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Sample records for luis potos mxico

  1. Genetic diversity of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex in San Luis Potosí, México

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Although epidemiologic and socioeconomic criteria and biomedical risk factors indicate high-priority for tuberculosis (TB) control in Mexico, molecular epidemiology studies of the disease in the country are scarce. Methods Complete sociodemographic and clinical data were obtained from 248 of the 432 pulmonary TB (PTB) cases confirmed from 2006 to 2010 on the population under epidemiological surveillance in the state of San Luis Potosí, México. From most PTB cases with complete data Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTC) isolates were recovered and their spoligotypes, lineages and families, geographic distribution and drug resistance determined. Results Pulmonary tuberculosis incidence ranged from 2.4 to 33.4 (cases per 100,000 inhabitants) in the six state sanitary jurisdictions that were grouped in regions of low (jurisdictions I-II-III), intermediate (jurisdictions IV-V) and high incidence (jurisdiction VI) with 6.2, 17.3 and 33.4 rates, respectively. Most patients were poor, 50-years-median-age males and housewives. Among the 237 MTC spoligotyped isolates, 232 corresponded to M. tuberculosis (104 spoligotypes in 24 clusters) and five to M. bovis. The predominant Euro-American lineage was distributed all over the state, the East-Asian lineage (Beijing family) in the capital city, the Indo-Oceanic (Manila family) in eastern localities, and M. bovis in rural localities. Conclusions In San Luis Potosí TB affects mainly poor male adults and is caused by M. tuberculosis and to a minor extent by M. bovis. There is great genotypic diversity among M. tuberculosis strains, the Euro-American lineage being much more prevalent than the Indo-Oceanic and East-Asian lineages. The frequency of resistant strains is relatively low and not associated to any particular lineage. PMID:23635381

  2. Superinfection between Influenza and RSV Alternating Patterns in San Luis Potosí State, México

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Hernández, Jorge Xicoténcatl; Núñez-López, Mayra; Comas-García, Andreu; Cherpitel, Daniel Ernesto Noyola; Ocampo, Marcos Capistrán

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to explain through the ecological hypothesis superinfection and competitive interaction between two viral populations and niche (host) availability, the alternating patterns of Respiratory Syncytial Virus (RSV) and influenza observed in a regional hospital in San Luis Potosí State, México using a mathematical model as a methodological tool. The data analyzed consists of community-based and hospital-based Acute Respiratory Infections (ARI) consultations provided by health-care institutions reported to the State Health Service Epidemiology Department from 2003 through 2009. PMID:25803450

  3. Severe Pneumonia Associated with Pandemic (H1N1) 2009 Outbreak, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Magaña-Aquino, Martin; García-Sepúlveda, Christian A.; Ochoa-Pérez, Uciel R.; Falcón-Escobedo, Reynaldo; Comas-García, Andreu; Aranda-Romo, Saray; Contreras-Treviño, Hugo I.; Jiménez-Rico, Paulina V.; Banda-Barbosa, Mario A.; Dominguez-Paulin, Félix; Bernal-Blanco, J. Mario; Pérez-González, Luis F.; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    We describe the clinical characteristics and outcomes of adults hospitalized with pneumonia during the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak. Patients admitted to a general hospital in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, from April 10 through May 11, 2009, suspected to have influenza virus–associated pneumonia were evaluated. We identified 50 patients with suspected influenza pneumonia; the presence of influenza virus was confirmed in 18: 11 with pandemic (H1N1) 2009 virus, 5 with unsubtypeable influenza A virus, 1 with seasonal influenza A virus (H3N2), and 1 in whom assay results for seasonal and pandemic (H1N1) 2009 viruses were positive. Eighteen patients were treated in the intensive care unit, and 10 died. During the pandemic (H1N1) 2009 outbreak, severe pneumonia developed in young adults who had no identifiable risk factors; early diagnosis and treatment of influenza virus infections may have a determinant role in outcome. PMID:20031039

  4. Hydrovolcanic evolution of the Joya Prieta maar, San Luis Potosí, northeast Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davila-Harris, P.; Aranda-Gomez, J. J.; Carrasco, G.

    2013-05-01

    The Joya Prieta is a Quaternary maar volcano emplaced at the western sector of the Sierra Madre Oriental fold and thrust belt. The crater is located at the axis of an open Laramide fold with a N20°W axis trend. It is the most easterly structure of the Santo Domingo Group, a cluster of intraplate maars and tuff-rings northeast of San Luis Potosí. A characteristic feature of these maars is that they are emplaced in close relationship with anticlines, exposing impressive inner crater walls of folded strata. In the Joya Prieta maar, the calcareous basement rocks are clearly exposed and unconformably overlain by the volcanic succession. A generalized stratigraphic sequence registers, from base to top, olivine-bearing basalt lava resting unconformably atop El Abra Formation limestone. The lava is overlain by thick and oxidized scoria and spatter agglomerate that grades into a moderately sorted spatter-fall layer with pervasive palagonite alteration. In direct contact with no evidence of reworking, pedogenesis or remobilization, the maar-forming sequence starts with parallel-stratified fall layers of altered basaltic pumice and scoria, with lava and limestone lithic clasts. This fall deposit marks the influx of xenocrystals and xenoliths, widely documented in previous works; they comprise mainly kaersutite mega crystals and spinel lherzolite respectively. The proximal fall deposit is divided into two thick layers by an indurated ash-tuff bed with pellets and single-rimmed accretionary lapilli. The upper layer of this fall deposit passes gradually onto an alternation of lapilli-sized layers with parallel ash-tuff horizons until it grades into cross-stratified, lithic-rich lapilli-tuff. The heterolithologic lapilli tuff is cemented on a fine ash matrix with palagonized juvenile clasts and abundant lava, shale and limestone lithics exhibiting a plethora of lithofacies in the like of parallel-bedded tuff, low-angle cross-bedded tuff and massive strata. This passes gradually

  5. Mortality attributable to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Comas‐García, Andreu; García‐Sepúlveda, Christian A.; Méndez‐de Lira, José J.; Aranda‐Romo, Saray; Hernández‐Salinas, Alba E.; Noyola, Daniel E.

    2010-01-01

    Please cite this paper as: Comas‐García et al. (2011) Mortality attributable to pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Influenza and Other Respiratory Viruses 5(2), 76–82. Background  Acute respiratory infections are a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Starting in 2009, pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus has become one of the leading respiratory pathogens worldwide. However, the overall impact of this virus as a cause of mortality has not been clearly defined. Objectives  To determine the impact of pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 on mortality in a Mexican population. Methods  We assessed the impact of pandemic influenza virus on mortality during the first and second outbreaks in San Luis Potosí, Mexico, and compared it to mortality associated with seasonal influenza and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) during the previous winter seasons. Results  We estimated that, on average, 8·1% of all deaths that occurred during the 2003–2009 seasons were attributable to influenza and RSV. During the first pandemic influenza A(H1N1) 2009 outbreak, there was an increase in mortality in persons 5–59 years of age, but not during the second outbreak (Fall of 2009). Overall, pandemic influenza A (H1N1) 2009 outbreaks had similar effects on mortality to those associated with seasonal influenza virus epidemics. Conclusions  The impact of influenza A(H1N1) 2009 virus on mortality during the first year of the pandemic was similar to that observed for seasonal influenza. The establishment of real‐time surveillance systems capable of integrating virological, morbidity, and mortality data may result in the timely identification of outbreaks so as to allow for the institution of appropriate control measures to reduce the impact of emerging pathogens on the population. PMID:21306570

  6. Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) and heavy metals in soil from San Luis Potosí, México.

    PubMed

    Perez-Vazquez, Francisco Javier; Flores-Ramirez, Rogelio; Ochoa-Martinez, Angeles Catalina; Orta-Garcia, Sandra Teresa; Hernandez-Castro, Berenice; Carrizalez-Yañez, Leticia; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE), and four heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, lead, and mercury) in soil from the city of San Luis Potosí in Mexico. In order to confirm the presence of the previously mentioned compounds, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and analyzed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometer for PBDEs, PCBs, DDT, and DDE. Meanwhile, heavy metals were quantified using the atomic absorption spectrophotometry technique. The total PBDEs levels ranged from 5.0 to 134 μg/kg dry weight (dw), with a total mean PBDEs level of 22.0 ± 32.5 μg/kg dw (geometric mean ± standard deviation). For PCBs, the total mean level in the studied soil was 21.6 ± 24.7 μg/kg dw (range, Luis Potosí, Mexico, and considering that soil is an important pathway of exposure for people, a biomonitoring program for the surveillance of the general population in the city of San Luis Potosi is necessary.

  7. Comprehensive Paleomagnetic Study of the Oligocene-Miocene Rocks from the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alva-Valdivia, L. M.; Gonzalez-Rangel, J. A.; Torres-Hernandez, J. R.

    2014-12-01

    Comprehensive paleomagnetic study of the Oligocene-Miocene sequence of lithological units from the San Luis Potosí volcanic field in central Mexico was accomplished to set up the magnetostratigraphic record. Two hundred and one oriented standard paleomagnetic cores corresponding to twenty-eight paleomagnetic sites were collected from all units. Rock-magnetic properties are characteristic for each unit. Isothermal remanent magnetization acquisition curves and continuous susceptibility vs. temperature experiments point from low to medium-Ti content in titanomagnetite as the main opaque magnetic minerals, presumably result from oxy-exsolution processes during the initial flow cooling. Opaque mineral microscopy supports this assumption. Unblocking temperature and hysteresis parameters suggests predominance of pseudo-single domain magnetic grain size. Thermal and alternating field demagnetizations show mostly well-defined univectorial magnetizations. Most sites present a mean direction with small angular dispersion. The overall mean direction (N=10, Dec=1.1°, Inc=34.1°, k=531 and α95=2.1°) is characterized by small angular dispersion and inclination close to dipolar value for the locality. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility lineation match the geologically inferred flow direction.

  8. [Violence against women in transnational communities in San Luis Potosí, Mexico: a public health problem].

    PubMed

    Flores, Yesica Yolanda Rangel

    2016-08-01

    Violence against women is a worldwide problem due to its impact on quality of life for those living under the complicity of a patriarchal culture and a state that makes such violence invisible. This article aims to give visibility to the contexts of violence affecting female "partners of migrants" in their places of origin, problematizing how such violence assaults their physical and mental health. This was a qualitative study with an interpretative anthropological focus, drawing on a sample of 21 women from rural and urban areas in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Interviews were based on daily life history and discourse analysis. According to the results, women experience more violence when their spouses migrate, new forms of violence are committed against them, and the violence occurs in both the household and the community. Violence against women is a public health problem that should be treated through a framework that is sensitive to the social and cultural dynamics characterizing the contexts in which health programs are implemented.

  9. Analysis of the Magnetic Susceptibility Anisotropy of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosé­ Volcanic field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero, C.; Torres-Hernandez, J.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2007-05-01

    Anisotropy of Magnetic Susceptibility (AMS) results from a group of 17 - 18 sites (286 - 312 specimens) from the Cantera Ignimbrite - of Oligocene age and part of the San Luis Potosí Volcanic Filed (SLPVF), México - are presented and analysed in order to help to determine the source and flow directions. In each site a flow direction is inferred based on AMS results. As the Cantera Ignimbrite is generally dipping, AMS was structural corrected. So two sets of geographical and paleo-geographical (structural corrected) inferred-flow directions were obtained. Both sets are analysed trying to define if the source of the ignimbrite is related to a calderic (concentric structure) or to the NW-SE faulting and jointing. Geographical AMS results mostly give SW flow directions, the southernmost sites give to SSE. Meanwhile structural corrected results give a wider range of flow directions, a group of them to NW and another northerly group mostly to NE. AMS was measured in a KLY2 appliance, Jelinek and other statistics and density distributions were performed, giving all very similar results in each site. Mean susceptibilities range from 147 to 27200 x10-6 SI (average = 5713 x10-6 SI). Anisotropy degree (Pj) range from 1.011 to 1.055 with two sites of 1.134-1.254 (Pj average = 1.046). Shape is mostly oblate ranging the T-factor from 0.843 to 0.409 and only one site mainly prolate: T of -0.277 (T average = 0.550).

  10. DNA methylation changes in Mexican children exposed to arsenic from two historic mining areas in San Luis potosí.

    PubMed

    Alegría-Torres, Jorge Alejandro; Carrizales-Yánez, Leticia; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando; Rosso-Camacho, Fernando; Motta, Valeria; Tarantini, Letizia; Bollati, Valentina

    2016-12-01

    Arsenic is a carcinogen and epimutagen that threatens the health of exposed populations worldwide. In this study, we examined the methylation status of Alu and long interspersed nucleotide elements (LINE-1) and their association with levels of urinary arsenic in 84 Mexican children between 6 and 12 years old from two historic mining areas in the State of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Urinary arsenic levels were determined by atomic absorption spectrophotometry and DNA methylation analysis was performed in peripheral blood leukocytes by bisulfite-pyrosequencing. The geometric mean of urinary arsenic was 26.44 µg/g Cr (range 1.93-139.35). No significant differences in urinary arsenic or methylation patterns due to gender were observed. A positive correlation was found between urinary arsenic and the mean percentage of methylated cytosines in Alu sequences (Spearman correlation coefficient r = 0.532, P < 0.001), and a trend of LINE-1 hypomethylation was also observed (Spearman correlation coefficient r = -0.232, P = 0.038) after adjustment for sex and age. A linear regression model showed an association with log-normalized urinary arsenic for Alu (β = 1.05, 95% CI: 0.67; 1.43, P < 0.001) and LINE-1 (β = -0.703, 95% CI: -1.36; -0.38, P = 0.038). Despite the low-level arsenic exposure, a subtle epigenetic imbalance measured as DNA methylation was detected in the leukocytes of Mexican children living in two historic mining areas. Environ. Mol. Mutagen. 57:717-723, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Counterclockwise rotations in the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic fields of San Luis Potosí and Sierra de Guanajuato (eastern Mesa Central, Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andreani, Louis; Gattacceca, Jerôme; Rangin, Claude; Martínez-Reyes, Juventino; Demory, François

    2014-12-01

    We used paleomagnetic and structural data to investigate the late Eocene-Oligocene tectonic evolution of the Mesa Central area in Mexico. The Mesa Central was affected by NW-trending faults (Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system) coeval with a Late Eocene-Oligocene ignimbrite flare-up and by post-27 Ma NNE-trending grabens related to the Basin and Range. We obtained reliable paleomagnetic directions from 61 sites within the Late Eocene-Oligocene volcanic series (~ 30 to ~ 27 Ma) of the San Luis Potosí volcanic field and Sierra de Guanajuato. For each site we also measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS). Tilt corrections were made using AMS data for 33 sites where in situ bedding measurements were not available. Paleomagnetic directions indicate counterclockwise rotations of about 10° with respect to stable North America after 30-25 Ma. Structural data suggest that the volcanic succession was mainly affected by normal faults. However, we also found evidences for oblique or horizontal striae showing a left-lateral component along NW-trending faults and a right lateral component along NE-trending faults. Both motions are consistent with a N-S extension oblique to the Tepehuanes-San Luis fault system. Previous paleomagnetic studies in northern and southern Mexico show the prevalence of minor left-lateral shear components along regional-scale transpressional and transtensional lineaments. Our paleomagnetic data may reflect thus small vertical-axis rotations related to a minor shear component coeval with the Oligocene intra-arc extension in central Mexico.

  12. Use of abstraction regime and knowledge of hydrogeological conditions to control high-fluoride concentration in abstracted groundwater: San Luis Potosı´ basin, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Edmunds, W. M.

    2002-04-01

    Significant amounts of fluoride are found in the abstracted groundwater of San Luis Potosı´. This groundwater withdrawal induces a cold, low-fluoride flow as well as deeper thermal fluoride-rich flow in various proportions. Flow mixing takes place depending on the abstraction regime, local hydrogeology, and borehole construction design and operation. Fluoride concentrations (≈3.7 mg l -1) could become higher still, in time and space, if the input of regional fluoride-rich water to the abstraction boreholes is enhanced. It is suggested that by controlling the abstraction well-head water temperature at 28-30 °C, a pumped water mixture with a fluoride content close to the maximum drinking water standard of 1.5 mg l -1 will be produced. Further, new boreholes and those already operating could take advantage of fluoride solubility controls to reduce the F concentration in the abstracted water by considering lithology and borehole construction design in order to regulate groundwater flow conditions.

  13. Thermal history of the upper mantle beneath a young back-arc extensional zone: ultramafic xenoliths from San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heinrich, Wilhelm; Besch, Thomas

    1992-06-01

    At the San Luis Potosí (SLP) volcanic field (Central Mexico), Quaternary basanites and tuff breccias have sampled a suite of ultramafic xenoliths, predominately spinel lherzolites, spinel-olivine websterites, spinel pyroxenites, and hornblende-rich pyroxenites. Spinel lherzolites from the La Ventura maars have protogranular to equigranular textures, those from the Santo Domingo maars are strongly sheared. Both spinel-lherzolite types show similar whole-rock major and trace-element abundances. They are fertile to slightly depleted with mineralogical and geochemical heterogeneities induced by partial melting processes. Pyroxenites with either magmatic or metamorphic textures are high-pressure cumulates. Hornblende-rich pyroxenites are genetically linked to the host basanites. Most of the protogranular spinel lherzolites contain veinlets of glass along grain boundaries. These glasses are chemically homogeneous and have trachybasaltic to trachyandesitic compositions. Mg- and Fe2+-partitioning between olivine and glass suggests chemical equilibrium between the melts represented by the glasses and the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at about 1,000°C and 10 to 15 kbar. The melts are interpreted to be of upper mantle origin. They may have been formed by in-situ partial melting in the presence of volatiles or represent percolating melts chemically buffered by the spinel-lherzolite mineral assemblage at uppermost mantle conditions. Mineral chemistry in all rock types of the whole xenolith suite reveals distinct disequilibrium features reflecting partial re-equilibration stages towards lower temperatures estimated to be from 1,050°C to 850°C at 9 to 15 kbar. The presence of similar zoning and exsolution features mainly documented in pyroxenes along with similar maximum and minimum temperatures requires all sampled xenoliths to have undergone the same temperature regime within the upper mantle. The sheared spinel lherzolites from the Sto. Domingo field are interpreted

  14. Eocene to Quaternary mafic-intermediate volcanism in San Luis Potosí, central Mexico: The transition from Farallon plate subduction to intra-plate continental magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo; Tristán-González, Margarito; de Jesús Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo; López-Doncel, Rubén A.; Bellon, Hervé; Martínez-Esparza, Gilberto

    2014-04-01

    The San Luis Potosí Volcanic Field (SLPVF) of central Mexico includes volcanic sequences of felsic, intermediate and basic compositions that were erupted as discrete episodes from the Eocene to the Pleistocene. Volcanism was dominated by widespread and voluminous rhyolitic ignimbrites of the mid-Tertiary Ignimbrite Flare-up. However, the complete volcanic history must consider basaltic and andesitic Eocene-Pleistocene volcanic successions that provide key evidence for understanding the geochemical evolution of the volcanism in the SLPVF during this time span. Five sequences are recognized according to their geochemical characteristics, each comprising a volcano-tectonic episode. The first episode comprises basaltic andesites and andesites erupted during three intervals, 45-42 Ma, 36-31 Ma, and 31-30 Ma. The oldest was derived from subduction magmatism, whereas the youngest has an intra-plate magmatic signature and this represents the transition from the end of a long lasting subduction regime of the Farallon plate to the initiation of intra-plate continental extension in the North American plate. The second episode, at 29.5-28 Ma, comprises a bimodal succession of high-silica rhyolites and alkaline basalts (hawaiites) that are interpreted as magmatism generated in an intra-plate continental extension regime during the Basin and Range faulting. The third episode, at 21 Ma, is characterized by trachybasalts and trachyandesites that represent mantle basaltic melts that were contaminated through assimilation of the lower crust during advanced stage of intra-plate extension that started at Oligocene. The fourth episode includes 12 Ma alkaline basalts and andesites that were erupted from fissures. These mantle derived magmas evolved to andesites by crustal anatexis and crystal fractionation within a continued, extensional, intra-plate regime. Lastly, the fifth episode comprises 5.0 to 0.6 Ma alkaline basalts (basanites) containing mantle xenoliths, that were erupted

  15. Origin of the Joya Honda maar, San Luis Potosí, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aranda-Gómez, JoséJorge; Luhr, James F.

    1996-11-01

    Joya Honda is a Quaternary maar of unusual type from the Mexican Basin and Range Province. Its ~ 300-m-deep crater is excavated in Cretaceous limestones. The surrounding tephra deposit, which in places is > 100 m thick, begins with a series of weakly indurated pyroclastic-surge and -fall layers that we interpret as dry-surge deposits. These are overlain by the main sequence of strongly indurated, massive tuff breccias that we interpret as wet-surge deposits. Joya Honda formed subaerially from the interaction of groundwater with rapidly ascending intraplate-type basanitic magma carrying peridotitic mantle xenoliths. Local aquifer characteristics controlled the style of eruption and the nature of the deposits. Groundwater in the limestone-hosted aquifer beneath Joya Honda was apparently contained within solution-enhanced fractures. At the onset of the eruption, magma began to interact with a moderate amount of groundwater, producing the dry-surge deposits, which are typical of deposits found at many maars and tuff rings. As the eruption continued, the crater grew and the hydromagmatic blasts fractured the limestones around the explosion foci. A marked increase in the water/magma ratio of the system followed when a large fracture or a portion of the limestone with enhanced secondary permeability was intersected by the expanding crater. Subsequent phreatomagmatic explosions occurred in a system with groundwater flow rates several orders of magnitude larger than in the initial dry-surge stage. At the maar rim these wet eruptions led to the emplacement of massive tuff breccias through a combination of fallout, surges and mudflows. These steeply dipping tuff breccias are similar to deposits found at many tuff cones. Juvenile clasts in the near-vent deposits show marked upward increases in both hydration (palagonitization) and vesicularity. The increased palagonitization with height in the section appears to be a consequence of the overall increased wetness of the eruption with time, correlating with greater carbonate cementation and lithification in the upper part of the deposit. The transition toward higher vesicularity is interpreted as evidence of a gradual reduction in the confining pressure for the ascending magma prior to explosive fragmentation, perhaps related to unroofing during progressive excavation of the overlying maar crater. Thus, Joya Honda does not support maar-formation models that invoke downward displacement of explosion foci, caused by formation of a cone of depression in the aquifer, in order to maintain the confining pressure for the hydromagmatic blasts.

  16. Detecting areas disturbed by mining activities through Landsat images, San Luis Potosi City, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres-Vera, M.-A.

    2009-04-01

    Mining history in San Luis Potosí (Mexico) goes back to more than four centuries, and the accumulation of mining waste poses an important problem to ecological risk prevention. Epithermal deposits are the most common in this region and the impact of mining exploitation must be evaluated to propose sustainable development of the natural resources, which have a strong contribution of the national economy. The state San Luis Potosi is situated in the central part of Mexico between parallels 21°11' and 24°34' of north latitude and 98°23' and 102°14' of west longitude, 424 km northeast from Mexico City. Today is a sprawling city with more than half a million residents. The aim of this study was to analyse land cover and vegetation changes between 1972 and 2000 in San Luis Potosi Valley, using satellite image data. Since large changes in land cover and vegetation are taking place in the Valley and there is a lack of good data, such as maps, statistics and aerial photographs, it was appropriate to use satellite data for assessment of land cover and vegetation to estimate the environmental impact of the mining industry. Field data samples were used to evaluate the change results obtained with the multispectral satellite images. The results show that land cover change in the San Luis Potosi Valley has occurred in the past decade as a result of both natural forces and human activities, which have in turn impacted on the regional sustainable development of the mining resources.

  17. Labor attributes and strategies: the case of tomato workers in san luis potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ledesma, Maria Isabel Mora

    2010-01-01

    In the context of the economic crisis in the 1980s that affected Mexico and the rest of Latin America, official policies encouraged commercial agriculture, especially the cultivation of export crops. During that period, women's entry into the paid labor market accelerated. For many women in rural areas, this meant widening opportunities for participation and a chance not only to help their families, but also to look for a partner, earn their own money, and "see the world." This article analyzes the incorporation of women into the tomato agro-industry in the Altiplano region of el Valle de Arista, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. It discusses the strategies that women workers use-physical appearance, experience, and efficiency-as characteristics that are "required" in order to stay in this highly competitive, segmented, and precarious labor market.

  18. Geophysical Exploration of Fractured-Media Aquifers at the Mexican Mesa Central: Satellite City, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Loera, Héctor; Ramos Leal, José Alfredo; Dávila Harris, Pablo; Torres Gaytan, David Ernesto; Martinez Ruiz, Victor Julian; Gogichaishvili, Avto

    2015-01-01

    Groundwater is scarce in arid and semi-arid zones in the Mexican Mesa Central. It is found at depths over 200 m, and its movement is primarily through fractures. This work aims to present a geophysical methodology, which shows the potential of combining natural and induced methods to locate confined aquifers in fault zones. The studies begin by interpreting the aeromagnetic survey, mainly by seeking lineaments associated with low magnetic anomalies, which are correlated with fault zones, and/or fractures and/or geological contacts where ferromagnetic minerals have undergone oxidation due to their association with recharge zones. These aeromagnetic lineaments are confirmed on land by a ground magnetic survey. After locating these areas, interpreted as permeability zones, their possible association with moist zones is confirmed by applying the vertical electrical sounding (VES) technique. H-type curve is associated with the presence of saturated zones. This study used the proposed methodology to interpret four main aeromagnetic lineaments and 12 main ground magnetic lineaments in a 36 km2 (6 km × 6 km) area. Twenty-six SEV were performed over these magnetic lineaments, of which about 50 % were associated with H-type resistivity curves, interpreted as being associated with moisture. Of the 12 VES with inferred groundwater potential, two wells have been drilled to date, one having an extraction flow of 70 lps.

  19. Geophysical Exploration of Fractured-Media Aquifers at the Mexican Mesa Central: Satellite City, San Luis Potosí, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    López Loera, Héctor; Ramos Leal, José Alfredo; Dávila Harris, Pablo; Torres Gaytan, David Ernesto; Martinez Ruiz, Victor Julian; Gogichaishvili, Avto

    2014-09-01

    Groundwater is scarce in arid and semi-arid zones in the Mexican Mesa Central. It is found at depths over 200 m, and its movement is primarily through fractures. This work aims to present a geophysical methodology, which shows the potential of combining natural and induced methods to locate confined aquifers in fault zones. The studies begin by interpreting the aeromagnetic survey, mainly by seeking lineaments associated with low magnetic anomalies, which are correlated with fault zones, and/or fractures and/or geological contacts where ferromagnetic minerals have undergone oxidation due to their association with recharge zones. These aeromagnetic lineaments are confirmed on land by a ground magnetic survey. After locating these areas, interpreted as permeability zones, their possible association with moist zones is confirmed by applying the vertical electrical sounding (VES) technique. H-type curve is associated with the presence of saturated zones. This study used the proposed methodology to interpret four main aeromagnetic lineaments and 12 main ground magnetic lineaments in a 36 km2 (6 km × 6 km) area. Twenty-six SEV were performed over these magnetic lineaments, of which about 50 % were associated with H-type resistivity curves, interpreted as being associated with moisture. Of the 12 VES with inferred groundwater potential, two wells have been drilled to date, one having an extraction flow of 70 lps.

  20. Obstructive cholelithiasis and cholecystitis in a kinkajou (Potos flavus).

    PubMed

    Potier, Romain; Reineau, Olivier

    2015-03-01

    A 14.5-yr-old female kinkajou (Potos flavus) was diagnosed with cholelithiasis after an episode of vomiting; diagnostics included biochemical analysis and abdominal ultrasound exam. Despite antimicrobial treatment, cholelithiasis led to cholecystitis. A cholecystotomy was performed to remove choleliths and inspissated bile. Morphological and spectroscopic properties of the choleliths were similar to those of gallstones from the brown pigment family and Streptococcus sp. and Escherichia coli were isolated from the bile. Biliary tract infection is directly related to pathogenesis of brown pigment gallstones. Serial ultrasound exams revealed that cholecystitis developed secondary to the presence of gallstones in the biliary tree. Despite full recovery postsurgery, the patient died 15 mo later from gallbladder necrosis. Based on the progression of this case, a cholecystectomy would be preferred over a cholecystotomy in similar cases, and the efficacy of long-acting antibiotics may not be adequate in nontarget species. Gallstones and biliary tract infection are rarely described in small domestic carnivores, and this is the first reported case in a kinkajou.

  1. [Physical factors influencing the floristic relationships of pinyon pine (Pinaceae) from San Luis Potosi, Mexico].

    PubMed

    Romero, Angélica; Luna, Mario; García, Edmundo

    2014-06-01

    In plant communities, the species distribution patterns and their relationships with environmental factors are of central importance in ecology. In San Luis Potosí of Mexico, woodlands of Pinus cembroides and P. johannis are sympatric, but P. cembroides tends to be located in South and Southwest slopes, in more disturbed sites; unlike, P. johannis, is mostly distributed in mesic areas, in North and Northeast slopes. The aim of this study was to analyze the influence of some physical factors on the floristic similarity of pinyon pine P. cembroides and P. johannis. The study area was located in the Sierra San Miguelito, San Luis Potosí, Mexico. We selected 40 sampling units spread over an area of 50km2. In each unit, we laid out two 20m long lines perpendicular to each other, in which we recorded cover data of the plant species intercepted. We developed two data matrices, the first one including cover values of 91 species, and the second one, considering seven topographical, climatic, and solar radiation variables. We applied cluster analysis and ordination to explore the influence of environmental variables on the floristic differentiation of pinyon pine woodlands. Clustering showed six groups, the first three characterized by P. cembroides. The ordination showed that variance represented by the first three axes was 65.9%. Axis 1 was positively correlated with altitude and negatively with mean annual temperature; axes two and three, showed low correlation with the variables tested. P. cembroides woodlands and accompanying flora tend to be located in lower altitude, higher mean annual temperature, and mainly in South-Southwestern slopes. In contrast, stands of P. johannis, mixed stands of P. johannis-P. cembroides, and Quercus potosina, were usually founded in greater altitudes, mean annual temperature slightly lower, and North-Northeastern exposure. The sites of these monospecific and mixed woodlands with associated species, indicators of environmental variables

  2. Culture-independent analysis of the microbial composition of the African traditional fermented foods poto poto and dégué by using three different DNA extraction methods.

    PubMed

    Abriouel, Hikmate; Ben Omar, Nabil; López, Rosario Lucas; Martínez-Cañamero, Madgalena; Keleke, Simon; Gálvez, Antonio

    2006-10-01

    The microbial composition of the traditional fermented foods poto poto (a maize dough from the Rep. of Congo) and dégué (a millet dough from Burkina Faso) was studied by a culture-independent approach using TTGE to separate the amplified target V3 region of the 16S rRNA gene from total microbial community, followed by DNA sequencing and homology search. Three different extraction methods were used. Guanidium thiocyanate-based DNA extraction provided better performance regarding purity and DNA yield, allowing the detection of a higher number of DNA bands by TTGE in poto poto. By contrast, all three methods yielded similar results for dégué samples, indicating that the performance of the DNA extraction method largely depends on the food composition. Sequencing of DNA bands from TTGE gels corresponding to poto poto samples revealed the presence of Lactobacillus gasseri, Enterococcus sp., Escherichia coli, Lactobacillus plantarum/paraplantarum, Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii, Bacillus sp., Lactobacillus reuteri and Lactobacillus casei. The following bacteria were identified in dégué: L. gasseri, Enterococcus sp., E. coli, Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus brevis, and L. casei.

  3. 19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. REGIONAL MAP, SALINAS RIVER PROJECT, CAMP SAN LUIS OBISPO, IN CENTRAL PORTION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO, CALIFORNIA. Leeds Hill Barnard & Jewett - Consulting Engineers, February 1942. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. 76 FR 10945 - San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of Receiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-28

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY Office of Thrift Supervision San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, CA; Notice of Appointment of... Corporation as sole Receiver for San Luis Trust Bank, FSB, San Luis Obispo, California, (OTS No. 15051)...

  5. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  6. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  7. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  8. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  9. 33 CFR 110.120 - San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. 110... ANCHORAGES ANCHORAGE REGULATIONS Special Anchorage Areas § 110.120 San Luis Obispo Bay, Calif. (a) Area A-1. Area A-1 is the water area bounded by the San Luis Obispo County wharf, the shoreline, a line...

  10. Residential metal contamination and potential health risks of exposure in adobe brick houses in Potosí, Bolivia

    EPA Science Inventory

    Potosí, Bolivia, is the site of centuries of historic and present-day mining of the Cerro Rico Mountain, known for its rich polymetallic deposits, and was the site of large-scale Colonial era silver refining operations, both of which have left a legacy of pollution. In this study...

  11. Magnetotelluric Data, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.; Williams, Jackie M.

    2008-01-01

    The San Luis Valley region population is growing. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region?s ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The shallow unconfined aquifer and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey (called magnetotellurics, or MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers. The MT survey primary goal is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock types. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers. This report does not include any data interpretation. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at 24 stations. Two of the stations were collected near Santa Fe, New Mexico, near deep wildcat wells. Well logs from those wells will help tie future interpretations of this data with geologic units from the Santa Fe Group sediments to Precambrian basement.

  12. Magnetotelluric Data, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, Jackie M.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2007-01-01

    Introduction The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifer in the San Luis Basin is the main sources of municipal water for the region. Water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's ground-water resources. An important issue in managing the ground-water resources is a better understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits that fill the Rio Grande rift, which contain the principal ground-water aquifers. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin located in southern Colorado. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, an electromagnetic survey, called magnetotellurics (MT), and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifer systems. The primary goal of the MT survey is to map changes in electrical resistivity with depth that are related to differences in rock type. These various rock types help control the properties of aquifers in the region. This report does not include any interpretation of the data. Its purpose is to release the MT data acquired at the 22 stations shown in figure 1.

  13. Tectono-volcanic control of fissure type vents for the 28 Ma Panalillo ignimbrite in the Villa de Reyes Graben, San Luis Potosí, México.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristán-González, Margarito; Labarthe-Hernández, Guillermo; Aguirre-Díaz, Gerardo J.; Aguillón-Robles, Alfredo

    2008-10-01

    The volcano-tectonic events at the Villa de Reyes Graben (VRG), in the southern Sierra Madre Occidental, Mexico, include 1) a regional NNE fault system developed before 32 Ma, 2) this pre-32 Ma faulting controlled the emplacement of 31.5 Ma dacitic domes, 3) NE faulting at 28 Ma that displaced the 31.5 Ma dacitic domes and formed the VRG, as well as the oblique grabens of Bledos and Enramadas oriented NW, 4) emplacement of Panalillo ignimbrite at 28 Ma filling the VRG and erupting from fissures related to the oblique grabens, and eruption of Placa basalt apparently also from fault-controlled vents.

  14. Voice and Valency in San Luis Potosi Huasteco

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Munoz Ledo Yanez, Veronica

    2014-01-01

    This thesis presents an analysis of the system of transitivity, voice and valency alternations in Huasteco of San Luis Potosi (Mayan) within a functional-typological framework. The study is based on spoken discourse and elicited data collected in the municipalities of Aquismon and Tancanhuitz de Santos in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. The…

  15. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  16. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  17. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  18. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  19. 33 CFR 80.1130 - San Luis Obispo Bay, CA.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. 80.1130 Section 80.1130 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY INTERNATIONAL NAVIGATION RULES COLREGS DEMARCATION LINES Pacific Coast § 80.1130 San Luis Obispo Bay, CA. A line drawn...

  20. Reconstructing a Spanish Mission: San Luis de Talimali.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McEwan, Bonnie G.; Hann, John H.

    2000-01-01

    Focuses on the reconstruction of the San Luis de Talimali, which was among the largest and most important missions in Spanish Florida with the Apalachee Indians as their parishioners. Describes the various structures found at San Luis: (1) the council house; (2) the chief's house; and (3) the church. (CMK)

  1. Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility analysis of the Cantera Ignimbrite, San Luis Potosi, México: flow source recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caballero-Miranda, C. I.; Torres-Hernández, J. R.; Alva-Valdivia, L. M.

    2009-01-01

    Anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) was selected as the key technique to find the source of the widespread Cantera Ignimbrite and to seek its possible relationship with the San Luis Potosí Caldera. Eighteen sites (372 specimens from 155 cores) from the Oligocene Cantera Ignimbrite were sampled. AMS was measured on a KLY2 Kappabridge. AMS data were processed with Anisoft 3 software using Jelinek statistics as well as `SpheriStat' principal components and density distribution. Mean susceptibilities range from 290 to 5026 × 10-6 SI (average = 2526 × 10-6 SI). The anisotropy degree ( P j) ranges from 1.005 to 1.055, with only one site displaying a value of 1.134 ( P j average = 1.031). AMS ellipsoid shapes are mostly oblate, with the T-factor ranging from 0.843 to 0.144 ( T average = 0.529), although one site is mainly prolate ( T = -0.005), and three additional sites have an important proportion of prolate specimens. Magnetic fabrics of most sites shows k3 axes around nearly circular distributions and k 1- k 2 axes around elongated-girdle distributions defining sub-horizontal foliation planes; exceptions to this are related to sites with a significant percentage of prolate specimens. Flow directions inferred from AMS analysis indicate several ignimbrite sources located along selected NW-SE linear features (faults and fractures such as El Potosino Fault) as well as along the rim of the caldera structure. The geometry of volcanic outcrops, the NW-SE faulting-fracture system, as well as the AMS results suggest that this is a caldera structure resembling the trapdoor-type (Lipman, 1997).

  2. Multielemental pollution of soils at the Ingenios, decommissioned mineralurgical sites in Potosí (Bolivia).

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higueras, Pablo; Llanos, Willians; García, María. Eugenia; Millán, Rocío.; Serrano, Carlos; María García-Noguero, Eva

    2010-05-01

    Potosí is a world classical mining site, located in South West Bolivia. Mining activity is centered at the so-called Cerro Rico, an impressive mount formed by rhyolitic rocks affected by intensive hydrothermal alteration, and hosting a complex multivein deposit including mainly Ag and Sn minerals. From the starting of the mining activity, in the late 16th Century, to 1850 the main ore was silver minerals, and from 1850 the silver ores exhausted, and mining activity centered on Sn minerals. During the first stage, the silver minerals were treated by amalgamation, using the so-called "método de patio", which implies the usage of mercury and other compounds as metallurgical agents. This work was carried out at the "ingenios", facilities located next to streams, in order to have the water and mechanical energy needed for the process, and nowadays in ruins. We have studied the soil pollution related with this activity, at several of these old "ingenios", putting forward a multielemental contamination including high Hg and Sn concentrations, and, to a lesser extent, but also with values above reference levels, with As, Cu, Zn, Pb and Sb.

  3. Estimating historical atmospheric mercury concentrations from silver mining and their legacies in present-day surface soil in Potosí, Bolivia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagan, Nicole; Robins, Nicholas; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Halabi, Susan; Morris, Mark; Woodall, George; Zhang, Tong; Bacon, Allan; Richter, Daniel De B.; Vandenberg, John

    2011-12-01

    Detailed Spanish records of mercury use and silver production during the colonial period in Potosí, Bolivia were evaluated to estimate atmospheric emissions of mercury from silver smelting. Mercury was used in the silver production process in Potosí and nearly 32,000 metric tons of mercury were released to the environment. AERMOD was used in combination with the estimated emissions to approximate historical air concentrations of mercury from colonial mining operations during 1715, a year of relatively low silver production. Source characteristics were selected from archival documents, colonial maps and images of silver smelters in Potosí and a base case of input parameters was selected. Input parameters were varied to understand the sensitivity of the model to each parameter. Modeled maximum 1-h concentrations were most sensitive to stack height and diameter, whereas an index of community exposure was relatively insensitive to uncertainty in input parameters. Modeled 1-h and long-term concentrations were compared to inhalation reference values for elemental mercury vapor. Estimated 1-h maximum concentrations within 500 m of the silver smelters consistently exceeded present-day occupational inhalation reference values. Additionally, the entire community was estimated to have been exposed to levels of mercury vapor that exceed present-day acute inhalation reference values for the general public. Estimated long-term maximum concentrations of mercury were predicted to substantially exceed the EPA Reference Concentration for areas within 600 m of the silver smelters. A concentration gradient predicted by AERMOD was used to select soil sampling locations along transects in Potosí. Total mercury in soils ranged from 0.105 to 155 mg kg-1, among the highest levels reported for surface soils in the scientific literature. The correlation between estimated air concentrations and measured soil concentrations will guide future research to determine the extent to which the

  4. Scintillation properties of LuI 3:Ce

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glodo, J.; Shah, K. S.; Klugerman, M.; Wong, P.; Higgins, B.; Dorenbos, P.

    2005-01-01

    Lutetium iodide (LuI3) is a new addition to the family of Ce-doped lanthanide trihalide scintillating materials. Crystals of this material show hexagonal structure with density of 5.6 g/cm3 and have been grown by the Bridgman method. Under X-ray excitation this material exhibits broad, cerium based emission that peaks at 475 and 520 nm. The fastest and major component of scintillation time profile of LuI3:Ce emission decays with a 31 ns time constant. The light yield of LuI3:Ce for thin samples (∼0.2 mm) was estimated to be ∼50,000 photons/MeV.

  5. Social Integration and Health Behavioral Change in San Luis, Honduras

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McQuestion, Michael J.; Calle, Ana Quijano; Drasbek, Christopher; Harkins, Thomas; Sagastume, Lourdes J.

    2010-01-01

    This study explores the effects of social integration on behavioral change in the course of an intensive, community-based public health intervention. The intervention trained volunteers and mobilized local organizations to promote 16 key family health practices in rural San Luis, Honduras, during 2004 to 2006. A mixed methods approach is used.…

  6. Juan Luis Vives: Tradition and Innovation in Renaissance Rhetoric.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abbott, Don Paul

    1986-01-01

    Argues that Juan Luis Vives' efforts to rehabilitate the discipline of discourse may well have been the most original of the sixteenth century, and that his discussion of elecutio (the essence of rhetoric) is considerably more distinguished than that of the better known Peter Ramus. (RS)

  7. Educational and Demographic Profile: San Luis Obispo County.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Postsecondary Education Commission, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This profile uniquely presents a variety of educational and socioeconomic information for San Luis Obispo County, nearby counties, and the state. The profile highlights the relationship between various factors that affect the economic well-being of individuals and communities. This presentation of information provides a framework for enhanced…

  8. Chasing Personal Meaning: Pedagogical Lessons through Luis Rodriguez's "Always Running"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theisen-Homer, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    In this autobiographical narrative, the author recounts her experiences teaching the novel "Always Running" by Luis Rodriguez with her English classes at a high school in a gang-heavy area. When she first started teaching, this teacher struggled to engage students. One particularly disruptive student requested to read "Always…

  9. Geologic Map of the San Luis Quadrangle, Costilla County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Thompson, Ren A.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2008-01-01

    The map area includes San Luis and the primarily rural surrounding area. San Luis, the county seat of Costilla County, is the oldest surviving settlement in Colorado (1851). West of the town are San Pedro and San Luis mesas (basalt-covered tablelands), which are horsts with the San Luis fault zone to the east and the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone to the west. The map also includes the Sanchez graben (part of the larger Culebra graben), a deep structural basin that lies between the San Luis fault zone (on the west) and the central Sangre de Cristo fault zone (on the east). The oldest rocks exposed in the map area are the Pliocene to upper Oligocene basin-fill sediments of the Santa Fe Group, and Pliocene Servilleta Basalt, a regional series of 3.7?4.8 Ma old flood basalts. Landslide deposits and colluvium that rest on sediments of the Santa Fe Group cover the steep margins of the mesas. Rare exposures of the sediment are comprised of siltstones, sandstones, and minor fluvial conglomerates. Most of the low ground surrounding the mesas and in the graben is covered by surficial deposits of Quaternary age. The alluvial deposits are subdivided into three Pleistocene-age units and three Holocene-age units. The oldest Pleistocene gravel (unit Qao) forms extensive coalesced alluvial fan and piedmont surfaces, the largest of which is known as the Costilla Plain. This surface extends west from San Pedro Mesa to the Rio Grande. The primary geologic hazards in the map area are from earthquakes, landslides, and localized flooding. There are three major fault zones in the area (as discussed above), and they all show evidence for late Pleistocene to possible Holocene movement. The landslides may have seismogenic origins; that is, they may be stimulated by strong ground shaking during large earthquakes. Machette and Thompson based this geologic map entirely on new mapping, whereas Drenth supplied geophysical data and interpretations.

  10. Residential metal contamination and potential health risks of exposure in adobe brick houses in Potosí, Bolivia.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Abigail R; Hsu-Kim, Heileen; Robins, Nicholas A; Hagan, Nicole A; Halabi, Susan; Barras, Olivo; Richter, Daniel deB; Vandenberg, John J

    2016-08-15

    Potosí, Bolivia, is the site of centuries of historic and present-day mining of the Cerro Rico, a mountain known for its rich polymetallic deposits, and was the site of large-scale Colonial era silver refining operations. In this study, the concentrations of several metal and metalloid elements were quantified in adobe brick, dirt floor, and surface dust samples from 49 houses in Potosí. Median concentrations of total mercury (Hg), lead (Pb), and arsenic (As) were significantly greater than concentrations measured in Sucre, Bolivia, a non-mining town, and exceeded US-based soil screening levels. Adobe brick samples were further analyzed for bioaccessible concentrations of trace elements using a simulated gastric fluid (GF) extraction. Median GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were 0.085, 13.9, and 32.2% of the total element concentration, respectively. Total and GF extractable concentrations of Hg, As, and Pb were used to estimate exposure and potential health risks to children following incidental ingestion of adobe brick particles. Risks were assessed using a range of potential ingestion rates (50-1000mg/day). Overall, the results of the risk assessment show that the majority of households sampled contained concentrations of bioaccessible Pb and As, but not Hg, that represent a potential health risk. Even at the lowest ingestion rate considered, the majority of households exceeded the risk threshold for Pb, indicating that the concentrations of this metal are of particular concern. To our knowledge, this is the first study to quantify key trace elements in building materials in adobe brick houses and the results indicate that these houses are a potential source of exposure to metals and metalloids in South American mining communities. Additional studies are needed to fully characterize personal exposure and to understand potential adverse health outcomes within the community.

  11. Gravity survey in the San Luis Valley area, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaca, J. Robert; Karig, Daniel E.

    1965-01-01

    During the summers of 1963 and 1964, a regional gravity survey covering 6,000 square miles of the San Luis Valley and surrounding areas was made to determine subsurface basement configurations and to guide future crustal studies. The San Luis Valley, a large intermontane basin, is a segment of the Rio Grande trough, a reef system characterized by volcanism, normal faulting, and tilted fault blocks. The gravity data, accurate to about 0.5 mgal, were reduced to complete-Bouguer anomaly values. The Bouguer-anomaly gravity map delineates a series of en-echelon gravity highs in the central and western San Luis Valley. These gravity highs are interpreted as horsts of Precambrian rock buried by basin fill. A series of en-echelon gravity lows along the eastern edge of the Valley is interpreted as a graben filled with sedimentary and igneous rock estimated to be up to 30,000 ft thick. The relatively high regional gravity over the Sangre de Cristo Mountains suggests that these mountains are locally uncompensated. A subcircular gravity low in the Bonanza area is interpreted as an indication of low-density volcanic rocks within a caldera structure.

  12. Hydrology of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Emery, P.A.; Boettcher, A.J.; Snipes, R.J.; Mcintyre, H.J.

    1969-01-01

    An investigation of the water resources of the Colorado part of the San Luis Valley was begun in 1966 by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Water Conservation Board. (See index map, fig. 1). The purpose of the investigation is to provide information for planning and implementing improved water-development and management practices. The major water problems in the San Luis Valley include (1) waterlogging, (2) waste of water by nonbeneficial evapotranspiration, (3) deterioration of ground-water chemical quality, and (4) failure of Colorado to deliver water to New Mexico and Texas in accordance with the Rio Grande Compact. This report describes the hydrologic environment, extent of water-resource development, and some of the problems related to that development. Information presented is based on data collected from 1966 to 1968 and on previous studies. Subsequent reports are planned as the investigation progresses. The San Luis Valley extends about 100 miles from Poncha Pass near the northeast corner of Saguache County, Colo., to a point about 16 miles south of the Colorado-New Mexico State line. The total area is 3,125 square miles, of which about 3,000 are in Colorado. The valley is nearly flat except for the San Luis Hills and a few other small areas. The Colorado part of the San Luis Valley, which is described in this report, has an average altitude of about 7,700 feet. Bounding the valley on the west are the San Juan Mountains and on the east the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Most of the valley floor is bordered by alluvial fans deposited by streams originating in the mountains, the most extensive being the Rio Grande fan (see block diagram, fig. 2 in pocket). Most of the streamflow is derived from snowmelt from 4,700 square miles of watershed in the surrounding mountains. The northern half of the San Luis Valley is internally drained and is referred to as the closed basin. The lowest part of this area is known locally as the "sump." The

  13. Binturong (Arctictis binturong) and Kinkajou (Potos flavus) Digestive Strategy: Implications for Interpreting Frugivory in Carnivora and Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lambert, Joanna E.; Fellner, Vivek; McKenney, Erin; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2014-01-01

    Exclusive frugivory is rare. As a food resource, fruit is temporally and spatially patchy, low in protein, and variable in terms of energy yield from different carbohydrate types. Here, we evaluate the digestive physiology of two frugivorous Carnivora species (Potos flavus, Arctictis binturong) that converge with primates in a diversity of ecological and anatomical traits related to fruit consumption. We conducted feeding trials to determine mean digestive retention times (MRT) on captive animals at the Carnivore Preservation Trust (now Carolina Tiger Rescue), Pittsboro, NC. Fecal samples were collected on study subjects for in vitro analysis to determine methane, pH, and short chain fatty acid profiles; fiber was assayed using standard neutral detergent (NDF) and acid detergent (ADF) fiber methods. Results indicate that both carnivoran species have rapid digestive passage for mammals that consume a predominantly plant-based diet: A. binturong MRT = 6.5 hrs (0.3); P. flavus MRT = 2.5 hrs (1.6). In vitro experiments revealed no fermentation of structural polysaccharides – methane levels did not shift from 0 h to either 24 or 48 hours and no short chain fatty acids were detected. In both species, however, pH declined from one incubation period to another suggesting acidification and bacterial activity of microbes using soluble carbohydrates. A comparison with primates indicates that the study species are most similar in digestive retention times to Ateles – the most frugivorous anthropoid primate taxon. PMID:25157614

  14. Cannibalism in wild bonobos (Pan paniscus) at Lui Kotale.

    PubMed

    Fowler, Andrew; Hohmann, Gottfried

    2010-06-01

    We describe the cannibalization of an infant bonobo (circa 2.5 years old) at Lui Kotale, in the Democratic Republic of Congo. The infant died of unknown causes and was consumed by several community members including its mother and an older sibling one day after death. Certain features concerning the pattern of consumption fit in with previously observed episodes of cannibalism in Pan, whereas others, such as the mother's participation in consuming the body, are notable. The incident suggests that filial cannibalism among apes need not be the result of nutritional or social stress and does not support the idea that filial cannibalism is a behavioral aberration.

  15. Sedimentation in Santa Margarita Lake, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glysson, G. Douglas

    1977-01-01

    The 1975 storage capacity of Santa Margarita Lake in San Luis Obispo County, Calif., was 41,400 acre-feet, a decrease of 3,400 acre-feet since 1941. Usable capacity decreased from 25,800 to 23,000 acre-feet. Long-term sediment yield for the Salinas River basin upstream from the lake was estimated at 1,150 tons per square mile per year. A correlation between the annual water discharge of the Salinas River near Pozo and the annual quantity of sediment deposited in the lake was developed that can be used to stimate future sediment deposition. (Woodard-USGS)

  16. Art as Critical Public Pedagogy: A Qualitative Study of Luis Camnitzer and His Conceptual Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana; Tisdell, Elizabeth J.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness from the perspective and work of conceptual artist, Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework is grounded in the critical public pedagogy literature. Data collection methods included interviews with conceptual artist Luis Camnitzer and with…

  17. Ultrathin lava layers exposed near San Luis Obispo Bay, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, James G.; Charlton, Douglas W.

    1984-09-01

    Sequences of extraordinarily thin (1 5 cm thick) lava layers, resembling individual lava flows, are interbedded with Jurassic and Cretaceous pillowed lava flows near San Luis Obispo Bay on the California coast. Such layers are formed inside submarine pillowed lava pipes or flow lobes. As the lava surface in a pillow pipe falls to a lower level owing to diminished supply entering the pipe, water enters the upper compartment through cracks in the outer crust and chills a new crust on top of the lava stream. Repeated lowerings of the lava level in the pipe create a series of discrete lava shelves, each of which represents the upper crust of the lava stream flowing within the pipe. These crusts are supported at different levels on their edges at the side of the pipe. The weight of subsequent overlying lava flows collapses the partly hollow tube, creating a stacked sequence of ultrathin lava layers progressively younger downward.

  18. Luis de Florez and the Special Devices Division

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Paul Louis

    This Dissertation presents the life of Luis de Florez and the World War II history of the Special Devices Division (SDD) of the U.S. Navy's Bureau of Aeronautics. Luis de Florez was a well known consulting engineer, aviation fuel expert, private pilot and reserve Naval officer. While on active duty in 1940, he received the assignment to improve the Navy's flight training methods. To accomplish this objective, he promoted the concept of synthetic training, the use of simulators and other non-operational equipment, to provide training for Navy flight personnel such as pilots, gunners, navigators, flight engineers, radio operators and others as well as for ground based people like mechanics. He founded the Special Devices Division to design the tools and equipment needed for this type of training. The success of synthetic training and the devices developed by the SDD received recognition by the awarding of the Collier Trophy to de Florez in December 1944. This trophy is awarded annually for the most significant aeronautical achievement of the previous year (1943). De Florez received the award for the strategic accomplishment of training thousands of American airmen in 1943. The work of the Division also had other important technical, social, financial and operational impacts on the prosecution of WW II by the Allies. The work of the Division also had impacts on American society as a whole that persist to the present day. These impacts are discussed in detail. The Dissertation presents details of the devices and their use in aviation training as well as a history of the Division during the war. After the war, de Florez led an advisory board for the CIA. These activities and some of both the positive and negative results of the work of this board are discussed. This discussion includes de Florez' involvement in the CIA's drug experiments and the unfortunate Frank Olsen affair.

  19. Magnetotelluric data collected to characterize aquifers in the San Luis Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ailes, Chad E.; Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey is conducting a series of multidisciplinary studies of the San Luis Basin as part of the Geologic Framework of Rio Grande Basins project. Detailed geologic mapping, high-resolution airborne magnetic surveys, gravity surveys, magnetotelluric surveys, and hydrologic and lithologic data are being used to better understand the aquifers in the San Luis Basin. This report describes one north-south and two east-west regional magnetotelluric sounding profiles, acquired in June of 2010 and July and August of 2011, across the San Luis Basin in northern New Mexico. No interpretation of the data is included.

  20. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of northern San Luis Valley, Colorado: A remote sensing investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Huntley, D.

    1976-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Ground water recharge to the aquifers of San Luis Valley west of San Luis Creek was primarily from ground water flow in the volcanic aquifers of the San Juan Mountains. The high permeability and anisotropic nature of the volcanic rocks resulted in very little contrast in flow conditions between the San Juan Mountains and San Luis Valley. Ground water recharge to aquifers of eastern San Luis Valley was primarily from stream seepage into the upper reaches of the alluvial fans at the base of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. The use of photography and thermal infrared imagery resulted in a savings of time and increase in accuracy in regional hydrogeologic studies. Volcanic rocks exhibited the same spectral reflectance curve as sedimentary rocks, with only the absolute magnitude of reflectance varying. Both saline soils and vegetation were used to estimate general ground water depths.

  1. Magnetotelluric sounding data, stations 1 to 22, Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado, 2006

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, Brian D.

    2016-01-01

    This dataset includes the locations of magnetotelluric (MT) stations collected in 2006 in the Southern San Luis Valley, Colorado. The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a series of multidisciplinary studies, including MT surveys, in the San Luis Valley to improve understanding of the hydrogeology of the Santa Fe Group and the nature of the sedimentary deposits comprising the principal groundwater aquifers of the Rio Grande rift. The shallow unconfined and the deeper confined Santa Fe Group aquifers in the San Luis Basin are the main sources of municipal water for the region. The population of the San Luis Valley region is growing rapidly and water shortfalls could have serious consequences. Future growth and land management in the region depend on accurate assessment and protection of the region's groundwater resources.

  2. High-light-output scintillator for photodiode readout: LuI3:Ce3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birowosuto, M. D.; Dorenbos, P.; van Eijk, C. W. E.; Krämer, K. W.; Güdel, H. U.

    2006-06-01

    In this paper, we investigated the scintillation properties of LuI3:Ce3+. Radioluminescence, light output, energy resolution, and γ-scintillation decay are reported. We find an extremely high light output of 98 000+/-10 000 photons/MeV. LuI3:Ce3+ also gives a very high electron-hole (e-h) pair response when it is coupled with an avalanche photodiode (APD) (92 000+/-9000 e-h pairs/MeV). With an APD, a best energy resolution (full width at half maximum over the peak position) of 3.3%+/-0.3% for 662 keV γ quanta is observed. A combination of an extremely high light output and a good energy resolution makes LuI3:Ce3+ an ideal scintillator for radiation sensor applications. Some drawbacks due to the hygroscopicity and the difficult growth of LuI3:Ce3+ crystals are also discussed.

  3. Oligocene basaltic volcanism of the northern Rio Grande Rift: San Luis Hills, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, R.A.; Johnson, C.M.; Mehnert, H.H.

    1991-01-01

    The inception of the Rio Grande Rift in northern New Mexico and southern Colorado was accompanied by voluminous mafic volcanism preserved in part as erosional remnants on an intrarift horst within the current axial rift graben of the San Luis Valley. Major and trace element constraints support a petrogenetic model of fractionation plus lower crustal assimilation for petrologic suites within the San Luis Hills rocks, although the model cannot relate lavas for the entire series to a common parent. Most mafic lavas of the San Luis Hills were evolved (Mg # <60) and contaminated by LREE-enriched silicic partial melts of granulitic lower crust depleted in Rb, Th, and U. However, relatively noncontaminated lavas can be identified and indicate at least two mantle source regions were involved. -from Authors

  4. 76 FR 39091 - San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice of Effectiveness of Surrender

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-05

    ... for a Conduit Hydroelectric Project \\1\\ to the San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District (District) for the Lopez Water Treatment Plant Hydropower Generation Unit Project No. 4804. The... Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Obispo Flood Control and Water Conservation District; Notice...

  5. 75 FR 76726 - San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market-Based Rate Filing Includes Request...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission San Luis Solar, LLC; Supplemental Notice That Initial Market- Based Rate... notice in the above-referenced proceeding of San Luis ] Solar, LLC's application for market-based...

  6. Of Salsa and Sonnets, Stories and Soul: A Conversation with Cuban-American Literary Critic William Luis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Figueredo, Danilo H.

    2000-01-01

    Contains an interview conducted in Spring 2000 via email with William Luis, an author, professor of Spanish at Vanderbilt University, and leading authority on Latin American, Caribbean, Afro-Hispanic, and Latino literatures. Offers Luis' perspective on topics of literature and ethnic/cultural identity. (EV)

  7. Lagrangian water quality dynamics in the San Luis Drain, California.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkmar, E. C.; Dahlgren, R. A.; Stringfellow, W. T.; Henson, S. S.; Borglin, S. E.; Kendall, C.

    2007-12-01

    Integration of temporal changes in biological and water quality constituents during downstream transport is critical to understanding aquatic ecosystem and biogeochemical dynamics of rivers, estuaries, and the near- coastal waters into which rivers flow. Changes in chemical, physical, and biological water quality constituents during downstream transport can be evaluated by following a specific parcel of water, known as a Lagrangian study. The objective of this study was to differentiate changes in water quality constituents occurring within a parcel of water as it travels downstream to the changes observed at a fixed sampling location. We sampled a parcel of agricultural drainage water as it traveled downstream for 84 h in a concrete-lined channel (San Luis Drain in San Joaquin Valley) with no additional water inputs or outputs. The Lagrangian sampling occurred in August 2006 and June 2007. Data from the Lagrangian study was compared to data collected at a fixed point using an automatic pump sampler and water quality sonde. Fluorescence (a measure of algal pigments), dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, and conductivity were measured every 30 minutes, as well as collecting grab samples every 2 h for nutrient and suspended sediment analyses. Sinusoidal diel (24 h) patterns were observed for dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature within the parcel of water. Algal pigments, nutrients, suspended solids, and turbidity did not exhibit sinusoidal diel patterns, generally observed at a fixed sampling location. The diel patterns observed indicated changes that would occur during downstream transport. Algal pigments showed a rapid day time increase during the first 24 to 48 h followed by a plateau or decrease for the remainder of the study. Algal growth was apparent each day during the study, as measured by increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations, in spite of non-detectable phosphate concentrations (<5 ppb) and nearly complete consumption of soluble silica during the 2007

  8. Survey of San Luis Valley School Closures. Resource Report No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Potts, Alfred M.

    School closures in Colorado's San Luis Valley were surveyed, listing the pros and cons of closing school during the potato harvest. In 1958, 12 of 31 elementary schools and 7 of 13 secondary schools ceased operation for periods up to 18 days during the potato harvest, closing schools to 4,447 students. Of these students, 904 elementary children…

  9. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: An Economic Measure of Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). GNRP is equal to aggregate consumption minus the depreciation of man-made and natural capital. We measure the move...

  10. SPECIAL PROBLEM REPORT, IMPROVING EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING PROCEDURES IN SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CANNON, DALE CARTER

    A SURVEY WAS CONDUCTED BY MAIL QUESTIONNAIRE TO GATHER DATA ON THE FARM POPULATION OF SAN LUIS OBISPO COUNTY, CALIFORNIA, TO GET NAMES OF COMMUNITY LEADERS, AND PROVIDE MOTIVATION FOR EXTENSION PROGRAM PLANNING. THE MEAN AGE OF RESPONDENTS WAS 50, THE LARGE MAJORITY WITH CHILDREN AT HOME, THREE-FOURTHS NATIVE TO CALIFORNIA, ONE-HALF BEING BORN IN…

  11. Building from a sustainability viewpoint: New headquarters for San Luis Obispo Solar Group

    SciTech Connect

    Haggard, K.

    1996-10-01

    The Highway 41 fire of 1994 in Central California destroyed the San Luis Obispo Solar Group complex. This destruction offered them an opportunity to update their approach to sustainability while designing and building new facilities for the firm. This paper will describe this approach and the design characteristics of this project.

  12. San Luis Valley - Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Wescott, Konstance L.; Abplanalp, Jennifer M.; Brown, Jeff; Cantwell, Brian; Dicks, Merrill; Fredericks, Brian; Krall, Angie; Rollins, Katherine E.; Sullivan, Robert; Valdez, Arnie; Verhaaren, Bruce; Vieira, Joseph; Walston, Lee; Zvolanek, Emily A.

    2016-10-01

    The San Luis Valley – Taos Plateau Landscape-Level Cultural Heritage Values and Risk Assessment (hereafter referred to as cultural assessment) is a BLM pilot project designed to see whether the Rapid Ecoregional Assessment (REA) framework (already established and implemented throughout many ecoregions in the West) can be applied to the cultural environment.

  13. Emphatic or Reflexive? On the Endophoric Character of French "lui-meme" and Similar Complex Pronouns.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zribi-Hertz, Anne

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the referential properties of a class of complex pronouns labelled M-Pronouns, exemplified by Old English "himself," French "lui-meme," and English "his own." It is shown that M-Pronouns exhibit some properties commonly taken as characterizing reflexive anaphors, and that they also occur as…

  14. Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an ...

  15. Late Glacial and Holocene Record of Hydroclimate in the San Luis Valley, Southern Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, F.; Koran, M.

    2012-12-01

    Lake sediments from the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, archive a detailed record of Late Glacial and Holocene climatic fluctuations in the southern Rocky Mountains. Together with radiometric dating analysis, measurements of grain size, magnetic susceptibility, total inorganic carbon (TIC), oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the TIC fraction on sediment samples from San Luis Lake (at an average resolution of 60 years per sample) allow us to generate a sediment record of climatic change in the region spanning the last 16ka (1 ka=1000 cal yrs). This record documents the timing and duration of major climate episodes and trends, comparable to the existing paleoclimate records from the American Southwest. The Late Glacial record of San Luis Lake contains a big wet episode in the late part of the Mystery Interval (MI), a relatively dry climate during Bølling-Allerød (B/A) warm interval, and a relatively wet episode during the Younger Dryas (YD) interval, similar to the lake-level record found in the Estancia basin in central New Mexico. The early to middle Holocene record of d18O in the San Luis Lake parallels the calcite d18O record of Bison Lake in northern Colorado, documenting a history of significant change in precipitation seasonality across the northern boundary of the North American monsoon (NAM). The middle Holocene epoch is characterized by greater variations in magnetic susceptibility, d18O and d13C, suggesting the prevalence of wet, variable or transitional climate conditions. In contrast, the late Holocene climate is relatively dry, as indicated by more positive values of d18O in San Luis Lake. The results of this study reveal a complex history of climate evolution due to the interactions of two seasonally distinct precipitation regimes with mountainous landforms in the region.

  16. Cyanobacteria/Foraminifera Association from Anoxic/Dysoxic Beds of the Agua Nueva Formation (Upper Cretaceous - Cenomanian/Turonian) at Xilitla, San Luis Potosi, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco-Piñón, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Rojas-León, A.; Duque-Botero, F.

    2008-05-01

    The Agua Nueva Formation in the vicinity of Xilitla, State of San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico, consists of interbedded brown shale (Grayish orange 10YR 7/4 to Moderate yellowish brown 10YR 5/4) and dark-gray fossiliferous limestone (Bluish gray 5B 6/1 to Dark bluish gray 5B 4/1), varying between 10 and 20 cm in thickness. The sequence also includes 2 to 4 cm- thick intermittent bentonite layers (Moderate greenish yellow 10Y 7/4, to dark greenish yellow 10Y 6/6 and Light olive 10Y 5/4). At the field scale, shaly intervals show no apparent internal structures, whereas most limestone beds show primary lamination at the millimeter scale (1-2 mm), and intermittent layers of black chert of about 5 cm thick. Pyrite is present as disseminated crystals and as 2 cm-thick layers. Bioturbation or macrobenthic organisms other than inoceramids do not occur in the Agua Nueva Formation at Xilitla. Unusual macrofossils are present only in limestone strata, and consist of well- preserved diverse genera of fishes such as sharks, Ptychodus sp. and teleosteans, Rhynchodercetis sp., Tselfatia sp., Goulmimichthys sp., and scales of Ichtyodectiformes, as well as ammonites and inoceramids (Blanco et al., 2006). The presence of Inoceramus (Mytyloides) labiatus (Maldonado-Koederll, 1956) indicates an Early Turonian age for the sequence. Total carbonate content (CaCO3 = TIC) varies between 62 and 94% in the Limestone beds, which yield Total Organic Carbon (TOC) from 0.4% to 2.5%; the shale intervals contain TIC values consistently lower than 33% and TOC lower than 0.8% Microscopically the limestone beds vary from mudstone to packstone composed essentially of coccoid cyanobacteria similar to coeval deposits in northeastern Mexico, Coahuila State, at Parras de La Fuente (Duque- Botero 2006). Similarly, the microspheroids are spherical to sub-spherical, and occur as isolated elements or aggregates forming series of chains of parallel-packed light lamina 1-2 mm thick. Filamentous cyanobacteria

  17. Dual-system Tectonics of the San Luis Range and Vicinity, Coastal Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. H.

    2010-12-01

    The M 6.5 "San Simeon" earthquake of December 22, 2003, occurred beneath the Santa Lucia Range in coastal central California, and resulted in around $250,000,000 property damage and two deaths from collapse of an historic building in the town of Paso Robles, located 40 km from the epicenter. The earthquake and more than 10,000 aftershocks were well recorded by nearby seismographs, which permitted detailed analysis of the event (eg: McLaren et al., 2008). This analysis facilitated evaluation of the hazard of the occurrence of a similar event in the nearby San Luis Range, located along the coast west of the city of San Luis Obispo some 55 km south of the San Simeon epicenter. The future occurrence of earthquakes analogous to the 2003 event in this area had been proposed in the late 1960’s (eg: Benioff and Smith, 1967; Richter, 1969) but the apparent hazard of such occurrences came to be overshadowed by the discovery of the “Hosgri” strike slip fault passing close to the area in the offshore. However data accumulated since the early 1970’s clearly demonstrate the hazard as being partitioned between nearby earthquakes of strike slip origin, and underlying earthquakes of thrust origin analogous to that of the 2003 San Simeon earthquake. And for the onshore San Luis Range area, an underlying actively seismogenic thrust wedge appears to provide the maximum potential seismic ground motion; exceeding that potentially resulting from large events on nearby strike slip faults of the San Simeon-Hosgri system, for onshore sites. Understanding and documentation of the geology, geomorphology, tectonics and seismogenesis of the San Luis Range and vicinity has recently experienced a quantum improvement as both new and accumulated data have been analysed. An integrated interpretation of all available data now clearly shows that a dual “side by side” system of active tectonics exists in the region. Essentially the most obvious evidence for this is seen simply in the

  18. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Sherwood, P.B.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.

    1983-07-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 and 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (KGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstock for the production of ethanol.

  19. Airborne electromagnetic and magnetic survey data of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, Lyndsay B.; Bloss, Benjamin R.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Grauch, V.J.S.; Smith, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    In October 2011, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) contracted airborne magnetic and electromagnetic surveys of the Paradox and San Luis Valleys in southern Colorado, United States. These airborne geophysical surveys provide high-resolution and spatially comprehensive datasets characterizing the resistivity structure of the shallow subsurface of each survey region, accompanied by magnetic-field information over matching areas. These data were collected to provide insight into the distribution of groundwater brine in the Paradox Valley, the extent of clay aquitards in the San Luis Valley, and to improve our understanding of the geologic framework for both regions. This report describes these contracted surveys and releases digital data supplied under contract to the USGS.

  20. Commercial production of ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Ferguson, C.D.; Boswell, B.S.; Walter, K.M.; Hart, M.L.; Sherwood, P.B.

    1983-07-01

    The commercial feasibility of producing between 76 and 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of ethanol annually in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using geothermal energy as the primary heat source was assessed. The San Luis Valley is located in south-central Colorado. The valley is a high basin situated approximately 2316 meters (7600 feet) above sea level which contains numerous warm water wells and springs. A known geothermal resource area (IGRA) is located in the east-central area of the valley. The main industry in the valley is agriculture, while the main industry in the surrounding mountains is lumber. Both of these industries can provide feedstocks for the production of ethanol.

  1. [Luis Simarro: precursor of Spanish Neurology and Grand Master of the freemasons].

    PubMed

    García-Albea, E

    Luis Simarro is considered to be the great precursor of Spanish Neurology, Neurohistology and Psychology. Together with Cajal he was one of the most outstanding figures of the Spanish freemasons in the field of medicine, where he reached the highest rank: Grand Master of the Spanish Great Orient. These historical notes summarize the scientific contribution of Simarro and his extensive work in the field of politics where he was influential in the modernization of Spain.

  2. Geologic Map of the San Luis Hills Area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Ren A.; Machette, Michael N.

    1989-01-01

    This report is a digital image of the U.S. Geological Survey Miscellaneous Investigations Series Map I-1906, 'Geologic map of the San Luis Hills area, Conejos and Costilla Counties, Colorado,' which was published in 1989 by Thompson and Machette, scale 1:50,000 but has been unavailable in a digital version. The map area represents the southwestern portion of the Alamosa 30' x 60' quadrangle, which is currently being remapped by the U.S. Geological Survey. The northern and eastern margins of the San Luis Hills area have been remapped at greater detail and thus small portions of the map area have been updated. The northern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2005-1392, the northeastern portion is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2008-1124, and the eastern margin is shown on U.S. Geological Survey Open-File Report 2007-1074. The most significant changes to the 1989 map area are recognition of Lake Alamosa and its deposits (Alamosa Formation), remapping of bedrock in the northeastern San Luis Hills, and redating of volcanic units in the San Luis Hills. Although unpublished, new 40Ar/39Ar ages for volcanic units in the Conejos and Hinsdale Formations add precision to the previous K/Ar-dated rocks, but do not change the basic chronology of the units. The digital version of this map was prepared by Theodore R. Brandt by scanning the original map at 300 pixels per inch, prior to creating the press-quality (96 Mb) and standard (5 Mb) .pdf files.

  3. High Resolution Bathymetric LIDAR Measurements at San Luis Obispo Bay, CA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bensky, T.; Seck, C.; Smith, D.

    2007-12-01

    The movement of sand by ocean currents is an invisible but critically important phenomenon to coastal communities and sea-vessel-dependent economies such as in San Luis Obispo Bay. Over time, sand (or sediment) can cause beaches to erode or rebuild and harbors to "silt up." Dredging harbors is an obvious control mechanism, but the process is messy and expensive. Thus, such "coastal management" decisions should be well informed. Unfortunately, the effect of ocean currents on sand and sediment levels on the ocean floor is poorly understood in part because it is hard to observe: it occurs at the bottom of the ocean. But questions remain: What are the sand movement dynamics at the bottom of San Luis Obispo Bay? Is the bay filling in? Emptying out? What effects do persistent wind and wave patterns have on the ocean bottom? What about large storms? In order to answer these questions, we have installed a bathymetric Light Detection And Ranging (LIDAR) system on the Cal Poly Center for Costal Marine Sciences Pier in Port San Luis Obispo, California. Using a 1 Watt ocean floor (benthic boundary layer or BBL). The photon detector is attached to a high resolution, multiple-stop timer, with 15 picoseconds of event-to-event resolution. This yields an approximate 1 cm resolution of LIDAR ranging and hence sediment transport dynamics. In this poster, we will present preliminary results of our work including evidence of surface- and BBL-scattered photons.

  4. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Méndez-García, C.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.

    2008-01-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. ²³²Th-series, ²³⁸U-series, ⁴⁰K and ¹³⁷Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg⁻¹) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. ²³⁸U and ²³⁴U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to ²¹⁰Pb activities. Results were verified by ¹³⁷Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High ²³⁸U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento – Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) ²³⁴U/²³⁸U and ²³⁸U/²²⁶Ra in sediments have values between 0.9–1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. ²³²Th/²³⁸U, ²²⁸Ra/²²⁶Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  5. Uranium series isotopes concentration in sediments at San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Méndez-García, C.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; García-Tenorio, R.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    Spatial and temporal distribution of the radioisotopes concentrations were determined in sediments near the surface and core samples extracted from two reservoirs located in an arid region close to Chihuahua City, Mexico. At San Marcos reservoir one core was studied, while from Luis L. Leon reservoir one core from the entrance and another one close to the wall were investigated. 232Th-series, 238U-series, 40K and 137Cs activity concentrations (AC, Bq kg-1) were determined by gamma spectrometry with a high purity Ge detector. 238U and 234U ACs were obtained by liquid scintillation and alpha spectrometry with a surface barrier detector. Dating of core sediments was performed applying CRS method to 210Pb activities. Results were verified by 137Cs AC. Resulting activity concentrations were compared among corresponding surface and core sediments. High 238U-series AC values were found in sediments from San Marcos reservoir, because this site is located close to the Victorino uranium deposit. Low AC values found in Luis L. Leon reservoir suggest that the uranium present in the source of the Sacramento - Chuviscar Rivers is not transported up to the Conchos River. Activity ratios (AR) 234U/overflow="scroll">238U and 238U/overflow="scroll">226Ra in sediments have values between 0.9-1.2, showing a behavior close to radioactive equilibrium in the entire basin. 232Th/overflow="scroll">238U, 228Ra/overflow="scroll">226Ra ARs are witnesses of the different geological origin of sediments from San Marcos and Luis L. Leon reservoirs.

  6. Chytridiomycosis in endemic amphibians of the mountain tops of the Córdoba and San Luis ranges, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Lescano, Julián N; Longo, Silvana; Robledo, Gerardo

    2013-02-28

    Chytridiomycosis is a major threat to amphibian conservation. In Argentina, the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been recorded in several localities, and recently, it was registered in amphibians inhabiting low-elevation areas of mountain environments in Córdoba and San Luis provinces. In the present study, we searched for B. dendrobatidis in endemic and non-endemic amphibians on the mountain tops of Córdoba and San Luis provinces. We collected dead amphibians in the upper vegetation belt of the mountains of Córdoba and San Luis. Using standard histological techniques, the presence of fungal infection was confirmed in 5 species. Three of these species are endemic to the mountain tops of both provinces. Although there are no reported population declines in amphibians in these mountains, the presence of B. dendrobatidis in endemic species highlights the need for long-term monitoring plans in the area.

  7. Utilization of geothermal energy in the production of fuel grade ethanol in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Hewlett, E.M.; Erickson, M.V.; Walter, K.M.

    1981-10-01

    The San Luis Valley, a high alpine valley in south-central Colorado, is an area of known geothermal activity. The valley is a sparsely populated agricultural area whose principal crops are potatoes, beer barley, and wheat. In the surrounding mountains there are several lumber operations. This combination of a geothermal heat source and a biomass feedstock source makes the valley a candidate area for the production of fermentation ethanol. Therefore, a study was initiated to investigate the engineering, environmental, institutional and economic feasibility of utilizing geothermal energy for the commercial production of 76 to 189 million liters (20 to 50 million gallons) of fuel grade ethanol in the San Luis Valley.

  8. Presence of Oxyodontherium (Macraucheniidae, Litopterna) in the Río Quinto Formation, San Luis (Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cerdeño, Esperanza; Chiesa, Jorge; Ojeda, Guillermo

    2008-03-01

    This paper deals with the new mammal remains from the Río Quinto Formation, found at the Arroyo La Petra locality (San Luis, Argentina). They consist of an incomplete skull and two mandibular fragments of a macraucheniid, both with milk dentition and M1/m1 erupting, corresponding to a very young individual. Morfometrical characteristics of the specimens allow their identification as Oxyodontherium zeballosi and provide the first cranial data for this species. The holotype of this species is considered a juvenile individual. We maintain a conservative position in maintaining O. zeballosi as a valid species though based on juvenile specimens. However, a full systematic revision of the Family Macraucheniidae is needed to verify the validity and phylogenetic relationships of the taxa included in it. The identification of O. zeballosi indicates a late Miocene age for the fossiliferous level, which implies a cronoestratigraphic extension of the Río Quinto Formation, thus far considered as Pliocene in age. In addition, the presence of Oxyodontherium in San Luis Province increases the geographical distribution of this macrauchenid, whose record previously was limited to Miocene outcrops of the Paraná River (Entre Ríos Province). Its presence in the Mio-Pliocene beds of Uruguay is very doubtful because it is based on a metapodial.

  9. Offshore geology and geomorphology from Point Piedras Blancas to Pismo Beach, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Watt, Janet Tilden; Johnson, Samuel Y.; Hartwell, Stephen R.; Roberts, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Sea level was approximately 120 to 130 m lower during the Last Glacial Maximum (about 21 ka). This approximate depth corresponds to the modern shelf break, a lateral change from the gently dipping (0.8° to 1.0°) outer shelf to the slightly more steeply dipping (about 1.5° to 2.5°) upper slope in the central and northern parts of the map area. South of Point San Luis in San Luis Bay, deltaic deposits offshore of the mouth of the Santa Maria River (11 km south of the map area) have prograded across the shelf break and now form a continuous low-angle (about 0.8°) ramp that extends to water depths of more than 160 m. The shelf break defines the landward boundary of slope deposits. North of Estero Bay, the shelf break is characterized by a distinctly sharp slope break that is mapped as a landslide headscarp above landslide deposits. Multibeam imagery and seismic-reflection profiles across this part of the shelf break show evidence of slope failure, such as slumping, sliding, and soft-sediment deformation, along the entire length of the scarp. Notably, this shelf-break scarp corresponds to a west splay of the Hosgri Fault that dies out just north of the scarp, suggesting that faulting is controlling the location (and instability) of the shelf break in this area.

  10. Novel High Efficiency Microcolumnar LuI3:Ce for Hard X-ray Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marton, Z.; Nagarkar, Vivek V.; Miller, Stuart R.; Brecher, Charles; Bhandari, Harish B.; Kenesei, Peter; Ross, Stephen K.; Almer, Jonathan D.; Singh, Bipin

    2014-03-01

    We have developed a structured scintillator using a vacuum deposition technique that is suitable for manufacturing large area scintillators in a microcolumnar form. While providing high absorption efficiency, it also allows great temporal and spatial resolution X-ray imaging. Microcolumnar films of extremely fast and bright cerium-doped lutetium iodide (LuI3:Ce) scintillator were synthesized. It has high density (~5.6 g/cm3), high effective atomic number (59.7), bright green emission (540 nm range, well matched to commercial optics and CCD sensors), light yield exceeding 115,000 ph/MeV, and rapid, afterglow-free decay (~28 ns). This new scintillator could resolve the 153 ns bunch structure of the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL). Due to the fast, afterglow-free decay, and high efficiency of LuI3:Ce, during the experiments performed at the 1-ID hard X-ray beamline at the APS, single 65 keV X-ray photons could be resolved with high signal-to-noise ratio and with temporal resolution better than 20ns. In the future, it will enable a wide range of hard X-ray (20 keV to 100 keV) imaging and/or high frame-rate applications such as dynamic studies of the structural and electrochemical properties of batteries using microtomographic X-ray imaging, internal corrosion in fuel cells, and time-resolved muscle diffraction experiments.

  11. Master Mentors: Linda Golian-Lui University of Hawaii-Hilo--George Oberle George Mason University, VA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Library Journal, 2005

    2005-01-01

    Many movers and shakers inspire admiration and even awe, but those who inspire love are the mentors who have changed lives. That is why many grateful librarians nominated Linda Golian-Lui and George Oberle. Both of them were accidental librarians, work-study students whose supervisors encouraged them to become paraprofessionals, and then…

  12. DPyC-SMF Medal Award in Honor of José Luis Lucio Martínez

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Napsuciale, M.

    2011-09-01

    The DPyC Medal award 2009 has been granted to José Luis Lucio for his contributions to the field of particle physics and to the development of the Mexican high energy physics community. In this contribution I briefly discuss these topics.

  13. 76 FR 41811 - Kellaway Proposed Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail, San Luis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-15

    ... Shoulderband Snail, San Luis Obispo County, CA AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife Service, Interior. ACTION: Notice of... ``take'' of the Federally endangered Morro shoulderband snail (Helminthoglypta walkeriana) incidental to..., which includes the Kellaway Low-Effect Habitat Conservation Plan for the Morro Shoulderband Snail...

  14. Differences and Commonalities: Farmer Stratifications in the San Luis Valley Research/Extension Project Area. ARE Research Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckert, Jerry B.

    A research project in the San Luis Valley of Colorado sought to isolate a few unique farm types that could become target groups for the design and implementation of agricultural research and extension programs. Questionnaires were completed by 44 of 65 farmers in one watershed area of Conejos County. Analysis revealed a complex pattern of…

  15. Anomalous Representations of Reality in Luis Valdez's "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saborio, Linda

    2008-01-01

    Luis Valdez creates anomalous realities in two of his plays, "The Shrunken Head of Pancho Villa" and "The Mummified Deer," in order to defy dominant expressions of reality as well as classifications of "Chicano" and "Mexican." The anomalous realities, represented primarily by a bodiless head in the first play and an eighty-four-year-old Yaqui…

  16. More than Meets the Eye: Adult Education for Critical Consciousness in Luis Camnitzer's Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zorrilla, Ana Carlina

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the connection between art and adult education for critical consciousness through the conceptual art of Luis Camnitzer. The theoretical framework grounding this research was critical public pedagogy, influenced by both critical theory and Stuart Hall's systems of representation (1997). This framework…

  17. Reducing Seismic Hazards Through Local Geologic Review, San Luis Obispo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, L. I.

    2005-12-01

    San Luis Obispo County is located on the California coastline midway between the large metropolitan areas of Los Angeles and San Francisco. Until the early 1990s, San Luis Obispo was mainly rural and believed to have a lower seismic hazard compared to Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay area. Economic growth in the middle 1990s caused the county to grow nearly 30 percent in 5 years, with new residents emigrating from Los Angeles and the San Francisco Bay area. Local government had vague geologic report requirements. Hence, the quality of reports submitted to the County was poor. Two events changed this: first, the County established a new County Geologist position and program; second, the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake made the general public greatly aware of the seismic risks in their own backyard. Through stringent peer-review, the County Geologist program has reduced seismic losses by requiring detailed engineering geologic reports based on guidelines outlined in the California Geological Survey's Special Publication 117. In addition, in-depth liquefaction studies are required in the community of Oceano, where liquefaction was previously unknown, but revealed in the San Simeon earthquake. Other improvements in seismic hazard characterization include trenching late Quaternary faults, using probabilistic estimates of ground motion, and recognition of enhanced ground shaking in basins and along ridgetops. The success of the County Geologist program was based on several factors: hiring a local geologist with expertise in seismic hazards, support of the County's decision-makers, and cooperative technical studies with the U.S. Geological Survey, the California Geological Survey, CalTrans, and the California Coastal Commission. Some resistance was initially from the land development community, but was resolved by applying policy fairly and uniformly. Thus, standard-of-practice in seismic hazard characterization in San Luis Obispo County is closer to that of the

  18. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO.

    PubMed

    Faccini-Martínez, Álvaro A; Botero-García, Carlos A; Hidalgo, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence of R. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas for R. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia.

  19. Archaeometry of pre-Hispanic pottery from San Luis Potosi, México

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenorio, D.; Jiménez-Reyes, M.; Cabral-Prieto, A.; Siles-Dotor, M. G.; Flores-Ramírez, H.; Galván-Madrid, J. L.

    2000-11-01

    Neutron activation analysis, Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction techniques were used to characterize pre-Hispanic potsherds and modern ceramic pottery, samples of which were collected in Tenexco, San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Elementary and spectroscopic analysis showed differences between ancient and modern ceramics. While the modern ceramics studied were practically new and not used at all, the ancient ones were probably used in domestic or ceremonial activities. Besides, the latter were kept buried for a long time, and it is quite probable that their manufacture was also slightly different from that of the former. These assumptions could provide the clues to understand some of the observed differences between the composition of ancient and modern ceramics whose raw materials may have the same origin.

  20. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments: Progress Report October 1998 through November 2000

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, P.T.; Benson, S.M.; TerBerg, R.; Borglin, S.E.

    2001-06-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), in collaboration with the US Bureau of Reclamation and the Panoche Water District, is conducting a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium (Se)-enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems which may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to the groundwater; increased exposure to the biota; and reduced productivity of farm crops. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through November 2000, as well as the results of these investigations.

  1. Virucidal activity of essential oils from aromatic plants of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    García, C C; Talarico, L; Almeida, N; Colombres, S; Duschatzky, C; Damonte, E B

    2003-11-01

    Essential oils obtained from eight aromatic plants of San Luis Province, Argentina, were screened for virucidal activity against herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1), Junin virus (JUNV) and dengue virus type 2 (DEN-2). The most potent inhibition was observed with the essential oil of Lippia junelliana and Lippia turbinata against JUNV with virucidal concentration 50% (VC(50)) values in the range 14-20 ppm, whereas Aloysia gratissima, Heterotheca latifolia and Tessaria absinthioides inhibited JUNV in the range 52-90 ppm. The virucidal activity was time- and temperature-dependent. The essential oils of A. gratissima, Artemisia douglasiana, Eupatorium patens and T. absinthioides inactivated HSV-1 at 65-125 ppm. However, only A. douglasiana and E. patens had any discernible effect on DEN-2 infectivity with VC(50) values of 60 and 150 ppm, respectively.

  2. CONTRIBUTIONS TO RICKETTSIOSES RESEARCH IN COLOMBIA (1917-1943), LUIS B. PATIÑO CAMARGO

    PubMed Central

    FACCINI-MARTÍNEZ, Álvaro A.; BOTERO-GARCÍA, Carlos A.; HIDALGO, Marylin

    2016-01-01

    Colombian physician Luis Benigno Patiño Camargo was one of the pioneers in the study of rickettsioses in South America, demonstrating for the first time in Colombia the presence of Rickettsia rickettsii as the etiological agent of a highly deadly exanthematic febrile syndrome in the 1930s. However, Patiño-Camargo performed other investigations from 1917-1943, which represent the first descriptions and scientific evidence of the presence of R. prowazekii and R. typhi in Colombia. Almost 60 years after the latest research conducted by Dr. Patiño-Camargo, rickettsioses were again a matter of interest and research. In the last decade over 20 research studies have been published, showing new endemic areas for R. rickettsii, as well as the description of new rickettsial species in Colombia. PMID:27074327

  3. Measured performance results: low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Swisher, J.

    1983-01-01

    The measured performance of seven low-cost solar water heating systems in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado is summarized. During the summer and fall of 1981, SERI monitored a variety of low-cost solar water heating system designs and components. Five systems had site-built collectors, and four included low-cost tank-in-jacket heat exchanger/storage tank components. Two were air-to-water systems. The five liquid-based systems included a drain-down design, a propylene glycol-charged thermosiphon system, and three pumped-glycol systems. The pumped-liquid systems performed the best, with system efficiencies greater than 20% and solar fractions between 40% and 70%. Tjhe air-to-water systems did not perform as well because of leakage in the collectors and heat exchangers. The thermosiphon system performed at lower efficiency because the collector flows were low.

  4. [Chemical physical study of honey of the province of San Luis, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Uñates, M A; Aguilar, A B; Piola, H D; Sturniolo, H L; Aguilar, E G; Molins de Pedernera, M

    1999-06-01

    In Argentina, honey is a product of popular and industrial consumption. It has great economic importance for the province of San Luis, with good acceptance at international level for its quality and purity. To accede to these markets, a suitable control of quality is necessary, with the purpose of adjusting to their requirements. The objective of this work was to analyze the honey of different places of the province and to verify if the quality is optimal, for the commercialization and so guarantee a genuine product to the consumer. The methods applied are the specified by the national and international organisms and the results showed the acceptable quality of the honey. In order to maintain the excellence of this natural product, it is necessary to instruct the producer about the importance of an adequate technological practice, supported by a satisfactory control of quality.

  5. Hydrogeologic Assessment of the East Bear Creek Unit, San LuisNational Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.

    2007-07-15

    San Luis National Wildlife Refuge Complex to meetReclamation s obligations for Level 4 water supply under the CentralValley Project Improvement Act. Hydrogeological assessment of the EastBear Creek Unit of the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge was conductedusing a combination of field investigations and a survey of availableliterature from past US Geological Survey Reports and reports by localgeological consultants. Conservative safe yield estimates made using theavailable data show that the East Bear Creek Unit may have sufficientgroundwater resources in the shallow groundwater aquifer to meet aboutbetween 25 percent and 52 percent of its current Level II and between 17percent and 35 percent of its level IV water supply needs. The rate ofsurface and lateral recharge to the Unit and the design of the well fieldand the layout and capacity of pumped wells will decide both thepercentage of annual needs that the shallow aquifer can supply andwhether this yield is sustainable without affecting long-term aquiferquality. In order to further investigate the merits of pumping the nearsurface aquifer, which appears to have reasonable water quality for usewithin the East Bear Creek Unit -- monitoring of the potential sources ofaquifer recharge and the installation of a pilot shallow well would bewarranted. Simple monitoring stations could be installed both upstreamand downstream of both the San Joaquin River and Bear Creek and beinstrumented to measureriver stage, flow and electrical conductivity.Ideally this would be done in conjunction with a shallow pilot well,pumped to supply a portion of the Unit's needs for the wetland inundationperiod.

  6. Introduction to the Special Collection of Papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, descripti...

  7. Physical properties by geologic unit in the southern San Luis Basin, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V. J.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2016-01-01

    ambient magnetic field (McElhinny, 1973). Remanent components that are generally aligned with or opposite to the present-day Earth’s field are considered to have normal or reversed polarity, respectively. The remanent component is determined from paleomagnetic laboratory measurements of oriented samples, none of which are reported here. However, the remanent components for volcanic units in the southern San Luis Basin are known to be significant, and commonly dominate the total magnetization (Grauch and Keller, 2004).References:Blakely, R.J., 1995, Potential theory in gravity and magnetic applications:  Cambridge University Press, 441 p.Grauch, V.J.S., and Keller, G.R., 2004, Gravity and aeromagnetic expression of tectonic and volcanic elements of the southern San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado: New Mexico Geological Society Guidebook 55, p. 230–243.Hansen, R.O., Racic, L., and Grauch, V J.S., 2005, Magnetic methods in near-surface geophysics, in Butler, D. K., ed., Near-surface Geophysics: Investigations in Geophysics No. 13, Society of Exploration Geophysicists, p. 151–175.Koning, D., and Mansell, M.M., 2011, Regional geologic map of north-central New Mexico:  New Mexico Geological Society Guidebok 62, Plate 2, p. 150.McElhinny, M.W., 1973, Paleomagnetism and plate tectonics, Cambridge, Mass., Cambridge University Press, 358 p.Read, A.S., Thompson, R.A., and Mansell, M.M., 2004, Generalized geologic map—southern San Luis Basin:  New Mexico Geological Society Guidebok 55, Plate 2, p. 114.

  8. Transient Electromagnetic Soundings Near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado (2006 Field Season)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fitterman, David V.; de Sozua Filho, Oderson A.

    2009-01-01

    Time-domain electromagnetic (TEM) soundings were made near Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve in the San Luis Valley of southern Colorado to obtain subsurface information of use to hydrologic modeling. Seventeen soundings were made to the east and north of the sand dunes. Using a small loop TEM system, maximum exploration depths of about 75 to 150 m were obtained. In general, layered earth interpretations of the data found that resistivity decreases with depth. Comparison of soundings with geologic logs from nearby wells found that zones logged as having increased clay content usually corresponded with a significant resistivity decrease in the TEM determined model. This result supports the use of TEM soundings to map the location of the top of the clay unit deposited at the bottom of the ancient Lake Alamosa that filled the San Luis Valley from Pliocene to middle Pleistocene time.

  9. The Pismo Formation and evidence for Pliocene tectonic evolution of the San Luis Range, central coast California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutz, A. T.; Abramsonward, H.; Lettis, W. R.; Thompson, S.; Page, W. D.

    2011-12-01

    Our study of the stratigraphic framework, facies architecture, and structural relationships within the Pliocene Pismo Formation reveals at least two temporally distinct phases of deformation within the San Luis Range and provides important context for on-going analyses of late Quaternary deformation and seismic hazard in coastal San Luis Obispo County. The Pismo Formation is composed of roughly 2 km of sediment deposited during the late Miocene to late Pliocene along the inner and outer continental shelf. The lower Pismo Formation is the Miguelito and Edna Members-lateral equivalents that compose the majority of Pismo Formation by volume-and the upper Pismo Formation is the Gragg Member, the Belleview Member, and the Squire Member. The Gragg Member and the Squire Member both overlie basal unconformities that record separate episodes of deformation in the San Luis Range. The first phase of deformation is characterized by laterally continuous short wavelength WNW-ESE-oriented folds developed in the lower Pismo Formation that collectively form the basin-scale Pismo syncline. This NNE-SSW-directed shortening initiated sometime after the completion of lower Pismo deposition at about 6 Ma. These laterally continuous short wavelength folds are only recognized in the Irish Hills block, the western and topographically highest part of the San Luis Range, and San Luis Obispo Creek marks the position of a roughly NNE-SSW-oriented structural boundary that separates intensely folded lower Pismo Formation in the Irish Hills block from the broadly folded lower Pismo Formation in the Edna block and the eastern San Luis Range. On the west side of this structural boundary the upper Pismo Formation overlies lower Pismo Formation along an angular unconformity and on the east side this contact is disconformable, indicating differential uplift and early Pliocene emergence of the Irish Hills block and western San Luis Range. The second phase of deformation is represented by a broad E

  10. Visual Resource Analysis for Solar Energy Zones in the San Luis Valley

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Robert; Abplanalp, Jennifer M.; Zvolanek, Emily; Brown, Jeffery

    2016-01-01

    This report summarizes the results of a study conducted by Argonne National Laboratory’s (Argonne’s) Environmental Science Division for the U.S. Department of the Interior Bureau of Land Management (BLM). The study analyzed the regional effects of potential visual impacts of solar energy development on three BLM-designated solar energy zones (SEZs) in the San Luis Valley (SLV) in Colorado, and, based on the analysis, made recommendations for or against regional compensatory mitigation to compensate residents and other stakeholders for the potential visual impacts to the SEZs. The analysis was conducted as part of the solar regional mitigation strategy (SRMS) task conducted by BLM Colorado with assistance from Argonne. Two separate analyses were performed. The first analysis, referred to as the VSA Analysis, analyzed the potential visual impacts of solar energy development in the SEZs on nearby visually sensitive areas (VSAs), and, based on the impact analyses, made recommendations for or against regional compensatory mitigation. VSAs are locations for which some type of visual sensitivity has been identified, either because the location is an area of high scenic value or because it is a location from which people view the surrounding landscape and attach some level of importance or sensitivity to what is seen from the location. The VSA analysis included both BLM-administered lands in Colorado and in the Taos FO in New Mexico. The second analysis, referred to as the SEZ Analysis, used BLM visual resource inventory (VRI) and other data on visual resources in the former Saguache and La Jara Field Offices (FOs), now contained within the San Luis Valley FO (SLFO), to determine whether the changes in scenic values that would result from the development of utility-scale solar energy facilities in the SEZs would affect the quality and quantity of valued scenic resources in the SLV region as a whole. If the regional effects were judged to be significant, regional

  11. Airborne pollen and fungal spore sampling on the central California coast: the San Luis Obispo pollen project.

    PubMed

    McLean, A C; Parker, L; von Reis, J; von Reis, J

    1991-10-01

    A semiarid coastal location in San Luis Obispo, California was surveyed for 3 years (1986-1988) using a Rotorod sampler. Significant year-to-year variations in predominant pollen occurred, and abundant levels of fungal spores were observed. Coincidently, a large wildlands fire that may have affected pollen levels occurred in the region shortly before sampling began. The entire survey period took place during a drought.

  12. Pliocene and Pleistocene geologic and climatic evolution in the San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rogers, K.L.; Larson, E.E.; Smith, G.; Katzman, D.; Smith, G.R.; Cerling, T.; Wang, Y.; Baker, R.G.; Lohmann, K.C.; Repenning, C.A.; Patterson, P.; Mackie, G.

    1992-01-01

    Sediments of the Alamosa Formation spanning the upper part of the Gauss and most of the Matuyama Chrons were recovered by coring in the high (2300 m) San Luis Valley of south-central Colorado. The study site is located at the northern end of the Rio Grande rift. Lithologic changes in the core sediments provide evidence of events leading to integration of the San Luis drainage basin into the Rio Grande. The section, which includes the Huckleberry Ridge Ash (2.02 Ma) and spans the entire Matuyama Chron, contains pollen, and invertebrate and vertebrate fossils. Stable isotope analyses of inorganic and biogenic carbonate taken over most of the core indicate substantially warmer temperatures than occur today in the San Luis Valley. At the end of the Olduvai Subchron, summer precipitation decreased, summer pan evaporation increased, and temperatures increased slightly compared to the earlier climate represented in the core. By the end of the Jaramillo Subchron, however, cold/wet and warm/dry cycles become evident and continue into the cold/wet regime associated with the deep-sea oxygen-isotope Stage 22 glaciation previously determined from outcrops at the same locality. Correspondence between the Hansen Bluff climatic record and the deep-sea oxygen-isotope record (oxygen-isotope stages from about 110-18) is apparent, indicating that climate at Hansen Bluff was responding to global climatic changes. ?? 1992.

  13. Mössbauer, TEM/SAED and XRD investigation on waste dumps of the Valea lui Stan gold mines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Constantinescu, Serban Grigore; Udubasa, Sorin S.; Udubasa, Gheorghe; Kuncser, Victor; Popescu-Pogrion, Nicoleta; Mercioniu, Ionel; Feder, Marcel

    2012-03-01

    The complementary investigation techniques, Mössbauer spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy with selected area electron diffraction (TEM/SAED), X-ray diffraction (XRD) have been used to investigate the fate of the Valea lui Stan, Romania, gold-ore nanoscale-minerals during the long time of residence in the waste dumps. The preliminary investigations showed such waste dumps to contain significant amount of metals which cannot be identified by conventional methods. An intense research activity started up in order to evaluate the possibilities to recycle Valea lui Stan waste dumps and to recover metals by chemical or phytoextraction procedures. The waste dumps naturally show different mineral constituents with clay minerals as major phases, observed by XRD-technique. Although the waste dumps materials have whitish-yellowish colours, MÖSSBAUER technique evidences the presence of the finely dispersed iron bearing minerals. The authors are focusing to inspect and analyze Fe-compounds in the samples collected from Valea lui Stan's waste dumps in order to identify the magnetic phases by Mössbauer technique.

  14. Agricultural producers' perceptions of sandhill cranes in the San Luis Valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.

    2001-01-01

    Management for migratory birds at an ecosystem scale requires forming cooperative partnerships with the private sector. To be effective, however, wildlife managers must understand the economic and social attitudes of private landowners to ensure that strategies involving stakeholders are viable and can be implemented. We documented attitudes of farmers in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado toward Rocky Mountain Population greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida) using a self administered, mail-back survey. Overall response rate was 46.7%. Viewing sandhill cranes in the SLV was considered somewhat important or important by 78.6% of respondents. In contrast, only 62.1% of respondents indicated that viewing sandhill cranes was somewhat important or important on their own land. Farmers' attitudes toward viewing sandhill cranes on their own property were related (P=0.02) to perceived conflicts with crop production. The extent of crane use (P=0.04) was the only variable we tested that predicted whether conflicts were reported. Our results suggest that partnerships between farmers and natural resource agencies concerned with management of sandhill cranes may be viable. However, the role of farmers in any proposed management strategy must be examined carefully because there may be an upper limit of crane use on private land that farmers will tolerate.

  15. Evaluating the sustainability of a regional system using Fisher information in the San Luis Basin, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Eason, Tarsha; Cabezas, Heriberto

    2012-02-01

    This paper describes the theory, data, and methodology necessary for using Fisher information to assess the sustainability of the San Luis Basin (SLB) regional system over time. Fisher information was originally developed as a measure of the information content in data and is an important method in information theory. Our adaptation of Fisher information provides a means of monitoring the variables of a system to characterize dynamic order, and, therefore, its regimes and regime shifts. This work is part of the SLB Sustainability Metrics Project, which aimed to evaluate movement over time towards or away from regional sustainability. One of the key goals of this project was to use readily available data to assess the sustainability of the system including its environmental, social and economic aspects. For this study, Fisher information was calculated for fifty-three variables which characterize the consumption of food and energy, agricultural production, environmental characteristics, demographic properties and changes in land use for the SLB system from 1980 to 2005. Our analysis revealed that while the system displayed small changes in dynamic order over time with a slight decreasing trend near the end of the period, there is no indication of a regime shift. Therefore, the SLB system is stable with very slight movement away from sustainability in more recent years.

  16. Patterns of food abundance for breeding waterbirds in the san luis valley of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gammonley, J.H.; Laubhan, M.K.

    2002-01-01

    We measured the amount and distribution of macroinvertebrates and seeds in four wetland habitats (short emergent, seasonal open water, semipermanent/permanent open water, and saltgrass [Distichlis spicata]) used by breeding ducks and shorebirds at a wetland complex in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA. Density of macroinvertebrates did not differ among habitats or sampling periods (P = 0.45), but dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy production were greater (P < 0.05) in short emergent than in other habitats. These differences were largely due to the greater dry mass of gastropods in short emergent than in other habitats. Total seed density, dry mass, crude protein, and gross energy differed among habitats and periods with interaction effects (P <0.01). Although seed abundance varied among habitats and sampling periods, abundance was greatest in short emergent during all sampling periods. Breeding waterbirds consumed a variety of macroinvertebrates and seeds on the study area. Patterns of abundance among habitats of macroinvertebrates and seeds consumed by six waterbird species were not consistent with patterns of foraging habitat use by most ducks and shorebirds at this wetland complex. Our results indicate that estimates of food or nutrient abundance are useful in assessing the functional role of broad habitat types, but factors other than food abundance also influence avian selection of wetland foraging habitats. ?? 2002, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  17. Land disposal of San Luis drain sediments, Panoche Water District, South Dos Palos, California

    SciTech Connect

    Zawislanski, Peter; Benson, Sally; TerBerg, Robert; Borglin, Sharon

    2002-07-01

    Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL), LFR Levine-Fricke (LFR), the U.S. Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) and the Panoche Water District, have completed a pilot-scale test of the viability of land application of selenium- (Se-) enriched San Luis Drain (SLD) sediments. The project was initiated in October 1998 by LBNL. LFR assumed the role of primary subcontractor on the project in July 2001. Substantial portions of this report, describing work performed prior to November 2000, were previously prepared by LBNL personnel. The data set, findings, and recommendations are herein updated with information collected since November 2000. Local land disposal is an attractive option due to its low cost and the proximity of large areas of available land. Two modes of disposal are being tested: (1) the application to a nearby SLD embankment, and (2) the application to and incorporation with nearby farm soils. The study of these options considers the key problems that may potentially arise from this approach. These include disturbance of SLD sediments during dredging, resulting in increased downstream Se concentrations; movement of the land-applied Se to groundwater; reduced productivity of farm crops; and Se uptake by wild and crop plants. This report describes field and laboratory activities carried out from 1998 through February 2002, and results of these investigations.

  18. Angiotensin II type 1 receptor A1166C gene polymorphism and essential hypertension in San Luis.

    PubMed

    Lapierre, Alicia Viviana; Arce, Maria Elena; Lopez, José Raul; Ciuffo, Gladys María

    2006-12-01

    Essential hypertension is considered a multifactorial trait resulting from a combination of environmental and genetic factors. The angiotensin II type 1 receptor mediates the vasoconstrictor and growth-promoting effects of Ang II. The A1166C polymorphism of the AT1 receptor gene may be associated with cardiovascular phenotypes, such as high arterial blood pressure, aortic stiffness, and increased cardiovascular risk. We investigated the association between this A1166C polymorphism and hypertension in hypertense and normotense subjects from San Luis (Argentina) by mismatch PCR-RFLP analysis. Hypertense patients exhibited significant increases in lipid related values and body mass index. The frequency of occurrence of the C1166 allele was higher among patients with hypertension (0.19) than in the control group (0.06). No significant association was found between this polymorphism and essential hypertension in the study population, although the AC genotype prevalence was higher in patients with hypertension and positive family history of hypertension (32%) than in control subjects (12%). Patients with the A1166C polymorphism exhibited higher levels of serum total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol and BMI than in control subjects. Taken together the genotype and biochemical parameters and considering the restrictive selection criteria used, the present results suggest a correlation between AT1 A1166C gene polymorphism and risk of cardiovascular disease.

  19. Quality of ground water in agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Edelmann, Patrick; Buckles, D.R.

    1984-01-01

    The quality of ground water in the principal agricultural areas of the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado was evaluated using chemical analyses of water collected from 57 wells completed in the unconfined aquifer and from 25 wells completed in the confined aquifer. Ground water in both aquifers generally contains dissolved-solids concentrations of less than 500 milligrams per liter. In most areas, calcium is the principal cation in the ground water. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations expressed as nitrogen, are generally less than 1 milligram per liter. However, the quality of ground water in certain areas may pose health and agricultural hazards. Water in the unconfined aquifer near Center contains high nitrite plus nitrate as nitrogen concentrations. The highest measured concentration in this area was 33 milligrams per liter. Water containing more than 1 milligram per liter of nitrite as nitrogen, or 10 milligrams per liter nitrate, as nitrogen, poses a potential health hazard for infants and should not be used for drinking. In addition, dissolved-solids concentration in the ground water in some areas is greater than 500 milligrams per liter and, if used for irrigation may reduce crop yields. (USGS)

  20. A geophysical study of the hydrogeology of the Carrizo plain area, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, J.W. )

    1991-02-01

    This investigation was conducted to attempt to locate structural geologic features and variations in aquifer characteristics in an area within the Carrizo plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. The investigation included a review of the established geologic knowledge for the region, followed by field studies. The field studies included surface magnetometer surveys, thermal borehole logging, and a piezometric level survey. Existing borehole electric logs were obtained. The conclusions of the investigation were then derived from a collective interpretation. The investigation concluded that a fault appears to extend beneath the valley fill in the northwestern part of the area, and that a subsurface basaltic dike is apparently located in the southeastern part of the area. Evaluations indicate that the valley has a deep aquifer overlain by a confining clay-rich layer in the central part of the area. Areal and depth-related variations in water quality are probably influenced by the presence of evaporites near Soda Lake and in the region near the San Andreas fault.

  1. Problems related to water quality and algal control in Lopez Reservoir, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fuller, Richard H.; Averett, Robert C.; Hines, Walter G.

    1975-01-01

    A study to determine the present enrichment status of Liopez Reservoir in San Luis Obispo county, California, and to evaluate copper sulfate algal treatment found that stratification in the reservoir regulates nutrient release and that algal control has been ineffective. Nuisance algal blooms, particularly from March to June, have been a problem in the warm multipurpose reservoir since it was initially filled following intense storms in 1968-69. The cyanophyte Anabaena unispora has been dominant; cospecies are the diatoms Stephanodiscus astraea and Cyclotella operculata, and the chlorophytes Pediastrum deplex and Sphaerocystis schroeteri. During an A. unispora bloom in May 1972 the total lake surface cell count was nearly 100,000 cells/ml. Thermal stratification from late spring through autumn results in oxygen deficiency in the hypolimnion and metalimnion caused by bacterial oxidation of organic detritus. The anaerobic conditions favor chemical reduction of organic matter, which constitute 10-14% of the sediment. As algae die, sink to the bottom, and decompose, nutrients are released to the hypolimnion , and with the autumn overturn are spread to the epilimnion. Algal blooms not only hamper recreation, but through depletion of dissolved oxygen in the epilimnion may have caused periodic fishkills. Copper sulfate mixed with sodium citrate and applied at 1.10-1.73 lbs/acre has not significantly reduced algal growth; a method for determining correct dosage is presented. (Lynch-Wisconsin)

  2. Ecology of mosquitoes and lack of arbovirus activity at Morro Bay, San Luis Obispo County, California.

    PubMed

    Reisen, W K; Hardy, J L; Chiles, R E; Kramer, L D; Martinez, V M; Presser, S B

    1996-12-01

    During 1994-95, totals of 17,656 adult females and 111,104 adults reared from field-collected immatures comprising 19 species in 4 genera of mosquitoes were collected from Morro Bay estuary and surrounding environs in San Luis Obispo County, California. Aedes dorsalis was the dominant summer mosquito, whereas Aedes squamiger and Ae. washinoi were abundant during winter and early spring. Host-seeking Culex tarsalis were collected infrequently, even though immatures were collected frequently from freshwater surface pools. Overall, 13,561 adults (386 pools) and 91,547 adults reared from field-collected immatures (3,027 pools) were tested for arboviruses by plaque assay in Vero cell culture. Morro Bay virus, a member of the California serogroup, was isolated from 4 pools of Ae. squamiger reared from field-collected immatures (minimum field infection rate-1.07 per 1,000), verifying the maintenance of this virus by vertical transmission. All remaining pools were negative. Three flocks of 10 sentinel chickens and one group of 5 sentinel rabbits were bled biweekly and tested for arbovirus antibodies with negative results. Neither horizontal nor vertical transmission of western equine encephalomyelitis virus was detected.

  3. The characteristic photoluminescence and EPR features of superdeep diamonds (São-Luis, Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuryeva, Olga P.; Rakhmanova, Mariana I.; Nadolinny, Vladimir A.; Zedgenizov, Dmitry A.; Shatsky, Vladislav S.; Kagi, Hiroyuki; Komarovskikh, Andrey Yu.

    2015-10-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) were used for the first time to characterize properties of superdeep diamonds from the São-Luis alluvial deposits (Brazil). The infrared measurements showed the low nitrogen content (>50 of 87 diamonds from this locality were nitrogen free and belonged to type IIa) and simultaneously the extremely high level of nitrogen aggregation (pure type IaB being predominant), which indicates that diamonds under study might have formed under high pressure and temperature conditions. In most cases, PL features excited at various wavelengths (313, 473, and 532 nm) were indicative of different growth and post-growth processes during which PL centers could be formed via interaction between vacancies and nitrogen atoms. The overall presence of the 490.7 nm, H3, and H4 centers in the luminescence spectra attests to strong plastic deformations in these diamonds. The neutral vacancy known as the GR1 center has probably occurred in a number of crystals due to radiation damage in the post-growth period. The 558.5 nm PL center is found to be one of the most common defects in type IIa samples which is accompanied by the EPR center with g-factor of 2.00285. The 536 and 576 nm vibronic systems totally dominated the PL spectra of superdeep diamonds, while none of "normal" diamonds from the Mir pipe (Yakutia) with similar nitrogen characteristics showed the latter three PL centers.

  4. Theoretical investigation of the lowest-lying electronic structure of LuI molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Assaf, J.; Taher, F.; Magnier, S.

    2014-01-01

    CASSCF/MRCI calculations using Effective Core Potential (ECP) basis sets for both Lu and I atoms, have been performed for the first 22 electronic states in the representation 2s+1Λ(±) for the LuI molecule. This investigation included the corresponding 43 molecular states in the representation Ω(±) when taking the spin-orbit coupling (SOC) in consideration. Calculated potential energy curves (PECs) have been displayed. Spectroscopic constants Te, ωe, ωeχe, Be and the internuclear distance Re have been calculated for the ground state and for the low-lying electronic states situated below 40,410 cm-1 and for their corresponding components with SOC. The transition dipolar moments between states have been given at the minimum position Re = 2.75 Å of the ground state X1Σ+. The calculated set of singlet and triplet states provides a theoretical prediction for more than 19 yet unobserved electronic states.

  5. Tracing groundwater recharge in the San Luis Valley, Colorado: Groundwater contamination susceptibility in an agricultural watershed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Tanya; Hindshaw, Ruth; Singer, Michael

    2015-04-01

    Water is a vital resource in any agricultural watershed, yet in the arid western United States farming practices threaten the quality and availability of groundwater. This is a pressing concern in the San Luis Valley, southern Colorado, where agriculture comprises 30% of the local economy, and employs over half the valley population. Although 54 % of the water used for irrigation is surface water, farmers do not usually apply this water directly to their fields. Instead, the water is often diverted into pits which recharge the aquifer, and the water is subsequently pumped during the following irrigation season. The Rio Grande Water Conservation District recognises that recharge to the unconfined aquifer has been outpaced by commercial irrigation for at least four decades, resulting in a decline in groundwater levels. Recycled irrigation water, and leakage from unlined canals now represent the greatest recharge contribution to the unconfined aquifer in this region. This makes the shallow groundwater particularly susceptible to agricultural contamination. The purpose of this study is to assess groundwater contamination in the unconfined and upper confined aquifers of the San Luis Valley, which are the most susceptible to contamination due to their close proximity to the surface. Although concentrations of potentially harmful contaminants from agricultural runoff are regularly monitored, the large spatial and temporal fluctuations in values make it difficult to determine long-term trends. We have analysed δ18O, δ2H and major-ion chemistry of 57 groundwater, stream and precipitation samples, collected in June 2014, and interpreted them alongside regional stream flow data and groundwater levels. This will allow us to study the seasonality and locality of groundwater recharge to provide greater insight into the watershed's potential for pollution. A groundwater vulnerability assessment was performed using the model DRASTIC (Depth to water, Recharge, Aquifer media, Soil

  6. Scanning electron microscope and statistical analysis of suspended heavy metal particles in San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Fernández, M. Monroy; Luszczewski Kudra, A.; Leyva Ramos, R.

    Three hundred samples of urban aerosol were collected in high-volume samplers from five urban locations situated near an important metallurgical plant in the city of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Whole samples were analyzed by atomic absorption (AA) for Pb, Cd, As, Cu, Ni, Fe and Cr. One hundred eighty of these samples were subjected to X-ray microanalysis (EDS) coupled with a scanning electron microscope to classify individual particles according to their chemical or mineralogical composition. The principal component analysis (PCA) obtained from the bulk sample analysis, and X-ray microanalysis from individual particles, confirmed chemical associations among elements directly and indirectly. PCA from bulk assays made the most effective use of X-ray microanalysis to characterize major particle types. Some chemical associations would be difficult to detect using microanalysis, alone, for example, in anthropogenic complex phases. In this work, the combined use of microanalysis and statistical methods permitted identification of associations among elements. We observed an association of Pb-As-Cd and Fe-Mn among the samples. In a second order, Pb-Fe, Pb-Mn, Fe-As, Fe-Cd, Cd-Mn and As-Mn showed a lower association. Only Ni and Cu appeared unassociated with any other element analyzed by AA. We characterized the mineral phases by size range, morphology and chemical composition using SEM-EDS to obtain a compositional approach of anthropogenic phases and peculiar morphology and size. A high percentage of heavy metal particles smaller than 2 μm were detected.

  7. Shoreline and Oceano Fault Zones' Intersection Geometry, San Luis Obispo Bay, Offshore South Central Coastal California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hogan, P. J.; Nishenko, S. P.; Greene, H. G.; Bergkamp, B.

    2015-12-01

    As part of the Central Coastal California Seismic Imaging Project, high-resolution 3D low energy marine seismic-reflection data were acquired within San Luis Obispo Bay in 2011 and 2012. Mapping of the sediment-buried bedrock surface using 2D and 3D data clearly reveals that the trace of the Shoreline fault zone bifurcates at Souza Rock. The eastern strand is a reverse fault that trends toward the east-southeast, connecting with the Oceano fault zone onshore. The Shoreline fault is a vertical dextral fault with a very linear geometry that continues south to near the Santa Maria river mouth, and may intersect the Casmalia fault onshore. Both of these fault strands are crossed by Pleistocene low-stand paleochannels eroded into bedrock, and are buried by marine and non-marine sediment. The 3D data show that both the Oceano and Shoreline faults are narrow, well defined fault zones. The reverse slip rate for the Oceano fault (~0.1 mm/y.) falls within published slip rate estimates for the Oceano fault onshore (0.01-0.20 mm/y). The dextral slip rate for the Shoreline fault southeast of Souza Rock is estimated to be 0.06 mm/y. Souza Rock is located on the hanging wall of the Oceano Fault, north of the point of intersection between the Shoreline and Oceano faults. Water depths shoal from 60 m on the surrounding seafloor to 5 m on top of Souza Rock. This structure is interpreted as a structural popup in a restraining bend where the N65°W-trending Oceano fault intersects the N25°W-trending Shoreline fault. The structural geometry near the point of intersection has several minor secondary fault strands, but is remarkably simple.

  8. An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Daniel E; Garmestani, Ahjond S

    2012-03-01

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) provides a framework for understanding and interpreting sustainability. EST implies that "what is sustainable" for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system and within the system of concern. The pulsing paradigm explains the ubiquitous cycles of change that apparently govern ecosystems, rather than succession to a steady state that is then sustainable. Therefore, to make robust decisions among environmental policies and alternatives, decision-makers need to know where their system resides in the cycles of change that govern it. This theory was examined by performing an emergy evaluation of the sustainability of a regional system, the San Luis Basin (SLB), CO. By 1980, the SLB contained a climax stage agricultural system with well-developed crop and livestock production along with food and animal waste processing. The SLB is also a hinterland in that it exports raw materials and primary products (exploitation stage) to more developed areas. Emergy indices calculated for the SLB from 1995 to 2005 revealed changes in the relative sustainability of the system over this time. The sustainability of the region as indicated by the renewable emergy used as a percent of total use declined 4%, whereas, the renewable carrying capacity declined 6% over this time. The Emergy Sustainability Index (ESI) showed the largest decline (27%) in the sustainability of the region. The total emergy used by the SLB, a measure of system well-being, was fairly stable (CV = 0.05). In 1997, using renewable emergy alone, the SLB could support 50.7% of its population at the current standard of living, while under similar conditions the U.S. could support only 4.8% of its population. In contrast to other indices of sustainability, a new index, the Emergy Sustainable Use Index (ESUI), which considers the benefits gained by the larger system compared to the potential for local environmental

  9. Sedimentary record of storm deposits from Hurricane Ike, Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkes, A. D.; Horton, B. P.

    2012-10-01

    Prehistoric records of land-falling tropical cyclones further our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of tropical cyclone activity and its relationship with global climatic changes. Here, we describe deposit stratigraphy and sedimentology resulting from overwash during Hurricane Ike, which made landfall on September 13th 2008, to provide a much needed modern analogue for paleo-hurricane deposits and evaluate the hurricane's influence on barrier stability. We compared the volume, grain size distribution, organic content and foraminiferal assemblages of washover deposits at three sites from Galveston and San Luis Islands, Texas that were up to 50 km west of Ike's landfall. Storm surge heights varied between 3.7 and 2.7 m with inland inundation extents of 330 to 113 m. At each of the study sites, Hurricane Ike eroded the shoreline and re-deposited a landward-thinning sand sheet between 0.02 and 0.28 m thick over short-grass prairie/salt-marsh soil. Shoreline erosion estimates suggest that only between 10 and 30% of eroded beach sediment is deposited on land as washover (net gain to barrier elevation), while the remainder is re-deposited subtidally or offshore, a potential net loss to the coastal sediment budget. The washover sediment was readily identifiable by abrupt changes in grain size, organic content, and buried in situ grasses. Foraminiferal assemblages within washover and short-grass prairie/salt-marsh sediments (when present) have similar assemblages, which are dominated by Ammonia spp. and Elphidium spp. These species are common to bay and nearshore environments of the Gulf of Mexico. Foraminiferal species Bolivina subaenariensis, Quinqueloculina seminulum and planktonic species are restricted to the washover deposits, which may suggest sediment provenance from inner shelf environments.

  10. Laser ultrasonic inspection system (LUIS) at the Sacramento Air Logistics Center

    SciTech Connect

    Fiedler, C.; Ducharme, T.; Kwan, J.

    1996-12-31

    The usage of composite parts for critical applications on Air Force aircraft increases significantly with each new aircraft design. These composite parts are susceptible to delaminations, disbonds, and impact damage. As part of its mission to validate the integrity of aging composite aircraft, the Sacramento Air Logistics Center needs to be able to rapidly, economically, and accurately inspect a wide range of composite aircraft parts. Laser based ultrasound (LBU) inspection systems can rapidly inspect composite parts because they use laser beams which can be rapidly scanned because they do not need to be incident normal to the surface. One short pulse of laser light (120 ns) is used to generate an ultrasonic pulse, which always propagates normal to the surface where it is generated. A second, much longer pulse of laser light, and an interferometer are used to detect ultrasonic echoes which are reflected by internal flaws. Both of these laser beams can be rapidly scanned across the surface of the part, which enables LBU inspections to be as much as ten times faster than conventional inspections. In addition, LBU inspections do not require the complex scan plans or expensive fixturing that squirter systems require. Because of these advantages, and because of its composite workload, the Sacramento Air Logistics Center (SM-ALC/TIMSN) has procured the Laser Ultrasonic Inspection System (LUIS) for inspecting composite parts. Since this is the first known LBU inspection system to be installed in a production environment for scanning a production workload, the capabilities of this system will be described in detail.

  11. [Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos: criminal and legal aspects of serial homicide with over 200 victims].

    PubMed

    Benecke, Mark; Rodriguez y Rowinski, Miguel

    2002-01-01

    This is the first scientific report on the crimes of the homosexual paedophile sadist Luis Alfredo Garavito Cubillos, based on a research stay of the authors in Columbia, and including discussions with the investigators, and the offender. Between 1992 and 1999, Garavito killed more than 200 children in the core age span between 8 and 13 years (as an exception, 6 to 16 years). His modus operandi remained stable. During daytime, he lured children of a lower social status out of crowded parts of the city into hidden areas that were overgrown with high plants. Garavito promised either payment for easy work, or drugs, or made other socially believable offers. The children were tied up, tortured, raped, and killed by at least one cut in the lateral part of the neck, or by decapitation. During the killings, Garavito was drunk. Even after his arrest (for attempted sexual abuse under a wrong identity) it was not immediately possible to track his crimes since Garavito had frequently changed his places of stay and his jobs. He also grew different hairdos and used wrong names. During his still ongoing confessions, he directs the investigators correctly to all scenes of crime spread over large parts of Columbia. In our report, we give an overview over the course of investigations, hint to similarities in the cases of the German serial killer Denke (1920's) and homosexual paedophile serial killer Jürgen Bartsch (1960's), and give preliminary impressions on the offender's personality. Furthermore, the violent environment and juridical peculiarities in Columbia are discussed. In spite of a total penalty of 2600 years in prison, it is formally well possible that Garavito will be released out of prison within the next 10 to 20 years, i.e. even before the maximum sentence of 40 years will be over.

  12. Green Net Regional Product for the San Luis Basin, Colorado: an economic measure of regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Templeton, Joshua J; Wu, Shanshan

    2012-11-30

    This paper presents the data sources and methodology used to estimate Green Net Regional Product (GNRP), a green accounting approach, for the San Luis Basin (SLB). We measured the movement away from sustainability by examining the change in GNRP over time. Any attempt at green accounting requires both economic and natural capital data. However, limited data for the Basin requires a number of simplifying assumptions and requires transforming economic data at the national, state, and county levels to the level of the SLB. Given the contribution of agribusiness to the SLB, we included the depletion of both groundwater and soil as components in the depreciation of natural capital. We also captured the effect of the consumption of energy on climate change for future generations through carbon dioxide (CO(2)) emissions. In order to estimate the depreciation of natural capital, the shadow price of water for agriculture, the economic damages from soil erosion due to wind, and the social cost of carbon emissions were obtained from the literature and applied to the SLB using benefit transfer. We used Colorado's total factor productivity for agriculture to estimate the value of time (i.e., to include the effects of exogenous technological progress). We aggregated the economic data and the depreciation of natural capital for the SLB from 1980 to 2005. The results suggest that GNRP had a slight upward trend through most of this time period, despite temporary negative trends, the longest of which occurred during the period 1985-86 to 1987-88. However, given the upward trend in GNRP and the possibility of business cycles causing the temporary declines, there is no definitive evidence of moving away from sustainability.

  13. Advancements in understanding the aeromagnetic expressions of basin-margin faults—An example from San Luis Basin, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grauch, V. J.; Bedrosian, Paul A.; Drenth, Benjamin J.

    2013-01-01

    Herein, we summarize and expand on an investigation of the sources of aeromagnetic anomalies related to faults along the eastern margin of the San Luis Basin, northern Rio Grande Rift, Colorado (Grauch et al., 2010). Similar to the faults examined in the central Rio Grande Rift, magnetic sources can be completely explained by tectonic juxtaposition and produce multiple, vertically stacked magnetic contrasts at individual faults. However, the geologic sources are different. They arise from both the sedimentary cover and the underlying bedrock rather than from stratified sediments. In addition, geologic evidence for secondary growth or destruction of magnetic minerals at the fault zone is lacking.

  14. Summary of the geology of the San Luis Basin, Colorado-New Mexico with emphasis on the geothermal potential for the Monte Vista Graben. Special Publication 17

    SciTech Connect

    Burroughs, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The known geologic data of the San Luis Basin are reviewed and related to an understanding of the hydrogeothermal potential of the Alamosa-Monte Vista area. The physiographic setting of the region, the structural framework of the basin, and its influence on the stratigraphic makeup of the rock sequence, which in turn control the occurrence of potential deep water reservoirs, are reviewed. It is suggested that the San Luis Basin was well-developed by Miocene time, and that although the basin was modified by Neogene faulting, it is essentially a late Laramide event having been produced during the Paleogene. Attention is also given to high heat flow along the Rio Grande Rift and to the geothermal gradient of the San Luis Basin. The confined aquifer is then considered in respect to its hydrogeology, water quality, and as to the legal aspects of the system. (LEW)

  15. Late Miocene-Pleistocene evolution of a Rio Grande rift subbasin, Sunshine Valley-Costilla Plain, San Luis Basin, New Mexico and Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ruleman, C.A.; Thompson, R.A.; Shroba, R.R.; Anderson, M.; Drenth, B.J.; Rotzien, J.; Lyon, J.

    2013-01-01

    The Sunshine Valley–Costilla Plain, a structural subbasin of the greater San Luis Basin of the northern Rio Grande rift, is bounded to the north and south by the San Luis Hills and the Red River fault zone, respectively. Surficial mapping, neotectonic investigations, geochronology, and geophysics demonstrate that the structural, volcanic, and geomorphic evolution of the basin involves the intermingling of climatic cycles and spatially and temporally varying tectonic activity of the Rio Grande rift system. Tectonic activity has transferred between range-bounding and intrabasin faults creating relict landforms of higher tectonic-activity rates along the mountain-piedmont junction. Pliocene–Pleistocene average long-term slip rates along the southern Sangre de Cristo fault zone range between 0.1 and 0.2 mm/year with late Pleistocene slip rates approximately half (0.06 mm/year) of the longer Quaternary slip rate. During the late Pleistocene, climatic influences have been dominant over tectonic influences on mountain-front geomorphic processes. Geomorphic evidence suggests that this once-closed subbasin was integrated into the Rio Grande prior to the integration of the once-closed northern San Luis Basin, north of the San Luis Hills, Colorado; however, deep canyon incision, north of the Red River and south of the San Luis Hills, initiated relatively coeval to the integration of the northern San Luis Basin. Long-term projections of slip rates applied to a 1.6 km basin depth defined from geophysical modeling suggests that rifting initiated within this subbasin between 20 and 10 Ma. Geologic mapping and geophysical interpretations reveal a complex network of northwest-, northeast-, and north-south–trending faults. Northwest- and northeast-trending faults show dual polarity and are crosscut by north-south– trending faults. This structural model possibly provides an analog for how some intracontinental rift structures evolve through time.

  16. San Luis Obispo Transform Fault and Middle Miocene rotation of the Western Transverse Ranges, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Clarence A., Jr.

    1981-02-01

    A fault-disrupted, linear belt of lower middle Miocene pyroclastic and volcanic rocks was erupted 15-17 m.y. B.P. along a trend 140 to 200 km long in the southern Coast Ranges and along the northern flank of the western Transverse Ranges of California. Offset segments of the belt are coincident with the Oceanic-West Huasna, Santa Maria River-Little Pine, and Lompoc-Solvang fault zones. The volcanic rocks thin eastward and also vary in thickness along strike, the latter reflecting the undulation of `porpoising' highs and lows of basins. To account for the linear distribution of over 3000 km2 of bimodal volcanic rock types, it is proposed that they were intruded, extruded, and ejected into a continental submarine margin environment along a feature here named the San Luis Obispo transform (SLOT). The fault was near the mid-Miocene continental margin and evidently joined the early mid-Miocene Mendocino triple junction with the crest of the East Pacific Rise. Subduction of the Farallon Plate had stopped along the adjacent continental margin before Miocene magmatism in this region. The inferred position of the East Pacific Rise crest was too far to the south, and the inferred position of the Mendocino triple junction was too far to the north between 15 and 20 m.y. B.P. to have been directly related to the Miocene volcanic event near 35°N latitude at that time. A part of the western Transverse Ranges was transported northwestward immediately following Miocene volcanism. Earlier movement is possible, but evidence is inconclusive. Microplate transport was concurrent with the development of pull-apart structures and the ≃12- to ≃16-m.y.-old period of volcanism along the southern margin of the microplate within the Los Angeles basin. Variable paleomagnetic directions that display clockwise deflections in the Oligocene (e.g., Morro Rock-Islay Hill Complex) and Miocene igneous rocks (e.g., western Transverse Ranges) in the vicinity of SLOT can be accounted for by extension

  17. InSAR deformation time series for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreüder, W. A.; Shanker, P.; Lauknes, T. R.

    2009-05-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies for both the surface water and the ground water. In 1998 the state of Colorado commissioned the Rio Grande Decision Support System to refine the hydogeologic characterization of the system, including the development of a MODFLOW finite difference model of groundwater flow. The main challenge in the SLV is acquiring sufficient data to characterize the spatially heterogeneous, time-varying behavior of the groundwater system. Here we apply the small baseline subset analysis (SBAS) interferometric radar (InSAR) technique to provide such data. InSAR techniques yield the deformation of Earth's surface at fine spatial resolution occurring between two satellite overflights, and SBAS permits solution for a time series of deformation maps. The measured deformation can be related to changes in the water table in underlying confined aquifers. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. Historically, InSAR measurements have been difficult to make in agricultural areas. The change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation and the loss of useful information about surface deformation. The recently-developed SBAS method allows stable deformation estimates at certain ground points in an otherwise decorrelated time series of data. We applied this approach to data collected by the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV from track 98 frame 2853 for the years 1992-2001. We used the Generic SAR (GSAR) SBAS software developed by Norut to produce time series deformation measurements for many positions across the entire SLV. We find that the 2000 km2 area captured in track 98 frame 2853 shows very high

  18. InSAR imaging of seasonal groundwater change in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.

    2011-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. The valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators facing the challenge of developing appropriate management policies for both surface water and ground water supplies. Legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels within the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978 - 2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the confined aquifer system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide spatially dense maps of deformation of Earth's surface, with one pixel representing the deformation of a 50 m by 50 m area on the ground. This deformation can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. The ability to map these changes, over time, in the SLV will provide critical information about the groundwater system. In this study we used data from the European Space Agency's ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have 31 acquisitions archived from 1992 - 2001. We applied small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to create a time series of deformation for all pixels with high data quality. We find that the seasonal deformation measured by InSAR mimics hydraulic head measurements made in the confined aquifer system. We also find that the deformation occurring in the confined aquifer system is primarily elastic and recoverable in nature. At many well locations there are gaps in the hydraulic head record during the period relevant for the 2004 legislation. We find that high quality InSAR data exist during those time periods and can be used to fill historical gaps in hydraulic head data. We have processed the deformation time series for 2500 km2 of area on the ground at a spatial resolution of ~ 50 m. We find it useful to visualize the deformation

  19. Identification of the I - → Pr 3+ charge transfer transition in the excitation spectrum of LuI 3:Pr 3+

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, A. M.

    2008-06-01

    The excitation spectrum of LuI3:Pr3+ is dominated by a strong ultraviolet band centered at 320 nm. This band is identified as the I- → Pr3+ charge transfer transition. The Pr3+ 4f2 → 4f15d1 interconfiguration optical transitions are located within the host lattice absorption band. The luminescence of LuI3:Pr3+ under charge transfer excitation is dominated by the Pr3+ 4f2 → 4f2 intraconfiguration optical transitions. The absence of luminescence from the charge transfer state is due fast (nonradiative) relaxation of the charge transfer state into the Pr3+ 4f2 states.

  20. Initial vegetation species and senescience/stress indicator mapping in the San Luis Valley, Colorado using imaging spectrometer data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Roger N.; King, Trude V. V.; Ager, Cathy; Swayze, Gregg A.

    1995-01-01

    We analyzed AVIRIS data obtained over agricultural areas in the San Luis Valley of Colorado. The data were acquired on September 3, 1993. A combined method of radiative transfer modeling and ground calibration site reflectance was used to correct the flight data to surface reflectance. This method, called Radiative Transfer Ground Calibration, or RTGC, corrects for variable water vapor in the atmosphere and produces spectra free of artifacts with spectral channel to channel noise approaching the signal to noise of the raw data. The calibration site soil samples were obtained on the day of the overflight and measured on our laboratory spectrometer. The site was near the center of the AVIRIS scene and the spectra of the soil is spectrally bland, especially in the region of the chlorophyll absorption in the visible portion of the spectrum. The center of the scene is located at approximately 106 deg 03' longitude, 37 deg 23' latitude, and the scene covers about 92 square kilometers. This scene is one of 28 in the area for a general project to study the Summitville abandoned mine site, located in the mountains west of the San Luis Valley, and its effects on the surrounding environment.

  1. A New Destination for "The Flying Bus"?: The Implications of Orlando-Rican Migration for Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barreneche, Gabriel Ignacio; Lombardi, Jane; Ramos-Flores, Hector

    2012-01-01

    Puerto Rican author Luis Rafael Sanchez's "La guagua aerea" explores the duality, hybridity, and fluidity of US-Puerto Rican identity through the frequent travel of migrants between New York City (the traditional destination city for Puerto Rican migrants) and the island. In recent years, however, the "flying bus" has adopted a…

  2. Followup Study of Transfer Students from C.O.S. to California State University, Fresno, & California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo, Fall 1984.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Webb, Elaine

    A study was conducted at College of the Sequoias (COS) to assess the academic success of students transferring to California State University, Fresno (Fresno State), and California Poly-Technic State University, San Luis Obispo (Cal-Poly). The study focused on the number of units completed at COS, grade point average (GPA) at COS, COS units…

  3. Revision, Validation, and Evaluation of the Undergraduate Teacher Field Work Experience in Reading at California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ceaser, Lisbeth

    Education majors at California Polytechnic State University in San Luis Obispo are primarily English speaking only and need guidance in strategies for adapting instruction for a variety of levels of second language acquisition students. This project addressed the problem of a lack of sufficient preparation of undergraduate students to participate…

  4. On the Origin of the Crestone Crater: Low-Latitude Periglacial Features in San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwans, E.; Meng, T. M.; Prudhomme, K.; Morgan, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Located within the northern boundary of the Great Sand Dunes National Park is the Crestone Crater, a elliptical bowl-shaped feature consisting of a raised rim surrounding a central depression. The elongate crater has an approximate diameter of 100 m and reaches a depth of 10 m at its center relative to its rim, which rises 10 m above the elevation of the surrounding surface. Its precise origin is largely unknown and has perplexed regional geologists and residents of Crestone, Colorado for more than 80 years. This project used on-site and remote geophysical methods to characterize the processes that led to the geomorphologic surface expression observed today. Formation hypotheses examined encompass extraterrestrial, eolian, and periglacial processes. Field methods included a new gravity survey and reanalysis of gravity data collected in a previous student investigation of the feature. Additionally, a recent LiDAR dataset spanning San Luis Valley was examined to analyze the main structure, similar features in the area, and surrounding eolian and alluvial surfaces. An extraterrestrial origin, as suggested by numerous previous investigators, was deemed unlikely due to the non-unique gravity signature of the crater, its topographic similarity to many other like features identified in San Luis Valley, as well as its failure to excavate below the elevation of the surrounding surface. Furthermore, the expression of confirmed eolian landforms in San Luis Valley indicates that eolian processes alone would not produce such a prominent form in the level of vegetation observed. Proximal glacial deposits in the Sangre de Cristo Mountains show that the windblown sand in which all these features are clustered is adjacent to areas of past glaciations, and thus would have been affected by freeze-thaw cycles and thin, localized permafrost. Ice extent maps provided by the Colorado Geological Survey, as well as research on the timing of the formation of the Great Sand Dunes reinforce

  5. Forecasting Selenium Discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: Ecological Effects of A Proposed San Luis Drain Extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Presser, Theresa S.; Luoma, Samuel N.

    2006-01-01

    Selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta) could change significantly if federal and state agencies (1) approve an extension of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley to the North Bay (Suisun Bay, Carquinez Strait, and San Pablo Bay); (2) allow changes in flow patterns of the lower San Joaquin River and Bay-Delta while using an existing portion of the San Luis Drain to convey agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River; or (3) revise selenium criteria for the protection of aquatic life or issue criteria for the protection of wildlife. Understanding the biotransfer of selenium is essential to evaluating effects of selenium on Bay-Delta ecosystems. Confusion about selenium threats to fish and wildlife stem from (1) monitoring programs that do not address specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates; and (2) failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in selenium toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from selenium contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. This report presents an approach to conceptualize and model the fate and effects of selenium under various load scenarios from the San Joaquin Valley. For each potential load, progressive forecasts show resulting (1) water-column concentration; (2) speciation; (3) transformation to particulate form; (4) particulate concentration; (5) bioaccumulation by invertebrates; (6) trophic transfer to predators; and (7) effects on those predators. Enough is known to establish a first-order understanding of relevant conditions, biological response, and ecological risks should selenium be discharged directly into the North Bay through a conveyance such as a proposed extension of the San Luis Drain. The approach presented here, the Bay-Delta selenium model, determines the mass, fate

  6. Spring stopover food resources and land use patterns of Rocky Mountain population Sandhill Carnes in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laubhan, M.K.; Gammonley, J.H.; Dolton, D.D.

    2001-01-01

    Virtually the entire Rocky Mountain population (RMP) of greater sandhill cranes uses the San Luis Valley (SLV) of Colorado as a spring stopover area. RMP cranes in the SLV depend on unharvested grain provided on Monte Vista National Wildlife Refuge, and on waste grain in privately owned fields. In recent years, however, fall tillage and irrigation of grain fields has become increasingly widespread in the SLV. These changes in farming practices have resulted in an unmeasured reduction in waste grain availability for RMP cranes during spring and have prompted concern over whether current or projected foods are adequate to meet spring demands of the target population size of 18,000-20,000 RMP cranesa?|

  7. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation: Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goering, S. W.; Garing, K. L.; Coury, G. E.; Fritzler, E. A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The institutional and environmental analyses indicate that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  8. Real-Time Water Quality Monitoring and Habitat Assessment in theSan Luis National Wildlife Refuge

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, Nigel W.T.; Hanlon, Jeremy S.; Burns, Josephine R.; Stromayer, Karl A.K.; Jordan, Brandon M.; Ennis, Mike J.; Woolington,Dennis W.

    2005-08-28

    The project report describes a two year experiment to control wetland drainage to the San Joaquin River of California from the San Luis National Wildlife Refuge using a decision support system for real-time water quality management. This system required the installation and operation of one inlet and three drainage flow and water quality monitoring stations which allowed a simple mass balance model to be developed of the seasonally managed wetlands in the study area. Remote sensing methods were developed to document long-term trends in wetland moist soil vegetation and soil salinity in response to management options such as delaying the initiation of seasonal wetland drainage. These environmental management tools provide wetland managers with some of the tools necessary to improve salinity conditions in the San Joaquin River and improve compliance with State mandated salinity objectives without inflicting long-term harm on the wild fowl habitat resource.

  9. Alfonso Luis Herrera and the Beginnings of Evolutionism and Studies in the Origin of Life in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Mateos, Ismael; Cleaves, H James

    2016-12-01

    Alfonso Luis Herrera (1868-1942) was a Mexican biologist, and significant as the principal promoter of Darwinian thought in that country. However, Herrera's thinking went beyond the evolution of living beings, and extended to the question of the origin of life itself and the place of living phenomena in the larger context of the cosmos. Perhaps more significantly, though now largely forgotten, Herrera was among the first to embark on an experimental program to understand the origin of life, one which may be seen as foundational for later workers, most notably Sidney Fox and Alexander Oparin, and which has been resuscitated recently. We review here the development of Herrera's scientific thought on Darwinism and the origin of life and the context in which it developed.

  10. [Luis Hidalgo y Carpio, Editor of Gaceta Médica de México (1818-1879)].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Pérez, Martha Eugenia

    2009-01-01

    Luis Hidalgo y Carpio (1818-1879) was a notable physician who made important contributions to the field of medicine during his time. Nevertheless, reference sources on the aspect from Hidalgo y Carpio that we would like to emphasize (i.e. as an editor of a medical journal) are scarce since precisely when Hidalgo y Carpio was named President of the Medical Society (later the Academia Nacional de Medicina), in 1987, the publication of the Gaceta Médica de México was temporarily interrupted. Hidalgo y Carpio played a key role as an editor at a time when the medical community of Mexico required a means whereby the scientific achievements could be published and discussed among peers and colleagues. Under Hidalgo y Carpio, the Gaceta Médica de México soon reached a wide audience, not only as a periodical publication but also for the prestige of the Academy that represented.

  11. [A seroepidemiological survey on the island of São Luis during a dengue epidemic in Maranhão].

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, P F; Lima, J W; Raposo, M L; Rodrigues, S G; da Rosa, J F; Amorim, S M; da Rosa, E S; Moura, C M; Fonseca, N; da Rosa, A P

    1999-01-01

    The island of São Luis in the State of Maranhão, constituted by the municipalities of São Luis-SL (835,428 inhabitants), São José de Ribamar-SJR (60,633 inhabitants) and Paço do Lumiar-PL (80,274 inhabitants), has been suffering dengue (DEN) fever epidemics since 1995, caused by DEN-1. In 1996, from August through October, an aleatory sero-epidemiologic survey was carried out in order to estimate the incidence of DEN infection and to analyze other clinical and epidemiological parameters. A questionnaire was applied and serum samples were simultaneously obtained. Serum samples were tested by hemagglutination inhibition (HI). Results were analyzed using Lotus 123, Epi-info 6.0, Excel 5.0 and STATA softwares. A total of 1,217 serum samples were obtained (101 of PL, 100 of SJR and 1017 of SL). The rate of DEN was 55.4% in PL, 28% in SJR and 41.4% in SL, suggesting the occurrence of 401,933 infections. No difference was seen between males and females, but infection occurred more in the upper social class than in poor people (p < 0.003), and was more frequent in adults than in children (p < 0.0004). In SL, the incidence was stratified into seven sanitary districts (SD), and prevalence was found to range from 26.1% in SD4 to 56.8% in SD1 (p < 0.0001). Symptoms were more frequently reported by people whose HI was positive: they included fever, headache, chills, dizziness, retrobulbar pains, muscle and joint pains, nausea, anorexia and skin rash. In spite of the high incidence of infection, no hemorrhagic cases were reported.

  12. Archosauriform remains from the Late Triassic of San Luis province, Argentina, Quebrada del Barro Formation, Marayes-El Carrizal Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianechini, Federico A.; Codorniú, Laura; Arcucci, Andrea B.; Castillo Elías, Gabriela; Rivarola, David

    2016-03-01

    Here we present archosauriform remains from 'Abra de los Colorados', a fossiliferous locality at Sierra de Guayaguas, NW San Luis Province. Two fossiliferous levels were identified in outcrops of the Quebrada del Barro Formation (Norian), which represent the southernmost outcrops of the Marayes-El Carrizal Basin. These levels are composed by massive muddy lithofacies, interpreted as floodplain deposits. The specimens consist of one incomplete maxilla (MIC-V718), one caudal vertebra (MIC-V719), one metatarsal (MIC-V720) and one indeterminate appendicular bone (MIC-V721). The materials can be assigned to Archosauriformes but the fragmentary nature and lack of unambiguous synapomorphies preclude a more precise taxomic assignment. The maxilla is remarkably large and robust and represents the posterior process. It preserved one partially erupted tooth with ziphodont morphology. This bone shows some anatomical traits and size match with 'rauisuchians' and theropods. MIC-V719 corresponds to a proximal caudal vertebra. It has a high centrum, a ventral longitudinal furrow, expanded articular processes for the chevrons, a posteriorly displaced diapophysis located below the level of the prezygapophyses, and short prezygapophyses. This vertebra would be from an indeterminate archosauriform. MIC-V720 presents a cylindrical diaphysis, with a well-developed distal trochlea, which present resemblances with metatarsals of theropods, pseudosuchians, and silesaurids, although the size matches better with theropods. MIC-V721 has a slender diaphysis and a convex triangular articular surface, and corresponds to an indeterminate archosauriform. Despite being fragmentary, these materials indicate the presence of a diverse archosauriforms association from Late Triassic beds of San Luis. Thus, they add to the faunal assemblage recently reported from this basin at San Juan Province, which is much rich and diverse than the coeval paleofauna well known from Los Colorados Formation in the

  13. Lithium Systematics Revealed in Samples from ODP Leg 204 (Hydrate Ridge): A Tribute to Lui-Heung Chan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torres, M. E.; Chan, L.; Ungerer, A.

    2008-12-01

    Changes in chemical and isotopic composition of interstitial fluids with depth have shown to be powerful tracers of fluid sources and migration patterns, an area of research pioneered by Lui-Heung Chan. It was due to her expertise and passion to unravel key geochemical processes in accretionary margins that we pursued lithium analyses in sediment and pore waters recovered by drilling on Hydrate Ridge during ODP Leg 204. The data reveals several important processes associated with lithium systematics in marine sediments. Specifically: 1) Lithium is consumed at shallow sequences, probably resulting from an interplay of reactions involving alteration of volcanogenic material that occurs simultaneously with release of light lithium from clay sites by exchange with ammonium, as shown previously for the Costa Rica margin. 2) Release of light lithium at depth is consistent with that previously reported in deep sequences of accretionary margins along the Pacific Rim, and likely occurs during clay alteration reactions that precede illitization. 3) An increase in dissolved lithium, associated with anomalously light lithium isotopic composition in a high permeability zone (Horizon A) document migration of aqueous fluids along this horizon, which is thought to act as a methane pathway feeding massive gas hydrate deposits at the seafloor. 4) Analyses of fluids collected from zones of massive hydrate formation at the summit sites reveal that there is no isotopic fractionation of lithium during gas hydrate formation. Lui's life long dedication to precise and accurate measurements of lithium isotopes forms the cornerstone to our understanding of lithium geochemistry and led to important new perspectives on a wide range of natural processes. The rigor of her analytical approaches, the influence of her publications, the patience and dedication to train others and her contagious enthusiasm will be sorely missed. She had a tremendous influence in the personal and professional lives of

  14. Provenance of the late Proterozoic to early Cambrian metaclastic sediments of the Sierra de San Luis (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas) and Cordillera Oriental, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drobe, Malte; López de Luchi, Mónica G.; Steenken, André; Frei, Robert; Naumann, Rudolf; Siegesmund, Siegfried; Wemmer, Klaus

    2009-10-01

    Provenance studies have been performed utilising major and trace elements, Nd systematics, whole rock Pb-Pb isotopes and zircon U/Pb SHRIMP data on metasedimentary rocks of the Sierra de San Luis (Nogolí Metamorphic Complex, Pringles Metamorphic Complex, Conlara Metamorphic Complex and San Luis Formation) and the Puncoviscana Formation of the Cordillera Oriental. The goal was the characterisation of the different domains in the study area and to give insights to the location of the source rocks. An active continental margin setting with typical composition of the upper continental crust is depicted for all the complexes using major and trace elements. The Pringles Metamorphic Complex shows indications for crustal recycling, pointing to a bimodal provenance. Major volcanic input has to be rejected due to Th/Sc, Y/Ni and Cr/V ratios for all units. The ɛNd (540 Ma) data is lower for the San Luis Formation and higher for the Conlara Metamorphic Complex, as compared to the other units, in which a good consistency is given. This is similar to the TDM ages, where the metapsammitic samples of the San Luis Formation are slightly older. The spread of data is largest for the Pringles Metamorphic Complex, again implying two different sources. The whole rock 207Pb/ 206Pb isotopic data lies in between the South American and African sources, excluding Laurentian provenances. The whole rock Pb-Pb data is almost indistinguishable in the different investigated domains. Only the PMC shows slightly elevated 208Pb/ 204Pb values. Possible source rocks for the different domains could be the Quebrada Choja in the Central Arequipa-Antofalla domain, the Southern domain of the Arequipa-Antofalla basement, the Brazilian shield or southern Africa. Zircon SHRIMP data point to a connection between the Puncoviscana Formation and the Conlara Metamorphic Complex. Two maxima around 600 Ma and around 1000 Ma have been determined. The Nogolí Metamorphic Complex and the Pringles Metamorphic Complex

  15. Digital data from the Questa-San Luis and Santa Fe East helicopter magnetic surveys in Santa Fe and Taos Counties, New Mexico, and Costilla County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Drenth, B.J.; ,

    2006-01-01

    This report contains digital data, image files, and text files describing data formats and survey procedures for aeromagnetic data collected during high-resolution aeromagnetic surveys in southern Colorado and northern New Mexico in December, 2005. One survey covers the eastern edge of the San Luis basin, including the towns of Questa, New Mexico and San Luis, Colorado. A second survey covers the mountain front east of Santa Fe, New Mexico, including the town of Chimayo and portions of the Pueblos of Tesuque and Nambe. Several derivative products from these data are also presented as grids and images, including reduced-to-pole data and data continued to a reference surface. Images are presented in various formats and are intended to be used as input to geographic information systems, standard graphics software, or map plotting packages.

  16. The potential effect of unchecked statistical assumptions: A fault in San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace v. United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission

    SciTech Connect

    Gastwirth, J.L.

    1989-01-01

    This Article explores the possible impact of several unchecked assumptions on the calculated risk of a radiation leak used by the San Luis Obispo court in evaluating the safety of the Diablo Canyon nuclear power plant. Further, it demonstrates that these assumptions are quite restrictive and should be verified with empirical data before subsequent results are routinely accepted. This Article emphasizes the San Luis Obispo court's statistical assumptions and their effect on safety estimates. However, unchecked assumptions of risk analyses similarly arise in other areas such as environmental or occupational health and safety. Better information concerning the statistical accuracy and reliability of the risk and benefits of technology to society is also useful in the continuing debate concerning the social costs and benefits that has involved a number of distinguished legal scholars.

  17. Deep structure of the northern Rio Grande rift beneath the San Luis basin (Colorado) from a seismic reflection survey: implications for rift evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tandon, Kush; Brown, Larry; Hearn, Thomas

    1999-02-01

    A seismic reflection survey by Chevron across the San Luis basin (northern Rio Grande rift) and San Juan volcanic field of southern Colorado is reprocessed with extended correlation to search for basement structure. The trace of the main bounding fault of the basin, a high-angle normal fault against the Sangre de Cristo Range, can be correlated to a wide zone of dipping reflection fabric and soles out at lower crustal depths (26-28 km). The deeper reflection fabric represent either broad extensional strain or pre-existing structure, such as a Laramide thrust system. The Sangre de Cristo bounding fault in San Luis basin does not sole out at mid-crustal depths but continues into the lower crust with a shallower dip. The basin architecture in the northern Rio Grande rift (San Luis basin) provides little if any evidence that the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault should flatten in a shallow listric fashion. This fault geometry is quite similar to the high-angle bounding fault in the Espanola basin but contrasts with less deeply-rooted faults in the Albuquerque basin in the central Rio Grande rift. Deeper soling out of the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault could be due to less extension in the northern Rio Grande rift and/or greater strength of the lithosphere compared to the central Rio Grande rift. Unequivocal Moho reflections beneath the San Luis basin cannot be identified, probably due to limited signal penetration or a gradational nature of the Moho. The majority of rift-related movement observed on the Sangre de Cristo bounding fault is post-Eocene. Either the western margin of the basin is marked by a tight monocline or a low-angle normal fault.

  18. Early use of corrective lenses in Spanish colonies of the Americas including parts of the future United States: reference to Viceroy Luis de Velasco (the Son).

    PubMed

    Calvo, Maria; Enoch, Jay M

    2003-10-01

    We discuss many aspects of a reproduction of a formal painting from the XVIth century. It is a portrait of Viceroy of New Spain Luis de Velasco, El Joven or Hijo (son-see text), found at the Museum of the Pecos National Monument (near Pecos and Santa Fe, New Mexico). A formal portrait of each Viceroy of New Spain was created, and this one was painted during de Velasco's first term as Viceroy (1590 to 1595 AD). In this depiction, he is seen wearing spectacles. To our knowledge, this is the first known reference suggesting the introduction of this form of visual correction in the Spanish Colonies in the Americas and in the future United States. There are three known portraits of Luis de Velasco (son): One painting, which included his father and significant others, hangs in the Colegiata (a small cathedral) de San Luis near Valladolid, Spain. In this portrayal, he was shown as a young man without a spectacle correction. And there are two viceregal portraits (Term 1, 1590 to 1595; Term 2, 1607 to 1611) in which he wears the same spectacle correction (these are located in Mexico City).

  19. The tectonic significance of K/Ar illite fine-fraction ages from the San Luis Formation (Eastern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wemmer, Klaus; Steenken, André; Müller, Stefan; de Luchi, Mónica G. López; Siegesmund, Siegfried

    2011-04-01

    The Sierra de San Luis forms the southern tip of the Eastern Sierras Pampeanas in central Argentina. Two narrow belts of low-grade phyllites and quartz arenites, i.e. the San Luis Formation, have accommodated part of the strain-related differential exhumation of the medium- to high-grade metamorphic domains that constitute to the basement complex of the sierra. Eleven phyllite samples were subjected to the K/Ar fine-fraction dating technique. Results are interpreted in relation to the Kübler index of the illites, which indicate epimetamorphic conditions for the majority of the samples. Obtained ages between 330 and 290 Ma cover a period of compressional tectonics in the late Mississippian (Visean/Serpukhovian boundary) followed by the subsidence during the formation of the Paganzo Basin in the provinces of La Rioja and San Luis. These tectonic movements are coincident with the Toco orogeny in northern Chile and southern Bolivia. This suggests that the older K/Ar ages document the compressional stage and that younger ages record the cooling of the basement during the subsequent extensional uplift of the basement.

  20. Potential human health risk by 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" reservoir (Northern Mexico)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luna-Porres, M. Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, M. A.; Herrera-Peraza, E.; Cabral-Lares, M.; Renteria-Villalobos, M.; Montero-Cabrera, M. E.

    2014-07-01

    The Conchos River is one of the most important in northern Mexico and the main surface waterway in the arid state of Chihuahua. The Luis L. Leon dam produces the Luis L. Leon Reservoir, which is the last major reservoir before the Conchos River enters the Rio Grande at the Texas-Chihuahua border. Activity concentrations (AC) of 234,238U and 210Po in fillet and liver of three stocked fish species (Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus), as well as in water from the Luis L. Leon reservoir were determined. 238U and 234U ACs in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus species, present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bqṡkg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues respect to their concentrations in water was determined. Lepomis cyanellus species showed the highest BAF for total uranium in fillet, with value 1.5. The annual effective dose for uranium in adults by fish consumption in this work ranged from 4.46×10-3 to 3.68×10-2 μSvṡyear-1. The difference in concentrations of uranium in fillet among the studied species is likely primarily due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  1. {open_quotes}Black Gold{close_quotes} leads to new structural interpretation, Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    In the course of exploring for gold along the east margin of the Rio Grande Rift (northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains and northeastern San Luis Basin) live Cretaceous oil was discovered in fractured Precambrian gneiss in 25 of 42 shallow drill holes. Geologic mapping located two outcrops of Mesozoic sediments along the west flank of the Sangre de Cristo Mountains. Mancos Shale, Dakota Group and Morrison Formation sediments were identified from 17 drill holes. These are the first known occurrences of Mesozoic sediments in the area. Previous investigations had concluded that the Mesozoic section eroded from the San Luis uplift during the Laramide. Surface and subsurface geologic data was integrated with gravity, magnetic and seismic surveys for a new structural interpretation. The San Luis Basin is separated from the mountains by an intermediate block and the main basin-bounding fault is three miles west-southwest of the mountain front. A major low-angle, normal fault or detachment fault is related to Miocene rifting. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments are interpreted to be present in the hanging wall of this low angle fault. Buried and thermally matured in a Laramide intermountane basin, these sediments are likely the source of the present day oil found in Precambrian rocks.

  2. Use of multiple indicators to assess the environmental quality of urbanized aquatic surroundings in San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Calderon, Mirian R; González, Patricia; Moglia, Marta; Gonzáles, Soledad Oliva; Jofré, Mariana

    2014-07-01

    Urbanization can cause significant changes in the integrity of fluvial ecosystems, which makes it necessary to assess environmental conditions of areas where population growth rates are high. A study of the environmental quality of Chorrillos River (San Luis-Argentina) and its tributaries was carried out in order to evaluate the potential effect of an urbanization gradient. Six sites were sampled along the main course and tributaries of the river. Urbanization variables were measured and included to calculate an Urbanization Index. Physical–chemical analyses were performed in water samples to evaluate water quality through the use of a simplified index of water quality (SIWQ). Plants, macroinvertebrates, and amphibians metrics were used to assess the biological state of the studied sites. The Urbanization Index varied significantly between sites and was significantly correlated to the SIWQ. However, no significant correlations were found between SIWQ and macroinvertebrates and amphibians variables. Water quality of Chorrillos River and its tributaries is good, but it is affected by anthropic influences as reflected by the declining of SIWQ values. Although biological sampling constitutes an important tool in the assessment of water quality of rivers, in this report biological results were not conclusive.

  3. Detection of residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velasco, Antonio; Hernández, Sergio; Ramírez, Martha; Ortíz, Irmene

    2014-01-01

    Organochlorine pesticides were intensively used in Mexico from 1950 until their ban and restriction in 1991. However, the presence of these compounds is commonly reported in many regions of the country. The aim of the present study was to identify and quantify residual organochlorine and organophosphorus pesticides in agricultural soil in Rio Verde region, San Luis Potosi state, which has been identified as possibly polluted by pesticides. Composed samples from 24 zones covering an area of approximately 5,440 ha were analyzed. The most frequently found pesticides were p,p'-DDT followed by ,p,p'-DDE, heptachlor, endosulfan and γ-HCH whose frequency rates were 100, 91, 83 and 54%, respectively. The concentration of p,p'-DDT in the crops grown in these soils was in the following order: chili > maize > tomato > alfalfa. The results obtained in this study show that p,p'-DDT values are lower or similar to those found in other agricultural regions of Mexico. Methyl and ethyl parathion were the most frequent organophosphate pesticide detected in 100% and 62.5% of the samples with average concentrations of 25.20 and 47.48 μg kg(-1), respectively. More research is needed to establish the background levels of pesticides in agricultural soils and their potential ecological and human health effects in this region.

  4. Scanning and transmission electron microscope of suspended lead-rich particles in the air of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piña, A. Aragón; Villaseñor, G. Torres; Jacinto, P. Santiago; Fernández, M. Monroy

    In the city of San Luis Potosi exists an important metallurgical plant and is known that in the adjacent urban zone, there is a high concentration of lead in the air, it is also supposed that most of the particles with lead have an anthropogenic origin because these particles show morphological characteristics and chemical composition very different in comparison with common lead minerals. In this work it was proved that most of the airborne particles with lead present in this urban zone, effectively came from the copper smelter. The airborne particles with lead were compared with particles with lead obtained starting from samples of slag and lead calcine of the copper smelter. To perform the comparative study, these particles were studied with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis (EDS) in conjunction with scanning electron microscope to obtain chemical composition and associated morphological characteristics. Results suggest that these particles, composed of only one phase, are chemically distinct from any crustal lead mineral. Because of the complexity of the chemical composition of these particles (Pb, S, Cu, As, Fe, Zn, Cd, Sb, O), some of the airborne particles were analyzed by transmission microscopy in order to associate crystalline structure with any particular chemical phase.

  5. Luminescence dating of anthropogenic features of the San Luis Valley, Colorado: from stone huts to stone walls

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mahan, Shannon; Donlan, Rebecca A.; Kardos, Barbara Maat

    2015-01-01

    The Snake Nest Wall site and the Crestone Stone Huts are in the northern San Luis Valley, Colorado, and provide a unique opportunity to date high-altitude archeological sites of unknown age and origin using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL). We sampled sediment underlying foundation stones of these structures to establish a chronological framework for each site's construction. OSL dating of the quartz grains directly under the Snake Nest Wall suggest that the stones and, therefore, the structure was most recently emplaced between 1855 and 1890 A.D. Dating of the sediment beneath the Crestone Stone Huts suggests the construction time of these huts is between 1860 and 1890 A.D. Analysis of the equivalent dose (DE) dispersion of the OSL samples at Snake Nest Wall and the Crestone Huts shows that the majority of sediments were fully bleached prior to deposition and the low scatter suggests that short-term or shallow alluvial processes were the dominant transport for sediments. In both cases, the OSL ages show that the construction was during very recent historical times, although it is likely that the Snake Nest Wall was rebuilt in the late 19th century. Further study is warranted at the Snake Nest Wall since it shows signs of greater antiquity and a continued presence of human use. The Crestone Huts are shown to be a product of railroad building during the boomtown days of Lucky and Crestone.

  6. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) concentration in soil from San Luis Potosi, Mexico: levels and ecological and human health risk characterization.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco J; Orta-García, Sandra T; Ochoa-Martínez, Ángeles C; Pruneda-Álvarez, Lucia G; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Jiménez-Avalos, Jorge Armando; González-Palomo, Ana K; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in soils from the city of San Luis Potosi in Mexico and perform an ecological and human health risk characterization. In order to confirm the presence of PBDEs, outdoor surface soil samples were collected and the concentrations of PBDEs in urban, industrial, agricultural, and brick kiln industry areas were determined. The mean total PBDEs levels obtained in the study sites were 25.0 ± 39.5 μg/kg (geometric mean ± standard deviation) in the brick kiln industry zone; 34.5 ± 36.0 μg/kg in the urban zone; 8.00 ± 7.10 μg/kg in the industrial zone and 16.6 ± 15.3 μg/kg in the agricultural zone. The ecological and human health risk characterization showed relatively low-hazard quotient values. However, the moderately high PBDEs levels found in soils highlight the necessity to establish a systematic monitoring process for PBDEs in environmental and biological samples.

  7. Direct, immunological and molecular techniques for a fasciolosis survey in a rural area of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, Silvana; Cabrera, Marta Graciela; Cucher, Marcela Alejandra; di Risio, Cecilia Alicia; Malandrini, Jorge Bruno; Kamenetzky, Laura; Alazraqui, Marcio; Etchart, Cristina Beatriz; Pantano, María Laura; Velásquez, Jorge Néstor

    2013-10-01

    Fasciolosis is a zoonosis caused by the trematode Fasciola hepatica, prevalent in cattle, that is actually emerging as a cause of disease in humans. The goal of this work was to describe the characteristics of fasciolosis in arroyo El Juncal region, La Toma, San Luis province, Argentina. In order to get this objective, a transversal, quantitative study was carried out by a fieldwork that allowed the collection of data, human, animal, and environmental samples. The materials were processed by direct, immunological and/or molecular diagnostic techniques. According to the geographical characteristics and in presence of all the definitive and intermediate hosts, reservoirs, and sources of infection, it was possible to describe the persistence of fasciolosis in the area. The prevalence was 11.90 % in humans (by serology), 5.26 % in cattle (by coprological analysis) and 61.76 % in snails (by PCR). The situation that was found for this area indicates that any measure of intervention for the control of this zoonosis should be adopted by multidisciplinary teams.

  8. Community Response to Concentrating Solar Power in the San Luis Valley: October 9, 2008 - March 31, 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Farhar, B. C.; Hunter, L. M.; Kirkland, T. M.; Tierney, K. J.

    2010-06-01

    This report is about the social acceptance of utility-scale concentrating solar power (CSP) plants in the San Luis Valley, approximately 200 miles southwest of Denver, Colorado. The research focused on social factors that may facilitate and impede the adoption and implementation of CSP. During the winter of 2008-2009, interviews were conducted with a purposive sample of 25 CSP-related stakeholders inside and outside the Valley. Interviews focused on the perceived advantages and disadvantages of siting a hypothetical 100-MW CSP facility in the Valley, the level of community support and opposition to CSP development, and related issues, such as transmission. State policy recommendations based on the findings include developing education programs for Valley residents, integrating Valley decision makers into an energy-water-land group, providing training for Valley decision makers, offering workforce training, evaluating models of taxation, and forming landholder energy associations. In addition, the SLV could become a laboratory for new approaches to CSP facility and transmission siting decision-making. The author recommends that outside stakeholders address community concerns and engage Valley residents in CSP decisions. Engaging the residents in CSP and transmission decisions, the author says, should take parallel significance with the investment in solar technology.

  9. Residential and commercial space heating and cooling with possible greenhouse operation; Baca Grande development, San Luis Valley, Colorado. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Goering, S.W.; Garing, K.L.; Coury, G.E.; Fritzler, E.A.

    1980-05-01

    A feasibility study was performed to evaluate the potential of multipurpose applications of moderate-temperature geothermal waters in the vicinity of the Baca Grande community development in the San Luis Valley, Colorado. The project resource assessment, based on a thorough review of existing data, indicates that a substantial resource likely exists in the Baca Grande region capable of supporting residential and light industrial activity. Engineering designs were developed for geothermal district heating systems for space heating and domestic hot water heating for residences, including a mobile home park, an existing motel, a greenhouse complex, and other small commercial uses such as aquaculture. In addition, a thorough institutional analysis of the study area was performed to highlight factors which might pose barriers to the ultimate commercial development of the resource. Finally, an environmental evaluation of the possible impacts of the proposed action was also performed. The feasibility evaluation indicates the economics of the residential areas are dependent on the continued rate of housing construction. If essentially complete development could occur over a 30-year period, the economics are favorable as compared to existing alternatives. For the commercial area, the economics are good as compared to existing conventional energy sources. This is especially true as related to proposed greenhouse operations. The institutional and environmental analyses indicates that no significant barriers to development are apparent.

  10. Sediment discharge in the Upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knott, J.M.

    1976-01-01

    Sediment data collected in the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins, San Luis Obispo County, California, during the 1968-73 water years were analyzed to determine total sediment discharge at four stations in the basins. Water discharge and total sediment discharge at these stations, representative of the 1943-72 period, were estimated from long-term flow data for nearby gaging stations and water-sediment discharge relations determined for the 1968-73 water years. Most of the total annual sediment discharge at each station occurs during a few days each year. The quantity of sediment transported in a single day often accounts for more than 40 percent of the total annual sediment discharge. Estimated sediment discharge for the upper Arroyo Grande and Santa Rita Creek basins during the 1943-72 water years averaged 53,000 tons and 23,000 tons per year. Long-term sediment deposition in Lopez Reservoir, which is in the southern part of the upper Arroyo Grande basin, was estimated to be 35 acre-feet per year. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Evaluation of the transfer of soil arsenic to maize crops in suburban areas of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Rosas-Castor, J M; Guzmán-Mar, J L; Alfaro-Barbosa, J M; Hernández-Ramírez, A; Pérez-Maldonado, I N; Caballero-Quintero, A; Hinojosa-Reyes, L

    2014-11-01

    The presence of arsenic (As) in agricultural food products is a matter of concern because it can cause adverse health effects at low concentrations. Agricultural-product intake constitutes a principal source for As exposure in humans. In this study, the contribution of the chemical-soil parameters in As accumulation and translocation in the maize crop from a mining area of San Luis Potosi was evaluated. The total arsenic concentration and arsenic speciation were determined by HG-AFS and IC-HG-AFS, respectively. The data analysis was conducted by cluster analysis (CA) and principal component analysis (PCA). The soil pH presented a negative correlation with the accumulated As in each maize plant part, and parameters such as iron (Fe) and manganese (Mn) presented a higher correlation with the As translocation in maize. Thus, the metabolic stress in maize may induce organic acid exudation leading a higher As bioavailability. A high As inorganic/organic ratio in edible maize plant tissues suggests a substantial risk of poisoning by this metalloid. Careful attention to the chemical changes in the rhizosphere of the agricultural zones that can affect As transfer through the food chain could reduce the As-intoxication risk of maize consumers.

  12. Confined aquifer head measurements and storage properties in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, from spaceborne InSAR observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jingyi; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.

    2016-05-01

    Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), a remote sensing technique for measuring centimeter-level surface deformation, is used to estimate hydraulic head in the confined aquifer of the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. Reconstructing head measurements from InSAR in agricultural regions can be difficult, as InSAR phase data are often decorrelated due to vegetation growth. Analysis of 17 L-band ALOS PALSAR scenes, acquired between January 2007 and March 2011, demonstrates that comprehensive InSAR deformation measurements can be recovered over the vegetated groundwater basin with an improved processing strategy. Local skeletal storage coefficients and time delays between the head change and deformation are estimated through a joint InSAR-well data analysis. InSAR subsidence estimates are transformed to head changes with finer temporal and spatial resolution than is possible using existing well records alone. Both InSAR and well data suggest that little long-term water-storage loss occurred in the SLV over the study period and that inelastic compaction was negligible. The seasonal head variations derived from InSAR are consistent with the existing well data at most locations where confined aquifer pumping activity dominates. Our results demonstrate the advantages of InSAR measurements for basin-wide characterization of aquifer storage properties and groundwater levels over agricultural regions.

  13. Influence of urbanization and tourist activities on the water quality of the Potrero de los Funes River (San Luis - Argentina).

    PubMed

    Almeida, Cesar A; Quintar, Silvya; González, Patricia; Mallea, Miguel A

    2007-10-01

    A study of the water quality of the Potrero de los Funes River (San Luis - Argentina) was carried out in order to evaluate the possible effect of the anthropogenic activities on the river developed in the homonymous town. Samples were collected during the period March 2000-November 2005 at three selected sampling sites (RP(1), RP(2) and RP(3)). Different physicochemical and bacteriological parameters (turbidity, pH, conductivity, suspended solids, alkalinity, potassium, sodium, calcium, magnesium, chlorides, nitrates, phosphates, sulphates, chemical oxygen demand (COD), 5-day biological oxygen demand (BOD(5)), dissolved oxygen, total coliforms, Escherichia coli and total heterotrophic bacteria) were analysed according to the Standard Method for the Examination of Water and Wastewater. When comparing the values of total coliforms, E. coli, total heterotrophic bacteria, COD, BOD(5) and phosphates from the zone without anthropogenic influence (RP(1)) and the urban zones (RP(2) and RP(3)) an important variation in the parameters was observed. These results indicate that the urban activity produces a serious and negative effect on the water quality, thus constituting a sanitary risk and may have a major impact on the trophic status of the Potrero de los Funes dam. As case study, we report on the use of General Quality Index (GQI) to evaluate spatial and seasonal changes in the water quality of Potrero de los Funes River. Results revealed a significant degradation of the water quality at RP(2) and RP(3).

  14. Diet and habitat landscape of Equus sp. and Mammuthus columbi for the Late Pleistocene deposit at El Cedral, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez-Crespo, V. A.; Bennami, M.; Sanchez-Chillon, B.; Alberdi, M. T.; Santos-Moreno, A.

    2007-05-01

    The diet and habitat landscape for fossil specimens pertaining to Late Pleistocene horse Equus sp., and mammoth Mammuthus columbi from the deposit at Rancho La Amapola, El Cedral, San Luís Potosí, México were assayed with basis on stable isotopes analysis the carbon and oxygen found in dental enamel apatite. For horses the Δ 13C values showed from C3/C4 a basic C4-plants diet ranging into a C3/C4 mixer feeder, while mammoth showed values as a C3/C4 mixer feeder, but preferring C4 plants; there was not significant differences among the average values for both groups, with -3.5 ‰ for horses and -3.8 ‰ for mammoth. Mexican data was compared with those for the same genera from US localities, including the states of Florida, New Mexico, and Texas, allowing confirmation of the inference that El Cedral species were mainly grazers, but with some C3 plants being consumed; furthermore, comparisons of El Cedral specimens, using both carbon and oxygen isotopes, with Floridan C3-plant sites showed El Cedral specimens could be defined as mixer feeders in open habitats, preferring such opn areas like grassland or savanna. Our results are in agreement with the species dental morphology, as well as with the pollen record for the same site, which showed the existence of grassland that could have extended during the Late Pleistocene from southern Canada to central Mé xico

  15. Identification and distribution of cotton rats, genus Sigmodon (Muridae: Sigmodontinae), of Nayarit, M?xico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carleton, M.D.; Fisher, R.D.; Gardner, A.L.

    1999-01-01

    Morphological, chromosomal, distributional, and ecological data are presented for three species of Sigmodon (S. alleni, S. arizonae, and S. mascotensis) from the state of Nayarit, Mexico. The species were collected in all possible pairwise combinations of sympatry, including the first record of such documented for S. arizonae and S. mascotensis. Emphasis is devoted to the discrimination of S. arizonae and S. mascotensis, from each other and from typical S. hispidus, using qualitative features of the skin and skull and morphometric analyses of craniodental measurements. Based on these results and examination of type specimens, additional synonyms of S. mascotensis are identified, with reassignment of two forms, tonalensis Bailey (1902) and obvelatus Russell (1952), currently mistaken as subspecies of S. hispidus. Sigmodon mascotensis emerges as a species distributed from southern Nayarit and Zacatecas to extreme western Chiapas, where it inhabits deciduous or semi-deciduous tropical vegetation having a pronounced dry season. These reallocations and other reidentifications remove any documentation for S. hispidus along the entire Pacific versant of Mexico.

  16. [Prevalence of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical bovine mastitis in dairies of the city of San Luis].

    PubMed

    Puig de Centorbi, O N; de Cuadrado, A M; Alcaraz, L E; Laciar, A L; de Milán, M C

    1992-01-01

    In order to detect subclinical mastitis by means of California Mastitis Test and recounting of somatic cells, 163 cows from the dairies of San Luis city, Argentina, were examined. Seventy six individuals (46.6%) exhibited an inflammatory response ranging > or = 2+ grade and a cellular recounting value of > or = 5 x 10(5), data compatible with those of subclinical mastitis. Staphylococcus aureus was isolated from 39 (51.3%) cultures as estimated by the sum of the two last values listed in Table 1. Organisms were isolated by plating on brain heart infusion agar with 5% of sheep blood and on Baird-Parker media. One hundred and three S. aureus isolates recovered from 51 of 63 cows were characterized by coagulase activity by the tube method using human and bovine plasma; clumping factor; glucose and mannitol fermentation; thermonuclease (TNase), pigment, gelatinase, fibrinolysin, acetoin, hemolysin production; egg yolk, tellurite and catalase reaction and crystal violet types. All isolates were susceptible to cephalothin, clindamycin, methicillin, gentamycin and vancomycin; 94.1% were susceptible to chloramphenicol and 53.8% to G penicillin. Sixty three isolates (61.1%) were classified according to Hájek and Marsálek scheme as biotype C (bovine and ovine ecovar), 33 isolates (32.0%) were classified as biotype B (swine and poultry ecovar); 1 isolated (0.9%) as intermediate between B and D; 5 isolates (4.8%) as biotype A (human ecovar) and 1 isolated (0.9%) as biotype D (ecovar silvestres spp) (Table 2). Production of enterotoxins A to E and toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) was determined by the optimal susceptibility plate method on 27 isolates (26.2%) which were coagulase 3+ to 4+ and TNase highly positive. None of them produced enterotoxins including TSST-1. The subclinical mastitis data and the prevalence of S. aureus coincide with those of other authors, both from Argentina and from other countries.

  17. [Geographic distribution of birds in the Sierra Madre Oriental of San Luis Potosi, Mexico: a regional analysis of conservation status].

    PubMed

    Sahagún Sánchez, Francisco Javier; Navarro, Jaime Castro; Reyes Hernández, Humberto

    2013-06-01

    The Sierra Madre Oriental region in the mexican state of San Luis Potosi is a relevant place for bird conservation at a country level. Therefore the main goal of this study was to analyze the geographic patterns of distribution and the conservation current state of the birds, to support the needs to expand the conservation areas in the future. Data was collected from various databases of zoological museums and collections, and field sampling methods conducted from January 2009 to May 2011. Potential distributions were modeled for 284 species using GARP software and then a map was developed to determine areas with favorable environmental characteristics for the distribution of species richness. Finally, the importance of conservation areas for the potential distribution of birds in the region was evaluated. A total of 359 species were recorded of which 71.4% are permanent residents, 19% are winter migrants and 4% are summer residents. From this total, 41 species were endemic, 47 were species at risk and 149 were neotropical migrants. The largest species richness correspond to oak forests, cloud forests, and tropical moist forests located at altitudes from 100m to 1 500m. Their potential distribution was concentrated towards the center and Southeast of the study area. Only 10% of areas with a high potential conservation was included in areas of priority for bird conservation (AICA) and just 3% of all potential areas were under some governmental category of protection. However, no conservation area has a management plan currently applied and monitored. The information generated is important for the development of management proposals for birds conservation in the region.

  18. Socio-Urban Spatial Patterns Associated with Dyslipidemia among Schoolchildren in the City of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aradillas-García, Celia; Palos-Lucio, Gabriela; Padrón-Salas, Aldanely

    2016-02-01

    The places where a child lives and attends to school are both major environmental and social determinants of its present and future health status. Noncommunicable diseases (NCDs) and some of their risk factors among child and adolescent populations are obesity and dyslipidemia, so finding the patterns of distribution of these risk factors by gender, type of school, area, and margination level is important to do health intervention focusing in their necessities to prevent diseases at younger ages. Because of that, a cross-sectional study was performed among elementary and junior high school students from public and private schools in six of the seven areas of the metropolitan zone of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Biochemical dyslipidemia indicators (triglycerides, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein) and anthropometric data (weight and height) were obtained. Seventeen public schools and five private schools with a total of 383 students were included. More than half of the studied population (53.0%) had elevated triglyceride levels. A total of 330 students (86.2%) had normal levels of total cholesterol with a mean value of 141.7 mg/dl, and 202 schoolchildren (52.8%) had lower than acceptable levels of high-density lipoprotein (HDL) with a mean value of 43.9 mg/dl. There were differences in the levels of high-density protein between the areas and the type of school where they had been studied. Finally, a total of 150 students (39.4%) had at least one altered lipid value and 103 participants (26.9%) had two altered values. Several students, despite their young age, showed a high prevalence of risk factors, so it is important to design programs according to their necessities.

  19. Blood lead concentrations in wild birds from a polluted mining region at Villa de La Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Chapa-Vargas, Leonardo; Mejia-Saavedra, Jose J; Monzalvo-Santos, Karina; Puebla-Olivares, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to determine the concentrations of lead in bird blood samples from a mining region in central Mexico and to compare concentrations among several different feeding guilds. The study took place in the Mexican state of San Luis Potosi in a region known as "Villa de la Paz." This is one of the most intensely exploited mining regions in central Mexico and has been actively mined for over four centuries. Lead concentrations from bird blood samples taken from four polluted sites were significantly higher than those from a control, unpolluted site (F = 6.3, P < 0.0002). Similarly, mean blood lead concentrations in birds from a highly polluted site were higher than those from a site that has intermediate pollution levels (P < 0.05). In addition, samples from insectivorous birds had significantly lower lead concentrations compared to granivores, frugivores-insectivores, and omnivores (F = 4.86, P = 0.004), and a large proportion of all individuals had blood lead concentrations indicative of low, sub-lethal toxic effects. Finally, in two polluted sites, remarkably small numbers of insectivore-frugivores, and granivores were trapped, and in one polluted site a large number of insectivores was trapped (X(2) = 29.9, P = 0.03), and no differences in proportions of migrants and non-migrants were found among sampling sites (X(2) = 0.6, P = 0.96). To date, it has not been determined to what extent constant exposure to these levels of pollution can influence health at the individual level, lifespan, and, therefore, population demography of birds from this region.

  20. Jorge Luis Borges and the New Physics: the Literature of Modern Science and the Science of Modern Literature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosher, Mark Robert

    1992-01-01

    By examining the works of the Argentine writer, Jorge Luis Borges, and the parallels it has with modern physics, literature and science converge in their quest for truth regarding the structure and meaning of the universe. The classical perception of physics as a "hard" science--that of quantitative, rational thought which was established during the Newtonian era--has been replaced by the "new physics," which integrates the so-called "soft" elements into its paradigm. It presents us with a universe based not exclusively on a series of particle-like interactions, or a "billiard-ball" hypothesis where discrete objects have a measurable position and velocity in absolute space and time, but rather on a combination of these mechanistic properties and those that make up the non-physical side of nature such as intuition, consciousness, and emotion. According to physicists like James Jeans science has been "humanized" to the extent that the universe as a "great machine" has been converted into a "great thought.". In nearly all his collections of essays and short stories, Borges complements the new physics by producing a literature that can be described as "scientized." The abstract, metaphysical implications and concerns of the new world-view, such as space, time, language, consciousness, free will, determinism, etc., appear repeatedly throughout Borges' texts, and are treated in terms that are remarkably similar to those expressed in the scientific texts whose authors include Albert Einstein, Niels Bohr, Werner Heisenberg, and Erwin Schrodinger. As a final comparison, Borges and post-modern physicists address the question of the individual's ability to ever comprehend the universe. They share an attitude of incredulity toward all models and theories of reality simply because they are based on partial information, and therefore seen only as conjectures.

  1. Climate, streamflow, and legacy effects on growth of riparian Populus angustifolia in the arid San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andersen, Douglas

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the factors affecting the vigor of desert riparian trees is important for their conservation and management. I used multiple regression to assess effects of streamflow and climate (12–14 years of data) or climate alone (up to 60 years of data) on radial growth of clonal narrowleaf cottonwood (Populus angustifolia), a foundation species in the arid, Closed Basin portion of the San Luis Valley, Colorado. I collected increment cores from trees (14–90 cm DBH) at four sites along each of Sand and Deadman creeks (total N = 85), including both perennial and ephemeral reaches. Analyses on trees <110 m from the stream channel explained 33–64% of the variation in standardized growth index (SGI) over the period having discharge measurements. Only 3 of 7 models included a streamflow variable; inclusion of prior-year conditions was common. Models for trees farther from the channel or over a deep water table explained 23–71% of SGI variability, and 4 of 5 contained a streamflow variable. Analyses using solely climate variables over longer time periods explained 17–85% of SGI variability, and 10 of 12 included a variable indexing summer precipitation. Three large, abrupt shifts in recent decades from wet to dry conditions (indexed by a seasonal Palmer Drought Severity Index) coincided with dramatically reduced radial growth. Each shift was presumably associated with branch dieback that produced a legacy effect apparent in many SGI series: uncharacteristically low SGI in the year following the shift. My results suggest trees in locations distant from the active channel rely on the regional shallow unconfined aquifer, summer rainfall, or both to meet water demands. The landscape-level differences in the water supplies sustaining these trees imply variable effects from shifts in winter-versus monsoon-related precipitation, and from climate change versus streamflow or groundwater management.

  2. Depositional environments of Painted Rock sandstone member of Miocene Vaqueros Formation in eastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Oldershaw, M.W.

    1988-03-01

    The Painted Rock Sandstone Member of the Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California, crops out in a narrow band along the anticlinal Caliente Range. The study area is on the eastern flanks of the northwest-trending range. The Painted Rock Sandstone Member is conformably underlain by the Soda Lake Shale Member of the Vaqueros. In the eastern part of the study area, the member is conformably overlain or interfingers with the Oligocene-Miocene Caliente Formation. In the western study area, Painted Rock is conformably overlain by the Miocene Monterey Formation. The Painted Rock Member thickens rapidly to the west with measured thickness ranging from 130 m in the easternmost section to 1800 m in the westernmost and type section. The member generally coarsens upward from interbedded mudstone and fossiliferous, laminated, fine-grained sandstones to cyclical couplets of fossiliferous, medium-grained, cross-bedded sandstones underlying laminated, medium-grained sandstones and local conglomerates. Interspersed within the member is a medium to coarse-grained, structureless sandstone. The Painted Rock generally coarsens to the east, except for almost completely conglomeratic outcrops in a central section. The Painted Rock sequence represents a gradual shoaling from lower-shoreface environments (fine sands and mudstones), to shoreface and foreshore deposits (sandy couplets). The structureless sandstone may fit in this sequence or it may record a subaqueous part of the nearby Caliente delta. The conglomerate section represents a basin-feeding channel. The anomalously thick type section coupled with the conformably overlying deep-marine Monterey Formation records rapid basin subsidence in the western study area.

  3. Sr Isotopes and Migration of Prairie Mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) from Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solis-Pichardo, G.; Perez-Crespo, V.; Schaaf, P. E.; Arroyo-Cabrales, J.

    2011-12-01

    Asserting mobility of ancient humans is a major issue for anthropologists. For more than 25 years, Sr isotopes have been used as a resourceful tracer tool in this context. A comparison of the 87Sr/86Sr ratios found in tooth enamel and in bone is performed to determine if the human skeletal remains belonged to a local or a migrant. Sr in bone approximately reflects the isotopic composition of the geological region where the person lived before death; whereas the Sr isotopic system in tooth enamel is thought to remain as a closed system and thus conserves the isotope ratio acquired during childhood. Sr isotope ratios are obtained through the geologic substrate and its overlying soil, from where an individual got hold of food and water; these ratios are in turn incorporated into the dentition and skeleton during tissue formation. In previous studies from Teotihuacan, Mexico we have shown that a three-step leaching procedure on tooth enamel samples is important to assure that only the biogenic Sr isotope contribution is analyzed. The same Sr isotopic tools can function concerning ancient animal migration patterns. To determine or to discard the mobility of prairie mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) found at Laguna de las Cruces, San Luis Potosi, México the leaching procedure was applied on six molar samples from several fossil remains. The initial hypothesis was to use 87Sr/86Sr values to verify if the mammoth population was a mixture of individuals from various herds and further by comparing their Sr isotopic composition with that of plants and soils, to confirm their geographic origin. The dissimilar Sr results point to two distinct mammoth groups. The mammoth population from Laguna de Cruces was then not a family unit because it was composed by individuals originated from different localities. Only one individual was identified as local. Others could have walked as much as 100 km to find food and water sources.

  4. Introduction to the special collection of papers on the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability.

    PubMed

    Heberling, Matthew T; Hopton, Matthew E

    2012-11-30

    This paper introduces a collection of four articles describing the San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project. The Project developed a methodology for evaluating regional sustainability. This introduction provides the necessary background information for the project, description of the region, overview of the methods, and summary of the results. Although there are a multitude of scientifically based sustainability metrics, many are data intensive, difficult to calculate, and fail to capture all aspects of a system. We wanted to see if we could develop an approach that decision-makers could use to understand if their system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The goal was to produce a scientifically defensible, but straightforward and inexpensive methodology to measure and monitor environmental quality within a regional system. We initiated an interdisciplinary pilot project in the San Luis Basin, south-central Colorado, to test the methodology. The objectives were: 1) determine the applicability of using existing datasets to estimate metrics of sustainability at a regional scale; 2) calculate metrics through time from 1980 to 2005; and 3) compare and contrast the results to determine if the system was moving toward or away from sustainability. The sustainability metrics, chosen to represent major components of the system, were: 1) Ecological Footprint to capture the impact and human burden on the system; 2) Green Net Regional Product to represent economic welfare; 3) Emergy to capture the quality-normalized flow of energy through the system; and 4) Fisher information to capture the overall dynamic order and to look for possible regime changes. The methodology, data, and results of each metric are presented in the remaining four papers of the special collection. Based on the results of each metric and our criteria for understanding the sustainability trends, we find that the San Luis Basin is moving away from sustainability. Although we understand

  5. Blue oak plant communities of southern San Luis Obispo and northern Santa Barbara Counties, California. Forest Service general technical report (Final)

    SciTech Connect

    Borchert, M.I.; Cunha, N.D.; Krosse, P.C.; Lawrence, M.L.

    1993-02-01

    An ecological classification system has been developed for the Pacific Southwest Region of the Forest Service. As part of that classification effort, blue oak (Quercus douglasii) woodlands and forests of southern San Luis Obispo and northern Santa Barbara Counties in Los Padres National Forest were classified into 13 plant communities using vegetation collected from 208 plots, 0.1 acre each. Three distinct regions of vegetation were identified in the study area: Avenales, Miranda Pine Mountain and Branch Mountain. Communities were classified separately for plots in each region. Each region has a woodland community that occupies flat or gently sloping benches, toeslopes, and valley bottoms.

  6. [The Professor Luis Cerqueira Center for Psycho-Social Care Photocopier Project: from the reproduction of things to a productive life].

    PubMed

    e Silva, Ana Luisa; da Fonseca, Rosa Maria

    2002-12-01

    This study was born out of the necessity manifested by a portion of the population which uses the mental health service linked to the process of production of materialistic life through work. The intention was to comprehend the significance of work using historical and dialectic materialism as a reference, based upon the concepts of psycosocial rehabilitation and was performed through the analysis of discourses of the users. The site is the Prof. Luis Cerqueira Center for Psyco-Social Care (CAPS). The results evidence the comprehension of work as an instrument which enabled the users access to the field of social rights.

  7. Importance of the vertical component of groundwater flow: a hydrogeochemical approach in the valley of San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrillo-Rivera, J. J.; Cardona, A.; Moss, D.

    1996-11-01

    Fractured volcanics exert a control on groundwater flow in the San Luis Potosi (SLP) valley. The chemical composition and temperature of water pumped from boreholes partially penetrating the fractured volcanics indicate that the produced water originates from an upward vertical flow. Most of the thermal groundwater has been detected in areas related to regional faults and lineaments. Intensive and uncontrolled pumping from the upper {1}/{4} of the aquifer (total depth > 1500 m) causes the rise of water from a deep regional flow system that mixes with the shallower waters. The deep waters contain high fluoride concentrations that contaminate the mixture and cause substantial health related effects. The recharge controls on the regional flow system require further research; however, hydrogeochemical evidence supports the view that the origin of this recharge is limited to the western bounding Sierra Madre Occidental. Higher levels of dissolved Na +, Li +, F - (and SO 4-2) derived from Tertiary volcanics have been introduced into the exploited region; the concentrations indicate lengthy and deep circulation flow. Li + concentration was used as an indicator of groundwater residence time, and therefore of the length of the groundwater flow path. Hydrogeochemical interpretation indicates the presence of three flow systems: a shallow local one controlled by a clay layer that subcrops most of the valley floor, an intermediate system in which water infiltrates just beyond the boundary of the clay layer, and a deep regional system which originates outside the surface catchment. The local and intermediate systems circulate through materials with comparatively low hydraulic conductivity. Low Cl - concentrations suggest rapid flow in the regional system. Concentrations of Li + and F - can be used to calculate percentages of waters in mixtures of regional and intermediate flows. Concentrations of Na +, Ca 2+ and SO 4-2 appear to be controlled by water-rock reactions

  8. The Use of InSAR Data to Map Hydraulic Head Levels in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2014-12-01

    A measurement of hydraulic head in the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Here we report on the use of InSAR data to inform groundwater management in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado. We selected the SLV for study, as it is an important agricultural area struggling with groundwater management after a period of extreme drought. The techniques developed here can also be used to assist groundwater management in other agricultural areas, such as California's Central Valley. Reeves at al. (2013) analyzed 30 C-band ERS scenes over the SLV between 1992 and 2000 using the small baseline subset method (SBAS). They concluded that InSAR data can be used to calibrate the subsidence-to-head relationship and temporally extend hydraulic head measurements. To study the extent to which InSAR deformation time series can be used to interpolate spatial gaps in the well-based head measurements, we need to derive an InSAR ground deformation map due to groundwater extraction over the entire SLV. A major error source of InSAR data is highly variable temporal decorrelation over agricultural areas such as the SLV, which limits the number of InSAR pixels that can be selected for the SBAS analysis. Because L-band spaceborne radar systems such as ALOS PALSAR suffer less from temporal decorrelation than C-band and X-band spaceborne radar systems, we processed 92 small baseline interferograms using 17 ALOS scenes acquired between January 2007 and March 2011. We further employed an SBAS ground deformation model to represent surface subsidence due to groundwater extraction, which consists of a seasonal deformation superimposed on a linear trend. We observed that the long-term subsidence rate is smaller than 5 mm/year over the entire SLV and the magnitude of the seasonal subsidence can be up to 2 cm. Our results indicate that there is no severe long-term water storage loss in the confined aquifer at the SLV, consistent with previous C-band InSAR study (Reeves at

  9. A multi-dimensional analysis of the upper Rio Grande-San Luis Valley social-ecological system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mix, Ken

    The Upper Rio Grande (URG), located in the San Luis Valley (SLV) of southern Colorado, is the primary contributor to streamflow to the Rio Grande Basin, upstream of the confluence of the Rio Conchos at Presidio, TX. The URG-SLV includes a complex irrigation-dependent agricultural social-ecological system (SES), which began development in 1852, and today generates more than 30% of the SLV revenue. The diversions of Rio Grande water for irrigation in the SLV have had a disproportionate impact on the downstream portion of the river. These diversions caused the flow to cease at Ciudad Juarez, Mexico in the late 1880s, creating international conflict. Similarly, low flows in New Mexico and Texas led to interstate conflict. Understanding changes in the URG-SLV that led to this event and the interactions among various drivers of change in the URG-SLV is a difficult task. One reason is that complex social-ecological systems are adaptive, contain feedbacks, emergent properties, cross-scale linkages, large-scale dynamics and non-linearities. Further, most analyses of SES to date have been qualitative, utilizing conceptual models to understand driver interactions. This study utilizes both qualitative and quantitative techniques to develop an innovative approach for analyzing driver interactions in the URG-SLV. Five drivers were identified for the URG-SLV social-ecological system: water (streamflow), water rights, climate, agriculture, and internal and external water policy. The drivers contained several longitudes (data aspect) relevant to the system, except water policy, for which only discreet events were present. Change point and statistical analyses were applied to the longitudes to identify quantifiable changes, to allow detection of cross-scale linkages between drivers, and presence of feedback cycles. Agricultural was identified as the driver signal. Change points for agricultural expansion defined four distinct periods: 1852--1923, 1924--1948, 1949--1978 and 1979

  10. Episodic Late Holocene dune movements on the sand-sheet area, Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, San Luis Valley, Colorado, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, S. L.; Spaeth, M.; Marín, L.; Pierson, J.; Gómez, J.; Bunch, F.; Valdez, A.

    2006-07-01

    The Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve (GSDNPP) in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, contains a variety of eolian landforms that reflect Holocene drought variability. The most spectacular is a dune mass banked against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains, which is fronted by an extensive sand sheet with stabilized parabolic dunes. Stratigraphic exposures of parabolic dunes and associated luminescence dating of quartz grains by single-aliquot regeneration (SAR) protocols indicate eolian deposition of unknown magnitude occurred ca. 1290-940, 715 ± 80, 320 ± 30, and 200-120 yr ago and in the 20th century. There are 11 drought intervals inferred from the tree-ring record in the past 1300 yr at GSDNPP potentially associated with dune movement, though only five eolian depositional events are currently recognized in the stratigraphic record. There is evidence for eolian transport associated with dune movement in the 13th century, which may coincide with the "Great Drought", a 26-yr-long dry interval identified in the tree ring record, and associated with migration of Anasazi people from the Four Corners areas to wetter areas in southern New Mexico. This nascent chronology indicates that the transport of eolian sand across San Luis Valley was episodic in the late Holocene with appreciable dune migration in the 8th, 10-13th, and 19th centuries, which ultimately nourished the dune mass against the Sangre de Cristo Mountains.

  11. Analysis of the potential impacts on surface water quality resulting from the proposed use of the San Luis Drain to transport agricultural drainage through the northern Grasslands

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, N.W.T.

    1992-05-01

    An Environmental Assessment and initial Study for the interim use of a portion of the San Luis Drain for conveyance water through the Grassland Water District and adjacent Grassland areas was conducted. The project proposes the use of 18 miles of the San Luis Drain for the conveyance of agricultural drainage water for a period of five years and the elimination of agricultural drainage discharges from 76 miles of existing channels in and adjacent to the Grassland Water District. A report was prepared to (a) quantify the potential project effects on surface water quality within Salt and Mud Sloughs and the San Joaquin River using currently available data, and (b) to improve the understanding of existing water supply and drainage operations within the Grassland area. After submission of the original report it was brought to the attention of one of the coauthors that the database on selenium and boron concentrations in drainage water did not include the water quality data collected by the Regional Water Quality Control Board (CRWQCB). In addition, the US Bureau of Reclamation (USBR) requested further examination of Grasslands hydrology to estimate the quantity of supplemental water that would be needed to restore the San Joaquin River to the same TDS and trace element concentrations prior to implementation of the project. This report addresses these issues.

  12. InSAR data produce specific storage estimates for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.; Schreuder, W.; Agram, P. S.; Lauknes, T.

    2010-12-01

    The San Luis Valley (SLV) is an 8000 km2 region in southern Colorado that is home to a thriving agricultural economy. This valley is currently in a period of extreme drought, with county and state regulators struggling to develop appropriate management policies in order to sustain water levels in the confined aquifer system. The water level from 1970 - 2000 remains a key, but poorly known, component for characterization. Some relevant data, such as water levels measured in wells, were collected during this period and incorporated into a groundwater flow model. However, data with finer spatial and temporal resolution would be very valuable in understanding the behavior and therefore the management of the system. Spaceborne interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide maps of the deformation of the Earth’s surface at a spatial resolution of 50 m; these data are acquired approximately once per month. The deformation measured by InSAR can be related to water levels in the confined aquifer system. However, changes in cm-scale crop structure in agricultural areas lead to signal decorrelation over long periods of time, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply the recently developed small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected by the European Space Agency’s ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites over the western SLV for the years 1992-2001. The SBAS measurements show high levels of InSAR correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. By using SBAS analysis, we are able to estimate the magnitude of the seasonal deformation and compare it with hydraulic head measurements in nearby wells. We directly compare, at three well locations, specific storage parameters estimated from InSAR data to those estimated using traditional pump test techniques. The InSAR and pump test estimated parameters are: 3.4 x10-5 ft-1 vs. 1.7 x 10-5 ft-1, 2.2 x 10

  13. An analysis of the uncertainty in InSAR deformation measurements for groundwater applications in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, J. A.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2012-12-01

    Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide spatially dense maps of the deformation of Earth's surface, where one pixel represents 50 m by 50 m. At a number of field sites it has been shown that the deformation measured by InSAR is related to changes in hydraulic head in underlying confined aquifer systems. In an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado, we have shown that InSAR deformation measurements exhibit seasonal trends similar to hydraulic head measurements made in wells. However, when we attempted to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR deformation measurements we found that the estimate of the uncertainty in these measurements was not accurate enough to assess the agreement between the two datasets. Here we more accurately estimate the uncertainty in the InSAR deformation measurements and present a methodology that uses this uncertainty to optimally process the data for groundwater applications. In this study we used data from the ERS-1 and ERS-2 satellites, which have 30 acquisitions archived from 1992 - 2001. Small Baseline Subset (SBAS) analysis was used to produce a time-series of the deformation for all pixels with data quality above a selected threshold. The deformation is derived from a change in the electromagnetic phase between two different acquisition times. Four major components contribute to uncertainty in the measurement of the phase ( ): integer phase ambiguities, incorrect orbital parameters, atmospheric phase effects and decorrelation of radar signals. We assumed that uncertainty due to integer phase ambiguities and incorrect orbital parameters is small in the SLV. We proceeded to address the two other components of uncertainty, atmospheric phase effects and decorrelation of radar signals. We first used the trends in the hydraulic head to help us identify acquisitions that may have been corrupted by atmospheric phase effects. We found that our technique works well with synthetic data. However, with real

  14. A Review of the Proposed North County Center in Paso Robles--An Educational Center of the San Luis Obispo County Community College District. Commission Report 97-5.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Postsecondary Education Commission, Sacramento.

    This three-part report presents the recommendations of the California Postsecondary Education Commission on a proposal by the San Luis Obispo County Community College District (SLOCCCD) to create an educational center in the City of Paso Robles. Part 1 provides the Commission's conclusions and recommendations, indicating that, based on a needs…

  15. Selected water-quality characteristics and flow of ground water in the San Luis basin, including the Conejos River subbasin, Colorado and New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, R.S.; Hammond, S.E.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical analyses of water from 99 wells and 19 springs in the San Luis basin in Colorado and New Mexico were evaluated to determine selected water quality characteristics as an aid in understanding the flow of groundwater in the basin. The evaluation shows that the distribution of chemical water types in the basin is consistent with chemical changes to be expected along flow paths in rocks typical of those in the basin. The San Luis basin area is underlain by a surficial (< 100-ft-thick) unconfined aquifer and, in turn, by a confining bed and a deeper confined aquifer. Previous studies have indicated that the groundwater system is recharged around the edges of the basin and that groundwater then moves toward discharge areas in the topographically closed part of the basin and along principal streams. The evaluation of water quality data showed that groundwater at the perimeter of the San Luis basin is primarily a calcium bicarbonate type, which is typical in recharge areas. Groundwater near the center of the basin is primarily a sodium bicarbonate type, which is typical of groundwater in downgradient areas. The change in principal cation from calcium to sodium indicates chemical evolution of the water along the groundwater flow path and supports previously developed concepts of groundwater movement in the basin. The exchange of calcium for sodium along the flow path also is assumed to occur in the Conejos River subbasin. Upgradient wells yield calcium bicarbonate type water, whereas downgradient wells yield sodium bicarbonate type water. However, an exception to this relation is found at McIntire Spring, which yields calcium bicarbonate type water from a downgradient location. The source of water discharging from the spring may be the confined aquifer, with hydraulic connection along the Manassa fault. The concentration of dissolved solids in water from both the unconfined and confined aquifers increases downgradient. The increase is dramatic in the closed basin

  16. Hydraulic head levels and aquifer parameters inferred from a joint analysis of InSAR and well data in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, J.; Knight, R. J.; Zebker, H. A.

    2015-12-01

    Groundwater extraction is the primary source of irrigation water in many agricultural regions throughout the world. A set of spatially dense hydraulic head measurements adequately sampling the aquifer is a critical metric needed for effective water management. Because the total compaction due to pumping is nearly proportional to the change in hydraulic head, land subsidence measurements derived from InSAR data can be used to obtain head measurements in confined aquifers when well data are unavailable or insufficiently dense. Reeves at al. (2013) demonstrated that C-band ERS InSAR data acquired between 1992 and 2000 over the San Luis Valley of Colorado suffice to fill temporal gaps in the hydraulic head field dataset at 3 well locations. Here, we further analyze whether the InSAR deformation time series can be used to infer head levels over a larger region than Reeves et al. analyzed. We processed 17 L-band ALOS radar scenes over the San Luis Valley acquired between Jan., 2007 and Mar., 2011 and applied an adaptive interpolation filter between persistent scatterer pixels to reduce vegetation decorrelation artifacts. We estimated the InSAR deformation time series at each image point using a least-squares SBAS approach. We then jointly analyzed the InSAR and the well data to estimate the local skeletal storage coefficient and the time delay between the head change and deformation and converted the InSAR deformation time series to InSAR head levels. The resulting InSAR-head and well-head measurements in the San Luis valley show good agreement with all 18 well measurements in the region with confined aquifer pumping activities. Assuming that geologic parameters such as skeletal storage coefficients often vary slowly in space, we interpolate the obtained skeletal storage coefficients at each well spatially to relate InSAR subsidence measurements over the entire SLV to changes in head with improved spatial resolution over the well data. This demonstration shows that In

  17. 2007 Rocky Mountain Section Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip - Quaternary Geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, September 7-9, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Machette, Michael N.; Coates, Mary-Margaret; Johnson, Margo L.

    2007-01-01

    Prologue Welcome to the 2007 Rocky Mountain Cell Friends of the Pleistocene Field Trip, which will concentrate on the Quaternary geology of the San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico. To our best knowledge, Friends of the Pleistocene (FOP) has never run a trip through the San Luis Basin, although former trips in the region reviewed the 'Northern Rio Grande rift' in 1987 and the 'Landscape History and Processes on the Pajarito Plateau' in 1996. After nearly a decade, the FOP has returned to the Rio Grande rift, but to an area that has rarely hosted a trip with a Quaternary focus. The objective of FOP trips is to review - in the field - new and exciting research on Quaternary geoscience, typically research being conducted by graduate students. In our case, the research is more topically oriented around three areas of the San Luis Basin, and it is being conducted by a wide range of Federal, State, academic, and consulting geologists. This year's trip is ambitious?we will spend our first day mainly on the Holocene record around Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve, the second day on the Quaternary stratigraphy around the San Luis Hills, including evidence for Lake Alamosa and the 1.0 Ma Mesita volcano, and wrap up the trip's third day in the Costilla Plain and Sunshine Valley reviewing alluvial stratigraphy, the history of the Rio Grande, and evidence for young movement on the Sangre de Cristo fault zone. In the tradition of FOP trips, we will be camping along the field trip route for this meeting. On the night before our trip, we will be at the Great Sand Dunes National Park and Preserve's Pinyon Flats Campground, a group facility located about 2 miles north of the Visitors Center. After the first day's trip, we will dine and camp in the Bachus pit, about 3 miles southwest of Alamosa. For the final night (after day 2), we will bed down at La Junta Campground at the Bureau of Land Management (BLM) Wild and Scenic Rivers State Recreation Area, west of Questa

  18. Integration of geology, non-seismic geophysics and seismic data in a structurally complex, frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, T.A.; Belcher, J.S.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    The discovery of live Cretaceous oil in mineral exploration drill holes, followed by the identification of Mesozoic sediments in outcrop and in shallow drill holes, has lead to an integrated approach to exploration of a structurally complex, frontier oil play in south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric (MT), and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted in the initial stages of the project. Models derived from the geophysical data were augmented with geologic field work to explain specific anomalies. Interpretation of the gravity data was constrained by density measurements on representative rock samples collected in the field. Seismic data, acquired in the most recent exploration stage, provided confirmation and modification of the basin margin geometry. Velocity data from the seismic was integrated with resistivity, density, magnetic and geologic data to predict lithologies on an intermediate fault block located between the Sangre de Cristo Mountains and the San Luis Basin.

  19. Survey of potential habitat for the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica) in the Carrizo Plain, San Luis Obispo County, California. [Vulpes macrotis mutica

    SciTech Connect

    Kato, T.T.

    1986-10-01

    A field study was conducted for the US Fish and Wildlife Service to determine the presence and distribution of the endangered San Joaquin kit fox (Vulpes macrotis mutica), and to map land use patterns on the Carrizo Plain, eastern San Luis Obispo County, California. The survey was conducted in July 1985 and covered approximately 8140 acres in 20 sections of land. A total of 41 kit fox dens were found. The highest number of kit fox dens observed per 1000 acres was 12; the lowest was 1.5. Approximately 29,720 acres (49%) were grazed by cattle and sheep, 25,600 acres (42%) were cultivated for dry-land farming, but land use was not determined for 5560 acres (9%).

  20. The institutionalization of biology in Mexico in the early 20th century: the conflict between Alfonso Luis Herrera (1865-1942) and Isaac Ochoterena (1885-1950).

    PubMed

    Ledesma-Mateos, Ismael; Barahona, Ana

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the role played by Alfonso Luis Herrera and Isaac Ochoterena in the institutionalization of academic biology in Mexico in the early 20th century. As biology became institutionalized in Mexico, Herrera's basic approach to biology was displaced by Isaac Ochoterena's professional goals due to the prevailing political conditions at the end of the 1929. The conflict arose from two different conceptions of biology, because Herrera and Ochoterena had different discourses that were incommensurable, not only linguistically speaking, but also socioprofessionally. They had different links to influential groups related to education, having distinct political and socioprofessional interests. The conflict between Herrera and Ochoterena determined the way in which professional biology education has developed in Mexico, as well as the advancement in specific research subjects and the neglect of others.

  1. Maps of the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley, San Diego County, California, showing geology, hydrology, and ground-water quality

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izbicki, John A.

    1985-01-01

    In November 1984, 84 wells and 1 spring in the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley were inventoried by U.S. Geological Survey personnel. Depth to water in 38 wells ranged from 1.3 to 38 ft and 23 wells had depths to water less than 10 feet. Dissolved solids concentration of water from 29 wells and 1 spring sampled in autumn 1983 and spring 1984 ranged from 574 to 2,370 mgs/L. Groundwater with a dissolved solids concentration less than 1,000 mgs/L was generally restricted to the eastern part of the aquifer. The total volume of alluvial fill in the Bonsall area is 113,000 acre-feet; the amount of groundwater storage available in the alluvial aquifer is 18,000 acre-feet. The alluvial aquifer is, in part, surrounded and underlain by colluvium and weathered crystalline rock that add some additional groundwater storage capacity to the system. Data in this report are presented on five maps showing well locations , thickness of alluvial fill, water level contours in November 1983 and hydrographs of selected wells, groundwater quality in spring 1960 and graphs showing changes in dissolved solids concentrations of water from selected wells with time, and groundwater quality in spring 1984. This report is part of a larger cooperative project between the Rainbow Municipal Irrigation District and the U.S. Geological Survey. The purpose of the larger project is to develop an appropriate groundwater management plan for the Bonsall area of the San Luis Rey River valley. (USGS)

  2. Forecasting selenium discharges to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary: ecological effects of a proposed San Luis drain extension

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Luoma, Samuel N.; Presser, Theresa S.

    2000-01-01

    During the next few years, federal and state agencies may be required to evaluate proposals and discharge permits that could significantly change selenium (Se) inputs to the San Francisco Bay-Delta Estuary (Bay-Delta), particularly in the North Bay (i.e., Suisun Bay and San Pablo Bay). These decisions may include discharge requirements for an extension of the San Luis Drain (SLD) to the estuary to convey subsurface agricultural drainage from the western San Joaquin Valley (SJV), a renewal of an agreement to allow the existing portion of the SLD to convey subsurface agricultural drainage to a tributary of the San Joaquin River (SJR) (coincident with changes in flow patterns of the lower SJR), and refinements to promulgated Se criteria for the protection of aquatic life for the estuary. Understanding the biotransfer of Se is essential to evaluating the fate and impact of proposed changes in Se discharges to the Bay-Delta. However, past monitoring programs have not addressed the specific protocols necessary for an element that bioaccumulates. Confusion about Se threats in the past have stemmed from failure to consider the full complexity of the processes that result in Se toxicity. Past studies show that predators are more at risk from Se contamination than their prey, making it difficult to use traditional methods to predict risk from environmental concentrations alone. In this report, we employ a novel procedure to model the fate of Se under different, potentially realistic load scenarios from the SJV. For each potential load, we progressively forecast the resulting environmental concentrations, speciation, transformation to particulate form, bioaccumulation by invertebrates, trophic transfer to predators, and effects in those predators. Enough is known to establish a first order understanding of effects should Se be discharged directly into the North Bay via a conveyance such as the SLD. Our approach uses 1) existing knowledge concerning the biogeochemical

  3. Selex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morelos, Antonio

    2000-08-01

    A summary of the path which lead to a high energy physics group at Instituto de Física de la Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí is presented. This group is the result of the initial push made by Leon Lederman at the beginning of the 80's. .

  4. A new species of the "mexicanus" group of the genus Vaejovis C. L. Koch, 1836 from the Mexican state of Aguascalientes (Scorpiones: Vaejovidae).

    PubMed

    Contreras-Félix, Gerardo A; Francke, Oscar F; Bryson, Robert W

    2015-03-18

    A new species of Vaejovis is described from the Mexican state of Aguascalientes. It is assigned to the "mexicanus" group and compared with similar species from Jalisco, Guanajuato, and San Luis Potosí. A map with their known distributions is provided.

  5. Potential for RbGd 2Br 7:Ce, LaBr 3:Ce, LaBr 3:Ce, and LuI 3:Ce in nuclear medical imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moses, William W.; Shah, Kanai S.

    2005-01-01

    Several new scintillators (RbGd2Br7:Ce, LaCl3:Ce, LaBr3:Ce, and LuI3:Ce) have excellent energy resolution, high light output, short decay time, and moderate density and effective atomic number, making them attractive for nuclear medical imaging. We analyze how well these four materials meet the requirements for SPECT and PET. Because of their high light output and excellent energy resolution, LaBr3:Ce and LaCl3:Ce have the potential to replace NaI:Tl as the material of choice for SPECT. The light output and energy resolution make LaBr3:Ce and LuI3:Ce the most promising of these scintillators for PET, but their relatively low density and photoelectric fraction make them less attractive than BGO and LSO.

  6. Latest Miocene-earliest Pliocene evolution of the ancestral Rio Grande at the Española-San Luis Basin boundary, northern New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Daniel J. Koning,; Scott Aby,; Grauch, V. J.; Matthew J. Zimmerer,

    2016-01-01

    We use stratigraphic relations, paleoflow data, and 40Ar/39Ar dating to interpret net aggradation, punctuated by at least two minor incisional events, along part of the upper ancestral Rio Grande fluvial system between 5.5 and 4.5 Ma (in northern New Mexico). The studied fluvial deposits, which we informally call the Sandlin unit of the Santa Fe Group, overlie a structural high between the San Luis and Española Basins. The Sandlin unit was deposited by two merging, west- to southwest-flowing, ancestral Rio Grande tributaries respectively sourced in the central Taos Mountains and southern Taos Mountains-northeastern Picuris Mountains. The river confluence progressively shifted southwestward (downstream) with time, and the integrated river (ancestral Rio Grande) flowed southwards into the Española Basin to merge with the ancestral Rio Chama. Just prior to the end of the Miocene, this fluvial system was incised in the southern part of the study area (resulting in an approximately 4–7 km wide paleovalley), and had sufficient competency to transport cobbles and boulders. Sometime between emplacement of two basalt flows dated at 5.54± 0.38 Ma and 4.82±0.20 Ma (groundmass 40Ar/39Ar ages), this fluvial system deposited 10–12 m of sandier sediment (lower Sandlin subunit) preserved in the northern part of this paleovalley. The fluvial system widened between 4.82±0.20 and 4.50±0.07 Ma, depositing coarse sand and fine gravel up to 14 km north of the present-day Rio Grande. This 10–25 m-thick sediment package (upper Sandlin unit) buried earlier south- to southeast-trending paleovalleys (500–800 m wide) inferred from aeromagnetic data. Two brief incisional events are recognized. The first was caused by the 4.82±0.20 Ma basalt flow impounding south-flowing paleodrainages, and the second occurred shortly after emplacement of a 4.69±0.09 Ma basalt flow in the northern study area. Drivers responsible for Sandlin unit aggradation may include climate

  7. Digital data and derivative products from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey of the central San Luis basin, covering parts of Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande counties, Colorado, and Taos county, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bankey, Viki; Grauch, V.J.S.; Webbers, Ank; PRJ, Inc

    2005-01-01

    This report describes data collected from a high-resolution aeromagnetic survey flown over the central San Luis basin during October, 2004, by PRJ, Inc., on contract to the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The survey extends from just north of Alamosa, Colorado, southward to just northwest of Taos, New Mexico. It covers large parts of the San Luis Valley in Alamosa, Conejos, Costilla, and Rio Grande Counties, southern Colorado, and the Taos Plateau in Taos County, northern New Mexico. The survey was designed to complement two surveys previously acquired along the eastern borders of the San Luis Basin over the vicinities of Taos, New Mexico (Bankey and others, 2004a) and Blanca, Colorado (Bankey and others, 2004b). Our overall objective in conducting these surveys is to improve knowledge of the subsurface geologic framework in order to understand ground-water systems in populated alluvial basins along the Rio Grande. These USGS efforts are conducted in collaboration with other federal, state, and local governmental entities where possible.

  8. Determinants of scientific output: an in-depth view of the productivity of tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro.

    PubMed

    Monge-Nájera, Julián; Nielsen-Muñoz, Vanessa; Beatriz Azofeifa, Ana

    2010-12-01

    Bibliometric studies have found that male researchers have their greatest productivity around the age of 40, that female researchers produce less than their male colleagues, that incentives for collaboration are slow to affect productivity and that, just like humans, research institutes become larger, less productive, more expensive to maintain and less able to raise money as they grow old. Almost invariably, these conclusions come from statistical studies of large numbers of European and American scientists, and there are practically no studies about tropical researchers. We present an in-depth analysis of the productivity of an internationally recognized tropical botanist and conservationist, Luis Diego Gómez Pignataro, based on the totality of his published work and on our own knowledge, as co-workers and friends, of the life frame in which that scientific output was produced. His life output departs from the expected pattern in that he had the highest productivity before reaching the expected peak productivity age, and that when he reached it his productivity fell and never recovered. Furthermore, marriage did not produce the expected fall in productivity. A close analysis of his life indicates that in the middle of his career he switched to intense teaching and conservation activities, and this better explains why his output of scientific research articles was low afterwards. This switch may occur in other tropical scientists.

  9. Opportunities for Open Automated Demand Response in Wastewater Treatment Facilities in California - Phase II Report. San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant Case Study

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, Lisa; Lekov, Alex; McKane, Aimee; Piette, Mary Ann

    2010-08-20

    This case study enhances the understanding of open automated demand response opportunities in municipal wastewater treatment facilities. The report summarizes the findings of a 100 day submetering project at the San Luis Rey Wastewater Treatment Plant, a municipal wastewater treatment facility in Oceanside, California. The report reveals that key energy-intensive equipment such as pumps and centrifuges can be targeted for large load reductions. Demand response tests on the effluent pumps resulted a 300 kW load reduction and tests on centrifuges resulted in a 40 kW load reduction. Although tests on the facility?s blowers resulted in peak period load reductions of 78 kW sharp, short-lived increases in the turbidity of the wastewater effluent were experienced within 24 hours of the test. The results of these tests, which were conducted on blowers without variable speed drive capability, would not be acceptable and warrant further study. This study finds that wastewater treatment facilities have significant open automated demand response potential. However, limiting factors to implementing demand response are the reaction of effluent turbidity to reduced aeration load, along with the cogeneration capabilities of municipal facilities, including existing power purchase agreements and utility receptiveness to purchasing electricity from cogeneration facilities.

  10. Plant endemism in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis (Argentina): understanding links between phylogeny and regional biogeographical patterns.

    PubMed

    Chiapella, Jorge O; Demaio, Pablo H

    2015-01-01

    We compiled a checklist with all known endemic plants occurring in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis, an isolated mountainous range located in central Argentina. In order to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary history, relationships and age of the regional flora, we gathered basic information on the biogeographical and floristic affinities of the endemics, and documented the inclusion of each taxon in molecular phylogenies. We listed 89 taxa (including 69 species and 20 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 53 genera and 29 families. The endemics are not distributed evenly, being more abundant in the lower than in the middle and upper vegetation belts. Thirty-two genera (60.3%) have been included in phylogenetic analyses, but only ten (18.8%) included local endemic taxa. A total of 28 endemic taxa of the Sierras CSL have a clear relationship with a widespread species of the same genus, or with one found close to the area. Available phylogenies for some taxa show divergence times between 7.0 - 1.8 Ma; all endemic taxa are most probably neoendemics sensu Stebbins and Major. Our analysis was specifically aimed at a particular geographic area, but the approach of analyzing phylogenetic patterns together with floristic or biogeographical relationships of the endemic taxa of an area, delimited by clear geomorphological features, could reveal evolutionary trends shaping the area.

  11. Plant endemism in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis (Argentina): understanding links between phylogeny and regional biogeographical patterns1

    PubMed Central

    Chiapella, Jorge O.; Demaio, Pablo H.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We compiled a checklist with all known endemic plants occurring in the Sierras of Córdoba and San Luis, an isolated mountainous range located in central Argentina. In order to obtain a better understanding of the evolutionary history, relationships and age of the regional flora, we gathered basic information on the biogeographical and floristic affinities of the endemics, and documented the inclusion of each taxon in molecular phylogenies. We listed 89 taxa (including 69 species and 20 infraspecific taxa) belonging to 53 genera and 29 families. The endemics are not distributed evenly, being more abundant in the lower than in the middle and upper vegetation belts. Thirty-two genera (60.3%) have been included in phylogenetic analyses, but only ten (18.8%) included local endemic taxa. A total of 28 endemic taxa of the Sierras CSL have a clear relationship with a widespread species of the same genus, or with one found close to the area. Available phylogenies for some taxa show divergence times between 7.0 – 1.8 Ma; all endemic taxa are most probably neoendemics sensu Stebbins and Major. Our analysis was specifically aimed at a particular geographic area, but the approach of analyzing phylogenetic patterns together with floristic or biogeographical relationships of the endemic taxa of an area, delimited by clear geomorphological features, could reveal evolutionary trends shaping the area. PMID:25878555

  12. Non-seismic geophysics compared and integrated with seismic in a frontier oil play: Northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/Northeast San Luis Basin, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Longacre, M.B.; Christopherson, K.R.; Gries, R.

    1995-06-01

    Four non-seismic geophysical tools have made a significant contribution to a new geological interpretation of the northern Sangre de Cristo Mountains/northeast San Luis Basin of south-central Colorado. Gravity, aeromagnetic, magnetotelluric, (MT) and time domain electromagnetic (TDEM) data were acquired and interpreted during the early stages of exploration. Two-dimensional modeling of the gravity and magnetics placed the main, basin-bounding fault three miles southwest of the mountain front, identified an intermediate fault block at the basin margin and identified a thick sequence of non-magnetic, intermediate density rocks on top of this block. A thick section of Mesozoic sediments is interpreted, supported by the discovery of outcrops of Cretaceous sediments and live Cretaceous oil. Magnetotelluric data was acquired to confirm the presence of Mesozoic sediments and depth to basement. Detailed TDEM data has been useful in correlating the MT with surface geology. Integration of the gravity, magnetic and MT data with seismic resulted in minor modifications to the new geological model.

  13. Geophysical logging to determine construction, contributing zones, and appropriate use of water levels measured in confined-aquifer network wells, San Luis Valley, Colorado, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brendle, D.L.

    2002-01-01

    Geophysical logs were recorded in 32 wells in the confined-aquifer monitoring well network maintained by the Rio Grande Water Conservation District. Logging results were used to determine well construction, zones contributing water to the wells, and the purposes for which the ground-water levels measured in the wells can be used. The confined-aquifer well network consists of 42 flowing and nonflowing wells. This network consists of wells used to supply water for irrigation, household use, wildlife refuge supply, and stock use, and wells for water-level monitoring. Geophysical logs recorded in the wells included video, caliper, water specific conductance, water temperature, and water flow. Most wells in the confined-aquifer well network yield a composite water level representing water levels in multiple permeable zones in the confined-aquifer system of the San Luis Valley. A potentiometric-surface map constructed using November 2000 water levels indicates that water levels from most wells in the network are correlated with water levels from nearby network wells. Potentiometric-surface maps that are constructed from water levels measured in most of the wells in the network can be used to understand long-term local and regional changes in water levels in the confined-aquifer system. Water levels measured in 8 of the 42 wells in the confined-aquifer network are not representative of water levels in the confined-aquifer system.

  14. [Species, dynamics and population composition of phthirapteran in free-range chickens (Gallus gallus L.) in São Luis Island, State of Maranhão].

    PubMed

    Guerra, Rita de M S N de C; Chaves, Elba P; Passos, Tarsila M G; Santos, Ana C G Dos

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this work was to identify the phthirapteran species, to determine the prevalence according to the anatomical region of the body and to know the dynamics and composition of the population of these ectoparasites in free-range chicken in São Luis Island, state of Maranhão. Inspection was performed in 40 chickens and feathers were collected from the head, neck, wing, thigh, dorsal and ventral regions and cloacae. The phthirapteran species identified were: Menopon gallinae L., Menacanthus stramineus Nitzsch, Menacanthus pallidulus Neumann, Menacanthus cornutus Schommer (Menoponidae), and Lipeurus caponis L., Goniodes dissimilis Denny and Goniocotes gallinae De Geer (Philopteridae). L. caponis was collected from all regions sampled, including the head, which was the least infested region. The dorsum was the most infested, especially in the dry period of the year and where the greater parasitic diversity was observed, the wing and the head were the least infested regions. Considering the dynamics and the composition of the population the phthirapteran presented a prevalence of 85% of the sampled chickens, the mean intensity of infestation was 45.3 varying from <1 to 453. The egg stage was superior to the others life stages followed by nymphs and female adults, independent of the phthirapteran species.

  15. Association between Urine Fluoride and Dental Fluorosis as a Toxicity Factor in a Rural Community in the State of San Luis Potosi

    PubMed Central

    Jarquín-Yañez, Lizet; Mejía-Saavedra, José de Jesús; Molina-Frechero, Nelly; Gaona, Enrique; Rocha-Amador, Diana Olivia; López-Guzmán, Olga Dania; Bologna-Molina, Ronell

    2015-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this study is to investigate urine fluoride concentration as a toxicity factor in a rural community in the state of San Luis Potosi, Mexico. Materials and Methods. A sample of 111 children exposed to high concentrations of fluoride in drinking water (4.13 mg/L) was evaluated. Fluoride exposure was determined by measuring urine fluoride concentration using the potentiometric method with an ion selective electrode. The diagnosis of dental fluorosis was performed by clinical examination, and the severity of damage was determined using Dean's index and the Thylstrup-Fejerskov (TF) index. Results. The range of exposure in the study population, evaluated through the fluoride content in urine, was 1.1 to 5.9 mg/L, with a mean of 3.14 ± 1.09 mg/L. Dental fluorosis was present in all subjects, of which 95% had severe cases. Higher urine fluoride levels and greater degrees of severity occurred in older children. Conclusions. The results show that dental fluorosis was determined by the presence of fluoride exposure finding a high positive correlation between the severity of fluorosis and urine fluoride concentration and the years of exposure suggested a cumulative effect. PMID:25789336

  16. Water-quality assessment of the Rio Grande Valley, Colorado, New Mexico, and Texas; shallow ground-water quality of a land-use area in the San Luis Valley, south-central Colorado, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Anderholm, S.K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes the quality of shallow ground water in an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado, and discusses how natural and human factors affect the quality of shallow ground water. Thirty-five wells were installed, and water samples were collected from these wells and analyzed for selected dissolved common constituents, nutrients, trace elements, radionuclides, and synthetic organic compounds. The San Luis Valley is a high intermontane valley that is partially drained by the Rio Grande. The San Luis Valley land-use study area was limited to a part of the valley where the depth to water is generally less than 25 feet. The area where the 35 monitor wells were installed was further limited to the part of the study area where center-pivot overhead sprinklers are used to irrigate crops. Precipitation, runoff from adjacent mountainous areas, and ground-water inflow from the adjacent mountainous areas are the main sources of water to the aquifers in the San Luis Valley. Discharge of water from the shallow, unconfined aquifer in the valley is mainly from evapotranspiration. The dominant land use in the San Luis Valley is agriculture, although nonirrigated land and residential land are interspersed with agricultural land. Alfalfa, native hay, barley, wheat, potatoes, and other vegetables are the main crops. Dissolved-solids concentrations in shallow ground water sampled ranged from 75 to 1,960 milligrams per liter. The largest median concentration of cations was for calcium, and the largest median concentration of anions was for bicarbonate in shallow ground water in the San Luis Valley. Calcium concentrations ranged from 7.5 to 300 milligrams per liter, and bicarbonate concentrations ranged from 28 to 451 milligrams per liter. Nitrite plus nitrate concentrations ranged from less than 0.1 to 58 milligrams per liter as N; water from 11 wells had nitrite plus nitrate concentrations greater than 10 milligrams per liter as N. With the exception of the

  17. Potential field studies of the central San Luis Basin and San Juan Mountains, Colorado and New Mexico, and southern and western Afghanistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drenth, Benjamin John

    This dissertation includes three separate chapters, each demonstrating the interpretive utility of potential field (gravity and magnetic) geophysical datasets at various scales and in various geologic environments. The locations of these studies are the central San Luis Basin of Colorado and New Mexico, the San Juan Mountains of southwestern Colorado, and southern and western Afghanistan. The San Luis Basin is the northernmost of the major basins that make up the Rio Grande rift, and interpretation of gravity and aeromagnetic data reveals patterns of rifting, rift-sediment thicknesses, distribution of pre-rift volcanic and sedimentary rocks, and distribution of syn-rift volcanic rocks. Syn-rift Santa Fe Group sediments have a maximum thickness of ˜2 km in the Sanchez graben near the eastern margin of the basin along the central Sangre de Cristo fault zone. Under the Costilla Plains, thickness of these sediments is estimated to reach ˜1.3 km. The Santa Fe Group sediments also reach a thickness of nearly 1 km within the Monte Vista graben near the western basin margin along the San Juan Mountains. A narrow, north-south-trending structural high beneath San Pedro Mesa separates the graben from the structural depression beneath the Costilla Plains. Aeromagnetic anomalies are interpreted to mainly reflect variations of remanent magnetic polarity and burial depth of the 5.3-3.7 Ma Servilleta basalt of the Taos Plateau volcanic field. Magnetic-source depth estimates indicate patterns of subsidence following eruption of the basalt and show that the Sanchez graben has been the site of maximum subsidence. One of the largest and most pronounced gravity lows in North America lies over the rugged San Juan Mountains in southwestern Colorado. A buried, low-density silicic batholith related to an Oligocene volcanic field coincident with the San Juan Mountains has been the accepted interpretation of the source of the gravity low since the 1970s. However, this interpretation was

  18. Nitrate concentrations, 1936-99, and pesticide concentrations, 1990-99, in the unconfined aquifer in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stogner, Robert W.

    2001-01-01

    ineffective in evaluating variations in the amount of nitrate leaching associated with differences in application rates. It was concluded that irrigation practices have the greatest effect on leaching of nitrate to the aquifer. Management tools, such as irrigation scheduling, center-pivot sprinkler systems, soil and ground-water nitrogen credits, and cultivation of cover and winter crops, are being used to help maintain crop quality and yields while minimizing the potential of leaching and reducing residual nitrogen left in the soil. Review of available data from previous studies indicates that most of the sampled wells with elevated nitrate concentrations are located in the intensively cultivated area north of the Rio Grande. This area represents about 10 percent of the San Luis Valley and approximately 35 percent of the crop and pasture land in the valley. The area where nitrate concentrations exceed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency drinking water maximum contaminant level represents about 150 square miles or 5 percent of the valley. Aquifer vulnerability to and contamination by pesticides was not evaluated until the 1990's. Risk analyses indicated that selected pesticides can pose a contamination threat to an unconfined aquifer in areas consisting primarily of sandy loam soil; sandy loam soils are common in the San Luis Valley. Water-quality samples collected from some wells during 1990 and 1993 indicated trace- to low-level pesticide contamination. The occurrence of pesticides was infrequent and isolated.

  19. Detection and Characterization of Shiga Toxin Producing Escherichia coli, Salmonella spp., and Yersinia Strains from Human, Animal, and Food Samples in San Luis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Favier, Gabriela Isabel; Lucero Estrada, Cecilia; Cortiñas, Teresa Inés; Escudero, María Esther

    2014-01-01

    Shiga toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC), Salmonella spp., and Yersinia species was investigated in humans, animals, and foods in San Luis, Argentina. A total of 453 samples were analyzed by culture and PCR. The antimicrobial susceptibility of all the strains was studied, the genomic relationships among isolates of the same species were determined by PFGE, and the potencial virulence of Y. enterocolitica strains was analyzed. Yersinia species showed higher prevalence (9/453, 2.0%, 95% CI, 0.7–3.3%) than STEC (4/453, 0.9%, 95% CI, 0–1.8%) and Salmonella spp. (3/453, 0.7%, 95% CI, 0–1.5%). Y. enterocolitica and Y. intermedia were isolated from chicken carcasses (6/80, 7.5%, 95% CI, 1.5–13.5%) and porcine skin and bones (3/10, 30%, 95% CI, 0–65%). One STEC strain was recovered from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) and STEC stx1/stx2 genes were detected in bovine stools (3/129, 2.3%, 95% CI, 0–5.0%). S. Typhimurium was isolated from human feces (1/70, 1.4%, 95% CI, 0–4.2%) while one S. Newport and two S. Gaminara strains were recovered from one wild boar (1/3, 33%, 95% CI, 0–99%). The knowledge of prevalence and characteristics of these enteropathogens in our region would allow public health services to take adequate preventive measures. PMID:25177351

  20. New evidence for self-medication in bonobos: Manniophyton fulvum leaf- and stemstrip-swallowing from LuiKotale, Salonga National Park, DR Congo.

    PubMed

    Fruth, Barbara; Ikombe, Nono Bondjengo; Matshimba, Gaby Kitengie; Metzger, Sonja; Muganza, Désiré Musuyu; Mundry, Roger; Fowler, Andrew

    2014-02-01

    The swallowing of entire leaves by apes across Africa without chewing has been observed for over 40 plant species. Here we add evidence for (a) a new site, LuiKotale where leaf-swallowing of Manniophyton fulvum (Euphorbiaceae) is observed in bonobos, (b) a so far unreported ingestion of unchewed stemstrips of M. fulvum, we name stemstrip-swallowing; and (c) a test of some of the requirements put forward by Huffman for the assessment of plants ingested for medical purpose. As ecological correlates we analyzed M. fulvum phenological data and examined 1,094 dung piles collected between 2002 and 2009. By that we assessed availability and choice of leaves. In addition, we provide the first full description of the behavior related to this plant species' use by chimpanzees or bonobos using 56 bouts of M. fulvum ingestion observed between October 2007 and February 2010. With these data we tested and met 4 of the 6 requirements given by Huffman, supporting ingestion of this species as self-medication. Despite species' year-round availability and abundance, M. fulvum was ingested only at specific times, in very small amounts, and by a small proportion of individuals per party. In the absence of our own parasitological data, we used M. fulvum swallowing as evidence for parasite infestation, and seasonality as a proxy for stressors underlying seasonal fluctuation and impacting immune responses. Using these indirect factors available, we investigated conditions for a parasite to develop to its infective stage as well as conditions for the host to cope with infections. Both rain and temperature were good predictors for M. fulvum ingestion. We discuss the use of M. fulvum with respect to its hispidity and subsequent purging properties and provide insight into its ethnomedicinal uses by humans, stimulating speculations about potentially additional pharmacological effects.

  1. High quality InSAR data linked to seasonal change in hydraulic head for an agricultural area in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reeves, Jessica A.; Knight, Rosemary; Zebker, Howard A.; Schreüder, Willem A.; Shanker Agram, Piyush; Lauknes, Tom R.

    2011-12-01

    In the San Luis Valley (SLV), Colorado legislation passed in 2004 requires that hydraulic head levels in the confined aquifer system stay within the range experienced in the years 1978-2000. While some measurements of hydraulic head exist, greater spatial and temporal sampling would be very valuable in understanding the behavior of the system. Interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) data provide fine spatial resolution measurements of Earth surface deformation, which can be related to hydraulic head change in the confined aquifer system. However, change in cm-scale crop structure with time leads to signal decorrelation, resulting in low quality data. Here we apply small baseline subset (SBAS) analysis to InSAR data collected from 1992 to 2001. We are able to show high levels of correlation, denoting high quality data, in areas between the center pivot irrigation circles, where the lack of water results in little surface vegetation. At three well locations we see a seasonal variation in the InSAR data that mimics the hydraulic head data. We use measured values of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient to estimate hydraulic head from the InSAR data. In general the magnitude of estimated and measured head agree to within the calculated error. However, the errors are unacceptably large due to both errors in the InSAR data and uncertainty in the measured value of the elastic skeletal storage coefficient. We conclude that InSAR is capturing the seasonal head variation, but that further research is required to obtain accurate hydraulic head estimates from the InSAR deformation measurements.

  2. The Influence of Meteorology on the Air Quality in the San Luis Obispo County-Southwestern San Joaquin Valley Region for 3Â 6 August 1990.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niccum, Elizabeth M.; Lehrman, Donald E.; Knuth, William R.

    1995-08-01

    The large volume of data measured during the 1990 summer San Joaquin Valley Air Quality Study/Atmospheric Utility Signatures, Predictions, and Experiments (SJVAQS/AUSPEX) provides a unique opportunity to examine the influence of meteorology on air quality for a variety of regions in central California. This paper provides a qualitative analysis of surface and upper-level meteorological and air quality data measured during 3 6 August 1990 in San Luis Obispo County (SLOC) and the southwestern side of the San Joaquin Valley (SJV). During this 4-day period, daytime and nighttime atmospheric mechanisms helped to transport ozone into layers aloft over the SJV. Air flowing out of the SJV in the afternoon transported elevated layers of ozone into SLOC. The daily onshore flow from the west opposed this outflow of air from the SJV. The onshore flow prevented the transported ozone from the SJV from reaching the surface and allowed some ventilation into the southwestern side of the SJV. However, on 5 August 1990, a strong ridge of high pressure over the western United States helped to weaken onshore flow and allowed outflow from the SJV to penetrate much further to the coast. These changes in the synoptic-scale meteorology increased transport of polluted air into the region and decreased overall circulations at the surface. As a result, ozone levels exceeded the California state standard for ozone (>90 ppb) at two remote sites in the SJV on 5 August, and at one site in the SLOC on 6 August 1990. This paper discusses the synoptic meteorology and the surface and upper-level meteorological and air quality data. Also, it is revealed that ozone transport and other atmospheric processes that influence surface air quality caused the ozone exceedances.

  3. Depositional environments of Qual Canyon sandstone and Soda Lake shale members of Miocene Vaqueros Formation in southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Goaldman, D.C.

    1988-03-01

    The Quail Canyon Sandstone and the Soda Lake Shale Members are the lower members of the Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the southeastern Caliente Range, San Luis Obispo County, California. The Quail Canyon Sandstone Member is conformably underlain by the nonmarine Oligocene Simmler Formation. The Soda Lake Shale Member is conformably overlain by the Painted Rock Sandstone Member of the Vaqueros Formation. The rarely fossiliferous Quail Canyon Sandstone Member is medium to coarse grained and well sorted in its lower half, becoming medium to fine grained upsection. The lower rocks consist of parallel-laminated and large-scale cross-bedded sandstones, representing an upper-shoreface environment. The upper rocks are primarily structureless sandstone and represent a lower-shoreface environment. The entire section ranges in thickness from 50 to 150 m, thinning westward. The Soda Lake Shale Member consists primarily of gray sandy siltstone, brown siltstone, and structureless sandstone. The sandy siltstone and structureless sandstone are interbedded at the bottom of the unit and indicate lower-shoreface to transitional-marine environments. The rocks become progressively finer into the characteristic, usually structureless, brown siltstone of the Soda Lake Shale Member. The brown siltstone represents an offshore environment, perhaps a restricted bay. Farther upsection, the brown siltstone is interbedded with lenticular structureless sandstone, either of which is locally the dominant lithology. Locally interbedded with the upper rocks is organic-rich, clay-rich sandstone. Above the organic sandstone, the other rocks may contain laminations, grading, and channels that are absent to sparse lower in the section. The upper rocks indicate a shallower and more restricted bay alongside a delta. The Soda Lake Shale Member ranges in thickness from 30 m in the east to 350 m in the west.

  4. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-06-11

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation or neutrino oscillation by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5 percent respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock

  5. Geologic Investigation of a Potential Site for a Next-Generation Reactor Neutrino Oscillation Experiment -- Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    SciTech Connect

    Onishi, Celia Tiemi; Dobson, Patrick; Nakagawa, Seiji; Glaser, Steven; Galic, Dom

    2004-08-01

    This report provides information on the geology and selected physical and mechanical properties of surface rocks collected at Diablo Canyon, San Luis Obispo County, California as part of the design and engineering studies towards a future reactor neutrino oscillation experiment. The main objective of this neutrino project is to study the process of neutrino flavor transformation--or neutrino oscillation--by measuring neutrinos produced in the fission reactions of a nuclear power plant. Diablo Canyon was selected as a candidate site because it allows the detectors to be situated underground in a tunnel close to the source of neutrinos (i.e., at a distance of several hundred meters from the nuclear power plant) while having suitable topography for shielding against cosmic rays. The detectors have to be located underground to minimize the cosmic ray-related background noise that can mimic the signal of reactor neutrino interactions in the detector. Three Pliocene-Miocene marine sedimentary units dominate the geology of Diablo Canyon: the Pismo Formation, the Monterey Formation, and the Obispo Formation. The area is tectonically active, located east of the active Hosgri Fault and in the southern limb of the northwest trending Pismo Syncline. Most of the potential tunnel for the neutrino detector lies within the Obispo Formation. Review of previous geologic studies, observations from a field visit, and selected physical and mechanical properties of rock samples collected from the site provided baseline geological information used in developing a preliminary estimate for tunneling construction cost. Gamma-ray spectrometric results indicate low levels of radioactivity for uranium, thorium, and potassium. Grain density, bulk density, and porosity values for these rock samples range from 2.37 to 2.86 g/cc, 1.41 to 2.57 g/cc, and 1.94 to 68.5% respectively. Point load, unconfined compressive strength, and ultrasonic velocity tests were conducted to determine rock mechanical

  6. The effect of regulation caused by a dam on the distribution of the functional feeding groups of the benthos in the sub basin of the Grande River (san Luis, Argentina).

    PubMed

    Vallania, Adriana; Corigliano, Maria Del Carmen

    2007-01-01

    The construction of small dams in principal streams is one of the most common forms of regulation in the province of San Luis since they cause changes of physical, chemical and biological nature downstream. The purpose of this study was to analyze the short-term modifications in the food organization of benthic macroinvertebrates communities due to the construction of a dam in the Grande River (San Luis, Argentina). Two sampling sites were established: one before the dam and another one after it. The samplings were carried out with Surber sampler and during an annual cycle extending from April 1997 to March 1998, and two complementary samplings were done in low and high waters. The field sampling design was stratified randomly, and 3 pseudo replicas were taken in a transect seasonally and monthly and were then averaged. Macroinvertebrates were classified in different functional feeding groups. The comparisons at the level of physical and chemical variables and absolute abundances of the functional groups were carried out by means of the Wilcoxon test for two related samples. The collector-filterers, scrapers and predators increase whereas the collector-gatherers and shredders decreased. There were significant differences at the level of gatherers and shredders.

  7. Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, D.W.; Densmore, J.N.; Galloway, D.L.; Amelung, Falk

    2000-01-01

    The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

  8. Use of InSAR to identify land-surface displacements caused by aquifer-system compaction in the Paso Robles area, San Luis Obispo County, California, March to August 1997

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Valentine, David W.; Densmore, Jill N.; Galloway, Devin L.; Amelung, Falk

    2001-01-01

    The population in San Luis Obispo County has grown steadily during the 1990s, and some land use has been converted from dry farming to grazing to irrigated vineyards and urban areas. Because insufficient surface-water supplies are available to meet the growing demand, ground-water pumpage has increased and the resulting water-level declines have raised concern that this water resource may become overstressed. One particular concern is whether the larger ground-water basins within the county function as large individual basins or whether subsurface structures divide these large basins into smaller subbasins, as differences in ground-water-level data suggest. Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR) is used in locating land-surface displacement, which may indicate subsurface structures in ground-water basins by determining seasonal and historical land-surface changes. Owing to the high spatial detail of InSAR imagery, the InSAR-derived displacement maps can be used with ground-water-level data to reveal differential aquifer-system compaction related to the presence of geological structures or the distribution of compressible sediments that may define subbasin boundaries. This report describes InSAR displacement maps of the Paso Robles area of San Luis Obispo County and compares them to maps of seasonal changes in ground-water levels to detect the presence of aquifer-system compaction.

  9. "Fanm se poto mitan": Haitian woman, the pillar of society.

    PubMed

    N'zengou-tayo, M J

    1998-01-01

    This reexamination of the status of women in Haiti opens by noting that the analysis was prompted by an acknowledgement that the past decade has given Haitian women the opportunity to make great developmental and educational progress. The analysis begins by presenting a brief social history of Haitian women, which focuses on such issues as the second-class status afforded Haitian peasants in the 19th century; the fact that household and agricultural duties curtail the education of children; the prestige assigned to marriage versus the more usual common-law unions; the social hierarchy recognized by the peasants; the survival of polygamous unions; the involvement of women in farming, marketing, and trading food; and recent attempts by rural women to gain education and organize themselves to improve the conditions of their lives. The analysis then turns to the status of rural women after they migrate to urban areas, where economic categories create the social hierarchy and Statute Law applies. This section focuses on the income-generation opportunities that were available to these women during the Duvalier regimes, on the conditions of life for the middle class, and on the use of violence by employers and the state to control women of all classes. The second part of the analysis looks at how Haitian women have been represented in literature by female and male Haitian writers and highlights the way female writers used subversive narrative techniques to create a stereotype-breaking female identity. The essay concludes that women writers are continuing to further social activism and feminist struggles.

  10. Geochemistry and petrology of spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico: Partial melting and mantle metasomatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yan; Elthon, Don

    1990-09-01

    Spinel Iherzolite xenoliths from Xalapasco de La Joya, San Luis Potosi, Mexico, are divided into two distinct groups according to their major element and trace element characteristics. Group Ia xenoliths are characterized by light rare earth element (LREE) depletion ((La/Lu)N = 0.10-0.77 in clinopyroxene) and linear major and compatible trace element relationships. Group Ib xenoliths are characterized by FeO and Na2O enrichment and higher (La/Lu)N ratios (0.80-4.1 in clinopyroxene) and complex major element relationships. These samples, which have a range of equilibrium temperatures of 910°-1070°C, exhibit protogranular textures and typical orthopyroxene+clinopyroxene+spinel clusters. Modal abundances and chemical compositions of the group Ia xenoliths vary from primitive (15.2% clinopyroxene, 38.5% MgO, 1824 ppm Ni) to moderately depleted (6.4-8.7% clinopyroxene, 43.8-44.1% MgO, 2192 ppm Ni). Systematic variations of major elements and compatible trace elements in the group Ia xenoliths are interpreted to result from various degrees (<25%) of partial melting and melt extraction, followed by subsolidus equilibration and annealing. The extracted melts have a range of compositions similar to picritic basalts. Abundances of moderately incompatible trace elements, Sc and Cr, in the group Ia minerals have been substantially redistributed during subsolidus equilibration. In a few of these xenoliths there appears to be vestiges of incipient metasomatism, but metasomatism has not substantially influenced the group as a whole. Group Ib xenoliths have been substantially influenced by metasomatic processes. The ∑FeO and Na2O contents of the cores of clinopyroxenes in group Ib xenoliths are higher than clinopyroxenes in group Ia samples. The higher La contents and La/Lu ratios in group Ib clinopyroxenes (compared to group Ia), together with this FeO and Na2O enrichment, suggest that equilibration of basanites with residual mantle has been a major process in the evolution

  11. Maps showing estimated sediment yield from coastal landslides and active slope distribution along the Big Sur coast, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Green, Krystal R.; Dallas, Kate

    2004-01-01

    The 1982-83 and 1997-98 El Ni?os brought very high precipitation to California?s central coast; this precipitation resulted in raised groundwater levels, coastal flooding, and destabilized slopes throughout the region. Large landslides in the coastal mountains of Big Sur in Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties blocked sections of California State Route 1, closing the road for months at a time. Large landslides such as these occur frequently in the winter months along the Big Sur coast due to the steep topography and weak bedrock. A large landslide in 1983 resulted in the closure of Highway 1 for over a year to repair the road and stabilize the slope. Resulting work from the 1983 landslide cost over $7 million and generated 30 million cubic yards of debris from landslide removal and excavations to re-establish the highway along the Big Sur coast. Before establishment of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary (MBNMS) in 1992, typical road opening measures involved disposal of some landslide material and excess material generated from slope stabilization onto the seaward side of the highway. It is likely that some or most of this disposed material, either directly or indirectly through subsequent erosion, was eventually transported downslope into the ocean. In addition to the landslides that initiate above the road, natural slope failures sometimes occur on the steep slopes below the road and thus deliver material to the base of the coastal mountains where it is eroded and dispersed by waves and nearshore currents. Any coastal-slope landslide, generated through natural or anthropogenic processes, can result in sediment entering the nearshore zone. The waters offshore of the Big Sur coast are part of the MBNMS. Since it was established in 1992, landslide-disposal practices came under question for two reasons. The U.S. Code of Federal Regulations, Title 15, Section 922.132 prohibits discharging or depositing, from beyond the boundary of the Sanctuary, any material

  12. Hydrogeology, water quality, water budgets, and simulated responses to hydrologic changes in Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creek ground-water basins, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yates, Eugene B.; Van Konyenburg, Kathryn M.

    1998-01-01

    Santa Rosa and San Simeon Creeks are underlain by thin, narrow ground-water basins that supply nearly all water used for local agricultural and municipal purposes. The creeks discharge to the Pacific Ocean near the northwestern corner of San Luis Obispo County, California. The basins contain heterogeneous, unconsolidated alluvial deposits and are underlain by relatively impermeable bedrock. Both creeks usually stop flowing during the summer dry season, and most of the pumpage during that time is derived from ground-water storage. Annual pumpage increased substantially during 1956?88 and is now a large fraction of basin storage capacity. Consequently, dry-season water levels are lower and the water supply is more vulnerable to drought. The creeks are the largest source of ground-water recharge, and complete basin recharge can occur within the first few weeks of winter streamflow. Agricultural and municipal pumpages are the largest outflows and cause dry-season water-level declines throughout the San Simeon Basin. Pumping effects are more localized in the Santa Rosa Basin because of subsurface flow obstructions. Even without pumpage, a large quantity of water naturally drains out of storage at the upper ends of the basins during the dry season. Ground water is more saline in areas close to the coast than in inland areas. Although seawater intrusion has occurred in the past, it probably was not the cause of high salinity in 1988?89. Ground water is very hard, and concentrations of dissolved solids, chloride, iron, and manganese exceed drinking-water standards in some locations. Probability distributions of streamflow were estimated indirectly from a 120-year rainfall record because the periods of record for local stream-gaging stations were wetter than average. Dry-season durations with recurrence intervals between 5 and 43 years are likely to dry up some wells but not cause seawater intrusion. A winter with no streamflow is likely to occur about every 32 years and to

  13. [Seroprevalence, clinical and biochemical data of dogs naturally infected by Leishmania and phlebotominae sandfly fauna in an endemic area in São Luis Island, Maranhão State, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Abreu-Silva, Ana Lúcia; Lima, Tiago B; De Macedo, Auricélio A; Moraes-Júnior, Felipe De Jesus; Dias, Elaine L; Batista, Zulmira Da S; Calabrese, Katia Da S; Moraes, Jorge Luiz P; Rebêlo, José Manuel M; Guerra, Rita Maria S N De C

    2008-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the seroprevalence, clinical and biochemical profile of Leishmania chagasi infection in dogs naturally infected and identify the phlebotominae fauna in an endemic area of São Luis Island. In this present study, 62 household mongrel dogs were sampled for antibodies anti-Leishmania. The seroprevalence was 51.61%. In the clinical evaluation, 36.68% dogs were symptomatic, 38.41% were oligosymptomatic and 26.13% were asymptomatic. The most frequent signs were onychogryphosis and lymphadenomegaly. In 29.41% animals were observed anemia. In the biochemical analysis hepatic function showed changes in relation to alaninoaminotransferase (ALT) and aspartato aminotransferase (AST). Urea values were higher than the references ones for canine specie. The following phlebotominae sandflies were identified: Lutzomyia longipalpis (86.9%), L. evandroi (9.6%), L. choti (2.1%), L. umbratilis (0.7%) e L. whitmani (0.7%).

  14. Transient Cognitive Dynamics, Metastability, and Decision Making

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-02

    793–810. 39. Wagatsuma H, Yamaguchi Y (2007) Neural dynamics of the cognitive map in the hippocampus. Cognitive Neurodynamics 1: 119–141. 40. Kifer Y...Transient Cognitive Dynamics, Metastability, and Decision Making Mikhail I. Rabinovich1*, Ramón Huerta1,2, Pablo Varona2, Valentin S. Afraimovich3 1...Óptica, UASLP, San Luis de Potosı́, Mexico Abstract The idea that cognitive activity can be understood using nonlinear dynamics has been intensively

  15. Exploiting Weaknesses: An Approach to Counter Cartel Strategy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    up, although the initial vision and goals derive from the top. 12 Figure 1. Los Zetas Organizational Structure -m .__ lione...85 In addition to Tamaulipas, Coahuila, and Nuevo Leon, Los Zetas has also taken over the piracy business in Chiapas, Tabasco, Veracruz and Puebla ...Tabasco, Campeche, Yucatán, Quintana Roo, San Luis Potosí, Chiapas, Puebla , Tlaxcala, Hidalgo, Querétaro, Zacatecas, Durango, Guerrero, Oaxaca

  16. First Record of the Asian Tiger Mosquito Aedes albopictus in Hidalgo State, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Morales, Aldo I; Cueto-Medina, Sarai M; Rodríguez, Quetzaly K Siller

    2016-09-01

    The occurrence of the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus , has been reported in the Mexican states of Tamaulipas, Nuevo León, Coahuila (northeastern), Veracruz, Chiapas, Quintana Roo (southeastern), Morelos, San Luis Potosí (middle), and Sinaloa (northwestern). In April and September 2012, Ae. albopictus was collected in a variety of habitats and landing/biting on the collecting personnel in 12 counties of Hidalgo state (middle). This is the first record of the occurrence of this species in Hidalgo state.

  17. [Prevalence of anti-rubella and anti-parvovirus B19 antibodies in pregnant women in the city of Córdoba, and in women of fertile age in the city of Villa Mercedes, province of San Luis].

    PubMed

    Pedranti, M S; Adamo, M P; Macedo, R; Zapata, M T

    2007-01-01

    We determined the prevalence of anti-rubella antibodies in 100 serum samples from pregnant women who attended routine examination at a private institution in the city of Córdoba, and in 100 serum samples from women of gestational age, 42 of whom were pregnant, attending health centres in the city of Villa Mercedes, province of San Luis. IgG antibodies against parvovirus 819 were also determined in the serum samples from Córdoba. Using the hemmagglutination inhibition test, we found a 98% prevalence of anti-rubella antibodies among pregnant women in Córdoba and of 96% among the women in Villa Mercedes, whereas the prevalence of anti-parvovirus 819 was 66% in the serum samples from Cordoba. These results coincide with those reported for other cities in the world, and establish an interest in continuing similar studies in order to monitor the immunization plan, which in Argentina has been going on since 1997. They also suggest the importance of the determination of IgM anti-parvovirus B19 in pregnant women who are symptomatic but with a negative result for rubella.

  18. Geological and geochemical studies of the Sierra del Morro-Oeste (San Luis Province, Argentina): Meta-sediments and meta-volcanics from a probable back-arc setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delakowitz, B.; Höll, R.; Hack, M.; de Brodtkorb, M. K.; Stärk, H.

    The Sierra del Morro-Oeste covers an area of some 40 km 2 in the northeastern part of San Luis Province, Argentina. This area is an integral part of the scheelite- and wolframite-bearing crystalline basement of the Sierras Pampeanas. A "characteristic rock sequence"—several tens of meters thick—is concordantly embedded between uniform country rocks (quartz-oligoclase/andesine micaschists and gneises); it includes layered alternations of banded amphibolites, hornblende-epidote schists, scheelite-bearing calc-silicate rocks, lenses of barren marble, and, locally, tourmaline-bearing micaschists. Chemical analyses of amphibolite samples allow these metamorphic rocks to be interpreted as derivatives of a tholeiite-basaltic volcanism. The amphibolites are subdivided into two groups (A and B) because of significant differences in their chemical composition. These differences are related to hydrothermal seafloor alteration. This sea-water alteration has been most effective in the youngest tholeiite-basaltic lava extrusions. The derivatives of the submarine altered tholeiite-basaltic lavas (amphibolites of Group B) can therefore be interpreted as younger in comparison with the primary lavas of the non-altered amphibolites of Group A. The extrusion of the tholeiite-basaltic lavas obviously took place during an initial stage of back-arc basin rifting on continental crust.

  19. Pre- and postnatal findings in a patient with a novel rec(8)dup(8q)inv(8)(p23.2q22.3) associated with San Luis Valley syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vera-Carbonell, Ascensión; López-González, Vanesa; Bafalliu, Juan Antonio; Piñero-Fernández, Juan; Susmozas, Joaquín; Sorli, Moisés; López-Pérez, Rocío; Fernández, Asunción; Guillén-Navarro, Encarna; López-Expósito, Isabel

    2013-09-01

    San Luis Valley syndrome, which is due to a recombinant chromosome 8 (SLV Rec8) found in Hispanic individuals from Southwestern United States, is a well-established syndrome associated with intellectual disabilities and, frequently, severe cardiac anomalies. We report for the first time on a Moroccan girl with a recombinant chromosome 8 prenatally diagnosed as SLV Rec8 by conventional cytogenetic studies. At birth, an oligo array-CGH (105 K) defined the breakpoints and the size of the imbalanced segments, with a deletion of ≈ 2.27 Mb (8p23.2-pter) and a duplication of ≈ 41.93 Mb (8q22.3-qter); thus this recombinant chromosome 8 differed from that previously reported in SLV Rec8 syndrome. The phenotypic characteristics associated with this SLV Rec8 genotype overlap those commonly found in patients with 8q duplication reported in the literature. We review SLV Rec8 and other chromosome 8 aberrations and suggest that the overexpression of cardiogenic genes located at 8q may be the cause of the cardiac defects in this patient.

  20. Potential human health risk by metal(loid)s, 234,238U and 210Po due to consumption of fish from the "Luis L. Leon" Reservoir (Northern México).

    PubMed

    Luna-Porres, Mayra Y; Rodríguez-Villa, Marco A; Herrera-Peraza, Eduardo F; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia; Montero-Cabrera, María E

    2014-06-25

    Concentrations of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn and activity concentrations from 234,238U and 210Po in water, fillet, liver and gills were determined in three stocked fish species from the Luis L. Leon reservoir, located in Northern Mexico. The considered species were Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus. 238U and 234U activity concentration (AC) in fillet samples showed values of 0.007-0.014 and 0.01-0.02 Bq∙kg-1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for L. cyanellus, C. carpio and I. furcatus present 210Po AC of 1.16-3.26, 0.70-1.13 and 0.93-1.37 Bq∙kg-1 ww. Arsenic, mercury and lead concentration intervals in fillet samples were 0.13-0.39, 0.005-0.126 and 0.009-0.08 mg∙kg-1 ww, respectively, while in gill samples they were 0.11-0.43, 0.002-0.039 and 0.02-0.26 mg∙kg-1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues with respect to their concentrations in water was determined. L. cyanellus showed the highest BAF values for As and total U, being BAFAs = 37 and 40 L∙kg-1 in fillet and gills, respectively, and BAFU total = 1.5 L∙kg-1 in fillet. I. furcatus showed the highest BAF values for Hg and Pb, being BAFHg = 40 and 13 L∙kg-1 in fillet and gills, and BAFPb = 6.5 and 22 L∙kg-1 in fillet and gills, respectively. Some metal(loid) concentrations are slightly higher than European regulations for fish fillets. The difference in concentrations of metal(loid)s in fillet among the studied species is probably due to their differences in diet and habitat.

  1. Potential Human Health Risk by Metal(loid)s, 234,238U and 210Po due to Consumption of Fish from the “Luis L. Leon” Reservoir (Northern México)

    PubMed Central

    Luna-Porres, Mayra Y.; Rodríguez-Villa, Marco A.; Herrera-Peraza, Eduardo F.; Renteria-Villalobos, Marusia; Montero-Cabrera, María E.

    2014-01-01

    Concentrations of As, Cu, Fe, Hg, Pb and Zn and activity concentrations from 234,238U and 210Po in water, fillet, liver and gills were determined in three stocked fish species from the Luis L. Leon reservoir, located in Northern Mexico. The considered species were Lepomis cyanellus, Cyprinus carpio and Ictalurus furcatus. 238U and 234U activity concentration (AC) in fillet samples showed values of 0.007–0.014 and 0.01–0.02 Bq∙kg−1 wet weight (ww), respectively. Liver samples for L. cyanellus, C. carpio and I. furcatus present 210Po AC of 1.16–3.26, 0.70–1.13 and 0.93–1.37 Bq∙kg−1 ww. Arsenic, mercury and lead concentration intervals in fillet samples were 0.13–0.39, 0.005–0.126 and 0.009–0.08 mg∙kg−1 ww, respectively, while in gill samples they were 0.11–0.43, 0.002–0.039 and 0.02–0.26 mg∙kg−1 ww. The elemental Bioaccumulation Factor (BAF) for fish tissues with respect to their concentrations in water was determined. L. cyanellus showed the highest BAF values for As and total U, being BAFAs = 37 and 40 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, respectively, and BAFU total = 1.5 L∙kg−1 in fillet. I. furcatus showed the highest BAF values for Hg and Pb, being BAFHg = 40 and 13 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, and BAFPb = 6.5 and 22 L∙kg−1 in fillet and gills, respectively. Some metal(loid) concentrations are slightly higher than European regulations for fish fillets. The difference in concentrations of metal(loid)s in fillet among the studied species is probably due to their differences in diet and habitat. PMID:24968208

  2. Alvarez, Luis Walter (1911-88)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murdin, P.

    2000-11-01

    Physicist and astronomer, born in San Francisco, CA, professor at the University of California, Nobel prizewinner (1968) for his discoveries in particle physics. Used cosmic rays to `x-ray' the pyramids of Egypt, finding in particular that the tombs in the Great Pyramid at Giza had no hidden rooms. Alvarez (and his son) discovered globally distributed iridium at the Cretaceous/Tertiary boundary i...

  3. Sustainability Metrics: The San Luis Basin Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    Sustainability is about promoting humanly desirable dynamic regimes of the environment. Metrics: ecological footprint, net regional product, exergy, emergy, and Fisher Information. Adaptive management: (1) metrics assess problem, (2) specific problem identified, and (3) managemen...

  4. Hispanos en la EPA: Luis Troche

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    La diversidad de la fuerza laboral es importante para la Agencia de Protección Ambiental de EE.UU. (EPA, por sus siglas en inglés). Los empleados hispanos de la EPA contribuyen diariamente hacia la protección de la salud y el medio ambiente.

  5. Prediabetes in rural and urban children in 3 states in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Aradillas-García, Celia; Malacara, Juan M; Garay-Sevilla, Ma Eugenia; Guízar, Juan M; Camacho, Nicolás; De la Cruz-Mendoza, Esperanza; Quemada, Leticia; Sierra, Juan Francisco Hernández

    2007-01-01

    The authors studied the frequency, distribution, and factors associated with prediabetes (fasting glucose, 100-125 mg/dL) in rural and urban children from San Luis Potosí, León, and Querétaro in central Mexico. Family history, somatometry, and levels of fasting insulin, glucose, and lipids were collected in 1238 children 6 to 13 years of age. The authors found no cases of type 2 diabetes and a 5.7% frequency of prediabetes. The group with prediabetes had higher homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance scores and total cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels. Prediabetes was more frequent in León, with similar distribution in rural and urban children. The frequency of insulin resistance was 24.1%, with higher figures in urban groups and in San Luis Potosí. In multivariate analysis, prediabetes was associated with insulin resistance and residence in León. The authors concluded that in central Mexico the frequency of prediabetes is significant, and it is associated with insulin resistance and a geographic location, but not with obesity or urban vs rural dwelling.

  6. 2009 ESTCP UXO Classification Study, San Luis Obispo, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    and mountains with three categories of soils occurring within: alluvial plains and fans ; terrace soils; and hill/mountain soils. Occurring mainly...adjacent to stream channels are the soils associated with the alluvial plains and fans . Slope is nearly level to moderately sloping and the

  7. 2009 ESTCP UXO Discrimination Study, San Luis Obispo, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    intensely folded, fractured, and faulted. The site is underlain by a mixture of metamor- phic, igneous , and sedimentary rocks less than 200 million...parameters for two types of UXO (4.2-inch mortar in (a) and 81-mm mortar in (b)), and a rock (clutter). The picture of the UXO are shown inset. Note that...typically much larger than M2 and M3). We do not observe similar pattern for a rock , which is not metallic and does not have a rotationally symmetric

  8. Regional Sustainability: The San Luis Basin Metrics Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    There are a number of established, scientifically supported metrics of sustainability. Many of the metrics are data intensive and require extensive effort to collect data and compute. Moreover, individual metrics may not capture all aspects of a system that are relevant to sust...

  9. "Ficciones," Jorge Luis Borges. Performance Guides to Spanish Texts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gies, David Thatcher, Comp.

    This performance guide is the result of work conducted at the University of Virginia's National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Institute, 1989, on "Spanish Literature in Performance," in which 25 secondary school Spanish teachers studied Spanish texts from the perspective of classroom performance to deepen knowledge of the texts and…

  10. The UXO Classification Demonstration at San Luis Obispo, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-09-01

    gradiometer mode. Partial site cued The data-collection teams selected detection thresholds for the survey instruments on the basis of physics...orthogonal transmit coils and eight pairs of receive coils that are differenced to provide a gradiometer output. The eight pairs of receive coils are

  11. San Luis Obispo County: A major switching. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Nevarez, L.; Molotch, H.; Freudenburg, W.

    1996-07-01

    The objectives of this report are: (1) Explain how the county and its major communities came to have particular economic and cultural configurations making them more or less accepting of oil development, OCS development in particular; (2) Analyze the way different factors (e.g. migration, industrial development, political change) intersected with one another over time; (3) Indicate how these factors differed from one local community to another; (4) Provide a Timeline of important local events, including those involving the oil industry; (5) Display both quantitative and qualitative indicators of the evidence for the conclusions reached; and (6) Provide a data base on diskette (supplied separately) that contains the data base upon which this analysis was based and which can be used for future EIR/EISs and other analytic exercises.

  12. Sun Spot One (SS1): San Luis Valley, Colorado (Data)

    DOE Data Explorer

    Stoffel, T.; Andreas, A.

    2008-06-10

    A partnership with industry and U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) to collect solar data to support future solar power generation in the United States. The measurement station monitors global horizontal, direct normal, and diffuse horizontal irradiance to define the amount of solar energy that hits this particular location. The solar measurement instrumentation is also accompanied by meteorological monitoring equipment to provide scientists with a complete picture of the solar power possibilities.

  13. San Luis Rey River Basin: Overview of Cultural Resources,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-12-01

    Vista Irrigation District. A total of 24 sites was reported, including Kupa , the chief village of the Cupeno, located at Warner’s Hot Springs; Mataguay...after the name of their principal village, Kupa , at the springs. The history of the Cupeno is not clear. Bean and Lawton (1967:5) are of the opinion...with a distinct dialect closely related to Cahuilla, and were living at the village of Kupa , where they remained until their eviction in 1903. 12 A

  14. Geothermal energy potential in the San Luis Valley, Colorado

    SciTech Connect

    Coe, B.A.

    1980-01-01

    The background of the area itself is investigated considering the geography, population, economy, attitudes of residents, and energy demands of the area. The requirements for geothermal energy development are considered, including socio-economic, institutional, and environmental conditions as well as some technical aspects. The current, proposed, and potential geothermal energy developments are described. The summary, conclusions, and methodology are included. (MHR)

  15. North Texas Sediment Budget: Sabine Pass to San Luis Pass

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    along with descriptions of the jetties and limited geographic coordinate data1 (Figure 18). The original velum or Mylar sheets from which the report...historical data may have errors from a number of sources: a. The reproduction from velum to 11x17 inch paper may have induced random error. b

  16. Heavy metals concentration in plants growing on mine tailings in Central Mexico.

    PubMed

    Franco-Hernández, M O; Vásquez-Murrieta, M S; Patiño-Siciliano, A; Dendooven, L

    2010-06-01

    Metal concentrations were measured in plants growing on heavily contaminated tailings from a mine active since about 1800 in San Luis Potosí (Mexico). Viguiera dentata (Cav.) Spreng., Parthenium bipinnatifidum (Ort.) Rollins, Flaveria angustifolia (Cav.) Pers., F. trinervia (Spreng.) C. Mohr. and Sporobolusindicus (L.) R. Br. were tolerant to high As, Cu, Pb and Zn concentrations. Of those, S.indicus excluded heavy metals from its shoots, while P. bipinnatifidum and F. angustifolia accumulated them. V. dentata and P. bipinnatifidum were accumulators of As, but not hyperaccumulators. It was found that V. dentata,P. bipinnatifidum, F. angustifolia, F. trinervia and S.indicus, could be used to vegetate soils contaminated with As, Cu, Pb and Zn. Ambrosiaartemisifolia could be used to remediate soils contaminated with Zn, S. amplexicaulis those with Cu and F. angustifolia and F. trinervia those with As, as they have a strong capacity to accumulate those metals.

  17. Mollusks of the Upper Jurassic (upper Oxfordian-lower Kimmeridgian) shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation, northeastern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zell, Patrick; Beckmann, Seija; Stinnesbeck, Wolfgang; Götte, Martin

    2015-10-01

    We present the first systematic description of Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) invertebrates from the shallow marine Minas Viejas Formation of northeastern Mexico. The unit was generally considered to be extremely poor in fossils, due to an overall evaporitic character. The collection described here includes three taxa of ammonites, 10 taxa of bivalves and five taxa of gastropods. The fossils were discovered near Galeana and other localities in southern Nuevo León and northeastern San Luis Potosí, in thin-bedded marly limestones intercalated between gypsum units. Due to complex internal deformation of the sediments, fossils used for this study cannot be assigned to precise layers of origin. However, the taxa identified suggest a Late Jurassic (late Oxfordian-early Kimmeridgian) age for these fossil-bearing layers and allow us, for the first time, to assign a biostratigraphic age to Upper Jurassic strata in the region underlying the La Caja and La Casita formations.

  18. Arsenic and fluoride in the groundwater of Mexico.

    PubMed

    Armienta, M A; Segovia, N

    2008-08-01

    Concentrations of arsenic and fluoride above Mexican drinking water standards have been detected in aquifers of various areas of Mexico. This contamination has been found to be mainly caused by natural sources. However, the specific processes releasing these toxic elements into groundwater have been determined in a few zones only. Many studies, focused on arsenic-related health effects, have been performed at Comarca Lagunera in northern México. High concentrations of fluoride in water were also found in this area. The origin of the arsenic there is still controversial. Groundwater in active mining areas has been polluted by both natural and anthropogenic sources. Arsenic-rich minerals contaminate the fractured limestone aquifer at Zimapán, Central México. Tailings and deposits smelter-rich fumes polluted the shallow granular aquifer. Arsenic contamination has also been reported in the San Antonio-El Triunfo mining zone, southern Baja California, and Santa María de la Paz, in San Luis Potosí state. Even in the absence of mining activities, hydrogeochemistry and statistical techniques showed that arsenopyrite oxidation may also contaminate water, as in the case of the Independencia aquifer in the Mexican Altiplano. High concentrations of arsenic have also been detected in geothermal areas like Los Azufres, Los Humeros, and Acoculco. Prevalence of dental fluorosis was revealed by epidemiological studies in Aguascalientes and San Luis Potosí states. Presence of fluoride in water results from dissolution of acid-volcanic rocks. In Mexico, groundwater supplies most drinking water. Current knowledge and the geology of Mexico indicate the need to include arsenic and fluoride determinations in groundwater on a routine basis, and to develop interdisciplinary studies to assess the contaminant's sources in all enriched areas.

  19. La Escalerilla pluton, San Luis Argentina: The orogenic and post-orogenic magmatic evolution of the famatinian cycle at Sierras de San Luis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morosini, Augusto Francisco; Ortiz Suárez, Ariel Emilio; Otamendi, Juan Enrique; Pagano, Diego Sebastián; Ramos, Gabriel Alejandro

    2017-01-01

    Field relationships, geochemical analysis and two new absolute ages (LA-MC-ICP-MS U/Pb-zircon) allow the division of the La Escalerilla pluton (previously considered to be a single granitic body) into two different plutons: a new La Escalerilla pluton (s.s.), dated at 476.7 ± 9.6 Ma, that represents the northern portion, and the El Volcán pluton, dated at 404.5 ± 8.5 Ma, located in the southern sector. The La Escalerilla pluton is composed of three facies: (1) biotite-bearing granodiorite, (2) porphyritic biotite-bearing granite, and (3) porphyritic two micas-bearing leucogranite, being the presence of late-magmatic dykes in these facies common. The El Volcán pluton is composed of two main facies: 1) porphyritic biotite-bearing granite, and 2) two micas-bearing leucogranite, but amphibole-bearing monzodioritic and tonalititic mega-enclaves are also common, as well as some dykes of amphibole and clinopyroxene-bearing syenites. A peculiarity between the two plutons is that their most representative facies (porphyritic biotite-bearing granites) have, apart from different absolute ages, distinctive geochemical characteristics in their concentrations of trace elements; the La Escalerilla granite is comparatively poorer in Ba, Sr, Nb, La, Ce, P, and richer in Rb, Tb, Y, Tm and Yb. The El Volcán granite is notably enriched in Sr and depleted in Y, resulting in high Sr/Y ratios (12.67-39.08) compared to the La Escalerilla granite (1.11-2.41). These contrasts indicate that the separation from their sources occurred at different depths: below 25 km for the La Escalerilla, and above 30 km for the El Volcán. Moreover, the contrasts allow us to interpret a thin crust linked to an environment of pre-collisional subduction for the first case, and a thickened crust of post-collisional environment for the second, respectively.

  20. Promoting Ethical Competencies: Education for Democratic Citizenship in a Mexican Institution of Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patino-Gonzalez, Susana

    2009-01-01

    Higher education institutions have a responsibility to promote the development of students' ethical and citizenship competencies, especially in contexts of major social inequality. Graduates, who constitute a very small percentage of the population in Mxico, are the best qualified to conceive of creative alternatives to resolve its demanding…

  1. Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in artisan fruit salads in the city of San Luis, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Estrada, Cecilia S M Lucero; Alcaráz, Lucia E; Satorres, Sara E; Manfredi, Eduardo; Velázquez, Lidia Del C

    2013-12-01

    An increase in the consumption of fruit juices and minimally processed fruits salads has been observed in recent years all over the world. In this work, the microbiological quality of artisan fruit salads was analysed. Faecal coliforms, Salmonella spp, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were not detected; nevertheless, eleven strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. By multiplex PCR, all isolates showed positive results for S. aureus 16S rRNA gene and 63.6% of them were positive for sea gene. Furthermore, PCR sea positive strains were able to produce the corresponding enterotoxin. Finally, the inactivation of these strains in fruit salads by nisin, lysozyme and EDTA, was studied. EDTA produced a total S. aureus growth inhibition after 60 h of incubation at a concentration of 250 mg/L. The presence of S. aureus might indicate inadequate hygiene conditions during salad elaboration; however, the enterotoxigenicity of the strains isolated in this study, highlights the risk of consumers' intoxication. EDTA could be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in artisan fruit salads and extend the shelf life of these products.

  2. 76 FR 6517 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Petition for a Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-04

    ...-10910 (CRA), including whether SLRG's containers are original shipping containers under 49 U.S.C. 10908...) (August decision). Specifically, the facility will be used to transfer containers and/or bags...

  3. Making the Transition to the SuperCatalog: ISU's Experience with LUIS II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, H. Scott; Ensor, Patricia L.

    1991-01-01

    Describes the development at Indiana State University of a SuperCatalog, a computerized library catalog that provides access to both library holdings and locally loaded commercial databases, including ERIC and Wilson indexes. Software is discussed; the impact on staff, users, interlibrary loan, and library instruction is examined; and future…

  4. Demonstration of Advanced EMI Models for Live-Site UXO Discrimination at San Luis Obispo, California

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    are mounted on the diagonals between the Z-coils (see Figure 4): the X-coils are 45.5  23.5 while the Y-coils are 45.5  22.5 in size, and...643 2876 Fax: 603-643-5161 fridon.shubitidze@skyresearch.com PI Erik Russell Sky Research, Inc. 3 Schoolhouse Ln, Etna , NH 03750, USA Tel

  5. 75 FR 49022 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Petition for a Declaratory Order

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-12

    ... otherwise apply to SLRG's proposed operation of a containerized truck-to-rail solid waste transload facility... is ``government-generated dirt'' as opposed to industrial waste. Under 5 U.S.C. 554(e), the Board...

  6. Presence of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus in artisan fruit salads in the city of San Luis, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Estrada, Cecilia S.M. Lucero; Alcaráz, Lucia E.; Satorres, Sara E.; Manfredi, Eduardo; Velázquez, Lidia del C.

    2013-01-01

    An increase in the consumption of fruit juices and minimally processed fruits salads has been observed in recent years all over the world. In this work, the microbiological quality of artisan fruit salads was analysed. Faecal coliforms, Salmonella spp, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica and Escherichia coli O157:H7 were not detected; nevertheless, eleven strains of Staphylococcus aureus were isolated. By multiplex PCR, all isolates showed positive results for S. aureus 16S rRNA gene and 63.6% of them were positive for sea gene. Furthermore, PCR sea positive strains were able to produce the corresponding enterotoxin. Finally, the inactivation of these strains in fruit salads by nisin, lysozyme and EDTA, was studied. EDTA produced a total S. aureus growth inhibition after 60 h of incubation at a concentration of 250 mg/L. The presence of S. aureus might indicate inadequate hygiene conditions during salad elaboration; however, the enterotoxigenicity of the strains isolated in this study, highlights the risk of consumers’ intoxication. EDTA could be used to inhibit the growth of S. aureus in artisan fruit salads and extend the shelf life of these products. PMID:24688505

  7. Evaluation of Skylab photography for water resources, San Luis Valley, Colorado

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K. (Principal Investigator); Huntley, D.

    1975-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Skylab S190A photography used in a stereo mode is sufficient for defining the drainage divides and drainage patterns at the regional level. This data, combined with geologic information, define the boundaries and distribution of ground water recharge and discharge areas within the basin.

  8. San Luis Basin Sustainability Metrics Project: A Methodology for Evaluating Regional Sustainability

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although there are several scientifically-based sustainability metrics, many are data intensive, difficult to calculate, and fail to capture all aspects of a system. To address these issues, we produced a scientifically-defensible, but straightforward and inexpensive, methodolog...

  9. 76 FR 14042 - San Luis Valley National Wildlife Refuge Complex, Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-15

    ..., Alamosa, CO; Comprehensive Conservation Plan and Environmental Impact Statement AGENCY: Fish and Wildlife... Service (Service), intend to prepare a Comprehensive Conservation Plan (CCP) and an Environmental Impact... public input in local news media throughout the CCP process. ADDRESSES: Send your comments or...

  10. Feature Extraction and Classification of Magnetic and EMI Data, San Luis Obispo, CA

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-01

    Munitions Dug was 100%; and Pink = the second “best case scenario” dig threshold, that which, in retrospect, would have resulted in the fewest...magmag X mag XXX  22  mag Y magmag Y mag YYY  22  mag Z magmag Z mag ZZZ  22  where the estimated location from the inversion

  11. Effect of mining activities in biotic communities of Villa de la Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Espinosa-Reyes, Guillermo; González-Mille, Donaji J; Ilizaliturri-Hernández, César A; Mejía-Saavedra, Jesús; Cilia-López, V Gabriela; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Mining is one of the most important industrial activities worldwide. During its different stages numerous impacts are generated to the environment. The activities in the region have generated a great amount of mining residues, which have caused severe pollution and health effects in both human population and biotic components. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of mining activities on biotic communities within the district of Villa de la Paz. The results showed that the concentrations of As and Pb in soil were higher than the national regulations for urban or agricultural areas. The bioavailability of these metals was certified by the presence of them in the roots of species of plants and in kidneys and livers of wild rodents. In regard to the community analysis, the sites that were located close to the mining district of Villa de la Paz registered a lower biological diversity, in both plants and wild rodents, aside from showing a change in the species composition of plant communities. The results of this study are evidence of the impact of mining on biotic communities, and the need to take into account the wildlife in the assessment of contaminated sites.

  12. An energy systems view of sustainability: emergy analysis of the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) is used to provide a context for understanding and interpreting sustainability. We propose that “what is sustainable” for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system. Further...

  13. An Emergy Systems View of Sustainability: Emergy Evaluation of the San Luis Basin, Colorado

    EPA Science Inventory

    Energy Systems Theory (EST) was used to provide a context for understanding and interpreting sustainability. We propose that “what is sustainable” for a system at any given level of organization is determined by the cycles of change originating in the next larger system. Furtherm...

  14. 75 FR 59285 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-27

    ... applicant's take of the federally endangered Morro shoulderband snail (Helminthoglypta walkeriana... INFORMATION: Background The Morro shoulderband (also known as banded dune) snail was listed by the U.S. Fish... snail in association with a residential redevelopment project. The project is proposed for a...

  15. 75 FR 8735 - Endangered and Threatened Wildlife and Plants; Permit, San Luis Obispo County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-25

    ... the Federally endangered Morro shoulderband snail (Helminthoglypta walkeriana) incidental to otherwise lawful activities that would result in the permanent loss of 0.2 acre of Morro shoulderband snail habitat... shoulderband snail was listed as endangered on December 15, 1994 (59 FR 64613). Section 9 of the Act (16...

  16. Effect of Mining Activities in Biotic Communities of Villa de la Paz, San Luis Potosi, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Espinosa-Reyes, Guillermo; González-Mille, Donaji J.; Ilizaliturri-Hernández, César A.; Mejía-Saavedra, Jesús; Cilia-López, V. Gabriela; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Díaz-Barriga, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Mining is one of the most important industrial activities worldwide. During its different stages numerous impacts are generated to the environment. The activities in the region have generated a great amount of mining residues, which have caused severe pollution and health effects in both human population and biotic components. The aim of this paper was to assess the impact of mining activities on biotic communities within the district of Villa de la Paz. The results showed that the concentrations of As and Pb in soil were higher than the national regulations for urban or agricultural areas. The bioavailability of these metals was certified by the presence of them in the roots of species of plants and in kidneys and livers of wild rodents. In regard to the community analysis, the sites that were located close to the mining district of Villa de la Paz registered a lower biological diversity, in both plants and wild rodents, aside from showing a change in the species composition of plant communities. The results of this study are evidence of the impact of mining on biotic communities, and the need to take into account the wildlife in the assessment of contaminated sites. PMID:24592381

  17. Meteorological Data Inventory, Southern California, Coastal Zone, Ragged Point (San Luis Obispo County) to Mexican Border.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    7C.,077. . f :7.6 *496 O6’ le 7770 7:.707 21 7 - ~ ~ S I1 I17 I7 9.07C4019 .7 0’.7 ?I 271.1119744*’ * 9 717* 9~~w . TIC fcc𔃾 nt M0.-97.*77l 7...SANTA PAULA-DA ES 134-200-35 p 19-06-30 039/010w-S 9 1976 301.0 9?6 7996-03:1S AMO P AULA BAR RA CA 34-18-30 119-06-31 56 1966 1976 461.8 1979 396.4

  18. A Report on the System of Radioprimaria in the State of San Luis Potosi, Mexico.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain, Peter L.

    A project called "radioprimaria" is bringing classes by radio to fourth, fifth, and sixth grades in a rural area of Mexico to make up for the lack of teachers in these grades. Even though the project was largely unsupervised and plagued with disorganization and equipment problems, children taught with radio did as well as children in the…

  19. Magnetic map of the Irish Hills and surrounding areas, San Luis Obispo County, central California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Langenheim, V.E.; Watt, J.T.; Denton, K.M.

    2012-01-01

    A magnetic map of the Irish Hills and surrounding areas was created as part of a cooperative research and development agreement with the Pacific Gas and Electric Company and is intended to promote further understanding of the areal geology and structure by serving as a basis for geophysical interpretations and by supporting geological mapping, mineral and water resource investigations, and other topical studies. Local spatial variations in the Earth's magnetic field (evident as anomalies on magnetic maps) reflect the distribution of magnetic minerals, primarily magnetite, in the underlying rocks. In many cases the volume content of magnetic minerals can be related to rock type, and abrupt spatial changes in the amount of magnetic minerals can be related to either lithologic or structural boundaries. Magnetic susceptibility measurements from the area indicate that bodies of serpentinite and other mafic and ultramafic rocks tend to produce the most intense magnetic anomalies, but such generalizations must be applied with caution because some sedimentary units also can produce measurable magnetic anomalies. Remanent magnetization does not appear to be a significant source for magnetic anomalies because it is an order of magnitude less than the induced magnetization. The map is a mosaic of three separate surveys collected by (1) fixed-wing aircraft at a nominal height of 305 m, (2) by boat with the sensor at sea level, and (3) by helicopter. The helicopter survey was flown by New-Sense Geophysics in October 2009 along flight lines spaced 150-m apart and at a nominal terrain clearance of 50 to 100 m. Tie lines were flown 1,500-m apart. Data were adjusted for lag error and diurnal field variations. Further processing included microleveling using the tie lines and subtraction of the reference field defined by International Geomagnetic Reference Field (IGRF) 2005 extrapolated to August 1, 2008.

  20. Radon (222Rn) in groundwater studies in two volcanic zones of central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortés, A.; Cardona, A.; Pérez-Quezadas, J.; Inguaggiato, S.; Vázquez-López, C.; Golzarri, J. I.; Espinosa, G.

    2013-07-01

    The distribution of radon (222Rn) concentrations in groundwater from two basins of volcanic origin is presented. Regions have different physiographic characteristics with fractured mafic/intermediate and felsic rocks. Samples were taken from deep wells and springs. Concentrations were field measured by two methods: i) scintillator, coupled to a photomultiplier, and ii) passive method, using Nuclear Track Detectors. Qualitatively, results of 222Rn measured with both techniques are comparable only when concentrations have values less than 1 Bq/l. For the Basin of Mexico City the data shows an average difference of 0.13 Bq/l. Results of 222Rn concentrations in 46 groundwater samples indicate that the data are below 11.1 Bq/l, with both methodologies. Low concentrations of 222Rn in the Basin of Mexico City are related to the mafic intermediate composition rocks such as basalt. The anomalies with high values are correlated with the transition zone between volcanic units and clays from ancient lakes. In San Luis Potosí 10 samples show an average of 4.2 Bq/l. These concentrations compared with those of the Basin of Mexico City are related to the composition of the felsic (rhyolite) volcanic rocks.

  1. Geographic Distribution of Hantaviruses Associated with Neotomine and Sigmodontine Rodents, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Milazzo, Mary L.; Cajimat, Maria N.B.; Romo, Hannah E.; Estrada-Franco, Jose G.; Iñiguez-Dávalos, L. Ignacio; Bradley, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    To increase our knowledge of the geographic distribution of hantaviruses associated with neotomine or sigmodontine rodents in Mexico, we tested 876 cricetid rodents captured in 18 Mexican states (representing at least 44 species in the subfamily Neotominae and 10 species in the subfamily Sigmodontinae) for anti-hantavirus IgG. We found antibodies against hantavirus in 35 (4.0%) rodents. Nucleotide sequence data from 5 antibody-positive rodents indicated that Sin Nombre virus (the major cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome [HPS] in the United States) is enzootic in the Mexican states of Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, and Veracruz. However, HPS has not been reported from these states, which suggests that in northeastern Mexico, HPS has been confused with other rapidly progressive, life-threatening respiratory diseases. Analyses of nucleotide sequence data from 19 other antibody-positive rodents indicated that El Moro Canyon virus and Limestone Canyon virus are geographically widely distributed in Mexico. PMID:22469569

  2. Hexavalent Chromium Removal by a Paecilomyces sp. Fungal Strain Isolated from Environment

    PubMed Central

    Cárdenas-González, Juan F.; Acosta-Rodríguez, Ismael

    2010-01-01

    A resistant and capable fungal strain in removing hexavalent chromium was isolated from an environment near of Chemical Science Faculty, located in the city of San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The strain was identified as Paecilomyces sp., by macro- and microscopic characteristics. Strain resistance of the strain to high Cr (VI) concentrations and its ability to reduce chromium were studied. When it was incubated in minimal medium with glucose, another inexpensive commercial carbon source like unrefined and brown sugar or glycerol, in the presence of 50 mg/L of Cr (VI), the strain caused complete disappearance of Cr (VI), with the concomitant production of Cr (III) in the growth medium after 7 days of incubation, at 28°C, pH 4.0, 100 rpm, and an inoculum of 38 mg of dry weight. Decrease of Cr (VI) levels from industrial wastes was also induced by Paecilomyces biomass. These results indicate that reducing capacity of chromate resistant filamentous fungus Cr (VI) could be useful for the removal of Cr (VI) pollution. PMID:20634988

  3. Notes about Alta Vista in Chalchihuites, Zacatecas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero García, Ismael Arturo

    2016-11-01

    The Tropic of Cancer is a parallel located at the latitude of 23°26'16''. This imaginary line extends across northern Mexico from the southernmost point of the Baja California Peninsula, to the Gulf of Mexico, passing through the states of Baja California Sur, Sinaloa, Durango, Zacatecas, San Luis Potosí, Nuevo León and Tamaulipas. The Tropic of Cancer marks the northernmost position of the sun at its midday zenith, which takes place in the Summer solstice. On this day, the sun's rays hit the earth's surface vertically along the entire length of this latitude, which was supposed to be significant for the priest/astronomers of ancient times, who dedicated themselves to observing the apparent movements of the sun. It so happens that Alta Vista in Zacatecas, corresponds to the westernmost peak where this phenomenon can occur, although the date of the zenith's course differs depending on the latitude of each position and so various archaeoastronomical specialists stress how the ancient indigenous cultures, at least those dating from Mexico's Classical period, valued this finding in developing their calendars. On the other hand, the research contributes new elements for discussion because it presents a calendar of the horizon, based on of the highest peaks of the Sierra Prieta mountain range ranging from the archaeological sites of El Chapín, Cerro Pedregoso, to the excavations at El Picacho Pelón (peak El Pelón).

  4. At last! The single-crystal X-ray structure of a naturally occurring sample of the ilmenite-type oxide FeCrO3.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Cruz, María Ana; Elizalde-González, María de la Paz; Escudero, Roberto; Bernès, Sylvain; Silva-González, Rutilo; Reyes-Ortega, Yasmi

    2015-10-01

    A natural single crystal of the ferrimagnetic oxide FeCrO3, which was found in an opencast mine situated in the San Luis Potosí State in Mexico, has been characterized in order to elucidate some outstanding issues about the actual structure of this material. The single-crystal X-ray analysis unambiguously shows that transition metal cations are segregated in alternating layers normal to the threefold crystallographic axis, affording a structure isomorphous to that of ilmenite (FeTiO3), in the space group R3̅. The possible occurrence of cation antisite and vacancy defects is below the limit of detection available from X-ray data. Structural and magnetic results are in agreement with the coherent slow intergrowth of magnetic phases provided by the two antiferromagnetic corundum-type parent oxides Fe2O3 (hematite) and Cr2O3 (eskolaite). Our results are consistent with the most recent density functional theory (DFT) studies carried out on digital FeCrO3 [Sadat Nabi & Pentcheva (2011). Phys. Rev. B, 83, 214424], and suggest that synthetic samples of FeCrO3 might present a cation distribution different to that of the ilmenite structural type.

  5. Apoptosis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in children exposed to arsenic and fluoride.

    PubMed

    Rocha-Amador, Diana O; Calderón, Jaqueline; Carrizales, Leticia; Costilla-Salazar, Rogelio; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván Nelinho

    2011-11-01

    In this study, we evaluated apoptosis induction in human immune cells in children exposed to arsenic (As) and fluoride (F). Children living in two areas in Mexico (Soledad de Graciano Sanchez (SGS) in San Luis Potosí and Colonia 5 de Febrero in Durango) were studied. Water, urine and blood samples were collected. Approximately 90% of the water samples in 5 de Febrero had As and F levels above the World Health Organization intervention guideline (10 μg/L and 1.5mg/L, respectively). In SGS, 0% of the water samples exceeded Mexican guidelines. Urinary As and F levels in children living in 5 de Febrero were significantly higher than the levels found in children living in SGS. In addition, the level of apoptosis was higher in children from the 5 de Febrero community when compared with the level of apoptosis in children living in SGS. Thus, in a worldwide context, our study demonstrates the health risks to children living in these regions.

  6. The Experimental Discovery of Double-Charm Baryons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engelfried, Jürgen; Selex Collaboration

    2005-04-01

    In 2002, the SELEX [The SELEX (Fermilab E781) Collaboration: Ball State University, Bogazici University, Carnegie-Mellon University, Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Fisicas, Fermilab, Institute For High Energy Physics (Protvino), Institute of High Energy Physics (Beijing), Institute of Theoretical and Experimental Physics (Moscow), Max-Planck-Institute for Nuclear Physics, Moscow State University, Petersburg Nuclear Physics Institute, Tel Aviv University, Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí, Universidade Federal da Paraíba, H. H. Wills Physics Laboratory, University of Bristol, University of Iowa, University of Michigan-Flint, University of Rochester, University of Rome La Sapienza and INFN, University of São Paulo, University of Trieste and INFN. http://www-selex.fnal.gov] Experiment (Fermilab E781) reported the first observation of a member of the family of doubly charmed baryons [SELEX Collaboration, M. Mattson et al.: First observation of the doubly charmed baryonΞcc+. Phys. Rev. Letters 89 (2002) 112001, [ arXiv:hep-ex/0208014

  7. Geographic distribution of hantaviruses associated with neotomine and sigmodontine rodents, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Milazzo, Mary L; Cajimat, Maria N B; Romo, Hannah E; Estrada-Franco, Jose G; Iñiguez-Dávalos, L Ignacio; Bradley, Robert D; Fulhorst, Charles F

    2012-04-01

    To increase our knowledge of the geographic distribution of hantaviruses associated with neotomine or sigmodontine rodents in Mexico, we tested 876 cricetid rodents captured in 18 Mexican states (representing at least 44 species in the subfamily Neotominae and 10 species in the subfamily Sigmodontinae) for anti-hantavirus IgG. We found antibodies against hantavirus in 35 (4.0%) rodents. Nucleotide sequence data from 5 antibody-positive rodents indicated that Sin Nombre virus (the major cause of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome [HPS] in the United States) is enzootic in the Mexican states of Nuevo León, San Luis Potosí, Tamaulipas, and Veracruz. However, HPS has not been reported from these states, which suggests that in northeastern Mexico, HPS has been confused with other rapidly progressive, life-threatening respiratory diseases. Analyses of nucleotide sequence data from 19 other antibody-positive rodents indicated that El Moro Canyon virus and Limestone Canyon virus are geographically widely distributed in Mexico.

  8. Effect of climatological factors on respiratory syncytial virus epidemics

    PubMed Central

    NOYOLA, D. E.; MANDEVILLE, P. B.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) presents as yearly epidemics in temperate climates. We analysed the association of atmospheric conditions to RSV epidemics in San Luis Potosí, S.L.P., Mexico. The weekly number of RSV detections between October 2002 and May 2006 were correlated to ambient temperature, barometric pressure, relative humidity, vapour tension, dew point, precipitation, and hours of light using time-series and regression analyses. Of the variation in RSV cases, 49·8% was explained by the study variables. Of the explained variation in RSV cases, 32·5% was explained by the study week and 17·3% was explained by meteorological variables (average daily temperature, maximum daily temperature, temperature at 08:00 hours, and relative humidity at 08:00 hours). We concluded that atmospheric conditions, particularly temperature, partly explain the year to year variability in RSV activity. Identification of additional factors that affect RSV seasonality may help develop a model to predict the onset of RSV epidemics. PMID:18177520

  9. The etiology of maternal mortality in developing countries: what do verbal autopsies tell us?

    PubMed Central

    Sloan, N. L.; Langer, A.; Hernandez, B.; Romero, M.; Winikoff, B.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To reassess the practical value of verbal autopsy data, which, in the absence of more definitive information, have been used to describe the causes of maternal mortality and to identify priorities in programmes intended to save women's lives in developing countries. METHODS: We reanalysed verbal autopsy data from a study of 145 maternal deaths that occurred in Guerrero, Querétaro and San Luis Potosí, Mexico, in 1995, taking into account other causes of death and the WHO classification system. The results were also compared with information given on imperfect death certificates. FINDINGS: The reclassification showed wide variations in the attribution of maternal deaths to single specific medical causes. CONCLUSION: The verbal autopsy methodology has inherent limitations as a means of obtaining histories of medical events. At best it may reconfirm the knowledge that mortality among poor women with little access to medical care is higher than that among wealthier women who have better access to such care. PMID:11584727

  10. [Cardiovascular risk in children from 6 to 15 years with exogenous obesity].

    PubMed

    Escudero-Lourdes, Gabriela Virginia; Morales-Romero, Luz Viridiana; Valverde-Ocaña, Concepción; Velasco-Chávez, José Fernando

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCCIÓN: el riesgo cardiovascular (RCV) es una epidemia creciente relacionada con hábitos alimentarios y estilo de vida que tiene como uno de sus grupos de riesgo a los niños obesos. El objetivo de este estudio es evaluar el RCV en la población infantil obesa, en un hospital de segundo nivel del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social en San Luis Potosí, México. MÉTODOS: estudio analítico con diseño transversal. Se incluyeron todos los niños obesos atendidos en el servicio de endocrinología durante un año. Se utilizó la escala Alústiza para medir el RCV. Las variables de estudio fueron: edad, sexo, índice de masa corporal, historia familiar de diabetes, obesidad, toxicomanías, presión arterial y colesterol. El RCV se correlacionó con los valores de colesterol HDL y glucosa por medio de chi cuadrada.

  11. [150 years ago physicians and surgeons heeded the call of their country].

    PubMed

    de Micheli, A

    1997-01-01

    One hundred and fifty years ago began the conflict between the Mexican and North American Republics, due to inherent problems related to the incorporation of Texas to the United States of North America. The first phase of the war developed in the northern regions of México culminating in the bloody combat of La Angostura. In these episodes participated the Mexican medical corps, organized in San Luis Potosí, at the orders of doctor Pedro Van der Linden. The theater of the second phase of this war moved to the beaches of Veracruz and the route toward Mexico City, dying in the unfortunate battle of Cerro Gordo. In tis combat, many Mexican physicians together with the commandant of the medical corps himself were taken prisoners by the enemy. The third phase corresponded to the campaign of Valle de México. In its different episodes physicians, surgeons, and medical students participated courageously. The latter, with their teachers, constituted a company, incorporated to the battalion "Hidalgo" of the national guard, for defending the capital. It is just to remember now all the physicians who, as well as the other social classes, responded with enthusiasm and abnegation to the call of their fatherland.

  12. Nonequilibrium Effects in Ion and Electron Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-01

    Fisica Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico P.O. Box 1-39-B 62191 Cuernavaca, Mor. M~xico ABSTRACT A compilation of recent experimental work on the...and G. Mauri Dipartimento de Matematica dell’Universita Cattolica Brescia, Italy An integral expansion is obtained which reduces under explicitly...di Matematica Physics Department University Cattolica W. Lafayette, IN 47906 via Trieste, 17(317) 494-3014 25121 Brescia Italy 030-57-286 Steven Bajic

  13. 75 FR 17430 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Kern, San Luis Obispo...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... condor, its habitat, and other wildlife resources. The refuge encompasses 2,471 contiguous acres owned in... for California condors. The refuge encompasses nearly 14,097 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish... condor. Blue Ridge NWR encompasses 897 acres owned in fee title by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife...

  14. 77 FR 21797 - Hopper Mountain, Bitter Creek, and Blue Ridge National Wildlife Refuges, Ventura, Kern, San Luis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    .... 1531 et seq.), primarily to restore the endangered California condor population to its native range. Due to the sensitivity of the California condor recovery activities, the Refuges are currently closed... the California Condor Recovery Program (Recovery Program) activities. The three Refuges would...

  15. 78 FR 57651 - Habitat Conservation Plan for the Community of Los Osos, San Luis Obispo County, CA; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-19

    ..., intend to prepare either an Environmental Assessment (EA) or an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) under the National Environmental Policy Act, as amended (NEPA), for the proposed Los Osos Community-wide... Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as amended (42 U.S.C. 4321 et seq.; NEPA), and its implementing regulations...

  16. Map showing coastal cliff retreat rates along the Big Sur coast, Monterey and San Luis Obispo Counties, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hapke, Cheryl J.; Green, Krystal R.

    2004-01-01

    The average coastal cliff retreat rate along the Big Sur coast is 18 ? 6 cm/yr as measured over a 52-year time period. The erosion reference features measured as the cliff edge include the well-defined cliff edges common to marine terraces, slight breaks in the slope defining the upper edge of the active lower slope, and the road grade. Cliff erosion and retreat are focused in isolated erosion hotspots that account for most of the calculated average retreat.

  17. Self-rated health among Hispanic vs non-Hispanic white adults: the San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study.

    PubMed Central

    Shetterly, S M; Baxter, J; Mason, L D; Hamman, R F

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study investigated whether objective health indicators explained lower self-rated health among Hispanics compared with non-Hispanic Whites. It also considered socioeconomic and cultural explanations. METHODS: Health ratings of 429 Hispanics and 583 non-Hispanic Whites aged 20 through 74 were analyzed with logistic regression. RESULTS: Illness indicators were found to be strongly correlated with self-rated health in both ethnic groups, but after such markers were controlled for, Hispanics remained 3.6 times more likely to report fair or poor health (95% confidence interval = 2.4, 5.3). Adjustment for socioeconomic factors accounted for a portion of Hispanics' lower health rating, but the strongest explanatory factor was acculturation. CONCLUSIONS: Because of cultural and economic influences on definitions of health, ethnic differences in self-assessed health may not accurately reflected patterns resulting from objective health measurements. PMID:9003141

  18. 76 FR 33362 - Request for Interest in Lease Arrangement on Federal Lands, San Luis Project, Los Banos, California

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-08

    ... Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation), a water management agency within the Department of the Interior... many of those facilities. Reclamation is a water management agency that assists in meeting the... structures. Water management efforts emphasize fulfilling water delivery obligations, water...

  19. 77 FR 49856 - Environmental Impact Statement for the Salinas to San Luis Obispo Portion of the Coast Corridor...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-17

    ... and trains are often delayed due to the primarily single-track rail system operating beyond its design... straining the existing transportation network. An effective rail system is necessary to meet the future... transportation system that includes air, highway, and rail modes system access and capacity is insufficient...

  20. 78 FR 16569 - Iowa Pacific Holdings, LLC, Permian Basin Railways, and San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Corporate...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ..., DC 20423-0001. In addition, one copy of each pleading must be served on John D. Heffner, Strasburger.... Campbell, Director, Office of Proceedings. Derrick A. Gardner, Clearance Clerk. BILLING CODE 4915-01-P...

  1. 76 FR 414 - Tier 1 Environmental Impact Statement for the Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo (LOSSAN North) Rail...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-04

    ... infrastructure has not been upgraded or improved in over one hundred years. Goals of the project underlying the environmental review include increasing the cost-effectiveness of State-supported intercity passenger rail... infrastructure components, and identification of major terminal area or facility capacity constraints....

  2. Using Lagrangian sampling to study water quality during downstream transport in the San Luis Drain, California, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkmar, E.C.; Dahlgren, R.A.; Stringfellow, W.T.; Henson, S.S.; Borglin, S.E.; Kendall, C.; Van Nieuwenhuyse, E. E.

    2011-01-01

    To investigate the mechanism for diel (24h) changes commonly observed at fixed sampling locations and how these diel changes relate to downstream transport in hypereutrophic surface waters, we studied a parcel of agricultural drainage water as it traveled for 84h in a concrete-lined channel having no additional water inputs or outputs. Algal fluorescence, dissolved oxygen, temperature, pH, conductivity, and turbidity were measured every 30min. Grab samples were collected every 2h for water quality analyses, including nutrients, suspended sediment, and chlorophyll/pheophytin. Strong diel patterns were observed for dissolved oxygen, pH, and temperature within the parcel of water. In contrast, algal pigments and nitrate did not exhibit diel patterns within the parcel of water, but did exhibit strong diel patterns for samples collected at a fixed sampling location. The diel patterns observed at fixed sampling locations for these constituents can be attributed to algal growth during the day and downstream transport (washout) of algae at night. Algal pigments showed a rapid daytime increase during the first 48h followed by a general decrease for the remainder of the study, possibly due to sedimentation and photobleaching. Algal growth (primarily diatoms) was apparent each day during the study, as measured by increasing dissolved oxygen concentrations, despite low phosphate concentrations (<0.01mgL-1). ?? 2011 Elsevier B.V.

  3. For the relief of Roberto Luis Dunoyer Mejia, Consuelo Cardona Molina, Camilo Dunoyer Cardona, and Pablo Dunoyer Cardona.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Hunter, Duncan D. [R-CA-52

    2009-04-30

    06/15/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Immigration, Citizenship, Refugees, Border Security, and International Law. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  4. Development and Application of Multidisciplinary Sustainability Metrics to Environmental Management in the San Luis Basin in Colorado at AESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A pilot project was initiated to create an approach to measure, monitor, and maintain prosperity and environmental quality within a regional system. The goal was to produce a scientifically defensible but straightforward and inexpensive methodology that is simple to use and int...

  5. MTAD Demonstration Data Report Former Camp San Luis Obispo Magnetometer and EM61 MkII Surveys

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    The site is shown as a series of included 30m x 30m cells . See the text for further discussion... cells with a topographical map as the background. The cells are color-coded based on the data collection systems that collected data on them, tan...L9 L7 K5 K8 K4 K7 K6 K9 N8 N9 N6 N7 P9 I11 O9 O8 M7 M9 M8 M6 M5 I10 I12 J12 J13 F11 L14 L15 L13 F10 N11H11 K13 K14 O11G11 P11 N10H10 N13 N12 O12 G10

  6. 76 FR 31678 - San Luis & Rio Grande Railroad-Continuance in Control Exemption-Saratoga and North Creek Railway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-01

    ... to acquire from Delaware and Hudson Railway Company, Inc, d/b/a Canadian Pacific (CP) a permanent and... the purpose of interchange with CP between Adirondack Branch milepost 39.44 and CP's yard at...

  7. 78 FR 73557 - Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes National Wildlife Refuge, San Luis Obispo County, CA: Intent To Prepare a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-06

    ... of the message. Fax: Attn: GND CCP, 805-644-1732. U.S. Mail: Hopper Mountain National Wildlife Refuge... opportunities for hunting, fishing, wildlife observation and photography, and environmental education and... management, habitat management, wildlife-dependent recreation, environmental education, and...

  8. 78 FR 70035 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the San Luis Transmission...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-22

    ... and maintenance responsibilities of certain Reclamation CVP facilities, and to do so at an optimum..., Department of Water Resources operates the Gianelli Pump/Generation and the Dos Amigos Pumping Plant portion... Tariff and existing laws. Reclamation must evaluate options to economically pump, store, convey,...

  9. Accidents related to the use of products and services in the city of São Luis, Brazil.

    PubMed

    De Souza Dias, Líssia Maria; Diniz, Raimundo Lopes; de Macedo Guimarães, Lia Buarque

    2012-01-01

    This article presents a study on the accidents related to the use of products and services, as recorded at two emergency hospitals at the city São Luís, Brazil. The goal of the study was to evaluate the main types and causes of unintentional accidents as well as the more frequent injuries for further improvement of products and services. The study evaluated the victims profile (gender and age), the circumstances (activity, local and time) that lead to the accidents and the type of resulted injury. Non-parametric statistics showed that 83.64% of the accidents were related to products (57.6% of them being consumer products) and 8.6% are related to maintenance services. 57.6% of the victims were children under 15 years old, and 58.4% were male. 50.2% of accidents occurred at home, more often (44.7%) in the afternoon. The most common injury was musculoesqueletal (48.6%), 49.0% being cranioencephalic trauma and 15.2% fractures.

  10. Reabilitation of degraded area by erosion, using soil bioengineering techniques in Bacanga river basin, Sao Luis City - Maranhao State, Brazil.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira Guerra, A. J.; Rodrigues Bezerra, J. F.; da Mota Lima, L. D.; Silva Mendonça, J. K.; Vieira Souza, U. D.; Teixeira Guerra, T.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to assess the stages of rehabilitation of a degraded site by erosion, in Salina/Sacavém district, São Luís City, considering geomorphologic characteristics and soil bioengineering techniques. This technique has been applied in different situations to rehabilitate degraded areas, with positive results from the use of biodegradable materials (e.g. vegetal fibres, wooden stakes and re-vegetation). These techniques stabilize the soil at low cost and improve the environment. Bioengineering involves the planned and strategic application of selected materials, involving biodegradable materials, often in combination with 'hard engineering' structures constructed from stone, concrete and steel. The settlement of São Luís was established in 1612 and has evolved in distinct phases. Rapid urban growth was associated with industrialization in the second half of the 18th Century. Rapid population and urban growth has intensified problems, compounded by poor planning and improper soil use. São Luís, like many other Brazilian cities, has experienced rapid population growth in recent decades, which has created a series of socio-economic and environmental problems, including accelerated soil erosion. Sacavém is one of these communities where natural and human factors contribute to the severe gully erosion. The local lithology is mainly Tertiary sandstones and, to a lesser extent, shales, argillites and siltstones, all of which belong to the Barreiras Formation. Weathering on these rocks produces erodible soils, including lithosols, latosols, concretionary red/yellow clay soils and concretionary plinthosols. Thus, erodible soils and regolith are subject to high erosion rates, especially on steeper slopes subject to additional human interventions. Furthermore, although regional slopes are quite gentle, there is localized high relative relief. Sacavém vegetation, in the gullied area, consists of brushwood. Secondary mixed forest and brushwood are the dominant vegetal cover adjacent to the urban gullies. The local climate is humid tropical, with average annual temperatures of 26°C, reaching higher values in October to December and lower from April to June. Rainfall distribution throughout the year is irregular, marked by two very distinct seasons (rainy and dry). The highly seasonal erosive rains incise a complex series of soil erosion landforms, mainly gullies in this area. The following procedures have been carried out: fieldwork with monitoring of gully head erosion; Environmental Education Program; handcraft workshop regarding the prodution of geotextiles from Buriti fiber. The rehabilitation of this degraded site, follows these stages: 1. Acquisition of equipment and materials; 2. Contracting workers; 3. Reshaping selected gully walls; 4. Adding organic palm materials to the topsoil and ~30 kg of grass seeds; 5. Application of geotextile anchored on the ground by using wooden stakes; 6. Maintenance work with photographic records; 7. Photo comparison to measure the vegetal cover percentage, with the aid of geoprocessing software. Some of the gully walls presented steep slopes, around 90 degrees, and therefore, it was necessary to reshape them for the application of soil bioengineering techniques. It was selected a sample area of 2.000 m2 to be rehabilitated. The knowledge of soil and geomorphological characteristics was essential to understand surface runoff, considering the direction of water flows. Due to the difficulties in diverting the flows, which would require more extensive engineering works, the channel was maintained, and the base of the slopes was strengthened to support the flows. In the upper part of this area, which had ~8° slope angle, contour lines were surveyed and barriers of wooden stakes were used to retard runoff velocity from adjacent vegetated slopes. Some slopes in this part had a 45° slope angle, due to the local topography. However, this angle is considered too steep for the application of palm-mats. In some parts of gully, work was completed to reshape the gullies and construct the ~12 m high terraces using the gully material. Tractor work was impeded, because on the second terrace the tractor had difficulty in working, because of the high sand content, which made the slope unstable. These terraces are crossed by a flow convergence area, which was formed by men inserting sand bags, decomposing palm leaves and grass seeds, to form a vegetated channel after grass growth. Key-words: Rehabilitation, gully, geotextile, soil bioengineering.

  11. Fleas (Siphonaptera) infesting giant kangaroo rats (Dipodomys ingens) on the Elkhorn and Carrizo Plains, San Luis Obispo County, California.

    PubMed

    Tabor, S P; Williams, D F; Germano, D J; Thomas, R E

    1993-01-01

    The giant kangaroo rat, Dipodomys ingens (Merriam), has a limited distribution in the San Joaquin Valley, CA. Because of reductions in its geographic range, largely resulting from humans, the species was listed as an endangered species in 1980 by the California Fish and Game Commission. As part of a study of the community ecology of southern California endangered species, including D. ingens, we were able to make flea collections from the rats when they were trapped and marked for population studies. All but one of the fleas collected from the D. ingens in this study were Hoplopsyllus anomalus, a flea normally associated with ground squirrels (Sciuridae). It has been suggested that giant kangaroo rats fill the ground squirrel niche within their range. Our data indicate that this role includes a normal association with Hoplopsyllus anomalus.

  12. Support Services for Exceptional Students: Fresno, Inyo, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, Mono, San Luis Obispo, and Tulare Counties.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hampel, Angelica; And Others

    Intended for use by vocational administrators responsible for mainstreaming handicapped students into vocational education classes, the resource guide lists and describes governmental and private agencies that provide vocational programs and support services for the handicapped on a local and statewide basis in the California counties of Fresno,…

  13. Collection Development Policy of the Robert E. Kennedy Library, California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo, California.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis Obispo. Library.

    This policy statement provides the guidelines for the development of library collections and coordinates all collection development efforts of the California Polytechnic State University library. It discusses clientele and user needs, subject boundaries, general priorities and limitations, and categories of materials. It defines the collections…

  14. 76 FR 45602 - Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow Creek Ranch, San Luis...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... Fish and Wildlife Service Proposed Safe Harbor Agreement for California Red-Legged Frog, at Swallow... the Federally threatened California red-legged frog (Rana draytonii), under the Endangered Species Act... California red-legged frog on the property subject to the Agreement (Enrolled Property), which is owned...

  15. [Caloric nutritional evaluation of the menu served to the university community of the Universidad Nacional de San Luis, Republica Argentina].

    PubMed

    Ascar José, M; Molíns de Pedernera, M; Moyano de Pringles, G; Guardia Calderón, C; Rodríguez de Farabelli, N; Luconi de Romero, M; Piola, H

    1993-06-01

    We have analysed the meals for lunch and dinner at the University cafeteria, during one Winter week (June through September); in this season the menus are repeated every week round. A percentage analysis (humidity, ashes, lipids, protein, raw fiber, and nitrogen-free extract) was carried out on the sample, which were appropriately processed, thus allowing us to know the nutrients amount and caloric value of each meal. When examining both the formulas ingredients and the technique applied to the preparation of the meals, it was found that they have the best cooking quality, and also that their amount is sufficient (see tables). As to the meals nutrients, the results allow us to conclude that the diets are hypercaloric as well as hypoproteic, with a preponderance of proteins of animal origin.

  16. 76 FR 62819 - Notice of Intent To Amend the Resource Management Plan for the San Luis Resource Area, Colorado...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... local media and newspapers. In order to be included in the RMP amendment and associated EA, all comments... purpose of the public scoping process is to determine relevant issues that will influence the scope of...

  17. Review of samples of water, sediment, tailings, and biota at the Little Bonanza mercury mine, San Luis Obispo County, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rytuba, James J.; Hothem, Roger L.; Goldstein, Daniel N.; Brussee, Brianne E.; May, Jason T.

    2011-01-01

    Sample Sites and Methods Samples were collected to assess the concentrations of Hg and biogeochemically relevant constituents in tailings and wasterock piles at the Little Bonanza Hg mine. Tailings are present adjacent to a three-pipe retort used to process the Hg ore. The tailings occur in the upper 15 cm of the soil adjacent to the retort and slag from the retort is present on the surface. An area of disturbed soil and rock uphill from the retort was likely formed during construction of a dam that provided water for mining activities. Wasterock in these piles was sampled. The largest amount of tailings is exposed to the west of the retort in the bank of WF Las Tablas Creek. Water, sediment, and biota were sampled from WF Las Tablas Creek, which flows through the mine area. Sample-site locations are shown in figures 10 and 11 and listed in table 1. Samples were collected when streamflow was low and no precipitation had occurred.

  18. Student Teacher and Cooperating Teacher Tensions in a High School Mathematics Teacher Internship: The Case of Luis and Sheri

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhoads, Kathryn; Samkoff, Aron; Weber, Keith

    2013-01-01

    We investigate interpersonal difficulties that student teachers and cooperating teachers may experience during the teaching internship by exploring the tension between one high school mathematics student teacher and his cooperating teacher. We identified seven causes of this tension, which included different ideas about what mathematics should be…

  19. Secular variation from Mexican stalagmites: their potential and problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latham, A. G.; Ford, D. C.; Schwarcz, H. P.; Birchall, T.

    1989-07-01

    As part of a feasibility study to see whether stalagmites could provide useful records of secular variation, nine oriented stalagmites were collected from the states of Chiapas and San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Of these, six have yielded measurable natural remanent magnetizations (NRMs) throughout their length. The cleaned magnetizations of one of these samples were shown unequivocally to have recorded the ambient field, and there is no reason to believe that this is not true of the primary magnetizations of other samples. The sequences of palaeofield directions, up the samples' length, have varying degrees of resolution and serial correlation, depending on the rate of field change as averaged by the stalagmite growth rate and the thickness of the measured specimens. Ages and growth rates were estimated by the U-Th method. The main problem in stalagmite palaeomagnetic analysis is a weak NRM, although this may be avoided by judicious choice of the sample. Samples which possess significant viscous components may be cleaned by alternating field or thermally if there is sufficient magnetic material. Unlike many sediments, stalagmites do not appear to suffer from depositional error problems. Dating problems may include low initial U-content, yielding ages with large errors, and the presence of allogenic 230Th in detritus, which causes older apparent ages. The dating limit is ˜ 350 ka. It is usually not possible to obtain long records comparable with those of most lake sediments, and there are aesthetic reasons for not spoiling caves adorned with stalagmites. The method is seen to be complementary to the use of sedimentary sequences to study palaeosecular variation. Studies of the rock magnetism of stalagmites are presented to suggest the mineral carriers of the magnetization and the origins of the natural remanence.

  20. Eruptive and structural controls on the evolution of Mexican maar volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrasco, G.; Ort, M. H.

    2013-05-01

    Although monogenetic volcanoes seem to have a very simple eruptive history, the geologic evolution of maar volcanoes is more complex because they involve a fluctuating explosive behavior due to rapid changes in how an ascending magma interacts with a source of external water. Maar volcanoes evolve in different ways depending on several factors such as magma extrusion rate, explosion depth variation, water/magma ratio, increasing cratering, viscosity, as well as characteristics of the country rock and structural features of the regional setting., Three main maar volcano fields, San Luis Potosí, Valle de Santiago and Serdán-Oriental, occur in central Mexico. In the first two fields, a strong tectonic control is evident for the general distribution of the volcanoes, while in the third case, a more local influence of shallow crustal fractures seems to control the migration of the explosion locus, causing elongated or craters shapes. Initial magma extrusion rates may have played an important role in producing different types of maar volcanoes. Also, the location of the explosions within the upper unconsolidated granular aquifer (brown tuff) or the deeper highly-fractured bedrock aquifer may control the efficiency of the explosions. Deepening and lateral migration of explosion loci are commonly observed in maar volcanoes, and lateral migration is strongly controlled by the regional stress regime. Eruptive styles vary from surge- and blast-dominated eruptions to alternating strombolian and vulcanian activity. Some show a drying-upward trend but others change from dry magmatic activity (hawaiian lava flows, followed by strombolian scoria) to highly fragmented hydromagmatic maar-forming explosions, which includes the periodic injection of juvenile material, particularly at the end of the eruptive phase.

  1. [Dietary training for school food service providers in support of the Acuerdo Nacional para la Salud Alimentaria].

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Dávila, Carolina; Rangel-Peniche, Diana Beatriz

    2015-01-01

    Introducción: en apoyo a la problemática de sobrepeso y obesidad en México, en el 2010 se publicó el Acuerdo Nacional para la Salud Alimentaria. A nivel escolar, los comodatarios se consideraron fundamentales para cumplir con ciertos compromisos. El objetivo de esta intervención fue capacitar a comodatarios de los Establecimientos de Consumo Escolar (ECE) en cuanto a los criterios establecidos en los “Lineamientos Generales para el Expendio y Distribución de Alimentos en Planteles de Educación Básica.” Métodos: participaron 13 ECE en San Luis Potosí. Con base en un diagnóstico inicial, se diseñó un curso-taller de 5 sesiones. Se evaluaron conocimientos en materia alimentaria al inicio y al final de las sesiones. Se obtuvo el porcentaje de apego en cuanto a higiene general, preparación y distribución de alimentos, al inicio, al mes y a los dos meses postintervención. Resultados: los comodatarios presentaron pocos conocimientos en los objetivos que persigue el “Acuerdo” en grupos y combinación de alimentos así como en lectura de etiquetas; con cambios significativos en los dos últimos tras la intervención. El porcentaje inicial de cumplimiento en higiene general fue del 60 %, con un incremento de casi 20 % postcapacitación. La preparación y distribución de alimentos no presentaron cambios significativos. Conclusiones: los comodatarios adquirieron conocimientos sobre los lineamientos que debe cubrir un ECE, sin ponerlos en práctica, dado el impacto que ello implica en su economía.

  2. Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System Failure Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nino Prieto, Omar Ariosto; Colmenares Guillen, Luis Enrique

    2013-09-01

    In this paper the Real Time Fire Reconnaissance Satellite Monitoring System is presented. This architecture is a legacy of the Detection System for Real-Time Physical Variables which is undergoing a patent process in Mexico. The methodologies for this design are the Structured Analysis for Real Time (SA- RT) [8], and the software is carried out by LACATRE (Langage d'aide à la Conception d'Application multitâche Temps Réel) [9,10] Real Time formal language. The system failures model is analyzed and the proposal is based on the formal language for the design of critical systems and Risk Assessment; AltaRica. This formal architecture uses satellites as input sensors and it was adapted from the original model which is a design pattern for physical variation detection in Real Time. The original design, whose task is to monitor events such as natural disasters and health related applications, or actual sickness monitoring and prevention, as the Real Time Diabetes Monitoring System, among others. Some related work has been presented on the Mexican Space Agency (AEM) Creation and Consultation Forums (2010-2011), and throughout the International Mexican Aerospace Science and Technology Society (SOMECYTA) international congress held in San Luis Potosí, México (2012). This Architecture will allow a Real Time Fire Satellite Monitoring, which will reduce the damage and danger caused by fires which consumes the forests and tropical forests of Mexico. This new proposal, permits having a new system that impacts on disaster prevention, by combining national and international technologies and cooperation for the benefit of humankind.

  3. Food assistance programmes are indirectly associated with anaemia status in children <5 years old in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Shamah-Levy, Teresa; Méndez-Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio; Gaona-Pineda, Elsa B; Cuevas-Nasu, Lucia; Villalpando, Salvador

    2016-09-01

    Anaemia in children is a public health concern in Mexico; Federal food assistance programmes are being implemented to prevent it. We undertook this research to investigate the indirect association between food assistance programmes (FAP) and anaemia through dietary and socio-economic conditions of beneficiary children. A structural equation model (SEM) was constructed to assess associations among FAP, dietary and socio-economic conditions, as well as anaemia. A cross-sectional comparative study was conducted based on a sample of 1214 households with children <5 years old, beneficiaries of two FAP: Prospera and rescue from malnutrition with amaranth (RMA) and a comparison group in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. The SEM and a decomposition effect analysis revealed the existence of a significant indirect association of FAP on the prevalence of anaemia via dietary and socio-economic conditions in children under 5 years old. The Prospera assistance programme showed a significant indirect positive association with the prevalence of anaemia (standard coefficient=0·027, P<0·031), and the RMA programme showed a significant indirect negative association with the prevalence of anaemia (standard coefficient=-0·029, P=0·047). There was a direct association between FAP and dietary and socio-economic conditions. FAP could indirectly modify the prevalence of anaemia in young children with a direct improvement on dietary and socio-economic conditions. The unexpected finding of the association between RMA, dietary and socio-economic conditions and the prevalence of anaemia reflects differences in the focus of the programmes.

  4. Long-distance colonization, isolation by distance, and historical demography in a relictual Mexican pinyon pine (Pinus nelsonii Shaw) as revealed by paternally inherited genetic markers (cpSSRs).

    PubMed

    Cuenca, A; Escalante, A E; Piñero, D

    2003-08-01

    Pinus nelsonii is a relictual pinyon pine distributed across a wide altitudinal range in semiarid zones in Mexico near the border between the States of Nuevo León and Tamaulipas. It also occurs in small patches in the State of San Luis Potosí. Pinus nelsonii is classified in the monotypic subsection Nelsoniae, separated from other pinyon pines (subsection Cembroides), because it possesses several distinctive characters including persistent fascicle sheaths, connate needles, and a distinctive wood anatomy. In the present study, chloroplast simple sequence repeats (cpSSRs) were used to estimate genetic variation in most known populations (nine) of P. nelsonii. The genetic variation (HT = 0.73; 27 haplotypes in 256 individuals) is moderate when compared to other pine species. Population differentiation ranged between low and moderate (FST = 0.13 and RST = 0.05), as did the Nei and Goldstein genetic distances between populations. However, this pattern varied depending on whether the infinite alleles or stepwise mutation model was used. In the former case a significant isolation by distance was found, but not in the latter. A significant association between geographical and genetic structure in one clade, through a nested clade analysis, was found, which suggested long-distance colonization between 125000 and 309000 years ago. We found weak evidence for a population expansion. A mismatch distribution suggests that P. nelsonii populations underwent an expansion 4.25 times their size between 59000 and 146000 years ago. On the other hand, the populations' star-like phylogeny and a slight parabolic relationship between coalescence times and lineage number also suggest weak population expansion. Overall, this species appears to have been in demographic stasis for a large proportion of the time detected by the markers used.

  5. Brevibacterium metallicus sp. nov., an endophytic bacterium isolated from roots of Prosopis laegivata grown at the edge of a mine tailing in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Román-Ponce, Brenda; Li, Yong Hua; Vásquez-Murrieta, María Soledad; Sui, Xin Hua; Chen, Wen Feng; Estrada-de Los Santos, Paulina; Wang, En Tao

    2015-12-01

    A Gram-positive, aerobic, nonmotile strain, NM2E3(T) was identified as Brevibacterium based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis and had the highest similarities to Brevibacterium jeotgali SJ5-8(T) (97.3 %). This novel bacterium was isolated from root tissue of Prosopis laegivata grown at the edge of a mine tailing in San Luis Potosí, Mexico. Its cells were non-spore-forming rods, showing catalase and oxidase activities and were able to grow in LB medium added with 40 mM Cu(2+), 72 mM As(5+) and various other toxic elements. Anteiso-C15:0 (41.6 %), anteiso-C17:0 (30 %) and iso-C15:0 (9.5 %) were the major fatty acids. MK-8(H2) (88.4 %) and MK-7(H2) (11.6 %) were the major menaquinones. The DNA G + C content of the strain NM2E3(T) was 70.8 mol % (Tm). DNA-DNA hybridization showed that the strain NM2E3(T) had 39.8, 21.7 and 20.3 % relatedness with B. yomogidense JCM 17779(T), B. jeotgali JCM 18571(T) and B. salitolerans TRM 45(T), respectively. Based on the phenotypic and genotypic analyses, the strain NM2E3(T) (=CCBAU 101093(T) = HAMBI 3627(T) = LMG 8673(T)) is reported as a novel species of the genus Brevibacterium, for which the name Brevibacterium metallicus sp. nov., is proposed.

  6. In vitro immunopotentiating properties and tumour cell toxicity induced by Lophophora williamsii (peyote) cactus methanolic extract.

    PubMed

    Franco-Molina, M; Gomez-Flores, R; Tamez-Guerra, P; Tamez-Guerra, R; Castillo-Leon, L; Rodríguez-Padilla, C

    2003-11-01

    Lophophora williamsii, also known as peyote, is found primarily in dry regions from Central Mexico, including the Mexican States of Nayarit, San Luis Potosí, Zacatecas, Nuevo León, Chihuahua, Coahuila and Tamaulipas, to Texas particularly in regions along Rio Grande. Peyote extracts have been associated with stimulating the central nervous system and regulating blood pressure, sleep, hunger and thirst. However, there is no evidence of any effect of peyote on the immune system or against tumour cell growth. The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effects of peyote methanolic extracts on some parameters of mouse and human leukocyte immunocompetence and tumour cell growth. Peyote extract (0.18-18 micro g/mL) activated nitric oxide production by murine macrophages, and stimulated up to 2.4-fold proliferation of murine thymic lymphocytes. In addition, peyote extract induced up to 1.85-, 2.29- and 1.89-fold increases in mRNA signal of IL-1, IL-6 and IL-8 by human leukocytes. Also examined were the effects of peyote extracts on murine lymphoma L5178Y-R and fi broblastoma L929, and human myeloid U937 and mammary gland MCF7 tumour cell growth using 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). Peyote extracts were toxic for MCF7, L5178Y-R, U937 and L929 (18 mg/mL peyote extract caused 1.3%, 8%, 45% and 60% viability respectively) cell lines.

  7. National survey on edentulism and its geographic distribution, among Mexicans 18 years of age and older (with emphasis in WHO age groups).

    PubMed

    Medina-Solís, C E; Pérez-Núñez, R; Maupomé, G; Avila-Burgos, L; Pontigo-Loyola, A P; Patiño-Marín, N; Villalobos-Rodelo, J J

    2008-04-01

    To determine the prevalence of edentulism in adults aged 18 years and older in Mexico and to describe its distribution in 20 of the 32 States in Mexico, highlighting the experience in the WHO age groups. A secondary analysis of the National Performance Evaluation Survey 2002-2003 (representative at the state level and part of the Word Health Survey) was undertaken. The sample design was probabilistic, stratified and through conglomerates. Data on dental conditions were available only for 20 of the 32 states of Mexico, leading to a total of 24 159 households (N = 54 638 654). The percentage of edentulism was determined as the proportion of subjects that self-reported complete loss of teeth. Data were analyzed using the SVY module for complex surveys in STATA 8.2. The mean age was 41.3 +/- 17.0 years (range 18-99). An estimated 6.3% (N = 3 437 816) of the population > or =18 years was edentulous. Lowest prevalences were observed in the states of Tlaxcala, Puebla and the Estado de Mexico with 3.4%, 3.8% and 4.5%, respectively. Highest prevalences were observed in San Luis Potosí, Colima, and Michoacán with 10.3%, 10.2% and 10.1%, respectively. Following the WHO age groups, the prevalence ranged from 2.4% in the 35-44 group through 25.5% in the 65-74 group. No obvious association between socio-economic and socio-demographic indicators at the state level and prevalence of edentulism was found. The prevalence of complete tooth loss observed in the present study varied greatly across states, although no straightforward association was found with socio-economic and socio-demographic indicators at the state level. This study could serve as a baseline to enable future evaluations of the oral status of Mexican adults and elders, following WHO age groups.

  8. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 MONASTERY GENERAL VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST. - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, Monastery, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  9. 7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 DETAIL OF DOOR TO SACRISTRY (EXTERIOR) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  10. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 GENERAL VIEW OF CHURCH AND LIVING QUARTERS FROM GARDEN. - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, Monastery, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  11. 2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 NORTH ELEVATION OF CHURCH - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    6. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 DETAIL OF CHURCH LOGGIA (NORTH ELEVATION, EXTERIOR) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 EAST ELEVATION OF CHURCH (FRONT) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 Church Nave (General view) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  15. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 GARDEN SIDE OF LIVING QUARTERS (WEST AND CHURCH SOUTH) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, Monastery, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 MAIN ENTRANCE DOOR TO CHURCH (EAST FRONT) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. 8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    8. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 SACRISTRY WINDOW, NORTH ELEVATION (EXTERIOR) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 CHURCH NAVE (GENERAL VIEW) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. View of yacht club and avila pier, facing west. The ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of yacht club and avila pier, facing west. The San Luis Bay Club is visible on the hill in the background. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. 1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    1. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 MONASTERY GENERAL VIEW FROM NORTHEAST (EAST FRONT) - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, Monastery, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  1. 4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    4. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION OF CHURCH FROM EAST END - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    3. Historic American Buildings Survey Photographed by Henry F. Withey December 1936 SOUTH ELEVATION OF CHURCH FROM WEST END - Mission San Luis Obispo de Tolosa, 782 Monterey Street, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. Cultural Resource Test Sampling Program for a Proposed Flood Control Project in the Lower San Luis Rey River Drainage, Oceanside, California.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-01

    percentarges of Pinaceae tend to reflect cooler conditions or relative close proximity to a pine tree stand. As expected palynomorph recovery decreased...clubmoss) Diverse Pinaceae (undifferentiated bisaccates) Temperate Selaginellaceae (clubmosses) " elarinella sp. (clubmoss) Diverse Typhaceae (cat

  4. Proceedings of the Workshop on The Human-Computer Partnership in Decision-Support Held in San Luis Obispo, California on May 2-4, 2000

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-09-01

    decision will rarely have a proportional cause. In other 6 Douglas C. Giancoli , The Ideas of Physics ...have a proportional cause. In other 6 Douglas C. Giancoli , The Ideas of Physics , Third Editon...until 1990. In 1990, he joined the Office of Naval Research as the Director of Chemistry. Since then, he has held the positions of Director of Physical

  5. Influence of low amplitude/high frequency relative sea-level changes in a wave-dominated estuary (Miocene), São Luis Basin, northern Brazil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Fátima Rossetti, D.

    2000-06-01

    Miocene deposits exceptionally well exposed along several coastal cliffs between the towns of Alcântara and Guimarães, Maranhão State, northern Brazil, record the history of low-amplitude/high-frequency sea-level changes in a wave-dominated incised valley estuarine setting. These deposits are interpreted as estuarine in origin, based on: (i) depauparated ichnological assemblage and occurrence of Gyrolithes, both typical of highly stressed brackish water conditions; (ii) dominance of sedimentary structures diagnostic of tidal processes (e.g. alternating thicker/thinner sand bundles marked by reactivation surfaces and/or mud drapes); and (iii) presence of widespread channel deposits. This estuarine fill consists of three stratigraphic units (Units 1-3): (1) Unit 1—shoaling shoreline (SH) and tidal channel (CH); (2) Unit 2—shoaling shoreline (SH), tidal channel (CH) facies associations, lagoon (LG), and flood-tidal delta/washover (FTD/W) facies associations; and (3) Unit 3—tidal channel (CH), estuarine bay (EB), and fluvial-influenced channel (FCH) facies associations. The individual units internally show a dominantly prograding character, a pattern also reflected throughout the succession by the overall upward stacking of units showing successively more restricted conditions. These characteristics, combined with the position in the uppermost portion of the valley fill succession, led to suggest that the deposits exposed in the study area likely formed during the transition from rising to highstand stages of relative sea level. Mapping of regionally significant discontinuity surfaces led to the recognition of a sequence boundary (i.e. discontinuity surface DS1) marked by erosion and subaerial exposure at the valley floor. This surface separates the Miocene succession from underlying Cretaceous rocks, and it is attributed to a major period of incision that led to the genesis of the incised valley during relative sea level fall. Unit 1 onlaps against DS1 and is bounded above by discontinuity surface DS2, which probably formed by tidal ravinement during a period of transgressive erosion. This ravinement surface is the boundary between two shoaling up successions (i.e. Units 1 and 2) interpreted as parasequences from a same depositional sequence. Discontinuity surface DS3 between Units 2 and 3 is attributed to a sequence boundary marked by significant erosion and subaerial exposure, and is interpreted as a reflex of a renewed period of incision within the estuary due to a strong drop in relative sea level. The top of Unit 3 is defined by another discontinuity surface (i.e. DS4) with pronounced erosion and subaerial exposure, which is attributed to a sequence boundary that ended the estuarine deposition in the study area. Thus, Unit 3, defined at the base and top by unconformities, is a complete depositional sequence resulting from a low amplitude/high frequency relative sea level cycle superposed upon the overall highstand stages of the estuary evolution.

  6. Cognitive decline and cardiometabolic risk among Hispanic and non-Hispanic white adults in the San Luis Valley Health and Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Hildreth, Kerry L; Grigsby, Jim; Bryant, Lucinda L; Wolfe, Pamela; Baxter, Judith

    2014-04-01

    Cardiometabolic risk factors, including hypertension, dyslipidemia, central obesity, insulin resistance and diabetes are linked to cognitive impairment. The Hispanic population appears to be differentially affected by both cardiometabolic risk factors and cognitive impairment. We sought to determine whether ethnic differences in cognitive impairment in long-resident southwestern US elders was explained by the presence of cardiometabolic risk factors, and to explore patterns of cognitive decline over time. We performed a secondary analysis of data collected on 378 Hispanic and 409 non-Hispanic white adult participants in a longitudinal study of community-dwelling elderly in southern Colorado. Measures of cardiometabolic risk included waist circumference, blood pressure, diagnosis of diabetes, and random blood glucose. Cognitive measures included the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) and the behavioral dyscontrol scale (a measure of executive cognitive function), at baseline and after an average of 22 months. Subjects were also administered the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale, and the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults 1-Year Activity Recall. At baseline, Hispanic elders had a greater number of cardiometabolic risk factors and lower MMSE and behavioral dyscontrol scale scores than non-Hispanic whites. Hispanic ethnicity was associated with a greater likelihood of decline in general cognitive function, but not executive cognitive function, after adjusting for age and education. This differential decline was not explained by either individual or total number of baseline cardiometabolic risk factors, depression, or physical activity. A borderline increased risk of decline in general cognitive function was seen in sedentary individuals (P = 0.05).

  7. Highlighting Changes in the Classrooms of a Successful One-to-One Program in Rural Argentina: Case Studies of "Todos los Chicos en la Red" in San Luis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Light, Daniel; Pierson, Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    One-to-one computing programs and laptop programs have been a popular approach to education reform in developing countries over the last decade. A motivation behind so many one-to-one laptop programs is the desire to overcome with one powerful resource the historical lack of educational tools and resources available in developing countries.…

  8. Effects of topographic position and geology on shaking damage to residential wood-framed structures during the 2003 San Simeon earthquake, western San Luis obispo county, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCrink, T.P.; Wills, C.J.; Real, C.R.; Manson, M.W.

    2010-01-01

    A statistical evaluation of shaking damage to wood-framed houses caused by the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake indicates that both the rate and severity of damage, independent of structure type, are significantly greater on hilltops compared to hill slopes when underlain by Cretaceous or Tertiary sedimentary rocks. This increase in damage is interpreted to be the result of topographic amplification. An increase in the damage rate is found for all structures built on Plio-Pleistocene rocks independent of topographic position, and this is interpreted to be the result of amplified shaking caused by geologic site response. Damage rate and severity to houses built on Tertiary rocks suggest that amplification due to both topographic position and geologic site response may be occurring in these rocks, but effects from other topographic parameters cannot be ruled out. For all geologic and topographic conditions, houses with raised foundations are more frequently damaged than those with slab foundations. However, the severity of damage to houses on raised foundations is only significantly greater for those on hill slopes underlain by Tertiary rocks. Structures with some damage-resistant characteristics experienced greater damage severity on hilltops, suggesting a spectral response to topographic amplification. ?? 2010, Earthquake Engineering Research Institute.

  9. The association of non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus with perceived quality of life in a biethnic population: the San Luis Valley Diabetes Study.

    PubMed Central

    Caldwell, E M; Baxter, J; Mitchell, C M; Shetterly, S M; Hamman, R F

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study evaluated the association between quality of life and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) status, and whether this association differs between Hispanics and non-Hispanic Whites. METHODS: Between 1986 and 1989, cross-sectional data on perceived quality of life (PQOL) were collected from 223 persons with NIDDM and 753 non-diabetic subjects. RESULTS: After adjustment, persons with NIDDM rated their PQOL significantly lower than did control subjects. The relationship of diabetes and PQOL did not differ by ethnicity. The number of complications of diabetes was not associated with lower PQOL scores. CONCLUSIONS: Control and treatment strategies should reflect an understanding of the impact that diabetes has on social functioning, leisure activities, and physical and mental health. PMID:9702155

  10. Effects of Topography and Geology on Shaking Damage to Wood Frame Residential Structures During the 2003 San Simeon Earthquake, Western San Luis Obispo County, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCrink, T. P.; Wills, C. J.; Real, C. R.; Manson, M. W.

    2009-12-01

    A statistical evaluation of shake damage to wood-frame houses caused by the 2003 M6.5 San Simeon earthquake indicates that both the rate and severity of damage, independent of structure type, is significantly greater on hilltops compared to hill slopes when underlain by Cretaceous or Tertiary sedimentary rocks. This increase in damage is interpreted to be the result of topographic amplification. An increase in the damage rate is found for all structures built on Plio-Pleistocene rocks independent of topographic position, and this is interpreted as the result of amplified shaking caused by geologic site response. Damage rate and severity to houses built on Tertiary rocks suggest that amplification due to both topographic position and geologic site response may be occurring in these rocks, but effects from other topographic parameters cannot be ruled out. In particular, higher slope curvature on hilltops, a characteristic feature of hills and ridges underlain by Tertiary rocks, also correlates with higher damage frequency. For all geologic and topographic conditions, houses with raised foundations are more frequently damaged than those with slab foundations. However, the severity of damage to houses on raised foundations is only significantly greater for those on hill slopes underlain by Tertiary rocks. Structures with some damage-resistant characteristics experienced greater damage severity on hilltops, suggesting a spectral response to topographic amplification.

  11. System learning approach to assess sustainability and forecast trends in regional dynamics: The San Luis Basin study, Colorado, U.S.A.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents a methodology that combines the power of an Artificial Neural Network and Information Theory to forecast variables describing the condition of a regional system. The novelty and strength of this approach is in the application of Fisher information, a key metho...

  12. Jim. L'historie de Jim Caron jeune homme racontee par lui-meme (Jim. The Story of Jim Caron as a Young Man Told by Himself).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oliver, Julien

    This illustrated account of an interview with Jim Caron, a 101 year-old Franco-American resident of New Hampshire, is intended for use in a bilingual education setting. The narrative is divided into ten chapters and is written in the style of the spoken French dialect of Quebec and New England. In addition to details on the long life of Jim it…

  13. Opium -- The Fuel of Instability in Afghanistan: Why the Military Must be Involved in the Solution, and Recommendations for Action

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-18

    that the 7Luis Suarez Salazar and Luis Fierro. “Drug... Salazar , Luis Suarez , and Luis Fierro. “Drug Trafficking and Social and Political Conflicts in Latin America: Some Hypothesis.” Latin American Perspectives...trafficking finances the insurgencies in those two countries.6 Salazar (1993) argues that addressing the underlying economic issues that cause the

  14. Geochemical and Sr Nd Pb isotopic evidence for a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation process for volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, Hidalgo, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Surendra P.

    2001-03-01

    This study reports new geochemical and Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic data for Miocene to Quaternary basaltic to andesitic, dacitic, and rhyolitic volcanic rocks from the Huichapan caldera, located in the central part of the Mexican Volcanic Belt (MVB). The initial Sr and Nd isotopic ratios, except for one rhyolite, range as follows: 87Sr/ 86Sr 0.70357-0.70498 and 143Nd/ 144Nd 0.51265-0.51282. The Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic ratios are generally similar to those for volcanic rocks from other areas of the central and eastern parts of the MVB. The isotopic ratios of one older pre-caldera rhyolite (HP30) from the Huichapan area, particularly its high 87Sr/ 86Sr, are significantly different from rhyolitic rocks from this and other areas of the MVB, but are isotopically similar to some felsic rocks from the neighbouring geological province of Sierra Madre Occidental (SMO), implying an origin as a partial melt of the underlying crust. The evolved andesitic to rhyolitic magmas could have originated from a basaltic magma through a combined assimilation and fractional crystallisation (AFC) process. Different compositions, representing lower crust (LC) and upper crust (UC) as well as a hypothetical crust similar to the source of high 87Sr/ 86Sr rhyolite HP30, were tested as plausible assimilants for the AFC process. The results show that the UC represented by granitic rocks from a nearby Los Humeros area or by Cretaceous limestone (L) rocks outcropping in the northern part of the study area, and the LC represented by granulitic xenoliths from a nearby San Luis Potosı´ (SLP) area are not possible assimilants for Huichapan magmas, whereas a hypothetical crust (HA) similar in isotopic compositions to rhyolite HP30 could be considered a possible assimilant for the AFC process. Chemical composition of assimilant HA, although not well constrained at present, was inferred under the assumption that HP30 type partial melts could be generated from its partial melting. These data were then used to evaluate

  15. Orientational data on the state of stress in northeastern Mexico as inferred from stress-induced borehole elongations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suter, Max

    1987-03-01

    Preferential elongation directions are presented from 46 subvertical wells in northeastern Mexico from depth intervals ranging from 161 to 4,912 m. The measurements document a remarkably consistent west-east to northwest-southeast direction of the contemporary least horizontal stress in the upper crust of this intraplate region. In the regional neotectonic framework, the data suggest that Mexico north of the trans-Mexican volcanic belt is being stretched in west-east to northwest-southeast direction. The measurements from the area of the Laramide Chihuahua and Coahuila fold-thrust belts define the southern extend of the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province of the southwestern United States into northern Mexico. The least horizontal in situ stress directions recorded in the Gulf Coastal Plain (Burgos and Tampico-Misantla Basins) are oblique to the continental margin of the Gulf of Mexico, but subparallel to the direction measured in the area of the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province. This suggests that the stress distribution in these basins is not mainly the result of gravitational loading as in the Gulf Coast stress province of the United States, but is controlled by the same lithospheric stress system that characterizes the Basin and Range—Rio Grande rift stress province. This is also supported by the north-south trending zone of Oligocene-Quaternary alkaline volcanism that crosses the Tampico-Misantla Basin. Furthermore, the data indicate that the active deformation of the Mexican Ridges fold belt, east of the study area in the Gulf of Mexico cannot be caused by a compressional external tectonic load. The direction of the least horizontal in situ stress measured in the area of the Laramide Sierra Madre Oriental fold-thrust belt in Hidalgo and San Luis Potosí States is consistent with that of the other zones. However, wellbore elongations were recorded less frequently and show a rather large circular variance, which suggests that

  16. Raman Spectroscopy an Option for the Early Detection of Citrus Huanglongbing.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Moisés Roberto Vallejo; Mendoza, María Guadalupe Galindo; Elías, Miguel Ghebre Ramírez; González, Francisco Javier; Contreras, Hugo Ricardo Navarro; Servín, Carlos Contreras

    2016-05-01

    This research describes the application of portable field Raman spectroscopy combined with a statistical analysis of the resulting spectra, employing principal component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA), in which we determine that this method provides a high degree of reliability in the early detection of Huanglongbing (HLB) on Sweet Orange, disease caused by the bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus. Symptomatic and asymptomatic plant samples of Sweet Orange (Citrus sinensis), Persian Lime (C. latifolia), and Mexican Lime (C. aurantifolia) trees were collected from several municipalities, three at Colima State and three at Jalisco State (HLB presence). In addition, Sweet Orange samples were taken from two other Mexican municipalities, one at San Luis Potosí and the other at Veracruz (HLB absent). All samples were analyzed by real-time PCR to determine its phytosanitary condition, and its spectral signatures were obtained with an ID-Raman mini. Spectral anomalies in orange trees HLB-positive, were identified in bands related to carbohydrates (905 cm(-1), 1043 cm(-1), 1127 cm(-1), 1208 cm(-1), 1370 cm(-1), 1272 cm(-1), 1340 cm(-1), and 1260-1280 cm(-1)), amino acids, proteins (815 cm(-1), 830 cm(-1), 852 cm(-1), 918 cm(-1), 926 cm(-1), 970 cm(-1), 1002 cm(-1), 1053 cm(-1), and 1446 cm(-1)), and lipids (1734 cm(-1), 1736 cm(-1), 1738 cm(-1), 1745 cm(-1), and 1746 cm(-1)). Moreover, PCA-LDA showed a sensitivity of 86.9 % (percentage of positives, which are correctly identified), a specificity of 91.4 % (percentage of negatives, which are correctly identified), and a precision of 89.2 % (the proportion of all tests that are correct) in discriminating between orange plants HLB-positive and healthy plants. The Raman spectroscopy technique permitted rapid diagnoses, was low-cost, simple, and practical to administer, and produced immediate results. These are essential features for phytosanitary

  17. [Not Available].

    PubMed

    Vizuet Vega, Norma Isela; Shamah Levy, Teresa; Gaona Pineda, Elsa Berenice; Cuevas Nasu, Lucía; Méndez Gómez-Humarán, Ignacio

    2016-07-19

    Introducción: la anemia es un factor de riesgo en la población infantil con consecuencias graves para su crecimiento y desarrollo. Los programas de ayuda alimentaria pueden contribuir a su prevención y control. Objetivo: estudiar la adherencia al consumo de suplementos y su relación con la prevalencia de anemia en niños menores de tres años de edad en San Luis Potosí, México beneficiarios del programa PROSPERA.Métodos: se realizó un análisis comparativo en niños de 12 a 36 meses que consumen diferentes suplementos alimenticios: 414 pertenecientes al grupo de intervención y 334 al de comparación. Se midió la hemoglobina (Hb) por Hemocue clasificando como anémicos a quienes tuvieron valores <110 g/l. Se aplicaron pruebas de t de Student y X2. Se estimaron efectos de intervención mediante el método de diferencias en diferencias y un puntaje de adherencia al consumo de suplementos.Resultados: al final del estudio la prevalencia de anemia disminuyó 11.2 pp en el grupo de intervención y 8.7 pp en el de comparación; la interacción del puntaje de adherencia por suplemento y etapa de observación mostró que la adherencia al consumo de Bebida láctea + Vitaniño reduce el riesgo de presentar anemia (p = 0,14). El consumo de Nutrisano + Vitaniño se asoció con menor riesgo (0,2), ambos con respecto al consumo de Nutrisano.Conclusiones: el programa PROSPERA tuvo efectos importantes en la disminución de las prevalencias de anemia. Se recomienda llevar a cabo acciones para mejorar la adherencia al consumo de suplementos alimenticios, a fIn de mejorar la efectividad de los programas.

  18. Petrographic Evidence of Microbial Mats in the Upper Cretaceous Fish-Bearing, Organic-Rich Limestone, Agua Nueva Formation, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanco, A.; Maurrasse, F. J.; Hernández-Ávila, J.; Ángeles-Trigueros, S. A.; García-Cabrera, M. E.

    2013-05-01

    We document petrographic evidence of microbial mats in the Upper Cretaceous Agua Nueva Formation in the area of Xilitla (San Luis Potosí, Central Mexico), located in the southern part of the Tampico-Misantla basin. The sequence consists predominantly of alternating decimeter-thick beds of fossiliferous dark laminated limestone (C-org > 1.0wt%), and light gray, bioturbated limestone (C-org < 1.0wt%), with occasional brown shale and green bentonite layers. Well-preserved fossil-fish assemblages occur in the laminated dark limestone beds, which include shark teeth (cf. Ptychodus), scales of teleosteans (Ichthyodectiformes), as well as skeletal remains of holosteans (Nursallia. sp), and teleosteans (cf. Rhynchodercetis, Tselfatia, and unidentified Enchodontids). Thin section and SEM analyses of the laminated, dark limestones, reveal a micritic matrix consisting of dark and light sub-parallel wavy laminae, continuous and discontinuous folded laminae with shreds of organic matter, filaments, oncoids, and interlocking structures. The structures are identical to those previously described for the Cenomanian-Turonian Indidura Fm at Parras de la Fuente (Coahuila state) demonstrated to be of microbial origin (Duque-Botero and Maurrasse, 2005; 2008). These structures are also analogous to microbial mats in present environments, and Devonian deposits (Kremer, 2006). In addition, the laminae at Xilitla include filamentous bacterial structures, as thin and segmented red elements. In some thin sections, filaments appear to be embedded within the crinkly laminae and shreds showing the same pattern of folding, suggestive of biomorphic elements that represent the main producers of the organic matter associated with the laminae. Thus, exceptional bacterial activity characterizes sedimentation during the accumulation of the Agua Nueva Formation. Oxygen-deficient conditions related to the microbial mats were an important element in the mass mortality and preservation of the fish

  19. Curicaberis, a new genus of Sparassidae from North and Central America (Araneae, Sparassidae, Sparassinae).

    PubMed

    Rheims, Cristina A

    2015-09-04

    The genus Curicaberis gen. nov. is described to include the type species, Curicaberis ferrugineus (C.L. Koch, 1836) comb. nov., and eight other species transferred from Olios Walckenaer, 1837: C. abnormis (Keyserling, 1884) comb. nov., C. annulatus (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) comb. nov., C. bibranchiatus (Fox, 1937) comb. nov., C. ensiger (F.O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1900) comb. nov., C. ferrugineus (C.L. Koch, 1836) comb. nov., C. luctuosus (Banks, 1898) comb. nov., C. minax (O. Pickard-Cambridge,1896) comb. nov., C. manifestus (O. Pickard-Cambridge, 1890) comb. nov., and C. peninsulanus (Banks, 1898) comb. nov.. All species are redescribed and illustrated. The males of C. ferrugineus comb. nov. and C. luctuosus comb. nov., and the female of C. annulatus comb. nov. are described and illustrated for the first time. Twenty-three new species are described: C. azul sp. nov. (♂) from Veracruz, C. catarinas sp. nov. (♀) from Chihuahua, C. chamela sp. nov. (♂ and ♀), C. eberhardi sp. nov. (♂ and ♀), C. jalisco sp. nov. (♂ and ♀), and C. urquizai sp. nov. (♂ and ♀) from Jalisco, C. culiacan sp. nov. (♂) from Sinaloa, C. cuyutlan sp. nov. (♂) from Colima, C. durango sp. nov. (♂) from Durango, C. elpunto sp. nov. (♂ and ♀), C. sanpedrito sp. nov. (♂ and ♀), C. tortugero sp. nov. (♀), C. yerba sp. nov. (♀) and C. zapotec sp. nov. (♂) from Oaxaca, C. huitiupan sp. nov. (♂), from Chiapas, C. pedregal sp. nov. (♂) from Distrito Federal, C. potosi sp. nov. (♀) from San Luis Potosí, C. puebla sp. nov. (♀) from Puebla, C. tepic sp. nov. (♀) from Nayarit, and C. mitla sp. nov. (♂ and ♀) from Veracruz and Oaxaca, C. chiapas sp. nov. (♂ and ♀) from Chiapas and Tabasco, all in Mexico, C. granada sp. nov. (♂ and ♀) from Granada and Manágua in Nicaragua and Guanacaste in Costa Rica, and C. bagaces sp. nov. (♀), from Guanacaste, Costa Rica. An identification key and distribution maps are provided for all known species.

  20. Mercury Production and Use in Colonial Andean Silver Production: Emissions and Health Implications

    PubMed Central

    Hagan, Nicole A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Colonial cinnabar mining and refining began in Huancavelica, Peru, in 1564. With a local source of mercury, the amalgamation process was adopted to refine silver in Potosí, Bolivia, in the early 1570s. As a result, large quantities of mercury were released into the environment. Objectives: We used archival, primary, and secondary sources to develop the first estimate of mercury emissions from cinnabar refining in Huancavelica and to revise previous estimates of emissions from silver refining in Potosí during the colonial period (1564–1810). Discussion: Although other estimates of historical mercury emissions have recognized Potosí as a significant source, Huancavelica has been overlooked. In addition, previous estimates of mercury emissions from silver refining under-estimated emissions because of unrecorded (contra-band) production and volatilization of mercury during processing and recovery. Archival descriptions document behavioral and health issues during the colonial period that are consistent with known effects of mercury intoxication. Conclusions: According to our calculations, between 1564 and 1810, an estimated 17,000 metric tons of mercury vapor were emitted from cinnabar smelting in Huancavelica, and an estimated 39,000 metric tons were released as vapor during silver refining operations in Potosí. Huancavelica and Potosí combined contributed > 25% of the 196,000 metric tons of mercury vapor emissions in all of Latin America between 1500 and 1800. The historical record is laden with evidence of mercury intoxication consistent with effects recognized today. Our estimates serve as the foundation of investigations of present-day contamination in Huancavelica and Potosí resulting from historical emissions of mercury. PMID:22334094

  1. 13. GROOVED FOOTING (CONSTRUCTION KEY) EXTENDING ABOVE CEMENT FLOOR IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. GROOVED FOOTING (CONSTRUCTION KEY) EXTENDING ABOVE CEMENT FLOOR IN FIRST UNLINED SECTION BEYOND SOUTH PORTAL. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 22. TRANSMISSION MAIN, PLAN AND PROFILE, INDEX SHEET. Leeds, Hill, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. TRANSMISSION MAIN, PLAN AND PROFILE, INDEX SHEET. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no date, no number. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. 23. CUESTA TUNNEL, PORTAL STRUCTURES. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. CUESTA TUNNEL, PORTAL STRUCTURES. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no number, revised 10/10/41. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. 5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. SOUTHWEST AND SOUTHEAST ELEVATIONS, SOUTH PORTAL, SHOWING BOX ENCLOSING VALVES. VIEW TO NORTH. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  5. 7 CFR 319.8-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River. Permit. A form of authorization to allow the importation of... Sonora (except that part of the Imperial Valley lying between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River),...

  6. 7 CFR 319.8-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River. Permit. A form of authorization to allow the importation of... Sonora (except that part of the Imperial Valley lying between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River),...

  7. 7 CFR 319.8-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River. Permit. A form of authorization to allow the importation of... Sonora (except that part of the Imperial Valley lying between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River),...

  8. 7 CFR 319.8-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River. Permit. A form of authorization to allow the importation of... Sonora (except that part of the Imperial Valley lying between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River),...

  9. 75 FR 20010 - Pacific Gas & Electric Company; Establishment of Atomic Safety and Licensing Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... Power Plant, Units 1 and 2, located near San Luis Obispo, California. The current operating licenses... was submitted by Diane Curran, representing San Luis Obispo Mothers for Peace. The Board is...

  10. View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing south from Front Street. Harbor storage building and restrooms are on the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  11. Main interior space facing the bar. The more recent kitchen ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main interior space facing the bar. The more recent kitchen and restroom additions are behind the rear wall. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. The Art and Craft of Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Root-Bernstein, Robert; Root-Bernstein, Michele

    2013-01-01

    Walter Alvarez, a doctor and physiologist of some renown, decided to send his scientifically talented son, Luis, to an arts and crafts school where Luis took industrial drawing and woodworking instead of calculus. Luis Alvarez won the Nobel Prize in physics in 1968. Einstein was certainly not a standout in his mathematics and physics classes. Yet…

  13. MetalMapper: A Multi-Sensor TEM System for UXO Detection and Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    Camp  San   Luis  Obispo  (SLO)  ....................................................................................  22   4.2.  SITE  HISTORY...4.3.2.  San   Luis  Obispo  ..........................................................................................................  23   4.4...24   4.4.2.  San   Luis  Obispo

  14. 78 FR 8166 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Department, 919 Palm Docs/12-09-1856P- 1856P). Marx, Mayor, Street, San Luis 060310-102DA.pdf. City of San Obispo, CA 93401. Luis Obispo, 990 Palm Street, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401. Colorado: Adams City of The.... Box 791, Boulder, CO 80306. Florida: Brevard City of Cocoa The Honorable Development Services...

  15. Performance Evaluation of a Semantic Perception Classifier

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    Performance Evaluation of a Semantic Perception Classifier by Craig Lennon, Barry Bodt, Marshal Childers, Rick Camden, Arne Suppe, Luis...Camden and Nicoleta Florea Engility Corporation Luis Navarro-Serment and Arne Suppe Carnegie Mellon University...Lennon, Barry Bodt, Marshal Childers, Rick Camden,* Arne Suppe, † Luis Navarro-Serment, † and Nicoleta Florea* 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK

  16. 77 FR 46518 - Draft Resource Management Plan/General Plan Draft Environmental Impact Statement/Revised Draft...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-03

    .../Revised Draft Environmental Impact Report for the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area, Merced County... available for public review and comment the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area Resource Management... meeting will be held at the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area Headquarters, 31426 Gonzaga...

  17. 78 FR 37846 - Resource Management Plan/General Plan and Environmental Impact Statement/Environmental Impact...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-24

    .../Environmental Impact Report for the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area, Merced County, California AGENCY... Statement/Environmental Impact Report (EIS/EIR) for the San Luis Reservoir State Recreation Area Resource... of Reclamation (Reclamation) and includes the water surfaces of San Luis Reservoir, O'Neill...

  18. 27 CFR 9.84 - Paso Robles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... United States Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale map of San Luis Obispo, California, 1956, revised 1969... within San Luis Obispo County, California. From the point of beginning where the county lines of San Luis Obispo, Kings and Kern Counties converge, the county line also being the township line between T.24S....

  19. 27 CFR 9.84 - Paso Robles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... United States Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale map of San Luis Obispo, California, 1956, revised 1969... within San Luis Obispo County, California. From the point of beginning where the county lines of San Luis Obispo, Kings and Kern Counties converge, the county line also being the township line between T.24S....

  20. 27 CFR 9.84 - Paso Robles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... United States Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale map of San Luis Obispo, California, 1956, revised 1969... within San Luis Obispo County, California. From the point of beginning where the county lines of San Luis Obispo, Kings and Kern Counties converge, the county line also being the township line between T.24S....

  1. 27 CFR 9.28 - Santa Maria Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Quadrangle, California, 7.5 minute series, 1959, photorevised 1982; (3) “San Luis Obispo”, N.I. 10-3, series... Valley viticultural area is located in Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo Counties, California. The... generally northeast along State Route 166 (east) onto the San Luis Obispo N.I. 10-3 map to State Route...

  2. 27 CFR 9.84 - Paso Robles.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... United States Geological Survey 1:250,000-scale map of San Luis Obispo, California, 1956, revised 1969... within San Luis Obispo County, California. From the point of beginning where the county lines of San Luis Obispo, Kings and Kern Counties converge, the county line also being the township line between T.24S....

  3. A History of the Los Angeles District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1898-1965

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-01

    Arroyo drainage area, and along Julian Wash. About 40 miles southeast of Phoenix, the District completed in November 1960 the Whitlow Ranch Reservoir...Luis, California. By Porter-Urquhart- McCreary -O’Brien, Consulting Engineers, 1958. 370 Review Report for Navigation, Port San Luis (San Luis Obispo

  4. PREFACE: Collapse Calderas Workshop

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gottsmann, Jo; Aguirre-Diaz, Gerardo

    2008-10-01

    (IAVCEI), the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG), the Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México (UNAM) through the Coordinación de la Investigación Científica, the Institute of Physics Publishing services, the Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología de Querétaro (CONCYTEQ). The workshop represented the key activity of the IAVCEI Commission on Collapse Calderas in 2008. We, the workshop organizers, would like to express our gratitude to all workshop participants, the staff of Misión La Muralla, the Centro de Geociencias of UNAM for administrative and logistic support, to Adelina Geyer for web support, to María Inés Rojano for organization of logistics, the Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí for logistics support, the Comisiòn Nacional de Electricidad for authorizing a visit to Los Azufres geothermal field, and to all sponsors that provided financial support. We expect these proceedings to stimulate further fruitful discussions, which we hope will be continued at a future meeting. Jo Gottsmann and Gerardo Aguirre-Diaz October 2008

  5. MorphoSys Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-12-01

    Machine, April 1997. 10. Villasenor, B. Schoner, K. Chia, C. Zapata , H. J. Kim, C. Jones, S. Lansing, and B. Mangione-Smith, “Configurable Computing...globl main .loc 2 23 .ent main main: nop lui $1, 0x0004 nop # Load Frame buffer at Bank A, set 0...data, low half for context lui $1, 0x0004 nop # Load current data to Bank A set 0 ldfb $1, 0, 0, 64 lui $2, 0x0006 addi $3

  6. Integration of Advanced Statistical Analysis Tools and Geophysical Modeling

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    later in this section. 2) San Luis Obispo . Extracted features were also provided for MTADS EM61, MTADS magnetics, EM61 cart, and TEMTADS data sets from...subsequent training of statistical classifiers using these features. Results of discrimination studies at Camp Sibert and San Luis Obispo have shown...Comparison of classification performance Figures 10 through 13 show receiver operating characteristics for data sets acquired at San Luis Obispo . Subplot

  7. Beach Erosion Control; Comparative Study of Coast of Southern California, Point of Conception to Mexico Boundary. Appendix 7

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1960-01-01

    Lagoon and at 17 locations at San Luis Obispo County. Aerial photographs were taken of the coastline from Morro Bay to the International Boundary. DD ,AN...established in San Luis Obispo County, for comparison with 1938 photographs. Hydrographic surveys made in 1958 at 17 locations along San Luis Obispo...Santa Barbara County.--The shore of Santa Barbara County extends from the mouth of the Santa Maria River on the north to Rincon Point, a distance of

  8. The Battle of the Malvinas: The Argentinian Version,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-16

    waters, where the shallow water depth prevent submarine attack. The Argentine submarine SAN LUIS (Class 209) fired one or more torpedoes at a range of...Coast Guard personnel and 13 civilian seamen were killed. On the same day, the Argentine submarine SAN LUIS fired 4 14 torpedoes at two targets at a...aircraft missile launchers of the British The reports of one or more attacks of the Argentine SEA CAT type. It is unclear submarine SAN LUIS (Class

  9. Nesting the Gulf of Mexico in Atlantic HYCOM: Oceanographic Processes Generated by Hurricane Ivan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    NUMBER Luis Zamudio , Patrick J. Hogan 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 73-6644-07-5 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8...generated by Hurricane Ivan Luis Zamudio a,*, Patrick J. Hogan b Center for Ocean-Atmospheric Prediction Studies, Florida State University...author. first time. (2) GOM buoys recorded sea surface temperature E-mail address: Luis.Zamudio@nrssc.navy.mil (L. Zamudio ). (SST) decreases of >3 ’C in

  10. The Role of the Armed Forces in the Americas: Civil-Military Relations for the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-04-01

    politics, in nostalgic prose and poetry than in academic writings. Authors such as Octavio Paz, Pedro Nava or Jorge Luis Borges had a greater political...Democracy in the Americas Licenciado Luis Tibiletti Ser 2000, Argentina 77 Part Three: National Security and Civil-Military Relations in the 21st...Century: Three Views From Latin America 83 6. Civil-Military Relations in the Americas for the 21st Century: A Latin American Perspective Professor Luis

  11. Latin America Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Plan ( Jose Luis Machinea Interview; CLARIN, 23 Jun 85) 50 Salient Points in ’Forced Savings’ Bill Noted (CLARIN, 28 Jun 85) 56 Meat Exports...us out the window." Jose Luis Castillo (ship navigators) was one of the labor leaders waiting in the building on Azopardo Street and he was heard to...with Undersecretary of Economic Policy Jose Luis Machinea, by Martin Ravazzani; date, time and place not given; passages enclosed in slantlines

  12. China Report, Political, Sociological and Military Affairs, No. 445.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Espriella of Panama and Luis Herrera Campins of Venezuela, sent a message today to presidents of all Central American states as well as President Reagan...August. Ecuadorian Foreign Minister Luis Valencia Rodriguez said in Quito on July 22 that the presence of U.S. warships in Central American waters has...President Luis Herrera Campins told reporters in Caracas on July 20 that the U.S. move was taken at "an inappropriate time." Venezuelan Foreign

  13. Latin America Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-08

    Mendez (domestic trade) and Adolfo Martin Canitröt (economic coordination). They, in turn, have appointed the undersecretaries: Jose Luis Machinea, for...Crucido Tejado Samos, 26; Milton de la Cruz, 28; Luis Fermin Sosa, 30; Bernado Alcala, 26; Leocadiq Sandoval, 34 and Jose de; Castro, 29...drug traffickers such as Luis "Kojak" Garcia, Harry "The Rock" Hoffman, Griffin and Sonny Wilson who "all had their bases in North Andros or the

  14. Telecommunication Policy in the Caribbean: A Comparison of Telecommunications in the Dominican Republic and Haiti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    POLICY IN THE CARIBBEAN: A COMPARISON OF TELECOMMUNICATIONS IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AND HAITI by Luis F. Socias September 2011 Thesis...Comparison of Telecommunications in the Dominican Republic and Haiti 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S) Luis F. Socias 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S...IN THE DOMINICAN REPUBLIC AND HAITI Luis F. Socias Lieutenant Commander, United States Navy B.S., Marquette University, 2001 Submitted in

  15. Tools for Risk-Based UXO Remediation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    we (i) performed a probabilistic risk assessment using polarizabilities and ground truth information from Camp San Luis Obispo , Camp Butner, and...actual depth distribution of the UXO recovered at San Luis Obispo and results of the synthetic seed study, we conclude that all of the UXO, at least...same detection scheme, for burial depths of up to 0.77m. Thus, the detection process applied to ESTCP’s Classification Study at San Luis Obispo , CA

  16. 78 FR 36098 - Final Flood Elevation Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-17

    ... CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... 13132. Executive Order 12988, Civil Justice Reform. This final rule meets the applicable standards...

  17. 34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR, PULPIT - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 75 FR 33307 - Formations of, Acquisitions by, and Mergers of Bank Holding Companies

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-11

    ..., California; Morton CapitalManagement, Calabasas, California; and R. E. Wacker Associates, Inc., San Luis Obispo, California, and thereby engage in activities related to extending credit, trust company...

  19. 75 FR 81642 - Long-Term North to South Water Transfer Program, Sacramento County, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-28

    ..., Bureau of Reclamation (Reclamation) and the San Luis & Delta-Mendota Water Authority propose to prepare a... water agencies south of the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta (Delta) and in the San Francisco Bay Area. The.... Sacramento at the Best Western Expo Inn & Suites, 1413 Howe Avenue. Los Banos at the San Luis &...

  20. 76 FR 36518 - Notice of Meeting; Federal Lands Recreation Enhancement Act (Title VIII, Pub. L. 108-447)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    .... 3. An increase of overnight camping fees for the Penitente Canyon Campground located in the San Luis Valley Public Lands Center area. 4. A new fee for overnight camping fees at the new Zapata Falls Campground located in the San Luis Valley Public Lands Center area. 5. A fee revision for the Green...

  1. Main interior space facing south toward the ocean. Original scissor ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Main interior space facing south toward the ocean. Original scissor trusses and deck roof are visible at the top. Octagonal window with large picture windows face the ocean. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 76 FR 12719 - City of Escondido, California, and Vista Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... Rincon Indian Reservation. Lake Wohlford stores the water obtained from the San Luis Rey River and... Powerhouse Project. f. Location: On the San Luis Rey River in San Diego County, near Escondido, California... reservation lands owned by the La Jolla, San Pasqual, and Rincon Indian Tribes. g. Filed Pursuant to:...

  3. 76 FR 12720 - City of Escondido, CA, and Vista Irrigation District; Notice of Application Accepted for Filing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-08

    ... District (Vista). e. Name of Project: Escondido Hydroelectric Project. f. Location: On the San Luis Rey... also occupies 66 acres of Indian reservation lands owned by the La Jolla, San Pasqual, and Rincon... storage reservoirs (Lake Henshaw on San Luis Rey River and Lake Wohlford on Escondido Creek) with...

  4. Telecommunications Growth in Latin America: A Comparative Analysis, the Development and Policy of Technologies in Emerging Markets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    Access Results. April 2008, 1. 78 Ibid. 79 Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango, Historia de La Television en Colombia December 2005 http://www.lablaa.org...Restrictions on Cable TV,” New York Times, 9 July 2009. Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango. Historia de La Television en Colombia December 2005 http

  5. Colombia: A Country Under Constant Threat of Disasters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-22

    social doctrines of Catholicism. “Historia de los Partidos Políticos Tradicionales de Colombia,” Biblioteca Virtual, Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango, http... Biblioteca Virtual, Biblioteca Luis Ángel Arango. “Historia de los Partidos Políticos Tradicionales de Colombia.” http://www.banrepcultural.org

  6. Insight into Foreign Thoughtworlds for National Security Decision Makers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    really existed or was a creation of Argentine writer Jorge Luis Borges , it is a striking example of the human possibilities of even such a potentially...1 Jorge Luis Borges , quoted by Michel Foucault in The Order of Things, and cited by David Augsburger in Conflict

  7. 75 FR 55602 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Assessment To Amend the Resource Management Plan for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-13

    ... can be found at the following Web site: http://www.blm.gov/wo/st/en/frog/energy/geothermal/geothermal... compliance with the Geothermal Steam Act, as amended, and the legislative directives set forth in the Energy... Management Plan for the San Luis Resource Area for Geothermal Leasing in Colorado's San Luis Valley...

  8. 21. CHAINAGE FROM SALINAS DAM TO NORTH PORTAL, STATIONS. Leeds, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. CHAINAGE FROM SALINAS DAM TO NORTH PORTAL, STATIONS. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no date, no number, title block partially obscured. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  9. Adult Hispanic ESL Students and Graded Readers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Liza E.

    2013-01-01

    Adult Hispanic ESL students in rural San Luis, Arizona, face a challenging situation. Since San Luis lies on the southwestern tip of Arizona and borders with Mexico, Spanish is the predominant language. English, on the other hand, is mostly heard in classrooms. This can be a predicament for adult Hispanics who need to be proficient in English in…

  10. 76 FR 31977 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for Domestic Sheep Grazing...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Sheep Grazing Allotments for Term Grazing Permit Renewals in the Southern San Luis Valley, CO AGENCY... sheep grazing permits on 12 allotments and 1 cattle grazing allotment in the southern San Luis Valley.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Term permits on 12 sheep grazing and 1 cattle grazing allotments located in...

  11. 75 FR 39091 - Airport Privatization Pilot Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-07

    ... Mu oz Mar n International Airport (SJU), San Juan, Puerto Rico. SUMMARY: The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) has completed its review of the Luis Mu oz Mar n International Airport International Airport... submitted a preliminary application to the Airport Privatization Pilot Program for Luis Mu oz Mar...

  12. 20. GEOLOGY, PLAN AND PROFILE, SHOWING LINED AND UNLINED SECTIONS, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. GEOLOGY, PLAN AND PROFILE, SHOWING LINED AND UNLINED SECTIONS, AND DETAILED TYPICAL CROSS SECTIONS. Leeds, Hill, Barnard & Jewett drawing, no number, revised 3-20-42. - Salinas River Project, Cuesta Tunnel, Southeast of U.S. 101, San Luis Obispo, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. View of the main interior space facing east. The main ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the main interior space facing east. The main entry is on the left hand side at the rear. The exit to the deck is to the right. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. Dealing with Bullies (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... leave bullies behind. Luis lived in fear of Brian — every day he would give his lunch money to Brian, but Brian still beat him up. He said that if ... so bad about himself and about school. Finally, Brian got caught threatening Luis and they were both ...

  15. USACE Participation in the Pole Mountain Advanced Classification Demonstration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    mm millimeter Nfa number of false alarms PMTMA Pole Mountain Target and Maneuver Area Sky Sky Research, Inc SLO San Luis Obispo ...plus Direct Fire and Indirect Fire Areas), and most recently at Camp San Luis Obispo (SLO), Camp Butner, and Camp Beale in connection with 2009 through

  16. 27 CFR 9.194 - San Antonio Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... boundary line of sections 22, 27, and 34, T24S, R10E, to the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line; then (5) Follow the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line west for approximately 7.0 miles, back onto the Tierra... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false San Antonio Valley....

  17. 27 CFR 9.194 - San Antonio Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... boundary line of sections 22, 27, and 34, T24S, R10E, to the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line; then (5) Follow the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line west for approximately 7.0 miles, back onto the Tierra... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false San Antonio Valley....

  18. 27 CFR 9.194 - San Antonio Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... boundary line of sections 22, 27, and 34, T24S, R10E, to the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line; then (5) Follow the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line west for approximately 7.0 miles, back onto the Tierra... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false San Antonio Valley....

  19. 27 CFR 9.194 - San Antonio Valley.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... boundary line of sections 22, 27, and 34, T24S, R10E, to the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line; then (5) Follow the Monterey-San Luis Obispo County line west for approximately 7.0 miles, back onto the Tierra... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false San Antonio Valley....

  20. Solid Geometry in the Works of an Iron Artisan

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    The author shares a story of how Luis González, an iron artisan, helped the author build a wooden and iron toy truck. The knowledge required to build the skeleton for the parallelepiped in the construction of the truck is not in the mathematical high school curriculum in Venezuela. Although Luis never received a degree beyond high school,…

  1. 78 FR 8181 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-05

    ... Docket No. FEMA-B-1281, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and....Rodriguez3@fema.dhs.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These proposed flood...

  2. 78 FR 20341 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Docket No. FEMA-B-1303, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and....Rodriguez3@fema.dhs.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... the Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These proposed...

  3. 78 FR 20343 - Proposed Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-04

    ... Docket No. FEMA-B-1304, to Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and....Rodriguez3@fema.dhs.gov . FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management... Flood Disaster Protection Act of 1973, 42 U.S.C. 4104, and 44 CFR 67.4(a). These proposed flood...

  4. Oral History of Coastal Engineering Activities in Southern California, 1930-1981,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-01-01

    7 p .. . - -= p -- -. San Luis Obispo County Monterey Co._ ( ~ San Luis Obispo Co. SAN SIMEON Pedr PASO ROBLES A L Blancas CAMBRIA Pt Esteros LL...CARPINTERIA - Santd Barbara Channel Santa Cruz Is. S Santa Rosa Is. San Miguel Is. 00 26 , Miles *"Jk .i *19 ’II ELLWOD/GOLTASSOUGH PAC F C at araaP

  5. 76 FR 17844 - Notice of Availability of the Draft Environmental Impact Statement and Public Hearing for a...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-31

    ... Loan Guarantee To Support Construction and Start-Up of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, CA... Construction and Startup of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, California (DOE/EIS-0458D) (Draft EIS... loan guarantee to support construction and startup of the Topaz Solar Farm Project located in San...

  6. 76 FR 50477 - Notice of Availability of the Final Environmental Impact Statement for a Proposed Federal Loan...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-15

    ... Support Construction and Start-up of the Topaz Solar Farm, San Luis Obispo County, CA AGENCY: U.S... Statement for the DOE Loan Guarantee to Royal Bank of Scotland for Construction and Startup of the Topaz... Topaz Solar Farm Project located in San Luis Obispo County, California (Proposed Project). The...

  7. 23. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING CURVED CONCRETE CHUTE SPILLWAY. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. 22. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) CONSTRUCTION PHOTO SHOWING THE STRUTS, POURED TO ALIGN WITH THE RIGHT (WEST) BUTTRESS. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  9. 24. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown, report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) SALINAS DAM COMPLETION PHOTO. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  10. 21. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of original photo from Corps of Engineers, Los Angeles District, 'Report on Salinas Dam, Salinas River, California,' June 15, 1943. (Photographer unknown; report located at City of San Luis Obispo.) SALINAS DAM UNDER CONSTRUCTION IN 1941. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  11. Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of Luis Pumarada, San German, Puerto Rico). Luis Pumarada, Photographer, September 4, 1989. PUENTE RIO HONDO, VIEW FROM SOUTHWEST. - Puente Rio Hondo, Spanning Hondo River on PR Road 156, Barrio Rio Hondo, Comerio, Comerio Municipio, PR

  12. Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of Luis Pumarada, San German, Puerto Rico). Luis Pumarada, Photographer, September 4, 1989. PUENTE RIO HONDO, VIEW OF SOUTH ABUTMENT. - Puente Rio Hondo, Spanning Hondo River on PR Road 156, Barrio Rio Hondo, Comerio, Comerio Municipio, PR

  13. View of the yacht club facing east. The new deck ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing east. The new deck and the avila pier are on the right and the harbor storage and restrooms are on the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 27. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and Jewitt, Architect-Engineer (original drawing located at County of San Luis Obispo). STRUT LAYOUT -- RIGHT ABUTMENT. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  15. 26. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and Jewitt, Architect-Engineer (original drawing located at County of San Luis Obispo) SALINAS DAM ROOFING PLAN. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. View of the yacht club from avila pier, facing west ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club from avila pier, facing west northwest. The main entry is to the right and the more recent deck addition is to the left. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. The Language Use Inventory for Young Children: A Parent-Report Measure of Pragmatic Language Development for 18- to 47-Month-Old Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Neill, Daniela K.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To demonstrate the internal reliability and discriminative validity of the Language Use Inventory for Young Children (LUI; D. K. O'Neill, 2002), a newly developed parent-report measure designed to assess pragmatic language development in 18-47-month-olds. Method: To examine internal reliability, the LUI was completed by mail by 177…

  18. 25. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of engineering drawing by Leeds, Hill, Barnard, and Jewitt, Architect-Engineer (original drawing located at County of San Luis Obispo). SALINAS DAM PLAN AND SECTIONS. - Salinas Dam, Salinas River near Pozo Road, Santa Margarita, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. Predicting Later Language Outcomes from the Language Use Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pesco, Diane; O'Neill, Daniela K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine the predictive validity of the Language Use Inventory (LUI), a parent report of language use by children 18-47 months old (O'Neill, 2009). Method: 348 children whose parents had completed the LUI were reassessed at 5-6 years old with standardized, norm-referenced language measures and parent report of developmental history. The…

  20. View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View of the yacht club facing north. The beach is in the foreground, the pier to the right. The painted octagonal window is above the deck. Avila's Front Street is at the rear of the building. - San Luis Yacht Club, Avila Pier, South of Front Street, Avila Beach, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  1. Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Photocopy of photograph (original 35 millimeter negative in possession of Luis Pumarada, San German, Puerto Rico). Luis Pumarada, Photographer, September 4, 1989. PUENTE RIO HONDO, DOMED PLATE DECK FROM BELOW. - Puente Rio Hondo, Spanning Hondo River on PR Road 156, Barrio Rio Hondo, Comerio, Comerio Municipio, PR

  2. Installation Restoration Program. 156th Tactical Fighter Group, Puerto Rico ANG, Luis Munoz Marin International Airport, San Juan, Puerto Rico; 140th Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, Puerto Rico ANG, Toa Baja, Puerto Rico; and 141st Aircraft Control and Warning Squadron, Puerto Rico ANG, Aguadilla, Puerto Rico

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    are the clays, shales, and argillaceous limestones laid down during the early stages of deposition. The most productive are the pure reef complex...expulsion from a volcanic vent. QUATERNARY - The second period of the Cenozoic era, following the Tertiary: I it began 3 to 2 million years ago and extends to...ground surface, including streams, rivers, ponds, and lakes. TERTIARY - The first period of the Cenozoic era, thought to have covered the I span of

  3. EDITORIAL: XIII Mexican Workshop on Particles and Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barranco, Juan; Contreras, Guillermo; Delepine, David; Napsuciale, Mauro

    2012-08-01

    is just a set of foundations and a portal, considered national monuments. There, we enjoyed a delicious meal in the cellars of the Corralejo Hacienda before returning to Leon. The XIII MWPF was sponsored by several institutions: Consejo Nacional de Ciencia y Tecnología (CONACyT) through the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías and individual research projects, Consejo de Ciencia y Tecnológico del Estado de Guanajuato (CONCyTEG), Universidad de Guanajuato, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Universidad de Guanajuato, Centro de Investigaciones de Estudios Avanzados del IPN (CINVESTAV), Universidad Michoacana de San Nicolás de Hidalgo, Benemérita Universidad Autónoma de Puebla and Universidad Autónoma de San Luis Potosí. Also, we wish to thak to those who helped in the process of getting financial support for the meeting, specially Dr Juan Carlos D'Olivo, President of the Red Nacional de Física de Altas Energías and Dr José Luis Lucio Martínez, Rector of Universidad de Guanajuato, Campus León. These proceedings have been published thanks to the support of PIFI 2011. This meeting was possible due to the commitment of the working groups and we wish to thank to their members for the decisive collaboration with the organizing committee. At the local level, we thank our graduate students: Carolina Luján, Vannia González, Selim Gomez and Carlos Alberto Vaquera for their invaluable contribution in the organization of the large amount of small but important things around the meeting. Finally, we would like to thank all the speakers for delivering excellent talks which contributed to the success of the event. We are also grateful to all the participants for the nice academic and social atmosphere during the meeting and for providing their write-ups on time. The National organizing committee was formed by Arnulfo Zepeda (CINVESTAV-DF) Guillermo Contreras (CINVESTAV-Mérida) David Delepine (DF-UG) Axel de la Macorra (IAC/IF-UNAM) Lorenzo Díaz (BUAP

  4. Geotechnical Data Inventory, Southern California Coastal Zone, Cape San Martin (Monterey County) to Mexican Border.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    storm of 1983 caused $1.5 million dollars of damage to the Morro Bay breakwaters, along with $600,000 in damage to the Port San Luis breakwater. 1.16...sediments to the beach (San Luis Obispo Creek, Pismo Creek and Arroyo Grande Creek). Major drainage control feature: Lopez Lake 1-Santa Maria Adequate Only...control feature(s): Vial, and Skinner Lakes. 3-San Luis Rey River Adequate 790,00 cu. Moderate sized coastal yds./yr. mountain drainage. Ref: 137B

  5. Santa Ana River Design Memorandum Number 1. Phase 2. GDM on the Santa Ana River Mainstem, Including Santiago Creek. Volume 7. Hydrology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-01

    Santa Ysabel Creek near Mesa Grande ................... 53.9 21,100 .... ..... mGS wSp 426 San Luis Rey River at Oceanside ....................... 557...95,600 .... do ..... usS wSp 426 5 San Luis Rey River at Bonsall ......................... 512 128,OO 23 Feb 1691 (US G p 𔃾.7 s 6 San Luis Rey River...San Gabriel River at Camp Rincon ..... 102 i.,o .. ..... ,SGS C.af. i1 63 L 3 Devil’s Canyon above Cogswell Dam..................... . .. 3 -U0 .... do

  6. JPRS Report, Latin America.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Colonel I: The objective doesn’t matter; they want chaos first, then light. [Question] Jorge Luis Borges wrote that any objective whose outcome is not...Reaction to Army Revolt (Various sources, various dates) 1 ’National Revolution’ Plans, by Luis Sicilia 1 ’People’s Mandate’ Emphasized, by Oscar...Buenos Aires EL PERIODISTA in Spanish 8-14 May 87 pp 4-5 [Interview with retired and active military officers by Luis Sicilia on 5 and 6 April; place

  7. Push Factor in Mexican Migration to the United States: The Background to Migration.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-07-01

    Mexicali is economically the best-off, while San Luis Potosi is the poorest (Conroy’s report rank orders the cities the same as does Unikel .) Households...3) Las Huastecas, an indigenous zone in San Luis Potosi, a state closer to the United States border and one known 3 to send relatively large numbers...Data for five cities are examined: Quer6taro, Qro., San Luis Potosi, S.L.P., Mazatln, Sin., Mexicali, B.D., and Tampico, Tamps. Of the five cities

  8. Suriname installing first crude-oil pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    McAllister, E.W. )

    1992-04-27

    This paper reports that the first cross country crude-oil pipeline in the south American country of Suriname is currently under construction. The State Oil Co. of Suriname (Staatsolie) is building the 34.4-mile, 14-in. pipeline to deliver crude oil from the Catharina Sophia field (Tambaredjo) to the Tout Lui Faut terminal near the capital, Paramaribo. Crude oil from the Jossi Kreek field will be injected at mile point (MP) 3.4. Oil from these two fields is now being moved to tout Lui Faut by Staatsolie-owned motorized ocean barges. Increased production to meet requirements of a planned refinery near Tout Lui Faut prompted the pipeline.

  9. Reassessing the Aurignacian of Slovenia: techno-economic behaviour and direct dating of osseous projectile points.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Luc; Odar, Boštjan; Higham, Tom; Horvat, Aleksander; Pirkmajer, Darja; Turk, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The Palaeolithic of southern Central Europe has a long history of archaeological research. Particularly, the presence of numerous osseous projectile points in many early Upper Palaeolithic (EUP) assemblages in this region has attracted the attention of the international research community. However, the scarcity of properly identified and well-dated Aurignacian contexts represents an obstacle for investigation of the nature and timing of the Middle to Upper Palaeolithic transition. In this context, the question of whether Neandertals made Aurignacian osseous projectile points, either on their own or as a consequence of cultural interaction with anatomically modern humans (AMH), still remains an open issue. Here we reassess the EUP record of Slovenia by evaluating the Aurignacian character of the assemblages from Potočka zijalka, Mokriška jama and Divje babe I in the light of their suggested roots in the local Mousterian. We provide a comprehensive description of the lithic industry from Potočka zijalka, which represents one of the rare EUP assemblages of southern Central Europe with a representative number of lithic artefacts to be analysed from the perspective of lithic technology and raw material economy. Our re-analysis of the Slovenian assemblages is backed by a series of 11 new ultrafiltered collagen 14C dates obtained directly on associated osseous projectile points from the studied assemblages. The Aurignacian of Potočka zijalka underlines the remarkable consistency of the Early Aurignacian with low typo-technological variability across Europe, resulting from a marked dependence on transported toolkits and raw material conservation. The new radiocarbon determinations for the Aurignacian of Slovenia appear to post-date the 34-32 ka BP (thousands of years before present) threshold for the last Neandertals in the region. Although not falsified, the hypothesis of Aurignacian bone tools in southern Central Europe as a product of late Neandertals is not

  10. Effects of mining activities on heavy metal concentrations in water, sediment, and macroinvertebrates in different reaches of the Pilcomayo River, South America.

    PubMed

    Smolders, A J P; Lock, R A C; Van der Velde, G; Medina Hoyos, R I; Roelofs, J G M

    2003-04-01

    From 1997 until 1999 the extent and the ecological effects of zinc, copper, lead, and cadmium pollution were studied in different reaches of the South American Pilcomayo River. A comparison of metal concentrations in water, sediment, and chironomid larvae, as well as the diversity of macroinvertebrate species, was made between sites near the origin of the Pilcomayo River, with hardly any mining activities, sites in the Potosí region, with intensive mining, and sites located 500 km or further downstream of Potosí, in the Chaco plain. Samples were also collected in an unpolluted river (Cachi Mayu River) and in the Tarapaya River, which is strongly contaminated by mine tailings (1000 tons a day). The upper parts of the Pilcomayo River are strongly affected by the release of mine tailings from the Potosí mines where mean concentrations of lead, cadmium, copper, and zinc in water, filtered water, sediment, and chironomid larvae were up to a thousand times higher than the local background levels. The diversity of the benthic macroinvertebrate community was strongly reduced in the contaminated parts; 97% of the benthic macroinvertebrates consisted of chironomid larvae. The degree of contamination in the lower reaches of the river, however, was fairly low because of sedimentation processes and the strong dilution of mine tailings with enormous amounts of clean sediment from erosion processes. Analysis of sediment cores from the Ibibobo floodplain, however, reveal an increase of the heavy metal concentrations in the lower reaches since the introduction of the contaminating flotation process in the mine industry in 1985.

  11. Federal Bureau of Investigation

    MedlinePlus

    ... AL-UMARI Crimes Against Children JEFFREY DEAN MCDANIEL Violent Crimes - Murders EDGARDO LUIS PEREZ Kidnappings & Missing Persons ... Wanted: Case of the Week WALTER YOVANY GOMEZ Violent Crime in Aid of Racketeering (Homicide) Walter Yovany ...

  12. 75 FR 76753 - Notice of Resource Advisory Council Meeting for the Front Range Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-09

    ... the San Luis Valley Public Lands Center and its respective field offices: Saguache Field Office, Del...: Saguache Field Office's Zapata Falls Campground fee proposals, a tour and discussion of the Wild...

  13. 76 FR 77552 - Notice of Meeting, Front Range Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... the BLM Front Range District, which includes the Royal Gorge Field Office (RGFO) and the San Luis...: introducing new RAC members and discussing fee proposals at Zapata Falls Campground, Penitente...

  14. 77 FR 21584 - Notice of Meeting, Front Range Resource Advisory Council

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-10

    ... Luis Valley Field Office. Planned topics of discussion items include: Trail work and native fish... trip to the BLM Zapata Falls campground on Wednesday. The meeting is open to the public. The public...

  15. 32. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    32. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SOUTH END OF CORRIDOR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. 19. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    19. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society, 1880) Photographer unknown, April 1940 EXTERIOR VIEW OF REAR OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. 5. Historic American Buildings Survey Roger Sturtevant, Photographer Jan. 27, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    5. Historic American Buildings Survey Roger Sturtevant, Photographer Jan. 27, 1934 INTERIOR OF CHURCH LOOKING SOUTH-EAST - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 17. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF EXTERIOR, 1936 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. 21. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    21. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown CLOSE-UP OF REAR OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  20. 25. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF ARCHES - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  1. 15. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, c. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento, c. 1890) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM AN ANGLE, c. 1890 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  2. 23. Photocopy of photograph (From William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    23. Photocopy of photograph (From William H. Knowles Collection, 1936) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SIDE VIEW OF COMPLEX FROM A DISTANCE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  3. 13. Photocopy of drawing (from Society of California Pioneers) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. Photocopy of drawing (from Society of California Pioneers) Photographer unknown, January 1940 EXTERIOR OF COMPLEX FROM THE SOUTHEAST - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  4. 29. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    29. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF NORTHEAST CORNER - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  5. 22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    22. Photocopy of photograph (from San Francisco Chronicle Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown SIDE VIEW OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  6. 30. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    30. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF NORTH & WEST WALLS OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  7. 20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    20. Photocopy of photograph (From Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF CHURCH FROM REAR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  8. 26. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    26. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown CLOSE-UP OF ARCHES - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  9. 16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. Photocopy of photograph (from Frances Rand Smith Collection, California Historical Society, 1900) Photographer unknown, Date unknown FRONT VIEW OF MISSION, c. 1900 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  10. 28. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    28. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown NORTHEAST CORNER OF COMPLEX - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  11. 31. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    31. Photocopy of photograph (from William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown REAR AND NORTH WALL OF CHURCH AND OLD INDIAN CEMETERY - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  12. 35. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    35. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR OF CHURCH - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  13. 36. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    36. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown INTERIOR OF CHURCH, LOOKING TOWARD THE FRONT - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  14. 33. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library. Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library. Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown DETAIL OF SOUTH END OF CORRIDOR - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  15. 14. Photocopy of photograph (from Society of California Pioneers, 1890) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. Photocopy of photograph (from Society of California Pioneers, 1890) Photographer unknown, January 1940 VIEW FROM SOUTHEAST IN 1890 - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  16. 27. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    27. Photocopy of photograph (from Mr. William H. Knowles Collection) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF NORTHEAST CORNER OF QUADRANGLE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  17. 24. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    24. Photocopy of photograph (from California State Library, Sacramento) Photographer unknown, Date unknown VIEW OF EXTERIOR ARCHES FROM AN ANGLE - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  18. 18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. Photocopy of photograph (from De Young Museum, San Francisco, CA. c. 1900) Photographer unknown, February 1940 EXTERIOR VIEW FROM NORTHEAST - Mission San Miguel Arcangel, Highway 101, San Miguel, San Luis Obispo County, CA

  19. The Budget and Economic Outlook: Fiscal Years 2008 to 2018

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    and Afghanistan and the war on terrorism), veterans’ housing Michelle Patterson International affairs (development, security, international financial...Interest on the public debt, report coordinator Luis Serna National income and product accounts, report coordinator Phan Siris Computer support

  20. 50 CFR 660.130 - Trawl fishery-management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Figure 1 of part 660, subpart D. (ii) (6) Midwater (or pelagic) trawl gear. Midwater trawl gear must have... Luis, East San Lucia Bank, Point Conception, Hidden Reef/Kidney Bank (within Cowcod Conservation...

  1. 50 CFR 660.381 - Limited entry trawl fishery management measures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Figure 1 of part 660, subpart G. (ii) (6) Midwater (or pelagic) trawl gear. Midwater trawl gear must have..., Point Sur Deep, Big Sur Coast/Port San Luis, East San Lucia Bank, Point Conception, Hidden...

  2. The Author and His Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain Today, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Critical evaluation and biographical comments on contemporary Spanish authors Arcadio de Larrea Palacin, Leopoldo de Luis, Andres Bosch, Condesa de Campo Alange, Gonzalo Torrente Ballester, and Juan Rof Carballo. (DS)

  3. 7 CFR 351.2 - Location of inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...., Progreso, Tex., Ramey AFB, P.R., Roma, Tex., Rouses Point, N.Y., St. Paul, Minn., San Antonio, Tex., San Diego, Calif., San Francisco, Calif., San Juan, P.R., San Luis, Ariz., San Pedro, Calif., San...

  4. 7 CFR 351.2 - Location of inspectors.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...., Progreso, Tex., Ramey AFB, P.R., Roma, Tex., Rouses Point, N.Y., St. Paul, Minn., San Antonio, Tex., San Diego, Calif., San Francisco, Calif., San Juan, P.R., San Luis, Ariz., San Pedro, Calif., San...

  5. 77 FR 32986 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Marine Corps Base Camp Pendleton, U.S. Marine Corps, San Diego...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... the Pechanga Reservation, California; Rincon Band of Luiseno Mission Indians of the Rincon Reservation... Juaneno Band of Mission Indians and the San Luis Rey Band of Mission Indians. History and Description...

  6. Physical, Nutrient, and Biological Measurements of Coastal Waters off Central California in November 2007

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-07-01

    Durazo Universidad Autonoma de Baja California Ensenada, Mexico Libe Washburn University of California Santa Barbara, CA Paul Choboter...CalPoly State University San Luis Obispo, CA Roger Hewitt NOAA La Jolla, CA Carmen G. Castro Consejo Superior de Investigaciones

  7. ISS Update: EarthKAM Participants

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA Public Affair Officer Brandi Dean talks with Frank Sanchez, a teacher, and Luis Tamayo, student, on their experience with using EarthKAM to capture images of Earth from the International Space...

  8. Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spain Today, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Discusses works of Joan Miro, Angel Medina, Felix Adelantado, Meki Megara, Ramon Calderon, and Luis Hernandez Cruz. The Last portion examines a show by painters and sculptors whose common subject is the bull. (SK)

  9. El espanol familiar y zonas afines--ensayo bibliografico: 26 (Colloquial Spanish and Related Areas--Bibliographic Essay: 26)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Polo, Jose

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the study of colloquial Spanish in literary texts. Presents an annotated list of Spanish colloquial expressions extracted from "Paralelo 40" by Jose Luis Castillo-Puche. (Text is in Spanish.) (TL)

  10. 78 FR 32673 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation...). City of Santa Valencia 060729-102DA.pdf. Clarita, 23920 Boulevard, Santa Valencia Clarita, CA...

  11. 75 FR 30029 - Notice of Proposals to Engage in Permissible Nonbanking Activities or to Acquire Companies that...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-28

    ... Bancorp, San Luis Obispo, California; Carpenter Fund Manager GP, LLC; Carpenter Fund Management, LLC; Carpenter Community Bancfund, L.P.; Carpenter Community Bancfund-A, L.P.; Carpenter Community Bancfund-CA,...

  12. 40 CFR 52.224 - General requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... County APCD. (xvi) Shasta County APCD. (xvii) Sacramento County APCD. (xviii)-(xix) (xx) Lake County APCD...) (xxvi) San Luis Obispo County APCD. (xxvii) Kings County APCD. (xxviii) Plumas County APCD....

  13. 76 FR 62329 - Proposed Flood Elevation Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    .... Mean Sea Level, rounded to the nearest 0.1 meter. * * BFEs to be changed include the listed downstream...) for exact locations of all BFEs to be changed. Send comments to Luis Rodriguez, Chief,...

  14. 77 FR 54382 - Revisions of Five California Clean Air Act Title V Operating Permits Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ... pollution control, Carbon dioxide, Carbon dioxide equivalents, Greenhouse gases, Hydrofluorocarbons... revisions to the Operating Permits (Title V) programs of the Monterey Bay Unified Air Pollution Control District (MBUAPCD), San Luis Obispo County Air Pollution Control District (SLOCAPCD), Santa Barbara...

  15. 78 FR 35305 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation... lomrs.htm. 3911P). East San Antonio Department, 1251 Street, Suite Civic Center 300, San Marcos,...

  16. 78 FR 28887 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation..., 10th Floor, San 420, San Antonio, Antonio, TX 78205. TX 78207. ] Collin (FEMA Docket No.: B- City...

  17. 78 FR 34116 - Changes in Flood Hazard Determinations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... INFORMATION CONTACT: Luis Rodriguez, Chief, Engineering Management Branch, Federal Insurance and Mitigation..., 10th Floor, San Suite 420, San Antonio, TX 78205. Antonio, TX 78207. Harris (FEMA Docket No.:...

  18. 7 CFR 319.8-1 - Definitions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ..., Mexico, and that part of the State of Sonora, Mexico, lying between San Luis Mesa and the Colorado River... Colorado River), and the Southern Territory of Baja California, in Mexico. Conditions of Importation...

  19. 78 FR 17414 - Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-21

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Risk Communications Advisory Committee; Notice of Meeting... the public. Name of Committee: Risk Communications Advisory Committee. General Function of the...: Luis G. Bravo, Designated Federal Officer, Risk Communication Staff, Office of Planning, Food and...

  20. Profiles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Arts, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Profiles seven Black, Native American, and Chicano artists and art teachers: Hale A. Woodruff, Allan Houser, Luis Jimenez, Betrand D. Phillips, James E. Pate, I, and Fernando Navarro. This article is part of a theme issue on multicultural art. (SJL)