative plastic deformation demands is used to estimate the cyclic drift capacity of steel structures. To achieve this, seismic hazard curves are used to discuss the limitations of the maximum interstory drift demand as a performance parameter to achieve adequate damage control. Then the concept of cyclic drift capacity, which incorporates information of the influence of cumulative plastic deformation demands, is introduced as an alternative for future applications of seismic design of structures subjected to long duration ground motions. PMID:25089288

  2. Estimation of cyclic interstory drift capacity of steel framed structures and future applications for seismic design.

    PubMed

    Bojórquez, Edén; Reyes-Salazar, Alfredo; Ruiz, Sonia E; Terán-Gilmore, Amador

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have been devoted to calibrate damage indices for steel and reinforced concrete members with the purpose of overcoming some of the shortcomings of the parameters currently used during seismic design. Nevertheless, there is a challenge to study and calibrate the use of such indices for the practical structural evaluation of complex structures. In this paper, an energy-based damage model for multidegree-of-freedom (MDOF) steel framed structures that accounts explicitly for the effects of cumulative plastic deformation demands is used to estimate the cyclic drift capacity of steel structures. To achieve this, seismic hazard curves are used to discuss the limitations of the maximum interstory drift demand as a performance parameter to achieve adequate damage control. Then the concept of cyclic drift capacity, which incorporates information of the influence of cumulative plastic deformation demands, is introduced as an alternative for future applications of seismic design of structures subjected to long duration ground motions.

  3. Design and operational characteristics of a cast steel mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Blantocas, Gene Q.; Ramos, Henry J.; Wada, Motoi

    2004-09-01

    A cast steel magnetic sector mass analyzer is developed for studies of hydrogen and helium ion beams generated by a gas discharge compact ion source. The optimum induced magnetic flux density of 3500 G made it possible to scan the whole spectrum of hydrogen and helium ion species. Analysis of beam characteristics shows that the mass spectrometer sensitivity, and resolving power are approximately inversely proportional. The resolution is enhanced at higher pressures and lower current discharges. In contrast, the instrument sensitivity increased at higher current discharges and decreased at higher pressures. Calculations of the ultimate resolving power with reference to analyzer dimensions yield a numerical value of 30. System anomaly in the form of spherical aberrations was also analyzed using the paraxial beam envelope equation. Beam divergence is most significant at high discharge conditions where angular spread reaches an upper limit of 8.6 deg.

  4. Design and implementation of ergonomic performance measurement system at a steel plant in India.

    PubMed

    Ray, Pradip Kumar; Tewari, V K

    2012-01-01

    Management of Tata Steel, the largest steel making company of India in the private sector, felt the need to develop a framework to determine the levels of ergonomic performance at its different workplaces. The objectives of the study are manifold: to identify and characterize the ergonomic variables for a given worksystem with regard to work efficiency, operator safety, and working conditions, to design a comprehensive Ergonomic Performance Indicator (EPI) for quantitative determination of the ergonomic status and maturity of a given worksystem. The study team of IIT Kharagpur consists of three faculty members and the management of Tata Steel formed a team of eleven members for implementation of EPI model. In order to design and develop the EPI model with total participation and understanding of the concerned personnel of Tata Steel, a three-phase action plan for the project was prepared. The project consists of three phases: preparation and data collection, detailed structuring and validation of EPI model. Identification of ergonomic performance factors, development of interaction matrix, design of assessment tool, and testing and validation of assessment tool (EPI) in varied situations are the major steps in these phases. The case study discusses in detail the EPI model and its applications.

  5. Design, fabrication, and test of a steel spar wind turbine blade

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, T. L.; Sirocky, P. J., Jr.; Viterna, L. A.

    1979-01-01

    The design and fabrication of wind turbine blades based on 60 foot steel spars are discussed. Performance and blade load information is given and compared to analytical prediction. In addition, performance is compared to that of the original MOD-O aluminum blades. Costs for building the two blades are given, and a projection is made for the cost in mass production. Design improvements to reduce weight and improve fatigue life are suggested.

  6. Study, Development, and Design of Replaceable Shear Yielding Steel Panel Damper

    SciTech Connect

    Murakami, Katsuhide; Keii, Michio

    2008-07-08

    For middle-high rise buildings, vibration controlled structures to reduce the damage of main frames are recently becoming general in Japan. A steel material damper is low price and excellent in the energy absorption efficiency at a large earthquake. Though the exchange of the dampers are necessary when an excessive accumulation of plasticity deformation occurs, a steel material damping system, which received an excessive accumulation of plasticity deformation after a large earthquake, can recover a seismic-proof performance and property value of the building after the replacement. In the paper, shear yielding steel panel dampers installed in the web of a beam connected with high tension bolt joint is introduced. This damper is made of low-yield point steel, and the advantages of this system are low cost, easy-production and easy-replacement. For this steel panel damper, the finite element method (FEM) analysis using the shell element model adjusted to 1/2 of 6.4 m beam span is executed to make the design most effective. Yielding property of the beam installing this damper, shape of the splice plate and the bolt orientation for the connecting are examined in this analysis. As a result, we found that the plastic strain extends uniformly to the entire damping panel when making the splice plate a trapezoidal shape. The basic performance confirmation examination was also done using the real scale examination model besides the FEM analysis, and the performance of the system was confirmed. In addition, design of a high rise building in which the steel shear-yielding panel dampers and oil dampers were adopted without disturbing an architectural plan is also introduced.

  7. Synergistic Computational and Microstructural Design of Next- Generation High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Karaman, Ibrahim; Arroyave, Raymundo

    2015-07-31

    The purpose of this project was to: 1) study deformation twinning, its evolution, thermal stability, and the contribution on mechanical response of the new advanced stainless steels, especially at elevated temperatures; 2) study alumina-scale formation on the surface, as an alternative for conventional chromium oxide, that shows better oxidation resistance, through alloy design; and 3) design new generation of high temperature stainless steels that form alumina scale and have thermally stable nano-twins. The work involved few baseline alloys for investigating the twin formation under tensile loading, thermal stability of these twins, and the role of deformation twins on the mechanical response of the alloys. These baseline alloys included Hadfield Steel (Fe-13Mn-1C), 316, 316L and 316N stainless steels. Another baseline alloy was studied for alumina-scale formation investigations. Hadfield steel showed twinning but undesired second phases formed at higher temperatures. 316N stainless steel did not show signs of deformation twinning. Conventional 316 stainless steel demonstrated extensive deformation twinning at room temperature. Investigations on this alloy, both in single crystalline and polycrystalline forms, showed that deformation twins evolve in a hierarchical manner, consisting of micron–sized bundles of nano-twins. The width of nano-twins stays almost constant as the extent of strain increases, but the width and number of the bundles increase with increasing strain. A systematic thermomechanical cycling study showed that the twins were stable at temperatures as high as 900°C, after the dislocations are annealed out. Using such cycles, volume fraction of the thermally stable deformation twins were increased up to 40% in 316 stainless steel. Using computational thermodynamics and kinetics calculations, we designed two generations of advanced austenitic stainless steels. In the first generation, Alloy 1, which had been proposed as an alumina

  8. Enabling lightweight designs by a new laser based approach for joining aluminum to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brockmann, Rüdiger; Kaufmann, Sebastian; Kirchhoff, Marc; Candel-Ruiz, Antonio; Müllerschön, Oliver; Havrilla, David

    2015-03-01

    As sustainability is an essential requirement, lightweight design becomes more and more important, especially for mobility. Reduced weight ensures more efficient vehicles and enables better environmental impact. Besides the design, new materials and material combinations are one major trend to achieve the required weight savings. The use of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Plastics (abbr. CFRP) is widely discussed, but so far high volume applications are rarely to be found. This is mainly due to the fact that parts made of CFRP are much more expensive than conventional parts. Furthermore, the proper technologies for high volume production are not yet ready. Another material with a large potential for lightweight design is aluminum. In comparison to CFRP, aluminum alloys are generally more affordable. As aluminum is a metallic material, production technologies for high volume standard cutting or joining applications are already developed. In addition, bending and deep-drawing can be applied. In automotive engineering, hybrid structures such as combining high-strength steels with lightweight aluminum alloys retain significant weight reduction but also have an advantage over monolithic aluminum - enhanced behavior in case of crash. Therefore, since the use of steel for applications requiring high mechanical properties is unavoidable, methods for joining aluminum with steel parts have to be further developed. Former studies showed that the use of a laser beam can be a possibility to join aluminum to steel parts. In this sense, the laser welding process represents a major challenge, since both materials have different thermal expansion coefficients and properties related to the behavior in corrosive media. Additionally, brittle intermetallic phases are formed during welding. A promising approach to welding aluminum to steel is based on the use of Laser Metal Deposition (abbr. LMD) with deposit materials in the form of powders. Within the present work, the advantages of this

  9. RELIABILITY BASED DESIGN OF FIXED FOUNDATION WIND TURBINES

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, R.

    2013-10-14

    Recent analysis of offshore wind turbine foundations using both applicable API and IEC standards show that the total load demand from wind and waves is greatest in wave driven storms. Further, analysis of overturning moment loads (OTM) reveal that impact forces exerted by breaking waves are the largest contributor to OTM in big storms at wind speeds above the operating range of 25 m/s. Currently, no codes or standards for offshore wind power generators have been adopted by the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Regulation and Enforcement (BOEMRE) for use on the Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Current design methods based on allowable stress design (ASD) incorporate the uncertainty in the variation of loads transferred to the foundation and geotechnical capacity of the soil and rock to support the loads is incorporated into a factor of safety. Sources of uncertainty include spatial and temporal variation of engineering properties, reliability of property measurements applicability and sufficiency of sampling and testing methods, modeling errors, and variability of estimated load predictions. In ASD these sources of variability are generally given qualitative rather than quantitative consideration. The IEC 61400‐3 design standard for offshore wind turbines is based on ASD methods. Load and resistance factor design (LRFD) methods are being increasingly used in the design of structures. Uncertainties such as those listed above can be included quantitatively into the LRFD process. In LRFD load factors and resistance factors are statistically based. This type of analysis recognizes that there is always some probability of failure and enables the probability of failure to be quantified. This paper presents an integrated approach consisting of field observations and numerical simulation to establish the distribution of loads from breaking waves to support the LRFD of fixed offshore foundations.

  10. Effects of LWR coolant environments on fatigue design curves of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1998-03-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of reactor coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data indicate that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This report summarizes work performed by Argonne National Laboratory on fatigue of carbon and low-alloy steels in light water reactor (LWR) environments. The existing fatigue S-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of various material and loading variables such as steel type, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, strain rate, temperature, orientation, and sulfur content on the fatigue life of these steels. Statistical models have been developed for estimating the fatigue S-N curves as a function of material, loading, and environmental variables. The results have been used to estimate the probability of fatigue cracking of reactor components. The different methods for incorporating the effects of LWR coolant environments on the ASME Code fatigue design curves are presented.

  11. Study of Martensite Ageing with Plasma Ion Nitriding of Steel C300 Using Design of an Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gezicioglu, Yavuz; Inal, Osman Tugay

    2014-09-01

    Double treatment of maraging steel C300 (nitriding + ageing) is studied using experimental design with a full 32 factorial matrix. After this treatment maximum surface hardness is 1270 HV and for the core it is 553 HV.

  12. An Investigation of the Role of Second Phase Particles in the Design of Ultra High Strength Steels of Improved Toughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-06-20

    examples in the literature. The only example in the literature of blunting to vertices from an initially sharp crack is the blunting of HY80 steel to three...AD-A226 056 AN INVESTIGATION OF THE ROLE OF SECOND PHASE PARTICLES IN THE DESIGN OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH STEELS OF IMPROVED TOUGHNESS FINAL REPORT W...THE ROLE OF SECOND PHASE PARTICLES IN THE DESIGN OF ULTRA HIGH STRENGTH STEELS OF IMPROVED TOUGHNESS FINAL REPORT W. M. Garrison, Jr. June 15, 1990 U.S

  13. Cathodic protection system design for steel pilings of a wharf structure

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolakakos, S.

    1999-07-01

    Corrosion of steel pilings in sea and brackish water is mostly due to the establishment of localized corrosion cells and the effects of the tidal changes. The most frequently used corrosion protection systems are coatings and/or cathodic protection. These protective systems when properly designed, installed and operated are very effective in preventing corrosion problems. The design of a cathodic protection system, in order to be effective and reliable, must take into consideration all technical design criteria, the type of materials used, the geometric shape of the structure, environmental conditions, site restrictions, and any outside interferences. These design considerations, as well as the use of design data and an overall design methodology for a cathodic protection system for pipe and sheet piling used in a wharf structure, are discussed in this paper.

  14. Numerical design optimization of an EMAT for A0 Lamb wave generation in steel plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seher, Matthias; Huthwaite, Peter; Lowe, Mike; Nagy, Peter; Cawley, Peter

    2014-02-01

    An electromagnetic acoustic transducer (EMAT) for A0 Lamb wave generation on steel plates is developed to operate at 0.50 MHz-mm. A key objective of the development is to maximize the excitation and reception of the A0 mode, while minimizing those of the S0 mode. The chosen EMAT design consists of an induction coil and a permanent magnet. A finite element (FE) model of the EMAT is developed, coupling the electromagnetic and elastodynamic phenomena. An optimization process using a genetic algorithm is implemented, employing the magnet diameter and liftoff distance from the plate as design parameters and using the FE model to calculate the fitness. The optimal design suggested by the optimization process is physically implemented and the experimental measurements are compared to the FE simulation results. In a further step, the variations of the design parameters are studied numerically and the proposed EMAT design exhibits a robust behavior to small changes of the design parameters.

  15. Influence of the Soil-Structure Interaction on the Design of Steel-Braced Building Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azarbakht, Alireza; Ashtiany, Mohsen Ghafory

    2008-07-01

    The modeling and analysis of the superstructure and the foundation for the seismic lateral loads are traditionally done separately. This assumption is an important issue in the design/rehabilitate procedures especially for the short period structures, i.e. steel braced or shear wall systems, which may result to a conservative design. By using more advance procedures, i.e. nonlinear static method, and the incorporation of the soil-structure interaction (SSI), the seismic demand in the lateral resisting system decreases and the design will become more economic. This paper includes an investigation about the influence of the SSI effect on the design of the steel-braced building foundation. The presented example is a three-bay three-storey steel braced frame. Three design methods based on the FEMA 356 guideline and the UBC 97 code are taken in to consideration. The three methods are: (1) linear static analysis based on the UBC 97 code assuming the fixed based condition; (2) linear static analysis based on the FEMA 356 guideline assuming the fixed based condition; and (3) nonlinear static analysis assuming both fixed and flexible based assumptions. The results show that the influence of the SSI on the input demand of the short period building foundations is significant and the foundation design based on the linear static method with the fixed base assumption is so conservative. A simple method is proposed to take the SSI effect in to consideration in the linear static procedure with the fixed base assumption, which is a common method for the engineers. The advantage of this proposed method is the simplicity and the applicability for the engineering purposes.

  16. Influence of the Soil-Structure Interaction on the Design of Steel-Braced Building Foundation

    SciTech Connect

    Azarbakht, Alireza; Ashtiany, Mohsen Ghafory

    2008-07-08

    The modeling and analysis of the superstructure and the foundation for the seismic lateral loads are traditionally done separately. This assumption is an important issue in the design/rehabilitate procedures especially for the short period structures, i.e. steel braced or shear wall systems, which may result to a conservative design. By using more advance procedures, i.e. nonlinear static method, and the incorporation of the soil-structure interaction (SSI), the seismic demand in the lateral resisting system decreases and the design will become more economic. This paper includes an investigation about the influence of the SSI effect on the design of the steel-braced building foundation. The presented example is a three-bay three-storey steel braced frame. Three design methods based on the FEMA 356 guideline and the UBC 97 code are taken in to consideration. The three methods are: (1) linear static analysis based on the UBC 97 code assuming the fixed based condition; (2) linear static analysis based on the FEMA 356 guideline assuming the fixed based condition; and (3) nonlinear static analysis assuming both fixed and flexible based assumptions. The results show that the influence of the SSI on the input demand of the short period building foundations is significant and the foundation design based on the linear static method with the fixed base assumption is so conservative. A simple method is proposed to take the SSI effect in to consideration in the linear static procedure with the fixed base assumption, which is a common method for the engineers. The advantage of this proposed method is the simplicity and the applicability for the engineering purposes.

  17. Experimental Design and Data collection of a finishing end milling operation of AISI 1045 steel

    PubMed Central

    Dias Lopes, Luiz Gustavo; de Brito, Tarcísio Gonçalves; de Paiva, Anderson Paulo; Peruchi, Rogério Santana; Balestrassi, Pedro Paulo

    2016-01-01

    In this Data in Brief paper, a central composite experimental design was planned to collect the surface roughness of an end milling operation of AISI 1045 steel. The surface roughness values are supposed to suffer some kind of variation due to the action of several factors. The main objective here was to present a multivariate experimental design and data collection including control factors, noise factors, and two correlated responses, capable of achieving a reduced surface roughness with minimal variance. Lopes et al. (2016) [1], for example, explores the influence of noise factors on the process performance. PMID:26909374

  18. Design and fabrication considerations for stainless steel liquid helium jackets surrounding SCRF cavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonnema, E. C.; Cunningham, E. K.; Rumel, J. D.

    2014-01-01

    The Department of Energy requires its subcontractors to meet 10 CFR 851 Appendix A Part 4 for all new pressure vessels and pressure piping. The stainless steel pressure vessel boundaries surrounding SCRF cavities fall under this requirement. Methods for meeting this requirement include design and fabrication of the pressure vessels to meet the requirements of the ASME Boiler & Pressure Vessel Code Section VIII Division 1 or Division 2. Design considerations include determining whether the configuration of the SCRF cavity can be accommodated under the rules of Division 1 or must be analyzed under Division 2 Part 4 Design by Rule Requirements or Part 5 Design by Analysis Requirements. Regardless of the Division or Part choice, designers will find the rules of the ASME Code require thicker pressure boundary members, larger welds, and additional non-destructive testing and quality assurance requirements. These challenges must be met and overcome by the fabricator through the development of robust, detailed, and repeatable manufacturing processes. In this paper we discuss the considerations for stainless steel pressure vessels that must meet the ASME Code and illustrate the discussion with examples from direct experience fabricating such vessels.

  19. A hierarchical multi-physics model for design of high toughness steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Su; Moran, Brian; Kam Liu, Wing; Olson, Gregory B.

    2003-05-01

    In support of the computational design of high toughness steels as hierarchically structured materials, a multiscale, multiphysics methodology is developed for a `ductile fracture simulator.' At the nanometer scale, the method unites continuum mechanics with quantum physics, using first-principles calculations to predict the force-distance laws for interfacial separation with both normal and plastic sliding components. The predicted adhesion behavior is applied to the description of interfacial decohesion for both micron-scale primary inclusions governing primary void formation and submicron-scale secondary particles governing microvoid-based shear localization that accelerates primary void coalescence. Fine scale deformation is described by a `Particle Dynamics' method that extends the framework of molecular dynamics to multi-atom aggregates. This is combined with other meshfree and finite-element methods in two-level cell modeling to provide a hierarchical constitutive model for crack advance, combining conventional plasticity, microstructural damage, strain gradient effects and transformation plasticity from dispersed metastable austenite. Detailed results of a parallel experimental study of a commercial steel are used to calibrate the model at multiple scales. An initial application provides a Toughness-Strength-Adhesion diagram defining the relation among alloy strength, inclusion adhesion energy and fracture toughness as an aid to microstructural design. The analysis of this paper introduces an approach of creative steel design that can be stated as the exploration of the effective connections among the five key-components: elements selection, process design, micro/nanostructure optimization, desirable properties and industrial performance by virtue of innovations and inventions.

  20. Designing Pulse Laser Surface Modification of H13 Steel Using Response Surface Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aqida, S. N.; Brabazon, D.; Naher, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a design of experiment (DOE) for laser surface modification process of AISI H13 tool steel in achieving the maximum hardness and minimum surface roughness at a range of modified layer depth. A Rofin DC-015 diffusion-cooled CO2 slab laser was used to process AISI H13 tool steel samples. Samples of 10 mm diameter were sectioned to 100 mm length in order to process a predefined circumferential area. The parameters selected for examination were laser peak power, overlap percentage and pulse repetition frequency (PRF). The response surface method with Box-Behnken design approach in Design Expert 7 software was used to design the H13 laser surface modification process. Metallographic study and image analysis were done to measure the modified layer depth. The modified surface roughness was measured using two-dimensional surface profilometer. The correlation of the three laser processing parameters and the modified surface properties was specified by plotting three-dimensional graph. The hardness properties were tested at 981 mN force. From metallographic study, the laser modified surface depth was between 37 μm and 150 μm. The average surface roughness recorded from the 2D profilometry was at a minimum value of 1.8 μm. The maximum hardness achieved was between 728 and 905 HV0.1. These findings are significant to modern development of hard coatings for wear resistant applications.

  1. Systems design of transformation toughened blast-resistant naval hull steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Arup

    A systems approach to computational materials design has demonstrated a new class of ultratough, weldable secondary hardened plate steels combining new levels of strength and toughness while meeting processability requirements. A first prototype alloy has achieved property goals motivated by projected naval hull applications requiring extreme fracture toughness (Cv > 85 ft-lbs (115 J) corresponding to KId > 200 ksi.in1/2 (220 MPa.m1/2)) at strength levels of 150--180 ksi (1034--1241 MPa) yield strength in weldable, formable plate steels. A theoretical design concept was explored integrating the mechanism of precipitated nickel-stabilized dispersed austenite for transformation toughening in an alloy strengthened by combined precipitation of M2C carbides and BCC copper both at an optimal ˜3nm particle size for efficient strengthening. This concept was adapted to plate steel design by employing a mixed bainitic/martensitic matrix microstructure produced by air-cooling after solution-treatment and constraining the composition to low carbon content for weldability. With optimized levels of copper and M2C carbide formers based on a quantitative strength model, a required alloy nickel content of 6.5 wt% was predicted for optimal austenite stability for transformation toughening at the desired strength level of 160 ksi (1100 MPa) yield strength. A relatively high Cu level of 3.65 wt% was employed to allow a carbon limit of 0.05 wt% for good weldability. Hardness and tensile tests conducted on the designed prototype confirmed predicted precipitation strengthening behavior in quench and tempered material. Multi-step tempering conditions were employed to achieve the optimal austenite stability resulting in significant increase of impact toughness to 130 ft-lb (176 J) at a strength level of 160 ksi (1100 MPa). Comparison with the baseline toughness-strength combination determined by isochronal tempering studies indicates a transformation toughening increment of 60% in Charpy

  2. Computer-aided design of transformation toughened blast resistant naval hull steels: Part I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, A.; Olson, G. B.

    2007-07-01

    A systematic approach to computer-aided materials design has formulated a new class of ultratough, weldable secondary hardened plate steels combining new levels of strength and toughness while meeting processability requirements. A theoretical design concept integrated the mechanism of precipitated nickel-stabilized dispersed austenite for transformation toughening in an alloy strengthened by combined precipitation of M2C carbides and BCC copper both at an optimal ˜3 nm particle size for efficient strengthening. This concept was adapted to plate steel design by employing a mixed bainitic/martensitic matrix microstructure produced by air-cooling after solution-treatment and constraining the composition to low carbon content for weldability. With optimized levels of copper and M2C carbide formers based on a quantitative strength model, a required alloy nickel content of 6.5 wt% was predicted for optimal austenite stability for transformation toughening at the desired strength level of 160 ksi (1,100 MPa) yield strength. A relatively high Cu level of 3.65 wt% was employed to allow a carbon limit of 0.05 wt% for good weldability, without causing excessive solidification microsegregation.

  3. A new methodology for energy-based seismic design of steel moment frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezgebo, Mebrahtom Gebrekirstos; Lui, Eric M.

    2017-01-01

    A procedure is proposed whereby input and hysteretic energy spectra developed for single-degree-of-freedom (SDOF) systems are applied to multi-degree-of-freedom (MDOF) steel moment resisting frames. The proposed procedure is verified using four frames, viz., frame with three-, five-, seven- and nine-stories, each of which is subjected to the fault-normal and fault-parallel components of three actual earthquakes. A very good estimate for the three- and five-story frames, and a reasonably acceptable estimate for the seven-, and nine-story frames, have been obtained. A method for distributing the hysteretic energy over the frame height is also proposed. This distribution scheme allows for the determination of the energy demand component of a proposed energy-based seismic design (EBSD) procedure for each story. To address the capacity component of EBSD, a story-wise optimization design procedure is developed by utilizing the energy dissipating capacity from plastic hinge formation/rotation for these moment frames. The proposed EBSD procedure is demonstrated in the design of a three-story one-bay steel moment frame.

  4. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. The present study investigates the use of a sandwich foam fan blade mae up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The resulting structures possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and a detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of kin thickness and core volume are presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  5. German guidelines for steel fiber reinforced shotcrete in tunnels with special consideration of design and statical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt-Schleicher, H.

    1995-12-31

    Steel fiber reinforced concrete can undoubtedly absorb tensile forces. The utilization of this characteristic for the design and specifications of support structures for underground tunnels is regulated by the new Guidelines from the German Concrete Association. Recommendations are given in these guidelines for construction design and for construction itself. The required tests for classification, suitability and quality monitoring are presented.

  6. Design and evaluation of low-cost stainless steel fiberglass foam blades for large wind driven generating systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eggert, W. S.

    1982-01-01

    A low cost wind turbine blade based on a stainless steel fiberglass foam Budd blade design concept, was evaluated for its principle characteristics, low cost features, and its advantages and disadvantages. A blade structure was designed and construction methods and materials were selected. A complete blade tooling concepts, various technical and economic analysis, and evaluations of the blade design were performed. A comprehensive fatigue test program is conducted to provide data to verify the design stress allowables.

  7. APPLICATION OF STEEL PIPE PILE LOADING TESTS TO DESIGN VERIFICATION OF FOUNDATION OF THE TOKYO GATE BRIDGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saitou, Yutaka; Kikuchi, Yoshiaki; Kusakabe, Osamu; Kiyomiya, Osamu; Yoneyama, Haruo; Kawakami, Taiji

    Steel sheet pipe pile foundations with large diameter steel pipe sheet pile were used for the foundation of the main pier of the Tokyo Gateway bridge. However, as for the large diameter steel pipe pile, the bearing mechanism including a pile tip plugging effect is still unclear due to lack of the practical examinations even though loading tests are performed on Trans-Tokyo Bay Highway. In the light of the foregoing problems, static pile loading tests both vertical and horizontal directions, a dynamic loading test, and cone penetration tests we re conducted for determining proper design parameters of the ground for the foundations. Design parameters were determined rationally based on the tests results. Rational design verification was obtained from this research.

  8. M-X Environmental Technical Report. Environmental Characteristics of Alternative Designated Deployment Areas, Steel Industry.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-12-22

    at McMinnville , Oregon near Portland and has a current capacity to produce approximately 180,000 tons of raw steel. During the current year with...Steel Co. 120,000 60 75,000 7,vntana wtteman Steel Mills 42.000 100 42,000 Oregon McMinnville Cascade Steel Rolling Mills, Inc. 250,0001 80 200,000

  9. Advancing density functional theory to finite temperatures: methods and applications in steel design.

    PubMed

    Hickel, T; Grabowski, B; Körmann, F; Neugebauer, J

    2012-02-08

    The performance of materials such as steels, their high strength and formability, is based on an impressive variety of competing mechanisms on the microscopic/atomic scale (e.g. dislocation gliding, solid solution hardening, mechanical twinning or structural phase transformations). Whereas many of the currently available concepts to describe these mechanisms are based on empirical and experimental data, it becomes more and more apparent that further improvement of materials needs to be based on a more fundamental level. Recent progress for methods based on density functional theory (DFT) now makes the exploration of chemical trends, the determination of parameters for phenomenological models and the identification of new routes for the optimization of steel properties feasible. A major challenge in applying these methods to a true materials design is, however, the inclusion of temperature-driven effects on the desired properties. Therefore, a large range of computational tools has been developed in order to improve the capability and accuracy of first-principles methods in determining free energies. These combine electronic, vibrational and magnetic effects as well as structural defects in an integrated approach. Based on these simulation tools, one is now able to successfully predict mechanical and thermodynamic properties of metals with a hitherto not achievable accuracy.

  10. Optimization as a support for design of hot rolling technology of dual phase steel strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szeliga, Danuta; Sztangret, Łukasz; Kusiak, Jan; Pietrzyk, Maciej

    2013-05-01

    The objective of the paper was performing of the sensitivity analysis of the model used for design of manufacturing technology for auto body parts made of the Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). Dual phase steel was considered as an example. The sensitivity analysis was performed to evaluate the importance of all variables as far as their influence on the finishing rolling temperature and grain size. The phase composition after cooling was also considered. An arbitrary hot rolling process characterized only by a number of passes and cooling conditions between passes, as well as by laminar cooling parameters, was selected for the analysis. Metamodel of the rolling cycle was developed to decrease the computing costs for the optimization task. Modified Avrami equation was used for modelling phase transformations during cooling. Such process parameters as the initial temperature, interpass times, heat exchange coefficients and rolling velocities were selected as optimization variables for the rolling process. Parameters of the thermal cycles were selected as the optimization variables for the laminar cooling process. Achieving the required phase composition of product was the optimization objective function. Optimization was performed using various techniques, including methods inspired by nature optimization.

  11. Supertough Stainless Bearing Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1995-01-01

    Composition and processing of supertough stainless bearing steel designed with help of computer-aided thermodynamic modeling. Fracture toughness and hardness of steel exceeds those of other bearing steels like 440C stainless bearing steel. Developed for service in fuel and oxidizer turbopumps on Space Shuttle main engine. Because of strength and toughness, also proves useful in other applications like gears and surgical knives.

  12. Microstructure design of low alloy transformation-induced plasticity assisted steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ruixian

    The microstructure of low alloy Transformation Induced Plasticity (TRIP) assisted steels has been systematically varied through the combination of computational and experimental methodologies in order to enhance the mechanical performance and to fulfill the requirement of the next generation Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS). The roles of microstructural parameters, such as phase constitutions, phase stability, and volume fractions on the strength-ductility combination have been revealed. Two model alloy compositions (i.e. Fe-1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C, and Fe-3Mn-1Si-0.3C in wt%, nominal composition) were studied. Multiphase microstructures including ferrite, bainite, retained austenite and martensite were obtained through conventional two step heat treatment (i.e. intercritical annealing-IA, and bainitic isothermal transformation-BIT). The effect of phase constitution on the mechanical properties was first characterized experimentally via systematically varying the volume fractions of these phases through computational thermodynamics. It was found that martensite was the main phase to deteriorate ductility, meanwhile the C/VA ratio (i.e. carbon content over the volume fraction of austenite) could be another indicator for the ductility of the multiphase microstructure. Following the microstructural characterization of the multiphase alloys, two microstructural design criteria (i.e. maximizing ferrite and austenite, suppressing athermal martensite) were proposed in order to optimize the corresponding mechanical performance. The volume fraction of ferrite was maximized during the IA with the help of computational thermodyanmics. On the other hand, it turned out theoretically that the martensite suppression could not be avoided on the low Mn contained alloy (i.e. Fe- 1.5Mn-1.5Si-0.3C). Nevertheless, the achieved combination of strength (~1300MPa true strength) and ductility (˜23% uniform elongation) on the low Mn alloy following the proposed design criteria fulfilled the

  13. Design, analysis and application of innovative composite PR connections between steel beams and CFT columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jong Wan; Choi, Eunsoo; Leon, Roberto T.

    2011-02-01

    In this research, three structural design concepts are integrated: the use of composite concrete-filled tube (CFT) columns, the use of partially restrained (PR) connections and the introduction of innovative materials (shape memory alloys) in the connection design. These concepts are used to enhance the robustness and performance of composite-special moment frames. These innovative connections intend to exploit the recentering properties of super-elastic SMA tension bars, the energy dissipation capacity of low-carbon steel bars and the toughness of CFT columns. PR-CFT connection prototypes were designed based on a hierarchy of strength models for each connection component. Simplified user joint elements based on the mechanical modeling approach were formulated in an effort to simulate the realistic behavior of bolted connections. The application of new connections to low-rise PR composite frames is illustrated by designing four buildings in both 2D and 3D for the western US region. The performance of these composite frames was compared with those with conventional welded frames in terms of strength, ductility and recentering behavior. In all three areas, frames with the PR composite connections showed superior performance. This is due primarily to the capability of this system to redistribute inter-story drift more evenly through the height of the frame.

  14. Analysis of Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels with a Metal Foam Care for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Ghosn, Louis J.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Raj, Sai V.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.; Hebsur, Mohan G.

    2004-01-01

    The quest for cheap, low density and high performance materials in the design of aircraft and rotorcraft engine fan and propeller blades poses immense challenges to the materials and structural design engineers. Traditionally, these components have been fabricated using expensive materials such as light weight titanium alloys, polymeric composite materials and carbon-carbon composites. The present study investigates the use of P sandwich foam fan blade made up of solid face sheets and a metal foam core. The face sheets and the metal foam core material were an aerospace grade precipitation hardened 17-4 PH stainless steel with high strength and high toughness. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by a foam core. The resulting structure possesses a high stiffness while being lighter than a similar solid construction. Since the face sheets carry the applied bending loads, the sandwich architecture is a viable engineering concept. The material properties of 17-4 PH metal foam are reviewed briefly to describe the characteristics of the sandwich structure for a fan blade application. A vibration analysis for natural frequencies and P detailed stress analysis on the 17-4 PH sandwich foam blade design for different combinations of skin thickness and core volume %re presented with a comparison to a solid titanium blade.

  15. Methodology to make a robust estimation of the carbon steel overpack lifetime with respect to the Belgian Supercontainer design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kursten, B.; Druyts, F.

    2008-09-01

    The Supercontainer (SC) design is the preferred Belgian option for the final disposal of vitrified high-level waste (VHLW) and spent fuel (SF) in deep underground clay layers. The SC consists of a carbon steel overpack, containing VHLW canisters or SF assemblies, surrounded by a thick concrete buffer, which in turn, is entirely encased in a stainless steel envelope. An integrated R&D strategy is developed to demonstrate and defend that the integrity of the carbon steel overpack can be ensured at least during the thermal phase. This integrated approach, proposed to estimate the lifetime of the carbon steel overpack, consists of three steps: lifetime prediction, validation, and confidence building. Under the predicted conditions within the SC (highly alkaline concrete buffer), the carbon steel overpack is expected to undergo uniform corrosion (passive dissolution). The methodology exists in demonstrating that corrosion forms other than uniform corrosion (e.g. localised corrosion such as pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion and stress corrosion cracking) cannot occur ('exclusion principle'). This paper elaborates on how this methodology is implemented.

  16. Performance optimization and computational design of ultra-high strength gear steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiemens, Benjamin Lee

    Rising power density requirements in transmission gear applications are swiftly outpacing gear redesign alone and will ultimately depend on better materials. Ni-Co secondary hardening steels show great promise for these applications due to their optimized combination of strength and toughness. The commercially available secondary hardening alloys GearMet RTM C61 and C67 have already demonstrated promising contact fatigue resistance, however bending fatigue is anticipated to be the primary failure mode limiting high power density gear applications. Single tooth bending fatigue testing was therefore completed on C61 and C67 spur gears to both assess the optimized performance of these alloys as well as identify defect populations currently limiting further advances. The resultant best-practice C61 spur gears in a shot peened and isotropic superfinished condition outperformed the top-ranking premium gear steel, demonstrating an approximate 15% improvement in bending fatigue endurance limit. Fatigue failures limiting further bending fatigue performance were identified to primarily initiate at three defect classes: shot peening-induced surface damage, subsurface inter-granular cleavage facets and Al2O3 and La2O2S inclusions. C67 spur gears did not show increased performance despite elevated surface hardness levels due to the inability of current shot peening practices to achieve maximum compressive stress in ultra-high hardness materials. In an effort to reduce the material cost of these alloys through minimization/elimination of cobalt alloying additions, BCC Cu precipitation was incorporated to offset ensuing losses in temper resistance by providing additional heterogeneous nucleation sites for the M2C strengthening dispersion. Fifty-pound experimental heats were made of four designed compositions. Peak hardness levels achieved during tempering fell on average 200 VHN short of the 900 VHN designed surface hardness. 3-dimensional local electrode atom probe (LEAP

  17. Design study of steel V-Belt CVT for electric vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swain, J. C.; Klausing, T. A.; Wilcox, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    A continuously variable transmission (CVT) design layout was completed. The intended application was for coupling the flywheel to the driveline of a flywheel battery hybrid electric vehicle. The requirements were that the CVT accommodate flywheel speeds from 14,000 to 28,000 rpm and driveline speeds of 850 to 5000 rpm without slipping. Below 850 rpm a slipping clutch was used between the CVT and the driveline. The CVT was required to accommodate 330 ft-lb maximum torque and 100 hp maximum transient. The weighted average power was 22 hp, the maximum allowable full range shift time was 2 seconds and the required lift was 2600 hours. The resulting design utilized two steel V-belts in series to accommodate the required wide speed ratio. The size of the CVT, including the slipping clutch, was 20.6 inches long, 9.8 inches high and 13.8 inches wide. The estimated weight was 155 lb. An overall potential efficiency of 95 percent was projected for the average power condition.

  18. Seismic design repair and retrofit strategies for steel roof deck diaphragms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franquet, John-Edward

    Structural engineers will often rely on the roof diaphragm to transfer lateral seismic loads to the bracing system of single-storey structures. The implementation of capacity-based design in the NBCC 2005 has caused an increase in the diaphragm design load due to the need to use the probable capacity of the bracing system, thus resulting in thicker decks, closer connector patterns and higher construction costs. Previous studies have shown that accounting for the in-plane flexibility of the diaphragm when calculating the overall building period can result in lower seismic forces and a more cost-efficient design. However, recent studies estimating the fundamental period of single storey structures using ambient vibration testing showed that the in-situ approximation was much shorter than that obtained using analytical means. The difference lies partially in the diaphragm stiffness characteristics which have been shown to decrease under increasing excitation amplitude. Using the diaphragm as the energy-dissipating element in the seismic force resisting system has also been investigated as this would take advantage of the diaphragm's ductility and limited overstrength; thus, lower capacity based seismic forces would result. An experimental program on 21.0m by 7.31m diaphragm test specimens was carried out so as to investigate the dynamic properties of diaphragms including the stiffness, ductility and capacity. The specimens consisted of 20 and 22 gauge panels with nailed frame fasteners and screwed sidelap connections as well a welded and button-punch specimen. Repair strategies for diaphragms that have previously undergone inelastic deformations were devised in an attempt to restitute the original stiffness and strength and were then experimentally evaluated. Strength and stiffness experimental estimations are compared with those predicted with the Steel Deck Institute (SDI) method. A building design comparative study was also completed. This study looks at the

  19. Computational design and analysis of high strength austenitic TRIP steels for blast protection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadhukhan, Padmanava

    Recent assessment of material property requirements for blast resistant applications, especially for the naval ship hulls, has defined the need to design steels with high stretch ductility and fragment penetration resistance, along with high strength and adequate toughness. Using a system based computational materials design approach, two series of austenitic (gamma) steels have been designed -- BA120 to exhibit high uniform ductility in tension (>20%) and SA120 to exhibit high tensile (>20%) and shear strains (>50%), with both alloys maintaining high levels of yield strength (120 ksi/827 MPa) at room temperature under Tensile and Shear stress states. BA120 is low chromium (4 wt %) high nickel (23.5 wt %) alloy while the SA120 is a high chromium design (10 wt %), both designed for non-magnetic behavior. The Thermo-Calc computational thermodynamics software in conjunction with a Ni-DATA 7 thermodynamic database has been used to model precipitation strengthening of the alloy, by quantifying the dependence of yield stress of austenitic steels on the mole fraction of the precipitated gamma' (Gamma Prime) Ni3(Ti, Al) phase. The required high strength has been achieved by the precipitation of spheroidal intermetallic gamma' -- phase of optimum diameter (15 nm) in equilibrium with the matrix at the standard aging temperature. Adequate Al and Ti with respect 5 to the Ni in the matrix ensure enough gamma' phase fraction and number density of precipitates to provide the necessary strength. The predicted gamma' precipitation strengthening to 120-130 ksi for both BA120 and SA120 has been validated through both microhardness as well as static and dynamic tensile and shear tests conducted at room temperature. 3-D LEAP analysis of the aged specimens has shown the expected size and distribution of gamma' -- precipitates with good compositional accuracy of predicted values from the thermodynamic models, for both matrix austenite and gamma'. Metastable austenitic steels have been

  20. Stress-corrosion cracking of steels in ammonia with consideration given to OTEC design: a survey

    SciTech Connect

    Teel, R.B.

    1980-03-01

    Carbon steel, alloy steel, and high-strength, quenched and tempered steel, when under applied or residual stress and especially when cold formed and/or welded without subsequent thermal stress relief, are subject to failure by stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) in air-contaminated dry ammonia. Water as well as hydrazine when present in small amounts have been shown to be effective inhibitors in an all steel system. Galvanic corrosion between dissimilar metals and/or accelerated failure by SCC of stressed steel as a result of galvanic coupling may be of concern. Where water has proven effective as an inhibitor of SCC in an all steel system, it may not be adequate in a mixed metal system. With aluminum tubes, the tube sheet will either have to be solid aluminum, aluminum clad steel or some nonconductive coating will be necessary to effectively remove the cathodic alloy from the galvanic circuit. Research is required to determine the severity of the coupling effect between dissimilar alloys in ammonia under OTEC conditions; especially the possibility of accelerated SCC failures of stressed steel where the presence of an inhibitor in the ammonia may not be sufficient to override the galvanic coupling effect.

  1. Design and analysis of eccentrically braced steel frames with vertical links using shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Massah, Saeed Reza; Dorvar, Hosein

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, the philosophy behind traditional methods by which structures were designed to withstand natural disasters has gone through major changes. Shape memory alloys (SMAs) are characterized by their superelastic behavior, which enables them to recover their original shape after experiencing large deformations. This characteristic provides an ideal reversibility capacity that can be used in the passive control of buildings exposed to earthquakes. This article has attempted to identify the effects of changing the hysteretic characteristics of SMA materials when they are used as passive control systems in eccentric bracing frames. By evaluating the numerical analysis results obtained from the modeling of an experimental sample and the modeling of the proposed EBF system, the accuracy of the above-stated notion was confirmed. Moreover, the results that pertain to the nonlinear pushover analysis, time-history dynamic analysis and seismic damage analysis of eccentric steel bracing frames of 4-, 9- and 14-story structures indicate that the use of SMA superelastic materials, in addition to effectively improving their ductility, stiffness and lateral strength, provides an excellent reversibility capacity, which considerably reduces both the maximum relative displacement and the residual deformation in the structure.

  2. Probabilistic Assessment of the Design and Safety of HSLA-100 Steel Confinement Vessels

    SciTech Connect

    R.M. Dolin

    2003-03-03

    This probabilistic approach for assessing the design and safety of the HSLA-100 steel confinement vessel used for a DynEx test involved the probability of failure for several scenarios, in which a fragment may penetrate the vessel. The samples involve vessel thicknesses of 1 inch, 2 inches, and 5.25 inches--the combined thicknesses of the 2 inch containment vessel and the 3.25 inch safety vessel. Two simulation approaches were used for each scenario to assess the probability of failure. The Likelihood of Occurrence method simultaneously models all likely fragment events of a test, for which the net probability of failure is the sum of all the fragment events. The Stochastic Sampling method determines the probability of a fragment perforation on the basis of a logical model and takes the overall probability that an experiment results in failure as the maximum probability for any fragment event. With margin and safety assessments taken into account, it was concluded that the one and two inch thicknesses by themselves are inadequate for containing a DynEx test. The 5.25 inch thickness was determined to be safe by the Likelihood of Occurrence method and nearly adequate by the Stochastic Sampling simulation.

  3. Biotherapeutic formulation factors affecting metal leachables from stainless steel studied by design of experiments.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Shuxia; Evans, Brad; Schöneich, Christian; Singh, Satish K

    2012-03-01

    Trace amounts of metals are inevitably present in biotherapeutic products. They can arise from various sources. The impact of common formulation factors such as protein concentration, antioxidant, metal chelator concentration and type, surfactant, pH, and contact time with stainless steel on metal leachables was investigated by a design of experiments approach. Three major metal leachables, iron, chromium, and nickel were monitored by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. It was observed that among all the tested factors, contact time, metal chelator concentration, and protein concentration were statistically significant factors with higher temperature resulting in higher levels of leached metals. Within a pH range of 5.5-6.5, solution pH played a minor role for chromium leaching at 25°C. No statistically significant difference was observed due to type of chelator, presence of antioxidant, or surfactant. In order to optimize a biotherapeutic formulation to achieve a target drug product shelf life with acceptable quality, each formulation component must be evaluated for its impact.

  4. Design of a continuous process setup for precipitated calcium carbonate production from steel converter slag.

    PubMed

    Mattila, Hannu-Petteri; Zevenhoven, Ron

    2014-03-01

    A mineral carbonation process "slag2PCC" for carbon capture, utilization, and storage is discussed. Ca is extracted from steel slag by an ammonium salt solvent and carbonated with gaseous CO2 after the separation of the residual slag. The solvent is reused after regeneration. The effects of slag properties such as the content of free lime, fractions of Ca, Si, Fe, and V, particle size, and slag storage on the Ca extraction efficiency are studied. Small particles with a high free-lime content and minor fractions of Si and V are the most suitable. To limit the amount of impurities in the process, the slag-to-liquid ratio should remain below a certain value, which depends on the slag composition. Also, the design of a continuous test setup (total volume ∼75 L) is described, which enables quick process variations needed to adapt the system to the varying slag quality. Different precipitated calcium carbonate crystals (calcite and vaterite) are generated in different parts of the setup.

  5. Design optimization of cold-formed steel portal frames taking into account the effect of building topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phan, Duoc T.; Lim, James B. P.; Sha, Wei; Siew, Calvin Y. M.; Tanyimboh, Tiku T.; Issa, Honar K.; Mohammad, Fouad A.

    2013-04-01

    Cold-formed steel portal frames are a popular form of construction for low-rise commercial, light industrial and agricultural buildings with spans of up to 20 m. In this article, a real-coded genetic algorithm is described that is used to minimize the cost of the main frame of such buildings. The key decision variables considered in this proposed algorithm consist of both the spacing and pitch of the frame as continuous variables, as well as the discrete section sizes. A routine taking the structural analysis and frame design for cold-formed steel sections is embedded into a genetic algorithm. The results show that the real-coded genetic algorithm handles effectively the mixture of design variables, with high robustness and consistency in achieving the optimum solution. All wind load combinations according to Australian code are considered in this research. Results for frames with knee braces are also included, for which the optimization achieved even larger savings in cost.

  6. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, V.K.; Pankiw, R.I.

    2006-04-15

    The goal of this program was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and upper use temperature by 86 to 140 F (30 to 60 C). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 38 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of $185 million/year. The higher strength H-Series of cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat-treating industry. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc. with research participation by the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies. Energy Industries of Ohio (EIO) was also a partner in this project. Each team partner had well-defined roles. Duraloy Technologies led the team by identifying the base alloys that were to be improved from this research. Duraloy Technologies also provided an extensive creep data base on current alloys, provided creep-tested specimens of certain commercial alloys, and carried out centrifugal casting and component fabrication of newly designed alloys. Nucor Steel was the first partner company that installed the radiant burner tube assembly in their heat-treating furnace. Other steel companies participated in project review meetings and are currently working with Duraloy Technologies to obtain components of the new alloys. EIO is promoting the enhanced performance of the newly designed alloys to Ohio-based companies. The Timken Company is one of the Ohio companies being promoted by EIO. The project management and coordination plan is shown in Fig. 1.1. A related project at University of Texas-Arlington (UT-A) is described in Development of Semi-Stochastic Algorithm for Optimizing Alloy Composition of High-Temperature Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) for Desired

  7. Smart Elasto-Magneto-Electric (EME) Sensors for Stress Monitoring of Steel Cables: Design Theory and Experimental Validation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ru; Duan, Yuanfeng; Or, Siu Wing; Zhao, Yang

    2014-01-01

    An elasto-magnetic (EM) and magneto-electric (ME) effect based elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensor has been proposed recently by the authors for stress monitoring of steel cables with obvious superiorities over traditional elasto-magnetic sensors. For design optimization and engineering application of the EME sensor, the design theory is interpreted with a developed model taking into account the EM coupling effect and ME coupling effect. This model is able to approximate the magnetization changes that a steel structural component undergoes when subjected to excitation magnetic field and external stress, and to simulate the induced ME voltages of the ME sensing unit located in the magnetization area. A full-scale experiment is then carried out to verify the model and to calibrate the EME sensor as a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tool to monitor the cable stress. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results using the developed model. The proposed EME sensor proves to be feasible for stress monitoring of steel cables with high sensitivity, fast response, and ease of installation. PMID:25072348

  8. A Novel Martensitic Creep-Resistant Steel Strengthened by MX Carbonitrides with Extremely Low Coarsening Rates: Design and Characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; Ma, Wenjie; Yan, Wei; Yang, Ke; Toda, Yoshiaki; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-09-01

    A general computational alloy design approach, based on thermodynamics and thermokinetics and coupled with a genetic algorithm optimization routine, was applied to the design of novel creep martensitic resistant steels. The optimal alloy suggested by the model has a high density of barely coarsening MX carbonitride precipitates. The model yielded precise values for the concentrations of the 10 alloying elements considered. The model alloy was produced on a 10 kg lab scale. Samples of the new alloy of one of the best commercial martensitic steels on the market P92 were subjected to a high aging temperature of 923 K (650 °C) for times up to 1000 hours. The microstructure of the new alloy in the as-produced state as well as after 1000 hours exposure has all the intended features as predicted by the model. The coarsening rate of the MX rate carbonitrides was substantially lower than that of the precipitates in the P92 steel. The very low coarsening rate explains the superior hardness at very long exposure times.

  9. Smart elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensors for stress monitoring of steel cables: design theory and experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ru; Duan, Yuanfeng; Or, Siu Wing; Zhao, Yang

    2014-07-28

    An elasto-magnetic (EM) and magneto-electric (ME) effect based elasto-magneto-electric (EME) sensor has been proposed recently by the authors for stress monitoring of steel cables with obvious superiorities over traditional elasto-magnetic sensors. For design optimization and engineering application of the EME sensor, the design theory is interpreted with a developed model taking into account the EM coupling effect and ME coupling effect. This model is able to approximate the magnetization changes that a steel structural component undergoes when subjected to excitation magnetic field and external stress, and to simulate the induced ME voltages of the ME sensing unit located in the magnetization area. A full-scale experiment is then carried out to verify the model and to calibrate the EME sensor as a non-destructive evaluation (NDE) tool to monitor the cable stress. The experimental results agree well with the simulation results using the developed model. The proposed EME sensor proves to be feasible for stress monitoring of steel cables with high sensitivity, fast response, and ease of installation.

  10. Recommend design of filler metal to minimize carbon steel weld metal preferential corrosion in CO2-saturated oilfield produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Yongxin; Jing, Hongyang; Han, Yongdian; Feng, Zhicao; Xu, Lianyong

    2016-12-01

    The paper proposes a recommend design for the alloying elements in the filler metal to minimize preferential weld corrosion of carbon steel. The tensile and corrosion resistance properties of the weld metal are considerably improved by using a filler metal containing alloying elements according to the recommended design. Analysis of the morphology and composition of corrosion products on weld metals showed that the common weld metal suffered severe localized corrosion, whereas the weld metal with the alloying elements exhibited uniform corrosion. Based on these results, a tentative mechanism of CO2 corrosion resistance for both weld metals has been proposed.

  11. Ferritic steels for sodium-cooled fast reactors: Design principles and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raj, Baldev; Vijayalakshmi, M.

    2010-09-01

    An overview of the current status of development of ferritic steels for emerging fast reactor technologies is presented in this paper. The creep-resistant 9-12Cr ferritic/martensitic steels are classically known for steam generator applications. The excellent void swelling resistance of ferritic steels enabled the identification of their potential for core component applications of fast reactors. Since then, an extensive knowledge base has been generated by identifying the empirical correlations between chemistry of the steels, heat treatment, structure, and properties, in addition to their in-reactor behavior. A few concerns have also been identified which pertain to high-temperature irradiation creep, embrittlement, Type IV cracking in creep-loaded weldments, and hard zone formation in dissimilar joints. The origin of these problems and the methodologies to overcome the limitations are highlighted. Finally, the suitability of the ferritic steels is re-evaluated in the emerging scenario of the fast reactor technology, with a target of achieving better breeding ratio and improved thermal efficiency.

  12. A Model Study of Inclusions Deposition, Macroscopic Transport, and Dynamic Removal at Steel-Slag Interface for Different Tundish Designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chao; Ni, Peiyuan; Jonsson, Lage Tord Ingemar; Tilliander, Anders; Cheng, Guoguang; Jönsson, Pär Göran

    2016-06-01

    This paper presents computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation results of inclusions macroscopic transport as well as dynamic removal in tundishes. A novel treatment was implemented using the deposition velocity calculated by a revised unified Eulerian deposition model to replace the widely used Stokes rising velocity in the boundary conditions for inclusions removal at the steel-slag interface in tundishes. In this study, the dynamic removal for different size groups of inclusions at different steel-slag interfaces (smooth or rough) with different absorption conditions at the interface (partially or fully absorbed) in two tundish designs was studied. The results showed that the dynamic removal ratios were higher for larger inclusions than for smaller inclusions. Besides, the dynamic removal ratio was higher for rough interfaces than for smooth interfaces. On the other hand, regarding the cases when inclusions are partially or fully absorbed at a smooth steel-slag interface, the removal ratio values are proportional to the absorption proportion of inclusions at the steel-slag interface. Furthermore, the removal of inclusions in two tundish designs, i.e., with and without a weir and a dam were compared. Specifically, the tundish with a weir and a dam exhibited a better performance with respect to the removal of bigger inclusions (radii of 5, 7, and 9 μm) than that of the case without weir and dam. That was found to be due to the strong paralleling flow near the middle part of the top surface. However, the tundish without weir and dam showed a higher removal ratio of smaller inclusions (radius of 1 μm). The reason could be the presence of a paralleling flow near the inlet zone, where the inclusions deposition velocities were much higher than in other parts.

  13. Alloy Design Based on Computational Thermodynamics and Multi-objective Optimization: The Case of Medium-Mn Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aristeidakis, John S.; Haidemenopoulos, Gregory N.

    2017-02-01

    A new alloy design methodology is presented for the identification of alloy compositions, which exhibit process windows (PWs) satisfying specific design objectives and optimized for overall performance. The methodology is applied to the design of medium-Mn steels containing Al and/or Ni. By implementing computational alloy thermodynamics, a large composition space was investigated systematically to map the fraction and stability of retained austenite as a function of intercritical annealing temperature. Alloys exhibiting PWs, i.e., an intercritical annealing range, which when applied satisfies the given design objectives, were identified. A multi-objective optimization method, involving Pareto optimality, was then applied to identify a list of optimum alloy compositions, which maximized retained austenite amount and stability, as well as intercritical annealing temperature, while minimized overall alloy content. A heuristic approach was finally employed in order to rank the optimum alloys. The methodology provided a final short list of alloy compositions and associated PWs ranked according to their overall performance. The proposed methodology could be the first step in the process of computational alloy design of medium-Mn steels or other alloy systems.

  14. EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EAST ELEVATION, LTV STEEL (FORMERLY REPUBLIC STEEL), 8" BAR MILL, BUFFALO PLANT. VIEW LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM ROLL SHOP. 8" BAR MILL DESIGNED AND BUILT BY DONNER STEEL CO. (PREDECESSOR OF REPUBLIC), 1919-1920. FOR DESCRIPTION OF ORIGINAL MILL SEE "IRON AGE", 116\\4 (23 JULY 1925): 201-204. - LTV Steel, 8-inch Bar Mill, Buffalo Plant, Buffalo, Erie County, NY

  15. High-throughput design of low-activation, high-strength creep-resistant steels for nuclear-reactor applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Qi; van der Zwaag, Sybrand; Xu, Wei

    2016-02-01

    Reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels are prime candidate materials for structural applications in nuclear power reactors. However, their creep strength is much lower than that of creep-resistant steel developed for conventional fossil-fired power plants as alloying elements with a high neutron activation cannot be used. To improve the creep strength and to maintain a low activation, a high-throughput computational alloy design model coupling thermodynamics, precipitate-coarsening kinetics and an optimization genetic algorithm, is developed. Twelve relevant alloying elements with either low or high activation are considered simultaneously. The activity levels at 0-10 year after the end of irradiation are taken as optimization parameter. The creep-strength values (after exposure for 10 years at 650 °C) are estimated on the basis of the solid-solution strengthening and the precipitation hardening (taking into account precipitate coarsening). Potential alloy compositions leading to a high austenite fraction or a high percentage of undesirable second phase particles are rejected automatically in the optimization cycle. The newly identified alloys have a much higher precipitation hardening and solid-solution strengthening at the same activity level as existing reduced-activation ferritic/martensitic steels.

  16. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... inclusions affecting pipe quality. (2) A mill inspection program or internal quality management program must... paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. (c) Plate/coil quality control (1) There must be an internal quality management program at all mills involved in producing steel, plate, coil, skelp, and/or rolling pipe to...

  17. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... inclusions affecting pipe quality. (2) A mill inspection program or internal quality management program must... paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. (c) Plate/coil quality control (1) There must be an internal quality management program at all mills involved in producing steel, plate, coil, skelp, and/or rolling pipe to...

  18. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inclusions affecting pipe quality. (2) A mill inspection program or internal quality management program must... paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. (c) Plate/coil quality control (1) There must be an internal quality management program at all mills involved in producing steel, plate, coil, skelp, and/or rolling pipe to...

  19. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inclusions affecting pipe quality. (2) A mill inspection program or internal quality management program must... paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. (c) Plate/coil quality control (1) There must be an internal quality management program at all mills involved in producing steel, plate, coil, skelp, and/or rolling pipe to...

  20. 49 CFR 192.112 - Additional design requirements for steel pipe using alternative maximum allowable operating...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inclusions affecting pipe quality. (2) A mill inspection program or internal quality management program must... paragraph (b)(2)(iii) of this section. (c) Plate/coil quality control (1) There must be an internal quality management program at all mills involved in producing steel, plate, coil, skelp, and/or rolling pipe to...

  1. Moving Aerospace Structural Design Practice to a Load and Resistance Factor Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, Curtis E.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2016-01-01

    Aerospace structures are traditionally designed using the factor of safety (FOS) approach. The limit load on the structure is determined and the structure is then designed for FOS times the limit load - the ultimate load. Probabilistic approaches utilize distributions for loads and strengths. Failures are predicted to occur in the region of intersection of the two distributions. The load and resistance factor design (LRFD) approach judiciously combines these two approaches by intensive calibration studies on loads and strength to result in structures that are efficient and reliable. This paper discusses these three approaches.

  2. Seismic design of steel structures with lead-extrusion dampers as knee braces

    SciTech Connect

    Monir, Habib Saeed; Naser, Ali

    2008-07-08

    One of the effective methods in decreasing the seismic response of structure against dynamic loads due to earthquake is using energy dissipating systems. Lead-extrusion dampers (LED) are one of these systems that dissipate energy in to one lead sleeve because of steel rod movement. Hysteresis loops of these dampers are approximately rectangular and acts independent from velocity in frequencies that are in the seismic frequency rang. In this paper lead dampers are considered as knee brace in steel frames and are studied in an economical view. Considering that lead dampers don't clog structural panels, so this characteristic can solve brace problems from architectural view. The behavior of these dampers is compared with the other kind of dampers such as XADAS and TADAS. The results indicate that lead dampers act properly in absorbing the induced energy due to earthquake and good function in controlling seismic movements of multi-story structures.

  3. Seismic design of steel structures with lead-extrusion dampers as knee braces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    monir, Habib Saeed; Naser, Ali

    2008-07-01

    One of the effective methods in decreasing the seismic response of structure against dynamic loads due to earthquake is using energy dissipating systems. Lead-extrusion dampers (LED)are one of these systems that dissipate energy in to one lead sleeve because of steel rod movement. Hysteresis loops of these dampers are approximately rectangular and acts independent from velocity in frequencies that are in the seismic frequency rang. In this paper lead dampers are considered as knee brace in steel frames and are studied in an economical view. Considering that lead dampers don't clog structural panels, so this characteristic can solve brace problems from architectural view. The behavior of these dampers is compared with the other kind of dampers such as XADAS and TADAS. The results indicate that lead dampers act properly in absorbing the induced energy due to earthquake and good function in controlling seismic movements of multi-story structures

  4. Effect of Groove Design and Post-Weld Heat Treatment on Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of P91 Steel Weld

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, C.; Mahapatra, M. M.

    2016-07-01

    The martensitic creep-resistant steel designated as ASTM A335 for plate and as P91 for pipe is primarily used for high-temperature and high-pressure applications in steam power plants due to its excellent high-temperature properties such as high creep strength, high thermal conductivity, low thermal expansion, and so on. However, in the case of welded joints of such steels, the presence of an inter-critical heat-affected zone (IC-HAZ) can cause the joint to have lower creep strength than the base metal. In the present study, the effect of post-welding heat treatment (PWHT) and weld groove designs on the overall microstructure and mechanical properties of P91 steel pipe welds produced by the gas tungsten arc welding process was studied. Various regions of welded joints were characterized in detail for hardness and metallographic and tensile properties. Sub-size tensile samples were also tested to evaluate the mechanical properties of the weld metal and heat-affected zone (HAZ) with respect to PWHT. After PWHT, a homogenous microstructure was observed in the HAZ and tensile test fracture samples revealed shifting of the fracture location from the IC-HAZ to the fine-grained heat-affected zone. Before PWHT, the conventional V-grooved welded joints exhibited higher tensile strength compared to the narrow-grooved joints. However, after PWHT, both narrow- and V-grooved joints exhibited similar strength. Fractography of the samples indicates the presence of carbide precipitates such as Cr23C6, VC, and NbC on the fracture surface.

  5. Design of dual-phase Fe/Mn/C steel for low-temperature application

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, N.J.

    1981-09-01

    An investigation has been made to improve the impact properties of a dual phase Fe/1.5Mn/.06C steel for potential low temperature application. The research involved establishing the microstructure-property relationships, especially with regard to the morphology of the constituents. Dual phase processing was done in two ways, viz., controlled rolling and intercritical annealing of the as-hot-rolled structure.

  6. Design of ultrasonic attenuation sensor with focused transmitter for density measurements of a slurry in a large steel pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Greenwood, Margaret Stautberg

    2015-12-01

    To design an ultrasonic sensor to measure the attenuation and density of a slurry carried by a large steel pipeline (diameter up to 70 cm) is the goal of this research. The pitch-catch attenuation sensor, placed in a small section of the pipeline, contains a send unit with a focused transducer that focuses the ultrasound to a small region of the receive unit on the opposite wall. The focused transducer consists of a section of a sphere (base ~12 cm) on the outer side of the send unit and a 500 kHz piezoelectric shell of PZT5A epoxied to it. The Rayleigh surface integral is used to calculate the pressure in steel and in water (slurry). An incremental method to plot the paths of ultrasonic rays shows that the rays focus where expected. Further, there is a region where the parallel rays are perpendicular to the wall of the receive unit. Designs for pipeline diameters of 25 cm and 71 cm show that the pressure in water at the receive transducer is about 17 times that for a pitch-catch system using 5 cm diameter disk transducers. The enhanced signal increases the sensitivity of the measurements and improves the signal-to-noise ratio.

  7. Metallurgical design basis, qualification testing, and production history of 50 ksi and 60 ksi steel plate for the MARS TLP deck fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Shuichi; Sueda, Kyosuke; Iki, Hiroshi; Smith, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    The MARS TLP fast-track deck construction project required rapid qualification and production of 50 ksi and 60 ksi steel plate. This paper describes the development of high-performance 4 in. (101.6mm) 50 ksi and 3 in. (76.2mm) 60 ksi steels of a modified API 2W composition and presents the production history for the MARS deck steel order. The same base composition was used for both grades via innovative proprietary TMCP practice. Utilization of the mono-chemistry steel allowed for production of a wide range of thicknesses and grades in a very short time frame via a simplified melting schedule and made it possible to minimize the number of new welding procedures to be developed by the deck fabricator. Extremely low carbon equivalent allowed the implementation of low fabrication preheats, with resultant cost and fabrication schedule savings. The chemical composition of the steel was specifically designed for this project and qualification testing in accordance with API RP 2Z verified high heat-affected zone CTOD toughness free of local brittle zones over a wide range of heat input and interpass temperature. Strict production process control resulted in very tight production property histograms with all steel being verified to have Charpy V-notch transition temperatures below {minus}80 C ({minus}112 F) at the plate mid-width, mid-thickness position. The success of the MARS deck steel rapid qualification, production and delivery was enabled by close teamwork between deck design engineers, construction fabrication contractor, and steelmaker for this steel.

  8. Investigation of the Corrosion Inhibition of CTAB and SDS on Carbon Steel Using an Experimental Design Strategy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmand, Farzin; Wang, Jiamei; Zhang, Lefu

    2016-03-01

    The corrosion inhibition performance of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) on carbon steel was investigated in sodium chloride solutions. Using an experimental design strategy pH, chloride concentration, SDS/CTAB concentrations, and temperature were optimized by conducting only 30 experiments. The optimum value of each factor was obtained from the designed matrix of the experiments based on the lowest log I corr value calculated for each experimental condition. The 3D surface plots of the electrochemical response (log I corr) against each factor were constructed. The optimum conditions in which the lowest log I corr can be achieved were found as follows: pH 12, [Cl-] ≈ 1 M, [SDS] ≈ 200 ppm, [CTAB] ≈ 20 ppm, and T ≈ 10 °C.

  9. Alloy design to control the size and morphology of niobium carbides in tool steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pereira, M.M.; Andrade, M.S. , Belo Horizonte, MG ); Guimaraes, J.R.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Controlling the size and the morphology of niobium carbides is crucial to develop a carbide volume fraction capable of significantly influencing the cutting/wear properties of tool steels and cast irons. The phase diagram suggests that by increasing the delta phase field, ferrite may be forced to precipitate preferentially to NbC. Hence, alloying with a strong ferritizer such as aluminum and/or silicon may result in more convenient microstructure when Nb %{gt}3. To check that possibility, as-cast microstructures were analyzed by optical and scanning electron microscopy. By combining additions of niobium and aluminum, it seems possible to control the size and the morphology of niobium carbides without necessarily resorting to more complex processes such as atomization and the like.

  10. Design and analysis on fume exhaust system of blackbody cavity sensor for continuously measuring molten steel temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Guohui; Zhang, Jiu; Zhao, Shumao; Xie, Zhi

    2017-03-01

    Fume exhaust system is the main component of the novel blackbody cavity sensor with a single layer tube, which removes the fume by gas flow along the exhaust pipe to keep the light path clean. However, the gas flow may break the conditions of blackbody cavity and results in the poor measurement accuracy. In this paper, we analyzed the influence of the gas flow on the temperature distribution of the measuring cavity, and then calculated the integrated effective emissivity of the non-isothermal cavity based on Monte-Carlo method, accordingly evaluated the sensor measurement accuracy, finally obtained the maximum allowable flow rate for various length of the exhaust pipe to meet the measurement accuracy. These results will help optimize the novel blackbody cavity sensor design and use it better for measuring the temperature of molten steel.

  11. JAPC-USDOE joint study on structural design methods and data for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo Steel; Annual report, April 1, 1990--March 31, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Blass, J J; Brinkman, C R; Alexander, D J; Battiste, R L; Gieseke, B G; Maziasz, P J; Moosbrugger, J C; O`Connor, D G; Ruggles, M B

    1991-03-01

    This document is the last in a series of five reports issued by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) as part of the study, jointly supported by the Japan Atomic Power Company (JAPC) and the US Department of Energy (USDOE), on structural design methods and data for modified 9 Cr-1 Mo steel. This annual report covers the period of April 1 to March 31.

  12. Performance-Based Seismic Design of Steel Frames Utilizing Colliding Bodies Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Veladi, H.

    2014-01-01

    A pushover analysis method based on semirigid connection concept is developed and the colliding bodies optimization algorithm is employed to find optimum seismic design of frame structures. Two numerical examples from the literature are studied. The results of the new algorithm are compared to the conventional design methods to show the power or weakness of the algorithm. PMID:25202717

  13. Performance-based seismic design of steel frames utilizing colliding bodies algorithm.

    PubMed

    Veladi, H

    2014-01-01

    A pushover analysis method based on semirigid connection concept is developed and the colliding bodies optimization algorithm is employed to find optimum seismic design of frame structures. Two numerical examples from the literature are studied. The results of the new algorithm are compared to the conventional design methods to show the power or weakness of the algorithm.

  14. Vibration Characteristics Determined for Stainless Steel Sandwich Panels With a Metal Foam Core for Lightweight Fan Blade Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ghosn, Louis J.; Min, James B.; Raj, Sai V.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Holland, Frederic A., Jr.

    2004-01-01

    The goal of this project at the NASA Glenn Research Center is to provide fan materials that are safer, weigh less, and cost less than the currently used titanium alloy or polymer matrix composite fans. The proposed material system is a sandwich fan construction made up of thin solid face sheets and a lightweight metal foam core. The stiffness of the sandwich structure is increased by separating the two face sheets by the foam layer. The resulting structure has a high stiffness and lighter weight in comparison to the solid facesheet material alone. The face sheets carry the applied in-plane and bending loads (ref. 1). The metal foam core must resist the transverse shear and transverse normal loads, as well as keep the facings supported and working as a single unit. Metal foams have ranges of mechanical properties, such as light weight, impact resistance, and vibration suppression (ref. 2), which makes them more suitable for use in lightweight fan structures. Metal foams have been available for decades (refs. 3 and 4), but the difficulties in the original processes and high costs have prevented their widespread use. However, advances in production techniques and cost reduction have created a new interest in this class of materials (ref. 5). The material chosen for the face sheet and the metal foam for this study was the aerospace-grade stainless steel 17-4PH. This steel was chosen because of its attractive mechanical properties and the ease with which it can be made through the powder metallurgy process (ref. 6). The advantages of a metal foam core, in comparison to a typical honeycomb core, are material isotropy and the ease of forming complex geometries, such as fan blades. A section of a 17-4PH sandwich structure is shown in the following photograph. Part of process of designing any blade is to determine the natural frequencies of the particular blade shape. A designer needs to predict the resonance frequencies of a new blade design to properly identify a useful

  15. Innovative Comparison of Transient Ignition Temperature at the Booster Interface, New Stainless Steel Pyrovalve Primer Chamber Assembly "V" (PCA) Design Versus the Current Aluminum "Y" PCA Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saulsberry, Regor L.; McDougle, Stephen H.; Garcia,Roberto; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Sipes, William; Rickman, Steven; Hosangadi, Ashvin

    2011-01-01

    An assessment of four spacecraft pyrovalve anomalies that occurred during ground testing was conducted by the NASA Engineering & Safety Center (NESC) in 2008. In all four cases, a common aluminum (Al) primer chamber assembly (PCA) was used with dual NASA Standard Initiators (NSIs) and the nearly simultaneous (separated by less than 80 microseconds) firing of both initiators failed to ignite the booster charge. The results of the assessment and associated test program were reported in AIAA Paper AIAA-2008-4798, NESC Independent Assessment of Pyrovalve Ground Test Anomalies. As a result of the four Al PCA anomalies, and the test results and findings of the NESC assessment, the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) project team decided to make changes to the PCA. The material for the PCA body was changed from aluminum (Al) to stainless steel (SS) to avoid melting, distortion, and potential leakage of the NSI flow passages when the device functioned. The flow passages, which were interconnected in a Y-shaped configuration (Y-PCA) in the original design, were changed to a V-shaped configuration (V-PCA). The V-shape was used to more efficiently transfer energy from the NSIs to the booster. Development and qualification testing of the new design clearly demonstrated faster booster ignition times compared to the legacy AL Y-PCA design. However, the final NESC assessment report recommended that the SS V-PCA be experimentally characterized and quantitatively compared to the Al Y-PCA design. This data was deemed important for properly evaluating the design options for future NASA projects. This test program has successfully quantified the improvement of the SS V-PCA over the Al Y-PCA. A phase B of the project was also conducted and evaluated the effect of firing command skew and enlargement of flame channels to further assist spacecraft applications.

  16. Steel Structures for Civil Works, General Considerations for Design and Rehabilitation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    careful attention to design details and manufacturing processes. The most effective and economical methods of improving fatigue strength consist of the...including serviceability deflection limits and consideration of fatigue are specified. With these additional criteria, and since minor local yielding will not... fatigue analysis should be performed, and additional inspection may be necessary. Modifications may consist of smoothing the discontinuity, provid- ing

  17. Interfacial modification to optimize stainless steel photoanode design for flexible dye sensitized solar cells: an experimental and numerical modeling approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salehi Taleghani, Sara; Zamani Meymian, Mohammad Reza; Ameri, Mohsen

    2016-10-01

    In the present research, we report fabrication, experimental characterization and theoretical analysis of semi and full flexible dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) manufactured on the basis of bare and roughened stainless steel type 304 (SS304) substrates. The morphological, optical and electrical characterizations confirm the advantage of roughened SS304 over bare and even common transparent conducting oxides (TCOs). A significant enhancement of about 51% in power conversion efficiency is obtained for flexible device (5.51%) based on roughened SS304 substrate compared to the bare SS304. The effect of roughening the SS304 substrates on electrical transport characteristics is also investigated by means of numerical modeling with regard to metal-semiconductor and interfacial resistance arising from the metallic substrate and nanocrystalline semiconductor contact. The numerical modeling results provide a reliable theoretical backbone to be combined with experimental implications. It highlights the stronger effect of series resistance compared to schottky barrier in lowering the fill factor of the SS304-based DSSCs. The findings of the present study nominate roughened SS304 as a promising replacement for conventional DSSCs substrates as well as introducing a highly accurate modeling framework to design and diagnose treated metallic or non-metallic based DSSCs.

  18. Investigation of a piezoelectric valveless micropump with an integrated stainless-steel diffuser/nozzle bulge-piece design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tseng, Li-Yu; Yang, An-Shik; Lee, Chun-Ying; Cheng, Chiang-Ho

    2013-08-01

    To meet a growing need in biological and medical applications, innovative micro-electro-mechanical system (MEMS) technologies have realized important progress on the micropump as one of the essential fluid handling devices to deliver and control precise amounts of fluid flowing along a specific direction. This research proposes a piezoelectric (PZT) valveless micropump adopting an integrated diffuser/nozzle bulge-piece design. The pump mainly consisted of a stainless-steel structured chamber with dimensions of 8 mm in diameter and 70 μm in depth to enhance its long-term reliability, low-cost production, and maximized liquid compatibility. A PZT diaphragm was also used as a driving source to propel the liquid stream under actuation. As commonly used indices to describe pump operation, the delivered volumetric flow rates and pressures were determined at bulge-piece diameters of 2, 4 and 6 mm, with a driving voltage of 160 Vpp and frequency ranging from 50 to 550 Hz. Measurements and simulations have successfully shown that this micropump is capable of operating at a greater volumetric flow rate of up to 1.2 ml min-1 with a maximum back pressure of 5.3 kPa. In addition, the time-recurring flow behavior in the chamber and its relationship to the pumping performance were examined in detail.

  19. The Composition and Temperature Effects on the Ultra High Strength Stainless Steel Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, W.; Del Castillo, P. E. J. Rivera Díaz; van der Zwaag, S.

    Alloy composition and heat treatment are of paramount importance to determining alloy properties. Their control is of great importance for new alloy design and industrial fabrication control. A base alloy utilizing MX carbide is designed through a theory guided computational approach coupling a genetic algorithm with optimization criteria based on thermodynamic, kinetic and mechanical principles. The combined effects of 11 alloying elements (Al, C, Co, Cr, Cu, Mo, Nb, Ni, Si, Ti and V) are investigated in terms of the composition optimization criteria: the martensite start (Ms) temperature, the suppression of undesirable phases, the Cr concentration in the matrix and the potency of the precipitation strengthening contribution. The results show the concentration sensitivities of each component and also point out new potential composition domains for further strength increase. The aging temperature effect is studied and the aging temperature industrially followed is recovered.

  20. Statistical complex fatigue data for SAE 4340 steel and its use in design by reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kececioglu, D.; Smith, J. L.

    1970-01-01

    A brief description of the complex fatigue machines used in the test program is presented. The data generated from these machines are given and discussed. Two methods of obtaining strength distributions from the data are also discussed. Then follows a discussion of the construction of statistical fatigue diagrams and their use in designing by reliability. Finally, some of the problems encountered in the test equipment and a corrective modification are presented.

  1. Design, Development and Application of New, High-Performance Gear Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    continued 600 500 400 300 200 100 0 1.E-03 1.E- 02 1.E-01 1.E+00 1.E+01 Vi ck er ’s H ar dn es s (V H N ) Equivalent Air Cooled Bar diameter (inch...ASMH publication, UNS numbering, publication of SAE AMS 5922, and inclusion of A- and B-basis design allowables in the MMPDS Handbook (previously MIL

  2. Design of Steel Structures to Resist the Effects of HE Explosions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-08-01

    individual columns and girders are designed according to the beam -column criteria of Chapter 4. For frames greater than two stories, bracing is normally...3.5 `t7iffnetis and Deflection 97 5.3.6 Pre.1iminary 6izing of -’raae ,pinbe-. 91i 5.3.7 Slenderness Requirements for Diagonal Braces 100 5.3.8... BRACING AND PINNED BASES. 94 5.5 COLLAPSE ,11ECHAXIS..S FOR FPRAES WITH SUPPLE•.’tTARY BRACING , NON-RIGID GIRDER TO COLUnV CONNECTION1S AND PINNED

  3. Development of Stronger and More Reliable Cast Austenitic Stainless Steels (H-Series) Based on Scientific and Design Methodology

    SciTech Connect

    Pankiw, Roman I; Muralidharan, G.; Sikka, Vinod K.

    2006-06-30

    The goal of this project was to increase the high-temperature strength of the H-Series of cast austenitic stainless steels by 50% and the upper use temperature by 86 to 140 degrees fahrenheit (30 to 60 degrees celsius). Meeting this goal is expected to result in energy savings of 35 trillion Btu/year by 2020 and energy cost savings of approximately $230 million/year. The higher-strength H-Series cast stainless steels (HK and HP type) have applications for the production of ethylene in the chemical industry, for radiant burner tubes and transfer rolls for secondary processing of steel in the steel industry, and for many applications in the heat treating industry, including radiant burner tubes. The project was led by Duraloy Technologies, Inc., with research participation by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and industrial participation by a diverse group of companies.

  4. ESF GROUND SUPPORT - STRUCTURAL STEEL ANALYSIS

    SciTech Connect

    T. Misiak

    1996-06-26

    The purpose and objective of this analysis are to expand the level of detail and confirm member sizes for steel sets included in the Ground Support Design Analysis, Reference 5.20. This analysis also provides bounding values and details and defines critical design attributes for alternative configurations of the steel set. One possible configuration for the steel set is presented. This analysis covers the steel set design for the Exploratory Studies Facility (ESF) entire Main Loop 25-foot diameter tunnel.

  5. Preliminary Design, Feasibility and Cost Evaluation of 1- to 15-Kilometer Height Steel Towers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shanker, Ajay

    2003-01-01

    Design and construction of tall towers is an on-going research program of NASA. The agency has already done preliminary review in this area and has determined that multi-kilometer height towers are technically and economically feasible. The proposed towers will provide high altitude launch platforms reaching above eighty percent of Earth's atmosphere and provide tremendous gains in the potential energy as well as substantial reduction in aerodynamic drag. NASA has also determined that a 15-KM tower will have many useful applications in: (i)Meteorology,(ii)Oceanography, (iii)Astronomy, (iv)High Altitude Launch, (v)Physics Drop Tower, (vi) Biosphere Research, (vii) Nanotechnology, (viii) Energy/Power, (ix)Broadband Wireless Technology, (x)Space Transportation and (xi)Space Tourism.

  6. Design and Characterization of Thin Stainless Steel Burst Disks for Increasing Two-Stage Light Gas Launcher Efficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tylka, Jonathan M.; Johnson, Kenneth L.; Henderson, Donald; Rodriguez, Karen

    2012-01-01

    Laser etched 300 series Stainless Steel Burst Disks (SSBD) ranging between 0.178 mm (0.007-in.) and 0.508mm (0.020-in.) thick were designed for use in a 17-caliber two-stage light gas launcher. First, a disk manufacturing method was selected using a combination of wire electrical discharge machining (EDM) to form the blank disks and laser etching to define the pedaling fracture pattern. Second, a replaceable insert was designed to go between the SSDB and the barrel. This insert reduced the stress concentration between the SSBD and the barrel, providing a place for the petals of the SSDB to open, and protecting the rifling on the inside of the barrel. Thereafter, a design of experiments was implemented to test and characterize the burst characteristics of SSBDs. Extensive hydrostatic burst testing of the SSBDs was performed to complete the design of experiments study with one-hundred and seven burst tests. The experiment simultaneously tested the effects of the following: two SSBD material states (full hard, annealed); five SSBD thicknesses 0.178, 0.254, 0.305, 0.381 mm (0.007, 0.010, 0.012, 0.015, 0.020-in.); two grain directions relative); number of times the laser etch pattern was repeated (varies between 5-200 times); two heat sink configurations (with and without heat sink); and, two barrel configurations (with and without insert). These tests resulted in the quantification of the relationship between SSBD thickness, laser etch parameters, and desired burst pressure. Of the factors investigated only thickness and number of laser etches were needed to develop a mathematical relationship predicting hydrostatic burst pressure of disks using the same barrel configuration. The fracture surfaces of two representative SSBD bursts were then investigated with a scanning electron microscope, one burst hydrostatically in a fixture and another dynamically in the launcher. The fracture analysis verified that both burst conditions resulted in a ductile overload failure

  7. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dense Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2017-01-01

    Momentum transfer of argon-steel flows in a slab mold were studied through an air-water physical model and particle image velocimetry measurements under the effects of nozzle design (nozzles with square ports S, square ports with bottom design U and circular ports C) and gas flow rate. The ratio of drag momentum of the gas phase over the liquid phase defines the conditions for coupled (existence of momentum transfer between the phases) and channeled flows (defined as those conditions where there is not further momentum transfer between both phases). When the ratio of superficial velocities of the gas phase over the liquid phase in the nozzle bore is less than 0.14, the flow pattern in the mold is dependent on the nozzle design and flow rate of gas (2 to 10 L/minute). Above this magnitude, the flow pattern becomes uncoupled and independent from the nozzle design and from the flow rate of gas. The ratios of drag velocities of the gas phase on the liquid phase and their superficial velocities in the nozzle bore are strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the gas phase. Nozzle U delivers the smallest sizes of bubbles and the smaller amount of bubble swarms per unit time impacting on the narrow face of the mold. It is, therefore, the most recommendable to cast ultra-low carbon steels. Practical implications derived from these results are written down in the text.

  8. A Physical Model to Study the Effects of Nozzle Design on Dense Two-Phase Flows in a Slab Mold Casting Ultra-Low Carbon Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salazar-Campoy, María M.; Morales, R. D.; Nájera-Bastida, A.; Cedillo-Hernández, Valentín; Delgado-Pureco, J. C.

    2017-04-01

    Momentum transfer of argon-steel flows in a slab mold were studied through an air-water physical model and particle image velocimetry measurements under the effects of nozzle design (nozzles with square ports S, square ports with bottom design U and circular ports C) and gas flow rate. The ratio of drag momentum of the gas phase over the liquid phase defines the conditions for coupled (existence of momentum transfer between the phases) and channeled flows (defined as those conditions where there is not further momentum transfer between both phases). When the ratio of superficial velocities of the gas phase over the liquid phase in the nozzle bore is less than 0.14, the flow pattern in the mold is dependent on the nozzle design and flow rate of gas (2 to 10 L/minute). Above this magnitude, the flow pattern becomes uncoupled and independent from the nozzle design and from the flow rate of gas. The ratios of drag velocities of the gas phase on the liquid phase and their superficial velocities in the nozzle bore are strongly dependent on the volume fraction of the gas phase. Nozzle U delivers the smallest sizes of bubbles and the smaller amount of bubble swarms per unit time impacting on the narrow face of the mold. It is, therefore, the most recommendable to cast ultra-low carbon steels. Practical implications derived from these results are written down in the text.

  9. 75 FR 13543 - Decision To Evaluate a Petition To Designate a Class of Employees for the Simonds Saw and Steel...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-22

    ... Special Exposure Cohort under the Energy Employees Occupational Illness Compensation Program Act of 2000... evaluation, is as follows: Facility: Simonds Saw and Steel Co. Location: Lockport, New York. Job Titles and... and residual periods. Period of Employment: January 1, 1951 through December 31, 2006. FOR...

  10. PERFORMANCE IMPROVEMENT OF CREEP-RESISTANT FERRITIC STEEL WELDMENTS THROUGH THERMO-MECHANICAL TREATMENT AND ALLOY DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Yukinori; Babu, Prof. Sudarsanam Suresh; Shassere, Benjamin; Yu, Xinghua

    2016-01-01

    Two different approaches have been proposed for improvement of cross-weld creep properties of the high temperature ferrous structural materials for fossil-fired energy applications. The traditional creep strength-enhanced ferritic (CSEF) steel weldments suffer from Type IV failures which occur at the fine-grained heat affected zone (FGHAZ). In order to minimize the premature failure at FGHAZ in the existing CSEF steels, such as modified 9Cr-1Mo ferritic-martensitic steels (Grade 91), a thermo-mechanical treatment consisting of aus-forging/rolling and subsequent aus-aging is proposed which promotes the formation of stable MX carbonitrides prior to martensitic transformation. Such MX remains undissolved during welding process, even in FGHAZ, which successfully improves the cross-weld creep properties. Another approach is to develop a new fully ferrtic, creep-resistant FeCrAl alloy which is essentially free from Type IV failure issues. Fe-30Cr-3Al base alloys with minor alloying additions were developed which achieved a combination of good oxidation/corrosion resistance and improved tensile and creep performance comparable or superior to Grade 92 steel.

  11. Primary and embedded steel imports to the U.S.: implications for the design of border tax adjustments.

    PubMed

    Izard, Catherine F; Weber, Christopher L; Matthews, H Scott

    2010-09-01

    Carbon Border Tax Adjustments (BTAs) are a politically popular strategy for avoiding competitive disadvantage problems when a country implements a unilateral climate change policy. A BTA taxes carbon embodied in imported goods in order to protect domestic industry and motivate other countries to implement climate change policy. To estimate the effectiveness of a BTA, is it is necessary to know which products are covered, where they were originally produced and ultimately exported from, and how the covered amount compares to total production in foreign countries. Using a scrap-adjusted, mixed-unit input-output model in conjunction with a multiregional input-output model, this analysis evaluates the effectiveness of BTAs for the case study of U.S. steel imports. Most imported steel by mass is embedded in finished products (60%), and 30% of that steel is produced in a different country than the one from which the final good is exported. Given the magnitudes involved and complexities of global supply chains, a BTA that protects domestic industry will be a challenge to implement. We propose a logistically feasible BTA structure that minimizes the information burden while still accounting for these complexities. However, the amount of steel imported to the U.S. is negligible (5%) compared to foreign production in BTA-eligible countries and is unlikely to motivate affected countries to impose an emissions reduction policy.

  12. The design of an Fe-12Mn-O.2Ti alloy steel for low temperature use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hwang, S. K.; Morris, J. W., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation was made to improve the low temperature mechanical properties of Fe-8 approximately 12% Mn-O 2Ti alloy steels. A two-phase(alpha + gamma) tempering in combination with cold working or hot working was identified as an effective treatment. A potential application as a Ni-free cryogenic steel was shown for this alloy. It was also shown that an Fe-8Mn steel could be grain-refined by a purely thermal treatment because of its dislocated martensitic structure and absence of epsilon phase. A significant reduction of the ductile-brittle transition temperature was obtained in this alloy. The nature and origin of brittle fracture in Fe-Mn alloys were also investigated. Two embrittling regions were found in a cooling curve of an Fe-12Mn-O 2Ti steel which was shown to be responsible for intergranular fracture. Auger electron spectroscopy identified no segregation during solution-annealing treatment. Avoiding the embrittling zones by controlled cooling led to a high cryogenic toughness in a solution-annealed condition.

  13. Stainless steel tanks

    SciTech Connect

    Hagen, T.

    1995-12-31

    There is currently no recognized code or standard for the design, fabrication and construction of atmospheric and low pressure stainless steel tanks. At the present time these tanks are being designed to individual specifications, manufacturers standards or utilizing other codes and standards that may not be entirely applicable. Recognizing the need, the American Petroleum Institute will be publishing a new appendix to the API STD 650 Standard which will cover stainless steel tanks. The new Appendix was put together by a Task Group of selected individuals from the API Subcommittee of Pressure Vessels and Tanks from the Committee on Refinery Equipment. This paper deals with the development and basis of the new appendix. The new appendix will provide a much needed standard to cover the material, design, fabrication, erection and testing requirements for vertical, cylindrical, austenitic stainless steel aboveground tanks in nonrefrigerated service.

  14. Aircraft Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-19

    NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders 19 February 2009...MARYLAND NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 19 February 2009 AIRCRAFT STEELS by E. U. Lee R. Taylor C. Lei H. C. Sanders...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39-18 NAWCADPAX/TR-2009/ 12 ii SUMMARY Five high strength and four stainless steels have been studied, identifying their

  15. Effects of Mn, Si, and purity on the design of 3.5NiCrMoV, 1CrMoV, and 2.25Cr-1Mo bainitic alloy steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodnar, R. L.; Ohhashi, T.; Jaffee, R. I.

    1989-08-01

    Three high-temperature bainitic alloy steels were evaluated in the laboratory to determine the effects of Mn, Si, and impurities ( i.e., S, P, Sn, As, and Sb) on microstructure and mechanical properties. The alloy steels were 3.5NiCrMoV and CrMoV, which are used for turbine rotors, and 2.25Cr-1Mo, which is used in pressure vessel applications. The important effects of Mn, Si, and impurities, which should control the design of these high-temperature bainitic steels, are presented. Key results are used to illustrate the influence of these variables on cleanliness, overheating, austenitizing, hardenability, tempering, ductility, toughness, temper embrittlement, creep rupture, and low-cycle fatigue. Low levels of Mn, Si, and impurities not only result in improved temper embrittlement resistance in these steels but also lead to an improvement in creep rupture properties ( i.e., improved strength and ductility). These results have produced some general guidelines for the design of high-temperature bainitic steels. Examples illustrating the implementation of the results and the effectiveness of the design guidelines are provided. Largely based on the benefits shown by this work, a high-purity 3.5NiCrMoV steel, which is essentially free of Mn, Si, and impurities, has been developed and is already being used commercially.

  16. Review on cold-formed steel connections.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeong Huei; Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Tahir, Mahmood Md; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed.

  17. Review on Cold-Formed Steel Connections

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Cher Siang; Mohammad, Shahrin; Md Tahir, Mahmood; Shek, Poi Ngian

    2014-01-01

    The concept of cold-formed light steel framing construction has been widespread after understanding its structural characteristics with massive research works over the years. Connection serves as one of the important elements for light steel framing in order to achieve its structural stability. Compared to hot-rolled steel sections, cold-formed steel connections perform dissimilarity due to the thin-walled behaviour. This paper aims to review current researches on cold-formed steel connections, particularly for screw connections, storage rack connections, welded connections, and bolted connections. The performance of these connections in the design of cold-formed steel structures is discussed. PMID:24688448

  18. Evolution of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels under accelerated irradiation up to beyond design fluences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurovich, B.; Kuleshova, E.; Shtrombakh, Ya.; Fedotova, S.; Maltsev, D.; Frolov, A.; Zabusov, O.; Erak, D.; Zhurko, D.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper comprehensive studies of structure and properties of VVER-1000 RPV steels after the accelerated irradiation to fluences corresponding to extended lifetime up to 60 years or more as well as comparative studies of materials irradiated with different fluxes were carried out. The significant flux effect is confirmed for the weld metal (nickel concentration ⩾1.35%) which is mainly due to development of reversible temper brittleness. The rate of radiation embrittlement of VVER-1000 RPV steels under operation up to 60 years and more (based on the results of accelerated irradiation considering flux effect for weld metal) is expected not to differ significantly from the observed rate under irradiation within surveillance specimens.

  19. Precipitate design for creep strengthening of 9% Cr tempered martensitic steel for ultra-supercritical power plants

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Fujio

    2008-01-01

    It is crucial for the carbon concentration of 9% Cr steel to be reduced to a very low level, so as to promote the formation of MX nitrides rich in vanadium as very fine and thermally stable particles to enable prolonged periods of exposure at elevated temperatures and also to eliminate Cr-rich carbides M23C6. Sub-boundary hardening, which is inversely proportional to the width of laths and blocks, is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism for creep and is enhanced by the fine dispersion of precipitates along boundaries. The suppression of particle coarsening during creep and the maintenance of a homogeneous distribution of M23C6 carbides near prior austenite grain boundaries, which precipitate during tempering and are less fine, are effective for preventing the long-term degradation of creep strength and for improving long-term creep strength. This can be achieved by the addition of boron. The steels considered in this paper exhibit higher creep strength at 650 °C than existing high-strength steels used for thick section boiler components. PMID:27877920

  20. Precipitate design for creep strengthening of 9% Cr tempered martensitic steel for ultra-supercritical power plants.

    PubMed

    Abe, Fujio

    2008-01-01

    It is crucial for the carbon concentration of 9% Cr steel to be reduced to a very low level, so as to promote the formation of MX nitrides rich in vanadium as very fine and thermally stable particles to enable prolonged periods of exposure at elevated temperatures and also to eliminate Cr-rich carbides M23C6. Sub-boundary hardening, which is inversely proportional to the width of laths and blocks, is shown to be the most important strengthening mechanism for creep and is enhanced by the fine dispersion of precipitates along boundaries. The suppression of particle coarsening during creep and the maintenance of a homogeneous distribution of M23C6 carbides near prior austenite grain boundaries, which precipitate during tempering and are less fine, are effective for preventing the long-term degradation of creep strength and for improving long-term creep strength. This can be achieved by the addition of boron. The steels considered in this paper exhibit higher creep strength at 650 °C than existing high-strength steels used for thick section boiler components.

  1. The design of superhydrophobic stainless steel surfaces by controlling nanostructures: A key parameter to reduce the implantation of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Bruzaud, Jérôme; Tarrade, Jeanne; Celia, Elena; Darmanin, Thierry; Taffin de Givenchy, Elisabeth; Guittard, Frédéric; Herry, Jean-Marie; Guilbaud, Morgan; Bellon-Fontaine, Marie-Noëlle

    2017-04-01

    Reducing bacterial adhesion on substrates is fundamental for various industries. In this work, new superhydrophobic surfaces are created by electrodeposition of hydrophobic polymers (PEDOT-F4 or PEDOT-H8) on stainless steel with controlled topographical features, especially at a nano-scale. Results show that anti-bioadhesive and anti-biofilm properties require the control of the surface topographical features, and should be associated with a low adhesion of water onto the surface (Cassie-Baxter state) with limited crevice features at the scale of bacterial cells (nano-scale structures).

  2. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Structural Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Somerday, Brian P.; San Marchi, Christopher W

    2014-08-01

    Carbon-manganese steels are candidates for the structural materials in hydrogen gas pipelines; however, it is well known that these steels are susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement. Decades of research and industrial experience have established that hydrogen embrittlement compromises the structural integrity of steel components. This experience has also helped identify the failure modes that can operate in hydrogen containment structures. As a result, there are tangible ideas for managing hydrogen embrittlement in steels and quantifying safety margins for steel hydrogen containment structures. For example, fatigue crack growth aided by hydrogen embrittlement is a well-established failure mode for steel hydrogen containment structures subjected to pressure cycling. This pressure cycling represents one of the key differences in operating conditions between current hydrogen pipelines and those anticipated in a hydrogen delivery infrastructure. Applying structural integrity models in design codes coupled with measurement of relevant material properties allows quantification of the reliability/integrity of steel hydrogen pipelines subjected to pressure cycling. Furthermore, application of these structural integrity models is aided by the development of physics-based predictive models, which provide important insights such as the effects of microstructure on hydrogen-assisted fatigue crack growth. Successful implementation of these structural integrity and physics-based models enhances confidence in the design codes and enables decisions about materials selection and operating conditions for reliable and efficient steel hydrogen pipelines.

  3. Microstructural engineering applied to the controlled cooling of steel wire rod: Part I. Experimental design and heat transfer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, P. C.; Hawbolt, E. B.; Brimacombe, J. K.

    1991-11-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a mathematical model which incorporates heat flow, phase transformation kinetics, and property-structure-composition relationships to predict the mechanical properties of steel rod being control cooled under industrial conditions. Thus, the principles of microstructural engineering have been brought to bear on this interdisciplinary problem by combining computer modeling with laboratory measurements of heat flow, austenite decomposition kinetics, microstructure and mechanical properties, and industrial trials to determine heat transfer and obtain rod samples under known conditions. Owing to the length and diversity of the study, it is reported in three parts,[8191]the first of which is concerned with the heat flow measurements. A relatively simple and reliable technique, involving a preheated steel rod instrumented with a thermocouple secured at its centerline, has been devised to determine the cooling rate in different regions of the moving bed of rod loops on an operating Stelmor line. The measured thermal response of the rod has been analyzed by two transient conduction models (lumped and distributed parameter, respectively) to yield overall heat-transfer coefficients for radiation and convection. The adequacy of the technique has been checked by cooling instrumented rods under well-defined, air crossflow conditions in the laboratory and comparing measured heat-transfer coefficients to values predicted from well-established equations. The industrial thermal measurements have permitted the characterization of a coefficient to account for radiative interaction among adjacent rod loops near the edge and at the center of the bed.

  4. Web-Based Interactive Steel Sculpture for the Google Generation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Karen C.; Moaveni, Saeed

    2009-01-01

    In almost all the civil engineering programs in the United States, a student is required to take at least one design course in either steel or reinforced concrete. One of the topics covered in an introductory steel design course is the design of connections. Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many…

  5. Superclean steel development

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has actively encouraged and sponsored a number of research projects to develop a superclean 3.5NiCrMoV steel for low pressure turbine rotors. Such steel is highly resistant to temper embrittlement and will thus facilitate increased efficiency in electricity generation through the use of higher operating temperatures and improvements in design. The objective of this interim report was to integrate the results that have been generated to date worldwide in the pursuit of superclean steel. The report contains detailed findings that enable the interested utility to evaluate how the results affect utility decision making. A companion document has been written to summarize the findings from this technical report. The results indicate that steels with impurity contents typical of the superclean specification can be manufactured for production rotors with properties that equal or exceed those for conventional 3.5NiCrMoV rotors in every detail. Of particular interest are the results that the superclean steels appear to be virtually resistant to temper embrittlement to a temperature of 500 {degrees}C. 109 refs., 51 figs., 9 tabs.

  6. Three-dimensional dynamic fabrication of engineered cartilage based on chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffold in a spinner flask with a special designed steel frame.

    PubMed

    Song, Kedong; Li, Liying; Li, Wenfang; Zhu, Yanxia; Jiao, Zeren; Lim, Mayasari; Fang, Meiyun; Shi, Fangxin; Wang, Ling; Liu, Tianqing

    2015-10-01

    Cartilage transplantation using in vitro tissue engineered cartilage is considered a promising treatment for articular cartilage defects. In this study, we assessed the advantages of adipose derived stem cells (ADSCs) combined with chitosan/gelatin hybrid hydrogel scaffolds, which acted as a cartilage biomimetic scaffold, to fabricate a tissue engineered cartilage dynamically in vitro and compared this with traditional static culture. Physical properties of the hydrogel scaffolds were evaluated and ADSCs were inoculated into the hydrogel at a density of 1×10(7) cells/mL and cultured in a spinner flask with a special designed steel framework and feed with chondrogenic inductive media for two weeks. The results showed that the average pore size, porosity, swelling rate and elasticity modulus of hybrid scaffolds with good biocompatibility were 118.25±19.51 μm, 82.60±2.34%, 361.28±0.47% and 61.2±0.16 kPa, respectively. ADSCs grew well in chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffold and successfully differentiated into chondrocytes, showing that the scaffolds were suitable for tissue engineering applications in cartilage regeneration. Induced cells cultivated in a dynamic spinner flask with a special designed steel frame expressed more proteoglycans and the cell distribution was much more uniform with the scaffold being filled mostly with extracellular matrix produced by cells. A spinner flask with framework promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of ADSCs within chitosan/gelatin hybrid scaffolds and accelerated dynamic fabrication of cell-hydrogel constructs, which could be a selective and good method to construct tissue engineered cartilage in vitro.

  7. Improved 4-chlorophenol dechlorination at biocathode in bioelectrochemical system using optimized modular cathode design with composite stainless steel and carbon-based materials.

    PubMed

    Kong, Fanying; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Hong-Yu

    2014-08-01

    This study developed and optimized a modular biocathode materials design in bioelectrochemical system (BES) using composite metal and carbon-based materials. The 4-chlorophenol (4-CP) dechlorination could be improved with such composite materials. Results showed that stainless steel basket (SSB) filled with graphite granules (GG) and carbon brush (CB) (SSB/GG/CB) was optimum for dechlorination, followed by SSB/CB and SSB/GG, with rate constant k of 0.0418 ± 0.0002, 0.0374 ± 0.0004, and 0.0239 ± 0.0002 h(-1), respectively. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) demonstrated that the composite materials with metal can benefit the electron transfer and decrease the charge transfer resistance to be 80.4 Ω in BES-SSB/GG/CB, much lower than that in BES-SSB (1674.3 Ω), BES-GG (387.3 Ω), and BES-CB (193.8 Ω). This modular cathode design would be scalable with successive modules for BES scale-up, and may offer useful information to guide the selection and design of BES materials towards dechlorination improvement in wastewater treatment.

  8. Guidelines for structural bolting in accordance with the AISC (American Institute of Steel Construction) eighth edition manual of steel construction''

    SciTech Connect

    Western, J.L.; Johns, D.M.

    1990-05-11

    This paper specifies the usage of structural bolts in terms of their design, selection and application, in accordance with the American Institute of Steel Construction (AISC) Eighth Edition. Manual of Steel Construction.'' 1 tab.

  9. Application of the Materials-by-Design Methodology to Redesign a New Grade of the High-Strength Low-Alloy Class of Steels with Improved Mechanical Properties and Processability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Snipes, J. S.; Ramaswami, S.

    2016-01-01

    An alternative to the traditional trial-and-error empirical approach for the development of new materials is the so-called materials-by-design approach. Within the latter approach, a material is treated as a complex system and its design and optimization is carried out by employing computer-aided engineering analyses, predictive tools, and available material databases. In the present work, the materials-by-design approach is utilized to redesign a grade of high-strength low-alloy (HSLA) class of steels with improved mechanical properties (primarily strength and fracture toughness), processability (e.g., castability, hot formability, and weldability), and corrosion resistance. Toward that end, a number of material thermodynamics, kinetics of phase transformations, and physics of deformation and fracture computational models and databases have been developed/assembled and utilized within a multi-disciplinary, two-level material-by-design optimization scheme. To validate the models, their prediction is compared against the experimental results for the related steel HSLA100. Then the optimization procedure is employed to determine the optimal chemical composition and the tempering schedule for a newly designed grade of the HSLA class of steels with enhanced mechanical properties, processability, and corrosion resistance.

  10. Steel Rattler

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trudo, Robert A.; Stotts, Larry G.

    1997-07-01

    Steel Rattler is a multi-phased project to determine the feasibility of using commercial off-the-shelf components in an advanced acoustic/seismic unattended ground sensor. This project is supported by the Defense Intelligence Agency through Sandia National Laboratories as the lead development agency. Steel Rattler uses advanced acoustic and seismic detection algorithms to categorize and identify various heavy vehicles down to the number of cylinders in the engine. This detection is accomplished with the capabilities of new, high-speed digital signal processors which analyze both acoustic and seismic data. The resulting analysis is compared against an onboard library of known vehicles and a statistical match is determined. An integrated thermal imager is also employed to capture digital thermal images for subsequent compression and transmission. Information acquired by Steel Rattler in the field is transmitted in small packets by a built-in low-power satellite communication system. The ground station receivers distribute the coded information to multiple analysis sites where the information is reassembled into coherent messages and images.

  11. Design of Low-Melting Point Compositions Suitable for Transient Liquid Phase Sintering of PM Steels Based on a Thermodynamic and Kinetic Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernardo, Elena; de Oro, Raquel; Campos, Mónica; Torralba, José Manuel

    2014-04-01

    The possibility of tailoring the characteristics of a liquid metal is an important asset in a wide number of processing techniques. For most of these processes, the nature and degree of the interaction between liquid and solid phases are usually a focus of interest since they determine liquid properties such as wettability and infiltration capacity. Particularly, within the powder metallurgy (PM) technology, it is considered one of the key aspects to obtain high performance steels through liquid phase sintering. In this work, it is proved how thermodynamic and kinetics software is a powerful tool to study the liquid/solid interactions. The assessment of different liquid phase promoters for transient liquid phase sintering is addressed through the use of ThermoCalc and DICTRA calculations. Besides melting temperatures, particular attention is given to the solubility phenomena between the phases and the kinetics of these processes. Experimental validation of thermodynamic results is carried out by wetting and infiltration experiments at high temperatures. Compositions presenting different liquid/solid solubility are evaluated and directly correlated to the behavior of the liquid during a real sintering process. Therefore, this work opens the possibility to optimize liquid phase compositions and predict the liquid behavior from the design step, which is considered of high technological value for the PM industry.

  12. Technological properties of steels of martensitic class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, L. M.; Greben'kov, S. K.; Zakirova, M. G.; Tolchina, I. V.; Ryaposov, I. V.

    2011-03-01

    Process, design, and ecological advantages of low-carbon martensitic steels (LCMS) are presented as compared to medium-carbon heat-treatable structural steels with a structure of tempered sorbite. The factors ensuring high manufacture adaptability in all stages of the production cycle are considered. Technological properties of widely used commercial weldable LCMS are analyzed.

  13. Ellie Mannette: Master of the Steel Drum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svaline, J. Marc

    2001-01-01

    Presents an interview with Elliot ("Ellie") Mannette who has played a major role in the development and application of steel drums. States that he has spent most of his life designing and teaching the steel drums. Covers interview topics and background information on Mannette. (CMK)

  14. Improvements in 500-kHz Ultrasonic Phased-Array Probe Designs for Evaluation of Thick Section Cast Austenitic Stainless Steel Piping Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, Susan L.; Cinson, Anthony D.; Moran, Traci L.; Anderson, Michael T.; Diaz, Aaron A.

    2011-02-01

    PNNL has been studying and performing confirmatory research on the inspection of piping welds in coarse-grained steels for over 30 years. More recent efforts have been the application of low frequency phased array technology to this difficult to inspect material. The evolution of 500 kHz PA probes and the associated electronics and scanning protocol are documented in this report. The basis for the probe comparisons are responses from one mechanical fatigue crack and two thermal fatigue cracks in large-bore cast mockup specimens on loan from the Electric Power Research Institution. One of the most significant improvements was seen in the use of piezo-composite elements in the later two probes instead of the piezo-ceramic material used in the prototype array. This allowed a reduction in system gain of 30 dB and greatly reduced electronic noise. The latest probe had as much as a 5 dB increase in signal to noise, adding to its flaw discrimination capability. The system electronics for the latest probe were fully optimized for a 500 kHz center frequency, however significant improvements were not observed in the center frequency of the flaw responses. With improved scanner capabilities, smaller step sizes were used, allowing both line and raster data improvements to be made with the latest probe. The small step sizes produce high resolution images that improve flaw discrimination and, along with the increased signal-to-noise ratio inherent in the latest probe design, enhanced detection of the upper regions of the flaw make depth sizing more plausible. Finally, the physical sizes of the probes were progressively decreased allowing better access to the area of interest on specimens with weld crowns, and the latest probe was designed with non-integral wedges providing flexibility in focusing on different specimen geometries.

  15. Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentation carried out in a novel-design stainless steel tank: influence on the dynamics of microbial populations and physical-chemical properties.

    PubMed

    de Melo Pereira, Gilberto Vinícius; Magalhães, Karina Teixeira; de Almeida, Euziclei Gonzaga; da Silva Coelho, Irene; Schwan, Rosane Freitas

    2013-02-01

    Spontaneous cocoa bean fermentations carried out in a novel-design 40-kg-capacity stainless steel tank (SST) was studied in parallel to traditional Brazilian methods of fermentation in wooden boxes (40-kg-capacity wooden boxes (WB1) and 600-kg-capacity wooden boxes (WB2)) using a multiphasic approach that entailed culture-dependent and -independent microbiological analyses of fermenting cocoa bean pulp samples and target metabolite analyses of both cocoa pulp and cotyledons. Both microbiological approaches revealed that the dominant species of major physiological roles were the same for fermentations in SST, relative to boxes. These species consisted of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Hanseniaspora sp. in the yeast group; Lactobacillus fermentum and L. plantarum in the lactic acid bacteria (LAB) group; Acetobacter tropicalis belonging to the acetic acid bacteria (AAB) group; and Bacillus subtilis in the Bacillaceae family. A greater diversity of bacteria and non-Saccharomyces yeasts was observed in box fermentations. Additionally, a potentially novel AAB belonging to the genus Asaia was isolated during fermentation in WB1. Cluster analysis of the rRNA genes-PCR-DGGE profiles revealed a more complex picture of the box samples, indicating that bacterial and yeast ecology were fermentation-specific processes (wooden boxes vs. SST). The profile of carbohydrate consumption and fermentation products in the pulp and beans showed similar trends during both fermentation processes. However, the yeast-AAB-mediated conversion of carbohydrates into ethanol, and subsequent conversion of ethanol into acetic acid, was achieved with greater efficiency in SST, while temperatures were generally higher during fermentation in wooden boxes. With further refinements, the SST model may be useful in designing novel bioreactors for the optimisation of cocoa fermentation with starter cultures.

  16. Microstructural behavior of VVER-440 reactor pressure vessel steels under irradiation to neutron fluences beyond the design operation period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuleshova, E. A.; Gurovich, B. A.; Shtrombakh, Ya. I.; Nikolaev, Yu. A.; Pechenkin, V. A.

    2005-06-01

    Electron-microscopy and fractographic studies of the surveillance specimens from base and weld metals of VVER-440/213 reactor pressure vessel (RPV) in the original state and after irradiations to different fast neutron fluences from ˜5 × 10 23 n m -2 ( E > 0.5 MeV) up to over design values have been carried out. The maximum specimens irradiation time was 84 480 h. It is shown that there is an evolution in radiation-induced structural behavior with radiation dose increase, which causes a change in relative contribution of the mechanisms responsible for radiation embrittlement of RPV materials. Particularly, radiation coalescence of copper-enriched precipitates and extensive density increase of dislocation loops was observed. Increase in dislocation loop density was shown to provide the dominant contribution to radiation hardening at the late irradiation stages (after reaching double the design end-of-life neutron fluence of ˜4 × 10 24 n m -2). The fracture mechanism of the base metal at those stages was observed to change from transcrystalline to intercrystalline.

  17. Design and validation of high-precision wireless strain sensors for structural health monitoring of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Hongki; Park, JongWoong; Spencer, B. F., Jr.; Jung, Hyung-Jo

    2012-04-01

    Due to their cost-effectiveness and ease of installation, smart wireless sensors have received considerable recent attention for structural health monitoring of civil infrastructure. Though various wireless smart sensor networks (WSSN) have been successfully implemented for full-scale structural health monitoring (SHM) applications, monitoring of low-level ambient strain still remains a challenging problem for wireless smart sensors (WSS) due to A/D converter resolution, inherent circuit noise, and the need for automatic operation. In this paper, the design and validation of high-precision strain sensor board for Imote2 WSS platform and its application to SHM of a cable-stayed bridge are presented. By accurate and automated balancing the Wheatstone bridge, signal amplification of up to 2507-times can be obtained. Temperature compensation and shunt calibration are implemented. In addition to traditional foil-type strain gages, the sensor board has been designed to accommodate a friction-type magnet strain sensor, facilitating fast and easy deployment. The sensor board has been calibrated using lab-scale tests, and then deployed on a full-scale cable-stayed bridge to verify its performance.

  18. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 178 - Specifications for Steel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Specifications for Steel A Appendix A to Part 178... to Part 178—Specifications for Steel Table 1 Designation Chemical composition, percent-ladle analysis... be 1.40 percent. 6 Rephosphorized Grade 3 steels containing no more than 0.15 percent phosphorus...

  19. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 178 - Specifications for Steel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Specifications for Steel A Appendix A to Part 178... to Part 178—Specifications for Steel Table 1 Designation Chemical composition, percent-ladle analysis... be 1.40 percent. 6 Rephosphorized Grade 3 steels containing no more than 0.15 percent phosphorus...

  20. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 178 - Specifications for Steel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Specifications for Steel A Appendix A to Part 178... to Part 178—Specifications for Steel Table 1 Designation Chemical composition, percent-ladle analysis... be 1.40 percent. 6 Rephosphorized Grade 3 steels containing no more than 0.15 percent phosphorus...

  1. Virtual Steel Connection Sculpture--Student Learning Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chou, Karen C.; Moaveni, Saeed; Drane, Denise

    2016-01-01

    A Virtual Steel Connection Sculpture was developed through a grant from the National Science Foundation. The Virtual Sculpture is an interactive tool that shows students and anyone interested in connections how steel members are connected. This tool is created to complement students' steel design courses. The features of this educational tool,…

  2. 49 CFR Appendix A to Part 178 - Specifications for Steel

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Specifications for Steel A Appendix A to Part 178... to Part 178—Specifications for Steel Table 1 Designation Chemical composition, percent-ladle analysis... be 1.40 percent. 6 Rephosphorized Grade 3 steels containing no more than 0.15 percent phosphorus...

  3. Development of New Stainless Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Robert F. Buck

    2005-08-30

    A new family of innovative martensitic stainless steels, 521-A, 521-B, and 521-C has been developed by Advanced Steel Technology, LLC (Trafford, PA) as high strength fastener (bolt) materials for use at moderate temperatures in turbine engines, including steam turbines, gas turbines, and aircraft engines. The primary objective of the development program was to create a martensitic stainless steel with high strength at moderate temperatures, and which could replace the expensive nickel-based superalloy IN 718 in some fasteners applications. A secondary objective was to replace conventional 12Cr steels such as AISI 422 used as blades, buckets and shafts that operate at intermediate temperatures in turbine engines with stronger steel. The composition of the new alloys was specifically designed to produce excellent mechanical properties while integrating heat treatment steps into production to reduce energy consumption during manufacturing. As a result, production costs and energy consumption during production of rolled bar products is significantly lower than conventional materials. Successful commercialization of the new alloys would permit the installed cost of certain turbine engines to be reduced without sacrificing high availability or operational flexibility, thereby enhancing the global competitiveness of U.S. turbine engine manufacturers. Moreover, the domestic specialty steel industry would also benefit through increased productivity and reduced operating costs, while increasing their share of the international market for turbine engine fasteners, blades, buckets and shafts.

  4. Limit states and reliability-based pipeline design. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Zimmerman, T.J.E.; Chen, Q.; Pandey, M.D.

    1997-06-01

    This report provides the results of a study to develop limit states design (LSD) procedures for pipelines. Limit states design, also known as load and resistance factor design (LRFD), provides a unified approach to dealing with all relevant failure modes combinations of concern. It explicitly accounts for the uncertainties that naturally occur in the determination of the loads which act on a pipeline and in the resistance of the pipe to failure. The load and resistance factors used are based on reliability considerations; however, the designer is not faced with carrying out probabilistic calculations. This work is done during development and periodic updating of the LSD document. This report provides background information concerning limits states and reliability-based design (Section 2), gives the limit states design procedures that were developed (Section 3) and provides results of the reliability analyses that were undertaken in order to partially calibrate the LSD method (Section 4). An appendix contains LSD design examples in order to demonstrate use of the method. Section 3, Limit States Design has been written in the format of a recommended practice. It has been structured so that, in future, it can easily be converted to a limit states design code format. Throughout the report, figures and tables are given at the end of each section, with the exception of Section 3, where to facilitate understanding of the LSD method, they have been included with the text.

  5. A Virtual Steel Sculpture for Structural Engineering Education: Development and Initial Findings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dib, Hazar Nicholas; Adamo-Villani, Nicoletta

    2016-01-01

    We describe the development and evaluation of a virtual steel sculpture for engineering education. A good connection design requires the engineer to have a solid understanding of the mechanics and steel behavior. To help students better understand various connection types, many schools have acquired steel sculptures. A steel sculpture is a…

  6. 3D stress simulation and parameter design during twin-roll casting of 304 stainless steel based on the Anand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Liu, Yuan-yuan; Liu, Li-gang; Zhang, Yue; Yang, Qing-xiang

    2014-07-01

    This study first investigated cracks on the surface of an actual steel strip. Formulating the Anand model in ANSYS software, we then simulated the stress field in the molten pool of type 304 stainless steel during the twin-roll casting process. Parameters affecting the stress distribution in the molten pool were analyzed in detail and optimized. After twin-roll casting, a large number of transgranular and intergranular cracks resided on the surface of the thin steel strip, and followed a tortuous path. In the molten pool, stress was enhanced at the exit and at the roller contact positions. The stress at the exit decreased with increasing casting speed and pouring temperature. To ensure high quality of the fabricated strips, the casting speed and pouring temperature should be controlled above 0.7 m/s and 1520°C, respectively.

  7. Superstrength of nanograined steel with nanoscale intermetallic precipitates transformed from shock-compressed martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hailiang; Yan, Ming; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Li, Huijun; Zhu, Qiang; Godbole, Ajit; Li, Jintao; Su, Lihong; Kong, Charlie

    2016-11-01

    An increasing number of industrial applications need superstrength steels. It is known that refined grains and nanoscale precipitates can increase strength. The hardest martensitic steel reported to date is C0.8 steel, whose nanohardness can reach 11.9 GPa through incremental interstitial solid solution strengthening. Here we report a nanograined (NG) steel dispersed with nanoscale precipitates which has an extraordinarily high hardness of 19.1 GPa. The NG steel (shock-compressed Armox 500T steel) was obtained under these conditions: high strain rate of 1.2 μs-1, high temperature rise rate of 600 Kμs-1 and high pressure of 17 GPa. The mean grain size achieved was 39 nm and reinforcing precipitates were indexed in the NG steel. The strength of the NG steel is expected to be ~3950 MPa. The discovery of the NG steel offers a general pathway for designing new advanced steel materials with exceptional hardness and excellent strength.

  8. Superstrength of nanograined steel with nanoscale intermetallic precipitates transformed from shock-compressed martensitic steel

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hailiang; Yan, Ming; Lu, Cheng; Tieu, Anh Kiet; Li, Huijun; Zhu, Qiang; Godbole, Ajit; Li, Jintao; Su, Lihong; Kong, Charlie

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of industrial applications need superstrength steels. It is known that refined grains and nanoscale precipitates can increase strength. The hardest martensitic steel reported to date is C0.8 steel, whose nanohardness can reach 11.9 GPa through incremental interstitial solid solution strengthening. Here we report a nanograined (NG) steel dispersed with nanoscale precipitates which has an extraordinarily high hardness of 19.1 GPa. The NG steel (shock-compressed Armox 500T steel) was obtained under these conditions: high strain rate of 1.2 μs−1, high temperature rise rate of 600 Kμs−1 and high pressure of 17 GPa. The mean grain size achieved was 39 nm and reinforcing precipitates were indexed in the NG steel. The strength of the NG steel is expected to be ~3950 MPa. The discovery of the NG steel offers a general pathway for designing new advanced steel materials with exceptional hardness and excellent strength. PMID:27892460

  9. Optimization of Modes of Vacuum Carburizing of Gears from Heat-Resistant Steel VKS-7 on the Basis of Computational Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semenov, M. Yu.; Smirnov, A. E.; Fakhurtdinov, R. S.; Ospennikova, O. G.; Gromov, V. I.

    2015-05-01

    Mathematical simulation is used to develop modes of vacuum carburizing providing the specified level of operating properties in high-load gears from steel VKS-7. The computed values of the operating properties are compared to experimental data obtained by testing check pieces subjected to vacuum carburizing by the modes developed.

  10. Ultrahigh carbon steels, Damascus steels, and superplasticity

    SciTech Connect

    Sherby, O.D.; Wadsworth, J.

    1997-04-01

    The processing properties of ultrahigh carbon steels (UHCSs) have been studied at Stanford University over the past twenty years. These studies have shown that such steels (1 to 2.1% C) can be made superplastic at elevated temperature and can have remarkable mechanical properties at room temperature. It was the investigation of these UHCSs that eventually brought us to study the myths, magic, and metallurgy of ancient Damascus steels, which in fact, were also ultrahigh carbon steels. These steels were made in India as castings, known as wootz, possibly as far back as the time of Alexander the Great. The best swords are believed to have been forged in Persia from Indian wootz. This paper centers on recent work on superplastic UHCSs and on their relation to Damascus steels. 32 refs., 6 figs.

  11. Marine Structural Steel Toughness Data Bank (Abridged Edition)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-31

    August 28, 1991 SR-1311 MARINE STRUCTURAL STEEL TOUGHNESS DATA BANK (ABRIDGED EDITION) A substantial amount of toughness data for commonly used marine... steels is available to ship designers. The information, however, did not exist in a comprehensive database that users could access. The Ship Structure...Committee recognized the need for a conve -ent source of materials design data and sponsored the development of the Marine Structural Steel Toughness

  12. Designing the Color of Hot-Dip Galvanized Steel Sheet Through Destructive Light Interference Using a Zn-Ti Liquid Metallic Bath

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levai, Gabor; Godzsák, Melinda; Török, Tamas I.; Hakl, Jozsef; Takáts, Viktor; Csik, Attila; Vad, Kalman; Kaptay, George

    2016-07-01

    The color of hot-dip galvanized steel sheet was adjusted in a reproducible way using a liquid Zn-Ti metallic bath, air atmosphere, and controlling the bath temperature as the only experimental parameter. Coloring was found only for samples cooled in air and dipped into Ti-containing liquid Zn. For samples dipped into a 0.15 wt pct Ti-containing Zn bath, the color remained metallic (gray) below a 792 K (519 °C) bath temperature; it was yellow at 814 K ± 22 K (541 °C ± 22 °C), violet at 847 K ± 10 K (574 °C ± 10 °C), and blue at 873 K ± 15 K (600 °C ± 15 °C). With the increasing bath temperature, the thickness of the adhered Zn-Ti layer gradually decreased from 52 to 32 micrometers, while the thickness of the outer TiO2 layer gradually increased from 24 to 69 nm. Due to small Al contamination of the Zn bath, a thin (around 2 nm) alumina-rich layer is found between the outer TiO2 layer and the inner macroscopic Zn layer. It is proven that the color change was governed by the formation of thin outer TiO2 layer; different colors appear depending on the thickness of this layer, mostly due to the destructive interference of visible light on this transparent nano-layer. A complex model was built to explain the results using known relationships of chemical thermodynamics, adhesion, heat flow, kinetics of chemical reactions, diffusion, and optics. The complex model was able to reproduce the observations and allowed making predictions on the color of the hot-dip galvanized steel sample, as a function of the following experimental parameters: temperature and Ti content of the Zn bath, oxygen content, pressure, temperature and flow rate of the cooling gas, dimensions of the steel sheet, velocity of dipping the steel sheet into the Zn-Ti bath, residence time of the steel sheet within the bath, and the velocity of its removal from the bath. These relationships will be valuable for planning further experiments and technologies on color hot-dip galvanization of steel

  13. Crack stability analysis of low alloy steel primary coolant pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, T.; Kameyama, M.; Urabe, Y.

    1997-04-01

    At present, cast duplex stainless steel has been used for the primary coolant piping of PWRs in Japan and joints of dissimilar material have been applied for welding to reactor vessels and steam generators. For the primary coolant piping of the next APWR plants, application of low alloy steel that results in designing main loops with the same material is being studied. It means that there is no need to weld low alloy steel with stainless steel and that makes it possible to reduce the welding length. Attenuation of Ultra Sonic Wave Intensity is lower for low alloy steel than for stainless steel and they have advantageous inspection characteristics. In addition to that, the thermal expansion rate is smaller for low alloy steel than for stainless steel. In consideration of the above features of low alloy steel, the overall reliability of primary coolant piping is expected to be improved. Therefore, for the evaluation of crack stability of low alloy steel piping to be applied for primary loops, elastic-plastic future mechanics analysis was performed by means of a three-dimensioned FEM. The evaluation results for the low alloy steel pipings show that cracks will not grow into unstable fractures under maximum design load conditions, even when such a circumferential crack is assumed to be 6 times the size of the wall thickness.

  14. Steel Ammunition Bins, MIL-STD-l66O Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-03-01

    Research, Development and Engineering Center (ARDEC) to conduct MIL- STD -1660 tests on steel ammunition bins with newly-designed plywood lids for use in the...transportation of hazardous waste. This report contains test results of the steel ammunition bins with plywood lids meeting MIL- STD -1660, Design Criteria for Ammunition Unit Loads, test procedures.

  15. Welding Rustproof Steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffmann, W

    1929-01-01

    The following experimental results will perhaps increase the knowledge of the process of welding rustproof steels. The experiments were made with two chrome-steel sheets and with two chrome-steel-nickel sheets having the composition shown in Table I.

  16. Comminuting irradiated ferritic steel

    DOEpatents

    Bauer, Roger E.; Straalsund, Jerry L.; Chin, Bryan A.

    1985-01-01

    Disclosed is a method of comminuting irradiated ferritic steel by placing the steel in a solution of a compound selected from the group consisting of sulfamic acid, bisulfate, and mixtures thereof. The ferritic steel is used as cladding on nuclear fuel rods or other irradiated components.

  17. Towards establishing practical multi-hazard bridge design limit states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Zach; Lee, George C.

    2013-09-01

    In the U.S., the current Load and Resistance Factor Design (LRFD) Specifications for highway bridges is a reliability-based formulation that considers failure probabilities of bridge components due to the actions of typical dead load and frequent vehicular loads. Various extreme load effects, such as earthquake and vessel collision, are not considered on the same reliability-based platform. Since these extreme loads are time variables, combining them with frequent, nonextreme loads is a significant challenge. The number of design limit state equations based on these failure probabilities can be unrealistically large and unnecessary from the view point of practical applications. Based on the opinion of AASHTO State Bridge Engineers, many load combinations are insignificant in their states. This paper describes the formulation of a criterion to include only the necessary load combinations to establish the design limit states. This criterion is established by examining the total failure probabilities for all possible time-invariant and time varying load combinations and breaking them down into partial terms. Then, important load combinations can be readily determined quantitatively.

  18. Ultrahigh Ductility, High-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shengwei; Liu, Yu; Hao, Qingguo; Zuo, Xunwei; Rong, Yonghua; Chen, Nailu

    2016-10-01

    Based on the proposed design idea of the anti-transformation-induced plasticity effect, both the additions of the Nb element and pretreatment of the normalization process as a novel quenching-partitioning-tempering (Q-P-T) were designed for Fe-0.63C-1.52Mn-1.49Si-0.62Cr-0.036Nb hot-rolled steel. This high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel exhibits a tensile strength of 1890 MPa and elongation of 29 pct accompanied by the excellent product of tensile and elongation of 55 GPa pct. The origin of ultrahigh ductility for high-carbon Q-P-T martensitic steel is revealed from two aspects: one is the softening of martensitic matrix due to both the depletion of carbon in the matensitic matrix during the Q-P-T process by partitioning of carbon from supersaturated martensite to retained austenite and the reduction of the dislocation density in a martensitic matrix by dislocation absorption by retained austenite effect during deformation, which significantly enhances the deformation ability of martensitic matrix; another is the high mechanical stability of considerable carbon-enriched retained austenite, which effectively reduces the formation of brittle twin-type martensite. This work verifies the correctness of the design idea of the anti-TRIP effect and makes the third-generation advanced high-strength steels extend to the field of high-carbon steels from low- and medium-carbon steels.

  19. Utilization of structural steel in buildings

    PubMed Central

    Moynihan, Muiris C.; Allwood, Julian M.

    2014-01-01

    Over one-quarter of steel produced annually is used in the construction of buildings. Making this steel causes carbon dioxide emissions, which climate change experts recommend be reduced by half in the next 37 years. One option to achieve this is to design and build more efficiently, still delivering the same service from buildings but using less steel to do so. To estimate how much steel could be saved from this option, 23 steel-framed building designs are studied, sourced from leading UK engineering firms. The utilization of each beam is found and buildings are analysed to find patterns. The results for over 10 000 beams show that average utilization is below 50% of their capacity. The primary reason for this low value is ‘rationalization’—providing extra material to reduce labour costs. By designing for minimum material rather than minimum cost, steel use in buildings could be drastically reduced, leading to an equivalent reduction in ‘embodied’ carbon emissions. PMID:25104911

  20. The steel scrap age.

    PubMed

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Milford, Rachel L; Müller, Daniel B; Allwood, Julian M

    2013-04-02

    Steel production accounts for 25% of industrial carbon emissions. Long-term forecasts of steel demand and scrap supply are needed to develop strategies for how the steel industry could respond to industrialization and urbanization in the developing world while simultaneously reducing its environmental impact, and in particular, its carbon footprint. We developed a dynamic stock model to estimate future final demand for steel and the available scrap for 10 world regions. Based on evidence from developed countries, we assumed that per capita in-use stocks will saturate eventually. We determined the response of the entire steel cycle to stock saturation, in particular the future split between primary and secondary steel production. During the 21st century, steel demand may peak in the developed world, China, the Middle East, Latin America, and India. As China completes its industrialization, global primary steel production may peak between 2020 and 2030 and decline thereafter. We developed a capacity model to show how extensive trade of finished steel could prolong the lifetime of the Chinese steelmaking assets. Secondary steel production will more than double by 2050, and it may surpass primary production between 2050 and 2060: the late 21st century can become the steel scrap age.

  1. Methods of forming steel

    DOEpatents

    Branagan, Daniel J.; Burch, Joseph V.

    2001-01-01

    In one aspect, the invention encompasses a method of forming a steel. A metallic glass is formed and at least a portion of the glass is converted to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A molten alloy is formed and cooled the alloy at a rate which forms a metallic glass. The metallic glass is devitrified to convert the glass to a crystalline steel material having a nanocrystalline scale grain size. In yet another aspect, the invention encompasses another method of forming a steel. A first metallic glass steel substrate is provided, and a molten alloy is formed over the first metallic glass steel substrate to heat and devitrify at least some of the underlying metallic glass of the substrate.

  2. Radioactive waste isolation in salt: Peer review of the Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation's draft report on a multifactor test design to investigate uniform corrosion of low-carbon steel

    SciTech Connect

    Paddock, R.A.; Lerman, A.; Ditmars, J.D.; Macdonald, D.D.; Peerenboom, J.P.; Was, G.S.; Harrison, W.

    1987-01-01

    This report documents Argonne National Laboratory's review of an internal technical memorandum prepared by Battelle Memorial Institute's Office of Nuclear Waste Isolation (ONWI) entitled Multifactor Test Design to Investigate Uniform Corrosion of Low-Carbon Steel in a Nuclear Waste Salt Repository Environment. The several major areas of concern identified by peer review panelists are important to the credibility of the test design proposed in the memorandum and are to adequately addressed there. These areas of concern, along with specific recommendations to improve their treatment, are discussed in detail in Sec. 2 of this report. The twenty recommendations, which were abstracted from those discussions, are presented essentially in the order in which they are introduced in Sec. 2.

  3. Development of Next Generation Heating System for Scale Free Steel Reheating

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Arvind C. Thekdi

    2011-01-27

    The work carried out under this project includes development and design of components, controls, and economic modeling tools that would enable the steel industry to reduce energy intensity through reduction of scale formation during the steel reheating process. Application of scale free reheating offers savings in energy used for production of steel that is lost as scale, and increase in product yield for the global steel industry. The technology can be applied to a new furnace application as well as retrofit design for conversion of existing steel reheating furnaces. The development work has resulted in the knowledge base that will enable the steel industry and steel forging industry us to reheat steel with 75% to 95% reduction in scale formation and associated energy savings during the reheating process. Scale reduction also results in additional energy savings associated with higher yield from reheat furnaces. Energy used for steel production ranges from 9 MM Btu/ton to 16.6 MM Btu/ton or the industry average of approximately 13 MM Btu/ton. Hence, reduction in scale at reheating stage would represent a substantial energy reduction for the steel industry. Potential energy savings for the US steel industry could be in excess of 25 Trillion Btu/year when the technology is applied to all reheating processes. The development work has resulted in new design of reheating process and the required burners and control systems that would allow use of this technology for steel reheating in steel as well as steel forging industries.

  4. Advanced reactor vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markov, S. I.; Dub, V. S.; Lebedev, A. G.; Kuleshova, E. A.; Balikoev, A. G.; Makarycheva, E. V.; Tolstykh, D. S.; Frolov, A. S.; Krikun, E. V.

    2016-09-01

    A set of studies, tests, and technological works is performed to design promising high-strength vessel steels for reactors with supercritical coolant parameters. Compositions and technological parameters are proposed for the production of reference steel (within the limits of the grade composition of 15Kh2NMFA-A steel) and high-nickel steel. These steels are characterized by high properties, including metallurgical quality and service and technological parameters. Steel of the reference composition has high (higher by 15%) strength properties, improved viscoplastic properties, and ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-125°C. The strength properties of the high-nickel steel are higher than those of the existing steels by 40-50% and higher than those of advanced foreign steels by 15-20% at ductile-brittle transition temperature t c of at most-165°C. Moreover, the designed steels are characterized by a low content of harmful impurity elements and nonmetallic inclusions, a fine-grained structure, and a low susceptibility to thermal embrittlement.

  5. Recycling galvanized steel: Operating experience and benefits

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.

    1993-08-01

    In response to the increase in consumption of galvanized steel for automobiles in the last decade and the problems associated with remelting larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is recovered electrolytically as dendritic powder. The dezinced ferrous scrap is rinsed and used directly. The process is effective for zinc, lead, and aluminum removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 900 tonnes of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap, with a design capacity of 48,000 tonnes annually, has been in operation in East Chicago, Indiana since early in 1993. The first 450 t of scrap degalvanized in the pilot plant have residual zinc below 0.01% and sodium dragout below 0.01%. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials, environmental compliance, and opportunity costs to steel- and iron-makers. Availability of clean degalvanized scrap may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant and EAF shops to produce flat products without use of high quality scrap alternatives such as DRI, pig iron, or iron carbide. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap. The quantities of zinc available by the year 2000 from prompt and obsolete automotive scrap win approach 25% of zinc consumed in the major automotive production centers of the world. Zinc recycling from galvanized steel scrap, either before or after scrap melting, will have to be implemented.

  6. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-15

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  7. Lightweight Steel Solutions for Automotive Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hong Woo; Kim, Gyosung; Park, Sung Ho

    2010-06-01

    Recently, improvement in fuel efficiency and safety has become the biggest issue in worldwide automotive industry. Although the regulation of environment and safety has been tightened up more and more, the majority of vehicle bodies are still manufactured from stamped steel components. This means that the optimized steel solutions enable to demonstrate its ability to reduce body weight with high crashworthiness performance instead of expensive light weight materials such as Al, Mg and composites. To provide the innovative steel solutions for automotive industry, POSCO has developed AHSS and its application technologies, which is directly connected to EVI activities. EVI is a technical cooperation program with customer covering all stages of new car project from design to mass production. Integrated light weight solutions through new forming technologies such as TWB, hydroforming and HPF are continuously developed and provided for EVI activities. This paper will discuss the detailed status of these technologies especially light weight steel solutions based on innovative technologies.

  8. Maraging Steel Machining Improvements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-23

    APR 2007 2. REPORT TYPE Technical, Success Story 3. DATES COVERED 01-12-2006 to 23-04-2007 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Maraging Steel Machining...consumers of cobalt-strengthened maraging steel . An increase in production requires them to reduce the machining time of certain operations producing... maraging steel ; Success Stories 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 1 18. NUMBER OF PAGES 1 19a. NAME OF RESPONSIBLE

  9. Underwater wet welding of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ibarra, S.; Liu, S.; Olson, D.L.

    1995-05-01

    Underwater wet welding is conducted directly in water with the shielded metal arc (SMA) and flux cored arc (FCA) welding processes. Underwater wet welding has been demonstrated as an acceptable repair technique down to 100 meters (325 ft.) in depth, but wet welds have been attempted on carbon steel structures down to 200 meters (650 ft.). The primary purpose of this interpretive report is to document and evaluate current understanding of metallurgical behavior of underwater wet welds so that new welding consumables can be designed and new welding practices can be developed for fabrication and repair of high strength steel structures at greater depths. First the pyrometallurgical and physical metallurgy behaviors of underwater weldments are discussed. Second, modifications of the welding consumables and processes are suggested to enhance the ability to apply wet welding techniques.

  10. Existing Steel Railway Bridges Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vičan, Josef; Gocál, Jozef; Odrobiňák, Jaroslav; Koteš, Peter

    2016-12-01

    The article describes general principles and basis of evaluation of existing railway bridges based on the concept of load-carrying capacity determination. Compared to the design of a new bridge, the modified reliability level for existing bridges evaluation should be considered due to implementation of the additional data related to bridge condition and behaviour obtained from regular inspections. Based on those data respecting the bridge remaining lifetime, a modification of partial safety factors for actions and materials could be respected in the bridge evaluation process. A great attention is also paid to the specific problems of determination of load-caring capacity of steel railway bridges in service. Recommendation for global analysis and methodology for existing steel bridge superstructure load-carrying capacity determination are described too.

  11. Welding irradiated stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.; Chandler, G.T.; Nelson, D.Z.; Franco-Ferreira, E.A.

    1993-12-31

    Conventional welding processes produced severe underbead cracking in irradiated stainless steel containing 1 to 33 appm helium from n,a reactions. A shallow penetration overlay technique was successfully demonstrated for welding irradiated stainless steel. The technique was applied to irradiated 304 stainless steel that contained 10 appm helium. Surface cracking, present in conventional welds made on the same steel at the same and lower helium concentrations, was eliminated. Underbead cracking was minimal compared to conventional welding methods. However, cracking in the irradiated material was greater than in tritium charged and aged material at the same helium concentrations. The overlay technique provides a potential method for repair or modification of irradiated reactor materials.

  12. Microstructure, Properties and Weldability of Duplex Stainless Steel 2101

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Li; Hu, Shengsun; Shen, Junqi

    2017-01-01

    The continuous development of duplex stainless steels (DSSs) is due to their excellent corrosion resistance in aggressive environments and their mechanical strength, which is usually twice of conventional austenitic stainless steels (ASSs). In this paper, a designed lean duplex stainless steel 2101, with the alloy design of reduced nickel content and increased additions of manganese and nitrogen, is studied by being partly compared with typical ASS 304L steels. The microstructure, mechanical properties, impact toughness, corrosion resistance and weldability of the designed DSS 2101 were conducted. The results demonstrated that both 2101 steel and its weldment show excellent mechanical properties, impact toughness and corrosion resistance, so DSS 2101 exhibits good comprehensive properties and can be used to replace 304L in numerous applications.

  13. Low carbon dual phase steels for high strength wire

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, G.; Ahn, J.H.

    1985-08-01

    This paper shows that dual phase steels can be designed and processed as new, economical low carbon steels for cold drawing into high tensile strength steel wires. Current work indicates wires of tensile strengths up to 400,000 psi can be obtained. Potential applications for dual phase steel wire include bead wire, tire cord, wire rope and prestressed concrete. It should be possible to produce wire rods in existing rod mills by adapting the controlled rolling and quenching procedures outlined in this paper.

  14. Electropolishing of Re-melted SLM Stainless Steel 316L Parts Using Deep Eutectic Solvents: 3 × 3 Full Factorial Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrbaey, K.; Wimpenny, D. I.; Al-Barzinjy, A. A.; Moroz, A.

    2016-07-01

    This three-level three-factor full factorial study describes the effects of electropolishing using deep eutectic solvents on the surface roughness of re-melted 316L stainless steel samples produced by the selective laser melting (SLM) powder bed fusion additive manufacturing method. An improvement in the surface finish of re-melted stainless steel 316L parts was achieved by optimizing the processing parameters for a relatively environmentally friendly (`green') electropolishing process using a Choline Chloride ionic electrolyte. The results show that further improvement of the response value-average surface roughness ( Ra) can be obtained by electropolishing after re-melting to yield a 75% improvement compared to the as-built Ra. The best Ra value was less than 0.5 μm, obtained with a potential of 4 V, maintained for 30 min at 40 °C. Electropolishing has been shown to be effective at removing the residual oxide film formed during the re-melting process. The material dissolution during the process is not homogenous and is directed preferentially toward the iron and nickel, leaving the surface rich in chromium with potentially enhanced properties. The re-melted and polished surface of the samples gave an approximately 20% improvement in fatigue life at low stresses (approximately 570 MPa). The results of the study demonstrate that a combination of re-melting and electropolishing provides a flexible method for surface texture improvement which is capable of delivering a significant improvement in surface finish while holding the dimensional accuracy of parts within an acceptable range.

  15. Transient heat transfer behavior of water spray evaporative cooling on a stainless steel cylinder with structured surface for safety design application in high temperature scenario

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aamir, Muhammad; Liao, Qiang; Hong, Wang; Xun, Zhu; Song, Sihong; Sajid, Muhammad

    2017-02-01

    High heat transfer performance of spray cooling on structured surface might be an additional measure to increase the safety of an installation against any threat caused by rapid increase in the temperature. The purpose of present experimental study is to explore heat transfer performance of structured surface under different spray conditions and surface temperatures. Two cylindrical stainless steel samples were used, one with pyramid pins structured surface and other with smooth surface. Surface heat flux of 3.60, 3.46, 3.93 and 4.91 MW/m2 are estimated for sample initial average temperature of 600, 700, 800 and 900 °C, respectively for an inlet pressure of 1.0 MPa. A maximum cooling rate of 507 °C/s was estimated for an inlet pressure of 0.7 MPa at 900 °C for structured surface while for smooth surface maximum cooling rate of 356 °C/s was attained at 1.0 MPa for 700 °C. Structured surface performed better to exchange heat during spray cooling at initial sample temperature of 900 °C with a relative increase in surface heat flux by factor of 1.9, 1.56, 1.66 and 1.74 relative to smooth surface, for inlet pressure of 0.4, 0.7, 1.0 and 1.3 MPa, respectively. For smooth surface, a decreasing trend in estimated heat flux is observed, when initial sample temperature was increased from 600 to 900 °C. Temperature-based function specification method was utilized to estimate surface heat flux and surface temperature. Limited published work is available about the application of structured surface spray cooling techniques for safety of stainless steel structures at very high temperature scenario such as nuclear safety vessel and liquid natural gas storage tanks.

  16. Tundish Technology for Casting Clean Steel: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahai, Yogeshwar

    2016-08-01

    With increasing demand of high-quality clean steel, cleanliness is of paramount importance in steel production and casting. Tundish plays an important role in controlling the continuously cast steel quality as it links a batch vessel, ladle, to a continuous casting mold. Tundish is also the last vessel in which metal flows before solidifying in mold. For controlling the quality of steel, flow and temperature control of the melt are critical, and these are presented in this paper. Use of proper flux, design of flow control devices, and gas injection in tundish become important factors in casting clean steel. Recycling of hot tundish, centrifugal flow tundish, H-shaped tundish, etc. are some of the developments which were implemented to cast clean steel and these are discussed.

  17. Process development of thin strip steel casting

    SciTech Connect

    Sussman, R.C.; Williams, R.S.

    1990-12-01

    An important new frontier is being opened in steel processing with the emergence of thin strip casting. Casting steel directly to thin strip has enormous benefits in energy savings by potentially eliminating the need for hot reduction in a hot strip mill. This has been the driving force for numerous current research efforts into the direct strip casting of steel. The US Department of Energy initiated a program to evaluate the development of thin strip casting in the steel industry. In earlier phases of this program, planar flow casting on an experimental caster was studied by a team of engineers from Westinghouse Electric corporation and Armco Inc. A subsequent research program was designed as a fundamental and developmental study of both planar and melt overflow casting processes. This study was arranged as several separate and distinct tasks which were often completed by different teams of researchers. An early task was to design and build a water model to study fluid flow through different designs of planar flow casting nozzles. Another important task was mathematically modeling of melt overflow casting process. A mathematical solidification model for the formation of the strip in the melt overflow process was written. A study of the material and conditioning of casting substrates was made on the small wheel caster using the melt overflow casting process. This report discusses work on the development of thin steel casting.

  18. TRP 9904 - Constitutive Behavior of High Strength Multiphase Sheel Steel Under High Strain Rate Deformation

    SciTech Connect

    David Matlock; John Speer

    2005-03-31

    The focus of the research project was to systematically assess the strain rate dependence of strengthening mechanisms in new advanced high strength sheet steels. Data were obtained on specially designed and produced Duel Phase and TRIP steels and compared to the properties of automotive steels currently in use.

  19. Development of Steel Foam Materials and Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Kremer; Anthony Liszkiewicz; James Adkins

    2004-10-20

    In the past few years there has been a growing interest in lightweight metal foams. Demands for weight reduction, improved fuel efficiency, and increased passenger safety in automobiles now has manufacturers seriously considering the use of metal foams, in contrast to a few years ago, when the same materials would have been ruled out for technical or economical reasons. The objective of this program was to advance the development and use of steel foam materials, by demonstrating the advantages of these novel lightweight materials in selected generic applications. Progress was made in defining materials and process parameters; characterization of physical and mechanical properties; and fabrication and testing of generic steel foam-filled shapes with compositions from 2.5 wt.% to 0.7 wt.% carbon. A means of producing steel foam shapes with uniform long range porosity levels of 50 to 60 percent was demonstrated and verified with NDE methods. Steel foam integrated beams, cylinders and plates were mechanically tested and demonstrated advantages in bend stiffness, bend resistance, and crush energy absorption. Methods of joining by welding, adhesive bonding, and mechanical fastening were investigated. It is important to keep in mind that steel foam is a conventional material in an unconventional form. A substantial amount of physical and mechanical properties are presented throughout the report and in a properties database at the end of the report to support designer's in applying steel foam in unconventional ways.

  20. Microstructural studies of advanced austenitic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Todd, J. A.; Ren, Jyh-Ching

    1989-11-15

    This report presents the first complete microstructural and analytical electron microscopy study of Alloy AX5, one of a series of advanced austenitic steels developed by Maziasz and co-workers at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, for their potential application as reheater and superheater materials in power plants that will reach the end of their design lives in the 1990's. The advanced steels are modified with carbide forming elements such as titanium, niobium and vanadium. When combined with optimized thermo-mechanical treatments, the advanced steels exhibit significantly improved creep rupture properties compared to commercially available 316 stainless steels, 17--14 Cu--Mo and 800 H steels. The importance of microstructure in controlling these improvements has been demonstrated for selected alloys, using stress relaxation testing as an accelerated test method. The microstructural features responsible for the improved creep strengths have been identified by studying the thermal aging kinetics of one of the 16Ni--14Cr advanced steels, Alloy AX5, in both the solution annealed and the solution annealed plus cold worked conditions. Time-temperature-precipitation diagrams have been developed for the temperature range 600 C to 900 C and for times from 1 h to 3000 h. 226 refs., 88 figs., 10 tabs.

  1. Development of Advanced 9Cr Ferritic-Martensitic Steels and Austenitic Stainless Steels for Sodium-Cooled Fast Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Sham, Sam; Tan, Lizhen; Yamamoto, Yukinori

    2013-01-01

    Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steel Grade 92, with or without thermomechanical treatment (TMT), and austenitic stainless steels HT-UPS (high-temperature ultrafine precipitate strengthening) and NF709 were selected as potential candidate structural materials in the U.S. Sodium-cooled Fast Reactor (SFR) program. The objective is to develop advanced steels with improved properties as compared with reference materials such as Grade 91 and Type 316H steels that are currently in nuclear design codes. Composition modification and/or processing optimization (e.g., TMT and cold-work) were performed to improve properties such as resistance to thermal aging, creep, creep-fatigue, fracture, and sodium corrosion. Testings to characterize these properties for the advanced steels were conducted by the Idaho National Laboratory, the Argonne National Laboratory and the Oak Ridge National Laboratory under the U.S. SFR program. This paper focuses on the resistance to thermal aging and creep of the advanced steels. The advanced steels exhibited up to two orders of magnitude increase in creep life compared to the reference materials. Preliminary results on the weldment performance of the advanced steels are also presented. The superior performance of the advanced steels would improve reactor design flexibility, safety margins and economics.

  2. Coated 4340 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-26

    the effects of three coating systems on the mechanical property, fatigue, and...defined striations or striations-like features were formed in air, Figure A-13(b). On the other hand, intergranular cracking and formation of brittle...steel, in air. Their respective effects on the fatigue resistance of bare 4340 steel were similar in both of the employed environments, air and

  3. Steel Industry Wastes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidtke, N. W.; Averill, D. W.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of wastes from steel industry, covering publications of 1976-77. This review covers: (1) coke production; (2) iron and steel production; (3) rolling operations; and (4) surface treatment. A list of 133 references is also presented. (NM)

  4. Ultrasonic phased array transducers for nondestructive evaluation of steel structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Sung-Jin; Shin, Hyeon Jae; Jang, You Hyun

    2000-05-01

    An ultrasonic phased array transducer has been developed and demonstrated for the nondestructive evaluation of steel structures. The number of array elements is 64 and the center frequency is about 5 MHz. This phased array transducer is designed to use with the phased array system that does steering, transmission focusing and dynamic receive focusing. Each of the array elements is individually excited according to the focal laws and steering angles. Measurements of ultrasonic beam profiles for the array transducer in a reference steel block are presented and compared with theoretical predictions. Some of the phased array transducer design concepts for the application in steel structures are discussed. The two-dimensional ultrasonic images of the sample steel block including flat bottom holes and side drilled holes are presented. Experimental and theoretical results demonstrate excellent feasibility of the utility of the phased array transducer in imaging and detection of defects in steel structures.

  5. New insights into the chemical structure of Y2Ti2O7-δ nanoparticles in oxide dispersion-strengthened steels designed for sodium fast reactors by electron energy-loss spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badjeck, V.; Walls, M. G.; Chaffron, L.; Malaplate, J.; March, K.

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we study by high resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy coupled with electron energy-loss spectroscopy (STEM-EELS) an oxide dispersion-strengthened (ODS) steel with the nominal composition Fe-14Cr-1W-0.3TiH2-0.3Y2O3 (wt.%) designed to withstand the extreme conditions met in Gen. IV nuclear reactors. After denoising via principal component analysis (PCA) the data are analyzed using independent component analysis (ICA) which is useful in the investigation of the physical properties and chemical structure of the material by separating the individual spectral responses. The Y-Ti-O nanoparticles are found to be homogeneously distributed in the ferritic matrix, sized from 1 to 20 nm and match a non-stoichiometric pyrochlore-Y2Ti2O7-δ structure for sizes greater than 5 nm. We show that they adopt a (Y-Ti-O)-Cr core-shell structure and that Cr also segregates at the matrix grain boundaries, which may slightly modify the corrosion properties of the steel. Using Ti-L2,3 and O-K fine structure (ELNES) the Ti oxidation state is shown to vary from the center of the nanoparticles to their periphery, from Ti4+ in distorted Oh symmetry to a valency often lower than 3+. The sensitivity of the Ti "white lines" ELNES to local symmetry distortions is also shown to be useful when investigating the strain induced in the nanoparticles by the surrounding matrix. The Cr-shell and the variation of the Ti valence state highlight a complex nanoparticle-matrix interface.

  6. Evaluation of stainless steels for their resistance to intergranular corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korostelev, A. B.; Abramov, V. Ya.; Belous, V. N.

    1996-10-01

    Austenitic stainless steels are being considered as structural materials for first wall/blanket systems in the International Thermonuclear Reactor (ITER). The uniform corrosion of stainless steels in water is well known and is not a critical issue limiting its application for the ITER design. The sensitivity of austenitic steels to intergranular corrosion (IGC) can be estimated rather accurately by means of calculation methods, considering structure and chemical composition of steel. There is a maximum permissible carbon content level, at which sensitization of stainless steel is eliminated: K = Cr eff - αC eff, where α-thermodynamic coefficient, Cr eff-effective chromium content (regarding molybdenum influence) and C eff-effective carbon content (taking into account nickel and stabilizing elements). Corrosion tests for 16Cr11Ni3MoTi, 316L and 316LN steel specimens, irradiated up to 2 × 10 22 n/cm 2 fluence have proved the effectiveness of this calculation technique for determination of austenitic steels tendency to IGC. This method is directly applicable in austenitic stainless steel production and enables one to exclude complicated experiments on determination of stainless steel susceptibility to IGC.

  7. Damascus steel ledeburite class

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sukhanov, D. A.; Arkhangelsky, L. B.; Plotnikova, N. V.

    2017-02-01

    Discovered that some of blades Damascus steel has an unusual nature of origin of the excess cementite, which different from the redundant phases of secondary cementite, cementite of ledeburite and primary cementite in iron-carbon alloys. It is revealed that the morphological features of separate particles of cementite in Damascus steels lies in the abnormal size of excess carbides having the shape of irregular prisms. Considered three hypotheses for the formation of excess cementite in the form of faceted prismatic of excess carbides. The first hypothesis is based on thermal fission of cementite of a few isolated grains. The second hypothesis is based on the process of fragmentation cementite during deformation to the separate the pieces. The third hypothesis is based on the transformation of metastable cementite in the stable of angular eutectic carbide. It is shown that the angular carbides are formed within the original metastable colony ledeburite, so they are called “eutectic carbide”. It is established that high-purity white cast iron is converted into of Damascus steel during isothermal soaking at the annealing. It was revealed that some of blades Damascus steel ledeburite class do not contain in its microstructure of crushed ledeburite. It is shown that the pattern of carbide heterogeneity of Damascus steel consists entirely of angular eutectic carbides. Believe that Damascus steel refers to non-heat-resistant steel of ledeburite class, which have similar structural characteristics with semi-heat-resistant die steel or heat-resistant high speed steel, differing from them only in the nature of excess carbide phase.

  8. Austenitic stainless steels for cryogenic service

    SciTech Connect

    Dalder, E.N.C.; Juhas, M.C.

    1985-09-19

    Presently available information on austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni stainless steel plate, welds, and castings for service below 77 K are reviewed with the intent (1) of developing systematic relationships between mechanical properties, composition, microstructure, and processing, and (2) of assessing the adequacy of these data bases in the design, fabrication, and operation of engineering systems at 4 K.

  9. Tests Of Materials For Repair Coating Of Carbon Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Macdowell, Louis G., III

    1995-01-01

    Report describes tests of paints (primers and topcoats) for use in recoating rusted carbon steel for protection against further corrosion. Paints selected for evaluation all designated by manufacturers as suitable for application over tightly adhering rust.

  10. Stainless-steel elbows formed by spin forging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    Large seamless austenitic stainless steel elbows are fabricated by spin forging /rotary shear forming/. A specially designed spin forging tool for mounting on a hydrospin machine has been built for this purpose.

  11. Building Strength in Schools: Why Steel Makes Sense.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Praeger, Charles E.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the advantages of metal building and roofing systems, especially the use of steel. Considers such factors as installation ease and design flexibility, reliability and durability, and cost-effectiveness. (PKP)

  12. Steel Roofing Systems Have School Districts Looking Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Werner, Michael F.

    2001-01-01

    Examines the leading benefits of choosing steel roofing for educational facilities. Benefits examined are durability, energy efficiency, aesthetics and design flexibility, and construction efficiency and low life cycle cost. (GR)

  13. Evaluation of seismic design spectrum based on UHS implementing fourth-generation seismic hazard maps of Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Ali; Hasan, Rafiq; Pekau, Oscar A.

    2016-12-01

    Two recent developments have come into the forefront with reference to updating the seismic design provisions for codes: (1) publication of new seismic hazard maps for Canada by the Geological Survey of Canada, and (2) emergence of the concept of new spectral format outdating the conventional standardized spectral format. The fourth -generation seismic hazard maps are based on enriched seismic data, enhanced knowledge of regional seismicity and improved seismic hazard modeling techniques. Therefore, the new maps are more accurate and need to incorporate into the Canadian Highway Bridge Design Code (CHBDC) for its next edition similar to its building counterpart National Building Code of Canada (NBCC). In fact, the code writers expressed similar intentions with comments in the commentary of CHBCD 2006. During the process of updating codes, NBCC, and AASHTO Guide Specifications for LRFD Seismic Bridge Design, American Association of State Highway and Transportation Officials, Washington (2009) lowered the probability level from 10 to 2% and 10 to 5%, respectively. This study has brought five sets of hazard maps corresponding to 2%, 5% and 10% probability of exceedance in 50 years developed by the GSC under investigation. To have a sound statistical inference, 389 Canadian cities are selected. This study shows the implications of the changes of new hazard maps on the design process (i.e., extent of magnification or reduction of the design forces).

  14. Modern steels at atomic and nanometre scales

    DOE PAGES

    Caballero, F. G.; Garcia-Mateo, C.; Miller, M. K.

    2014-10-10

    Processing bulk nanocrystalline materials for structural applications still poses a difficult challenge, particularly in achieving an industrially viable process. Recent work in ferritic steels has proved that it is possible to move from ultrafine to nanoscale by exploiting the bainite reaction without the use of severe deformation, rapid heat treatment or mechanical processing. This new generation of steels has been designed in which transformation at low temperature leads to a nanoscale structure consisting of extremely fine, 20–40 nm thick plates of bainitic ferrite and films of retained austenite. Finally, a description of the characteristics and significance of this remarkable microstructuremore » is provided here.« less

  15. Economic feasibility of radioactive scrap steel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Balhiser, R.; Rosholt, D.; Nichols, F.

    1995-12-31

    The goal of MSE`s Radioactive Scrap Steel (RSS) Recycle Program is to develop practical methods for recycling RSS into useful product. This paper provides interim information about ongoing feasibility investigations that are scheduled for completion by September 1995. The project approach, major issues, and cost projections are outlined. Current information indicates that a cost effective RSS Recycling Facility can be designed, built, and in operation by 1999. The RSS team believes that high quality steel plate can be made from RSS at a conversion cost of $1500 per ton or less.

  16. Modern steels at atomic and nanometre scales

    SciTech Connect

    Caballero, F. G.; Garcia-Mateo, C.; Miller, M. K.

    2014-10-10

    Processing bulk nanocrystalline materials for structural applications still poses a difficult challenge, particularly in achieving an industrially viable process. Recent work in ferritic steels has proved that it is possible to move from ultrafine to nanoscale by exploiting the bainite reaction without the use of severe deformation, rapid heat treatment or mechanical processing. This new generation of steels has been designed in which transformation at low temperature leads to a nanoscale structure consisting of extremely fine, 20–40 nm thick plates of bainitic ferrite and films of retained austenite. Finally, a description of the characteristics and significance of this remarkable microstructure is provided here.

  17. Certification of offshore mooring steel wire ropes

    SciTech Connect

    Lohne, P.W.

    1996-12-31

    The trend to produce oil in increasingly deeper water has led to the development of floating production solutions for the exploitation of the energy resources in these areas. It is a fact that steel wire ropes have been used and are being proposed as line segments in the majority of the mooring systems of these units/ships. This paper specifies requirements for the materials, design, manufacture and testing of large diameter offshore mooring steel wire ropes and may serve as a technical reference document in contractual matters between the purchaser and the manufacturer. Typical applications covered are permanently moored floating production systems (FPS), offshore loading systems and mobile offshore units.

  18. Cobalt free maraging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Floreen, S.

    1984-04-17

    The subject invention is directed to ferrous-base alloys, particularly to a cobalt-free maraging steel of novel chemistry characterized by a desired combination of strength and toughness, notwithstanding that cobalt is non-essential.

  19. Structural Amorphous Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Z. P.; Liu, C. T.; Thompson, J. R.; Porter, W. D.

    2004-06-01

    Recent advancement in bulk metallic glasses, whose properties are usually superior to their crystalline counterparts, has stimulated great interest in fabricating bulk amorphous steels. While a great deal of effort has been devoted to this field, the fabrication of structural amorphous steels with large cross sections has remained an alchemist’s dream because of the limited glass-forming ability (GFA) of these materials. Here we report the discovery of structural amorphous steels that can be cast into glasses with large cross-section sizes using conventional drop-casting methods. These new steels showed interesting physical, magnetic, and mechanical properties, along with high thermal stability. The underlying mechanisms for the superior GFA of these materials are discussed.

  20. Glass Stronger than Steel

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Yarris, Lynn

    2011-03-28

    A new type of damage-tolerant metallic glass, demonstrating a strength and toughness beyond that of steel or any other known material, has been developed and tested by a collaboration of researchers from Berkeley Lab and Caltech.

  1. Joining Steel Armor - Intermix

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-03-01

    TARADCOM a d ki Lk A el B~ 0el RWET0 TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 12311 JOINING STEEL ARMOR - INTERMIX March 1979 U U * S* ’ "U .by B. . A.SCEV * U...authorized documents. O "if TECHNICAL REPORT NO. 12311 JOINING STEEL ARMOR - INTERMIX BY B. A. SCHEVO March 1979 AMS: 3197..6D.4329 TARADCOM ARMOR AND...Intermix Process ...... ........ 3 Test Procedures - Intermix Armor ........ ......... 4 Mock Hull ................. ..................... 5 Results

  2. Life after Steel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mangan, Katherine

    2013-01-01

    Bobby Curran grew up in a working-class neighborhood in Baltimore, finished high school, and followed his grandfather's steel-toed bootprints straight to Sparrows Point, a 3,000-acre sprawl of industry on the Chesapeake Bay. College was not part of the plan. A gritty but well-paying job at the RG Steel plant was Mr. Curran's ticket to a secure…

  3. Ferrium M54 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-18

    15 to 18% (reference 1). Beyond this range the alloy becomes more noble than steel and loses its sacrificial protection property . Therefore, Zn-14...for a 7075-T651 aluminum alloy , which was subjected to biaxial fatigue loading in 3.5% NaCl solution (reference 27). NAWCADPAX/TIM-2014/292...Edition, Properties and Selection: Iron, Steels, and High- Performance Alloys , ASM International, 1990, p. 395. 8. G. L. Spencer and D. J. Duquette

  4. High Strength, Weldable Precipitation Aged Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Alexander D.

    1987-03-01

    The family of plate steels represented by ASTM Specification A7101 is finding increasing applications. These low carbon, Cu-Ni-Cr-Mo-Cb, copper precipitation hardened steels have been identified by a number of designations over the years. During early development in the late 1960's and first commercial production in 1970, the steels were known as IN-787 (trademark of International Nickel Company).2 ASTM specifications were subsequently developed for structural (A710) and pressure vessel (A736) applications over ten years ago. More recent interest and application of this family of steels by the U.S. Navy has lead to development of a military specification MIL-S-24645 (SH),3 also initially known as "HSLA-80." Significant tonnage is being produced for the U.S. Navy as a replacement for HY80 (MIL-S-16216) in cruiser deck, bulkhead and hull applications.4 In these applications, the enhanced weldability and requirement of no preheat at this high strength and toughness level has been the main motivation for its use. Over the past 15 years, A710 type steels have also been used in a variety of applications, including off-shore platforms, pressure vessels, arctic linepipe valves and off-highway mining truck frames.

  5. Corrosion behaviour of steel rebars embedded in a concrete designed for the construction of an intermediate-level radioactive waste disposal facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duffó, G. S.; Arva, E. A.; Schulz, F. M.; Vazquez, D. R.

    2013-07-01

    The National Atomic Energy Commission of the Argentine Republic is developing a nuclear waste disposal management programme that contemplates the design and construction of a facility for the final disposal of intermediate-level radioactive wastes. The repository is based on the use of multiple, independent and redundant barriers. The major components are made in reinforced concrete so, the durability of these structures is an important aspect for the facility integrity. This work presents an investigation performed on an instrumented reinforced concrete prototype specifically designed for this purpose, to study the behaviour of an intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility from the rebar corrosion point of view. The information obtained will be used for the final design of the facility in order to guarantee a service life more or equal than the foreseen durability for this type of facilities.

  6. Articles comprising ferritic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Rakowski, James M.

    2016-06-28

    An article of manufacture comprises a ferritic stainless steel that includes a near-surface region depleted of silicon relative to a remainder of the ferritic stainless steel. The article has a reduced tendency to form an electrically resistive silica layer including silicon derived from the steel when the article is subjected to high temperature oxidizing conditions. The ferritic stainless steel is selected from the group comprising AISI Type 430 stainless steel, AISI Type 439 stainless steel, AISI Type 441 stainless steel, AISI Type 444 stainless steel, and E-BRITE.RTM. alloy, also known as UNS 44627 stainless steel. In certain embodiments, the article of manufacture is a fuel cell interconnect for a solid oxide fuel cell.

  7. EMPLACEMENT DRIFT INVERT-LOW STEEL EVALUATION

    SciTech Connect

    M. E. Taylor and D. H. Tang

    2000-09-29

    This technical report evaluates and develops options for reducing the amount of steel in the emplacement drift invert. Concepts developed in the ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' were evaluated to determine material properties required for the proposed invert concepts. Project requirements documents prescribe the use of a carbon steel frame for the invert with a granular material of crushed tuff as ballast. The ''Invert Configuration and Drip Shield Interface'' developed three concepts: (1) All-Ballast Invert; (2) Modified Steel Invert with Ballast; and (3) Steel Tie with Ballast Invert. Analysis of the steel frame members, runway beams, and guide beams, for the modified steel invert with ballast, decreased the quantity of steel in the emplacement drift invert, however a substantial steel support frame for the gantry and waste package/pallet assembly is still required. Use of one of the other two concepts appears to be an alternative to the steel frame and each of the concepts uses considerably less steel materials. Analysis of the steel tie with ballast invert shows that the bearing pressure on the ballast under the single steel tie, C 9 x 20, loaded with the waste package/pallet assembly, drip shield, and backfill exceeds the upper bound of the allowable bearing capacity for tuff used in this study. The single tie, C 10 x 20, will also fail for the same loading condition except for the tie length of 4.2 meters and longer. Analysis also shows that with two ties, C 9 or 10 x 20's, the average ballast pressure is less than the allowable bearing capacity. Distributing the waste package/pallet, drip shield, and backfill loads to two steel ties reduces the contact bearing pressure. Modifying the emplacement pallet end beams to a greater width, reducing the tie spacing, and increasing the width of the ties would ensure that the pallet beams are always supported by two steel ties. Further analysis is required to determine compatible tie size and spacing

  8. Steamside Oxidation Behavior of Experimental 9%Cr Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Dogan, O.N.; Holcomb, G.R.; Alman, D.E.; Jablonski, P.D.

    2007-10-01

    Reducing emissions and increasing economic competitiveness require more efficient steam power plants that utilize fossil fuels. One of the major challenges in designing these plants is the availability of materials that can stand the supercritical and ultra-supercritical steam conditions at a competitive cost. There are several programs around the world developing new ferritic and austenitic steels for superheater and reheater tubes exposed to the advanced steam conditions. The new steels must possess properties better than current steels in terms of creep strength, steamside oxidation resistance, fireside corrosion resistance, and thermal fatigue resistance. This paper introduces a series of experimental 9%Cr steels containing Cu, Co, and Ti. Stability of the phases in the new steels is discussed and compared to the phases in the commercially available materials. The steels were tested under both the dry and moist conditions at 650ºC for their cyclical oxidation resistance. Results of oxidation tests are presented. Under the moist conditions, the experimental steels exhibited significantly less mass gain compared to the commercial P91 steel. Microstructural characterization of the scale revealed different oxide compositions.

  9. Mechanical behavior study of laser welded joints for DP steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Qi

    2008-03-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are gaining considerable market shares in the automotive industry. The development and application of Dual Phase (DP) steel is just a consistent step towards high-strength steel grades with improved mechanical behavior. Tailor welded blanks with DP steel are promoted in the application of Body-In-White (BIW) structure by the automotive industry. A tailor welded blank consists of several flat sheets that are laser welded together before stamping. Applied cases of tailor welded blanks of high strength steels on the automotive structural parts are investigated in this paper. The mechanical behavior of laser welded joints for DP steel is studied. Microstructure of laser welded joints for DP steel was observed by SEM. Martensite in the weld seam explains the higher strength of welded joints than the base metal. Results show that the strain safety tolerance of laser welded seam for high strength steel can meet the requirement of automobile parts for stamping if the location of laser welded seam is designed reasonably.

  10. View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View northwest, wharf A, sheet steel bulkhead, steel lift tower - U.S. Coast Guard Sandy Hook Station, Western Docking Structure, West of intersection of Canfield Road & Hartshorne Drive, Highlands, Monmouth County, NJ

  11. Designing Clothing for Coal Miners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Watkins, Susan M.

    1977-01-01

    Describes procedures taken by apparel design students, working in an industrial setting, in designing functional clothing for coal miners as part of the Armco Steel Corporation's Student Design Program. (TA)

  12. Trends in steel technology. [Dual phase and HSLA steels

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-01-01

    Dual phase steels, composite products, and microalloyed steels are making inroads in the automotive industry applications for bumpers, automotive parts, bodies, mechanical parts, suspension and steering equipment and truck bumpers. New steels are also used to support solar mirrors and cells, in corrosive environments in the oil and gas industry, fusion reactors, and pressure vessels in nuclear power plants. (FS)

  13. 24 CFR 200.949 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems. 200.949 Section 200.949 Housing and Urban... program for exterior insulated steel door systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All Exterior Insulated Steel Door Systems shall be designed, manufactured, and tested in compliance with the...

  14. 24 CFR 200.949 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems. 200.949 Section 200.949 Housing and Urban... program for exterior insulated steel door systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All Exterior Insulated Steel Door Systems shall be designed, manufactured, and tested in compliance with the...

  15. 24 CFR 200.949 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems. 200.949 Section 200.949 Housing and Urban... program for exterior insulated steel door systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All Exterior Insulated Steel Door Systems shall be designed, manufactured, and tested in compliance with the...

  16. 24 CFR 200.949 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems. 200.949 Section 200.949 Housing and Urban... program for exterior insulated steel door systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All Exterior Insulated Steel Door Systems shall be designed, manufactured, and tested in compliance with the...

  17. 24 CFR 200.949 - Building product standards and certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... certification program for exterior insulated steel door systems. 200.949 Section 200.949 Housing and Urban... program for exterior insulated steel door systems. (a) Applicable standards. (1) All Exterior Insulated Steel Door Systems shall be designed, manufactured, and tested in compliance with the...

  18. Boundary effects in welded steel moment connections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kyoung-Hyeog

    Unprecedented widespread failure of welded moment connections in steel frames caused by the 1994 Northridge and the 1995 Kobe earthquakes have alarmed the engineering communities throughout the world. Welded moment connections in steel frames have been traditionally designed by using the classical beam theory which leads to assumptions that the flanges transfer moment while the web connection primarily resists the shear force. However, this study shows that the magnitude and direction of the principal stresses in the connection region are better approximated by using truss analogy rather than the classical beam theory. Accordingly, both the bending moment and the shear force are transferred across the connection near the beam flanges through diagonal strut action. Thus, the beam flange region of the traditionally designed connection is overloaded. This conclusion explains, to a large extent, the recently observed steel moment connection failures. In this study, detailed finite element analyses were carried out for a representative beam-to-column subassemblage with fully welded connection. The stress distribution in the beam web and flanges in the vicinity of the connection were closely studied. The factors responsible for stress redistribution and concentration were identified by using fundamental principles of mechanics. It was concluded that peak resultant stresses can exceed the values used in simple design calculations by large margins. Using the finite element analysis results and the truss analogy to establish a realistic load path in the connection, a practical and more rational analysis and design procedure was developed. The proposed design procedure and the new connection details were successfully validated through cyclic load testing of a nearly full size specimen. The truss model represented the force transmission around the beam-to-column moment connection region very well. Results of the finite element analyses and the laboratory testing showed

  19. Continuous steel production and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Peaslee, Kent D.; Peter, Jorg J.; Robertson, David G. C.; Thomas, Brian G.; Zhang, Lifeng

    2009-11-17

    A process for continuous refining of steel via multiple distinct reaction vessels for melting, oxidation, reduction, and refining for delivery of steel continuously to, for example, a tundish of a continuous caster system, and associated apparatus.

  20. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  1. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  2. Chromizing of 3Cr Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Ravi, Vilupanur; Harrison, Bradley; Koch, Jordan; Ly, Alexander; Schissler, Andrew; Pint, Bruce A; Haynes, James A

    2011-01-01

    Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N) was chromized by the halide-activated pack cementation (HAPC) process. Key process parameters, i.e., coating temperatures and pack compositions, were investigated. Ammonium chloride-activated packs in the 700-1000 C range produced coatings nominally in the 1-8 {micro}m range, as determined by optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Coatings applied in the 900-1000 C temperature range resulted in Cr-rich coatings. The predominant phase in the coating was identified as Cr23C6 by X-ray diffraction. In addition, the presence of chromium nitride, Cr2N, was observed in the coating. The power generation industry is faced with an ever-increasing demand for energy while simultaneously having to reduce carbon emissions. These goals can be facilitated by increasing plant efficiency through the use of higher operating temperatures and pressures. Traditional construction materials, e.g., the ferritic Grade 22 high strength low alloy steel, are limited to operations below {approx} 550 C. Therefore, new materials are required for future plants designed to operate up to 650 C and possibly higher. These new materials need to have improved tensile strength, ductility, toughness, corrosion resistance, and creep properties at elevated temperatures. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is investigating the oxidation and creep behavior of various coatings on Grade 315 steel (Fe-2.9 Cr-1.7 W-0.7 Mo-0.3 Mn-0.3 Si-0.2 V-0.1 Ni-0.13 C-0.01 N), a super-bainitic steel developed for superior creep properties. Thin, chemical vapor-deposited (CVD) aluminide coatings were used to compensate for the reduced corrosion and oxidation resistance that resulted from the low chromium content of the alloy. However, the aluminized Grade 315 alloys performed less-than-favorably under conditions relevant to fossil boilers, leading to the conclusion that higher chromium contents are required for the formation of

  3. A-3 steel work completed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Stennis Space Center engineers celebrated a key milestone in construction of the A-3 Test Stand on April 9 - completion of structural steel work. Workers with Lafayette (La.) Steel Erector Inc. placed the last structural steel beam atop the stand during a noon ceremony attended by more than 100 workers and guests.

  4. Microbial-Influenced Corrosion of Corten Steel Compared with Carbon Steel and Stainless Steel in Oily Wastewater by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansouri, Hamidreza; Alavi, Seyed Abolhasan; Fotovat, Meysam

    2015-07-01

    The microbial corrosion behavior of three important steels (carbon steel, stainless steel, and Corten steel) was investigated in semi petroleum medium. This work was done in modified nutrient broth (2 g nutrient broth in 1 L oily wastewater) in the presence of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and mixed culture (as a biotic media) and an abiotic medium for 2 weeks. The behavior of corrosion was analyzed by spectrophotometric and electrochemical methods and at the end was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy. The results show that the degree of corrosion of Corten steel in mixed culture, unlike carbon steel and stainless steel, is less than P. aeruginosa inoculated medium because some bacteria affect Corten steel less than other steels. According to the experiments, carbon steel had less resistance than Corten steel and stainless steel. Furthermore, biofilm inhibits separated particles of those steels to spread to the medium; in other words, particles get trapped between biofilm and steel.

  5. New nano-particle-strengthened ferritic/martensitic steels by conventional thermo-mechanical treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.; Hashimoto, N.; Maziasz, P. J.

    2007-08-01

    For increased fusion power plant efficiency, steels for operation at 650 °C and higher are sought. Based on the science of precipitate strengthening, a thermo-mechanical treatment (TMT) was developed that increased the strength from room temperature to 700 °C of commercial nitrogen-containing steels and new steels designed for the TMT. At 700 °C increases in yield stress of 80 and 200% were observed for a commercial steel and a new steel, respectively, compared to commercial normalized-and-tempered steels. Creep-rupture strength was similarly improved. Depending on the TMT, precipitates were up to eight-times smaller at a number density four orders of magnitude greater than those in a conventionally heat treated steel of similar composition.

  6. Corrosion Resistant Steels for Structural Applications in Aircraft

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    first structural stainless steel design are: A strong and tough fine lath martensite matrix; A stable passive oxide film on the material surface...for corrosion resistance; Nanoscale M2C dispersion strengthening through tempering while avoiding other carbides to improve strength and toughness...is all stainless steel , is prone to oxidation and decarburization if heat-treated in air. If sufficient stock is removed after heat-treatment, the

  7. The Use of Magnetoresistors for Imaging Steel Bars in Concrete

    SciTech Connect

    Torres, V.; Gaydecki, P.; Miller, G.; Fernandes, B.; Zaid, M.

    2005-04-09

    This paper reports on the design of a new system for the detection and imaging of steel bars in concrete. It is based on the magnetoresistive effect, whereby the resistance of a material changes due to the presence of a magnetic field. An innovative way of processing and separating the steel characteristics is presented. Here, the combination voltage, frequency and distance parameters generate a unique signature for each metal, profoundly enhancing the analysis.

  8. Process to Continuously Melt, Refine and Cast High Quality Steel

    SciTech Connect

    2005-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to conduct research and development targeted at designing a revolutionary steelmaking process. This process will deliver high quality steel from scrap to the casting mold in one continuous process and will be safer, more productive, and less capital intensive to build and operate than conventional steelmaking. The new process will produce higher quality steel faster than traditional batch processes while consuming less energy and other resources.

  9. Audience Analysis for "The Making, Shaping and Treating of Steel": A Pilot Study. Final Report Presented to United States Steel and the Association of Iron and Steel Engineers. CDC Technical Report No. 10.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stein, Mark J.; And Others

    Prompted by the realization that a reference text presents special problems in audience address since there is typically a diverse set of users, a study was designed to provide preliminary data on the use of the reference text, "The Making, Shaping and Treating of Steel," a landmark book in the steel industry. Data on the use of the text were…

  10. Braze alloy spreading on steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siewert, T. A.; Heine, R. W.; Lagally, M. G.

    1978-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Auger electron microscopy (AEM) were employed to observe elemental surface decomposition resulting from the brazing of a copper-treated steel. Two types of steel were used for the study, stainless steel (treated with a eutectic silver-copper alloy), and low-carbon steel (treated with pure copper). Attention is given to oxygen partial pressure during the processes; a low enough pressure (8 x 10 to the -5th torr) was found to totally inhibit the spreading of the filler material at a fixed heating cycle. With both types of steel, copper treatment enhanced even spreading at a decreased temperature.

  11. Steel Creek fish, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Sayers, R.E. Jr.; Mealing, H.G. III

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The lake has an average width of approximately 600 m and extends along the Steel Creek valley approximately 7000 m from the dam to the headwaters. Water level is maintained at a normal pool elevation of 58 m above mean sea level by overflow into a vertical intake tower that has multilevel discharge gates. The intake tower is connected to a horizontal conduit that passes through the dam and releases water into Steel Creek. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet environmental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  12. Computational Modeling Develops Ultra-Hard Steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Glenn Research Center's Mechanical Components Branch developed a spiral bevel or face gear test rig for testing thermal behavior, surface fatigue, strain, vibration, and noise; a full-scale, 500-horsepower helicopter main-rotor transmission testing stand; a gear rig that allows fundamental studies of the dynamic behavior of gear systems and gear noise; and a high-speed helical gear test for analyzing thermal behavior for rotorcraft. The test rig provides accelerated fatigue life testing for standard spur gears at speeds of up to 10,000 rotations per minute. The test rig enables engineers to investigate the effects of materials, heat treat, shot peen, lubricants, and other factors on the gear's performance. QuesTek Innovations LLC, based in Evanston, Illinois, recently developed a carburized, martensitic gear steel with an ultra-hard case using its computational design methodology, but needed to verify surface fatigue, lifecycle performance, and overall reliability. The Battelle Memorial Institute introduced the company to researchers at Glenn's Mechanical Components Branch and facilitated a partnership allowing researchers at the NASA Center to conduct spur gear fatigue testing for the company. Testing revealed that QuesTek's gear steel outperforms the current state-of-the-art alloys used for aviation gears in contact fatigue by almost 300 percent. With the confidence and credibility provided by the NASA testing, QuesTek is commercializing two new steel alloys. Uses for this new class of steel are limitless in areas that demand exceptional strength for high throughput applications.

  13. Must we use ferritic steel in TBM?

    SciTech Connect

    Salavy, Jean-Francois; Boccaccini, Lorenzo V.; Chaudhuri, Paritosh; Cho, Seungyon; Enoeda, Mikio; Giancarli, Luciano; Kurtz, Richard J.; Luo, Tian Y.; Rao, K. Bhanu Sankara; Wong, Clement

    2010-12-13

    Mock-ups of DEMO breeding blankets, called Test Blanket Modules (TBMs), inserted and tested in ITER in dedicated equatorial ports directly facing the plasma, are expected to provide the first experimental answers on the necessary performance of the corresponding DEMO breeding blankets. Several DEMO breeding blanket designs have been studied and assessed in the last 20 years. At present, after considering various coolant and breeder combinations, all the TBM concepts proposed by the seven ITER Parties use Reduced-Activation Ferritic/Martensitic (RAFM) steel as the structural material. In order to perform valuable tests in ITER, the TBMs are expected to use the same structural material as corresponding DEMO blankets. However, due to the fact that this family of steels is ferromagnetic, their presence in the ITER vacuum vessel will create perturbations of the ITER magnetic fields that could reduce the quality of the plasma confinement during H-mode. As a consequence, a legitimate question has been raised on the necessity of using RAFM steel for TBMs structural material in ITER. By giving a short description of the main TBM testing objectives in ITER and assessing the consequences of not using such a material, this paper gives a comprehensive answer to this question. According to the working group author of the study, the use of RAFM steel as structural material for TBM is judged mandatory.

  14. Feasibility analysis of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, B.; Cignetti, N.

    1995-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to: (1) establish a conceptual design that integrates commercial steel mill technology with radioactive scrap metal (RSM) processing to produce carbon and stainless steel sheet and plate at a grade suitable for fabricating into radioactive waste containers; (2) determine the economic feasibility of building a micro-mill in the Western US to process 30,000 tons of RSM per year from both DOE and the nuclear utilities; and (3) provide recommendations for implementation. For purposes of defining the project, it is divided into phases: economic feasibility and conceptual design; preliminary design; detail design; construction; and operation. This study comprises the bulk of Phase 1. It is divided into four sections. Section 1 provides the reader with a complete overview extracting pertinent data, recommendations and conclusions from the remainder of the report. Section 2 defines the variables that impact the design requirements. These data form the baseline to create a preliminary conceptual design that is technically sound, economically viable, and capitalizes on economies of scale. Priorities governing the design activities are: (1) minimizing worker exposure to radionuclide hazards, (2) maximizing worker safety, (3) minimizing environmental contamination, (4) minimizing secondary wastes, and (5) establishing engineering controls to insure that the plant will be granted a license in the state selected for operation. Section 3 provides details of the preliminary conceptual design that was selected. The cost of project construction is estimated and the personnel needed to support the steel-making operation and radiological and environmental control are identified. Section 4 identifies the operational costs and supports the economic feasibility analysis. A detailed discussion of the resulting conclusions and recommendations is included in this section.

  15. TMD-Based Structural Control of High Performance Steel Bridges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae Min; Kim, Gun; Kyum Kim, Moon

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effectiveness of structural control using tuned mass damper (TMD) for suppressing excessive traffic induced vibration of high performance steel bridge. The study considered 1-span steel plate girder bridge and bridge-vehicle interaction using HS-24 truck model. A numerical model of steel plate girder, traffic load, and TMD is constructed and time history analysis is performed using commercial structural analysis program ABAQUS 6.10. Results from analyses show that high performance steel bridge has dynamic serviceability problem, compared to relatively low performance steel bridge. Therefore, the structural control using TMD is implemented in order to alleviate dynamic serviceability problems. TMD is applied to the bridge with high performance steel and then vertical vibration due to dynamic behavior is assessed again. In consequent, by using TMD, it is confirmed that the residual amplitude is appreciably reduced by 85% in steady-state vibration. Moreover, vibration serviceability assessment using 'Reiher-Meister Curve' is also remarkably improved. As a result, this paper provides the guideline for economical design of I-girder using high performance steel and evaluates the effectiveness of structural control using TMD, simultaneously.

  16. Friction Stir Spot Welding of Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Hovanski, Yuri; Santella, M. L.; Grant, Glenn J.

    2009-12-28

    Friction stir spot welding was used to join two advanced high-strength steels using polycrystalline cubic boron nitride tooling. Numerous tool designs were employed to study the influence of tool geometry on weld joints produced in both DP780 and a hot-stamp boron steel. Tool designs included conventional, concave shouldered pin tools with several pin configurations; a number of shoulderless designs; and a convex, scrolled shoulder tool. Weld quality was assessed based on lap shear strength, microstructure, microhardness, and bonded area. Mechanical properties were functionally related to bonded area and joint microstructure, demonstrating the necessity to characterize processing windows based on tool geometry.

  17. 77 FR 30589 - SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates LLC, SteelRiver...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-23

    ... Surface Transportation Board SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP, SteelRiver Infrastructure Associates LLC, SteelRiver Infrastructure Fund North America LP, and Patriot Funding LLC--Control Exemption--Patriot Rail Corp., et al. SteelRiver Infrastructure Partners LP (SRIP LP), SteelRiver...

  18. Ferritic steel melt and FLiBe/steel experiment : melting ferritic steel.

    SciTech Connect

    Troncosa, Kenneth P.; Smith, Brandon M.; Tanaka, Tina Joan

    2004-11-01

    In preparation for developing a Z-pinch IFE power plant, the interaction of ferritic steel with the coolant, FLiBe, must be explored. Sandia National Laboratories Fusion Technology Department was asked to drop molten ferritic steel and FLiBe in a vacuum system and determine the gas byproducts and ability to recycle the steel. We tried various methods of resistive heating of ferritic steel using available power supplies and easily obtained heaters. Although we could melt the steel, we could not cause a drop to fall. This report describes the various experiments that were performed and includes some suggestions and materials needed to be successful. Although the steel was easily melted, it was not possible to drip the molten steel into a FLiBe pool Levitation melting of the drop is likely to be more successful.

  19. The Microstructure and Hardness of Hot Dip Galvanized Steel During Wire Drawing

    SciTech Connect

    Klmaku, Snukn; Syla, Nairn; Dilo, Teuta

    2010-01-21

    The steel wire samples are hot-dip-galvanized. The zinc coating is preformed using the standard method. To recognize the behavior of the zinc coated steel wire during the submission to deformation, the wire samples are drawn on a machine designed for this aim and then investigated. In this research is represented the phase structure of the zinc coated samples. Afterwards the thickness of the layer and the hardness of the hot-dip galvanized steel depending on the drawing is represented.

  20. History of ultrahigh carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wadsworth, J.; Sherby, O.D.

    1997-06-20

    The history and development of ultrahigh carbon steels (i.e., steels containing between 1 and 2.l percent C and now known as UHCS) are described. The early use of steel compositions containing carbon contents above the eutectoid level is found in ancient weapons from around the world. For example, both Damascus and Japanese sword steels are hypereutectoid steels. Their manufacture and processing is of interest in understanding the role of carbon content in the development of modern steels. Although sporadic examples of UHCS compositions are found in steels examined in the early part of this century, it was not until the mid-1970s that the modern study began. This study had its origin in the development of superplastic behavior in steels and the recognition that increasing the carbon content was of importance in developing that property. The compositions that were optimal for superplasticity involved the development of steels that contained higher carbon contents than conventional modern steels. It was discovered, however, that the room temperature properties of these compositions were of interest in their own right. Following this discovery, a period of intense work began on understanding their manufacture, processing, and properties for both superplastic forming and room temperature applications. The development of superplastic cast irons and iron carbides, as well as those of laminated composites containing UHCS, was an important part of this history.

  1. Grain Refinement in Dual-Phase Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukherjee, K.; Hazra, S. S.; Militzer, M.

    2009-09-01

    Deformation-induced ferrite transformation (DIFT) was applied in laboratory tests to produce fine-grained dual-phase (DP) steels. Four different chemistries were investigated, starting from a conventional DP 600 chemistry of 0.06 wt pct C-1.9 wt pct Mn-0.16 wt pct Mo and subsequently varying Nb and Mo additions. For all investigated steels, ultrafine ferrite (UFF) with a grain size of 1 to 2 μm can be obtained when a sufficient amount of deformation ( e.g., a true strain of 0.6 or above in axisymmetric compression) is applied to an austenite microstructure with a grain size in the range of 10 to 20 μm at 25 °C to 50 °C above the austenite-to-ferrite transformation start temperature ( Ar 3) characteristic for the given cooling condition. Rapid post-deformation cooling at rates of approximately 100 °C/s yields the desired UFF-martensite microstructure. Electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) mapping reveals a high percentage (approximately 40 pct) of low-angle boundaries in these microstructures, except for the steel that is just microalloyed with Nb. The steel with the plain-carbon-base chemistry was subjected to hot torsion simulations of a hot strip rolling processing schedules that incorporate a DIFT pass after a conventional seven-stand finish mill schedule. Executing the DIFT pass at 650 °C to 675 °C produced an UFF microstructure, illustrating the potential for the design of novel thermomechanical processing paths to produce hot-rolled ultrafine DP steels.

  2. Machinability of a Stainless Steel by Electrochemical Discharge Microdrilling

    SciTech Connect

    Coteata, Margareta; Pop, Nicolae; Slatineanu, Laurentiu; Schulze, Hans-Peter; Besliu, Irina

    2011-05-04

    Due to the chemical elements included in their structure for ensuring an increased resistance to the environment action, the stainless steels are characterized by a low machinability when classical machining methods are applied. For this reason, sometimes non-traditional machining methods are applied, one of these being the electrochemical discharge machining. To obtain microholes and to evaluate the machinability by electrochemical discharge microdrilling, test pieces of stainless steel were used for experimental research. The electrolyte was an aqueous solution of sodium silicate with different densities. A complete factorial plan was designed to highlight the influence of some input variables on the sizes of the considered machinability indexes (electrode tool wear, material removal rate, depth of the machined hole). By mathematically processing of experimental data, empirical functions were established both for stainless steel and carbon steel. Graphical representations were used to obtain more suggestive vision concerning the influence exerted by the considered input variables on the size of the machinability indexes.

  3. Technology Roadmap Research Program for the Steel Industry

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph R. Vehec

    2010-12-30

    The steel industry's Technology Roadmap Program (TRP) is a collaborative R&D effort jointly sponsored by the steel industry and the United States Department of Energy. The TRP program was designed to develop new technologies to save energy , increase competitiveness, and improve the environment. TRP ran from July, 1997 to December, 2008, with a total program budget of $38 million dollars. During that period 47 R&D projects were performed by 28 unique research organizations; co-funding was provided by DOE and 60 industry partners. The projects benefited all areas of steelmaking and much know-how was developed and transferred to industry. The American Iron and Steel Institute is the owner of all intellectual property developed under TRP and licenses it at commercial rates to all steelmakers. TRP technologies are in widespread use in the steel industry as participants received royalty-free use of intellectual property in return for taking the risk of funding this research.

  4. Distribution of porosity and macrosegregation in slab steel ingot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkadleckova, M.; Jonsta, P.; Carbol, Z.; Susovsky, M.; Michalek, K.; Socha, L.; Sviželová, J.; Zwyrtek, J.

    2017-02-01

    The paper presents a new knowledge and experiences with verification and optimization of production technology of heavy slab ingot weighing 40 t from tool steel using the results of numerical modelling and of operational experiments at a steel plant in the company VÍTKOVICE HEAVY MACHINERY a.s. The final porosity, macrosegregation and the risk of cracks were predicted. Based on the results, the slab ingot can be used instead of the conventional heavy steel ingot. Also, the ratio, the chamfer, and the external shape of the wall of the new design of the slab ingot was improved, which enabled to reduce production costs while the internal quality of steel ingots was still maintained at very high level.

  5. Applying MHD technology to the continuous casting of steel slab

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, Eiichi

    1995-05-01

    The application of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) in the continuous casting process started with the electromagnetic stirring of the stand pool with a traveling magnetic field. It has now advanced to the electromagnetic stirring of molten steel in the mold and the control of molten steel flow by an in-mold direct current magnetic field brake. These applied MHD techniques are designed to further improve the continuous casting process capability. They improve the surface quality of cast steel by homogenizing the meniscus temperature, stabilizing initial solidification, and cleaning the surface layer. They also improve the internal quality of cast steel by preventing inclusions from penetrating deep into the pool and promoting the flotation of argon bubbles. Applied MHD technology is still advancing in scope and methods in addition to the improvement of conventional continuously cast slab qualities. The continuous casting of bimetallic slab by suppressing mixing in the pool is one example of this progress.

  6. Eddy sensors for small diameter stainless steel tubes.

    SciTech Connect

    Skinner, Jack L.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Grant, J. Brian; Korellis, Henry James; LaFord, Marianne Elizabeth; Van Blarigan, Benjamin; Andersen, Lisa E.

    2011-08-01

    The goal of this project was to develop non-destructive, minimally disruptive eddy sensors to inspect small diameter stainless steel metal tubes. Modifications to Sandia's Emphasis/EIGER code allowed for the modeling of eddy current bobbin sensors near or around 1/8-inch outer diameter stainless steel tubing. Modeling results indicated that an eddy sensor based on a single axial coil could effectively detect changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tubing. Based on the modeling results, sensor coils capable of detecting small changes in the inner diameter of a stainless steel tube were designed, built and tested. The observed sensor response agreed with the results of the modeling and with eddy sensor theory. A separate limited distribution SAND report is being issued demonstrating the application of this sensor.

  7. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  8. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  9. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  10. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  11. 46 CFR 59.20-1 - Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. 59.20-1 Section 59... BOILERS, PRESSURE VESSELS AND APPURTENANCES Welding Repairs to Castings § 59.20-1 Carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings. Defects in carbon-steel or alloy-steel castings may be repaired by welding. The...

  12. Fracture-tough, corrosion-resistant bearing steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, Gregory B.

    1990-01-01

    The fundamental principles allowing design of stainless bearing steels with enhanced toughness and stress corrosion resistance has involved both investigation of basic phenomena in model alloys and evaluation of a prototype bearing steel based on a conceptual design exercise. Progress in model studies has included a scanning Auger microprobe (SAM) study of the kinetics of interfacial segregation of embrittling impurities which compete with the kinetics of alloy carbide precipitation in secondary hardening steels. These results can define minimum allowable carbide precipitation rates and/or maximum allowable free impurity contents in these ultrahigh strength steels. Characterization of the prototype bearing steel designed to combine precipitated austenite transformation toughening with secondary hardening shows good agreement between predicted and observed solution treatment response including the nature of the high temperature carbides. An approximate equilibrium constraint applied in the preliminary design calculations to maintain a high martensitic temperature proved inadequate, and the solution treated alloy remained fully austenitic down to liquid nitrogen temperature rather than transforming above 200 C. The alloy can be martensitically transformed by cryogenic deformation, and material so processed will be studied further to test predicted carbide and austenite precipitation behavior. A mechanistically-based martensitic kinetic model was developed and parameters are being evaluated from available kinetic data to allow precise control of martensitic temperatures of high alloy steels in future designs. Preliminary calculations incorporating the prototype stability results suggest that the transformation-toughened secondary-hardening martensitic-stainless design concept is still viable, but may require lowering Cr content to 9 wt. pct. and adding 0.5 to 1.0 wt. pct. Al. An alternative design approach based on strain-induced martensitic transformation during

  13. Stainless Steel Permeability

    SciTech Connect

    Buchenauer, Dean A.; Karnesky, Richard A.

    2015-09-01

    An understanding of the behavior of hydrogen isotopes in materials is critical to predicting tritium transport in structural metals (at high pressure), estimating tritium losses during production (fission environment), and predicting in-vessel inventory for future fusion devices (plasma driven permeation). Current models often assume equilibrium diffusivity and solubility for a class of materials (e.g. stainless steels or aluminum alloys), neglecting trapping effects or, at best, considering a single population of trapping sites. Permeation and trapping studies of the particular castings and forgings enable greater confidence and reduced margins in the models. For FY15, we have continued our investigation of the role of ferrite in permeation for steels of interest to GTS, through measurements of the duplex steel 2507. We also initiated an investigation of the permeability in work hardened materials, to follow up on earlier observations of unusual permeability in a particular region of 304L forgings. Samples were prepared and characterized for ferrite content and coated with palladium to prevent oxidation. Issues with the poor reproducibility of measurements at low permeability were overcome, although the techniques in use are tedious. Funding through TPBAR and GTS were secured for a research grade quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) and replacement turbo pumps, which should improve the fidelity and throughput of measurements in FY16.

  14. 23 CFR 625.4 - Standards, policies, and standard specifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    .... (b) Bridges and structures. (1) Standard Specifications for Highway Bridges, Fifteenth Edition, AASHTO 1992. (2) Interim Specifications—Bridges, AASHTO 1993. (3) Interim Specifications—Bridges, AASHTO 1994. (4) Interim Specifications—Bridges, AASHTO 1995. (5) AASHTO LRFD Bridge Design...

  15. Fillability of Thin-Wall Steel Castings

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Voigt; Joseph Bertoletti; Andrew Kaley; Sandi Ricotta; Travis Sunday

    2002-07-30

    The use of steel components is being challenged by lighter nonferrous or cast iron components. The development of techniques for enhancing and ensuring the filability of thin-wall mold cavities is most critical for thinner wall cast steel production. The purpose of this research was to develop thin-wall casting techniques that can be used to reliably produce thin-wall castings from traditional gravity poured sand casting processes. The focus of the research was to enhance the filling behavior to prevent misrunds. Experiments were conducted to investigate the influence of various foundry variables on the filling of thin section steel castings. These variables include casting design, heat transfer, gating design, and metal fluidity. Wall thickness and pouring temperature have the greatest effect on casting fill. As wall thickness increases the volume to surface area of the casting increases, which increases the solidification time, allowing the metal to flow further in thicker sect ions. Pouring time is another significant variable affecting casting fill. Increases or decreases of 20% in the pouring time were found to have a significant effect on the filling of thin-wall production castings. Gating variables, including venting, pouring head height, and mold tilting also significantly affected thin-wall casting fill. Filters offer less turbulent, steadier flow, which is appropriate for thicker castings, but they do not enhance thin-wall casting fill.

  16. Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Online-Offline, 1998

    1998-01-01

    Provides an annotated bibliography of resources on this month's theme "Design" for K-8 language arts, art and architecture, music and dance, science, math, social studies, health, and physical education. Includes Web sites, CD-ROMs and software, videos, books, audiotapes, magazines, professional resources and classroom activities.…

  17. Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchanan, Richard; Cross, Nigel; Durling, David; Nelson, Harold; Owen, Charles; Valtonen, Anna; Boling, Elizabeth; Gibbons, Andrew; Visscher-Voerman, Irene

    2013-01-01

    Scholars representing the field of design were asked to identify what they considered to be the most exciting and imaginative work currently being done in their field, as well as how that work might change our understanding. The scholars included Richard Buchanan, Nigel Cross, David Durling, Harold Nelson, Charles Owen, and Anna Valtonen. Scholars…

  18. High Fragmentation Steel Production Process

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    phase of the project entailed the purchase and metallurgical characterization of two heats of HF-1 steel from different vendors. Performed by...At>-A 13^ nzt AD AD-E401 117 CONTRACTOR REPORT ARLCD-CR-83049 HIGH FRAGMENTATION STEEL PRODUCTION PROCESS ^"fP-PTTMirj A 1 James F. Kane...Report 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER High Fragmentation Steel Production Process 7. AUTHORfs; James F. Kane, Ronald L. Kivak, Colin C. MacCrindle

  19. Banding of MAR-aging steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hays, C.; Stemmler, R.P.

    2000-04-01

    MAR-aging steels have gained a respectable position among design engineers who demand ultra-high strength, reasonable ductility, and good fracture toughness, especially where outerspace and aerospace applications are concerned. This specialty steel category of MAR-aging alloys owes its unique properties to a complex hardening reaction, which involves precipitation of uniform intragranular ribbons (Ni{sub 3}Mo phase) on dislocations during the treatment cycle. Like any other metallurgical process, MAR-aging treatment cycles can become quite difficult, if not impossible. When that condition does exist, the end result is often called a dead heat by MAR-aging technologists. This paper examines a dead heat and makes appropriate comparisons to other live heats. Salient differences and interactive similarities are both studied in terms of microstructure, serial sections, chemical composition, and selected mechanical properties. The intent of this paper is to shed more light on the previously indistinct subject of banding.

  20. Economic feasibility of radioactive scrap steel recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, F.; Balhiser, R.; Rosholt, D.

    1995-12-31

    In the past, government and commercial nuclear operators treated radioactive scrap steel (RSS) as a liability and disposed of it by burial; this was an accepted and economical solution at that time. Today, environmental concerns about burial are changing the waste disposal picture by (a) causing burial costs to soar rapidly, (b) creating pressure to close existing burial sites, and (c) making it difficult and expensive to open and operate burial facilities. To exacerbate the problem, planned dismantling of nuclear facilities will substantially increase volumes of RSS {open_quotes}waste{close_quotes} over the next 30 yr. This report describes a project with the intention of integrating the current commercial mini-mill approach of recycling uncontaminated steel with radiological controls to design a system that can process contaminated metals at prices significantly below the current processors or burial costs.

  1. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, W.A.; Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.

    1998-07-14

    A process is described for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75 C and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (1) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (2) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (3) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (4) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte. 1 fig.

  2. Process for dezincing galvanized steel

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, William A.; Dudek, Frederick J.; Daniels, Edward J.

    1998-01-01

    A process for removing zinc from galvanized steel. The galvanized steel is immersed in an electrolyte containing at least about 15% by weight of sodium or potassium hydroxide and having a temperature of at least about 75.degree. C. and the zinc is galvanically corroded from the surface of the galvanized steel. The material serving as the cathode is principally a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series. The corrosion rate may be accelerated by (i) increasing the number density of corrosion sites in the galvanized steel by mechanically abrading or deforming the galvanized steel, (ii) heating the galvanized steel to form an alloy of zinc on the surface of the galvanized steel, (iii) mixing the galvanized steel with a material having a standard electrode potential which is intermediate of the standard electrode potentials of zinc and cadmium in the electrochemical series, or (iv) moving the galvanized steel relative to itself and to the electrolyte while immersed in the electrolyte.

  3. High strength, tough alloy steel

    DOEpatents

    Thomas, Gareth; Rao, Bangaru V. N.

    1979-01-01

    A high strength, tough alloy steel is formed by heating the steel to a temperature in the austenite range (1000.degree.-1100.degree. C.) to form a homogeneous austenite phase and then cooling the steel to form a microstructure of uniformly dispersed dislocated martensite separated by continuous thin boundary films of stabilized retained austenite. The steel includes 0.2-0.35 weight % carbon, at least 1% and preferably 3-4.5% chromium, and at least one other substitutional alloying element, preferably manganese or nickel. The austenite film is stable to subsequent heat treatment as by tempering (below 300.degree. C.) and reforms to a stable film after austenite grain refinement.

  4. Hydrogen Embrittlement of Gun Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-11-01

    8217s HY80 and HY130 steels were checked for the critical hydrogen concentrations which were determined to be 6 ppm for HY8O steel 8 and 3 ppm for HY130...JOTC FILE COPY AD-A188 972 AD 1 TECHNICAL REPORT ARCCB-TR-87030 HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEMENT OF GUN STEEL F’ GERALD L. SPFNCER DTIC DEC 1 5 1987 NOVEMBER...PtEtIOC COVERED HYDROGEN EMBRITTLEHENT OF GUN STEEL Final OG EOTNME 6. PERFORMINGORO EOTNME 7. A*JTNOR(s) S. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(&) Gerald L

  5. Metallographic problems of the production of parts from continuously cast high-speed steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Supov, A. V.; Aleksandrova, N. M.; Paren'kov, S. A.; Kakabadze, R. V.; Pavlov, V. P.

    1998-09-01

    It has been assumed until recently that high-speed steels cannot be produced by the method of continuous casting. Numerous attempts to use this highly efficient technology for manufacturing such steels have failed because of breakage of the cast preforms. A solution was sought in improving the design of the continuous-casting machines (CCM), increasing the level of their automation, and using rational compositions of slag-forming mixtures (SFM). The idea was that a high-speed steel can be cast only in vertical CCM. The present work concerns regimes of secondary cooling under which the structures formed in high-speed steels provide a ductility sufficient for bending the continuously cast preform without failure. Steel R6M5 cast continuously in such a machine can easily be machined into hot-rolled preforms for sheets, wire, silver-steel rods, and other final products without a forging stage.

  6. Improving production, control and properties of bearing steels intended for demanding applications

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, T.B.; Oelund, L.J.P.

    1999-07-01

    The advances of ladle metallurgy have led to very significant developments in the internal cleanliness of low alloy steel products. This development, which started with the design of the first functioning ladle furnaces with effective stirring facilities, has now reached a level where standard produced steels outperform complex and costly remelting processes. The steel making advances necessitates corresponding developments in testing procedures, perhaps in particular as concerns the control of the non-metallic inclusion contents of steel. The developments in steel processing are reviewed and recent progress in the rating of non-metallic inclusions is detailed, in particular as regards test methods encompassing ultrasonic techniques. Further, recent advances in assessing fatigue initiation causes in bearing steels are discussed and related to contents and morphology of micro-inclusions.

  7. Automobile bodies: Can aluminum be an economical alternative to steel?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Richard; Clark, Joel; Kelkar, Ashish

    2001-08-01

    Although the use of aluminum in cars has been increasing for the past two decades, progress has been limited in developing aluminum auto bodies. In fact, most aluminum substitution has come in the form of castings and forgings in the transmission, wheels, etc. Car manufacturers have developed all-aluminum cars with two competing designs: conventional unibody and the spaceframe. However, aluminum is far from being a material of choice for auto bodies. The substitution of aluminum for steel is partly influenced by regulatory pressures to meet fuel efficiency standards by reducing vehicle weight, and to meet recycling standards. The key obstacles are the high cost of primary aluminum as compared to steel and added fabrication costs of aluminum panels. Both the aluminum and the automotive industries have attempted to make aluminum a cost-effective alternative to steel. This paper analyzes the cost of fabrication and assembly of four different aluminum car body designs, making comparisons with conventional steel designs at current aluminum prices and using current aluminum fabrication technology. It then attempts to determine if aluminum can be an alternative to steel at lower primary aluminum prices, and improved fabrication processes.

  8. Microanalytical evaluation of a prototype stainless bearing steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinkus, T. J.; Olson, G. B.

    1992-04-01

    A novel bearing steel composition intended for a space shuttle main engine turbopump application has been designed by computer-aided thermodynamic modelling. Property objectives for the martensitic stainless steel are a doubling of KIC toughness and KISCC stress-corrosion resistance relative to existing bearing steels. The composition is designed to achieve sufficient refinement of M 2C carbides to provide the required hardness of RC = 60 at 0.30C, and to achieve a high stability austenite dispersion for transformation toughening. Microanalytical study of the prototype steel of composition Fe-22.5Co-12Cr-8.5Ni- 0.3Mo-0.25V-0.30C has tested key model predictions. STEM microanalysis of extracted Cr and CrMo carbides was used to evaluate solution treatment response between 1100 and 1150°C. Atom-probe microanalysis was employed to measure compositions of fine M 2C carbides in cryogenically-formed martensitic material tempered at 500°C to a slightly c raged condition promoting high toughness. The observed composition of (Cr 0.88Mo 0.03V 0.03Fe 0.06) 2 C 0.92 lies between computed values corresponding to coherent and incoherent equilibrium. The prototype steel exceeds the design toughness objectives, giving a KIC toughness of 47 MPa √ m at RC = 60.4 hardness.

  9. Martensitic/ferritic steels as container materials for liquid mercury target of ESS

    SciTech Connect

    Dai, Y.

    1996-06-01

    In the previous report, the suitability of steels as the ESS liquid mercury target container material was discussed on the basis of the existing database on conventional austenitic and martensitic/ferritic steels, especially on their representatives, solution annealed 316 stainless steel (SA 316) and Sandvik HT-9 martensitic steel (HT-9). Compared to solution annealed austenitic stainless steels, martensitic/ferritic steels have superior properties in terms of strength, thermal conductivity, thermal expansion, mercury corrosion resistance, void swelling and irradiation creep resistance. The main limitation for conventional martensitic/ferritic steels (CMFS) is embrittlement after low temperature ({le}380{degrees}C) irradiation. The ductile-brittle transition temperature (DBTT) can increase as much as 250 to 300{degrees}C and the upper-shelf energy (USE), at the same time, reduce more than 50%. This makes the application temperature range of CMFS is likely between 300{degrees}C to 500{degrees}C. For the present target design concept, the temperature at the container will be likely controlled in a temperature range between 180{degrees}C to 330{degrees}C. Hence, CMFS seem to be difficult to apply. However, solution annealed austenitic stainless steels are also difficult to apply as the maximum stress level at the container will be higher than the design stress. The solution to the problem is very likely to use advanced low-activation martensitic/ferritic steels (LAMS) developed by the fusion materials community though the present database on the materials is still very limited.

  10. Behaviour of Steel Arch Stabilized by a Textile Membrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Svoboda, O.; Machacek, J.

    2015-11-01

    Behaviour of the slender steel arch supporting textile membranes in a membrane structure with respect to in-plane and out-of plane stability is investigated in the paper. In the last decades the textile membranes have been widely used to cover both common and exclusive structures due to progress in new membrane materials with eminent properties. Nevertheless, complex analysis of such membranes in interaction with steel structure (carbon/stainless steel perimeter or supporting elements) is rather demanding, even with specialized software. Laboratory model of a large membrane structure simulating a shelter roof of a concert stage was tested and the resulting stress/deflection values are presented. The model of a reasonable size was provided with prestressed membrane of PVC coated polyester fabric Ferrari® Précontraint 702S and tested under various loadings. The supporting steel structure consisted of two steel arch tubes from S355 grade steel and perimeter prestressed cables. The stability behaviour of the inner tube was the primary interest of the investigation. The SOFiSTiK software was used to analyse the structural behaviour in 3D. Numerical non-linear analysis of deflections and internal forces of the structure under symmetrical and asymmetrical loadings covers various membrane prestressing and specific boundary conditions. The numerical results are validated using test results. Finally, the preliminary recommendations for appropriate numerical modelling and stability design of the supporting structure are presented.

  11. Superclean steel development: A guide for utility use

    SciTech Connect

    Richman, R.H.; McNaughton, W.P. )

    1989-12-01

    The Electric Power Research Institute has actively encouraged and sponsored a number of research projects to develop superclean 3. 5NiCrMoV steel for low pressure turbine rotors. Such steel is highly resistant to temper embrittlement and will thus facilitate increased efficiency in electricity generation through the use of higher operating temperatures and improvements in design. Steels with impurity contents typical of the superclean specification can be manufactured for production rotors with properties that equal or exceed those for conventional 3.5NiCrMoV rotors in every detail. Of particular interest are the results that the superclean steels appear to be virtually resistant to temper embrittlement to a temperature of 500{degree}C. The objective of this users guide is to assist US utilities with decisions about when to adopt superclean steel for new or replacement rotor forgings by providing an overview of superclean steel developments and a summary of the properties to be expected of production rotor forgings. 57 refs., 26 figs.

  12. Hydrogen embrittlement of duplex stainless steel and maraging steel in sea water: Effect of pressure

    SciTech Connect

    Pohjanne, P.; Festy, D.

    1994-12-31

    Hydrogen embrittlement behavior of cast super duplex stainless steel and cast maraging steel was examined as a function of electrode potential and hydrostatic pressure, i.e, the water depth, in synthetic sea water using fracture mechanics bolt-loaded wedge-opening (WOL) specimens. The experimental variables investigated included: (1) Electrode potential: free corrosion potential and cathodic protection; (2) Hydrostatic pressure: ambient and 10 MPa corresponding depth of 1,000 meters. The duplex stainless-,steel was not susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement with initial stress intensity values of 30 MPa{radical}m < K{sub i} < 45 MPa{radical}m at ambient pressure. However, at pressure of 10 MPa slight crack growth was observed at open circuit potential and the crack growth was enhanced by the cathodic protection. The maraging steel was susceptible to hydrogen embrittlement in all tests, with all examined initial stress intensity values, K{sub i} < 36 MPa{radical}m. At the open circuit potential the crack growth rate was almost independent of the pressure. Cathodic protection enhanced crack growth and lowered the threshold stress intensity value at ambient as well as at 10 MPa pressure and the crack growth rate increased clearly as pressure increased from 0.1 MPa to 10 MPa. According to these experimental results the combined effect of cathodic protection and hydrostatic pressure must be taken into consideration when designing new offshore structures and equipment especially for deep sea application.

  13. The industrial ecology of steel

    SciTech Connect

    Considine, Timothy J.; Jablonowski, Christopher; Considine, Donita M.M.; Rao, Prasad G.

    2001-03-26

    This study performs an integrated assessment of new technology adoption in the steel industry. New coke, iron, and steel production technologies are discussed, and their economic and environmental characteristics are compared. Based upon detailed plant level data on cost and physical input-output relations by process, this study develops a simple mathematical optimization model of steel process choice. This model is then expanded to a life cycle context, accounting for environmental emissions generated during the production and transportation of energy and material inputs into steelmaking. This life-cycle optimization model provides a basis for evaluating the environmental impacts of existing and new iron and steel technologies. Five different plant configurations are examined, from conventional integrated steel production to completely scrap-based operations. Two cost criteria are used to evaluate technology choice: private and social cost, with the latter including the environmental damages associated with emissions. While scrap-based technologies clearly generate lower emissions in mass terms, their emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxides are significantly higher. Using conventional damage cost estimates reported in the literature suggests that the social costs associated with scrap-based steel production are slightly higher than with integrated steel production. This suggests that adopting a life-cycle viewpoint can substantially affect environmental assessment of new technologies. Finally, this study also examines the impacts of carbon taxes on steel production costs and technology choice.

  14. MINOS Detector Steel Magnetic Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Robert C. Trendler and Walter F. Jaskierny

    1999-03-03

    Magnetic measurements were made on one steel plate of the MINOS far detector. The conventionally used technique of measuring sense coil voltage induced by step changes in excitation current voltage was successful in providing stable, repeatable measurements. Measurements were made at several locations on the steel and the results are presented.

  15. Steel Creek primary producers: Periphyton and seston, L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, January 1986--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.; Toole, M.A.; van Duyn, Y.

    1992-02-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- Upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor and to protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to assess various components of the system and identify and changes due to the operation of L-Reactor or discharge from L Lake. An intensive ecological assessment program prior to the construction of the lake provided baseline data with which to compare data accumulated after the lake was filled and began discharging into the creek. The Department of Energy must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems. This report summarizes the results of six years` data from Steel Creek under the L-Lake/Steel Creek Monitoring Program. L Lake is discussed separately from Steel Creek in Volumes NAI-SR-138 through NAI-SR-143.

  16. Optimization of steel bar manufacturing process using six sigma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naeem, Khawar; Ullah, Misbah; Tariq, Adnan; Maqsood, Shahid; Akhtar, Rehman; Nawaz, Rashid; Hussain, Iftikhar

    2016-03-01

    Optimization of a manufacturing process results in higher productivity and reduced wastes. Production parameters of a local steel bar manufacturing industry of Pakistan is optimized by using six Sigma-Define, measure, analyze, improve, and controlmethodology. Production data is collected and analyzed. After analysis, experimental design result is used to identify significant factors affecting process performance. The significant factors are controlled to optimized level using two-level factorial design method. A regression model is developed that helps in the estimation of response under multi variable input values. Model is tested, verified, and validated by using industrial data collected at a local steel bar manufacturing industry of Peshawar(Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, Pakistan). The sigma level of the manufacturing process is improved to 4.01 from 3.58. The novelty of the research is the identification of the significant factors along with the optimum levels that affects the process yield, and the methodology to optimize the steel bar manufacturing process.

  17. A two-dimensional measuring equipment for electrical steel

    SciTech Connect

    Salz, W. . Inst. fuer Werkstoffe der Elektrotechnik)

    1994-05-01

    The technical aspects of two-dimensional measuring equipment for electrical steel are described. The choice of the appropriate field sensors and the important point of the control of [rvec B](t) are described. The equipment described is designed to measure the two-dimensional properties of square shaped single sheets of all qualities of electrical steel covering the technical frequencies and induction ranges of the major applications. The equipment is useful for the manufacturers of electrical steel to control the texture of their material and for designers of machines to know about the properties of the material under two-dimensional excitation, which in case of rotational flux conditions are different from the one-dimensional properties measured with Epstein frame or single sheet testers.

  18. Specular steel surfaces for solar mirror substrates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tracy, C. E.; Gross, G. E.

    1988-04-01

    The long-range objective is to develop a process for making a silvered stainless steel mirror that has the optical performance and service life of a mirror coupled with the mechanical durability, structural strength, and flexibility of sheet steel. Such reflectors are expected to minimize the cost handling, shipping, and fabrication into concentrators. Applications for helistats are assumed to require a lifetime average reflectance of 90 percent in a full-cone aperture angle of 8 mrad. Specifically, this work is designed to produce thin metal membranes with sufficiently fine surface finishes to serve as substrates for direct silver deposition or indirectly for silvered polymer films or silvered sol-gel coatings in heliostat, parabolic trough, and dish applications. Our focus is on the effect of the sheet metal finish on specularity and the ways to obtain the optimum surface finish by conventional manufacturing processes. This report addresses the relationship of optical quality to surface finish and the results of a cooperative research venture with a commercial sheet manufacturer to produce specular stainless steel surfaces by cold-rolling with highly polished rollers.

  19. 2169 Steel Waveform Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Furnish, M.; Alexander, C.; Reinhart, W.; Brown, J.

    2013-06-01

    In support of efforts to develop multiscale models of materials, we performed eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn). These experiments provided shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were used, with samples 1 to 5 mm thick. The study focused on dynamic strength determination via the release/reshock paths. Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allowed release information to be determined from these free surface samples as well. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi-program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. Connections: Superplasticity, Damascus Steels, Laminated Steels, and Carbon Dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Jeffrey

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a description is given of the connections that evolved from the initial development of a family of superplastic plain carbon steels that came to be known as Ultra-High Carbon Steels (UHCS). It was observed that their very high carbon contents were similar, if not identical, to those of Damascus steels. There followed a series of attempts to rediscover how the famous patterns found on Damascus steels blades were formed. At the same time, in order to improve the toughness at room temperature of the newly-developed UHCS, laminated composites were made of alternating layers of UHCS and mild steel (and subsequently other steels and other metals). This led to a study of ancient laminated composites, the motives for their manufacture, and the plausibility of some of the claims relating to the number of layers in the final blades. One apparently ancient laminated composite, recovered in 1837 from the great pyramid of Giza which was constructed in about 2750 B.C., stimulated a carbon dating study of ancient steels. The modern interest in "Bladesmithing" has connections back to many of these ancient weapons.

  1. Occupational Profiles in the European Steel Industry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franz, Hans-Werner; And Others

    The steel industry in Europe has faced great changes, with resulting layoffs and restructuring. Now that the most basic changes seem to be over, it has become evident that the remaining steel industry requires more highly trained workers than was the case previously. Although steel maintenance employees were always highly skilled, steel production…

  2. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  3. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  4. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  5. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  6. 49 CFR 192.55 - Steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel pipe. 192.55 Section 192.55 Transportation... BY PIPELINE: MINIMUM FEDERAL SAFETY STANDARDS Materials § 192.55 Steel pipe. (a) New steel pipe is... in accordance with paragraph (c) or (d) of this section. (b) Used steel pipe is qualified for...

  7. Improving the toughness of ultrahigh strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Soto, Koji

    2002-01-01

    The ideal structural steel combines high strength with high fracture toughness. This dissertation discusses the toughening mechanism of the Fe/Co/Ni/Cr/Mo/C steel, AerMet 100, which has the highest toughness/strength combination among all commercial ultrahigh strength steels. The possibility of improving the toughness of this steel was examined by considering several relevant factors.

  8. Effects of Microstructure on CVN Impact Toughness in Thermomechanically Processed High Strength Microalloyed Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Tao; Zhou, Yanlei; Jia, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Zhaodong

    2017-02-01

    Investigation on the correlation between microstructure and CVN impact toughness is of practical importance for the microstructure design of high strength microalloyed steels. In this work, three steels with characteristic microstructures were produced by cooling path control, i.e., steel A with granular bainite (GB), steel B with polygonal ferrite (PF) and martensite-austenite (M-A) constituent, and steel C with the mixture of bainitic ferrite (BF), acicular ferrite (AF), and M-A constituent. Under the same alloy composition and controlled rolling, similar ductile-to-brittle transition temperatures were obtained for the three steels. Steel A achieved the highest upper shelf energy (USE), while large variation of impact absorbed energy has been observed in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. With apparently large-sized PF and M-A constituent, steel B shows the lowest USE and delamination phenomenon in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. Steel C exhibits an extended upper shelf region, intermediate USE, and the fastest decrease of impact absorbed energy in the ductile-to-brittle transition region. The detailed CVN impact behavior is studied and then linked to the microstructural features.

  9. Current status and recent research achievements in ferritic/martensitic steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tavassoli, A.-A. F.; Diegele, E.; Lindau, R.; Luzginova, N.; Tanigawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    When the austenitic stainless steel 316L(N) was selected for ITER, it was well known that it would not be suitable for DEMO and fusion reactors due to its irradiation swelling at high doses. A parallel programme to ITER collaboration already had been put in place, under an IEA fusion materials implementing agreement for the development of a low activation ferritic/martensitic steel, known for their excellent high dose irradiation swelling resistance. After extensive screening tests on different compositions of Fe-Cr alloys, the chromium range was narrowed to 7-9% and the first RAFM was industrially produced in Japan (F82H: Fe-8%Cr-2%W-TaV). All IEA partners tested this steel and contributed to its maturity. In parallel several other RAFM steels were produced in other countries. From those experiences and also for improving neutron efficiency and corrosion resistance, European Union opted for a higher chromium lower tungsten grade, Fe-9%Cr-1%W-TaV steel (Eurofer), and in 1997 ordered the first industrial heats. Other industrial heats have been produced since and characterised in different states, including irradiated up to 80 dpa. China, India, Russia, Korea and US have also produced their grades of RAFM steels, contributing to overall maturity of these steels. This paper reviews the work done on RAFM steels by the fusion materials community over the past 30 years, in particular on the Eurofer steel and its design code qualification for RCC-MRx.

  10. Wear Resistance of H13 and a New Hot-Work Die Steel at High temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shuang; Wu, Xiaochun; Chen, Shihao; Li, Junwan

    2016-07-01

    The friction and wear behaviors of a new hot-work die steel, SDCM-SS, were studied at high temperature under dry air conditions. The wear mechanism and microstructural characteristics of the SDCM-SS steel were also investigated. The results showed that the SDCM-SS steel had greater wear resistance compared with H13 steel; this was owed to its high oxidizability and temper stability. These features facilitate the generation, growth, and maintenance of a tribo-oxide layer at high temperature under relatively stable conditions. The high oxidizability and thermal stability of the SDCM-SS steel originate from its particular alloy design. No chromium is added to the steel; this ensures that the material has high oxidizability, and facilitates the generation of tribo-oxides during the sliding process. Molybdenum, tungsten, and vanadium additions promote the high temper resistance and stability of the steel. Many fine Mo2C and VC carbides precipitate during the tempering of SDCM-SS steel. During sliding, these carbides can delay the recovery process and postpone martensitic softening. The high temper stability postpones the transition from mild to severe wear and ensures that conditions of mild oxidative wear are maintained. Mild oxidative wear is the dominant wear mechanism for SDCM-SS steel between 400 and 700 °C.

  11. Hypereutectoid high-speed steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kremnev, L.S.

    1986-01-01

    Half of the tungsten and molybdenum contained in R6M5 and R18 steels is concentrated in the undissolved eutectic carbides hindering austenitic grain gowth in hardening and providing the necessary strength and impact strength. This article describes the tungsten-free low-alloy high-speed steel 11M5F with a chemical composition of 1.03-1.10% C, 5.2-5.7% Mo, 3.8-4.2% Cr, 1.3-1.7% V, 0.3-0.6% Si, and 0.3% Ce. The properties of 11M5F and R6M5 steels are examined and compared. The results of production and laboratory tests of the cutting properties of tools of the steels developed showed their high effectiveness, especially of 11M5F steel with 1% A1. The life of tools of the tungsten-free steels is two or three times greater than the life of tools of R6M5 steel.

  12. The Taiwanese species of the genus Paraphloeostiba Steel, 1960 (Coleoptera: Staphylinidae: Omaliinae: Omaliini).

    PubMed

    Shavrin, Alexey V; Smetana, Aleš

    2016-05-12

    Paraphloeostiba formosana sp. n. from Taiwan is described. Paraphloeostiba sonani (Bernhauer, 1943) is redescribed, the lectotype of Phloeonomus sonani Bernhauer, 1943 is designated. Both species are illustrated. A key to the species of Paraphloeostiba Steel, 1960 of Taiwan is given.

  13. Experimental and analytical behavior of strengthened reinforced concrete columns with steel angles and strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalifa, Essam S.; Al-Tersawy, Sherif H.

    2014-06-01

    The need of strengthening reinforced concrete columns, due to loss of strength and/or stiffness, is an essential requirement due to variation of the loads and environmental conditions applied on these columns. Steel jackets around the reinforced concrete (RC) columns are usually made by means of steel plates covering all over the column surface area. For the value of engineering purposes, another technique was developed using steel angles at the corners of the RC columns connected with discrete steel strips. In this paper, an experimental program is designed to evaluate the improvement in load-carrying capacity, stiffness and ductility of strengthened RC columns, concomitant with steel angles and strips. Despite of prevailing a substantially increased loading capacity and strength a pronounced enhancement in ductility and stiffness has been reported. A need for experimental test results with low value of concrete strength to mimic the local old-age structures condition that required strengthening in local countries. Seven columns specimens are tested to evaluate the strength improvement provided by steel strengthening of columns. The method of strengthened steel angles with strips is compared with another strengthening technique. This technique includes connected and unconnected steel-casing specimens. The observed experimental results describe load-shortening curves, horizontal strains in stirrups and steel strips, as well as description of failure mode. The extra-confinement pressure, due to existence of steel cage, of the strengthened RC column can be also observed from experimental results. The code provisions that predict the load-carrying capacity of the strengthened RC composite column has a discrepancy in the results. For this reason, an analytical model is developed in this paper to compare the code limit with experimental observed results. The proposed model accounts for the composite action for concrete confinement and enhancement of the local buckling

  14. Welding tritium exposed stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Kanne, W.R. Jr.

    1994-11-01

    Stainless steels that are exposed to tritium become unweldable by conventional methods due to buildup of decay helium within the metal matrix. With longer service lives expected for tritium containment systems, methods for welding on tritium exposed material will become important for repair or modification of the systems. Solid-state resistance welding and low-penetration overlay welding have been shown to mitigate helium embrittlement cracking in tritium exposed 304 stainless steel. These processes can also be used on stainless steel containing helium from neutron irradiation, such as occurs in nuclear reactors.

  15. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sikka, V.K.

    1986-09-16

    A process is described for welding chromium-molybdenum steels which consist of: subjecting the steel to normalization by heating to above the transformation temperature and cooling in air; subjecting the steel to a partial temper by heating to a temperature less than a full temper; welding the steel using an appropriate filler metal; subjecting the steel to a full temper by heating to a temperature sufficient to optimize strength, reduce stress, increase ductility and reduce hardness.

  16. 2169 steel waveform experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Furnish, Michael David; Alexander, C. Scott; Reinhart, William Dodd; Brown, Justin L.

    2012-11-01

    In support of LLNL efforts to develop multiscale models of a variety of materials, we have performed a set of eight gas gun impact experiments on 2169 steel (21% Cr, 6% Ni, 9% Mn, balance predominantly Fe). These experiments provided carefully controlled shock, reshock and release velocimetry data, with initial shock stresses ranging from 10 to 50 GPa (particle velocities from 0.25 to 1.05 km/s). Both windowed and free-surface measurements were included in this experiment set to increase the utility of the data set, as were samples ranging in thickness from 1 to 5 mm. Target physical phenomena included the elastic/plastic transition (Hugoniot elastic limit), the Hugoniot, any phase transition phenomena, and the release path (windowed and free-surface). The Hugoniot was found to be nearly linear, with no indications of the Fe phase transition. Releases were non-hysteretic, and relatively consistent between 3- and 5-mmthick samples (the 3 mm samples giving slightly lower wavespeeds on release). Reshock tests with explosively welded impactors produced clean results; those with glue bonds showed transient releases prior to the arrival of the reshock, reducing their usefulness for deriving strength information. The free-surface samples, which were steps on a single piece of steel, showed lower wavespeeds for thin (1 mm) samples than for thicker (2 or 4 mm) samples. A configuration used for the last three shots allows release information to be determined from these free surface samples. The sample strength appears to increase with stress from ~1 GPa to ~ 3 GPa over this range, consistent with other recent work but about 40% above the Steinberg model.

  17. Effects of LWR environments on fatigue life of carbon and low-alloy steels

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Shack, W.J.

    1995-03-01

    SME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides construction of nuclear power plant components. Figure I-90 Appendix I to Section III of the Code specifies fatigue design curves for structural materials. While effects of environments are not explicitly addressed by the design curves, test data suggest that the Code fatigue curves may not always be adequate in coolant environments. This paper reports the results of recent fatigue tests that examine the effects of steel type, strain rate, dissolved oxygen level, strain range, loading waveform, and surface morphology on the fatigue life of A 106-Gr B carbon steel and A533-Gr B low-alloy steel in water.

  18. White-Etching Matter in Bearing Steel. Part I: Controlled Cracking of 52100 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solano-Alvarez, W.; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.

    2014-10-01

    Although most of the research performed in bearing steel metallurgy aims to prevent crack nucleation and propagation, some applications require the exact opposite in order to study the role that disconnected surfaces inside the bulk material play when load is applied, or when fluids entrapped in surface cracks propagate tensile stresses or exacerbate corrosion. Four heat treatments have been designed to create controlled arrays of crack types and distributions in quenched and untempered steel normally used in the manufacture of bearings. The varieties of cracks studied include sparsely distributed martensite-plate cracks, fine-grain-boundary cracks, abundant martensite-plate cracks, and surface cracks. The intention was to create samples which can then be subjected to appropriate mechanical testing so that phenomena such as the appearance of "white-etching areas" or "white-etching cracks," crack-lubricant interactions, or hydrogen trapping can be studied further.

  19. Comparison of carbon fiber and stainless steel root canal posts.

    PubMed

    Purton, D G; Payne, J A

    1996-02-01

    This in vitro study compared physical properties of root canal posts made of carbon fiber-reinforced epoxy resin with those of stainless steel posts. Three-point bending tests were used to derive the transverse modulus of elasticity of the posts. Resin composite cores on the posts were subjected to tensile forces to test the bonds between the cores and posts. Carbon fiber posts appeared to have adequate rigidity for their designed purpose. The bond strength of the resin composite cores to the carbon fiber posts was significantly less than that to the stainless steel posts.

  20. Fatigue handbook: Offshore steel structures

    SciTech Connect

    Almarnaess, A.

    1985-01-01

    The contents of this book are: Overview of Offshore Steel Structures; Loads on Ocean Structures; Fracture Mechanics As a Tool in Fatigue Analysis; Basic Fatigue Properties of Welded Joints; Significance of Defects; Improving the Fatigue Strength of Welded Joints; Effects of Marine Environment and Cathodic Protection on Fatigue of Structural Steels Fatigue of Tubular Joints; Unstable Fracture; Fatigue Life Calculations; and Fatigue in Building Codes Background and Applications.

  1. Wear of steel by rubber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gent, A. N.; Pulford, C. T. R.

    1978-01-01

    Wear of a steel blade used as a scraper to abrade rubber surfaces has been found to take place much more rapidly on a cis-polyisoprene (natural rubber) surface than on a cis-polybutadiene surface, and much more rapidly in an inert atmosphere than in air. These observations are attributed to the direct attack upon steel of free-radical species generated by mechanical rupture of elastomer molecules during abrasion.

  2. ELECTROMAGNETIC INSPECTION OF HARDENED STEEL.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    heat treat methods (no carbon added to the surface), and (2) The determination of through hardness or tempering temperature history of Stentor tool...effectiveness of phase sensitive and harmonic eddy current test methods for determining tempering temperature history of 4340 and Stentor tool steels was...showed that tempering temperature history of 4340 and Stentor steel can be determined for all temperatures (265 F to 820 F) used for specimen preparation on this program.

  3. Aging of cast duplex stainless steels in LWR systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O.K.; Chung, H.M.

    1984-10-01

    A program is being conducted to investigate the significance of in-service embrittlement of cast duplex stainless steels under light-water reactor operating conditions. The existing data are evaluated to determine the expected embrittlement of cast components during the operating lifetime of reactors and to define the objectives and scope of the investigation. This presentation describes the status of the program. Data for the metallurgical characterization of the various cast stainless steels used in the investigation are presented. Charpy impact tests on short-term aged material indicate that CF-3 stainless steels are less susceptible to embrittlement than CF-8 or CF-8M stainless steels. Microstructural characterization of cast stainless steels that were obtained from Georg Fischer Co. and aged for up to 70,000 h at 300, 350, and 400/sup 0/C reveals the formation of four different types of precipitates that are not ..cap alpha..'. Embrittlement of the ferrite phase is primarily due to pinning of the dislocations by two of these precipitates, designated as Type M and Type X. The ferrite phase is embrittled after approx. 8 y at 300/sup 0/C and shows cleavage fracture. Examination of the fracture surfaces of the impact-test specimens indicates that the toughness of the long-term aged material is determined by the austenite phase. 8 figures, 3 tables.

  4. Laser Welded Corrugated Steel Panels in Industrial Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kananen, M.; Mäntyjärvi, K.; Keskitalo, M.; Hietala, M.; Järvenpää, A.; Holappa, K.; Saine, K.; Teiskonen, J.

    Corrugated core steel panels are an effective way to reduce weight and increase stiffness of steel structures. In numerous applications, these panels have shown very promising commercial possibilities. This study presents the design, manufacturing and commercializing process for two practical examples: Case 1) a fly wheel cover for a diesel engine and Case 2) rotationally symmetrical panel for an electric motor. Test materials of various kinds were used for corrugated cores and skin plates: conventional low-carbon steel grade EN 10130 and ferritic stainless steel grade 1.4509 with plate the thicknesses of 0.5, 0.6 and 0.75 mm. To manufacture different kinds of corrugated core steel panels, flexible manufacturing tools and cost-effective processes are needed. The most important criterion for laser welding panels was the capability of forming tools for producing high quality geometry for the core. Laser welding assembly showed that the quality of the core in both studied cases was good enough for welding the lap joints properly. Developed panels have been tested in industrial applications with excellent feedback. If thickness of a corrugated panel structure is not a limiting issue, these panels are good solution on application where stiffness and lighter weight are required as well as vibrational aspect considered.

  5. Reusing steel and aluminum components at end of product life.

    PubMed

    Cooper, Daniel R; Allwood, Julian M

    2012-09-18

    Reusing steel and aluminum components would reduce the need for new production, possibly creating significant savings in carbon emissions. Currently, there is no clearly defined set of strategies or barriers to enable assessment of appropriate component reuse; neither is it possible to predict future levels of reuse. This work presents a global assessment of the potential for reusing steel and aluminum components. A combination of top-down and bottom-up analyses is used to allocate the final destinations of current global steel and aluminum production to product types. A substantial catalogue has been compiled for these products characterizing key features of steel and aluminum components including design specifications, requirements in use, and current reuse patterns. To estimate the fraction of end-of-life metal components that could be reused for each product, the catalogue formed the basis of a set of semistructured interviews with industrial experts. The results suggest that approximately 30% of steel and aluminum used in current products could be reused. Barriers against reuse are examined, prompting recommendations for redesign that would facilitate future reuse.

  6. Laser ignition of bulk 1018 carbon steel in pure oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, K.; Branch, M. C.

    1986-01-01

    Experiments were undertaken to study the ignition characteristics of bulk 1018 carbon steel in a pure oxygen environment. Cylindrical 1018 carbon steel specimens 5 mm in diameter and 5 mm high were ignited by a focused CW CO2 laser beam in a cool, static, pure oxygen environment at oxygen pressures ranging from 0.103 to 6.895 MPa. A two-color pyrometer was designed and used to measure the ignition temperatures of the specimens. The temperature history of a spot approximately 0.5 mm in diameter located at the center of the specimen top surface was recorded with a maximum time resolution of 25 microsec, and with an accuracy of a few percent. Ignition temperature of bulk 1018 carbon steel was identified from the temperature history curve with the aid of the light intensity curve. Results show that 1018 carbon steel specimens ignite at temperatures between 1388 and 1450 K, which are below the melting range of the alloy (1662-1685 K). The ignition temperature of 1018 carbon steel is mildly dependent on oxygen pressure over the range of oxygen pressure investigated in this study.

  7. Effective Exploration of New 760°C-Capability Steels for Coal Energy

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, Williams; Zhao, Ji-Cheng

    2016-09-17

    Cost effective and high performance alloys that are capable of operating at 760 °C or higher for extended periods of time under a very aggressive environment are critically required for the design and development of advanced ultrasupercritical (AUSC) boilers and steam turbines. Finely dispersed Laves phase precipitates have been shown by Takeyama and co-workers to be a viable strengthening mechanism in high temperature austenitic steels. There is currently no straightforward theory that can predict what other intermetallic phases can serve as potent precipitation-strengthening phases for steels; thus we employed a highly effective dual-anneal diffusion multiple (DADM) approach to screen for viable strengthening precipitates over a wide range of compositions. From the Fe-Co-Cr-Ni-Mo DADMs, the Fe-Cr-Mo based Chi phase was identified as a new strengthening phase for high temperature ferritic steels; and from the Fe-Mn-Cr-Nb-Ni-Mo-FeAl DADMs, the Laves phase was identified as a viable strengthening precipitate in Fe-Mn and Fe-Ni based austenitic steels. After identification of viable strengthening phases from the DADMs that covered compositions in the basic ternary and quaternary systems, we employed computation thermodynamics to perform multicomponent alloy design and optimization. For the new the Chi-phase strengthened steels, we performed thermodynamic calculations to vary the volume fraction of the Chi phase and introduced Nb and carbon to promote the formation of stable carbides for grain size control during solution heat treatment. For the Fe-Ni-Mn based austenitic steels, we performed extensive parametric optimization of compositions in order to reduce the expensive Ni content, add Cr and Al for oxidation resistance, and balance the alloying contents (Ni, Mn, Cr, Al, Mo) to suppress the ferritic phase and promote the austenitic matrix phase. Four steels (two ferritic + two austenitic) were designed and tested. The two Chi-phase strengthened ferritic steels

  8. Application of headed studs in steel fiber reinforced cementitious composite slab of steel beam-column connection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Cui; Nakashima, Masayoshi

    2012-03-01

    Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) is a promising material with high strength in both compression and tension compared with normal concrete. The ductility is also greatly improved because of 6% volume portion of straight steel fibers. A steel beam-column connection with Steel fiber reinforced cementitous composites (SFRCC) slab diaphragms is proposed to overcome the damage caused by the weld. The push-out test results suggested that the application of SFRCC promises larger shear forces transferred through headed studs allocated in a small area in the slab. Finite element models were developed to simulate the behavior of headed studs. The failure mechanism of the grouped arrangement is further discussed based on a series of parametric analysis. In the proposed connection, the SFRCC slab is designed as an exterior diaphragm to transfer the beam flange load to the column face. The headed studs are densely arranged on the beam flange to connect the SFRCC slab diaphragms and steel beams. The seismic performance and failure mechanism of the SFRCC slab diaphragm beam-column connection were investigated based on the cyclic loading test. Beam hinge mechanism was achieved at the end of the SFRCC slab diaphragm by using sufficient studs and appropriate rebars in the SFRCC slab.

  9. Development of a Press-Hardened Steel Suitable for Thin Slab Direct Rolling Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jewoong; De Cooman, Bruno C.

    2015-01-01

    The thin slab casting and direct rolling process is a hot-rolled strip production method which has maintained commercial quality steel grades as a major material in many industrial applications due to its low processing cost. Few innovative products have however been developed specifically for production by thin slab direct rolling. Press hardening or hot press forming steel grades which are now widely used to produce structural automotive steel parts requiring ultra-high strength and formability may however offer an opportunity for thin slab direct rolling-specific ultra-high strength products. In this work, a newly designed press hardening steel grade developed specifically for thin slab direct rolling processing is presented. The press hardening steel has a high nitrogen content compared with press hardening steel grades produced by conventional steelmaking routes. Boron and titanium which are key alloying additions in conventional press hardening steel such as the 22MnB5 press hardening steel grade are not utilized. Cr is added in the press hardening steel to obtain the required hardenability. The properties of the new thin slab direct rolling-specific 22MnCrN5 press hardening steel grade are reviewed. The evolution of the microstructure and mechanical properties with increasing amounts of Cr additions from 0.6 to 1.4 wt pct and the effect of the cooling rate during die-quenching were studied by means of laboratory simulations. The selection of the optimum chemical composition range for the thin slab direct rolling-specific 22MnCrN5 steel in press hardening heat treatment conditions is discussed.

  10. Predictive Process Optimization for Fracture Ductility in Automotive TRIP Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, Jiadong

    In light of the emerging challenges in the automotive industry of meeting new energy-saving and environment-friendly requirements imposed by both the government and the society, the auto makers have been working relentlessly to reduce the weight of automobiles. While steel makers pushed out a variety of novel Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) to serve this market with new needs, TRIP (Transformation Induced Plasticity) steels is one of the most promising materials for auto-body due to its exceptional combination of strength and formability. However, current commercial automotive TRIP steels demonstrate relatively low hole-expansion (HE) capability, which is critical in stretch forming of various auto parts. This shortcoming on ductility has been causing fracture issues in the forming process and limits the wider applications of this steel. The kinetic theory of martensitic transformations and associated transformation plasticity is applied to the optimization of transformation stability for enhanced mechanical properties in a class of high strength galvannealed TRIP steel. This research leverages newly developed characterization and simulation capabilities, supporting computational design of high-performance steels exploiting optimized transformation plasticity for desired mechanical behaviors, especially for the hole-expansion ductility. The microstructure of the automotive TRIP sheet steels was investigated, using advanced tomographic characterization including nanoscale Local Electrode Atom Probe (LEAP) microanalysis. The microstructural basis of austenite stability, the austenite carbon concentration in particular, was quantified and correlated with measured fracture ductility through transformation plasticity constitutive laws. Plastic flow stability for enhanced local fracture ductility at high strength is sought to maintain high hole-expansion ductility, through quantifying the optimal stability and the heat-treatment process to achieve it. An additional

  11. Influence of Heat Input on the Content of Delta Ferrite in the Structure of 304L Stainless Steel GTA Welded Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sejč, Pavol; Kubíček, Rastislav

    2011-12-01

    Welding of austenitic stainless steel has its specific issues, even when the weldability is considered good. The main problems of austenitic stainless steel welding are connected with its metallurgical weldability. The amount of the components presented in the structure of stainless steel welded joint affect its properties, therefore the understanding of the behavior of stainless steel during its welding is important for successful processing and allows the fabricators the possibility to manage the resulting issues. This paper is focused on the influence of heat input on the structural changes in GTA welded joints of austenitic stainless steel designated: ASTM SA TP 304L.

  12. 38. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, BOILERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    38. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, BOILERS UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN BOILER PLANT LOCATED EAST OF MAIN STEEL PLANT, 1909. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation collection, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  13. Steel Creek water quality: L-Lake/Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program, November 1985--December 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Bowers, J.A.; Kretchmer, D.W.; Chimney, M.J.

    1992-04-01

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) encompasses 300 sq mi of the Atlantic Coastal Plain in west-central South Carolina. The Savannah River forms the western boundary of the site. Five major tributaries of the Savannah River -- upper Three Runs Creek, Four Mile Creek, Pen Branch, Steel Creek, and Lower Three Runs Creek -- drain the site. All but Upper Three Runs Creek receive, or in the past received, thermal effluents from nuclear production reactors. In 1985, L Lake, a 400-hectare cooling reservoir, was built on the upper reaches of Steel Creek to receive effluent from the restart of L-Reactor, and protect the lower reaches from thermal impacts. The Steel Creek Biological Monitoring Program was designed to meet envirorunental regulatory requirements associated with the restart of L-Reactor and complements the Biological Monitoring Program for L Lake. This extensive program was implemented to address portions of Section 316(a) of the Clean Water Act. The Department of Energy (DOE) must demonstrate that the operation of L-Reactor will not significantly alter the established aquatic ecosystems.

  14. Neodymium-rich precipitate phases in a high-chromium ferritic/martensitic steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yinzhong; Zhou, Xiaoling; Shang, Zhongxia

    2016-05-01

    Neodymium being considered as nitride forming element has been used in a design of advanced ferritic/martensitic (FM) steels for fossil fired power plants at service temperatures of 630 °C to 650 °C to effectively improve the creep strength of the steels. To fully understand the characteristics of neodymium precipitates in high-Cr FM steels, precipitate phases in an 11Cr FM steel with 0.03 wt% addition of Nd have been investigated by transmission electron microscopy. Three neodymium phases with a face-centered cubic crystal structure and different composition were observed in the steel. They consisted of neodymium carbonitride with an average lattice parameter of 1.0836 nm, Nd-rich carbonitride mainly containing Mn, and Nd-rich MN nitride mainly containing Mn and Co. Other three Nd-rich and Nd-containing phases, which appear to be Nd-Co-Cr/Nd-rich intermetallic compounds and Cr-Fe-rich nitride containing Nd, were also detected in the steel. Nd-relevant precipitates were found to be minor phases compared with M23C6 and Nb/V/Ta-rich MX phases in the steel. The content of Nd in other precipitate phases was very low. Most of added Nd is considered to be present as solid solution in the matrix of the steel.

  15. Polymeric coupling agents for enhancing the adhesion of epoxy to steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaideeswaran, Karthik

    The work described in this dissertation involves the conceptualization, design, development and testing of new polymers for their efficiency as coupling agents to enhance the bonding of steel to epoxy. Two novel series of polymeric coupling agents have been tested viz., a quinone-amine polyurethane (QAP) series and a beta-diketone functionalized polymer (BFP) series. Several QAP and BFP polymers were synthesized and studied. These polymers were characterized using Infrared spectroscopy, thermal analyses (Thermogravimetric Analysis, Differential Scanning Calorimetry) and Gel Permeation Chromatography. The surfaces of QAP and BFP polymeric coupling agent treated steel coupons were analyzed using Infrared Reflection Spectroscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy. These tests gave indications that the QAPs and BFPs interact with the steel surface chemically. The QAPs and BFPs were found to be very effective coupling agents for the steel-epoxy system. The coupling agent treated epoxy-steel torsional joints were tested (in dry and wet environments) in shear. The QAPs were compared with commercial silanes and demonstrated a 10-15% better strength retention and hot water durability. The QAP treated and epoxy resin topcoated steel coupons demonstrated excellent corrosion resistance when tested in a lab-scale salt-spray chamber. The process conditions (in the coupling agent based polymer coating process for steel described in this dissertation) are mild and process control is relatively simple. This organic coating process is more environmentally friendly than other conventionally used toxic processes for steel like Chrome Etching.

  16. Friction Stir Lap Welding of Magnesium Alloy to Steel: A Preliminary Investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Jana, Saumyadeep; Hovanski, Yuri; Grant, Glenn J.

    2010-12-01

    An initial study was made to evaluate the feasibility of joining Magnesium alloy AZ31 sheet to galvanized steel sheet in lap configuration using friction stir welding (FSW). Two different automotive sheet steels were used for comparative evaluation of the dissimilar joining potential; a 0.8mm thick, electro galvanized (EG) mild steel, and a 1.5mm thick hot dipped galvanized (HDG) high-strength, low-alloy steel (HSLA). These steels were joined to 2.33mm thick AZ31B magnesium sheet. A single FSW tool design was used for both dissimilar welds, and process parameters were kept the same. Average peak load for the AZ31-1.5 mm steel weld joint in lap shear mode was found to be 6.3 ± 1.0 kN. For the AZ31-0.8 mm steel weld, joint strength was 5.1 ± 1.5 kN. Microstructural investigation indicates melting of the Zn coating at the interface and subsequent alloying with the Mg sheet resulting in formation of solidified Zn-Mg alloy layer at AZ31/steel interface.

  17. Elevated Temperature Fracture Toughness and Fatigue Testing of Steels for Geothermal Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Cutler, R.A.; Goodman, E.C.; Hendrickson, R.R.

    1981-10-01

    Conventional drill bit steels exhibit increased wear and decreased toughness when run at elevated temperatures in geothermal wells. Bits are therefore run at lower speeds and lighter loads, resulting in lower penetration rates for geothermal drilling than for conventional rock drilling. Carpenter EX-00053, Timken CBS 600, Timken CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2M steels with improved hot hardness (improved wear resistance), were tested in conjunction with the steels used for cones (AISI 4829, 3915 and EX55) in conventional roller cones and lugs (AISI 8620, 9315 and EX55) in conventional roller cone rock bits. Short-rod fracture toughness measurements were made on each of these steels between room temperature and 400{degree}C. Fatigue crack resistance was determined at 300{degree}C for high-temperature steels and at room temperature for conventional steels. Scanning electron microscopy analyses of the fractured short-rod specimens were correlated with observed crack behavior from the test records. Materials testing results are discussed and steel selections made for improved geothermal bits. Carpenter EX-00053 and Timken CBS 1000M steels meet all design requirements for use in stabilizers, lugs and cones at temperatures to 400{degree}C. It is recommended that EX-00053 and CBS 1000M be manufactured for geothermal drilling at the Geysers site. [DJE 2005

  18. Creep of A508/533 Pressure Vessel Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Richard Wright

    2014-08-01

    ABSTRACT Evaluation of potential Reactor Pressure Vessel (RPV) steels has been carried out as part of the pre-conceptual Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR) design studies. These design studies have generally focused on American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) Code status of the steels, temperature limits, and allowable stresses. Initially, three candidate materials were identified by this process: conventional light water reactor (LWR) RPV steels A508 and A533, 2¼Cr-1Mo in the annealed condition, and Grade 91 steel. The low strength of 2¼Cr-1Mo at elevated temperature has eliminated this steel from serious consideration as the VHTR RPV candidate material. Discussions with the very few vendors that can potentially produce large forgings for nuclear pressure vessels indicate a strong preference for conventional LWR steels. This preference is based in part on extensive experience with forging these steels for nuclear components. It is also based on the inability to cast large ingots of the Grade 91 steel due to segregation during ingot solidification, thus restricting the possible mass of forging components and increasing the amount of welding required for completion of the RPV. Grade 91 steel is also prone to weld cracking and must be post-weld heat treated to ensure adequate high-temperature strength. There are also questions about the ability to produce, and very importantly, verify the through thickness properties of thick sections of Grade 91 material. The availability of large components, ease of fabrication, and nuclear service experience with the A508 and A533 steels strongly favor their use in the RPV for the VHTR. Lowering the gas outlet temperature for the VHTR to 750°C from 950 to 1000°C, proposed in early concept studies, further strengthens the justification for this material selection. This steel is allowed in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code for nuclear service up to 371°C (700°F); certain excursions above that temperature are

  19. Nickel release from stainless steels.

    PubMed

    Haudrechy, P; Mantout, B; Frappaz, A; Rousseau, D; Chabeau, G; Faure, M; Claudy, A

    1997-09-01

    In 1994, a study of nickel release and allergic contact dermatitis from nickel-plated metals and stainless steels was published in this journal. It was shown that low-sulfur stainless steel grades like AISI 304, 316L or 430 (S < or = 0.007%) release less than 0.03 microgram/cm2/week of nickel in acid artificial sweat and elicit no reactions in patients already sensitized to nickel. In contrast, nickel-plated samples release around 100 micrograms/cm2/week of Ni and high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303-S approximately 0.3%) releases about 1.5 micrograms/cm2/week in this acid artificial sweat. Applied on patients sensitized to nickel, these metals elicit positive reactions in 96% and 14%, respectively, of the patients. The main conclusion was that low-sulfur stainless steels like AISI 304, 316L or 430, even when containing Ni, should not elicit nickel contact dermatitis, while metals having a mean corrosion resistance like a high-sulfur stainless steel (AISI 303) or nickel-plated steel should be avoided. The determining characteristic was in fact the corrosion resistance in chloride media, which, for stainless steels, is connected, among other factors, to the sulfur content. Thus, a question remained concerning the grades with an intermediate sulfur content, around 0.03%, which were not studied. They are the object of the study presented in this paper. 3 tests were performed: leaching experiments, dimethylglyoxime and HNO3 spot tests, and clinical patch tests; however, only stainless steels were tested: a low-sulfur AISI 304 and AISI 303 as references and 3 grades with a sulfur content around 0.03%: AISI 304L, AISI 304L added with Ca, AISI 304L+Cu. Leaching experiments showed that the 4 non-resulfurised grades released less than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week in acid sweat while the reulfurized AISI 303 released around or more than 0.5 microgram/cm2/week. This is explained by the poorer corrosion resistance of the resulfurized grade. Yet all these grades had the same

  20. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  1. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel,...

  2. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel,...

  3. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  4. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  5. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  6. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel,...

  7. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel,...

  8. 46 CFR 56.60-5 - Steel (High temperature applications).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steel (High temperature applications). 56.60-5 Section... SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Materials § 56.60-5 Steel (High temperature applications). (a) (Reproduces 124.2... steel, plain nickel-alloy steel, carbon-manganese-alloy steel, manganese-vanadium-alloy steel,...

  9. 29 CFR 1926.754 - Structural steel assembly.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Structural steel assembly. 1926.754 Section 1926.754 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.754 Structural steel...) Tripping hazards. Shear connectors (such as headed steel studs, steel bars or steel lugs), reinforcing...

  10. Compact X-band high power load using magnetic stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Tantawi, S.G. |; Vlieks, A.E.

    1995-05-01

    We present design and experimental results of a high power X-band load. The load is formed as a disk-loaded waveguide structure using lossy, Type 430 stainless steel. The design parameters have been optimized using the recently developed mode-matching code MLEGO. The load has been designed for compactness while maintaining a band width greater than 300 MHz.

  11. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Workers erect the first fabricated steel girders to arrive at the A-3 Test Stand at Stennis Space Center. Steel work began at the construction site Oct. 29 and is scheduled to continue into next spring.

  12. High-temperature brazing of stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Heisman, R. M.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1978-01-01

    Prevention of iron contamination of platens is eliminated by placing alumina/silica ceramic-fiber blankets between platens and carbon-steel plate. Carbon-steel plates provide rigidity and improve heat transfer.

  13. Corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, D. D. L.

    2000-10-01

    The methods and materials for corrosion control of steel-reinforced concrete are reviewed. The methods are steel surface treatment, the use of admixtures in concrete, surface coating on concrete, and cathodic protection.

  14. Investigation of hot cracking resistance of 2205 duplex steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamiec, J.; Ścibisz, B.

    2010-02-01

    Austenitic duplex steel of the brand 2205 according to Avesta Sheffield is used for welded constructions (pipelines, tanks) in the petrol industry, chemical industry and food industry. It is important to know the range of high-temperature brittleness in designing welding technology for constructions made of this steel type. There is no data in literature concerning this issue. High-temperature brittleness tests using the simulator of heat flow device Gleeble 3800 were performed. The tests results allowed the evaluation of the characteristic temperatures in the brittleness temperature range during the joining of duplex steels, specifically the nil-strength temperature (NST) and nil-ductility temperatures (NDT) during heating, the strength and ductility recovery temperatures (DRT) during cooling, the Rfparameter (Rf = (Tliquidus - NDT)/NDT) describing the duplex steel inclination for hot cracking, and the brittleness temperature range (BTR). It has been stated that, for the examined steel, this range is wide and amounts to ca. 90 °C. The joining of duplex steels with the help of welding techniques creates a significant risk of hot cracks. After analysis of the DTA curves a liquidus temperature of TL = 1465 °C and a solidus temperature of TS = 1454 °C were observed. For NST a mean value was assumed, in which the cracks appeared for six samples; the temperature was 1381 °C. As the value of the NDT temperature 1367 °C was applied while for DRT the assumed temperature was 1375 °C. The microstructure of the fractures was observed using a Hitachi S-3400N scanning electron microscope (SEM). The analyses of the chemical composition were performed using an energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometer (EDS), Noran System Six of Thermo Fisher Scientific. Essential differences of fracture morphology type over the brittle temperature range were observed and described.

  15. Copper-Nickel Cladding on Stainless Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    steel,. Monel (65Ni/35Cu) alloy consumables should be used as they can tolerate more iron dilution from the steel than the 70-30 copper-nickel alloy ...Cooper Alloys , 400 , K-500 Stainless Steel - Tyles 302, 304, 321, 347 N ickel 200 Silver Braze Alloys Nickel-Chromium Alloy 600 Nickel-Aluminum Bronze 70...cladding of austenitic stainless steels may also offer some ballistic, non-magnetic, and electromagnetic signature advantages over current hull alloys and

  16. Corrosion Behavior of Steel Fibrous Concrete

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-05-01

    Crvtaiue wi ,rerse sido it necessaty m’d Identify by block number) steel fibrous concrete corrosion cracked fibrous concrete 20 ABST RACT (Continue...dissolved gas in liq- Although chloride ions affect the rate of steel corro- uids. sion in concrete , corrosion can occur without them. Verbeck has...repcrted that steel subjected to a concrete Corrosion of steel will not occur without water. Not environment normally develops a protective oxide film

  17. Research on the illumination model based on light scattering properties of steel surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yuanjiong; Kong, Jianyi; Xu, Pan; Liu, Cancan; Zheng, Guo

    2015-12-01

    Experimental scheme was designed based on the steel production process, surface optical characteristics and BRDF (Bidirectional Reflectance Distribution Function) illumination model theory. The relationship between the light incidence angle, surface roughness and laws of light scattering under a particular light-source conditions were found through a series of light scattering characteristics experiments for different steel plate surface. The results showed that there was an apparent specular reflection peak on steel surface. surface light scattering was influenced greatly by light incidence angle and surface roughness, and it showed the law of exponential distribution functions. Thus the improved semi-empirical light scattering mathematical model which based on roughness factor and surface Gaussian distribution of micro-plane components has been formed through non-linear model fitting and optimization. The surface illumination model has been proposed to accurately describe the light intensity distribution of steel plate surface and provide a theoretical method for the design of optimal imaging system.

  18. Finite element analysis of bridge steel pedestal anchor bolts in reinforced concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Logan Hancock, B.; Hite Head, Monique

    2009-10-01

    Steel pedestals are short, column-like structures currently being used to elevate highway bridges to reduce the risk of collisions with over-height vehicles. Previous full-scale experimental research has been done to examine the efficacy of these steel pedestals and their components under quasi-static loading to evaluate any added instability in the event of an earthquake. As part of the Undergraduate Summer Research Grant (USRG) program at Texas A&M University, this specific project was focused on observing the behavior of the post-installed steel pedestal anchor bolts under applied shear and tensile loading using the finite element (FE) software Abaqus. The results from some of the preliminary analyses are compared to theoretical anchorage calculations with the aim of producing a benchmark for future steel pedestal anchor bolt embedment design. Future research improvements regarding FE modeling and structural design suggestions are proposed as well.

  19. HYDROGEN-ASSISTED FRACTURE IN FORGED TYPE 304L AUSTENITIC STAINLESS STEEL

    SciTech Connect

    Switzner, Nathan; Neidt, Ted; Hollenbeck, John; Knutson, J.; Everhart, Wes; Hanlin, R.; Bergen, R.; Balch, D. K.

    2012-09-06

    Austenitic stainless steels generally have good resistance to hydrogen-assisted fracture; however, structural designs for high-pressure gaseous hydrogen are constrained by the low strength of this class of material. Forging is used to increase the low strength of austenitic stainless steels, thus improving the efficiency of structural designs. Hydrogen-assisted racture, however, depends on microstructural details associated with manufacturing. In this study, hydrogen-assisted fracture of forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is investigated. Microstructural variation in multi-step forged 304L was achieved by forging at different rates and temperatures, and by process annealing. High internal hydrogen content in forged type 304L austenitic stainless steel is achieved by thermal precharging in gaseous hydrogen and results in as much as 50% reduction of tensile ductility.

  20. Economic feasibility of recycling radioactive scrap steel

    SciTech Connect

    Balhiser, B.C.; Rosholt, D.L.; Nichols, F.A.

    1995-12-31

    Radioactive scrap metal has traditionally been disposed of by burial in low-level waste repositories, an option that will become increasingly unattractive if burial costs rise as projected. This paper will examine recycling opportunities that may arise from two divergent economic trends: (1) escalating burial costs, and (2) historically flat product costs from state-of-the-art metal recycle operations. Emphasis will be placed on recycling the radioactive scrap steel (RSS) that will arise from D&D of Government and commercial nuclear facilities in the western United States. An effort is underway to compare processes for recycling RSS at least cost to the generator, least impact to the environment, and minimum worker exposure to radionuclide hazards. An experienced industry team with expertise in radioactive metals recycling, commercial steel recycling, and state-of-the-art metal recycle facilities design has been assembled under subcontract for this purpose. Methods for evaluating process options to arrive at an optimized solution will be discussed in the paper. An analysis of burial versus recycle costs for RSS will also be presented.

  1. Recycling steel automatically - through resource recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Foley, W.J.

    1997-12-01

    Last year, more than 55 percent of all steel cans were recycled. But no matter how effective the local recycling programs may be, some steel cans and other steel products are overlooked and appear in MSW. This missed steel fraction is automatically recycled by resource recovery facilities through magnetic separation. More than three-fourths of the operating resource recovery plants magnetically separate steel cans and other discarded steel items either pre- or post-combustion. Recovering ferrous scrap clearly reduces the post-combustion material that is landfilled and heightens the facilities` environmental performance. Both the resource recovery and steel industries must heighten public awareness of the benefits of automatic steel recycling. Magnetic separation at resource recovery facilities is a simple method of diverting what would otherwise be relegated as solid waste to the landfill. It should be recognized as an increasingly important and valued part of the resource recovery and steel industries` overall recycling efforts. This paper will discuss the status of steel can recycling in the United States, describe how recovered ferrous is beneficiated before recycling by the steel industry, and make recommendations for heightening awareness of the steel recycling contribution made by resource recovery facilities.

  2. Steel erected at A-3 Test Stand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Fabricated steel began arriving by truck Oct. 24 for construction of the A-3 Test Stand that will be used to test the engine for the nation's next generation of moon rockets. Within days workers from Lafayette Steel Erector Inc. began assembling the 16 steel stages needed on the foundation and footings poured in the previous year.

  3. Steeling and Resilience in Art Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heise, Donalyn

    2014-01-01

    Steel is an incredibly strong alloy of iron and carbon. Due to its incredible strength and durability, this resilient material is commonly used for constructing buildings. The transitive verb "steeling" is defined in Miriam-Webster dictionary as "to fill with resolution or determination, as in, she 'steeled herself to face the…

  4. Metallography of maraging 350 steel

    SciTech Connect

    Hutson, S.M.; Merten, C.W.

    1987-01-01

    A technique for etching maraging 350 steel with Glyceregia is described. Surface activation procedures are integral to this technique. Microstructural features revealed by this technique are compared with those obtained with Kalling's reagent, Fry's reagent, and 5% Nital, three etchants commonly used to reveal microstructures of maraging steels. Features which may be simultaneously revealed using Glyceregia include prior austenite grain boundaries, martensitic structure, precipitates, titanium carbo-nitrides, and reverted austenite. The other etchants examined in this investigation typically reveal only a few of the microstructural features detailed above at any one time. 11 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Microstructural Developments Leading to New Advanced High Strength Sheet Steels: A Historical Assessment of Critical Metallographic Observations

    SciTech Connect

    Matlock, David K

    2015-08-03

    In the past 30+ years significant advancements have been made in the development of higher strength sheet steels with improved combinations of strength and ductility that have enabled important product improvements leading to safer, lighter weight, and more fuel efficient automobiles and in other applications. Properties of the primarily low carbon, low alloy steels are derived through careful control of time-temperature processing histories designed to produce multiphase ferritic based microstructures that include martensite and other constituents including retained austenite. The basis for these developments stems from the early work on dual-phase steels which was the subject of much interest. In response to industry needs, dual-phase steels have evolved as a unique class of advanced high strength sheet steels (AHSS) in which the thermal and mechanical processing histories have been specifically designed to produce constituent combinations for the purpose of simultaneously controlling strength and deformation behavior, i.e. stress-strain curve shapes. Improvements continue as enhanced dual-phase steels have recently been produced with finer microstructures, higher strengths, and better overall formability. Today, dual phase steels are the primary AHSS products used in vehicle manufacture, and several companies have indicated that the steels will remain as important design materials well into the future. In this presentation, fundamental results from the early work on dual-phase steels will be reviewed and assessed in light of recent steel developments. Specific contributions from industry/university cooperative research leading to product improvements will be highlighted. The historical perspective provided in the evolution of dual-phase steels represents a case-study that provides important framework and lessons to be incorporated in next generation AHSS products.

  6. Teaching Steel Connections Using an Interactive Virtual Steel Sculpture

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moaveni, Saeed; Chou, Karen C.

    2015-01-01

    Steel connections play important roles in the integrity of a structure, and many structural failures are attributed to connection failures. Connections are the glue that holds a structure together. The failures of the Hartford Coliseum in 1977, the Hyatt Regency Hotel in Kansas City in 1980, and the I-35W Bridge in Minneapolis in 2007 are all…

  7. The single steel drilling caisson: A novel approach to bottom-founded structures in arctic waters

    SciTech Connect

    Fitzpatrick, J.; Janson, B.

    1983-10-01

    In 1982, a mobile, bottom founded steel caisson drilling system, was conceived, constructed and installed on an underwater sand berm in 31 m of water, in the active shear zone of the Canadian Beaufort Sea. Discussed in this paper are the principal design criteria, the ice/structure/foundation interaction, the construction and installation, and the post set down stress analysis of the steel caisson.

  8. Carbide Precipitation Behavior and Wear Resistance of a Novel Roller Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Jing; Li, Qiang; Qu, Hongwei; Liu, Ligang; Yang, Qingxiang

    2013-06-01

    High speed steel, which contains more alloy elements, cannot be used to manufacture the forged work roll. Therefore, a novel roller steel was designed on the basis of W6Mo5Cr4V2 (M2) steel. In this study, the carbide precipitation behavior and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were investigated. The Fe-C isopleths were calculated by Thermo-Calc to determine the carbide types, which were precipitated at different temperatures. The phase transformation temperatures were measured by differential scanning calorimeter and then the characteristic temperatures were designed. The phase structures quenched from the characteristic temperatures were measured by x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The typical microstructures were observed by field emission scanning electron microscopy with Energy Disperse Spectroscopy. The hardness and wear resistance of the novel roller steel were measured. The results show that the precipitation temperatures of austenite, MC, M6C, M23C6, and ferrite are 1360, 1340, 1230, 926, and 843 °C respectively. When the specimen is quenched from 1300 °C, only MC precipitates from the matrix. At 1220 °C, MC and M2C precipitate. At 1150 °C, all of MC, M2C and M6C precipitate. Relationship between mass fraction of different phases and temperature were also simulated by Thermo-Calc. The hardness of the novel roller steel is a little lower than that of M2 steel, however, the wear resistance of the novel roller steel is a little higher than that of M2 steel with the increase of wear time.

  9. Superhard Nanocrystalline Homometallic Stainless Steel on Steel for Seamless Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tobin, Eric J.; Hafley, R. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The objective of this work is to deposit nanocrystalline stainless steel onto steel substrates (homometallic) for enhanced wear and corrosion resistance. Homometallic coatings provide superior adhesion, and it has been shown that ultrafine-grained materials exhibit the increased hardness and decreased permeability desired for protective coatings. Nanocrystals will be produced by controlling nucleation and growth and use of an ion beam during deposition by e-beam evaporation or sputtering. Phase I is depositing 31 6L nanocrystalline stainless steel onto 31 6L stainless steel substrates. These coatings exhibit hardnesses comparable to those normally obtained for ceramic coatings such ZrO2, and possess the superior adhesion of seamless, homometallic coatings. Hardening the surface with a similar material also enhances adhesion, by avoiding problems associated with thermal and lattice mismatch. So far we have deposited nanocrystalline homometallic 316L stainless steel coatings by varying the ions and the current density of the ion beams. For all deposition conditions we have produced smooth, uniform, superhard coatings. All coatings exhibit hardness of at least 200% harder than that of bulk materials. Our measurements indicate that there is a direct relationship between nanohardness and the current density of the ion beam. Stress measurements indicate that stress in the films is increasingly proportional to current density of the ion beam. TEM, XPS, and XRD results indicate that the coated layers consist of FCC structure nanocrystallites with a dimension of about 10 to 20 nm. The Ni and Mo concentration of these coating are lower than those of bulk 316L but the concentration of Cr is higher.

  10. Bearing steels in the 21. century

    SciTech Connect

    Tsubota, Kazuichi; Sato, Toshio; Kato, Yoshiyuki; Hiraoka, Kazuhiko; Hayashi, Ryoji

    1998-12-31

    Oxygen content of bearing steel will be reduced to below 3 ppm in the year 2000 if the current trend for the reduction of oxygen in the steel continues. As a result, size of oxide inclusions will become smaller and the fatigue life will be doubled. From the viewpoint of life prediction, cleanliness evaluation methods currently used are not effective. Inclusion Rating Method by Statistics of Extreme is useful for both cleanliness evaluation and fatigue life prediction. Bearings made of suitably heat treated carbon steels or low alloy steels, which possess equivalent fatigue properties to bearing steels, will increase owing to the requirement for lower cost and better formability.

  11. Optimization of the place of the plastic hinges by steel braces at RC buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hatami, Farzad; Ragheb, Mohammad; Namazi, Meysam

    2012-12-01

    Usage of steel braces has become a solution not only for retrofitting of RC structures but as a method in designing of concrete frames in recent years. Although X-braced RC frames have been number of successful studies, but eccentric braced RC frames have not been studied seriously. Maybe it's because of the non ductile behaviour of concrete beams. In this article, a numerical study was conducted to evaluate performance of concrete frames, braced with eccentric steel brace with a vertical steel shear link. Vertical steel shear link eliminated shortcomings of non ductile concrete beam. Therefore 4, 8 and 12 storey concrete frames were designed and subjected to a push over analysis. Life safety level was chose to evaluate the frames and hinges performance. Results were compared with the same frames designed with X braces and moment resisting frame. Results indicated that steel braces shift the place of plastic hinges to be formed on the bracing members instead of columns and beams. Furthermore steel braces delayed the process of formation of first plastic hinge and column failure mechanism.

  12. Reduced-activation steels: Future development for improved creep strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klueh, R. L.

    2008-08-01

    Reduced-activation steels for fusion applications were developed in the 1980s to replace the elevated-temperature commercial steels first considered. The new steels were patterned after the commercial steels, with the objective that the new steels have yield stress and ultimate tensile strength and impact toughness in a Charpy test comparable to or better than the steels they replaced. That objective was achieved in reduced-activation steels developed in Japan, Europe, and the United States. Although tensile and impact toughness of the reduced-activation steels exceed those of the commercial steels they were patterned after, their creep-rupture properties are inferior to some commercial steels they replaced. They are even more inferior to commercial steels developed since the 1980s. In this paper, compositional differences between reduced-activation steels and new commercial steels are examined, and compositions are proposed for development of new-and-improved reduced-activation steels.

  13. Beam Line VI REC-steel hybrid wiggler for SSRL

    SciTech Connect

    Hoyer, E.; Chan, T.; Chin, J.W.G.; Halbach, K.; Kim, K.J.; Winick, H.; Yang, J.

    1983-03-01

    A wiggler magnet with 27 periods, each 7 cm long which reaches 1.21 T at a 1.2 cm gap and 1.64 T at 0.8 cm gap has been designed and is in fabrication. Installation in SPEAR is scheduled for mid 1983. This new wiggler will be the radiation source for a new high intensity synchrotron radiation beam line at SSRL. The magnet utilizes rare-earth cobalt (REC) material and steel in a hybrid configuration to achieve simultaneously a high magnetic field with a short period. The magnet is external to a thin walled variable gap stainless steel vacuum chamber which is opened to provide beam aperture of 1.8 cm gap at injection and then closed to a smaller aperture (< 1.0 cm). Five independent drive systems are provided to adjust the magnet and chamber gaps and alignment. Magnetic design, construction details and magnetic measurements are presented.

  14. On-Line Measurement Of Hot Rolling Steel Bar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Chen

    1989-03-01

    A passive instrument for on-line measuring hot rolling steel bar has been developed. The instrument uses self emission of the hot steel bar to deside the profile of working piece. The instrument can measure the dimensions of the cross section of the high speed and high temperature steel bar on the production line. It can be used for real-time monitoring, evaluating, and controlling the quality of the products. Compared with other similar instrument, new instrument has following features: - Passive measurement for simplifying the structure; - Simultaneous dimension and position measurement for ensuring high accuracy; - Temperature measurement for compensating thermal error; - Solid state sensor array for raising reliability; - Special structure for running in hostile enviornment; All these features make it possible to realize accurate measurement in high temperature, high humidity, and high dusty circumstance. The paper will present and discuss relative problems in the design and construction of this instrument. A prototype has been made and a series analogue experiments have been carried out in the laboratory. Rolling shop running test approves that the instrument can accurately measure the hot rolling steel bar on the production line. The total error is less than 0.05 mm while the measuring rate is as high as 2000 samples per second.

  15. Dendritic inhomogeneity of stainless maraging steels

    SciTech Connect

    Krasnikova, S.I.; Drobot, A.V.; Shmelev, A.Y.; Vukelich, S.B.

    1986-03-01

    The authors investigated dendritic inhomogeneity in industrial ingots 630 mm (steel I) in diameter and 500 mm (steel II) in diameter. The variation in the degree of dendritic inhomogeneity was investigated over the height of the ingots and across the sections on an MS-46 microprobe. It was established that the elements can be placed in the following order in accordance with the degree of reduction in the liquation factor: titanium, molybdenum, nickel, chromium, and cobalt. Titanium and molybdenum exhibit forward liquation in both steels, and chromium in steel II. The distribution of nickel and chromium in the steel I ingots and cobalt in the steel II ingots is unconventional. Dendritic inhomogeneity, which must be considered in assigning the heat treatment for finished articles, develops during the crystallization of stainless maraging steels.

  16. STEFINS: a steel freezing integral simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Frank, M.V.

    1980-09-01

    STEFINS (STEel Freezing INtegral Simulation) is a computer program for the calculation of the rate of solidification of molten steel on solid steel. Such computations arize when investigating core melt accidents in fast reactors. In principle this problem involves a coupled two-dimensional thermal and hydraulic approach. However, by physically reasonable assumptions a decoupled approach has been developed. The transient solidification of molten steel on a cold wall is solved in the direction normal to the molten steel flow and independent from the solution for the molten steel temperature and Nusselt number along the direction of flow. The solutions to the applicable energy equations have been programmed in cylindrical and slab geometries. Internal gamma heating of steel is included.

  17. Thermal Linear Expansion of Nine Selected AISI Stainless Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-04-01

    stainless steels. The nine selected stainless steels are AISI 303, 304, 304L, 316, 317, 321, 347, 410 , and 430. The recoended values Include the...point of the stainless steels. The nine selected stainless steels are AISI 303, 304, 304L, 316, 317, 321, 347, 410 , and 430. The recommended values...Stainless Steel..................................26 8. AISI 410 Stainless Steel..................................29 9. AISI 430 Stainless Steel

  18. Structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels for superheater tubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blinov, V. M.

    2009-12-01

    The structure and properties of high-temperature austenitic steels intended for superheater tubes are analyzed. Widely used Kh18N10T (AISI 304) and Kh16N13M3 (AISI 316) steels are found not to ensure a stable austenitic structure and stable properties during long-term thermal holding under stresses. The hardening of austenitic steels by fine particles of vanadium and niobium carbides and nitrides and γ'-phase and Fe2W and Fe2Mo Laves phase intermetallics is considered. The role of Cr23C6 chromium carbides, the σ phase, and coarse precipitates of an M 3B2 phase and a boron-containing eutectic in decreasing the time to failure and the stress-rupture strength of austenitic steels is established. The mechanism of increasing the stress-rupture strength of steels by boron additions is described. The chemical compositions, mechanical properties, stress-rupture strength, and creep characteristics of Russian and foreign austenitic steels used or designed for superheater tubes intended for operation under stress conditions at temperatures above 600°C are presented. The conditions are found for increasing the strength, plasticity, and thermodeformation stability of austenite in steels intended for superheater tubes operating at 700°C under high stresses for a long time.

  19. R-Curve Approach to Describe the Fracture Resistance of Tool Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picas, Ingrid; Casellas, Daniel; Llanes, Luis

    2016-06-01

    This work addresses the events involved in the fracture of tool steels, aiming to understand the effect of primary carbides, inclusions, and the metallic matrix on their effective fracture toughness and strength. Microstructurally different steels were investigated. It is found that cracks nucleate on carbides or inclusions at stress values lower than the fracture resistance. It is experimentally evidenced that such cracks exhibit an increasing growth resistance as they progressively extend, i.e., R-curve behavior. Ingot cast steels present a rising R-curve, which implies that the effective toughness developed by small cracks is lower than that determined with long artificial cracks. On the other hand, cracks grow steadily in the powder metallurgy tool steel, yielding as a result a flat R-curve. Accordingly, effective toughness for this material is mostly independent of the crack size. Thus, differences in fracture toughness values measured using short and long cracks must be considered when assessing fracture resistance of tool steels, especially when tool performance is controlled by short cracks. Hence, material selection for tools or development of new steel grades should take into consideration R-curve concepts, in order to avoid unexpected tool failures or to optimize microstructural design of tool steels, respectively.

  20. Characterization and monitoring of cracking of steel equipment in wet H{sub 2}S service

    SciTech Connect

    Cayard, M.S.; Kane, R.D.

    1995-11-01

    The results of large-scale wet H{sub 2}S exposure tests which utilized a steel pressure vessel containing various welded test plates are presented. Effect of variables including steel base plate composition, metallurgical processing, welding, applied stress and orientation were examined. Particular attention was given to (1) large-scale behavior versus that determined for small-scale laboratory test specimens under an applied tensile stress, (2) performance of conventional carbon steels versus advanced carbon steels designed for enhanced resistance to hydrogen-induced cracking (MC), and (3) the interrelationship of stress, welding and plate orientation on the susceptibility to wet H{sub 2}S cracking. Several non-destructive evaluation (NDE) techniques were also evaluated for their ability to detect and monitor wet H{sub 2}S cracking. NDE techniques evaluated included wet fluorescent magnetic particle testing (WFMPT), manual ultrasonic testing (MUT), automated ultrasonic testing (AUT) and on-line acoustic emission testing (AET). The results of this program have (1) provided valuable insight on the role of steel quality and microstructure on the susceptibility to wet H{sub 2}S cracking, (2) demonstrated the effectiveness of various NDE techniques in detecting and monitoring cracking of carbon steel equipment exposed to wet H{sub 2}S environments and (3) provided valuable data on the residual strengths and toughnesses of steels containing extensive wet H{sub 2}S damage.

  1. Steel-surface defect detection using a switching-lighting scheme.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Yong-Ju; Choi, Doo-Chul; Lee, Sang Jun; Yun, Jong Pil; Kim, Sang Woo

    2016-01-01

    In this paper a novel filtering scheme combined with a lighting method is proposed for defect detection in steel surfaces. A steel surface has non-uniform brightness and various shaped defects, which cause difficulties in defect detection. To solve this problem we propose a sub-optimal filtering that is combined with a switching-lighting method. First, dual-light switching lighting (DLSL) is explained, which decreases the effect of non-uniformity of surface brightness and improves the detection accuracy. By using the DLSL method, defects are represented as alternated black and white patterns regardless of the size, shape, or orientation of defects. Therefore, defects can be detected by finding alternated black and white patterns. Second, we propose a scheme for detecting defects in steel-surface images acquired using the DLSL method. The presence of scales strongly affects the optical properties of the surface. Moreover, the textures of steel-plate images vary greatly because of the temperature and grade of steel. Therefore, conventional filter-design methods are not effective for different image textures. A sub-optimal scheme based on an optimized general-finite impulse-response filter is also proposed. Finally, experimental results conducted on steel-surface images from an actual steel-production line show the effectiveness of the proposed algorithm.

  2. Influence of alloying elements on corrosion resistance of low alloy steels in marine environment

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, F.I.

    1995-09-01

    Most area of the earth is ocean. Therefore, exploitation of marine resources and utilization of marine space rapidly increase in recent years. Most of marine structures, such as wharfs, oil drilling platforms, coastal bridges, airports, etc. are mainly constructed by steel. It is therefore very important to develop marine corrosion resistant steels that do not require protection and are inexpensive. In this study, a series of low alloy steels were prepared by the method of experimental design as well as conventional design to study the effects of alloying elements on the marine corrosion resistance, under consideration of the requirement of mechanical properties. All steels were cyclically dipped to synthetic sea water in the laboratory for 7 weeks or exposed in the Taichung Harbor for more than 4 years. Both test results show similar tendency of the effects of alloying elements, but the effects of fouling on pitting were only observed in the latter. Addition of phosphorus and copper can improve the general corrosion resistance in atmospheric splash zone and titanium has the same effect in sea water. Molybdenum can improve the general corrosion resistance in both splash and tidal zones and pitting resistance in tidal and submerged zones. Due to enrichment of the alloying elements in the rust resulting in development of inner dense rust layer and change of rust composition, the anti-corrosion ability of most designed steels can be enhanced in marine environment. In addition, the corrosion resistance of most tested steels is superior to plain carbon steel (A-36) and weathering steel (Acr-Ten A) in Taichung Harbor.

  3. A comparison of low-chromium and high-chromium reduced-activation steels for fusion applications

    SciTech Connect

    Klueh, R.L.; Maziasz, P.J.; Alexander, D.J.

    1996-11-01

    Ferritic steels have been considered candidate structural materials for first wall and blanket structures for fusion power plants since the late 1970s. The first steels considered in the United States were the conventional Cr-Mo steels Sandvik HT9 (nominally 12Cr-1Mo-0.25V-0.5W-0.5Ni-0.2C, here designated l2Cr-1MoVW), modified 9Cr-1Mo steel (9Cr-1Mo-0.2V-0.06Nb-0. IC, designated 9Cr-1MoVNb) and, to a lesser extent, 2 1/4Cr-1Mo steel (2.25Cr-Mo-0.1C). All compositions are in wt. %. The normalized-and-tempered 9 and 12Cr steels had a tempered martensite microstructure, and the normalized-and-tempered 2 1/4 Cr steel had a tempered bainite microstructure. This report describes chromium steels tested in normalized and tempered conditions. Miniature tensile and Charpy specimens were tested.

  4. Comparative Structural Strength Research of Hardened Carbon Steel and Hot-Rolled Alloy Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bogomolov, A. V.; Zhakupov, A. N.; Kanayev, A. T.; Sikach, I. A.; Tugumov, K. K.

    2016-08-01

    Experiments on quantitative evaluation of fatigue strength showed that St5ps and St5sp carbon steels with A400 strength class can be fully applied for erection of constructions and buildings having cyclical loads during operation. Study of corrosion resistance of hardened carbon steel in comparison with hot-rolled alloy steel consists in difference in structures and hence, difference in intensity of electric and chemical processes featuring presence of steel in concrete. Structure of St5sp steel with A400 strength class in surface area has significantly less corrosion rate than ferritic-perlitic structure of 35GS steel with A400 strength class.

  5. SQA(TM): Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar Program

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Tzyy-Shuh; Shi, Jianjun; Zhou, Shiyu

    2009-03-03

    OG Technologies, Inc. (OGT) has led this SQA (Surface Quality Assured Steel Bar) program to solve the major surface quality problems plaguing the US special quality steel bars and rods industry and their customers, based on crosscutting sensors and controls technologies. Surface defects in steel formed in a hot rolling process are one of the most common quality issues faced by the American steel industry, accounting for roughly 50% of the rejects or 2.5% of the total shipment. Unlike other problems such as the mechanical properties of the steel product, most surface defects are sporadic and cannot be addressed based on sampling techniques. This issue hurts the rolling industry and their customers in their process efficiency and operational costs. The goal of this program is to develop and demonstrate an SQA prototype, with synergy of HotEye® and other innovations, that enables effective rolling process control and efficient quality control. HotEye®, OGT’s invention, delivers high definition images of workpieces at or exceeding 1,450°C while the workpieces travel at 100 m/s. The elimination of surface defect rejects will be achieved through the integration of imaging-based quality assessment, advanced signal processing, predictive process controls and the integration with other quality control tools. The SQA program team, composed of entities capable of and experienced in (1) research, (2) technology manufacturing, (3) technology sales and marketing, and (4) technology end users, is very strong. There were 5 core participants: OGT, Georgia Institute of Technology (GIT), University of Wisconsin (UW), Charter Steel (Charter) and ArcelorMittal Indiana Harbor (Inland). OGT served as the project coordinator. OGT participated in both research and commercialization. GIT and UW provided significant technical inputs to this SQA project. The steel mills provided access to their rolling lines for data collection, design of experiments, host of technology test and

  6. A Numerical Investigation of CFRP-Steel Interfacial Failure with Material Point Method

    SciTech Connect

    Shen Luming; Faleh, Haydar; Al-Mahaidi, Riadh

    2010-05-21

    The success of retrofitting steel structures by using the Carbon Fibre Reinforced Polymers (CFRP) significantly depends on the performance and integrity of CFRP-steel joint and the effectiveness of the adhesive used. Many of the previous numerical studies focused on the design and structural performance of the CFRP-steel system and neglected the mechanical responses of adhesive layer, which results in the lack of understanding in how the adhesive layer between the CFRP and steel performs during the loading and failure stages. Based on the recent observation on the failure of CFRP-steel bond in the double lap shear tests, a numerical approach is proposed in this study to simulate the delamination process of CFRP sheet from steel plate using the Material Point Method (MPM). In the proposed approach, an elastoplasticity model with a linear hardening and softening law is used to model the epoxy layer. The MPM, which does not employ fixed mesh-connectivity, is employed as a robust spatial discretization method to accommodate the multi-scale discontinuities involved in the CFRP-steel bond failure process. To demonstrate the potential of the proposed approach, a parametric study is conducted to investigate the effects of bond length and loading rates on the capacity and failure modes of CFRP-steel system. The evolution of the CFRP-steel bond failure and the distribution of stress and strain along bond length direction will be presented. The simulation results not only well match the available experimental data but also provide a better understanding on the physics behind the CFRP sheet delamination process.

  7. [Radioactivity monitoring of steel processing in Croatian steel mills and foundries].

    PubMed

    Sofilić, Tahir; Marjanović, Tihana; Rastovcan-Mioc, Alenka

    2006-03-01

    The last twenty years have seen a number of cases of radioactive pollution in metallurgical industry. Therefore many metal producers have implemented systematic monitoring of radioactivity in their production processes, especially in steel processing, steel being the most applied construction material with the annual world output of over billion tonnes. Learning from the experience of the best known steel producers in Europe and the world Croatian steel mills have introduced radioactivity surveillance and control systems for radioactive elements in steel scrap, semi-finished and finished products. This paper argues in favour of radioactivity surveillance and control systems in steel and steel castings production in Croatia, and describes current systems and solutions available. Since we lack our own standards and regulations to control both domestic and imported steel scrap, semi-finished products (crude steel, hot and cold rolled strip) and finished products, we need to start implementing radioactivity surveillance and control systems in our steel and steel castings production applying the current international recommendations and guidelines, until we build up our own monitoring system and adopt legislation on the national level. This paper gives an overview of the basic types of radioactivity surveillance and control systems, the most frequent requirements to be met, as well as of the measurement and information flow in their application in steel and steel castings production.

  8. 1. GENERAL OFFICE BUILDING FOR THE HOMESTEAD WORKS, DESIGNED BY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. GENERAL OFFICE BUILDING FOR THE HOMESTEAD WORKS, DESIGNED BY HOFFMAN & CRUMPTON OF PITTSBURGH. THE BUILDING WAS DESIGNED TO SHOWCASE THE ARCHITECTURAL POSSIBILITIES OF STEEL. - U.S. Steel Homestead Works, Auxiliary Buildings & Shops, Along Monongahela River, Homestead, Allegheny County, PA

  9. Mechanism and estimation of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR environments.

    SciTech Connect

    Chopra, O. K.; Energy Technology

    2002-08-01

    The ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code provides rules for the construction of nuclear power plant components. Figures I-9.1 through I-9.6 of Appendix I to Section III of the Code specify fatigue design curves for structural materials. However, the effects of light water reactor (LWR) coolant environments are not explicitly addressed by the Code design curves. Existing fatigue strain-vs.-life ({var_epsilon}-N) data illustrate potentially significant effects of LWR coolant environments on the fatigue resistance of pressure vessel and piping steels. This report provides an overview of fatigue crack initiation in austenitic stainless steels in LWR coolant environments. The existing fatigue {var_epsilon}-N data have been evaluated to establish the effects of key material, loading, and environmental parameters (such as steel type, strain range, strain rate, temperature, dissolved-oxygen level in water, and flow rate) on the fatigue lives of these steels. Statistical models are presented for estimating the fatigue {var_epsilon}-N curves for austenitic stainless steels as a function of the material, loading, and environmental parameters. Two methods for incorporating environmental effects into the ASME Code fatigue evaluations are presented. The influence of reactor environments on the mechanism of fatigue crack initiation in these steels is also discussed.

  10. Graded High-Strength Spring-Steels by a Special Inductive Heat T reatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tump, A.; Brandt, R.

    2016-03-01

    A method for effective lightweight design is the use of materials with high specific strength. As materials e.g. titanium are very expensive, steel is still the most important material for manufacturing automotive components. Steel is cost efficient, easy to recycle and its tensile strength easily exceeds 2,000 MPa by means of modern QT-technology (Quenched and Tempered). Therefore, lightweight design is still feasible in spite of the high density of steel. However, a further increase of tensile strength is limited, especially due to an increasing notch sensitivity and exposure to a corrosive environment. One solution is a special QT-process for steel, which creates a hardness gradient from the surface to the core of the material. This type of tailored material possesses a softer layer, which improves material properties such as fracture toughness and notch sensitivity. This leads to a better resistance to stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue. Due to this optimization, a weight reduction is feasible without the use of expensive alloying elements. To understand the damage mechanism a comprehensive testing procedure was performed on homogeneous and gradient steels. Some results regarding the fracture mechanic behavior of such steels will be discussed.

  11. Seismic behavior of outrigger truss-wall shear connections using multiple steel angles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xian; Wang, Wei; Lü, Henglin; Zhang, Guangchang

    2016-06-01

    An experimental investigation on the seismic behavior of a type of outrigger truss-reinforced concrete wall shear connection using multiple steel angles is presented. Six large-scale shear connection models, which involved a portion of reinforced concrete wall and a shear tab welded onto a steel endplate with three steel angles, were constructed and tested under combined actions of cyclic axial load and eccentric shear. The effects of embedment lengths of steel angles, wall boundary elements, types of anchor plates, and thicknesses of endplates were investigated. The test results indicate that properly detailed connections exhibit desirable seismic behavior and fail due to the ductile fracture of steel angles. Wall boundary elements provide beneficial confinement to the concrete surrounding steel angles and thus increase the strength and stiffness of connections. Connections using whole anchor plates are prone to suffer concrete pry-out failure while connections with thin endplates have a relatively low strength and fail due to large inelastic deformations of the endplates. The current design equations proposed by Chinese Standard 04G362 and Code GB50011 significantly underestimate the capacities of the connection models. A revised design method to account for the influence of previously mentioned test parameters was developed.

  12. Microstructure and Mechanical Properties of HSLA-100 Steel

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    13 Figure 4. High Strength Bainite Strength Components .................... 20 Figure 5. Bainitic Steel Tempering and DBTT ...21 Figure 6. Tempered Bainite Steel Yield Stress and DBTT .................. 21 Figure 7. HSLA-100 Steel Yield Strength versus Aging...Energy at -84°C ............... 31 Figure 14. HSLA-100 Steel Lot GQH DBTT ............................ 31 Figure 15. HSLA-100 Steel Lot GQH Ductility

  13. Selection of rolling-element bearing steels for long-life application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, E. V.

    1986-01-01

    Nearly four decades of research in bearing steel metallurgy and processing have resulted in improvements in bearing life by a factor of 100 over that obtained in the early 1940's. For critical applications such as aircraft, these improvements have resulted in longer lived, more reliable commercial aircraft engines. Material factors such as hardness, retained austenite, grain size and carbide size, number, and area can influence rolling-element fatigue life. Bearing steel processing such as double vacuum melting can have a greater efect on bearing life than material chemistry. The selection and specification of a bearing steel is dependent on the integration of all these considerations into the bearing design and application. The paper reviews rolling-element fatigue data and analysis which can enable the engineer or metallurgist to select a rolling-element bearing steel for critical applications where long life is required.

  14. Evaluation of silver-coated stainless steel bipolar plates for fuel cell applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Ing-Bang

    In this study, computer-aided design and manufacturing (CAD/CAM) technology were applied to develop and produce stainless steel bipolar plates for DMFC (direct methanol fuel cell). Effect of surface modification on the cell performance of DMFC was investigated. Surface modifications of the stainless steel bipolar plates were made by the electroless plating method. A DMFC consisting of silver coated stainless steel as anode and uncoated stainless steel as cathode was assembled and evaluated. The methanol crossover rate (R c) of the proton exchange membrane (PEM) was decreased by about 52.8%, the efficiency (E f) of DMFC increased about 7.1% and amounts of methanol electro-oxidation at the cathode side (M co) were decreased by about 28.6%, as compared to uncoated anode polar plates. These measurements were determined by the transient current and mathematical analysis.

  15. Corrosion resistance and microstructure of nitrogen plasma source ion implanted bearing steel

    SciTech Connect

    Mente, K.; Baum, C.; Wang, W.; Zhang, L.; Booske, J.; Shohet, J.L.; Jacobs, J.; Freeman, D.; Perez-Albuerne, E.A.

    1996-12-31

    Feasibility of plasma source ion implantation (PSII) treatments for metal corrosion protection of bearing steel in humid environments has been investigated, following successful results with aluminum alloy. The bearing steel coupons have been treated by nitrogen PSII with a statistically designed range of processing conditions, including stage bias implant voltage, and dose. Corrosion properties of the implanted samples were tested using aerated distilled water (72, 168, and 720 hours), 90 F, 90% RH air (24, 120, 816, and 1,464 hours), and a nitric acid soak. The results are compared favorably with 400 C stainless steel, and 52100 steel with nitrogen and argon recoil-implanted chromium. Evidence is seen for an optimal process contour (low voltage-high dose; high voltage-low dose). Results from microstructure analysis will also be presented.

  16. Effects of Manufacturing Processes and In-Service Temperature Variations on the Properties of TRIP Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, Xin; Stephens, Elizabeth V.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.

    2007-04-30

    This paper examines key aspects of the manufacturing process that “Transformation Induced Plasticity” (TRIP) steels would be exposed to, and systematically evaluate how the forming and thermal histories affect final strength and ductility of the material. The paper evaluates in-service temperature variations, such as under hood and hot/cold cyclic conditions, to determine whether these conditions influence final strength, ductility and energy absorption characteristics of several available TRIP steel grades. As part of the manufacturing thermal environment evaluations, stamping process thermal histories are included in the studies. As part of the in-service conditions, different pre-straining levels are also included. Materials from four steel suppliers world wide are examined. The material properties are established over a full range of expected thermal histories and selected loading modes. Establishing these relationships will allow OEM designers to select TRIP steels for proper vehicle applications, and to specify manufacturing process conditions that yield reliable final material property levels.

  17. Bulk Nanostructured FCC Steels With Enhanced Radiation Tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xinghang; Hartwig, K. Ted; Allen, Todd; Yang, Yong

    2012-10-27

    The objective of this project is to increase radiation tolerance in austenitic steels through optimization of grain size and grain boundary (GB) characteristics. The focus will be on nanocrystalline austenitic Fe-Cr-Ni alloys with an fcc crystal structure. The long-term goal is to design and develop bulk nanostructured austenitic steels with enhanced void swelling resistance and substantial ductility, and to enhance their creep resistance at elevated temperatures via GB engineering. The combination of grain refinement and grain boundary engineering approaches allows us to tailor the material strength, ductility, and resistance to swelling by 1) changing the sink strength for point defects, 2) by increasing the nucleation barriers for bubble formation at GBs, and 3) by changing the precipitate distributions at boundaries. Compared to ferritic/martensitic steels, austenitic stainless steels (SS) possess good creep and fatigue resistance at elevated temperatures, and better toughness at low temperature. However, a major disadvantage of austenitic SS is that they are vulnerable to significant void swelling in nuclear reactors, especially at the temperatures and doses anticipated in the Advanced Burner Reactor. The lack of resistance to void swelling in austenitic alloys led to the switch to ferritic/martensitic steels as the preferred material for the fast reactor cladding application. Recently a type of austenitic stainless steel, HT-UPS, was developed at ORNL, and is expected to show enhanced void swelling resistance through the trapping of point defects at nanometersized carbides. Reducing the grain size and increasing the fraction of low energy grain boundaries should reduce the available radiation-produced point defects (due to the increased sink area of the grain boundaries), should make bubble nucleation at the boundaries less likely (by reducing the fraction of high-energy boundaries), and improve the strength and ductility under radiation by producing a higher

  18. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths (τ (app)) and slip coefficient (β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle (ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  19. Bond characteristics of steel fiber and deformed reinforcing steel bar embedded in steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aslani, Farhad; Nejadi, Shami

    2012-09-01

    Steel fiber reinforced self-compacting concrete (SFRSCC) is a relatively new composite material which congregates the benefits of the self-compacting concrete (SCC) technology with the profits derived from the fiber addition to a brittle cementitious matrix. Steel fibers improve many of the properties of SCC elements including tensile strength, ductility, toughness, energy absorption capacity, fracture toughness and cracking. Although the available research regarding the influence of steel fibers on the properties of SFRSCC is limited, this paper investigates the bond characteristics between steel fiber and SCC firstly. Based on the available experimental results, the current analytical steel fiber pullout model (Dubey 1999) is modified by considering the different SCC properties and different fiber types (smooth, hooked) and inclination. In order to take into account the effect of fiber inclination in the pullout model, apparent shear strengths ( τ ( app)) and slip coefficient ( β) are incorporated to express the variation of pullout peak load and the augmentation of peak slip as the inclined angle increases. These variables are expressed as functions of the inclined angle ( ϕ). Furthurmore, steel-concrete composite floors, reinforced concrete floors supported by columns or walls and floors on an elastic foundations belong to the category of structural elements in which the conventional steel reinforcement can be partially replaced by the use of steel fibers. When discussing deformation capacity of structural elements or civil engineering structures manufactured using SFRSCC, one must be able to describe thoroughly both the behavior of the concrete matrix reinforced with steel fibers and the interaction between this composite matrix and discrete steel reinforcement of the conventional type. However, even though the knowledge on bond behavior is essential for evaluating the overall behavior of structural components containing reinforcement and steel fibers

  20. Longer Life for Steel Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    IC 531 is a coating manufactured and marketed by Inorganic Coatings, Inc. The coating was developed by Goddard to protect structures at Kennedy Space Center. It is a high ratio potassium silicate formula. The coating is water based, nontoxic, and nonflammable. It generates no volatile organic compounds nor hazardous chemical waste, and bonds to steel in 30 minutes. At the present time, no one can say for sure how long IC 531's effective lifetime is. Some of the original Goddard test applications of 1976 are still going strong after lengthy exposure to the Sun, salt and moisture. Says IC in company literature: 'IC 531 offers virtually permanent protection for steel. We predict it will protect structures for well beyond 25 years. If necessary, it is infinitely maintainable; if damaged, it can easily be touched up with more IC 531.'

  1. Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2004-10-01

    ITP conducted a study on energy use and potential savings, or "bandwidth" study, in major steelmaking processes. Intended to provide a realistic estimate of the potential amount of energy that can be saved in an industrial process, the "bandwidth" refers to the difference between the amount of energy that would be consumed in a process using commercially available technology versus the minimum amount of energy needed to achieve those same results based on the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The Steel Industry Energy Bandwidth Study (PDF 133 KB) also estimates steel industry energy use in the year 2010, and uses that value as a basis for comparison against the minimum requirements. This energy savings opportunity for 2010 will aid focus on longer term R&D.

  2. Light microscopy of carbon steels

    SciTech Connect

    Samuels, L.E.

    1998-12-31

    Containing over 1,200 representative micrographs and the information and explanatory text that makes them really useful: composition, condition, etchant, and magnification, and more than 100 graphs and tables, this how to book not only gives everyday working examples, but also discusses the relationship between the constitution, metallurgy, and microstructure of various carbon steel products. Written by a renowned expert in metallography, this definitive work is a must for all those working in this area. Contents include: nomenclature of phases and constituents; phase transformations; low-carbon irons and steels; annealing and normalizing; spheroidization and graphitization; austenitization; transformation of austenite; tempering of martensite; welding; surface oxidation, decarburation; and oxidation scaling; glossary of terms; etching methods; conversion tables.

  3. Welding of high chromium steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W B

    1928-01-01

    A brief description is given of different groups of high chromium steels (rustless iron and stainless steels) according to their composition and more generally accepted names. The welding procedure for a given group will be much the same regardless of the slight variations in chemical composition which may exist within a certain group. Information is given for the tensile properties (yield point and ultimate strength) of metal sheets and welds before and after annealing on coupons one and one-half inches wide. Since welds in rustless iron containing 16 to 18 percent chromium and 7 to 12 percent nickel show the best combination of strength and ductility in the 'as welded' or annealed condition, it is considered the best alloy to use for welded construction.

  4. Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2005-09-01

    The Steel Industry Marginal Opportunity Analysis (PDF 347 KB) identifies opportunities for developing advanced technologies and estimates both the necessary funding and the potential payoff. This analysis determines what portion of the energy bandwidth can be captured through the adoption of state-of-the-art technology and practices. R&D opportunities for addressing the remainder of the bandwidth are characterized and plotted on a marginal opportunity curve.

  5. Nano-composite stainless steel

    DOEpatents

    Dehoff, Ryan R.; Blue, Craig A.; Peter, William H.; Chen, Wei; Aprigliano, Louis F.

    2015-07-14

    A composite stainless steel composition is composed essentially of, in terms of wt. % ranges: 25 to 28 Cr; 11 to 13 Ni; 7 to 8 W; 3.5 to 4 Mo; 3 to 3.5 B; 2 to 2.5 Mn; 1 to 1.5 Si; 0.3 to 1.7 C; up to 2 O; balance Fe. The composition has an austenitic matrix phase and a particulate, crystalline dispersed phase.

  6. A study of Damascus steel

    SciTech Connect

    Berge, P.

    1995-02-16

    The Damascus sword has been an article of fascination for many years to blade collectors and metallurgists alike. The blades were given their name by Europeans who encountered these blades which originated from Damascus, Syria. They are best known for the appearance of the blade face. Genuine Damascus blades show swirling patterns of alternating light and dark regions which are due to the microstructure of the steel. The microstructure consists of arrays of well rounded cementite patterns in a matrix of either pearlite, bainite, or martensite. When this structure is etched the matrix will turn dark leaving the cementite particles light. Although many blades were produced over the centuries, while some of the process is known the making of a genuine Damascus blade today is generally considered a lost art. Many scientists have studied the subject in an attempt to understand the complex process by which the clustered arrays of cementite particles develop in the steel blades. The most prominent theories to date are presented in the General Introduction to this thesis. The thesis is divided into four main parts. In the first part, four proposed mechanisms of cementite cluster sheet formation as they relate to the banding theory are introduced. Experiments to investigate these mechanisms are presented. In Part II, collaborative research focused on the methodology of the reconstructed process for making Damascus steel is presented. In the third part, a study into the graphitization of the reconstructed blades is presented. In Part IV, experimental attempts at producing Damascus steel ingots in the laboratory are presented.

  7. Phase Transformations in Cast Duplex Stainless Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Yoon-Jun

    2004-01-01

    Duplex stainless steels (DSS) constitute both ferrite and austenite as a matrix. Such a microstructure confers a high corrosion resistance with favorable mechanical properties. However, intermetallic phases such as σ and χ can also form during casting or high-temperature processing and can degrade the properties of the DSS. This research was initiated to develop time-temperature-transformation (TTT) and continuous-cooling-transformation (CCT) diagrams of two types of cast duplex stainless steels, CD3MN (Fe-22Cr-5Ni-Mo-N) and CD3MWCuN (Fe-25Cr-7Ni-Mo-W-Cu-N), in order to understand the time and temperature ranges for intermetallic phase formation. The alloys were heat treated isothermally or under controlled cooling conditions and then characterized using conventional metallographic methods that included tint etching, and also using electron microscopy (SEM, TEM) and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS). The kinetics of intermetallic-phase (σ + χ) formation were analyzed using the Johnson-Mehl-Avrami (MA) equation in the case of isothermal transformations and a modified form of this equation in the case of continuous cooling transformations. The rate of intermetallic-phase formation was found to be much faster in CD3MWCuN than CD3MN due mainly to differences in the major alloying contents such as Cr, Ni and Mo. To examine in more detail the effects of these elements of the phase stabilities; a series of eight steel castings was designed with the Cr, Ni and Mo contents systematically varied with respect to the nominal composition of CD3MN. The effects of varying the contents of alloying additions on the formation of intermetallic phases were also studied computationally using the commercial thermodynamic software package, Thermo-Calc. In general, σ was stabilized with increasing Cr addition and χ by increasing Mo addition. However, a delicate balance among Ni and other minor elements such as N and Si also exists. Phase equilibria in DSS can be affected by

  8. Preparation and characterization of 304 stainless steel/Q235 carbon steel composite material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wenning; Feng, Lajun; Feng, Hui; Cao, Ying; Liu, Lei; Cao, Mo; Ge, Yanfeng

    The composite material of 304 stainless steel reinforced Q235 carbon steel has been prepared by modified hot-rolling process. The resulted material was characterized by scanning electron microscope, three-electrode method, fault current impact method, electrochemical potentiodynamic polarization curve measurement and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that metallurgical bond between the stainless steel layer and carbon steel substrate has been formed. The composite material exhibited good electrical conductivity and thermal stability. The average grounding resistance of the composite material was about 13/20 of dip galvanized steel. There has no surface crack and bubbling formed after fault current impact. The composite material led to a significant decrease in the corrosion current density in soil solution, compared with that of hot dip galvanized steel and bare carbon steel. On the basis polarization curve and EIS analyses, it can be concluded that the composite material showed improved anti-corrosion property than hot-dip galvanized steel.

  9. 77 FR 67400 - RG Steel Wheeling, LLC, a Division of RG Steel, LLC, Doing Business as Wheeling Corrugating...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-09

    ... Employment and Training Administration RG Steel Wheeling, LLC, a Division of RG Steel, LLC, Doing Business as..., 2012, applicable to workers of RG Steel Wheeling, LLC, a division of RG Steel, LLC, doing business as... RG Steel, LLC, doing business as Wheeling Corrugating Company, Beech Bottom, West Virginia,...

  10. Nickel: makes stainless steel strong

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Boland, Maeve A.

    2012-01-01

    Nickel is a silvery-white metal that is used mainly to make stainless steel and other alloys stronger and better able to withstand extreme temperatures and corrosive environments. Nickel was first identified as a unique element in 1751 by Baron Axel Fredrik Cronstedt, a Swedish mineralogist and chemist. He originally called the element kupfernickel because it was found in rock that looked like copper (kupfer) ore and because miners thought that "bad spirits" (nickel) in the rock were making it difficult for them to extract copper from it. Approximately 80 percent of the primary (not recycled) nickel consumed in the United States in 2011 was used in alloys, such as stainless steel and superalloys. Because nickel increases an alloy's resistance to corrosion and its ability to withstand extreme temperatures, equipment and parts made of nickel-bearing alloys are often used in harsh environments, such as those in chemical plants, petroleum refineries, jet engines, power generation facilities, and offshore installations. Medical equipment, cookware, and cutlery are often made of stainless steel because it is easy to clean and sterilize. All U.S. circulating coins except the penny are made of alloys that contain nickel. Nickel alloys are increasingly being used in making rechargeable batteries for portable computers, power tools, and hybrid and electric vehicles. Nickel is also plated onto such items as bathroom fixtures to reduce corrosion and provide an attractive finish.

  11. Materials design - An undergraduate course

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, G. B.

    1991-01-01

    General principles of systems engineering are applied to the design of materials to meet specific performance objectives. Results of ongoing reseach on processing/structure and structure/property relations in ultrahigh-strength steels are used to illustrate the formulation of quantitative microstructural objectives to achieve required property combinations, and the computer thermodynamics-based design of compositions responding to prescribed processing conditions. A class project addresses the conceptual design of a 7-component stainless bearing steel for a critical Space Shuttle application.

  12. Dosimetric evaluation of hybrid brass/stainless-steel apertures for proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hao; Matysiak, Witold; Flampouri, Stella; Slopsema, Roelf; Li, Zuofeng

    2014-09-01

    In passive scattering proton therapy, patient specific collimators (apertures) are used to laterally shape the proton beam, and compensators are employed to distally conform proton dose to the target. Brass is a commonly used material for apertures and recently a hybrid brass/stainless-steel (BR/SST) aperture design has been introduced to reduce treatment cost without clinical flow change. We measured stopping power and leakage dose for apertures made of stainless steel and brass in the Proton Therapy system. The linear stopping power ratios for stainless steel (type 304) and brass to water were calculated to be 5.46 and 5.51, respectively. Measured stopping power ratios of SST and BR were 5.51  ±  0.04 and 5.56  ±  0.08, respectively, which agrees with the calculated values within 1%. Leakage dose on the downstream surface of two slabs of Ø18 cm stainless steel apertures (total thickness of 6.5 cm) for the maximum available proton energy (235 MeV) was 1.283% ± 0.004% of the prescription dose, and was smaller compared to the 1.358% ± 0.005% leakage dose measured for existing brass apertures of identical physical dimensions. Therefore, the existing beam range limits for brass aperture slabs used at our institution with safety margin allowances for material composition and delivered beam range uncertainties can be safely applied for the new BR/SST aperture design. Potential range differences in the brass and stainless steel interface regions of the hybrid design were further investigated using EBT3 GafChromic film. Film dosimetry revealed no discernible range variations across the brass and stainless steel interface regions. Neutron dose to the patient from brass and stainless steel apertures was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that stainless steel produces similar patient neutron dose compared to brass. Material activation dose rates of stainless steel were measured over a period of 7 d after irradiation. The

  13. Dosimetric evaluation of hybrid brass/stainless-steel apertures for proton therapy.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hao; Matysiak, Witold; Flampouri, Stella; Slopsema, Roelf; Li, Zuofeng

    2014-09-07

    In passive scattering proton therapy, patient specific collimators (apertures) are used to laterally shape the proton beam, and compensators are employed to distally conform proton dose to the target. Brass is a commonly used material for apertures and recently a hybrid brass/stainless-steel (BR/SST) aperture design has been introduced to reduce treatment cost without clinical flow change. We measured stopping power and leakage dose for apertures made of stainless steel and brass in the Proton Therapy system. The linear stopping power ratios for stainless steel (type 304) and brass to water were calculated to be 5.46 and 5.51, respectively. Measured stopping power ratios of SST and BR were 5.51  ±  0.04 and 5.56  ±  0.08, respectively, which agrees with the calculated values within 1%. Leakage dose on the downstream surface of two slabs of Ø18 cm stainless steel apertures (total thickness of 6.5 cm) for the maximum available proton energy (235 MeV) was 1.283% ± 0.004% of the prescription dose, and was smaller compared to the 1.358% ± 0.005% leakage dose measured for existing brass apertures of identical physical dimensions. Therefore, the existing beam range limits for brass aperture slabs used at our institution with safety margin allowances for material composition and delivered beam range uncertainties can be safely applied for the new BR/SST aperture design. Potential range differences in the brass and stainless steel interface regions of the hybrid design were further investigated using EBT3 GafChromic film. Film dosimetry revealed no discernible range variations across the brass and stainless steel interface regions. Neutron dose to the patient from brass and stainless steel apertures was simulated using the Monte Carlo method. The results indicate that stainless steel produces similar patient neutron dose compared to brass. Material activation dose rates of stainless steel were measured over a period of 7 d after irradiation. The

  14. Recycling steel. Conducting a waste audit.

    PubMed

    Crawford, G

    1996-01-01

    This is the second in a series of three articles regarding steel can recycling from foodservice operations of healthcare facilities. This article highlights the basic methods of recycling steel cans, and includes information on conducting a waste audit and negotiating with a hauler regarding the benefits of recycling. The previous article discussed how steel is recycled across the country. The next article will convey a case history of actual foodservice recycling practice from a healthcare facility.

  15. Nonmetallic Inclusions in HSLA Steel Weldments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    lowering the DBTT . Nickel prevents the hot shortness phenomenon often observed in copper-bearing steels . Nickel is also an austenite stabilizer. By lowering... STEEL WELDMENTS by Brent A. Douglas December, 1989 Thesis Advisor Alan G. Fox Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. 90 ,-. S...ACCESSION NO. II. TITLE (Incude Security Claw fication) Nonmetallic Inclusions In HSLA Steel Weldments IZ. PERSONAL AUTHOR(S) Douglas, Brent A. 138

  16. Evaluation of the Benefits of HSLA Steels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-01

    quenched and tempered steels , such as HY80 and HY1OO, require preheat and interpass temperature controls during welding of plates thicker than 1/2 inch...interpass tempera- tures and heat input limitations. Strict adherence to these requirements is mandatory to avoid cracking in hydrogen- sensitive steels ...requirement and excellent weldability of this steel will probably lower produc- tion costs and cracking -related repairs enough to overcome the slight

  17. Fire Behaviour of Structural Steel - Code vs. Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrina, Tudor

    2016-10-01

    This article shows part of the results of a complex research on the behaviour of steel beam-to-column end-plate connections under the fire action. In the paper, a parallel between a computation made with the help of a computer model, based on the prescriptions of the European design code EN 1993 and experimental tests conducted on real scale substructures is presented. The main goal of this work is to find the difference, in terms of strength and mode of failure, between the European design code and the experimental situation in the testing facility.

  18. MECHANISTIC UNDERSTANDING OF CAUSTIC CRACKING OF CARBON STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia-Diaz, B.; Roy, A.

    2009-10-19

    Liquid waste generated by the PUREX process for separation of nuclear materials is concentrated and stored in Type IV single-shell carbon steel tanks at the Savannah River Site (SRS). The Type IV tanks for this waste do not have cooling coils and have not undergone heat treatment to stress-relieve the tanks. After the waste is concentrated by evaporation, it becomes very alkaline and can cause stress corrosion cracking (SCC) and pitting corrosion of the tank materials. SRS has experienced leakage from non-stress-relieved waste tanks constructed of A285 carbon steel and pitting of A212 carbon steel tanks in the vapor space. An investigation of tank materials has been undertaken at SRS to develop a basic understanding of caustic SCC of A285 and A212 grade carbon steels exposed to aqueous solutions, primarily containing sodium hydroxide (NaOH), sodium nitrate (NaNO{sub 3}), and sodium nitrite (NaNO{sub 2}) at temperatures relevant to the operating conditions of both the F and H area plants. This report presents the results of this corrosion testing program. Electrochemical tests were designed using unstressed coupons in a simulated tank environment. The purpose of this testing was to determine the corrosion susceptibility of the tank materials as a function of chemical concentration, pH, and temperature. A285 and A516 (simulates A212 carbon steel) coupons were used to investigate differences in the corrosion of these carbon steels. Electrochemical testing included measurement of the corrosion potential and polarization resistance as well as cyclic potentiodynamic polarization (CPP) testing of coupons. From the CPP experiments, corrosion characteristics were determined including: corrosion potential (E{sub corr}), pitting or breakdown potential (E{sub pit}), and repassivation potential (E{sub prot}). CPP results showed no indications of localized corrosion, such as pitting, and all samples showed the formation of a stable passive layer as evidenced by the positive

  19. Stress Ratio Effect on Ratcheting Behavior of AISI 4340 Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Divya Bharathi, K.; Dutta, K.

    2016-02-01

    Ratcheting is known as accumulation of plastic strain during asymmetric cyclic loading of metallic materials under non-zero mean stress. This phenomenon reduces fatigue life of engineering materials and thus limits the life prediction capacity of Coffin-Manson relationship. This study intends to investigate the ratcheting behavior in AISI 4340 steel which is mainly used for designing of railway wheel sets, axles, shafts, aircraft components and other machinery parts. The effect of stress ratio on the ratcheting behaviour in both annealed and normalised conditions were investigated for investigated steel. Ratcheting tests were done at different stress ratios of -0.4, -0.6 and -0.8. The results showed that the material responds to hardening behavior and nature of strain accumulation is dependent on the magnitude of stress ratio. The post ratcheted samples showed increase in tensile strength and hardness which increases with increasing stress ratio and these variations in tensile properties are correlated with the induced cyclic hardening.

  20. Precipitation sequence in niobium-alloyed ferritic stainless steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Nobuhiro; Bhadeshia, H. K. D. H.; Kikuchi, Masao

    2004-03-01

    Niobium is an important alloying element in the design of heat-resistant ferritic stainless steels for automotive exhaust systems. When in solid solution, it improves both the high temperature strength and the resistance to thermal fatigue. However, it also forms several kinds of precipitates during service. These reactions have been modelled, taking into account the multicomponent nature of the diffusion process and allowing for capillarity effects. It has been possible to estimate not only the volume fractions but also the particle sizes for Fe2Nb (Laves phase) and Fe3Nb3C (M6C) carbide in a 19Cr-0.8Nb steel, with good agreement against experimental data.

  1. Residual ferrite formation in 12CrODS steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukai, S.; Kudo, Y.; Wu, X.; Oono, N.; Hayashi, S.; Ohtsuka, S.; Kaito, T.

    2014-12-01

    Increasing Cr content from 9 to 12 mass% leads to superior corrosion and high-temperature oxidation resistances, and usually changes microstructure from martensite to a ferrite. To make transformable martensitic type of 12CrODS steels that have superior processing capability by using α/γ phase transformation, alloy design was conducted through varying nickel content. The structure of 12CrODS steels was successfully modified from full ferrite to a transformable martensite-base matrix containing ferrite. This ferrite consists of both equilibrium ferrite and a metastable residual ferrite. It was shown that the fraction of the equilibrium ferrite is predictable by computed phase diagram and formation of the residual ferrite was successfully evaluated through pinning of α/γ interfacial boundaries by oxide particles.

  2. Milling and Drilling Evaluation of Stainless Steel Powder Metallurgy Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Lazarus, L.J.

    2001-12-10

    Near-net-shape components can be made with powder metallurgy (PM) processes. Only secondary operations such as milling and drilling are required to complete these components. In the past and currently production components are made from powder metallurgy (PM) stainless steel alloys. process engineers are unfamiliar with the difference in machining properties of wrought versus PM alloys and have had to make parts to develop the machining parameters. Design engineers are not generally aware that some PM alloy variations can be furnished with machining additives that greatly increase tool life. Specimens from a MANTEC PM alloy property study were made available. This study was undertaken to determine the machining properties of a number of stainless steel wrought and PM alloys under the same conditions so that comparisons of their machining properties could be made and relative tool life determined.

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-05-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  4. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Borated Stainless Steel Alloys

    SciTech Connect

    lister, tedd e; Mizia, Ronald E

    2007-09-01

    The Department of Energy Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management has specified borated stainless steel manufactured to the requirements of ASTM A 887-89, Grade A, UNS S30464, to be the material used for the fabrication of the fuel basket internals of the preliminary transportation, aging, and disposal canister system preliminary design. The long-term corrosion resistance performance of this class of borated materials must be verified when exposed to expected YMP repository conditions after a waste package breach. Electrochemical corrosion tests were performed on crevice corrosion coupons of Type 304 B4 and Type 304 B5 borated stainless steels exposed to single postulated in-package chemistry at 60°C. The results show low corrosion rates for the test period

  5. Pulsed Magnetic Welding for Advanced Core and Cladding Steel

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Guoping; Yang, Yong

    2013-12-19

    To investigate a solid-state joining method, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW), for welding the advanced core and cladding steels to be used in Generation IV systems, with a specific application for fuel pin end-plug welding. As another alternative solid state welding technique, pulsed magnetic welding (PMW) has not been extensively explored on the advanced steels. The resultant weld can be free from microstructure defects (pores, non-metallic inclusions, segregation of alloying elements). More specifically, the following objectives are to be achieved: 1. To design a suitable welding apparatus fixture, and optimize welding parameters for repeatable and acceptable joining of the fuel pin end-plug. The welding will be evaluated using tensile tests for lap joint weldments and helium leak tests for the fuel pin end-plug; 2 Investigate the microstructural and mechanical properties changes in PMW weldments of proposed advanced core and cladding alloys; 3. Simulate the irradiation effects on the PWM weldments using ion irradiation.

  6. Bending Properties of Al-Steel and Steel-Steel Composite Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Judith A.; Vendra, Lakshmi J.; Rabiei, Afsaneh

    2010-11-01

    The performance of new composite metal foams (CMFs) under bending was evaluated with simultaneous acoustic emission (AE) monitoring on samples processed by cast and powder metallurgy (PM) techniques. The results showed high maximum strength in all samples up to 86 MPa with more ductile failure in PM samples. Acoustic emission behavior confirmed that the dominating failure mechanism of cast CMF is the brittle fracture of intermetallic phases that mostly exist at the interface of the steel spheres with the aluminum matrix, whereas in PM samples (100 pct steel), the failure is governed by the propagation of preexisting microporosities in the matrix resulting in a complete ductile failure. SEM imaging of the fracture surfaces supported these findings.

  7. Modified 43XX Steels for High Toughness

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-01

    AL AMMRC TR 80-20 MODIFIED 43XX STEELS FOR HIGH TOUGHNESS T CS.,•, °x ,•, o o,,o,,,sD T I W4 AftELECTE APRIL 1980 J N.J. Kar, V.F. Zackay and E.R...carried out. Isohra tasomions in these steels resulted inn bbaainni 11-v DI FOR Z 47 RITIOW OF I NOV695 IS OBSOLETE UCASFE SECURITY UCLASSIFIEDINOFTI PAGE...this investigation for Si-modified AISI 4330 steel appear to be superior to those for unmodified AISI 4340 and 300-M steels , whilst the strength-tough

  8. Fracture Characteristics of Structural Steels and Weldments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-11-01

    constrctionTECHNICAL REPORT`M.170 engineringNovember 1975 research laboratory FRACTURE CHARACTERISTICS OF STRUCTURAL STEELS AND WELDMENTS by J...microscope structure steel steel weldments 2 0. AUS51RA.Y’ Ztiu is~~g e ".C f ,e owl mod Idwisf~yb 6405 ". b mbef This5 tepof I p)wnh~t tlie tiIodings...CLALUVICA1IOli Of UAE(.0’ LINCLASSTFI~n SECURITY CLASSIFICATION Of THIS PAQE(1h.M Data EntWOO4 The hydrogen-enibrittled, high-strength steels exhibited

  9. Corrosion of stainless steel, 2. edition

    SciTech Connect

    Sedriks, A.J.

    1996-10-01

    The book describes corrosion characteristics in all the major and minor groups of stainless steels, namely, in austenitic, ferritic, martensitic, duplex, and precipitation hardenable steels. Several chapters are spent on those special forms of corrosion that are investigated in the great detail in stainless steels, namely, pitting corrosion, crevice corrosion, and stress corrosion cracking. The influences of thermal treatment (heat affected zone cases), composition, and microstructure on corrosion are given good coverage. Corrosive environments include high temperature oxidation, sulfidation as well as acids, alkalis, various different petroleum plant environments, and even human body fluids (stainless steels are commonly used prosthetic materials).

  10. Recycling steel automatically -- through resource recovery

    SciTech Connect

    Crawford, G.L.

    1996-12-31

    More than three-fourths of the operating resource recovery plants magnetically separate steel cans and other discarded steel items either pre- or post-combustion. This last year, 121 resource recovery facilities combusted about 14% of the solid waste for communities across the US. Automatic recycling of steel clearly reduces the post-combustion material that is landfilled and heightens the facilities environmental performance through tangible recycling achievement. Even though about one out of every six steel cans is recycled automatically through resource recovery, not many people are aware of automatic recycling of steel cans through resource recovery. How many people know that their local resource recovery plant is insuring that virtually all of their food, beverage and general purpose cans--including paint and aerosol--are being recycled so easily and efficiently? Magnetic separation at resource recovery facilities is a fundamentally simple and desirable method of diverting what would otherwise be relegated as solid waste to the landfill. It should be recognized as an increasingly important and valued part of the resource recovery and steel industries overall recycling efforts. This paper will provide the latest information on steel recycled automatically from resource recovery facilities within the total context of all recycling accomplished annually by the steel industry. Most important, recommendations are provided for building public awareness of the automatic steel recycling contribution made so solidly by resource recovery facilities.

  11. 30. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HEARTH FURNACE CHARGING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HEARTH FURNACE CHARGING CREW, 1910. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Colletion, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  12. 37. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HOUSE INSIDE PLANT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    37. Photocopy of photograph. STEEL PLANT, OPEN HOUSE INSIDE PLANT AT TIME OF ITS OPENING, 1910. (From the Bethlehem Steel Corporation Collection, Seattle, WA) - Irondale Iron & Steel Plant, Port Townsend, Jefferson County, WA

  13. North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    North and west facades of crucible steel building; looking southeast - Bethlehem Steel Corporation, South Bethlehem Works, Crucible Steel Plant, Along Lehigh River, North of Fourth Street, West of Minsi Trail Bridge, Bethlehem, Northampton County, PA

  14. Optimization and testing results of Zr-bearing ferritic steels

    SciTech Connect

    Tan, Lizhen; Yang, Ying; Tyburska-Puschel, Beata; Sridharan, K.

    2014-09-01

    The mission of the Nuclear Energy Enabling Technologies (NEET) program is to develop crosscutting technologies for nuclear energy applications. Advanced structural materials with superior performance at elevated temperatures are always desired for nuclear reactors, which can improve reactor economics, safety margins, and design flexibility. They benefit not only new reactors, including advanced light water reactors (LWRs) and fast reactors such as sodium-cooled fast reactor (SFR) that is primarily designed for management of high-level wastes, but also life extension of the existing fleet when component exchange is needed. Developing and utilizing the modern materials science tools (experimental, theoretical, and computational tools) is an important path to more efficient alloy development and process optimization. Ferritic-martensitic (FM) steels are important structural materials for nuclear reactors due to their advantages over other applicable materials like austenitic stainless steels, notably their resistance to void swelling, low thermal expansion coefficients, and higher thermal conductivity. However, traditional FM steels exhibit a noticeable yield strength reduction at elevated temperatures above ~500°C, which limits their applications in advanced nuclear reactors which target operating temperatures at 650°C or higher. Although oxide-dispersion-strengthened (ODS) ferritic steels have shown excellent high-temperature performance, their extremely high cost, limited size and fabricability of products, as well as the great difficulty with welding and joining, have limited or precluded their commercial applications. Zirconium has shown many benefits to Fe-base alloys such as grain refinement, improved phase stability, and reduced radiation-induced segregation. The ultimate goal of this project is, with the aid of computational modeling tools, to accelerate the development of a new generation of Zr-bearing ferritic alloys to be fabricated using conventional

  15. The R.M.C. Design-Build-Test Projects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, J. S.

    1971-01-01

    Four projects were assigned to final year civil engineering undergraduates in a course on structural steel design. The projects involved the design, construction, and testing of two columns and two trusses. (TS)

  16. 221-U Facility concrete and reinforcing steel evaluations specification for the canyon disposition initiative (CDI)

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, J.T.

    1998-05-28

    This describes a test program to establish the in-situ material properties of the reinforced concrete in Building 221-U for comparison to the original design specifications. Field sampling and laboratory testing of concrete and reinforcing steel structural materials in Building 221-U for design verification will be undertaken. Forty seven samples are to be taken from radiologically clean exterior walls of the canyon. Laboratory testing program includes unconfined compressive strength of concrete cores, tensile strength of reinforcing steel, and petrographic examinations of concrete cores taken from walls below existing grade.

  17. Applications of Optical Image Processing Technique for Steel Mill Non-contacting Conveyance System Operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Cheng-Tsung; Yang, Yung-Yi; Lin, Sheng-Yang

    This paper is aimed to present the design and feasibility investigations of adopting the available on-site optical inspection system, which is commonly used for steel plate dimension measurement, to supply on-line dynamic gap measurements of a non-contacting conveyance structure in a steel mill. Adequate software and hardware implementations based on digital image processing techniques have been adapted to the entire system formulations and estimations. Results show that the system can supply accurate and rapid gap measurements and thus can fulfill the design and operational objectives.

  18. A Metallurgical Evaluation of the Powder-Bed Laser Additive Manufactured 4140 Steel Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wesley; Kelly, Shawn

    2016-03-01

    Using laser powder bed fusion (PBF-L) additive manufacturing (AM) process for steel or iron powder has been attempted for decades. This work used a medium carbon steel (AISI 4140) powder to explore the feasibility of AM. The high carbon equivalent of 4140 steel (CEIIW ≈ 0.83) has a strong tendency toward cold cracking. As such, the process parameters must be carefully controlled to ensure the AM build quality. Through an orthogonally designed experimental matrix, a laser-welding procedure was successfully developed to produce 4140 steel AM builds with no welding defects. In addition, the microstructure and micro-cleanliness of the as-welded PBF-L AM builds were also examined. The results showed an ultra-fine martensite lath structure and an ultra-clean internal quality with minimal oxide inclusion distribution. After optimizing the PBF-L AM process parameters, including the laser power and scan speed, the as-welded AM builds yielded an average tensile strength higher than 1482 MPa and an average 33 J Charpy V-notch impact toughness at -18°C. The surface quality, tensile strength, and Charpy V-notch impact toughness of AM builds were comparable to the wrought 4140 steel. The excellent mechanical properties of 4140 steel builds created by the PBF-L AM AM process make industrial production more feasible, which shows great potential for application in the aerospace, automobile, and machinery industries.

  19. The effect of carbide precipitate morphology on fracture toughness in low-tempered steels containing Ni.

    PubMed

    Krawczyk, J; Bała, P; Pacyna, J

    2010-03-01

    Nickel is known to increase the resistance to cleavage fracture of iron and decrease a ductile-to-brittle transition temperature. The medium-carbon, low-alloy martensitic steels attain the best combination of properties in low-tempered condition, with tempered martensite, retained austenite and transition carbides in the microstructure. This paper is focused on the influence of Ni addition (from 0.35 to 4.00%) on the microstructure and fracture toughness of structural steels after tempering. In this research, four model alloys of different concentration of Ni and constant concentration of carbon and other elements were used. All samples were in as-quenched and tempered conditions. Quenching was performed in oil at room temperature. After quenching, samples were tempered at 200 degrees C for 2 h. The microstructure of the investigated steels was analyzed using JEM200CX transmission electron microscope. An increase of nickel content in the investigated structural steels causes a decrease of epsilon carbide concentration in their microstructure after tempering. In these steels, cementite precipitates independently in the boundaries of martensite needles and in the twin boundaries in the areas where the Fe(2.4)C carbide has been dissolved. These results will be used to design new technologies of tempering of structural steels with nickel addition.

  20. Comparison of corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steels in flowing Pb-15.7Li

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konys, J.; Krauss, W.; Zhu, Z.; Huang, Q.

    2014-12-01

    Ferritic martensitic steels are envisaged to be applied as structural materials in HCLL blanket systems. Their compatibility with the liquid breeder, which is in direct contact with the structural alloy, will be essential for reliable and safe operation of the designed blankets. Formerly performed corrosion tests of RAFM steels in PICOLO loop of KIT were mainly done at high flow velocities, e.g., 0.22 m/s and delivered severe attack with material loss rates above 400 μm/yr at 823 K. Meanwhile, flow velocities for corrosion testing have been reduced into the "cm range" to be near fusion relevant conditions. Among the international ITER-partners, many varieties of RAFM steels have been developed and manufactured within the last decade, e.g., the so-called Chinese Low Activation Martensitic steel (CLAM). In this paper, the long term corrosion behavior of EUROFER and CLAM steel in flowing Pb-15.7Li will be presented at a flow velocity of about 0.10 m/s and compared with earlier obtained results of RAFM steels exposed at other operation parameters of PICOLO loop. The observed corrosion attack is near 220 μm/yr and fits well to predictions made by MATLIM-modeling for low flow velocities in the turbulent flow regime.

  1. A Novel Ni-Containing Powder Metallurgy Steel with Ultrahigh Impact, Fatigue, and Tensile Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Wei; Shu, Guo-Jiun; Chang, Shih-Ying; Lin, Bing-Hao

    2014-08-01

    The impact toughness of powder metallurgy (PM) steel is typically inferior, and it is further impaired when the microstructure is strengthened. To formulate a versatile PM steel with superior impact, fatigue, and tensile properties, the influences of various microstructures, including ferrite, pearlite, bainite, and Ni-rich areas, were identified. The correlations between impact toughness with other mechanical properties were also studied. The results demonstrated that ferrite provides more resistance to impact loading than Ni-rich martensite, followed by bainite and pearlite. However, Ni-rich martensite presents the highest transverse rupture strength (TRS), fatigue strength, tensile strength, and hardness, followed by bainite, pearlite, and ferrite. With 74 pct Ni-rich martensite and 14 pct bainite, Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel achieves the optimal combination of impact energy (39 J), TRS (2170 MPa), bending fatigue strength at 2 × 106 cycles (770 MPa), tensile strength (1323 MPa), and apparent hardness (38 HRC). The impact energy of Fe-3Cr-0.5Mo-4Ni-0.5C steel is twice as high as those of the ordinary high-strength PM steels. These findings demonstrate that a high-strength PM steel with high-toughness can be produced by optimized alloy design and microstructure.

  2. Precipitates in Nb and Nb-V microalloyed X80 pipeline steel.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongyi; Liu, Delu; Zhang, Jianping; Tian, Wenhuai

    2013-08-01

    Precipitates in two X80 pipeline steels were studied by transmission electron microscopy equipped with an energy filtering system. The steels are microalloyed with niobium and niobium-vanadium (Nb-V), respectively, and produced by continuous hot rolling. Besides the precipitates TiN and (Ti, Nb) (C, N), which were 10-100 nm in size, a large number of precipitates smaller than 10 nm distributed in the two steels have been observed. In the Nb-V microalloyed steel, only a few titanium nitrides covered by vanadium compounds on the surface have been observed. It is inferred that the vanadium exists mainly in the matrix as a solid solution element. The fact has been accepted that there was no contribution to the precipitation strengthening of the X80 steel by adding 0.04-0.06% vanadium under the present production process. By contrast, the toughness of the Nb-V steel is deteriorated. Therefore, a better toughness property of the Nb microalloyed X80 results from the optimum microalloying composition design and the suitable accelerating cooling after hot rolling.

  3. Clean steel technology -- Fundamental to the development of high performance steels

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, A.D.

    1999-07-01

    The use of clean steel technology (low sulfur with calcium treatment for inclusion shape control) is a fundamental building block in the development of high performance plate steels. A brief review will be presented of the benefits of calcium treatment and its effect on non-metallic inclusions (sulfides and oxides) and reducing sulfur levels. During the past thirty years the requirements for low sulfur levels have been reduced from 0.010% maximum to 0.001% maximum. The effects of clean steel practices on specific properties will be reviewed including tensile ductility, Charpy V-notch and fracture toughness, fatigue crack propagation and hydrogen-induced-cracking resistance. Traditional low sulfur plate steel applications have included pressure vessels. offshore platforms, plastic injection molds and line-pipe skelp. More recent applications will be discussed including bridge steels, high strength structural steels to 130 ksi (897 MPa) minimum yield strength, 9% nickel steels for cryogenic applications, and military armor.

  4. Corrosion Behavior of IF Steel in Various Media and Its Comparison with Mild Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, G. P.; Moon, A. P.; Sengupta, S.; Deo, G.; Sangal, S.; Mondal, K.

    2015-05-01

    The present work discusses corrosion behavior of an interstitial-free (IF) steel in 0.6 M NaCl, 1 M NaOH, and 1 M HCl solutions, and its comparison with mild steel (MS). Dynamics polarization and AC Impedance Spectroscopy explain different polarization behaviors of the steel samples. All the steels were exposed to open atmosphere for 100 days, and to 0.6 M NaCl salt fog for 30 days. Scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman and Fourier Transformed Infrared Spectroscopy were used to characterize microstructure of the steels, rust constituents, and morphologies. Corrosion behavior of the steels has close relation with the morphology and constituents of the rusts. It has been observed that the corrosion in the IF and MS steels is uniform in nature.

  5. Work Hardening Behavior of 1020 Steel During Cold-Beating Simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CUI, Fengkui; LING, Yuanfei; XUE, Jinxue; LIU, Jia; LIU, Yuhui; LI, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The present research of cold-beating formation mainly focused on roller design and manufacture, kinematics, constitutive relation, metal flow law, thermo-mechanical coupling, surface micro-topography and microstructure evolution. However, the research on surface quality and performance of workpieces in the process of cold-beating is rare. Cold-beating simulation experiment of 1020 steel is conducted at room temperature and strain rates ranging from 2000 to 4000 s-1 base on the law of plastic forming. According to the experimental data, the model of strain hardening of 1020 steel is established, Scanning Electron Microscopy(SEM) is conducted, the mechanism of the work hardening of 1020 steel is clarified by analyzing microstructure variation of 1020 steel. It is found that the strain rate hardening effect of 1020 steel is stronger than the softening effect induced by increasing temperatures, the process of simulation cold-beating cause the grain shape of 1020 steel significant change and microstructure elongate significantly to form a fibrous tissue parallel to the direction of deformation, the higher strain rate, the more obvious grain refinement and the more hardening effect. Additionally, the change law of the work hardening rate is investigated, the relationship between dislocation density and strain, the relationship between work hardening rate and dislocation density is obtained. Results show that the change trend of the work hardening rate of 1020 steel is divided into two stages, the work hardening rate decreases dramatically in the first stage and slowly decreases in the second stage, finally tending toward zero. Dislocation density increases with increasing strain and strain rate, work hardening rate decreases with increasing dislocation density. The research results provide the basis for solving the problem of improving the surface quality and performance of workpieces under cold-beating formation of 1020 steel.

  6. Hardness analysis of welded joints of austenitic and duplex stainless steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Topolska, S.

    2016-08-01

    Stainless steels are widely used in the modern world. The continuous increase in the use of stainless steels is caused by getting greater requirements relating the corrosion resistance of all types of devices. The main property of these steels is the ability to overlap a passive layer of an oxide on their surface. This layer causes that they become resistant to oxidation. One of types of corrosion-resistant steels is ferritic-austenitic steel of the duplex type, which has good strength properties. It is easily formable and weldable as well as resistant to erosion and abrasive wear. It has a low susceptibility to stress-corrosion cracking, to stress corrosion, to intercrystalline one, to pitting one and to crevice one. For these reasons they are used, among others, in the construction of devices and facilities designed for chemicals transportation and for petroleum and natural gas extraction. The paper presents the results which shows that the particular specimens of the ][joint representing both heat affected zones (from the side of the 2205 steel and the 316L one) and the weld are characterized by higher hardness values than in the case of the same specimens for the 2Y joint. Probably this is caused by machining of edges of the sections of metal sheets before the welding process, which came to better mixing of native materials and the filler metal. After submerged arc welding the 2205 steel still retains the diphase, austenitic-ferritic structure and the 316L steel retains the austenitic structure with sparse bands of ferrite σ.

  7. Help for the Steel Industry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1991-01-01

    A collaboration between NASA Lewis Research Center (LRC) and Gladwin Engineering resulted in the adaptation of aerospace high temperature metal technology to the continuous casting of steel. The continuous process is more efficient because it takes less time and labor. A high temperature material, once used on the X-15 research plane, was applied to metal rollers by a LRC developed spraying technique. Lewis Research Center also supplied mold prototype of metal composites, reducing erosion and promoting thermal conductivity. Rollers that previously cracked due to thermal fatigue, lasted longer. Gladwin's sales have increased, and additional NASA-developed innovations are anticipated.

  8. Diffusion brazing nickel-plated stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beuyukian, C. S.; Mitchell, M. J.

    1976-01-01

    To bond parts, sandwich assembly is made up of aluminum core, aluminum face sheet with brazing alloy interface, and nickel plated stainless steel part. Sandwich is placed between bottom and top glide sheet that is placed in stainless steel retort where assembly is bonded at 580 C.

  9. Method for welding chromium molybdenum steels

    DOEpatents

    Sikka, Vinod K.

    1986-01-01

    Chromium-molybdenum steels exhibit a weakening after welding in an area adjacent to the weld. This invention is an improved method for welding to eliminate the weakness by subjecting normalized steel to a partial temper prior to welding and subsequently fully tempering the welded article for optimum strength and ductility.

  10. History dependence of magnetomechanical properties of steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melquiond, F.; Mouroux, A.; Jouglar, J.; Vuillermoz, P. L.; Weinstock, H.

    1996-05-01

    Magnetomechanical measurements using a superconducting SQUID magnetic gradiometer and a tensile-testing machine have been performed on a variety of steel specimens to determine the change in magnetization due to applied stress and the possible application of the observed behavior as a new form of nondestructive evaluation in steel. This study builds on earlier related measurements.

  11. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J. ); Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J. )

    1992-01-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  12. A recycling process for dezincing steel scrap

    SciTech Connect

    Dudek, F.J.; Daniels, E.J.; Morgan, W.A.; Kellner, A.W.; Harrison, J.

    1992-08-01

    In response to the several-fold increase in consumption of galvanized steel in the last decade and the problems associated with refurnacing larger quantities of galvanized steel scrap, a process is being developed to separate and recover the steel and zinc from galvanized ferrous scrap. The zinc is dissolved from the scrap in hot caustic using anodic assistance and is electrowon as dendritic powder. The process is effective for zinc, lead, aluminum, and cadmium removal on loose and baled scrap and on all types of galvanized steel. The process has been pilot tested for batch treatment of 1,000 tons of mostly baled scrap. A pilot plant to continuously treat loose scrap is under construction. Use of degalvanized steel scrap decreases raw materials and environmental compliance costs to steel- and iron-makers, may enable integrated steel producers to recycle furnace dusts to the sinter plant, and may enable EAF production of flat products without use of DRI or pig iron. Recycling the components of galvanized steel scrap saves primary energy, decreases zinc imports, and adds value to the scrap.

  13. Chem I Supplement: Chemistry of Steel Making.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sellers, Neal

    1980-01-01

    Provides information about the chemistry of steel making applicable to teaching secondary school science. Generalized chemical reactions describe the manufacture of steel from iron ore. Also discussed are raw materials, processing choices, and how various furnaces (blast, direct reduction, open hearth, basic oxygen, electric) work. (CS)

  14. Mineral resource of the month: steel

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fenton, Michael D.

    2007-01-01

    About 96 million metric tons of steel was produced in the United States last year — more than any other metal. And the $3.46 billion of iron and steel scrap exported was also the highest of any metal scrap export, helping to reduce the U.S. trade deficit.

  15. African Drum and Steel Pan Ensembles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sunkett, Mark E.

    2000-01-01

    Discusses how to develop both African drum and steel pan ensembles providing information on teacher preparation, instrument choice, beginning the ensemble, and lesson planning. Includes additional information for the drum ensembles. Lists references and instructional materials, sources of drums and pans, and common note layout/range for steel pan…

  16. METHOD FOR JOINING ALUMINUM TO STAINLESS STEEL

    DOEpatents

    Lemon, L.C.

    1960-05-24

    Aluminum may be joined to stainless steel without the use of flux by tinning the aluminum with a tin solder containing 1% silver and 1% lead, tinning the stainless steel with a 50% lead 50% tin solder, and then sweating the tinned surfaces together.

  17. Low Mn alloy steel for cryogenic service

    DOEpatents

    Morris, J.W. Jr.; Niikura, M.

    A ferritic cryogenic steel which has a relatively low (about 4 to 6%) manganese content and which has been made suitable for use at cryogenic temperatures by a thermal cycling treatment followed by a final tempering. The steel includes 4 to 6% manganese, 0.02 to 0.06% carbon, 0.1 to 0.4% molybdenum and 0 to 3% nickel.

  18. Forming "dynamic" membranes on stainless steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brandon, C. A.; Gaddis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    "Dynamic" zirconium polyacrylic membrane is formed directly on stainless steel substrate without excessive corrosion of steel. Membrane is potentially useful in removal of contaminated chemicals from solution through reversed osmosis. Application includes use in filtration and desalination equipment, and in textile industry for separation of dyes from aqueous solvents.

  19. Triangle Tilt and Steel Osteotomy: Similar Approaches to Common Problems

    PubMed Central

    Nath, Rahul K; Somasundaram, Chandra; Mahmooduddin, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    Background: Each year, thousands of children worldwide suffer obstetric brachial plexus nerve injuries resulting not only in primary nerve injury, but also in development of secondary muscle and bone deformities of the shoulder. The triangle tilt surgery has been developed and shown to effectively address these deformities. The triangle tilt procedure was initially designed by the lead author (RKN) to follow the concepts of joint normalization featured in the Steel pelvic osteotomy used to correct developmental dysplasia of the hip joint, and indeed ultimately bears a striking resemblance to the Steel osteotomy. Prior to performing these bony surgical procedures, soft tissue procedures are performed to release the muscle contractures of the shoulder and hip. The purpose of this article is to compare and analyze the similarities between the indications, surgical techniques, involved anatomy, and outcomes of these operative procedures. Methods: A literature review was conducted using PubMed to identify articles pertaining to triangle tilt surgery and the Steel pelvic osteotomy. Functional parameters and surgical strategies were compared. Pre- and post-operative CTs were analyzed to compare anatomical results of the procedures. Results: Similarities were found between both procedures in terms of indications, involved anatomy, surgical techniques, and outcomes. The triangle tilt surgery is indicated to correct the developmental dysplasia of the glenohumeral joint in obstetric brachial plexus injury patients. Steel pelvic osteotomy is performed to correct the subluxation and dislocation of the hip innominate bone in patients with congenital dysplasia, cerebral palsy myelodysplasia, and poliomyelitis. The involved anatomy of both procedures is similar in that both involve limb girdles and ball-and-socket joints, namely the shoulder and hip. Both procedures are also triple osteotomies, the triangle tilt involving the acromion, clavicle and scapula while the Steel

  20. Removable Type Expansion Bolt Innovative Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Feng-Lan; Zhang, Bo; Gao, Bo; Liu, Yan-Xin; Gao, Bo

    2016-05-01

    Expansion bolt is a kind of the most common things in our daily life. Currently, there are many kinds of expansion bolts in the market. However, they have some shortcomings that mainly contain underuse and unremovement but our innovation of design makes up for these shortcomings very well. Principle of working follows this: expansion tube is fixed outside of bolt, steel balls and expansion covers are fixed inside. Meanwhile, the steel balls have 120° with each other. When using it ,expansion cover is moved in the direction of its internal part. So the front part of expansion bolt cover is increasingly becoming big and steel halls is moved outside. Only in this way can it be fixed that steel balls make expansion tube expand. When removing them, expansion bolt is moved outside. So the front part of expansion bolt cover is gradually becoming small and steel balls moves inside, after expansion tube shrinks, we can detach them.

  1. Hydrogen transport in iron and steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Louthan, M. R., Jr.; Derrick, R. G.; Donovan, J. A.; Caskey, G. R., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The permeabilities of protium, deuterium, and tritium in foil specimens of Marz grade iron, 4130 steel, Armco iron, HP-9-4-20, and T-1 steels were studied at hydrogen pressures between 0.02 and 0.5 MPa over the temperature range 260-700 K. The permeability was measured by a pressure-rise method, deuterium counting with a detector, and radioactivity counting. Good agreement is found between the measurement techniques used. It is shown that the permeabilities of protium, deuterium, and tritium in iron and T-1 steel at temperatures as low as 260 K are in good agreement with the equation proposed by Gonzalez (1967). However, the permeabilities of HP-9-4-20 and 4130 steel to hydrogen are typically lower than predicted. The isotope effect on hydrogen permeability of HP-9-4-20, 4130 and T-1 steels, and high-purity iron can be estimated by an inverse square root of mass correction.

  2. Development of cryogenic thermal control heat pipes. [of stainless steels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The development of thermal control heat pipes that are applicable to the low temperature to cryogenic range was investigated. A previous effort demonstrated that stainless steel axially grooved tubing which met performance requirements could be fabricated. Three heat pipe designs utilizing stainless steel axially grooved tubing were fabricated and tested. One is a liquid trap diode heat pipe which conforms to the configuration and performance requirements of the Heat Pipe Experiment Package (HEPP). The HEPP is scheduled for flight aboard the Long Duration Flight Exposure Facility (LDEF). Another is a thermal switch heat pipe which is designed to permit energy transfer at the cooler of the two identical legs. The third thermal component is a hybrid variable conductance heat pipe (VCHP). The design incorporates both a conventional VCHP system and a liquid trap diode. The design, fabrication and thermal testing of these heat pipes is described. The demonstrated heat pipe behavior including start-up, forward mode transport, recovery after evaporator dry-out, diode performance and variable conductance control are discussed.

  3. Fabricating characteristics of an ultrahigh-strength steel

    SciTech Connect

    Novotny, P.M. . Tool and Alloy R and D); Nye, R.D. . Special Products Division); Robino, C.V. . Physical and Joining Metallurgy Dept.)

    1995-02-01

    AerMet[reg sign] 100 alloy is an ultra-high-strength steel initially developed to meet the demanding specifications for landing gear of US Navy carrier-based jet aircraft. Welding is an important process in the fabrication of parts and components made from AerMet 100 alloy which, because of its unusual combination of ultrahigh strength and fracture toughness, is finding widespread commercial application. It already has been designated by the National Association for Science, Technology and Society as the most significant new steel developed in the last decade. Experience shows that when this new steel is welded properly, and can be fully heat treated, the metallurgical properties of the weld metal are similar to those of the base metal. The alloy can be welded successfully in the overage annealed (as-shipped) condition. It also can be welded in the fully heat treated pulse aged condition without cracking, but there is a sacrifice in yield strength and ductility if not re-heat treated. Some strength and ductility can be restored with a stress relief or an aging heat treatment. Finally, although AerMet 100 alloy and AISI 4130 appear to be similar alloys, greater skill is required to weld the thinner wall AerMet 100 alloy, different equipment settings are necessary and some new welding techniques are needed for best results.

  4. Thermomechanical steels behaviors at semi-solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Traidi, K.; Favier, V.; Lestriez, P.; Debray, K.; Langlois, L.; Ranc, N.; Saby, M.; Mangin, P.

    2016-10-01

    Semisolid thixoforming is an intermediate process between casting and forging. The combination of the semi-solid state and globular microstructures leads to thixotropic properties of the material [1]. Thixoformingprocess presents several advantages such as energy efficiency, high production rates, smooth die filling, low shrinkage porosity, which together lead to near net shape capability and thus to fewer manufacturing steps than with classical methods. So far, there are only few applications of semisolid processing of highr melting point alloys [2]. Steel is a particularly challenging material to semi-solid process because of about 1400°C temperatures involved. Characterizing and modelling such semi-solid behaviour for steels is still challenging. The aim of the research work was to study the rheological properties of a suitable graded steel (LTT C38) designed for semi-solid processing. An experimental protocol was determined to characterize the thermomechanical behaviors and defect condition. Uniaxial tensile tests were carried out on semi-solid specimen having >0.8 solid fraction for different temperatures. The variation in both ductility and strength with temperature has been identified.

  5. Corrosion Performance of Stainless Steels in a Simulated Launch Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Vinje, Rubiela D.; MacDowell, Louis

    2004-01-01

    At the Kennedy Space Center, NASA relies on stainless steel (SS) tubing to supply the gases and fluids required to launch the Space Shuttle. 300 series SS tubing has been used for decades but the highly corrosive environment at the launch pad has proven to be detrimental to these alloys. An upgrade with higher alloy content materials has become necessary in order to provide a safer and long lasting launch facility. In the effort to find the most suitable material to replace the existing AISI 304L SS ([iNS S30403) and AISI 316L SS (UNS S31603) shuttle tubing, a study involving atmospheric exposure at the corrosion test site near the launch pads and electrochemical measurements is being conducted. This paper presents the results of an investigation in which stainless steels of the 300 series, 304L, 316L, and AISI 317L SS (UNS S31703) as well as highly alloyed stainless steels 254-SMO (UNS S32154), AL-6XN (N08367) and AL29-4C ([iNS S44735) were evaluated using direct current (DC) electrochemical techniques under conditions designed to simulate those found at the Space Shuttle Launch pad. The electrochemical results were compared to the atmospheric exposure data and evaluated for their ability to predict the long-term corrosion performance of the alloys.

  6. Optimization of Melt Treatment for Austenitic Steel Grain Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lekakh, Simon N.; Ge, Jun; Richards, Von; O'Malley, Ron; TerBush, Jessica R.

    2017-02-01

    Refinement of the as-cast grain structure of austenitic steels requires the presence of active solid nuclei during solidification. These nuclei can be formed in situ in the liquid alloy by promoting reactions between transition metals (Ti, Zr, Nb, and Hf) and metalloid elements (C, S, O, and N) dissolved in the melt. Using thermodynamic simulations, experiments were designed to evaluate the effectiveness of a predicted sequence of reactions targeted to form precipitates that could act as active nuclei for grain refinement in austenitic steel castings. Melt additions performed to promote the sequential precipitation of titanium nitride (TiN) onto previously formed spinel (Al2MgO4) inclusions in the melt resulted in a significant refinement of the as-cast grain structure in heavy section Cr-Ni-Mo stainless steel castings. A refined as-cast structure consisting of an inner fine-equiaxed grain structure and outer columnar dendrite zone structure of limited length was achieved in experimental castings. The sequential of precipitation of TiN onto Al2MgO4 was confirmed using automated SEM/EDX and TEM analyses.

  7. Seismic damage identification for steel structures using distributed fiber optics.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuang; Cai, C S; Ou, Jinping

    2009-08-01

    A distributed fiber optic monitoring methodology based on optic time domain reflectometry technology is developed for seismic damage identification of steel structures. Epoxy with a strength closely associated to a specified structure damage state is used for bonding zigzagged configured optic fibers on the surfaces of the structure. Sensing the local deformation of the structure, the epoxy modulates the signal change within the optic fiber in response to the damage state of the structure. A monotonic loading test is conducted on a steel specimen installed with the proposed sensing system using selected epoxy that will crack at the designated strain level, which indicates the damage of the steel structure. Then, using the selected epoxy, a varying degree of cyclic loading amplitudes, which is associated with different damage states, is applied on a second specimen. The test results show that the specimen's damage can be identified by the optic sensors, and its maximum local deformation can be recorded by the sensing system; moreover, the damage evolution can also be identified.

  8. 2012 ACCOMPLISHMENTS - TRITIUM AGING STUDIES ON STAINLESS STEELS

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, M.

    2013-01-31

    This report summarizes the research and development accomplishments during FY12 for the tritium effects on materials program. The tritium effects on materials program is designed to measure the long-term effects of tritium and its radioactive decay product, helium-3, on the structural properties of forged stainless steels which are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. The FY12 R&D accomplishments include: (1) Fabricated and Thermally-Charged 150 Forged Stainless Steel Samples with Tritium for Future Aging Studies; (2) Developed an Experimental Plan for Measuring Cracking Thresholds of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Steels in High Pressure Hydrogen Gas; (3) Calculated Sample Tritium Contents For Laboratory Inventory Requirements and Environmental Release Estimates; (4) Published report on “Cracking Thresholds and Fracture Toughness Properties of Tritium-Charged-and-Aged Stainless Steels”; and, (5) Published report on “The Effects of Hydrogen, Tritium, and Heat Treatment on the Deformation and Fracture Toughness Properties of Stainless Steels”. These accomplishments are highlighted here and references given to additional reports for more detailed information.

  9. An understanding of HSLA-65 plate steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sampath, K.

    2006-02-01

    HSLA-65 plate steels can be produced using one of five plate manufacturing techniques: normalizing, controlled rolling (CR), controlled rolling followed by accelerated cooling (CR-AC), direct quenching and tempering (DQT), or conventional quenching and tempering (Q&T). The HSLA-65 steels are characterized by low carbon content and low alloy content, and they exhibit a low carbon equivalent that allows improved plate weldability. These characteristics in turn (a) provide the steel plate with a refined microstructure that ensures high strength and toughness; (b) eliminate or substantially reduce the need for preheating during welding; (c) resist susceptibility to hydrogen-assisted cracking (HAC) in the weld heat affected zone (HAZ) when fusion (arc) welded using low heat-input conditions; and (d) depending on section thickness, facilitate high heat-input welding (about 2 kJ/mm) without significant loss of strength or toughness in the HAZ. However, application of this plate manufacturing process and of these controls produces significant differences in the metallurgical structure and range of mechanical properties of the HSLA-65 plate steels both among themselves and versus conventional higher strength steel (HSS) plates. For example, among the HSLA-65 plate steels, those produced by Q&T exhibit minimal variability in mechanical properties, especially in thicker plates. Besides variability in mechanical properties depending on plate thickness, the CR and CR-AC plate steels exhibit a relatively higher yield strength to ultimate tensile strength (YS/UTS) ratio than do DQT and Q&T steels. Such differences in processing and properties of HSLA-65 plate steels could potentially affect the selection and control of various secondary fabrication practices, including arc welding. Consequently, fabricators must exercise extreme caution when transferring allowable limits of certified secondary fabrication practices from one type of HSLA-65 plate steel to another, even for the

  10. Safety and environmental comparisons of stainless steel with alternative structural materials for fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Kinzig, A.P.; Holdren, J.P.; Hibbard, P.J.

    1994-08-01

    Using the FuseDose II computer code, we calculated and compared several indices of safety and environmental (S&E) hazards for conceptual magnetic-fusion reactor designs based on a variety of structural materials-stainless steel, ferritic steel, vanadium-chromium-titanium alloy, and silicon-carbide-and, for comparison, the fuel of a liquid-metal fast breeder fission reactor. FuseDose II is a second-generation code derived from the Fuse-Dose code used in the U.S. Department of Energy`s Committee on Environmental, Safety, and Economic Aspects of Magnetic Fusion Energy (ESECOM) study in the late 1980s. The comparisons update and extend those of the ESECOM study by adding the stainless-steel case, some new indices, graphical representation of the results, and other refinements. The results of our analysis support earlier conclusions concerning the S&E liabilities of stainless steel: The use of stainless steel would significantly reduce the S&E advantages of fusion over fission that are implied by the indices we consider, compared with the advantages portrayed in the ESECOM results for lower-activation fusion materials. The dose potentials represented by the radioactive materials that conceivably could be mobilized in severe accidents are substantially higher for the stainless steel case than for the lower activation fusion designs analyzed by ESECOM, and the waste disposal burden imposed by a stainless steel fusion reactor, though significantly smaller than that associated with a fission reactor of the same output, is high enough to rule out the chance of qualification for shallow burial under current regulations (in contrast to some of the lower activation fusion cases). This work underscores the conclusion that research to demonstrate the viability of the low-activation materials is essential if fusion is to achieve its potential for large and easily demonstrated S&E advantages over fission. 37 refs., 17 figs., 8 tabs.

  11. 2014 Accomplishments-Tritium aging studies on stainless steel: Fracture toughness properties of forged stainless steels-Effect of hydrogen, forging strain rate, and forging temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Michael J.

    2015-02-01

    Forged stainless steels are used as the materials of construction for tritium reservoirs. During service, tritium diffuses into the reservoir walls and radioactively decays to helium-3. Tritium and decay helium cause a higher propensity for cracking which could lead to a tritium leak or delayed failure of a tritium reservoir. The factors that affect the tendency for crack formation and propagation include: Environment; steel type and microstructure; and, vessel configuration (geometry, pressure, residual stress). Fracture toughness properties are needed for evaluating the long-term effects of tritium on their structural properties. Until now, these effects have been characterized by measuring the effects of tritium on the tensile and fracture toughness properties of specimens fabricated from experimental forgings in the form of forward-extruded cylinders. A key result of those studies is that the long-term cracking resistance of stainless steels in tritium service depends greatly on the interaction between decay helium and the steels’ forged microstructure. New experimental research programs are underway and are designed to measure tritium and decay helium effects on the cracking properties of stainless steels using actual tritium reservoir forgings instead of the experimental forgings of past programs. The properties measured should be more representative of actual reservoir properties because the microstructure of the specimens tested will be more like that of the tritium reservoirs. The programs are designed to measure the effects of key forging variables on tritium compatibility and include three stainless steels, multiple yield strengths, and four different forging processes. The effects on fracture toughness of hydrogen and crack orientation were measured for type 316L forgings. In addition, hydrogen effects on toughness were measured for Type 304L block forgings having two different yield strengths. Finally, fracture toughness properties of type 304L

  12. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D. ); Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D. )

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 [times] 6l0 [times] 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m[sup 2] of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 [mu]m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO[sub 2] aerosols. We used a 1,700 m[sup 3]/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m[sup 3]/hr exhaust system.

  13. Development and evaluation of a cleanable high efficiency steel filter

    SciTech Connect

    Bergman, W.; Larsen, G.; Weber, F.; Wilson, P.; Lopez, R.; Valha, G.; Conner, J.; Garr, J.; Williams, K.; Biermann, A.; Wilson, K.; Moore, P.; Gellner, C.; Rapchun, D.; Simon, K.; Turley, J.; Frye, L.; Monroe, D.

    1993-01-01

    We have developed a high efficiency steel filter that can be cleaned in-situ by reverse air pulses. The filter consists of 64 pleated cylindrical filter elements packaged into a 6l0 {times} 6l0 {times} 292 mm aluminum frame and has 13.5 m{sup 2} of filter area. The filter media consists of a sintered steel fiber mat using 2 {mu}m diameter fibers. We conducted an optimization study for filter efficiency and pressure drop to determine the filter design parameters of pleat width, pleat depth, outside diameter of the cylinder, and the total number of cylinders. Several prototype cylinders were then built and evaluated in terms of filter cleaning by reverse air pulses. The results of these studies were used to build the high efficiency steel filter. We evaluated the prototype filter for efficiency and cleanability. The DOP filter certification test showed the filter has a passing efficiency of 99.99% but a failing pressure drop of 0.80 kPa at 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr. Since we were not able to achieve a pressure drop less than 0.25 kPa, the steel filter does not meet all the criteria for a HEPA filter. Filter loading and cleaning tests using AC Fine dust showed the filter could be repeatedly cleaned by reverse air pulses. The next phase of the prototype evaluation consisted of installing the unit and support housing in the exhaust duct work of a uranium grit blaster for a field evaluation at the Y-12 Plant in Oak Ridge, TN. The grit blaster is used to clean the surface of uranium parts and generates a cloud of UO{sub 2} aerosols. We used a 1,700 m{sup 3}/hr slip stream from the 10,200 m{sup 3}/hr exhaust system.

  14. Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCAT)

    SciTech Connect

    Gary Casuccio; Michael Potter; Fred Schwerer; Dr. Richard J. Fruehan; Dr. Scott Story

    2005-12-30

    The objective of this study was to develop the Automated Steel Cleanliness Analysis Tool (ASCATTM) to permit steelmakers to evaluate the quality of the steel through the analysis of individual inclusions. By characterizing individual inclusions, determinations can be made as to the cleanliness of the steel. Understanding the complicating effects of inclusions in the steelmaking process and on the resulting properties of steel allows the steel producer to increase throughput, better control the process, reduce remelts, and improve the quality of the product. The ASCAT (Figure 1) is a steel-smart inclusion analysis tool developed around a customized next-generation computer controlled scanning electron microscopy (NG-CCSEM) hardware platform that permits acquisition of inclusion size and composition data at a rate never before possible in SEM-based instruments. With built-in customized ''intelligent'' software, the inclusion data is automatically sorted into clusters representing different inclusion types to define the characteristics of a particular heat (Figure 2). The ASCAT represents an innovative new tool for the collection of statistically meaningful data on inclusions, and provides a means of understanding the complicated effects of inclusions in the steel making process and on the resulting properties of steel. Research conducted by RJLG with AISI (American Iron and Steel Institute) and SMA (Steel Manufactures of America) members indicates that the ASCAT has application in high-grade bar, sheet, plate, tin products, pipes, SBQ, tire cord, welding rod, and specialty steels and alloys where control of inclusions, whether natural or engineered, are crucial to their specification for a given end-use. Example applications include castability of calcium treated steel; interstitial free (IF) degasser grade slag conditioning practice; tundish clogging and erosion minimization; degasser circulation and optimization; quality assessment/steel cleanliness; slab, billet

  15. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-02

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400-450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0-1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3-5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  16. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Jung Kil Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-22

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4∼5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO{sub 2} fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  17. Microstructural Characterization of 6061 Aluminum to 304L Stainless Steel Inertia Welds

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, K.A.

    1999-09-29

    'Microstructural characterization of 6061-T6 aluminum-to-Type 304L stainless steel inertia welds provided a technical basis to conclude that transition joints fabricated from such welds should satisfactorily contain helium/hydrogen gas mixtures. This conclusion is based on the lack of semi-continuous alignments of particles and/or inclusions at, or near, the aluminum-to-stainless steel interface. These dissimilar metal transition joints play a key role in the operation of an accelerator driven, spallation neutron source designed for the production of tritium. The Accelerator Production of Tritium system will produce tritium through neutron interactions with 3He gas contained in water-cooled, 6061-T6 aluminum pressure tubes. Current design concepts include thousands of thin-walled pressure tubes distributed throughout a number of aluminum-clad, lead-filled, blanket modules. The aluminum pressure tubes are connected to a tritium extraction and purification system through a stainless steel manifold. The transition from aluminum to stainless steel is made via transition joints machined from the aluminum-to-stainless steel inertia welds. The paper describes the baseline microstructural characterization of the welds, including optical, scanning and transmission electron microscopy and uses that characterization to evaluate potential gas leakage across the weld.'

  18. Effect of cryogenic treatment on tensile behavior of case carburized steel-815M17

    SciTech Connect

    Bensely, A. . E-mail: benzlee@annauniv.edu; Senthilkumar, D.; Mohan Lal, D.; Nagarajan, G.; Rajadurai, A.

    2007-05-15

    The crown wheel and pinion represent the most highly stressed parts of a heavy vehicle; these are typically made of 815M17 steel. The reasons for the frequent failure of these components are due to tooth bending impact, wear and fatigue. The modern processes employed to produce these as high, durable components include cryogenic treatment as well as conventional heat treatment. It helps to convert retained austenite into martensite as well as promote carbide precipitation. This paper deals with the influence of cryogenic treatment on the tensile behavior of case carburized steel 815M17. The impetus for studying the tensile properties of gear steels is to ensure that steels used in gears have sufficient tensile strength to prevent failure when gears are subjected to tensile or fatigue loads, and to provide basic design information on the strength of 815M17 steel. A comparative study on the effects of deep cryogenic treatment (DCT), shallow cryogenic treatment (SCT) and conventional heat treatment (CHT) was made by means of tension testing. This test was conducted as per ASTM standard designation E 8M. The present results confirm that the tensile behavior is marginally reduced after cryogenic treatment (i.e. both shallow and deep cryogenic treatment) for 815M17 when compared with conventional heat treatment. Scanning electron microscopic (SEM) analysis of the fracture surface indicates the presence of dimples and flat fracture regions are more common in SCT specimens than for CHT and DCT-processed material.

  19. The effects of stainless steel radial reflector on core reactivity for small modular reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jung Kil; Hah, Chang Joo; Cho, Sung Ju; Seong, Ki Bong

    2016-01-01

    Commercial PWR core is surrounded by a radial reflector, which consists of a baffle and water. Radial reflector is designed to reflect neutron back into the core region to improve the neutron efficiency of the reactor and to protect the reactor vessels from the embrittling effects caused by irradiation during power operation. Reflector also helps to flatten the neutron flux and power distributions in the reactor core. The conceptual nuclear design for boron-free small modular reactor (SMR) under development in Korea requires to have the cycle length of 4˜5 years, rated power of 180 MWth and enrichment less than 5 w/o. The aim of this paper is to analyze the effects of stainless steel radial reflector on the performance of the SMR using UO2 fuels. Three types of reflectors such as water, water/stainless steel 304 mixture and stainless steel 304 are selected to investigate the effect on core reactivity. Additionally, the thickness of stainless steel and double layer reflector type are also investigated. CASMO-4/SIMULATE-3 code system is used for this analysis. The results of analysis show that single layer stainless steel reflector is the most efficient reflector.

  20. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-01-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry. PMID:28150692

  1. Ultrahigh Charpy impact toughness (~450J) achieved in high strength ferrite/martensite laminated steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Wenquan; Zhang, Mingda; Huang, Chongxiang; Xiao, Shuyang; Dong, Han; Weng, Yuqing

    2017-02-01

    Strength and toughness are a couple of paradox as similar as strength-ductility trade-off in homogenous materials, body-centered-cubic steels in particular. Here we report a simple way to get ultrahigh toughness without sacrificing strength. By simple alloying design and hot rolling the 5Mn3Al steels in ferrite/austenite dual phase temperature region, we obtain a series of ferrite/martensite laminated steels that show up-to 400–450J Charpy V-notch impact energy combined with a tensile strength as high as 1.0–1.2 GPa at room temperature, which is nearly 3–5 times higher than that of conventional low alloy steels at similar strength level. This remarkably enhanced toughness is mainly attributed to the delamination between ferrite and martensite lamellae. The current finding gives us a promising way to produce high strength steel with ultrahigh impact toughness by simple alloying design and hot rolling in industry.

  2. Mechanical properties of structural amorphous steels: Intrinsic correlations, conflicts, and optimizing strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Z. Q. Zhang, Z. F.

    2013-12-28

    Amorphous steels have demonstrated superior properties and great potentials for structural applications since their emergence, yet it still remains unclear about how and why their mechanical properties are correlated with other factors and how to achieve intended properties by designing their compositions. Here, the intrinsic interdependences among the mechanical, thermal, and elastic properties of various amorphous steels are systematically elucidated and a general trade-off relation is exposed between the strength and ductility/toughness. Encouragingly, a breakthrough is achievable that the strength and ductility/toughness can be simultaneously improved by tuning the compositions. The composition dependences of the properties and alloying effects are further analyzed thoroughly and interpreted from the fundamental plastic flow and atomic bonding characters. Most importantly, systematic strategies are outlined for optimizing the mechanical properties of the amorphous steels. The study may help establish the intrinsic correlations among the compositions, atomic structures, and properties of the amorphous steels, and provide useful guidance for their alloy design and property optimization. Thus, it is believed to have implications for the development and applications of the structural amorphous steels.

  3. Some Remarks on the Choice of Ductility Class for Earthquake-Resistant Steel Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matejčeková-Farhat, Miroslava; Ároch, Rudolf

    2013-09-01

    The implementation of the Eurocodes in current structural design practice has brought about a new emphasis on the design of earthquake-resistant structures. In some European countries, new earthquake zones have been defined; henceforth, the design requirements of many ongoing projects have changed as well. The choice of the ductility class of steel structures as one of the key design parameters, the consequences of this choice on design procedure, and some applications of the Eurocode 8 design criteria by comparing French and Slovak national practice are discussed, using a practical example of a structure.

  4. Microstructural Characterization of Friction Stir Welded Aluminum-Steel Joints

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    and around particle inclusions within the WZ. In the case of FSW aluminum to steel , the structure often seen is one of steel particles dispersed...the microstructure and mechanical performance of dissimilar FSWs between aluminum and steel , this study focuses on the characterization of the...MICROSTRUCTURAL CHARACTERIZATION OF FRICTION STIR WELDED ALUMINUM - STEEL JOINTS By ERIN ELIZABETH PATTERSON A thesis submitted in

  5. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-bulk Performance-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2...

  6. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  7. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  8. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  9. 19 CFR 360.101 - Steel import licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Steel import licensing. 360.101 Section 360.101 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STEEL IMPORT MONITORING AND ANALYSIS SYSTEM § 360.101 Steel import licensing. (a) In general. (1) All imports of basic steel...

  10. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  11. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  12. 19 CFR 360.101 - Steel import licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Steel import licensing. 360.101 Section 360.101 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STEEL IMPORT MONITORING AND ANALYSIS SYSTEM § 360.101 Steel import licensing. (a) In general. (1) All imports of basic steel...

  13. 46 CFR 154.195 - Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. 154.195 Section... Equipment Hull Structure § 154.195 Aluminum cargo tank: Steel enclosure. (a) An aluminum cargo tank and its dome must be enclosed by the vessel's hull structure or a separate steel cover. (b) The steel cover...

  14. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  15. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  16. 19 CFR 360.101 - Steel import licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Steel import licensing. 360.101 Section 360.101 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STEEL IMPORT MONITORING AND ANALYSIS SYSTEM § 360.101 Steel import licensing. (a) In general. (1) All imports of basic steel...

  17. 46 CFR 154.172 - Contiguous steel hull structure.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Contiguous steel hull structure. 154.172 Section 154.172... Structure § 154.172 Contiguous steel hull structure. (a) Except as allowed in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this... construction of the contiguous steel hull structure must meet the thickness and steel grade in Table 1 for...

  18. 19 CFR 360.101 - Steel import licensing.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Steel import licensing. 360.101 Section 360.101 Customs Duties INTERNATIONAL TRADE ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STEEL IMPORT MONITORING AND ANALYSIS SYSTEM § 360.101 Steel import licensing. (a) In general. (1) All imports of basic steel...

  19. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...

  20. 49 CFR 178.504 - Standards for steel drums.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Standards for steel drums. 178.504 Section 178.504...-Oriented Packaging Standards § 178.504 Standards for steel drums. (a) The following are identification codes for steel drums: (1) 1A1 for a non-removable head steel drum; and (2) 1A2 for a removable...