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Sample records for luis obispo counties

  1. 19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, IN CENTRAL PORTION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA. Leeds Hill Barnard & Jewett - Consulting Engineers, February 1942. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANNON, DALE CARTER

    A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

  3. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  4. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  5. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  6. A geophysical study of the hydrogeology of the Carrizo plain area, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.W. )

    1991-02-01

    This investigation was conducted to attempt to locate structural geologic features and variations in aquifer characteristics in an area within the Carrizo plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. The investigation included a review of the established geologic knowledge for the region, followed by field studies. The field studies included surface magnetometer surveys, thermal borehole logging, and a piezometric level survey. Existing borehole electric logs were obtained. The conclusions of the investigation were then derived from a collective interpretation. The investigation concluded that a fault appears to extend beneath the valley fill in the northwestern part of the area, and that a subsurface basaltic dike is apparently located in the southeastern part of the area. Evaluations indicate that the valley has a deep aquifer overlain by a confining clay-rich layer in the central part of the area. Areal and depth-related variations in water quality are probably influenced by the presence of evaporites near Soda Lake and in the region near the San Andreas fault.

  7. Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

  8. Offshore geology and geomorphology from Point Piedras Blancas to Pismo Beach, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Roberts, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Sea level was approximately 120 to 130 m lower during the Last Glacial Maximum (about 21 ka). This approximate depth corresponds to the modern shelf break, a lateral change from the gently dipping (0.8° to 1.0°) outer shelf to the slightly more steeply dipping (about 1.5° to 2.5°) upper slope in the central and northern parts of the map area. South of Point San Luis in San Luis Bay, deltaic deposits offshore of the mouth of the Santa Maria River (11 km south of the map area) have prograded across the shelf break and now form a continuous low-angle (about 0.8°) ramp that extends to water depths of more than 160 m. The shelf break defines the landward boundary of slope deposits. North of Estero Bay, the shelf break is characterized by a distinctly sharp slope break that is mapped as a landslide headscarp above landslide deposits. Multibeam imagery and seismic-reflection profiles across this part of the shelf break show evidence of slope failure, such as slumping, sliding, and soft-sediment deformation, along the entire length of the scarp. Notably, this shelf-break scarp corresponds to a west splay of the Hosgri Fault that dies out just north of the scarp, suggesting that faulting is controlling the location (and instability) of the shelf break in this area.

  9. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  10. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  11. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  12. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  13. 76 FR 10945 - San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of... Corporation as sole Receiver for San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, California, (OTS No. 15051)...

  14. Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, D.W.; Densmore, J.N.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, Falk

    2000-01-01

    The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

  15. Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, David W.; Densmore, Jill N.; Galloway, Devin L.; Amelung, Falk

    2001-01-01

    The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

  16. Support Services for Exceptional Students: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Angelica; And Others

    Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Fresno,…

  17. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  18. Maps showing estimated sediment yield from coastal landslides and active slope distribution along the Big Sur coast, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Green, Krystal R.; Dallas, Kate

    2004-01-01

    The 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Ni?os brought very high precipitation to California?s central coast; this precipitation resulted in raised groundwater levels, coastal flooding, and destabilized slopes throughout the region. Large landslides in the coastal mountains of Big Sur in Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties blocked sections of California State Route 1, closing the road for months at a time. Large landslides such as these occur frequently in the winter months along the Big Sur coast due to the steep topography and weak bedrock. A large landslide in 1983 resulted in the closure of Highway 1 for over a year to repair the road and stabilize the slope. Resulting work from the 1983 landslide cost over $7 million and generated 30 million cubic yards of debris from landslide removal and excavations to re-establish the highway along the Big Sur coast. Before establishment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) in 1992, typical road opening measures involved disposal of some landslide material and excess material generated from slope stabilization onto the seaward side of the highway. It is likely that some or most of this disposed material, either directly or indirectly through subsequent erosion, was eventually transported downslope into the ocean. In addition to the landslides that initiate above the road, natural slope failures sometimes occur on the steep slopes below the road and thus deliver material to the base of the coastal mountains where it is eroded and dispersed by waves and nearshore currents. Any coastal-slope landslide, generated through natural or anthropogenic processes, can result in sediment entering the nearshore zone. The waters offshore of the Big Sur coast are part of the MBNMS. Since it was established in 1992, landslide-disposal practices came under question for two reasons. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 15, Section 922.132 prohibits discharging or depositing, from beyond the boundary of the Sanctuary, any material

  19. 76 FR 39091 - San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of Effectiveness of Surrender

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of... for a Conduit Hydroelectric Project \\1\\ to the San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation...\\ San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District, 17 FERC ] 62,113 (1981). On October...

  20. Building from a sustainability viewpoint: New headquarters for San Luis Obispo Solar Group

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.

    1996-10-01

    The Highway 41 fire of 1994 in Central California destroyed the San Luis Obispo Solar Group complex. This destruction offered them an opportunity to update their approach to sustainability while designing and building new facilities for the firm. This paper will describe this approach and the design characteristics of this project.

  1. Shoreline and Oceano Fault Zones' Intersection Geometry, San Luis Obispo Bay, Offshore South Central Coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P. J.; Nishenko, S. P.; Greene, H. G.; Bergkamp, B.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project, high-resolution 3D low energy marine seismic-reflection data were acquired within San Luis Obispo Bay in 2011 and 2012. Mapping of the sediment-buried bedrock surface using 2D and 3D data clearly reveals that the trace of the Shoreline fault zone bifurcates at Souza Rock. The eastern strand is a reverse fault that trends toward the east-southeast, connecting with the Oceano fault zone onshore. The Shoreline fault is a vertical dextral fault with a very linear geometry that continues south to near the Santa Maria river mouth, and may intersect the Casmalia fault onshore. Both of these fault strands are crossed by Pleistocene low-stand paleochannels eroded into bedrock, and are buried by marine and non-marine sediment. The 3D data show that both the Oceano and Shoreline faults are narrow, well defined fault zones. The reverse slip rate for the Oceano fault (~0.1 mm/y.) falls within published slip rate estimates for the Oceano fault onshore (0.01-0.20 mm/y). The dextral slip rate for the Shoreline fault southeast of Souza Rock is estimated to be 0.06 mm/y. Souza Rock is located on the hanging wall of the Oceano Fault, north of the point of intersection between the Shoreline and Oceano faults. Water depths shoal from 60 m on the surrounding seafloor to 5 m on top of Souza Rock. This structure is interpreted as a structural popup in a restraining bend where the N65°W-trending Oceano fault intersects the N25°W-trending Shoreline fault. The structural geometry near the point of intersection has several minor secondary fault strands, but is remarkably simple.

  2. 76 FR 414 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN North) Rail...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ...), Division 13, Public Resources Code; and FRA's Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts (64 FR 28545... Lowry Davis Center, Lu Gilbert Room, 1232 De La Vina St., Santa Barbara, CA, 93101. San Luis...

  3. Geologic Map of the San Luis Quadrangle, Costilla County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Thompson, Ren A.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    The map area includes San Luis and the primarily rural surrounding area. San Luis, the county seat of Costilla County, is the oldest surviving settlement in Colorado (1851). West of the town are San Pedro and San Luis mesas (basalt-covered tablelands), which are horsts with the San Luis fault zone to the east and the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone to the west. The map also includes the Sanchez graben (part of the larger Culebra graben), a deep structural basin that lies between the San Luis fault zone (on the west) and the central Sangre de Cristo fault zone (on the east). The oldest rocks exposed in the map area are the Pliocene to upper Oligocene basin-fill sediments of the Santa Fe Group, and Pliocene Servilleta Basalt, a regional series of 3.7?4.8 Ma old flood basalts. Landslide deposits and colluvium that rest on sediments of the Santa Fe Group cover the steep margins of the mesas. Rare exposures of the sediment are comprised of siltstones, sandstones, and minor fluvial conglomerates. Most of the low ground surrounding the mesas and in the graben is covered by surficial deposits of Quaternary age. The alluvial deposits are subdivided into three Pleistocene-age units and three Holocene-age units. The oldest Pleistocene gravel (unit Qao) forms extensive coalesced alluvial fan and piedmont surfaces, the largest of which is known as the Costilla Plain. This surface extends west from San Pedro Mesa to the Rio Grande. The primary geologic hazards in the map area are from earthquakes, landslides, and localized flooding. There are three major fault zones in the area (as discussed above), and they all show evidence for late Pleistocene to possible Holocene movement. The landslides may have seismogenic origins; that is, they may be stimulated by strong ground shaking during large earthquakes. Machette and Thompson based this geologic map entirely on new mapping, whereas Drenth supplied geophysical data and interpretations.

  4. 75 FR 59285 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... and Wildlife Service as endangered on December 15, 1994 (59 FR 64613). Section 9 of the Act (16 U.S.C...-3958. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Julie M. Vanderwier, Fish and Wildlife Biologist, or Jen...

  5. 75 FR 8735 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... shoulderband snail was listed as endangered on December 15, 1994 (59 FR 64613). Section 9 of the Act (16 U.S.C... to (805) 644-3958. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Jen Lechuga, HCP Coordinator, at Ventura...

  6. Magnetic map of the Irish Hills and surrounding areas, San Luis Obispo County, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Watt, J.T.; Denton, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic map of the Irish Hills and surrounding areas was created as part of a cooperative research and development agreement with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and is intended to promote further understanding of the areal geology and structure by serving as a basis for geophysical interpretations and by supporting geological mapping, mineral and water resource investigations, and other topical studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's magnetic field (evident as anomalies on magnetic maps) reflect the distribution of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite, in the underlying rocks. In many cases the volume content of magnetic minerals can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in the amount of magnetic minerals can be related to either lithologic or structural boundaries. Magnetic susceptibility measurements from the area indicate that bodies of serpentinite and other mafic and ultramafic rocks tend to produce the most intense magnetic anomalies, but such generalizations must be applied with caution because some sedimentary units also can produce measurable magnetic anomalies. Remanent magnetization does not appear to be a significant source for magnetic anomalies because it is an order of magnitude less than the induced magnetization. The map is a mosaic of three separate surveys collected by (1) fixed-wing aircraft at a nominal height of 305 m, (2) by boat with the sensor at sea level, and (3) by helicopter. The helicopter survey was flown by New-Sense Geophysics in October 2009 along flight lines spaced 150-m apart and at a nominal terrain clearance of 50 to 100 m. Tie lines were flown 1,500-m apart. Data were adjusted for lag error and diurnal field variations. Further processing included microleveling using the tie lines and subtraction of the reference field defined by International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 2005 extrapolated to August 1, 2008.

  7. 78 FR 57651 - Habitat Conservation Plan for the Community of Los Osos, San Luis Obispo County, CA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ..., intend to prepare either an Environmental Assessment (EA) or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act, as amended (NEPA), for the proposed Los Osos Community-wide... Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; NEPA), and its implementing regulations...

  8. Fleas (Siphonaptera) infesting giant kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ingens) on the Elkhorn and Carrizo Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S P; Williams, D F; Germano, D J; Thomas, R E

    1993-01-01

    The giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens (Merriam), has a limited distribution in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. Because of reductions in its geographic range, largely resulting from humans, the species was listed as an endangered species in 1980 by the California Fish and Game Commission. As part of a study of the community ecology of southern California endangered species, including D. ingens, we were able to make flea collections from the rats when they were trapped and marked for population studies. All but one of the fleas collected from the D. ingens in this study were Hoplopsyllus anomalus, a flea normally associated with ground squirrels (Sciuridae). It has been suggested that giant kangaroo rats fill the ground squirrel niche within their range. Our data indicate that this role includes a normal association with Hoplopsyllus anomalus.

  9. 78 FR 73557 - Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes National Wildlife Refuge, San Luis Obispo County, CA: Intent To Prepare a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ..., objectives, and strategies that will ensure the best possible approach to wildlife, plant, and habitat... habitats and assist in the recovery of native plants and animals that are federally listed as threatened or..., protecting and restoring biodiversity, creating and leading conservation partnerships, and providing safe...

  10. Review of samples of water, sediment, tailings, and biota at the Little Bonanza mercury mine, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Goldstein, Daniel N.; Brussee, Brianne E.; May, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Sample Sites and Methods Samples were collected to assess the concentrations of Hg and biogeochemically relevant constituents in tailings and wasterock piles at the Little Bonanza Hg mine. Tailings are present adjacent to a three-pipe retort used to process the Hg ore. The tailings occur in the upper 15 cm of the soil adjacent to the retort and slag from the retort is present on the surface. An area of disturbed soil and rock uphill from the retort was likely formed during construction of a dam that provided water for mining activities. Wasterock in these piles was sampled. The largest amount of tailings is exposed to the west of the retort in the bank of WF Las Tablas Creek. Water, sediment, and biota were sampled from WF Las Tablas Creek, which flows through the mine area. Sample-site locations are shown in figures 10 and 11 and listed in table 1. Samples were collected when streamflow was low and no precipitation had occurred.

  11. Map showing coastal cliff retreat rates along the Big Sur coast, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Green, Krystal R.

    2004-01-01

    The average coastal cliff retreat rate along the Big Sur coast is 18 ? 6 cm/yr as measured over a 52-year time period. The erosion reference features measured as the cliff edge include the well-defined cliff edges common to marine terraces, slight breaks in the slope defining the upper edge of the active lower slope, and the road grade. Cliff erosion and retreat are focused in isolated erosion hotspots that account for most of the calculated average retreat.

  12. Geologic Map of the San Luis Hills Area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Ren A.; Machette, Michael N.

    1989-01-01

    This report is a digital image of the U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1906, 'Geologic map of the San Luis Hills area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado,' which was published in 1989 by Thompson and Machette, scale 1:50,000 but has been unavailable in a digital version. The map area represents the southwestern portion of the Alamosa 30' x 60' quadrangle, which is currently being remapped by the U.S. Geological Survey. The northern and eastern margins of the San Luis Hills area have been remapped at greater detail and thus small portions of the map area have been updated. The northern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1392, the northeastern portion is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1124, and the eastern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1074. The most significant changes to the 1989 map area are recognition of Lake Alamosa and its deposits (Alamosa Formation), remapping of bedrock in the northeastern San Luis Hills, and redating of volcanic units in the San Luis Hills. Although unpublished, new 40Ar/39Ar ages for volcanic units in the Conejos and Hinsdale Formations add precision to the previous K/Ar-dated rocks, but do not change the basic chronology of the units. The digital version of this map was prepared by Theodore R. Brandt by scanning the original map at 300 pixels per inch, prior to creating the press-quality (96 Mb) and standard (5 Mb) .pdf files.

  13. Effects of topographic position and geology on shaking damage to residential wood-framed structures during the 2003 San Simeon earthquake, western San Luis obispo county, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrink, T.P.; Wills, C.J.; Real, C.R.; Manson, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical evaluation of shaking damage to wood-framed houses caused by the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake indicates that both the rate and severity of damage, independent of structure type, are significantly greater on hilltops compared to hill slopes when underlain by Cretaceous or Tertiary sedimentary rocks. This increase in damage is interpreted to be the result of topographic amplification. An increase in the damage rate is found for all structures built on Plio-Pleistocene rocks independent of topographic position, and this is interpreted to be the result of amplified shaking caused by geologic site response. Damage rate and severity to houses built on Tertiary rocks suggest that amplification due to both topographic position and geologic site response may be occurring in these rocks, but effects from other topographic parameters cannot be ruled out. For all geologic and topographic conditions, houses with raised foundations are more frequently damaged than those with slab foundations. However, the severity of damage to houses on raised foundations is only significantly greater for those on hill slopes underlain by Tertiary rocks. Structures with some damage-resistant characteristics experienced greater damage severity on hilltops, suggesting a spectral response to topographic amplification. ?? 2010, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  14. Digital data and derivative products from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the central San Luis basin, covering parts of Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande counties, Colorado, and Taos county, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Webbers, Ank; PRJ, Inc

    2005-01-01

    This report describes data collected from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey flown over the central San Luis basin during October, 2004, by PRJ, Inc., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The survey extends from just north of Alamosa, Colorado, southward to just northwest of Taos, New Mexico. It covers large parts of the San Luis Valley in Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande Counties, southern Colorado, and the Taos Plateau in Taos County, northern New Mexico. The survey was designed to complement two surveys previously acquired along the eastern borders of the San Luis Basin over the vicinities of Taos, New Mexico (Bankey and others, 2004a) and Blanca, Colorado (Bankey and others, 2004b). Our overall objective in conducting these surveys is to improve knowledge of the subsurface geologic framework in order to understand ground-water systems in populated alluvial basins along the Rio Grande. These USGS efforts are conducted in collaboration with other federal, state, and local governmental entities where possible.

  15. Digital data from the Questa-San Luis and Santa Fe East helicopter magnetic surveys in Santa Fe and Taos Counties, New Mexico, and Costilla County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Drenth, B.J.; ,

    2006-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for aeromagnetic data collected during high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in December, 2005. One survey covers the eastern edge of the San Luis basin, including the towns of Questa, New Mexico and San Luis, Colorado. A second survey covers the mountain front east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, including the town of Chimayo and portions of the Pueblos of Tesuque and Nambe. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including reduced-to-pole data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

  16. 5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING VALVES. VIEW TO NORTH. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. 23. CUESTA TUNNEL, PORTAL STRUCTURES. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CUESTA TUNNEL, PORTAL STRUCTURES. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no number, revised 10/10/41. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 13. GROOVED FOOTING (CONSTRUCTION KEY) EXTENDING ABOVE CEMENT FLOOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GROOVED FOOTING (CONSTRUCTION KEY) EXTENDING ABOVE CEMENT FLOOR IN FIRST UNLINED SECTION BEYOND SOUTH PORTAL. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. 22. TRANSMISSION MAIN, PLAN AND PROFILE, INDEX SHEET. Leeds, Hill, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. TRANSMISSION MAIN, PLAN AND PROFILE, INDEX SHEET. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no date, no number. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. Biological assessment of the effects of activities conducted at Camp Roberts Army National Guard training site, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California, on the endangered san joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-12-01

    Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act of 1973 imposes several requirements on federal agencies concerning listed threatened and endangered species and their designated critical habitat. Camp Roberts is operated by the California Army National Guard (CA ARNG) with funding from the National Guard Bureau (NGB). Its primary mission to provide a site where military training requirements of the western United States can be met. The presence of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) was confirmed in 1960 and the distribution and abundance of the species increased over the next two decades. The Secretary of Interior has not designated any critical habitat for San Joaquin kit fox. The major objective of this Biological Assessment is to provide FWS with sufficient information concerning the possible impacts that routine military training, maintenance and repair activities, and proposed construction projects may have on the San Joaquin kit fox and its essential habitat at Camp Roberts so that formal consultation with NGB and CA ARNG can begin. FWS will use this information as part of the basis for issuing a Biological Opinion which will include an incidental take provision. 45 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  1. 34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR, PULPIT - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 21. CHAINAGE FROM SALINAS DAM TO NORTH PORTAL, STATIONS. Leeds, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. CHAINAGE FROM SALINAS DAM TO NORTH PORTAL, STATIONS. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no date, no number, title block partially obscured. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. 20. GEOLOGY, PLAN AND PROFILE, SHOWING LINED AND UNLINED SECTIONS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. GEOLOGY, PLAN AND PROFILE, SHOWING LINED AND UNLINED SECTIONS, AND DETAILED TYPICAL CROSS SECTIONS. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no number, revised 3-20-42. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. 22. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING THE STRUTS, POURED TO ALIGN WITH THE RIGHT (WEST) BUTTRESS. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  5. 24. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown, report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) SALINAS DAM COMPLETION PHOTO. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  6. 23. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CURVED CONCRETE CHUTE SPILLWAY. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  7. 21. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) SALINAS DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN 1941. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. 75 FR 17430 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Kern, San Luis Obispo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... condor, its habitat, and other wildlife resources. The refuge encompasses 2,471 contiguous acres owned in... for California condors. The refuge encompasses nearly 14,097 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish... condor. Blue Ridge NWR encompasses 897 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  9. 77 FR 49856 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Salinas to San Luis Obispo Portion of the Coast Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... relieve some of the projected near- and long-term demand on the highway system, potentially slowing the... generate increased travel demand. By 2040, statewide population is expected to grow substantially, further... challenges as evidenced by the following: Constrained Travel Options--While the Coast Corridor is served by...

  10. Serologic survey for disease in endangered San Joaquin kit fox, Vulpes macrotis mutica, inhabiting the Elk Hills Naval Petroleum Reserve, Kern County, California

    SciTech Connect

    McCue, P.M.; O'Farrell, T.P.

    1986-07-01

    Serum from endangered San Joaquin kit foxes, Vulpes macrotis mutica, and sympatric wildlife inhabiting the Elk Hills Petroleum Reserve, Kern County, and Elkhorn Plain, San Luis Obispo County, California, was collected in 1981 to 1982 and 1984, and tested for antibodies against 10 infectious disease pathogens. Proportions of kit fox sera containing antibodies against diseases were: canine parvovirus, 100% in 1981 to 1982 and 67% in 1984; infectious canine hepatitis, 6% in 1981 to 1982 and 21% in 1984; canine distemper, 0 in 1981 to 1982 and 14% in 1984; tularemia, 8% in 1981 to 1982 and 31% in 1984; Brucella abortus, 8% in 1981 to 1982 and 3% in 1984; Brucella canis, 14% in 1981 to 1982 and 0 in 1984; toxoplasmosis, 6% in 1981 to 1982; coccidioidomycosis, 3% in 1981 to 1982; and plague and leptospirosis, 0 in 1981 to 1982. High population density, overlapping home ranges, ability to disperse great distances, and infestation by ectoparasites were cited as possible factors in the transmission and maintenance of these diseases in kit fox populations.

  11. 17. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF EXTERIOR, 1936 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 25. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF ARCHES - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. 30. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF NORTH & WEST WALLS OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 27. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER OF QUADRANGLE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  15. 24. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF EXTERIOR ARCHES FROM AN ANGLE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. 35. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. 22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SIDE VIEW OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 23. Photocopy of photograph (From William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (From William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SIDE VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM A DISTANCE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. 26. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown CLOSE-UP OF ARCHES - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. 21. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown CLOSE-UP OF REAR OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  1. 32. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SOUTH END OF CORRIDOR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 33. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library. Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library. Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF SOUTH END OF CORRIDOR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. 28. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown NORTHEAST CORNER OF COMPLEX - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. 20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM REAR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  5. 29. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CORNER - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  6. 36. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR OF CHURCH, LOOKING TOWARD THE FRONT - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  7. 31. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown REAR AND NORTH WALL OF CHURCH AND OLD INDIAN CEMETERY - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society, 1900) Photographer unknown, Date unknown FRONT VIEW OF MISSION, c. 1900 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  9. 15. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, c. 1890) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM AN ANGLE, c. 1890 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  10. Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the

  11. Hydrology of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, P.A.; Boettcher, A.J.; Snipes, R.J.; Mcintyre, H.J.

    1969-01-01

    An investigation of the water resources of the Colorado part of the San Luis Valley was begun in 1966 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. (See index map, fig. 1). The purpose of the investigation is to provide information for planning and implementing improved water-development and management practices. The major water problems in the San Luis Valley include (1) waterlogging, (2) waste of water by nonbeneficial evapotranspiration, (3) deterioration of ground-water chemical quality, and (4) failure of Colorado to deliver water to New Mexico and Texas in accordance with the Rio Grande Compact. This report describes the hydrologic environment, extent of water-resource development, and some of the problems related to that development. Information presented is based on data collected from 1966 to 1968 and on previous studies. Subsequent reports are planned as the investigation progresses. The San Luis Valley extends about 100 miles from Poncha Pass near the northeast corner of Saguache County, Colo., to a point about 16 miles south of the Colorado-New Mexico State line. The total area is 3,125 square miles, of which about 3,000 are in Colorado. The valley is nearly flat except for the San Luis Hills and a few other small areas. The Colorado part of the San Luis Valley, which is described in this report, has an average altitude of about 7,700 feet. Bounding the valley on the west are the San Juan Mountains and on the east the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Most of the valley floor is bordered by alluvial fans deposited by streams originating in the mountains, the most extensive being the Rio Grande fan (see block diagram, fig. 2 in pocket). Most of the streamflow is derived from snowmelt from 4,700 square miles of watershed in the surrounding mountains. The northern half of the San Luis Valley is internally drained and is referred to as the closed basin. The lowest part of this area is known locally as the "sump." The

  12. Differences and Commonalities: Farmer Stratifications in the San Luis Valley Research/Extension Project Area. ARE Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Jerry B.

    A research project in the San Luis Valley of Colorado sought to isolate a few unique farm types that could become target groups for the design and implementation of agricultural research and extension programs. Questionnaires were completed by 44 of 65 farmers in one watershed area of Conejos County. Analysis revealed a complex pattern of…

  13. Main interior space facing south toward the ocean. Original scissor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main interior space facing south toward the ocean. Original scissor trusses and deck roof are visible at the top. Octagonal window with large picture windows face the ocean. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 77 FR 11084 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact Report for the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-24

    ...), including waste water treatment and related facilities and water supply, storage, treatment, and.../ Environmental Impact Report for the Proposed Cambria Water Supply Project, San Luis Obispo County, CA AGENCY... implement a project to provide for a reliable water supply for the community of Cambria in San Luis...

  15. View of the main interior space facing east. The main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the main interior space facing east. The main entry is on the left hand side at the rear. The exit to the deck is to the right. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin is the main sources of municipal water for the region. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey, called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. The primary goal of the MT survey is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock type. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers in the region. This report does not include any interpretation of the data. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at the 22 stations shown in figure 1.

  17. Magnetotelluric Data, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2008-01-01

    The San Luis Valley region population is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region?s ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey (called magnetotellurics, or MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. The MT survey primary goal is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. This report does not include any data interpretation. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at 24 stations. Two of the stations were collected near Santa Fe, New Mexico, near deep wildcat wells. Well logs from those wells will help tie future interpretations of this data with geologic units from the Santa Fe Group sediments to Precambrian basement.

  18. Neuroimaging Features of San Luis Valley Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Whitehead, Matthew T.; Lee, Bonmyong

    2015-01-01

    A 14-month-old Hispanic female with a history of double-outlet right ventricle and developmental delay in the setting of recombinant chromosome 8 syndrome was referred for neurologic imaging. Brain MR revealed multiple abnormalities primarily affecting midline structures, including commissural dysgenesis, vermian and brainstem hypoplasia/dysplasia, an interhypothalamic adhesion, and an epidermoid between the frontal lobes that enlarged over time. Spine MR demonstrated hypoplastic C1 and C2 posterior elements, scoliosis, and a borderline low conus medullaris position. Presented herein is the first illustration of neuroimaging findings from a patient with San Luis Valley syndrome. PMID:26425383

  19. Reconstructing a Spanish Mission: San Luis de Talimali.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Bonnie G.; Hann, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the reconstruction of the San Luis de Talimali, which was among the largest and most important missions in Spanish Florida with the Apalachee Indians as their parishioners. Describes the various structures found at San Luis: (1) the council house; (2) the chief's house; and (3) the church. (CMK)

  20. Voice and Valency in San Luis Potosi Huasteco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz Ledo Yanez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of the system of transitivity, voice and valency alternations in Huasteco of San Luis Potosi (Mayan) within a functional-typological framework. The study is based on spoken discourse and elicited data collected in the municipalities of Aquismon and Tancanhuitz de Santos in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The…

  1. 40 CFR 81.176 - San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.176 Section 81.176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.176 San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San Luis...

  2. 40 CFR 81.176 - San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. 81.176 Section 81.176 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Quality Control Regions § 81.176 San Luis Intrastate Air Quality Control Region. The San Luis...

  3. 76 FR 6517 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Petition for a Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ... Surface Transportation Board San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad--Petition for a Declaratory Order AGENCY... INFORMATION: In response to a petition filed by San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad (SLRG), the Board instituted a.... See San Luis & Rio Grande R.R.--Petition for a Declaratory Order, FD 35380 (STB served Aug. 12,...

  4. General Community Needs Assessment: Conducted for the Development of the Educational and Facilities Master Plan.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shaffer, Richard A.

    In 1990, a needs assessment survey was conducted of residents of San Luis Obispo County to gather information regarding community members' experiences with Cuesta College (CC), opinions about what CC should be doing, assessment of how good a job the college is doing, and obstacles preventing people from attending CC. Study findings, based on…

  5. 12. CONCRETE STAIRWAY LEADING TO A LANDING BUILT TO HOUSE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    12. CONCRETE STAIRWAY LEADING TO A LANDING BUILT TO HOUSE THE MACHINERY AND COUNTERWEIGHT FOR THE DRUM GATE WHICH WAS NEVER INSTALLED, INSIDE THE RIGHT (WEST) BUTTRESS. CAMERA FACING NORTH. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  6. 40 CFR 52.236 - Rules and regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... following Air Pollution Control District (APCD) rules do not define the term “agricultural operations,” the... November 10, 1976. (b) The following Air Pollution Control District (APCD) rules are disapproved because... control rules unenforceable: (1) San Luis Obispo County APCD. (i) Rules 401(B)(4) and 401(B)(6),...

  7. 11. Photocopy of Painting (Original in De Young Museum, San ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Photocopy of Painting (Original in De Young Museum, San Francisco, Oriana Day Paintings 1861-1865) Photographer unknown, February 1940 PAINTING OF MISSION COMPLEX SHOWING EXTERIOR PRIOR TO 1835 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. Social Integration and Health Behavioral Change in San Luis, Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuestion, Michael J.; Calle, Ana Quijano; Drasbek, Christopher; Harkins, Thomas; Sagastume, Lourdes J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effects of social integration on behavioral change in the course of an intensive, community-based public health intervention. The intervention trained volunteers and mobilized local organizations to promote 16 key family health practices in rural San Luis, Honduras, during 2004 to 2006. A mixed methods approach is used.…

  9. Rotavirus epidemiology in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Noyola, Daniel E; Herrera, Ismael F

    2005-07-01

    The epidemiology of rotavirus infections was investigated in San Luis Potosí, Mexico during a 6-year period. In each of the study years, the epidemic period started in October or November; peak activity was detected between December and February, and the end of the epidemic occurred in March or April. Rotavirus infections show a consistent temporal pattern in our community.

  10. Working (And Sparring) With Luis: Some Personal Recollections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pripstein, Moishe

    2011-04-01

    Luis Alvarez was the most remarkable physicist I have ever worked with. As a member of his bubble chamber group at the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley and subsequently as a leader of that group for several years, I could appreciate his outstanding attributes as a physicist and his forceful and colorful personality. Each day at the lab seemed exciting. Although he created the largest research group in particle physics in the world at the time, Luis was an ardent foe of group-think, which he characterized as ``intellectual phase-lock''. He had an uncanny intuition about physics and technology, coupled with an insatiable curiosity about the world around him. He is justly renowned as a member of the Inventors Hall of Fame for his myriad inventions and as a Nobel Laureate in physics for his contributions to particle physics through his development of the hydrogen bubble chamber technique, leading to the discovery of a large number of resonance states. However, it was his wide-ranging curiosity which led him to one of his finest achievements, while working with his son Walter - developing the asteroid impact theory as the explanation of the extinction of the dinosaurs. I will offer some personal recollections of Luis and the group in this period, including some of his other intriguing efforts which illustrate the breadth of his interests, pertaining to the Kennedy assassination and x-raying the pyramids, among them. All in all, a brilliant and most unusual scientist and stimulating colleague.

  11. Geothermal resource assessment of western San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Zacharakis, Ted G.; Pearl, Richard Howard; Ringrose, Charles D.

    1983-01-01

    The Colorado Geological Survey initiated and carried out a fully integrated assessment program of the geothermal resource potential of the western San Luis Valley during 1979 and 1980. The San Luis Valley is a large intermontane basin located in southcentral Colorado. While thermal springs and wells are found throughout the Valley, the only thermal waters found along the western part of the Valley are found at Shaw Warm Springs which is a relatively unused spring located approximately 6 miles (9.66 km) north of Del Norte, Colorado. The waters at Shaws Warm Spring have a temperature of 86 F (30 C), a discharge of 40 gallons per minute and contain approximately 408 mg/l of total dissolved solids. The assessment program carried out din the western San Luis Valley consisted of: soil mercury geochemical surveys; geothermal gradient drilling; and dipole-dipole electrical resistivity traverses, Schlumberger soundings, Audio-magnetotelluric surveys, telluric surveys, and time-domain electro-magnetic soundings and seismic surveys. Shaw Warm Springs appears to be the only source of thermal waters along the western side of the Valley. From the various investigations conducted the springs appear to be fault controlled and is very limited in extent. Based on best evidence presently available estimates are presented on the size and extent of Shaw Warm Springs thermal system. It is estimated that this could have an areal extent of 0.63 sq. miles (1.62 sq. km) and contain 0.0148 Q's of heat energy.

  12. Cannibalism in wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) at Lui Kotale.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Andrew; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2010-06-01

    We describe the cannibalization of an infant bonobo (circa 2.5 years old) at Lui Kotale, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The infant died of unknown causes and was consumed by several community members including its mother and an older sibling one day after death. Certain features concerning the pattern of consumption fit in with previously observed episodes of cannibalism in Pan, whereas others, such as the mother's participation in consuming the body, are notable. The incident suggests that filial cannibalism among apes need not be the result of nutritional or social stress and does not support the idea that filial cannibalism is a behavioral aberration.

  13. Art as Critical Public Pedagogy: A Qualitative Study of Luis Camnitzer and His Conceptual Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana; Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness from the perspective and work of conceptual artist, Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework is grounded in the critical public pedagogy literature. Data collection methods included interviews with conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer and with…

  14. 76 FR 14042 - San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service ; 60138-1265-6CCP-S3] San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex... Statement (EIS) for the San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex (Complex) in Alamosa, Colorado. The Complex comprises Baca, Monte Vista, and Alamosa National Wildlife Refuges (NWRs).We provide this...

  15. Luis de Florez and the Special Devices Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Paul Louis

    This Dissertation presents the life of Luis de Florez and the World War II history of the Special Devices Division (SDD) of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics. Luis de Florez was a well known consulting engineer, aviation fuel expert, private pilot and reserve Naval officer. While on active duty in 1940, he received the assignment to improve the Navy's flight training methods. To accomplish this objective, he promoted the concept of synthetic training, the use of simulators and other non-operational equipment, to provide training for Navy flight personnel such as pilots, gunners, navigators, flight engineers, radio operators and others as well as for ground based people like mechanics. He founded the Special Devices Division to design the tools and equipment needed for this type of training. The success of synthetic training and the devices developed by the SDD received recognition by the awarding of the Collier Trophy to de Florez in December 1944. This trophy is awarded annually for the most significant aeronautical achievement of the previous year (1943). De Florez received the award for the strategic accomplishment of training thousands of American airmen in 1943. The work of the Division also had other important technical, social, financial and operational impacts on the prosecution of WW II by the Allies. The work of the Division also had impacts on American society as a whole that persist to the present day. These impacts are discussed in detail. The Dissertation presents details of the devices and their use in aviation training as well as a history of the Division during the war. After the war, de Florez led an advisory board for the CIA. These activities and some of both the positive and negative results of the work of this board are discussed. This discussion includes de Florez' involvement in the CIA's drug experiments and the unfortunate Frank Olsen affair.

  16. Magnetotelluric data collected to characterize aquifers in the San Luis Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin as part of the Geologic Framework of Rio Grande Basins project. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, magnetotelluric surveys, and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers in the San Luis Basin. This report describes one north-south and two east-west regional magnetotelluric sounding profiles, acquired in June of 2010 and July and August of 2011, across the San Luis Basin in northern New Mexico. No interpretation of the data is included.

  17. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: an economic measure of regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Templeton, Joshua J; Wu, Shanshan

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). We measured the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNRP over time. Any attempt at green accounting requires both economic and natural capital data. However, limited data for the Basin requires a number of simplifying assumptions and requires transforming economic data at the national, state, and county levels to the level of the SLB. Given the contribution of agribusiness to the SLB, we included the depletion of both groundwater and soil as components in the depreciation of natural capital. We also captured the effect of the consumption of energy on climate change for future generations through carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. In order to estimate the depreciation of natural capital, the shadow price of water for agriculture, the economic damages from soil erosion due to wind, and the social cost of carbon emissions were obtained from the literature and applied to the SLB using benefit transfer. We used Colorado's total factor productivity for agriculture to estimate the value of time (i.e., to include the effects of exogenous technological progress). We aggregated the economic data and the depreciation of natural capital for the SLB from 1980 to 2005. The results suggest that GNRP had a slight upward trend through most of this time period, despite temporary negative trends, the longest of which occurred during the period 1985-86 to 1987-88. However, given the upward trend in GNRP and the possibility of business cycles causing the temporary declines, there is no definitive evidence of moving away from sustainability.

  18. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: an economic measure of regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Templeton, Joshua J; Wu, Shanshan

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). We measured the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNRP over time. Any attempt at green accounting requires both economic and natural capital data. However, limited data for the Basin requires a number of simplifying assumptions and requires transforming economic data at the national, state, and county levels to the level of the SLB. Given the contribution of agribusiness to the SLB, we included the depletion of both groundwater and soil as components in the depreciation of natural capital. We also captured the effect of the consumption of energy on climate change for future generations through carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. In order to estimate the depreciation of natural capital, the shadow price of water for agriculture, the economic damages from soil erosion due to wind, and the social cost of carbon emissions were obtained from the literature and applied to the SLB using benefit transfer. We used Colorado's total factor productivity for agriculture to estimate the value of time (i.e., to include the effects of exogenous technological progress). We aggregated the economic data and the depreciation of natural capital for the SLB from 1980 to 2005. The results suggest that GNRP had a slight upward trend through most of this time period, despite temporary negative trends, the longest of which occurred during the period 1985-86 to 1987-88. However, given the upward trend in GNRP and the possibility of business cycles causing the temporary declines, there is no definitive evidence of moving away from sustainability. PMID:22483369

  19. The San Luis Project: An Attempt to Decentralize Physics in Mexico

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Will, T. A.; Valladares, A. A.

    1976-01-01

    Described is a project being conducted by the Physics Institute of the University of San Luis Potori, Mexico, in order to avoid concentrating physics education and research activities in Mexico City. (SL)

  20. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of northern San Luis Valley, Colorado: A remote sensing investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Huntley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of San Luis Valley west of San Luis Creek was primarily from ground water flow in the volcanic aquifers of the San Juan Mountains. The high permeability and anisotropic nature of the volcanic rocks resulted in very little contrast in flow conditions between the San Juan Mountains and San Luis Valley. Ground water recharge to aquifers of eastern San Luis Valley was primarily from stream seepage into the upper reaches of the alluvial fans at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The use of photography and thermal infrared imagery resulted in a savings of time and increase in accuracy in regional hydrogeologic studies. Volcanic rocks exhibited the same spectral reflectance curve as sedimentary rocks, with only the absolute magnitude of reflectance varying. Both saline soils and vegetation were used to estimate general ground water depths.

  1. Reconnaissance for uranium-bearing carbonaceous rocks in California and adjacent parts of Oregon and Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Moore, George Winfred; Stephens, James G.

    1954-01-01

    During the summer of 1952 a reconnaissance was conducted in California and parts of Oregon and Nevada in search of new deposits of uranium-bearing carbonaceous rocks. The principal localities found in California where uranium occurs in coal are listed here with. the uranium content of the coal: Newhall prospect, Los Angeles County, 0.020 percent; Fireflex mine, San Benito County, 0.005 percent; American licyaite mine, Amador County, 0.004 percent; and Tesla prospect, Alameda County, 0.003 percent. An oil-saturated sandstone near Edna, San Luis Obispo County, contains 0.002 percent uranium.

  2. Coccidioidomycosis in southern sea otters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thomas, Nancy J.; Pappagianis, Demosthenes; Creekmore, Lynn; Duncan, Ruth M.

    1994-01-01

    Disseminated coccidioidomycosis was diagnosed postmortem in six southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) found dying or dead along the Pacific Coast of California at San Luis Obispo County.  These otters were found during winter or summer 1992, 1993, and 1994.  Coccidioides immitis was identified by its morphology in tissue impression smears and by histopathology, and was confirmed by culture.  Positive serologic results were obtained from four of five sea otters tested.  The lungs, pleura, tracheobronchial lymph nodes, liver, and spleen were involved in each case.  There was meningeal involvement in half of the affected animals.  Coccidioidomycosis has been reported in a wild sea otter only once previously, in 1976, and that otter was also found on the coast of San Luis Obispo County.

  3. Coccidioidomycosis in a California sea otter (Enhydra lutris).

    PubMed

    Cornell, L H; Osborn, K G; Antrim, J E; Simpson, J G

    1979-07-01

    A weak and emaciated California sea otter (Enhydra lutris) was found stranded on Atascadero Beach in Morro Bay, California. It died three weeks after capture. A diagnosis of coccidioidomycosis was confirmed by histology, serology and culture. This is believed to be the first reported case of this disease from the Morro Bay area of San Luis Obispo County, California as well as the first reported case in a free-ranging marine mammal.

  4. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.A.; Johnson, C.M.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande Rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved. -from Authors

  5. InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreüder, W. A.; Shanker, P.; Lauknes, T. R.

    2009-05-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio Grande Decision Support System to refine the hydogeologic characterization of the system, including the development of a MODFLOW finite difference model of groundwater flow. The main challenge in the SLV is acquiring sufficient data to characterize the spatially heterogeneous, time-varying behavior of the groundwater system. Here we apply the small baseline subset analysis (SBAS) interferometric radar (InSAR) technique to provide such data. InSAR techniques yield the deformation of Earth's surface at fine spatial resolution occurring between two satellite overflights, and SBAS permits solution for a time series of deformation maps. The measured deformation can be related to changes in the water table in underlying confined aquifers. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. Historically, InSAR measurements have been difficult to make in agricultural areas. The change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation and the loss of useful information about surface deformation. The recently-developed SBAS method allows stable deformation estimates at certain ground points in an otherwise decorrelated time series of data. We applied this approach to data collected by the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV from track 98 frame 2853 for the years 1992-2001. We used the Generic SAR (GSAR) SBAS software developed by Norut to produce time series deformation measurements for many positions across the entire SLV. We find that the 2000 km2 area captured in track 98 frame 2853 shows very high

  6. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the Northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thompson, Ren A.; Johnson, Clark M.; Mehnert, Harald H.

    1991-07-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Oligocene (˜26 Ma) volcanic rocks of the Hinsdale Formation at San Luis Hills range from 49 to 57 wt % SiO2 and include nepheline and hypersthene normative lavas. A mildly alkalic series consisting of trachybasalt, basaltic trachyandesite, and trachyandesite is volumetrically dominant, olivine tholeiites are subordinate, and xenocrystic trachyandesites containing abundant quartz and plagioclase xenocrysts occur only locally. Relative to the San Luis Hills olivine tholeiites which have La/Smn ˜ 2, the more alkaline series are enriched in light rare earth elements (LREE) and have La/Sm ratios that increase in the trachybasalt-basaltic trachyandesite suite (La/Smn ˜ 3) to xenocrystic trachyandesites that are the most LREE enriched (La/Smn ˜ 4). Chondrite-normalized, trace element patterns for the lavas in the San Luis Hills are similar in shape within the mildly alkaline to transitional series; they have characteristic Nb and Ta depletions and high K and Th relative to Ta, Nb, and LREE. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. Pb isotopes are the most sensitive indicators of crustal contamination, whereas shifts in Nd and Sr isotope ratios are associated with large amounts of assimilation. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved.

  7. 76 FR 33337 - Endangered Species Recovery Permit Applications

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... (capture, handle, and release) the Stephens' kangaroo rat (Dipodomys stephensi) in conjunction with surveys... of Land Management in Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, Tulare, Kings, Fresno, and Kern...

  8. Contrasts in early Miocene subsidence history across Oceanic-West Huasna fault system, northern Santa Maria province, California

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, M.E. ); Keller, M.A. ); Filewicz, N.V.; Thornton, M.L.C. )

    1991-02-01

    Within the Oceanic-West Huasna fault system of western San Luis Obispo County, thick bathyal mudstone records abrupt early Miocene subsidence. Lower Miocene rocks west of the fault, in contrast, suggest a relative high. Between fault splays, {le} 1,800 ft of mudstone (Rincon Formation) contains Saucesian lower bathyal foraminifera and CN2-CN1c ({approximately} 17-21 Ma) nannofossils. The mudstone was deposited on a subsiding erosional surface cut on Great Valley and Franciscan basement overlain locally by late Oligocene rhyodacite (Cambria Felsite), nonmarine conglomerate (Lospe Formation), and nearshore sandstone (Vaqueros Formation). Basinal late early to middle Miocene Obispo and Monterey formations overlie the older mudstone. West of the fault, major subsidence does not conclusively predate {approximately} 17 Ma submarine Obispo tuff. Northeast of Morro Bay, nearshore Vaqueros underlies Obispo or Monterey formations. Northeast of Santa Maria, Franciscan rocks are overlain by thin nonmarine conglomerate, sandstone with upper bathyal Saucesian foraminifera and upper CN2 nannofossils, and Obispo volcanics. Near Cambria, nonmarine conglomerate and Vaqueros sandstone were deposited on the Franciscan between {approximately} 27-27 Ma (Cambria Felsite) and 25 Ma ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr on Vaqueros shells); only {approximately}100 ft of basinal mudstone separates Vaqueros from obispo tuff. In the Pismo syncline, the Franciscan was near sea level 25 Ma ({sup 87}Sr/{sup 86}Sr or shells); subsidence to bathyal depths cannot be demonstrated until just before Obispo eruption. Paleobathymetric estimates suggest initiation of at least 6,000 ft of subsidence along the fault system {approximately} 20-21 Ma. The block to the west, in contrast, either stayed high, or subsided but was uplifted and stripped, subsiding again as Obispo eruption began. The authors have not found evidence for major lateral offset on this fault.

  9. 75 FR 76726 - San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of San Luis ] Solar, LLC's application for market-based...

  10. Lagrangian water quality dynamics in the San Luis Drain, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmar, E. C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Henson, S. S.; Borglin, S. E.; Kendall, C.

    2007-12-01

    Integration of temporal changes in biological and water quality constituents during downstream transport is critical to understanding aquatic ecosystem and biogeochemical dynamics of rivers, estuaries, and the near- coastal waters into which rivers flow. Changes in chemical, physical, and biological water quality constituents during downstream transport can be evaluated by following a specific parcel of water, known as a Lagrangian study. The objective of this study was to differentiate changes in water quality constituents occurring within a parcel of water as it travels downstream to the changes observed at a fixed sampling location. We sampled a parcel of agricultural drainage water as it traveled downstream for 84 h in a concrete-lined channel (San Luis Drain in San Joaquin Valley) with no additional water inputs or outputs. The Lagrangian sampling occurred in August 2006 and June 2007. Data from the Lagrangian study was compared to data collected at a fixed point using an automatic pump sampler and water quality sonde. Fluorescence (a measure of algal pigments), dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and conductivity were measured every 30 minutes, as well as collecting grab samples every 2 h for nutrient and suspended sediment analyses. Sinusoidal diel (24 h) patterns were observed for dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature within the parcel of water. Algal pigments, nutrients, suspended solids, and turbidity did not exhibit sinusoidal diel patterns, generally observed at a fixed sampling location. The diel patterns observed indicated changes that would occur during downstream transport. Algal pigments showed a rapid day time increase during the first 24 to 48 h followed by a plateau or decrease for the remainder of the study. Algal growth was apparent each day during the study, as measured by increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations, in spite of non-detectable phosphate concentrations (<5 ppb) and nearly complete consumption of soluble silica during the 2007

  11. HAZUS Analysis of a Hosgri Fault Earthquake Scenario in Support of the Diablo Canyon Power Plant Earthquake Emergency Evacuation Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLaren, M. K.; Nishenko, S. P.; Seligson, H.; Vardas, T.

    2011-12-01

    The objective of this project was to provide detailed bridge and roadway damage estimates within Diablo Canyon Power Plant's (DCPP) Emergency Planning Zone (EPZ) resulting from a Moment Magnitude (Mw) 7.2 scenario earthquake on the Hosgri Fault, to be used in the subsequent evacuation planning efforts. Scenario earthquake damage assessments implemented for this study utilized the Federal Emergency Management Agency's HAZUS (HAZUS-MH MR-4) natural hazard loss estimation software. Ground motion data for the M7.2 Hosgri Fault scenario were developed by the ShakeMap Development Team (Dr. David Wald and Dr. Kuo-wan Lin of the USGS) using Chiou and Youngs' "Next Generation Attenuation" (NGA) relationship. Liquefaction and landslide susceptibility within the DCPP Emergency Planning Zone were mapped by Fugro William Lettis & Associates (FWLA). Several bridge database improvements were implemented, derived from available information on bridge retrofit and replacement, provided by Caltrans and San Luis Obispo County Public Works personnel. Data on 186 Caltrans-owned bridges in San Luis Obispo County, including 22 with "Phase 2" bridge retrofits, were provided by Mark Yashinsky, Caltrans Office of Earthquake Engineering. Data on 13 County-owned bridges, including five that have had Phase 2 retrofit work completed and eight that have been replaced, were provided by Dave Flynn, County of San Luis Obispo Department of Public Works. In addition, enhanced roadway data within the EPZ were compiled and incorporated into HAZUS, including improved highway and roadway data available from ESRI (ArcGIS 9 Media Kit, ESRI Data and Maps), and street centerline data within the DCPP Plant limits, provided by FWLA. This study also leveraged earlier work conducted on behalf of the California Emergency Management Agency to test methodologies for improving the underlying building inventory databases for HAZUS (see: http://www.hazus.org/CAHUG/OES_Guidelines.htm). Improved building inventory

  12. Emphatic or Reflexive? On the Endophoric Character of French "lui-meme" and Similar Complex Pronouns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zribi-Hertz, Anne

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the referential properties of a class of complex pronouns labelled M-Pronouns, exemplified by Old English "himself," French "lui-meme," and English "his own." It is shown that M-Pronouns exhibit some properties commonly taken as characterizing reflexive anaphors, and that they also occur as "intensive" pronouns. Contains 66…

  13. Chasing Personal Meaning: Pedagogical Lessons through Luis Rodriguez's "Always Running"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theisen-Homer, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    In this autobiographical narrative, the author recounts her experiences teaching the novel "Always Running" by Luis Rodriguez with her English classes at a high school in a gang-heavy area. When she first started teaching, this teacher struggled to engage students. One particularly disruptive student requested to read "Always…

  14. Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an ...

  15. Survey of San Luis Valley School Closures. Resource Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Alfred M.

    School closures in Colorado's San Luis Valley were surveyed, listing the pros and cons of closing school during the potato harvest. In 1958, 12 of 31 elementary schools and 7 of 13 secondary schools ceased operation for periods up to 18 days during the potato harvest, closing schools to 4,447 students. Of these students, 904 elementary children…

  16. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: An Economic Measure of Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). GNRP is equal to aggregate consumption minus the depreciation of man-made and natural capital. We measure the move...

  17. Detecting areas disturbed by mining activities through Landsat images, San Luis Potosi City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vera, M.-A.

    2009-04-01

    Mining history in San Luis Potosí (Mexico) goes back to more than four centuries, and the accumulation of mining waste poses an important problem to ecological risk prevention. Epithermal deposits are the most common in this region and the impact of mining exploitation must be evaluated to propose sustainable development of the natural resources, which have a strong contribution of the national economy. The state San Luis Potosi is situated in the central part of Mexico between parallels 21°11' and 24°34' of north latitude and 98°23' and 102°14' of west longitude, 424 km northeast from Mexico City. Today is a sprawling city with more than half a million residents. The aim of this study was to analyse land cover and vegetation changes between 1972 and 2000 in San Luis Potosi Valley, using satellite image data. Since large changes in land cover and vegetation are taking place in the Valley and there is a lack of good data, such as maps, statistics and aerial photographs, it was appropriate to use satellite data for assessment of land cover and vegetation to estimate the environmental impact of the mining industry. Field data samples were used to evaluate the change results obtained with the multispectral satellite images. The results show that land cover change in the San Luis Potosi Valley has occurred in the past decade as a result of both natural forces and human activities, which have in turn impacted on the regional sustainable development of the mining resources.

  18. [Dental fluorosis in San Luis Potosi and its solution alternatives (pilot study)].

    PubMed

    Sánchez Prieto, M; Vázquez Guerrero, V; Silva Romo, E; Moreno Vélez, R; Ochoa Flores, L; Hernández, M J

    1988-12-01

    A study exposing the situation affecting the population of San Luis Potosí in central México, caused by dental fluorosis. Findings point to the need of implementing devices capable of regulating the concentrations of Fluorine ion (generating the efficient prevention of dental cavity incidence), to maintain them at optimal levels and without deletereal effects.

  19. Late Glacial and Holocene Record of Hydroclimate in the San Luis Valley, Southern Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Koran, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments from the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, archive a detailed record of Late Glacial and Holocene climatic fluctuations in the southern Rocky Mountains. Together with radiometric dating analysis, measurements of grain size, magnetic susceptibility, total inorganic carbon (TIC), oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the TIC fraction on sediment samples from San Luis Lake (at an average resolution of 60 years per sample) allow us to generate a sediment record of climatic change in the region spanning the last 16ka (1 ka=1000 cal yrs). This record documents the timing and duration of major climate episodes and trends, comparable to the existing paleoclimate records from the American Southwest. The Late Glacial record of San Luis Lake contains a big wet episode in the late part of the Mystery Interval (MI), a relatively dry climate during Bølling-Allerød (B/A) warm interval, and a relatively wet episode during the Younger Dryas (YD) interval, similar to the lake-level record found in the Estancia basin in central New Mexico. The early to middle Holocene record of d18O in the San Luis Lake parallels the calcite d18O record of Bison Lake in northern Colorado, documenting a history of significant change in precipitation seasonality across the northern boundary of the North American monsoon (NAM). The middle Holocene epoch is characterized by greater variations in magnetic susceptibility, d18O and d13C, suggesting the prevalence of wet, variable or transitional climate conditions. In contrast, the late Holocene climate is relatively dry, as indicated by more positive values of d18O in San Luis Lake. The results of this study reveal a complex history of climate evolution due to the interactions of two seasonally distinct precipitation regimes with mountainous landforms in the region.

  20. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic survey data of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys in southern Colorado, United States. These airborne geophysical surveys provide high-resolution and spatially comprehensive datasets characterizing the resistivity structure of the shallow subsurface of each survey region, accompanied by magnetic-field information over matching areas. These data were collected to provide insight into the distribution of groundwater brine in the Paradox Valley, the extent of clay aquitards in the San Luis Valley, and to improve our understanding of the geologic framework for both regions. This report describes these contracted surveys and releases digital data supplied under contract to the USGS.

  1. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

  2. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1983-07-01

    The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

  3. Epidemiology of Bordetella pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Perez, Uciel R; Hernández-Sierra, Juan F; Escalante-Padrón, Francisco J; Contreras-Vidales, Soledad; Berman-Puente, Ana M; Hernandez-Maldonado, Fernando; Noyola, Daniel E

    2014-05-01

    We analyzed data from 147 patients with suspected pertussis in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Bordetella pertussis was detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction in 59 (40.1%) cases. The incidence of B. pertussis infection was 2.3 per 100,000 population. There were 6 deaths among the study patients. We conclude that the impact of pertussis in our state is significantly higher than previously estimated.

  4. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Méndez-García, C.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. ²³²Th-series, ²³⁸U-series, ⁴⁰K and ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg⁻¹) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. ²³⁸U and ²³⁴U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to ²¹⁰Pb activities. Results were verified by ¹³⁷Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High ²³⁸U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento – Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) ²³⁴U/²³⁸U and ²³⁸U/²²⁶Ra in sediments have values between 0.9–1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. ²³²Th/²³⁸U, ²²⁸Ra/²²⁶Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  5. Chytridiomycosis in endemic amphibians of the mountain tops of the Córdoba and San Luis ranges, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Julián N; Longo, Silvana; Robledo, Gerardo

    2013-02-28

    Chytridiomycosis is a major threat to amphibian conservation. In Argentina, the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been recorded in several localities, and recently, it was registered in amphibians inhabiting low-elevation areas of mountain environments in Córdoba and San Luis provinces. In the present study, we searched for B. dendrobatidis in endemic and non-endemic amphibians on the mountain tops of Córdoba and San Luis provinces. We collected dead amphibians in the upper vegetation belt of the mountains of Córdoba and San Luis. Using standard histological techniques, the presence of fungal infection was confirmed in 5 species. Three of these species are endemic to the mountain tops of both provinces. Although there are no reported population declines in amphibians in these mountains, the presence of B. dendrobatidis in endemic species highlights the need for long-term monitoring plans in the area.

  6. Biological structure and health implications from tooth size at Mission San Luis de Apalachee.

    PubMed

    Stojanowski, Christopher M; Larsen, Clark S; Tung, Tiffiny A; McEwan, Bonnie G

    2007-02-01

    This study analyzes dental metric variation to examine the biological structure of the native population at Mission San Luis de Apalachee, a late 17th century mission located in the Apalachee Province of Spanish colonial Florida. Three topics are addressed: (1) comparison of tooth sizes among adult and subadults, (2) analysis of the bio-spatial structure of skeletons within the church area, and (3) comparison of phenotypic profiles of individuals interred within coffins in the ritual nucleus of the church: the altar region. Analyses indicate that subadults had smaller average tooth sizes than adults for the posterior dentition that was particularly evident in mandibular nonpolar molars and premolars. This disparity, also documented in two other mission populations, likely represents ontogenetic stress and resulting increased mortality among those most at risk for early death. Analysis of the spatial structure of graves failed to document biological structuring by side of the aisle or by burial row, although some gross differences were evident when front, middle, and rear church burials were compared. Individuals buried in coffins within the same row were phenotypically similar to one another. However, inter-row comparisons indicated lack of phenotypic similarity among all coffin interments. These analyses suggest maintenance of kin-structured burial for elites alone within the San Luis community.

  7. Presence of Oxyodontherium (Macraucheniidae, Litopterna) in the Río Quinto Formation, San Luis (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, Esperanza; Chiesa, Jorge; Ojeda, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    This paper deals with the new mammal remains from the Río Quinto Formation, found at the Arroyo La Petra locality (San Luis, Argentina). They consist of an incomplete skull and two mandibular fragments of a macraucheniid, both with milk dentition and M1/m1 erupting, corresponding to a very young individual. Morfometrical characteristics of the specimens allow their identification as Oxyodontherium zeballosi and provide the first cranial data for this species. The holotype of this species is considered a juvenile individual. We maintain a conservative position in maintaining O. zeballosi as a valid species though based on juvenile specimens. However, a full systematic revision of the Family Macraucheniidae is needed to verify the validity and phylogenetic relationships of the taxa included in it. The identification of O. zeballosi indicates a late Miocene age for the fossiliferous level, which implies a cronoestratigraphic extension of the Río Quinto Formation, thus far considered as Pliocene in age. In addition, the presence of Oxyodontherium in San Luis Province increases the geographical distribution of this macrauchenid, whose record previously was limited to Miocene outcrops of the Paraná River (Entre Ríos Province). Its presence in the Mio-Pliocene beds of Uruguay is very doubtful because it is based on a metapodial.

  8. Novel High Efficiency Microcolumnar LuI3:Ce for Hard X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Z.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Miller, Stuart R.; Brecher, Charles; Bhandari, Harish B.; Kenesei, Peter; Ross, Stephen K.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Singh, Bipin

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a structured scintillator using a vacuum deposition technique that is suitable for manufacturing large area scintillators in a microcolumnar form. While providing high absorption efficiency, it also allows great temporal and spatial resolution X-ray imaging. Microcolumnar films of extremely fast and bright cerium-doped lutetium iodide (LuI3:Ce) scintillator were synthesized. It has high density (~5.6 g/cm3), high effective atomic number (59.7), bright green emission (540 nm range, well matched to commercial optics and CCD sensors), light yield exceeding 115,000 ph/MeV, and rapid, afterglow-free decay (~28 ns). This new scintillator could resolve the 153 ns bunch structure of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Due to the fast, afterglow-free decay, and high efficiency of LuI3:Ce, during the experiments performed at the 1-ID hard X-ray beamline at the APS, single 65 keV X-ray photons could be resolved with high signal-to-noise ratio and with temporal resolution better than 20ns. In the future, it will enable a wide range of hard X-ray (20 keV to 100 keV) imaging and/or high frame-rate applications such as dynamic studies of the structural and electrochemical properties of batteries using microtomographic X-ray imaging, internal corrosion in fuel cells, and time-resolved muscle diffraction experiments.

  9. Binational Dengue Outbreak Along the United States-Mexico Border - Yuma County, Arizona, and Sonora, Mexico, 2014.

    PubMed

    Jones, Jefferson M; Lopez, Benito; Adams, Laura; Gálvez, Francisco Javier Navarro; Núñez, Alfredo Sánchez; Santillán, Nubia Astrid Hernández; Plante, Lydia; Hemme, Ryan R; Casal, Mariana; Hunsperger, Elizabeth A; Muñoz-Jordan, Jorge; Acevedo, Veronica; Ernst, Kacey; Hayden, Mary; Waterman, Steve; Gomez, Diana; Sharp, Tyler M; Komatsu, Kenneth K

    2016-05-20

    Dengue is an acute febrile illness caused by any of four dengue virus types (DENV-1-4). DENVs are transmitted by mosquitos of the genus Aedes (1) and are endemic throughout the tropics (2). In 2010, an estimated 390 million DENV infections occurred worldwide (2). During 2007-2013, a total of three to 10 dengue cases were reported annually in Arizona and all were travel-associated. During September-December 2014, coincident with a dengue outbreak in Sonora, Mexico, 93 travel-associated dengue cases were reported in Arizona residents; 70 (75%) cases were among residents of Yuma County, which borders San Luis Río Colorado, Sonora, Mexico. San Luis Río Colorado reported its first case of locally acquired dengue in September 2014. To investigate the temporal relationship of the dengue outbreaks in Yuma County and San Luis Río Colorado and compare patient characteristics and signs and symptoms, passive surveillance data from both locations were analyzed. In addition, household-based cluster investigations were conducted near the residences of reported dengue cases in Yuma County to identify unreported cases and assess risk for local transmission. Surveillance data identified 52 locally acquired cases (21% hospitalized) in San Luis Río Colorado and 70 travel-associated cases (66% hospitalized) in Yuma County with illness onset during September-December 2014. Among 194 persons who participated in the cluster investigations in Yuma County, 152 (78%) traveled to Mexico at least monthly during the preceding 3 months. Four (2%) of 161 Yuma County residents who provided serum samples for diagnostic testing during cluster investigations had detectable DENV immunoglobulin M (IgM); one reported a recent febrile illness, and all four had traveled to Mexico during the preceding 3 months. Entomologic assessments among 105 households revealed 24 water containers per 100 houses colonized by Ae. aegypti. Frequent travel to Mexico and Ae. aegypti colonization indicate risk for local

  10. 78 FR 16569 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Holdings, LLC (IPH), its wholly owned subsidiaries Permian Basin Railways (PBR) and San Luis & Rio Grande..., IPH is a noncarrier that wholly owns PBR, which directly controls seven Class III railroads.\\1\\ PBR... (Saratoga). In addition, PBR controls 80% of Cape Rail, Inc. (Cape Rail), a noncarrier railroad...

  11. Scientist as detective: Luis Alvarez and the pyramid burial chambers, the JFK assassination, and the end of the dinosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wohl, Charles G.

    2007-11-01

    Luis Alvarez (1911-1988) was one of the most brilliant and productive experimental physicists of the twentieth century. His investigations of three mysteries, all of them outside his normal areas of research, show what remarkable things a far-ranging imagination working with an immense store of knowledge can accomplish.

  12. Anomalous Representations of Reality in Luis Valdez's "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saborio, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Luis Valdez creates anomalous realities in two of his plays, "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer," in order to defy dominant expressions of reality as well as classifications of "Chicano" and "Mexican." The anomalous realities, represented primarily by a bodiless head in the first play and an eighty-four-year-old Yaqui…

  13. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  14. DRAFT LANDSAT DATA MOSAIC: MONTGOMERY COUNTY, TEXAS; HARRIS COUNTY, TEXAS; FORT BEND COUNTY, TEXAS; BRAZORIA COUNTY, TEXAS; GALVESTON COUNTY, TEXAS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This is a draft Landsat Data Mosaic, which contains remote sensing information for Montgomery County, Texas Harris County, Texas Fort Bend County, Texas Brazoria County, Texas Galveston County, and Texas Imagery dates on the following dates: October 6, 1999 and September 29, 200...

  15. Labor attributes and strategies: the case of tomato workers in san luis potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Isabel Mora

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the economic crisis in the 1980s that affected Mexico and the rest of Latin America, official policies encouraged commercial agriculture, especially the cultivation of export crops. During that period, women's entry into the paid labor market accelerated. For many women in rural areas, this meant widening opportunities for participation and a chance not only to help their families, but also to look for a partner, earn their own money, and "see the world." This article analyzes the incorporation of women into the tomato agro-industry in the Altiplano region of el Valle de Arista, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. It discusses the strategies that women workers use-physical appearance, experience, and efficiency-as characteristics that are "required" in order to stay in this highly competitive, segmented, and precarious labor market. PMID:21342870

  16. [Intradermal reactions with coccidioidins in different towns of San Luis Province].

    PubMed

    Bonardello, N M; de Gagliardi, C G

    1979-12-01

    Intradermal tests were used to determine the extent of the endemic zone of coccidioidomycosis in Argentina. We performed our endemiological study among school-aged children and grown-ups in San Luis city and in the following towns: Nogoli, Villa de la Quebrada, Balde, Salinas del Bebedero, Beazley, Fraga and Eleodoro Lobos. We employed three coccidioidins for each person--Negroni's coccidioidin, coloured coccidioidin and uncoloured coccidioidin. Reactions were usually read 48 h after inoculation. After inoculating 1,262 individuals we could read only 1,069 results. Overall, the positive reactors to one, two or three coccidioidins were 14.8%. We found no relation between positive reactors and the sex of subjects, but every group showed a noticeable relation between age and positive reactions, especially in older people. The positive reactors for each of the coccidioidins were as follows: Negroni coccidioidin: 10.1%: coloured coccidioidin: 4.9% and uncoloured coccidioidin: 5.0%.

  17. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO

    PubMed Central

    FACCINI-MARTÍNEZ, Álvaro A.; BOTERO-GARCÍA, Carlos A.; HIDALGO, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence of R. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas for R. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia. PMID:27074327

  18. Measured performance results: low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The measured performance of seven low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado is summarized. During the summer and fall of 1981, SERI monitored a variety of low-cost solar water heating system designs and components. Five systems had site-built collectors, and four included low-cost tank-in-jacket heat exchanger/storage tank components. Two were air-to-water systems. The five liquid-based systems included a drain-down design, a propylene glycol-charged thermosiphon system, and three pumped-glycol systems. The pumped-liquid systems performed the best, with system efficiencies greater than 20% and solar fractions between 40% and 70%. Tjhe air-to-water systems did not perform as well because of leakage in the collectors and heat exchangers. The thermosiphon system performed at lower efficiency because the collector flows were low.

  19. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

    2001-06-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

  20. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO.

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Botero-García, Carlos A; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence of R. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas for R. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia.

  1. Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

    2003-11-01

    Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively. PMID:14595590

  2. Labor attributes and strategies: the case of tomato workers in san luis potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Isabel Mora

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the economic crisis in the 1980s that affected Mexico and the rest of Latin America, official policies encouraged commercial agriculture, especially the cultivation of export crops. During that period, women's entry into the paid labor market accelerated. For many women in rural areas, this meant widening opportunities for participation and a chance not only to help their families, but also to look for a partner, earn their own money, and "see the world." This article analyzes the incorporation of women into the tomato agro-industry in the Altiplano region of el Valle de Arista, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. It discusses the strategies that women workers use-physical appearance, experience, and efficiency-as characteristics that are "required" in order to stay in this highly competitive, segmented, and precarious labor market.

  3. Amoebological study of the atmosphere of San Luis Potosi, SLP, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Zaragoza, S; Rivera, F; Bonilla, P; Ramirez, E; Gallegos, E; Calderon, A; Ortiz, R; Hernandez, D

    1993-01-01

    A one year round survey was conducted for isolation of free living amoebae (FLA) in the city of San Luis Potosi, (SLP), Mexico, which is placed in a desert environment. Samples were taken by modified impinger method and cultivated in laboratory conditions for FLA isolation following a week period of rehidration. 57 strains were isolated, 39% belonged to Acanthamoeba genus (which is important because it bears opportunistic pathogens that produce amoebic keratitis and granulomatous amoebic encephalitis in humans), 16% to Hartmannella, 9% to Vahlkampfia and the other proportion was divided among 6 other genera. The isolations were more abundant during dry season and the main genera were present in all four stands. The difference among them was the species variety which is discused as connected with abundance of organic wastes and lack of urbanization near the stations.

  4. Archaeometry of pre-Hispanic pottery from San Luis Potosi, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio, D.; Jiménez-Reyes, M.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Siles-Dotor, M. G.; Flores-Ramírez, H.; Galván-Madrid, J. L.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron activation analysis, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to characterize pre-Hispanic potsherds and modern ceramic pottery, samples of which were collected in Tenexco, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Elementary and spectroscopic analysis showed differences between ancient and modern ceramics. While the modern ceramics studied were practically new and not used at all, the ancient ones were probably used in domestic or ceremonial activities. Besides, the latter were kept buried for a long time, and it is quite probable that their manufacture was also slightly different from that of the former. These assumptions could provide the clues to understand some of the observed differences between the composition of ancient and modern ceramics whose raw materials may have the same origin.

  5. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San LuisNational Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-07-15

    San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex to meetReclamation s obligations for Level 4 water supply under the CentralValley Project Improvement Act. Hydrogeological assessment of the EastBear Creek Unit of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge was conductedusing a combination of field investigations and a survey of availableliterature from past US Geological Survey Reports and reports by localgeological consultants. Conservative safe yield estimates made using theavailable data show that the East Bear Creek Unit may have sufficientgroundwater resources in the shallow groundwater aquifer to meet aboutbetween 25 percent and 52 percent of its current Level II and between 17percent and 35 percent of its level IV water supply needs. The rate ofsurface and lateral recharge to the Unit and the design of the well fieldand the layout and capacity of pumped wells will decide both thepercentage of annual needs that the shallow aquifer can supply andwhether this yield is sustainable without affecting long-term aquiferquality. In order to further investigate the merits of pumping the nearsurface aquifer, which appears to have reasonable water quality for usewithin the East Bear Creek Unit -- monitoring of the potential sources ofaquifer recharge and the installation of a pilot shallow well would bewarranted. Simple monitoring stations could be installed both upstreamand downstream of both the San Joaquin River and Bear Creek and beinstrumented to measureriver stage, flow and electrical conductivity.Ideally this would be done in conjunction with a shallow pilot well,pumped to supply a portion of the Unit's needs for the wetland inundationperiod.

  6. Introduction to the Special Collection of Papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, descripti...

  7. InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.; Agram, P. S.; Lauknes, T.

    2010-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000 remains a key, but poorly known, component for characterization. Some relevant data, such as water levels measured in wells, were collected during this period and incorporated into a groundwater flow model. However, data with finer spatial and temporal resolution would be very valuable in understanding the behavior and therefore the management of the system. Spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide maps of the deformation of the Earth’s surface at a spatial resolution of 50 m; these data are acquired approximately once per month. The deformation measured by InSAR can be related to water levels in the confined aquifer system. However, changes in cm-scale crop structure in agricultural areas lead to signal decorrelation over long periods of time, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply the recently developed small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV for the years 1992-2001. The SBAS measurements show high levels of InSAR correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. By using SBAS analysis, we are able to estimate the magnitude of the seasonal deformation and compare it with hydraulic head measurements in nearby wells. We directly compare, at three well locations, specific storage parameters estimated from InSAR data to those estimated using traditional pump test techniques. The InSAR and pump test estimated parameters are: 3.4 x10-5 ft-1 vs. 1.7 x 10-5 ft-1, 2.2 x 10

  8. Transient Electromagnetic Soundings Near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado (2006 Field Season)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; de Sozua Filho, Oderson A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado to obtain subsurface information of use to hydrologic modeling. Seventeen soundings were made to the east and north of the sand dunes. Using a small loop TEM system, maximum exploration depths of about 75 to 150 m were obtained. In general, layered earth interpretations of the data found that resistivity decreases with depth. Comparison of soundings with geologic logs from nearby wells found that zones logged as having increased clay content usually corresponded with a significant resistivity decrease in the TEM determined model. This result supports the use of TEM soundings to map the location of the top of the clay unit deposited at the bottom of the ancient Lake Alamosa that filled the San Luis Valley from Pliocene to middle Pleistocene time.

  9. Visual Resource Analysis for Solar Energy Zones in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Robert; Abplanalp, Jennifer M.; Zvolanek, Emily; Brown, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory’s (Argonne’s) Environmental Science Division for the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The study analyzed the regional effects of potential visual impacts of solar energy development on three BLM-designated solar energy zones (SEZs) in the San Luis Valley (SLV) in Colorado, and, based on the analysis, made recommendations for or against regional compensatory mitigation to compensate residents and other stakeholders for the potential visual impacts to the SEZs. The analysis was conducted as part of the solar regional mitigation strategy (SRMS) task conducted by BLM Colorado with assistance from Argonne. Two separate analyses were performed. The first analysis, referred to as the VSA Analysis, analyzed the potential visual impacts of solar energy development in the SEZs on nearby visually sensitive areas (VSAs), and, based on the impact analyses, made recommendations for or against regional compensatory mitigation. VSAs are locations for which some type of visual sensitivity has been identified, either because the location is an area of high scenic value or because it is a location from which people view the surrounding landscape and attach some level of importance or sensitivity to what is seen from the location. The VSA analysis included both BLM-administered lands in Colorado and in the Taos FO in New Mexico. The second analysis, referred to as the SEZ Analysis, used BLM visual resource inventory (VRI) and other data on visual resources in the former Saguache and La Jara Field Offices (FOs), now contained within the San Luis Valley FO (SLFO), to determine whether the changes in scenic values that would result from the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities in the SEZs would affect the quality and quantity of valued scenic resources in the SLV region as a whole. If the regional effects were judged to be significant, regional

  10. [Physical factors influencing the floristic relationships of pinyon pine (Pinaceae) from San Luis Potosi, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Romero, Angélica; Luna, Mario; García, Edmundo

    2014-06-01

    In plant communities, the species distribution patterns and their relationships with environmental factors are of central importance in ecology. In San Luis Potosí of Mexico, woodlands of Pinus cembroides and P. johannis are sympatric, but P. cembroides tends to be located in South and Southwest slopes, in more disturbed sites; unlike, P. johannis, is mostly distributed in mesic areas, in North and Northeast slopes. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of some physical factors on the floristic similarity of pinyon pine P. cembroides and P. johannis. The study area was located in the Sierra San Miguelito, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. We selected 40 sampling units spread over an area of 50km2. In each unit, we laid out two 20m long lines perpendicular to each other, in which we recorded cover data of the plant species intercepted. We developed two data matrices, the first one including cover values of 91 species, and the second one, considering seven topographical, climatic, and solar radiation variables. We applied cluster analysis and ordination to explore the influence of environmental variables on the floristic differentiation of pinyon pine woodlands. Clustering showed six groups, the first three characterized by P. cembroides. The ordination showed that variance represented by the first three axes was 65.9%. Axis 1 was positively correlated with altitude and negatively with mean annual temperature; axes two and three, showed low correlation with the variables tested. P. cembroides woodlands and accompanying flora tend to be located in lower altitude, higher mean annual temperature, and mainly in South-Southwestern slopes. In contrast, stands of P. johannis, mixed stands of P. johannis-P. cembroides, and Quercus potosina, were usually founded in greater altitudes, mean annual temperature slightly lower, and North-Northeastern exposure. The sites of these monospecific and mixed woodlands with associated species, indicators of environmental variables

  11. Pliocene and Pleistocene geologic and climatic evolution in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.L.; Larson, E.E.; Smith, G.; Katzman, D.; Smith, G.R.; Cerling, T.; Wang, Y.; Baker, R.G.; Lohmann, K.C.; Repenning, C.A.; Patterson, P.; Mackie, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sediments of the Alamosa Formation spanning the upper part of the Gauss and most of the Matuyama Chrons were recovered by coring in the high (2300 m) San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado. The study site is located at the northern end of the Rio Grande rift. Lithologic changes in the core sediments provide evidence of events leading to integration of the San Luis drainage basin into the Rio Grande. The section, which includes the Huckleberry Ridge Ash (2.02 Ma) and spans the entire Matuyama Chron, contains pollen, and invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Stable isotope analyses of inorganic and biogenic carbonate taken over most of the core indicate substantially warmer temperatures than occur today in the San Luis Valley. At the end of the Olduvai Subchron, summer precipitation decreased, summer pan evaporation increased, and temperatures increased slightly compared to the earlier climate represented in the core. By the end of the Jaramillo Subchron, however, cold/wet and warm/dry cycles become evident and continue into the cold/wet regime associated with the deep-sea oxygen-isotope Stage 22 glaciation previously determined from outcrops at the same locality. Correspondence between the Hansen Bluff climatic record and the deep-sea oxygen-isotope record (oxygen-isotope stages from about 110-18) is apparent, indicating that climate at Hansen Bluff was responding to global climatic changes. ?? 1992.

  12. Quality of ground water in agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Buckles, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The quality of ground water in the principal agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado was evaluated using chemical analyses of water collected from 57 wells completed in the unconfined aquifer and from 25 wells completed in the confined aquifer. Ground water in both aquifers generally contains dissolved-solids concentrations of less than 500 milligrams per liter. In most areas, calcium is the principal cation in the ground water. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations expressed as nitrogen, are generally less than 1 milligram per liter. However, the quality of ground water in certain areas may pose health and agricultural hazards. Water in the unconfined aquifer near Center contains high nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations. The highest measured concentration in this area was 33 milligrams per liter. Water containing more than 1 milligram per liter of nitrite as nitrogen, or 10 milligrams per liter nitrate, as nitrogen, poses a potential health hazard for infants and should not be used for drinking. In addition, dissolved-solids concentration in the ground water in some areas is greater than 500 milligrams per liter and, if used for irrigation may reduce crop yields. (USGS)

  13. Agricultural producers' perceptions of sandhill cranes in the San Luis Valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Management for migratory birds at an ecosystem scale requires forming cooperative partnerships with the private sector. To be effective, however, wildlife managers must understand the economic and social attitudes of private landowners to ensure that strategies involving stakeholders are viable and can be implemented. We documented attitudes of farmers in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado toward Rocky Mountain Population greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) using a self administered, mail-back survey. Overall response rate was 46.7%. Viewing sandhill cranes in the SLV was considered somewhat important or important by 78.6% of respondents. In contrast, only 62.1% of respondents indicated that viewing sandhill cranes was somewhat important or important on their own land. Farmers' attitudes toward viewing sandhill cranes on their own property were related (P=0.02) to perceived conflicts with crop production. The extent of crane use (P=0.04) was the only variable we tested that predicted whether conflicts were reported. Our results suggest that partnerships between farmers and natural resource agencies concerned with management of sandhill cranes may be viable. However, the role of farmers in any proposed management strategy must be examined carefully because there may be an upper limit of crane use on private land that farmers will tolerate.

  14. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

    2002-07-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

  15. Patterns of food abundance for breeding waterbirds in the san luis valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammonley, J.H.; Laubhan, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    We measured the amount and distribution of macroinvertebrates and seeds in four wetland habitats (short emergent, seasonal open water, semipermanent/permanent open water, and saltgrass [Distichlis spicata]) used by breeding ducks and shorebirds at a wetland complex in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA. Density of macroinvertebrates did not differ among habitats or sampling periods (P = 0.45), but dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy production were greater (P < 0.05) in short emergent than in other habitats. These differences were largely due to the greater dry mass of gastropods in short emergent than in other habitats. Total seed density, dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy differed among habitats and periods with interaction effects (P <0.01). Although seed abundance varied among habitats and sampling periods, abundance was greatest in short emergent during all sampling periods. Breeding waterbirds consumed a variety of macroinvertebrates and seeds on the study area. Patterns of abundance among habitats of macroinvertebrates and seeds consumed by six waterbird species were not consistent with patterns of foraging habitat use by most ducks and shorebirds at this wetland complex. Our results indicate that estimates of food or nutrient abundance are useful in assessing the functional role of broad habitat types, but factors other than food abundance also influence avian selection of wetland foraging habitats. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  16. Impact of Hurricane Luis on the health services of Antigua and Barbuda.

    PubMed

    Gibbs, T; van Alphen, D

    1996-01-01

    Antigua and Barbuda, located in the Caribbean, was one of the countries most affected by Hurricane Luis in 1995. Electricity, water supply and health facilities were disrupted for several weeks. Inadequate criteria at the design stages, unsound structural design, and lack of maintenance of building components, are some of the reasons that damage was so severe. The main hospitals and 6 health facilities were destroyed and flooded and most of the medical staff had to cope with their own damaged houses. Although the knowledge and materials are available to reduce the losses caused by hurricanes, building codes are not reinforced by laws and preventive maintenance to protect health care facilities from natural hazard damage is not usually budgeted for. The additional cost of making a single or two-storey health facility almost invulnerable to future catastrophe in a hurricane is only 2% in initial capital cost and becomes negligible when spread over the life of a building. The effort of UN International Decade for Natural Disasters (IDNDR) directed towards disaster mitigation should be increased over the remainder of the decade to ensure that standards are respected and building codes are mandatory.

  17. Tracing groundwater recharge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: Groundwater contamination susceptibility in an agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tanya; Hindshaw, Ruth; Singer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Water is a vital resource in any agricultural watershed, yet in the arid western United States farming practices threaten the quality and availability of groundwater. This is a pressing concern in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, where agriculture comprises 30% of the local economy, and employs over half the valley population. Although 54 % of the water used for irrigation is surface water, farmers do not usually apply this water directly to their fields. Instead, the water is often diverted into pits which recharge the aquifer, and the water is subsequently pumped during the following irrigation season. The Rio Grande Water Conservation District recognises that recharge to the unconfined aquifer has been outpaced by commercial irrigation for at least four decades, resulting in a decline in groundwater levels. Recycled irrigation water, and leakage from unlined canals now represent the greatest recharge contribution to the unconfined aquifer in this region. This makes the shallow groundwater particularly susceptible to agricultural contamination. The purpose of this study is to assess groundwater contamination in the unconfined and upper confined aquifers of the San Luis Valley, which are the most susceptible to contamination due to their close proximity to the surface. Although concentrations of potentially harmful contaminants from agricultural runoff are regularly monitored, the large spatial and temporal fluctuations in values make it difficult to determine long-term trends. We have analysed δ18O, δ2H and major-ion chemistry of 57 groundwater, stream and precipitation samples, collected in June 2014, and interpreted them alongside regional stream flow data and groundwater levels. This will allow us to study the seasonality and locality of groundwater recharge to provide greater insight into the watershed's potential for pollution. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed using the model DRASTIC (Depth to water, Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil

  18. Selenium volatilization in vegetated agricultural drainage sediment from the San Luis Drain, Central California.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; Lin, Z-Q; Arroyo, I; Terry, N

    2005-09-01

    The presence of large amounts of Se-laden agricultural drainage sediment in the San Luis Drain, Central California, poses a serious toxic threat to wildlife in the surrounding environment. Effective management of the drainage sediment becomes a practical challenge because the sediment is polluted with high levels of Se, B, and salts. This two-year field study was conducted to identify the best plant species that are salt and B tolerant and that have a superior ability of volatilizing Se from drainage sediment. The drainage sediment was mixed with clean soil, and vegetated with salado alfalfa (Medicago sativa 'salado'), salado grass (Sporobulus airoides 'salado'), saltgrass-turf (Distichlis spp. 'NYPA Turf'), saltgrass-forage (Distichlis spicata (L.) Greene), cordgrass (Spartina patens 'Flageo'), Leucaenia (Leucaena leucocephola), elephant grass (Pennistum purpureum), or wild type-Brassica (Brassica spp.). Results show that elephant grass produced the greatest amount of biomass and accumulated highest concentrations of B. Highest concentrations of Se, S, and Cl were observed in wild-type Brassica. Biogenic volatilization of Se by plants and soil microbes was greater in summer. Among the treatments, the mean daily rates of Se volatilization (microg Se m(-2)d(-1)) were wild-type Brassica (39) > saltgrass-turf (31) > cordgrass (27) > saltgrass forage (24) > elephant grass (22) > salado grass (21) > leucaenia (19) > salado alfalfa (14) > irrigated bare soil (11) > non-irrigated bare soil (6). Overall, rates of Se volatilization in drainage sediment were relatively low due to high levels of sulfate. To manage Se in drainage sediment by phytoremediation, the biological volatilization process needs to be enhanced substantially under field conditions.

  19. Sedimentary record of storm deposits from Hurricane Ike, Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Horton, B. P.

    2012-10-01

    Prehistoric records of land-falling tropical cyclones further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and its relationship with global climatic changes. Here, we describe deposit stratigraphy and sedimentology resulting from overwash during Hurricane Ike, which made landfall on September 13th 2008, to provide a much needed modern analogue for paleo-hurricane deposits and evaluate the hurricane's influence on barrier stability. We compared the volume, grain size distribution, organic content and foraminiferal assemblages of washover deposits at three sites from Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas that were up to 50 km west of Ike's landfall. Storm surge heights varied between 3.7 and 2.7 m with inland inundation extents of 330 to 113 m. At each of the study sites, Hurricane Ike eroded the shoreline and re-deposited a landward-thinning sand sheet between 0.02 and 0.28 m thick over short-grass prairie/salt-marsh soil. Shoreline erosion estimates suggest that only between 10 and 30% of eroded beach sediment is deposited on land as washover (net gain to barrier elevation), while the remainder is re-deposited subtidally or offshore, a potential net loss to the coastal sediment budget. The washover sediment was readily identifiable by abrupt changes in grain size, organic content, and buried in situ grasses. Foraminiferal assemblages within washover and short-grass prairie/salt-marsh sediments (when present) have similar assemblages, which are dominated by Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. These species are common to bay and nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico. Foraminiferal species Bolivina subaenariensis, Quinqueloculina seminulum and planktonic species are restricted to the washover deposits, which may suggest sediment provenance from inner shelf environments.

  20. [Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos: criminal and legal aspects of serial homicide with over 200 victims].

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Rodriguez y Rowinski, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the crimes of the homosexual paedophile sadist Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, based on a research stay of the authors in Columbia, and including discussions with the investigators, and the offender. Between 1992 and 1999, Garavito killed more than 200 children in the core age span between 8 and 13 years (as an exception, 6 to 16 years). His modus operandi remained stable. During daytime, he lured children of a lower social status out of crowded parts of the city into hidden areas that were overgrown with high plants. Garavito promised either payment for easy work, or drugs, or made other socially believable offers. The children were tied up, tortured, raped, and killed by at least one cut in the lateral part of the neck, or by decapitation. During the killings, Garavito was drunk. Even after his arrest (for attempted sexual abuse under a wrong identity) it was not immediately possible to track his crimes since Garavito had frequently changed his places of stay and his jobs. He also grew different hairdos and used wrong names. During his still ongoing confessions, he directs the investigators correctly to all scenes of crime spread over large parts of Columbia. In our report, we give an overview over the course of investigations, hint to similarities in the cases of the German serial killer Denke (1920's) and homosexual paedophile serial killer Jürgen Bartsch (1960's), and give preliminary impressions on the offender's personality. Furthermore, the violent environment and juridical peculiarities in Columbia are discussed. In spite of a total penalty of 2600 years in prison, it is formally well possible that Garavito will be released out of prison within the next 10 to 20 years, i.e. even before the maximum sentence of 40 years will be over. PMID:12462935

  1. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  2. KIR gene diversity in Mexican mestizos of San Luis Potosí.

    PubMed

    Alvarado-Hernández, Diana Lorena; Hernández-Ramírez, Daniel; Noyola, Daniel Ernesto; García-Sepúlveda, Christian Alberto

    2011-09-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell function is regulated by different types of membrane-bound receptors of which killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) are the most complex and diverse. KIRs are encoded by 17 different genes located within the leukocyte receptor complex (19q13.4). The frequency with which KIR gene features are present in different human populations differs. Here, we present our results on the KIR gene diversity observed in a large group of mestizos from the central Mexican city of San Luis Potosí. In total, 53 different KIR genotypes were observed, 47 with previously described gene profiles and six harboring novel KIR gene combinations. Group A homozygous haplotypes were seen in 102 individuals (34%), while group B homozygous haplotypes were present in 45 (15%). Heterozygous combinations of groups A and B haplotypes were seen in 153 individuals (51%). Haplotype frequency estimations based on a true content of 600 chromosomes showed a relatively balanced proportion of group A (59.5%) and group B (40.5%) haplotypes in our study population. A homozygous combination of the cA01|tA01 haplotype was present in 33% of the population with other frequent combinations being cA01|tA01, cB03|tB01 in 14.7% and cA01|tA01, cB02|tA01 in 12%. The dendrogram derived from activating KIR gene phylogenetic analysis revealed five clearly distinct clades corresponding to African, East Asian, Arab/Caucasoid, Mexican mestizo/Amerindian and South Asian populations. Our results illustrate the genetic contribution that Caucasoid and Amerindian populations have made toward present-day Mexicans and suggest an important Southeast Asian genetic contribution to native Amerindian populations.

  3. 76 FR 5856 - California Disaster #CA-00164

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ..., San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Tulare. The Interest Rates are: Percent For Physical Damage... is 12457B (Catalog of Federal Domestic Assistance Numbers 59002 and 59008) James E. Rivera,...

  4. Coccidioidomycosis among Workers Constructing Solar Power Farms, California, USA, 2011-2014.

    PubMed

    Wilken, Jason A; Sondermeyer, Gail; Shusterman, Dennis; McNary, Jennifer; Vugia, Duc J; McDowell, Ann; Borenstein, Penny; Gilliss, Debra; Ancock, Benedict; Prudhomme, Janice; Gold, Deborah; Windham, Gayle C; Lee, Lauren; Materna, Barbara L

    2015-11-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is associated with soil-disruptive work in Coccidioides-endemic areas of the southwestern United States. Among 3,572 workers constructing 2 solar power-generating facilities in San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, we identified 44 patients with symptom onset during October 2011-April 2014 (attack rate 1.2 cases/100 workers). Of these 44 patients, 20 resided in California outside San Luis Obispo County and 10 resided in another state; 9 were hospitalized (median 3 days), 34 missed work (median 22 days), and 2 had disseminated disease. Of the 25 patients who frequently performed soil-disruptive work, 6 reported frequent use of respiratory protection. As solar farm construction in Coccidioides-endemic areas increases, additional workers will probably be exposed and infected unless awareness is emphasized and effective exposure reduction measures implemented, including limiting dust generation and providing respiratory protection. Medical providers, including those in non-Coccidioides-endemic areas, should suspect coccidioidomycosis in workers with compatible illness and report cases to their local health department.

  5. Coccidioidomycosis among Workers Constructing Solar Power Farms, California, USA, 2011–2014

    PubMed Central

    Sondermeyer, Gail; Shusterman, Dennis; McNary, Jennifer; Vugia, Duc J.; McDowell, Ann; Borenstein, Penny; Gilliss, Debra; Ancock, Benedict; Prudhomme, Janice; Gold, Deborah; Windham, Gayle C.; Lee, Lauren; Materna, Barbara L.

    2015-01-01

    Coccidioidomycosis is associated with soil-disruptive work in Coccidioides-endemic areas of the southwestern United States. Among 3,572 workers constructing 2 solar power–generating facilities in San Luis Obispo County, California, USA, we identified 44 patients with symptom onset during October 2011–April 2014 (attack rate 1.2 cases/100 workers). Of these 44 patients, 20 resided in California outside San Luis Obispo County and 10 resided in another state; 9 were hospitalized (median 3 days), 34 missed work (median 22 days), and 2 had disseminated disease. Of the 25 patients who frequently performed soil-disruptive work, 6 reported frequent use of respiratory protection. As solar farm construction in Coccidioides-endemic areas increases, additional workers will probably be exposed and infected unless awareness is emphasized and effective exposure reduction measures implemented, including limiting dust generation and providing respiratory protection. Medical providers, including those in non–Coccidioides-endemic areas, should suspect coccidioidomycosis in workers with compatible illness and report cases to their local health department. PMID:26484688

  6. Advancements in understanding the aeromagnetic expressions of basin-margin faults—An example from San Luis Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V. J.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we summarize and expand on an investigation of the sources of aeromagnetic anomalies related to faults along the eastern margin of the San Luis Basin, northern Rio Grande Rift, Colorado (Grauch et al., 2010). Similar to the faults examined in the central Rio Grande Rift, magnetic sources can be completely explained by tectonic juxtaposition and produce multiple, vertically stacked magnetic contrasts at individual faults. However, the geologic sources are different. They arise from both the sedimentary cover and the underlying bedrock rather than from stratified sediments. In addition, geologic evidence for secondary growth or destruction of magnetic minerals at the fault zone is lacking.

  7. Seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi among Teenek Amerindian residents of the Huasteca region in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Juarez-Tobias, Soledad; Vaughan, Gilberto; Torres-Montoya, Aida; Escobar-Gutierrez, Alejandro

    2009-08-01

    Scarce information on the seroprevalence of Trypanosoma cruzi among Amerindians is available, and the distribution of this disease in Mexican Indian populations is unknown. In this study, the presence of specific antibodies against T. cruzi among Teenek Amerindians in nine different communities located in San Luis Potosi State was analyzed. An average seroprevalence of 6.5% was found in these populations, suggesting that active transmission of disease occurs in this relatively isolated population in Mexico, and therefore, further studies should be conducted to identify risk factor associated to Chagas disease in other isolated populations across the country to determine the prevalence of Chagas disease in Mexican Amerindians.

  8. Superinfection between influenza and RSV alternating patterns in San Luis Potosí State, México.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Hernández, Jorge Xicoténcatl; Núñez-López, Mayra; Comas-García, Andreu; Cherpitel, Daniel Ernesto Noyola; Ocampo, Marcos Capistrán

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host) availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009.

  9. Superinfection between Influenza and RSV Alternating Patterns in San Luis Potosí State, México

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Hernández, Jorge Xicoténcatl; Núñez-López, Mayra; Comas-García, Andreu; Cherpitel, Daniel Ernesto Noyola; Ocampo, Marcos Capistrán

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host) availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009. PMID:25803450

  10. Summary of the geology of the San Luis Basin, Colorado-New Mexico with emphasis on the geothermal potential for the Monte Vista Graben. Special Publication 17

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The known geologic data of the San Luis Basin are reviewed and related to an understanding of the hydrogeothermal potential of the Alamosa-Monte Vista area. The physiographic setting of the region, the structural framework of the basin, and its influence on the stratigraphic makeup of the rock sequence, which in turn control the occurrence of potential deep water reservoirs, are reviewed. It is suggested that the San Luis Basin was well-developed by Miocene time, and that although the basin was modified by Neogene faulting, it is essentially a late Laramide event having been produced during the Paleogene. Attention is also given to high heat flow along the Rio Grande Rift and to the geothermal gradient of the San Luis Basin. The confined aquifer is then considered in respect to its hydrogeology, water quality, and as to the legal aspects of the system. (LEW)

  11. Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of a Rio Grande rift subbasin, Sunshine Valley-Costilla Plain, San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, C.A.; Thompson, R.A.; Shroba, R.R.; Anderson, M.; Drenth, B.J.; Rotzien, J.; Lyon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sunshine Valley–Costilla Plain, a structural subbasin of the greater San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift, is bounded to the north and south by the San Luis Hills and the Red River fault zone, respectively. Surficial mapping, neotectonic investigations, geochronology, and geophysics demonstrate that the structural, volcanic, and geomorphic evolution of the basin involves the intermingling of climatic cycles and spatially and temporally varying tectonic activity of the Rio Grande rift system. Tectonic activity has transferred between range-bounding and intrabasin faults creating relict landforms of higher tectonic-activity rates along the mountain-piedmont junction. Pliocene–Pleistocene average long-term slip rates along the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone range between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/year with late Pleistocene slip rates approximately half (0.06 mm/year) of the longer Quaternary slip rate. During the late Pleistocene, climatic influences have been dominant over tectonic influences on mountain-front geomorphic processes. Geomorphic evidence suggests that this once-closed subbasin was integrated into the Rio Grande prior to the integration of the once-closed northern San Luis Basin, north of the San Luis Hills, Colorado; however, deep canyon incision, north of the Red River and south of the San Luis Hills, initiated relatively coeval to the integration of the northern San Luis Basin. Long-term projections of slip rates applied to a 1.6 km basin depth defined from geophysical modeling suggests that rifting initiated within this subbasin between 20 and 10 Ma. Geologic mapping and geophysical interpretations reveal a complex network of northwest-, northeast-, and north-south–trending faults. Northwest- and northeast-trending faults show dual polarity and are crosscut by north-south– trending faults. This structural model possibly provides an analog for how some intracontinental rift structures evolve through time.

  12. Contamination of heavy metals in birds from Embalse La Florida (San Luis, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Cid, Fabricio Damián; Gatica-Sosa, Claudia; Antón, Rosa Isabel; Caviedes-Vidal, Enrique

    2009-11-01

    Embalse La Florida is an artificial lake located in midwestern Argentina's San Luis province. It provides drinking water to approximately 70% of the province's human population and approximately 20% of the province is irrigated with water from the reservoir. The presence of heavy metals in Embalse La Florida's water has previously been reported. Nevertheless, no information about the levels of these contaminants in birds is available for this region. The aim of this study, therefore, is to (1) establish baseline data on lead (Pb) and cadmium (Cd) levels in birds from Embalse La Florida, (2) assess metal accumulation patterns between organs and bird species, and (3) evaluate the potential risk that these heavy metals pose for the local avifauna. We measured Pb and Cd in bone, pectoralis muscle, liver, gonad, and brain of three bird species representative of the Embalse La Florida ecosystem: Podiceps major (Great Grebe), Phalacrocorax brasilianus (Neotropic Cormorant), both of which are piscivorous, and Pitangus sulphuratus (Great Kiskadee), which is omnivorous. We also measured both heavy metals in Great Grebe eggs. Pb and Cd were detected in all of the tissues we assayed, and Pb concentrations were significantly higher than those for Cd in all tissues. The patterns of Pb and Cd accumulation differed between tissues, however. In general, gonads had the highest concentrations of Pb while Cd tended to accumulate in the liver. An interspecific analysis revealed that the omnivorous species had higher levels of both metals in bone, liver, and brain compared to both piscivorous species. There were no differences in Pb and Cd concentrations between males and females. The highest liver level of Pb (4.69 ppm wet weight) detected in Great Kiskadee, was comparable to those associated with toxic effects in birds, and Pb concentrations found in the liver of two females and two males (2.07 to 2.32 ppm wet weight) were also similar to those that could be physiologically

  13. Initial vegetation species and senescience/stress indicator mapping in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; King, Trude V. V.; Ager, Cathy; Swayze, Gregg A.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed AVIRIS data obtained over agricultural areas in the San Luis Valley of Colorado. The data were acquired on September 3, 1993. A combined method of radiative transfer modeling and ground calibration site reflectance was used to correct the flight data to surface reflectance. This method, called Radiative Transfer Ground Calibration, or RTGC, corrects for variable water vapor in the atmosphere and produces spectra free of artifacts with spectral channel to channel noise approaching the signal to noise of the raw data. The calibration site soil samples were obtained on the day of the overflight and measured on our laboratory spectrometer. The site was near the center of the AVIRIS scene and the spectra of the soil is spectrally bland, especially in the region of the chlorophyll absorption in the visible portion of the spectrum. The center of the scene is located at approximately 106 deg 03' longitude, 37 deg 23' latitude, and the scene covers about 92 square kilometers. This scene is one of 28 in the area for a general project to study the Summitville abandoned mine site, located in the mountains west of the San Luis Valley, and its effects on the surrounding environment.

  14. County Staff or Area Staff?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McIntyre, William J.

    1970-01-01

    McIntryre explores the questions of county-based extention and increased specialization in Indiana. He compares the multi-county with individual county systems using variables including clientele's reactions to the two systems. (NL)

  15. Hydrovolcanic evolution of the Joya Prieta maar, San Luis Potosí, northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila-Harris, P.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Carrasco, G.

    2013-05-01

    The Joya Prieta is a Quaternary maar volcano emplaced at the western sector of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt. The crater is located at the axis of an open Laramide fold with a N20°W axis trend. It is the most easterly structure of the Santo Domingo Group, a cluster of intraplate maars and tuff-rings northeast of San Luis Potosí. A characteristic feature of these maars is that they are emplaced in close relationship with anticlines, exposing impressive inner crater walls of folded strata. In the Joya Prieta maar, the calcareous basement rocks are clearly exposed and unconformably overlain by the volcanic succession. A generalized stratigraphic sequence registers, from base to top, olivine-bearing basalt lava resting unconformably atop El Abra Formation limestone. The lava is overlain by thick and oxidized scoria and spatter agglomerate that grades into a moderately sorted spatter-fall layer with pervasive palagonite alteration. In direct contact with no evidence of reworking, pedogenesis or remobilization, the maar-forming sequence starts with parallel-stratified fall layers of altered basaltic pumice and scoria, with lava and limestone lithic clasts. This fall deposit marks the influx of xenocrystals and xenoliths, widely documented in previous works; they comprise mainly kaersutite mega crystals and spinel lherzolite respectively. The proximal fall deposit is divided into two thick layers by an indurated ash-tuff bed with pellets and single-rimmed accretionary lapilli. The upper layer of this fall deposit passes gradually onto an alternation of lapilli-sized layers with parallel ash-tuff horizons until it grades into cross-stratified, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff. The heterolithologic lapilli tuff is cemented on a fine ash matrix with palagonized juvenile clasts and abundant lava, shale and limestone lithics exhibiting a plethora of lithofacies in the like of parallel-bedded tuff, low-angle cross-bedded tuff and massive strata. This passes gradually

  16. A New Destination for "The Flying Bus"?: The Implications of Orlando-Rican Migration for Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreneche, Gabriel Ignacio; Lombardi, Jane; Ramos-Flores, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Rican author Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea" explores the duality, hybridity, and fluidity of US-Puerto Rican identity through the frequent travel of migrants between New York City (the traditional destination city for Puerto Rican migrants) and the island. In recent years, however, the "flying bus" has adopted a new number one…

  17. On the Origin of the Crestone Crater: Low-Latitude Periglacial Features in San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwans, E.; Meng, T. M.; Prudhomme, K.; Morgan, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Located within the northern boundary of the Great Sand Dunes National Park is the Crestone Crater, a elliptical bowl-shaped feature consisting of a raised rim surrounding a central depression. The elongate crater has an approximate diameter of 100 m and reaches a depth of 10 m at its center relative to its rim, which rises 10 m above the elevation of the surrounding surface. Its precise origin is largely unknown and has perplexed regional geologists and residents of Crestone, Colorado for more than 80 years. This project used on-site and remote geophysical methods to characterize the processes that led to the geomorphologic surface expression observed today. Formation hypotheses examined encompass extraterrestrial, eolian, and periglacial processes. Field methods included a new gravity survey and reanalysis of gravity data collected in a previous student investigation of the feature. Additionally, a recent LiDAR dataset spanning San Luis Valley was examined to analyze the main structure, similar features in the area, and surrounding eolian and alluvial surfaces. An extraterrestrial origin, as suggested by numerous previous investigators, was deemed unlikely due to the non-unique gravity signature of the crater, its topographic similarity to many other like features identified in San Luis Valley, as well as its failure to excavate below the elevation of the surrounding surface. Furthermore, the expression of confirmed eolian landforms in San Luis Valley indicates that eolian processes alone would not produce such a prominent form in the level of vegetation observed. Proximal glacial deposits in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains show that the windblown sand in which all these features are clustered is adjacent to areas of past glaciations, and thus would have been affected by freeze-thaw cycles and thin, localized permafrost. Ice extent maps provided by the Colorado Geological Survey, as well as research on the timing of the formation of the Great Sand Dunes reinforce

  18. Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals in soil from San Luis Potosí, México.

    PubMed

    Perez-Vazquez, Francisco Javier; Flores-Ramirez, Rogelio; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Orta-Garcia, Sandra Teresa; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Carrizalez-Yañez, Leticia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) in soil from the city of San Luis Potosí in Mexico. In order to confirm the presence of the previously mentioned compounds, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometer for PBDEs, PCBs, DDT, and DDE. Meanwhile, heavy metals were quantified using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. The total PBDEs levels ranged from 5.0 to 134 μg/kg dry weight (dw), with a total mean PBDEs level of 22.0 ± 32.5 μg/kg dw (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the total mean level in the studied soil was 21.6 ± 24.7 μg/kg dw (range, Luis Potosí, Mexico, and considering that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the city of San Luis Potosi is necessary.

  19. Forecasting Selenium Discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Ecological Effects of A Proposed San Luis Drain Extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2006-01-01

    Selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta) could change significantly if federal and state agencies (1) approve an extension of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley to the North Bay (Suisun Bay, Carquinez Strait, and San Pablo Bay); (2) allow changes in flow patterns of the lower San Joaquin River and Bay-Delta while using an existing portion of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River; or (3) revise selenium criteria for the protection of aquatic life or issue criteria for the protection of wildlife. Understanding the biotransfer of selenium is essential to evaluating effects of selenium on Bay-Delta ecosystems. Confusion about selenium threats to fish and wildlife stem from (1) monitoring programs that do not address specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates; and (2) failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in selenium toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from selenium contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. This report presents an approach to conceptualize and model the fate and effects of selenium under various load scenarios from the San Joaquin Valley. For each potential load, progressive forecasts show resulting (1) water-column concentration; (2) speciation; (3) transformation to particulate form; (4) particulate concentration; (5) bioaccumulation by invertebrates; (6) trophic transfer to predators; and (7) effects on those predators. Enough is known to establish a first-order understanding of relevant conditions, biological response, and ecological risks should selenium be discharged directly into the North Bay through a conveyance such as a proposed extension of the San Luis Drain. The approach presented here, the Bay-Delta selenium model, determines the mass, fate

  20. Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.; Dolton, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

  1. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  2. [Luis Hidalgo y Carpio, Editor of Gaceta Médica de México (1818-1879)].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Martha Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Luis Hidalgo y Carpio (1818-1879) was a notable physician who made important contributions to the field of medicine during his time. Nevertheless, reference sources on the aspect from Hidalgo y Carpio that we would like to emphasize (i.e. as an editor of a medical journal) are scarce since precisely when Hidalgo y Carpio was named President of the Medical Society (later the Academia Nacional de Medicina), in 1987, the publication of the Gaceta Médica de México was temporarily interrupted. Hidalgo y Carpio played a key role as an editor at a time when the medical community of Mexico required a means whereby the scientific achievements could be published and discussed among peers and colleagues. Under Hidalgo y Carpio, the Gaceta Médica de México soon reached a wide audience, not only as a periodical publication but also for the prestige of the Academy that represented.

  3. Severe pneumonia associated with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Alejandro; Magaña-Aquino, Martin; Garcia-Sepúlveda, Christian; Ochoa-Pérez, Uciel R; Falcón-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Comas-García, Andreu; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Contreras-Treviño, Hugo I; Jimenéz-Rico, Paulina V; Banda-Barbosa, Mario A; Dominguez-Paulin, Félix; Bernal-Blanco, J Mario; Peréz-González, Luis F; Noyola, Daniel E

    2010-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus-associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome.

  4. Prevalence of pathogenic Acanthamoeba (Protozoa:Amoebidae) in the atmosphere of the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Zaragoza, S; Magana-Becerra, A

    1997-01-01

    Several species of pathogenic Acanthamoeba cause infections to humans, but amoebic keratitis is more frequently found than any other due to the increasing number of contact lens wearers in the world. Cysts and trophozoites of these amebas are airborne and may pollute water from the air. We investigated the proportion of pathogenic Acanthamoeba from the atmosphere of the city of San Luis Potosi. Samples were taken by the impinger method, every month during one year. We isolated 23 strains of Acanthamoeba, 61% of them were non-pathogenic, 31% were non-pathogenic with invasive capacity and 8% were pathogenic to mice. Almost 40% of these strains represent danger of infections to humans. The isolations were more abundant during the dry season in the south (urban) and west (suburban) stations, which means that the sanitary conditions around stands may enhance the proportion of pathogenic strains in the surroundings.

  5. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation: Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goering, S. W.; Garing, K. L.; Coury, G. E.; Fritzler, E. A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The institutional and environmental analyses indicate that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  6. Archosauriform remains from the Late Triassic of San Luis province, Argentina, Quebrada del Barro Formation, Marayes-El Carrizal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianechini, Federico A.; Codorniú, Laura; Arcucci, Andrea B.; Castillo Elías, Gabriela; Rivarola, David

    2016-03-01

    Here we present archosauriform remains from 'Abra de los Colorados', a fossiliferous locality at Sierra de Guayaguas, NW San Luis Province. Two fossiliferous levels were identified in outcrops of the Quebrada del Barro Formation (Norian), which represent the southernmost outcrops of the Marayes-El Carrizal Basin. These levels are composed by massive muddy lithofacies, interpreted as floodplain deposits. The specimens consist of one incomplete maxilla (MIC-V718), one caudal vertebra (MIC-V719), one metatarsal (MIC-V720) and one indeterminate appendicular bone (MIC-V721). The materials can be assigned to Archosauriformes but the fragmentary nature and lack of unambiguous synapomorphies preclude a more precise taxomic assignment. The maxilla is remarkably large and robust and represents the posterior process. It preserved one partially erupted tooth with ziphodont morphology. This bone shows some anatomical traits and size match with 'rauisuchians' and theropods. MIC-V719 corresponds to a proximal caudal vertebra. It has a high centrum, a ventral longitudinal furrow, expanded articular processes for the chevrons, a posteriorly displaced diapophysis located below the level of the prezygapophyses, and short prezygapophyses. This vertebra would be from an indeterminate archosauriform. MIC-V720 presents a cylindrical diaphysis, with a well-developed distal trochlea, which present resemblances with metatarsals of theropods, pseudosuchians, and silesaurids, although the size matches better with theropods. MIC-V721 has a slender diaphysis and a convex triangular articular surface, and corresponds to an indeterminate archosauriform. Despite being fragmentary, these materials indicate the presence of a diverse archosauriforms association from Late Triassic beds of San Luis. Thus, they add to the faunal assemblage recently reported from this basin at San Juan Province, which is much rich and diverse than the coeval paleofauna well known from Los Colorados Formation in the

  7. Mortality attributable to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Comas‐García, Andreu; García‐Sepúlveda, Christian A.; Méndez‐de Lira, José J.; Aranda‐Romo, Saray; Hernández‐Salinas, Alba E.; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Comas‐García et al. (2011) Mortality attributable to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 76–82. Background  Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Starting in 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus has become one of the leading respiratory pathogens worldwide. However, the overall impact of this virus as a cause of mortality has not been clearly defined. Objectives  To determine the impact of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 on mortality in a Mexican population. Methods  We assessed the impact of pandemic influenza virus on mortality during the first and second outbreaks in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, and compared it to mortality associated with seasonal influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) during the previous winter seasons. Results  We estimated that, on average, 8·1% of all deaths that occurred during the 2003–2009 seasons were attributable to influenza and RSV. During the first pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 outbreak, there was an increase in mortality in persons 5–59 years of age, but not during the second outbreak (Fall of 2009). Overall, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 outbreaks had similar effects on mortality to those associated with seasonal influenza virus epidemics. Conclusions  The impact of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus on mortality during the first year of the pandemic was similar to that observed for seasonal influenza. The establishment of real‐time surveillance systems capable of integrating virological, morbidity, and mortality data may result in the timely identification of outbreaks so as to allow for the institution of appropriate control measures to reduce the impact of emerging pathogens on the population. PMID:21306570

  8. [A seroepidemiological survey on the island of São Luis during a dengue epidemic in Maranhão].

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, P F; Lima, J W; Raposo, M L; Rodrigues, S G; da Rosa, J F; Amorim, S M; da Rosa, E S; Moura, C M; Fonseca, N; da Rosa, A P

    1999-01-01

    The island of São Luis in the State of Maranhão, constituted by the municipalities of São Luis-SL (835,428 inhabitants), São José de Ribamar-SJR (60,633 inhabitants) and Paço do Lumiar-PL (80,274 inhabitants), has been suffering dengue (DEN) fever epidemics since 1995, caused by DEN-1. In 1996, from August through October, an aleatory sero-epidemiologic survey was carried out in order to estimate the incidence of DEN infection and to analyze other clinical and epidemiological parameters. A questionnaire was applied and serum samples were simultaneously obtained. Serum samples were tested by hemagglutination inhibition (HI). Results were analyzed using Lotus 123, Epi-info 6.0, Excel 5.0 and STATA softwares. A total of 1,217 serum samples were obtained (101 of PL, 100 of SJR and 1017 of SL). The rate of DEN was 55.4% in PL, 28% in SJR and 41.4% in SL, suggesting the occurrence of 401,933 infections. No difference was seen between males and females, but infection occurred more in the upper social class than in poor people (p < 0.003), and was more frequent in adults than in children (p < 0.0004). In SL, the incidence was stratified into seven sanitary districts (SD), and prevalence was found to range from 26.1% in SD4 to 56.8% in SD1 (p < 0.0001). Symptoms were more frequently reported by people whose HI was positive: they included fever, headache, chills, dizziness, retrobulbar pains, muscle and joint pains, nausea, anorexia and skin rash. In spite of the high incidence of infection, no hemorrhagic cases were reported.

  9. Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-15

    Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix ``E``), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

  10. Environmental assessment of curly top virus control in California. [Curly Top Virus

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-15

    Curly top is a viral disease of sugarbeets, tomatoes, melons, peppers, beans, cucumbers, squash, pumpkins, spinach, vineseed and other commercially important crops, including ornamentals. Curly top not only infects commercial crops, but at times devastates backyard vegetable and flower gardens. The only known vector of curly top is Circulifer tenellus, commonly known as the beet leafhopper. Control of the beet leafhopper may take place at various locations throughout the San Joaquin Valley, Salinas Valley, Cuyama Valley, Antelope Valley of northern Los Angeles County, Riverside County and the Imperial Valley (See Maps in Appendix E''), including portions of Merced, Fresno, Kings. Kern, San Luis Obispo, Monterey, San Benito, Santa Barbara, Los Angeles, Riverside and Imperial Counties. The size of the control program is totally dependent on the location, size, nd distribution of the beet leafhopper population. In a year with a low population, only 80,000 acres in western Fresno, Kings, and Kern Counties may require treatment. In a drought year, the treatment required may increase to more than 200,000 acres and include some inter-coastal valleys of Monterey, San Luis Obispo and Santa Barbara Counties. Not all areas require treatment on an annual basis and at no time is the entire area subject to blanket treatment. The Curly Top Virus Control Program (CTVCP) was instrumental in supporting research which developed an antisera allowing the use of Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay to determine the presence, on a percentage basis, of curly top virus. Thus, the amount of virus found in a given area lends weight to treatment priorities.

  11. 77 FR 72968 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, for Imperial County, Placer County and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... County and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Imperial County Air Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portions of the California...

  12. {open_quotes}Black Gold{close_quotes} leads to new structural interpretation, Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    In the course of exploring for gold along the east margin of the Rio Grande Rift (northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and northeastern San Luis Basin) live Cretaceous oil was discovered in fractured Precambrian gneiss in 25 of 42 shallow drill holes. Geologic mapping located two outcrops of Mesozoic sediments along the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Mancos Shale, Dakota Group and Morrison Formation sediments were identified from 17 drill holes. These are the first known occurrences of Mesozoic sediments in the area. Previous investigations had concluded that the Mesozoic section eroded from the San Luis uplift during the Laramide. Surface and subsurface geologic data was integrated with gravity, magnetic and seismic surveys for a new structural interpretation. The San Luis Basin is separated from the mountains by an intermediate block and the main basin-bounding fault is three miles west-southwest of the mountain front. A major low-angle, normal fault or detachment fault is related to Miocene rifting. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments are interpreted to be present in the hanging wall of this low angle fault. Buried and thermally matured in a Laramide intermountane basin, these sediments are likely the source of the present day oil found in Precambrian rocks.

  13. Potential human health risk by 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" reservoir (Northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Porres, M. Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, M. A.; Herrera-Peraza, E.; Cabral-Lares, M.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Conchos River is one of the most important in northern Mexico and the main surface waterway in the arid state of Chihuahua. The Luis L. Leon dam produces the Luis L. Leon Reservoir, which is the last major reservoir before the Conchos River enters the Rio Grande at the Texas-Chihuahua border. Activity concentrations (AC) of 234,238U and 210Po in fillet and liver of three stocked fish species (Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus), as well as in water from the Luis L. Leon reservoir were determined. 238U and 234U ACs in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus species, present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bqṡkg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues respect to their concentrations in water was determined. Lepomis cyanellus species showed the highest BAF for total uranium in fillet, with value 1.5. The annual effective dose for uranium in adults by fish consumption in this work ranged from 4.46×10-3 to 3.68×10-2 μSvṡyear-1. The difference in concentrations of uranium in fillet among the studied species is likely primarily due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  14. Snohomish County Biodiesel Project

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Terrill; Carveth, Deanna

    2010-02-01

    Snohomish County in western Washington State began converting its vehicle fleet to use a blend of biodiesel and petroleum diesel in 2005. As prices for biodiesel rose due to increased demand for this cleaner-burning fuel, Snohomish County looked to its farmers to grow this fuel locally. Suitable seed crops that can be crushed to extract oil for use as biodiesel feedstock include canola, mustard, and camelina. The residue, or mash, has high value as an animal feed. County farmers began with 52 acres of canola and mustard crops in 2006, increasing to 250 acres and 356 tons in 2008. In 2009, this number decreased to about 150 acres and 300 tons due to increased price for mustard seed.

  15. Confined aquifer head measurements and storage properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, from spaceborne InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a remote sensing technique for measuring centimeter-level surface deformation, is used to estimate hydraulic head in the confined aquifer of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. Reconstructing head measurements from InSAR in agricultural regions can be difficult, as InSAR phase data are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. Analysis of 17 L-band ALOS PALSAR scenes, acquired between January 2007 and March 2011, demonstrates that comprehensive InSAR deformation measurements can be recovered over the vegetated groundwater basin with an improved processing strategy. Local skeletal storage coefficients and time delays between the head change and deformation are estimated through a joint InSAR-well data analysis. InSAR subsidence estimates are transformed to head changes with finer temporal and spatial resolution than is possible using existing well records alone. Both InSAR and well data suggest that little long-term water-storage loss occurred in the SLV over the study period and that inelastic compaction was negligible. The seasonal head variations derived from InSAR are consistent with the existing well data at most locations where confined aquifer pumping activity dominates. Our results demonstrate the advantages of InSAR measurements for basin-wide characterization of aquifer storage properties and groundwater levels over agricultural regions.

  16. Detection of residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Hernández, Sergio; Ramírez, Martha; Ortíz, Irmene

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides were intensively used in Mexico from 1950 until their ban and restriction in 1991. However, the presence of these compounds is commonly reported in many regions of the country. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region, San Luis Potosi state, which has been identified as possibly polluted by pesticides. Composed samples from 24 zones covering an area of approximately 5,440 ha were analyzed. The most frequently found pesticides were p,p'-DDT followed by ,p,p'-DDE, heptachlor, endosulfan and γ-HCH whose frequency rates were 100, 91, 83 and 54%, respectively. The concentration of p,p'-DDT in the crops grown in these soils was in the following order: chili > maize > tomato > alfalfa. The results obtained in this study show that p,p'-DDT values are lower or similar to those found in other agricultural regions of Mexico. Methyl and ethyl parathion were the most frequent organophosphate pesticide detected in 100% and 62.5% of the samples with average concentrations of 25.20 and 47.48 μg kg(-1), respectively. More research is needed to establish the background levels of pesticides in agricultural soils and their potential ecological and human health effects in this region. PMID:24813984

  17. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  18. Luminescence dating of anthropogenic features of the San Luis Valley, Colorado: from stone huts to stone walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Donlan, Rebecca A.; Kardos, Barbara Maat

    2015-01-01

    The Snake Nest Wall site and the Crestone Stone Huts are in the northern San Luis Valley, Colorado, and provide a unique opportunity to date high-altitude archeological sites of unknown age and origin using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). We sampled sediment underlying foundation stones of these structures to establish a chronological framework for each site's construction. OSL dating of the quartz grains directly under the Snake Nest Wall suggest that the stones and, therefore, the structure was most recently emplaced between 1855 and 1890 A.D. Dating of the sediment beneath the Crestone Stone Huts suggests the construction time of these huts is between 1860 and 1890 A.D. Analysis of the equivalent dose (DE) dispersion of the OSL samples at Snake Nest Wall and the Crestone Huts shows that the majority of sediments were fully bleached prior to deposition and the low scatter suggests that short-term or shallow alluvial processes were the dominant transport for sediments. In both cases, the OSL ages show that the construction was during very recent historical times, although it is likely that the Snake Nest Wall was rebuilt in the late 19th century. Further study is warranted at the Snake Nest Wall since it shows signs of greater antiquity and a continued presence of human use. The Crestone Huts are shown to be a product of railroad building during the boomtown days of Lucky and Crestone.

  19. [Violence against women in transnational communities in San Luis Potosí, Mexico: a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Flores, Yesica Yolanda Rangel

    2016-08-01

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem due to its impact on quality of life for those living under the complicity of a patriarchal culture and a state that makes such violence invisible. This article aims to give visibility to the contexts of violence affecting female "partners of migrants" in their places of origin, problematizing how such violence assaults their physical and mental health. This was a qualitative study with an interpretative anthropological focus, drawing on a sample of 21 women from rural and urban areas in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Interviews were based on daily life history and discourse analysis. According to the results, women experience more violence when their spouses migrate, new forms of violence are committed against them, and the violence occurs in both the household and the community. Violence against women is a public health problem that should be treated through a framework that is sensitive to the social and cultural dynamics characterizing the contexts in which health programs are implemented. PMID:27487439

  20. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentration in soil from San Luis Potosi, Mexico: levels and ecological and human health risk characterization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Orta-García, Sandra T; Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Jiménez-Avalos, Jorge Armando; González-Palomo, Ana K; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in soils from the city of San Luis Potosi in Mexico and perform an ecological and human health risk characterization. In order to confirm the presence of PBDEs, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and the concentrations of PBDEs in urban, industrial, agricultural, and brick kiln industry areas were determined. The mean total PBDEs levels obtained in the study sites were 25.0 ± 39.5 μg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation) in the brick kiln industry zone; 34.5 ± 36.0 μg/kg in the urban zone; 8.00 ± 7.10 μg/kg in the industrial zone and 16.6 ± 15.3 μg/kg in the agricultural zone. The ecological and human health risk characterization showed relatively low-hazard quotient values. However, the moderately high PBDEs levels found in soils highlight the necessity to establish a systematic monitoring process for PBDEs in environmental and biological samples. PMID:26566197

  1. Community Response to Concentrating Solar Power in the San Luis Valley: October 9, 2008 - March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B. C.; Hunter, L. M.; Kirkland, T. M.; Tierney, K. J.

    2010-06-01

    This report is about the social acceptance of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants in the San Luis Valley, approximately 200 miles southwest of Denver, Colorado. The research focused on social factors that may facilitate and impede the adoption and implementation of CSP. During the winter of 2008-2009, interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 25 CSP-related stakeholders inside and outside the Valley. Interviews focused on the perceived advantages and disadvantages of siting a hypothetical 100-MW CSP facility in the Valley, the level of community support and opposition to CSP development, and related issues, such as transmission. State policy recommendations based on the findings include developing education programs for Valley residents, integrating Valley decision makers into an energy-water-land group, providing training for Valley decision makers, offering workforce training, evaluating models of taxation, and forming landholder energy associations. In addition, the SLV could become a laboratory for new approaches to CSP facility and transmission siting decision-making. The author recommends that outside stakeholders address community concerns and engage Valley residents in CSP decisions. Engaging the residents in CSP and transmission decisions, the author says, should take parallel significance with the investment in solar technology.

  2. Use of multiple indicators to assess the environmental quality of urbanized aquatic surroundings in San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Mirian R; González, Patricia; Moglia, Marta; Gonzáles, Soledad Oliva; Jofré, Mariana

    2014-07-01

    Urbanization can cause significant changes in the integrity of fluvial ecosystems, which makes it necessary to assess environmental conditions of areas where population growth rates are high. A study of the environmental quality of Chorrillos River (San Luis-Argentina) and its tributaries was carried out in order to evaluate the potential effect of an urbanization gradient. Six sites were sampled along the main course and tributaries of the river. Urbanization variables were measured and included to calculate an Urbanization Index. Physical–chemical analyses were performed in water samples to evaluate water quality through the use of a simplified index of water quality (SIWQ). Plants, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians metrics were used to assess the biological state of the studied sites. The Urbanization Index varied significantly between sites and was significantly correlated to the SIWQ. However, no significant correlations were found between SIWQ and macroinvertebrates and amphibians variables. Water quality of Chorrillos River and its tributaries is good, but it is affected by anthropic influences as reflected by the declining of SIWQ values. Although biological sampling constitutes an important tool in the assessment of water quality of rivers, in this report biological results were not conclusive. PMID:24659439

  3. Evaluation of the transfer of soil arsenic to maize crops in suburban areas of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Alfaro-Barbosa, J M; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Pérez-Maldonado, I N; Caballero-Quintero, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-11-01

    The presence of arsenic (As) in agricultural food products is a matter of concern because it can cause adverse health effects at low concentrations. Agricultural-product intake constitutes a principal source for As exposure in humans. In this study, the contribution of the chemical-soil parameters in As accumulation and translocation in the maize crop from a mining area of San Luis Potosi was evaluated. The total arsenic concentration and arsenic speciation were determined by HG-AFS and IC-HG-AFS, respectively. The data analysis was conducted by cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The soil pH presented a negative correlation with the accumulated As in each maize plant part, and parameters such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) presented a higher correlation with the As translocation in maize. Thus, the metabolic stress in maize may induce organic acid exudation leading a higher As bioavailability. A high As inorganic/organic ratio in edible maize plant tissues suggests a substantial risk of poisoning by this metalloid. Careful attention to the chemical changes in the rhizosphere of the agricultural zones that can affect As transfer through the food chain could reduce the As-intoxication risk of maize consumers. PMID:25128885

  4. Detection of residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Hernández, Sergio; Ramírez, Martha; Ortíz, Irmene

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides were intensively used in Mexico from 1950 until their ban and restriction in 1991. However, the presence of these compounds is commonly reported in many regions of the country. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region, San Luis Potosi state, which has been identified as possibly polluted by pesticides. Composed samples from 24 zones covering an area of approximately 5,440 ha were analyzed. The most frequently found pesticides were p,p'-DDT followed by ,p,p'-DDE, heptachlor, endosulfan and γ-HCH whose frequency rates were 100, 91, 83 and 54%, respectively. The concentration of p,p'-DDT in the crops grown in these soils was in the following order: chili > maize > tomato > alfalfa. The results obtained in this study show that p,p'-DDT values are lower or similar to those found in other agricultural regions of Mexico. Methyl and ethyl parathion were the most frequent organophosphate pesticide detected in 100% and 62.5% of the samples with average concentrations of 25.20 and 47.48 μg kg(-1), respectively. More research is needed to establish the background levels of pesticides in agricultural soils and their potential ecological and human health effects in this region.

  5. Prevalence of antibodies to the repeat epitope of the circumsporozoite protein of Plasmodium vivax in San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Mota, J; Coreño, O; Cochrane, A H; Ramos, C

    1996-01-01

    The prevalence of antibodies against the repeat epitope of the circumsporozoite protein (cs) of the standard (PV210) and variant (PVK247) strain of Plasmodium vivax was determined by ELISA in 1170 sera from individual residents of seven localities of the Region Huasteca of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The capture antigens were the synthetic peptides DDAAD and (ANGAGNQPG) that correspond to the repeats of the PV210 and PVK247 cs proteins, respectively. Of the analyzed serum samples, 34.1% (400/1170) were positive with one or both of these antigens. Of the sera, 18.2% (214/1170) reacted with the DDAAD peptide and 6.6% (78/1170) were positive with the variant synthetic peptide. Additionally, 9.2% (108/1170) of the samples reacted with both peptides. A sample of 10% of positive sera for the variant cs repeat (18/78) was tested with the cs repeat peptide of P. malariae/P. brasilianum (NAAG); almost all of them (16/18, 89%) being positive. These results confirm that the transmission of the variant strain of P. vivax is a common phenomenon in endemic regions in Latin America, as well as in other tropical regions of the world. These findings may have implications for the development of aP. vivax vaccine since that based on the standard cs repeat only would not be universally protective.

  6. [Violence against women in transnational communities in San Luis Potosí, Mexico: a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Flores, Yesica Yolanda Rangel

    2016-08-01

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem due to its impact on quality of life for those living under the complicity of a patriarchal culture and a state that makes such violence invisible. This article aims to give visibility to the contexts of violence affecting female "partners of migrants" in their places of origin, problematizing how such violence assaults their physical and mental health. This was a qualitative study with an interpretative anthropological focus, drawing on a sample of 21 women from rural and urban areas in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Interviews were based on daily life history and discourse analysis. According to the results, women experience more violence when their spouses migrate, new forms of violence are committed against them, and the violence occurs in both the household and the community. Violence against women is a public health problem that should be treated through a framework that is sensitive to the social and cultural dynamics characterizing the contexts in which health programs are implemented.

  7. Genetic structure of the populations migrating from San Luis Potosi and Zacatecas to Nuevo León in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Cerda-Flores, R M; Kshatriya, G K; Barton, S A; Leal-Garza, C H; Garza-Chapa, R; Schull, W J; Chakraborty, R

    1991-06-01

    The Mexicans residing in the Monterrey metropolitan area in Nuevo León, Mexico, were grouped by generation and birthplace [Monterrey Metropolitan Area (MMA), San Luis Potosi (SLP), and Zacatecas (ZAC)] of the four grandparents to determine the extent of genetic variation within this population and the genetic differences, if any, between the natives living in the MMA and the immigrant populations from SLP and ZAC. Nine genetic marker systems were analyzed. The genetic distance analysis indicates that SLP and ZAC are similar to the MMA, irrespective of birthplace and generation. Gene diversity analysis (GST) suggests that more than 96% of the total gene diversity (HT) can be attributed to individual variation within the population. The genetic admixture analysis suggests that the Mexicans of the MMA, SLP, and ZAC, stratified by birthplace and generation, have received a predominantly Spanish contribution (78.5%), followed by a Mexican Indian contribution (21.5%). Similarly, admixture analysis, conducted on the population of Nuevo León and stratified by generation, indicates a substantial contribution from the MMA (64.6%), followed by ZAC (22.1%) and SLP (13.3%). Finally, we demonstrate that there is no nonrandom association of alleles among the genetic marker systems (i.e., no evidence of gametic disequilibrium) despite the Mestizo origin of this population.

  8. Scanning and transmission electron microscope of suspended lead-rich particles in the air of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Jacinto, P. Santiago; Fernández, M. Monroy

    In the city of San Luis Potosi exists an important metallurgical plant and is known that in the adjacent urban zone, there is a high concentration of lead in the air, it is also supposed that most of the particles with lead have an anthropogenic origin because these particles show morphological characteristics and chemical composition very different in comparison with common lead minerals. In this work it was proved that most of the airborne particles with lead present in this urban zone, effectively came from the copper smelter. The airborne particles with lead were compared with particles with lead obtained starting from samples of slag and lead calcine of the copper smelter. To perform the comparative study, these particles were studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope to obtain chemical composition and associated morphological characteristics. Results suggest that these particles, composed of only one phase, are chemically distinct from any crustal lead mineral. Because of the complexity of the chemical composition of these particles (Pb, S, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cd, Sb, O), some of the airborne particles were analyzed by transmission microscopy in order to associate crystalline structure with any particular chemical phase.

  9. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentration in soil from San Luis Potosi, Mexico: levels and ecological and human health risk characterization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Orta-García, Sandra T; Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Jiménez-Avalos, Jorge Armando; González-Palomo, Ana K; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in soils from the city of San Luis Potosi in Mexico and perform an ecological and human health risk characterization. In order to confirm the presence of PBDEs, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and the concentrations of PBDEs in urban, industrial, agricultural, and brick kiln industry areas were determined. The mean total PBDEs levels obtained in the study sites were 25.0 ± 39.5 μg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation) in the brick kiln industry zone; 34.5 ± 36.0 μg/kg in the urban zone; 8.00 ± 7.10 μg/kg in the industrial zone and 16.6 ± 15.3 μg/kg in the agricultural zone. The ecological and human health risk characterization showed relatively low-hazard quotient values. However, the moderately high PBDEs levels found in soils highlight the necessity to establish a systematic monitoring process for PBDEs in environmental and biological samples.

  10. Evaluation of the transfer of soil arsenic to maize crops in suburban areas of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Alfaro-Barbosa, J M; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Pérez-Maldonado, I N; Caballero-Quintero, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-11-01

    The presence of arsenic (As) in agricultural food products is a matter of concern because it can cause adverse health effects at low concentrations. Agricultural-product intake constitutes a principal source for As exposure in humans. In this study, the contribution of the chemical-soil parameters in As accumulation and translocation in the maize crop from a mining area of San Luis Potosi was evaluated. The total arsenic concentration and arsenic speciation were determined by HG-AFS and IC-HG-AFS, respectively. The data analysis was conducted by cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The soil pH presented a negative correlation with the accumulated As in each maize plant part, and parameters such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) presented a higher correlation with the As translocation in maize. Thus, the metabolic stress in maize may induce organic acid exudation leading a higher As bioavailability. A high As inorganic/organic ratio in edible maize plant tissues suggests a substantial risk of poisoning by this metalloid. Careful attention to the chemical changes in the rhizosphere of the agricultural zones that can affect As transfer through the food chain could reduce the As-intoxication risk of maize consumers.

  11. Comprehensive Paleomagnetic Study of the Oligocene-Miocene Rocks from the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.; Torres-Hernandez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive paleomagnetic study of the Oligocene-Miocene sequence of lithological units from the San Luis Potosí volcanic field in central Mexico was accomplished to set up the magnetostratigraphic record. Two hundred and one oriented standard paleomagnetic cores corresponding to twenty-eight paleomagnetic sites were collected from all units. Rock-magnetic properties are characteristic for each unit. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and continuous susceptibility vs. temperature experiments point from low to medium-Ti content in titanomagnetite as the main opaque magnetic minerals, presumably result from oxy-exsolution processes during the initial flow cooling. Opaque mineral microscopy supports this assumption. Unblocking temperature and hysteresis parameters suggests predominance of pseudo-single domain magnetic grain size. Thermal and alternating field demagnetizations show mostly well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Most sites present a mean direction with small angular dispersion. The overall mean direction (N=10, Dec=1.1°, Inc=34.1°, k=531 and α95=2.1°) is characterized by small angular dispersion and inclination close to dipolar value for the locality. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility lineation match the geologically inferred flow direction.

  12. Direct, immunological and molecular techniques for a fasciolosis survey in a rural area of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Silvana; Cabrera, Marta Graciela; Cucher, Marcela Alejandra; di Risio, Cecilia Alicia; Malandrini, Jorge Bruno; Kamenetzky, Laura; Alazraqui, Marcio; Etchart, Cristina Beatriz; Pantano, María Laura; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor

    2013-10-01

    Fasciolosis is a zoonosis caused by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, prevalent in cattle, that is actually emerging as a cause of disease in humans. The goal of this work was to describe the characteristics of fasciolosis in arroyo El Juncal region, La Toma, San Luis province, Argentina. In order to get this objective, a transversal, quantitative study was carried out by a fieldwork that allowed the collection of data, human, animal, and environmental samples. The materials were processed by direct, immunological and/or molecular diagnostic techniques. According to the geographical characteristics and in presence of all the definitive and intermediate hosts, reservoirs, and sources of infection, it was possible to describe the persistence of fasciolosis in the area. The prevalence was 11.90 % in humans (by serology), 5.26 % in cattle (by coprological analysis) and 61.76 % in snails (by PCR). The situation that was found for this area indicates that any measure of intervention for the control of this zoonosis should be adopted by multidisciplinary teams. PMID:24431579

  13. An inventory of published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for California, 1956-70

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Porterfield, George

    1972-01-01

    This inventory was prepared to provide a convenient reference to published and unpublished fluvial-sediment data for water years 1956-70, and updates substantially previous inventories. Sediment stations are listed in downstream order, and an alphabetical list of stations is also included. Figure 1 shows the approximate location of sediment stations in California. Most of the fluvial-sediment data in California were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, under cooperative agreements with the following Federal, State, and local agencies: California Department of Water Resources, California Department of Navigation and Ocean Development, California Department of Fish and Game, Bolinas Harbor District, Monterey County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Orange County Flood Control District, Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, San Diego County Department of Sanitation and Flood Control, San Luis Obispo County, San Mateo County, Santa Clara County Flood Control and Water District, Santa Cruz County Flood Control and Water Conservation District, Santa Cruz, city of, University of California, Ventura County Flood Control District, Forest Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Soil Conservation Service, U.S. Department of Agriculture, Corps of Engineers, U.S. Army, Bureau of Reclamation, U.S. Department of the Interior, National Park Service, U.S. Department of the Interior. This report was prepared by the Geological Survey under the general supervision of R. Stanley Lord, district chief in charge of water-resources investigations in California.

  14. Preliminary Geologic Map of the North-Central Part of the Alamosa 30' x 60' Quadrangle, Alamosa, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Thompson, Ren A.; Brandt, Theodore R.

    2008-01-01

    This geologic map presents new polygon (geologic map unit contacts) and line (terrace and lacustrine spit/barrier bar) vector data for a map comprised of four 7.5' quadrangles in the north-central part of the Alamosa, Colorado, 30' x 60' quadrangle. The quadrangles include Baldy, Blanca, Blanca SE, and Lasauses. The map database, compiled at 1:50,000 scale from new 1:24,000-scale mapping, provides geologic coverage of an area of current hydrogeologic, tectonic, and stratigraphic interest. The mapped area is located primarily in Costilla County, but contains portions of Alamosa and Conejos Counties, and includes the town of Blanca in its northeastern part. The map area is mainly underlain by surficial geologic materials (fluvial and lacustrine deposits, and eolian sand), but Tertiary volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks crop out in the San Luis Hills, which are in the central and southern parts of the mapped area. The surficial geology of this area has never been mapped at any scale greater than 1:250,000 (broad reconnaissance), so this new map provides important data for ground-water assessments, engineering geology, and the Quaternary geologic history of the San Luis Basin. Newly discovered shoreline deposits are of particular interest (sands and gravels) that are associated with the high-water stand of Lake Alamosa, a Pliocene to middle Pleistocene lake that occupied the San Luis basin prior to its overflow and cutting of a river gorge through the San Luis Hills. After the lake drained, the Rio Grande system included Colorado drainages for the first time since the Miocene (>5.3 Ma). In addition, Servilleta Basalt, which forms the Basaltic Hills on the east margin of the map area, is dated at 3.79+or-0.17 Ma, consistent with its general age range of 3.67-4.84 Ma. This map provides new geologic information for better understanding ground-water flow paths in and adjacent to the Rio Grande system. The map abuts U.S. Geological Survey Open File Report 2005-1392 (a map of

  15. Climate, streamflow, and legacy effects on growth of riparian Populus angustifolia in the arid San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the factors affecting the vigor of desert riparian trees is important for their conservation and management. I used multiple regression to assess effects of streamflow and climate (12–14 years of data) or climate alone (up to 60 years of data) on radial growth of clonal narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), a foundation species in the arid, Closed Basin portion of the San Luis Valley, Colorado. I collected increment cores from trees (14–90 cm DBH) at four sites along each of Sand and Deadman creeks (total N = 85), including both perennial and ephemeral reaches. Analyses on trees <110 m from the stream channel explained 33–64% of the variation in standardized growth index (SGI) over the period having discharge measurements. Only 3 of 7 models included a streamflow variable; inclusion of prior-year conditions was common. Models for trees farther from the channel or over a deep water table explained 23–71% of SGI variability, and 4 of 5 contained a streamflow variable. Analyses using solely climate variables over longer time periods explained 17–85% of SGI variability, and 10 of 12 included a variable indexing summer precipitation. Three large, abrupt shifts in recent decades from wet to dry conditions (indexed by a seasonal Palmer Drought Severity Index) coincided with dramatically reduced radial growth. Each shift was presumably associated with branch dieback that produced a legacy effect apparent in many SGI series: uncharacteristically low SGI in the year following the shift. My results suggest trees in locations distant from the active channel rely on the regional shallow unconfined aquifer, summer rainfall, or both to meet water demands. The landscape-level differences in the water supplies sustaining these trees imply variable effects from shifts in winter-versus monsoon-related precipitation, and from climate change versus streamflow or groundwater management.

  16. Jorge Luis Borges and the New Physics: the Literature of Modern Science and the Science of Modern Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Mark Robert

    1992-01-01

    By examining the works of the Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges, and the parallels it has with modern physics, literature and science converge in their quest for truth regarding the structure and meaning of the universe. The classical perception of physics as a "hard" science--that of quantitative, rational thought which was established during the Newtonian era--has been replaced by the "new physics," which integrates the so-called "soft" elements into its paradigm. It presents us with a universe based not exclusively on a series of particle-like interactions, or a "billiard-ball" hypothesis where discrete objects have a measurable position and velocity in absolute space and time, but rather on a combination of these mechanistic properties and those that make up the non-physical side of nature such as intuition, consciousness, and emotion. According to physicists like James Jeans science has been "humanized" to the extent that the universe as a "great machine" has been converted into a "great thought.". In nearly all his collections of essays and short stories, Borges complements the new physics by producing a literature that can be described as "scientized." The abstract, metaphysical implications and concerns of the new world-view, such as space, time, language, consciousness, free will, determinism, etc., appear repeatedly throughout Borges' texts, and are treated in terms that are remarkably similar to those expressed in the scientific texts whose authors include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrodinger. As a final comparison, Borges and post-modern physicists address the question of the individual's ability to ever comprehend the universe. They share an attitude of incredulity toward all models and theories of reality simply because they are based on partial information, and therefore seen only as conjectures.

  17. [Geographic distribution of birds in the Sierra Madre Oriental of San Luis Potosi, Mexico: a regional analysis of conservation status].

    PubMed

    Sahagún Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Jaime Castro; Reyes Hernández, Humberto

    2013-06-01

    The Sierra Madre Oriental region in the mexican state of San Luis Potosi is a relevant place for bird conservation at a country level. Therefore the main goal of this study was to analyze the geographic patterns of distribution and the conservation current state of the birds, to support the needs to expand the conservation areas in the future. Data was collected from various databases of zoological museums and collections, and field sampling methods conducted from January 2009 to May 2011. Potential distributions were modeled for 284 species using GARP software and then a map was developed to determine areas with favorable environmental characteristics for the distribution of species richness. Finally, the importance of conservation areas for the potential distribution of birds in the region was evaluated. A total of 359 species were recorded of which 71.4% are permanent residents, 19% are winter migrants and 4% are summer residents. From this total, 41 species were endemic, 47 were species at risk and 149 were neotropical migrants. The largest species richness correspond to oak forests, cloud forests, and tropical moist forests located at altitudes from 100m to 1 500m. Their potential distribution was concentrated towards the center and Southeast of the study area. Only 10% of areas with a high potential conservation was included in areas of priority for bird conservation (AICA) and just 3% of all potential areas were under some governmental category of protection. However, no conservation area has a management plan currently applied and monitored. The information generated is important for the development of management proposals for birds conservation in the region. PMID:23885599

  18. [Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis in dairies of the city of San Luis].

    PubMed

    Puig de Centorbi, O N; de Cuadrado, A M; Alcaraz, L E; Laciar, A L; de Milán, M C

    1992-01-01

    In order to detect subclinical mastitis by means of California Mastitis Test and recounting of somatic cells, 163 cows from the dairies of San Luis city, Argentina, were examined. Seventy six individuals (46.6%) exhibited an inflammatory response ranging > or = 2+ grade and a cellular recounting value of > or = 5 x 10(5), data compatible with those of subclinical mastitis. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 39 (51.3%) cultures as estimated by the sum of the two last values listed in Table 1. Organisms were isolated by plating on brain heart infusion agar with 5% of sheep blood and on Baird-Parker media. One hundred and three S. aureus isolates recovered from 51 of 63 cows were characterized by coagulase activity by the tube method using human and bovine plasma; clumping factor; glucose and mannitol fermentation; thermonuclease (TNase), pigment, gelatinase, fibrinolysin, acetoin, hemolysin production; egg yolk, tellurite and catalase reaction and crystal violet types. All isolates were susceptible to cephalothin, clindamycin, methicillin, gentamycin and vancomycin; 94.1% were susceptible to chloramphenicol and 53.8% to G penicillin. Sixty three isolates (61.1%) were classified according to Hájek and Marsálek scheme as biotype C (bovine and ovine ecovar), 33 isolates (32.0%) were classified as biotype B (swine and poultry ecovar); 1 isolated (0.9%) as intermediate between B and D; 5 isolates (4.8%) as biotype A (human ecovar) and 1 isolated (0.9%) as biotype D (ecovar silvestres spp) (Table 2). Production of enterotoxins A to E and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) was determined by the optimal susceptibility plate method on 27 isolates (26.2%) which were coagulase 3+ to 4+ and TNase highly positive. None of them produced enterotoxins including TSST-1. The subclinical mastitis data and the prevalence of S. aureus coincide with those of other authors, both from Argentina and from other countries.

  19. Socio-Urban Spatial Patterns Associated with Dyslipidemia among Schoolchildren in the City of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aradillas-García, Celia; Palos-Lucio, Gabriela; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely

    2016-02-01

    The places where a child lives and attends to school are both major environmental and social determinants of its present and future health status. Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and some of their risk factors among child and adolescent populations are obesity and dyslipidemia, so finding the patterns of distribution of these risk factors by gender, type of school, area, and margination level is important to do health intervention focusing in their necessities to prevent diseases at younger ages. Because of that, a cross-sectional study was performed among elementary and junior high school students from public and private schools in six of the seven areas of the metropolitan zone of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Biochemical dyslipidemia indicators (triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein) and anthropometric data (weight and height) were obtained. Seventeen public schools and five private schools with a total of 383 students were included. More than half of the studied population (53.0%) had elevated triglyceride levels. A total of 330 students (86.2%) had normal levels of total cholesterol with a mean value of 141.7 mg/dl, and 202 schoolchildren (52.8%) had lower than acceptable levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with a mean value of 43.9 mg/dl. There were differences in the levels of high-density protein between the areas and the type of school where they had been studied. Finally, a total of 150 students (39.4%) had at least one altered lipid value and 103 participants (26.9%) had two altered values. Several students, despite their young age, showed a high prevalence of risk factors, so it is important to design programs according to their necessities.

  20. Analysis of the Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosé­ Volcanic field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Torres-Hernandez, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2007-05-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) results from a group of 17 - 18 sites (286 - 312 specimens) from the Cantera Ignimbrite - of Oligocene age and part of the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Filed (SLPVF), México - are presented and analysed in order to help to determine the source and flow directions. In each site a flow direction is inferred based on AMS results. As the Cantera Ignimbrite is generally dipping, AMS was structural corrected. So two sets of geographical and paleo-geographical (structural corrected) inferred-flow directions were obtained. Both sets are analysed trying to define if the source of the ignimbrite is related to a calderic (concentric structure) or to the NW-SE faulting and jointing. Geographical AMS results mostly give SW flow directions, the southernmost sites give to SSE. Meanwhile structural corrected results give a wider range of flow directions, a group of them to NW and another northerly group mostly to NE. AMS was measured in a KLY2 appliance, Jelinek and other statistics and density distributions were performed, giving all very similar results in each site. Mean susceptibilities range from 147 to 27200 x10-6 SI (average = 5713 x10-6 SI). Anisotropy degree (Pj) range from 1.011 to 1.055 with two sites of 1.134-1.254 (Pj average = 1.046). Shape is mostly oblate ranging the T-factor from 0.843 to 0.409 and only one site mainly prolate: T of -0.277 (T average = 0.550).

  1. Blood lead concentrations in wild birds from a polluted mining region at Villa de La Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Chapa-Vargas, Leonardo; Mejia-Saavedra, Jose J; Monzalvo-Santos, Karina; Puebla-Olivares, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the concentrations of lead in bird blood samples from a mining region in central Mexico and to compare concentrations among several different feeding guilds. The study took place in the Mexican state of San Luis Potosi in a region known as "Villa de la Paz." This is one of the most intensely exploited mining regions in central Mexico and has been actively mined for over four centuries. Lead concentrations from bird blood samples taken from four polluted sites were significantly higher than those from a control, unpolluted site (F = 6.3, P < 0.0002). Similarly, mean blood lead concentrations in birds from a highly polluted site were higher than those from a site that has intermediate pollution levels (P < 0.05). In addition, samples from insectivorous birds had significantly lower lead concentrations compared to granivores, frugivores-insectivores, and omnivores (F = 4.86, P = 0.004), and a large proportion of all individuals had blood lead concentrations indicative of low, sub-lethal toxic effects. Finally, in two polluted sites, remarkably small numbers of insectivore-frugivores, and granivores were trapped, and in one polluted site a large number of insectivores was trapped (X(2) = 29.9, P = 0.03), and no differences in proportions of migrants and non-migrants were found among sampling sites (X(2) = 0.6, P = 0.96). To date, it has not been determined to what extent constant exposure to these levels of pollution can influence health at the individual level, lifespan, and, therefore, population demography of birds from this region.

  2. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosi, México: flow source recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Torres-Hernández, J. R.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was selected as the key technique to find the source of the widespread Cantera Ignimbrite and to seek its possible relationship with the San Luis Potosí Caldera. Eighteen sites (372 specimens from 155 cores) from the Oligocene Cantera Ignimbrite were sampled. AMS was measured on a KLY2 Kappabridge. AMS data were processed with Anisoft 3 software using Jelinek statistics as well as `SpheriStat' principal components and density distribution. Mean susceptibilities range from 290 to 5026 × 10-6 SI (average = 2526 × 10-6 SI). The anisotropy degree ( P j) ranges from 1.005 to 1.055, with only one site displaying a value of 1.134 ( P j average = 1.031). AMS ellipsoid shapes are mostly oblate, with the T-factor ranging from 0.843 to 0.144 ( T average = 0.529), although one site is mainly prolate ( T = -0.005), and three additional sites have an important proportion of prolate specimens. Magnetic fabrics of most sites shows k3 axes around nearly circular distributions and k 1- k 2 axes around elongated-girdle distributions defining sub-horizontal foliation planes; exceptions to this are related to sites with a significant percentage of prolate specimens. Flow directions inferred from AMS analysis indicate several ignimbrite sources located along selected NW-SE linear features (faults and fractures such as El Potosino Fault) as well as along the rim of the caldera structure. The geometry of volcanic outcrops, the NW-SE faulting-fracture system, as well as the AMS results suggest that this is a caldera structure resembling the trapdoor-type (Lipman, 1997).

  3. Arsenic and cadmium exposure in children living near a smelter complex in San Luis Potosí, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Díaz-Barriga, F; Santos, M A; Mejía, J J; Batres, L; Yáñez, L; Carrizales, L; Vera, E; del Razo, L M; Cebrián, M E

    1993-08-01

    The main purpose of this study was to assess environmental contamination by arsenic and cadmium in a smelter community (San Luis Potosí City, México) and its possible contribution to an increased body burden of these elements in children. Arsenic and cadmium were found in the environment (air, soil, and household dust, and tap water) as well as in the urine and hair from children. The study was undertaken in three zones: Morales, an urban area close to the smelter complex; Graciano, an urban area 7 km away from the complex; and Mexquitic, a small rural town 25 km away. The environmental study showed that Morales is the most contaminated of the zones studied. The range of arsenic levels in soil (117-1396 ppm), dust (515-2625 ppm), and air (0.13-1.45 micrograms/m3) in the exposed area (Morales) was higher than those in the control areas. Cadmium concentrations were also higher in Morales. Estimates of the arsenic ingestion rate in Morales (1.0-19.8 micrograms/kg/day) were equal to or higher than the reference dose of 1 microgram/kg/day calculated by the Environmental Protection Agency. The range of arsenic levels in urine (69-594 micrograms/g creatinine) and hair (1.4-57.3 micrograms/g) and that of cadmium in hair (0.25-3.5 micrograms/g) indicated that environmental exposure has resulted in an increased body burden of these elements in children, suggesting that children living in Morales are at high risk of suffering adverse health effects if exposure continues.

  4. Endemic fluorosis in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. I. Identification of risk factors associated with human exposure to fluoride.

    PubMed

    Grimaldo, M; Borja-Aburto, V H; Ramírez, A L; Ponce, M; Rosas, M; Díaz-Barriga, F

    1995-01-01

    In order to identify risk factors associated with human exposure to fluoride in San Luis Potosi (SLP), Mexico, a biochemical and epidemiological study was carried out in 1992. Results from the analysis of fluoride sources showed that 61% of tap water samples had fluoride levels above the optimal level of 0.7-1.2 ppm. The levels were higher after boiling. In bottled water, fluoride levels ranged from 0.33 to 6.97 ppm. These sources are important since in SLP 82% of the children drink tap water, 31% also drink bottled water, 92% prepare their food with tap water, 44% boiled all the drinking water, and 91% used infant formula reconstituted with boiled water. The prevalence and severity of dental fluorosis in children (11-13 years old) increased as the concentration of water fluoride increased. At levels of fluoride in water lower than 0.7 ppm a prevalence of 69% was found for total dental fluorosis, whereas at levels of fluoride in water higher than 2.0 ppm a prevalence of 98% was found. In the same children, fluoride levels in urine were quantified. The levels increased as the concentration of water fluoride increased. Regressional analysis showed an increment of 0.54 ppm (P < 0.0001) of fluoride in urine for each ppm of fluoride in water. Fluoride urinary levels were higher in samples collected during the afternoon (1800) when compared with sample collected during the morning (1100). Taking together all these results, three risk factors for human exposure to fluoride in SLP can be identified: ambient temperature, boiled water, and food preparation with boiled water. These factors explain the prevalence of dental fluorosis in SLP.

  5. [Geographic distribution of birds in the Sierra Madre Oriental of San Luis Potosi, Mexico: a regional analysis of conservation status].

    PubMed

    Sahagún Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Jaime Castro; Reyes Hernández, Humberto

    2013-06-01

    The Sierra Madre Oriental region in the mexican state of San Luis Potosi is a relevant place for bird conservation at a country level. Therefore the main goal of this study was to analyze the geographic patterns of distribution and the conservation current state of the birds, to support the needs to expand the conservation areas in the future. Data was collected from various databases of zoological museums and collections, and field sampling methods conducted from January 2009 to May 2011. Potential distributions were modeled for 284 species using GARP software and then a map was developed to determine areas with favorable environmental characteristics for the distribution of species richness. Finally, the importance of conservation areas for the potential distribution of birds in the region was evaluated. A total of 359 species were recorded of which 71.4% are permanent residents, 19% are winter migrants and 4% are summer residents. From this total, 41 species were endemic, 47 were species at risk and 149 were neotropical migrants. The largest species richness correspond to oak forests, cloud forests, and tropical moist forests located at altitudes from 100m to 1 500m. Their potential distribution was concentrated towards the center and Southeast of the study area. Only 10% of areas with a high potential conservation was included in areas of priority for bird conservation (AICA) and just 3% of all potential areas were under some governmental category of protection. However, no conservation area has a management plan currently applied and monitored. The information generated is important for the development of management proposals for birds conservation in the region.

  6. Sr Isotopes and Migration of Prairie Mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) from Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Crespo, V.; Schaaf, P. E.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asserting mobility of ancient humans is a major issue for anthropologists. For more than 25 years, Sr isotopes have been used as a resourceful tracer tool in this context. A comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios found in tooth enamel and in bone is performed to determine if the human skeletal remains belonged to a local or a migrant. Sr in bone approximately reflects the isotopic composition of the geological region where the person lived before death; whereas the Sr isotopic system in tooth enamel is thought to remain as a closed system and thus conserves the isotope ratio acquired during childhood. Sr isotope ratios are obtained through the geologic substrate and its overlying soil, from where an individual got hold of food and water; these ratios are in turn incorporated into the dentition and skeleton during tissue formation. In previous studies from Teotihuacan, Mexico we have shown that a three-step leaching procedure on tooth enamel samples is important to assure that only the biogenic Sr isotope contribution is analyzed. The same Sr isotopic tools can function concerning ancient animal migration patterns. To determine or to discard the mobility of prairie mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) found at Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, México the leaching procedure was applied on six molar samples from several fossil remains. The initial hypothesis was to use 87Sr/86Sr values to verify if the mammoth population was a mixture of individuals from various herds and further by comparing their Sr isotopic composition with that of plants and soils, to confirm their geographic origin. The dissimilar Sr results point to two distinct mammoth groups. The mammoth population from Laguna de Cruces was then not a family unit because it was composed by individuals originated from different localities. Only one individual was identified as local. Others could have walked as much as 100 km to find food and water sources.

  7. Mono County update

    SciTech Connect

    Lyster, D.L.

    1987-06-01

    On February 9, 1988, the Mono County Board of Supervisors voted to approve Bonneville Pacific Corporation's Mammoth Chance Geothermal Project. The project is an air-cooled, binary, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The Mono County Board of Supervisors issued a project use-permit with vigorous and stringent conditions. Specific emphasis was placed on the establishment of a monitoring program designed to detect the effects of geothermal development on the springs at the Hot Creek Fish Hatchery and Hot Creek Gorge. On October 5, 1987, the Mono County Planning Commission granted a use-permit to Mammoth Pacific for its Mammoth Pacific II Project, a binary, air-cooled, geothermal power plant, 10 megawatts, net. The issuance of the use-permit instigated an appeal by the Sierra Club. That appeal was heard on February 22, 1988, At the end of the testimony, the Board of Supervisors voted to uphold the appeal of the Sierra Club, thereby denying the project by a vote of 3 to 2. The main areas of concern voiced by the majority of the Board included potential hydrologic impacts to Hot Creek Gorge and Hot Creek Fish Hatchery, visual impacts, and impacts to mule deer migration and survival. One of the options now available to Mammoth Pacific is to request that the project be denied without prejudice. This would allow Mammoth Pacific to return to the Board immediately with additional material regarding its concerns.

  8. 77 FR 73005 - Revisions to the California State Implementation Plan, Imperial County, Placer County, and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-07

    ... County, and Ventura County Air Pollution Control Districts AGENCY: Environmental Protection Agency (EPA... Pollution Control District (ICAPCD), Placer County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) and Ventura County Air Pollution Control District (PCAPCD) portions of the California State Implementation Plan...

  9. Paleothermal structure of the Point San Luis slab of central California: Effects of Late Cretaceous underplating, out-of-sequence thrusting, and late Cenozoic dextral offset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Michael B.; Laughland, Matthew M.

    2001-02-01

    Late Cretaceous shale and sandstone turbidites of the Point San Luis "slab" are isoclinally folded, locally sheared, and faulted, but their severity of stratal disruption is relatively mild when compared to adjacent polymictic mélange of the Franciscan Complex. We tested the interpretation of a trench-slope basin origin for these strata by documenting their paleothermal structure, including contacts between turbidites and mélange. Values of mean random vitrinite reflectance (Rm) from turbidites are 0.9-1.7% estimates of maximum paleotemperature are 135°-200°C. Mélange matrix samples yield Rm values of 1.1-2.5%, with an average of 1.5%, and peak temperatures between 160° and 240°C. The turbidite-over-mélange contact is locally "cooler over warmer" and was folded after peak heating. The relatively high paleotemperatures cast doubt on a shallow slope basin model (i.e., 1-2 km burial depth). We suggest, instead, that thermal maturation of the Point San Luis slab occurred much deeper in an accretionary prism (10-15 km), where offscraped trench wedge deposits were faulted against underplated mélange. The paleothermal structure was offset and tilted after peak heating by two out-of-sequence faults. Late Oligocene to Pliocene strata rest unconformably above the Franciscan, and there is a significant gap in thermal maturity across this unconformity, with no evidence to show that Franciscan rocks were reset thermally following the main episode of uplift and erosion. Three-dimensional orientations of isoreflectance surfaces on opposite sides of the San Gregorio-San Simeon-Hosgri fault system also can be used to test interpretations of strike-slip neotectonics. The failure to match these geometries among suspected piercing points at Point San Luis, Cambria, and Point Sur favors a suggestion that differential, post thermal peak, dextral offset of Franciscan basement has not exceeded 10-15 km.

  10. Counterclockwise rotations in the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic fields of San Luis Potosí and Sierra de Guanajuato (eastern Mesa Central, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Louis; Gattacceca, Jerôme; Rangin, Claude; Martínez-Reyes, Juventino; Demory, François

    2014-12-01

    We used paleomagnetic and structural data to investigate the late Eocene-Oligocene tectonic evolution of the Mesa Central area in Mexico. The Mesa Central was affected by NW-trending faults (Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system) coeval with a Late Eocene-Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and by post-27 Ma NNE-trending grabens related to the Basin and Range. We obtained reliable paleomagnetic directions from 61 sites within the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic series (~ 30 to ~ 27 Ma) of the San Luis Potosí volcanic field and Sierra de Guanajuato. For each site we also measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Tilt corrections were made using AMS data for 33 sites where in situ bedding measurements were not available. Paleomagnetic directions indicate counterclockwise rotations of about 10° with respect to stable North America after 30-25 Ma. Structural data suggest that the volcanic succession was mainly affected by normal faults. However, we also found evidences for oblique or horizontal striae showing a left-lateral component along NW-trending faults and a right lateral component along NE-trending faults. Both motions are consistent with a N-S extension oblique to the Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system. Previous paleomagnetic studies in northern and southern Mexico show the prevalence of minor left-lateral shear components along regional-scale transpressional and transtensional lineaments. Our paleomagnetic data may reflect thus small vertical-axis rotations related to a minor shear component coeval with the Oligocene intra-arc extension in central Mexico.

  11. Introduction to the special collection of papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Hopton, Matthew E

    2012-11-30

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, description of the region, overview of the methods, and summary of the results. Although there are a multitude of scientifically based sustainability metrics, many are data intensive, difficult to calculate, and fail to capture all aspects of a system. We wanted to see if we could develop an approach that decision-makers could use to understand if their system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The goal was to produce a scientifically defensible, but straightforward and inexpensive methodology to measure and monitor environmental quality within a regional system. We initiated an interdisciplinary pilot project in the San Luis Basin, south-central Colorado, to test the methodology. The objectives were: 1) determine the applicability of using existing datasets to estimate metrics of sustainability at a regional scale; 2) calculate metrics through time from 1980 to 2005; and 3) compare and contrast the results to determine if the system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The sustainability metrics, chosen to represent major components of the system, were: 1) Ecological Footprint to capture the impact and human burden on the system; 2) Green Net Regional Product to represent economic welfare; 3) Emergy to capture the quality-normalized flow of energy through the system; and 4) Fisher information to capture the overall dynamic order and to look for possible regime changes. The methodology, data, and results of each metric are presented in the remaining four papers of the special collection. Based on the results of each metric and our criteria for understanding the sustainability trends, we find that the San Luis Basin is moving away from sustainability. Although we understand

  12. Hydrology of Lake County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knochenmus, Darwin D.; Hughes, G.H.

    1976-01-01

    Lake County includes a 1,150 square-mile area consisting of ridges, uplands, and valleys in central-peninsular Florida. About 32 percent of the county is covered by lakes, swamps, and marshes. Water requirements in 1970 averaged about 54 million gallons per day. About 85 percent of the water was obtained from wells; about 15 percent from lakes. The Floridan aquifer supplies almost all the ground water used in Lake County. Annual recharge to the Floridan aquifer averages about 7 inches over the county; runoff average 8.5 inches. The quality of ground and surface water in Lake County is in general good enough for most uses; however, the poor quality of Floridan-aquifer water in the St. John River Valley probably results from the upward movement of saline water along a fault zone. Surface water in Lake County is usually less mineralized than ground water but is more turbid and colored. (Woodard-USGS)

  13. Pharmacological aspects of selected herbs employed in Hispanic folk medicine in the San Luis Valley of Colorado, USA: I. Ligusticum porteri (osha) and Matricaria chamomilla (manzanilla).

    PubMed

    Appelt, G D

    1985-03-01

    Interviews with Hispanic families in the San Luis Valley of Colorado delineated several medicinal herbs that are popular in Hispanic folk medicine, including Ligusticum porteri (osha) and Matricaria chamomilla (manzanilla). A search of the scientific literature reveals that related species of Ligusticum and Matricaria chamomilla contain compounds that possess significant pharmacologic activity. This combined information is now being used as a basis for further investigation at the University of Colorado School of Pharmacy in an effort to detect pharmacologic activity in osha and manzanilla preparations. PMID:3990316

  14. Preliminary design of the Carrisa Plains solar central receiver power plant. Volume I. Executive summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-31

    The design of the 30 MWe central receiver solar power plant to be located at Carrisa Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California, is summarized. The plant uses a vertical flat-panel (billboard) solar receiver located at the top of a tower to collect solar energy redirected by approximately 1900 heliostats located to the north of the tower. The solar energy is used to heat liquid sodium pumped from ground level from 610 to 1050/sup 0/F. The power conversion system is a non-reheat system, cost-effective at this size level, and designed for high-efficiency performance in an application requiring daily startup. Successful completion of this project will lead to power generation starting in 1986. This report also discusses plant performance, operations and maintenance, development, and facility cost estimate and economic analysis.

  15. A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, Ken

    The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979

  16. Phytoremediation management of selenium-laden drainage sediments in the San Luis Drain: a greenhouse feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Bañuelos, G S; Lin, Z-Q

    2005-11-01

    An estimated 100,000m(3) selenium (Se)-laden drainage sediment resides in the San Luis Drain (SLD) of Central California. This greenhouse study was undertaken to evaluate the feasibility of growing salt- and boron-tolerant plant species in sediment for reduction of Se content by plant extraction. Drainage sediment was collected from the SLD and mixed with control soil (i.e., uncontaminated soil) to the following ratios (sediment:control soil) by volume: 0:3 (i.e., control soil only), 1:2 (i.e., 1/3 sediment and 2/3 control soil), 2:1 (i.e., 2/3 sediment and 1/3 control soil), and 3:0 (i.e., sediment only). Salt-tolerant plant species consisted of canola (Brassica napus var. Hyola 420), tall fescue (Festuca arundinacea var. Au Triumph), salado grass (Sporobulus airoides), and cordgrass (Spartina patens var. Flageo). Increased ratios of sediment:soil resulted in decreased dry matter production for all tested plant species; especially at ratios of sediment:soil greater than 1:2. Plant Se concentrations (mgkg(-1) DM) ranged as follows for plant species at all ratios of sediment:soil: canola (51-72), tall fescue (16-36), and cordgrass and salado grass (9-14). Total Se concentrations in the soil were at least 20% lower at postharvest compared to preplant concentrations for all plant species at each ratio of sediment:soil. In contrast, water-extractable Se concentrations in the soil were at least three times higher at postharvest than at preplant for all plant species, irrespective of the ratio of sediment:soil. Leaching of Se occurred in irrigated bare pots from each respective ratio of sediment:soil over a duration of 60 days. Based upon the downward movement of Se in bare pots of sediment:soil, it may be more prudent to leave the drainage sediment in the SLD, incorporate clean soil, and then grow low maintenance salt-tolerant plants (e.g., cordgrass, salado grass) in the concrete-lined canal. By this means, possible contamination of groundwater with soluble Se will be

  17. Importance of the vertical component of groundwater flow: a hydrogeochemical approach in the valley of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Moss, D.

    1996-11-01

    Fractured volcanics exert a control on groundwater flow in the San Luis Potosi (SLP) valley. The chemical composition and temperature of water pumped from boreholes partially penetrating the fractured volcanics indicate that the produced water originates from an upward vertical flow. Most of the thermal groundwater has been detected in areas related to regional faults and lineaments. Intensive and uncontrolled pumping from the upper {1}/{4} of the aquifer (total depth > 1500 m) causes the rise of water from a deep regional flow system that mixes with the shallower waters. The deep waters contain high fluoride concentrations that contaminate the mixture and cause substantial health related effects. The recharge controls on the regional flow system require further research; however, hydrogeochemical evidence supports the view that the origin of this recharge is limited to the western bounding Sierra Madre Occidental. Higher levels of dissolved Na +, Li +, F - (and SO 4-2) derived from Tertiary volcanics have been introduced into the exploited region; the concentrations indicate lengthy and deep circulation flow. Li + concentration was used as an indicator of groundwater residence time, and therefore of the length of the groundwater flow path. Hydrogeochemical interpretation indicates the presence of three flow systems: a shallow local one controlled by a clay layer that subcrops most of the valley floor, an intermediate system in which water infiltrates just beyond the boundary of the clay layer, and a deep regional system which originates outside the surface catchment. The local and intermediate systems circulate through materials with comparatively low hydraulic conductivity. Low Cl - concentrations suggest rapid flow in the regional system. Concentrations of Li + and F - can be used to calculate percentages of waters in mixtures of regional and intermediate flows. Concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+ and SO 4-2 appear to be controlled by water-rock reactions

  18. Analysis of the potential impacts on surface water quality resulting from the proposed use of the San Luis Drain to transport agricultural drainage through the northern Grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-05-01

    An Environmental Assessment and initial Study for the interim use of a portion of the San Luis Drain for conveyance water through the Grassland Water District and adjacent Grassland areas was conducted. The project proposes the use of 18 miles of the San Luis Drain for the conveyance of agricultural drainage water for a period of five years and the elimination of agricultural drainage discharges from 76 miles of existing channels in and adjacent to the Grassland Water District. A report was prepared to (a) quantify the potential project effects on surface water quality within Salt and Mud Sloughs and the San Joaquin River using currently available data, and (b) to improve the understanding of existing water supply and drainage operations within the Grassland area. After submission of the original report it was brought to the attention of one of the coauthors that the database on selenium and boron concentrations in drainage water did not include the water quality data collected by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB). In addition, the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) requested further examination of Grasslands hydrology to estimate the quantity of supplemental water that would be needed to restore the San Joaquin River to the same TDS and trace element concentrations prior to implementation of the project. This report addresses these issues.

  19. Equity and County College Financing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey State Commission on Financing Postsecondary Education, Trenton.

    An analysis by the Commission on Financial Postsecondary Education of the system by which New Jersey supports county colleges revealed disparities and inequities among the New Jersey counties in wealth and effort per full-time equivalent student, and current state financing practices that aggravate this problem. In response, alternative state…

  20. Frederick County Community Perception Survey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frederick Community Coll., MD.

    In 1997, Frederick Community College (FCC) in Maryland conducted a telephone survey of a random sample of 466 Frederick County residents to identify their perceptions of the college. In particular, the survey examined Frederick County residents' image of FCC, level of awareness of services and programs offered by FCC, and the types of services…

  1. Topics for Lehigh County Seniors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehigh County Community Coll., Schnecksville, PA.

    Lehigh County Community College (Pennsylvania) and the Lehigh County Senior Citizens' Center collaborated on a project to assess the learning needs of the senior center's 1,600 members. A needs assessment completed by 68 center members and interviews of an additional 38 center members established that senior citizens preferred short-term workshops…

  2. Hydrology of Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Spechler, Rick M.; Kroening, Sharon E.

    2007-01-01

    Local water managers usually rely on information produced at the State and regional scale to make water-resource management decisions. Current assessments of hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County, Florida, commonly end at the boundaries of two water management districts (South Florida Water Management District and the Southwest Florida Water Management District), which makes it difficult for managers to determine conditions throughout the county. The last comprehensive water-resources assessment of Polk County was published almost 40 years ago. To address the need for current countywide information, the U.S. Geological Survey began a 3?-year study in 2002 to update information about hydrologic and water-quality conditions in Polk County and identify changes that have occurred. Ground-water use in Polk County has decreased substantially since 1965. In 1965, total ground-water withdrawals in the county were about 350 million gallons per day. In 2002, withdrawals totaled about 285 million gallons per day, of which nearly 95 percent was from the Floridan aquifer system. Water-conservation practices mainly related to the phosphate-mining industry as well as the decrease in the number of mines in operation in Polk County have reduced total water use by about 65 million gallons per day since 1965. Polk County is underlain by three principal hydrogeologic units. The uppermost water-bearing unit is the surficial aquifer system, which is unconfined and composed primarily of clastic deposits. The surficial aquifer system is underlain by the intermediate confining unit, which grades into the intermediate aquifer system and consists of up to two water-bearing zones composed of interbedded clastic and carbonate rocks. The lowermost hydrogeologic unit is the Floridan aquifer system. The Floridan aquifer system, a thick sequence of permeable limestone and dolostone, consists of the Upper Floridan aquifer, a middle semiconfining unit, a middle confining unit, and

  3. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  4. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  5. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  6. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  7. 32 CFR 1602.10 - County.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false County. 1602.10 Section 1602.10 National Defense Other Regulations Relating to National Defense SELECTIVE SERVICE SYSTEM DEFINITIONS § 1602.10 County. The word county includes, where applicable, counties, independent cities, and similar...

  8. Selected water-quality characteristics and flow of ground water in the San Luis basin, including the Conejos River subbasin, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Hammond, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water from 99 wells and 19 springs in the San Luis basin in Colorado and New Mexico were evaluated to determine selected water quality characteristics as an aid in understanding the flow of groundwater in the basin. The evaluation shows that the distribution of chemical water types in the basin is consistent with chemical changes to be expected along flow paths in rocks typical of those in the basin. The San Luis basin area is underlain by a surficial (< 100-ft-thick) unconfined aquifer and, in turn, by a confining bed and a deeper confined aquifer. Previous studies have indicated that the groundwater system is recharged around the edges of the basin and that groundwater then moves toward discharge areas in the topographically closed part of the basin and along principal streams. The evaluation of water quality data showed that groundwater at the perimeter of the San Luis basin is primarily a calcium bicarbonate type, which is typical in recharge areas. Groundwater near the center of the basin is primarily a sodium bicarbonate type, which is typical of groundwater in downgradient areas. The change in principal cation from calcium to sodium indicates chemical evolution of the water along the groundwater flow path and supports previously developed concepts of groundwater movement in the basin. The exchange of calcium for sodium along the flow path also is assumed to occur in the Conejos River subbasin. Upgradient wells yield calcium bicarbonate type water, whereas downgradient wells yield sodium bicarbonate type water. However, an exception to this relation is found at McIntire Spring, which yields calcium bicarbonate type water from a downgradient location. The source of water discharging from the spring may be the confined aquifer, with hydraulic connection along the Manassa fault. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from both the unconfined and confined aquifers increases downgradient. The increase is dramatic in the closed basin

  9. Hydraulic head levels and aquifer parameters inferred from a joint analysis of InSAR and well data in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater extraction is the primary source of irrigation water in many agricultural regions throughout the world. A set of spatially dense hydraulic head measurements adequately sampling the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Because the total compaction due to pumping is nearly proportional to the change in hydraulic head, land subsidence measurements derived from InSAR data can be used to obtain head measurements in confined aquifers when well data are unavailable or insufficiently dense. Reeves at al. (2013) demonstrated that C-band ERS InSAR data acquired between 1992 and 2000 over the San Luis Valley of Colorado suffice to fill temporal gaps in the hydraulic head field dataset at 3 well locations. Here, we further analyze whether the InSAR deformation time series can be used to infer head levels over a larger region than Reeves et al. analyzed. We processed 17 L-band ALOS radar scenes over the San Luis Valley acquired between Jan., 2007 and Mar., 2011 and applied an adaptive interpolation filter between persistent scatterer pixels to reduce vegetation decorrelation artifacts. We estimated the InSAR deformation time series at each image point using a least-squares SBAS approach. We then jointly analyzed the InSAR and the well data to estimate the local skeletal storage coefficient and the time delay between the head change and deformation and converted the InSAR deformation time series to InSAR head levels. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with all 18 well measurements in the region with confined aquifer pumping activities. Assuming that geologic parameters such as skeletal storage coefficients often vary slowly in space, we interpolate the obtained skeletal storage coefficients at each well spatially to relate InSAR subsidence measurements over the entire SLV to changes in head with improved spatial resolution over the well data. This demonstration shows that In

  10. Energy Improvements in Barnstable County

    SciTech Connect

    2003-09-01

    A fact sheet that describes Barnstable County, Massachusetts, effort to improve energy efficiency through a public appliance trade-in program, installation of compact fluorescent light bulbs in public buildings, and public energy education.

  11. 2007 Rocky Mountain Section Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip - Quaternary Geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, September 7-9, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Coates, Mary-Margaret; Johnson, Margo L.

    2007-01-01

    Prologue Welcome to the 2007 Rocky Mountain Cell Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip, which will concentrate on the Quaternary geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico. To our best knowledge, Friends of the Pleistocene (FOP) has never run a trip through the San Luis Basin, although former trips in the region reviewed the 'Northern Rio Grande rift' in 1987 and the 'Landscape History and Processes on the Pajarito Plateau' in 1996. After nearly a decade, the FOP has returned to the Rio Grande rift, but to an area that has rarely hosted a trip with a Quaternary focus. The objective of FOP trips is to review - in the field - new and exciting research on Quaternary geoscience, typically research being conducted by graduate students. In our case, the research is more topically oriented around three areas of the San Luis Basin, and it is being conducted by a wide range of Federal, State, academic, and consulting geologists. This year's trip is ambitious?we will spend our first day mainly on the Holocene record around Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, the second day on the Quaternary stratigraphy around the San Luis Hills, including evidence for Lake Alamosa and the 1.0 Ma Mesita volcano, and wrap up the trip's third day in the Costilla Plain and Sunshine Valley reviewing alluvial stratigraphy, the history of the Rio Grande, and evidence for young movement on the Sangre de Cristo fault zone. In the tradition of FOP trips, we will be camping along the field trip route for this meeting. On the night before our trip, we will be at the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve's Pinyon Flats Campground, a group facility located about 2 miles north of the Visitors Center. After the first day's trip, we will dine and camp in the Bachus pit, about 3 miles southwest of Alamosa. For the final night (after day 2), we will bed down at La Junta Campground at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wild and Scenic Rivers State Recreation Area, west of Questa

  12. The institutionalization of biology in Mexico in the early 20th century: the conflict between Alfonso Luis Herrera (1865-1942) and Isaac Ochoterena (1885-1950).

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Mateos, Ismael; Barahona, Ana

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the role played by Alfonso Luis Herrera and Isaac Ochoterena in the institutionalization of academic biology in Mexico in the early 20th century. As biology became institutionalized in Mexico, Herrera's basic approach to biology was displaced by Isaac Ochoterena's professional goals due to the prevailing political conditions at the end of the 1929. The conflict arose from two different conceptions of biology, because Herrera and Ochoterena had different discourses that were incommensurable, not only linguistically speaking, but also socioprofessionally. They had different links to influential groups related to education, having distinct political and socioprofessional interests. The conflict between Herrera and Ochoterena determined the way in which professional biology education has developed in Mexico, as well as the advancement in specific research subjects and the neglect of others.

  13. Integration of geology, non-seismic geophysics and seismic data in a structurally complex, frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    The discovery of live Cretaceous oil in mineral exploration drill holes, followed by the identification of Mesozoic sediments in outcrop and in shallow drill holes, has lead to an integrated approach to exploration of a structurally complex, frontier oil play in south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric (MT), and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted in the initial stages of the project. Models derived from the geophysical data were augmented with geologic field work to explain specific anomalies. Interpretation of the gravity data was constrained by density measurements on representative rock samples collected in the field. Seismic data, acquired in the most recent exploration stage, provided confirmation and modification of the basin margin geometry. Velocity data from the seismic was integrated with resistivity, density, magnetic and geologic data to predict lithologies on an intermediate fault block located between the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the San Luis Basin.

  14. Phytoavailability of antimony and heavy metals in arid regions: the case of the Wadley Sb district (San Luis, Potosí, Mexico).

    PubMed

    Levresse, G; Lopez, G; Tritlla, J; López, E Cardellach; Chavez, A Carrillo; Salvador, E Mascuñano; Soler, A; Corbella, M; Sandoval, L G Hernández; Corona-Esquivel, R

    2012-06-15

    This paper presents original results on the Sb and heavy metals contents in sediments and waste tailings, plants and water from the giant Wadley antimony mine district (San Luis Potosí State, Mexico). The dominant antimony phases in mining wastes are stibiconite, montroydite and minor hermimorphite. The waste tailings contain high concentrations of metals and metalloids (antimony, iron, zinc, arsenic, copper, and mercury). Manganese, copper, zinc, and antimony contents exceed the quality guidelines values for groundwater, plants and for waste tailings. Results indicate that peak accumulation is seasonal due to the concentration by high metabolism plants as Solanaceae Nicotiana. The metal phytoavailability in waste tailings is highly dependant on the metal speciation, its capability to be transported in water and, more particularly, the plant metabolism efficiency.

  15. Geothermal development plan: Yuma county

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    One hot spring and 33 wells drilled in the county discharge water at temperatures sufficient for direct-use geothermal applications such as process heat and space heating and cooling. Currently, one industry within the county has been identified which may be able to use geothermal energy for its process heat requirements. Also, a computer simulation model was used to predict geothermal energy on line as a function of time under both private and city-owned utility development of the resource.

  16. Geothermal Development Plan: Pima County

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Pima County is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic province in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Continued growth as indicated by such factors as population growth, employment and income will require large amounts of energy. It is believed that geothermal energy could provide some of the energy that will be needed. Potential users of geothermal energy within the county are identified.

  17. Forecasting selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: ecological effects of a proposed San Luis drain extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Presser, Theresa S.

    2000-01-01

    During the next few years, federal and state agencies may be required to evaluate proposals and discharge permits that could significantly change selenium (Se) inputs to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta), particularly in the North Bay (i.e., Suisun Bay and San Pablo Bay). These decisions may include discharge requirements for an extension of the San Luis Drain (SLD) to the estuary to convey subsurface agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a renewal of an agreement to allow the existing portion of the SLD to convey subsurface agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River (SJR) (coincident with changes in flow patterns of the lower SJR), and refinements to promulgated Se criteria for the protection of aquatic life for the estuary. Understanding the biotransfer of Se is essential to evaluating the fate and impact of proposed changes in Se discharges to the Bay-Delta. However, past monitoring programs have not addressed the specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates. Confusion about Se threats in the past have stemmed from failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in Se toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from Se contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. In this report, we employ a novel procedure to model the fate of Se under different, potentially realistic load scenarios from the SJV. For each potential load, we progressively forecast the resulting environmental concentrations, speciation, transformation to particulate form, bioaccumulation by invertebrates, trophic transfer to predators, and effects in those predators. Enough is known to establish a first order understanding of effects should Se be discharged directly into the North Bay via a conveyance such as the SLD. Our approach uses 1) existing knowledge concerning the biogeochemical

  18. Skunk rabies in California (1992-2003)--implications for oral rabies vaccination.

    PubMed

    Sterner, Ray T; Sun, Ben; Bourassa, Jean B; Hale, Robert L; Shwiff, Stephanie A; Jay, Michele T; Slate, Dennis

    2008-10-01

    Skunk-variant rabies is endemic in California (United States), and the development of oral vaccines and baits to vaccinate skunks is in progress. In 2003, the California Department of Public Health (CDPH) began to quantify the impacts of skunk-variant rabies and to assess the feasibility of using oral rabies vaccination (ORV) as a containment measure. The CDPH rabies case data for skunks were spatially depicted and analyzed using a geographic information system. Statewide, rabid skunks (1992-2003) primarily occurred in seven physiographic regions: Central Coast, North Coast, North Sierra, Sacramento Valley, San Francisco Bay and Delta, San Joaquin Valley, and South Sierra. Detailed analysis of rabid skunks in San Luis Obispo (SLO) and Santa Barbara (SB) counties showed that skunk rabies was endemic in the coastal plain of SLO County between 1992 and 2000, but only became epizootic in SB County during 2002. Despite the widespread distribution of striped skunks (Mephitis mephitis) throughout most of California, the skunk rabies variant has not been found in Los Angeles County since 1979. Results imply that future ORV campaigns for skunk-variant rabies in the Pacific Coastal Plain could deter spread from SLO into SB County, as well as deterring the reintroduction of skunk-variant rabies into southern California.

  19. Somerset County Flood Information System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hoppe, Heidi L.

    2007-01-01

    The timely warning of a flood is crucial to the protection of lives and property. One has only to recall the floods of August 2, 1973, September 16 and 17, 1999, and April 16, 2007, in Somerset County, New Jersey, in which lives were lost and major property damage occurred, to realize how costly, especially in terms of human life, an unexpected flood can be. Accurate forecasts and warnings cannot be made, however, without detailed information about precipitation and streamflow in the drainage basin. Since the mid 1960's, the National Weather Service (NWS) has been able to forecast flooding on larger streams in Somerset County, such as the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. Flooding on smaller streams in urban areas was more difficult to predict. In response to this problem the NWS, in cooperation with the Green Brook Flood Control Commission, installed a precipitation gage in North Plainfield, and two flash-flood alarms, one on Green Brook at Seeley Mills and one on Stony Brook at Watchung, in the early 1970's. In 1978, New Jersey's first countywide flood-warning system was installed by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in Somerset County. This system consisted of a network of eight stage and discharge gages equipped with precipitation gages linked by telephone telemetry and eight auxiliary precipitation gages. The gages were installed throughout the county to collect precipitation and runoff data that could be used to improve flood-monitoring capabilities and flood-frequency estimates. Recognizing the need for more detailed hydrologic information for Somerset County, the USGS, in cooperation with Somerset County, designed and installed the Somerset County Flood Information System (SCFIS) in 1990. This system is part of a statewide network of stream gages, precipitation gages, weather stations, and tide gages that collect data in real time. The data provided by the SCFIS improve the flood forecasting ability of the NWS and aid Somerset County and municipal agencies in

  20. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ..., Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority propose to prepare a... water agencies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and in the San Francisco Bay Area. The.... Sacramento at the Best Western Expo Inn & Suites, 1413 Howe Avenue. Los Banos at the San Luis &...

  1. Geothermal development plan: Yuma County

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.; Goldstone, L.A.

    1982-08-01

    The Yuma County Area Development Plan evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. The study identified four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 90/sup 0/C (194/sup 0/F), and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate (90/sup 0/C to 150/sup 0/C, 194/sup 0/F to 300/sup 0/F) temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated, although one resource area is located near Yuma, Arizona. One resource site is inferred to contain a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2 percent per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without advese affect on agriculture. Six firms were found in Yuma County which may be able to utilize geothermal energy for process heat needs. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. Geothermal energy utilization projections suggest that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

  2. Geothermal development plan: Maricopa county

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Maricopa county is the area of Arizona receiving top priority since it contains over half of the state's population. The county is located entirely within the Basin and Range physiographic region in which geothermal resources are known to occur. Several approaches were taken to match potential users to geothermal resources. One approach involved matching some of the largest facilities in the county to nearby geothermal resources. Other approaches involved identifying industrial processes whose heat requirements are less than the average assessed geothermal reservoir temperature of 110/sup 0/C (230/sup 0/F). Since many of the industries are located on or near geothermal resources, geothermal energy potentially could be adapted to many industrial processes.

  3. Archuleta County CO Lineaments

    DOE Data Explorer

    Zehner, Richard E.

    2012-01-01

    Citation Information: Originator: Earth Science &Observation Center (ESOC), CIRES, University of Colorado at Boulder Originator: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Publication Date: 2012 Title: Archuleta Lineaments Edition: First Publication Information: Publication Place: Reno Nevada Publisher: Geothermal Development Associates, Reno, Nevada Description: This layer traces apparent topographic and air-photo lineaments in the area around Pagosa springs in Archuleta County, Colorado. It was made in order to identify possible fault and fracture systems that might be conduits for geothermal fluids. Geothermal fluids commonly utilize fault and fractures in competent rocks as conduits for fluid flow. Geothermal exploration involves finding areas of high near-surface temperature gradients, along with a suitable “plumbing system” that can provide the necessary permeability. Geothermal power plants can sometimes be built where temperature and flow rates are high. To do this, georeferenced topographic maps and aerial photographs were utilized in an existing GIS, using ESRI ArcMap 10.0 software. The USA_Topo_Maps and World_Imagery map layers were chosen from the GIS Server at server.arcgisonline.com, using a UTM Zone 13 NAD27 projection. This line shapefile was then constructed over that which appeared to be through-going structural lineaments in both the aerial photographs and topographic layers, taking care to avoid manmade features such as roads, fence lines, and right-of-ways. These lineaments may be displaced somewhat from their actual location, due to such factors as shadow effects with low sun angles in the aerial photographs. Note: This shape file was constructed as an aid to geothermal exploration in preparation for a site visit for field checking. We make no claims as to the existence of the lineaments, their location, orientation, and nature. Spatial Domain: Extent: Top: 4132831.990103 m Left: 311979.997741 m Right: 331678.289280 m Bottom: 4116067

  4. 76 FR 13172 - Placer County Water Agency

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-10

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Placer County Water Agency Notice of Application Tendered for Filing with... Filed: February 23, 2011 d. Applicant: Placer County Water Agency e. Name of Project: Middle Fork... Manager, Placer County Water Agency, 144 Ferguson Road, Auburn, CA 95603; Telephone: (530) 823-4490....

  5. Community Analysis for the Pitkin County Library.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirwin, Florence M.

    This document analyzes the social and demographic characteristics of Pitkin County, Colorado (population 12,000) and the Pitkin County Library located in Aspen (24,000 volumes). The report contains statistics gathered from the 1978 Mid-Term U.S. Bureau Census of Pitkin County, as well as other statistics from local, state, and federal sources; the…

  6. Community Types and Mortality in Georgia Counties

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Frank W.

    2012-01-01

    Using an "ecological regional analysis" methodology for defining types of communities and their associated mortality rates, this study of Georgia's 159 counties finds that the suburban and town centered counties have low mortality while the city-centered type predicts low mortality for the whites. The military-centered counties do not predict. The…

  7. The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Causseaux, K.W.

    1985-01-01

    The surficial aquifer in Pinellas County, Florida, contains potable water throughout most of the county and is a potential source of water to augment the public supply that is presently imported from adjacent counties. The county accounts for 38 percent of the public supply consumption of ground water in the 11-county area of west-central Florida and 68 percent of this water is imported from two adjacent counties. The surficial aquifer has a saturated thickness of more than 30 feet throughout most of the county. Specific capacity per foot of screen for wells is less than 0.1 gallon per minute per foot of drawdown in some parts of the county, but yield is sufficient in most of the county for many small uses with shallow-well pumps. Minimum potential yield varies from 5 gallons per minute in the northern part of the county to more than 30 gallons per minute in the south. Concentrations of iron are high enough in parts of the county to cause staining. Chloride concentrations are less than 100 milligrams per liter in most of the county and do not pose a problem for many uses. (USGS)

  8. Trouble Brewing in Orange County. Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    Orange County will soon face enormous budgetary pressures from the growing deficits in public pensions, both at a state and local level. In this policy brief, the author estimates that Orange County faces a total $41.2 billion liability for retiree benefits that are underfunded--including $9.4 billion for the county pension system and an estimated…

  9. Regression models of monthly water-level change in and near the Closed Basin Division of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watts, Kenneth R.

    1995-01-01

    The Bureau of Reclamation is developing a water-resource project, the Closed Basin Division, in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado that is designed to salvage unconfined ground water that currently is discharged as evapotranspiration. The water table in and near the 130,000-acre Closed Basin Division area will be lowered by an annual withdrawal of as much as 100,000 acre-feet of ground water from the unconfined aquifer. The legislation authorizing the project limits resulting drawdown of the water table in preexisting irrigation and domestic wells outside the Closed Basin Division to a maximum of 2 feet. Water levels in the closed basin in the northern part of the San Luis Valley historically have fluctuated more than 2 feet in response to water-use practices and variation of climatically controlled recharge and discharge. Declines of water levels in nearby wells that are caused by withdrawals in the Closed Basin Division can be quantified if water-level fluctuations that result from other water-use practices and climatic variations can be estimated. This study was done to evaluate water-level change at selected observation wells in and near the Closed Basin Division. Regression models of monthly water-level change were developed to predict monthly water-level change in 46 selected observation wells. Predictions of monthly water-level change are based on one or more of the following: elapsed time, cosine and sine functions with an annual period, streamflow depletion of the Rio Grande, electrical use for agricultural purposes, runoff into the closed basin, precipitation, and mean air temperature. Regression models for five of the wells include only an intercept term and either an elapsed-time term or terms determined by the cosine and sine functions. Regression models for the other 41 wells include 1 to 4 of the 5 other variables, which can vary from month to month and from year to year. Serial correlation of the residuals was detected in 24 of the

  10. Latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene evolution of the ancestral Rio Grande at the Española-San Luis Basin boundary, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel J. Koning,; Scott Aby,; Grauch, V. J.; Matthew J. Zimmerer,

    2016-01-01

    We use stratigraphic relations, paleoflow data, and 40Ar/39Ar dating to interpret net aggradation, punctuated by at least two minor incisional events, along part of the upper ancestral Rio Grande fluvial system between 5.5 and 4.5 Ma (in northern New Mexico). The studied fluvial deposits, which we informally call the Sandlin unit of the Santa Fe Group, overlie a structural high between the San Luis and Española Basins. The Sandlin unit was deposited by two merging, west- to southwest-flowing, ancestral Rio Grande tributaries respectively sourced in the central Taos Mountains and southern Taos Mountains-northeastern Picuris Mountains. The river confluence progressively shifted southwestward (downstream) with time, and the integrated river (ancestral Rio Grande) flowed southwards into the Española Basin to merge with the ancestral Rio Chama. Just prior to the end of the Miocene, this fluvial system was incised in the southern part of the study area (resulting in an approximately 4–7 km wide paleovalley), and had sufficient competency to transport cobbles and boulders. Sometime between emplacement of two basalt flows dated at 5.54± 0.38 Ma and 4.82±0.20 Ma (groundmass 40Ar/39Ar ages), this fluvial system deposited 10–12 m of sandier sediment (lower Sandlin subunit) preserved in the northern part of this paleovalley. The fluvial system widened between 4.82±0.20 and 4.50±0.07 Ma, depositing coarse sand and fine gravel up to 14 km north of the present-day Rio Grande. This 10–25 m-thick sediment package (upper Sandlin unit) buried earlier south- to southeast-trending paleovalleys (500–800 m wide) inferred from aeromagnetic data. Two brief incisional events are recognized. The first was caused by the 4.82±0.20 Ma basalt flow impounding south-flowing paleodrainages, and the second occurred shortly after emplacement of a 4.69±0.09 Ma basalt flow in the northern study area. Drivers responsible for Sandlin unit aggradation may include climate

  11. Fresno County Mock Trial Competition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fresno City Unified School District, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: The Fresno County Office of Education and the Fresno Unified School District hosted the Mock Trial Competition. The state competition is sponsored by the Constitutional Rights Foundation, with cosponsorship from the California State Bar Association and the California Young Lawyer's Association. This…

  12. Composting in Prince William County

    SciTech Connect

    Lyons, K.

    1995-10-01

    Hidden in a small industrial corner of Prince Williams County, in Northern Virginia, a composting facility, after its first flourishing year in business, has found itself part of a symbiotic triangle. Along with a landfill and a waste-to-energy (WTE) plant, the composting facility is one of three programs that make up a joint public-private venture and form a interjurisdictional solid waste/refuse exchange agreement. Faced with the prospects of having to close a landfill at the end of the year, a mandate on yard waste collection that was increasing collection tonnage, and no room for further landfill development, Fairfax County, with approximately 900,000 residents, needed help. In a turn-around situation, Prince William County--with approximately 240,000 residents, a low budget, and much space available for development--responded. Together the counties created a solid waste exchange. The basis for the program is a unity between the local governments on some solid waste issues and a composting facility. Composting, specifically yard waste composting, has been among the fastest-growing aspects of waste management. In 1990, the nation was composting 2% of its solid waste. By the end of 1995, according to the US EPA, between 4% and 7% of solid waste will be recovered through composting. The number of yard waste composting facilities operating has increased from 651 in 1988 to more than 3,000 in 1994.

  13. Somerset County Employer Needs Assessment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rephann, Terance J.

    Allegany Community College in Cumberland, Maryland, conducted an employer assessment survey of Somerset County businesses during the winter of 1995 in order to provide evaluation data for planning and curriculum development for the secondary and postsecondary educational institutions. The survey was mailed to 760 establishments, with a 29 percent…

  14. Kinship Care in Walton County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Charon, Sara L.; Nackerud, Larry

    1996-01-01

    The quality of life of maltreated children placed with relatives was examined through interviews with nine families in Walton County (Georgia) who had taken in related children. Over half of the children had experienced some improvement in home life, school performance, and their physical and mental status. Kinship care families indicated needs…

  15. Southern Nevada Library Services; Serving Lincoln County, Nye County, Esmeralda County through the Clark County Library District: An Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalton, Phyllis I.

    An anecdotal review covers the first year of increased library service in Nye, Lincoln, and Esmeralda Counties, Nevada, under the Southern Nevada Library Services project funded by the Library Services and Construction Act. Using information from questionnaires and site visits, the extent of library services in each community in the area is…

  16. Truancy in Yolo County, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sommer, Barbara; Tyburczy, Jason

    The problem of truancy in the elementary and junior high schools of California's Yolo County was investigated during the 1980-81 academic year by means of questionnaires completed by 16 school principals and interviews with 30 people representing schools, school district offices, law enforcement agencies, the Department of Social Services, and the…

  17. Geothermal development plan: Pima County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. H.; Goldstone, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    The Pima County Area Development evaluated the county-wide market potential for utilizing geothermal energy. Four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 1000 C (2120 F) were identified. In addition, one area is identified as having a temperature of 1470 F (2970 F). Geothermal resources are found to occur in Tecson where average population growth rates of two to three percent per year are expected over the next 40 years. Rapid growth in the manufacturing sector and the existence of major copper mines provide opportunities for the direct utilization of geothermal energy. However, available water supplies are identified as a major constraing to projected growth. A regional energy analysis, future predictions for energy consumption, and energy prices are given. Potential geothermal users in Pima County are identified and projections of maximum economic geothermal utilization are given. One hundred fifteen firms in 32 industrial classes have some potential for geothermal use are identified. In addition, 26 agribusiness firms were found in the county.

  18. Hydrogeology of Wood County, Wisconsin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Batten, W.G.

    1989-01-01

    The average rate of ground·water pumpage in Wood County in 1985 was 9.7 million gallons per day. Of this rate, about 6 million gallons per day is pumped from municipal-supply wells in seven communities.An additional 1.08 million gallons per day is pumped for agricultural irrigation.

  19. Measles in rural Ohio county.

    PubMed

    Orenstein, W A; Irvin, J; Jennings, M R; Giandelia, J; Halpin, T J; Marks, J S; Conrad, J L

    1980-06-01

    Between December 23, 1975, and March 31, 1976, 169 cases of measles were reported from Defiance County, Ohio, a small rural county in the northwest corner of the State. The outbreak spread from a single junior high school basketball player to eventually involve 19 of the 28 county schools. Among the affected schools, measles attack rates varied from 0.3-7.2% with a mean of 2.0%. A likely source of illness was determined for 160 of the 169 cases (95%). Intraschool transmission was most common, accounting for 97 of the 169 cases (57%) followed by sibling contact for 23 cases (14%). The pattern of measles spread was complex and would have been difficult to predict in advance even if surveillance systems reported each case the day it occurred. A control program held between February 2 and February 20, 1976, vaccinated 5145 of the 11,114 (46.3%) county schoolchildren. Forty-four cases of measles occurred 4 or more days following school clinics, 22 (50%) in children who requested measles vaccine at school clinics, 17 of whom were actually vaccinated. Most of the other cases occurred in students whose parents thought their children to be protected. Measles is a disease which spreads rapidly in a complex pattern over wide geographic areas. A control program vaccinating a large proportion of the children without definitive history of adequate vaccination or disease was apprently effective in curtailing the outbreak.

  20. Hydrogeology of Webb County, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lambert, Rebecca B.

    2004-01-01

    Introduction: Webb County, in semiarid South Texas on the U.S.-Mexico border, is a region confronted by increasing stresses on natural resources. Laredo (fig. 1), the largest city in Webb County (population 193,000 in 2000), was one of the 10 fastest-growing metropolitan areas in the country during 1990-2000 (Perry and Mackun, 2001). Commercial and industrial activities have expanded throughout the region to support the maquiladora industry (manufacturing plants in Mexico) along the border and other growth as a result of the passage of the North American Free Trade Agreement. The Rio Grande currently (2002) is the primary source of public water supply for Laredo and other cities along the border in Webb County (fig. 1). Other cities, such as Bruni and Mirando City in the southeastern part of the county, rely on ground-water supplies to meet municipal demands. Increased water demand associated with development and population growth in the region has increased the need for the City of Laredo and Webb County to evaluate alternative water sources to meet future demand. Possible options include (1) supplementing the surface-water supply with ground water, and (2) applying artificial storage and recovery (ASR) technology to recharge local aquifers. These options raise issues regarding the hydraulic capability of the aquifers to store economically substantial quantities of water, current or potential uses of the resource, and possible effects on the quality of water resulting from mixing ground water with alternative source waters. To address some of these issues, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the City of Laredo, began a study in 1996 to assess the ground-water resources of Webb County. A hydrogeologic study was conducted to review and analyze available information on the hydrogeologic units (aquifers and confining units) in Webb County, to locate available wells in the region with water-level and water-quality information from the aquifers, and

  1. Geophysical logging to determine construction, contributing zones, and appropriate use of water levels measured in confined-aquifer network wells, San Luis Valley, Colorado, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brendle, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Geophysical logs were recorded in 32 wells in the confined-aquifer monitoring well network maintained by the Rio Grande Water Conservation District. Logging results were used to determine well construction, zones contributing water to the wells, and the purposes for which the ground-water levels measured in the wells can be used. The confined-aquifer well network consists of 42 flowing and nonflowing wells. This network consists of wells used to supply water for irrigation, household use, wildlife refuge supply, and stock use, and wells for water-level monitoring. Geophysical logs recorded in the wells included video, caliper, water specific conductance, water temperature, and water flow. Most wells in the confined-aquifer well network yield a composite water level representing water levels in multiple permeable zones in the confined-aquifer system of the San Luis Valley. A potentiometric-surface map constructed using November 2000 water levels indicates that water levels from most wells in the network are correlated with water levels from nearby network wells. Potentiometric-surface maps that are constructed from water levels measured in most of the wells in the network can be used to understand long-term local and regional changes in water levels in the confined-aquifer system. Water levels measured in 8 of the 42 wells in the confined-aquifer network are not representative of water levels in the confined-aquifer system.

  2. [Species, dynamics and population composition of phthirapteran in free-range chickens (Gallus gallus L.) in São Luis Island, State of Maranhão].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Rita de M S N de C; Chaves, Elba P; Passos, Tarsila M G; Santos, Ana C G Dos

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify the phthirapteran species, to determine the prevalence according to the anatomical region of the body and to know the dynamics and composition of the population of these ectoparasites in free-range chicken in São Luis Island, state of Maranhão. Inspection was performed in 40 chickens and feathers were collected from the head, neck, wing, thigh, dorsal and ventral regions and cloacae. The phthirapteran species identified were: Menopon gallinae L., Menacanthus stramineus Nitzsch, Menacanthus pallidulus Neumann, Menacanthus cornutus Schommer (Menoponidae), and Lipeurus caponis L., Goniodes dissimilis Denny and Goniocotes gallinae De Geer (Philopteridae). L. caponis was collected from all regions sampled, including the head, which was the least infested region. The dorsum was the most infested, especially in the dry period of the year and where the greater parasitic diversity was observed, the wing and the head were the least infested regions. Considering the dynamics and the composition of the population the phthirapteran presented a prevalence of 85% of the sampled chickens, the mean intensity of infestation was 45.3 varying from <1 to 453. The egg stage was superior to the others life stages followed by nymphs and female adults, independent of the phthirapteran species.

  3. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi enhance fruit growth and quality of chile ancho (Capsicum annuum L. cv San Luis) plants exposed to drought.

    PubMed

    Mena-Violante, Hortencia G; Ocampo-Jiménez, Omar; Dendooven, Luc; Martínez-Soto, Gerardo; González-Castañeda, Jaquelina; Davies, Fred T; Olalde-Portugal, Víctor

    2006-06-01

    The effect of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and drought on fruit quality was evaluated in chile ancho (Capsicum annuum L. cv San Luis). AMF treatments were (1) Glomus fasciculatum (AMFG), (2) a fungal species consortium from the forest "Los Tuxtla" in Mexico (AMFT), (3) a fungal species consortium from the Sonorian desert in Mexico (AMFD), and (4) a noninoculated control (NAMF). Plants were exposed to a 26-day drought cycle. Fruit quality was determined by measuring size (length, width, and pedicel length), color, chlorophyll, and carotenoid concentration. Under nondrought conditions, AMFG produced fruits that were 13% wider and 15% longer than the NAMF treatment. Under nondrought conditions, fruit fresh weight was 25% greater in the AMFG treatment compared to the NAMF. Under drought, fruits in the AMFT and AMFD treatments showed fresh weights similar to those in the NAMF treatment not subjected to drought. Fruits of the AMFG treatment subjected to drought showed the same color intensity and chlorophyll content as those of the nondroughted NAMF treatment and carotenoid content increased 1.4 times compared to that in the NAMF not exposed to drought. It is interesting to note that fruits in the AMFD treatment subjected to drought and the NAMF treatment not exposed to drought reached the same size. AMFD treatment increased the concentration of carotenes (1.4 times) under nondrought conditions and the concentration of xanthophylls (1.5 times) under drought when compared to the nondroughted NAMF treatment.

  4. Plant endemism in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis (Argentina): understanding links between phylogeny and regional biogeographical patterns1

    PubMed Central

    Chiapella, Jorge O.; Demaio, Pablo H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a checklist with all known endemic plants occurring in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis, an isolated mountainous range located in central Argentina. In order to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary history, relationships and age of the regional flora, we gathered basic information on the biogeographical and floristic affinities of the endemics, and documented the inclusion of each taxon in molecular phylogenies. We listed 89 taxa (including 69 species and 20 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 53 genera and 29 families. The endemics are not distributed evenly, being more abundant in the lower than in the middle and upper vegetation belts. Thirty-two genera (60.3%) have been included in phylogenetic analyses, but only ten (18.8%) included local endemic taxa. A total of 28 endemic taxa of the Sierras CSL have a clear relationship with a widespread species of the same genus, or with one found close to the area. Available phylogenies for some taxa show divergence times between 7.0 – 1.8 Ma; all endemic taxa are most probably neoendemics sensu Stebbins and Major. Our analysis was specifically aimed at a particular geographic area, but the approach of analyzing phylogenetic patterns together with floristic or biogeographical relationships of the endemic taxa of an area, delimited by clear geomorphological features, could reveal evolutionary trends shaping the area. PMID:25878555

  5. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-08-20

    This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

  6. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    PubMed Central

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean's index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. Results. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14 ± 1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. Conclusions. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect. PMID:25789336

  7. Non-seismic geophysics compared and integrated with seismic in a frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, M.B.; Christopherson, K.R.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    Four non-seismic geophysical tools have made a significant contribution to a new geological interpretation of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/northeast San Luis Basin of south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric, (MT) and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted during the early stages of exploration. Two-dimensional modeling of the gravity and magnetics placed the main, basin-bounding fault three miles southwest of the mountain front, identified an intermediate fault block at the basin margin and identified a thick sequence of non-magnetic, intermediate density rocks on top of this block. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments is interpreted, supported by the discovery of outcrops of Cretaceous sediments and live Cretaceous oil. Magnetotelluric data was acquired to confirm the presence of Mesozoic sediments and depth to basement. Detailed TDEM data has been useful in correlating the MT with surface geology. Integration of the gravity, magnetic and MT data with seismic resulted in minor modifications to the new geological model.

  8. Medical therapeutic itineraries of women with breast cancer diagnosis affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Tejada-Tayabas, Luz María; Salcedo, Liseth Amell; Espino, Joel Monárrez

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to describe the medical itineraries followed by breast cancer women affiliated to the People's Health Insurance in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico. We used an ethnographic approach based on oral histories of 12 women diagnosed with breast cancer in the year prior to the first meeting. Two face-to-face sessions per participant lasting 60 minutes each were conducted followed by a telephone interview. Content and diachronic analyses were used. Three main itineraries were identified: (1) diagnostic process, (2) final diagnosis to treatment, and (3) cancer control and relapse. Findings suggested that infrastructure and human resources to adequately screen and timely diagnose breast cancer were scant and insufficiently trained, respectively. Deferral of medical assessment was related with lack of information about breast cancer consequences, with women being afraid of a positive result, and with economic constraints. The current screening program needs to be redesigned to prevent diagnostic delays, as these seem to explain the high frequency of advanced stages reported at the time of diagnosis.

  9. Use of abstraction regime and knowledge of hydrogeological conditions to control high-fluoride concentration in abstracted groundwater: San Luis Potosı´ basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Edmunds, W. M.

    2002-04-01

    Significant amounts of fluoride are found in the abstracted groundwater of San Luis Potosı´. This groundwater withdrawal induces a cold, low-fluoride flow as well as deeper thermal fluoride-rich flow in various proportions. Flow mixing takes place depending on the abstraction regime, local hydrogeology, and borehole construction design and operation. Fluoride concentrations (≈3.7 mg l -1) could become higher still, in time and space, if the input of regional fluoride-rich water to the abstraction boreholes is enhanced. It is suggested that by controlling the abstraction well-head water temperature at 28-30 °C, a pumped water mixture with a fluoride content close to the maximum drinking water standard of 1.5 mg l -1 will be produced. Further, new boreholes and those already operating could take advantage of fluoride solubility controls to reduce the F concentration in the abstracted water by considering lithology and borehole construction design in order to regulate groundwater flow conditions.

  10. Determinants of scientific output: an in-depth view of the productivity of tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro.

    PubMed

    Monge-Nájera, Julián; Nielsen-Muñoz, Vanessa; Beatriz Azofeifa, Ana

    2010-12-01

    Bibliometric studies have found that male researchers have their greatest productivity around the age of 40, that female researchers produce less than their male colleagues, that incentives for collaboration are slow to affect productivity and that, just like humans, research institutes become larger, less productive, more expensive to maintain and less able to raise money as they grow old. Almost invariably, these conclusions come from statistical studies of large numbers of European and American scientists, and there are practically no studies about tropical researchers. We present an in-depth analysis of the productivity of an internationally recognized tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro, based on the totality of his published work and on our own knowledge, as co-workers and friends, of the life frame in which that scientific output was produced. His life output departs from the expected pattern in that he had the highest productivity before reaching the expected peak productivity age, and that when he reached it his productivity fell and never recovered. Furthermore, marriage did not produce the expected fall in productivity. A close analysis of his life indicates that in the middle of his career he switched to intense teaching and conservation activities, and this better explains why his output of scientific research articles was low afterwards. This switch may occur in other tropical scientists.

  11. Chester County ground-water atlas, Chester County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ludlow, Russell A.; Loper, Connie A.

    2004-01-01

    Chester County encompasses 760 square miles in southeastern Pennsylvania. Groundwater- quality studies have been conducted in the county over several decades to address specific hydrologic issues. This report compiles and describes water-quality data collected during studies conducted mostly after 1990 and summarizes the data in a county-wide perspective. In this report, water-quality constituents are described in regard to what they are, why the constituents are important, and where constituent concentrations vary relative to geology or land use. Water-quality constituents are grouped into logical units to aid presentation: water-quality constituents measured in the field (pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and dissolved oxygen), common ions, metals, radionuclides, bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds.Waterquality constituents measured in the field, common ions (except chloride), metals, and radionuclides are discussed relative to geology. Bacteria, nutrients, pesticides, and volatile organic compounds are discussed relative to land use. If the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) or Chester County Health Department has drinkingwater standards for a constituent, the standards are included. Tables and maps are included to assist Chester County residents in understanding the water-quality constituents and their distribution in the county. Ground water in Chester County generally is of good quality and is mostly acidic except in the carbonate rocks and serpentinite, where it is neutral to strongly basic. Calcium carbonate and magnesium carbonate are major constituents of these rocks. Both compounds have high solubility, and, as such, both are major contributors to elevated pH, alkalinity, specific conductance, and the common ions. Elevated pH and alkalinity in carbonate rocks and serpentinite can indicate a potential for scaling in water heaters and household plumbing. Low pH and low alkalinity in the schist, quartzite, and

  12. Friendly Spaces.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    D'Elia, William

    1996-01-01

    The creation of usable space for gatherings and socializing is an important consideration in any campus planning program. The University of California-San Diego has a large outdoor assembly area. An addition at Cal Poly-San Luis Obispo encompasses an existing pedestrian path. A new building at the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, is designed as a…

  13. Annual Report to the Board of Trustees, School Year 1979-1980.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuesta Coll., San Luis Obispo, CA.

    Financial and program information are presented in this five-part annual report summarizing the instructional and administrative activities of Cuesta College and the San Luis Obispo Community College District during l979-80. Part I examines the status of eight areas under the supervision of the Office of Educational Services: curriculum…

  14. Developing a Science Cafe Program for Your University Library

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scaramozzino, Jeanine Marie; Trujillo, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    The Science Cafe is a national movement that attempts to foster community dialog and inquiry on scientific topics in informal venues such as coffee houses, bookstores, restaurants and bars. The California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, Robert E. Kennedy Library staff have taken the Science Cafe model out of bars and cafes and into…

  15. Interactive Computing With a Programmable Calculator; Student Experimentations in Numerical Methods.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerald, Curtis F.

    Programable desk calculators can provide students with personal experience in the use of numerical methods. Courses at California Polytechnic State University at San Luis Obispo use the Compucorp Model 025 Educator Experiences with it as a teaching device for solving non-linear equations and differential equations show that students can by-pass…

  16. Think before for a Better After.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diskin, Brooke; Mullen, Kyla; Lancaster, Kate

    2003-01-01

    Describes a campaign to promote recycling and energy and water conservation at the California Polytechnic State University campus in San Luis Obispo. The student-led effort influenced students to think about their actions and change their behaviors to be more eco-friendly. (SLD)

  17. A Laboratory Classroom Where ?Wining? Is Encouraged

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibbs, Hope

    2004-01-01

    A wine analysis for most is: take a sip, and either like it or don't. Not so for the students taking wine analysis courses at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California. In the college's new Wine Analysis Laboratory, students learn how to run chemical analyses of wines and compare chemical profiles of wines. Professor…

  18. The Implementation of Inmate Mentor Programs in the Correctional Treatment System as an Innovative Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Jana; McClure, Scott; Koutsenok, Igor; Lord, Scot

    2008-01-01

    In October 2006, the California Men's Colony (CMC) in San Luis Obispo, faced with staff recruitment and retention difficulties, took an innovative step to utilize long-term sentenced inmates as peer mentors and primary counselors to lead their prison-based therapeutic community (TC) program. The program was designed, developed, and implemented…

  19. Rethinking What We Do and How We Do It: Systems Thinking Strategies for Library Leadership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somerville, Mary M.; Schader, Barbara; Huston, Malia E.

    2005-01-01

    Library leaders promote reconsideration of organisational purposes, processes, and relationships at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo, California, USA. Systems thinking, fortified by information literacy, informs workplace changes that provide learning experiences transferable to better alignment of library outcomes with…

  20. Expanding the Purpose of a Prison Education Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Robert G.

    2012-01-01

    In 1979, when the author began as an academic instructor at the Central Coast Adult School, located inside the California Men's Colony in San Luis Obispo, California, he saw his teaching role in the traditional sense of imparting knowledge through the school's curriculum. Over time, however, his viewpoint changed as he came to recognize that the…

  1. The History of the Labor Movement in the United States: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Compton, Luvenia

    The bibliography covers the history of the labor movement in the United States from Colonial times through the 1970s. It has been compiled almost entirely from books and periodicals available in the California Polytechnic State University Library at San Luis Obispo, California. Most of the entries have been published since the 1930s, with almost…

  2. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; shallow ground-water quality of a land-use area in the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water in an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and discusses how natural and human factors affect the quality of shallow ground water. Thirty-five wells were installed, and water samples were collected from these wells and analyzed for selected dissolved common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, and synthetic organic compounds. The San Luis Valley is a high intermontane valley that is partially drained by the Rio Grande. The San Luis Valley land-use study area was limited to a part of the valley where the depth to water is generally less than 25 feet. The area where the 35 monitor wells were installed was further limited to the part of the study area where center-pivot overhead sprinklers are used to irrigate crops. Precipitation, runoff from adjacent mountainous areas, and ground-water inflow from the adjacent mountainous areas are the main sources of water to the aquifers in the San Luis Valley. Discharge of water from the shallow, unconfined aquifer in the valley is mainly from evapotranspiration. The dominant land use in the San Luis Valley is agriculture, although nonirrigated land and residential land are interspersed with agricultural land. Alfalfa, native hay, barley, wheat, potatoes, and other vegetables are the main crops. Dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow ground water sampled ranged from 75 to 1,960 milligrams per liter. The largest median concentration of cations was for calcium, and the largest median concentration of anions was for bicarbonate in shallow ground water in the San Luis Valley. Calcium concentrations ranged from 7.5 to 300 milligrams per liter, and bicarbonate concentrations ranged from 28 to 451 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 to 58 milligrams per liter as N; water from 11 wells had nitrite plus nitrate concentrations greater than 10 milligrams per liter as N. With the exception of the

  3. 75 FR 34094 - Saguache County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-16

    ... Valley Public Lands Center, 1803 West U.S. Highway 160, Monte Vista, CO 81144. Comments may also be sent....S. Highway 160, Monte Vista, CO 81144. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mike Blakeman, RAC coordinator, USDA, San Luis Valley Public Lands Center, 1803 West U.S. Highway 160, Monte Vista, CO 81144;...

  4. 7 CFR 7.11 - County committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the county executive director, other employee of the county committee, or the county agricultural extension agent for the county. If the county agricultural extension agent is not selected as secretary to... Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION...

  5. 7 CFR 7.11 - County committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the county executive director, other employee of the county committee, or the county agricultural extension agent for the county. If the county agricultural extension agent is not selected as secretary to... Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION...

  6. 7 CFR 7.11 - County committee members.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the county executive director, other employee of the county committee, or the county agricultural extension agent for the county. If the county agricultural extension agent is not selected as secretary to... Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF AGRICULTURAL STABILIZATION...

  7. 7 CFR 7.25 - County executive director duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false County executive director duties. 7.25 Section 7.25... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.25 County executive director duties. (a) The county executive director shall execute the policies established by the county committee and be responsible for...

  8. 7 CFR 7.25 - County executive director duties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false County executive director duties. 7.25 Section 7.25... CONSERVATION STATE, COUNTY AND COMMUNITY COMMITTEES § 7.25 County executive director duties. (a) The county executive director shall execute the policies established by the county committee and be responsible for...

  9. 78 FR 10249 - Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, IL and Lake County, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-13

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Will and Kankakee Counties, IL and Lake County, IN AGENCY: Federal Highway Administration (FHWA), DOT. ACTION: Notice of Intent. SUMMARY... Federal Domestic Assistance Program Number 20.205, Highway Research, Planning and Construction....

  10. Nitrate concentrations, 1936-99, and pesticide concentrations, 1990-99, in the unconfined aquifer in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    ineffective in evaluating variations in the amount of nitrate leaching associated with differences in application rates. It was concluded that irrigation practices have the greatest effect on leaching of nitrate to the aquifer. Management tools, such as irrigation scheduling, center-pivot sprinkler systems, soil and ground-water nitrogen credits, and cultivation of cover and winter crops, are being used to help maintain crop quality and yields while minimizing the potential of leaching and reducing residual nitrogen left in the soil. Review of available data from previous studies indicates that most of the sampled wells with elevated nitrate concentrations are located in the intensively cultivated area north of the Rio Grande. This area represents about 10 percent of the San Luis Valley and approximately 35 percent of the crop and pasture land in the valley. The area where nitrate concentrations exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contaminant level represents about 150 square miles or 5 percent of the valley. Aquifer vulnerability to and contamination by pesticides was not evaluated until the 1990's. Risk analyses indicated that selected pesticides can pose a contamination threat to an unconfined aquifer in areas consisting primarily of sandy loam soil; sandy loam soils are common in the San Luis Valley. Water-quality samples collected from some wells during 1990 and 1993 indicated trace- to low-level pesticide contamination. The occurrence of pesticides was infrequent and isolated.

  11. New isotopic dating of intrusive rocks in the Sierra de San Luis (Argentina): implications for the geodynamic history of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Gosen, W.; Loske, W.; Prozzi, C.

    2002-06-01

    U-Pb datings of zircons from intrusions in the metamorphic complex of the Sierra de San Luis (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina) suggest that the depositional, tectonic, metamorphic, and magmatic history in this part of the Pampean Terrane spans the Proterozoic through Early Paleozoic time interval. The Paso del Rey Granite intruded a clastic succession at 608+26/-25 Ma and, afterward, was deformed together with the country rocks. The intrusions of the Rı´o Claro Granite and La Escalerilla Granite at 490±15 and 507±24 Ma, respectively, mark the onset of Famatinian arc plutonism due to east-directed subduction beneath the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas. The new data, along with structural analyses and published results of isotopic dating, allow an interpretation of the history in this segment of the Pampean Terrane. After basement formation, Late Proterozoic turbiditic sedimentation in a passive margin setting was accompanied by block faulting and continued at least to the Early Cambrian. It is assumed that the Pampean Terrane represents a detached fragment of the Rı´o de La Plata Craton in the east. The first deformation in the Micaschist Group was an effect of an early stage of the compressive Pampean event, which is related to the collision of the Pampean Terrane with the Rı´o de La Plata Craton. The Early Cambrian is recorded by injections of acid magmatic sills and dykes, probably under overall crustal extension. This also indicates an age of the turbiditic sediments comparable to that of the Puncoviscana Formation s.l. of northwest Argentina. After cessation of Famatinian arc plutonism, compression and regional metamorphism affected the intrusives, clastic succession, and older basement units. The related amalgamation of the Cuyania (Precordillera) Terrane with the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas was completed during the Early Devonian.

  12. High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

    2011-12-01

    In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

  13. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Lucero Estrada, Cecilia; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; Escudero, María Esther

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3%) than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8%) and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%). Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5%) and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%). One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%). S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%). The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures. PMID:25177351

  14. Exposure to arsenic and lead of children living near a copper-smelter in San Luis Potosi, Mexico: Importance of soil contamination for exposure of children.

    PubMed

    Carrizales, Leticia; Razo, Israel; Téllez-Hernández, Jesús I; Torres-Nerio, Rocío; Torres, Arturo; Batres, Lilia E; Cubillas, Ana-Cristina; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2006-05-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the levels of soil contamination and child exposure in areas next to a primary smelter (arsenic-copper metallurgical) located in the community of Morales in San Luis Potosi, Mexico. In Morales, 90% of the soil samples studied in this work were above 400 mg/kg of lead, and above 100 mg/kg of arsenic, which are guidelines recommended by the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). Bioaccessibility of these metals was studied in vitro in 10 soil samples; the median values of bioaccessibility obtained in these samples were 46.5% and 32.5% for arsenic and lead. Since the concentrations of arsenic and lead in soil were above normal values, and taking into account the bioaccessibility results, exposure to these metals was evaluated in children. Regarding lead, children aged 3-6 years had the highest mean blood lead levels; furthermore, 90% of them had concentrations above 10 microg/dl (CDC's action level). Total urinary arsenic was higher in children aged 8-9 yr; however, the percentage of children with concentrations above 50 microg/g creatinine (CDC's action level) or 100 microg/g creatinine (World Health Organization [WHO] action level) was similar among different age groups. Using the EPAs integrated exposure uptake biokinetic model for lead in children (IEUBK), we estimated that 87% of the total lead in blood is obtained from the soil/dust pathway. The exposure dose to arsenic, estimated for the children living in Morales using Monte Carlo analysis and the arsenic concentrations found in soil, was above the EPA's reference dose. With all these results, it is evident that studies are needed in order to identify adverse health effects in children living in Morales; nevertheless, it is more important to develop a risk reduction program as soon as possible.

  15. Hydrogeology and simulated effects of ground-water development on an unconfined aquifer in the Closed Basin Division, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leonard, G.J.; Watts, K.R.

    1988-01-01

    Wells completed in an unconfined aquifer in the Closed Basin Division of the San Luis Valley Project, Colorado, are expected to provide about 101,800 acre-ft of groundwater/year to the Rio Grande when this project is completed. Lowering of groundwater levels in the unconfined aquifer is expected to decrease the quantity of groundwater that is lost by evapotranspiration. The aquifer system, which consists of an unconfined aquifer that is 50 to 130 ft thick, overlies a thick, leaky confined aquifer. Groundwater moves from the edge of the valley toward a topographic low near the center of the Closed Basin Division, where it is lost by evapotranspiration. A two-dimensional groundwater flow model was used to evaluate the effects of projected withdrawal of about 141 cu ft/sec by 168 wells throughout a 20-year period. The simulated pumpage resulted in a projected drawdown greater than 0.1 ft in the water-levels of the unconfined aquifer over an area of about 370 sq mi. Maximum simulated drawdown was 25 ft. Simulations indicate that about 66 % of the water to be withdrawn from the unconfined aquifer would be derived from decreases of evapotranspiration, 26% from induced leakage from an underlying confined aquifer, and 8% from storage of the unconfined aquifer. Model simulations were based only on withdrawals from wells completed in the unconfined aquifer. Pumpage from the confined aquifer was not simulated. Upward leakage from the confined aquifer predicted by the model, results from the simulated declines of the potentiometric surface in the unconfined aquifer. (USGS)

  16. Water resources of Lehigh County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wood, Charles R.; Flippo, Herbert N.; Lescinsky, Joseph B.; Barker, James L.

    1972-01-01

    Lehigh County occupies an area of 347 square miles in southeastern Pennsylvania. The northern part of Lehigh County is underlain by the Martinsburg Formation, which consists chiefly of shale and slate. The central part of the county, where most of the population centers are located and much of the urbanization is occurring, is underlain by alternating beds of limestone and dolomite. From oldest to youngest, these carbonate rocks are the Leithsville Formation, the Allentown Formation, the Beekmantown Group, and the Jacksonburg Formation. The southern part of the county is underlain chiefly by the shales, sandstones, and conglomerates of the Brunswick Formation and by metamorphic and igneous rocks.

  17. Waste source reduction county government case study

    SciTech Connect

    1990-12-31

    Itasca County is located in north-central Minnesota, has a population of 42,000 and is known for its forests and scenic waterways. With Beltrami County, it contains the upper watershed of the Mississippi River. Its major industries are timber and tourism. Itasca County government made a commitment to source reduce its waste as much as possible. Secondarily, what they could not reduce they committed themselves to recycle. The project demonstrates functional reduction in practice. It shows that reduction is a realistic goal for county governments and that reduction can be measured on a waste stream by waste stream basis.

  18. Digital computer processing of LANDSAT data for North Alabama. [Linestone County, Madison County, Jackson County, Marshall County, and DeKalb County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bond, A. D.; Atkinson, R. J.; Lybanon, M.; Ramapriyan, H. K.

    1977-01-01

    Computer processing procedures and programs applied to Multispectral Scanner data from LANDSAT are described. The output product produced is a level 1 land use map in conformance with a Universal Transverse Mercator projection. The region studied was a five-county area in north Alabama.

  19. 75 FR 26709 - Clarke County Water Supply Project, Clarke County, IA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-12

    ... Natural Resources Conservation Service Clarke County Water Supply Project, Clarke County, IA AGENCY... Water Supply Project, Clarke County, Iowa. ] FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Richard Sims, State... comments by NRCS information related to water supply demand requirements for permitting by the State...

  20. 78 FR 29202 - Environmental Impact Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-17

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk... prepared for a proposed highway project in Grand Forks County, North Dakota and Polk County, Minnesota. FOR... Sorlie Bridge over the Red River between Grand Forks, North Dakota and East Grand Forks,...

  1. 75 FR 42815 - Fulton County, LLC-Abandonment Exemption-in Fulton County, IN

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-22

    ... Surface Transportation Board Fulton County, LLC--Abandonment Exemption--in Fulton County, IN Fulton County, LLC (FC), filed a verified notice of exemption under 49 CFR 1152 subpart F--Exempt Abandonments to... exemption, any employee adversely affected by the abandonment shall be protected under Oregon Short...

  2. The Economic Impact of Schenectady County Community College on Schenectady County, 1981-82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chestnut, Erma Ruth

    This report on the economic impact of Schenectady County Community College (SCCC) uses a modification of the Caffrey and Isaacs model to assess SCCC-related local business volume, SCCC costs and benefits to the Schenectady County government, and the likely impact on the county if SCCC did not exist. Part I provides background to the study,…

  3. 75 FR 45557 - Prevailing Rate Systems; Definition of Tulsa County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-03

    ... Counties, TX. Santa Clara, CA On March 9, 2009, we published a final rule (74 FR 9951) that abolished the... County, OK, and Angelina County, TX, to Nonappropriated Fund Federal Wage System Wage Areas AGENCY... area of application to the Oklahoma, OK, nonappropriated fund (NAF) Federal Wage System (FWS) wage...

  4. 75 FR 25308 - Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Winnebago County, IL and Rock County, WI... Beloit, Rock County, Wisconsin to the interchange of Rockton Road and I-90 southeast of South...

  5. 33 CFR 100.905 - Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI. 100.905 Section 100.905 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.905 Door County...

  6. 33 CFR 100.905 - Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI. 100.905 Section 100.905 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.905 Door County...

  7. 33 CFR 100.905 - Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI. 100.905 Section 100.905 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.905 Door County...

  8. 33 CFR 100.905 - Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI. 100.905 Section 100.905 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY REGATTAS AND MARINE PARADES SAFETY OF LIFE ON NAVIGABLE WATERS § 100.905 Door County...

  9. 75 FR 54419 - Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-07

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Yellowstone County, MT AGENCY: Federal... highway project in Yellowstone County, Montana. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Brian Hasselbach, Right... (I-90) and Old Highway 312 in or near the city of Billings, Yellowstone County, Montana....

  10. EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST ALONG JEFFERSON COUNTY 71 WITH RAILROAD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    EXTERIOR VIEW LOOKING WEST ALONG JEFFERSON COUNTY 71 WITH RAILROAD BRIDGE (RIGHT), SADDLEBAG COTTAGE (LEFT) AND COAL TRUCK. - Linn Crossing Trestle Bridge, Spanning County Road 71, Linn Crossing, Jefferson County, AL

  11. 111. 'PROPOSED CIRCULATION SYSTEM.' FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    111. 'PROPOSED CIRCULATION SYSTEM.' FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: THE FIRST PLANNED COUNTY IN NEW ENGLAND, JUNE 1933. - Merritt Parkway, Beginning in Greenwich & running 38 miles to Stratford, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  12. 113. "EXISTING MAJOR HIGHWAYS". FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. "EXISTING MAJOR HIGHWAYS". FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: THE FIRST PLANNED COUNTY IN NEW ENGLAND. JUNE 1933 - Merritt Parkway, Beginning in Greenwich & running 38 miles to Stratford, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  13. 112. 'PROPOSED CIRCULATION SYSTEM.' FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. 'PROPOSED CIRCULATION SYSTEM.' FROM FAIRFIELD COUNTY PLANNING ASSOCIATION, FAIRFIELD: THE FIRST PLANNED COUNTY IN NEW ENGLAND. JUNE 1933. - Merritt Parkway, Beginning in Greenwich & running 38 miles to Stratford, Greenwich, Fairfield County, CT

  14. Landsliding in Allegheny County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Briggs, Reginald Peter; Pomeroy, John S.; Davies, William E.

    1975-01-01

    Man should proceed with caution if modifications such as loading, excavation, or changes of the water regime are contemplated for slopes in Allegheny County, especially those slopes described on the map as highly sensitive to disturbance by man. Features indicative of unstable slope conditions include: cracks in buildings, yard walls, and pools; doors and windows that jam; fences and other linear features bowed out of line; tilted trees and utility poles; cracks and steplike ground features; hummocky ground; and water seeps. Geologic factors related to the landsliding process include rock types, layering, fracturing, and attitude; nature of soil cover; permeability of rocks and soils; and steepness of slope.

  15. Geothermal development plan: Pinal county

    SciTech Connect

    White, D.H.

    1981-01-01

    Wells drilled in the county provide evidence of geothermal energy sufficient for process heat and space heating and cooling applications. Annual energy consumption was estimated for industries whose process heat requirements are less than 105/sup 0/C (221/sup 0/F). This information was then used to model the introduction of geothermal energy into the process heat market. Also, agriculture and agribusiness industries were identified. Many of these are located on or near a geothermal resource and might be able to utilize geothermal energy in their operations.

  16. 77 FR 66791 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations for Wicomico County, MD, and Incorporated Areas

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-07

    ... proposed rulemaking at 75 FR 5909, proposing flood elevation determinations along one or more flooding..., identified by Docket No. FEMA-B- 1085, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch,...

  17. Water resources of Sweetwater County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, Jon P.; Miller, Kirk A.

    2004-01-01

    Sweetwater County is located in the southwestern part of Wyoming and is the largest county in the State. A study to quantify the availability and describe the chemical quality of surface-water and ground-water resources in Sweetwater County was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineers Office. Most of the county has an arid climate. For this reason a large amount of the flow in perennial streams within the county is derived from outside the county. Likewise, much of the ground-water recharge to aquifers within the county is from flows into the county, and occurs slowly. Surface-water data were not collected as part of the study. Evaluations of streamflow and stream-water quality were limited to analyses of historical data and descriptions of previous investigations. Forty-six new ground-water-quality samples were collected as part of the study and the results from an additional 782 historical ground-water-quality samples were reviewed. Available hydrogeologic characteristics for various aquifers throughout the county also are described. Flow characteristics of streams in Sweetwater County vary substantially depending on regional and local basin characteristics and anthropogenic factors. Because precipitation amounts in the county are small, most streams in the county are ephemeral, flowing only as a result of regional or local rainfall or snowmelt runoff. Flows in perennial streams in the county generally are a result of snowmelt runoff in the mountainous headwater areas to the north, west, and south of the county. Flow characteristics of most perennial streams are altered substantially by diversions and regulation. Water-quality characteristics of selected streams in and near Sweetwater County during water years 1974 through 1983 were variable. Concentrations of dissolved constituents, suspended sediment, and bacteria generally were smallest at sites on the Green River because of resistant geologic units, increased

  18. 76 FR 28415 - Fresno County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-17

    ... Robbin Ekman, Fresno County Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, c/ o Sierra National Forest, High... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robbin Ekman, Fresno County Resource ] Advisory Committee Coordinator,...

  19. 76 FR 44302 - Fresno County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-25

    ... Robbin Ekman, Fresno County Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator, c/ o Sierra National Forest, High... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Robbin Ekman, Fresno County Resource Advisory Committee Coordinator,...

  20. Shoreham Railroad Bridge, Former Addison County Railroad (later, Rutland Railroad, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Shoreham Railroad Bridge, Former Addison County Railroad (later, Rutland Railroad, Addison Branch), spanning Lemon Fair River above Richville Pond, west of East Shoreham Road, Shoreham, Addison County, VT

  1. Educational and Demographic Profile: Mendocino County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Mendocino County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  2. Geothermal development issues: Recommendations to Deschutes County

    SciTech Connect

    Gebhard, C.

    1982-07-01

    This report discusses processes and issues related to geothermal development. It is intended to inform planners and interested individuals in Deschutes County about geothermal energy, and advise County officials as to steps that can be taken in anticipation of resource development. (ACR)

  3. Latinos and Education in Ventura County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Segura, Denise A.

    This paper provides an overview of demographic and educational attainment data on Latinos in Ventura County, California, and describes an ongoing initiative to increase Latino college attendance through improved K-12 preparation and family involvement. In both its urban and rural areas, Ventura County harbors large Latino populations who are…

  4. Educational and Demographic Profile: Lake County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Lake County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced communication…

  5. Commodity Flow Study - Clark County, Nevada, USA

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, S.Ph.D.; Navis, I.

    2008-07-01

    The United States Department of Energy has designated Clark County, Nevada as an 'Affected Unit of Local Government' due to the potential for impacts by activities associated with the Yucca Mountain High Level Nuclear Waste Repository project. Urban Transit, LLC has led a project team of transportation including experts from the University of Nevada Las Vegas Transportation Research Center to conduct a hazardous materials community flow study along Clark County's rail and truck corridors. In addition, a critical infrastructure analysis has also been carried out in order to assess the potential impacts of transportation within Clark County of high level nuclear waste and spent nuclear fuel to a proposed repository 90 miles away in an adjacent county on the critical infrastructure in Clark County. These studies were designed to obtain information relating to the transportation, identification and routing of hazardous materials through Clark County. Coordinating with the United States Department of Energy, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, the U. S. Federal Highway Administration, the Nevada Department of Transportation, and various other stakeholders, these studies and future research will examine the risk factors along the entire transportation corridor within Clark County and provide a context for understanding the additional vulnerability associated with shipping spent fuel through Clark County. (authors)

  6. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Benito County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Benito County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  7. Public Library Service for San Benito County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGovern, Gail

    A sparsely populated, agricultural area, San Benito County (California) provides library services in conjunction with the Hollister city library and in cooperation with the San Juan Bautista city library. Financing comes from the county general fund. There are no written goals or policy statements and no professionally trained librarians. As…

  8. Groundwater management and protection Madison County, Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    French, J.H.; Strunk, J.W.

    1990-07-01

    Groundwater is extremely important to Madison County as it provides nearly three quarters of the county's drinking water. In recent years, Madison County has increasingly recognized the need to protect its groundwater resource. A supply of usable groundwater is one element of a high quality environment, which can help spur economic development and provide for the needs of a growing population. Without planning protection and understanding of possible consequences, however, economic development and population pressures can cause a gradual degradation of groundwater. In April 1987, the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA) convened a local groundwater steering group in Madison County. At the first meeting the ground agreed upon these goals: (1) to seek incorporate groundwater protection into the planning and development process for Madison County, (2) to support efforts by Madison County to obtain authority to adopt zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, and (3) to develop a groundwater management plan for the county. This report provides essential information needed in developing a plan and is based on the following assumptions: the citizens of Madison County value the environment in which they live and wish to protect it from pollution; continued economic development is necessary for a healthy local economy; and a healthy economy can be sustained and nurtured, without degradation of the groundwater resource, through countywide planning, education, and participation.

  9. 24 CFR 570.307 - Urban counties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... activities, specifically urban renewal and publicly assisted housing. In determining whether a county has the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Urban counties. 570.307 Section 570.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  10. 24 CFR 570.307 - Urban counties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... activities, specifically urban renewal and publicly assisted housing. In determining whether a county has the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Urban counties. 570.307 Section 570.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  11. 24 CFR 570.307 - Urban counties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... activities, specifically urban renewal and publicly assisted housing. In determining whether a county has the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2014-04-01 2013-04-01 true Urban counties. 570.307 Section 570.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  12. 24 CFR 570.307 - Urban counties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... activities, specifically urban renewal and publicly assisted housing. In determining whether a county has the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urban counties. 570.307 Section 570.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  13. 24 CFR 570.307 - Urban counties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... activities, specifically urban renewal and publicly assisted housing. In determining whether a county has the... 24 Housing and Urban Development 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Urban counties. 570.307 Section 570.307 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development...

  14. A Rural County's Response to Homelessness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loughran, Elizabeth Lee; White, Priscilla

    This paper describes the response of one locality, a rural county in Western Massachusetts, to the reality of rural homelessness. Jessie's House, in Hampshire County, Massachusetts, is a short-term emergency shelter providing meals, housing, and advocacy to homeless families and individuals. The shelter has a staff of three full-time residents and…

  15. Analysis of County School Districts in Arkansas.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Karol B.; Charlton, J.L.

    The 1948, Arkansas School District Reorganization Act was passed in an effort to reduce the 1589 small school districts to a smaller number. Those districts not consolidated would form county districts. As of the 1967-68 school year, 26 of these county districts remained. The purpose of this study was to provide information drawing attention to…

  16. Socioeconomic Heterogeneity of Mining-Dependent Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nord, Mark; Luloff, A. E.

    1993-01-01

    Although the socioeconomic well-being of all U.S. mining-dependent counties was slightly above the national average in 1990, disaggregation reveals substantial effects of region and mining subsector. In particular, southern and Great Lakes coal-mining counties had significantly lower high school graduation rates and higher poverty and unemployment…

  17. A Profile of Anson County, North Carolina.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, M. Gaston; And Others

    Since 1950 Anson County, North Carolina, has had major contributions to economic development, a source of great concern to residents of the almost entirely rural area. The increased capacity of the Blewitt Falls Dam power output and the county-wide water filtration system (one of only a few in the United States today) are attractive to industry.…

  18. [A Profile of Kershaw County, South Carolina].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lilley, Stephen C.; McLean, Edward L.

    Careful long-range planning and slow, deliberate growth have benefitted Kershaw County's 500,000 pleasantly varied acres near the state capitol. The county, famous for its equestrian activity, boasts prestige stables, riding clubs, and trails. In addition there are lakes and numerous parks. Leaders want to maintain this aesthetic appeal while…

  19. A Profile of Hardee County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beaulieu, Lionel J.; Anderson, Deborah S.

    In 1977 leaders of Hardee County, Florida, listed relationships and attitudes of residents, rural atmosphere, environmental conditions, and economic potential among the county's strong points, and public service and facility improvements, developing economic potential, recreational and entertainment development, and planning and zoning as its most…

  20. Educational and Demographic Profile: Yolo County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for Yolo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced communication…

  1. The Farm Crisis and Decatur County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flora, Jan L.; And Others

    This case study assesses the impact of the farm sector on the economy and social organization of Decatur County (Kansas), a county which has historically depended on agriculture for its livelihood. Data were obtained from analysis of time series statistical indicators for the period between 1966 and 1984, questionnaire responses of local…

  2. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Joaquin County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Joaquin County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  3. Geothermal development plan: Yuma County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, D. H.; Goldstone, L. A.

    1982-08-01

    The potential for utilizing geothermal energy was evaluated. Four potential geothermal resource areas with temperatures less than 900C (1940F) were identified, and in addition, two areas are inferred to contain geothermal resources with intermediate temperature potential. The resource areas are isolated. One resource site contains a hot dry rock resource. Anticipated population growth in the county is expected to be 2% per year over the next 40 years. The primary employment sector is agriculture, though some light industry is located in the county. Water supplies are found to be adequate to support future growth without adverse affect on agriculture. In addition, several agricultural processors were found, concentrated in citrus processing and livestock raising. It is suggested that by the year 2000, geothermal energy may economically provide the energy equivalent of 53,000 barrels of oil per year to the industrial sector if developed privately. Geothermal utilization projections increase to 132,000 barrels of oil per year by 2000 if a municipal utility developed the resource.

  4. Family planning in Nangong County.

    PubMed

    Sun, X

    1980-04-01

    Family planning has been practiced in Nangong county, China, since 1971; as a result the population growth rate has dropped from 16.7/1000 to 3.6/1000 in 1979; 98% of women of childbearing age use contraception, and most couples have only 1 child. Before 1971 most couples had 4-5 children; per capita grain rations had to be reduced because of the increase in population, and more grain had to be supplied by the state. 1 child families are now rewarded with an annual monetary bonus, extra grain allocations for the child, free tuition in schools, and preference in job placement and medical treatment. Parents who have more than 2 children are penalized by the withdrawal of 10% of their monthly earnings. The idea of "1 couple 1 child" is a radical change from China's traditional culture, which viewed children especially sons, as an insurance against old age insecurity. Marriage at a later age is also encouraged; in Nangong county none of the men of marriageable age married before 25, and none of the women before 23. As a result of promoting family planning Nangong country has ceased to need grain subsidies from the state, and in recent years has had a 10,000 ton surplus to sell.

  5. Family planning in Nangong County.

    PubMed

    Sun, X

    1980-04-01

    Family planning has been practiced in Nangong county, China, since 1971; as a result the population growth rate has dropped from 16.7/1000 to 3.6/1000 in 1979; 98% of women of childbearing age use contraception, and most couples have only 1 child. Before 1971 most couples had 4-5 children; per capita grain rations had to be reduced because of the increase in population, and more grain had to be supplied by the state. 1 child families are now rewarded with an annual monetary bonus, extra grain allocations for the child, free tuition in schools, and preference in job placement and medical treatment. Parents who have more than 2 children are penalized by the withdrawal of 10% of their monthly earnings. The idea of "1 couple 1 child" is a radical change from China's traditional culture, which viewed children especially sons, as an insurance against old age insecurity. Marriage at a later age is also encouraged; in Nangong county none of the men of marriageable age married before 25, and none of the women before 23. As a result of promoting family planning Nangong country has ceased to need grain subsidies from the state, and in recent years has had a 10,000 ton surplus to sell. PMID:12264032

  6. An Analysis of Unique Aerial Photographs of Atmospheric Eddies in Marine Stratocumulus Clouds Downwind of Complex Terrain Along the California Coast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, B. M.; Herbster, C. G.; Mosher, F. R.

    2013-12-01

    Unique aerial photographs of atmospheric eddies in marine stratocumulus clouds downwind of complex terrain along the California coast are presented and analyzed. While satellite imagery of similar eddies have appeared in the scientific literature since the 1960's, it is believed that these are the first close-up photographs of such eddies, taken from an airplane, to appear in publication. Two photographs by a commercial pilot, flying California coastal routes, are presented: one from July 16, 2006 downwind of Santa Cruz Island, a 740 m peak bordering the Santa Barbara Channel off the California coast; and one from September 12, 2006 near Grover Beach, California, downwind of a headland containing the San Luis Range, a region of complex terrain near San Luis Obispo, California, with ridges ranging approximately from 240 to 550 m elevation. Both eddies occurred in the lee of inversion-penetrating terrain, and were marked by a cyclonic vortex in the clouds with a striking cloud-free 'eye' feature roughly 3 km in diameter. The Santa Cruz Island eddy was 25 km in length and 9-10 km in width, while the Grover Beach eddy was 17 km in length and had a width of 9 km, placing it in the meso-gamma scale of atmospheric features. GOES (Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite) imagery for both cases was obtained and help to define the lifecycle and motions of the eddies captured in the snapshots. Relevant meteorological observations for the Santa Cruz Island eddy were not located, but in-situ observations from the Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, California Polytechnic State University (Cal Poly) pier, and the San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District, made possible a more detailed examination of the Grover Beach eddy and its structure. Additionally, we offer speculation on an eddy formation mechanism consistent with the satellite and in-situ observations described in this presentation, and hypotheses from the literature on low Froude number, continuously

  7. Imperial County geothermal development annual meeting: summary

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-01-01

    All phases of current geothermal development in Imperial County are discussed and future plans for development are reviewed. Topics covered include: Heber status update, Heber binary project, direct geothermal use for high-fructose corn sweetener production, update on county planning activities, Brawley and Salton Sea facility status, status of Imperial County projects, status of South Brawley Prospect 1983, Niland geothermal energy program, recent and pending changes in federal procedures/organizations, plant indicators of geothermal fluid on East Mesa, state lands activities in Imperial County, environmental interests in Imperial County, offshore exploration, strategic metals in geothermal fluids rebuilding of East Mesa Power Plant, direct use geothermal potential for Calipatria industrial Park, the Audubon Society case, status report of the Cerro Prieto geothermal field, East Brawley Prospect, and precision gravity survey at Heber and Cerro Prieto geothermal fields. (MHR)

  8. Water resources of Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phelps, G.G.

    1994-01-01

    The report describes the hydrology and water resources of Duval County, the development of its water supplies, and water use within the county. Also included are descriptions of various natural features of the county (such as topography and geology), an explanation of the hydrologic cycle, and an interpretation of the relationship between them. Ground-water and surface-water resources and principal water-quality features within the county are also discussed. The report is intended to provide the general public with an overview of the water resources Of Duval County, and to increase public awareness of water issues. Information is presented in nontechnical language to enable the general reader to understand facts about water as a part of nature, and the problems associated with its development and use.

  9. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of nine potentially acceptable sites for a mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and the eight other potentially sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines. On the basis of these findings, the DOE is nominating the Deaf Smith County site as one of the five sites suitable for characterization. 591 refs., 147 figs., 173 tabs.

  10. Time constraints on the Famatinian and Achalian structural evolution of the basement of the Sierra de San Luis (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steenken, André; Siegesmund, Siegfried; Wemmer, Klaus; López de Luchi, Mónica G.

    2008-05-01

    Geochronological data pertaining to the structural evolution of the Sierra de San Luis provide important insights into the geodynamic history along the southwestern margin of Gondwana. In the Pringles metamorphic complex, metamorphic fabrics (S 1) were affected by two folding events (D 2 and D 3) related to the Ordovician approach of the Cuyania terrane. Contemporary formations of high-temperature shear zones record a prominent east-side-up displacement. Resumption of compression due to the Achalian collision with the Chilenia terrane was accommodated by the reactivation of the Famatinian high-temperature shear zones in greenschist facies conditions. K-Ar Ms ages point to their activity up to the Early Carboniferous. The post-Pampean structural evolution of the Pringles metamorphic complex is supported by new Sm-Nd and 207Pb/ 206Pb data, which agree with previously proposed early Cambrian sedimentation of the psammopelitic precursors. A Sm-Nd mineral isochron, together with published SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages, bracket the emplacement of mafic and ultramafic intrusions that control the granulite facies metamorphism between 506 and 478 Ma. A late Cambrian emplacement of the crustal-derived Paso del Rey pluton is suggested by a 207Pb/ 206Pb zircon age at 491 ± 19 Ma. The syn-D 2 emplacement of these granitoids indicates that the D 1 to D 2 structural evolution predates the generally assumed Middle Ordovician accretion of the Precordillera/Cuyania terrane. K-Ar Hbl, Ms, and Bt ages and some Rb-Sr mica data record the cooling after the Famatinian metamorphic peak. Ms ages from large Ms booklets suggest a common cooling of the basement of the sierra at approximately 445 Ma, whereas normal-sized muscovites from gneissic rocks (K-Ar ages of ˜380 Ma) indicate slow cooling of the Pringles metamorphic complex with respect to the other basement domains. K-Ar Bt ages between 360 and 340 Ma capture cooling below approximately 300 °C of the basement. Differential cooling is

  11. Thermal history of the upper mantle beneath a young back-arc extensional zone: ultramafic xenoliths from San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Wilhelm; Besch, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    At the San Luis Potosí (SLP) volcanic field (Central Mexico), Quaternary basanites and tuff breccias have sampled a suite of ultramafic xenoliths, predominately spinel lherzolites, spinel-olivine websterites, spinel pyroxenites, and hornblende-rich pyroxenites. Spinel lherzolites from the La Ventura maars have protogranular to equigranular textures, those from the Santo Domingo maars are strongly sheared. Both spinel-lherzolite types show similar whole-rock major and trace-element abundances. They are fertile to slightly depleted with mineralogical and geochemical heterogeneities induced by partial melting processes. Pyroxenites with either magmatic or metamorphic textures are high-pressure cumulates. Hornblende-rich pyroxenites are genetically linked to the host basanites. Most of the protogranular spinel lherzolites contain veinlets of glass along grain boundaries. These glasses are chemically homogeneous and have trachybasaltic to trachyandesitic compositions. Mg- and Fe2+-partitioning between olivine and glass suggests chemical equilibrium between the melts represented by the glasses and the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at about 1,000°C and 10 to 15 kbar. The melts are interpreted to be of upper mantle origin. They may have been formed by in-situ partial melting in the presence of volatiles or represent percolating melts chemically buffered by the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at uppermost mantle conditions. Mineral chemistry in all rock types of the whole xenolith suite reveals distinct disequilibrium features reflecting partial re-equilibration stages towards lower temperatures estimated to be from 1,050°C to 850°C at 9 to 15 kbar. The presence of similar zoning and exsolution features mainly documented in pyroxenes along with similar maximum and minimum temperatures requires all sampled xenoliths to have undergone the same temperature regime within the upper mantle. The sheared spinel lherzolites from the Sto. Domingo field are interpreted

  12. Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

    2014-04-01

    The San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field (SLPVF) of central Mexico includes volcanic sequences of felsic, intermediate and basic compositions that were erupted as discrete episodes from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Volcanism was dominated by widespread and voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the mid-Tertiary Ignimbrite Flare-up. However, the complete volcanic history must consider basaltic and andesitic Eocene-Pleistocene volcanic successions that provide key evidence for understanding the geochemical evolution of the volcanism in the SLPVF during this time span. Five sequences are recognized according to their geochemical characteristics, each comprising a volcano-tectonic episode. The first episode comprises basaltic andesites and andesites erupted during three intervals, 45-42 Ma, 36-31 Ma, and 31-30 Ma. The oldest was derived from subduction magmatism, whereas the youngest has an intra-plate magmatic signature and this represents the transition from the end of a long lasting subduction regime of the Farallon plate to the initiation of intra-plate continental extension in the North American plate. The second episode, at 29.5-28 Ma, comprises a bimodal succession of high-silica rhyolites and alkaline basalts (hawaiites) that are interpreted as magmatism generated in an intra-plate continental extension regime during the Basin and Range faulting. The third episode, at 21 Ma, is characterized by trachybasalts and trachyandesites that represent mantle basaltic melts that were contaminated through assimilation of the lower crust during advanced stage of intra-plate extension that started at Oligocene. The fourth episode includes 12 Ma alkaline basalts and andesites that were erupted from fissures. These mantle derived magmas evolved to andesites by crustal anatexis and crystal fractionation within a continued, extensional, intra-plate regime. Lastly, the fifth episode comprises 5.0 to 0.6 Ma alkaline basalts (basanites) containing mantle xenoliths, that were erupted

  13. Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Capella, Arthur

    2015-03-04

    The Fayette County Better Buildings Initiative represented a comprehensive and collaborative approach to promoting and implementing energy efficiency improvements. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. The ultimate goal of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative was to implement a total of 1,067 residential energy efficiency retrofits with a minimum 15% estimated energy efficiency savings per unit. Program partners included: United States Department of Energy, Allegheny Power, and Private Industry Council of Westmoreland-Fayette, Fayette County Redevelopment Authority, and various local partners. The program was open to any Fayette County residents who own their home and meet the prequalifying conditions. The level of assistance offered depended upon household income and commitment to undergo a BPI – Certified Audit and implement energy efficiency measures, which aimed to result in at least a 15% reduction in energy usage. The initiative was designed to focus on implementing energy efficiency improvements in residential units, while simultaneously supporting general marketing of the benefits of implementing energy efficiency measures. Additionally, the program had components that involved recruitment and training for employment of persons in the energy sector (green jobs), as well as marketing and implementation of a commercial or community facilities component. The residential component of Fayette County’s Better Buildings Initiative involved a comprehensive approach, providing assistance to low- moderate- and market-rate homeowners. The initiative will also coordinate activities with local utility providers to further incentivize energy efficiency improvements among qualifying homeowners. The commercial component of Fayette County’s Better Building Initiative involved grants

  14. Nolley v. County of Erie.

    PubMed

    1991-10-31

    The U.S. District Court, Western District of New York, held that the Erie County Holding Center (ECHC) had violated an HIV-positive inmate's privacy rights under the U.S. Constitution and the New York Public Health Law by placing red stickers on the inmate's paperwork and belongings, and by segregating her from the general inmate population. The court reasoned that, pursuant to the federal Centers for Disease Control's recommendation that corrections staff take HIV precautions with all inmates, the ECHC's treatment constituted an unjustifiable isolation based solely on her HIV status. The court also held that the ECHC further violated the inmate's constitutional rights by denying her access to the law library and to religious services. Although the court found the inmate's incarceration conditions "deplorable," the conditions did not constitute "cruel and unusual punishment." The court also found no federal Rehabilitation Act violation because the ECHC did not receive federal financial assistance.

  15. Hydrologic conditions: Dade County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kohout, Francis Anthony; Klein, Howard; Sherwood, C.B.; Leach, Stanley D.

    1964-01-01

    Thin layers of dense limestone of low permeability that occur near the top of the Biscayne aquifer in the vicinity of the north end of Levee 30 in Dade County, Florida are of hydrologic importance because they retard the downward infiltration of ponded water in Conservation Area No. 3. This retarding effect frequently results in high head differentials across the levee. Tests made in a small area adjacent to Levee 30 indicate that the coefficient of transmissibility of the aquifer is 3,600,000 gpd (gallons per day) per foot, and the coefficient of vertical permeability of the dense limestones is 13 gpd per square foot. If ground-water flow beneath the levee is laminar, the total inflow to the Levee 30 Canal from Conservation Area No. 3 will be about 350 mgd (million gallons per day), or 540 cfs (cubic feet per second), per mile length of levee when the head difference across the levee is 10 feet.

  16. Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project

    SciTech Connect

    Doon, Ben; Quintana, Dan

    2011-08-25

    The Costilla County Biodiesel Pilot Project has demonstrated the compatibility of biodiesel technology and economics on a local scale. The project has been committed to making homegrown biodiesel a viable form of community economic development. The project has benefited by reducing risks by building the facility gradually and avoiding large initial outlays of money for facilities and technologies. A primary advantage of this type of community-scale biodiesel production is that it allows for a relatively independent, local solution to fuel production. Successfully using locally sourced feedstocks and putting the fuel into local use emphasizes the feasibility of different business models under the biodiesel tent and that there is more than just a one size fits all template for successful biodiesel production.

  17. Computer Technology in Rural Schools: The Case of Mendocino County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoachlander, E. Gareth

    The county education office of Mendocino County, California, serving nine school districts and 11,800 elementary and secondary students, began planning for computers in 1979-1980, purchased two central computers, and by 1983 had one computer or terminal for every 40 students in the county. The county was characterized by its very enthusiastic…

  18. Evaluation of the Union County Alternative to Suspension Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunlap, Joyce Ann

    2010-01-01

    The schools in Union County have undergone a tremendous amount of growth in the past decade. The growth in the county has led to an increase in discipline problems. In order to provide suspended students a second chance, Union County Public Schools implemented an alternative to suspension program, the Union County Alternative to Suspension Program…

  19. 7 CFR 760.902 - Eligible counties and disaster periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Eligible counties and disaster periods. 760.902... § 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods. Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance..., 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are...

  20. 7 CFR 760.902 - Eligible counties and disaster periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Eligible counties and disaster periods. 760.902... § 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods. Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance..., 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are...

  1. 7 CFR 760.902 - Eligible counties and disaster periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Eligible counties and disaster periods. 760.902... § 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods. Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance..., 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are...

  2. 7 CFR 760.902 - Eligible counties and disaster periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Eligible counties and disaster periods. 760.902... § 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods. Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance..., 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are...

  3. 7 CFR 760.902 - Eligible counties and disaster periods.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Eligible counties and disaster periods. 760.902... § 760.902 Eligible counties and disaster periods. Counties are eligible for agricultural assistance..., 2005, and before February 28, 2007. Eligible counties, disaster events, and disaster periods are...

  4. 7 CFR 1230.634 - FSA county office report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Referendum § 1230.634 FSA county office report. The FSA county office will notify the FSA State office of the results of the referendum. Each FSA county office will transmit the results of the referendum in its county to the FSA State office....

  5. 7 CFR 1230.634 - FSA county office report.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... CONSUMER INFORMATION Procedures for the Conduct of Referendum Referendum § 1230.634 FSA county office report. The FSA county office will notify the FSA State office of the results of the referendum. Each FSA county office will transmit the results of the referendum in its county to the FSA State office....

  6. 1918 Influenza: A Winnebago County, Wisconsin Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Shors, Teri; McFadden, Susan H.

    2009-01-01

    The population of Winnebago County in 1918 was approximately 62,000 residents. It consisted of towns supporting diverse manufacturers surrounded by farming country. For this study, records were revisited, and 1918 to 1920 influenza survivors were interviewed. A pharmacological investigation encompassing the various influenza treatments used in Wisconsin from 1918 to 1920 was documented. In 1918, over 180 individuals perished from influenza, and over 2000 cases were reported in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. Influenza returned in 1920, which some researchers refer to as the “fourth wave,” claiming nearly 50 lives in Winnebago County, Wisconsin. This study also documents the 1920 influenza wave. PMID:19889943

  7. Drainage basins in Duval County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Roy B.; Largen, Joseph B.

    1983-01-01

    The drainage basins and subbasins in Duval County, Florida, are delineated on this atlas map. The county 's 840 square-mile area is drained by three major river systems; the St. Johns, 668 square miles; Nassau, 113 square miles; and St. Marys, 59 square miles. The remainder of the county is drained by a network of small streams that flow into either the Intracoastal Waterway or directly into the Atlantic Ocean. The sub-basins range in size from less than one square mile to more than 50 square miles. (USGS)

  8. Tri-county pilot study. [Texas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reeves, C. A. (Principal Investigator); Austin, T. W.; Kerber, A. G.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. An area inventory was performed for three southeast Texas counties (Montgomery, Walker, and San Jacinto) totaling 0.65 million hectares. The inventory was performed using a two level hierarchy. Level 1 was divided into forestland, rangeland, and other land. Forestland was separated into Level 2 categories: pine, hardwood, and mixed; rangeland was not separated further. Results consisted of area statistics for each county and for the entire study site for pine, hardwood, mixed, rangeland, and other land. Color coded county classification maps were produced for the May data set, and procedures were developed and tested.

  9. County/private partnership expedites recycling

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-03-01

    This article describes how Broward County, Florida and Browning-Ferris Industries (Houston, Texas) implemented a highly accelerated recycling project that had a county-wide recycling system fully operational in 180 days. The program is a strong step toward speeding compliance with Florida's mandated 30 percent recycling goal. The 1.2 million citizens in Broward County began recycling materials in dual curbside bins October 1, 1993. Previously, the participating communities all acted autonomously. Minimal volumes of newspaper, aluminum, clear glass, and some plastic were collected by curbsort vehicles and processed at small local recycling centers.

  10. Lea County 001, an H5 chondrite, and Lea County 002, an ungrouped type 3 chondrite

    SciTech Connect

    Zolensky, M.E.; Score, R.; Clayton, R.N.; Mayeda, T.K.; Schutt, J.W. Lockheed Engineering and Sciences Co., Houston, TX Chicago Univ., IL )

    1989-12-01

    A search of active deflation basins near Jal, Lea County, New Mexico resulted in the discovery of two meteorites, Lea County 001 and 002. Lea County 001 has mean olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions of Fa(19) and Fs(17), respectively. These and all other mineralogical and petrological data collected indicate a classification of H5 for this stone. Lea County 002 has mean olivine and low-Ca pyroxene compositions of Fa(2) and Fs(4), and is unequilibrated. Although it is mineralogically most similar to Kakangari and chondritic clasts within Cumberland Falls, the high modal amount of forsterite makes Lea County a unique type 3 chondrite. Oxygen isotope data for Lea County 002 fall on an 0-16-mixing line through those of the enstatite meteorites and IAB irons, a feature shared by Kakangari. 28 refs.

  11. Characteristics of the Las Vegas/Clark County visitor economy

    SciTech Connect

    1988-06-01

    The purpose of this report is to present the results of a review of the Clark County visitor economy and the Clark County visitor. The review, undertaken in support of NWPO`s two objectives mentioned above, addressed a number of topics including performance of the Clark County visitor economy as a generator of employment, earnings and tax base; importance of the Clark County visitor economy to the Nevada economy as a whole; elements of the Clark County visitor economy outside the Las Vegas strip and downtown areas; current trends in the Clark County visitor industry; and indirect economic effects of Clark County casino/hotel purchases.

  12. 78 FR 60686 - Establishment of the Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ... on April 5, 2013 (78 FR 20544), proposing to establish the Big Valley District-Lake County and Kelsey... District-Lake County and Kelsey Bench-Lake County Viticultural Areas and Modification of the Red Hills Lake... approximately 11,000-acre ``Big Valley District-Lake County'' viticultural area and the approximately...

  13. 76 FR 30152 - East Calloway County Middle School Mercury Spill Site, Murray, Calloway County, KY; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-24

    ... AGENCY East Calloway County Middle School Mercury Spill Site, Murray, Calloway County, KY; Notice of... response costs concerning the East Calloway County Middle School Mercury Spill Site located in Murray... Site name East Calloway County ] Middle School Mercury Spill Site by one of the following methods:...

  14. 75 FR 49016 - County of Greenville, S.C.-Acquisition Exemption-Greenville County Economic Development Corporation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... Greenville County Economic Development Corporation (GCEDC) approximately 11.8 miles of rail line between... accordance with the National Trails System Act, 16 U.S.C. 1247(d). See Greenville County Economic Development... Surface Transportation Board County of Greenville, S.C.--Acquisition Exemption--Greenville County...

  15. 69. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 ROAD MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1931 by C.L. Wood, the county engineer. Updated through the mid-1930s to show new federal aid-state roads. Compares modern system with older county system. Original scale: 1 in. to 1 mi. Property of Helen (Mrs. Sam L.) Crawford, Hamilton, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  16. Multipurpose Centers in a Rural County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Norris, Jean

    1978-01-01

    Describes services, programs, and funding for the various senior centers in Frankin County, New York, which has a predominately rural, low-income population. Services include bus transportation, nutrition programs, health and financial assistance, and social events. (MF)

  17. Model county ordinance for wind projects

    SciTech Connect

    Bain, D.A.

    1997-12-31

    Permitting is a crucial step in the development cycle of a wind project and permits affect the timing, cost, location, feasibility, layout, and impacts of wind projects. Counties often have the lead responsibility for permitting yet few have appropriate siting regulations for wind projects. A model ordinance allows a county to quickly adopt appropriate permitting procedures. The model county wind ordinance developed for use by northwest states is generally applicable across the country and counties seeking to adopt siting or zoning regulations for wind will find it a good starting place. The model includes permitting procedures for wind measurement devices and two types of wind systems. Both discretionary and nondiscretionary standards apply to wind systems and a conditional use permit would be issued. The standards, criteria, conditions for approval, and process procedures are defined for each. Adaptation examples for the four northwest states are provided along with a model Wind Resource Overlay Zone.

  18. Surface-water availability, Tuscaloosa County, Alabama

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knight, Alfred L.; Davis, Marvin E.

    1975-01-01

    The average annual runoff, about 1,270 mgd (million gallons per day), originating in Tuscaloosa County is equivalent to 20 inches or 0.95 mgd per square mile. The Black Warrior and Sipsey Rivers, the largest streams in the county, have average flows of 5,230 mgd and 580 mgd, respectively, where they leave the county, and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 150 mgd and 35 mgd, respectively. North River, Big Sandy Creek, and Hurricane Creek have average flows in excess of 100 mgd and median annual 7-day low flows in excess of 2 mgd. Surface water generally contains less than 100 mg/l (milligrams per liter) dissolved solids, less than 10 mg/l chloride, and is soft to moderately hard. Streams having the higher hardness and the higher dissolved-solids content are in eastern Tuscaloosa County.

  19. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    ScienceCinema

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

    2016-07-12

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  20. Environmental assessment: Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    In February 1983, the US Department of Energy (DOE) identified a location in Deaf Smith County, Texas, as one of the nine potentially acceptable sites for mined geologic repository for spent nuclear fuel and high-level radioactive waste. To determine their suitability, the Deaf Smith County site and eight other potentially acceptable sites have been evaluated in accordance with the DOE's General Guidelines for the Recommendation of Sites for the Nuclear Waste Repositories. The Deaf Smith County site is in the Permian Basin, which is one of five distinct geohydrologic settings considered for the first repository. On the basis of the evaluations reported in this EA, the DOE has found that the Deaf Smith County site is not disqualified under the guidelines.

  1. Charging Up in King County, Washington

    SciTech Connect

    Constantine, Dow; Oliver, LeAnn; Inslee, Jay; Sahandy, Sheida; Posthuma, Ron; Morrison, David

    2011-01-01

    King County, Washington is spearheading a regional effort to develop a network of electric vehicle charging stations. It is also improving its vehicle fleet and made significant improvements to a low-income senior housing development.

  2. A Seniors' Program for Beaver County

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taylor, Donald F.

    1973-01-01

    Programs for seniors are needed, according to the assistant director of continuing education at the Community College of Beaver County (Pennsylvania); the question revolves around who will pay. (Editor)

  3. 7 CFR 718.8 - Administrative county.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... MARKETING QUOTAS, ACREAGE ALLOTMENTS, AND PRODUCTION ADJUSTMENT PROVISIONS APPLICABLE TO MULTIPLE PROGRAMS... located in the county where the principal dwelling is situated, or where the major portion of the farm...

  4. Environmental assessment, Deaf Smith County site, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-01

    The Nuclear Waste Policy Act of 1982 (42 USC sections 10101-10226) requires the environmental assessment of a proposed site to include a statement of the basis for nominating a site as suitable for characterization. Volume 2 provides a detailed statement evaluating the site suitability of the Deaf Smith County Site under DOE siting guidelines, as well as a comparison of the Deaf Smith County Site to the other sites under consideration. The evaluation of the Deaf Smith County Site is based on the impacts associated with the reference repository design, but the evaluation will not change if based on the Mission Plan repository concept. The second part of this document compares the Deaf Smith County Site to Davis Canyon, Hanford, Richton Dome and Yucca Mountain. This comparison is required under DOE guidelines and is not intended to directly support subsequent recommendation of three sites for characterization as candidate sites. 259 refs., 29 figs., 66 refs. (MHB)

  5. Hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Baldwin, J.A.; Rankin, D.R.

    1995-01-01

    The hydrogeology of Cibola County, New Mexico, was evaluated to determine the occurrence, availability, and quality of ground-water resources. Rocks of Precambrian through Quaternary age are present in Cibola County. Most rocks are sedimentary in origin except for Precambrian igneous and metamorphic rocks exposed in the Zuni Uplift and Tertiary and Quaternary basalts in northern and central parts of the county. The most productive aquifers in the county include (youngest to oldest) Quaternary deposits, sandstones in the Mesaverde Group, the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer, the Westwater Canyon aquifer, the Todilto- Entrada aquifer, sandstone beds in the Chinle Formation, and the San Andres-Glorieta aquifer. Unconsolidated sand, silt, and gravel form a mantle ranging from a few inches to 150 to 200 feet over much of the bedrock in Cibola County. Well yields range from 5 to 1,110 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water range from 200 to more than 5,200 milligrams per liter. Calcium, magnesium, bicarbonate, and sulfate are the predominant ions in ground water in alluvial material. The Mesaverde Group mainly occurs in three areas of the county. Well yields range from less than 1 to 12 gallons per minute. The predominant ions in water from wells in the Mesaverde Group are calcium, sodium, and bicarbonate. The transition from calcium-predominant to sodium-predominant water in the southwestern part of the county likely is a result of ion exchange. Wells completed in the Dakota-Zuni-Bluff aquifer yield from 1 to 30 gallons per minute. Dissolved-solids concentrations range from 220 to 2,000 milligrams per liter in water from 34 wells in the western part of the county. Predominant ions in the ground water include calcium, sodium, sulfate, and bicarbonate. Calcium predominates in areas where the aquifer is exposed at the surface or is overlain with alluvium. Sandstones in the Chinle Formation yield from 10 to 300 gallons per minute to wells in the Grants

  6. SOLAR PANELS ON HUDSON COUNTY FACILITIES

    SciTech Connect

    BARRY, KEVIN

    2014-06-06

    This project involved the installation of an 83 kW grid-connected photovoltaic system tied into the energy management system of Hudson County's new 60,000 square foot Emergency Operations and Command Center and staff offices. Other renewable energy features of the building include a 15 kW wind turbine, geothermal heating and cooling, natural daylighting, natural ventilation, gray water plumbing system and a green roof. The County intends to seek Silver LEED certification for the facility.

  7. The Water Cycle in Volusia County

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    German, Edward R.

    2009-01-01

    Earth's water is always in motion. The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the continuous movement of water on, above, and below the Earth's surface. This fact sheet provides information about how much water moves into and out of Volusia County, and where it is stored. It also illustrates the seasonal variation in water quantity and movement using data from some of the hydrologic data collection sites in or near Volusia County, Florida.

  8. Geochemistry and petrology of spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico: Partial melting and mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yan; Elthon, Don

    1990-09-01

    Spinel Iherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, are divided into two distinct groups according to their major element and trace element characteristics. Group Ia xenoliths are characterized by light rare earth element (LREE) depletion ((La/Lu)N = 0.10-0.77 in clinopyroxene) and linear major and compatible trace element relationships. Group Ib xenoliths are characterized by FeO and Na2O enrichment and higher (La/Lu)N ratios (0.80-4.1 in clinopyroxene) and complex major element relationships. These samples, which have a range of equilibrium temperatures of 910°-1070°C, exhibit protogranular textures and typical orthopyroxene+clinopyroxene+spinel clusters. Modal abundances and chemical compositions of the group Ia xenoliths vary from primitive (15.2% clinopyroxene, 38.5% MgO, 1824 ppm Ni) to moderately depleted (6.4-8.7% clinopyroxene, 43.8-44.1% MgO, 2192 ppm Ni). Systematic variations of major elements and compatible trace elements in the group Ia xenoliths are interpreted to result from various degrees (<25%) of partial melting and melt extraction, followed by subsolidus equilibration and annealing. The extracted melts have a range of compositions similar to picritic basalts. Abundances of moderately incompatible trace elements, Sc and Cr, in the group Ia minerals have been substantially redistributed during subsolidus equilibration. In a few of these xenoliths there appears to be vestiges of incipient metasomatism, but metasomatism has not substantially influenced the group as a whole. Group Ib xenoliths have been substantially influenced by metasomatic processes. The ∑FeO and Na2O contents of the cores of clinopyroxenes in group Ib xenoliths are higher than clinopyroxenes in group Ia samples. The higher La contents and La/Lu ratios in group Ib clinopyroxenes (compared to group Ia), together with this FeO and Na2O enrichment, suggest that equilibration of basanites with residual mantle has been a major process in the evolution

  9. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria

  10. Biotelemetry data for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in coastal southern California, November 2014–February 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Sebes, Jeremy B.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd Eli; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-01-01

    The status of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in coastal southern California is unclear. To address this knowledge gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with local, State, and other Federal agencies began a multi-year survey and tracking program of golden eagles to address questions regarding habitat use, movement behavior, nest occupancy, genetic population structure, and human impacts on eagles. Golden eagle trapping and tracking efforts began in October 2014 and continued until early March 2015. During the first trapping season that focused on San Diego County, we captured 13 golden eagles (8 females and 5 males). During the second trapping season that began in November 2015, we focused on trapping sites in San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties. By February 23, 2016, we captured an additional 14 golden eagles (7 females and 7 males). In this report, biotelemetry data were collected between November 22, 2014, and February 23, 2016. The location data for eagles ranged as far north as San Luis Obispo, California, and as far south as La Paz, Baja California, Mexico.

  11. Geologic and geophysical maps of the eastern three-fourths of the Cambria 30' x 60' quadrangle, central California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Graymer, R.W.; Langenheim, V.E.; Roberts, M.A.; McDougall, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    The Cambria 30´ x 60´ quadrangle comprises southwestern Monterey County and northwestern San Luis Obispo County. The land area includes rugged mountains of the Santa Lucia Range extending from the northwest to the southeast part of the map; the southern part of the Big Sur coast in the northwest; broad marine terraces along the southwest coast; and broadvalleys, rolling hills, and modest mountains in the northeast. This report contains geologic, gravity anomaly, and aeromagnetic anomaly maps of the eastern three-fourths of the 1:100,000-scale Cambria quadrangle and the associated geologic and geophysical databases (ArcMap databases), as well as complete descriptions of the geologic map units and the structural relations in the mapped area. A cross section is based on both the geologic map and potential-field geophysical data. The maps are presented as an interactive, multilayer PDF, rather than more traditional pre-formatted map-sheet PDFs. Various geologic, geophysical, paleontological, and base map elements are placed on separate layers, which allows the user to combine elements interactively to create map views beyond the traditional map sheets. Four traditional map sheets (geologic map, gravity map, aeromagnetic map, paleontological locality map) are easily compiled by choosing the associated data layers or by choosing the desired map under Bookmarks.

  12. Biotelemetry data for golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) captured in coastal southern California, November 2014–February 2016

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracey, Jeff A.; Madden, Melanie C.; Sebes, Jeremy B.; Bloom, Peter H.; Katzner, Todd Eli; Fisher, Robert N.

    2016-04-21

    The status of golden eagles (Aquila chrysaetos) in coastal southern California is unclear. To address this knowledge gap, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in collaboration with local, State, and other Federal agencies began a multi-year survey and tracking program of golden eagles to address questions regarding habitat use, movement behavior, nest occupancy, genetic population structure, and human impacts on eagles. Golden eagle trapping and tracking efforts began in October 2014 and continued until early March 2015. During the first trapping season that focused on San Diego County, we captured 13 golden eagles (8 females and 5 males). During the second trapping season that began in November 2015, we focused on trapping sites in San Diego, Orange, and western Riverside Counties. By February 23, 2016, we captured an additional 14 golden eagles (7 females and 7 males). In this report, biotelemetry data were collected between November 22, 2014, and February 23, 2016. The location data for eagles ranged as far north as San Luis Obispo, California, and as far south as La Paz, Baja California, Mexico.

  13. The flora of Oktibbeha County, Mississippi

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Leidolf, A.; McDaniel, S.; Nuttle, T.

    2002-01-01

    We surveyed the flora of Oktibbeha County, Mississippi, U.S.A., from February 1994 to 1996. Occupying 118 square kilometers in east-central Mississippi, Oktibbeha County lies among 3 physiographic regions that include, from west to east, Interior Flatwoods, Pontotoc Ridge, and Black Prairie. Accordingly, the county harbors a diverse flora. Based on field work, as well as an extensive review of published literature and herbarium records at IBE and MISSA, we recorded a total of 1,148 taxa (1,125 species, 7 hybrids, 16 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 514 genera in 160 families, over 85% of all taxa documented were native. Compared to 3 other counties in east-central Mississippi, Oktibbeha County has the second largest recorded flora. The number of state-listed (endangered, threatened, or of special concern) taxa (67) documented in this survey far exceeds that reported from any other county in the region. Three introduced species, Ilex cornuta Lindl. & Paxton, Mahonia bealei (Fortune) Carrie??re, and Nandina domestica Thunb., are reported in a naturalized state for the first time from Mississippi. We also describe 16 different plant communities belonging to 5 broad habitat categories: bottomland forests, upland forests and prairies, aquatic habitats, seepage areas, and human-influenced habitats. A detailed description of the vegetation associated with each of these communities is provided.

  14. Water resources of Carbon County, Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bartos, Timothy T.; Hallberg, Laura L.; Mason, Jon P.; Norris, Jodi R.; Miller, Kirk A.

    2006-01-01

    Carbon County is located in the south-central part of Wyoming and is the third largest county in the State. A study to describe the physical and chemical characteristics of surface-water and ground-water resources in Carbon County was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Wyoming State Engineer's Office. Evaluations of streamflow and stream-water quality were limited to analyses of historical data and descriptions of previous investigations. Surface-water data were not collected as part of the study. Forty-five ground-water-quality samples were collected as part of the study and the results from an additional 618 historical ground-water-quality samples were reviewed. Available hydrogeologic characteristics for various aquifers in hydrogeologic units throughout the county also are described. Flow characteristics of streams in Carbon County vary substantially depending on regional and local basin char-acteristics and anthropogenic factors. Precipitation in the county is variable with high mountainous areas receiving several times the annual precipitation of basin lowland areas. For this reason, streams with headwaters in mountainous areas generally are perennial, whereas most streams in the county with headwaters in basin lowland areas are ephemeral, flowing only as a result of regional or local rainfall or snowmelt runoff. Flow characteristics of most perennial streams are altered substantially by diversions and regulation. Water-quality characteristics of selected streams in and near Carbon County during water years 1966 through 1986 varied. Concentrations of dissolved constituents and suspended sediment were smallest at sites on streams with headwaters in mountainous areas because of resistant geologic units, large diluting streamflows, and increased vegetative cover compared to sites on streams with headwaters in basin lowlands. Both water-table and artesian conditions occur in aquifers within the county. Shallow ground water is

  15. The Bridge of Mandolin County

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lantz, Juliette M.; Feindt, Jenny E.; Lewellyn, Eric P. B.; Walczak, Mary M.

    1999-12-01

    The Bridge of Mandolin County is a case designed to teach the general chemistry principles of molar mass, ions and aqueous reactions, solubility rules, and inorganic nomenclature. Through the instructor-facilitated class discussion, students consider the options before the Mandolin Town Council regarding deicing the newly constructed bridge connecting Mandolin with a large nearby city. The students must decipher contradictory claims made on behalf of sodium chloride, the traditional deicer, and calcium magnesium acetate, a new environmentally friendly deicer, to arrive at the most cost-effective and environmentally appropriate deicing product. As they work through the analysis they raise questions that can be addressed in a laboratory setting. Four optional role-playing experiments are included, which can be used by the students to gather information helpful to resolution of the case. The case is intended to be used over two class periods, with a laboratory period in between, though suggestions for other models are provided. Laboratory procedures include an EDTA titration for Ca2+ and Mg2+, a gravimetric analysis, a qualitative examination of ions and solubility, an introduction to freezing point depression and measurement, and an experimental design activity. This case can also successfully be used without alteration in non-majors chemistry or environmental chemistry courses, or upper-level analytical or environmental chemistry courses.

  16. Constraints of Implementing Free Secondary Education in Mandera West Sub-County, Mandera County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adan, Mohammed Abdi; Orodho, John Aluko

    2015-01-01

    This study sought to find out the constraints of implementing free secondary education (FSE) in secondary schools in Mandera West Sub-County, Mandera County, Kenya. The study is based on the theory of constraints as the researcher examines the factors constraining the achievement of FSE objectives. The study used the survey design. The main…

  17. Coping with Resource Management Challenges in Mumias Sub-County, Kakamega County, Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anyango, Onginjo Rose; Orodho, John Aluko

    2016-01-01

    The gist of the study was to examine the main coping strategies used to manage resources in public secondary schools in Mumias Sub-County, Kakamega County, Kenya. The study was premised on Hunts (2007) theory on project management. A descriptive survey design was adopted. A combination of purposive and simple random sampling techniques were used…

  18. 75 FR 31463 - Comal County Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Comal County, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-03

    ... Federal Register on October 16, 2008 (73 FR 61433). A public scoping meeting was held on December 4, 2008... Fish and Wildlife Service Comal County Regional Habitat Conservation Plan, Comal County, TX AGENCY... statement, draft habitat conservation plan, and permit application; announcement of a public...

  19. How Are Kentucky's Children Stacking Up? A County by County Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandler, Betsy

    In a county by county analysis, this report assesses the quality of life for Kentucky's children. Researchers developed a child quotient (CQ) based on 18 indicators: per capita income, children in poverty, women receiving inadequate prenatal care, infant deaths, teens giving birth, substandard dwellings, children in foster care, per-pupil…

  20. The Need for a Branch Campus of Ocean County College in Southern Ocean County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parrish, Richard M.; Harris, David W.

    A study was conducted to determine the feasibility of establishing a branch campus of Ocean County College (OCC) in southern Ocean County, New Jersey. Specific variables examined during the study included demographic characteristics; transportation systems, in terms of both public access and roadway networks; land usage; the history of education…

  1. 76 FR 4254 - Irish Potatoes Grown in Certain Designated Counties in Idaho, and Malheur County, Oregon...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Designated Counties in Idaho, and Malheur County, Oregon; Continuance Referendum AGENCY: Agricultural Marketing Service, USDA. ACTION: Referendum order. SUMMARY: This document directs that a referendum be... handling of Irish potatoes grown in the production area. DATES: The referendum will be conducted from...

  2. Beginnings of geothermal impact on county population and leadership, Imperial County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Pick, J.B.; Butler, E.W.

    1980-09-01

    A major geothermal energy development scenario is about to begin in Imperial County. Initial energy-socioeconomic interactions in the areas of population and county leadership structure are discussed. These include immigration of energy company workers, a sewage plant dispute, conflict over union affiliation of geothermal laborers, and a transmission corridor routing dispute.

  3. Youth Representation on County Government Committees: Youth in Governance in Kenosha County, Wisconsin

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calvert, Matthew; de Montmollin, John; Winnett, Tedi

    2015-01-01

    The Kenosha County Youth in Governance program was created to build leadership skills and civic engagement opportunities for high school-aged students by placing two youth representatives on each of the Kenosha County Board of Supervisors standing committees. In reviewing data from 3 years of youth participants, the program was effective in…

  4. [Agreement between the Cumberland County College Board of Trustees and the Cumberland County College Faculty Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumberland County Coll., Vineland, NJ.

    This document presents the agreement between the Cumberland County College Board of Trustees and the Cumberland County College Faculty Association. Articles of the agreement cover recognition; negotiation procedure; association rights and responsibilities; conditions of employment; faculty benefits; salaries; compensation for graduate work;…

  5. Citrus County Schools Copyright Guidelines Recommended by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Citrus County School District, Inverness, FL.

    This document contains copyright guidelines determined appropriate for the Citrus County School System (Florida) by the Citrus County Association of School Media Specialists in May, 1992. These guidelines are based on interpretation and understanding of current copyright law as applied to education and implemented in school districts in the United…

  6. Geology of Griggs and Steele Counties

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bluemle, John P.

    1975-01-01

    Griggs and Steele Counties, located at the eastern edge of the Williston basin, are underlain by 400 to 2,600 feet of Paleozoic and Mesozoic rocks that dip gently to the west. The Cretaceous Greenhorn, Carlile, Niobrara, and Pierre Formations lie directly beneath the glacial drift, and shale of the Pierre Formation is exposed in several places along the Sheyenne River. The Pleistocene Coleharbor Formation, which covers most of the area, consists mainly of glacial, fluvial, and lake sediment. The Coleharbor Formation averages 200 to 300 feet thick, but it is as much as 550 feet thick in some of the buried valleys. The Holocene Walsh Formation occurs in parts of the area, chiefly sloughs and river bottomland. It consists mainly of alluvial and eolian sediment. Griggs County and the western two-thirds of Steele County are part of the Drift Prairie, which is characterized by flat to gently rolling topography that is rugged in areas of end moraines and intense ice thrusting, subdued on the ground moraine and outwash plains. Associated with these major landforms are numerous washboard moraines, drumlins, eskers, kames, meltwater trenches, and water-washed areas. The eastern third of Steele County is a nearly flat area covered by lake deposits of the glacial Lake Agassiz. As the Late Wisconsinan glacier in eastern North Dakota thinned and receded eastward, it was increasingly affected by the topography over which it was flowing. This resulted in lobation of the glacier. Locally intense areas of thrusting developed within the lobate glacier, and large blocks of subglacial material were moved short distances. Large areas of Griggs County were washed by water flowing from the glacier, and in some areas gravel and sand were deposited. Continued withdrawal of the glacier resulted in ponding of melt water in parts of the two counties. These and other ponds tended to coalesce at lower and lower elevations, eventually forming Lake Agassiz, which flooded part of eastern Steele

  7. Ground water in Creek County, Oklahoma

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cady, Richard Carlysle

    1937-01-01

    Creek County has been designated as a problem area by the Land Use Planning Section of the Resettlement Administration. Some of the earliest oil fields to brought into production were situated in and near this county, and new fields have been opened from time to time during the ensuing years. The production of the newer fields, however, has not kept pace with the exhaustion of the older fields, and the county now presents an excellent picture of the problems involved in adjusting a population to lands that are nearly depleted of their mineral wealth. Values of land have been greatly depressed; tax collection is far in arrears; tenancy is widespread; and in addition more people will apparently be forced to depend on the income from agriculture than the land seems capable of supporting. The county as a whole is at best indifferently suitable for general farming. The Land Use planning Section proposes to study the present and seemingly immanent maladjustments of population to the resources of the land, and make recommendations for their correction. The writer was detailed to the Land Use Planning Section of Region VIII for the purposes of making studies of ground water problems in the region. In Creek County two investigations were made. In September, 1936, the writer spent about ten days investigating the availability of ground water for the irrigation of garden crops during drouths. If it proved feasible to do this generally throughout the county, the Land Use Planning Section might be able to encourage this practice. The second investigation made by the writer was in regard to the extent to which ground water supplies have been damaged by oil well brines. He was in county for four days late in January 1937, and again in March, 1937. During part of the second field trip he was accompanied by R.M. Dixon, sanitary engineer of the Water Utilization Unit of the Resettlement Administration. (available as photostat copy only)

  8. [Seroprevalence, clinical and biochemical data of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania and phlebotominae sandfly fauna in an endemic area in São Luis Island, Maranhão State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia; Lima, Tiago B; De Macedo, Auricélio A; Moraes-Júnior, Felipe De Jesus; Dias, Elaine L; Batista, Zulmira Da S; Calabrese, Katia Da S; Moraes, Jorge Luiz P; Rebêlo, José Manuel M; Guerra, Rita Maria S N De C

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence, clinical and biochemical profile of Leishmania chagasi infection in dogs naturally infected and identify the phlebotominae fauna in an endemic area of São Luis Island. In this present study, 62 household mongrel dogs were sampled for antibodies anti-Leishmania. The seroprevalence was 51.61%. In the clinical evaluation, 36.68% dogs were symptomatic, 38.41% were oligosymptomatic and 26.13% were asymptomatic. The most frequent signs were onychogryphosis and lymphadenomegaly. In 29.41% animals were observed anemia. In the biochemical analysis hepatic function showed changes in relation to alaninoaminotransferase (ALT) and aspartato aminotransferase (AST). Urea values were higher than the references ones for canine specie. The following phlebotominae sandflies were identified: Lutzomyia longipalpis (86.9%), L. evandroi (9.6%), L. choti (2.1%), L. umbratilis (0.7%) e L. whitmani (0.7%).

  9. Water resources of King County, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Richardson, Donald; Bingham, J.W.; Madison, R.J.; Williams, R.

    1968-01-01

    Although the total supply of water in King County is large, water problems are inevitable because of the large and rapidly expanding population. The county contains a third of the 3 million people in Washington, most of the population being concentrated in the Seattle metropolitan area. King County includes parts of two major physiographic features: the western area is part of the Puget Sound Lowland, and the eastern area is part of the Cascade Range. In these two areas, the terrain, weather, and natural resources (including water) contrast markedly. Average annual precipitation in the county is about 80 inches, ranging from about 30 inches near Puget Sound to more than 150 inches in parts of the Cascades. Annual evapotranspiration is estimated to range from 15 to 24 inches. Average annual runoff ranges from about 15 inches in the lowlands to more than 100 inches in the mountains. Most of the streamflow is in the major basins of the county--the Green-Duwamish, Lake Washington, and Snoqualmie basins. The largest of these is the Snoqualmie River basin (693 square miles), where average annual runoff during the period 1931-60 was about 79 inches. During the same period, annual runoff in the Lake Washington basin ( 607 square miles) averaged about 32 inches, and in the Green-Duwamish River basin (483 square miles), about 46 inches. Seasonal runoff is generally characterized by several high-flow periods in the winter, medium flows in the spring, and sustained low flows in the summer and fall. When floods occur in the county they come almost exclusively between October and March. The threat of flood damage is greatest on the flood plaits of the larger rivers, but in the Green-Duwamish Valley the threat was greatly reduced with the completion of Howard A. Hanson Dam in 1962. In the Snoqualmie River basin, where no such dam exists, the potential damage from a major flood increases each year as additional land is developed in the Snoqualmie Valley. 0nly moderate amounts of

  10. Dutchess County Resource Recovery Task Force report: Dutchess County Pyrolysis Program

    SciTech Connect

    1980-07-01

    Dutchess County initiated development of a long-range master plan for Solid Waste Management in 1971. The plan included development of a resource recovery facility to service the municipalities in the County population center. Based on early recommendations, a pyrolysis facility employing Purox technology was to be implemented. A feasibility study, paid for by County funds was completed in 1975. The study provided siting recommendations, estimation of available waste, and preliminary facility design. Because of various considerations, the project was not developed. Under the Department of Energy grant, the County reassessed the feasibility of a resource recovery facility, with emphasis on confirming previous conclusions supporting the Purox technology, waste availability, energy recovery and sale and siting of the plant. The conclusions reached in the new study were: a resource recovery facility is feasible for the County; sufficient waste for such a facility is available and subject to control; While Purox technology was feasible it is not the most appropriate available technoloy for the County; that mass burning with steam recovery is the most appropriate technology; and that resource recovery while presently more expensive than landfilling, represents the only cost effective, energy efficient, and environmentally sound way to handle the solid waste problem in the County.

  11. Selenium status of Utah County residents

    SciTech Connect

    Bown, J.W.; Christensen, M.J.

    1986-03-01

    Counties of low and high soil selenium (Se) content appear to be in close proximity in the state of Utah. The Se status of Utah County residents was evaluated by measurement of plasma Se concentration, and plasma, platelet, and erythrocyte (RBC) Se-glutathione peroxidase (Se-GSH-Px) activity. A Random Digit Dialing procedure was employed to stratify subjects according to sex and annual income (< $10,000, $10-20,000, > $20,000) in a 2 x 3 factorial design, 7 subjects per cell. There were no significant differences due to sex or income. These results suggest (1) the Se status of Utah County residents is similar to that reported for residents of other regions in the US, and (2) no special consideration for income or gender need be made in surveys of population groups to determine Se status.

  12. Acute Rheumatic Fever in Los Angeles County

    PubMed Central

    Propp, Richard P.

    1965-01-01

    There was a general downward trend in the reported incidence of acute rheumatic fever in Los Angeles County during the years 1954-1963. A survey of hospital records in five large hospitals in 1962 revealed 100 cases diagnosed, 39 of which were reported. Diagnoses in the charts reviewed conformed to the Modified Jones Criteria. Most of the patients were born in Los Angeles County. Mortality rates for acute rheumatic fever during the same period were greatly in excess of those expected from the reported morbidity. The mean crude mortality rate for the period concerned was higher than for New York City, although not as high as for Boston. Acute rheumatic fever appears to constitute a health problem in need of review in Los Angeles County. PMID:5834286

  13. Day Fire in Ventura County

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated Version

    The Day fire has been burning in Ventura County in Southern California since Labor Day, and has consumed more than 160,000 acres. As of September 29, it was 63 percent contained. The Advanced Spaceborne Thermal Emission and Reflection Radiometer on NASA's Terra satellite flew over the fire at 10 p.m. Pacific Time on September 28, and imaged the fire with its infrared camera. The hottest areas of active burning appear as red spots on the image. The blue-green background is a daytime image acquired in June, used as a background to allow firefighters to localize the hot spots.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop stress; determining cloud morphology and physical properties; wetlands evaluation; thermal pollution monitoring; coral reef degradation; surface temperature mapping of soils and geology; and measuring surface heat balance.

    The U.S. science team is located at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. The Terra mission is part of NASA's Science Mission directorate.

    Size: 22.5 by 31.0 kilometers (12.6 by 15.2 miles) Location: 34

  14. Energy Efficient Buildings, Salt Lake County, Utah

    SciTech Connect

    Barnett, Kimberly

    2012-04-30

    Executive Summary Salt Lake County's Solar Photovoltaic Project - an unprecedented public/private partnership Salt Lake County is pleased to announce the completion of its unprecedented solar photovoltaic (PV) installation on the Calvin R. Rampton Salt Palace Convention Center. This 1.65 MW installation will be one the largest solar roof top installations in the country and will more than double the current installed solar capacity in the state of Utah. Construction is complete and the system will be operational in May 2012. The County has accomplished this project using a Power Purchase Agreement (PPA) financing model. In a PPA model a third-party solar developer will finance, develop, own, operate, and maintain the solar array. Salt Lake County will lease its roof, and purchase the power from this third-party under a long-term Power Purchase Agreement contract. In fact, this will be one of the first projects in the state of Utah to take advantage of the recent (March 2010) legislation which makes PPA models possible for projects of this type. In addition to utilizing a PPA, this solar project will employ public and private capital, Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grants (EECBG), and public/private subsidized bonds that are able to work together efficiently because of the recent stimulus bill. The project also makes use of recent changes to federal tax rules, and the recent re-awakening of private capital markets that make a significant public-private partnership possible. This is an extremely innovative project, and will mark the first time that all of these incentives (EECBG grants, Qualified Energy Conservation Bonds, New Markets tax credits, investment tax credits, public and private funds) have been packaged into one project. All of Salt Lake County's research documents and studies, agreements, and technical information is available to the public. In addition, the County has already shared a variety of information with the public through webinars

  15. 51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    51. Photographer unknown 1930 HUMBOLDT COUNTY, SECTION A, HIGHWAY 1. 1-HUM-1-A #101, MEASURING BETWEEN TREES, 1930. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  16. 44. Photographer unknown Date unknown MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION, HIGHWAY 1. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. Photographer unknown Date unknown MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION, HIGHWAY 1. 1-MEN-1-I #9, MOVING CAMP. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  17. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Ward Nos. 210 & 211 - Type B Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Laurel Street, Flores Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  18. Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Los Angeles County Poor Farm, Patient Wards 201, 202, 203, 204, 205, 206, 207, 208 & 209 - Type A Plan, 7601 Imperial Highway; bounded by Esperanza Street, Hawthorn Avenue, Laurel Street, and Descanso Street, Downey, Los Angeles County, CA

  19. 76 FR 45770 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-01

    ... Forest Service Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Red Bluff, California... comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino...

  20. 76 FR 28729 - Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-18

    ... Forest Service Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Tehama County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will meet in Red Bluff, California... comments. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Randy Jero, Committee Coordinator, USDA, Mendocino...

  1. 22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alameda County Recorder Office Map ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Historic American Buildings Survey Alameda County Recorder Office Map Book 6, page 17 October 1960 SURVEY OF 1868 - Mission San Jose de Guadalupe, Mission & Washington Boulevards, Fremont, Alameda County, CA

  2. 20. Photocopy of photograph (from the Bucks County Historical Society) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (from the Bucks County Historical Society) photographer and date unknown GENERAL VIEW FROM THE SOUTHWEST - Moravian Pottery & Tile Works, Southwest side of State Route 313 (Swamp Road), Northwest of East Court Street, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  3. 26. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) HEADER BUILDING, ELEVATIONS OF WEST SIDE ON COL LINE AH AND AP, 1920 - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Factory Building, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  4. 27. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) FACTORY BUILDING, PLAN OF FLOOR B, 1928, NOTE OPEN COURTS - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Factory Building, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  5. 5. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) FIRST FLOOR PLAN, BOILER AND POWER HOUSE, 1922 - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Power House, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  6. 28. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) FACTORY BUILDING, PLAN OF FLOOR B, MACHINERY LAYOUT, 1943, NOTE INFILLED COURTS - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Factory Building, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  7. 25. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) COURT 4, SECTION BETWEEN COLS. 51 AND 52, LOOKING NORTH, NOTE MONITOR WINDOW, 1920 - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Factory Building, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  8. Photocopy of drawing (original In possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original In possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) WELL WATER RESERVOIR, 1926 - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Cooling Tower, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  9. Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of drawing (original in possession of Allegany County, Cumberland, MD) CEMENT HOUSE FLOOR PLAN, 1942 - Kelly-Springfield Tire Plant, Cement House, 701 Kelly Road, Cumberland, Allegany County, MD

  10. 75 FR 14124 - Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hamilton, Montana....

  11. 76 FR 16725 - Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hamilton, Montana....

  12. 76 FR 12691 - Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hamilton, Montana....

  13. 76 FR 31297 - Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-31

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. ] SUMMARY: The Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hamilton, Montana....

  14. 76 FR 21701 - Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Ravalli County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Hamilton, Montana....

  15. 15. Photocopy of photograph (from Chester County Historical Society) ca. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (from Chester County Historical Society) ca. 1905, photographer unknown NORTH REAR - John Chad House, State Route 100, U.S. Route 1 vicinity, Chadds Ford, Delaware County, PA

  16. 17. Photocopy of photograph (source uncertain; probably the Bucks County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (source uncertain; probably the Bucks County Historical Society) ca. 1913, photographer unknown SHOWING 1904 SOCIETY HEADQUARTERS AND THE EARLY PHASES OF CONSTRUCTION ON MERCER'S ADDITION - Mercer Museum, Pine & Ashland Streets, Doylestown, Bucks County, PA

  17. GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    GENERAL SITE PLAN, HAMILTON AIR FORCE BASE, MARIN COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. Pencil on paper, dated December 4, 1952. Also marked "PWC 103474." By J.Y. Long Company, Engineers, Oakland, California - Hamilton Field, East of Nave Drive, Novato, Marin County, CA

  18. 75 FR 52804 - Environmental Impact Statement: Stanislaus County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-27

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement: Stanislaus County, CA AGENCY: Federal... Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared for a proposed highway project in Stanislaus County... subsequent environmental documentation for project-specific impacts. Letters describing the proposed...

  19. 75 FR 62627 - Environmental Impact Statement; Davis County, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Highway Administration Environmental Impact Statement; Davis County, UT AGENCY: Federal Highway... that an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) will be prepared for proposed transportation improvements in Davis County, Utah. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Edward Woolford, Environmental...

  20. 48. Photographer unknown February 1925 MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION K, HIGHWAY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. Photographer unknown February 1925 MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION K, HIGHWAY 1. 1-MEN-1-K #39, LOG GUARD RAIL, 2-25. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  1. 8. VIEW OF YOLO COUNTY ELEVATION, LOOKING EASTSOUTHEAST TOWARD SACRAMENTO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. VIEW OF YOLO COUNTY ELEVATION, LOOKING EAST-SOUTHEAST TOWARD SACRAMENTO, ALONG CENTERLINE OF STATE HIGHWAY 275 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  2. 44. PRECONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPH, LOOKING WESTNORTHWEST INTO YOLO COUNTY FROM OPEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    44. PRE-CONSTRUCTION PHOTOGRAPH, LOOKING WEST-NORTHWEST INTO YOLO COUNTY FROM OPEN SWING SPAN OF M STREET BRIDGE, mid-1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  3. 48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    48. EXCAVATING AND DRIVING PILES FOR SHOOFLY BRIDGE, YOLO COUNTY SIDE OF RIVER, November 7, 1934 - Sacramento River Bridge, Spanning Sacramento River at California State Highway 275, Sacramento, Sacramento County, CA

  4. 18. Photocopy of photograph (original print in Chester County Historical ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (original print in Chester County Historical Society, West Chester, Pennsylvania) Circa 1905, photographer unknown SOUTH FRONT AND WEST SIDE - Barnes-Brinton House, 630 Baltimore Pike (U.S. Route 1), Chadds Ford, Delaware County, PA

  5. View east, barn, west elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View east, barn, west elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  6. View north, barn, south elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north, barn, south elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  7. View west, barn, east elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View west, barn, east elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  8. View south, barn, north elevation Woods Homestead, Barn, County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View south, barn, north elevation - Woods Homestead, Barn, County Route 12 on north side of North Fork of Hughes River, 2.2 miles north & east of Goose Run Road intersection, Harrisville, Ritchie County, WV

  9. 5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVETHROUGHTREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. TUNNEL TREE AT DRIVE-THROUGH-TREE PARK. LEGGETT, HUMBOLDT COUNTY, CALIFORNIA. LOOKING NE. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  10. 15. Photocopy from Futhey and Cope's History of Chester County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy from Futhey and Cope's History of Chester County, Pennsylvania, 1881, facing page 27 VIEW OF FARM - Joseph Jackson House, Old Baltimore Pike (London Grove Township), West Grove, Chester County, PA

  11. Geologic Map of Loudoun County, Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Southworth, Scott; Burton, William C.; Schindler, J. Stephen; Froelich, Albert J.

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The geology of Loudoun County, Va., was mapped from 1988 through 1991 under a cooperative agreement between the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the Loudoun County Office of Mapping and Geographic Information. This geologic map was compiled in 1993 from a series of detailed published and unpublished field investigations at scales of 1:12,000 and 1:24,000. Some of these same data were compiled as a digital geologic map at 1:100,000 scale (Burton and others, 1992a) and were the basis for a cost-benefit analysis of the societal value of geologic maps (Bernknopf and others, 1993).

  12. 71. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUSSTEENS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    71. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO. COLUMBUS-STEENS MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 Detail of ROAD MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1931 by C. L. wood, county engineer. Orig. scale: I in. to I mi. Includes Columbus and area NE to steens. Extent: 12 mi. East-West, 9 mi. North-South. Property of Helen (Mrs. Sam L.) Crawford, Hamilton, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  13. 70. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO., NORTHWEST CORNER MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    70. MISSISSIPPI, LOWNDES CO., NORTHWEST CORNER MAP OF LOWNDES COUNTY, 1931 Detail of ROAD OF LOWNDES COUNTY, MISSISSIPPI, 1931 by C. L. wood, county engineer. Detail of section NW of Columbus (12 mi. N, 9 mi. W), including Plymouth, Waverly, Barton, Buttahatchie R. Orig. scale: 1 in. to 1 mi. Property of Helen (Mrs. Sam L.) Crawford, Hamilton, Ms. Sarcone Photography, Columbus, Ms., Sep 1978. - Bridges of the Upper Tombigbee River Valley, Columbus, Lowndes County, MS

  14. 43. Photographer unknown February 1925 MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION, HIGHWAY 1. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    43. Photographer unknown February 1925 MENDOCINO COUNTY, SECTION, HIGHWAY 1. 1-MEN-1-1 #12, NEW HIGHWAY DISPLACING OLD COUNTY ROAD, 2-25. Stamped office copy. - Redwood National & State Parks Roads, California coast from Crescent City to Trinidad, Crescent City, Del Norte County, CA

  15. 7. Photocopy of map (from Superior Court of Chatham County ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Photocopy of map (from Superior Court of Chatham County Land Records, Book 2G, p. 299) John McKinnon (County Surveyor), delineator 11 January 1817 PLAT OF SITE, SHOWING EASTERN PORTION OF BUILDING - William Taylor Store, 204 West Bay Street, Savannah, Chatham County, GA

  16. 76 FR 26240 - Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-06

    ... Forest Service Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Greybull, Wyoming..., 2011, and will begin at 10 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Big Horn County Weed...

  17. 78 FR 33326 - Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-04

    ... Forest Service Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Greybull, Wyoming... at 3:00 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at Big Horn County Weed and Pest Building,...

  18. 76 FR 47141 - Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-04

    ... Forest Service Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ] ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Greybull, Wyoming..., 2011 and will begin at 3 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Big Horn County Weed and...

  19. 77 FR 49779 - Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... Forest Service Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Greybull, Wyoming... 11, 2012 and will begin at 3 p.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Big Horn County Weed...

  20. 75 FR 71069 - Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-22

    ... Forest Service Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Big Horn County Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Greybull, Wyoming... December 1, 2010, and will begin at 10 a.m. ADDRESSES: The meeting will be held at the Big Horn County...

  1. 75 FR 4417 - Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, SD

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-27

    ... Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, SD AGENCY: National Park Service. ACTION: Notice of... Statement, Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota. SUMMARY: Pursuant to Section 102(2)(C) of... Environmental Impact Statement (Plan), Wind Cave National Park, Custer County, South Dakota. On December 3,...

  2. 77 FR 57556 - Lake County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Forest Service Lake County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Meeting. SUMMARY: The Lake County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a meeting. DATES: The... the Lake County Board of Supervisor's Chambers at 255 North Forbes Street, Lakeport or Conference...

  3. 76 FR 7531 - Lake County Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... Forest Service Lake County Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lake County Resource Advisory Committee (RAC) will hold a meeting. DATES: The... Lake County Board of Supervisor's Chambers at 255 North Forbes Street, Lakeport or Conference Room...

  4. A Plan of Library Services for Pinellas County, Florida.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Summers, F. William; Curran, Charles C.

    In order to determine the feasibility of establishing a county-wide library system, the Pinellas County (Florida) Board of County Commissioners authorized a study of existing library services and possible alternatives for reorganization. Data were gathered and analyzed from: (1) questionnaires sent to library directors; (2) interviews with these…

  5. 7 CFR 7.12 - Composition of a county committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Composition of a county committee. 7.12 Section 7.12 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF FARM SERVICE AGENCY STATE AND COUNTY COMMITTEES § 7.12 Composition of a county committee. (a) A committee established under this...

  6. 7 CFR 7.12 - Composition of a county committee.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Composition of a county committee. 7.12 Section 7.12 Agriculture Office of the Secretary of Agriculture SELECTION AND FUNCTIONS OF FARM SERVICE AGENCY STATE AND COUNTY COMMITTEES § 7.12 Composition of a county committee. (a) A committee established under this...

  7. 27 CFR 9.190 - Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Red Hill Douglas County... Areas § 9.190 Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon. (a) Name. The name of the viticultural area described in this section is “Red Hill Douglas County, Oregon”. For purposes of part 4 of this chapter, “Red...

  8. 17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing plan of bars in top flange, elevation of girder reinforcement, plan of bars in bottom flange - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  9. 18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. "Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919," showing elevation of center pier, elevation and plan of north and south abutments, sections of abutments, pier, and pier footings - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  10. 15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. 'Concrete Bridge Over Salt River, Port Kenyon, Humboldt County, California, A.J. Logan, County Surveyor, H.J. Brunnier, Consulting Engineer, March 7, 1919,' showing general plan, plan of top chord, elevation of main girder, transverse section, plan section at deck level. - Salt River Bridge, Spanning Salt River at Dillon Road, Ferndale, Humboldt County, CA

  11. County-level environmental quality and associations with individual - and county-level preterm birth

    EPA Science Inventory

    Human health is influenced by simultaneous exposure to stressors and amenities, but research usually considers single exposures. We constructed a county-level Environmental Quality Index (EQI) using principal components analysis with data from five domains (air, water, land, buil...

  12. 33 CFR 100.905 - Door County Triathlon; Door County, WI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; Door County, WI. (a) Regulated Area. A regulated area is established to include all waters of Green Bay... effective July 22, 2007, July 26 and 27, 2008, July 25 and 26, 2009, July 24 and 25, 2010, July 23 and...

  13. Counseling Survey: Crook County Middle School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zachow, Kathleen; Carter, Gary

    This paper reports the results of a counseling survey completed by 523 middle school students at Crook County Middle School, Prineville, Oregon, to provide data regarding student concerns in the areas of health and growth, personality, school, home and family, friends, and the future. Results are reported for each of the six categories by grade…

  14. The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wong, Betsy Lindeman

    The Fairfax County Family Literacy Curriculum is designed to be used in a multi-level adult English for Speakers of Other Languages (ESOL) family literacy class. There are four modules to choose from: Introductory (self, family, and community); Government (schools and community); Health (medicine and stress); and Consumerism (shopping and making a…

  15. Clark County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Clark County area of Nevada, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  16. Yellowstone County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Yellowstone County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  17. Sheridan County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Sheridan County area of Wyoming, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  18. Missoula County Health Manpower and Education Profile.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callen, John; And Others

    The profile is a concise description of the demographic and economic characteristics, existing health manpower employed, and health education programs for the Missoula County area of Montana, one of seven surveyed in the Mountain States region (Idaho, Montana, Wyoming, and Nevada). The first section of the profile provides general population…

  19. An Environmental Scan of Northern Alameda County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galloro, Nicholas

    A study was conducted to provide an overview of the demographic and economic characteristics of the geographical area served by the Peralta Community College District and to provide population and economic projections up to the year 2000. Historical data from the Alameda County Planning Commission, census data, and projections from the Association…

  20. Food control concept: A county perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Calvert, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    This paper explains the Benton County, Washington responsibilities for implementing the ingestion exposure pathway protective actions. These responsibilities were successfully demonstrated in the September 13-14, 1994 FEMA evaluated exercise involving the Washington Public Power Supply System`s WNP-2 commercial nuclear power reactor.