Science.gov

Sample records for lumbosacral radiculopathy preganglionic

  1. The role of core stabilization in lumbosacral radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David J; Noh, Maureen Y

    2011-02-01

    Lumbosacral radiculopathy is relatively common, and most cases resolve with appropriate conservative management. Along with pain control, the mainstay of treatment is a comprehensive rehabilitation program to correct for biomechanical factors that adversely affect spinal stability and predispose the patient to recurrent pain. Developing an appropriate treatment plan depends on thorough understanding of the structures providing core stability and the exercises to correct identifiable deficits. A comprehensive rehabilitation program includes postural training, muscle reactivation, correction of flexibility and strength deficits, and subsequent progression to functional exercises. This article reviews the current concepts regarding core stability and rehabilitation in lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  2. Effect of Trigger Point Injection on Lumbosacral Radiculopathy Source

    PubMed Central

    Saeidian, Seyed Reza; Pipelzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Rasras, Saleh; Zeinali, Masud

    2014-01-01

    Background: Active muscular trigger points (aMTPs) presenting with radiating pain can interfere in diagnosis and treatment of patients suffering from lumbosacral radiculopathy. Objectives: We aimed to diagnose and evaluate the trigger point therapy on the outcome of pain in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: A total of 98 patients were enrolled suffered with chronic pain andlumbosacral radiculopathy at L4-L5 and L5-S1 who were candidates of non-surgical management. All patients received conservative modalities, including bed rest, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory agents (NSAID), and physiotherapy. These treatments continued for a week. Patients were examined for the presence of trigger points in their lower extremities. Those who had trigger points were divided into 2 groups (TP and N). Patients in TP group underwent trigger point injection therapy. No further therapy was done for the N group. Pain scores and straight leg raise (SLR) test in both groups were collected and analyzed on the seventh and 10th days of the therapy. Results were analyzed by paired t test and chi-square test. Results: Out of 98 patients, 64 had trigger points. Thirty-two patients were assigned to each group. Pain scores (Mean ± SD) in TP group was 7.12 ± 1.13 and in N group was 6.7 ± 1.16, P = 0.196. Following the treatment, pain scores were 2.4 ± 1.5 in TP group and 4.06 ± 1.76 in N group P = 0.008. SLR test became negative in all patients in TP group but only in 6 (19%) patients in N group, P = 0.001. Conclusions: Results show that trigger point injection therapy in patients suffering from chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy with trigger points can significantly improve their recovery, and conservative therapy may not be adequate. PMID:25337469

  3. Focal neuromyotonia as a presenting feature of lumbosacral radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Raut, Tushar Premraj; Garg, Ravindra Kumar; Chaudhari, Tejendra Singh; Malhotra, Hardeep Singh; Singh, Maneesh Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Neuromyotonia is characterized by motor, sensory, and autonomic features along with characteristic electrophysiologic findings, resulting from hyperexcitability of the peripheral nerves. We describe the case of a 36-year-old man, who presented with the disabling symptoms suggestive of focal neuromyotonia involving both the lower limbs. His neurological examination revealed continuous rippling of both the calf muscles with normal power, reflexes, and sensory examination. Electrophysiology revealed spontaneous activity in the form of doublets, triplets, and neuromyotonic discharges along with the neurogenic motor unit potentials in bilateral L5, S1 innervated muscles. Magnetic resonance imaging lumbosacral spine revealed lumbar intervertebral disc protrusion with severe foraminal and spinal canal stenosis. Patient had good response to steroids and carbamazepine. The disabling focal neuromyotonia, occurring as a result of chronic active radiculopathy, brought the patient to medical attention. Patient responded to medical management. PMID:24339612

  4. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease.

  5. [Rehabilitation of radiculopathy of the spine lumbosacral region complicated with herniated disc depending on the type of hernia].

    PubMed

    Dovhyĭ, I L

    2012-01-01

    The article presents the results of treatment of 168 patients with radiculopathy lumbosacral spine, complicated hernias of intervertebral disc nucleus on the developed technique. The results show high efficacy of the treatment of this disease. PMID:23350123

  6. Interrater reliability of the needle examination in lumbosacral radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Richard; Werner, Robert A

    2006-08-01

    Low back pain and lumbar radiculopathy are among the most common painful disorders affecting the adult population. This study hypothesizes that there is good correlation between the diagnostic impression of an unblinded electromyographer, using clinical and electromyographic information, and an independent electromyographer, who uses the needle examination only to assess for lumbar radiculopathy. This is a prospective, single-blinded, observational pilot study. The needle examination was electronically recorded, reproduced, and shown to a second examiner, blinded to all clinical data. Diagnostic impressions from both examiners were recorded and evaluated for agreement. Six recorded cases were reviewed by 66 blinded examiners. Overall diagnostic agreement was 46.9% (60.5% faculty level, 28.5% resident level). Logistic regression shows a strong association between training level and agreement on diagnostic impression (odds ratio, 1.9; 95% confidence interval, 1.12-3.22; P = 0.019). This study shows that there is fair interrater reliability between faculty-level examiners and poor reliability among resident-level examiners when the needle examination is used to evaluate patients with lumbar radiculopathy.

  7. [The role of intravertebral disk protrusion in pathogenesis of lumbosacral radiculopathies in flying personnel].

    PubMed

    Vit'ko, N K

    1999-01-01

    The significance of x-ray computer tomography in determining the mechanisms of pathogenesis of lumbar-sacral radiculopathy in patients with protrusions of intervertebral disks of the lumbar-sacral backbone is demonstrated. Pilots with the protrusions (n = 135) and the intervertebral disk herinas (79) have been examined. The clinical course of the sickness was reviewed in both groups of patients. The computer-tomographic semiotics of various protrusions was elaborated and expanded and their clinical implications demonstrated. The fresh paradigm of pathogenesis of radiculopathy at various forms of protrusions is presented. The roentgenomorphologic classification of arthrosis of archiprossesed joints was studied and proposed.

  8. Pelvic radiculopathies, lumbosacral plexopathies, and neuropathies in oncologic disease: a multidisciplinary approach to a diagnostic challenge

    PubMed Central

    Berry, Jonathan; Nisbet, Angus; Bloomfield, David; Burkill, Guy

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this article is to familiarize the reader with the anatomy of the major pelvic nerves and the clinical features of associated lumbosacral plexopathies. To demonstrate this we illustrate several cases of malignant lumbosacral plexopathy on computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and positron emission tomography/computed tomography. A new lumbosacral plexopathy in a patient with a prior history of abdominal or pelvic malignancy is usually of malignant etiology. Biopsies may be required to definitively differentiate tumour from posttreatment fibrosis, and in cases of inconclusive sampling or where biopsies are not possible, follow-up imaging may be necessary. In view of the complexity of clinical findings often confounded by a history of prior surgery and/or radiotherapy, a multidisciplinary approach between oncologists, neurologists, and radiologists is often required for what can be a diagnostic challenge. PMID:24433993

  9. Incremental value of magnetic resonance neurography of Lumbosacral plexus over non-contributory lumbar spine magnetic resonance imaging in radiculopathy: A prospective study

    PubMed Central

    Chhabra, Avneesh; Farahani, Sahar J; Thawait, Gaurav K; Wadhwa, Vibhor; Belzberg, Allan J; Carrino, John A

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To test the incremental value of 3T magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) in a series of unilateral radiculopathy patients with non-contributory magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). METHODS: Ten subjects (3 men, 7 women; mean age 54 year and range 22-74 year) with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy and with previous non-contributory lumbar spine MRI underwent lumbosacral (LS) plexus MRN over a period of one year. Lumbar spine MRI performed as part of the MRN LS protocol as well as bilateral L4-S1 nerves, sciatic, femoral and lateral femoral cutaneous nerves were evaluated in each subject for neuropathy findings on both anatomic (nerve signal, course and caliber alterations) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) tensor maps (nerve signal and caliber alterations). Minimum fractional anisotropy (FA) and mean apparent diffusion coeffcient (ADC) of L4-S2 nerve roots, sciatic and femoral nerves were recorded. RESULTS: All anatomic studies and 80% of DTI imaging received a good-excellent imaging quality grading. In a blinded evaluation, all 10 examinations demonstrated neural and/or neuromuscular abnormality corresponding to the site of radiculopathy. A number of contributory neuropathy findings including double crush syndrome were observed. On DTI tensor maps, nerve signal and caliber alterations were more conspicuous. Although individual differences were observed among neuropathic appearing nerve (lower FA and increased ADC) as compared to its contralateral counterpart, there were no significant mean differences on statistical comparison of LS plexus nerves, femoral and sciatic nerves (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION: MRN of LS plexus is useful modality for the evaluation of patients with non-contributory MRI of lumbar spine as it can incrementally delineate the etiology and provide direct objective and non-invasive evidence of neuromuscular pathology. PMID:26834949

  10. Thoracic radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Ryan C; Andary, Michael T; Russo, Randolph B; DeLano, Mark

    2002-08-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of spinal pain syndromes. Degenerative disc disease and diabetes mellitus may frequently cause radiculopathy at the thoracic level. Electromyography and magnetic resonance imaging are useful in the evaluation of radiculopathy and thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Percutaneous vertebroplasty is a procedure that may be used in the treatment of thoracic spinal pain syndromes. Surgical intervention for thoracic radiculopathy usually is reserved for patients with progressive myelopathy and neurologic compromise.

  11. Cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Sravisht; Kim, Han Jo

    2016-09-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common clinical scenario. Patients with radiculopathy typically present with neck pain, arm pain, or both. We review the epidemiology of cervical radiculopathy and discuss the diagnosis of this condition. This includes an overview of the pertinent findings on the patient history and physical examination. We also discuss relevant clinical syndromes that must be considered in the differential diagnosis including peripheral nerve entrapment syndromes and shoulder pathology. The natural history of cervical radiculopathy is reviewed and options for management are discussed. These options include conservative management, non-operative modalities such as physical therapy, steroid injections, and operative intervention. While the exact indications for surgical intervention have not yet been elucidated, we provide an overview of the available literature regarding indications and discuss the timing of intervention. The surgical outcomes of anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF), cervical disc arthroplasty (CDA), and posterior cervical foraminotomy (PCF) are discussed. PMID:27250042

  12. Painful Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    PubMed Central

    Ehler, Edvard; Vyšata, Oldřich; Včelák, Radek; Pazdera, Ladislav

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Patients frequently suffer from lumbosacral plexus disorder. When conducting a neurological examination, it is essential to assess the extent of muscle paresis, sensory disorder distribution, pain occurrence, and blocked spine. An electromyography (EMG) can confirm axonal lesions and their severity and extent, root affliction (including dorsal branches), and disorders of motor and sensory fiber conduction. Imaging examination, particularly gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination, ensues. Cerebrospinal fluid examination is of diagnostic importance with radiculopathy, neuroinfections, and for evidence of immunoglobulin synthesis. Differential diagnostics of lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP) include metabolic, oncological, inflammatory, ischemic, and autoimmune disorders. In the presented case study, a 64-year-old man developed an acute onset of painful LSP with a specific EMG finding, MRI showing evidence of plexus affliction but not in the proximal part of the roots. Painful plexopathy presented itself with severe muscle paresis in the femoral nerve and the obturator nerve innervation areas, and gradual remission occurred after 3 months. Autoimmune origin of painful LSP is presumed. We describe a rare case of patient with painful lumbar plexopathy, with EMG findings of axonal type, we suppose of autoimmune etiology. PMID:25929915

  13. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression. PMID:26185991

  14. [Cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Kuijper, B

    2014-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain in the arm. It is caused by nerve root compression in the neck, as a consequence of a herniated disc, or spondyliotic foraminal stenosis. It causes severe pain, especially during the first few weeks, and paraesthesias in the forearm and hand. Patients also suffer from neck pain and loss of strength in the relevant arm. The arm pain can be exacerbated by certain movements of the head; these should be avoided as much as possible. Diagnosis can be made on the basis of history and physical examination. The pain generally disappears without active patient treatment. A semi-rigid cervical collar is recommended to accelerate pain relief. In cases of persistent pain, surgery will be considered. In such cases an MRI should be performed to show the cause and level of nerve root compression.

  15. [Complex approach to the treatment of the diskal hernia of lumbosacral spine].

    PubMed

    Chekhonatskiĭ, A A; Chekhonatskaia, M L; Sharova, E V; Toma, A S

    2010-08-01

    21 patients with lumbosacral osteochondritis and diskal hernia were treated. Diagnosis was verified with the help of radiological method. The spinal motion segment after the hernia excision was fixed with the help of fixator with the shape memory for the prevention of post-operation instability. Thioctic acid showed the high effectiveness in complex treatment of radiculopathy.

  16. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain. PMID:25538126

  17. Mimickers of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Grimm, Bennett Douglas; Blessinger, Brian Joseph; Darden, Bruce Vaiden; Brigham, Craig D; Kneisl, Jeffrey S; Laxer, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    Orthopaedic surgeons frequently treat patients who report pain that radiates from the back into the lower extremity. Although the most common etiology is either a herniated disk or spinal stenosis, a myriad of pathologies can mimic the symptoms of radiculopathy, resulting in differences in the clinical presentation and the workup. Therefore, the clinician must be able to distinguish the signs and symptoms of lumbar radiculopathy from pathologies that may have a similar presentation. Being cognizant of these other possible conditions enables the physician to consider a breadth of alternative diagnoses when a patient presents with radiating lower extremity pain.

  18. Electrodiagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Barr, Karen

    2013-02-01

    The evaluation of patients with suspected lumbar radiculopathy is one of the most common reasons patients are referred for electrodiagnostic testing. The utility of this study depends on the expertise of the physician who plans, performs, and completes the study. This article reviews the strengths and weaknesses of electrodiagnosis to make this diagnosis, as well as the clinical reasoning of appropriate study planning. The current use of electrodiagnostic testing to determine prognosis and treatment outcomes is also discussed.

  19. Electrodiagnosis of cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Hakimi, Kevin; Spanier, David

    2013-02-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a common diagnosis with a peak onset in the fifth decade. The most commonly affected nerve root is C7, C6, and C8. The etiology is often compressive, but may arise from noncompressive sources. Patients commonly complain of pain, weakness, numbness, and/or tingling. Examination may reveal sensory or motor disturbance in a dermatomal/myotomal distribution. Neural compression and tension signs may be positive. Diagnostic tests include imaging and electrodiagnostic study. Electrodiagnostic study serves as an extension of the neurologic examination. Electrodiagnostic findings can be useful for patients with atypical symptoms, potential pain-mediated weakness, and nonfocal imaging findings.

  20. Distinguishing Radiculopathies from Mononeuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Robblee, Jennifer; Katzberg, Hans

    2016-01-01

    Identifying “where is the lesion” is particularly important in the approach to the patient with focal dysfunction where a peripheral localization is suspected. This article outlines a methodical approach to the neuromuscular patient in distinguishing focal neuropathies versus radiculopathies, both of which are common presentations to the neurology clinic. This approach begins with evaluation of the sensory examination to determine whether there are irritative or negative sensory signs in a peripheral nerve or dermatomal distribution. This is followed by evaluation of deep tendon reflexes to evaluate if differential hyporeflexia can assist in the two localizations. Finally, identification of weak muscle groups unique to a nerve or myotomal pattern in the proximal and distal extremities can most reliably assist in a precise localization. The article concludes with an application of the described method to the common scenario of distinguishing radial neuropathy versus C7 radiculopathy in the setting of a wrist drop and provides additional examples for self-evaluation and reference. PMID:27468275

  1. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease. PMID:17048153

  2. Genetic disorders producing compressive radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Corey, Joseph M

    2006-11-01

    Back pain is a frequent complaint seen in neurological practice. In evaluating back pain, neurologists are asked to evaluate patients for radiculopathy, determine whether they may benefit from surgery, and help guide management. Although disc herniation is the most common etiology of compressive radiculopathy, there are many other causes, including genetic disorders. This article is a discussion of genetic disorders that cause or contribute to radiculopathies. These genetic disorders include neurofibromatosis, Paget's disease of bone, and ankylosing spondylitis. Numerous genetic disorders can also lead to deformities of the spine, including spinal muscular atrophy, Friedreich's ataxia, Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, familial dysautonomia, idiopathic torsional dystonia, Marfan's syndrome, and Ehlers-Danlos syndrome. However, the extent of radiculopathy caused by spine deformities is essentially absent from the literature. Finally, recent investigation into the heritability of disc degeneration and lumbar disc herniation suggests a significant genetic component in the etiology of lumbar disc disease.

  3. Morphology of two classes of target-specific bullfrog sympathetic preganglionic neurons.

    PubMed

    Peruzzi, D; Forehand, C J

    1994-03-15

    These experiments took advantage of the unique ability to define target-specific sympathetic preganglionic neurons in the bullfrog spinal cord in order to examine the morphologies of different classes of preganglionic neurons. Sympathetic preganglionic neurons were identified by retrograde transport of fast blue from the sympathetic chain. Subsequently, fast blue-labelled sympathetic preganglionic neurons in fixed spinal cord slices were filled with lucifer yellow and processed for visualization with lucifer yellow antiserum, biotinylated secondary antiserum, and avidin peroxidase. Target specificity of sympathetic preganglionic neurons was determined by anatomical position; sympathetic preganglionic neurons that control the vasculature (C-type sympathetic preganglionic neurons) lie in a position caudal to those that control nonvascular targets [B-type sympathetic preganglionic neurons; Horn and Stofer (1988) J. Comp. Neurol. 268:71]. These two classes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons have qualitatively similar morphologies. However, they exhibit significant quantitative differences in total dendritic length and the rostrocaudal extent of dendrites. These differences are likely to be associated with differences in the number of synapses received by these two classes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons. Moreover, the segmental control of sympathetic preganglionic neurons by descending brainstem projections is likely to be finer for those involved in vascular control than for those that influence other targets.

  4. Lumbosacral angiolipoma: case report.

    PubMed

    do Souto, Antonio Aversa; Domingues, Flavio S; Chimelli, Leila; Lemos, Armando M

    2003-06-01

    We present a case of a 46-year old woman with a ventral epidural angiolipoma at the lumbosacral level with erosion of the sacrum. About ninety cases of spinal angiolipomas have been previously described in the literature, most of them situated on the thoracic region, dorsal to the dural sac. Angiolipomas can be radically excised with a good prognosis even in the presence of bone erosion. We did not find any other angiolipoma at the sacral level surgically explored in the review of the literature.

  5. Does Electrodiagnostic Confirmation of Radiculopathy Predict Pain Reduction after Transforaminal Epidural Steroid Injection? A Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, Zachary; Cushman, Daniel; Caldwell, Mary; Marshall, Benjamin; Ghannad, Leda; Eng, Christine; Patel, Jaymin; Makovitch, Steven; Chu, Samuel K; Babu, Ashwin N.; Walega, David R.; Marciniak, Christina; Press, Joel; Kennedy, David J.; Plastaras, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Objective Minimal definitive literature identifies patients with radicular pain who would benefit most from epidural steroid injection (ESI). This study investigated if electromyographic (EMG) confirmation of radiculopathy with active or chronic denervation predicts a positive treatment outcome following ESI. Design Longitudinal cohort study of adults who underwent EMG and subsequent transforaminal ESI within 6 months. The proportion of individuals who experienced >50% pain relief and mean change in daily morphine equivalents (DME) were calculated. Results 170 individuals with respective mean (Standard Deviation) age and duration of symptoms of 55 (15) years and 36 (56) months were included. Mean time to <30 day and >30 day follow-up post-injection were 18 (6) and 99 (130) days, respectively. At >30 day follow-up, a larger proportion of EMG-confirmed individuals (37.7%) reported >50% pain reduction compared to EMG-negative individuals (17.8%) (p=0.03). This was significant for lumbosacral (40% vs. 15%, p=0.01) but not cervical symptoms (p>0.05). Mean decrease in DME at long-term follow-up in EMG-confirmed compared to EMG-negative individuals trended toward significance (-4 vs. -1, p=0.11). There was no significant relationship between myotomal spontaneous activity and pain or opioid use. Conclusions Needle EMG predicts long-term pain reduction from transforaminal ESI in patients with lumbosacral radiculopathy, regardless of the presence of active denervation. PMID:26251843

  6. Galanin-like immunoreactivity in autonomic regions of the rat lumbosacral spinal cord is sexually dimorphic and varies with the estrous cycle.

    PubMed

    Newton, B W

    1992-08-28

    These investigations show that there is a heterogeneous distribution of galanin-like immunoreactivity (GAL-LI) within laminae VII and X of the rat thoraco-sacral spinal cord. In either sex, GAL-LI fibers sparsely outline the position of male and female preganglionic sympathetic neurons in thoracic spinal segments; whereas in lumbosacral segments, far greater numbers of GAL-LI fibers surround autonomic preganglionic neurons. An unusual feature of the GAL-LI fibers in lumbosacral autonomic regions is their sexually dimorphic distribution with males containing greater numbers of GAL-LI fibers than all females examined. In this regard, although the number of GAL-LI fibers observed in males was consistent from animal to animal, the amount of GAL-LI in females fell into two qualitative categories: an 'average' and a 'heavy' amount. These data indicate that the difference in the amount of GAL-LI in the female rat lumbosacral spinal cord is related to the estrous cycle, such that heavy amounts of GAL-LI are observed during proestrus and estrus, while average amounts of GAL-LI are associated with metestrus and diestrus.

  7. T1 Radiculopathy: Electrodiagnostic Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Radecki, Jeffrey; Zimmer, Zachary R.

    2008-01-01

    Electromyography (EMG) studies are useful in the anatomical localization of nerve injuries and, in most cases, isolating lesions to a single nerve root level. Their utility is important in identifying specific nerve-root-level injuries where surgical or interventional procedures may be warranted. In this case report, an individual presented with right upper extremity radicular symptoms consistent with a clinical diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. EMG studies revealed that the lesion could be more specifically isolated to the T1 nerve root and, furthermore, provided evidence that the abductor pollicis brevis receives predominantly T1 innervation. PMID:19083061

  8. Lumbosacral spine x-ray

    MedlinePlus

    X-ray - lumbosacral spine; X-ray - lower spine ... The test is done in a hospital x-ray department or your health care provider's office by an x-ray technician. You will be asked to lie on the x-ray table ...

  9. Nonoperative Management of Cervical Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Childress, Marc A; Becker, Blair A

    2016-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy describes pain in one or both of the upper extremities, often in the setting of neck pain, secondary to compression or irritation of nerve roots in the cervical spine. It can be accompanied by motor, sensory, or reflex deficits and is most prevalent in persons 50 to 54 years of age. Cervical radiculopathy most often stems from degenerative disease in the cervical spine. The most common examination findings are painful neck movements and muscle spasm. Diminished deep tendon reflexes, particularly of the triceps, are the most common neurologic finding. The Spurling test, shoulder abduction test, and upper limb tension test can be used to confirm the diagnosis. Imaging is not required unless there is a history of trauma, persistent symptoms, or red flags for malignancy, myelopathy, or abscess. Electrodiagnostic testing is not needed if the diagnosis is clear, but has clinical utility when peripheral neuropathy of the upper extremity is a likely alternate diagnosis. Patients should be reassured that most cases will resolve regardless of the type of treatment. Nonoperative treatment includes physical therapy involving strengthening, stretching, and potentially traction, as well as nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, muscle relaxants, and massage. Epidural steroid injections may be helpful but have higher risks of serious complications. In patients with red flag symptoms or persistent symptoms after four to six weeks of treatment, magnetic resonance imaging can identify pathology amenable to epidural steroid injections or surgery. PMID:27175952

  10. Far caudally migrated extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniation treated by a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach: case report.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Tschugg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sebastian; Rhomberg, Paul; Thomé, Claudius

    2016-03-01

    A 33-year-old man presented with moderate low-back pain and L-5 radiculopathy that progressed to severe paresis of L-5. On initial imaging, a corresponding spinal lesion was overlooked. Further CT and contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated a presacral mass along the L-5 root far extraforaminally. A herniated disc was suspected, but with standard imaging a schwannoma could not be ruled out. The presacral L-5 root was explored via a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of sequestered extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniations that herniated into the presacral region. PMID:26637061

  11. Far caudally migrated extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniation treated by a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach: case report.

    PubMed

    Tschugg, Anja; Tschugg, Sebastian; Hartmann, Sebastian; Rhomberg, Paul; Thomé, Claudius

    2016-03-01

    A 33-year-old man presented with moderate low-back pain and L-5 radiculopathy that progressed to severe paresis of L-5. On initial imaging, a corresponding spinal lesion was overlooked. Further CT and contrast-enhanced MRI demonstrated a presacral mass along the L-5 root far extraforaminally. A herniated disc was suspected, but with standard imaging a schwannoma could not be ruled out. The presacral L-5 root was explored via a microsurgical lateral extraforaminal transmuscular approach. To the best of the authors' knowledge, there have been no reports of sequestered extraforaminal lumbosacral disc herniations that herniated into the presacral region.

  12. Parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motoneurons labeled after voluntary diving

    PubMed Central

    Panneton, W. Michael; Anch, A. Michael; Panneton, Whitney M.; Gan, Qi

    2014-01-01

    A dramatic bradycardia is induced by underwater submersion in vertebrates. The location of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons driving this aspect of the diving response was investigated using cFos immunohistochemistry combined with retrograde transport of cholera toxin subunit B (CTB) to double-label neurons. After pericardial injections of CTB, trained rats voluntarily dove underwater, and their heart rates (HR) dropped immediately to 95 ± 2 bpm, an 80% reduction. After immunohistochemical processing, the vast majority of CTB labeled neurons were located in the reticular formation from the rostral cervical spinal cord to the facial motor nucleus, confirming previous studies. Labeled neurons caudal to the rostral ventrolateral medulla were usually spindle-shaped aligned along an oblique line running from the dorsal vagal nucleus to the ventrolateral reticular formation, while those more rostrally were multipolar with extended dendrites. Nine percent of retrogradely-labeled neurons were positive for both cFos and CTB after diving and 74% of these were found rostral to the obex. CTB also was transported transganglionically in primary afferent fibers, resulting in large granular deposits in dorsolateral, ventrolateral, and commissural subnuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) and finer deposits in lamina I and IV-V of the trigeminocervical complex. The overlap of parasympathetic preganglionic cardiac motor neurons activated by diving with those activated by baro- and chemoreceptors in the rostral ventrolateral medulla is discussed. Thus, the profound bradycardia seen with underwater submersion reinforces the notion that the mammalian diving response is the most powerful autonomic reflex known. PMID:24478721

  13. Thoracic Radiculopathy due to Rare Causes

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy represents an uncommon spinal disorder that is frequently overlooked in the evaluation of thoracic, or abdominal pain syndrome. The clinical representation of this uncommon disorder is often atypical. With many differential diagnoses to consider, it is not surprising that the cause of thoracic radiculopathy is often not discovered for months, or years, after the symptoms arise. We report two rare cases of thoracic radiculopathy; one case was caused by extraskeletal Ewing sarcoma (EES) along the thoracic paraspinal area, and the other by foraminal stenosis, due to a bony spur of the thoracic vertebra. As such, thoracic radiculopathy should be considered in the diagnosis of patients with thoracic and abdominal pain, especially if initial diagnostic studies are inconclusive. PMID:27446792

  14. Introduction to Lumbosacral and Sacropelvic Fixation Strategies.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Patrick C; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    We are pleased to present this Neurosurgical Focus video supplement on lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation strategies. Despite advancement in surgical techniques and technologies in spine, achieving consistent solid fusion across the lumbosacral junction remains a major challenge. The anatomy of the lumbosacral junction allows for a higher range of motion compared to other areas of the thoracolumbar spine. The L5-S1 interspace is exposed to significant shear forces. As a result, complications such as pseudoarthrosis, screw pull-out, implant fracture, or sacral fractures can occur. Complications are particularly seen in long fusion constructs ending across the lumbosacral junction. To reduce these complications, various lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation techniques have been developed and utilized. The current supplement is intended to provide instructional videos that illustrate several current techniques for lumbosacral and sacropelvic fixation. The collection includes techniques for anterior L5-S1 interbody fusion, minimally invasive L5-S1 interbody fusions, lumbosacral pedicle screw placement, sacroiliac fusion, and sacro-alar-iliac screw placement. The authors of the videos in the supplement have provided detailed narration and video illustration to describe the nuances of the various open and minimally invasive techniques for lumbosacral and sacral-pelvic fixation. We are pleased to have such a collection of quality video illustration from experts in the field. It's been our privilege to serve as guest editors for this supplement and we believe that you will enjoy the contents of this supplement. PMID:27364425

  15. Salon sink radiculopathy: a case series.

    PubMed

    Stitik, T P; Nadler, S F; Foye, P M

    1999-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy can be diagnosed on physical examination with the Spurling test, which narrows neural foramina via neck extension along with coupled rotation and side-bending. In the presence of cervical radiculopathy, this test can reproduce radicular symptoms by transmitting compressive forces to affected nerve roots as they traverse the neural foramina. Treatment of cervical radiculopathy includes patient education to avoid obvious postures that exacerbate radicular symptoms and to assume positions that centralize discomfort. A potentially harmful position to which many patients are unwittingly subjected at least several times per year occurs when their hair is being shampooed in a salon sink before a haircut. This posture causes neck extension and is combined with rotation and side-bending as the patient's head is being manipulated during the shampooing. When the stylist then also applies a mild compressive force while shampooing the patient's hair, hyperextension of the neck is produced. We present two patients with cervical radiculopathy that was significantly exacerbated after the patient's hair had been shampooed in a salon sink; subsequently, these patients required oral administration of steroids. These cases illustrate that patients with suspected or known cervical radiculopathy should be forewarned to avoid this otherwise seemingly innocuous activity.

  16. The Effectiveness of Transforaminal Versus Caudal Routes for Epidural Steroid Injections in Managing Lumbosacral Radicular Pain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Lu, Lu; Li, Xueying; Jia, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Yao, Xue; Wu, Qiuli; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is one of the most commonly used treatments for radiculopathy. Previous studies have described the effectiveness of ESI in the management of radiculopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the route that is most beneficial and effective with respect to the administration of epidural steroids, as both transforaminal (TF) and caudal (C) routes are commonly used. This analysis reviewed studies comparing the effectiveness of TF-ESIs with that of C-ESIs in the treatment of radiculopathy as a means of providing pain relief and improving functionality. This meta-analysis was performed to guide clinical decision-making. The study was a systematic review of comparative studies. A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases for trials written in English. The randomized trials and observational studies that met our inclusion criteria were subsequently included. Two reviewers, respectively, extracted data and estimated the risk of bias. All statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3. Six prospective and 2 retrospective studies involving 664 patients were included. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing only the 6 prospective studies. Although slight pain and functional improvements were noted in the TF-ESI groups compared with the C-ESI groups, these improvements were neither clinically nor statistically significant. The limitations of this meta-analysis resulted primarily from the weaknesses of the comparative studies and the relative paucity of patients included in each study. Both the TF and C approaches are effective in reducing pain and improving functional scores, and they demonstrated similar efficacies in the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. PMID:27149443

  17. Epiduroscopy for patients with lumbosacral radicular pain.

    PubMed

    Kallewaard, Jan Willem; Vanelderen, Pascal; Richardson, Jonathan; Van Zundert, Jan; Heavner, James; Groen, Gerbrand Jan

    2014-04-01

    Lumbosacral radicular pain is a pain in the distribution area of one of the nerves of the lumbosacral plexus, with or without sensory and/or motor impairment. A major source of lumbosacral radicular pain is failed back surgery, which is defined as persistent or recurrent pain, mainly in the region of the lower back and legs even after technically, anatomically successful spine surgeries. If lumbosacral radicular neuropathic pain fails to respond to conservative or interventional treatments, epiduroscopy can be performed as part of a multidisciplinary approach. Epiduroscopy aids in identifying painful structures in the epidural space, establishing a diagnosis and administering therapy. The novelty consists in the use of an epiduroscope to deliver therapies such as adhesiolysis and targeted administration of epidural medications. Clinical trials report favorable treatment outcomes in 30% to 50% of patients. Complications are rare and related to the rate or volume of epidural fluid infusion or inadvertent dural puncture. In patients with lumbosacral radicular pain, especially after back surgery, epiduroscopy with adhesiolysis may be considered (evidence rating 2 B+).

  18. Cervical radiculopathy: epidemiology, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment.

    PubMed

    Woods, Barrett I; Hilibrand, Alan S

    2015-06-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is a relatively common neurological disorder resulting from nerve root dysfunction, which is often due to mechanical compression; however, inflammatory cytokines released from damaged intervertebral disks can also result in symptoms. Cervical radiculopathy can often be diagnosed with a thorough history and physical examination, but an magnetic resonance imaging or computed tomographic myelogram should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Because of the ubiquity of degenerative changes found on these imaging modalities, the patient's symptoms must correlate with pathology for a successful diagnosis. In the absence of myelopathy or significant muscle weakness all patients should be treated conservatively for at least 6 weeks. Conservative treatments consist of immobilization, anti-inflammatory medications, physical therapy, cervical traction, and epidural steroid injections. Cervical radiculopathy typically is self-limiting with 75%-90% of patients achieving symptomatic improvement with nonoperative care. For patients who are persistently symptomatic despite conservative treatment, or those who have a significant functional deficit surgical treatment is appropriate. Surgical options include anterior cervical decompression and fusion, cervical disk arthroplasty, and posterior foraminotomy. Patient selection is critical to optimize outcome. PMID:25985461

  19. Axons of sacral preganglionic neurons in the cat: II. Axon collaterals.

    PubMed

    Morgan, C W

    2001-01-01

    Axon collaterals were identified in 21 of 24 preganglionic neurons in the lateral band of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of the cat. Following the intracellular injection of HRP or neurobiotin the axons from 20 of these neurons were followed and 53 primary axon collaterals were found to originate from unmyelinated segments and from nodes of Ranvier. Detailed mapping done in the five best labeled cells showed bilateral axon collaterals distributions up to 25,000 microm in length with 950 varicosities and unilateral distributions up to 12,561 microm with 491 varicosities. The axon collaterals appeared to be unmyelinated, which was confirmed at EM, and were small in diameter (average 0.3 microm). Varicosities were located mostly in laminae I, V, VII, VIII and X and in the lateral funiculi. Most varicosities were not in contact with visible structures but some were seen in close apposition to Nissl stained somata and proximal dendrites. Varicosities had average minor diameters of 1.3 microm and major diameters of 2.3 microm. Most were boutons en passant while 10-20% were boutons termineaux. EM revealed axodendritic and axoaxonic synapses formed by varicosities and by the axons between varicosities. It is estimated that the most extensive of these axon collaterals systems may contact over 200 spinal neurons in multiple locations. These data lead to the conclusion that sacral preganglionic neurons have multiple functions within the spinal cord in addition to serving their target organ. As most preganglionic neurons in this location innervate the urinary bladder, it is possible that bladder preganglionic neurons have multiple functions.

  20. Low back pain, radiculopathy, and bilateral proximal hamstring ruptures: a case report.

    PubMed

    Deren, Matthew E; DeFroda, Steven F; Mukand, Nita H; Mukand, Jon A

    2015-12-01

    Low back pain (LBP) is a common complaint in the United States, with an incidence of 6.3%-15.4% and yearly recurrence in 54%-90% of patients.1 Trends show more frequent diagnostic testing, opioid use, and surgical intervention as the incidence of LBP increases.2 LBP is defined as pain at and near the lumbosacral region that can vary with physical activity and time. LBP is usually related to pathology of muscles, ligaments, spinal column joints, nerve roots, and the spinal cord. During the assessment of LBP, practitioners must also consider less common causes of pain in that region. For instance, patients with indolent or nighttime pain may have infectious or malignant processes. Referred pain from injuries to pelvic musculature or abdominal contents should be considered, especially following a traumatic event. One of these injuries, which can present as acute low back pain, is rupture of the proximal hamstring tendon. On rare occasion, concomitant LBP, radiculopathy, and hamstring injuries can occur;. This diagnostic challenge is described in the following case. PMID:26623451

  1. In vitro relation between preganglionic sympathetic stimulation and activity of cutaneous glands in the bullfrog.

    PubMed Central

    Jobling, P; Horn, J P

    1996-01-01

    1. Activation of cutaneous glands was studied by measuring changes in transepithelial potentiation (TEP) after pre- and postganglionic sympathetic stimulation in the bullfrog, Rana catesbeiana. 2. In normal Ringer solution, TEP was 20-90 mV with the basolateral (inside) surface positive. Single shocks to the preganglionic B pathway decreased TEP by up to 3 mV. Cutaneous depolarizations had a latency of 1.2 s, a rise time of 2.5 s, and decayed with an exponential time constant of 15 s. Similar depolarizations were evoked by postganglionic stimulation. 3. Cutaneous depolarizations summed during repetitive stimulation and > 0.05 Hz. For trains of three stimuli, peak amplitude increased with frequency and saturated at 2 Hz. In some preparations, longer trains evoked polyphasic changes in TEP. Preganglionically evoked cutaneous responses were abolished by (+)-tubocurarine. Postganglionically evoked cutaneous depolarizations were antagonized by phentolamine, but not propranolol. 4. Repetitive preganglionic stimulation of the C pathway (> 100 at 20 Hz) evoked little change in TEP and did not modulate depolarizations evoked through the B pathway. In nicotine, peptidergic cotransmission was enhanced in the ganglia, and repetitive C pathway stimulation evoked cutaneous depolarizations whose time course mirrored that of the postganglionic peptidergic after-discharge. The after-discharge and associated cutaneous depolarization were blocked by a luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone antagonist. 5. The results show cutaneous glands are selectively innervated by B neurones and respond to low levels of neural activity. Asynchronous postganglionic firing mediated by peptidergic cotransmission can provide a basis for heterosynaptic interactions between the B and C pathways. PMID:8814622

  2. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-07-01

    In minimally invasive spinal fusion surgery, transforaminal lumbar (sacral) interbody fusion (TLIF) is one of the most common procedures that provides both anterior and posterior column support without retraction or violation to the neural structure. Direct and indirect decompression can be done through this single approach. Preoperative plain radiographs and MR scan should be carefully evaluated. This video demonstrates a standard approach for how to perform a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/bhEeafKJ370 . PMID:27364426

  3. Upright magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine: Back pain and radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Ha Son; Doan, Ninh; Shabani, Saman; Baisden, Jamie; Wolfla, Christopher; Paskoff, Glenn; Shender, Barry; Stemper, Brian

    2016-01-01

    Background: Lumbar back pain and radiculopathy are common diagnoses. Unfortunately, conventional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings and clinical symptoms do not necessarily correlate in the lumbar spine. With upright imaging, disc pathologies or foraminal stenosis may become more salient, leading to improvements in diagnosis. Materials and Methods: Seventeen adults (10 asymptomatic and 7 symptomatic volunteers) provided their informed consent and participated in the study. A 0.6T upright MRI scan was performed on each adult in the seated position. Parameters were obtained from the L2/3 level to the L5/S1 level including those pertaining to the foramen [cross-sectional area (CSA), height, mid-disc width, width, thickness of ligamentum flavum], disc (bulge, height, width), vertebral body (height and width), and alignment (lordosis angle, wedge angle, lumbosacral angle). Each parameter was compared based on the spinal level and volunteer group using two-factor analysis of variance (ANOVA). Bonferroni post hoc analysis was used to assess the differences between individual spinal levels. Results: Mid-disc width accounted for 56% of maximum foramen width in symptomatic volunteers and over 63% in asymptomatic volunteers. Disc bulge was 48% greater in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers. CSA was generally smaller in symptomatic volunteers compared to asymptomatic volunteers, particularly at the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels. Thickness of ligamentum flavum (TLF) generally increased from the cranial to caudal spinal levels where the L4-L5 and L5-S1 spinal levels were significantly thicker than the L1-L2 spinal level. Conclusions: The data implied that upright MRI could be a useful diagnostic option, as it can delineate pertinent differences between symptomatic volunteers and asymptomatic volunteers, especially with respect to foraminal geometry. PMID:27041883

  4. The natural history of lumbar disc herniation and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Benoist, Michel

    2002-03-01

    The majority of patients suffering from a radiculopathy caused by a herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) heal spontaneously without surgery or chemonucleolysis. The clinical course of the radiculopathy varies as well as the efficacy of conservative treatment. In some patients the symptoms decline after a week or two; in others the pain may continue for many months or years. Despite an abundant literature there is still a controversy concerning the treatment of radiculopathies related to ruptured lumbar intervertebral discs. Obviously knowledge of the natural history of discal herniation, and of the mechanisms leading to the changes of the extruded discal tissue, would be of great help in planning the therapeutic procedure. The purpose of this article is to review the reliable data concerning the clinical and pathomorphological evolution and the biological mechanisms associated with the morphologic changes of discal herniation. PMID:12027305

  5. Management of degenerative lumbosacral disease in cats by dorsal laminectomy and lumbosacral stabilization.

    PubMed

    Danielski, A; Bertran, J; Fitzpatrick, N

    2013-01-01

    In this case series we describe the diagnosis and surgical treatment of five cats affected by clinical cauda equina syndrome as a result of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis. Radiographic and magnetic resonance imaging findings confirmed the suspected diagnosis of disc-associated lumbosacral disease. Cauda equina decompression was achieved by dorsal laminectomy followed by dorsal annulectomy and nuclear extirpation. Dorsal stabilization was achieved using miniature positive-profile pins inserted into the vertebral body of L7 and the wings of S1 with the free ends of the pins being embedded in a bolus of gentamicin-impregnated polymethylmethacrylate. Reassessment two years postoperatively using a previously validated feline specific owner questionnaire indicated satisfactory outcome with complete return to normal activity and resolution of signs of pain in all cases.

  6. Radiculopathy as Delayed Presentations of Retained Spinal Bullet

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Bang; Choi, Man Kyu; Kim, Kee D

    2015-01-01

    Bullet injuries to the spine may cause injury to the anatomical structures with or without neurologic deterioration. Most bullet injuries are acute, resulting from direct injury. However, in rare cases, delayed injury may occur, resulting in claudication. We report a case of intradural bullet at the L3-4 level with radiculopathy in a 30-year-old male. After surgical removal, radicular and claudicating pain were improved significantly, and motor power of the right leg also improved. We report the case of intradural bullet, which resulted in delayed radiculopathy. PMID:26587197

  7. The chiropractic management of two cases of cervical spondylotic radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Dufton, John A.; Giantomaso, Tony

    2003-01-01

    Cervical spondylotic radiculopathy (CSR) is one of the potential sources of radiculopathy, particularly in patients aged 40 to 60 years. The hallmark sign of cervical-brachial pain presents in the majority of the cases, however a definitive clinical diagnosis is often difficult in the absence of reliable and valid diagnostic tests. Two cases of presumed CSR illustrate the usefulness of applying a comprehensive mechanical assessment that guides the patient's rehabilitation regardless of the traditional anatomical diagnosis. A brief overview of the epidemiology, clinical presentation, and management of CSR is also presented.

  8. Sympathetic preganglionic efferent and afferent neurons mediated by the greater splanchnic nerve in rabbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Yasuhiro; Cernucan, Roxana D.; Nishimoto, Jo Ann S.; Blanks, Robert H. I.

    1985-01-01

    As a part of the study of the vestibular-autonomic pathways involved in motion sickness, the location and the morphology of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSNs) projecting via the greater splanchnic nerve were examined. Retrograde labeling of neurons was obtained by application of horseradish peroxidase to the cut end of the greater splanchnic nerve. Labeled PSNs were found, ipsilaterally, within the T1 to T11 spinal cord segments, with the highest density of neurons in T6. Most PSNs were located within the intermediolateral column, but a significant portion also occurred within the lateral funiculus, the intercalated region, and the central autonomic area; the proportion of labeling between the four regions depended on the spinal cord segment.

  9. The Effectiveness of Transforaminal Versus Caudal Routes for Epidural Steroid Injections in Managing Lumbosacral Radicular Pain: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Zhou, Hengxing; Lu, Lu; Li, Xueying; Jia, Jun; Shi, Zhongju; Yao, Xue; Wu, Qiuli; Feng, Shiqing

    2016-05-01

    Epidural steroid injection (ESI) is one of the most commonly used treatments for radiculopathy. Previous studies have described the effectiveness of ESI in the management of radiculopathy. However, controversy exists regarding the route that is most beneficial and effective with respect to the administration of epidural steroids, as both transforaminal (TF) and caudal (C) routes are commonly used.This analysis reviewed studies comparing the effectiveness of TF-ESIs with that of C-ESIs in the treatment of radiculopathy as a means of providing pain relief and improving functionality. This meta-analysis was performed to guide clinical decision-making.The study was a systematic review of comparative studies.A systematic literature search was performed using the PubMed, EMBASE, and Cochrane Library databases for trials written in English. The randomized trials and observational studies that met our inclusion criteria were subsequently included. Two reviewers, respectively, extracted data and estimated the risk of bias. All statistical analyses were performed using Review Manager 5.3.Six prospective and 2 retrospective studies involving 664 patients were included. Statistical analysis was performed utilizing only the 6 prospective studies. Although slight pain and functional improvements were noted in the TF-ESI groups compared with the C-ESI groups, these improvements were neither clinically nor statistically significant.The limitations of this meta-analysis resulted primarily from the weaknesses of the comparative studies and the relative paucity of patients included in each study.Both the TF and C approaches are effective in reducing pain and improving functional scores, and they demonstrated similar efficacies in the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. PMID:27149443

  10. Evidence for a glutamatergic input to pontine preganglionic neurons of the superior salivatory nucleus in rat.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li Hsien; Agassandian, Khristofor; Fujiyama, Fumino; Kaneko, Taneshi; Talman, William T

    2003-07-01

    Parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN), which projects to the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), modulate salivation, lacrimation, and cerebrovascular tone. Our previous studies suggest that excitatory projections from the nucleus tractus solitarii modulate cerebrovascular tone by actions on SSN neurons. In this study we sought to test the hypothesis that N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) type glutamate receptors and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT) are present in the SSN and that SSN neurons receive glutamatergic input. In six rats we injected tetramethylrhodamine dextran (TRD), a fluorescent tracer, unilaterally into the PPG to label SSN neurons. Four days later, rats were perfused and brain stem sections containing the SSN were processed for fluorescent immunohistochemistry for N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor subunit 1 (NMDAR1) and vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2). Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed that 88+/-3% of TRD-labeled SSN neurons contained NMDAR1-immunoreactivity (IR). The surrounding neuropil contained numerous fibers labeled for VGLUT2-IR, but not VGLUT1-IR. Double fluorescent immunohistochemistry for NMDAR1 and VGLUT2 revealed that fibers containing VGLUT2-IR were often in close proximity to cell bodies or proximal dendrites of TRD-labeled SSN neurons that were positive for NMDAR1-IR. These studies support our hypothesis that NMDA receptors and VGLUT are present in the SSN. They further provide support for the suggestion that there are glutamatergic inputs to SSN neurons and would be consistent with an excitatory input that could regulate cerebrovascular tone.

  11. Phenotypic traits of the hypothalamic PVN cells innervating airway-related vagal preganglionic neurons.

    PubMed

    Kc, Prabha; Karibi-Ikiriko, Abere; Rust, Cheryl F; Jayam-Trouth, Annapurni; Haxhiu, Musa A

    2006-12-01

    The paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN) integrates multiple inputs via projections from arginine vasopressin (AVP)- and oxytocin (OXT)-containing neurons to the brain stem and spinal cord as well as regulates respiratory and cardiovascular stress-related responses, which also affect airway function. In the present study, we used immunocytochemistry and the retrograde transneuronal tracer, Bartha strain of pseudorabies virus expressing green fluorescent protein (PRV-GFP), to localize AVP- and OXT-producing neurons that project to airway-related vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) innervating intrapulmonary airways. PRV-GFP was microinjected into the upper right lung lobe, and after 4 days survival, hypothalamic tissue sections were processed for co-expression of PRV-GFP and AVP or PRV-GFP and OXT. In addition, in a separate group of five rats, Phaseolus vulgaris leucoagglutinin (PHAL), an anterograde tracer, was injected unilaterally into the PVN and cholera toxin beta subunit was microinjected into the tracheal wall. Analysis of five successfully infected animals showed that 14% of PRV-GFP labeled neurons express AVP traits and 18% of transneuronally-labeled neurons contain OXT. Furthermore, the identified AVPNs innervating extrathoracic trachea receive axon terminals of the PVN neurons. The results indicate that AVP- and OXT-producing PVN cells, via direct projections to the AVPNs, could modulate cholinergic outflow to the airways, as a part of overall changes in response to stress.

  12. Peroneal neuropathy misdiagnosed as L5 radiculopathy: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe a patient who presented with a case of peroneal neuropathy that was originally diagnosed and treated as a L5 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 53-year old female registered nurse presented to a private chiropractic practice with complaints of left lateral leg pain. Three months earlier she underwent elective left L5 decompression surgery without relief of symptoms. Intervention and outcome Lumbar spine MRI seven months prior to lumbar decompression surgery revealed left neural foraminal stenosis at L5-S1. The patient symptoms resolved after she stopped crossing her legs. Conclusion This report discusses a case of undiagnosed peroneal neuropathy that underwent lumbar decompression surgery for a L5 radiculopathy. This case study demonstrates the importance of a thorough clinical examination and decision making that ensures proper patient diagnosis and management. PMID:23618508

  13. A rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy: spinal gas collection.

    PubMed

    Tamburrelli, F; Leone, A; Pitta, L

    2000-10-01

    The presence of gas in the intervertebral disk space, known as the vacuum phenomenon, is a relatively common radiologic finding, especially on computed tomographic investigation. In a few cases, the gas can be collected into the lumbar spinal canal and can also compress the nerve root. To date only seven cases of symptomatic lumbar radiculopathy caused by a bubble of gas are reported in the literature. The presence of gas inside a narrowed disk and the collection of gas in the spinal canal suggest a communication between the two structures. A case of lumbar radiculopathy caused by a collection of gas in the spinal canal provided the authors the opportunity to study this rare condition by magnetic resonance imaging. Magnetic resonance imaging had not been used before in the referred cases and proved conclusively the discal origin of the gas. PMID:11052357

  14. Histamine excites neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurons in vitro via activation of H1 receptors.

    PubMed

    Whyment, Andrew D; Blanks, Andrew M; Lee, Kevin; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2006-04-01

    The role of histamine in regulating excitability of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) and the expression of histamine receptor mRNA in SPNs was investigated using whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiological recording techniques combined with single-cell reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) in transverse neonatal rat spinal cord slices. Bath application of histamine (100 microM) or the H1 receptor agonist histamine trifluoromethyl toluidide dimaleate (HTMT; 10 microM) induced membrane depolarization associated with a decrease in membrane conductance in the majority (70%) of SPNs tested, via activation of postsynaptic H1 receptors negatively coupled to one or more unidentified K+ conductances. Histamine and HTMT application also induced or increased the amplitude and/or frequency of membrane potential oscillations in electrotonically coupled SPNs. The H2 receptor agonist dimaprit (10 microM) or the H3 receptor agonist imetit (100 nM) were without significant effect on the membrane properties of SPNs. Histamine responses were sensitive to the H1 receptor antagonist triprolidine (10 microM) and the nonselective potassium channel blocker barium (1 mM) but were unaffected by the H2 receptor antagonist tiotidine (10 microM) and the H3 receptor antagonist, clobenpropit (5 microM). Single cell RT-PCR revealed mRNA expression for H1 receptors in 75% of SPNs tested, with no expression of mRNA for H2, H3, or H4 receptors. These data represent the first demonstration of H1 receptor expression in SPNs and suggest that histamine acts to regulate excitability of these neurons via a direct postsynaptic effect on H1 receptors.

  15. Hydralazine administration activates sympathetic preganglionic neurons whose activity mobilizes glucose and increases cardiovascular function.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lindsay M; Damanhuri, Hanafi A; Fletcher, Sophie P S; Goodchild, Ann K

    2015-04-16

    Hypotensive drugs have been used to identify central neurons that mediate compensatory baroreceptor reflex responses. Such drugs also increase blood glucose. Our aim was to identify the neurochemical phenotypes of sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) and adrenal chromaffin cells activated following hydralazine (HDZ; 10mg/kg) administration in rats, and utilize this and SPN target organ destination to ascribe their function as cardiovascular or glucose regulating. Blood glucose was measured and adrenal chromaffin cell activation was assessed using c-Fos immunoreactivity (-ir) and phosphorylation of tyrosine hydroxylase, respectively. The activation and neurochemical phenotype of SPN innervating the adrenal glands and celiac ganglia were determined using the retrograde tracer cholera toxin B subunit, in combination with in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry. Blood glucose was elevated at multiple time points following HDZ administration but little evidence of chromaffin cell activation was seen suggesting non-adrenal mechanisms contribute to the sustained hyperglycemia. 16±0.1% of T4-T11 SPN contained c-Fos and of these: 24.3±1.4% projected to adrenal glands and 29±5.5% projected to celiac ganglia with the rest innervating other targets. 62.8±1.4% of SPN innervating adrenal glands were activated and 29.9±3.3% expressed PPE mRNA whereas 53.2±8.6% of SPN innervating celiac ganglia were activated and 31.2±8.8% expressed PPE mRNA. CART-ir SPN innervating each target were also activated and did not co-express PPE mRNA. Neurochemical coding reveals that HDZ administration activates both PPE+SPN, whose activity increase glucose mobilization causing hyperglycemia, as well as CART+SPN whose activity drive vasomotor responses mediated by baroreceptor unloading to raise vascular tone and heart rate.

  16. [Brachioradial pruritus as a symptom of cervical radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Mataix, J; Silvestre, J F; Climent, J M; Pastor, N; Lucas, A

    2008-11-01

    Brachioradial pruritus is characterized by the presence of pruritus on the lateral aspect of the arms. The etiology of this enigmatic entity is the subject of some debate some authors claim that brachioradial pruritus is a photodermatosis whereas others attribute it to the presence of underlying cervical radiculopathy. In these case reports, we present our experience with brachioradial pruritus and discuss the role of underlying neuropathy in its etiology and that of other types of localized pruritus such as notalgia paresthetica, anogenital pruritus, and burning mouth syndrome. PMID:19087811

  17. Bilaterally evoked monosynaptic EPSPs, NMDA receptors and potentiation in rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro.

    PubMed

    Spanswick, D; Renaud, L P; Logan, S D

    1998-05-15

    1. Whole-cell patch clamp and intracellular recordings were obtained from 190 sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) in spinal cord slices of neonatal rats. Fifty-two of these SPNs were identified histologically as innervating the superior cervical ganglion (SCG) by the presence of Lucifer Yellow introduced from the patch pipette and the appearance of retrograde labelling following the injection of rhodamine-dextran-lysine into the SCG. 2. Electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral (n = 71) or contralateral (n = 32) lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively), contralateral intermediolateral nucleus (cIML, n = 41) or ipsilateral dorsal horn (DH, n = 34) evoked EPSPs or EPSCs that showed a constant latency and rise time, graded response to increased stimulus intensity, and no failures, suggesting a monosynaptic origin. 3. In all neurones tested (n = 60), fast rising and decaying components of EPSPs or EPSCs evoked from the iLF, cLF, cIML and DH in response to low-frequency stimulation (0.03-0.1 Hz) were sensitive to non-NMDA receptor antagonists. 4. In approximately 50 % of neurones tested (n = 29 of 60), EPSPs and EPSCs evoked from the iLF, cLF, cIML and DH during low-frequency stimulation were reduced by NMDA receptor antagonists. In the remaining neurones, an NMDA receptor antagonist-sensitive EPSP or EPSC was revealed only in magnesium-free bathing medium, or following high-frequency stimulation. 5. EPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF exhibited a sustained potentiation of the peak amplitude (25.3 +/- 11.4 %) in six of fourteen SPNs tested following a brief high-frequency stimulus (10-20 Hz, 0.1-2 s). 6. These results indicate that SPNs, including SPNs innervating the SCG, receive monosynaptic connections from both sides of the spinal cord. The neurotransmitter mediating transmission in some of the pathways activated by stimulation of iLF, cLF, cIML and DH is glutamate acting via both NMDA and non-NMDA receptors. Synaptic plasticity is a feature of

  18. Nicotine enhances both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs to inspiratory-activated airway vagal preganglionic neurons.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xujiao; Chen, Yonghua; Ge, Dengyun; Yuan, Wenjun; Wang, Jijiang

    2013-01-01

    The airway vagal preganglionic neurons (AVPNs) supply the essential excitatory drive to the postganglionic neurons and dominate the neural control of the airway both physiologically and pathophysiologically. The AVPNs express multiple subunits of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs), but the influences of exogenous nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine are unknown. This study examined the effects of nicotine and endogenous acetylcholine on retrogradely labelled, functionally identified inspiratory-activated AVPNs (IA-AVPNs) using the patch-clamp technique. Nicotine (10 μmol l(-1)) significantly increased the frequency and amplitude of the spontaneous EPSCs of IA-AVPNs, and these effects were insensitive to methyllycaconitine (MLA, 100 nmol l(-1)), an antagonist of the α7 type of nAChR, but was prevented by dihydro-β-erythroidine (DHβE, 3 μmol l(-1)), an antagonist of the α4β2 type of nAChR. Nicotine caused a tonic inward current in IA-AVPNs, which was reduced by MLA or DHβE alone, but was not abolished by co-application of MLA and DHβE. Nicotine caused a significant increase in the frequency of GABAergic and glycinergic spontaneous IPSCs and significantly increased the amplitude of glycinergic spontaneous IPSCs, all of which were prevented by DHβE. Nicotine had no effects on the miniature EPSCs or miniature IPSCs following pretreatment with TTX. Under current clamp, nicotine caused depolarization and increased the firing rate of IA-AVPNs during inspiratory intervals. Neostigmine (10 μmol l(-1)), an acetylcholinesterase inhibitor, mimicked the effects of nicotine. These results demonstrate that nicotine and endogenous ACh enhance the excitatory and inhibitory synaptic inputs of IA-AVPNs and cause a postsynaptic excitatory current and that the nicotinic effects are mediated presynaptically by activation of the α4β2 type of nAChR and postsynaptically by activation of multiple nAChRs, including α7 and α4β2 types.

  19. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jackson, Keith L; Hire, Justin M; Jacobs, Jeremy M; Key, Charles C; DeVine, John G

    2015-06-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  20. Heterotopic Ossification Causing Radiculopathy after Lumbar Total Disc Arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Keith L.; Jacobs, Jeremy M.; Key, Charles C.; DeVine, John G.

    2015-01-01

    To date, no reports have presented radiculopathy secondary to heterotopic ossification following lumbar total disc arthroplasty. The authors present a previously unpublished complication of lumbar total disk arthroplasty (TDA) secondary to heterotopic ossification (HO) in the spinal canal, and they propose a modification to the McAfee classification of HO. The patient had undergone an L5/S1 lumbar TDA two years prior due to discogenic back pain. His preoperative back pain was significantly relieved, but he developed new, atraumatic onset radiculopathy. Radiographs and a computed tomography myelogram revealed an implant malposition posteriorly with heterotopic bone formation in the canal, causing an impingement of the traversing nerve root. Revision surgery was performed with implant extraction, L5/S1 anterior lumbar interbody fusion, supplemental posterior decompression, and pedicle screw fixation. The patient tolerated the procedure well, with complete resolution of the radicular leg pain. At a two-year follow up, the patient had a solid fusion without subsidence or recurrence of heterotopic bone. This case represents a novel pattern of heterotopic ossification, and it describes a previously unreported cause for implant failure in lumbar disc replacement surgery-reinforcing the importance of proper intraoperative component positioning. We propose a modification to the existing McAfee classification of HO after TDA with the addition of Class V and VI HO. PMID:26097664

  1. Cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula with radiculopathy mimicking cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Kawabori, Masahito; Hida, Kazutoshi; Yano, Shunsuke; Asano, Takeshi; Iwasaki, Yoshinobu

    2009-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with a rare case of cervical epidural arteriovenous fistula (AVF) manifesting as radiculopathy of the right upper extremity that mimicked cervical spondylosis. She had a 2-month history of gradually progressive right-hand motor weakness and sensory disturbance. The initial diagnosis was cervical disk herniation. However, computed tomography with contrast medium showed abnormal enhancement at the right C5-6 and C6-7 intervertebral foramina. Magnetic resonance (MR) imaging with gadolinium disclosed an enhanced abnormal epidural mass at the dorsal surface of the dural tube between the C5 and C6 vertebrae. T(2)-weighted MR imaging showed a slight flow void on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the spinal cord between C3 and T4. Digital subtraction angiography disclosed cervical epidural and dural AVFs fed by the C5 and C6 radicular arteries. The diagnosis was concomitant epidural and dural AVFs. The dilated internal vertebral venous plexus attributable to epidural AVF was considered to be responsible for the radiculopathy. Transarterial embolization using n-butylcyanoacrylate achieved complete occlusion of the lesions. Her symptoms improved immediately and MR imaging and angiography performed 10 days postembolization showed reduction of both the epidural and dural AVFs.

  2. High resolution neurography of the lumbosacral plexus on 3T magneteic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Cejas, C; Escobar, I; Serra, M; Barroso, F

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance neurography is a technique that complements clinical and electrophysiological study of the peripheral nerves and brachial and lumbosacral plexuses. Numerous focal processes (inflammatory, traumatic, primary tumors, secondary tumors) and diffuse processes (diabetic polyneuropathy, chronic idiopathic demyelinating polyneuropathy due to amyloidosis or Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease) can involve the lumbosacral plexus. This article reviews the anatomy of the lumbosacral plexus, describes the technique for neurography of the plexus at our institution, and shows the diverse diseases that affect it.

  3. Sacral Stress Fracture Mimicking Lumbar Radiculopathy in a Mounted Police Officer: Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Bednar, Drew A.; Almansoori, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Case report and review of the literature. Objective To present a unique case of L5 radiculopathy caused by a sacral stress fracture without neurologic compression. Methods We present our case and its clinical evolution and review the available literature on similar pathologies. Results Relief of the unusual mechanical loading causing sacral stress fracture led to rapid resolution of radiculopathy. Conclusion L5 radiculopathy can be caused by a sacral stress fracture and can be relieved by simple mechanical treatment of the fracture. PMID:26430605

  4. Medial cervical facetectomy for radiculopathy due to foraminal stenosis: 71 personal consecutive cases.

    PubMed

    Tan

    1999-05-01

    Medial cervical facetectomy performed on patients using a high speed drill and microscope represents an effective way for treatment of patients with radiculopathy due to multi-level, either uni- or bilateral, foraminal stenosis. The author presents the results of medial cervical facetectomy performed in 71 cases during a 4 year period. Medial cervical facetectomy appears to provide significant benefits to patients with radiculopathy secondary to foraminal stenosis. The procedure also appears to be superior to complete foraminotomy for relief of radiculopathy as the lateral third to half of the facet joint is still preserved and there is no instability problem. Copyright 1999 Harcourt Publishers Ltd.

  5. The evolution of image-guided lumbosacral spine surgery

    PubMed Central

    Faulkner, Austin R.; Pasciak, Alexander S.; Bradley, Yong C.

    2015-01-01

    Techniques and approaches of spinal fusion have considerably evolved since their first description in the early 1900s. The incorporation of pedicle screw constructs into lumbosacral spine surgery is among the most significant advances in the field, offering immediate stability and decreased rates of pseudarthrosis compared to previously described methods. However, early studies describing pedicle screw fixation and numerous studies thereafter have demonstrated clinically significant sequelae of inaccurate surgical fusion hardware placement. A number of image guidance systems have been developed to reduce morbidity from hardware malposition in increasingly complex spine surgeries. Advanced image guidance systems such as intraoperative stereotaxis improve the accuracy of pedicle screw placement using a variety of surgical approaches, however their clinical indications and clinical impact remain debated. Beginning with intraoperative fluoroscopy, this article describes the evolution of image guided lumbosacral spinal fusion, emphasizing two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) navigational methods. PMID:25992368

  6. Study on lumbosacral nerve root compression using DTI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yonghao; Wang, Yueyi; Lv, Yang; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can objectively describe the distribution of nerve roots in morphology, and provide a set of objective reference data on the quantitative indicators. The present study aimed to investigate the value of DTI in lumbosacral nerve root compression in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. DTI was performed in 45 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in compressed and normal nerve roots. Fiber tracking imaging was also applied to observe the lumbosacral nerve roots. ADC value was significantly lower in the compressed group (1.314±0.14 mm2/sec) compared to in the uncompressed group (1.794±0.11 mm2/sec) (P<0.05). The FA value was significantly lower in the compressed group (0.196±0.020) compared to the uncompressed group (0.272±0.016) (P<0.05). DTI can evidently reveal the compressed nerve roots. DTI could be used to evaluate the lumbosacral nerve injury in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration to quantitatively assess nerve roots.

  7. Study on lumbosacral nerve root compression using DTI

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jinfeng; Wang, Yonghao; Wang, Yueyi; Lv, Yang; Ma, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) can objectively describe the distribution of nerve roots in morphology, and provide a set of objective reference data on the quantitative indicators. The present study aimed to investigate the value of DTI in lumbosacral nerve root compression in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. DTI was performed in 45 patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration. Apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) values were measured in compressed and normal nerve roots. Fiber tracking imaging was also applied to observe the lumbosacral nerve roots. ADC value was significantly lower in the compressed group (1.314±0.14 mm2/sec) compared to in the uncompressed group (1.794±0.11 mm2/sec) (P<0.05). The FA value was significantly lower in the compressed group (0.196±0.020) compared to the uncompressed group (0.272±0.016) (P<0.05). DTI can evidently reveal the compressed nerve roots. DTI could be used to evaluate the lumbosacral nerve injury in patients with lumbar intervertebral disc degeneration to quantitatively assess nerve roots. PMID:27602215

  8. Lumbar disc herniation with contralateral radiculopathy: do we neglect the epidural fat?

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Song; Zhang, Dong-Jie; Hao, Ding-Jun

    2015-01-01

    Lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is the most common cause of radiculopathy, whose pathological entity underlying nerve root compression is usually on the same side as the symptoms. However, LDH causing contralateral radiculopathy are sometimes encountered by pain physicians. There have been tremendous developments in the treatment options for LDH; the situation of LDH causing contralateral radiculopathy is indeed a dilemma for some pain physicians. We will report a case of a patient with a L4-5 disc herniation whose left herniated disc caused radiculopathy on the right side. After a percutaneous lumbar endoscopic discectomy via the side ipsilateral to the symptomatic side, this case obtained a significant symptom remission. The migrated epidural fat is discussed as a cause of associated contralateral neurological deficit. Only via a surgical approach ipsilateral to the herniated side, could there be a clinical improvement postoperatively. PMID:25794228

  9. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Nikhil R; Stephen, James H; Abdullah, Kalil G; Stein, Sherman C; Malhotra, Neil R

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources. PMID:27099818

  10. Comparing Utility Scores in Common Spinal Radiculopathies: Results of a Prospective Valuation Study.

    PubMed

    Nayak, Nikhil R; Stephen, James H; Abdullah, Kalil G; Stein, Sherman C; Malhotra, Neil R

    2016-05-01

    Study Design Prospective observational study. Objective To determine whether preference-based health utility scores for common spinal radiculopathies vary by specific spinal level. Methods We employed a standard gamble study using the general public to calculate individual preference-based quality of life for four common radiculopathies: C6, C7, L5, and S1. We compared utility scores obtained for each level of radiculopathy with analysis of variance and t test. Multivariable regression was used to test the effects of the covariates age, sex, and years of education. We also reviewed the literature for publications reporting EuroQol-5 Dimensions (EQ-5D) scores for patients with radiculopathy. Results Two hundred participants were included in the study. Average utility for the four spinal levels fell within a narrow range (0.748 to 0.796). There were no statistically significant differences between lumbar and cervical radiculopathies, nor were there significant differences among the different spinal levels (F = 0.0850, p = 0.086). Age and sex had no significant effect on utility scores. There was a significant correlation between years of education and utility values for S1 radiculopathy (p = 0.037). On review of the literature, no study separated utility values by specific spinal level. EQ-5D utilities for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy were considerably lower than the results of our study. Conclusions Utility values associated with the most common levels of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy do not significantly differ from each other, validating the current practice of grouping utility by spinal segment rather than by specific root levels. The discrepancy in average utility values between our study and the EQ-5D highlights the need to be mindful of the underlying instruments used when assessing outcomes studies from different sources.

  11. Hypothalamic neuron projection to autonomic preganglionic levels related with glucose metabolism: a fluorescent labelling study in the rat.

    PubMed

    Portillo, F; Carrasco, M; Vallo, J J

    1996-06-01

    The location of hypothalamic paraventricular neurons projecting to sympathetic preganglionic levels and related to the autonomic regulation of various organs involved in glucose metabolism (OGM) was determined by ipsilateral injections of two fluorescent tracers, Diamidino Yellow into the left dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and Fast Blue into the left intermediolateral cell column of the T8-T9 spinal cord. Hypothalamospinal neurons were mainly located in the dorsal part of the paraventricular hypothalamic nucleus (PVH) and the hypothalamobulbar neurons were most abundant in the ventral, medial and extreme lateral parts of the PVH. No double-labelled neurons were found in the hypothalamus. These results can help the knowledge of the neural hypothalamic network related with the autonomic hypothalamic control.

  12. Cardioprotection evoked by remote ischaemic preconditioning is critically dependent on the activity of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones

    PubMed Central

    Mastitskaya, Svetlana; Marina, Nephtali; Gourine, Andrey; Gilbey, Michael P.; Spyer, K. Michael; Teschemacher, Anja G.; Kasparov, Sergey; Trapp, Stefan; Ackland, Gareth L.; Gourine, Alexander V.

    2012-01-01

    Aims Innate mechanisms of inter-organ protection underlie the phenomenon of remote ischaemic preconditioning (RPc) in which episode(s) of ischaemia and reperfusion in tissues remote from the heart reduce myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury. The uncertainty surrounding the mechanism(s) underlying RPc centres on whether humoral factor(s) produced during ischaemia/reperfusion of remote tissue and released into the systemic circulation mediate RPc, or whether a neural signal is required. While these two hypotheses may not be incompatible, one approach to clarify the potential role of a neural pathway requires targeted disruption or activation of discrete central nervous substrate(s). Methods and results Using a rat model of myocardial ischaemia/reperfusion injury in combination with viral gene transfer, pharmaco-, and optogenetics, we tested the hypothesis that RPc cardioprotection depends on the activity of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones and consequently an intact parasympathetic drive. For cell-specific silencing or activation, neurones of the brainstem dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus nerve (DVMN) were targeted using viral vectors to express a Drosophila allatostatin receptor (AlstR) or light-sensitive fast channelrhodopsin variant (ChIEF), respectively. RPc cardioprotection, elicited by ischaemia/reperfusion of the limbs, was abolished when DVMN neurones transduced to express AlstR were silenced by selective ligand allatostatin or in conditions of systemic muscarinic receptor blockade with atropine. In the absence of remote ischaemia/reperfusion, optogenetic activation of DVMN neurones transduced to express ChIEF reduced infarct size, mimicking the effect of RPc. Conclusion These data indicate a crucial dependence of RPc cardioprotection against ischaemia/reperfusion injury upon the activity of a distinct population of vagal pre-ganglionic neurones. PMID:22739118

  13. Endometriosis of the conus medullaris causing cyclic radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Steinberg, Jeffrey A; Gonda, David D; Muller, Karra; Ciacci, Joseph D

    2014-11-01

    Intramedullary spinal cord hematomas are a rare neurosurgical pathological entity typically arising from vascular and neoplastic lesions. Endometriosis is an extremely rare cause of intramedullary spinal cord hematoma, with only 5 previously reported cases in the literature. Endometriosis is characterized by ectopic endometrial tissue, typically located in the female pelvic cavity, that causes a cyclical pain syndrome, bleeding, and infertility. In the rare case of intramedullary endometriosis of the spinal cord, symptoms include cyclical lower-extremity radiculopathies and voiding difficulties, and can acutely cause cauda equina syndrome. The authors report a case of endometriosis of the conus medullaris, the first to include radiological, intraoperative, and histopathological imaging. A brief review of the literature is also presented, with discussion including etiological theories surrounding intramedullary endometriosis.

  14. [Critical approach to diagnostics and treatment of lumbar radiculopathy].

    PubMed

    Bosković, Ksenija

    2008-01-01

    Although the majority of patients suffering lumbar radiculopathy have a very good prospective outcome, some 20-30% persist having problems even in two or three years time. Diagnosis is based on anamnesis and physical examination. Imaging screening with additional diagnostic methods is indicated only in patients with the extremely complicated illnesses, or in cases where the surgical intervention is inevitable. Passive (bed rest) treatment is replaced by active one. In general, there is a consensus that the initial treatment during 6-8 weeks has to be conservative. Surgical intervention of discal lesion can bring faster pain relief in patients, but in a year or two after the medical treatment, there is no clear distinction between these two approaches. PMID:19368270

  15. Acute Contralateral Radiculopathy after Unilateral Transforaminal Lumbar Interbody Fusion

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Kyoung-Min; Kim, Young-Baeg; Park, Yong-Sook; Nam, Taek-Kyun; Lee, Young-Seok

    2015-01-01

    Objective Cases of contralateral radiculopathy after a transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with a single cage (unilateral TLIF) had been reported, but the phenomenon has not been explained satisfactorily. The purpose of this study was to determine its incidence, causes, and risk factors. Methods We did retrospective study with 546 patients who underwent a unilateral TLIF, and used CT and MRI to study the causes of contralateral radicular symptoms that appeared within a week postoperatively. Clinical and radiological results were compared by dividing the patients into the symptomatic group and asymptomatic group. Results Contralateral symptoms occurred in 32 (5.9%) of the patients underwent unilateral TLIF. The most common cause of contralateral symptoms was a contralateral foraminal stenosis in 22 (68.8%), screw malposition in 4 (12.5%), newly developed herniated nucleus pulposus in 3 (9.3%), hematoma in 1 (3.1%), and unknown origin in 2 patients (6.3%). 16 (50.0%) of the 32 patients received revision surgery. There was no difference in visual analogue scale and Oswestry disability index between the two groups at discharge. Both preoperative and postoperative contralateral foraminal areas were significantly smaller, and postoperative segmental angle was significantly greater in the symptomatic group comparing to those of the asymptomatic group (p<0.05). Conclusion The incidence rate is not likely to be small (5.9%). If unilateral TLIF is performed for cases when preoperative contralateral foraminal stenosis already exists or when a large restoration of segmental lordosis is required, the probability of developing contralateral radiculopathy is increased and caution from the surgeon is needed. PMID:26587189

  16. Calibration method for lumbosacral dimensions in wearable sensor system of lumbar alignment.

    PubMed

    Tsuchiya, Yoshio; Kusaka, Takashi; Tanaka, Takayuki; Matsuo, Yoshikazu; Oda, Makoto; Sasaki, Tsukasa; Kamishima, Tamotsu; Yamanaka, Masanori

    2015-01-01

    Anteflexion of the spine is essential for many physical activities in everyday life. However, this motion places the lumbar disks under heavy load due to changes in the shape of the lumbar spine and can lead to low back pain. With the aim of reducing low back pain, here we developed a wearable sensor system that can estimate lumbosacral alignment and lumbar load by measuring the shape of the lumbar skin when the lumbosacral alignment changes. In addition, we used this system to measure the parameters of anteflexion and studied the change in dimensions of the lumbar spine from changes in posture. By determining the dimensions of the lumbosacral spine on an X-ray image, a lumbosacral dimensions calibration method based on body surface area and height was developed. By using this method, lumbosacral alignment and lumbar load could be accurately estimated using the wearable sensor system.

  17. The lumbosacral segment as a vulnerable region in various postures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosemeyer, B.

    1978-01-01

    The lumbosacral region in man is exposed to special static and dynamic load. In a supine position, the disc size increases because of the absence of axial load. In a standing position, with physiological posture of the spine, strain discomfort occurs which is increased even more in the sitting position due to the curvature of the lumbar region of the spine and the irregular distribution of pressure in the discs as a result of this. This special problem of sitting posture can be confirmed by examinations.

  18. Prognosis for Patients With Traumatic Cervical Spinal Cord Injury Combined With Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Seo Yeon; Kim, Tae Uk; Lee, Seong Jae

    2014-01-01

    Objective To delineate cervical radiculopathy that is found in combination with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI) and to determine whether attendant cervical radiculopathy affects the prognosis and functional outcome for SCI patients. Methods A total of 66 patients diagnosed with traumatic cervical SCI were selected for neurological assessment (using the International Standards for the Neurological Classification of Spinal Cord Injury [ISNCSCI]) and functional evaluation (based on the Korean version Modified Barthel Index [K-MBI] and Functional Independence Measure [FIM]) at admission and upon discharge. All of the subjects received a preliminary electrophysiological assessment, according to which they were divided into two groups as follows: those with cervical radiculopathy (the SCI/Rad group) and those without (the SCI group). Results A total of 32 patients with cervical SCI (48.5%) had cervical radiculopathy. The initial ISNCSCI scores for sensory and motor, K-MBI, and total FIM did not significantly differ between the SCI group and the SCI/Rad group. However, at discharge, the ISNCSCI scores for motor, K-MBI, and FIM of the SCI/Rad group showed less improvement (5.44±8.08, 15.19±19.39 and 10.84±11.49, respectively) than those of the SCI group (10.76±9.86, 24.79±19.65 and 17.76±15.84, respectively) (p<0.05). In the SCI/Rad group, the number of involved levels of cervical radiculopathy was negatively correlated with the initial and follow-up motors score by ISNCSCI. Conclusion Cervical radiculopathy is not rare in patients with traumatic cervical SCI, and it can impede neurological and functional improvement. Therefore, detection of combined cervical radiculopathy by electrophysiological assessment is essential for accurate prognosis of cervical SCI patients in the rehabilitation unit. PMID:25229022

  19. Optimal duration of conservative management prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy: a literature review.

    PubMed

    Alentado, Vincent J; Lubelski, Daniel; Steinmetz, Michael P; Benzel, Edward C; Mroz, Thomas E

    2014-12-01

    Study Design Literature review. Objective Since the 1970s, spine surgeons have commonly required 6 weeks of failed conservative treatment prior to considering surgical intervention for various spinal pathologies. It is unclear, however, if this standard has been validated in the literature. The authors review the natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the current standard of 6 weeks of nonoperative care prior to surgery for patients with spinal pathologies. Methods A systematic Medline search from 1953 to 2013 was performed to identify natural history, outcomes, and cost-effectiveness studies relating to the optimal period of conservative management prior to surgical intervention for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Demographic information, operative indications, and clinical outcomes are reviewed for each study. Results A total of 5,719 studies were identified; of these, 13 studies were selected for inclusion. Natural history studies demonstrated that 88% of patients with cervical radiculopathy and 70% of patients with lumbar radiculopathy showed improvement within 4 weeks following onset of symptoms. Outcomes and cost-effectiveness studies supported surgical intervention within 8 weeks of symptom onset for both cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Conclusions There are limited studies supporting any optimal duration of conservative treatment prior to surgery for cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. Therefore, evidence-based conclusions cannot be made. Based on the available literature, we suggest that an optimal timing for surgery following cervical radiculopathy is within 8 weeks of onset of symptoms. A shorter period of 4 weeks may be appropriate based on natural history studies. Additionally, we found that optimal timing for surgery following lumbar radiculopathy is between 4 and 8 weeks. A prospective study is needed to explicitly identify the optimal duration of conservative therapy prior to surgery so that costs

  20. Epilepsy in patients with spina bifida in the lumbosacral region.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Fumiaki; Morioka, Takato; Hashiguchi, Kimiaki; Kawamura, Tadao; Miyagi, Yasushi; Nagata, Shinji; Mihara, Futoshi; Ohshio, Mayu; Sasaki, Tomio

    2006-10-01

    This study aimed to assess the relevance of epilepsy and spina bifida in the lumbosacral region. We evaluated 75 patients with spina bifida admitted to the Kyushu University Hospital from 1980 to 2004. Patients were classified as having meningocele (MC, 4 cases), myelomeningocele (MMC, 6), myeloschisis (MS, 45), and lumbosacral lipoma (LL, 20). Nine cases had epileptic disorders, and all showed MS. Meticulous neuroradiological investigations revealed cerebral abnormalities such as polymicrogyria or hypogenesis of the corpus callosum in all epileptic cases. Locations of cerebral abnormalities topographically correlated with areas of interictal EEG abnormalities. Although all epileptic cases had ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt for hydrocephalus before the onset of epilepsy, interictal EEG abnormalities could not be explained by location of the VP shunt. In all LL patients, neither history of epilepsy nor cerebral abnormalities were noted on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Epileptogenesis in spina bifida patients seemed to correlate with coexisting cerebral abnormalities in MS patients rather than with the VP shunt. However, not all spina bifida patients associated with cerebral abnormalities had epilepsy, and not all cerebral abnormalities were epileptogenic, suggesting that epilepsy in spina bifida patients was multifactorial.

  1. The application of Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy and changes on MRI findings in a patient with cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Spanos, G; Zounis, M; Natsika, M; May, S

    2013-12-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is an unusual presentation for patients with neck pain. Its diagnosis and management is uncertain. This case report presents an example of a patient with cervical radiculopathy who responded to Mechanical Diagnosis and Therapy, and whose MRI findings changed over time. PMID:23127992

  2. Postfixed Brachial Plexus Radiculopathy Due to Thoracic Disc Herniation in a Collegiate Wrestler: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kuzma, Scott A.; Doberstein, Scott T.; Rushlow, David R.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To present the unique case of a collegiate wrestler with C7 neurologic symptoms due to T1–T2 disc herniation. Background: A 23-year-old male collegiate wrestler injured his neck in a wrestling tournament match and experienced pain, weakness, and numbness in his left upper extremity. He completed that match and 1 additional match that day with mild symptoms. Evaluation by a certified athletic trainer 6 days postinjury showed radiculopathy in the C7 distribution of his left upper extremity. He was evaluated further by the team physician, a primary care physician, and a neurosurgeon. Differential Diagnosis: Cervical spine injury, stinger/burner, peripheral nerve injury, spinal cord injury, thoracic outlet syndrome, brachial plexus radiculopathy. Treatment: The patient initially underwent nonoperative management with ice, heat, massage, electrical stimulation, shortwave diathermy, and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs without symptom resolution. Cervical spine radiographs were negative for bony pathologic conditions. Magnetic resonance imaging showed evidence of T1–T2 disc herniation. The patient underwent surgery to resolve the symptoms and enable him to participate for the remainder of the wrestling season. Uniqueness: Whereas brachial plexus radiculopathy commonly is seen in collision sports, a postfixed brachial plexus in which the T2 nerve root has substantial contribution to the innervation of the upper extremity is a rare anatomic variation with which many health care providers are unfamiliar. Conclusions: The injury sustained by the wrestler appeared to be C7 radiculopathy due to a brachial plexus traction injury. However, it ultimately was diagnosed as radiculopathy due to a T1–T2 thoracic intervertebral disc herniation causing impingement of a postfixed brachial plexus and required surgical intervention. Athletic trainers and physicians need to be aware of the anatomic variations of the brachial plexus when evaluating and caring for

  3. Cervical Radiculopathy: Incidence and Treatment of 1,420 Consecutive Cases

    PubMed Central

    Nemani, Venu M.; Piyaskulkaew, Chaiwat; Vargas, Samuel Romero; Riew, K. Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case series. Purpose To determine the incidence of cervical radiculopathy requiring operative intervention by level and to report on the methods of treatment. Overview of Literature Cervical radiculopathy is a common cause of pain and can result in progressive neurological deficits. Although the pathology is well understood, the actual incidence of cervical radiculopathy at particular spinal levels ultimately requiring operative intervention is unknown. Methods A large consecutive series of patients operated on by a single surgeon were retrospectively analyzed. The incidence of cervical radiculopathy at each level was defined for every patient. Procedures used for operative treatment were noted. Health related quality of life (HRQL) scores were collected both pre-operatively and postoperatively. Results There were 1305 primary and 115 revision operations performed. The most common primary procedures performed were anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF, 50%) and anterior cervical corpectomy and fusion (ACCF, 28%). The most commonly affected levels were C6 (66%) and C7 (62%). Reasons for revision were pseudarthrosis (27%), clinical adjacent segment pathology (CASP, 63%), persistent radiculopathy (11%), and hardware-related (2.6%). The most common procedures performed in the revision group were posterior cervical decompression and fusion (PCDF, 42%) and ACDF (40%). The most commonly affected levels were C7 (43%) and C5 (30%). Among patients that had their index surgery at our institution, the revision rate was 6.4%. In both primary and revision cases there was a significant improvement in Neck Disability Index and visual analogue scale scores postoperatively. Postoperative HRQL scores in the revision cases were significantly worse than those in the primary cases (p <0.01). Conclusions This study provides the largest description of the incidence of cervical radiculopathy by level and operative outcomes in patients undergoing cervical

  4. The characteristic clinical symptoms of C-4 radiculopathy caused by ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament.

    PubMed

    Katsumi, Keiichi; Yamazaki, Akiyoshi; Watanabe, Kei; Hirano, Toru; Ohashi, Masayuki; Endo, Naoto

    2014-05-01

    Cervical radiculopathy of the C2-4 spinal nerves is a rare condition and is poorly documented in terms of clinical symptoms, hindering its detection during initial patient screening based on imaging diagnostics. The authors describe in detail the clinical symptoms and successful surgical treatment of a patient diagnosed with isolated C-4 radiculopathy. This 41-year-old man suffered from sleep disturbance because of pain behind the right ear, along the right clavicle, and at the back of his neck on the right side. The Jackson and Spurling tests were positive, with pain radiating to the area behind the patient's ear. Unlike in cases of radiculopathy involving the C5-8 spinal nerves, no loss of upper-extremity motor function was seen. Magnetic resonance imaging showed foraminal stenosis at the C3-4 level on the right side, and multiplanar reconstruction CT revealed a beak-type ossification of the posterior longitudinal ligament in the foraminal region at the same level. In the absence of intracranial lesions or spinal cord compressive lesions, the positive Jackson and Spurling tests and the C3-4 foraminal stenosis were indicative of isolated C-4 radiculopathy. Microscopic foraminotomy was performed at the C3-4 vertebral level and the ossified lesion was resected. The patient's symptoms completely resolved immediately after surgery. To the authors' knowledge, this report is the first to describe the symptomatic features of isolated C-4 radiculopathy, in a case in which the diagnosis has been confirmed by both radiological findings and surgical outcome. Based on this case study, the authors conclude that the characteristic symptoms of C-4 radiculopathy are the presence of pain behind the ear and in the clavicular region in the absence of upper-limb involvement.

  5. Human lumbosacral spinal cord interprets loading during stepping.

    PubMed

    Harkema, S J; Hurley, S L; Patel, U K; Requejo, P S; Dobkin, B H; Edgerton, V R

    1997-02-01

    Studies suggest that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can generate steplike oscillating electromyographic (EMG) patterns, but it remains unclear to what degree these efferent patterns depend on the phasic peripheral sensory information associated with bilateral limb movements and loading. We examined the role of sensory information related to lower-extremity weight bearing in modulating the efferent motor patterns of spinal-cord-injured (SCI) subjects during manually assisted stepping on a treadmill. Four nonambulatory subjects, each with a chronic thoracic spinal cord injury, and two nondisabled subjects were studied. The level of loading, EMG patterns, and kinematics of the lower limbs were studied during manually assisted or unassisted stepping on a treadmill with body weight support. The relationships among lumbosacral motor pool activity [soleus (SOL), medial gastrocnemius (MG), and tibialis anterior (TA)], limb load, muscle-tendon length, and velocity of muscle-tendon length change were examined. The EMG mean amplitude of the SOL, MG, and TA was directly related to the peak load per step on the lower limb during locomotion. The effects on the EMG amplitude were qualitatively similar in subjects with normal, partial, or no detectable supraspinal input. Responses were most consistent in the SOL and MG at load levels of < 50% of a subject's body weight. The modulation of the EMG amplitude from the SOL and MG, both across steps and within a step, was more closely associated with limb peak load than muscle-tendon stretch or the velocity of muscle-tendon stretch. Thus stretch reflexes were not the sole source of the phasic EMG activity in flexors and extensors during manually assisted stepping in SCI subjects. The EMG amplitude within a step was highly dependent on the phase of the step cycle regardless of level of load. These data suggest that level of loading on the lower limbs provides cues that enable the human lumbosacral spinal cord to modulate efferent

  6. Direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF) at the lumbosacral junction L5-S1.

    PubMed

    Shirzadi, Ali; Birch, Kurtis; Drazin, Doniel; Liu, John C; Acosta, Frank

    2012-07-01

    The direct lateral interbody fusion (DLIF), a minimally invasive lateral approach for placement of an interbody fusion device, does not require nerve root retraction or any contact with the great vessels and can lead to short operative times with little blood loss. Due to anatomical restrictions, this procedure has not been used at the lumbosacral (L5-S1) junction. Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV), a structural anomaly of the lumbosacral spine associated with low back pain, can result in a level being wrongly identified pre-operatively due to misnumbering of the vertebral levels. To our knowledge, use of the DLIF graft in this patient is the first report of an interbody fusion graft being placed at the disc space between the LSTV and S1 via the transpsoas route. We present a review of the literature regarding the LSTV variation as well as the lateral placement of interbody fusion grafts at the lumbosacral junction.

  7. Lumbosacral Osteomyelitis and Discitis with Phlegmon Following Laparoscopic Sacral Colpopexy.

    PubMed

    Jenson M D, Amanda V; Scranton, Robert; Antosh, Danielle D; Simpson, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Lumbosacral osteomyelitis and discitis are usually a result of hematogenous spread; rarely it can result from direct inoculation during a surgical procedure. Bacteria may also track along implanted devices to a different location. This is a rare complication seen from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with sacral colpopexy. A 67-year-old female developed increasing lower back pain four months following a laparoscopic sacral colpopexy. Imaging revealed lumbar 5-sacral 1 (L5-S1) osteomyelitis and discitis with associated phlegmon confirmed by percutaneous biopsy and culture. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics, but required laparoscopic removal of the pelvic and vaginal mesh followed by twelve weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient has experienced clinical improvement of her back pain. This is an uncommon complication of sacral colpopexy, but physicians must be vigilant and manage aggressively to avoid more serious complications and permanent deficit. PMID:27551651

  8. Lumbosacral Osteomyelitis and Discitis with Phlegmon Following Laparoscopic Sacral Colpopexy

    PubMed Central

    Scranton, Robert; Antosh, Danielle D; Simpson, Richard K

    2016-01-01

    Lumbosacral osteomyelitis and discitis are usually a result of hematogenous spread; rarely it can result from direct inoculation during a surgical procedure. Bacteria may also track along implanted devices to a different location. This is a rare complication seen from pelvic organ prolapse surgery with sacral colpopexy. A 67-year-old female developed increasing lower back pain four months following a laparoscopic sacral colpopexy. Imaging revealed lumbar 5-sacral 1 (L5-S1) osteomyelitis and discitis with associated phlegmon confirmed by percutaneous biopsy and culture. The patient was treated conservatively with antibiotics, but required laparoscopic removal of the pelvic and vaginal mesh followed by twelve weeks of intravenous antibiotics. The patient has experienced clinical improvement of her back pain. This is an uncommon complication of sacral colpopexy, but physicians must be vigilant and manage aggressively to avoid more serious complications and permanent deficit. PMID:27551651

  9. A Review of Symptomatic Lumbosacral Transitional Vertebrae: Bertolotti's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Jancuska, Jeffrey M.; Spivak, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lumbosacral transitional vertebrae (LSTV) are increasingly recognized as a common anatomical variant associated with altered patterns of degenerative spine changes. This review will focus on the clinical significance of LSTV, disruptions in normal spine biomechanics, imaging techniques, diagnosis, and treatment. Methods A Pubmed search using the specific key words “LSTV,” “lumbosacral transitional vertebrae,” and “Bertolotti's Syndrome” was performed. The resulting group of manuscripts from our search was evaluated. Results LSTV are associated with alterations in biomechanics and anatomy of spinal and paraspinal structures, which have important implications on surgical approaches and techniques. LSTV are often inaccurately detected and classified on standard AP radiographs and MRI. The use of whole-spine images as well as geometric relationships between the sacrum and lumbar vertebra increase accuracy. Uncertainty regarding the cause, clinical significance, and treatment of LSTV persists. Some authors suggest an association between LSTV types II and IV and low back pain. Pseudoarticulation between the transverse process and the sacrum creates a “false joint” susceptible to arthritic changes and osteophyte formation potentially leading to nerve root entrapment. The diagnosis of symptomatic LSTV is considered with appropriate patient history, imaging studies, and diagnostic injections. A positive radionuclide study along with a positive effect from a local injection helps distinguish the transitional vertebra as a significant pain source. Surgical resection is reserved for a subgroup of LSTV patients who fail conservative treatment and whose pain is definitively attributed to the anomalous pseudoarticulation. Conclusions Due to the common finding of low back pain and the wide prevalence of LSTV in the general population, it is essential to differentiate between symptoms originating from an anomalous psuedoarticulation from other potential

  10. Cytogenetic telomere and telomerase studies in lumbo-sacral chordoma

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, H.S.; Dahir, G.A.; Miller, L.K.

    1994-09-01

    Lumbo-sacral chordomas are rare skeletal sarcomas that originate from the remnant notochord. There are approximately 35 lumbo-sacral chordomas reported annually in the U.S.A. The understanding of this rare human cancer is limited to observations of its clinical behavior and embryonic link. We performed chromosome and molecular analyses from five surgically harvested chordomas in an effort to document genetic abnormalities and to further understand its tumor biology. Cytogenetically, four of five patients had entirely normal chromosomes. One patient had several abnormalities seen in one of 100 cells including a translocation with breakpoints at bands 5q13 and 7q22, loss of one X chromosome and an extra chromosome 14. There was no evidence of monosomy X or trisomy 14 seen with interphase in situ hybridization using biotin-labeled alpha satellite chromosome specific probes for chromosome 14/22 and X. Telomere integrity is required to protect termini from illegitimate recombination. Typically telomeric reduction occurs in senescent fibroblasts in vivo aging and several human solid tumors. A telomeric probe (TTAGGG){sub 50} was hybridized to genomic DNA isolated from chordoma cells and digested with Hinf I which allows the telomeric DNA to remain intact. The tumor DNA was paired with leukocyte DNA from age-matched controls and revealed telomere elongation in all four patients studied with molecular genetic techniques. Telomerase activity is required to maintain telomere integrity and is not present in normal somatic cells. It is determined by visualizing the sizes of the electrophoresis gel-separated radioactive telomeric fragments assembled during incubation of cytoplasmic extracts containing telomerase. Telomerase activity was detected when compared with HeLa cells, a positive control. In addition, no telomerase activity was detected from the chordoma patient`s fibroblasts.

  11. Impact of overweight and obesity on the musculoskeletal system using lumbosacral angles

    PubMed Central

    Onyemaechi, Ndubuisi OC; Anyanwu, Godson E; Obikili, Emmanuel N; Onwuasoigwe, Okechukwu; Nwankwo, Okechukwu E

    2016-01-01

    Background Overweight and obesity have been identified as independent risk factors for musculoskeletal disorders. However, the association between obesity and low back pain remains controversial. Little is known about the effects of overweight and obesity on the angles of the lumbosacral spine. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of body mass index (BMI) and waist–hip ratio (WHR) on lumbosacral angles. Methods The effects of BMI and WHR on the lumbar lordosis angle (LLA), lumbosacral angle (LSA), sacral inclination angle (°°), and lumbosacral disc angle (LSDA) of 174 overweight and obese subjects (test group) and 126 underweight and normal-weight subjects (control group) were analyzed. Results The test group had a significantly higher mean LSA, LLA, sacral inclination angle (SIA), and LSDA (P=0.001). A significant correlation was noted between BMI and LSA (P=0.001), LLA (P=0.001), SIA (P=0.001), and LSDA (P=0.03). There was also a positive relationship between WHR and LSA (P=0.012), LLA (P=0.009), SIA (P=0.02), and LSDA (P=0.01). Conclusion There was an increase in lumbosacral angles in individuals with raised BMI and WHR. This may result in biomechanical changes in the lumbosacral spine, which increase the incidence of low back pain. PMID:27022251

  12. Lumbosacral plexus delineation, dose distribution, and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy in cervical cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Tunio, Mutahir; Al Asiri, Mushabbab; Bayoumi, Yasser; Abdullah O Balbaid, Ali; AlHameed, Majid; Gabriela, Stanciu Laura; Amir O Ali, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background To evaluate the dose distribution to the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) and its correlation with radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) in patients with cervical cancer treated with intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) and high-dose-rate brachytherapy. Materials and methods After meeting eligibility criteria, 50 patients with cervical cancer were selected who were treated with IMRT and high-dose-rate brachytherapy, and the LSP was contoured. Mean volume; percentages of LSP volume absorbing 40, 50, 55, and 60 Gy (V30, V40, V50, V55, and V60) and point doses (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5, P6, P7, P8, P9, and P10); and RILSP incidence were calculated. Results At 60 months of follow-up, four patients (8%) were found to have grade 2/3 RILSP. The mean maximal LSP dose in patients with RILSP was 59.6 Gy compared with 53.9 Gy in patients without RILSP (control; P=0.04). The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 in patients with RILSP versus control were 61.8% versus 52.8%, 44.4% versus 27.7%, 8.0% versus 0.3% and 1.8% versus 0%, respectively (P=0.01, 0.001, 0.001, and 0.001, respectively). Conclusion The delineation of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce the risk for RILSP. The mean values of V40, V50, V55, and V60 for LSP should be less than 55%, 30%, 5%, and 0.5%, respectively; however, further studies are warranted. PMID:25565862

  13. Increased intrinsic excitability of muscle vasoconstrictor preganglionic neurons may contribute to the elevated sympathetic activity in hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Briant, Linford J. B.; Stalbovskiy, Alexey O.; Nolan, Matthew F.; Champneys, Alan R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypertension is associated with pathologically increased sympathetic drive to the vasculature. This has been attributed to increased excitatory drive to sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPN) from brainstem cardiovascular control centers. However, there is also evidence supporting increased intrinsic excitability of SPN. To test this hypothesis, we made whole cell recordings of muscle vasoconstrictor-like (MVClike) SPN in the working-heart brainstem preparation of spontaneously hypertensive (SH) and normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats. The MVClike SPN have a higher spontaneous firing frequency in the SH rat (3.85 ± 0.4 vs. 2.44 ± 0.4 Hz in WKY; P = 0.011) with greater respiratory modulation of their activity. The action potentials of SH SPN had smaller, shorter afterhyperpolarizations (AHPs) and showed diminished transient rectification indicating suppression of an A-type potassium conductance (IA). We developed mathematical models of the SPN to establish if changes in their intrinsic properties in SH rats could account for their altered firing. Reduction of the maximal conductance density of IA by 15–30% changed the excitability and output of the model from the WKY to a SH profile, with increased firing frequency, amplified respiratory modulation, and smaller AHPs. This change in output is predominantly a consequence of altered synaptic integration. Consistent with these in silico predictions, we found that intrathecal 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) increased sympathetic nerve activity, elevated perfusion pressure, and augmented Traube-Hering waves. Our findings indicate that IA acts as a powerful filter on incoming synaptic drive to SPN and that its diminution in the SH rat is potentially sufficient to account for the increased sympathetic output underlying hypertension. PMID:25122704

  14. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety.” The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables “present neck pain intensity,” “fear avoidance,” and “anxiety” had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy.

  15. The validity of using an electrocutaneous device for pain assessment in patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Abbott, Allan; Ghasemi-Kafash, Elaheh; Dedering, Åsa

    2014-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity and preference for assessing pain magnitude with electrocutaneous testing (ECT) compared to the visual analogue scale (VAS) and Borg CR10 scale in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. An additional purpose was to investigate ECT sensory and pain thresholds in men and women with cervical radiculopathy of varying sensory phenotypes. This is a cross-sectional study of 34 patients with cervical radiculopathy. Scatterplots and linear regression were used to investigate bivariate relationships between ECT, VAS and Borg CR10 methods of pain magnitude measurement as well as ECT sensory and pain thresholds. The use of the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm for patients with cervical radiculopathy with normal sensory phenotype shows good linear association with arm pain VAS (R(2) = 0.39), neck pain VAS (R(2) = 0.38), arm pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.50) and neck pain Borg CR10 scale (R(2) = 0.49) suggesting acceptable validity of the procedure. For patients with hypoesthesia and hyperesthesia sensory phenotypes, the ECT pain magnitude matching paradigm does not show adequate linear association with rating scale methods rendering the validity of the procedure as doubtful. ECT for sensory and pain threshold investigation, however, provides a method to objectively assess global sensory function in conjunction with sensory receptor specific bedside examination measures.

  16. The Study of Diagnostic Efficacy of Nerve Conduction Study Parameters in Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Pawar, Sachin; Kashikar, Aditi; Shende, Vinod; Waghmare, Satish

    2013-01-01

    Background: Cervical Radiculopathy (CR) is a neurologic condition characterised by dysfunction of a cervical spinal nerve, the roots of the nerve, or both. Diagnostic criteria for CR are not well defined, and no universally accepted criteria for its diagnosis have been established. Clinical examination, radiological imaging and electrophysiologic evaluation are the different modalities to diagnose CR. The incidence of Cervical Spondylosis and related conditions is increasing in the present scenario and the use of radiologic examination is time consuming and uneconomical for the common Indian setup. Thus, there is a definite need to establish a cost effective, reliable, and accurate means for establishing the diagnosis of cervical radiculopathy. Electrodiagnostic tests are the closest to fulfill these criteria. Aim: To evaluate diagnostic utility of various motor and sensory nerve conduction study parameters in cervical radiculopathy. Setting and Design: It was a cross-sectional study conducted on 100 subjects of age > 40 years. Material and Methods: The consecutive patients clinically diagnosed to have cervical radiculopathy, referred from department of Orthopaedics were prospectively recruited for the motor and sensory nerve conduction study using RMS EMG EP Mark-II. Parameters studied were Compound Muscle Action Potential (CMAP), Distal Motor Latency (DML) and Conduction Velocity (CV) for motor nerves and Sensory Nerve Action Potential (SNAP) and CV for sensory nerves. Statistical Analysis: Study observations and results were analysed to find the Specificity, Sensitivity, Positive Predictive Value and Negative Predictive Value using SPSS 16.0. Results: Among various motor nerve conduction parameters CMAP was found to be more sensitive with high positive predicative value. CV was found to have greater specificity and DML had least negative predictive value. Sensory nerve conduction parameters were found to have less sensitivity but higher specificity as compared

  17. Use of post-isometric relaxation in the chiropractic management of a 55-year-old man with cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Emary, Peter

    2012-01-01

    This case report chronicles the successful management of a 55-year-old patient diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy using spinal manipulative therapy and cervical paraspinal post-isometric relaxation stretches. PMID:22457537

  18. Activation and integration of bilateral GABA-mediated synaptic inputs in neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Whyment, Andrew D; Wilson, Jennifer M M; Renaud, Leo P; Spanswick, David

    2004-01-01

    The role of GABA receptors in synaptic transmission to neonatal rat sympathetic preganglionic neurones (SPNs) was investigated utilizing whole-cell patch clamp recording techniques in longitudinal and transverse spinal cord slice preparations. In the presence of glutamate receptor antagonists (NBQX, 5 μm and D-APV, 10 μm), electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral or contralateral lateral funiculi (iLF and cLF, respectively) revealed monosynaptic inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in 75% and 65% of SPNs, respectively. IPSPs were sensitive to bicuculline (10 μm) in all neurones tested and reversed polarity around −55 mV, the latter indicating mediation via chloride conductances. In three neurones IPSPs evoked by stimulation of the iLF (n = 1) or cLF (n = 2) were partly sensitive to strychnine (2 μm). The expression of postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors were confirmed by the sensitivity of SPNs to agonists, GABA (2 mm), muscimol (10–100 μm) or baclofen (10–100 μm), in the presence of TTX, each of which produced membrane hyperpolarization in all SPNs tested. Muscimol-induced responses were sensitive to bicuculline (1–10 μm) and SR95531 (10 μm) and baclofen-induced responses were sensitive to 2-hydroxy-saclofen (100–200 μm) and CGP55845 (200 nm). The GABAC receptor agonist CACA (200 μm) was without significant effect on SPNs. These results suggest that SPNs possess postsynaptic GABAA and GABAB receptors and that subsets of SPNs receive bilateral GABAergic inputs which activate GABAA receptors, coupled to a chloride conductance. At resting or holding potentials close to threshold either single or bursts (10–100 Hz) of IPSPs gave rise to a rebound excitation and action potential firing at the termination of the burst. This effect was mimicked by injection of small (10–20 pA) rectangular-wave current pulses, which revealed a time-dependent, Cs+-sensitive inward rectification and rebound excitation at the termination of the response to

  19. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation. PMID:26050872

  20. Persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation have altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements.

    PubMed

    Hendershot, Brad D; Wolf, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Increases in spinal loading have been related to altered movements of the lower back during gait among persons with lower limb amputation, movements which are self-perceived by these individuals as contributing factors in the development of low back pain. However, the relationships between altered trunk kinematics and associated changes in lumbosacral kinetics during sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements in this population have not yet been assessed. Three-dimensional lumbosacral kinetics (joint moments and powers) were compared between 9 persons with unilateral transfemoral amputation (wearing both a powered and passive knee device), and 9 uninjured controls, performing five consecutive sit-to-stand and stand-to-sit movements. During sit-to-stand movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls. During stand-to-sit movements, lumbosacral joint moments and powers were also significantly larger among persons with transfemoral amputation relative to uninjured controls, with the exception of sagittal joint powers. Minimal differences in kinetic measures were noted between the powered and passive knee devices among persons with transfemoral amputation across all conditions. Altered lumbosacral kinetics during sitting and standing movements, important activities of daily living, may play a biomechanical role in the onset and/or recurrence of low back pain or injury among persons with lower-limb amputation.

  1. Effectiveness of conservative treatments for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Verhagen, Arianne P.; Ostelo, Raymond W. J. G.; van Os, Ton A. G.; Peul, Wilco C.; Koes, Bart W.

    2007-01-01

    Patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome are mostly treated conservatively first. The effect of the conservative treatments remains controversial. To assess the effectiveness of conservative treatments of the lumbosacral radicular syndrome (sciatica). Relevant electronic databases and the reference lists of articles up to May 2004 were searched. Randomised clinical trials of all types of conservative treatments for patients with the lumbosacral radicular syndrome selected by two reviewers. Two reviewers independently assessed the methodological quality and the clinical relevance. Because the trials were considered heterogeneous we decided not to perform a meta-analysis but to summarise the results using the rating system of levels of evidence. Thirty trials were included that evaluated injections, traction, physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation, medication, and acupuncture as treatment for the lumbosacral radicular syndrome. Because several trials indicated no evidence of an effect it is not recommended to use corticosteroid injections and traction as treatment option. Whether clinicians should prescribe physical therapy, bed rest, manipulation or medication could not be concluded from this review. At present there is no evidence that one type of treatment is clearly superior to others, including no treatment, for patients with a lumbosacral radicular syndrome. PMID:17415595

  2. Multimodal intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during 409 lumbosacral surgical procedures in 409 patients

    PubMed Central

    Eggspuehler, Andreas; Grob, Dieter; Porchet, Francois; Jeszenszky, Dezsö; Dvorak, Jiri

    2007-01-01

    A prospective study on 409 patients who received multimodel intraoperative monitoring (MIOM) during lumbosacral surgical procedures between March 2000 and December 2005 was carried out. The objective of this study was to determine the sensitivity and specificity of MIOM techniques used to monitor conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during lumbosacral decompression surgery. MIOM has increasingly become important to monitor ascending and descending pathways, giving immediate feedback information regarding any neurological deficit during the decompression and stabilisation procedure in the lumbosacral region. Intraoperative spinal- and cortical-evoked potentials, combined with continuous EMG- and motor-evoked potentials of the muscles, were evaluated and compared with postoperative clinical neurological changes. A total of 409 consecutive patients with lumbosacral spinal stenosis with or without instability were monitored by MIOM during the entire surgical procedure. A total of 388 patients presented true-negative findings while two patients presented false negative and 1 patient false-positive findings. Eighteen patients presented true-positive findings where neurological deficit after the operation was intraoperatively predicted. Of the 18 true-positive findings, 12 patients recovered completely; however, 6 patients recovered only partially. The sensitivity of MIOM applied during decompression and fusion surgery of the lumbosacral region was calculated as 90%, and the specificity was calculated as 99.7%. On the basis of the results of this study, MIOM is an effective method of monitoring the conus medullaris, cauda equina and nerve root function during surgery at the lumbosacral junctions and might reduce postoperative surgical-related complications and therefore improve the long-term results. PMID:17912559

  3. A ganglion cyst causing lumbar radiculopathy in a baseball pitcher: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lee, J; Wisneski, R J; Lutz, G E

    2000-06-01

    This report describes a case of a professional baseball pitcher who developed acute left lumbar radicular symptoms after a baseball game and was subsequently sidelined for the rest of the season. Physical examination revealed depressed reflexes in the left posterior tibialis and left medial hamstring muscles, mild weakness in the left extensor hallucis longus, and positive dural tension signs. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an ovoid mass at the L4-L5 level, causing compression of the dura. Surgical resection of the mass resulted in resolution of his symptoms. Pathology revealed that the mass was a ganglion cyst. A ganglion cyst is a rare cause of lumbar radiculopathy and should be considered in the differential diagnosis if a patient with lumbar radiculopathy fails to respond to conservative treatment.

  4. Growing mammary choristoma masquerading as a lumbosacral lipomyelomeningocele in a pubertal girl.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xueyan; Harter, Josephine; Iskandar, Bermans J; Salamat, M Shahriar

    2011-09-01

    The authors report, to the best of their knowledge, the first case of lumbosacral choristoma of breast origin, presenting in a young girl with lumbosacral lipomyelomeningocele. Although choristomas are considered to be benign, the regrowth of this mass when the patient was 15 and 16 years of age, and its involvement in the conus medullaris and cauda equina, warranted 2 additional resections with spinal cordotomy resulting in cessation of any further growth. The authors describe the case and provide a review of pertinent literature and a discussion of the mechanisms involving the development and growth of this lesion.

  5. The use of metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Amber; Westveld, Anton H; Szkudlinska, Magdalena; Guruguri, Prathima; Annabi, Emil; Patwardhan, Amol; Price, Theodore J; Yassine, Hussein N

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy pain represents a major public health problem, with few effective long-term treatments. Preclinical neuropathic and postsurgical pain studies implicate the kinase adenosine monophosphate activated kinase (AMPK) as a potential pharmacological target for the treatment of chronic pain conditions. Metformin, which acts via AMPK, is a safe and clinically available drug used in the treatment of diabetes. Despite the strong preclinical rationale, the utility of metformin as a potential pain therapeutic has not yet been studied in humans. Our objective was to assess whether metformin is associated with decreased lumbar radiculopathy pain, in a retrospective chart review. We completed a retrospective chart review of patients who sought care from a university pain specialist for lumbar radiculopathy between 2008 and 2011. Patients on metformin at the time of visit to a university pain specialist were compared with patients who were not on metformin. We compared the pain outcomes in 46 patients on metformin and 94 patients not taking metformin therapy. The major finding was that metformin use was associated with a decrease in the mean of “pain now,” by −1.85 (confidence interval: −3.6 to −0.08) on a 0–10 visual analog scale, using a matched propensity scoring analysis and confirmed using a Bayesian analysis, with a significant mean decrease of −1.36 (credible interval: −2.6 to −0.03). Additionally, patients on metformin showed a non-statistically significant trend toward decreased pain on a variety of other pain descriptors. Our proof-of-concept findings suggest that metformin use is associated with a decrease in lumbar radiculopathy pain, providing a rational for larger retrospective trials in different pain populations and for prospective trials, to test the effectiveness of metformin in reducing neuropathic pain. PMID:24357937

  6. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju; Lee, Jung-Kil

    2015-12-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability.

  7. Posterior Cervical Microscopic Foraminotomy and Discectomy with Laser for Unilateral Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Hyo-Cheol; Kim, Cheol-Soo; Kim, Suk-Cheol; Kim, Tae-Ho; Jang, Jae-Won; Choi, Ki-Young; Moon, Bong Ju

    2015-01-01

    Surgical decompression for cervical radiculopathy includes anterior cervical discectomy and fusion, anterior or posterior cervical foraminotomy, and cervical arthroplasty after decompression. The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a CO2 laser in posterior-approach surgery for unilateral cervical radiculopathy. From January 2006 to December 2008, 12 consecutive patients with unilateral cervical radiculopathy from either foraminal stenosis or disc herniation, which was confirmed with imaging studies, underwent posterior foraminotomy and discectomy with the use of a microscope and CO2 laser. For annulotomy and discectomy, we used about 300 joules of CO2 laser energy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was used to evaluate the extent of disc removal or foraminal decompression. Clinical outcome was evaluated by using visual analogue scale scores for radicular pain and Odom's criteria. For evaluation of spinal stability, cervical flexion and extension radiographs were obtained. Single-level foraminotomy was performed in 10 patients and two-level foraminotomies were performed in 2 patients. Preoperative radicular symptoms were improved immediately after surgery in all patients. No surgery-related complications developed in our cases. Postoperative MRI demonstrated effective decompression of ventral lesions and widened foraminal spaces in all cases. There was no development of cervical instability during the follow-up period. Posterior foraminotomy and discectomy using a microscope and CO2 laser is an effective surgical tool for unilateral cervical radiculopathy caused by lateral or foraminal disc herniations or spondylotic stenosis. Long-term follow-up with radiographs showed no significant kyphotic changes or spinal instability. PMID:26730364

  8. Reevaluation of the lumbosacral region of Oreopithecus bambolii.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A; Shapiro, Liza J

    2013-09-01

    Functional interpretations of the postcranium of the late Miocene ape Oreopithecus bambolii are controversial. The claim that Oreopithecus practiced habitual terrestrial bipedalism is partly based on restored postcranial remains originally recovered from Baccinello, Tuscany (Köhler and Moyà-Solà, 1997). The lower lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 were cited as evidence that Oreopithecus exhibits features indicative of a lordotic lumbar spine, including dorsal wedging of the vertebral bodies and a caudally progressive increase in postzygapophyseal interfacet distance. Here, we demonstrate why the dorsal wedging index value obtained by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997) for the BA#72 last lumbar vertebra is questionable due to distortion in that region, present a more reliable way to measure postzygapophyseal interfacet distance, and include an additional metric (laminar width) with which to examine changes in the transverse dimensions of the neural arches. We also quantify the external morphology of the BA#72 proximal sacrum, which, despite well-documented links between sacral morphology and bipedal locomotion, and excellent preservation of the sacral prezygapophyses, first sacral vertebral body, and right ala, was not evaluated by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997). Measures of postzygapophyseal interfacet distance and laminar width on the penultimate and last lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 reveal a pattern encompassed within the range of living nonhuman hominoids and unlike that of modern humans, suggesting that Oreopithecus did not possess a lordotic lumbar spine. Results further show that the BA#72 sacrum exhibits relatively small prezygapophyseal articular facet surface areas and mediolaterally narrow alae compared with modern humans, indicating that the morphology of the Oreopithecus sacrum is incompatible with the functional demands of habitual bipedal stance and locomotion. The Oreopithecus lumbosacral region does not exhibit adaptations for habitual bipedal locomotion.

  9. Reevaluation of the lumbosacral region of Oreopithecus bambolii.

    PubMed

    Russo, Gabrielle A; Shapiro, Liza J

    2013-09-01

    Functional interpretations of the postcranium of the late Miocene ape Oreopithecus bambolii are controversial. The claim that Oreopithecus practiced habitual terrestrial bipedalism is partly based on restored postcranial remains originally recovered from Baccinello, Tuscany (Köhler and Moyà-Solà, 1997). The lower lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 were cited as evidence that Oreopithecus exhibits features indicative of a lordotic lumbar spine, including dorsal wedging of the vertebral bodies and a caudally progressive increase in postzygapophyseal interfacet distance. Here, we demonstrate why the dorsal wedging index value obtained by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997) for the BA#72 last lumbar vertebra is questionable due to distortion in that region, present a more reliable way to measure postzygapophyseal interfacet distance, and include an additional metric (laminar width) with which to examine changes in the transverse dimensions of the neural arches. We also quantify the external morphology of the BA#72 proximal sacrum, which, despite well-documented links between sacral morphology and bipedal locomotion, and excellent preservation of the sacral prezygapophyses, first sacral vertebral body, and right ala, was not evaluated by Köhler and Moyà-Solà (1997). Measures of postzygapophyseal interfacet distance and laminar width on the penultimate and last lumbar vertebrae of BA#72 reveal a pattern encompassed within the range of living nonhuman hominoids and unlike that of modern humans, suggesting that Oreopithecus did not possess a lordotic lumbar spine. Results further show that the BA#72 sacrum exhibits relatively small prezygapophyseal articular facet surface areas and mediolaterally narrow alae compared with modern humans, indicating that the morphology of the Oreopithecus sacrum is incompatible with the functional demands of habitual bipedal stance and locomotion. The Oreopithecus lumbosacral region does not exhibit adaptations for habitual bipedal locomotion. PMID

  10. Radiological evaluation of lumbosacral spine for post discectomy segmental instability.

    PubMed

    Skomorac, Rasim; Delić, Jasmin; Bečulić, Hakija; Jusić, Aldin

    2016-08-01

    Aim To establish presence of segmental instability in patients operated with standard discectomy comparing measurement of translation and rotation on postoperative functional radiographs of lumbosacral spine with reference values,and to explore difference between patients operated on one or two levels. Methods The study included 71 patients, who were operated due to herniated lumbar disc. They were divided into two groups operated on one level (group A) or two adjacent levels (group B). All patients had been imaged in a standing position with functional lateral radiography. Radiographic images were digitized and then computerized measurement of translation and rotation was made. Measurement data were compared between the groups and with reference values obtained in healthy adults. Results Standard lumbar discectomy leads to an increase in translation, however, it reached statistical significance only for L4/L5 level and a decrease of rotation, which showed statistical significance for all samples, relative to the reference values. There was no statistically significant difference in the values of translation and rotation between the groups for corresponding levels, except for the value of the rotation for L4/L5 level as adjacent, unoperated level. Comparison of translation and rotation between the operated and adjacent levels did not show a statistically significant difference. When it comes to comparing the measured and predicted translation, there was a statistically significant difference only at the L5/S1 as anunoperated level. Conclusion Standard discectomy does not lead to radiologically significant segmental instability, and two-level surgery has not caused more pronounced signs of instability comparing to onelevel surgery. PMID:27452325

  11. Value of repeat CT scans in low back pain and radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Schroeder, Josh E; Barzilay, Yair; Kaplan, Leon; Itshayek, Eyal; Hiller, Nurith

    2016-02-01

    We assessed the clinical value of repeat spine CT scan in 108 patients aged 18-60 years who underwent repeat lumbar spine CT scan for low back pain or radiculopathy from January 2008 to December 2010. Patients with a neoplasm or symptoms suggesting underlying disease were excluded from the study. Clinical data was retrospectively reviewed. Index examinations and repeat CT scan performed at a mean of 24.3 ± 11.3 months later were compared by a senior musculoskeletal radiologist. Disc abnormalities (herniation, sequestration, bulge), spinal stenosis, disc space narrowing, and bony changes (osteophytes, fractures, other changes) were documented. Indications for CT scan were low back pain (60 patients, 55%), radiculopathy (46 patients, 43%), or nonspecific back pain (two patients, 2%). A total of 292 spine pathologies were identified in 98 patients (90.7%); in 10 patients (9.3%) no spine pathology was seen on index or repeat CT scan. At repeat CT scan, 269/292 pathologies were unchanged (92.1%); 10/292 improved (3.4%), 8/292 worsened (2.8%, disc herniation or spinal stenosis), and five new pathologies were identified. No substantial therapeutic change was required in patients with worsened or new pathology. Added diagnostic value from repeat CT scan performed within 2-3 years was rare in patients suffering chronic or recurrent low back pain or radiculopathy, suggesting that repeat CT scan should be considered only in patients with progressive neurologic deficits, new neurologic complaints, or signs implying serious underlying conditions.

  12. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5-6 fusion.

    PubMed

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-Ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5-6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5-6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2-3 degenerative disease. C5-6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2-3 segment involved in the patient's scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2-3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  13. Prospective medium-term results of multimodal pain management in patients with lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Benditz, A.; Madl, M.; Loher, M.; Grifka, J.; Boluki, D.; Linhardt, O.

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is one of the most common diseases of modern civilisation. Multimodal pain management (MPM) represents a central approach to avoiding surgery. Only few medium-term results have been published in the literature so far. This study compared subjective and objective as well as anamnestic and clinical parameters of 60 patients who had undergone inpatient MPM because of lumbar radiculopathy before and 1 year ±2 weeks after treatment. The majority of patients were very satisfied (35%) or satisfied (52%) with the treatment outcome. Merely 8 patients commented neutrally and none negatively. The finger-floor distance had decreased significantly (p < 0.01), and 30 patients (50%) had shown improved mobility of the spine after therapy. The need for painkillers had also been significantly reduced after 1 year. The arithmetical average of pain on a visual analogue scale was 7.21 before treatment, which had significantly decreased to 3.58 at follow-up (p < 0.01). MPM is an effective approach for treating lumbar radiculopathy by mechanical nerve root irritation. Therefore, in the absence of an absolute indication for surgery or an absolute contradiction for MPM, patients should first be treated with this minimally invasive therapy. PMID:27305956

  14. A case of T2 radiculopathy after anterior C5–6 fusion

    PubMed Central

    Takenaka, Tomofumi; Ohnishi, Yu-ichiro; Oshino, Satoru

    2016-01-01

    Thoracic radiculopathy is a rare entity. Symptomatic adjacent-segment disease after anterior cervical fusion occurs commonly in the lower cervical spine segment. We describe the clinical presentation and treatment of T2 radiculopathy after C5–6 anterior fusion. A 60-year-old man presented with the right axillary pain for 3 months. He had undergone C5–6 anterior fusion for cervical spondylosis 5 years prior. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance images showed T2–3 degenerative disease. C5–6 anterior fusion exacerbated the T2–3 segment involved in the patient’s scoliotic deformity. After 2 months of conservative treatment, we decompressed the T2 foramen via T2–3 hemilaminectomy and partial facet resection. After the surgery, his symptoms disappeared. T2 radiculopathy is rare but should be considered in the differential diagnosis of chest pain. Surgeons should pay attention not only to adjacent-segment disease but also to segmental degeneration at the apex of a scoliotic deformity after cervical anterior fusion. PMID:27197614

  15. Cervical Interlaminar Epidural Steroid Injection for Unilateral Cervical Radiculopathy: Comparison of Midline and Paramedian Approaches for Efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ji Young; Yoon, Young Cheol; Lee, Jongseok

    2015-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to compare the clinical outcomes of the cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injection (CIESI) for unilateral radiculopathy by the midline or paramedian approaches and to determine the prognostic factors of CIESI. Materials and Methods We retrospectively analyzed 182 patients who underwent CIESI from January 2009 to December 2012. Inclusion criteria were no previous spinal steroid injection, presence of a cross-sectional image, and presence of follow-up records. Exclusion criteria were patients with bilateral cervical radiculopathy and/or dominant cervical axial pain, combined peripheral neuropathy, and previous cervical spine surgery. Short-term clinical outcomes were evaluated at the first follow-up after CIESI. We compared the clinical outcomes between the midline and paramedian approaches. Possible prognostic factors for the outcome, such as age, gender, duration of radiculopathy, and cause of radiculopathy were also analyzed. Results Cervical interlaminar epidural steroid injections were effective in 124 of 182 patients (68.1%) at the first follow-up. There was no significant difference in the clinical outcomes of CIESI, between midline (69.6%) and paramedian (63.7%) approaches (p = 0.723). Cause of radiculopathy was the only significant factor affecting the efficacy of CIESI. Patients with disc herniation had significantly better results than patients with neural foraminal stenosis (82.9% vs. 56.0%) (p < 0.001). Conclusion There is no significant difference in treatment efficacy between the midline and paramedian approaches in CIESI, for unilateral radiculopathy. The cause of the radiculopathy is significantly associated with the treatment efficacy; patients with disc herniation experience better pain relief than those with neural foraminal stenosis. PMID:25995690

  16. Organization of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups innervating hindlimb, pelvic floor, and axial muscles in the cat.

    PubMed

    Vanderhorst, V G; Holstege, G

    1997-05-26

    In a study on descending pathways from the nucleus retroambiguus (NRA) to hindlimb motoneurons (see accompanying paper), it appeared impossible, using data from the literature, to precisely determine which muscles were innervated by the motoneurons receiving the NRA fibers. This lack of data made it necessary to produce a detailed map of the lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups in the cat. Therefore, 50 different muscles or muscle compartments of hindlimb, pelvic floor and lower back were injected with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in 135 cases. The respective muscles were divided into ten groups: I, sartorius and iliopsoas; II, quadriceps; III, adductors; IV, hamstrings; V, gluteal and other proximal muscles of the hip; VI, posterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VII, anterior compartment of the distal hindlimb; VIII, long flexors and intrinsic muscles of the foot; IX, pelvic floor muscles; and X, extensors of the lower back and tail. The L4-S2 segments were cut and incubated, and labeled motoneurons were counted and plotted. A new method was developed that made it possible, despite variations in size and segmental organization between the different cases, to compare the results of different cases. The results show that the spatial interrelationship between the hindlimb and pelvic floor lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups remains constant. This finding enabled the authors to compose an accurate overall map of the location of lumbosacral motoneuronal cell groups. The general distribution of the motoneuronal cell groups is also discussed in respect to their dorsoventral, mediolateral, and rostrocaudal position within the lumbosacral ventral horn. PMID:9136811

  17. The effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy. A case report.

    PubMed

    Savva, Christos; Giakas, Giannis

    2013-10-01

    Cervical radiculopathy is the result of cervical nerve root pathology that may lead to chronic pain and disability. Although manual therapy interventions including cervical traction and neural mobilization have been advocated to decrease pain and disability caused by cervical radiculopathy, their analgesic effect has been questioned due to the low quality of research evidence. The purpose of this paper is to present the effect of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization on pain and disability in a patient experiencing cervical radiculopathy. A 52-year-old woman presented with a 2 month history of neurological cervico-brachial pain and whose presentation was consistent with cervical radiculopathy. Cervical traction and a slider neural mobilization of the medial nerve were applied simultaneously to reduce the patient's pain and disability measured at baseline and at 2 and 4 weeks using the Numeric Pain Rating Scale, the Neck Disability Index and the Patient-Specific Functional Scale. Improvements in all outcome measures were noted over a period of four weeks. Scores in all outcome measures revealed that the patient's pain had almost disappeared and that she was able to perform her household chores and job tasks without difficulties and limitations. In conclusion, the findings of this study support that the application of cervical traction combined with neural mobilization can produce significant improvements in terms of pain and disability in cervical radiculopathy.

  18. Neural control of left ventricular contractility in the dog heart: synaptic interactions of negative inotropic vagal preganglionic neurons in the nucleus ambiguus with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive terminals.

    PubMed

    Massari, V J; Dickerson, L W; Gray, A L; Lauenstein, J M; Blinder, K J; Newsome, J T; Rodak, D J; Fleming, T J; Gatti, P J; Gillis, R A

    1998-08-17

    Recent physiological evidence indicates that vagal postganglionic control of left ventricular contractility is mediated by neurons found in a ventricular epicardial fat pad ganglion. In the dog this region has been referred to as the cranial medial ventricular (CMV) ganglion [J.L. Ardell, Structure and function of mammalian intrinsic cardiac neurons, in: J.A. Armour, J.L. Ardell (Eds.). Neurocardiology, Oxford Univ. Press, New York, 1994, pp. 95-114; B.X. Yuan, J.L. Ardell, D.A. Hopkins, A.M. Losier, J.A. Armour, Gross and microscopic anatomy of the canine intrinsic cardiac nervous system, Anat. Rec., 239 (1994) 75-87]. Since activation of the vagal neuronal input to the CMV ganglion reduces left ventricular contractility without influencing cardiac rate or AV conduction, this ganglion contains a functionally selective pool of negative inotropic parasympathetic postganglionic neurons. In the present report we have defined the light microscopic distribution of preganglionic negative inotropic neurons in the CNS which are retrogradely labeled from the CMV ganglion. Some tissues were also processed for the simultaneous immunocytochemical visualization of tyrosine hydroxylase (TH: a marker for catecholaminergic neurons) and examined with both light microscopic and electron microscopic methods. Histochemically visualized neurons were observed in a long slender column in the ventrolateral nucleus ambiguus (NA-VL). The greatest number of retrogradely labeled neurons were observed just rostral to the level of the area postrema. TH perikarya and dendrites were commonly observed interspersed with vagal motoneurons in the NA-VL. TH nerve terminals formed axo-dendritic synapses upon negative inotropic vagal motoneurons, however the origin of these terminals remains to be determined. We conclude that synaptic interactions exist which would permit the parasympathetic preganglionic vagal control of left ventricular contractility to be modulated monosynaptically by

  19. Outcomes and Treatment of Lumbosacral Spinal Tuberculosis: A Retrospective Study of 53 Patients

    PubMed Central

    He, Maolin; Wang, Kun; Fowdur, Mitra; Wu, Yang

    2015-01-01

    Study Strategy A retrospective clinic study. Purpose To evaluate the efficacy of conservative and surgical treatment for lumbosacral tuberculosis. Methods This study retrospectively reviewed 53 patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis who were treated in our institution between January 2005 and January 2011. There were 29 males and 24 females with average ages of 37.53 ± 17.28 years (range 6–72 years). 11 patients were given only anti-TB drugs; the remainder underwent anterior debridement, interbody fusion with and without instrumentation, or one-stage anterior debridement combined with posterior instrumentation. Outcome data for these patients included neurologic status, lumbosacral angle, erythrocyte sedimentation rate value(ESR) and C-reactive protein value(CRP) were assessed before and after treatment. Results The mean lumbosacral angles were 23.00°± 2.90°in the conservatively treated patients and 22.36°± 3.92o in the surgically treated patients. At the final follow-up, this had improved to 24.10o ± 2.96°in the conservatively treated patients and 28.13° ± 1.93°in the surgically treated patients (all P < 0.05). There were statistically significant differences before and after treatment in terms of ESR and CRP (all P < 0.05). All patients achieved bone fusion. The mean follow-up period was 32.34 ± 8.13 months (range 18 to 55 months). The neurological deficit did not worsen in any of the patients. Conclusions It has been proven that conservative and surgical treatments are safe and effective and produce good clinical outcomes for patients with lumbosacral tuberculosis. The advantages of operation include thoroughness of debridement, decompression of the spinal cord, and adequate spinal stabilization. PMID:26121685

  20. Don't Forget the Pulses! Aortoiliac Peripheral Artery Disease Masquerading as Lumbar Radiculopathy-A Report of 3 Cases.

    PubMed

    Lin, James D; Morrissey, Nicholas J; Levine, William N

    2016-01-01

    Orthopedic surgeons commonly encounter patients with lumbar radiculopathy. These patients typically seek treatment for lower back or buttock pain radiating down the leg. It can be challenging to differentiate between orthopedic, neurologic, and vascular causes of leg pain, such as peripheral artery disease (PAD), especially aortoiliac PAD, which can present with hip, buttock, and thigh pain. To our knowledge, this is the first report on a series of patients with thigh pain initially diagnosed as radiculopathy who underwent unproductive diagnostic tests and procedures, and ultimately were given delayed diagnoses of aortoiliac PAD. PMID:27552456

  1. [Application of ENMG-controlled electrostimulation of peripheral nerves in the treatment of compression radiculopathies].

    PubMed

    Zakharov, Ia Iu; Shirokov, V A

    2009-01-01

    A clinical experiment on a group of 22 patients, aged 45,4+/-6,2 years, with compression radiculopathies L(5)-S(1) has proved the possibility of optimized therapeutic electrostimulation of peripheral nerves under the control of F-waves on ENMG. Parameters of electrostimulation were specified as follows: rectangular impulses of positive polarity and duration of 500-1000 ms, frequency 1-10 Hz and submaximal intensity of current. The positive effect of electrostimulation on the conductivity of nerve fibers and excitability of spinal motor neurons was found.

  2. Case study: Gluteal compartment syndrome as a cause of lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Andrew; Turk, David; Howard, Antonio; Reddy, Srinivas; Stern, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 24 yr old male who was diagnosed with gluteal compartment syndrome and was subsequently found to have developed lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy and complex regional pain syndrome. The patient's gluteal compartment syndrome was diagnosed within 24 h of presentation to the emergency room, and he underwent emergent compartment release. While recovering postoperatively, persistent weakness was noted in the right lower limb. Results of electrodiagnostic testing were consistent with a lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy. After admission to inpatient rehabilitation, the patient complained of pain, burning sensation, and numbness in the distal right lower limb. Based on clinical findings, he was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type II, or causalgia, and was referred for a lumbar sympathetic block under fluoroscopic guidance. Sympathetic block resulted in relief of the patient's symptoms. He was discharged home with good pain control on oral medications.

  3. Case study: Gluteal compartment syndrome as a cause of lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy and complex regional pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lederman, Andrew; Turk, David; Howard, Antonio; Reddy, Srinivas; Stern, Michelle

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 24 yr old male who was diagnosed with gluteal compartment syndrome and was subsequently found to have developed lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy and complex regional pain syndrome. The patient's gluteal compartment syndrome was diagnosed within 24 h of presentation to the emergency room, and he underwent emergent compartment release. While recovering postoperatively, persistent weakness was noted in the right lower limb. Results of electrodiagnostic testing were consistent with a lumbosacral radiculoplexopathy. After admission to inpatient rehabilitation, the patient complained of pain, burning sensation, and numbness in the distal right lower limb. Based on clinical findings, he was diagnosed with complex regional pain syndrome type II, or causalgia, and was referred for a lumbar sympathetic block under fluoroscopic guidance. Sympathetic block resulted in relief of the patient's symptoms. He was discharged home with good pain control on oral medications. PMID:27533628

  4. The management of weakness caused by lumbar and lumbosacral nerve root compression.

    PubMed

    Sharma, H; Lee, S W J; Cole, A A

    2012-11-01

    Spinal stenosis and disc herniation are the two most frequent causes of lumbosacral nerve root compression. This can result in muscle weakness and present with or without pain. The difficulty when managing patients with these conditions is knowing when surgery is better than non-operative treatment: the evidence is controversial. Younger patients with a lesser degree of weakness for a shorter period of time have been shown to respond better to surgical treatment than older patients with greater weakness for longer. However, they also constitute a group that fares better without surgery. The main indication for surgical treatment in the management of patients with lumbosacral nerve root compression should be pain rather than weakness.

  5. Acute lumbosacral plexopathy from gluteal compartment syndrome after drug abuse: a case report.

    PubMed

    Mitsiokapa, Evanthia A; Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Salacha, Andromachi; Tzanos, George

    2013-01-01

    Acute lumbosacral plexus injury from gluteal compartment syndrome is extremely rare. Physicians should be aware of this diagnosis when examining patients with altered mental status, prolonged immobilization, and gluteal muscle compression. This case report presents a patient with acute complete left lumbosacral plexus paralysis and acute renal failure after gluteal compartment syndrome secondary to prolonged immobilization from drug abuse. Clinical examination, imaging of the pelvis, renal function, creatine phosphokinase, and urine myoglobin were indicative of gluteal compartment syndrome and rhabdomyolysis. Electrodiagnostic studies showed complete limb paralysis. Medical treatment and rehabilitation was administered. Renal function recovered within the 1st week; function at the proximal muscles of the left lower limb improved within 6 months, with mild discomfort on sitting at the buttock, foot drop, and sensory deficits at the leg and dorsum of foot.

  6. The comparison of the efficacy of radiofrequency nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression in lumbar radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Adakli, Barıs; Turhan, K. Sanem Cakar; Asik, Ibrahim

    2015-01-01

    Chronic low back pain is a common clinical condition causing medical, socioeconomic, and treatment difficulties. In our study, we aimed to compare early and long-term efficacy of lumbar radiofrequency thermocoagulation (RFTC) nucleoplasty and targeted disc decompression (TDD) in patients with lumbar radiculopathy in whom previous conventional therapy had failed. The medical records of 37 patients undergoing TDD and 36 patients undergoing lumbar RFTC nucleoplasty were retrospectively examined and assigned to the Group D and Group N, respectively. In all patients Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) and Functional Rating Index (FRI) were recorded before treatment and after one, six and twelve months after the procedure. The North American Spine Society Satisfaction Scale (NASSSS) was also recoreded twelve months after the therapeutic procedure. Statistically significant postprocedural improvement in VAS and FRI was evident in both groups. VAS scores after one, six, and twelve month were slightly higher in Group N, compared to Group D. The overall procedure-related patient satisfaction ratio was 67.5% in the Group D, compared to 75% in the Group N. Regardless of the different mechanism of action, both methods are effective therapies for lumbar radiculopathy, with TDD showing long-term lower pain scores. PMID:26042514

  7. Development of a preoperative neuroscience educational program for patients with lumbar radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Butler, David S; Diener, Ina; Puentedura, Emilio J

    2013-05-01

    Postoperative rehabilitation for lumbar radiculopathy has shown little effect on reducing pain and disability. Current preoperative education programs with a focus on a biomedical approach feature procedural and anatomical information, and these too have shown little effect on postoperative outcomes. This report describes the development of an evidence-based educational program and booklet for patients undergoing lumbar surgery for radiculopathy using a recently conducted systematic review of neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. The previous systematic review produced evidence for neuroscience education as well as best-evidence synthesis of the content and delivery methods for neuroscience education for musculoskeletal pain. These evidence statements were extracted and developed into patient-centered messages and a booklet, which was then evaluated by peer and patient review. The neuroscience educational booklet and preoperative program convey key messages from the previous systematic review aimed at reducing fear and anxiety before surgery and assist in developing realistic expectations regarding pain after surgery. Key topics include the decision to undergo surgery, pain processing, peripheral nerve sensitization, effect of anxiety and stress on pain, surgery and the nervous system, and decreasing nerve sensitization. Feedback from the evaluations of the booklet and preoperative program was favorable from all review groups, suggesting that this proposed evidence-based neuroscience educational program may be ready for clinical application.

  8. Multidisciplinary approach of lumbo-sacral chordoma: From oncological treatment to reconstructive surgery.

    PubMed

    Garofalo, Fabio; di Summa, Pietro G; Christoforidis, Dimitrios; Pracht, Marc; Laudato, Pietro; Cherix, Stéphane; Bouchaab, Hanan; Raffoul, Wassim; Demartines, Nicolas; Matter, Maurice

    2015-10-01

    Lumbo-sacral chordoma is a rare, slow-growing tumor, arising from embryonic nothocordal remnants. Wide en bloc excision with clear margins remains mandatory to achieve satisfactory recurrence rates and disease-free survival. No chemotherapy has been demonstrated to be effective and radiotherapy is only marginally effective. Tyrosine kinase receptor inhibitors have showed encouraging results in locally advanced and metastatic chordoma. Reconstructive surgery may become very complex. Multidisciplinary approach in tertiary hospitals is always necessary.

  9. Differences of Sagittal Lumbosacral Parameters between Patients with Lumbar Spondylolysis and Normal Adults

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jin; Peng, Bao-Gan; Li, Yong-Chao; Zhang, Nai-Yang; Yang, Liang; Li, Duan-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Background: Recent studies have suggested an association between elevated pelvic incidence (PI) and the development of lumbar spondylolysis. However, there is still lack of investigation for Han Chinese people concerning the normal range of spinopelvic parameters and relationship between abnormal sagittal parameters and lumbar diseases. The objective of the study was to investigate sagittal lumbosacral parameters of adult lumbar spondylolysis patients in Han Chinese population. Methods: A total of 52 adult patients with symptomatic lumbar spondylolysis treated in the General Hospital of Armed Police Force (Beijing, China) were identified as the spondylolysis group. All the 52 patients were divided into two subgroups, Subgroup A: 36 patients with simple lumbar spondylolysis, and Subgroup B: 16 patients with lumbar spondylolysis accompanying with mild lumbar spondylolisthesis (slip percentage <30%). Altogether 207 healthy adults were chosen as the control group. All patients and the control group took lumbosacral lateral radiographs. Seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters, including PI, pelvic tilt (PT), sacral slope (SS), lumbar lordosis (LL), L5 incidence, L5 slope, and sacral table angle (STA), were measured in the lateral radiographs. All the parameters aforementioned were compared between the two subgroups and between the spondylolysis group and the control group with independent-sample t-test. Results: There were no statistically significant differences of all seven sagittal lumbosacral parameters between Subgroup A and Subgroup B. PI, PT, SS, and LL were higher (P < 0.05) in the spondylolysis group than those in the control group, but STA was lower (P < 0.001) in the spondylolysis group. Conclusions: Current study results suggest that increased PI and decreased STA may play important roles in the pathology of lumbar spondylolysis in Han Chinese population. PMID:27174324

  10. Feasibility of ultrasound-guided epidural access at the lumbo-sacral space in dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa; Busoni, Valeria; Carrozzo, Maria Valentina; Sandersen, Charlotte; Gabriel, Annick; Bolen, Géraldine

    2015-01-01

    Epidural injections are commonly performed blindly in veterinary medicine. The aims of this study were to describe the lumbosacral ultrasonographic anatomy and to assess the feasibility of an ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique in dogs. A cross sectional anatomic atlas of the lumbosacral region and ex vivo ultrasound images were obtained in two cadavers to describe the ultrasound anatomy and to identify the landmarks. Sixteen normal weight canine cadavers were used to establish two variations of the technique for direct ultrasound-guided injection, using spinal needles or epidural catheters. The technique was finally performed in two normal weight cadavers, in two overweight cadavers and in five live dogs with radiographic abnormalities resulting of the lumbosacral spine. Contrast medium was injected and CT was used to assess the success of the injection. The anatomic landmarks to carry out the procedure were the seventh lumbar vertebra, the iliac wings, and the first sacral vertebra. The target for directing the needle was the trapezoid-shaped echogenic zone between the contiguous articular facets of the lumbosacral vertebral canal visualized in a parasagittal plane. The spinal needle or epidural catheter was inserted in a 45° craniodorsal-caudoventral direction through the subcutaneous tissue and the interarcuate ligament until reaching the epidural space. CT examination confirmed the presence of contrast medium in the epidural space in 25/25 dogs, although a variable contamination of the subarachnoid space was also noted. Findings indicated that this ultrasound-guided epidural injection technique is feasible for normal weight and overweight dogs, with and without radiographic abnormalities of the spine.

  11. Evaluation of Outcome of Posterior Decompression and Instrumented Fusion in Lumbar and Lumbosacral Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Ravikant; Kiyawat, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Background For surgical treatment of lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis, the anterior approach has been the most popular approach because it allows direct access to the infected tissue, thereby providing good decompression. However, anterior fixation is not strong, and graft failure and loss of correction are frequent complications. The posterior approach allows circumferential decompression of neural elements along with three-column fixation attained via pedicle screws by the same approach. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcome (functional, neurological, and radiological) in patients with lumbar and lumbosacral tuberculosis operated through the posterior approach. Methods Twenty-eight patients were diagnosed with tuberculosis of the lumbar and lumbosacral region from August 2012 to August 2013. Of these, 13 patients had progressive neurological deterioration or increasing back pain despite conservative measures and underwent posterior decompression and pedicle screw fixation with posterolateral fusion. Antitubercular therapy was given till signs of radiological healing were evident (9 to 16 months). Functional outcome (visual analogue scale [VAS] score for back pain), neurological recovery (Frankel grading), and radiological improvement were evaluated preoperatively, immediately postoperatively and 3 months, 6 months, and 1 year postoperatively. Results The mean VAS score for back pain improved from 7.89 (range, 9 to 7) preoperatively to 2.2 (range, 3 to 1) at 1-year follow-up. Frankel grading was grade B in 3, grade C in 7, and grade D in 3 patients preoperatively, which improved to grade D in 7 and grade E in 6 patients at the last follow-up. Radiological healing was evident in the form of reappearance of trabeculae formation, resolution of pus, fatty marrow replacement, and bony fusion in all patients. The mean correction of segmental kyphosis was 9.85° postoperatively. The mean loss of correction at final follow-up was 3.15°. Conclusions

  12. Dimensions Underlying Measures of Disability, Personal Factors, and Health Status in Cervical Radiculopathy: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Halvorsen, Marie; Kierkegaard, Marie; Harms-Ringdahl, Karin; Peolsson, Anneli; Dedering, Åsa

    2015-06-01

    This cross-sectional study sought to identify dimensions underlying measures of impairment, disability, personal factors, and health status in patients with cervical radiculopathy. One hundred twenty-four patients with magnetic resonance imaging-verified cervical radiculopathy, attending a neurosurgery clinic in Sweden, participated. Data from clinical tests and questionnaires on disability, personal factors, and health status were used in a principal-component analysis (PCA) with oblique rotation. The PCA supported a 3-component model including 14 variables from clinical tests and questionnaires, accounting for 73% of the cumulative percentage. The first component, pain and disability, explained 56%. The second component, health, fear-avoidance beliefs, kinesiophobia, and self-efficacy, explained 9.2%. The third component including anxiety, depression, and catastrophizing explained 7.6%. The strongest-loading variables of each dimension were "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety." The three underlying dimensions identified and labeled Pain and functioning, Health, beliefs, and kinesiophobia, and Mood state and catastrophizing captured aspects of importance for cervical radiculopathy. Since the variables "present neck pain intensity," "fear avoidance," and "anxiety" had the strongest loading in each of the three dimensions; it may be important to include them in a reduced multidimensional measurement set in cervical radiculopathy. PMID:26091482

  13. Symptomatic lumbosacral perineural cysts: A report of three cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Mayur; Velho, Vernon; Mally, Rahul; Khan, Shadma W

    2015-01-01

    Lumbosacral perineural cysts (Tarlov's cysts) are nerve root cysts, which are usually asymptomatic and are detected incidentally on imaging. These cysts are rare with an incidence of 4.6%. We report three cases of Lumbosacral Tarlov's cysts, which presented with cauda equina syndrome and radicular pain syndrome. Two of our patients had symptoms of cauda equina syndrome, and one had acute sciatica. Complete excision of the cyst was achieved in two patients and marsupialization of the cyst was done in another patient due to its large size and dense adherence to the sacral nerve roots. All the patients were relieved of the radicular pain with no new neurological deficit following surgery. Symptomatic lumbosacral Tarlov's cyst is a rare lesion, and the presentation can be low back pain, cauda equina syndrome or sciatica. Therefore, this entity should be kept in the differential diagnosis of patients presenting with these symptoms. Complete Surgical excision of these symptomatic cysts is the treatment of choice to achieve a cure. PMID:26396612

  14. A 69-Year-Old Presenting With Musculoskeletal Low Back Pain: A Case of Lumbosacral Chordoma

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Shawn P.; Beckerman, Bernard; Piña Fonti, Maria Elena

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe the presentation of a patient with lumbosacral chordoma characterized by somatic chronic low back pain and intermittent sacral nerve impingement. Case report A 69-year-old male presenting to an emergency department (ED) with low back pain was provided analgesics and muscle relaxants then referred for a series of chiropractic treatments. Chiropractic treatment included manipulation, physical therapy, and rehabilitation. After 3 times per week for a total of 4 weeks, re-examination showed little relief of his symptoms. His pain symptoms worsened and he presented to the ED for the second time. Magnetic resonance imaging was performed and revealed a high intensity mass. Intervention and outcome The soft tissue mass identified on magnetic resonance imaging was surgically removed. Shortly after the surgery, the patient developed post-operative bleeding and was returned to surgery. During the second procedure, he developed a post-operative hemorrhage related to the development of disseminated intravascular coagulation and subsequently died during the second procedure. A malignant lumbosacral chordoma was diagnosed on pathologic examination. Conclusion This case report describes the presentation of a patient with lumbosacral chordoma presenting with musculoskeletal low back pain. Chordomas are rare with few prominent manifestations. An early diagnosis can potentially make a difference in morbidity and mortality. Due to its insidious nature, it is a difficult diagnosis and one that is often delayed. PMID:25685125

  15. Decoding intravesical pressure from local field potentials in rat lumbosacral spinal cord

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Changkyun; Park, Hae Yong; Koh, Chin Su; Ryu, Sang Baek; Seo, In Seok; Kim, Yong Jung; Kim, Kyung Hwan; Shin, Hyung-Cheul

    2016-10-01

    Chronic monitoring of intravesical pressure is required to detect the onset of intravesical hypertension and the progression of a more severe condition. Recent reports demonstrate the bladder state can be monitored from the spiking activity of the dorsal root ganglia or lumbosacral spinal cord. However, one of the most serious challenges for these methods is the difficulty of sustained spike signal acquisition due to the high-electrode-location-sensitivity of spikes or neuro-degeneration. Alternatively, it has been demonstrated that local field potential recordings are less affected by encapsulation reactions or electrode location changes. Here, we hypothesized that local field potential (LFP) from the lumbosacral dorsal horn may provide information concerning the intravesical pressure. LFP and spike activities were simultaneously recorded from the lumbosacral spinal cord of anesthetized rats during bladder filling. The results show that the LFP activities carry significant information about intravesical pressure along with spiking activities. Importantly, the intravesical pressure is decoded from the power in high-frequency bands (83.9-256 Hz) with a substantial performance similar to that of the spike train decoding. These findings demonstrate that high-frequency LFP activity can be an alternative intravesical pressure monitoring signal, which could lead to a proper closed loop system for urinary control.

  16. Comparison between effectiveness of Mechanical and Manual Traction combined with mobilization and exercise therapy in Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bukhari, Syed Rehan Iftikhar; Shakil-ur-Rehman, Syed; Ahmad, Shakeel; Naeem, Aamer

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective: Cervical radiculopathy is a common neuro-musculo-skeletal disorder causing pain and disability. Traction is part of the evidence based manual physical therapy management due to its mechanical nature, type of traction and parameters related to its applicability and are still to be explored more through research. Our objective was to determine the Effects of Mechanical versus Manual Traction in Manual Physical Therapy combined with segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in the physical therapy management of Patients with Cervical Radiculopathy. Methods: This randomized control trial was conducted at department of physical therapy and rehabilitation, Rathore Hospital Faisalabad, from February to July 2015. Inclusion criteria were both male and female patients with evident symptoms of cervical spine radiculopathy and age ranged between 20-70 years. The exclusion criteria were Patients with history of trauma, neck pain without radiculopathy, aged less than 20 and more than 70. A total of 72 patients with cervical radiculopathy were screened out as per the inclusion criteria, 42 patients were randomly selected and placed into two groups by toss and trial method, and only 36 patients completed the study, while 6 dropped out. The mechanical traction was applied in group A and manual traction in group B along with common intervention of segmental mobilization and exercise therapy in both groups for 6 weeks. The patient’s outcomes were assessed by self reported NPRS and NDI at the baseline and after completion of 06 weeks exercise program at 3 days per week. The data was analyzed through SPSS version-21, and paired T test was applied at 95% level significance to determine the statistical deference between two groups. Results: Clinically the group of patients treated with mechanical traction managed pain (mean pre 6.26, mean post 1.43), and disability (mean pre 24.43 and mean post 7.26) more effectively as compared with the group of patients

  17. Comparison of histopathologic changes following X-irradiation of mid-thoracic and lumbosacral levels of neonatal rat spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Heard, J.K.; Gilmore, S.A.

    1985-02-01

    Light microscopic changes were studied in the dorsal funiculi of spinal cords from rats irradiated (4000 R) at 3 days of age and killed from 9-60 days postirradiation (P-I). The irradiated site was limited to a 5-mm length of mid-thoracic spinal cord (T only) in one group of rats, to a 5-mm length of lumbosacral spinal cord (L only) in a second group, and to 5-mm lengths of both mid-thoracic and lumbosacral spinal cord (T/L) in the third group. Changes in the lumbosacral regions were essentially the same in both L only and T/L irradiated groups. These changes included a decreased neuroglial population and a concurrent state of hypomyelination from 9-30 days P-I. In contrast, in the mid-thoracic regions of T only and T/L irradiated groups the decrease in the neuroglial population was obvious only through 13 days P-I, and by 30 days this population resembled that of the controls. The irradiated mid-thoracic areas were hypomyelinated, with the fasciculus gracilis showing a greater degree of hypomyelination than the fasciculus cuneatus. By 25 days P-I, myelination appeared to be normal in these areas. Scattered hemorrhages were noted in both lumbosacral and mid-thoracic regions, but necrotic areas occurred only at the lumbosacral level. In general, the mid-thoracic area appeared to be less sensitive to x-radiation at 3 days of age than the lumbosacral area. These data suggest that there may be marked differences in the developmental states of cells at these two levels at 3 days of age.

  18. A Consistent, Quantifiable, and Graded Rat Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Injury Model

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis

  19. A consistent, quantifiable, and graded rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury model.

    PubMed

    Wen, Junxiang; Sun, Dongming; Tan, Jun; Young, Wise

    2015-06-15

    The purpose of this study is to develop a rat lumbosacral spinal cord injury (SCI) model that causes consistent motoneuronal loss and behavior deficits. Most SCI models focus on the thoracic or cervical spinal cord. Lumbosacral SCI accounts for about one third of human SCI but no standardized lumbosacral model is available for evaluating therapies. Twenty-six adult female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomized to three groups: sham (n=9), 25 mm (n=8), and 50 mm (n=9). Sham rats had laminectomy only, while 25 mm and 50 mm rats were injured by dropping a 10 g rod from a height of 25 mm or 50 mm, respectively, onto the L4-5 spinal cord at the T13/L1 vertebral junction. We measured footprint length (FL), toe spreading (TS), intermediate toe spreading (ITS), and sciatic function index (SFI) from walking footprints, and static toe spreading (STS), static intermediate toe spreading (SITS), and static sciatic index (SSI) from standing footprints. At six weeks, we assessed neuronal and white matter loss, quantified axons, diameter, and myelin thickness in the peroneal and tibial nerves, and measured cross-sectional areas of tibialis anterior and gastrocnemius muscle fibers. The result shows that peroneal and tibial motoneurons were respectively distributed in 4.71 mm and 5.01 mm columns in the spinal cord. Dropping a 10-g weight from 25 mm or 50 mm caused 1.5 mm or 3.75 mm gaps in peroneal and tibial motoneuronal columns, respectively, and increased spinal cord white matter loss. Fifty millimeter contusions significantly increased FL and reduced TS, ITS, STS, SITS, SFI, and SSI more than 25 mm contusions, and resulted in smaller axon and myelinated axon diameters in tibial and peroneal nerves and greater atrophy of gastrocnemius and anterior tibialis muscles, than 25 mm contusions. This model of lumbosacral SCI produces consistent and graded loss of white matter, motoneuronal loss, peripheral nerve axonal changes, and anterior tibialis and

  20. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion with percutaneous navigated guidewireless lumbosacral pedicle screw fixation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Kevin S; Park, Paul

    2016-07-01

    This video details the minimally invasive approach for treatment of a symptomatic Grade II lytic spondylolisthesis with high-grade foraminal stenosis. In this procedure, the use of a navigated, guidewireless technique for percutaneous pedicle screw placement at the lumbosacral junction is highlighted following initial decompression and transforaminal interbody fusion. Key steps of the procedure are delineated that include positioning, exposure, technique for interbody fusion, intraoperative image acquisition, and use of a concise 2-step process for navigated screw placement without using guidewires. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/2u6H4Pc_8To . PMID:27364422

  1. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, Du Hwan; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-04-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  2. Does C5 or C6 Radiculopathy Affect the Signal Intensity of the Brachial Plexus on Magnetic Resonance Neurography?

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Tae Gyu; Kim, In-Soo; Son, Eun Seok

    2016-01-01

    Patients with C5 or C6 radiculopathy complain of shoulder area pain or shoulder girdle weakness. Typical idiopathic neuralgic amyotrophy (INA) is also characterized by severe shoulder pain, followed by paresis of shoulder girdle muscles. Recent studies have demonstrated that magnetic resonance neurography (MRN) of the brachial plexus and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of the shoulder in patients with INA show high signal intensity (HSI) or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle. We evaluated the value of brachial plexus MRN and shoulder MRI in four patients with typical C5 or C6 radiculopathy. HSI of the brachial plexus was noted in all patients and intramuscular changes were observed in two patients who had symptoms over 4 weeks. Our results suggest that HSI or thickening of the brachial plexus and changes in intramuscular denervation of the shoulder girdle on MRN and MRI may not be specific for INA. PMID:27152289

  3. Research strategies for pain in lumbar radiculopathy focusing on acid-sensing ion channels and their toxins.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jiann-Her; Chiang, Yung-Hsiao; Chen, Chih-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    In lumbar radiculopathy, the dorsal root or dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are compressed or affected by herniated discs or degenerative spinal canal stenosis. The disease is multi-factorial and involves almost all types of pain, such as ischemic, inflammatory, mechanical, and neuropathic pain. Acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) activated by extracellular acidosis play an important role in pain generation, and the effects of ASICs are widespread in lumbar radiculopathy. ASICs may be involved in the disc degeneration process, which results in disc herniation and, therefore, the compression of the dorsal roots or DRG. ASIC3 is involved in inflammatory pain and ischemic pain, and, likely, mechanical pain. ASIC1a and ASIC3 may have an important effect on control of the vascular tone of the radicular artery. In the central nervous system, ASIC1a modulates the central sensitization of the spinal dorsal horn. Thus, toxins targeting ASICs, because of their specificity, may help elucidate the roles of ASICs in lumbar radiculopathy and could be developed as novel analgesic agents.

  4. In vitro biomechanical evaluation of internal fixation techniques on the canine lumbosacral junction

    PubMed Central

    Dillard, Stacy; Roe, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Few biomechanical studies have evaluated the effect of internal stabilization techniques after decompressive surgery on the stability of the canine lumbosacral junction. The purpose of this canine cadaver study is to evaluate the stability of the canine lumbosacral (LS) spine in flexion and extension following laminectomy and discectomy and then stabilization with each of the three techniques: pins and polymethylmethacrylate (P/PMMA), two dorsal locking plates (SOP) or bilateral transarticular facet screws (FACET).Using a cantilever biomechanical system, bending moments were applied to the LS and range of motion (ROM) was recorded via a rotational potentiometer. With 3 Nm, the ROM (n = 4 in each group) for P/PMMA, SOP and FACET were 1.92 ± 0.96°, 2.56 ± 0.55°and 3.18 ± 1.14°, respectively. With moments up to 35 Nm, the P/PMMA specimens appeared stable. Sacroiliac motion in the SOP and FACET groups invalidated further comparisons. Each of the stabilization techniques (P/PMMA, SOP, and FACET) significantly decreased the range of motion in flexion and extension for low bending moments. PMID:26312169

  5. Does lumbosacral spina bifida arise by failure of neural folding or by defective canalisation?

    PubMed Central

    Copp, A J; Brook, F A

    1989-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether open lumbosacral spina bifida results from an abnormality of neural folding (primary neurulation) or medullary cord canalisation (secondary neurulation). Homozygous curly tail (ct) mouse embryos were studied as a model system for human neural tube defects. The rostral end of the spina bifida was found to lie at the level of somites 27 to 32 in over 90% of affected ct/ct embryos. Indian ink marking experiments using non-mutant embryos showed that the posterior neuropore closes, and primary neurulation is completed, at the level of somites 32 to 34. Since neurulation in mammals progresses in a craniocaudal sequence, without overlap between regions of primary and secondary neurulation, we conclude that spina bifida in ct/ct embryos arises initially as a defect of primary neurulation. The position of posterior neuropore closure in human embryos is estimated to lie at the level of the future second sacral segment indicating that in humans, as in the ct mouse, lumbosacral spina bifida usually arises as a defect of posterior neuropore closure. Cranial NTD affect females predominantly, whereas lower spinal NTD are more common in males, both in humans and ct mice. We offer an explanation for this phenomenon based on (a) differences in the effect of embryonic growth retardation on the likelihood that an embryo will develop either cranial or lower spinal NTD and (b) differences in the rate of growth and development of male and female embryos at the time of neurulation. Images PMID:2709393

  6. Comparison between methods of assessing lumbosacral curve obtained by radiographic image

    PubMed Central

    Vacari, Daiane Aparecida; Neves, Eduardo Borba; Ulbricht, Leandra

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the correlation between different radiographic methods in the evaluation of the lumbosacral concavity. METHODS: The sample consisted of 52 individuals with ages ranging from 18 to 28 years old. The procedures related to radiographic image collection were carried out in collaboration with a diagnostic imaging center of a hospital in Curitiba, PR, Brazil. The angles of the lumbosacral concavity were evaluated by the following methods: Centroid, Cobb1L1-S1, Cobb2L1-L5, Cobb3L2-S1 Cobb4T12-S1, Posterior Tangent and Trall. RESULTS: High correlation coefficients (r ranging from 0.77 to 0.89) were found among variations of the Cobb method. Additionally, we propose a categorical classification of angle values obtained by each method. We also analyzed the influence of the level of the inflection point between the lumbar lordosis and thoracic kyphosis in determining the evaluation method to be used. The inflection point had a higher incidence in the region between the twelfth thoracic vertebra and the first lumbar vertebra (63.5%). CONCLUSION: The correlation and agreement between methods vary considerably. Moreover, the thoracolumbar inflection point should be considered when choosing the method of assessing patients. Level of Evidence I, Diagnostic Study. PMID:27069403

  7. The Influence of “wuqinxi” exercises on the Lumbosacral Multifidus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Bai, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Jing

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] To investigate the effect of the five animals (wuqinxi) exercises on the lumbosacral multifidus. [Subjects and Methods] This study enrolled two groups of volunteers, 15 volunteers who did the five animals exercises, the experimental group, and 15 volunteers who did aerobic exercise (walking), the control group. Both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention, the average surface electromyography (ASEMG) of the two groups in the process of flexion and extension was recorded and analyzed using DASYLab10.0 software, and the flexion extension ratio (FER) was calculated. [Results] The ASEMG in the process of flexion was lower than the ASEMG in the process of extension both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention on both sides of all volunteers. There was no significant difference in FER between the experimental group and control group before the 1 year exercise intervention; however, the FER of experimental group was lower than that of the control group after the 1 year exercise intervention. There was no significant difference between the two sides in any individual both before and after the 1 year exercise intervention in both groups. [Conclusion] The “wuqinxi” exercises improved the function of the lumbosacral multifidus, and might be an alternative method of reducing low back pain. PMID:25013288

  8. Lameness caused by an extradural lumbosacral foraminal synovial cyst in three German Shepherd Dogs.

    PubMed

    Schmökel, Hugo; Rapp, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Three German Shepherd Dogs that were presented for investigation of chronic unilateral hindlimb lameness and pain in the lumbosacral region were diagnosed with an intraspinal, extradural synovial cyst and reactive fibrosis protruding into the foramen of the lumbosacral articulation using magnetic resonance imaging and histology. This extradural mass compressed the nerve root in the foramen and the cauda equina. During a dorsal laminectomy and unilateral partial foraminotomy, the cyst and the fibrotic tissue were removed with the aid of a 2.4 mm 30° arthroscope for visualization of the foramen. The fibrotic tissue surrounding the cysts was in all cases confluent with the annulus of the intervertebral disc. The histological examination confirmed the diagnosis of a synovial cyst in all three cases by finding inflamed synovial membrane in the samples from the wall of the cyst as well as reactive fibrosis and cartilaginous metaplasia in the surrounding tissue. The three patients improved after the surgery and were pain free during the follow-up evaluations.

  9. Effects of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, on cervical radiculopathy: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Neck pain is a common symptom in most patients suffering from cervical radiculopathy. However, some conservative treatments are limited by their modest effectiveness. On the other hand, surgical intervention for cervical disc disorders is indicated when symptoms are refractory to conservative treatments and neurological symptoms are progressive. Many patients use complementary and alternative medicine, including traditional Chinese medicine, to address their symptoms. The purpose of the present study is to examine the efficacy and safety of Qishe Pill, a compound traditional Chinese herbal medicine, for neck pain in patients with cervical radiculopathy. Methods/design A multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial to evaluate the efficacy and safety of the Qishe Pill is proposed. The study will include 240 patients from five sites across China and diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy, according to the following inclusion criteria: age 18 to 65 with pain or stiffness in the neck for at least 2 weeks (neck disability index score 25 or more) and accompanying arm pain that radiates distally from the elbow. Qualified participants will be randomly allocated into two groups: Qishe Pill group and placebo group. The prescription of the trial medications (Qishe Pill/placebo) are 3.75 g each twice a day for 28 consecutive days. The primary outcome is pain severity. Secondary outcomes are functional status, patient satisfaction, and adverse events as reported in the trial. Discussion Qishe Pill is composed of processed Radix Astragali, Muscone, Szechuan Lovage Rhizome, Radix Stephaniae Tetrandrae, Ovientvine, and Calculus Bovis Artifactus. According to modern research and preparation standards, Qishe Pill is developed to improve on the various symptoms of cervical radiculopathy, especially for neck pain. As it has a potential benefit in treating patients with neck pain, we designed a double-blind, prospective, randomized-controlled trial and

  10. Lumbar artery perforator (LAP) flap: a salvage tool for extended lumbo-sacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization.

    PubMed

    di Summa, Pietro Giovanni; Schaffer, Clara; Zaugg, Patrice; Bauquis, Olivier; Raffoul, Wassim

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 52-year-old man presenting an extensive lumbosacral necrosis after bilateral internal iliac arteries embolization following unstable pelvic fracture. Coverage of the defect was performed using two extended lumbar artery perforator flaps in a propeller fashion. Good functional and esthetic result was achieved at one-year follow-up. PMID:27583264

  11. Inhibitory effects of endomorphin-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurons in young rats

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ying-Biao; Huang, Fen-Sheng; Fen, Ban; Yin, Jun-Bin; Wang, Wei; Li, Yun-Qing

    2015-01-01

    The function of the urinary bladder is partly controlled by parasympathetic preganglionic neurons (PPNs) of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus (SPN). Our recent work demonstrated that endomorphin-2 (EM-2)-immunoreactive (IR) terminals form synapses with μ-opioid receptor (MOR)-expressing PPNs in the rat SPN. Here, we examined the effects of EM-2 on excitatory synaptic transmission and the neuronal excitability of the PPNs in young rats (24–30 days old) using a whole-cell patch-clamp approach. PPNs were identified by retrograde labeling with the fluorescent tracer tetramethylrhodamine-dextran (TMR). EM-2 (3 μM) markedly decreased both the amplitude and the frequency of the spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and mEPSCs) of PPNs. EM-2 not only decreased the resting membrane potentials (RMPs) in 61.1% of the examined PPNs with half-maximal response at the concentration of 0.282 μM, but also increased the rheobase current and reduced the repetitive action potential firing of PPNs. Analysis of the current–voltage relationship revealed that the EM-2-induced current was reversed at −95 ± 2.5 mV and was suppressed by perfusion of the potassium channel blockers 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) or BaCl2 or by the addition of guanosine 5′-[β-thio]diphosphate trilithium salt (GDP-β-S) to the pipette solution, suggesting the involvement of the G-protein-coupled inwardly rectifying potassium (GIRK) channel. The above EM-2-invoked inhibitory effects were abolished by the MOR selective antagonist D-Phe-Cys-Tyr-D-Trp-Orn-Thr-Pen-Thr-NH2 (CTOP), indicating that the effects of EM-2 on PPNs were mediated by MOR via pre- and/or post-synaptic mechanisms. EM-2 activated pre- and post-synaptic MORs, inhibiting excitatory neurotransmitter release from the presynaptic terminals and decreasing the excitability of PPNs due to hyperpolarization of their membrane potentials, respectively. These inhibitory effects of EM-2 on PPNs at the spinal cord level may

  12. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS. PMID:26395827

  13. Resolution of pronounced painless weakness arising from radiculopathy and disk extrusion.

    PubMed

    Lipetz, Jason S; Misra, Neelam; Silber, Jeff S

    2005-07-01

    In this retrospective, consecutive case series, we report the nonsurgical and rehabilitation outcomes of consecutive patients who presented with pronounced painless weakness arising from disk extrusion. Seven consecutive patients who chose physiatric care were followed clinically, and strength return was monitored. Each presented with predominantly painless radiculopathy, functionally significant strength loss, and radiographic evidence of disk extrusion or sequestration. Each patient participated in a targeted strengthening program, and in some cases, transforaminal injection therapy was employed. Each patient demonstrated an eventual full functional recovery. In most cases, electrodiagnostic studies were performed and included a needle examination of the affected limb and compound muscle action potentials from the most clinically relevant and weakened limb muscle. The electrodiagnostic findings and, in particular, the quantitative compound muscle action potential data seemed to correlate with the timing of motor recovery. Patients with predominantly painless and significant weakness arising from disk extrusion can demonstrate successful rehabilitation outcomes. Despite a relative absence of pain, such patients can present with a more rapidly reversible neurapraxic type of weakness. The more quantitative compound muscle action potential data obtained through electrodiagnostic studies may offer the treating physician an additional means of characterizing the type of neuronal injury at play and the likelihood and timing of strength return. PMID:15973090

  14. Preoperative therapeutic neuroscience education for lumbar radiculopathy: a single-case fMRI report.

    PubMed

    Louw, Adriaan; Puentedura, Emilio J; Diener, Ina; Peoples, Randal R

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic neuroscience education (TNE) has been shown to be effective in the treatment of mainly chronic musculoskeletal pain conditions. This case study aims to describe the changes in brain activation on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) scanning, before and after the application of a newly-designed preoperative TNE program. A 30-year-old female with a current acute episode of low back pain (LBP) and radiculopathy participated in a single preoperative TNE session. She completed pre- and post-education measures including visual analog scale (VAS) for LBP and leg pain; Oswestry Disability Index (ODI); Fear Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ); Pain Catastrophizing Scale (PCS) and a series of Likert-scale questions regarding beliefs and attitudes to lumbar surgery (LS). After a 30-minute TNE session, ODI decreased by 10%, PCS decreased by 10 points and her beliefs and attitudes shifted positively regarding LS. Immediately following TNE straight leg raise increased by 7° and forward flexion by 8 cm. fMRI testing following TNE revealed 3 marked differences compared to pre-education scanning: (1) deactivation of the periaqueductal gray area; (2) deactivation of the cerebellum; and (3) increased activation of the motor cortex. The immediate positive fMRI, psychometric and physical movement changes may indicate a cortical mechanism of TNE for patients scheduled for LS.

  15. Bidirectional inhibitory interactions between the embryonic chicken metanephros and lumbosacral nerves in vitro.

    PubMed

    Silver, Lee; Qiang, Liang; Loudon, Robert; Gallo, Gianluca

    2004-09-01

    During chicken embryonic development the metanephros forms from the uretic duct at embryonic day (E) 7. As the metanephric tissue develops between E7 and E10, it comes into close apposition with lumbosacral nerves. Coculturing of metanephric and nerve explants demonstrated that the Schwann cells of the sciatic nerve inhibit the migration of metanephric cells in a contact-dependent manner. Conversely, metanephric cells inhibit dorsal root ganglion axon extension in a contact-dependent manner. However, metanephric cells are not inhibited by contact with growth cones or axons. Dorsal root ganglion growth cones become sensitive to the inhibitory signals on the surfaces of metanephric cells around E8, a time when the metanephros is expanding into the territory occupied by nerves in vivo. These observations demonstrate inhibitory bidirectional tissue-tissue interactions in vitro and provide a novel model system for the study of contact-based guidance of both neuronal and non-neuronal cell migration.

  16. [Pain relief in lumbosacral radicular syndrome: the role of transforaminal epidural injections with glucocorticoids].

    PubMed

    ter Meulen, Bastiaan C; van der Vegt, Rien H; Wouda, Ernest; van Tuder, Maurits; Ostelo, Raymond; Weinstein, Henry C

    2014-01-01

    Lumbosacral radicular syndrome is characterized by radiating pain into a part of the leg typically served by one nerve root in the lumbar or sacral spine. The most common cause of radicular syndrome is a herniated disk. The estimated annual incidence of radicular syndrome in The Netherlands is 9 cases per 1000 adults per year. The course of radicular syndrome is favorable, with resolution of leg pain within 3 months from onset in the majority of patients. During the first few weeks post-onset treatment focusses on pain relief. Besides pain medication, transforaminal, fluoroscopic injections with corticosteroids can be chosen. Transforaminal, fluoroscopic injections with glucocorticoids are safe and effective compared to placebo. The position within the treatment protocol for radicular pain of epidural steroid injections has yet to be determined based upon further scientific knowledge. PMID:25322354

  17. Methods for determining hip and lumbosacral joint centers in a seated position from external anatomical landmarks.

    PubMed

    Peng, Junfeng; Panda, Jules; Van Sint Jan, Serge; Wang, Xuguang

    2015-01-21

    A global coordinate system (GCS) method is proposed to estimate hip and lumbosacral joint centers (HJC and LSJC) from at least three distances between joint center of interest and target anatomic landmarks (ALs). The distances from HJC and LSJC to relevant pelvis and femur ALs were analyzed with respect to usual pelvis and femur scaling dimensions. Forty six pelves and related pairs of femurs from a same sample of adult specimens were examined. The corresponding regression equations were obtained. These equations can be used to estimate HJC and LSJC in conditions where a very limited number of ALs are available: for example, during seated posture analysis as performed in the automotive industry. Compared to currently existing HJC and LSJC methods from ALs, the proposed method showed better results with an average error less than 11 mm. PMID:25497377

  18. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord

    PubMed Central

    Danner, Simon M.; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-01-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22–60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5–26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  19. Measurement of Lumbosacral Angle in Normal Radiographs: A Retrospective Study in Southeast Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Okpala, FO

    2014-01-01

    Background: A retrospective study of lumbosacral angle (LSA) in normal lateral supine lumbosacral radiographs of 274 Nigerians (aged 15-74 years) of Southeast region. A supine lateral lumbar spine radiograph is a very accurate means of measuring lordotic angles. The LSA is one of such angles, and can be used in the investigation, treatment and follow-up of low back disorders. Little is known about what the normal value for our population is and therefore, what constitutes hypo-/hyper-lordosis; most of the data in use in medical practice are based on studies on other races. Aim: To quantify the normal LSA in our population. Materials and Methods: LSA was measured by the Ferguson's technique and the data analyzed with SPSS Statistics version 17.0 (Chicago IL, USA). Results: LSA varied between 18° and 71°. With a 95.0 confidence interval of 43.3-45.6°, the mean (standard deviation) was 44.5 (9.9)° and showed no significant variation with sex and between various age groups; it compared favorably (though with small difference) with some of the literature values currently in use. Conclusion: This study had established the normal lordosis and the possible values at which to consider hypo-lordosis (below 15°), and hyper-lordosis (above 75°) in our population. Also established is that the development of lumbar lordosis ceases at spinal maturity, and that in normal lumbar lordosis measurement, the retrospective approach is a credible alternative to the prospective method. PMID:25328789

  20. Periodic modulation of repetitively elicited monosynaptic reflexes of the human lumbosacral spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hofstoetter, Ursula S; Danner, Simon M; Freundl, Brigitta; Binder, Heinrich; Mayr, Winfried; Rattay, Frank; Minassian, Karen

    2015-07-01

    In individuals with motor-complete spinal cord injury, epidural stimulation of the lumbosacral spinal cord at 2 Hz evokes unmodulated reflexes in the lower limbs, while stimulation at 22-60 Hz can generate rhythmic burstlike activity. Here we elaborated on an output pattern emerging at transitional stimulation frequencies with consecutively elicited reflexes alternating between large and small. We analyzed responses concomitantly elicited in thigh and leg muscle groups bilaterally by epidural stimulation in eight motor-complete spinal cord-injured individuals. Periodic amplitude modulation of at least 20 successive responses occurred in 31.4% of all available data sets with stimulation frequency set at 5-26 Hz, with highest prevalence at 16 Hz. It could be evoked in a single muscle group only but was more strongly expressed and consistent when occurring in pairs of antagonists or in the same muscle group bilaterally. Latencies and waveforms of the modulated reflexes corresponded to those of the unmodulated, monosynaptic responses to 2-Hz stimulation. We suggest that the cyclical changes of reflex excitability resulted from the interaction of facilitatory and inhibitory mechanisms emerging after specific delays and with distinct durations, including postactivation depression, recurrent inhibition and facilitation, as well as reafferent feedback activation. The emergence of large responses within the patterns at a rate of 5.5/s or 8/s may further suggest the entrainment of spinal mechanisms as involved in clonus. The study demonstrates that the human lumbosacral spinal cord can organize a simple form of rhythmicity through the repetitive activation of spinal reflex circuits. PMID:25904708

  1. Autologous Conditioned Serum as a Novel Alternative Option in the Treatment of Unilateral Lumbar Radiculopathy: A Prospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Goni, Vijay G.; Y. K., Batra

    2015-01-01

    Study Design The study was conducted on patients who received autologous conditioned serum (ACS) as a line of treatment at the Orthopedics outpatient department of Post Graduate Institute of Medical Education and Research (PGIMER, Chandigarh) from January 2011 to June 2012. Of the 1,224 patients, 20 males or females were included in the study based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria. The institutional board of PGIMER approved the study before it was initiated. Purpose To study the efficacy of ACS in the treatment of unilateral lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Interleukin (IL)-1 appears to be of special importance among the cytokines identified in orthopedic diseases. ACS contains high concentrations of IL-1 receptor antagonist, antagonist to IL-1 in that is a biochemical 'sensitizer' of nerve roots in radiculopathy. Methods We included 20 patients with unilateral lumbar radiculopathy after obtaining informed consent. We prepared ACS as described by Meijer et al. Under bi-planar fluoroscopic imaging in anterior-posterior and lateral views, ACS was administered via epidural perineural technique. Patients in both groups were evaluated by quadruple visual analogue scale, straight leg raising test, revised Oswestry disability index, and 12-Item Short Form of Health Survey before and after epidural injections at 3 weeks, 3 months, and 6 months. Results There was a statistically significant change in all parameters from pre-injection to first, second, and third follow-up (p<0.001). Conclusions ACS can modify the disease course in addition to reducing pain, disability and improving general health. PMID:26713125

  2. [Tactics of surgical treatment of degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in case of HIP-SPINE-syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kavalerskiĭ, G M; Korkunov, A L; Lychagin, A V; Sereda, A P; Cherepanov, V G

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study is definition of surgical treatment tactics of multilevel degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in case of HIP-SPINE-syndrome. It was presented the experience of surgical treatment of multilevel degenerative-dystrophic lesions of the lumbosacral spine in 52 patients aged from 48 to 81 years. Lumbar stenosis prevailed in 38 (73.1%) cases. There was degenerative spondylolisthesis in 9 (17.3%) cases, and degenerative scoliosis was detected in 5 (9.6%) patients. Different types of decompressive-stabilizing interventions according to direction of compression and the presence of degenerative instability were performed in all patients. Evaluation of surgical treatment was done by using of visual analog scale and questionnaire Oswestry Disability Index. It was revealed significant improvement of life quality by reducing of pain and increasing of daily activity. Maximal time of observation was 36 months.

  3. Technique and nuances of an S-2 alar iliac screw for lumbosacral fixation in patients with transitional and normal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Ohya, Junichi; Vogel, Todd D; Dhall, Sanjay S; Berven, Sigurd; Mummaneni, Praveen V

    2016-07-01

    S-2 alar iliac (S2AI) screw fixation has recently been recognized as a useful technique for pelvic fixation. The authors demonstrate two cases where S2AI fixation was indicated: one case was a sacral insufficiency fracture following a long-segment fusion in a patient with a transitional S-1 vertebra; the other case involved pseudarthrosis following lumbosacral fixation. S2AI screws offer rigid fixation, low profile, and allow easy connection to the lumbosacral rod. The authors describe and demonstrate the surgical technique and nuances for the S2AI screw in a case with transitional S-1 anatomy and in a case with normal S-1 anatomy. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/Sj21lk13_aw . PMID:27364429

  4. Lumbosacral fixation using the diagonal S2 screw for long fusion in degenerative lumbar deformity: technical note involving 13 cases.

    PubMed

    Park, Ye-Soo; Kim, Hong-Sik; Baek, Seung-Wook; Lee, Sang-Hyun

    2013-09-01

    Placing instrumentation into the ilium has been shown to increase the biomechanical stability and the fusion rates, but it has some disadvantages. The diagonal S2 screw technique is an attractive surgical procedure for degenerative lumbar deformity. Between 2008 and 2010, we carried out long fusion across the lumbosacral junction in 13 patients with a degenerative lumbar deformity using the diagonal S2 screws. In 12 of these 13 patients, the lumbosacral fusion was graded as solid fusion with obvious bridging bone (92%). One patient had a rod dislodge at one S2 screw and breakage of one S1 screw and underwent revision nine months postoperatively. So, we present alternative method of lumbopelvic fixation for long fusion in degenerative lumbar deformity using diagonal S2 screw instead of iliac screw.

  5. USE OF CONTRAST-ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY TO STUDY THE CRANIAL MIGRATION OF A LUMBOSACRAL INJECTATE IN CADAVER DOGS.

    PubMed

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Tucker, Russell L; Greene, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Volumes used in lumbosacral epidural injections for anesthesia have remained unchanged since the 1960s. The goals of this cross-sectional observational study were to characterize the three-dimensional spread of a lumbosacral epidural injection, as well as confirm that the commonly used volume of 0.2 ml/kg injected into the lumbosacral epidural space reaches the thoracolumbar (TL) junction in the majority (≥80%) of dogs. Ten clinically normal, adult, nonpregnant, mixed-breed dogs were obtained within five minutes of euthanasia and 0.2 ml/kg of radiopaque contrast medium was injected into the lumbosacral epidural space. A computed tomography scan of the TL spine was performed immediately following the injection. Migration of contrast reached the TL junction in 8 of 10 (80%) dogs. Contrast was well visualized in all epidural planes with contrast travelling predominantly in the dorsal epidural space in 7 of 10 (70%) dogs. There was no significant difference in the weight of dogs where the epidural injectate reached the TL junction and those where it did not (P = 0.16), or in the weight of dogs where the cranial-most point of the contrast column was in the dorsal versus the ventral epidural space (P = 0.32). This preliminary study supports the use of computed tomography to characterize injectate distribution in the canine thoracolumbar epidural space and provides evidence that a 0.2-ml/kg volume is likely to reache the TL junction in most dogs. Further studies are needed in live dogs to determine if variables affecting human epidural injectate doses have similar effects in the dog.

  6. USE OF CONTRAST-ENHANCED COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY TO STUDY THE CRANIAL MIGRATION OF A LUMBOSACRAL INJECTATE IN CADAVER DOGS.

    PubMed

    Kawalilak, Lukas T; Tucker, Russell L; Greene, Stephen A

    2015-01-01

    Volumes used in lumbosacral epidural injections for anesthesia have remained unchanged since the 1960s. The goals of this cross-sectional observational study were to characterize the three-dimensional spread of a lumbosacral epidural injection, as well as confirm that the commonly used volume of 0.2 ml/kg injected into the lumbosacral epidural space reaches the thoracolumbar (TL) junction in the majority (≥80%) of dogs. Ten clinically normal, adult, nonpregnant, mixed-breed dogs were obtained within five minutes of euthanasia and 0.2 ml/kg of radiopaque contrast medium was injected into the lumbosacral epidural space. A computed tomography scan of the TL spine was performed immediately following the injection. Migration of contrast reached the TL junction in 8 of 10 (80%) dogs. Contrast was well visualized in all epidural planes with contrast travelling predominantly in the dorsal epidural space in 7 of 10 (70%) dogs. There was no significant difference in the weight of dogs where the epidural injectate reached the TL junction and those where it did not (P = 0.16), or in the weight of dogs where the cranial-most point of the contrast column was in the dorsal versus the ventral epidural space (P = 0.32). This preliminary study supports the use of computed tomography to characterize injectate distribution in the canine thoracolumbar epidural space and provides evidence that a 0.2-ml/kg volume is likely to reache the TL junction in most dogs. Further studies are needed in live dogs to determine if variables affecting human epidural injectate doses have similar effects in the dog. PMID:25868075

  7. The effect of sling exercise on sagittal lumbosacral angle and intervertebral disc area of chronic low back pain patients

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Bum; Cho, Won-Je

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to observe the change of lumbosacral angle and intervertebral disc (IVD) area. The study was conducted on chronic low back pain (CLBP) female patients for 12 weeks by operating sling exercise and general physical therapy. The 57 CLBP were divided into 2 groups which, sling exercise group (SEG, n=34) and general physical therapy group (PTG, n=23). The experiment was conducted three times a week for 12 weeks. The lumbosacral angle, which means the angle between the L1–L2 lumbar was measured by plain radiography. The IVD area, which means the IVD height and volume was measured by magnetic resonance imaging. The pain was measured by visual analogue scale (VAS). As a result, after 12-week exercise, VAS had decreased in all groups. The angle of L3–4 and L4–5 and the height of IVD had increased in SEG. Also, IVD height and volume has more improved in SEG compare the PTG. Therefore, the sling exercise is proper treatment for CLBP patients’ recovery because It improve the lumbosacral angle and IVD area. PMID:27807527

  8. Quantitative evaluation of the lumbosacral sagittal alignment in degenerative lumbar spinal stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Makirov, Serik K.; Jahaf, Mohammed T.; Nikulina, Anastasia A.

    2015-01-01

    Goal of the study This study intends to develop a method of quantitative sagittal balance parameters assessment, based on a geometrical model of lumbar spine and sacrum. Methods One hundred eight patients were divided into 2 groups. In the experimental group have been included 59 patients with lumbar spinal stenosis on L1-5 level. Forty-nine healthy volunteers without history of any lumbar spine pathlogy were included in the control group. All patients have been examined with supine MRI. Lumbar lordosis has been adopted as circular arc and described either anatomical (lumbar lordosis angle), or geometrical (chord length, circle segment height, the central angle, circle radius) parameters. Moreover, 2 sacral parameters have been assessed for all patients: sacral slope and sacral deviation angle. Both parameters characterize sacrum disposition in horizontal and vertical axis respectively. Results Significant correlation was observed between anatomical and geometrical lumbo-sacral parameters. Significant differences between stenosis group and control group were observed in the value of the “central angle” and “sacral deviation” parameters. We propose additional parameters: lumbar coefficient, as ratio of the lordosis angle to the segmental angle (Kl); sacral coefficient, as ratio of the sacral tilt (ST) to the sacral deviation (SD) angle (Ks); and assessment modulus of the mathematical difference between sacral and lumbar coefficients has been used for determining lumbosacral balance (LSB). Statistically significant differences between main and control group have been obtained for all described coefficients (p = 0.006, p = 0.0001, p = 0.0001, accordingly). Median of LSB value of was 0.18 and 0.34 for stenosis and control groups, accordingly. Conclusion Based on these results we believe that that spinal stenosis is associated with an acquired deformity that is measureable by the described parameters. It's possible that spinal stenosis occurs in patients with an

  9. Activation patterns of embryonic chick lumbosacral motoneurones following large spinal cord reversals.

    PubMed Central

    Vogel, M W

    1987-01-01

    1. Embryonic chick motoneurones were caused to innervate inappropriate hindlimb muscles by rotating the presumptive lumbosacral region of the neural tube in stage 15-16 embryos which is prior to the outgrowth of motoneurone axons. 2. The activation patterns of motoneurones in control and spinal cord reversal embryos were analysed from electromyographic (e.m.g.) recordings of stage 36 limb muscles during evoked movement sequences in an isolated spinal cord-limb preparation. Histograms representing the frequency of activation were constructed for each muscle. The muscle's pattern of activation was classified as flexor-like or extensor-like and compared to the activation patterns of control muscles. 3. A series of control operations was performed in which the prospective lumbosacral region of the neural tube was removed and replaced in its original orientation. Muscles in these embryos were innervated by their normal motoneurone pools and they were activated normally, indicating that the neural tube operation per se does not alter the activation pattern of motoneurones. Furthermore, some muscles (twelve out of sixty-one) in spinal cord reversal embryos had normal activation patterns and appeared to be innervated by their original motoneurones. Based on these results and the result of a previous study (Landmesser & O'Donovan, 1984 b), it is concluded that motoneurones in reversed spinal cords are activated in a manner appropriate for their original identity. 4. The majority of muscles (thirty-three out of sixty-one) in large spinal cord reversal embryos were activated during an appropriate phase of the kicking cycle. Of the remaining muscles, 16% were activated inappropriately (i.e. extensor muscles were activated as flexors, and vice versa), and 30% had a novel 'mixed' flexor- and extensor-like activation pattern. However, the activation pattern of most muscles differed markedly from that of any other control muscles regardless of whether the muscle was activated

  10. In vitro biomechanical comparison of the flexion/extension mobility of the canine lumbosacral junction before and after dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy.

    PubMed

    Early, P; Mente, P; Dillard, S; Roe, S

    2013-06-01

    The purpose of this canine cadaver study was to evaluate the range of flexion and extension of the canine lumbosacral spine before and after dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy. Using a cantilever biomechanical system, a 3Nm bending moment was applied to flex and extend the lumbosacral segment. Motion in L7 (total range of motion [ROM] and neutral zone motion [NZ]) was recorded via a rotational potentiometer. There was a significant increase in NZ and ROM after the decompressive procedures (NZ before decompression 6.0±1.2°; NZ after decompression 7.6±2.1°; ROM before decompression 32.8±6.4°; ROM after decompression 40.2±5.6°). It is unknown whether dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy will induce the same increased motion in clinical cases. Dogs with lumbosacral subluxation, active dogs with little radiographic degenerative changes and working dogs could benefit from lumbosacral stabilization. This cadaver study demonstrated that dorsal laminectomy and partial discectomy at the lumbosacral junction does lead to significant spinal instability.

  11. [Combined lumbosacral and vaginal physiotherapy in the treatment of overactive bladder in postmenopausal women].

    PubMed

    Neĭmark, B A; Neĭmark, A I; Raĭgorodskiĭ, Iu M; Tishchenko, G E; Gol'braĭkh, G E

    2011-01-01

    Efficacy of combined application of physical factors including lumbosacral magnetotherapy and vaginal vibromagnetic impact is shown in 48 postmenopausal women (mean age 62.5 +/- 1.6 years) with overactive bladder (OAB). Choice of this combination is explained by a multifactorial OAB pathogenesis and degenerative spinal diseases often encountered in postmenopausal women (70.8% in this study). The exposures of the spine and the bladder (vaginal) were made one after the other with duration of the first stage 10-15 min, of the second--5-7 min, the course consisted of 10-12 procedures. The results of the treatment were assessed by urination rhythm, volume, number of incontinence episodes. Quality of life was evaluated according to special questionnaires. Trophic function of the spinal cord and innervation of the bladder were studied by n. tibialis conduction measured by electroneuromyography (ENMG). The following results were obtained: reduction of urinations for 24 hours by 36.9%, urgent episodes--by 44%, urgent incontinence--by 59.7%. Voiding volume significantly increased (by 26%). A total score of anxiety related to OAB fell by 51.3%. M-response amplitude in ENMG rose 1.5-fold, while velocity of the impulse conduction along the n. tibialis enhanced 1.2-fold. The technique was accomplished with AMUS-01-Intramag device and attachment to it Rectomassager made in Russia. PMID:22066236

  12. A case report of extramedullary haematopoeisis in lumbosacral region presenting as cauda equina syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Tharadara, G D; Chhatrala, Naitik; Jain, Shubham

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Extramedullary hematopoeisis (EMH) is defined as formation of blood cells outside the bone marrow. It occurs most commonly in the liver and spleen in patients having disorders that lead to chronic anaemia. EMH in spinal canal is a very rare site and cauda equina syndrome due to EMH has very few cases presented in literature. Case Presentation A 28 year old male patient presented with complain of incontinenance of bladder and bowel along with saddle anaesthesia from 10 days. Patient was a known case of beta-thalassemia intermedia. And MRI scan of the spine showed multiple well circumscribed, enhancing lesions in the epidural space extending from L5 to S3 and resulting in compression of the cauda equina. Patient underwent posterior neural decompression by a laminectomy from L5 to S3. At 3 months follow up patient had partial recovery of his bladder control and complete recovery of sensation. Conclusion EMH should be recognized early on the basis of clinical features and MRI findings. The various modalities available for treatment of such cases includes blood transfusion, low dose radiotherapy, hydroxyurea and surgical decompression. There are very few cases noted in the literature of such phenomenon in the lumbosacral spine. In cases of acute presentations like cauda equine surgical decompression is a treatment modality of choice. PMID:27652196

  13. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index.

    PubMed

    Rodine, Robert J; Vernon, Howard

    2012-03-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR.

  14. Cervical radiculopathy: a systematic review on treatment by spinal manipulation and measurement with the Neck Disability Index

    PubMed Central

    Rodine, Robert J.; Vernon, Howard

    2012-01-01

    Cervical radiculopathy (CR), while less common than conditions with neck pain alone, can be a significant cause of neck pain and disability; thus the determination of adequate treatment options for patients is essential. Currently, inadequate scientific literature restricts specific conservative management recommendations for CR. Despite a paucity of evidence for high-velocity low-amplitude (HVLA) spinal manipulation in the treatment for CR, this strategy has been frequently labeled as contraindicated. Scientific support for appropriate outcome measures for CR is equally deficient. While more scientific data is needed to draw firm conclusions, the present review suggests that spinal manipulation may be cautiously considered as a therapeutic option for patients suffering from CR. With respect to outcome measures, the Neck Disability Index appears well-suited for spinal manipulative treatment of CR. PMID:22457538

  15. What progress has been made in the understanding and treatment of degenerative lumbosacral stenosis in dogs during the past 30 years?

    PubMed

    Jeffery, Nick D; Barker, Andrew; Harcourt-Brown, Tom

    2014-07-01

    An association between degenerative changes in the lumbosacral region of the vertebral column and clinical signs of pain and pelvic limb dysfunction has long been recognized in dogs and has become known as degenerative lumbosacral stenosis syndrome. Over the past two decades, methods of imaging this condition have advanced greatly, but definitive criteria for a reliable diagnosis using physical examination, imaging and electrodiagnostics remain elusive. Available treatment options have changed little over more than 30 years but, more importantly, there is a lack of comparative studies and little progress has been made in providing evidence-based recommendations for the treatment of affected dogs. This review provides an overview of the changes in diagnosis, understanding and treatment of lumbosacral disease in dogs over the past 30 years. Approaches to address the unanswered questions regarding treatment choice are also proposed.

  16. Kinematic and dynamic gait compensations in a rat model of lumbar radiculopathy and the effects of tumor necrosis factor-alpha antagonism

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) has received significant attention as a mediator of lumbar radiculopathy, with interest in TNF antagonism to treat radiculopathy. Prior studies have demonstrated that TNF antagonists can attenuate heightened nociception resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the preclinical model. Less is known about the potential impact of TNF antagonism on gait compensations, despite being of clinical relevance. In this study, we expand on previous descriptions of gait compensations resulting from lumbar radiculopathy in the rat and describe the ability of local TNF antagonism to prevent the development of gait compensations, altered weight bearing, and heightened nociception. Methods Eighteen male Sprague-Dawley rats were investigated for mechanical sensitivity, weight-bearing, and gait pre- and post-operatively. For surgery, tail nucleus pulposus (NP) tissue was collected and the right L5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) was exposed (Day 0). In sham animals, NP tissue was discarded (n = 6); for experimental animals, autologous NP was placed on the DRG with or without 20 μg of soluble TNF receptor type II (sTNFRII, n = 6 per group). Spatiotemporal gait characteristics (open arena) and mechanical sensitivity (von Frey filaments) were assessed on post-operative Day 5; gait dynamics (force plate arena) and weight-bearing (incapacitance meter) were assessed on post-operative Day 6. Results High-speed gait characterization revealed animals with NP alone had a 5% decrease in stance time on their affected limbs on Day 5 (P ≤0.032). Ground reaction force analysis on Day 6 aligned with temporal changes observed on Day 5, with vertical impulse reduced in the affected limb of animals with NP alone (area under the vertical force-time curve, P <0.02). Concordant with gait, animals with NP alone also had some evidence of affected limb mechanical allodynia on Day 5 (P = 0.08) and reduced weight-bearing on the affected limb on Day 6 (P <0.05). Delivery

  17. [The development of organization of medical care to patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine].

    PubMed

    2012-01-01

    The article deals with issues of development of organizational technologies in the field of medical care of patients with degenerative dystrophic diseases of lumbosacral section of spine. The comprehensive evaluation of the process of medical care provision to this category of patients revealed the need in measures concerning the reconstruction and development of effectiveness of process. The model is elaborated concerning medical cary of patients with backache with the purpose to establish the succession between various stages of medical care provision. The issues of rational distribution of manpower resources and exclusion of duplication of activities on different stages of the process are considered.

  18. A group II-activated ascending tract of lumbosacral origin in the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P J; Riddell, J S

    1990-01-01

    1. Electrophysiological investigations have revealed a population of ascending tract neurones originating in the lumbosacral enlargement, with input from group II muscle afferents of the cat hindlimb. 2. Single-unit microelectrode recordings were made in the lateral funiculus at L6, from the axons of thirty-four ascending tract neurones. All of the axons were antidromically activated by stimulation of the ipsilateral lateral funiculus at Th13 and, whenever tested (eight units), at C1. 3. Conduction velocities of the axons, between the L6 and Th13 segment, ranged from 33 to 92 m s-1 (mean 61 m s-1). 4. All of the ascending tract neurones were discharged following electrical stimulation of muscle nerves at group II strength, but not by weaker stimuli in the group I range. Most of the investigated neurones were excited by group II afferents of more than one muscle nerve. In addition, a proportion of the units tested could also be discharged by cutaneous and by joint afferents. 5. Responses to natural stimuli were investigated in eighteen ascending tract neurones discharged by electrical stimulation of group II afferents in the gastrocnemius-soleus (GS) and plantaris (P1) nerves which were dissected free in continuity with their muscles. Seven units were spontaneously active. Eight units responded to isometric contraction of the GS/P1 muscles with a discharge occurring mainly on the falling phase of muscle tension. Nine units increased their discharge frequency in response to stretching of the muscles and five units responded to mechanically probing the muscles with a blunt instrument. 6. The final termination sites of this group of ascending tract neurones has yet to be determined. Initial attempts (three units) to antidromically activate the neurones from the cerebellum have been unsuccessful. Other likely areas of termination in the brain stem are considered. PMID:2213583

  19. Increased serotonergic innervation of lumbosacral motoneurons of rolling mouse Nagoya in correlation with abnormal hindlimb extension.

    PubMed

    Koyanagi, Y; Sawada, K; Sakata-Haga, H; Jeong, Y-G; Fukui, Y

    2006-12-01

    Rolling Mouse Nagoya (RMN) carries a mutation in a gene encoding for alpha(1A) subunit of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channel (Ca(v)2.1). In addition to ataxia, this mutant mouse exhibits abnormal hindlimb extension, which is characterized by a sustained excessive tone of hindlimb extensor muscles. This study aimed to clarify whether serotonergic (5-HTergic) innervation of the spinal motoneurons was altered in RMN in relation to the abnormal hindlimb extension. The density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres in the ventral horn of lumbar and sacral regions of spinal cord was significantly greater in RMN than in controls. Retrograde wheat germ agglutinin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) labelling combined with 5-HT immunostaining revealed that the number of 5-HT immunoreactive terminals adjoining femoris quadriceps motoneurons was about 2.5-fold greater in RMN than in controls. Furthermore, 5-HT immunostaining in the lumbar cord ventral horn was examined in three other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice (tottering, leaner and pogo) as to whether or not they showed the abnormal hindlimb extension. Among these mutants, the increased density of 5-HT immunoreactive fibres was observed in correlation with the presence of the abnormal hindlimb extension. The results suggest an increased 5-HTergic innervation of the lumbosacral motoneurons in correlation with the abnormal hindlimb extension in RMN and other Ca(v)2.1 mutant mice. As 5-HT is known to induce the sustained membrane depolarizations without continuous excitatory synaptic inputs (plateau potentials) in spinal motoneurons, the increased 5-HTergic innervation may cause the sustained excitation of hindlimb extensor motoneurons, resulting in the abnormal hindlimb extension.

  20. Effects of Lumbosacral Spinal Cord Epidural Stimulation for Standing after Chronic Complete Paralysis in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rejc, Enrico; Angeli, Claudia; Harkema, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Sensory and motor complete spinal cord injury (SCI) has been considered functionally complete resulting in permanent paralysis with no recovery of voluntary movement, standing or walking. Previous findings demonstrated that lumbosacral spinal cord epidural stimulation can activate the spinal neural networks in one individual with motor complete, but sensory incomplete SCI, who achieved full body weight-bearing standing with independent knee extension, minimal self-assistance for balance and minimal external assistance for facilitating hip extension. In this study, we showed that two clinically sensory and motor complete participants were able to stand over-ground bearing full body-weight without any external assistance, using their hands to assist balance. The two clinically motor complete, but sensory incomplete participants also used minimal external assistance for hip extension. Standing with the least amount of assistance was achieved with individual-specific stimulation parameters, which promoted overall continuous EMG patterns in the lower limbs’ muscles. Stimulation parameters optimized for one individual resulted in poor standing and additional need of external assistance for hip and knee extension in the other participants. During sitting, little or negligible EMG activity of lower limb muscles was induced by epidural stimulation, showing that the weight-bearing related sensory information was needed to generate sufficient EMG patterns to effectively support full weight-bearing standing. In general, electrode configurations with cathodes selected in the caudal region of the array at relatively higher frequencies (25–60 Hz) resulted in the more effective EMG patterns for standing. These results show that human spinal circuitry can generate motor patterns effective for standing in the absence of functional supraspinal connections; however the appropriate selection of stimulation parameters is critical. PMID:26207623

  1. An Evaluation of the Effectiveness of Hyaluronidase in the Selective Nerve Root Block of Radiculopathy: A Double Blind, Controlled Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Sang-Bong; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Shin, Dong-Young

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Prospective, double-blind, randomized controlled trial. Purpose To determine the ability of hyaluronidase to provide longer lasting pain relief and functional improvement in patients with lumbar radiculopathy. Overview of Literature Selective nerve root block (SNRB) is a good treatment option in lumbar radiculopathy. We studied the effectiveness of hyaluronidase when added to the traditional SNRB regimen. Methods A sample size of 126 patients per group was necessary. A sample of 252 patients who underwent an injection procedure with or without hyaluronidase due to radiculopathy was included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups: the control (C) group and the hyaluronidase (H) group. After SNRB due to radiculopathy, the visual analog scale (VAS) was compared at 2, 4, 6, 8, and 12 weeks between the two groups, and the Oswestry disability index (ODI) was compared at 12 weeks between the two groups. Results Both groups seemed to have general improvement in VAS, but in C group, the VAS was higher than the H group 2 and 4 weeks after the surgery, and the difference in time-group change between 2 groups was statistically significant (p <0.05). ODI improved in both groups, and the difference in time-group change between 2 groups was not statistically significant (p >0.05). Conclusions The rebound pain (the re-occurrence of pain within 2-4 weeks after injection) that occurs within 2-4 weeks after the injection of the routine regimen can be reduced when hyaluronidase is added to the routine SNRB regimen. PMID:25705339

  2. [Stiffening effect of a transsacral fusion system for the lumbosacral junction. A probabilistic finite element analysis and sensitivity study].

    PubMed

    Boustani, H N; Rohlmann, A; Abouezzeddine, O; Bergmann, G; Zander, T

    2011-02-01

    The novel transsacral fusion system AxiALIF allows stabilization of the lumbosacral junction. The system consists of a screw with two different diameters. With additional facet screws or internal fixation devices 360° fusion can be achieved. The effects of different parameters such as length, diameter combination and material of the transsacral screw, type of additional fixation and stiffness of the bone are unknown. In a probabilistic finite element analysis, the input parameters were randomly varied. The rotational angles and the axial forces in the various implants were calculated for four different load scenarios. In a subsequent sensitivity study the influences of single input parameters on the variance of the results were calculated. A transsacral screw significantly reduces the motion in the treated segment, except for axial rotation. An additional fixation has a strong effect on the variance of rotation angles. The other parameters usually explain less than 10% of the variance. The novel lumbosacral fusion system allows good stabilization of the segment, especially when additional fixation via facet screws or fixators is performed.

  3. Sacroiliac fascial lipocele could be a neglected cause of lumbosacral pain: case study of percutaneous endoscopic treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jun-Song; Chu, Lei; Hao, Ding-Jun; Zhen, Yuan-Yi; Deng, Zhong-Liang

    2015-01-01

    The pathological entities commonly associated with lumbosacral pain are the intervertebral discs, facet joints or surrounding muscle. However, in the absence of diagnostic confirmation of the aforementioned structures, the diagnosis may become confusing and intractable. Sacroiliac fascial lipocele (SFL), namely, pannicular hernia, could be a neglected cause. First reported by Ficarra et al in 1952, it was highlighted by the formation of lipocele in the sacroiliac fascia. Mostly, it could be spontaneously eliminated under conservative therapy. However, for intractable pain, surgical intervention may be the only choice. We will first present a typical case of SFL which was treated by percutaneous endoscopic surgery. Ultimately, a satisfactory outcome was achieved and maintained at 12 months follow-up. It is important to distinguish SFL some cases with lumbosacral back pain. Detailed physical examination, superficial ultrasonography and diagnostic nerve block are extremely valuable for acquiring a precise diagnosis. Overall, when considering the clinical outcome of such cases and the foregoing benefits, percutaneous endoscopic treatment could be an efficacious alternative treatment for SFL-related lumboscral back pain.

  4. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on lumbosacral alignment and the low back pain disability index in patients with chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (group A) and a lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise group (group B). Group B did 15 min of lumbar stabilization exercises and 15 min of thoracic extension exercises, while group A did 30 min of lumbar stabilization exercises five times a week for 4 weeks. For assessing lumbosacral alignment, the lordotic angle, lumbosacral angle, and sacral angle were evaluated. The Oswestry disability index was used for assessment of disability due to low back pain. [Results] Both groups showed improvement in lumbosacral alignment and in the disability index. Group B showed greater changes in the lordotic angle and in the Oswestry disability index than group A, although the differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise can be recommended for improvement of chronic low back pain, although the improvements seen in lumbosacral alignment and low back pain disability index in this study did not achieve statistical significance.

  5. Traumatic anterior lumbosacral dislocation caused by hyperextension mechanism in preexisting L5 spondylolysis: a case report and a review of literature.

    PubMed

    Saiki, Kunio; Hirabayashi, Shigeru; Sakai, Hiroya; Inokuchi, Kouichi

    2006-08-01

    Of many reports referring to injury mechanism in anterior lumbosacral dislocation, there were none concerning hyperextension mechanism. We report a case of a 46-year-old man with preexisting L5 spondylolysis sustaining traumatic complete anterior lumbosacral dislocation. The operative findings, together with the radiologic findings, strongly suggested that the dislocation occurred by hyperextension mechanism. Open reduction was done by applying force of distraction with flexion using a rod and screw system, followed by the internal fixation from the L3 to S1 vertebrae and the postero-superior iliac spine. The lumbosacral dislocation was reduced to 77%. At the follow-up at 5 years after surgery, bony union was obtained and the patient could move with a wheelchair although the neurologic deficit in lower extremities observed preoperatively did not recover. Preexisting L5 spondylolysis was considered to increase the potential for anterior lumbosacral dislocation by additional force of compression with hyperextension. Posterior instrumentation using a rod and screw system was considered a useful method for reduction, decompression, stabilization, and fusion.

  6. Uterine necrosis and lumbosacral-plexopathy following pelvic vessel embolization for postpartum haemorrhage: report of two cases and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rohilla, Minakshi; Singh, Purnima; Kaur, Jaswinder; Prasad, G R V; Jain, Vanita; Lal, Anupam

    2014-10-01

    We are reporting two cases of uterine necrosis and lumbosacral-plexopathy in patients, who underwent pelvic vessel embolization (PVE) following postpartum hemorrhage. Embolization was performed with gelfoam slurry, polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) particles and coil in one patient and with gelfoam slurry only, in second patient. Both patients had lower limbs weakness and had persistent fever in the postembolization period. Nerve conduction study in both were suggestive of common peroneal and tibial neuropathy. An ultrasonography and computed tomography of abdomen and pelvis revealed bulky uterus with no identifiable endometrium and multiple air foci in subendometrial region suggestive of uterine necrosis, confirmed later by histology of expelled uterine mass. Lumbosacral ischemia resulting in paraparesis and uterine necrosis presenting as longstanding fever after embolization are extremely rare but overwhelming complications of embolization. Only 19 cases of uterine necrosis and <10 cases of lumbosacral plexopathy have been reported in the literature. The overall effectiveness of PVE is high in treatment of obstetric hemorrhage with low complication rate and highly selective PVE may further prevent these complication. To the best of our knowledge the co-existing uterine necrosis and lumbosacral plexopathy secondry to PVE has not been described prevoiusly in patients with postpartum hemorrhage. Both patients recovered with conservative management.

  7. The effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on lumbosacral alignment and the low back pain disability index in patients with chronic low back pain

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Seong-Dae; Kim, Tae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] To determine the effects of lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise on chronic low back pain patients. [Subjects and Methods] Thirty patients with chronic low back pain were randomly divided into a lumbar stabilization exercise group (group A) and a lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise group (group B). Group B did 15 min of lumbar stabilization exercises and 15 min of thoracic extension exercises, while group A did 30 min of lumbar stabilization exercises five times a week for 4 weeks. For assessing lumbosacral alignment, the lordotic angle, lumbosacral angle, and sacral angle were evaluated. The Oswestry disability index was used for assessment of disability due to low back pain. [Results] Both groups showed improvement in lumbosacral alignment and in the disability index. Group B showed greater changes in the lordotic angle and in the Oswestry disability index than group A, although the differences were not statistically significant. [Conclusion] Lumbar stabilization exercise with thoracic extension exercise can be recommended for improvement of chronic low back pain, although the improvements seen in lumbosacral alignment and low back pain disability index in this study did not achieve statistical significance. PMID:27065563

  8. Skeletal morphology and morphometry of the lumbosacral junction in German shepherd dogs and an evaluation of the possible genetic basis for radiographic findings.

    PubMed

    Ondreka, Nele; Amort, Kerstin H; Stock, Kathrin F; Tellhelm, Bernd; Klumpp, Stephan W; Kramer, Martin; Schmidt, Martin J

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this study was to identify skeletal variations in the lumbosacral junction (LSJ) of the German shepherd dog (GSD) compared with other large breeds. The radiographic traits of the LSJ were investigated in a group of 733 GSDs and a control group of 334 dogs of other breeds that were matched in terms of size. Nine morphological and 17 morphometric traits were recorded and analysed. Furthermore, the possibility of a genetic basis for these radiographic features was evaluated by calculation of genetic variance components. Five of the morphological and 14 of the morphometric traits varied significantly between the GSD group and the control group (P<0.05). Osteochondrosis of the sacral endplate (SOC) had a higher prevalence in the GSDs (10.1%) compared with controls (5.7%). The majority of LSJ degenerative changes recorded from the radiographs occurred in the GSDs. The extent and relative proportion of lumbosacral step formations were greater in the GSD group compared with controls (P<0.001). The lumbosacral vertebral canal height was reduced in the GSD compared with the control dogs (P<0.001) suggesting a primary stenosis. This was accentuated by an abrupt tapering of the vertebral canal at the level of the LSJ indicated by a lumbosacral ratio of 1.51 in the GSD. The skeletal morphology and morphometry of the LSJ in the GSD seem to be different from that found in other large dogs. For multiple traits frequently observed in GSD such as SOC, step formations, and LSJ stenosis, moderate to high non-zero heritabilities were noted. As these features are also assumed to promote lumbosacral disease, selection against these traits is suggested.

  9. Treatment outcomes of intradiscal steroid injection/selective nerve root block for 161 patients with cervical radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Ito, Keigo; Yukawa, Yasutsugu; Machino, Masaaki; Inoue, Taro; Ouchida, Jun; Tomita, Keisuke; Kato, Fumihiko

    2015-02-01

    Patients with cervical radiculopathy (CR) were treated with intradiscal injection of steroids (IDIS) and/or selective nerve root block (SNRB) at our hospital. We retrospectively report the outcomes of these nonsurgical treatments for CR. 161 patients who were followed up for >2months were enrolled in this study. Patients' clinical manifestations were classified as arm pain, arm numbness, neck and/or scapular pain, and arm paralysis. Improvement in each manifestation was classified as "disappeared," "improved," "poor," or "worsened." Responses of "disappeared" or "improved" manifestations suggested treatment effectiveness. Final clinical outcomes were evaluated using the Odom criteria. Changes in herniated disc size were evaluated by comparing the initial and final MRI scans. On the basis of these changes, the patients were divided into regression, no-change, or progression groups. We investigated the relationship between the Odom criteria and changes observed on MRI. Effectiveness rates were 89% for arm pain, 77% for arm numbness, 82% for neck and/or scapular pain, and 76% for arm paralysis. In total, 91 patients underwent repeated MRI. In 56 patients (62%), the size of the herniated disc decreased, but 31 patients (34%) exhibited no change in disc size. The regression group showed significantly better Odom criteria results than the no-change group. In conclusion, IDIS and SNRB for CR are not widely performed. However, other extremely effective therapies that can rapidly improve neuralgia should be considered before surgery. PMID:25797986

  10. Group II-activated lumbosacral interneurones with an ascending projection to midlumbar segments of the cat spinal cord.

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, P J; Riddell, J S

    1989-01-01

    1. In anaesthetized cats, single-unit microelectrode recordings were made in the lateral funiculus at L6, from the axons of lumbosacral interneurones discharged by hindlimb group II muscle afferents. 2. The level of the ascending projection of these interneurones was investigated by antidromic activation of their axons in the lateral funiculus from different spinal levels. The majority of units encountered were found to have an ascending projection to at least the L4 level and, of these, most (85%) did not project beyond the L4 or L3 segments of the cord. 3. The axons studied were discharged by group II afferents primarily from knee extensor muscles. Some units were discharged in addition by cutaneous and/or joint afferents. 4. The implications of this ascending projection are discussed. PMID:2778739

  11. Postnatal development of the gastrin-releasing peptide system in the lumbosacral spinal cord controlling male reproductive function in rats

    PubMed Central

    KATAYAMA, Nao; OTI, Takumi; TAKANAMI, Keiko; SAKAMOTO, Tatsuya; SAKAMOTO, Hirotaka

    2016-01-01

    A sexually dimorphic spinal gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) system in the lumbosacral spinal cord, which projects to the lower spinal centers, controls erection and ejaculation in rats. However, little is known about the postnatal development of this system. In this study, we therefore examined the postnatal development of the male-dominant spinal GRP system and its sexual differentiation in rats using immunohistochemistry. Our results show that male-dominant expression of GRP is prominent from the onset of puberty and that sexually dimorphism persists into adulthood. These results suggest that androgen surge during male puberty plays an important role in the development and maintenance of the male-specific GRP function in the rat spinal cord. PMID:26860455

  12. The identification and neurochemical characterization of central neurons that target parasympathetic preganglionic neurons involved in the regulation of choroidal blood flow in the rat eye using pseudorabies virus, immunolabeling and conventional pathway tracing methods

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Cuthbertson-Coates, Sherry; LeDoux, Mark S.; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, James P.; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The choroidal blood vessels of the eye provide the main vascular support to the outer retina. These blood vessels are under parasympathetic vasodilatory control via input from the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), which in turn receives its preganglionic input from the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) of the hindbrain. The present study characterized the central neurons projecting to the SSN neurons innervating choroidal PPG neurons, using pathway tracing and immunolabeling. In the initial set of studies, minute injections of the Bartha strain of the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) were made into choroid in rats in which the superior cervical ganglia had been excised (to prevent labeling of sympathetic circuitry). Diverse neuronal populations beyond the choroidal part of ipsilateral SSN showed transneuronal labeling, which notably included the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray, the raphe magnus (RaM), the B3 region of the pons, A5, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and the intermediate reticular nucleus of the medulla. The PRV+ neurons were located in the parts of these cell groups that are responsive to systemic blood pressure signals and involved in systemic blood pressure regulation by the sympathetic nervous system. In a second set of studies using PRV labeling, conventional pathway tracing, and immunolabeling, we found that PVN neurons projecting to SSN tended to be oxytocinergic and glutamatergic, RaM neurons projecting to SSN were serotonergic, and NTS neurons projecting to SSN were glutamatergic. Our results suggest that blood pressure and volume signals that drive sympathetic constriction of the systemic vasculature may also drive parasympathetic vasodilation of the choroidal vasculature, and may thereby contribute to choroidal baroregulation during low blood pressure. PMID:26082687

  13. The identification and neurochemical characterization of central neurons that target parasympathetic preganglionic neurons involved in the regulation of choroidal blood flow in the rat eye using pseudorabies virus, immunolabeling and conventional pathway tracing methods.

    PubMed

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Del Mar, Nobel; Cuthbertson-Coates, Sherry; LeDoux, Mark S; Gong, Suzhen; Ryan, James P; Reiner, Anton

    2015-01-01

    The choroidal blood vessels of the eye provide the main vascular support to the outer retina. These blood vessels are under parasympathetic vasodilatory control via input from the pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG), which in turn receives its preganglionic input from the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) of the hindbrain. The present study characterized the central neurons projecting to the SSN neurons innervating choroidal PPG neurons, using pathway tracing and immunolabeling. In the initial set of studies, minute injections of the Bartha strain of the retrograde transneuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) were made into choroid in rats in which the superior cervical ganglia had been excised (to prevent labeling of sympathetic circuitry). Diverse neuronal populations beyond the choroidal part of ipsilateral SSN showed transneuronal labeling, which notably included the parvocellular part of the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus (PVN), the periaqueductal gray, the raphe magnus (RaM), the B3 region of the pons, A5, the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM), and the intermediate reticular nucleus of the medulla. The PRV+ neurons were located in the parts of these cell groups that are responsive to systemic blood pressure signals and involved in systemic blood pressure regulation by the sympathetic nervous system. In a second set of studies using PRV labeling, conventional pathway tracing, and immunolabeling, we found that PVN neurons projecting to SSN tended to be oxytocinergic and glutamatergic, RaM neurons projecting to SSN were serotonergic, and NTS neurons projecting to SSN were glutamatergic. Our results suggest that blood pressure and volume signals that drive sympathetic constriction of the systemic vasculature may also drive parasympathetic vasodilation of the choroidal vasculature, and may thereby contribute to choroidal baroregulation during low blood pressure.

  14. Dislodgement and gastrointestinal tract penetration of bone cement used for spinal reconstruction after lumbosacral vertebral tumor excision

    PubMed Central

    Nagae, Masateru; Mikami, Yasuo; Mizuno, Kentaro; Harada, Tomohisa; Ikeda, Takumi; Tonomura, Hitoshi; Takatori, Ryota; Fujiwara, Hiroyoshi; Kubo, Toshikazu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA) cement is useful for spinal reconstruction, but can cause complications including new vertebral fractures, neurological disorders and pulmonary embolism. We report a case in PMMA cement used for spinal reconstruction after tumor curettage dislodged and penetrated the gastrointestinal tract. Diagnoses: The patient was diagnosed with a retroperitoneal extragonadal germ cell tumor at age 27 years. After chemotherapy and tumor resection, the tumor remained. It gradually increased in size and infiltrated lumbosacral vertebrae, causing him to present at age 35 years with increased low back pain. Image findings showed bone destruction in the vertebral bodies accompanied by neoplastic lesions. The left and right common iliac arteries and inferior vena cava were enclosed in the tumor on the anterior side of the vertebral bodies. Lumbosacral bone tumor due to direct extragonadal germ cell tumor infiltration was diagnosed. A 2-step operation was planned; first, fixation of the posterior side of the vertebral bodies, followed by tumor resection using an anterior transperitoneal approach, and spinal reconstruction using PMMA cement. After surgery, the PMMA cement gradually dislodged towards the anterior side and, 2 years 9 months after surgery, it had penetrated the retroperitoneum. The patient subsequently developed nausea and abdominal pain and was readmitted to hospital. The diagnosis was intestinal blockage with dislodged PMMA cement, and an operation was performed to remove the cement present in the small intestine. There was strong intra-abdominal adhesion, the peritoneum between the vertebral bodies and intestine could not be identified, and no additional treatment for vertebral body defects could be performed. After surgery, gastrointestinal symptoms resolved. Conclusion: Although this was a rare case, when using bone cement for vertebral body reconstruction, the way of anchoring for the cement must be thoroughly

  15. Accuracy of Percutaneous Lumbosacral Pedicle Screw Placement Using the Oblique Fluoroscopic View Based on Computed Tomography Evaluations

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koji; Kanemura, Tokumi; Iwase, Toshiki; Togawa, Daisuke; Matsuyama, Yukihiro

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective. Purpose This study aims to investigate the accuracy of the oblique fluoroscopic view, based on preoperative computed tomography (CT) images for accurate placement of lumbosacral percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS). Overview of Literature Although PPS misplacement has been reported as one of the main complications in minimally invasive spine surgery, there is no comparative data on the misplacement rate among different fluoroscopic techniques, or comparing such techniques with open procedures. Methods We retrospectively selected 230 consecutive patients who underwent posterior spinal fusion with a pedicle screw construct for degenerative lumbar disease, and divided them into 3 groups, those who had undergone: minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using biplane (lateral and anterior-posterior views using a single C-arm) fluoroscope views (group M-1), minimally invasive percutaneous procedure using the oblique fluoroscopic view based on preoperative CT (group M-2), and conventional open procedure using a lateral fluoroscopic view (group O: controls). The relative position of the screw to the pedicle was graded for the pedicle breach as no breach, <2 mm, 2–4 mm, or >4 mm. Inaccuracy was calculated and assessed according to the spinal level, direction and neurological deficit. Inter-group radiation exposure was estimated using fluoroscopy time. Results Inaccuracy involved an incline toward L5, causing medial or lateral perforation of pedicles in group M-1, but it was distributed relatively equally throughout multiple levels in groups M-2 and controls. The mean fluoroscopy time/case ranged from 1.6 to 3.9 minutes. Conclusions Minimally invasive lumbosacral PPS placement using the conventional fluoroscopic technique carries an increased risk of inaccurate screw placement and resultant neurological deficits, compared with that of the open procedure. Inaccuracy tended to be distributed between medial and lateral perforations of the L5 pedicle

  16. DISTRIBUTION AND SHORT- AND LONG-TERM EFFECTS OF INJECTED GELIFIED ETHANOL INTO THE LUMBOSACRAL INTERVERTEBRAL DISC IN HEALTHY DOGS.

    PubMed

    Mackenzie, Shawn D; Brisson, Brigitte A; Gaitero, Luis; Caswell, Jeff L; Liao, Penting; Sinclair, Melissa; Chalmers, Heather J

    2016-01-01

    Radiopaque gelified ethanol preparation has been described as a useful agent for treatment of humans with intervertebral disc protrusion. The material is injected into the nucleus pulposus under image guidance with intention to cause the protruded disc material to recede. Because treatment options for dogs with chronic protrusions are limited, new and minimally invasive treatments are desirable. The aim of this experimental, descriptive, prospective study was to assess the feasibility and safety of percutaneous injection of gelified ethanol into the lumbosacral intervertebral disc of dogs. Lumbosacral intervertebral discs of normal dogs (n = 9) were imaged with magnetic resonance imaging and then injected with gelified ethanol using image guidance. The accuracy of gelified ethanol placement in the nucleus pulposus and presence of leakage of the injected material were documented. Postinjection computed tomography (CT) findings (n = 9), short-term (n = 9) and long-term (n = 4) follow-up magnetic resonance imaging and CT findings were compared to document the distribution of the injected preparation and identify effects on adjacent tissues. Percutaneous injection of the intervertebral disc was successful in delivering radiopaque gelified ethanol to the nucleus pulposus in all dogs. Leakage of the injected material into the vertebral canal was present in three dogs immediately following injection and in another additional dog at 1 year following injection. All dogs tolerated the injection well and had no clinical adverse reactions within the study period. Findings indicated that injection of the nucleus pulposus of healthy dogs was well tolerated, even in the presence of mild leakage of material from the intervertebral disc. PMID:26626409

  17. Quantitative sensory testing somatosensory profiles in patients with cervical radiculopathy are distinct from those in patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain.

    PubMed

    Tampin, Brigitte; Slater, Helen; Hall, Toby; Lee, Gabriel; Briffa, Noelle Kathryn

    2012-12-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the somatosensory profiles of patients with cervical radiculopathy and patients with nonspecific neck-arm pain associated with heightened nerve mechanosensitivity (NSNAP). Sensory profiles were compared to healthy control (HC) subjects and a positive control group comprising patients with fibromyalgia (FM). Quantitative sensory testing (QST) of thermal and mechanical detection and pain thresholds, pain sensitivity and responsiveness to repetitive noxious mechanical stimulation was performed in the maximal pain area, the corresponding dermatome and foot of 23 patients with painful C6 or C7 cervical radiculopathy, 8 patients with NSNAP in a C6/7 dermatomal pain distribution, 31 HC and 22 patients with FM. For both neck-arm pain groups, all QST parameters were within the 95% confidence interval of HC data. Patients with cervical radiculopathy were characterised by localised loss of function (thermal, mechanical, vibration detection P<.009) in the maximal pain area and dermatome (thermal detection, vibration detection, pressure pain sensitivity P<.04), consistent with peripheral neuronal damage. Both neck-arm pain groups demonstrated increased cold sensitivity in their maximal pain area (P<.03) and the foot (P<.009), and this was also the dominant sensory characteristic in patients with NSNAP. Both neck-arm pain groups differed from patients with FM, the latter characterised by a widespread gain of function in most nociceptive parameters (thermal, pressure, mechanical pain sensitivity P<.027). Despite commonalities in pain characteristics between the 2 neck-arm pain groups, distinct sensory profiles were demonstrated for each group.

  18. Initial clinical experience with a next-generation artificial disc for the treatment of symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Sanchez, Alejandro; Miramontes, Victor; Olivarez, Luis M. Rosales; Aquirre, Armando Alpizar; Quiroz, Alfredo Ortega; Zarate-Kalfopulos, Baron

    2010-01-01

    Background A feasibility trial was conducted to evaluate the initial safety and clinical use of a next-generation artificial cervical disc (M6-C artificial cervical disc; Spinal Kinetics, Sunnyvale, CA) for the treatment of patients with symptomatic degenerative cervical radiculopathy. A standardized battery of validated outcome measures was utilized to assess condition-specific functional impairment, pain severity, and quality of life. Methods Thirty-six consecutive patients were implanted with the M6-C disc and complete clinical and radiographic outcomes for 25 patients (mean age, 44.5 ± 10.1 years) with radiographically-confirmed cervical disc disease and symptomatic radiculopathy unresponsive to conservative medical management are included in this report. All patients had disc-osteophyte complex causing neural compression and were treated with discectomy and artificial cervical disc replacement at either single level (n = 12) or 2-levels (n = 13). Functional impairment was evaluated using the Neck Disability Index (NDI). Evaluation of arm and neck pain severity utilized a standard 11-point numeric scale, and health-related quality of life was evaluated with the SF-36 Health Survey. Quantitative radiographic assessments of intervertebral motion were performed using specialized motion analysis software, QMA (Quantitative Motion Analysis; Medical Metrics, Houston, TX). All outcome measures were evaluated pre-treatment and at 6 weeks, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months. Results The mean NDI score improved from 51.6 ± 11.3% pre-treatment to 27.9 ± 16.9% at 24 months, representing an approximate 46% improvement (P <.0001). The mean arm pain score improved from 6.9 ± 2.5 pre-treatment to 3.9 ± 3.1 at 24 months (43%, P =.0006). The mean neck pain score improved from 7.8 ± 2.0 pre-treatment to 3.8 ± 3.0 at 24 months (51%, P <.0001). The mean PCS score of the SF-36 improved from 34.8 ± 7.8 pre-treatment to 43.8 ± 9.3 by 24 months (26%, P =.0006). Subgroup analyses found

  19. Computed tomography in cervical spondylotic myelopathy and radiculopathy: visualisation of structures, myelographic comparison, cord measurements and clinical utility.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; du Boulay, G H; Stevens, J M; Kendall, B E

    1986-01-01

    Sixty-nine patients with cervical spondylotic myelopathy (CSM), radiculopathy (CSR), or both (CSMR) were studied with computed tomography (CT). Computer-assisted myelography (CAM) accurately determines the site and nature of spondylotic protrusions and provides good visualisation of the subarachnoid space and cord deformities even in areas with dilute metrizamide. However, excessive vertebral movement and bulging ligamenta flava with their effects on cord deformity, so easily visualised in myelograms, are completely or partially missed. In the assessment of CSM, metrizamide myelography (MM) followed by CAM should be performed, particularly when the myelographic images are unsatisfactory due to contrast dilution or blockage, when cord compression cannot be ascertained with MM and when cord atrophy is suspected. In CSR, the diagnostic information from MM and CAM is comparable. The diagnostic criteria in CAM are, however, less direct and since MM is adequate in uncomplicated cases, CAM is generally not necessary. The APD, APD/TD ratio, area and circularity are sensitive indices of cord deformity and the first two should be used more often to assist visual assessment of cord deformity. The relation between cord parameters and treatment response is better reflected in CSM cases managed conservatively and the results suggest that the degree of cord deformity is helpful in determining the outcome and hence the choice between surgical and conservative treatment. In plain CT, the osteophytes and calcified discs are adequately visualised and canal dimensions measured with accuracy, but the cervical cord and roots cannot be properly assessed and the diagnosis of CSM or CSR cannot be ascertained. At present, its role in cervical spondylosis is therefore limited.

  20. Clinical effects of computed tomography-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs.

    PubMed

    Liotta, Annalisa P; Girod, Maud; Peeters, Dominique; Sandersen, Charlotte; Couvreur, Thierry; Bolen, Géraldine

    2016-10-01

    OBJECTIVE To determine clinical effects of CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate in healthy dogs. ANIMALS 15 healthy Beagles. PROCEDURES Dogs were randomly assigned to 3 groups (5 dogs/group) and received a single CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, or translaminar epidural injection of methylprednisolone acetate (0.1 mg/kg). Contrast medium was injected prior to injection of methylprednisolone to verify needle placement. Neurologic examinations were performed 1, 3, 7, and 10 days after the injection. In dogs with neurologic abnormalities, a final neurologic examination was performed 24 days after the procedure. RESULTS Methylprednisolone injections were successfully performed in 14 of the 15 dogs. In 1 dog, vascular puncture occurred, and the methylprednisolone injection was not performed. No major or minor complications were identified during or immediately after the procedure, other than mild transient hyperthermia. During follow-up neurologic examinations, no motor, sensory, or postural deficits were identified, other than mild alterations in the patellar, withdrawal, cranial tibial, and perineal reflexes in some dogs. Overall, altered reflexes were observed in 11 of the 14 dogs, during 27 of 65 neurologic examinations. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results suggested that CT-guided lumbosacral facet joint, transforaminal epidural, and translaminar epidural injections of methylprednisolone acetate were associated with few complications in healthy dogs. However, the number of dogs evaluated was small, and additional studies are needed to assess clinical efficacy and safety of these procedures. PMID:27668585

  1. The effect of severing a normal S1 nerve root to use for reconstruction of an avulsed contralateral lumbosacral plexus: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, L; F Zhang; Yang, D; Chen, A

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of using the intact S1 nerve root as a donor nerve to repair an avulsion of the contralateral lumbosacral plexus. Two cohorts of patients were recruited. In cohort 1, the L4-S4 nerve roots of 15 patients with a unilateral fracture of the sacrum and sacral nerve injury were stimulated during surgery to establish the precise functional distribution of the S1 nerve root and its proportional contribution to individual muscles. In cohort 2, the contralateral uninjured S1 nerve root of six patients with a unilateral lumbosacral plexus avulsion was transected extradurally and used with a 25 cm segment of the common peroneal nerve from the injured leg to reconstruct the avulsed plexus. The results from cohort 1 showed that the innervation of S1 in each muscle can be compensated for by L4, L5, S2 and S3. Numbness in the toes and a reduction in strength were found after surgery in cohort 2, but these symptoms gradually disappeared and strength recovered. The results of electrophysiological studies of the donor limb were generally normal. Severing the S1 nerve root does not appear to damage the healthy limb as far as clinical assessment and electrophysiological testing can determine. Consequently, the S1 nerve can be considered to be a suitable donor nerve for reconstruction of an avulsed contralateral lumbosacral plexus.

  2. Glycyl-L-glutamine, a precursor, and glycyl-L-glutamic acid, a neurotrophic factor for maintenance of acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase in the preganglionically denervated superior cervical ganglion of the cat in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Koelle, G B; Sanville, U J; Wall, S J

    1985-01-01

    L. W. Haynes and M. E. Smith have reported [(1985) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 13, 174-175] that glycyl-L-glutamine (Gly-Gln) increases the A12 and G4 forms of acetylcholinesterase (AcChoEase) in cultured embryonic rat skeletal muscle. Since Gly-Gln meets the criteria established for the neurotrophic factor (NF) in extracts of central nervous system/sciatic nerves that maintains AcChoEase and butyrylcholinesterase (BtChoEase) in the denervated cat superior cervical ganglion (SCG) in vivo, it was tested by the latter procedure. Solutions of Gly-Gln (10(-7)-10(-3) M) in 0.9% NaCl solution were infused for 24 hr via the right common carotid artery of cats with preganglionically denervated SCG, following ligation of the external carotid and lingual arteries. At 48 hr postdenervation, the AcChoEase and BtChoEase contents of the right SCG were within the range of similarly treated controls infused with 0.9% NaCl solution; the AcChoEase and BtChoEase contents of the left SCG, where the infused solutions arrived by way of a much more circuitous route, were significantly elevated at concentrations of Gly-Gln of 10(-5) M and higher. This suggested that the neurotrophic effect on the left SCG was produced by a metabolite of Gly-Gln. Accordingly, glycine, L-glutamine, and glycyl-L-glutamic acid (Gly-Glu) were then tested. Glycine and L-glutamine were inactive; Gly-Glu, 10(-6)-10(-5) M, exerted a significantly positive neurotrophic effect at both the right and left SCG; at 10(-4) M, the effect was absent. The method employed currently for preparation of extracts of SCG for assay of AcChoEase, BtChoEase, and protein contents (homogenization of scissor-minced ganglia in water) was compared with homogenization in molar NaCl/1% Triton X-100. Values obtained by the former procedure, in comparison with the latter, were 91% +/- 7% for AcChoEase and 83% +/- 7% for BtChoEase, expressed as substrate hydrolyzed per mg of protein per min. PMID:3860856

  3. Lumbar Intervertebral Discal Cyst: A Rare Cause of Low Back Pain and Radiculopathy. Case Report and Review of the Current Evidences on Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Certo, Francesco; Visocchi, Massimiliano; Borderi, Alessandro; Pennisi, Claudia; Albanese, Vincenzo; Barbagallo, Giuseppe M. V.

    2014-01-01

    Study Design Case Report and review of the literature. Objective The objective of the article is to report an illustrative case successfully treated by microsurgery and to review the literature on the current evidence on diagnosis and management of lumbar discal cysts. Methods A 43-year-old male patient presented with severe back pain, radiating down to the right leg, as well as with paraesthesias in the right L3 and L4 dermatomes. Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine revealed an intraspinal, extradural space-occupying lesion at the L3–L4 disc level, causing compression of the neural structures. The lesion was surgically removed and a diagnosis of lumbar discal cyst was made. Postoperatively, symptoms improved and the patient was discharged with no complications. A systematic review of pertinent articles published up to February 2014 was performed. Key articles were searched to identify studies describing the diagnosis and management modalities of lumbar discal cysts and the comparative effectiveness and safety of microsurgery versus endoscopic treatment. Conclusions Discal cysts are rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. Few cases have been reported; however, conclusive information about their natural history is not available and the best mode of treatment remains controversial. We submit that lumbar intervertebral disc cysts, with their peculiar radiological and anatomic features, should be considered in the differential diagnosis among rare causes of low back pain and radiculopathy. PMID:25364328

  4. Cox Decompression Manipulation and Guided Rehabilitation of a Patient With a Post Surgical C6-C7 Fusion With Spondylotic Myelopathy and Concurrent L5-S1 Radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Joachim, George C.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this case report is to describe combined treatment utilizing Cox distraction manipulation and guided rehabilitation for a patient with spine pain and post-surgical C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and L5-S1 radiculopathy. Clinical features A 38-year-old man presented to a chiropractic clinic with neck pain and a history of an anterior cervical spine plate fusion at C6-7 after a work related accident 4 years earlier. He had signs and symptoms of spondolytic myelopathy and right lower back, right posterior thigh pain and numbness. Intervention and outcome The patient was treated with Cox technique and rehabilitation. The patient experienced a reduction of pain on a numeric pain scale from 8/10 to 3/10. The patient was seen a total of 12 visits over 3 months. No adverse effects were reported. Conclusions A patient with a prior C6-7 fusion with spondylotic myelopathy and concurrent L5-S1 radiculopathy improved after a course of rehabilitation and Cox distraction manipulation. Further research is needed to establish its efficiency. PMID:25685119

  5. Evaluation of coccygeal bone variability, intercoccygeal and lumbo-sacral angles in asymptomatic patients in multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Przybylski, Piotr; Pankowicz, Marcin; Boćkowska, Agata; Czekajska-Chehab, Elżbieta; Staśkiewicz, Grzegorz; Korzec, Maria; Drop, Andrzej

    2013-09-01

    The coccyx is a highly variable structure in the human caudal spine. Previous studies have revealed a significant correlation between coccyx shape and the pain syndrome coccygodynia. The aim of this study was to carry out a complex morphological evaluation of the coccyx in a group of asymptomatic patients of different sex and age examined by multislice computed tomography (MSCT) of the pelvis for different clinical reasons. MSCT pelvis examinations from various nontraumatic clinical conditions from consecutive adult patients (250 males and 250 females of comparable age, mean 54.9 ± 14.8 years) were used. Based on middle sagittal plane reconstructions: coccyx configuration (types I-IV according to Postacchini and Massobrio classification, each successive type characterized by a more pronounced anterior position of coccyx), number of segments, length and angles (intercoccygeal and lumbo-sacral) were measured. The results obtained were analyzed statistically. The following types of coccyx were observed in the study group: type I in 16.2 %, type II 40.0 %, type III 32.4 %, and type IV 11.4 % cases. In most cases (50.8 %), three segments were noted. Lumbo-sacral angle varied from 15.6° to 66.4° (average 41.6° ± 7.7°), and intercoccygeal angle from 0° to 107° (average 51° ± 23.3°). A significant negative correlation between age and number of segments as well as age and intercoccygeal angle was observed. In males, the coccyx was significantly longer, while in females the intercoccygeal angle was significantly wider. Type I was significantly more frequent in males, while type IV was found more often in females. The results obtained differ from other results in the literature. Our research could be useful to determine population standards, and help (together with clinical history) future studies of associations between idiopathic coccygodynia and coccyx morphology.

  6. Control of leg-powered paraplegic cycling using stimulation of the lumbo-sacral anterior spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tim A; de N Donaldson, Nick; Hatcher, Neil A C; Swain, Ian D; Wood, Duncan E

    2002-09-01

    We investigated leg-powered cycling in a recumbent tricycle for a paraplegic using functional electrical stimulation (FES) with the lumbo-sacral anterior root stimulator implant (LARSI). A female complete T9 paraplegic had a stimulator for the anterior L2 to S2 spinal roots (bilaterally) implanted in 1994. She was provided with equipment for daily FES cycling exercise at home. The cycling controller applies a pattern of stimulation in each of 16 crank angle phases. A 7-bit shaft encoder measures the crank angle with adequate precision. Each pattern was originally chosen to give the greatest propulsive force in that position when there was no motion. However, dynamically, some reduction in co-contraction is needed; also the patterns are applied with a preset advance time. Maximal power is obtained with an advance of 250 ms, which compensates for muscle response delay and accommodates changes in cadence (from about 25 to 85 rpm). With this system, she has cycled 1.2 km at a time on gently undulating road. We found that spinal root stimulation gives sufficient control over the muscles in the legs to produce a fluid cycling gait. We propose that root stimulation for leg cycling exercise may be a practicable and valuable function for paraplegics following spinal cord injury.

  7. Extraspinal Type I Dural Arteriovenous Fistula with a Lumbosacral Lipomyelomeningocele: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Karsy, Michael; Ray, Wilson Z.; Dailey, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    Seven cases of adult spinal vascular malformations presenting in conjunction with spinal dysraphism have been reported in the literature. Two of these involved male patients with a combined dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) and lipomyelomeningocele. The authors present the third case of a patient with an extraspinal DAVF and associated lipomyelomeningocele in a lumbosacral location. A 58-year-old woman with rapid decline in bilateral motor function 10 years after a prior L4-5 laminectomy and cord detethering for diagnosed tethered cord underwent magnetic resonance imaging showing evidence of persistent cord tethering and a lipomyelomeningocele. Diagnostic spinal angiogram showed a DAVF with arterial feeders from bilateral sacral and the right internal iliac arteries. The patient underwent Onyx embolization of both feeding right and left lateral sacral arteries. At 6-month follow-up, MRI revealed decreased flow voids and new collateralized supply to the DAVF. The patient underwent successful lipomyelomeningocele exploration, resection, AV fistula ligation, and cord detethering. This report discusses management of this patient as well as the importance of endovascular embolization followed by microsurgery for the treatment of cases with combined vascular and dysraphic anomalies. PMID:25949837

  8. Control of leg-powered paraplegic cycling using stimulation of the lumbo-sacral anterior spinal nerve roots.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Tim A; de N Donaldson, Nick; Hatcher, Neil A C; Swain, Ian D; Wood, Duncan E

    2002-09-01

    We investigated leg-powered cycling in a recumbent tricycle for a paraplegic using functional electrical stimulation (FES) with the lumbo-sacral anterior root stimulator implant (LARSI). A female complete T9 paraplegic had a stimulator for the anterior L2 to S2 spinal roots (bilaterally) implanted in 1994. She was provided with equipment for daily FES cycling exercise at home. The cycling controller applies a pattern of stimulation in each of 16 crank angle phases. A 7-bit shaft encoder measures the crank angle with adequate precision. Each pattern was originally chosen to give the greatest propulsive force in that position when there was no motion. However, dynamically, some reduction in co-contraction is needed; also the patterns are applied with a preset advance time. Maximal power is obtained with an advance of 250 ms, which compensates for muscle response delay and accommodates changes in cadence (from about 25 to 85 rpm). With this system, she has cycled 1.2 km at a time on gently undulating road. We found that spinal root stimulation gives sufficient control over the muscles in the legs to produce a fluid cycling gait. We propose that root stimulation for leg cycling exercise may be a practicable and valuable function for paraplegics following spinal cord injury. PMID:12503780

  9. [Anterior and posterior stabilization of the lumbosacral spine with the usage of interbody cages in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis].

    PubMed

    Pankowski, Rafał; Smoczyński, Andrzej; Smoczyński, Maciej; Luczkiewicz, Piotr; Piotrowski, Maciej

    2006-01-01

    In the following work results of the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis by the posterior stabilization and anterior lumbosacral interbody fusion with the use of interbody implants--cages was taken under evaluation. The test group consisted of 21 patients (13 male and 8 male). The follow up period exceeded 2 years. The objective clinical outcome assessment was based on Oswestry disability questionnaire. Subjective clinical evaluation was done by the visual analog pain score and two questions concerning the evaluation of success of the operative treatment and a possible agreement to a following operation if necessary. The radiological results were done upon evaluation of the degree of the spondylolisthesis, the angle of the lumbosacral lordosis, the height of the interbody space and intervertebral foramen and the evaluation of the spinal fusion. The conclusion was that the usage of the distraction of the lumbosacral spine in the operational treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis result in the reduction of the slippage and the dynamic decompression of the compressed neural roots. The usage of the interbody cages prevented the loss of slippage correction, permanently reconstructed the anatomical conditions in the area of the operated spinal segment and helped to achieve good and very good clinical results in over 95% of patients. The fusion rate was 100%. The restoration of the correct height of the intervertebral foramen in the slip segment caused an improvement of the neurologic state. The usage of two level stabilization in the operative treatment of the isthmic spondylolisthesis prevented the initiation of the secondary degenerative changes adjacent to the fusion.

  10. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  11. Clinical and Radiological Characteristics of Lumbosacral Lateral Disc Herniation in Comparison With Those of Medial Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung Hwan; Lee, Sang-Ho

    2016-02-01

    Lateral disc herniation (foraminal and extra foraminal) has clinical characteristics that are different from those of medial disc herniation (central and subarticular), including older age, more frequent radicular pain, and neurologic deficits. This is supposedly because lateral disc herniation mechanically irritates or compresses the exiting nerve root or dorsal root ganglion inside of a narrow canal more directly than medial disc herniation. The purpose of this study was to investigate clinical and radiological characteristics of lateral disc herniation in comparison with medial disc herniation. The 352 subjects diagnosed with localized lumbosacral disc herniation and followed up for at least 12 months after completion of treatment were included and divided into medial and lateral disc herniation groups, according to the anatomical location of the herniated disc in axial plain of magnetic resonance image. Clinical and radiological data were obtained and compared between the two groups. The lateral group included 74 (21%) patients and the medial group included 278 (79%). Mean age of the lateral group was significantly higher than that in the medial group. The lateral group showed a significantly larger proportion of patients with radiating leg pain and multiple levels of disc herniations than the medial group. No significant differences were found in terms of gender, duration of pain, pretreatment numeric rating scale, severity of disc herniation (protrusion and extrusion), and presence of weakness in leg muscles. The proportion of patients who underwent surgery was not significantly different between the 2 groups. However, the proportion of patients who accomplished successful pain reduction after treatment was significantly smaller in the lateral than in the medial group. In conclusion, patients with lateral disc herniation were older and had larger proportion of radiating leg pain than those with medial disc herniation. Lateral disc herniation was more

  12. Cervical Radiculopathy (Pinched Nerve)

    MedlinePlus

    ... components: • Annulus fibrosus. This is the tough, flexible outer ring of the disk. • Nucleus pulposus. This is ... its jelly-like center (nucleus) pushes against its outer ring (annulus). If the disk is very worn ...

  13. Low back pain, radiculopathy.

    PubMed

    Selkirk, Stephen M; Ruff, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Low back pain is a pervasive problem in the adult population. Most patients with low back pain will not require imaging as spontaneous recovery within 12 weeks is the rule. However, a small percentage of patients with low back pain will have serious underlying pathology requiring more intensive investigation. This chapter delineates the signs and symptoms related to potential serious underlying causes and discusses appropriate imaging modalities that should be utilized in patients with low back pain. PMID:27430456

  14. Minimally Invasive Magnetic Resonance Imaging-Guided Free-Hand Aspiration of Symptomatic Nerve Route Compressing Lumbosacral Cysts Using a 1.0-Tesla Open Magnetic Resonance Imaging System

    SciTech Connect

    Bucourt, Maximilian de Streitparth, Florian Collettini, Federico; Guettler, Felix; Rathke, Hendrik; Lorenz, Britta; Rump, Jens; Hamm, Bernd; Teichgraeber, U. K.

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of minimally invasive magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-guided free-hand aspiration of symptomatic nerve route compressing lumbosacral cysts in a 1.0-Tesla (T) open MRI system using a tailored interactive sequence. Materials and Methods: Eleven patients with MRI-evident symptomatic cysts in the lumbosacral region and possible nerve route compressing character were referred to a 1.0-T open MRI system. For MRI interventional cyst aspiration, an interactive sequence was used, allowing for near real-time position validation of the needle in any desired three-dimensional plane. Results: Seven of 11 cysts in the lumbosacral region were successfully aspirated (average 10.1 mm [SD {+-} 1.9]). After successful cyst aspiration, each patient reported speedy relief of initial symptoms. Average cyst size was 9.6 mm ({+-}2.6 mm). Four cysts (8.8 {+-} 3.8 mm) could not be aspirated. Conclusion: Open MRI systems with tailored interactive sequences have great potential for cyst aspiration in the lumbosacral region. The authors perceive major advantages of the MR-guided cyst aspiration in its minimally invasive character compared to direct and open surgical options along with consecutive less trauma, less stress, and also less side-effects for the patient.

  15. Grey and White Matter Magnetisation Transfer Ratio Measurements in the Lumbosacral Enlargement: A Pilot In Vivo Study at 3T.

    PubMed

    Ugorji, Chinyere O; Samson, Rebecca S; Liechti, Martina D; Panicker, Jalesh N; Miller, David H; Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A M; Yiannakas, Marios C

    2015-01-01

    Magnetisation transfer (MT) imaging of the central nervous system has provided further insight into the pathophysiology of neurological disease. However, the use of this method to study the lower spinal cord has been technically challenging, despite the important role of this region, not only for motor control of the lower limbs, but also for the neural control of lower urinary tract, sexual and bowel functions. In this study, the feasibility of obtaining reliable grey matter (GM) and white matter (WM) magnetisation transfer ratio (MTR) measurements within the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) was investigated in ten healthy volunteers using a clinical 3T MRI system. The mean cross-sectional area of the LSE (LSE-CSA) and the mean GM area (LSE-GM-CSA) were first obtained by means of image segmentation and tissue-specific (i.e. WM and GM) MTR measurements within the LSE were subsequently obtained. The reproducibility of the segmentation method and MTR measurements was assessed from repeated measurements and their % coefficient of variation (%COV). Mean (± SD) LSE-CSA across 10 healthy subjects was 59.3 (± 8.4) mm2 and LSE-GM-CSA was 17.0 (± 3.1) mm2. The mean intra- and inter-rater % COV for measuring the LSE-CSA were 0.8% and 2.3%, respectively and for the LSE-GM-CSA were 3.8% and 5.4%, respectively. Mean (± SD) WM-MTR was 43.2 (± 4.4) and GM-MTR was 40.9 (± 4.3). The mean scan-rescan % COV for measuring WM-MTR was 4.6% and for GM-MTR was 3.8%. Using a paired t-test, a statistically significant difference was identified between WM-MTR and GM-MTR in the LSE (p<0.0001). This pilot study has shown that it is possible to obtain reliable tissue-specific MTR measurements within the LSE using a clinical MR system at 3T. The MTR acquisition and analysis protocol presented in this study can be used in future investigations of intrinsic spinal cord diseases that affect the LSE.

  16. Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion with Stand-Alone Trabecular Metal Cages as a Surgical Treatment for Cervical Radiculopathy: Mid-Term Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    ElAbed, Khaldoun; Shawky, Ahmad; Ainscow, Donald

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective case cohort study done between 2002 and 2012. Purpose To assess the mid-term clinical and radiological outcomes of 1-level and 2-level anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) with stand-alone trabecular metal cages. Overview of Literature ACDF is the gold standard surgical treatment for cervical degenerative disease. The usual surgical practice is to use an anteriorly placed fusion plate with or without interdiscal cages. Methods Patients between 36 and 64 years of age diagnosed with cervical radiculopathy who underwent ACDF using stand-alone trabecular metal cages with at least 3 years follow-up were included in this study. Recorded clinical outcomes included residual axial neck pain, radicular arm pain, upper extremity weakness, and upper extremity altered sensation. Visual Analogue scores were also recorded. Fusion was assessed by lateral radiographs looking for bone breaching and radiolucent lines around the device at the latest follow-up. Results Ninety patients were included in the study. Fifty-one patients underwent 2-level surgery and 39 patients underwent 1-level surgery. Mean age was 44±10.4 years and mean follow-up time was 4.5±2.6 years. Patients reported excellent or good outcomes (90%), as well as improvements in axial neck pain (80%), radicular arm pain (95%), upper extremity weakness (85%), and upper extremity altered sensation (90%). Most patients (90%) progressed to fusion at the 1-year follow-up. The reoperation rate was 3.6%. There was no reported persistent dysphagia, voice complaints, dural tear, or tracheal or oesophageal perforation in any of the patients. One patient developed a deep methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infectious infarction of the spinal cord, which was treated with antibiotics. Recovery was complete at the 1-year follow up. Conclusions Mid-term results show that surgical treatment with ACDF with trabecular metal cages is a safe and effective treatment of single and 2-level

  17. Limb-shaking transient ischemic attack masquerading as lumbar radiculopathy from pericallosal artery stenosis treated successfully with intracranial angioplasty and stenting.

    PubMed

    Kalia, Junaid; Wolfe, Thomas; Zaidat, Osama O

    2010-03-01

    The pericallosal artery is rarely associated with intracranial atherosclerotic disease and, until recently, was usually not amenable to endovascular therapy with balloon angioplasty and stenting. We present an elderly patient with postural left leg-shaking episodes secondary to pericallosal artery stenosis, which was treated initially with primary intracranial balloon angioplasty, and subsequently, angioplasty and stenting as a result of recurrent stenosis. Both procedures were preformed without complications, and the patient remained free of symptoms on 6-month follow-up. This case demonstrates unique clinical and neuroendovascular aspects; the isolated postural leg-shaking transient ischemic attacks, initially mistaken for radiculopathy and local joint etiology, were found later to be cerebrovascular ischemic in origin. Moreover, the correlation between the findings of computed tomography perfusion and angiography localized the lesion into the medial frontal lobe and pericallosal artery territory. In addition, the technical aspect provides insight into the current state of neuroendovascular techniques, addressing the difficulty of access into very small and distal intracranial arteries affected by stenosis.

  18. Physical model from 3D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a fetus with Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Lopes, Jorge; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Rapid prototyping is becoming a fast-growing and valuable technique for physical models in case of congenital anomalies. Manufacturing models are generally built from three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, computed tomography, and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data. Physical prototype has demonstrated to be clinically of value in case of complex fetal malformations and may improve antenatal management especially in cases of craniosynostosis, orofacial clefts, and giant epignathus. In addition, it may enhance parental bonding in visually impaired parents and have didactic value in teaching program. Hereby, the first 3D physical model from 3D ultrasound and MRI scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a third trimester fetus affected by Chiari II malformation is reported. PMID:25686895

  19. Physical model from 3D ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a fetus with Chiari II malformation.

    PubMed

    Werner, Heron; Lopes, Jorge; Tonni, Gabriele; Araujo Júnior, Edward

    2015-04-01

    Rapid prototyping is becoming a fast-growing and valuable technique for physical models in case of congenital anomalies. Manufacturing models are generally built from three-dimensional (3D) ultrasound, computed tomography, and fetal magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scan data. Physical prototype has demonstrated to be clinically of value in case of complex fetal malformations and may improve antenatal management especially in cases of craniosynostosis, orofacial clefts, and giant epignathus. In addition, it may enhance parental bonding in visually impaired parents and have didactic value in teaching program. Hereby, the first 3D physical model from 3D ultrasound and MRI scan data reconstruction of lumbosacral myelomeningocele in a third trimester fetus affected by Chiari II malformation is reported.

  20. Effects of Lumbosacral Manipulation on Isokinetic Strength of the Knee Extensors and Flexors in Healthy Subjects: A Randomized, Controlled, Single-Blind Crossover Trial

    PubMed Central

    Sanders, Grant D.; Nitz, Arthur J.; Abel, Mark G.; Symons, T. Brock; Shapiro, Robert; Black, W. Scott; Yates, James W.

    2015-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of manual manipulations targeting the lumbar spine and/or sacroiliac joint on concentric knee extension and flexion forces. Torque production was measured during isometric and isokinetic contractions. Methods This was a randomized, controlled, single-blind crossover design with 21 asymptomatic, college-aged subjects who had never received spinal manipulation. During 2 separate sessions, subjects’ peak torques were recorded while performing maximal voluntary contractions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Isometric knee extension and flexion were recorded at 60° of knee flexion, in addition to isokinetic measurements obtained at 60°/s and 180°/s. Baseline measurements were acquired before either treatment form of lumbosacral manipulation or sham manipulation, followed by identical peak torque measurements within 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Data were analyzed with a repeated measures analysis of variance. Results A statistically significant difference did not occur between the effects of lumbosacral manipulation or the sham manipulation in the percentage changes of knee extension and flexion peak torques at 5 and 20 minutes posttreatment. Similar, nonsignificant results were observed in the overall percentage changes of isometric contractions (spinal manipulation 4.0 ± 9.5 vs sham 1.2 ± 6.3, P = .067), isokinetic contractions at 60°/s (spinal manipulation − 4.0 ± 14.2 vs sham − 0.3 ± 8.2, P = .34), and isokinetic contractions at 180°/s (spinal manipulation − 1.4 ± 13.9 vs sham − 5.5 ± 20.0, P = .18). Conclusion The results of the current study suggest that spinal manipulation does not yield an immediate strength-enhancing effect about the knee in healthy, college-aged subjects when measured with isokinetic dynamometry. PMID:26793035

  1. A Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group Pilot Study of Milnacipran for Chronic Radicular Pain (Sciatica) Associated With Lumbosacral Disc Disease

    PubMed Central

    Pae, Chi-Un; Patkar, Ashwin A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The current study investigates whether milnacipran, an equipotent serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, is effective in reducing chronic radicular pain in patients (N = 11) with lumbosacral disc disease. Method: This study is a 10-week randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial of milnacipran (100–200 mg/d, dosed twice a day). Subjects (enrolled from October 2010 to September 2011 through the Duke University Pain and Palliative Care Clinic, Durham, North Carolina) included patients with radiologically confirmed disc disease with nerve root compression. The primary outcome measure was radicular pain measured by visual analog scale score (VAS-Rad); patients were asked to specifically rate radicular pain (“shooting or electrical or prickly pain in 1 or both legs”). Secondary outcome measures included nociceptive low back pain by visual analog scale (VAS-Noc), Oswestry Low Back Pain Disability Questionnaire, Neuropathic Pain Questionnaire, Medical Outcomes Study (MOS) 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, Beck Depression Inventory, and State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Between-group changes in outcome measures between baseline and endpoint were analyzed using Mann-Whitney U nonparametric measure of central tendency. Results: Milnacipran treatment yielded statistically significant reduction in radicular pain (VAS-Rad, P = .01) and nociceptive low back pain (VAS-Noc, P = .04) compared to placebo. No statistically significant between-group differences were observed in the other secondary outcome measures. Conclusions: In this small pilot study, milnacipran treatment was associated with reduction in radicular and nociceptive low back pain in patients with lumbosacral disc disease. Larger studies of milnacipran in this population are warranted. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01777581. PMID:25664215

  2. Combined intra-extracanal approach to lumbosacral disc herniations with bi-radicular involvement. Technical considerations from a surgical series of 15 cases.

    PubMed

    Paolini, Sergio; Ciappetta, Pasquale; Raco, Antonino; Missori, Paolo; Delfini, Roberto

    2006-05-01

    Large lumbosacral disc herniations effacing both the paramedian and the foraminal area often cause double radicular compression. Surgical management of these lesions may be difficult. A traditional interlaminar approach usually brings into view only the paramedian portion of the intervertebral disc, unless the lateral bone removal is considerably increased. Conversely, the numerous far-lateral approaches proposed for removing foraminal or extraforaminal disc herniations would decompress the exiting nerve root only. Overall, these approaches share the drawback of controlling the neuroforamen on one side alone. A combined intra-extraforaminal exposure is a useful yet rarely reported approach. Over a 3-year period, 15 patients with bi-radicular symptoms due to large disc herniations of the lumbar spine underwent surgery through a combined intra-extracanal approach. A standard medial exposure with an almost complete hemilaminectomy of the upper vertebra was combined with an extraforaminal exposure, achieved by minimal drilling of the inferior facet joint, the lateral border of the pars interarticularis and the inferior margin of the superior transverse process. The herniated discs were removed using key maneuvers made feasible by working simultaneously on both operative windows. In all cases the disc herniation could be completely removed, thus decompressing both nerve roots. Radicular pain was fully relieved without procedure-related morbidity. The intra-extraforaminal exposure was particularly useful in identifying the extraforaminal nerve root early. Early identification was especially advantageous when periradicular scar tissue hid the nerve root from view, as it did in patients who had undergone previous surgery at the same site or had long-standing radicular symptoms. Controlling the foramen on both sides also reduced the risk of leaving residual disc fragments. A curved probe was used to push the disc material outside the foramen. In conclusion, specific

  3. Lumbosacral spine CT

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Medical Imaging. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 4. Thomsen HS. Intravascular contrast ... of Medical Imaging. 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Churchill Livingstone; 2014:chap 2.

  4. Acquired degenerative changes of the intervertebral segments at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. A radioanatomic analysis of the nondiskal structures of the spinal column and perispinal soft tissues.

    PubMed

    Jinkins, J R

    2001-01-01

    In earlier evolutionary times, mammals were primarily quadrupeds. However, other bipeds have also been represented during the course of the Earth's several billion year history. In many cases, either the bipedal stance yielded a large tail and hypoplastic upper extremities (e.g., Tyrannosaurus rex and the kangaroo), or it culminated in hypoplasia of the tail and further development and specialization of the upper extremities (e.g., nonhuman primates and human beings). In the human species this relatively recently acquired posture resulted in a more or less pronounced lumbosacral kyphosis. In turn, certain compensatory anatomic features have since occurred. These include the normal characteristic posteriorly directed wedge-shape of the L5 vertebral body and the L5-S1 intervertebral disk; the L4 vertebral body and the L4-L5 disk may be similarly visibly affected. These compensatory mechanisms, however, have proved to be functionally inadequate over the long term of the human life span. Upright posture also leads to increased weight bearing in humans that progressively causes excess stresses at and suprajacent to the lumbosacral junction. These combined factors result in accelerated aging and degenerative changes and a predisposition to frank biomechanical failure of the subcomponents of the spinal column in these spinal segments. One other specific problem that occurs at the lumbosacral junction that predisposes toward premature degeneration is the singular relationship that exists between a normally mobile segment of spine (i.e., the lumbar spine) and a normally immobile one (i.e., the sacrum). It is well known that mobile spinal segments adjacent to congenitally or acquired fused segments have a predilection toward accelerated degenerative changes. The only segment of the spine in which this is invariably normally true is at the lumbosacral junction (i.e., the unfused lumbar spine adjoining the fused sacrum). Nevertheless, biomechanical failures of the human spine

  5. Ultrasound versus fluoroscopy-guided caudal epidural steroid injection for the treatment of chronic low back pain with radiculopathy: A randomised, controlled clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hazra, Arindam Kumar; Bhattacharya, Dipasri; Mukherjee, Sayantan; Ghosh, Santanu; Mitra, Manasij; Mandal, Mohanchandra

    2016-01-01

    Background and Aims: Caudal epidural steroid administration is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain (LBP). Fluoroscopy guidance is the gold standard for pain procedures. Ultrasound guidance is recently being used in pain clinic procedures. We compared the fluoroscopy guidance and ultrasound guidance for caudal epidural steroid injection with respect to the time needed for correct placement of the needle and clinical effectiveness in patients with chronic LBP. Methods: Fifty patients with chronic LBP with radiculopathy, not responding to conventional medical management, were randomly allocated to receive injection depot methyl prednisolone (40 mg) through caudal route either using ultrasound guidance (Group U, n = 25) or fluoroscopy guidance (Group F, n = 25). Pre-procedural visual analogue scale (VAS) score and Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) were noted. During the procedure, the time needed for correct placement of needle was observed. Adverse events, if any, were also noted. All patients were followed up for next 2 months to evaluate Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score and ODI at the 2nd week and again at the end of 1st and 2nd month. Results: The needle-placement time was less using ultrasound guidance as compared to fluoroscopy guidance (119 ± 7.66 vs. 222.28 ± 29.65 s, respectively, P < 0.001). Significant reduction in VAS score and ODI (clinical improvement) was noted in the follow-up time points and comparable between the groups at all time points. Conclusion: Ultrasound guidance can be a safe alternative tool for achieving faster needle placement in caudal epidural space. Clinical effectiveness (reduction of VAS and ODI scores) remains comparable between both the techniques. PMID:27330199

  6. Development of a Standardized Method for Contouring the Lumbosacral Plexus: A Preliminary Dosimetric Analysis of this Organ at Risk Among 15 Patients Treated With Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy for Lower Gastrointestinal Cancers and the Incidence of Radiation-Induced Lumbosacral Plexopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, Sun K.; Mak, Walter; Yang, Claus C.; Liu Tianxiao; Cui Jing; Chen, Allen M.; Purdy, James A.; Monjazeb, Arta M.; Do, Ly

    2012-10-01

    Purpose: To generate a reproducible step-wise guideline for the delineation of the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) on axial computed tomography (CT) planning images and to provide a preliminary dosimetric analysis on 15 representative patients with rectal or anal cancers treated with an intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) technique. Methods and Materials: A standardized method for contouring the LSP on axial CT images was devised. The LSP was referenced to identifiable anatomic structures from the L4-5 interspace to the level of the sciatic nerve. It was then contoured retrospectively on 15 patients treated with IMRT for rectal or anal cancer. No dose limitations were placed on this organ at risk during initial treatment planning. Dosimetric parameters were evaluated. The incidence of radiation-induced lumbosacral plexopathy (RILSP) was calculated. Results: Total prescribed dose to 95% of the planned target volume ranged from 50.4 to 59.4 Gy (median 54 Gy). The mean ({+-}standard deviation [SD]) LSP volume for the 15 patients was 100 {+-} 22 cm{sup 3} (range, 71-138 cm{sup 3}). The mean maximal dose to the LSP was 52.6 {+-} 3.9 Gy (range, 44.5-58.6 Gy). The mean irradiated volumes of the LSP were V40Gy = 58% {+-} 19%, V50Gy = 22% {+-} 23%, and V55Gy = 0.5% {+-} 0.9%. One patient (7%) was found to have developed RILSP at 13 months after treatment. Conclusions: The true incidence of RILSP in the literature is likely underreported and is not a toxicity commonly assessed by radiation oncologists. In our analysis the LSP commonly received doses approaching the prescribed target dose, and 1 patient developed RILSP. Identification of the LSP during IMRT planning may reduce RILSP. We have provided a reproducible method for delineation of the LSP on CT images and a preliminary dosimetric analysis for potential future dose constraints.

  7. NGF-mediated survival depends on p21ras in chick sympathetic neurons from the superior cervical but not from lumbosacral ganglia.

    PubMed

    Markus, A; von Holst, A; Rohrer, H; Heumann, R

    1997-11-15

    In rat embryonic sympathetic neurons from the superior cervical ganglia (SCG) NGF-mediated survival depends on the activation of the trkA receptor tyrosine kinase and on the activity of the intracellular plasmamembrane-anchored small G-protein p21ras. In contrast, chick sympathetic neurons derived from the more caudally located lumbosacral chain ganglia (LSCG) do not respond to activated p21ras (G12V-Ha-ras mutant). In these neurons endogenous p21ras and its downstream effector MAP kinase are activated but are not essential for NGF-dependent survival. Here we show that also in chick sympathetic neurons of the SCG permanently activated p21ras protein does promote neuron survival. Consistently, their NGF-mediated survival is sensitive to Fab fragments blocking endogenous p21ras activity. These results suggest that sympathetic neurons derived from sympathoenteric (SCG) and sympathoadrenal (LSCG) lineages differ in their requirement for p21ras in the NGF-mediated survival pathways.

  8. Navigated Transtubular Extraforaminal Decompression of the L5 Nerve Root at the Lumbosacral Junction: Clinical Data, Radiographic Features, and Outcome Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stavrinou, P.; Härtl, R.; Krischek, B.; Kabbasch, C.; Mpotsaris, A.; Goldbrunner, R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root remains a challenge due to anatomic constraints, severe level-degeneration, and variable anatomy. The purpose of this study is to introduce the use of navigation for transmuscular transtubular decompression at the L5/S1 level and report on radiological features and clinical outcome. Methods. Ten patients who underwent a navigation-assisted extraforaminal decompression of the L5 nerve root were retrospectively analyzed. Results. Six patients had an extraforaminal herniated disc and four had a foraminal stenosis. The distance between the L5 transverse process and the para-articular notch of the sacrum was 12.1 mm in patients with a herniated disc and 8.1 mm in those with a foraminal stenosis. One patient had an early recurrence and another developed dysesthesia that resolved after 3 months. There was a significant improvement from preoperative to postoperative NRS with the results being sustainable at follow-up. ODI was also significantly improved after surgery. According to the Macnab grading scale, excellent or good outcomes were obtained in 8 patients and fair ones in 2. Conclusions. The navigated transmuscular transtubular approach to the lumbosacral junction allows for optimal placement of the retractor and excellent orientation particularly for foraminal stenosis or in cases of complex anatomy. PMID:27127783

  9. AMPA glutamatergic receptor-immunoreactive subunits are expressed in lumbosacral neurons of the spinal cord and neurons of the dorsal root and pelvic ganglia controlling pelvic functions in the rat.

    PubMed

    Chambille, I; Rampin, O

    2002-04-12

    Sacral preganglionic neurons innervate the pelvic organs via a relay in the major pelvic ganglion. Pudendal motoneurons innervate striated muscles and sphincters of the lower urinary, genital and digestive tracts. The activity of these spinal neurons is regulated by sensory afferents of visceral and somatic origins. Glutamate is released by sensory afferents in the spinal cord, and interacts with a variety of receptor subtypes. The aim of the present study was to investigated the presence of AMPA glutamate receptor subunits (GluR1-GluR4) in the neural network controlling the lower urogenital and digestive tracts of male rats. We performed double-immunohistochemistry directed against a neuronal tracer, the cholera toxin beta subunit (Ctbeta) and each of the four receptor subunits. GluR1, GluR2 and GluR3 subunits were present in many sacral preganglionic neurons retrogradely labelled with Ctbeta applied to the pelvic nerve, and in some dorsolateral and dorsomedian motoneurons retrogradely labelled with Ctbeta injected in ischiocavernosus and bulbospongiosus muscles. The four subunits were detected in postganglionic neurons of the major pelvic ganglion retrogradely labelled with Ctbeta injected in the corpus cavernosum, and in some somata of sensory afferents of the L6 dorsal root ganglion labelled with Ctbeta applied to the dorsal penile nerve or injected in corpus cavernosum. The results provide a detailed knowledge of the neural targets expressing the various AMPA receptor subunits and suggest that part of the neural network that controls pelvic organs, including sensory afferents and postganglionic neurons, is sensitive to glutamate through the whole family of AMPA subunits.

  10. The effects of a three-week use of lumbosacral orthoses on trunk muscle activity and on the muscular response to trunk perturbations

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The effects of lumbosacral orthoses (LSOs) on neuromuscular control of the trunk are not known. There is a concern that wearing LSOs for a long period may adversely alter muscle control, making individuals more susceptible to injury if they discontinue wearing the LSOs. The purpose of this study was to document neuromuscular changes in healthy subjects during a 3-week period while they regularly wore a LSO. Methods Fourteen subjects wore LSOs 3 hrs a day for 3 weeks. Trunk muscle activity prior to and following a quick force release (trunk perturbation) was measured with EMG in 3 sessions on days 0, 7, and 21. A longitudinal, repeated-measures, factorial design was used. Muscle reflex response to trunk perturbations, spine compression force, as well as effective trunk stiffness and damping were dependent variables. The LSO, direction of perturbation, and testing session were the independent variables. Results The LSO significantly (P < 0.001) increased the effective trunk stiffness by 160 Nm/rad (27%) across all directions and testing sessions. The number of antagonist muscles that responded with an onset activity was significantly reduced after 7 days of wearing the LSO, but this difference disappeared on day 21 and is likely not clinically relevant. The average number of agonist muscles switching off following the quick force release was significantly greater with the LSO, compared to without the LSO (P = 0.003). Conclusions The LSO increased trunk stiffness and resulted in a greater number of agonist muscles shutting-off in response to a quick force release. However, these effects did not result in detrimental changes to the neuromuscular function of trunk muscles after 3 weeks of wearing a LSO 3 hours a day by healthy subjects. PMID:20609255

  11. Study on the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels pertinent to L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery with computer tomography angiography.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liehua; Liang, Yong; Zhou, Qiang; Zhang, Hong; Wang, Haoming; Li, Songtao; Zhao, Chen; Hou, Tianyong; Liu, Ling

    2014-12-01

    We investigate the anatomy of the lumbosacral anterior great vessels using computer tomography (CT) angiography before L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery. Sixty-two adult patients were selected. The location of the abdominal aortic bifurcation and common iliac venous confluence in the lumbar vertebrae and the anatomic parameters of the iliac vascular space (e.g., distances from the included angle vertex of the iliac vascular space to the median sagittal plane and to the inferior boundary of L5 and distances between the left and right iliac vessels on the inferior boundary of L5 and on the superior boundary of S1) were analysed. Overall, 67.73% of the 62 cases had an abdominal aortic bifurcation located at L4 and L4/5 intervertebral disc; 61.29%, the common iliac venous confluence located at L5. The four distances mentioned above were 0.98 cm ± 0.38 cm, 2.01 cm ± 1.26 cm, 3.11 cm ± 1.35 cm and 4.34 cm ± 1.10 cm, respectively. A classification system of types A, B and C was developed. The calculated L5/S1 intervertebral space exposure percentages of types A, B and C were 32.21%, 82.58% and 54.68%, respectively. During L5/S1 anterior interbody surgery, type B intervertebral discs can be exposed conveniently, preventing injury of the iliac vessels, which was also observed in 54.68% and 32.21% of the type C and type A discs, respectively. Because the type A intervertebral disc has minimal exposure, the risk of iliac vascular injury is relatively high in these patients.

  12. Comparison of the Lumbosacral Plexus Nerves Formation in Pampas Fox (Pseudalopex gymnocercus) and Crab-Eating Fox (Cerdocyon thous) in Relationship to Plexus Model in Dogs.

    PubMed

    Lorenzão, Caio José; Zimpel, Aline Veiga; Novakoski, Eduardo; da Silva, Aline Alves; Martinez-Pereira, Malcon Andrei

    2016-03-01

    In this study, the spinal nerves that constitute the lumbosacral plexus (LSP) were dissected in two species of South American wild canids (pampas fox-Pseudalopex gymnocercus, and crab-eating fox-Cerdocyon thous). The nerves origin and distribution in the pelvic limb were examined and compared with the LSP model of the dog described in the literature. The LSP was formed by whole ventral branches of L5 at L7 and S1, and a contribution of a one branch from S2, divided in three trunks. The trunk formed by union from L5-6 and S1 was divided into the cranial (cutaneus femoris lateralis nerve) medial (femoralis nerve) and lateral branches (obturatorius nerve). At the caudal part of the plexus, a thick branch, the ischiadicus plexus, was formed by contributions from L6-7 and S1-2. This root gives rise to the nerve branches which was disseminated to the pelvic limb (nerves gluteus cranial and gluteus caudal, cutaneus femoris caudalis and ischiadicus). The ischiadicus nerve was divided into fibularis communis and tibialis nerves. The tibialis nerve emits the cutaneus surae caudalis. The fibularis communis emits the cutaneus surae lateralis, fibularis superficialis and fibularis profundus. The pudendus nerve arises from S2 with contributions of one branch L7-S1 and one ramus of the cutaneus femoris lateralis. Still, one branch of S2 joins with S3 to form the rectales caudales nerve. These data provides an important anatomical knowledge of a two canid species of South American fauna, besides providing the effective surgical and clinical care of these animals. PMID:26692361

  13. Cervical Stenosis, Myelopathy and Radiculopathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... between the vertebrae results in narrowing of the space for the spinal cord and its branches, known ... and cervical stenosis refers to narrowing of the space for the spinal cord or nerve branches in ...

  14. A RANDOMIZED CLINICAL TRIAL COMPARING EXTENSIBLE AND INEXTENSIBLE LUMBOSACRAL ORTHOSES AND STANDARD CARE ALONE IN THE MANAGEMENT OF LOWER BACK PAIN

    PubMed Central

    Morrisette, David C.; Cholewicki, Jacek; Patenge, Walter F.; Logan, Sarah; Seif, Gretchen; McGowan, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Study Design Single blinded, randomized clinical trial for the evaluation of lumbosacral orthoses (LSOs) in the management of lower back pain (LBP). Objective To evaluate the effects of two types of LSO on self-rated disability in patients with lower back pain. Summary of Background Data LSOs are commonly used for the management of LBP, but their effectiveness may vary due to design. An inextensible LSO (iLSO) reduce trunk motion and increases trunk stiffness, whereas an extensible LSO (eLSO) does not. Methods 98 participants with LBP were randomized to three groups: 1) Standard care group (SC), which included medication and physical therapy (n=29), 2) SC with eLSO (eLSO group) (n=32), and 3) SC with iLSO (iLSO group) (n=37). Outcome measures were evaluated before and after 2 weeks of treatment: modified Oswestry Disability Index (ODI), Patient Specific Activity Score (PSAS), pain ratings, and Fear and Avoidance Beliefs Questionnaire (FABQ). Results There were no statistically significant differences between groups at baseline. Compared to the SC alone, iLSO group showed greater improvement on the ODI scores (p=.01), but not the eLSO group. The ODI scores improved by a mean of 2.4 (95% CI −2.2, 7.1), 8.1 (95% CI 2.8, 13.4), and 14.0 (95% CI 8.2, 19.8) points for SC, eLSO, and iLSO groups respectively. Individuals wearing the iLSO had 4.7 times higher odds of achieving 50% or greater improvement in the ODI scores compared to those assigned to SC (95% CI 1.2, 18.5, p=0.03). Both the eLSO and iLSO groups had a greater improvement in the PSAS scores compared to SC (p=.05 and p=.01, respectively), but the change did not meet the minimal clinically important difference. Pain ratings improved for all three groups, with no statistical difference between them. Finally, no significant differences across groups were found for the FABQ. Conclusions An iLSO led to greater improvement in ODI scores in comparison with SC and an eLSO. We surmise that the likely mechanism

  15. Reduced Field-of-View Diffusion-Weighted Imaging of the Lumbosacral Enlargement: A Pilot In Vivo Study of the Healthy Spinal Cord at 3T

    PubMed Central

    Grussu, Francesco; Louka, Polymnia; Prados, Ferran; Samson, Rebecca S.; Battiston, Marco; Altmann, Daniel R.; Ourselin, Sebastien; Miller, David H.; Gandini Wheeler-Kingshott, Claudia A. M.

    2016-01-01

    Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) has recently started to be adopted into clinical investigations of spinal cord (SC) diseases. However, DTI applications to the lower SC are limited due to a number of technical challenges, related mainly to the even smaller size of the SC structure at this level, its position relative to the receiver coil elements and the effects of motion during data acquisition. Developing methods to overcome these problems would offer new means to gain further insights into microstructural changes of neurological conditions involving the lower SC, and in turn could help explain symptoms such as bladder and sexual dysfunction. In this work, the feasibility of obtaining grey and white matter (GM/WM) DTI indices such as axial/radial/mean diffusivity (AD/RD/MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) within the lumbosacral enlargement (LSE) was investigated using a reduced field-of-view (rFOV) single-shot echo-planar imaging (ss-EPI) acquisition in 14 healthy participants using a clinical 3T MR system. The scan-rescan reproducibility of the measurements was assessed by calculating the percentage coefficient of variation (%COV). Mean FA was higher in WM compared to GM (0.58 and 0.4 in WM and GM respectively), AD and MD were higher in WM compared to GM (1.66 μm2ms-1 and 0.94 μm2ms-1 in WM and 1.2 μm2ms-1 and 0.82 μm2ms-1 in GM for AD and MD respectively) and RD was lower in WM compared to GM (0.58 μm2ms-1 and 0.63 μm2ms-1 respectively). The scan-rescan %COV was lower than 10% in all cases with the highest values observed for FA and the lowest for MD. This pilot study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain reliable tissue-specific estimation of DTI indices within the LSE using a rFOV ss-EPI acquisition. The DTI acquisition and analysis protocol presented here is clinically feasible and may be used in future investigations of neurological conditions implicating the lower SC. PMID:27741303

  16. The activity characteristics of the preganglionic pupilloconstrictor neurones

    PubMed Central

    Sillito, A. M.; Zbrożyna, A. W.

    1970-01-01

    1. Recordings have been made of pupilloconstrictor unit activity within the small-celled component of the oculomotor nucleus of the cat. The identity of these neurones was determined by testing unit responses to a sequence of stimuli which produced dilation and constriction of the sympathectomized pupil. 2. The frequency range of unit activity was from 0 to 28/sec. A maximal constriction of the pupil was maintained by unit activity in the region of 8/sec. The resting level of unit activity under chloralose anaesthesia was typically in the range 6-10/sec. 3. Stimulation in the defence area of the hypothalamus produced a maximal pupillodilation associated with a complete inhibition of unit activity and a block of the light reflex response. 4. Onset of retinal illumination produced a burst discharge followed by a transient silent period and then an over-all increase in the rate of activity. 5. Cessation of retinal illumination produced a post-excitatory depression of unit activity lasting from 190 to 700 msec. It is suggested that this effect is produced by retinal afferents activated by light `off' that exert an inhibitory influence on the pupilloconstrictor neurones. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5501060

  17. Long-term effects of a lumbosacral ventral root avulsion injury on axotomized motor neurons and avulsed ventral roots in a non-human primate model of cauda equina injury.

    PubMed

    Ohlsson, M; Nieto, J H; Christe, K L; Havton, L A

    2013-10-10

    Here, we have translated from the rat to the non-human primate a unilateral lumbosacral injury as a model for cauda equina injury. In this morphological study, we have investigated retrograde effects of a unilateral L6-S2 ventral root avulsion (VRA) injury as well as the long-term effects of Wallerian degeneration on avulsed ventral roots at 6-10 months post-operatively in four adult male rhesus monkeys. Immunohistochemistry for choline acetyl transferase and glial fibrillary acidic protein demonstrated a significant loss of the majority of the axotomized motoneurons in the affected L6-S2 segments and signs of an associated astrocytic glial response within the ventral horn of the L6 and S1 spinal cord segments. Quantitative analysis of the avulsed ventral roots showed that they exhibited normal size and were populated by a normal number of myelinated axons. However, the myelinated axons in the avulsed ventral roots were markedly smaller in caliber compared to the fibers of the intact contralateral ventral roots, which served as controls. Ultrastructural studies confirmed the presence of small myelinated axons and a population of unmyelinated axons within the avulsed roots. In addition, collagen fibers were readily identified within the endoneurium of the avulsed roots. In summary, a lumbosacral VRA injury resulted in retrograde motoneuron loss and astrocytic glial activation in the ventral horn. Surprisingly, the Wallerian degeneration of motor axons in the avulsed ventral roots was followed by a repopulation of the avulsed roots by small myelinated and unmyelinated fibers. We speculate that the small axons may represent sprouting or axonal regeneration by primary afferents or autonomic fibers. PMID:23830908

  18. Role of electrodiagnosis in patients being considered for epidural steroid injections.

    PubMed

    Annaswamy, Thiru M; Bierner, Samuel M; Avraham, Ravid

    2013-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic (EDX) evaluation, and, more specifically, electromyography (EMG), has a well-established role in the diagnostic confirmation of cervical and lumbar radiculopathy. The role of EMG in prognostication, however, is less established and remains a topic of debate. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the diagnostic and prognosticating role of EMG in cervical and lumbar radiculopathies, and to assess the utility of EMG in predicting outcomes after epidural steroid injections (ESI). A review of the existing literature strongly supports a prognosticating role for EDX in predicting outcomes after lumbar ESI in lumbosacral radiculopathies (LSR). Although limited research regarding outcome prediction after cervical ESI in cervical radiculopathies has been performed, no study has specifically evaluated the utility of EMG in predicting outcomes for cervical ESI, and this topic requires further investigation. An EDX evaluation can provide clinicians with accurate and reliable diagnostic information (level I or level II evidence) in the evaluation of patients with lumbosacral radiculopathies, and can provide more valid prognostic information (level I evidence) regarding potential benefits of lumbar ESI. An EDX evaluation, therefore, can enhance a clinician's ability to advise patients on the most appropriate and efficacious evaluation and management plan for the treatment of painful radiculopathies.

  19. Lumbar Epidural Steroid Injection for Painful Spasticity in Cervical Spinal Cord Injury: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Bang, Hyun; Chun, Seong Min; Park, Hee Won; Bang, Moon Suk

    2015-01-01

    We report a case of a 53-year-old male with traumatic cervical spinal cord injury (SCI). He could not maintain a standing position because of painful spasticity in his lower limbs. A magnetic resonance imaging and electromyography indicated chronic lumbosacral radiculopathy, explaining his chronic low back pain before the injury. For diagnostic as well as therapeutic purposes, transforaminal epidural steroid injection (ESI) to the right L5 root was performed. After the intervention, the spasticity decreased and his ambulatory function improved. This case illustrates that lumbar radiculopathy concomitant with a cervical SCI can produce severe spasticity and it can be dramatically improved by ESI. PMID:26361605

  20. Unusual Spinal Epidural Lipomatosis and Lumbosacral Instability

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Picazo, David; Ramírez Villaescusa, José

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Epidural lipomatosis is most frequently observed in patients on chronic steroid treatment. Only a few idiopathic epidural lipomatosis cases have been described. Material and Methods. 64-year-old male patient presented with low back pain and left leg pain. Later, the patient experienced neurogenic claudication and radicular pain in the left leg without urinary dysfunction. Plain radiography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated an abnormal fat tissue overgrowth in the epidural space with compression of the dural sac, degenerative disc disease at L4-L5 level, and instability at L5-S1. Endocrinopathic diseases and chronic steroid therapy were excluded. If conservative treatment failed, surgical treatment can be indicated. Results. After surgery, there was a gradual improvement in symptoms and signs, and six months later the patient returned to daily activities and was neurologically normal. Conclusion. In the absence of common causes of neurogenic claudication, epidural lipomatosis should be considered. The standard test for the diagnosis of epidural lipomatosis is magnetic resonance (MR). At first, conservative treatment must be considered; weight loss and the suspension of prior corticosteroid therapy are indicated. In the presence of neurological impairment, the operative treatment of wide surgical decompression must be performed soon after diagnosis. PMID:27069704

  1. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved.

  2. Scoliosis associated with idiopathic lumbosacral epidural lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Han, Seong Rok

    2016-03-01

    There are very few reports of spinal epidural lipomatosis (SEL) in association with scoliosis. A 49-year-old man presented with persistent back pain and right hip lump. The lumbar spine X-rays showed scoliosis (Lenke classification 5BN). Lumbar MRI demonstrated circumferential epidural fat deposit from L1 to lower S2 level. There was no obvious etiology of SEL except mild increased body mass index (BMI). The patient was managed with conservative treatment. After 6 months medication (limaprost and ginkgo), his symptoms were relieved. PMID:27683700

  3. [Amyothropic neuralgy of lumbosacral plexus - case report].

    PubMed

    Pastuszak, Żanna; Tomczykiewicz, Kazimierz; Stępień, Adam

    2015-02-01

    Amyothropic neuralgy is a rare disease witch unknown etiopathogenesis. The main popular theory says that inflammatory and immunomodulatory process is connected with that disease. Diagnosis is made after exclusion of other causes of plexus lumbosacralis damage. The main symptom is neuropathic pain after which there is observed muscle weakness and atrophy. ENG/EMG study and MRI are made to confirm the diagnosis. In this study we described a case of 52 years old female with lower limbs paresis, who was diagnosed few years after first symptoms. Limb paresis was preluded by lumbar pain. MRI study revealed central spinal disc herniations on L1-2, L2-3, L3-4 levels with dura matter compression, L4-5 spinal disc right lateral herniation and synovial cyst. MRI of both lumbar plexuses was also normal. EMG study revealed features of bilateral, chronic damage of lower legs nerves on lumbar plexus level. Patient was treated with physiotherapy and gabapentin with dose of 2x600mg per day. PMID:25771520

  4. The location of descending fibres to sympathetic preganglionic vasomotor and sudomotor neurons in man.

    PubMed Central

    Nathan, P W; Smith, M C

    1987-01-01

    Evidence is given of the location in the spinal cord of man of the central sympathetic fibres supplying vasomotor and sudomotor neurons of the body caudal to the head and neck. The evidence is based on anterolateral cordotomies. The fibres lie within the medial part of the equatorial plane, extending from the base of the posterior horn and the lateral horn across the medial half of the white matter. The evidence from a previous paper together with that of the present paper is that the pathway maintains this position throughout the spinal cord as far as the L2 segment. The sympathomotor fibres caudal to the head and neck are supplied from both sides of the cord: sympathetic activity is not removed, although it may be slightly diminished, by a hemisection of the cord. The evidence suggests that sympathetic fibres for vasomotor control leave the cord cranial to the Th 7 segment. The knowledge of the location of the pathways is of value to neurosurgeons so that they may be avoided in the operation of anterolateral cordotomy. Images PMID:3681303

  5. Physical and mechanical properties of calf lumbosacral trabecular bone.

    PubMed

    Swartz, D E; Wittenberg, R H; Shea, M; White, A A; Hayes, W C

    1991-01-01

    The physical and mechanical properties of calf lumbar and sacral trabecular bone were determined and compared with those of human trabecular bone. The mean tissue density (1.66 +/- 0.12 g cm-3), equivalent mineral density (169 +/- 36 mg cm-3), apparent density (453 +/- 89 mg cm-3), ash density (194 +/- 59 mg cm-3), ash content (0.6 +/- 0.05%), compressive strength (7.1 +/- 3.0 MPa) and compressive modulus (173 +/- 97 MPa) of calf trabecular bone are similar to those of young human. There were moderate, positive linear correlations between apparent density and equivalent mineral density, ash density, and compressive strength; and between compressive strength and equivalent mineral density (R2 ranging from 0.35 to 0.48, p less than 0.001). Apparent density, ash density, and equivalent mineral density did not differ significantly in different regions. In contrast to humans, the compressive strength increased from posterior, near the facet, to the anterior vertebral body. These comparisons of physical and mechanical properties, as well as anatomical comparisons by others, indicate that the calf spine is a good model of the young non-osteoporotic human spine and thus useful for the testing of spinal instrumentation.

  6. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy. PMID:27534095

  7. [Myxoid liposarcoma of the lumbosacral spine. Clinical case report].

    PubMed

    Granados-López, Sandy Lucero; Tavares-García, Juana Sonia; Pérez-Contreras, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    Introducción: el liposarcoma es un tumor maligno de tejidos blandos que constituye el grupo más numeroso de sarcomas en el adulto. La variante mixoide representa 30 a 35 % de todos los liposarcomas. Comúnmente se observa en los muslos. En la literatura se han informado solo dos pacientes con liposarcoma en la columna vertebral. Caso clínico: mujer de 28 años de edad con síntomas de compresión medular (marcha claudicante, fuerza en la extremidad derecha 4/5, disminución de la sensibilidad). La imagen por resonancia magnética confirmó una masa paravertebral derecha que se extendía desde L4 hasta S2, multinodular, sólido quística, que seguía el trayecto de los forámenes de conjunción de S1 y S2 hacia el espacio presacro, con señales hipointensas en T1 e hiperintensas en T2. Con los estudios radiológicos se concluyó que presentaba un neurofibroma. Se realizó resección extra e intrarraquídea, de la que se extrajo un tumor. El estudio histopatológico definitivo indicó que se trataba de un liposarcoma mixoide. Conclusiones: la columna vertebral es una localización poco frecuente para esta neoplasia, así como para sus metástasis. Es difícil lograr una resección completa en este sitio, por lo que la tasa de recurrencia es alta.

  8. [Relationship between lumbosacral multifidus muscle and lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-ye; Wang, Kuan; Yuan, Wei-an; Zhan, Hong-sheng

    2016-06-01

    As a common disease in clinical, the treatment of lumbar disc herniation (LDH) focused on local intervertebral disc, such as surgery and other interventional therapy treatment, but postoperative complications and recurrence rate has been a difficult problem in the field of profession. With the development of spine biomechanics and anatomy, researches on lumbar herniation also increased. Researchers discovered that the incidence and prognosis of LDH were inseparable with local muscle and soft tissue. As the deep paraspinal muscles, multifidus muscle plays an important role to make lumbar stability. Its abnormal function could reduce the stable of lumbar spine, and the chronic lumbar disease could also lead to multifidus muscle atrophy.

  9. Ischaemic neuropathy of the lumbosacral plexus following intragluteal injection.

    PubMed Central

    Stöhr, M; Dichgans, J; Dörstelmann

    1980-01-01

    A lesion of the lumbo sacral plexus may result from an inadvertent intra-arterial injection of vasotoxic drugs into one of the gluteal arteries. Symptoms and follow-up of three cases are reported. The neuropathy is attributed to a toxic endarteritis with retrograde propagation of spasm and thrombosis. Swelling an bluish discoloration of the buttocks ("embolia cutis medicamentosa") as well as an impaired circulation in the homolateral leg are associated with the neurological syndrome in fully developed cases and makes possible a correct diagnosis. Images PMID:7205289

  10. Technical considerations in transforaminal endoscopic spine surgery at the thoracolumbar junction: report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Telfeian, Albert E; Jasper, Gabriele P; Oyelese, Adetokunbo A; Gokaslan, Ziya L

    2016-02-01

    OBJECTIVE In this study the authors describe the technical considerations and feasibility of transforaminal discectomy and foraminoplasty for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy in patients who have herniated discs at the thoracolumbar junction. METHODS After institutional review board approval, charts from 3 consecutive patients with lumbar radiculopathy and T12-L1 herniated discs who underwent endoscopic procedures between 2006 and 2014 were reviewed. RESULTS Consecutive cases (n = 1316) were reviewed to determine the incidence and success of surgery performed at the T12-L1 level. Only 3 patients (0.23%) treated with endoscopic surgery for their herniated discs had T12-L1 herniated discs; the rest were lumbar or lumbosacral herniations. For patients with T12-L1 disc herniations, the average preoperative visual analog scale score was 8.3 (indicated in the questionnaire as describing severe and constant pain). The average 1-year postoperative visual analog scale score was 1.7 (indicated in the questionnaire as mild and intermittent pain). CONCLUSIONS Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy and foraminotomy can be used as a safe yet minimally invasive technique for the treatment of lumbar radiculopathy in the setting of a thoracolumbar disc herniation. PMID:26828890

  11. Spatial segregation within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus of neurons innervating the bladder or the penis of the rat as revealed by three-dimensional reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Banrezes, B; Andrey, P; Maschino, E; Schirar, A; Peytevin, J; Rampin, O; Maurin, Y

    2002-01-01

    The purpose of the present investigations was (1) to examine the spatial organization of preganglionic neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus in the lumbosacral spinal cord of male adult rats and (2) to search, in this nucleus, for a possible segregation of sub-populations of neurons innervating the penis or the bladder, respectively. To estimate their spatial organization, neurons of the sacral parasympathetic nucleus were retrogradely labeled by wheat germ agglutinin coupled to horseradish peroxidase applied to the central end of the sectioned pelvic nerve. The sub-populations of lumbosacral neurons innervating the corpus cavernosum of the penis or the dome of the bladder were identified using transsynaptic retrograde labeling by pseudorabies virus injected into these organs in different rats. In both wheat germ agglutinin-labeled and pseudorabies virus-labeled rats, serial coronal sections were cut through the spinal L5-S1 segments. Labeled neurons were revealed by histochemistry (peroxidase experiments) or immunohistochemistry (pseudorabies virus experiments). By means of a three-dimensional reconstruction software developed in our laboratory, three-dimensional models were calculated from each spinal section image series. They revealed the spatial organization of (i) preganglionic neurons and (ii) neurons innervating the bladder or the penis. The different three-dimensional models were subsequently merged into a single one which revealed the segregation, within the sacral parasympathetic nucleus, of the sub-populations of neurons. Neurons labeled by virus injected into the penis extended predominantly from the rostral part of the L6 segment to the rostral part of the S1 segment while those labeled by bladder injections were distributed predominantly from the caudal part of the L6 segment to the caudal part of the S1 segment. These results support the hypothesis of a viscerotopic organization of sacral neurons providing the spinal control of pelvic organs.

  12. The Furcal Nerve Revisited

    PubMed Central

    Dabke, Harshad V.

    2014-01-01

    Atypical sciatica and discrepancy between clinical presentation and imaging findings is a dilemma for treating surgeon in management of lumbar disc herniation. It also constitutes ground for failed back surgery and potential litigations thereof. Furcal nerve (Furcal = forked) is an independent nerve with its own ventral and dorsal branches (rootlets) and forms a link nerve that connects lumbar and sacral plexus. Its fibers branch out to be part of femoral and obturator nerves in-addition to the lumbosacral trunk. It is most commonly found at L4 level and is the most common cause of atypical presentation of radiculopathy/sciatica. Very little is published about the furcal nerve and many are unaware of its existence. This article summarizes all the existing evidence about furcal nerve in English literature in an attempt to create awareness and offer insight about this unique entity to fellow colleagues/professionals involved in spine care. PMID:25317309

  13. Neurovascular Compression Caused by Popliteus Muscle Enlargement Without Discrete Trauma

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Popliteal entrapment syndrome caused by isolated popliteus muscle enlargement is very rare, although its occurrence has been reported after discrete trauma. However, popliteal artery stenosis with combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy caused by popliteus muscle enlargement without preceding trauma has not been reported. A 57-year-old man presented with a tingling sensation and pain in his left calf. He had no previous history of an injury. The symptoms were similar to those of lumbosacral radiculopathy. Calf pain became worse despite treatment, and the inability to flex his toes progressed. Computed tomography angiography and magnetic resonance imaging of the lower extremity showed popliteal artery stenosis caused by popliteus muscle enlargement and surrounding edema. An electrodiagnostic study confirmed combined peroneal and proximal tibial neuropathy at the popliteal fossa. Urgent surgical decompression was performed because of the progressive neurologic deficit and increasing neuropathic pain. The calf pain disappeared immediately after surgery, and he was discharged after the neurologic functions improved. PMID:27446794

  14. Sciatica caused by lumbar epidural gas.

    PubMed

    Belfquih, Hatim; El Mostarchid, Brahim; Akhaddar, Ali; gazzaz, Miloudi; Boucetta, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Gas production as a part of disc degeneration can occur but rarely causes nerve compression syndromes. The clinical features are similar to those of common sciatica. CT is very useful in the detection of epidural gas accumulation and nerve root compression. We report a case of symptomatic epidural gas accumulation originating from vacuum phenomenon in the intervertebral disc, causing lumbo-sacral radiculopathy. A 45-year-old woman suffered from sciatica for 9 months. The condition worsened in recent days. Computed tomography (CT) demonstrated intradiscal vacuum phenomenon, and accumulation of gas in the lumbar epidural space compressing the dural sac and S1 nerve root. After evacuation of the gas, her pain resolved without recurrence.

  15. [Radiation-Induced Radiculopathy with Paresis of the Neck and Autochthonous Back Muscles with Additional Myopathy].

    PubMed

    Ellrichmann, G; Lukas, C; Adamietz, I A; Grunwald, C; Schneider-Gold, C; Gold, R

    2016-06-01

    Radiation-induced tissue damage is caused by ionizing radiation mainly affecting the skin, vascular, neuronal or muscle tissue. Early damages occur within weeks and months while late damages may occur months or even decades after radiation.Radiation-induced paresis of the spine or the trunk muscles with camptocormia or dropped-head syndrome are rare but have already been described as long-term sequelae after treatment of Hodgkin's lymphoma. The differential diagnosis includes limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, fascioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) or lysosomal storage diseases (e. g. Acid Maltase Deficiency). We present the case of a patient with long lasting diagnostics over many months due to different inconclusive results. PMID:27391986

  16. The Relief of Unilateral Painful Thoracic Radiculopathy without Headache from Remote Spontaneous Spinal Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak

    PubMed Central

    Son, Byung-chul; Ha, Sang-woo; Lee, Si-hoon; Choi, Jin-gyu

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension (SIH) caused by spontaneous spinal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) leaks produces orthostatic headaches. Although upper arm pain or paresthesia is reportedly associated with SIH from spontaneous spinal CSF leak in the presence of orthostatic headache, low thoracic radicular pain due to spontaneous spinal CSF leak unassociated with postural headache is extremely rare. We report a 67-year-old female who presented with chronic, positional radicular right T11 pain. Computed tomography myelography showed a spontaneous lumbar spinal CSF leak at L2-3 and repeated lumbar epidural blood patches significantly alleviated chronic, positional, and lower thoracic radiculopathic pain. The authors speculate that a chronic spontaneous spinal CSF leak not severe enough to cause typical orthostatic headache or epidural CSF collection may cause local symptoms such as irritation of a remote nerve root. There might be considerable variabilities in the clinical features of SIH which can present a diagnostic challenge. PMID:27445613

  17. CASINO: Surgical or Nonsurgical Treatment for cervical radiculopathy, a randomised controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Cervical radicular syndrome (CRS) due to a herniated disc can be safely treated by surgical decompression of the spinal root. In the vast majority of cases this relieves pain in the arm and restores function. However, conservative treatment also has a high chance on relieving symptoms. The objective of the present study is to evaluate the (cost-) effectiveness of surgery versus prolonged conservative care during one year of follow-up, and to evaluate the timing of surgery. Predisposing factors in favour of one of the two treatments will be evaluated. Methods/design Patients with disabling radicular arm pain, suffering for at least 2 months, and an MRI-proven herniated cervical disc will be randomised to receive either surgery or prolonged conservative care with surgery if needed. The surgical intervention will be an anterior discectomy or a posterior foraminotomy that is carried out according to usual care. Surgery will take place within 2–4 weeks after randomisation. Conservative care starts immediately after randomisation. The primary outcome measure is the VAS for pain or tingling sensations in the arm one year after randomisation. In addition, timing of surgery will be studied by correlating the primary outcome to the duration of symptoms. Secondary outcome measures encompass quality of life, costs and perceived recovery. Predefined prognostic factors will be evaluated. The total follow-up period will cover two years. A sample size of 400 patients is needed. Statistical analysis will be performed using a linear mixed model which will be based on the ‘intention to treat’ principle. In addition, a new CRS questionnaire for patients will be developed, the Leiden Cervical Radicular Syndrome Functioning (LCRSF) scale. Discussion The outcome will contribute to better decision making for the treatment of cervical radicular syndrome. Trial registration NTR3504 PMID:24731301

  18. Compression of Root Level in a Patient with Hereditary Neuropathy with Liability to Pressure Palsy Diagnosed by Magnetic Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Park, Donghwi; Ryu, Ju Seok; Kim, Ki-Jeong

    2016-09-01

    Hereditary neuropathy with liability to pressure palsies (HNPP) is characterized by acute, painless, and recurrent mononeuropathies that are secondary to compression or minor trauma. This case is the first to report an intraspinal compression of the radicular nerve by schwannoma in a patient with HNPP. A 66-year-old woman developed left foot drop and paresthesia of the lateral aspects of left distal lower leg. An electromyography showed left L5 radiculopathy and severe peripheral polyneuropathy. A lumbosacral magnetic resonance imaging revealed a radicular nerve in the intradural and extramedullary space being compressed by schwannoma. She previously had symptoms of foot drop several years ago, and HNPP was confirmed by peripheral myelin protein 22 deletion. She was surgically treated for L5 radiculopathy, which might have been caused by a traction of the nerve root by schwannoma at the intradural and extramedullary space. After surgical treatment, her symptoms of foot drop had improved from zero grade to IV+ grade within 4 weeks. The occurrence of HNPP and schwannoma in the same patient may be coincidental, but it is tempting to speculate that they share a common genetic basis. Therefore, for patients with HNPP, it is important to consider not only an electrophysiologic study but also a magnetic resonance imaging to locate the exact pathologic site.

  19. Cauda Equina Syndrome Associated with Dural Ectasia in Chronic Anlylosing Spondylitis

    PubMed Central

    Ha, Sang-woo

    2014-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) associated with dural ectasia is a rare neurologic complication in patients with longstanding ankylosing spondylitis (AS). We report a 68-year-old male with a 30-year history of AS who presented a typical symptom and signs of progressive CES, urinary incontinence and neuropathic pain of the lumbosacral radiculopathy. Computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) findings showed the unique appearances of dural ectasia, multiple dural diverticula, erosion of posterior element of the lumbar spine, tethering of the conus medullaris and adhesion of the lumbosacral nerve roots to the posterior aspect of the dural ectasia. Considering the progressive worsening of the clinical signs, detethering of the conus medullaris through resection of the filum terminale was performed through a limited laminectomy. However, the urinary incontinence did not improve and there was a partial relief of the neuropathic leg pain only. The possible pathogenetic mechanism of CES-AS and the dural ectasia in this patient with longstanding AS are discussed with a literature review. PMID:25628815

  20. The Influence of Environment Geometry on Injury Outcome: II. Lumbosacral Spine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaibani, Saami J.

    2006-03-01

    It is widely agreed that the type of motor vehicle in which an occupant is situated can sometimes make a noticeable difference in injury potential even when the insult suffered is the same. A simple example might be the same occupant being in a sports car as opposed to a minivan, but such anecdotal experience does not usually help to distinguish the effect of particular features within the same category of vehicle. Other research has addressed the role of environment geometry in neck injury,[1] and this paper adopts the same methodology for the low back. The heights, lengths and angles of the seat cushion and seat back (including head rest) are all examined as descriptors of passenger compartment geometry, and any changes caused by these are determined. Useful results are feasible with the large patient population available even if clear patterns in these are not always present. As in earlier work, there is still the option of finding individual outcomes on a case-by-case basis. [1] The influence of environment geometry on injury outcome: I. Cervical spine, Bull Am Phys Soc, in press (2006).

  1. Unique Spatiotemporal Neuromodulation of the Lumbosacral Circuitry Shapes Locomotor Success after Spinal Cord Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Prithvi K; Sureddi, Shakthi; Alam, Monzurul; Zhong, Hui; Roy, Roland R; Edgerton, V Reggie; Gerasimenko, Yury

    2016-09-15

    Spinal cord epidural stimulation has resulted in the initiation of voluntary leg movements and improvement in postural, bladder, and sexual function. However, one of the limitations in reaching the full potential of epidural stimulation for therapeutic purposes in humans has been the identification of optimal stimulation configurations that can neuromodulate the spinal cord for stepping. In the present work, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the specificity of interaction between the rostral and caudal spinal cord circuitries in enabling locomotion in spinal rats (n = 10) by epidural spinal cord stimulation. By using unique spatiotemporal epidural stimulation parameters of the lumbar and sacral spinal cords, a robust stepping pattern in spinal rats was observed with only six training sessions and as early as 3 weeks post-injury. Electrophysiological evidence reveals that in addition to frequency of stimulation pulses at the stimulation sites, the relative timing between stimulation pulses applied at the lumbar (L2) and sacral (S1) segments of the spinal cord heavily impacted stepping performance. Best stepping was established at a higher stimulation frequency (40 Hz vs. 5, 10, 15, and 20Hz) and at specific relative time-intervals between the stimulation pulses (L2 pulse applied at 18-25 msec after the onset of the S1 pulse; S1 pulse applied 0-7 msec after the L2 pulse). Our data suggest that controlling pulse-to-pulse timing at multiple stimulation sources provides a novel strategy to optimize spinal stepping by fine-tuning the physiological state of the locomotor networks. These findings hold direct relevance to the clinician who will incorporate electrical stimulation strategies for optimizing control of locomotion after complete paralysis.

  2. Electrophysiological Mapping of Rat Sensorimotor Lumbosacral Spinal Networks after Complete Paralysis

    PubMed Central

    Gad, Parag; Roy, Roland R.; Choe, Jaehoon; Zhong, Hui; Nandra, Mandheeraj Singh; Tai, Y.C.; Gerasimenko, Yury; Edgerton, V. Reggie

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of the spinal cord has been shown to have great potential for improving function after motor deficits caused by injury or pathological conditions. Using a wide range of animal models, many studies have shown that stimulation applied to the neural networks intrinsic to the spinal cord can result in a dramatic improvement of motor ability, even allowing an animal to step and stand after a complete spinal cord transection. Clinical use of this technology, however, has been slow to develop due to the invasive nature of the implantation procedures and the difficulty of ascertaining specific sites of stimulation that would provide optimal amelioration of the motor deficits. Moreover, the development of tools available to control precise stimulation chronically via biocompatible electrodes has been limited. In this paper, we outline the use of a multisite electrode array in the spinal rat model to identify and stimulate specific sites of the spinal cord to produce discrete motor behaviors in spinal rats. The results demonstrate that spinal rats can stand and step when the spinal cord is stimulated tonically via electrodes located at specific sites on the spinal cord. The quality of stepping and standing was dependent on the location of the electrodes on the spinal cord, the specific stimulation parameters, and the orientation of the cathode and anode. The spinal motor evoked potentials (sMEP) in selected muscles during standing and stepping are shown to be critical tools to study selective activation of interneuronal circuits via responses of varying latencies. The present results provide further evidence that the assessment of functional networks in the background of behaviorally relevant functional states is likely to be a physiological tool of considerable importance in developing strategies to facilitate recovery of motor function after a number of neuromotor disorders. PMID:25890138

  3. [Ways to optimize the treatment of patients with discogenic-venous lumbosacral radiculomyeloischemia].

    PubMed

    Skoromets, А А; Bubnova, Е V; Endalceva, S М; Kapitonov, D S; Lalayan, Т V; Perfilev, S V; Smolko, D G; Skoromets, А P; Skoromets, Т А; Sukhatskaya, О V; Shmonin, А А

    2015-01-01

    Цель исследования — изучение эффективности L-лизина эсцината в терапии больных с дискогенно-венозной люмбосакральной радикуломиелоишемией. Материал и методы. Проведен анализ терапевтической эффективности противоотечной терапии с использованием препарата L-лизина эсцинат у 40 больных 30—40 лет (основная группа) в сопоставлении с контрольной группой (40 пациентов), получавших традиционную терапию. У всех пациентов грыжи дисков были подтверждены данными МРТ. В неврологическом статусе оценивали мышечную силу пояснично-крестцовых миотомов, их трофику и состояние сегментарно-проводникового аппарата чувствительности с количественным определением времени вибрации камертона. Результаты и заключение. В основной группе пациентов регресс неврологических симптомов был более быстрым (в первые 3—5 дней) и у большего числа пациентов (у 77,5% по сравнению с 55% контрольной группы). Авторы считают, что в патогенезе грыж нижних поясничных дисков существенную роль играет нарушение венозной микро- и макроциркуляции. Клинически важной для диагностики венозной радикуломиелоишемии является количественное определение вибрационной чувствительности (камертональная проба).

  4. Charcot Arthropathy of the Lumbosacral Spine Mimicking a Vertebral Tumor after Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Son, Soo-Bum; Kim, Eun-Sang; Eoh, Whan

    2013-01-01

    Charcot spinal arthropathy is a rare, progressive type of vertebral joint degeneration that occurs in the setting of any preexisting condition characterized by decreased afferent innervation to the extent that normal protective joint sensation in the vertebral column is impaired. The authors report on a case of Charcot arthropathy of the lower lumbar spine mimicking a spinal tumor following cervical cord injury. PMID:24527202

  5. When does the patient with a disc herniation undergo lumbosacral discectomy?

    PubMed Central

    Vroomen, P.; de Krom, M. C T F M; Knottnerus, J

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To design a model that could accurately predict eventual lumbar disc surgery in the patient initially presenting with clinical findings of nerve root compression.
METHODS—Prospective study in 183 patients with nerve root compression sampled from a primary care population. All patients underwent a standardised history, physical examination, and MRI. Surgery carried out in the next 6 months was recorded. Models were constructed to predict whether patients eventually received surgery.
RESULTS—Two models were constructed. Reduced model A was based on baseline findings, only, and contained six variables. Model B incorporated change over time as well and contained 10 variables. The area under the curve (in a receiver operating characteristic) for these models was 0.86 and 0.92, respectively. It was shown that at a probability cut off of 0.60, model B predicted eventual surgery with a sensitivity of 57% and a specificity of 100%.
CONCLUSIONS—Given the requirement of a high specificity, eventual operation could be adequately predicted in a sample of 183 patients with clinical nerve root compression. The application of the model in patients with nerve root compression might lead to earlier operation in a subset of patients resulting in a reduction of duration of illness and associated indirect costs. An important prerequisite for future application would be the validation of the prediction rule in another population.

 PMID:10601406

  6. Influence of snow shovel shaft configuration on lumbosacral biomechanics during a load-lifting task.

    PubMed

    Lewinson, Ryan T; Rouhi, Gholamreza; Robertson, D Gordon E

    2014-03-01

    Lower-back injury from snow shovelling may be related to excessive joint loading. Bent-shaft snow shovels are commonly available for purchase; however, their influence on lower back-joint loading is currently not known. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare L5/S1 extension angular impulses between a bent-shaft and a standard straight-shaft snow shovel. Eight healthy subjects participated in this study. Each completed a simulated snow-lifting task in a biomechanics laboratory with each shovel design. A standard motion analysis procedure was used to determine L5/S1 angular impulses during each trial, as well as peak L5/S1 extension moments and peak upper body flexion angle. Paired-samples t-tests (α = 0.05) were used to compare variables between shovel designs. Correlation was used to determine the relationship between peak flexion and peak moments. Results of this study show that the bent-shaft snow shovel reduced L5/S1 extension angular impulses by 16.5% (p = 0.022), decreased peak moments by 11.8% (p = 0.044), and peak flexion by 13.0% (p = 0.002) compared to the straight-shaft shovel. Peak L5/S1 extension moment magnitude was correlated with peak upper body flexion angle (r = 0.70). Based on these results, it is concluded that the bent-shaft snow shovel can likely reduce lower-back joint loading during snow shovelling, and thus may have a role in snow shovelling injury prevention.

  7. Degenerative disease supra- and infra-jacent to fused lumbar and lumbo-sacral levels.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, M-A; Lazennec, J-Y

    2016-02-01

    Disc degeneration is a normal age-related process. Accelerated degeneration of discs adjacent to fused spinal levels has been observed in numerous case-series studies. The available data document this phenomenon and provide information on its time to occurrence but show huge variations in incidence rates (5% to 70%). The supra-jacent disc is involved more often than the infra-jacent disc. Studies have clarified the underlying biomechanical rationale by showing increased loading of the adjacent discs. Risk factors have been the focus of the most recent studies. They include the number of fused levels, sagittal alignment, level of fusion, stiffness of the construct, and integrity of the posterior structures. Nevertheless, the many published studies have produced somewhat conflicting results. Various radiological criteria have been used to define degeneration of the adjacent disc. Although most patients have no symptoms, adverse effects on the spine and/or nerve roots may occur and, in some cases, require revision surgery. We draw attention to the many sources of bias in the published studies, of which we provide a critical and pragmatic discussion in the light of our personal experience. PMID:26797007

  8. Colokinetic effect of noradrenaline in the spinal defecation center: implication for motility disorders

    PubMed Central

    Naitou, Kiyotada; Shiina, Takahiko; Kato, Kurumi; Nakamori, Hiroyuki; Sano, Yuuki; Shimizu, Yasutake

    2015-01-01

    Chronic abdominal pain in irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) usually appears in combination with disturbed bowel habits, but the etiological relationship between these symptoms remains unclear. Noradrenaline is a major neurotransmitter controlling pain sensation in the spinal cord. To test the hypothesis that the descending noradrenergic pathway from the brain stem moderates gut motility, we examined effects of intrathecal application of noradrenaline to the spinal defecation center on colorectal motility. Colorectal intraluminal pressure and expelled volume were recorded in vivo in anesthetized rats. Intrathecal application of noradrenaline into the L6-S1 spinal cord, where the lumbosacral defecation center is located, caused propulsive contractions of the colorectum. Inactivation of spinal neurons by tetrodotoxin blocked the effect of noradrenaline. Pharmacological experiments showed that the effect of noradrenaline is mediated primarily by alpha-1 adrenoceptors. The enhancement of colorectal motility by intrathecal noradrenaline was abolished by severing of the pelvic nerves. Our results demonstrate that noradrenaline acting on sacral parasympathetic preganglionic neurons through alpha-1 adrenoceptors causes propulsive motility of the colorectum in rats. Considering that visceral pain activates the descending inhibitory pathways including noradrenergic neurons, our results provide a rational explanation of the concurrent appearance of chronic abdominal pain and colonic motility disorders in IBS patients. PMID:26218221

  9. One decade follow up after nucleoplasty in the management of degenerative disc disease causing low back pain and radiculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Cincu, Rafael; Lorente, Francisco de Asis; Gomez, Joaquin; Eiras, Jose; Agrawal, Amit

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: Nucleoplasty is a minimally invasive procedure that is developed to treat patients with symptomatic, but contained disc herniations or bulging discs. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a decade follow-up of coblation nucleoplasty treatment for protruded lumbar intervertebral disc. Methods: In this retrospective study there a total 50 patients who underwent intradiscal coblation therapy for symptomatic, but contained lumbar degenerative disc disease were included. Relief of low back pain, leg pain and numbness after the operation were assessed by visual analog pain scale (VAS). Function of lower limb and daily living of patients were evaluated by the Oswestry disability index (ODI) and subjective global rating of overall satisfaction were recorded and analyzed. Results: There were 27 male and 23 female with followup mean follow up of 115 months (range 105–130 months) with a mean age was 52 years (range 26–74 years). Analgesic consumption was reduced or stopped in 90% of these cases after 1 year. At 24 months follow up VAS was four points and ODI was 7.2. In three patients, we repeated the cool ablation after 36 months, at L3–4 level in two cases. Ten patients continue to be asymptomatic after 114 months of intervention. There were no complications with the procedure including nerve root injury, discitis or allergic reactions. Conclusions: Nucleoplasty may provide intermittent relief in contained disc herniation without significant complications and minimal morbidity. In accordance with the literature the evidence for intradiscal coablation therapy is moderate in managing chronic discogenic low back pain; nucleoplasty appears to be safe and effective. PMID:25767571

  10. Guidelines in electrodiagnostic medicine. American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine.

    PubMed

    1992-02-01

    The American Association of Electrodiagnostic Medicine (AAEM) is committed to the development of sound and clinically relevant guidelines through review of literature, expert opinion and consensus. In 1979, with the assistance of its Professional Practice Committee and association leaders, the association published its initial guidelines, Guidelines in Electrodiagnostic Medicine, covering the practice of electrodiagnostic medicine. The committee is charged with ongoing revision of the document, as needed, and the current version includes standards of practice in clinical electromyography, risks in electrodiagnostic medicine, basic equipment requirements, and the role of paramedical support. In 1988, Educational Guidelines for Electrodiagnostic Training Programs (Appendix A) was prepared by the AAEM Training Program Committee and added to aid training program directors in establishing new training programs or in reviewing the current status of the educational aspects of existing programs. In 1986, the AAEM charged its Quality Assurance Committee with the responsibility for the development of guidelines pertinent to electrodiagnostic medical consultations. The impetus for the charge was the requests received from members of the AAEM and other interested parties for educational material on indications for and conduct of electrodiagnostic medical consultations. As a result of the committee's efforts, Suggested Guidelines for Electrodiagnostic Medical Consultations (Appendix D), was published in 1989 and additional sections added subsequently. The current document includes (1) general indications for an electrodiagnostic medical consultation for patients with suspected myopathies, neuromuscular junction disorders, polyneuropathies, mononeuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies, neuronopathies and central nervous system disorders, (2) specific indications for patients with suspected lumbosacral or cervical radiculopathies, (3) general principles of electrodiagnostic

  11. Potential of adult mammalian lumbosacral spinal cord to execute and acquire improved locomotion in the absence of supraspinal input

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edgerton, V. R.; Roy, R. R.; Hodgson, J. A.; Prober, R. J.; de Guzman, C. P.; de Leon, R.

    1992-01-01

    The neural circuitry of the lumbar spinal cord can generate alternating extension and flexion of the hindlimbs. The hindlimbs of adult cats with complete transection of the spinal cord at a low thoracic level (T12-T13) can perform full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt moving at a range of speeds. Some limitations in the locomotor capacity can be associated with a deficit in the recruitment level of the fast extensors during the stance phase and the flexors during the swing phase of a step cycle. The level of locomotor performance, however, can be enhanced by daily training on a treadmill while emphasizing full weight-support stepping and by providing appropriately timed sensory stimulation, loading, and/or pharmacologic stimulation of the hindlimb neuromuscular apparatus. Furthermore, there appears to be an interactive effect of these interventions. For example, the maximum treadmill speed that a spinal adult cat can attain and maintain is significantly improved with daily full weight-supporting treadmill training, but progressive recruitment of fast extensors becomes apparent only when the hindlimbs are loaded by gently pulling down on the tail during the stepping. Stimulation of the sural nerve at the initiation of the flexion phase of the step cycle can likewise markedly improve the locomotor capability. Administration of clonidine, in particular in combination with an elevated load, resulted in the most distinct and consistent alternating bursts of electromyographic activity during spinal stepping. These data indicate that the spinal cord has the ability to execute alternating activation of the extensor and flexor musculature of the hindlimbs (stepping) and that this ability can be improved by several interventions such as training, sensory stimulation, and use of some pharmacologic agents. Thus, it appears that the spinal cord, without supraspinal input, is highly plastic and has the potential to "learn," that is, to acquire and improve its ability to execute full weight-supporting locomotion on a treadmill belt.

  12. Paresis of the L5 nerve root after reduction of low-grade lumbosacral dysplastic spondylolisthesis: a case report.

    PubMed

    Lykissas, Marios G; Aichmair, Alexander; Widmann, Roger; Sama, Andrew A

    2014-09-01

    We present a unique case of a 16-year-old patient who underwent lumbar decompression surgery (L4-S1), low-grade spondylolisthesis reduction surgery at L5-S1, and posterior instrumented fusion from L4 to the pelvis. Neurologic monitoring did not show any sustained changes throughout the operation. The patient was awoken from endotracheal anesthesia with grade 0 muscle function of the left extensor hallucis longus and tibialis anterior muscles resulting in left-sided foot drop. At the last follow-up 12 months after surgery, the patient had partial recovery, with grade 4 muscle function of the left extensor hallucis longus and tibialis anterior muscles. We suggest that early identification with direct nerve root stimulation and wake-up test immediately after reduction of spondylolisthesis will allow prompt release of the reduction and further foramen exploration, and increase the possibility of good postoperative nerve root recovery. PMID:24887052

  13. Neuroimaging in pediatric leukemia and lymphoma: differential diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Elida; Lucaya, Javier; Castellote, Amparo; Piqueras, Joaquim; Sainz, Pilar; Olivé, Teresa; Sánchez-Toledo, José; Ortega, Juan J

    2002-01-01

    Recent advances in therapy for pediatric hematologic neoplasms have greatly improved the prognosis but have resulted in an increased incidence of associated complications and toxic effects. The main neuroimaging features in pediatric patients with leukemia or lymphoma treated with chemotherapy or radiation therapy were retrospectively reviewed. To simplify the approach and facilitate differential diagnosis, the neuroimaging features have been classified into three main categories: central nervous system manifestations of primary disease, side effects of therapeutic procedures (radiation therapy, chemotherapy, bone marrow transplantation), and complications due to immunosuppression, particularly infections. Manifestations of primary disease include cerebrovascular complications (hemorrhage, cerebral infarction) and central nervous system involvement (infiltration of the meninges, parenchyma, bone marrow, orbit, and spine). Effects of radiation therapy include white matter disease, mineralizing microangiopathy, parenchymal brain volume loss, radiation-induced cryptic vascular malformations, and second neoplasms. Effects of chemotherapy and bone marrow transplantation include hemorrhage, dural venous thrombosis, white matter disease, reversible posterior leukoencephalopathy syndrome, and anterior lumbosacral radiculopathy. Both the underlying malignancy and antineoplastic therapy can cause immunosuppression. Fungi are the most frequent causal microorganisms in immunosuppressed patients with infection. Familiarity with the imaging findings is essential for proper diagnosis of neurologic symptoms in pediatric patients with oncohematologic disease. PMID:12432112

  14. Transforaminal endoscopic discectomy to relieve sciatica and delay fusion in a 31-year-old man with pars defects and low-grade spondylolisthesis.

    PubMed

    Madhavan, Karthik; Chieng, Lee Onn; Hofstetter, Christoph P; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-02-01

    Isthmic spondylolisthesis due to pars defects resulting from trauma or spondylolysis is not uncommon. Symptomatic patients with such pars defects are traditionally treated with a variety of fusion surgeries. The authors present a unique case in which such a patient was successfully treated with endoscopic discectomy without iatrogenic destabilization. A 31-year-old man presented with a history of left radicular leg pain along the distribution of the sciatic nerve. He had a disc herniation at L5/S1 and bilateral pars defects with a Grade I spondylolisthesis. Dynamic radiographic studies did not show significant movement of L-5 over S-1. The patient did not desire to have a fusion. After induction of local anesthesia, the patient underwent an awake transforaminal endoscopic discectomy via the extraforaminal approach, with decompression of the L-5 and S-1 nerve roots. His preoperative pain resolved immediately, and he was discharged home the same day. His preoperative Oswestry Disability Index score was 74, and postoperatively it was noted to be 8. At 2-year follow-up he continued to be symptom free, and no radiographic progression of the listhesis was noted. In this case preservation of stabilizing structures, including the supraspinous and interspinous ligaments and the facet capsule, may have reduced the likelihood of iatrogenic instability while at the same time achieving symptom control. This may be a reasonable option for select patient symptoms confined to lumbosacral radiculopathy.

  15. Lumbar foraminal stenosis, the hidden stenosis including at L5/S1.

    PubMed

    Orita, Sumihisa; Inage, Kazuhide; Eguchi, Yawara; Kubota, Go; Aoki, Yasuchika; Nakamura, Junichi; Matsuura, Yusuke; Furuya, Takeo; Koda, Masao; Ohtori, Seiji

    2016-10-01

    In patients with lower back and leg pain, lumbar foraminal stenosis (LFS) is one of the most important pathologies, especially for predominant radicular symptoms. LFS pathology can develop as a result of progressing spinal degeneration and is characterized by exacerbation with foraminal narrowing caused by lumbar extension (Kemp's sign). However, there is a lack of critical clinical findings for LFS pathology. Therefore, patients with robust and persistent leg pain, which is exacerbated by lumbar extension, should be suspected of LFS. Radiological diagnosis is performed using multiple radiological modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging, including plain examination and novel protocols such as diffusion tensor imaging, as well as dynamic X-ray, and computed tomography. Electrophysiological testing can also aid diagnosis. Treatment options include both conservative and surgical approaches. Conservative treatment includes medication, rehabilitation, and spinal nerve block. Surgery should be considered when the pathology is refractory to conservative treatment and requires direct decompression of the exiting nerve root, including the dorsal root ganglia. In cases with decreased intervertebral height and/or instability, fusion surgery should also be considered. Recent advancements in minimally invasive lumbar lateral interbody fusion procedures enable effective and less invasive foraminal enlargement compared with traditional fusion surgeries such as transforaminal lumbar interbody fusion. The lumbosacral junction can cause L5 radiculopathy with greater incidence than other lumbar levels as a result of anatomical and epidemiological factors, which should be better addressed when treating clinical lower back pain.

  16. Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis and Cervicolumbar Radiculopathy as the Presenting Paraneoplastic Manifestations of Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, C. Elizabeth; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S.; Macdonald, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis (BVCP) is a potential medical emergency. The Otolaryngologist plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of BVCP and must consider a broad differential diagnosis. We present a rare case of BVCP secondary to anti-Hu paraneoplastic syndrome. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old female presented to an Otolaryngology clinic with a history of progressive hoarseness and dysphagia. Flexible nasolaryngoscopy demonstrated BVCP. Cross-sectional imaging of the brain and vagus nerves was negative. An antiparaneoplastic antibody panel was positive for anti-Hu antibodies. This led to an endobronchial biopsy of a paratracheal lymph node, which confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Conclusion. Paraneoplastic neuropathy is a rare cause of BVCP and should be considered when more common pathologies are ruled out. This is the second reported case of BVCP as a presenting symptom of paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to small cell lung cancer. PMID:27668114

  17. Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis and Cervicolumbar Radiculopathy as the Presenting Paraneoplastic Manifestations of Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Pringle, C. Elizabeth; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S.; Macdonald, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis (BVCP) is a potential medical emergency. The Otolaryngologist plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of BVCP and must consider a broad differential diagnosis. We present a rare case of BVCP secondary to anti-Hu paraneoplastic syndrome. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old female presented to an Otolaryngology clinic with a history of progressive hoarseness and dysphagia. Flexible nasolaryngoscopy demonstrated BVCP. Cross-sectional imaging of the brain and vagus nerves was negative. An antiparaneoplastic antibody panel was positive for anti-Hu antibodies. This led to an endobronchial biopsy of a paratracheal lymph node, which confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Conclusion. Paraneoplastic neuropathy is a rare cause of BVCP and should be considered when more common pathologies are ruled out. This is the second reported case of BVCP as a presenting symptom of paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to small cell lung cancer.

  18. Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis and Cervicolumbar Radiculopathy as the Presenting Paraneoplastic Manifestations of Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jeffrey C; Pringle, C Elizabeth; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Kilty, Shaun J; Macdonald, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis (BVCP) is a potential medical emergency. The Otolaryngologist plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of BVCP and must consider a broad differential diagnosis. We present a rare case of BVCP secondary to anti-Hu paraneoplastic syndrome. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old female presented to an Otolaryngology clinic with a history of progressive hoarseness and dysphagia. Flexible nasolaryngoscopy demonstrated BVCP. Cross-sectional imaging of the brain and vagus nerves was negative. An antiparaneoplastic antibody panel was positive for anti-Hu antibodies. This led to an endobronchial biopsy of a paratracheal lymph node, which confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Conclusion. Paraneoplastic neuropathy is a rare cause of BVCP and should be considered when more common pathologies are ruled out. This is the second reported case of BVCP as a presenting symptom of paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to small cell lung cancer. PMID:27668114

  19. Bilateral Vocal Cord Paralysis and Cervicolumbar Radiculopathy as the Presenting Paraneoplastic Manifestations of Small Cell Lung Cancer: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Yeung, Jeffrey C; Pringle, C Elizabeth; Sekhon, Harmanjatinder S; Kilty, Shaun J; Macdonald, Kristian

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. Bilateral vocal cord paralysis (BVCP) is a potential medical emergency. The Otolaryngologist plays a crucial role in the diagnosis and management of BVCP and must consider a broad differential diagnosis. We present a rare case of BVCP secondary to anti-Hu paraneoplastic syndrome. Case Presentation. A 58-year-old female presented to an Otolaryngology clinic with a history of progressive hoarseness and dysphagia. Flexible nasolaryngoscopy demonstrated BVCP. Cross-sectional imaging of the brain and vagus nerves was negative. An antiparaneoplastic antibody panel was positive for anti-Hu antibodies. This led to an endobronchial biopsy of a paratracheal lymph node, which confirmed the diagnosis of small cell lung cancer. Conclusion. Paraneoplastic neuropathy is a rare cause of BVCP and should be considered when more common pathologies are ruled out. This is the second reported case of BVCP as a presenting symptom of paraneoplastic syndrome secondary to small cell lung cancer.

  20. Vertebral canal and spinal cord mensuration: a comparative study of its effect on lumbosacral myelography in the dachshund and German shepherd dog.

    PubMed

    Morgan, J P; Atilola, M; Bailey, C S

    1987-10-15

    One hundred noncontrast spinal radiographic studies followed by myelography were evaluated to compare vertebral canal size and spinal cord location and size in a chondrodystrophic breed (50 Dachshunds) with those variables in a nonchondrodystrophic breed (50 German Shepherd Dogs). Measurements were made of the sagittal diameter (height) of the vertebral canal, sagittal diameter (height) of the spinal cord, and transverse diameter (width) of the spinal cord in the lumbar and sacral regions. Differences were detected in the craniocaudal location of maximal vertebral canal height and maximal spinal cord height. The spinal cords in the Dachshunds terminated further caudally than those in the German Shepherd Dogs. Location of maximal spinal cord width was different between the breeds, consistent with the apparent, more caudal termination of the cord in the Dachshunds. The ratio of spinal cord to vetebral canal heights was notably greater in the Dachshunds than in the German Shepherd Dogs. These differences in vertebral canal and spinal cord mensuration may influence the choice of radiographic technique and its interpretation. Injection sites may be selected further cranially in German Shepherd Dogs (L4-5) than in Dachshunds (L5-6).

  1. [Central necrosis of the lumbo-sacral segment of the spinal cord associated with multiple cholesterin emboli, clinically presenting as acute paraplegia].

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, M; Uchigata, M; Shimizu, S; Sakamoto, T; Murayama, S

    2000-10-01

    A seventy-six-year-old man suddenly suffered from paraplegia and pain in both legs. He had been maintained on hemodialysis and committed a suicide attempt by cutting the shunt at the paraplegic attack. He was brought to the emergency ward for the treatment of hemorrhagic preshock. Neurological examination demonstrated flaccid paraplegia, loss of tendon reflex in the lower extremities, dissociated sensory loss below the fourth lumbar level; and incontinence in defecation. MRI showed T2 shortening in the ventral spinal cord caudal below the level of the eleventh thoracic cord. Postmortem examination confirmed ischemic infarct in the central area of the spinal cord, associated with disseminated cholesterin emboli in the small arteries. This case was the first MRI demonstration of central necrosis caused by cholesterin emboli, and may emphasize the significance of cholesterin emboli in the spinal arterial disorders in the aged.

  2. Pharmacologic management of neuropathic pain: evidence-based recommendations.

    PubMed

    Dworkin, Robert H; O'Connor, Alec B; Backonja, Miroslav; Farrar, John T; Finnerup, Nanna B; Jensen, Troels S; Kalso, Eija A; Loeser, John D; Miaskowski, Christine; Nurmikko, Turo J; Portenoy, Russell K; Rice, Andrew S C; Stacey, Brett R; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Turk, Dennis C; Wallace, Mark S

    2007-12-01

    Patients with neuropathic pain (NP) are challenging to manage and evidence-based clinical recommendations for pharmacologic management are needed. Systematic literature reviews, randomized clinical trials, and existing guidelines were evaluated at a consensus meeting. Medications were considered for recommendation if their efficacy was supported by at least one methodologically-sound, randomized clinical trial (RCT) demonstrating superiority to placebo or a relevant comparison treatment. Recommendations were based on the amount and consistency of evidence, degree of efficacy, safety, and clinical experience of the authors. Available RCTs typically evaluated chronic NP of moderate to severe intensity. Recommended first-line treatments include certain antidepressants (i.e., tricyclic antidepressants and dual reuptake inhibitors of both serotonin and norepinephrine), calcium channel alpha2-delta ligands (i.e., gabapentin and pregabalin), and topical lidocaine. Opioid analgesics and tramadol are recommended as generally second-line treatments that can be considered for first-line use in select clinical circumstances. Other medications that would generally be used as third-line treatments but that could also be used as second-line treatments in some circumstances include certain antiepileptic and antidepressant medications, mexiletine, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonists, and topical capsaicin. Medication selection should be individualized, considering side effects, potential beneficial or deleterious effects on comorbidities, and whether prompt onset of pain relief is necessary. To date, no medications have demonstrated efficacy in lumbosacral radiculopathy, which is probably the most common type of NP. Long-term studies, head-to-head comparisons between medications, studies involving combinations of medications, and RCTs examining treatment of central NP are lacking and should be a priority for future research. PMID:17920770

  3. Polyradiculopathy and Gastroparesis due to Cytomegalovirus Infection in AIDS: A Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Thongpooswan, Supat; Chyn, Eric; Alfishawy, Mostafa; Restrepo, Erfidia; Berman, Charles; Ahmed, Kawser; Muralidharan, Sethu

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 46 Final Diagnosis: CMV gastroparesis and radiculopathy Symptoms: Nausea • paraplegia • urinary retention • vomiting Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Lumbar puncture Specialty: Infectious Diseases Objective: Unusual clinical course Background: Cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection has been well described as an opportunistic infection of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first case report of a patient with AIDS and lumbosacral polyradiculopathy, associated with gastroparesis resulting from CMV infection. Case Report: A 46-year-old Hispanic woman with a history of HIV for 10 years was admitted to our hospital for nausea, vomiting, urinary retention, and generalized weakness. Bilateral lower extremity examination revealed flaccid paraplegia, decreased sensations from the groin downwards, bilateral lower extremity areflexia, and absent plantar reflexes, with enlarged urinary bladder. CMV was detected in CSF by PCR, and cervical and lumbar magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed intense nodular leptomeningeal enhancement from the lower thoracic cord and extending along the conus medullaris/filum terminalis and nerve roots. Gastric emptying scintigraphy revealed severe delayed gastric emptying time. Ganciclovir was initiated and her neurological symptoms and gastrological symptoms gradually improved. Over 8 weeks, nausea and vomiting resolved and the patient was able to walk before being discharged from the hospital. Conclusions: Polyradiculopathy and gastroparesis can result from CMV infection in AIDS patients. Whether the mechanism is secondary to viral infection or immune systems remains unclear. It is important for physicians to be aware of this uncommon presentation in the antiretroviral therapy (ART) era. CMV treatment should be initiated immediately once diagnosis is confirmed. PMID:26552851

  4. MRI and low back pain

    MedlinePlus

    Backache - MRI; Low back pain - MRI; Lumbar pain - MRI; Back strain - MRI; Lumbar radiculopathy - MRI; Herniated intervertebral disk - MRI; Prolapsed intervertebral disk - MRI; Slipped disk - MRI; Ruptured ...

  5. Association of Transcutaneous Electrical Nerve Stimulation and Hypnosis

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-16

    Limbs Arthrosis; Non Arthrosic Limbs Arthralgia; Chronic Lomboradiculalgia; Chronic Back Pain; Cervical Radiculopathy; Post-herpetic Neuralgia; Post-surgical Peripheral Neuropathic Pain; Post Trauma Neuropathic Pain; Complex Regional Pain Syndrome Type I or II; Tendinopathy

  6. [Spontaneous resolution of a lumbar disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Gelabert-González, M; Serramito-García, R; Aran-Echabe, E; García-Allut, A

    2007-04-01

    Lumbar disc herniation is a common cause of lower leg radiculopathy and the most effective methods of treatment remain in question. Both surgical and nonsurgical treatments may provide a successful outcome in appropriately selected patients. The spontaneous resolution of herniated lumbar discs is a well-established phenomenon. The authors present a case of spontaneous regression of a herniated lumbar nucleus pulpous in a patient with radiculopathy. PMID:17497061

  7. Horner's syndrome secondary to intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1–2

    PubMed Central

    Spacey, Kate; Dannawi, Zaher; Khazim, R; Dannawi, Z

    2014-01-01

    A 54-year-old Caucasian woman presented with a 6 week history of periscapular pain and a T1 radiculopathy associated with Horner's syndrome. MRI of her cervicothoracic spine revealed an intervertebral disc herniation at the level of T1–2. During investigation she experienced some improvement in her symptoms and a conservative approach was pursued. At 6 months her pain and radiculopathy had resolved, and there was mild residual ptosis. PMID:24903729

  8. Guidelines for use of lumbar spine radiography

    SciTech Connect

    Kelen, G.D.; Noji, E.K.; Doris, P.E.

    1986-03-01

    In deciding whether to obtain lumbosacral spine films, the emergency physician must not ask whether a diagnosis can be established, but whether obtaining films will affect management. Low back pain is a considerable problem for society with cost in billions of dollars. Gonadal radiation from lumbosacral radiographs is significant, and thus ordering films should be minimized. Plain radiographs are rarely indicated in otherwise healthy patients 20 to 50 years old with mechanical or root pain on initial presentation. In other patients alternative diagnostic methodologies such as computed tomography may be superior, with less radiation risk. Specific recommendations for emergency radiographic evaluation of the lumbosacral spine are offered.68 references.

  9. Sequential imaging of intraneural sciatic nerve endometriosis provides insight into symptoms of cyclical sciatica.

    PubMed

    Capek, Stepan; Amrami, Kimberly K; Howe, Benjamin M; Collins, Mark S; Sandroni, Paola; Cheville, John C; Spinner, Robert J

    2016-03-01

    Endometriosis of the nerve often remains an elusive diagnosis. We report the first case of intraneural lumbosacral plexus endometriosis with sequential imaging at different phases of the menstrual cycle: during the luteal phase and menstruation. Compared to the first examination, the examination performed during the patient's period revealed the lumbosacral plexus larger and hyperintense on T2-weighted imaging. The intraneural endometriosis cyst was also larger and showed recent hemorrhage. Additionally, this case represents another example of perineural spread of endometriosis from the uterus to the lumbosacral plexus along the autonomic nerves and then distally to the sciatic nerve and proximally to the spinal nerves.

  10. beta -Neuregulin-1 is required for the in vivo development of functional Ca2+-activated K+ channels in parasympathetic neurons.

    PubMed

    Cameron, J S; Dryer, L; Dryer, S E

    2001-02-27

    The development of functional Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (K(Ca)) in chick ciliary ganglion (CG) neurons requires interactions with afferent preganglionic nerve terminals. Here we show that the essential preganglionic differentiation factor is an isoform of beta-neuregulin-1. beta-Neuregulin-1 transcripts are expressed in the midbrain preganglionic Edinger-Westphal nucleus at developmental stages that coincide with or precede the normal onset of macroscopic K(Ca) in CG neurons. Injection of beta-neuregulin-1 peptide into the brains of developing embryos evoked a robust stimulation of functional K(Ca) channels at stages before the normal appearance of these channels in CG neurons developing in vivo. Conversely, injection of a neutralizing antiserum specific for beta-neuregulin-1 inhibited the development of K(Ca) channels in CG neurons. Low concentrations of beta-neuregulin-1 evoked a robust increase in whole-cell K(Ca) in CG neurons cocultured with iris target tissues. By contrast, culturing CG neurons with iris cells or low concentrations of beta-neuregulin-1 by themselves was insufficient to stimulate K(Ca). These data suggest that the preganglionic factor required for the development of K(Ca) in ciliary ganglion neurons is an isoform of beta-neuregulin-1, and that this factor acts in concert with target-derived trophic molecules to regulate the differentiation of excitability.

  11. Continuous posterior lumbar plexus and continuous parasacral and intubation with lighted stylet for ankylosing spondylitis.

    PubMed

    Imbelloni, Luiz Eduardo; Lucena, Neli

    2015-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis is characterized by progressive ossification of the spinal column with resultant stiffness. Ankylosing spondylitis can present significant challenges to the anaesthetist as a consequence of the potential difficult airway and performing neuraxial blockade. We describe a case of intubation with lighted stylet, and use of the continuous lumbosacral plexus for THA and postoperative analgesia with an elastomeric pump. Key words: Airways difficult anticipated, anesthesia, ankoylosing spondylitis, arthroplasty, conduction, continuous lumbosacral plexus, hip, infusion pumps, intubation awake, replacement. PMID:25886430

  12. Fractures of the articular processes of the cervical spine

    SciTech Connect

    Woodring, J.H.; Goldstein, S.J.

    1982-08-01

    Fractures of the articular processes occurred in 16 (20.8%) of 77 patients with cervical spine fractures as demonstrated by multidirectional tomography. Plain films demonstrated the fractures in only two patients. Acute cervical radiculopathy occurred in five of the patients with articular process fractures (superior process, two cases; inferior process, three cases). Persistent neck pain occurred in one other patient without radiculopathy. Three patients suffered spinal cord damage at the time of injury, which was not the result of the articular process fracture itself. In the other seven cases, no definite sequelae occurred. However, disruption of the facet joint may predispose to early degenerative joint disease and chronic pain; unilateral or bilateral facet dislocation was present in five patients. In patients with cervical trauma who develop cervical radiculopathy, tomography should be performed to evaluate the articular processes.

  13. Serum Levels of the Inflammatory Cytokines in Patients with Lumbar Radicular Pain Due to Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Zu, Bo; Pan, Hong; Zhang, Xiao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Study Design Cohort study. Purpose This study primarily aimed to evaluate the serum levels of tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-4 in patients with lumbar radiculopathy 1 and 12 months after microdiscectomy. Overview of Literature Lumbar radiculopathy is possibly caused by inflammatory changes in the nerve root. The intraneural application of pro-inflammatory cytokines induces behavioral signs associated with pain. Anti-inflammatory cytokine treatment effectively reduces hyperalgesia. Methods The role of TNF-α and IL-4 in long-lasting lumbar radiculopathy was addressed. A total of 262 patients were recruited from Anqing Hospital, Anhui Medical University. During inclusion at 1 and 12 months, serum concentrations of TNF-α and IL-4 were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and pain intensity was reported on a 0–10 cm visual analog scale (VAS). Results Sixty six patients had VAS <3 and 196 patients had VAS ≥3. Serum concentrations of pro-inflammatory TNF-α and anti-inflammatory IL-4 in patients with lumbar radiculopathy related to disc herniation were measured at 1- and 12-month follow-up. TNF-α decreased in both VAS groups with time. In contrast, IL-4 increased in both groups at 1 month and then decreased gradually until month 12. The changes in serum levels of TNF-α and IL-4 over time between the VAS ≥3 and VAS <3 groups were significantly different. Conclusions Chronic lumbar radiculopathy may be associated with high level of pro-inflammatory substances, such as TNF-α, in serum after disc herniation, and elevated anti-inflammatory cytokine in patients with lumbar radiculopathy may indicate a favorable outcome. PMID:27790311

  14. Can lumbar hemorrhagic synovial cyst cause acute radicular compression? Case report

    PubMed Central

    Timbó, Luciana Sátiro; Rosemberg, Laercio Alberto; Brandt, Reynaldo André; Peres, Ricardo Botticini; Nakamura, Olavo Kyosen; Guimarães, Juliana Frota

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar synovial cysts are an uncommon cause of back pain and radiculopathy, usually manifesting with gradual onset of symptoms, secondary to involvement of the spinal canal. Rarely, intracyst hemorrhage occurs, and may acutely present as radicular - or even spinal cord - compression syndrome. Synovial cysts are generally associated with degenerative facets, although the pathogenesis has not been entirely established. We report a case of bleeding complication in a synovial cyst at L2-L3, adjacent to the right interfacet joint, causing acute pain and radiculopathy in a patient on anticoagulation therapy who required surgical resection. PMID:25628207

  15. Lumbar discal cyst with spontaneous regression and subsequent occurrence of lumbar disc herniation.

    PubMed

    Takeshima, Yasuhiro; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Hanakita, Junya; Watanabe, Mizuki; Kitahama, Yoshihiro; Kuraishi, Keita; Uesaka, Toshio; Minami, Manabu; Nakase, Hiroyuki

    2011-01-01

    A 39-year-old man presented with an extremely rare discal cyst at the L3-4 level manifesting as a left L4 radiculopathy. Two months after onset, he suffered right L4 radiculopathy with new lumbar disc protrusion. Five months after medical treatment, the patient's symptoms improved, and the discal cyst showed complete regression on magnetic resonance imaging. Most cases of discal cyst are surgically treated, with only two previous cases of spontaneous regression. The present case suggests clinical and radiological recovery of symptomatic lumbar discal cyst can be obtained by only conservative therapy. PMID:22123489

  16. Haemorrhagic Lumbar Juxtafacet Cyst with Ligamentum Flavum Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Ghent, Finn; Davidson, Trent; Mobbs, Ralph Jasper

    2014-01-01

    Juxtafacet cysts are an uncommon cause of radiculopathy. They occur most frequently in the lumbar region, and their distribution across the spine correlates with mobility. Haemorrhagic complications are rare and may occur in the absence of any provocation, although there is some association with anticoagulation and trauma. We present a case of acute radiculopathy due to an L5/S1 juxtafacet cyst with unprovoked haemorrhage which was found to extend into ligamentum flavum. The patient underwent uncomplicated microscope assisted decompression with excellent results. The demographics, presentation, aetiology, and management of juxtafacet cysts are discussed. PMID:25580330

  17. Identification of neurons that express ghrelin receptors in autonomic pathways originating from the spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Furness, John B; Cho, Hyun-Jung; Hunne, Billie; Hirayama, Haruko; Callaghan, Brid P; Lomax, Alan E; Brock, James A

    2012-06-01

    Functional studies have shown that subsets of autonomic preganglionic neurons respond to ghrelin and ghrelin mimetics and in situ hybridisation has revealed receptor gene expression in the cell bodies of some preganglionic neurons. Our present goal has been to determine which preganglionic neurons express ghrelin receptors by using mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the promoter for the ghrelin receptor (also called growth hormone secretagogue receptor). The retrograde tracer Fast Blue was injected into target organs of reporter mice under anaesthesia to identify specific functional subsets of postganglionic sympathetic neurons. Cryo-sections were immunohistochemically stained by using anti-EGFP and antibodies to neuronal markers. EGFP was detected in nerve terminal varicosities in all sympathetic chain, prevertebral and pelvic ganglia and in the adrenal medulla. Non-varicose fibres associated with the ganglia were also immunoreactive. No postganglionic cell bodies contained EGFP. In sympathetic chain ganglia, most neurons were surrounded by EGFP-positive terminals. In the stellate ganglion, neurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity, some being sudomotor neurons, lacked surrounding ghrelin-receptor-expressing terminals, although these terminals were found around other neurons. In the superior cervical ganglion, the ghrelin receptor terminals innervated subgroups of neurons including neuropeptide Y (NPY)-immunoreactive neurons that projected to the anterior chamber of the eye. However, large NPY-negative neurons projecting to the acini of the submaxillary gland were not innervated by EGFP-positive varicosities. In the celiaco-superior mesenteric ganglion, almost all neurons were surrounded by positive terminals but the VIP-immunoreactive terminals of intestinofugal neurons were EGFP-negative. The pelvic ganglia contained groups of neurons without ghrelin receptor terminal innervation and other groups with

  18. Synaptic transmission in the superior cervical ganglion of the cat after reinnervation by vagus fibres

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, B.; Clementi, F.; Mantegazza, P.

    1971-01-01

    1. A vagus-sympathetic anastomosis was performed in the cat by connecting end to end the cranial trunk of the vagus to the cranial end of the cervical sympathetic trunk, both severed under the ganglia. 2. Forty to sixty days after the anastomosis, the ocular signs of sympathetic paralysis (such as myosis and prolapse of the nictitating membrane) which had developed shortly after the operation, had completely disappeared, thus suggesting the recovery of synaptic transmission in the ganglion. In case of plain preganglionic denervation after the same period the ocular signs of cervical sympathetic paralysis were still present. 3. Contraction of the nictitating membrane could be induced by electrical stimulation of both the vagus preanastomotic and the sympathetic postanastomotic—preganglionic trunks. Ganglionic blocking agents induced the blockade of the `new' ganglionic synaptic function, while nicotine and pilocarpine provoked a marked contraction of the nictitating membrane. 4. Electron microscopy showed that the preganglionic regeneration of vagus fibers resulted in the formation of new synapses, mainly of axodendritic type, identical to normal ganglionic synapses. Moreover, after cutting the preanastomotic trunk of the vagus, these new ganglionic presynaptic profiles degenerated, thus proving their vagal origin. 5. During restoration of the synaptic contacts readjustment of dendritic tips occurred. ImagesText-fig. 2Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 16Fig. 17Fig. 14Fig. 15Fig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 7Fig. 8 PMID:4326851

  19. TrkB/BDNF signalling patterns the sympathetic nervous system.

    PubMed

    Kasemeier-Kulesa, Jennifer C; Morrison, Jason A; Lefcort, Frances; Kulesa, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    The sympathetic nervous system is essential for maintaining mammalian homeostasis. How this intricately connected network, composed of preganglionic neurons that reside in the spinal cord and post-ganglionic neurons that comprise a chain of vertebral sympathetic ganglia, arises developmentally is incompletely understood. This problem is especially complex given the vertebral chain of sympathetic ganglia derive secondarily from the dorsal migration of 'primary' sympathetic ganglia that are initially located several hundred microns ventrally from their future pre-synaptic partners. Here we report that the dorsal migration of discrete ganglia is not a simple migration of individual cells but a much more carefully choreographed process that is mediated by extensive interactions of pre-and post-ganglionic neurons. Dorsal migration does not occur in the absence of contact with preganglionic axons, and this is mediated by BDNF/TrkB signalling. Thus BDNF released by preganglionic axons acts chemotactically on TrkB-positive sympathetic neurons, to pattern the developing peripheral nervous system. PMID:26404565

  20. The distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the rhesus monkey spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Lechan, R M; Snapper, S B; Jacobson, S; Jackson, I M

    1984-01-01

    The distribution of thyrotropin-releasing hormone (TRH) in the Rhesus monkey spinal cord was studied using a highly specific antibody to TRH and the indirect peroxidase-antiperoxidase technique. TRH-positive fibers were found at all levels of the spinal cord and were in greatest concentration in the ventral gray, intermediolateral column and central gray. All motor nuclear groups in lamina IX of the ventral gray were innervated by TRH, frequently in close association with perikarya of alpha-motoneurons. The motor nuclei in the lumbar cord were the most heavily stained and contrasted to the minimal staining in the retrodorsolateral nuclear groups of the cervical, thoracic and sacral cord. Within the intermediolateral column, which contains the majority of preganglionic sympathetic neurons, TRH terminal fields reached their highest density between T2-T4 and T12-L2. Other preganglionic neurons including the nucleus intercalatus spinalis and the dorsal commissural nucleus were also densely innervated. These studies demonstrate the preferential distribution of TRH in the monkey spinal cord to regions containing alpha-motoneurons and preganglionic neurons and indicate that TRH may play an important role in the regulation of motor function and in the autonomic nervous system.

  1. A study of the inferior mesenteric and pelvic ganglia of guinea-pigs with intracellular electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Crowcroft, P. J.; Szurszewski, J. H.

    1971-01-01

    1. Ganglion cells in the inferior mesenteric ganglion (IMG) and the pelvic plexus of the guinea-pig were studied using intracellular micro-electrodes. 2. Ganglion cells had resting membrane potentials of 55-65 mV. Threshold for initiation of an action potential ranged from 10 to 20 mV depolarization. Action potentials often exceeded 100 mV in amplitude and were followed by an after-hyperpolarization of up to 20 mV. 3. Synaptic responses were recorded from cells in the IMG in response to stimulation of the right and left hypogastric nerves, ascending mesenteric, inferior splanchnic and colonic nerves. It has been established that more than forty preganglionic fibres converge on any one cell. Preganglionic fibres to the IMG were also observed in the pelvic nerves. 4. In contrast to the IMG, ganglion cells in the pelvic plexus received up to ten preganglionic fibres. 5. Ganglion cells responded to supramaximal preganglionic stimulation with up to four action potentials. 6. In the IMG, action potentials in response to synaptic action were followed by a prolonged period of hyperpolarization (after-hyperpolarization) and a later phase of prolonged depolarization (after-depolarization). The time course of these after potentials depended on the pattern of firing of action potentials during the period of stimulation. In the presence of dihydro-β-erythroidine, or if synaptic action was insufficient to evoke action potentials, only the after-depolarization was observed. 7. Other cells were impaled whose properties differed from those described above. In one group of cells the resting membrane potentials were higher (up to 85 mV), input resistances lower and the threshold for initiation of an action potential was higher. The other group were inexcitable, had high resting membrane potentials (up to 85 mV), low input resistances and underwent a slow depolarization in response to repetitive stimulation of preganglionic fibres. 8. This study indicates that marked convergence of

  2. Slipping accidents causing low-back pain in a gearbox factory.

    PubMed

    Manning, D P; Shannon, H S

    1981-01-01

    An accident model was used to analyze data in terms of the first event in all reported accidents occurring in a gearbox factory during 1974. The data were used to study the causes of lumbosacral injuries. A labor force of 2000 men sustained 99 lumbosacral injuries, 54 of which led to absence of one or more days. Twenty of the 54 were initiated by slipping, and 17 presented as a sudden onset of low-back pain without any preceding accidental event. A review of all patients who were absent following a slipping accident disclosed that the lumbosacral region was by far the commonest part of the body injured. Tripping was an infrequent cause of these injuries. Slipping rarely features in the literature as a cause of low-back pain. It is suggested that this is due to confusion between various contributory factors and events forming an accident.

  3. [Diabetic neuropathy].

    PubMed

    Lechleitner, Monika; Abrahamian, Heidemarie; Francesconi, Claudia; Kofler, Markus

    2016-04-01

    These are the guidelines for diagnosis and treatment of diabetic neuropathy. This diabetic late complication comprises a number of mono- and polyneuropathies, plexopathies, radiculopathies and autonomic neuropathy. The position statement summarizes characteristic clinical symptoms and techniques for diagnostic assessment of diabetic neuropathy. Recommendations for the therapeutic management of diabetic neuropathy, especially for the control of pain in sensorimotor neuropathy, are provided.

  4. Treatment of peripheral extremity pain with TENS: A report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Thiel, Haymo W; Cassidy, J David; Mierau, Dale R

    1987-01-01

    This paper reviews three cases in which radiculopathies of the cervical and lumbar spine were successfully managed by the use of transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (TENS) in addition to, or instead of, spinal manipulative therapy. Characteristics of TENS, indications for its use, and application procedures are discussed. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3

  5. Diagnostic challenge: bilateral infected lumbar facet cysts - a rare cause of acute lumbar spinal stenosis and back pain

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Symptomatic synovial lumbar facet cysts are a relatively rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal stenosis. This case and brief review of the literature, details a patient who presented with acutely symptomatic bilateral spontaneously infected synovial facet (L4/5) cysts. This report highlights diagnostic clues for identifying infection of a facet cyst. PMID:20205727

  6. Postlaminectomy Bilateral Lumbar Intraspinal Synovial Cysts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung Ik; Lee, Jung Hwan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts are included in the difference diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Developing imaging modalities has result in increased reporting about these lesions. However, the case of bilateral new lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy has been rarely reported. We report of a rare case with bilateral lumbar intraspinal synovial cysts after laminectomy, requiring surgical excision. PMID:27799997

  7. Spinal hydatid with meralgia paresthetica in a female: A rare case report

    PubMed Central

    Lonkar, Yeshwant; Amale, Amar; Acharya, Sourya; Banode, Pankaj; Yeola, Meenakshi

    2012-01-01

    Meralgia paresthetica presents as tingling sensation in the antero-lateral aspect of thigh. It occurs due to compression of the lateral cutaneous nerve of thigh. Proximal spinal lesions may present as meralgia paresthetica due to radiculopathy. We present a rare case of spinal hydatid with meralgia paresthetica. PMID:24082690

  8. Pseudarthrosis of the Cervical Spine: Risk Factors, Diagnosis and Management

    PubMed Central

    Leven, Dante

    2016-01-01

    Cervical myelopathy and radiculopathy are common pathologies that often improve with spinal decompression and fusion. Postoperative complications include pseudarthrosis, which can be challenging to diagnose and manage. We reviewed the literature with regard to risk factors, diagnosis, controversies, and management of cervical pseudarthrosis. PMID:27559462

  9. Somatosensory evoked potentials in cervical spondylosis. Correlation of median, ulnar and posterior tibial nerve responses with clinical and radiological findings.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y L; Jones, S J

    1985-06-01

    Somatosensory evoked potentials (SEPs) following median, ulnar and tibial nerve stimulation were recorded from sites over the shoulders, neck and scalp in 34 patients with cervical spondylosis. Twenty control subjects were matched for sex and age. Detailed clinical and radiological data were assembled, with particular attention to the sensory modalities impaired and the locus and severity of cord compression. The patients were divided clinically into 4 groups: combined myelopathy and radiculopathy (6 cases), myelopathy alone (15), radiculopathy (6) and neck pain (7). Four cases are described in detail. SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with clinical myelopathy, but not with radiculopathy. Median and ulnar nerve responses were less often affected than tibial, even with myelopathy above C6 level. Tibial nerve SEP abnormalities were strongly correlated with posterior column signs on the same side of the body, but not with anterolateral column sensory signs. In myelopathy cases, the SEP examination appeared to be more sensitive to sensory pathway involvement than clinical sensory testing. SEP abnormalities were infrequent in cases of radiculopathy and neck pain, bearing no relation to the clinical locus of root lesions. Abnormal SEPs consistent with subclinical posterior column involvement, however, were recorded in 1 patient with radiculopathy and 2 with neck pain. Follow-up recordings made postoperatively in 7 myelopathy cases reflected the clinical course (improvement, deterioration or no change) in 4, but failed to reflect improvement in 3. The correlation of SEP findings with radiological data was generally poor. SEP abnormalities were detected in 6 out of 8 patients with clinical myelopathy but no radiological evidence of posterior cord compression, suggesting that impairment of the blood supply may be an important factor contributing to cord damage. An application for SEPs in the clinical management of cervical spondylosis may lie in the detection of

  10. Case report: pseudotail with dermal sinus tract and tethered cord.

    PubMed

    Clark, Paul; Davidson, Laurence

    2016-09-01

    A pseudotail is a very rare, dermal appendage arising from the lumbosacral region with an association with spinal dysraphism. We report a case of a pseudotail in a healthy newborn female with sonographic imaging of a tethered cord and dermal sinus tract with MRI and surgical correlation. PMID:27635168

  11. Gross Anatomical Study of the Nerve Supply of Genitourinary Structures in Female Mongrel Hound Dogs

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Amaya, S. M.; Ruggieri, M. R.; Arias Serrato, S. A.; Massicotte, V. S.; Barbe, M. F.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Anatomical variations in lumbosacral plexus or nerves to genitourinary structures in dogs are under described, despite their importance during surgery and potential contributions to neuromuscular syndromes. Gross dissection of 16 female mongrel hound dogs showed frequent variations in lumbosacral plexus classification, sympathetic ganglia, ventral rami input to nerves innervating genitourinary structures and pudendal nerve (PdN) branching. Lumbosacral plexus classification types were mixed, rather than pure, in 13 (82%) of dogs. The genitofemoral nerve (GFN) originated from ventral ramus of L4 in 67% of nerves, differing from the expected L3. Considerable variability was seen in ventral rami origins of pelvic (PN) and Pd nerves, with new findings of L7 contributions to PN, joining S1 and S2 input (23% of sides in 11 dogs) or S1–S3 input (5%), and to PdN, joining S1–S2, unilaterally, in one dog. L7 input was confirmed using retrograde dye tracing methods. The PN also received CG1 contributions, bilaterally, in one dog. The PdN branched unusually in two dogs. Lumbosacral sympathetic ganglia had variant intra-, inter- and multisegmental connectivity in 6 (38%). Thus, the anatomy of mongrel dogs had higher variability than previously described for purebred dogs. Knowledge of this variant innervation during surgery could aid in the preservation of nerves and reduce risk of urinary and sexual dysfunctions. PMID:24730986

  12. Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus resembling a pigmented neurofibroma.

    PubMed

    Singh, Nidhi; Chandrashekar, Laxmisha; Kar, Rakhee; Sylvia, Mary Theresa; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2015-01-01

    Neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus and pigmented neurofibroma (PNF) are close mimics and pose a clinicopathological challenge. We present a case of pigmented hypertrichotic plaque over lumbosacral region and discuss the differential diagnosis and its clinical, histopathological and immunohistochemistry features which may aid in differentiation. We highlight the difficulties faced in differentiating neurotized congenital melanocytic nevus from pigmented neurofibroma.

  13. Calcinosis in juvenile dermatomyositis mimicking cold abscess.

    PubMed

    Nagar, Rajendra P; Bharati, Joyita; Sheriff, Abraar; Priyadarshini, Praytusha; Chumber, Sunil; Kabra, S K

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of dystrophic calcification presenting as soft cystic swelling in a patient with juvenile dermatomyositis. A 15-year-old boy with lumbosacral cystic swelling, which was considered a cold abscess clinically, was evaluated for nonresponse to antitubercular therapy. The cystic swelling had liquefied calcium with a well circumscribed calcified wall on imaging, which was subsequently excised. PMID:27586213

  14. Managing low back pain second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Kirkaldy-Willis, W.H. )

    1988-01-01

    This book contains 26 chapters. Some of the titles are: Magnetic resonance imaging of the lumbar spine; Diagnostic techniques; The site and nature of the lesion; The anatomy of the lumbosacral spine; The perception of pain; Differential diagnosis of low back pain; and A comprehensive outline of treatment.

  15. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... arthritis in the joints directly subject to strain. Amputation, or injury to an upper extremity, is not..., arthritis in the injured extremity, including also arthritis of the lumbosacral joints and lumbar spine, if..., that arthritis affecting joints not directly subject to strain as a result of the service...

  16. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... arthritis in the joints directly subject to strain. Amputation, or injury to an upper extremity, is not..., arthritis in the injured extremity, including also arthritis of the lumbosacral joints and lumbar spine, if..., that arthritis affecting joints not directly subject to strain as a result of the service...

  17. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... arthritis in the joints directly subject to strain. Amputation, or injury to an upper extremity, is not..., arthritis in the injured extremity, including also arthritis of the lumbosacral joints and lumbar spine, if..., that arthritis affecting joints not directly subject to strain as a result of the service...

  18. 38 CFR 4.58 - Arthritis due to strain.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... arthritis in the joints directly subject to strain. Amputation, or injury to an upper extremity, is not..., arthritis in the injured extremity, including also arthritis of the lumbosacral joints and lumbar spine, if..., that arthritis affecting joints not directly subject to strain as a result of the service...

  19. Gross anatomical study of the nerve supply of genitourinary structures in female mongrel hound dogs.

    PubMed

    Gomez-Amaya, S M; Ruggieri, M R; Arias Serrato, S A; Massicotte, V S; Barbe, M F

    2015-04-01

    Anatomical variations in lumbosacral plexus or nerves to genitourinary structures in dogs are under described, despite their importance during surgery and potential contributions to neuromuscular syndromes. Gross dissection of 16 female mongrel hound dogs showed frequent variations in lumbosacral plexus classification, sympathetic ganglia, ventral rami input to nerves innervating genitourinary structures and pudendal nerve (PdN) branching. Lumbosacral plexus classification types were mixed, rather than pure, in 13 (82%) of dogs. The genitofemoral nerve (GFN) originated from ventral ramus of L4 in 67% of nerves, differing from the expected L3. Considerable variability was seen in ventral rami origins of pelvic (PN) and Pd nerves, with new findings of L7 contributions to PN, joining S1 and S2 input (23% of sides in 11 dogs) or S1-S3 input (5%), and to PdN, joining S1-S2, unilaterally, in one dog. L7 input was confirmed using retrograde dye tracing methods. The PN also received CG1 contributions, bilaterally, in one dog. The PdN branched unusually in two dogs. Lumbosacral sympathetic ganglia had variant intra-, inter- and multisegmental connectivity in 6 (38%). Thus, the anatomy of mongrel dogs had higher variability than previously described for purebred dogs. Knowledge of this variant innervation during surgery could aid in the preservation of nerves and reduce risk of urinary and sexual dysfunctions.

  20. Central command neurons of the sympathetic nervous system: basis of the fight-or-flight response.

    PubMed

    Jansen, A S; Nguyen, X V; Karpitskiy, V; Mettenleiter, T C; Loewy, A D

    1995-10-27

    During stress, the activity of the sympathetic nervous system is changed in a global fashion, leading to an increase in cardiovascular function and a release of adrenal catecholamines. This response is thought to be regulated by a common set of brain neurons that provide a dual input to the sympathetic preganglionic neurons regulating cardiac and adrenal medullary functions. By using a double-virus transneuronal labeling technique, the existence of such a set of central autonomic neurons in the hypothalamus and brainstem was demonstrated. These neurons innervate both of the sympathetic outflow systems and likely function in circumstances where parallel sympathetic processing occurs, such as in the fight-or-flight response.

  1. Electrical stimulation of the salivatory nucleus in the rat.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, J; Mitchell, J; Templeton, D

    1984-01-01

    Unilateral electrical stimulation of the salivatory nucleus evoked a secretion from the ipsilateral parotid gland which was well maintained. Flow rate was not affected by sympathetic decentralization or by adrenoceptor antagonists but was abolished by atropine. Protein secretion was reduced by beta-adrenoceptor antagonists but not by sympathetic decentralization or adrenalectomy. In support of previous histochemical findings it is concluded that the cells of the reticular formation are the origin of the preganglionic parasympathetic fibres to the salivary glands but that a beta-adrenoceptor mechanism as yet unidentified is also involved in the protein secretion. PMID:6520785

  2. Do bacteria play an important role in the pathogenesis of low back pain?

    PubMed

    Fisher, Thomas J; Osti, Orso L

    2015-11-01

    Considerable interest has been generated recently regarding an alternative hypothesis for the pathogenesis of low back pain and radiculopathy in the presence of intervertebral disc prolapse. Traditionally, back pain and radicular (sciatic) symptoms have been attributed to mechanical compression of neural tissue by herniated disc material and to inflammation caused by exposure of the nerve roots to disc tissue. Recent research however has suggested that low-grade infection within the intervertebral disc by anaerobic bacteria may be responsible. The development of Modic changes in the corresponding adjacent vertebral endplates has also been suggested as an indicator of infection. This article is a thorough review of the current literature regarding the hypothesis that low-grade anaerobic bacterial infection may be the cause of disabling low back pain and radiculopathy.

  3. [Cervical disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2015-10-28

    A cervical disc herniation (CDH) is a frequently encountered pathology in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of a nerve root (a radiculopathy, with or without sensory-motor deficit) or of the spinal cord (myelopathy). The majority of CDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment. When a radiculopathy is found and a clinico-radiological correlation is present, a moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, or if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during 6 to 8 months, surgery is then recommended. A symptomatic cervical myelopathy is, by itself, an indication for a surgical treatment. PMID:26672182

  4. Spinal Subdural Haematoma

    PubMed Central

    Manish K, Kothari; Chandrakant, Shah Kunal; Abhay M, Nene

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spinal Subdural hematoma is a rare cause of radiculopathy and spinal cord compression syndromes. It’s early diagnosis is essential. Chronological appearance of these bleeds vary on MRI. Case Report: A 56 year old man presented with progressive left lower limb radiculopathy and paraesthesias with claudication of three days duration. MRI revealed a subdural space occupying lesion compressing the cauda equina at L5-S1 level producing a ‘Y’ shaped dural sac (Y sign), which was hyperintense on T1W imaging and hypointense to cord on T2W image. The STIR sequence showed hyperintensity to cord. There was no history of bleeding diathesis. The patient underwent decompressive durotomy and biopsy which confirmed the diagnosis. Conclusion: Spinal subdural hematoma may present with rapidly progressive neurological symptoms. MRI is the investigation of choice. The knowledge of MRI appearance with respect to the chronological stage of the bleed is essential to avoid diagnostic and hence surgical dilemma PMID:27299051

  5. Progressive paralyzing sciatica revealing a pelvic pseudoaneurysm a year after hip surgery in a 12yo boy.

    PubMed

    Boulouis, Grégoire; Shotar, Eimad; Dangouloff-Ros, Volodia; Janklevicz, Pierre-Henri; Boddaert, Nathalie; Naggara, Olivier; Brunelle, Francis

    2016-01-01

    Identifying extra spinal causes of a lumbar radiculopathy or polyneuropathy can be a tricky diagnosis challenge, especially in children. Among them, traumatic or iatrogenic pseudoaneurysms of iliac arteries have been seldom reported, in adults' series. The authors report an unusual case of progressive paralyzing left sciatica and lumbar plexopathy in a 12 years old boy, 12 months after a pelvic osteotomy for bilateral hip luxation secondary to osteochondritis dissecans. Spine MRI and pelvic CT angiography revealed a giant internal iliac artery pseudoaneurysm, enclosed in a chronic hematoma. The patient was successfully treated with endovascular coil embolization, and subsequent surgical hematoma evacuation. However, three months after treatment, neurological recovery was incomplete. This case highlights the importance of a rapid and extensive diagnosis work up of all causes of lower limb radiculopathies in children, including pelvic arteries lesions especially after pelvic surgery to avoid therapeutic delays that may jeopardize the chances of neurological recovery.

  6. Lumbar epidural varices: An unusual cause of lumbar claudication

    PubMed Central

    Subbiah, Meenakshisundaram; Yegumuthu, Krishnan

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices can also present with radiculopathy similar to acute intervertebral disc prolapse (IVDP). However as the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in these patients are usually normal without significant compressive lesions of the nerve roots, the diagnosis is commonly missed or delayed leading to persistent symptoms. We present a rare case of acute severe unilateral claudication with a normal MRI unresponsive to conservative management who was treated surgically. The nerve root on the symptomatic side was found to be compressed by large anterior epidural varices secondary to an abnormal cranial attachment of ligamentum flavum. Decompression of the root and coagulation of the varices resulted in complete pain relief. To conclude, lumbar epidural varices should be considered in the differential diagnosis of acute onset radiculopathy and claudication in the absence of significant MRI findings. PMID:27512228

  7. Lumbar nerve root: the enigmatic eponyms.

    PubMed

    Dyck, P

    1984-01-01

    Man's quest for recognition has not escaped the physician, whose contributions to medicine perpetuate his name in print. It is a final grasp for professional immortality, which for men like Imhotep and Hippocrates, has prevailed for millennia. This fervor was particularly evident in the latter 19th century, which created a flurry of eponyms, often two or more physicians publishing the same clinical observation. This article reviews the eponym epidemic as it relates to lumbar radiculopathy.

  8. Intraspinal hydatidosis with retroperitoneal extension: an uncommon location.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Yashdeep; Nair, Rajesh; Siddharth, Sankalp; Kumar, Vinod; Upadhyaya, Sunil; Shetty, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Hydatidosis is a ubiquitous disease that is endemic in India. It most commonly involves the liver (75%) and lungs (15%) with only 10% occurring in the rest of the body. Primary hydatid cyst in the spinal canal is extremely rare. Intraspinal hydatid accounts for 0.5-1% of the cases and carries a poor prognosis. It presents as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present one such case of a 64-year-old man with associated radiculopathy and myelomalcia.

  9. Deficits in foot skin sensation are related to alterations in balance control in chronic low back patients experiencing clinical signs of lumbar nerve root impingement.

    PubMed

    Frost, Lydia R; Bijman, Marc; Strzalkowski, Nicholas D J; Bent, Leah R; Brown, Stephen H M

    2015-05-01

    Chronic low back pain (LBP) patients with radiculopathy, or sciatica, experience pain, tingling or numbness radiating down their leg due to compression of the lumbar nerve root. The resulting reduction in somatosensory information from the foot sole may contribute to deficits in standing balance control. This work was designed to investigate the relationship between foot skin sensitivity and standing balance control in chronic LBP patients with associated radiculopathy. Patients (n=9) and matched healthy controls (n=9) were recruited to the study, and were tested for balance control in both quiet standing as well as during rapid arm raise perturbation trials on a force plate. Foot skin sensitivity was tested bilaterally for vibratory threshold (3, 40 and 250 Hz) and touch (monofilament) threshold. Results demonstrate that patients had reduced sensitivity to 250 Hz vibration in their affected compared to unaffected foot (at the great toe and heel), as well as compared to controls (at the great toe), but there were no differences with lower frequency vibratory testing or with monofilament testing. While there were no significant between-group differences in balance measures, moderate statistically significant correlations between 250 Hz sensitivity and quiet standing balance parameters were uncovered. Thus, patients demonstrate reduced high-frequency vibratory sensitivity at the foot sole, and correlations with quiet standing balance measures indicate a connection between these foot skin sensitivity deficits and alterations in balance control. Clinically, this identifies high frequency vibration testing as an important measure of skin sensitivity in patients with radiculopathy.

  10. Presentation and progression of a disc cyst in a pediatric patient.

    PubMed

    Lin, Ning; Schirmer, Clemens M; Proctor, Mark R

    2011-02-01

    Disc cysts are rare intraspinal extradural lesions that communicate with the intervertebral disc and can mimic the symptoms of acute lumbar disc herniation. Initially reported in the Japanese-language literature as a new entity (discal cyst), there are few documented cases in North America, and only 1 prior case in the pediatric population. The authors present the case of a 16-year-old girl with an intervertebral disc cyst causing lumbar radiculopathy that progressed despite conservative treatment. All medical records, imaging studies, intraoperative findings, and pertinent literature were reviewed. Serial preoperative MR imaging revealed enlargement of the intraspinal cyst at the L4-5 level, resulting in compression of the right L-5 nerve root. Enlargement of the cyst occurred over a 4-month period despite conservative treatment with physical therapy and corticosteroid injections. Microsurgical discectomy and excision of the cyst resulted in complete resolution of the preoperative radiculopathy. An intervertebral disc cyst is a rare entity in the adult population and exceedingly rare in the pediatric population but should remain in the differential diagnosis of any intraspinal extradural mass. The authors hypothesize that there exists a spectrum of this entity that may not be responsive to conservative therapy. Cyst excision alone or in conjunction with microsurgical discectomy is safe and effective in treating radiculopathy caused by disc cysts. PMID:21284469

  11. Sciatica: An Extremely Rare Complication of the Perianal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Gujrathi, Rahul; Gupta, Kanchan; Ravi, Chetan; Pai, Bhujang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Background Sciatica has been classically described as pain in the back and hip with radiation in the leg along the distribution of the sciatic nerve, secondary to compression or irritation of the sciatic nerve. Spinal abnormality being the most common etiology, is one of the most common indications for MRI of the lumbosacral spine. Here we describe imaging findings secondary to a supralevator perianal abscess causing irritation of the sciatic nerve, which was diagnosed on MRI of the lumbosacral spine. Case Report A 47-year-old male patient presented to the emergency department with severe acute pain in the right hip and right leg which was aggravated by limb movement. Clinically, a possibility of sciatica was suggested and MRI of the lumbosacral spine was ordered. The MRI did not reveal any abnormality in the lumbosacral spine; however, on STIR coronal images, a right perianal abscess with air pockets was seen. The perianal abscess was extending above the levator ani muscle with and was seen tracking along the sciatic nerve, explaining pain along the distribution of the sciatic nerve. The abscess was surgically drained, followed by an antibiotic course. The patient was symptomatically better post-surgery. Post-operative scan done 3 days later revealed significant resolution of the infra- and supralevator perianal abscess. The patient was discharged from hospital on post-operative day 3 on oral antibiotics for 7 days. On 15th post-operative day, the patient was clinically completely asymptomatic with good healing of the perianal surgical wound. Conclusions Extra-spinal causes are rare and most often overlooked in patients with sciatica. While assessing patients with sciatica, extra-spinal causes for the radiation of pain along the distribution of the sciatic nerve should always be looked for if abnormalities in the MRI of the lumbar spine are not found. Inclusion of STIR sequences in the imaging of the lumbosacral spine, more often than not, helps to

  12. Diagnostic Value and Surgical Implications of the 3D DW-SSFP MRI On the Management of Patients with Brachial Plexus Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Ben-Gang; Yang, Jian-Tao; Yang, Yi; Wang, Hong-Gang; Fu, Guo; Gu, Li-Qiang; Li, Ping; Zhu, Qing-Tang; Liu, Xiao-Lin; Zhu, Jia-Kai

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional diffusion-weighted steady-state free precession (3D DW-SSFP) of high-resolution magnetic resonance has emerged as a promising method to visualize the peripheral nerves. In this study, the application value of 3D DW-SSFP brachial plexus imaging in the diagnosis of brachial plexus injury (BPI) was investigated. 33 patients with BPI were prospectively examined using 3D DW-SSFP MR neurography (MRN) of brachial plexus. Results of 3D DW-SSFP MRN were compared with intraoperative findings and measurements of electromyogram (EMG) or somatosensory evoked potentials (SEP) for each injured nerve root. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus has enabled good visualization of the small components of the brachial plexus. The postganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 26 patients, while the preganglionic section of the brachial plexus was clearly visible in 22 patients. Pseudomeningoceles were commonly observed in 23 patients. Others finding of MRN of brachial plexus included spinal cord offset (in 16 patients) and spinal cord deformation (in 6 patients). As for the 3D DW-SSFP MRN diagnosis of preganglionic BPI, the sensitivity, the specificity and the accuracy were respectively 96.8%, 90.29%, and 94.18%. 3D DW-SSFP MRN of brachial plexus improve visualization of brachial plexus and benefit to determine the extent of injury. PMID:27782162

  13. The structural basis for electrotonic coupling in the avian ciliary ganglion. A study with thin sectioning and freeze-fracturing.

    PubMed

    Cantino, D; Mugnaini, E

    1975-10-01

    Each "ciliary" neurone in the ciliary ganglion of adult birds receives its innervation from a single myelinated fibre of the oculomotor nerve by means of a dual mode of synaptic action, electrical and chemical. The preganglionic fibre branches repeatedly around the postganglionic axon but the extra-cellular compartment is large. The preterminal fibres, most of which are unmyelinated, end with large boutons on the axon hillock, a few on short dendrites and on the portion of the perikaryon of the ciliary neurone from which the axon emerges. This synaptic apparatus is enveloped by a glial sheath, mainly consisting of satellite cell bodies and loose myelin lamellae. The nonsynaptic portion of the ciliary perikaryon is covered by a sheath consisting mainly of compact myelin. The ciliary neurone has an initial axon segment like that of C.N.S. neurones. The area of each neurone apposed to boutons measures about 16,000 mum2. Approximately 9 percent is specialized for chemical transmission and 0.17 percent for electrical transmission. Each neurone has about 280,000 gap junctional particles. Assuming that each particle represents one channel, the electrical resistance provided by these junctions is estimated to be of the order of 100 k omega. The electrical coupling between the preganglionic fibre and the ciliary neurone may therefore be of resistive nature.

  14. The distribution of cholinesterases in the cat carotid body.

    PubMed

    Biscoe, T J; Silver, A

    1966-03-01

    1. The distribution of acetyl- and butyrylcholinesterase in the carotid body of the cat has been examined histochemically. Studies were made on normal carotid bodies and on carotid bodies from cats in which certain nerves had been cut some time previously. The nerves sectioned were the sinus nerve, the post-ganglionic sympathetic branch of the superior cervical ganglion or the preganglionic cervical sympathetic trunk.2. It was confirmed that more butyrylcholinesterase than acetylcholinesterase is present. Both enzymes are found in three sites: (i) as strands, (ii) as plexuses, (iii) inside a few cells.3. The distribution is unaffected by cutting the sinus nerve or preganglionic cervical sympathetic nerves. Disorganization and depletion of the cholinesterases in the strands and plexuses occurs when the post-ganglionic branch of the superior cervical ganglion is cut. The cholinesterase in cells is unaffected.4. In carotid bodies in which vessels were filled with red blood cells or in which the vascular bed was injected with carmine-gelatine, it was seen that strands and plexuses are associated with blood vessels, and with blood vessels and cells respectively.5. It is suggested that a cholinergic pathway controlling carotid body blood vessels runs in the post-ganglionic cervical sympathetic.

  15. Sympathetic and sensory innervation of small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells in rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed

    Takaki, Fumiya; Nakamuta, Nobuaki; Kusakabe, Tatsumi; Yamamoto, Yoshio

    2015-02-01

    The sympathetic ganglion contains small intensely fluorescent (SIF) cells derived from the neural crest. We morphologically characterize SIF cells and focus on their relationship with ganglionic cells, preganglionic nerve fibers and sensory nerve endings. SIF cells stained intensely for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), with a few cells also being immunoreactive for dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH). Vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT)-immunoreactive puncta were distributed around some clusters of SIF cells, whereas some SIF cells closely abutted DBH-immunoreactive ganglionic cells. SIF cells contained bassoon-immunoreactive products beneath the cell membrane at the attachments and on opposite sites to the ganglionic cells. Ganglion neurons and SIF cells were immunoreactive to dopamine D2 receptors. Immunohistochemistry for P2X3 revealed ramified nerve endings with P2X3 immunoreactivity around SIF cells. Triple-labeling for P2X3, TH and VAChT allowed the classification of SIF cells into three types based on their innervation: (1) with only VAChT-immunoreactive puncta, (2) with only P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings, (3) with both P2X3-immunoreactive nerve endings and VAChT-immunoreactive puncta. The results of retrograde tracing with fast blue dye indicated that most of these nerve endings originated from the petrosal ganglion. Thus, SIF cells in the superior cervical ganglion are innervated by preganglionic fibers and glossopharyngeal sensory nerve endings and can be classified into three types. SIF cells might modulate sympathetic activity in the superior cervical ganglion. PMID:25416508

  16. Vagal tone: effects on sensitivity, motility, and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bonaz, B; Sinniger, V; Pellissier, S

    2016-04-01

    The vagus nerve (VN) is a key element of the autonomic nervous system. As a mixed nerve, the VN contributes to the bidirectional interactions between the brain and the gut, i.e., the brain-gut axis. In particular, after integration in the central autonomic network of peripheral sensations such as inflammation and pain via vagal and spinal afferents, an efferent response through modulation of preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus and/or preganglionic sympathetic neurons of the spinal cord is able to modulate gastrointestinal nociception, motility, and inflammation. A low vagal tone, as assessed by heart rate variability, a marker of the sympatho-vagal balance, is observed in functional digestive disorders and inflammatory bowel diseases. To restore a normal vagal tone appears as a goal in such diseases. Among the therapeutic tools, such as drugs targeting the cholinergic system and/or complementary medicine (hypnosis, meditation…), deep breathing, physical exercise, VN stimulation (VNS), either invasive or non-invasive, appears as innovative. There is new evidence in the current issue of this Journal supporting the role of VNS in the modulation of gastrointestinal functions. PMID:27010234

  17. Fluorescence histochemical study of the localisation and distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites in the spinal cord and cerebellum of the chicken.

    PubMed

    Bondok, A A; Botros, K G; el-Mohandes, E A

    1988-10-01

    The distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites has been studied in chicken spinal cord and cerebellum using a fluorescent analogue of propranolol, 9-amino-acridin-propranolol (9-AAP). In the cervical and lumbar regions of the spinal cord, beta-adrenoceptor sites were concentrated on cell bodies of alpha-motor neurons of the dorsolateral and ventrolateral nuclear groups of the ventral horn. In the thoracic region, they were present on cell bodies of the preganglionic sympathetic nucleus (dorsal commissural nucleus). In the dorsal horn, the receptor sites were present mainly on cell bodies of columna dorsalis magnocellularis. Sparse distribution of fluorescence was present in other regions of the gray matter. In the cerebellum, a dense distribution of beta-adrenergic receptor sites was observed on Purkinje cell bodies and their apical dendrites. Sparse distribution of receptor sites was present on fine ramifications of Purkinje cell dendrites in the molecular layer. Receptor sites were absent in the granule cell layer and the white matter. These observations indicate that alpha-motor neurons, preganglionic sympathetic neurons, neurons of columna dorsalis magnocellularis, and Purkinje cells are adrenoceptive, while granule cells are non-adrenoceptive.

  18. Anatomy of the Vestibulo-automatic Outflow to the Gut

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Torigoe, Y.

    1985-01-01

    Motion sickness can be induced by vestibular effects on the sympathetic portion of the autonomic nervous system. However, the pathways linking the vestibular and autonomic pathways are unknown. As a first step in this analysis, the locations of preganglionic sympathetic neurons (PSN) and dorsal root afferent ganglionic neurons (DRG) which supply sympathetic innervation to major portions of the gastrointestinal tract in rabbits were identified. The objective of a second series of experiments is to determine which of the brainstem nuclei project to the autonomic regions of the spinal cord that control gastrointestinal motility. To achieve this goal, a trans-synaptic retrograde tracer (3H-tetanus toxoid) is applied to the greater splanchnic nerve. This method allows the labeling of neurons within the brainstem that project only to the preganglionic synpathetic neurons. One structure that has been strongly implicated in mediating vestibulo-autonomic control is the cerebellum (i.e., nodulus and uvula). The outflow of these lobules to the autonomic regions of the brainstem is mediated by the fastigial nucleus. To determine the precise projections of the fastigial nucleus to the brainstem nuclei involved in emesis, anterograde tracer (3H-leucine) was injected into the fastigial nucleus in a third series of experiments.

  19. Calcium channel subtypes differ at two types of cholinergic synapse in lumbar sympathetic neurones of guinea-pigs

    PubMed Central

    Ireland, David R; Davies, Philip J; McLachlan, Elspeth M

    1999-01-01

    The involvement of different presynaptic Ca2+ channels in transmission at ‘weak’ (subthreshold) and ‘strong’ (suprathreshold) synapses was investigated in guinea-pig paravertebral ganglia isolated in vitro. Selective Ca2+ channel antagonists were used to block excitatory synaptic currents evoked by stimulating single preganglionic axons.The N-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-conotoxin GVIA (100 nm), reduced peak synaptic conductance by similar amounts at weak synapses (by 39 ± 6%) and strong synapses (34 ± 6%).The P-type Ca2+ channel blocker, ω-agatoxin IVA (40 nm), significantly reduced transmitter release at weak synapses (by 42 ± 6%) but had only a small effect at strong synapses (reduced by 6 ± 2%).Blockers of Q-, L- or T-type Ca2+ channels had no significant effects on peak synaptic conductance at either type of synapse.We conclude that the two functionally distinct types of preganglionic terminal in sympathetic ganglia which synapse on the same neurone differ in their expression of particular types of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels. Both types utilize N-type channels and channels resistant to blockade by specific antagonists, but Ca2+ entry through P-type channels makes a substantial contribution to acetylcholine release only at weak synapses. PMID:9831716

  20. Iatrogenic neurologic deficit after lumbar spine surgery: A review.

    PubMed

    Ghobrial, George M; Williams, Kim A; Arnold, Paul; Fehlings, Michael; Harrop, James S

    2015-12-01

    Iatrogenic neurologic deficits after lumbar spine surgery are rare complications, but important to recognize and manage. Complications such as radiculopathy, spinal cord compression, motor deficits (i.e. foot drop with L5 radiculopathy), and new onset radiculitis, while uncommon do occur. Attempts at mitigating these complications with the use of neuromonitoring have been successful. Guidance in the literature as to the true rate of iatrogenic neurologic deficit is limited to several case studies and retrospective designed studies describing the management, prevention and treatment of these deficits. The authors review the lumbar spinal surgery literature to examine the incidence of iatrogenic neurologic deficit in the lumbar spinal surgery literature. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 from January 1, 2004 through May 14, 2015, using the following MeSH search terms "postoperative complications," then subterms "lumbar vertebrae," treatment outcome," "spinal fusion," and "radiculopathy" were included together with "postoperative complications" in a single search. Postoperative complications including radiculopathy, weakness, and spinal cord compression were included. The definition of iatrogenic neurologic complication was limited to post-operative radiculopathy, motor weakness or new onset pain/radiculitis. An advanced MEDLINE search conducted on May 14th, 2015 using all of the above terms together yielded 21 results. After careful evaluation, 11 manuscripts were excluded and 10 were carefully reviewed. The most common indications for surgery were degenerative spondylolisthesis, spondylosis, scoliosis, and lumbar stenosis. In 2783 patients in 12 total studies, there were 56 patients who had reported a postoperative neurologic deficit for a rate of 5.7. The rates of deficits ranged from 0.46% to 17% in the studies used. The average rate of reported neurologic complications within these papers was 9% (range 0.46-24%). Thirty patients of a total of

  1. Cervicothoracic cystic dysraphism.

    PubMed

    Valeur, Natalie S; Iyer, Ramesh S; Ishak, Gisele E

    2016-09-01

    Cystic dysraphism of the cervical and upper thoracic spine is very rare. It differs from the much more common lumbosacral dysraphism in appearance and structure, and usually portends a better prognosis due to lack of functional neurological tissue in the dysraphic sac and absent or less severe intracranial anomalies. There is ambiguity in the literature regarding terminology because of the paucity of cases. We present cases of the most common type of cervicothoracic cystic dysraphism and emphasize differences from lumbosacral myelomeningocele. Patient outcome depends on the presence of associated anomalies and whether complete surgical resection is performed. Imaging plays a critical role in surgical planning, screening the central nervous system for additional anomalies, and in the postoperative setting for evaluation of retethering. PMID:27147079

  2. A case of faun tail naevus treated by intense pulsed light.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hye In; Rho, Yong Kwan; Kim, Beom Joon; Kim, Myeung Nam

    2009-05-01

    A faun tail is abnormal lumbar hypertrichosis that is characterized by a wide, often triangular or lozenge-shaped patch of coarse hair, and this hair is usually several inches long. Faun tail is a rare entity. A 36-year-old male presented with a triangular shaped hair tuft with terminal hair on the lumbosacral area, and he'd had this unusual hair since birth. There were no neurologic signs or abnormality on his spine X-ray. The MRI scan showed disc degeneration and loss of lodordosis. We report here on a rare case of faun tail, which was a form of localized hypertrichosis on the lumbosacral area, and this was successfully treated with intense pulsed (IPL) light. PMID:20523773

  3. Predict human body indentation lying on a spring mattress using a neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shilu; Shen, Liming; Zhou, Lijuan; Guan, Zhongwei

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a method to predict and assess the interaction between a human body and a spring mattress. A three-layer artificial neural network model was developed to simulate and predict an indentation curve of human spine, characterized with the depth of lumbar lordosis and four inclination angles: cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar, lumbosacral and the back-hip (β). By comparing the spinal indentation curves described by the optimal evaluation parameters (depth of lumbar lordosis, cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbosacral), a better design of five-zone spring mattresses was obtained for individuals to have an effective support to the main part of the body. Using such approach, an operating process was further introduced, in which appropriate stiffness proportions were proposed to design mattress for the normal body types of Chinese young women. Finally, case studies were undertaken, which show that the method developed is feasible and practical. PMID:25150192

  4. Predict human body indentation lying on a spring mattress using a neural network approach.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shilu; Shen, Liming; Zhou, Lijuan; Guan, Zhongwei

    2014-08-01

    This article presents a method to predict and assess the interaction between a human body and a spring mattress. A three-layer artificial neural network model was developed to simulate and predict an indentation curve of human spine, characterized with the depth of lumbar lordosis and four inclination angles: cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar, lumbosacral and the back-hip (β). By comparing the spinal indentation curves described by the optimal evaluation parameters (depth of lumbar lordosis, cervicothoracic, thoracolumbar and lumbosacral), a better design of five-zone spring mattresses was obtained for individuals to have an effective support to the main part of the body. Using such approach, an operating process was further introduced, in which appropriate stiffness proportions were proposed to design mattress for the normal body types of Chinese young women. Finally, case studies were undertaken, which show that the method developed is feasible and practical.

  5. Piriformis syndrome--a rare cause of extraspinal sciatica.

    PubMed

    Arooj, Shumaila; Azeemuddin, Muhammad

    2014-08-01

    Piriformis syndrome is a rare entity resulting in severe unilateral isolated buttock pain shooting in nature, non discogenic in origin. MR imaging of pelvis plays an important role in such patients to see the normal anatomy of piriformis muscle and its relationship with sciatic nerve. A 35-year-old woman presented with one year history of radiating leg pain with normal MR lumbosacral spine. MRI pelvis showed an abnormal orientation of left sciatic nerve through cleaved fibers of the piriformis muscle. The patient's symptoms were relieved by surgical decompression. The purpose of this case report is to show the role and importance of MR imaging for tracing sciatic nerve and its relationship to the Piriformis muscle. MR imaging of pelvis for sciatic nerve plays an important role in symptomatic patients with isolated buttock pain having normal MRI lumbosacral spine.

  6. [On the importance of the reflectory-segmental effects for the combined treatment of knee joint osteoporosis in the patients of advanced age].

    PubMed

    Kir'yanova, V V; Patrukhin, A P

    2016-01-01

    The present article demonstrates the role of reflectory-segmental effects during baro-laser therapy for the treatment of arthrosis of the knee joints in elderly patients. It has been shown that the additional treatment of the lumbosacral region while applying baro-laser therapy in the patients of the advanced age significantly enhances their functional capabilities including the increase of duration of painless walking and the reduced intensity of the pain syndrome. PMID:27030563

  7. Electrodiagnosis of plexopathy.

    PubMed

    Strakowski, Jeffrey A

    2013-05-01

    Electrodiagnostic evaluation of the brachial and lumbosacral plexus can be challenging even to an experienced practitioner. Detailed attention to anatomy and correlation with the history and physical examination results are needed to have a comprehensive differential diagnosis and to develop reliable conclusions. Electrophysiologic techniques, when applied appropriately, provide invaluable functional information after a plexus injury. Electrodiagnostic evaluation of a plexus injury should be systematic and comprehensive to provide the maximum precision for localization, extent of involvement, and severity of injury.

  8. Urinary Retention and Air in the Spinal Canal; a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Gheiratian, Mohammadmahdi; Karimian, Hoda

    2016-01-01

    Cauda equina syndrome (CES) although uncommon, is a very serious condition, which should be diagnosed as soon as possible. Urinary dysfunction following a lumbosacral trauma is a key for the physician to consider CES as the most probable diagnosis. Up to 62% of CES patients report a recent episode of trauma. We herein report a young man with CES due to sacral fracture with an interesting imaging. PMID:26862549

  9. Dopamine is produced in the rat spinal cord and regulates micturition reflex after spinal cord injury

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Shaoping; Carson, David M.; Wu, Di; Klaw, Michelle C.; Houlé, John D.; Tom, Veronica J.

    2016-01-01

    Dopamine (DA) neurons in the mammalian central nervous system are thought to be restricted to the brain. DA-mediated regulation of urinary activity is considered to occur through an interaction between midbrain DA neurons and the pontine micturition center. Here we show that DA is produced in the rat spinal cord and modulates the bladder reflex. We observed numerous tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)+ neurons in the autonomic nuclei and superficial dorsal horn in L6–S3 spinal segments. These neurons are dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH)− and some contain detectable dopamine decarboxylase (DDC), suggesting their capacity to produce DA. Interestingly, following a complete thoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) to interrupt supraspinal projections, more TH+ neurons emerged in the lumbosacral spinal cord, coincident with a sustained, low level of DA expression there and a partially recovered micturition reflex. Non-selective blockade of spinal DA receptors reduced bladder activity whereas activation of spinal D2-like receptors increased bladder activity and facilitated voiding. Additionally, depletion of lumbosacral TH+ neurons with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) decreased bladder non-voiding contractions and voiding efficiency. Furthermore, injecting the transsynaptic neuronal tracer pseudorabies virus (PRV) into the bladder detrusor labeled TH+ cells in the lumbosacral cord, confirming their involvement in spinal micturition reflex circuits. These results illustrate that DA is synthesized in the rat spinal cord; plasticity of lumbosacral TH+ neurons following SCI may contribute to DA expression and modulate the spinal bladder reflex. Thus, spinally-derived DA and receptors could be a novel therapeutic target to improve micturition recovery after SCI. PMID:26655672

  10. Anorgasmia in anterior spinal cord syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Berić, A; Light, J K

    1993-01-01

    Three male and two female patients with anorgasmia and dissociated sensory loss due to an anterior spinal cord syndrome are described. Clinical, neurophysiological and quantitative sensory evaluation revealed preservation of the large fibre dorsal column functions from the lumbosacral segments with concomitant severe dysfunction or absence of the small fibre neospinothalamic mediated functions. These findings indicate a role for the spinothalamic system in orgasm. PMID:8505649

  11. Acute administration of AMPA/Kainate blocker combined with delayed transplantation of neural precursors improves lower urinary tract function in spinal injured rats

    PubMed Central

    Mitsui, Takahiko; Neuhuber, Birgit; Fischer, Itzhak

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate bladder function recovery after spinal cord injury (SCI) in response to a combination treatment of an acutely administered AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist and delayed transplantation of neuronal precurors. Female rats received a contusion injury at T8/9. The AMPA/kainate receptor antagonist NBQX was directly administered into the lesion site immediately after injury. Nine days post-injury, NRP/GRP were delivered into the lesion site. Controls received NRP/GRP grafts only or no treatment (OP-Controls). Animals underwent bladder function testing during the course of the experiment and at the endpoint. Motor function was evaluated as well. After sacrifice, histological analysis of lesion site and lumbosacral spinal cord regions was performed. Rats receiving the combined treatment (NBQX&NRP/GRP) had voided volumes/micturition resembling that of normal animals and showed greater improvement of urodynamic parameters, compared to NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. Similarly, NBQX&NRP/GRP induced more spouting, regeneration or sparing of descending projections to the lumbosacral cord. The density of primary afferent projections at the lumbosacral spinal cord in rats with combined treatments was similar to that of NRP/GRP alone with decreased sprouting of primary afferents in lumbosacral cord, compared to OP-Control. Immunohistochemical evaluation revealed that the combined treatment reduced the size of the lesion to a greater extent than NRP/GRP alone or OP-Controls. NRP/GRP with and without NBQX produced significant recovery of hindlimb compared to OP-Controls. In conclusions, transplants of NRP/GRP combined with NBQX promote recovery of micturition function following spinal cord injury, likely through increased neuroprotection. PMID:21937028

  12. Lumbar spine: pretest predictability of CT findings

    SciTech Connect

    Giles, D.J.; Thomas, R.J.; Osborn, A.G.; Clayton, P.D.; Miller, M.H.; Bahr, A.L.; Frederick, P.R.; O'Connor, G.D.; Ostler, D.

    1984-03-01

    Demographic and symptomatic data gathered from 460 patients referred for lumbosacral CT examinations were analyzed to determine if the prescan probability of normal or abnormal findings could be predicted accurately. The authors were unable to predict the presence of herniated disk on the basis of patient-supplied data alone. Age was the single most significant predictor of an abnormality and was sharply related to degenerative disease and spinal stenosis.

  13. Management Patterns in Acute Low Back Pain: the Role of Physical Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gellhorn, Alfred Campbell; Chan, Leighton; Martin, Brook; Friedly, Janna

    2010-01-01

    Study Design Retrospective cohort study. Objective To evaluate the relationship between early physical therapy (PT) for acute low back pain and subsequent use of lumbosacral injections, lumbar surgery, and frequent physician office visits for low back pain. Summary of Background Data Wide practice variations exist in the treatment of acute low back pain. Physical Therapy (PT) has been advocated as an effective treatment in this setting though disagreement exists regarding its purported benefits. Methods A national 20% sample of the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services physician outpatient billing claims was analyzed. Patients were selected who received treatment for low back pain between 2003 and 2004 (n=439,195). To exclude chronic low back conditions, patients were excluded if they had a prior visit for back pain, lumbosacral injection, or lumbar surgery within the previous year. Main outcome measures were rates of lumbar surgery, lumbosacral injections, and frequent physician office visits for low back pain over the following year. Results Based on logistic regression analysis, the adjusted odds ratio for undergoing surgery in the group of enrollees that received PT in the acute phase (<4 weeks) compared to those receiving PT in the chronic phase (>3 months) was 0.38 (95% CI, 0.36 to 0.41), adjusting for age, gender, diagnosis, treating physician specialty, and comorbidity. The adjusted OR for receiving a lumbosacral injection in the group receiving PT in the acute phase was 0.46 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.49), and the adjusted OR for frequent physician office usage in the group receiving PT in the acute phase was 0.47 (95% CI, 0.44 to 0.50). Conclusions There was a lower risk of subsequent medical service usage among patients who received PT early after an episode of acute low back pain relative to those who received PT at later times. Medical specialty variations exist regarding early use of PT, with potential underutilization among generalist specialties. PMID

  14. Comparison of Transforaminal and Parasagittal Epidural Steroid Injections in Patients With Radicular Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi, Seyed Masoud; Aryani, Mohamad Reza; Momenzadeh, Sirus; Razavi, Seyed Sajad; Mohseni, Gholamreza; Mohajerani, Seyed Amir; Esmilijah, Ali Akbar

    2015-01-01

    Background: Epidural steroid injection (ESI), including transforaminal (TF) epidural injections and interlaminar (IL) epidural steroid injections are commonly performed procedures for the management of lumbosacral radicular pain. Parasagittal interlaminar (PIL) approach could enable higher ventral epidural spread, with fewer complications than TF. Objectives: This study aims to compare the effectiveness of PIL and TF ESI in relieving the pain and disability of patients with lumbosacral pain. Patients and Methods: This prospective study enrolled 64 patients, aged between 18 to 75 years, with a diagnosis of low back pain and unilateral lumbosacral radicular pain. The patients were randomized to receive fluoroscopically guided epidural injection, through either the PIL or TF approach. Patients were evaluated for effective pain relief [numerical rating scale (NRS) < 3] by 0 - 10 numeric rating scale (NRS) and functional improvement by the Oswestry Disability Index (ODI). Results: Effective pain relief [numeric rating scale (NRS) < 3] was observed in 77.3% (95% CI: 67‒90.5%) of patients in PIL group and 74.2% (95% CI: 62.4 - 89.4%) of patients in the TF group (P = 0.34), at 4 weeks. Mean NRS score was not significantly different between the PIL group compared to the TF group, at 4 weeks (P = 0.19). Number of patients with improved disability (measured by ODI < 20%) was not significantly different in PIL group (78% of cases) compared to the TF group (76% of cases), at 4 weeks (P = 0.21). There were no adverse effects observed in any of our patients. Conclusions: The PIL epidural injection is as effective as TF epidural injection in improving pain and functional status, in patients with chronic lumbosacral low back pain, due to disc degeneration. PMID:26587400

  15. The impact of body site, topical melatonin and brushing on hair regrowth after clipping normal Siberian Husky dogs.

    PubMed

    Diaz, Sandra F; Torres, Sheila M F; Nogueira, Sandra A F; Gilbert, Sophie; Jessen, Carl R

    2006-02-01

    The aims of this study were to determine the impact of body site, vigorous brushing and topical melatonin treatment on hair regrowth after clipping normal dogs. Siberian Husky dogs were randomly assigned to three groups of eight dogs each. All dogs had the lumbosacral region and both lateral thighs clipped. The left thigh and lumbosacral area received no treatment and were compared in all 24 dogs. Eight dogs had the right thigh treated with 0.1% melatonin twice daily for 2 months, and hair regrowth was compared with the left thigh. Eight dogs had the right thigh brushed twice daily for 2 months, and hair regrowth was compared with the left thigh. Eight dogs had neither thigh treated. Hairs were plucked before and 2 months postclipping, and the proportion of hair growth from the original length was calculated and compared as described above. Biopsy samples were collected before and after treatment to determine if brushing induced dermal inflammation and melatonin increased the proportion of anagen follicles. Proportionally, left thigh hairs were significantly longer compared to lumbosacral hairs 2 months postclipping. No significant differences in hair regrowth were noted between the nontreated thigh and the thigh treated with melatonin or brushed. No significant difference in dermal inflammation was noted before and after brushing. No significant differences were observed in the proportion of anagen follicles before and after topical melatonin treatment. Our results showed that the hairs in the lumbosacral region were proportionally shorter than lateral thigh hairs 2 months postclipping. Moreover, topical melatonin and brushing had no impact on hair regrowth after clipping normal dogs.

  16. Myelomeningocoele and a dermoid sinus-like lesion in a French bulldog

    PubMed Central

    Ployart, Stéphane; Doran, Ivan; Bomassi, Eric; Bille, Christophe; Libermann, Stéphane

    2013-01-01

    A 2-year-old male French bulldog was presented for investigation of lumbosacral pain and hindlimb ataxia associated with urinary and fecal incontinence. Survey radiography, myelography, and computed tomography images were suggestive of a dermoid sinus with associated spina bifida. Surgical intervention led to a resolution of pain and neurological deficits. Histopathological analysis of the excised tissue was compatible with a myelomeningocoele of the 7th lumbar vertebra. PMID:24293672

  17. Pacinioma of the cauda equina.

    PubMed

    Kojc, Nika; Korsic, Marjan; Popovic, Mara

    2006-12-01

    Lesions composed of Pacinian corpuscles or showing Pacinian corpuscle differentiation have usually been described in relation to benign tumours of the peripheral nervous system or reactive hyperplastic processes. On the other hand, mature Pacinian corpuscles have occasionally been detected as part of intraspinal lumbosacral lipomas, a rare developmental anomaly usually associated with spina bifida. A lesion of the cauda equina composed of numerous mature Pacinian corpuscles and nerve fascicles embedded in adipose tissue in association with spina bifida occulta is described in a 5-month-old male with a sacral red papula. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) revealed a cord-like mass in the region of the cauda equina, presumably connected to the subcutis. With the exception of a low lying, tethered spinal cord, there was no neurological deficit and the range of motor development was normal. In March 2005, at 17 months, surgery was carried out. A cord of yellow tissue was found running from the subcutis through the bone defect into the lumbosacral spinal canal. Intradurally, it ran parallel to the cauda equina, terminating at the conus medullaris. Fifteen months after the surgery the development of the child was normal. Only two similar cases have been reported so far. Due to their occurrence in the sacrococcygeal region and association with developmental anomalies, they have been regarded as malformations and the term Pacinioma has been suggested. Our case with clusters of Pacinian corpuscles may represent a rare variant of complex intraspinal lumbosacral lipomas, closely related to Paciniomas reported by Bale.

  18. The potential role of Piezo2 in the mediation of visceral sensation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jianna; Yang, Hongli; Li, Kun; Lei, Xiaofei; Xu, Changqing

    2016-09-01

    Piezo2 is an important mechano-gated ion channel that is involved in light touch sensitivity and inflammatory allodynia. However, current research has focused on the function of Piezo2 in somatic sensation but not in visceral sensation. The present study aimed to investigate the role of Piezo2 in visceral sensation of mechanically innocuous and noxious stimuli under physiological and hyperalgesic conditions using rats as a model organism. Neonatal enema with acetic acid induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal administration of Piezo2-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) reduced Piezo2 expression in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Piezo2 knock-down in DRG attenuated visceral sensation to innocuous stimuli in control rats and to both innocuous and noxious stimuli in rats with neonatal irritation. Compared with control rats, Piezo2 was not up-regulated in irritated rats at the mRNA or protein levels in thoracolumbar or lumbosacral DRGs, while TRPV1 was up-regulated in lumbosacral DRGs. These data suggest a potential role of Piezo2 in the mediation of visceral sensation. PMID:27481627

  19. The potential role of Piezo2 in the mediation of visceral sensation.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jing; Zhang, Jianna; Yang, Hongli; Li, Kun; Lei, Xiaofei; Xu, Changqing

    2016-09-01

    Piezo2 is an important mechano-gated ion channel that is involved in light touch sensitivity and inflammatory allodynia. However, current research has focused on the function of Piezo2 in somatic sensation but not in visceral sensation. The present study aimed to investigate the role of Piezo2 in visceral sensation of mechanically innocuous and noxious stimuli under physiological and hyperalgesic conditions using rats as a model organism. Neonatal enema with acetic acid induced visceral hypersensitivity. Intrathecal administration of Piezo2-short hairpin RNA (shRNA) reduced Piezo2 expression in lumbosacral dorsal root ganglia (DRG) at both the mRNA and protein levels. Piezo2 knock-down in DRG attenuated visceral sensation to innocuous stimuli in control rats and to both innocuous and noxious stimuli in rats with neonatal irritation. Compared with control rats, Piezo2 was not up-regulated in irritated rats at the mRNA or protein levels in thoracolumbar or lumbosacral DRGs, while TRPV1 was up-regulated in lumbosacral DRGs. These data suggest a potential role of Piezo2 in the mediation of visceral sensation.

  20. Prevalence of cystathionine beta synthase gene mutation 852Ins68 as a possible risk for neural tube defects in eastern India.

    PubMed

    Saxena, A K; Gupta, J; Pandey, S; Gangopadhaya, A N; Pandey, L K

    2011-01-01

    Cystathionine beta synthase gene (CβS) catalyzes the condensation of homocysteine with serine, forming cystathionine by the transsulfuration pathway. Disruption of CβS enzyme activity due to defective folic acid metabolism increases the risk factor for neural tube defects. We evaluated the CβS gene mutation in 25 children with neural tube defects (NTDs), including lumbosacral and thoracic myelomeningocele and open NTDs and mothers of cases, along with 25 healthy children and their mothers, serving as controls. Genomic DNA was isolated to assess the polymorphism of 852Ins68 in the CβS gene using PCR-RFLP analysis and nucleotide sequencing techniques. The 68-bp insertion was observed in one of the 25 NTD cases (lumbosacral myelomeningocele), and in two of the mothers of NTD cases. Statistical analysis was carried out using the Fischer exact probability test, which showed a lack of significance (P > 0.05), but the odds ratio of 2.08 with 95% confidence interval of 0.17-24.6 in NTDs mother was quite high because of the small sample size. However, the study was further extended to find out the involvement of specific nucleotide sequences, which again confirmed the 852Ins68 insertion and replacement of nucleotides (TCCAT to GGGG) in lumbosacral myelomeningocele (due to other category of NTDs), suggesting that it could be an independent risk factor for birth defects, including NTDs.

  1. Spinal neurons involved in the control of the seminal vesicles: a transsynaptic labeling study using pseudorabies virus in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, X Q; Xu, C; Leclerc, P; Benoît, G; Giuliano, F; Droupy, S

    2009-01-23

    The seminal vesicles are male accessory sex glands that mainly contribute the seminal fluid of the ejaculate. Previous studies have suggested that seminal vesicles are supplied by both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves. However, this conclusion was mainly based on studies in pelvic major ganglions and direct neuroanatomical evidence of spinal neurons innervating the seminal vesicles is still lacking. In order to map the spinal nerve circuit innervating the seminal vesicles, the present study used the pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing technique in combination with immunohistochemistry. Three groups of rats were prepared: (1) nerves intact; (2) right hypogastric nerve and bilateral pelvic nerves sectioned; (3) right pelvic and bilateral hypogastric nerves sectioned. For the intact group, 3 to 5 days after injection of PRV into the left seminal vesicle in male rats, immunohistochemistry for PRV was performed to map the control circuit. Double immunofluorescence experiments against PRV and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were performed to discriminate preganglionic neurons and interneurons. Double detection of PRV and galanin (GAL) was also performed to identify lumbar spinothalamic (LSt) cells. Three days after virus injection, both sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons were retrograde-labeled. Four days after injection of PRV into the seminal vesicles, PRV-infected neurons were found in the dorsal horn, ventral horn, dorsal gray commissure (DGC), medial gray matter and intermediolateral cell column (IML) from T13 to S1. For the group with an intact hypogastric nerve, 4 days after injection of PRV into the seminal vesicles, PRV-infected neurons were mainly located in DGC and IML of spinal lumbar segments (L) 1-L2. However, in the group with an intact pelvic nerve, PRV-infected neurons were mainly located in DGC of L5-S1 spinal segments. At the L3-L4 level, most of the virus-labeled neurons around the central canal expressed

  2. Distribution of androgen and oestrogen receptors-α in the seminal vesicle-related spinal neurones in male rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, X Q; Xu, C; Leclerc, P; Giuliano, F; Benoît, G; Droupy, S

    2013-06-01

    The seminal vesicles are male accessory sex glands that contribute much of the seminal fluid volume. Previous studies have suggested that the majority of autonomic innervations to the rat seminal vesicles originate from the bilateral major pelvic ganglia. Many preganglionic autonomic neurones innervating the pelvic ganglion were expressed androgen receptors (AR) or oestrogen receptor (ER)-α immunoreactivity. However, direct neuroanatomic data regarding the distribution of AR and ER-α in seminal vesicle related-spinal neurones are lacking. In the present study, a nonvirulent pseudorabies virus (PRV-152 strain) was used in a retrograde tracing experiment. Four days after PRV injection into the seminal vesicles of male rats, spinal cord sections were prepared. Double- and triple-fluorescence techniques using AR and ER-α with choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and PRV were used to investigate the AR and ER-α distribution in the seminal vesicles related spinal neurones in male rats. In lamina X, 14% of the PRV-labelled neurones in the L1-L4 segments and 43% in the L5-S1 segments were double-labelled with AR. In the L1-L4 segments, 6% of PRV-labelled neurones and 26% in the L5-S1 segments were double-labelled with ER-α. In the intermedial cell column area, 10% of PRV-labelled neurones in the L1-L4 segments and 47% of PRV-labelled neurones in the L5-S1 segments were double-labelled with AR. Up to 16% of PRV-labelled neurones in the L5-S1 segments were double-labelled with ER-α. No PRV-labelled neurones in the L1-L4 segments were double-labelled with ER-α. However, for the AR and ER-α/PRV/ChAT triple-fluorescence experiments, very few seminal vesicle preganglionic neurones expressed AR or ER-α. Our data suggests that many spinal interneurones but not preganglionic neurones involved in the seminal vesicle control in male rats were double-labelled with AR or ER-α, and they were mainly located at the parasympathetic level in the spinal cord. PMID:23414238

  3. Spinal neurons involved in the control of the seminal vesicles: a transsynaptic labeling study using pseudorabies virus in rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, X Q; Xu, C; Leclerc, P; Benoît, G; Giuliano, F; Droupy, S

    2009-01-23

    The seminal vesicles are male accessory sex glands that mainly contribute the seminal fluid of the ejaculate. Previous studies have suggested that seminal vesicles are supplied by both sympathetic and parasympathetic nerves. However, this conclusion was mainly based on studies in pelvic major ganglions and direct neuroanatomical evidence of spinal neurons innervating the seminal vesicles is still lacking. In order to map the spinal nerve circuit innervating the seminal vesicles, the present study used the pseudorabies virus (PRV) retrograde tracing technique in combination with immunohistochemistry. Three groups of rats were prepared: (1) nerves intact; (2) right hypogastric nerve and bilateral pelvic nerves sectioned; (3) right pelvic and bilateral hypogastric nerves sectioned. For the intact group, 3 to 5 days after injection of PRV into the left seminal vesicle in male rats, immunohistochemistry for PRV was performed to map the control circuit. Double immunofluorescence experiments against PRV and choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) were performed to discriminate preganglionic neurons and interneurons. Double detection of PRV and galanin (GAL) was also performed to identify lumbar spinothalamic (LSt) cells. Three days after virus injection, both sympathetic and parasympathetic preganglionic neurons were retrograde-labeled. Four days after injection of PRV into the seminal vesicles, PRV-infected neurons were found in the dorsal horn, ventral horn, dorsal gray commissure (DGC), medial gray matter and intermediolateral cell column (IML) from T13 to S1. For the group with an intact hypogastric nerve, 4 days after injection of PRV into the seminal vesicles, PRV-infected neurons were mainly located in DGC and IML of spinal lumbar segments (L) 1-L2. However, in the group with an intact pelvic nerve, PRV-infected neurons were mainly located in DGC of L5-S1 spinal segments. At the L3-L4 level, most of the virus-labeled neurons around the central canal expressed

  4. The organization of spinal motor neurons in a monotreme is consistent with a six-region schema of the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mitchelle, Amer; Watson, Charles

    2016-09-01

    The motor neurons in the spinal cord of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) have been mapped in Nissl-stained sections from spinal cord segments defined by spinal nerve anatomy. A medial motor column of motor neurons is found at all spinal cord levels, and a hypaxial column is found at most levels. The organization of the motor neuron clusters in the lateral motor column of the brachial (C5 to T3) and crural (L2 to S3) limb enlargements is very similar to the pattern previously revealed by retrograde tracing in placental mammals, and the motor neuron clusters have been tentatively identified according to the muscle groups they are likely to supply. The region separating the two limb enlargements (T4 to L1) contains preganglionic motor neurons that appear to represent the spinal sympathetic outflow. Immediately caudal to the crural limb enlargement is a short column of preganglionic motor neurons (S3 to S4), which it is believed represents the pelvic parasympathetic outflow. The rostral and caudal ends of the spinal cord contain neither a lateral motor column nor a preganglionic column. Branchial motor neurons (which are believed to supply the sternomastoid and trapezius muscles) are present at the lateral margin of the ventral horn in rostral cervical segments (C2-C4). These same segments contain the phrenic nucleus, which belongs to the hypaxial column. The presence or absence of the main spinal motor neuron columns in the different regions echidna spinal cord (and also in that of other amniote vertebrates) provides a basis for dividing the spinal cord into six main regions - prebrachial, brachial, postbrachial, crural, postcrural and caudal. The considerable biological and functional significance of this subdivision pattern is supported by recent studies on spinal cord hox gene expression in chicks and mice. On the other hand, the familiar 'segments' of the spinal cord are defined only by the anatomy of adjacent vertebrae, and are not demarcated by intrinsic gene

  5. The organization of spinal motor neurons in a monotreme is consistent with a six-region schema of the mammalian spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Mitchelle, Amer; Watson, Charles

    2016-09-01

    The motor neurons in the spinal cord of an echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus) have been mapped in Nissl-stained sections from spinal cord segments defined by spinal nerve anatomy. A medial motor column of motor neurons is found at all spinal cord levels, and a hypaxial column is found at most levels. The organization of the motor neuron clusters in the lateral motor column of the brachial (C5 to T3) and crural (L2 to S3) limb enlargements is very similar to the pattern previously revealed by retrograde tracing in placental mammals, and the motor neuron clusters have been tentatively identified according to the muscle groups they are likely to supply. The region separating the two limb enlargements (T4 to L1) contains preganglionic motor neurons that appear to represent the spinal sympathetic outflow. Immediately caudal to the crural limb enlargement is a short column of preganglionic motor neurons (S3 to S4), which it is believed represents the pelvic parasympathetic outflow. The rostral and caudal ends of the spinal cord contain neither a lateral motor column nor a preganglionic column. Branchial motor neurons (which are believed to supply the sternomastoid and trapezius muscles) are present at the lateral margin of the ventral horn in rostral cervical segments (C2-C4). These same segments contain the phrenic nucleus, which belongs to the hypaxial column. The presence or absence of the main spinal motor neuron columns in the different regions echidna spinal cord (and also in that of other amniote vertebrates) provides a basis for dividing the spinal cord into six main regions - prebrachial, brachial, postbrachial, crural, postcrural and caudal. The considerable biological and functional significance of this subdivision pattern is supported by recent studies on spinal cord hox gene expression in chicks and mice. On the other hand, the familiar 'segments' of the spinal cord are defined only by the anatomy of adjacent vertebrae, and are not demarcated by intrinsic gene

  6. Cervical disc hernia operations through posterior laminoforaminotomy

    PubMed Central

    Yolas, Coskun; Ozdemir, Nuriye Guzin; Okay, Hilmi Onder; Kanat, Ayhan; Senol, Mehmet; Atci, Ibrahim Burak; Yilmaz, Hakan; Coban, Mustafa Kemal; Yuksel, Mehmet Onur; Kahraman, Umit

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The most common used technique for posterolateral cervical disc herniations is anterior approach. However, posterior cervical laminotoforaminomy can provide excellent results in appropriately selected patients with foraminal stenosis in either soft disc prolapse or cervical spondylosis. The purpose of this study was to present the clinical outcomes following posterior laminoforaminotomy in patients with radiculopathy. Materials and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated 35 patients diagnosed with posterolateral cervical disc herniation and cervical spondylosis with foraminal stenosis causing radiculopathy operated by the posterior cervical keyhole laminoforaminotomy between the years 2010 and 2015. Results: The file records and the radiographic images of the 35 patients were assessed retrospectively. The mean age was 46.4 years (range: 34-66 years). Of the patients, 19 were males and 16 were females. In all of the patients, the neurologic deficit observed was radiculopathy. The posterolaterally localized disc herniations and the osteophytic structures were on the left side in 18 cases and on the right in 17 cases. In 10 of the patients, the disc level was at C5-6, in 18 at C6-7, in 2 at C3-4, in 2 at C4-5, in 1 at C7-T1, in 1 patient at both C5-6 and C6-7, and in 1 at both C4-5 and C5-6. In 14 of these 35 patients, both osteophytic structures and protruded disc herniation were present. Intervertebral foramen stenosis was present in all of the patients with osteophytes. Postoperatively, in 31 patients the complaints were relieved completely and four patients had complaints of neck pain and paresthesia radiating to the arm (the success of operation was 88.5%). On control examinations, there was no finding of instability or cervical kyphosis. Conclusion: Posterior cervical laminoforaminotomy is an alternative appropriate choice in both cervical soft disc herniations and cervical stenosis. PMID:27217655

  7. Cervical foraminal selective nerve root block: a 'two-needle technique' with results.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Naresh; Gowda, Veda

    2008-04-01

    Several techniques have been described for selective nerve root blocks. We describe a novel 'two-needle technique', performed through the postero-lateral route with the patient in lateral position under C-arm guidance. The aim of the current study is to highlight the effectiveness and safety of cervical selective nerve root block for radiculopathy using this technique. We present results of a retrospective 2-year follow-up study of 33 injections carried out on 33 patients with radiculopathy due to cervical disc disease and or foraminal stenosis using this procedure. Patients with myelopathy, gross motor weakness and any other pathology were excluded. The outcome was measured comparing 'Visual Analogue Score' (VAS) and 'Neck Disability Index' (NDI) before the procedure with those at 6 weeks and 12 months after the procedure. Thirty patients were included in the final analysis. Average pre-operative VAS score was 7.4 (range 5-10), which improved to 2.2 (range 0-7) at 6 weeks and 2.0 (range 0-4) at 1 year and the mean NDI score prior to intervention was 66.9 (range 44-84), which improved to 31.7 (range 18-66) at 6 weeks and 31.1 (range 16-48) at 1 year. The improvements were statistically significant. Patients with involvement of C6 or C7 nerve roots responded slightly better at 6 weeks with regards to VAS improvement. Mean duration of radiation exposure during the procedure was 27.8 s (range 10-90 s). Only minor complications were noted-transient dizziness in two and transient nystagmus in one patient. Our 'two-needle technique' is a new, safe and effective non-surgical treatment for cervical radiculopathy.

  8. Diffusion-Weighted Imaging for Pretreatment Evaluation and Prediction of Treatment Effect in Patients Undergoing CT-Guided Injection for Lumbar Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Xiang-Ke; Bhetuwal, Anup

    2015-01-01

    Objective To determine whether a change in apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) value could predict early response to CT-guided Oxygen-Ozone (O2-O3) injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. Materials and Methods A total of 52 patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy received a single intradiscal (3 mL) and periganglionic (5 mL) injection of an O2-O3 mixture. An ADC index of the involved side to the intact side was calculated using the following formula: pre-treatment ADC index = ([ADC involved side - ADC intact side] / ADC intact side) × 100. We analyzed the relationship between the pre-treatment Oswestry Disability Index (ODI) and the ADC index. In addition, the correlation between ODI recovery ratio and ADC index was investigated. The sensitivity and specificity of the ADC index for predicting response in O2-O3 therapy was determined. Results Oswestry Disability Index and the ADC index was not significantly correlated (r = -0.125, p = 0.093). The ADC index and ODI recovery ratio was significantly correlated (r = 0.819, p < 0.001). When using 7.10 as the cut-off value, the ADC index obtained a sensitivity of 86.3% and a specificity of 82.9% for predicting successful response to therapy around the first month of follow-up. Conclusion This preliminary study demonstrates that the patients with decreased ADC index tend to show poor improvement of clinical symptoms. The ADC index may be a useful indicator to predict early response to CT-guided O2-O3 injection therapy in patients with unilateral mono-radiculopathy due to lumbar disc herniation. PMID:26175588

  9. Site of origin and mechanism of action of adenosine in the frog sympathetic ganglion

    SciTech Connect

    Bencherif, M.

    1987-01-01

    The contribution of pre and postsynaptic activation on the release of {sup 3}H-purines was studied in the isolated sympathetic paravertebral ganglion of the frog. Preganglionic stimulation induced an overall release of {sup 3}H-purines. This release is blocked by atropine and curare and can be induced by carbachol and antidromic stimulation. Analyses of the effluent by anion exchange chromatography and by HPLC showed that the non-nucleotide fractions constituted most of the counts released. Hence, nucleosides are the main products released by the ganglion and did not arise from hydrolysis of extracellular ATP. We studied the effect of synaptic activity on tritiated inositol release (IR). This release did not change during orthodromic stimulation. However, upon cessation of the stimulation, release increased rapidly and remained elevated for at least 45 minutes. This increase in IR was reduced by suffusion of the ganglia with either acetylcholine or adenosine.

  10. Autonomic pain: features and methods of assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Gandhavadi, B.; Rosen, J.S.; Addison, R.G.

    1982-01-01

    The distribution of pain originating in the sympathetic nervous system does not match the somatic segmental sensory distribution at the postganglionic level. The two types of distribution are separate and different. At the preganglionic level, fibers show typical segmental sensory distribution, which resembles but is not identical to somatic segmental sensory distribution. Instead, sympathetic pain has its own distribution along the vascular supply and some peripheral nerves. It cannot be called atypical in terms of somatic segmental sensory distribution. Several techniques are available to assess autonomic function in cases of chronic pain. Infrared thermography is superior to any other physiologic or pharmacologic method to assess sympathetic function. Overactivity of sympathetic function in the area of pain is the probable cause of temperature reduction in that area. Accordingly it would appear that in cases in which thermography demonstrates decreased temperature, sympathetic block or sympathectomy would provide relief from the pain.

  11. Intrinsic innervation of the urinary bladder of kangaroo and albino rats.

    PubMed

    Mostafa, F A; Nassar, A M; MPAHRAN, Z Y; El-Mahallawi, M N

    1975-01-01

    A comparative study of the intrinsic innervation in desert rodents (kangaroo rats) and others (albino rats) was carried out in an attempt to understand the functional anatomy of the bladder in these animals which are known to sustain severe water restraint. The bladder of the albino rat was innervated by predominantly thin nerves, more numerous beaded endings and few ganglia. That of the kangaroo rat had more numerous thick nerves (pre-ganglionic), large verve trunks, and ganglia which were extensively distributed in the wall. These findings indicate that the bladder of the albino rat depends mainly on the intrinsic innervation and facilatory micturition reflexes, while that of the kangaroo rat is intrinsically regulated, depending on a short neuron system. It was concluded that all the structural differences found might be essential for constant urine retention.

  12. Local autonomic failure affecting a limb.

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, R H; Robinson, B J

    1987-01-01

    Three patients are described who presented with autonomic failure affecting predominantly one limb. Physiological studies revealed that there was sweating loss in the limb which appeared to be due to a preganglionic autonomic lesion and not to a sweat gland abnormality. In all three patients there was also evidence of failure of vasomotor control. There was no evidence of more generalised autonomic failure or neurological deficit. In two patients the condition appeared to be static and, according to the patients' accounts was life long. In the third the sweating loss was present for three years prior to pain loss becoming evident from C2/3 to T1 on the same side as the sweating loss. These patients, together with two recent case reports, indicate that isolated local autonomic failure, probably from a discrete cord lesion, can be a cause of presenting symptoms related to sweating loss or to change in temperature in a limb. PMID:3612155

  13. Dissection of intercostal nerves by means of assisted video thoracoscopy: experimental study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In total brachial plexus preganglionic lesions (C5-C6-C7-C8 and T1) different extraplexual neurotizations are indicated for partial motor function restitution. Mostly for the flexion of the elbow. Neurotization with intercostal nerves (ICN) to musculocutaneous nerve has been known and accepted during many years with different results 2 - 5. The customary technique as described by various authors is carried out by means of a large submammary incision to harvest three or four intercostal nerves (Figure 1). Then are connected by direct suture or grafts to the musculocutaneous nerve or its motor branches 6 - 7. In this article the authors described the possibility of dissection intercostal nerves by means of assisted video thoracoscopy. (VATS-videdo assisted thoracic surgery). PMID:23406448

  14. Peripheral ganglia supplying the genital smooth musculature in the female pig: an experimental study

    PubMed Central

    PANU, RINO; BO MINELLI, LUISA; BOTTI, MADDALENA; GAZZA, FERDINANDO; ACONE, FRANCA; PALMIERI, GIOVANNI

    2001-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to locate the sensory and autonomic ganglia innervating the female genital musculature in pigs. The retrograde neuronal tracers horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or fast blue (FB) were injected into the left retractor clitoridis muscle (RCM), which was treated as a typical model of the genital smooth musculature. Labelled cells were found in ipsilateral dorsal root ganglia Sl–S4, in bilateral sympathetic paravertebral ganglia from L5–L6 or L6–L7 to S3 and in the left and right caudal mesenteric ganglion. In two of the five animals treated, presumably preganglionic parasympathetic cells were labelled in the ipsilateral intermediate grey substance of the segments Sl–S2. PMID:11554508

  15. The "harlequin" sign and congenital Horner's syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, D A; Bibby, K; Woodruff, G

    1997-01-01

    When trying to establish the likely anatomical site (preganglionic or postganglionic) of a lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome, the distribution of facial flushing (the "harlequin" sign), may be seen. In babies and young children, facial flushing is a relatively simple clinical sign to demonstrate, compared with facial sweating. In unilateral facial flushing the areas that do not flush are almost always identical to the anhidrotic areas. However, neither facial flushing nor testing the pupil reactions with pholedrine or hydroxyamphetamine can be relied on to predict the probable site of any lesion causing congenital Horner's syndrome. Two patients with congenital Horner's syndrome are presented which demonstrated the "harlequin" sign and in whom clinical examination and pharmacological testing gave conflicting evidence for localisation of the site of the causative lesion. The presentation of congenital Horner's syndrome should be investigated and include MRI or CT to exclude a serious underlying cause. Images PMID:9219751

  16. Adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project into the splanchnic nerve.

    PubMed

    Dagerlind, A; Pelto-Huikko, M; Diez, M; Hökfelt, T

    1995-12-01

    Retrograde tract-tracing was used to study the projections of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons. The splanchnic nerve was cut close to the suprarenal ganglia and the retrograde tracer FluoroGold was applied at the site of nerve transection. Groups of adrenal medullary ganglion neurons exhibited FlurorGold- or Fast Blue-induced fluorescence restricted to the perikarya. Using immunohistochemistry most retrogradely labelled ganglion neurons showed immunoreactivity for neuropeptide Y. In addition, after splanchnicotomy most ganglion neurons expressed galanin and galanin message-associated peptide immunoreactivities which could not be observed in control adrenals. Taken together, the present results strongly indicate that adrenal medullary ganglion neurons project back into the splanchnic nerve perhaps representing feedback system modulating the preganglionic innervation of the adrenal gland.

  17. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed.

  18. Lumbar discal cyst: Diagnostic discography followed by therapeutic computed tomography-guided aspiration and injection.

    PubMed

    Endo, Yoshimi; Miller, Theodore T; Saboeiro, Gregory R; Cooke, Paul M

    2014-12-01

    Discal cysts are extradural masses that communicate with the intervertebral disk and are a rare cause of lower back pain and lumbar radiculopathy. This case report describes a lumbar discal cyst, the diagnosis of which was confirmed on conventional discography, and which was treated with computed tomography-guided aspiration and steroid injection. Several reports have described this procedure, but only one in the radiology literature, and thus the purpose of this report is to remind the radiology community of the existence of this entity and propose a minimally invasive means of treatment. PMID:25926915

  19. Microdiscectomy for a Paracentral Lumbar Herniated Disk.

    PubMed

    Millhouse, Paul W; Schroeder, Gregory D; Kurd, Mark F; Kepler, Christopher K; Vaccaro, Alexander R; Savage, Jason W

    2016-02-01

    Lumbar disk herniations occur frequently and are often associated with leg pain, weakness, and paresthesias. Fortunately, the natural outcomes of radiculopathy due to a disk herniation are generally favorable, and the vast majority of patients improve with nonoperative care. Surgical intervention is reserved for patients who have significant pain that is refractory to at least 6 weeks of conservative care, patients who have a severe or progressive motor deficit, or patients who have any symptoms of bowel or bladder dysfunction. This paper reviews the preoperative and postoperative considerations, as well as the surgical technique, for a microdiscectomy for a lumbar intervertebral disk herniation. PMID:26710186

  20. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-02-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  1. Clinics in diagnostic imaging (151). Acromioclavicular joint geyser sign with chronic full-thickness supraspinatus tendon (SST) tear.

    PubMed Central

    Khor, Andrew Yu Keat; Wong, Steven Bak Siew

    2014-01-01

    An 82-year-old man presented with neck pain, right upper limb radiculopathy and right shoulder pain. Physical examination revealed a soft lump over the right shoulder joint, as well as reduced range of shoulder movements. On magnetic resonance imaging, the soft lump was shown to be a cystic mass over the acromioclavicular joint and was related to a full-thickness supraspinatus tendon tear. This is the classic geyser sign. The pathophysiology and clinical features of the geyser sign, and its imaging features with various imaging modalities, are discussed. PMID:24570312

  2. Leg discomfort: beyond the joints.

    PubMed

    Berger, Douglas

    2014-05-01

    Although simple characterization of discomfort as cramps, heaviness, shooting pains, and so forth can be misleading, history and examination are key to accurate diagnosis. Absence of both dorsalis pedis and posterior tibial pulses strongly suggests peripheral arterial disease (PAD), and the presence of either pulse makes PAD less likely. Hydroxymethylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) are a common cause of lower extremity myalgias. Restless legs syndrome causes nocturnal discomfort but must be distinguished from confounding“mimics." Neurologic causes of leg symptoms include lumbar spinal stenosis, radiculopathy, distal symmetric polyneuropathy, and entrapment neuropathy. Many common causes of leg discomfort can be managed conservatively.

  3. Electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Simmons, Zachary

    2013-02-01

    This article describes the normal anatomy of the brachial plexus and its major terminal branches, as well as the major causes and clinical presentations of lesions of these structures. An approach to electrodiagnosis of brachial plexopathies and proximal upper extremity neuropathies is provided, with an emphasis on those nerve conduction studies and portions of the needle examination, which permit localization of lesions to specific trunks, cords, and terminal branches. The importance of specific sensory nerve conduction studies for differentiating plexopathies from radiculopathies and mononeuropathies is emphasized.

  4. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-01-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with anterior limbus vertebra because it is rare and the patient has atypical clinical presentation. PMID:27134989

  5. Intraspinal hydatidosis with retroperitoneal extension: an uncommon location

    PubMed Central

    Sarma, Yashdeep; Nair, Rajesh; Siddharth, Sankalp; Kumar, Vinod; Upadhyaya, Sunil; Shetty, Arjun

    2014-01-01

    Hydatidosis is a ubiquitous disease that is endemic in India. It most commonly involves the liver (75%) and lungs (15%) with only 10% occuring in the rest of the body. Primary hydatid cyst in the spinal canal is extremely rare. Intraspinal hydatid accounts for 0.5–1% of the cases and carries a poor prognosis. It presents as a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge. We present one such case of a 64-year-old man with associated radiculopathy and myelomalcia. PMID:25199198

  6. Limbus Vertebra Presenting with Inflammatory Low Back Pain: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Tuna, Serpil; Özdemir, Tayfun; Öz, Hande Ece

    2016-03-01

    Limbus vertebra is a condition characterized by marginal interosseous herniation of the nucleus pulposus, and causes non specific symptoms like low back pain, back pain, muscle spasms and radiculopathy. It is frequently confused with vertebral fracture, infection, schmorl nodule or tumour because it has not a spesific symptom. It usually causes mechanical low back pain rather than inflammatory low back pain. We reported a patient presented with inflammatory low back pain and diagnosed with anterior limbus vertebra because it is rare and the patient has atypical clinical presentation. PMID:27134989

  7. Muscle pain: animal and human experimental and clinical studies.

    PubMed

    Marchettini, P

    1993-10-01

    The search for the identification of the sensory apparatus encoding muscle pain sensation in humans is recounted. Basic neurophysiologic animal studies, leading to a description of slowly conducting afferent from muscle and definition of high threshold polymodal muscle nociceptors, and pioneer psychophysic human studies together with recent microneurographic experiments in humans are described. The phenomena of muscle pain broad localization and distant referral are discussed, and clinical implications are extrapolated to interpret muscle pain as a localizing sign of mononeuropathy or radiculopathy. The identification of human muscle nociceptors has defined the scientific standard to test emerging clinical descriptions having muscle pain as a symptom.

  8. [Clinical and instrumental characteristics of chronic neuroborreliosis].

    PubMed

    Baranova, N S; Spirin, N N; Nizovtseva, L A; Pakhomova, Iu A; Fadeeva, O A

    2012-01-01

    The impairment of the nervous system is the main clinical presentation of chronic Lyme borreliosis. Frequency and characteristics of neuroborreliosis in Russia are still under-investigated. The article contains the analysis of 160 cases of chronic Lyme borreliosis with detailed descriptions of different neurologic syndromes - radiculopathy, polyneuropathy, encephalopathy and encephalomyelitis. Epidemiology of this disease as well as its laboratory and instrumental diagnosis are discussed. Extraneural signs and symptoms of late stages of neuroborreliosis are presented. The results of antibacterial treatment of different forms of chronic neuroborreliosis are outlined. PMID:23235423

  9. The Degenerative Spine.

    PubMed

    Clarençon, Frédéric; Law-Ye, Bruno; Bienvenot, Peggy; Cormier, Évelyne; Chiras, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    Degenerative disease of the spine is a leading cause of back pain and radiculopathy, and is a frequent indication for spine MR imaging. Disc degeneration, disc protrusion/herniation, discarhtrosis, spinal canal stenosis, and facet joint arthrosis, as well as interspinous processes arthrosis, may require an MR imaging workup. This review presents the MR imaging patterns of these diseases and describes the benefit of the MR imaging in these indications compared with the other imaging modalities like plain radiographs or computed tomography scan. PMID:27417397

  10. Lumbar discal cyst: Diagnostic discography followed by therapeutic computed tomography-guided aspiration and injection

    PubMed Central

    Endo, Yoshimi; Miller, Theodore T.; Saboeiro, Gregory R.; Cooke, Paul M.

    2014-01-01

    Discal cysts are extradural masses that communicate with the intervertebral disk and are a rare cause of lower back pain and lumbar radiculopathy. This case report describes a lumbar discal cyst, the diagnosis of which was confirmed on conventional discography, and which was treated with computed tomography-guided aspiration and steroid injection. Several reports have described this procedure, but only one in the radiology literature, and thus the purpose of this report is to remind the radiology community of the existence of this entity and propose a minimally invasive means of treatment. PMID:25926915

  11. Structural remodeling of the heart and its premotor cardioinhibitory vagal neurons following T5 spinal cord transection

    PubMed Central

    Lujan, Heidi L.; Janbaih, Hussein

    2014-01-01

    Midthoracic spinal cord injury (SCI) is associated with enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity and reduced cardiac parasympathetic activity. The enhanced cardiac sympathetic activity is associated with sympathetic structural plasticity within the stellate ganglia, spinal cord segments T1–T4, and heart. However, changes to cardiac parasympathetic centers rostral to an experimental SCI are relatively unknown. Importantly, reduced vagal activity is a predictor of high mortality. Furthermore, this autonomic dysregulation promotes progressive left ventricular (LV) structural remodeling. Accordingly, we hypothesized that midthoracic spinal cord injury is associated with structural plasticity in premotor (preganglionic parasympathetic neurons) cardioinhibitory vagal neurons located within the nucleus ambiguus as well as LV structural remodeling. To test this hypothesis, dendritic arborization and morphology (cholera toxin B immunohistochemistry and Sholl analysis) of cardiac projecting premotor cardioinhibitory vagal neurons located within the nucleus ambiguus were determined in intact (sham transected) and thoracic level 5 transected (T5X) rats. In addition, LV chamber size, wall thickness, and collagen content (Masson trichrome stain and structural analysis) were determined. Midthoracic SCI was associated with structural changes within the nucleus ambiguus and heart. Specifically, following T5 spinal cord transection, there was a significant increase in cardiac parasympathetic preganglionic neuron dendritic arborization, soma area, maximum dendritic length, and number of intersections/animal. This parasympathetic structural remodeling was associated with a profound LV structural remodeling. Specifically, T5 spinal cord transection increased LV chamber area, reduced LV wall thickness, and increased collagen content. Accordingly, results document a dynamic interaction between the heart and its parasympathetic innervation. PMID:24610530

  12. Expression of receptors for glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor family ligands in sacral spinal cord reveals separate targets of pelvic afferent fibers.

    PubMed

    Forrest, Shelley L; Keast, Janet R

    2008-02-20

    Nerve growth factor has been proposed to mediate many structural and chemical changes in bladder sensory neurons after injury or inflammation. We have examined the expression of receptors for the glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) family within sensory terminals located in the sacral spinal cord and in bladder-projecting sacral dorsal root ganglion neurons of adult female Sprague-Dawley rats. Nerve fibers immunolabelled for GFRalpha1 (GDNF receptor), GFRalpha2 (neurturin receptor), or GFRalpha3 (artemin receptor) showed distinct distribution patterns in the spinal cord, suggesting separate populations of sensory fibers with different functions: GFRalpha1-labeled fibers were in outer lamina II and the lateral-collateral pathway and associated with autonomic interneurons and preganglionic neurons; GFRalpha2-labeled fibers were only in inner lamina II; GFRalpha3-labeled fibers were in lamina I, the lateral-collateral pathway, and areas surrounding dorsal groups of preganglionic neurons and associated interneurons. Immunofluorescence studies of retrogradely labelled bladder-projecting neurons in sacral dorsal root ganglia showed that approximately 25% expressed GFRalpha1 or GFRalpha3 immunoreactivity, the preferred receptors for GDNF and artemin, respectively. After cyclophosphamide-induced bladder inflammation, fluorescence intensity of GFRalpha1-positive fibers increased within the dorsal horn, but there was no change in the GFRalpha2- or GFRalpha3-positive fibers. These studies have shown that GDNF and artemin may target bladder sensory neurons and potentially mediate plasticity of sacral visceral afferent neurons following inflammation. Our results have also revealed three distinct subpopulations of sensory fibers within the sacral spinal cord, which have not been identified previously using other markers.

  13. Evidence for a respiratory component, similar to mammalian respiratory sinus arrhythmia, in the heart rate variability signal from the rattlesnake, Crotalus durissus terrificus.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Hamish A; Leite, Cleo A C; Wang, Tobias; Skals, Marianne; Abe, Augusto S; Egginton, Stuart; Rantin, F Tadeu; Bishop, Charles M; Taylor, Edwin W

    2006-07-01

    Autonomic control of heart rate variability and the central location of vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN) were examined in the rattlesnake (Crotalus durissus terrificus), in order to determine whether respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) occurred in a similar manner to that described for mammals. Resting ECG signals were recorded in undisturbed snakes using miniature datalogging devices, and the presence of oscillations in heart rate (fh) was assessed by power spectral analysis (PSA). This mathematical technique provides a graphical output that enables the estimation of cardiac autonomic control by measuring periodic changes in the heart beat interval. At fh above 19 min(-1) spectra were mainly characterised by low frequency components, reflecting mainly adrenergic tonus on the heart. By contrast, at fh below 19 min(-1) spectra typically contained high frequency components, demonstrated to be cholinergic in origin. Snakes with a fh >19 min(-1) may therefore have insufficient cholinergic tonus and/or too high an adrenergic tonus acting upon the heart for respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) to develop. A parallel study monitored fh simultaneously with the intraperitoneal pressures associated with lung inflation. Snakes with a fh<19 min(-1) exhibited a high frequency (HF) peak in the power spectrum, which correlated with ventilation rate (fv). Adrenergic blockade by propranolol infusion increased the variability of the ventilation cycle, and the oscillatory component of the fh spectrum broadened accordingly. Infusion of atropine to effect cholinergic blockade abolished this HF component, confirming a role for vagal control of the heart in matching fh and fv in the rattlesnake. A neuroanatomical study of the brainstem revealed two locations for vagal preganglionic neurones (VPN). This is consistent with the suggestion that generation of ventilatory components in the heart rate variability (HRV) signal are dependent on spatially distinct loci for cardiac VPN. Therefore

  14. The effect of hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel inhibitors on the vagal control of guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone

    PubMed Central

    McGovern, Alice E; Robusto, Jed; Rakoczy, Joanna; Simmons, David G; Phipps, Simon; Mazzone, Stuart B

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Subtypes of the hyperpolarization-activated cyclic nucleotide-gated (HCN) family of cation channels are widely expressed on nerves and smooth muscle cells in many organ systems, where they serve to regulate membrane excitability. Here we have assessed whether HCN channel inhibitors alter the function of airway smooth muscle or the neurons that regulate airway smooth muscle tone. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH The effects of the HCN channel inhibitors ZD7288, zatebradine and Cs+ were assessed on agonist and nerve stimulation-evoked changes in guinea pig airway smooth muscle tone using tracheal strips in vitro, an innervated tracheal tube preparation ex vivo or in anaesthetized mechanically ventilated guinea pigs in vivo. HCN channel expression in airway nerves was assessed using immunohistochemistry, PCR and in situ hybridization. KEY RESULTS HCN channel inhibition did not alter airway smooth muscle reactivity in vitro to exogenously administered smooth muscle spasmogens, but significantly potentiated smooth muscle contraction evoked by the sensory nerve stimulant capsaicin and electrical field stimulation of parasympathetic cholinergic postganglionic neurons. Sensory nerve hyperresponsiveness was also evident in in vivo following HCN channel blockade. Cs+, but not ZD7288, potentiated preganglionic nerve-dependent airway contractions and over time induced autorhythmic preganglionic nerve activity, which was not mimicked by inhibitors of potassium channels. HCN channel expression was most evident in vagal sensory ganglia and airway nerve fibres. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS HCN channel inhibitors had a previously unrecognized effect on the neural regulation of airway smooth muscle tone, which may have implications for some patients receiving HCN channel inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. PMID:24762027

  15. Expression of the cell adhesion proteins BEN/SC1/DM-GRASP and TAG-1 defines early steps of axonogenesis in the human spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Karagogeos, D; Pourquié, C; Kyriakopoulou, K; Tavian, M; Stallcup, W; Péault, B; Pourquié, O

    1997-03-17

    We have studied the expression pattern of two cell adhesion proteins of the immunoglobin (Ig) superfamily, BEN/SC1/DM-GRASP (BEN) and the transient axonal glycoprotein TAG-1, during the development of the human nervous system. This study was performed by immunocytochemistry on sections of human embryos ranging from 4 to 13 weeks postconception. The overall distribution of the two proteins during development is very similar to that reported in other vertebrate species, but several important differences have been observed. Both proteins exhibit a transient expression on selected neuronal populations, which include the motor and the sensory neurons. In addition, BEN was also detected on virtually all neurons derived from the neural crest as well as in nonneuronal tissues. A major difference of expression with the chick embryo is that, in the motor neurons, BEN expression was not observed at early stages of development, thus arguing against a role of this molecule in pathfinding and fasciculation. BEN was observed to be restricted to subsets of motor neurons, such as the medial column at the upper limb level. Expression was also detected in a laterodorsal population of the ventral horn cells, which are likely to correspond to migrating preganglionic neurons that originate from the motor pool at the thoracic level. TAG-1 was found on commissural neurons and weakly on the sympathetic neurons; it was also detected on restricted nonneuronal populations. In addition, we observed TAG-1 expression in fibers that could correspond either to subsets of dorsal root ganglia (DRGs) central afferences (including the Ia fibers) or to the axons of association interneurons and in scattered motoneurons likely to correspond either to preganglionic neurons, to gamma-motoneurons, or to late-born motoneurons. Therefore, our results indicate that the molecular strategies used to establish the axonal scaffolding of the nervous system in humans are extremely conserved among the different

  16. Stimulation of Baroresponsive Parts of the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract Produces Nitric Oxide-mediated Choroidal Vasodilation in Rat Eye

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chunyan; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Del Mar, Nobel; Reiner, Anton

    2016-01-01

    Preganglionic parasympathetic neurons of the ventromedial part of the superior salivatory nucleus (SSN) mediate vasodilation of orbital and choroidal blood vessels, via their projection to the nitrergic pterygopalatine ganglion (PPG) neurons that innervate these vessels. We recently showed that the baroresponsive part of the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) innervates choroidal control parasympathetic preganglionic neurons of SSN in rats. As this projection provides a means by which blood pressure (BP) signals may modulate choroidal blood flow (ChBF), we investigated if activation of baroresponsive NTS evokes ChBF increases in rat eye, using Laser Doppler Flowmetry (LDF) to measure ChBF transclerally. We found that electrical activation of ipsilateral baroresponsive NTS and its efferent fiber pathway to choroidal SSN increased mean ChBF by about 40–80% above baseline, depending on current level. The ChBF responses obtained with stimulation of baroresponsive NTS were driven by increases in both choroidal blood volume (ChBVol; i.e., vasodilation) and choroidal blood velocity (ChBVel; possibly due to orbital vessel dilation). Stimulation of baroresponsive NTS, by contrast, yielded no significant mean increases in systemic arterial blood pressure (ABP). We further found that the increases in ChBF with NTS stimulation were significantly reduced by administration of the neuronal nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor Nω-propyl-l-arginine (NPA), thus implicating nitrergic PPG terminals in the NTS-elicited ChBF increases. Our results show that the NTS neurons projecting to choroidal SSN do mediate increase in ChBF, and thus suggest a role of baroresponsive NTS in the BP-dependent regulation of ChBF. PMID:27774055

  17. Monoaminergic modulation of spinal viscero-sympathetic function in the neonatal mouse thoracic spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Zimmerman, Amanda L; Sawchuk, Michael; Hochman, Shawn

    2012-01-01

    Descending serotonergic, noradrenergic, and dopaminergic systems project diffusely to sensory, motor and autonomic spinal cord regions. Using neonatal mice, this study examined monoaminergic modulation of visceral sensory input and sympathetic preganglionic output. Whole-cell recordings from sympathetic preganglionic neurons (SPNs) in spinal cord slice demonstrated that serotonin, noradrenaline, and dopamine modulated SPN excitability. Serotonin depolarized all, while noradrenaline and dopamine depolarized most SPNs. Serotonin and noradrenaline also increased SPN current-evoked firing frequency, while both increases and decreases were seen with dopamine. In an in vitro thoracolumbar spinal cord/sympathetic chain preparation, stimulation of splanchnic nerve visceral afferents evoked reflexes and subthreshold population synaptic potentials in thoracic ventral roots that were dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Visceral afferent stimulation also evoked bicuculline-sensitive dorsal root potentials thought to reflect presynaptic inhibition via primary afferent depolarization. These dorsal root potentials were likewise dose-dependently depressed by the monoamines. Concomitant monoaminergic depression of population afferent synaptic transmission recorded as dorsal horn field potentials was also seen. Collectively, serotonin, norepinephrine and dopamine were shown to exert broad and comparable modulatory regulation of viscero-sympathetic function. The general facilitation of SPN efferent excitability with simultaneous depression of visceral afferent-evoked motor output suggests that descending monoaminergic systems reconfigure spinal cord autonomic function away from visceral sensory influence. Coincident monoaminergic reductions in dorsal horn responses support a multifaceted modulatory shift in the encoding of spinal visceral afferent activity. Similar monoamine-induced changes have been observed for somatic sensorimotor function, suggesting an integrative

  18. [Nerve ultrasound is useful for the diagnosis of neuromuscular diseases].

    PubMed

    Noto, Yu-Ichi

    2013-01-01

    High-resolution ultrasound allowed for more detailed morphological assessment peripheral nerves and muscles. It is important to elucidate ultrasound features of peripheral nerves or muscles in various neuromuscular diseases because ultrasound is a widely used, non-invasive and easily accessible diagnostic tool. We attempted to demonstrate characteristic findings of nerve ultrasound in patients with Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMT), Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), and Cervical radiculopathy. In patients with CMT1A, cross sectional areas (CSAs) of all the nerves we examined were significantly larger than those in normal controls. Additionally, median nerve CSA had positive correlation with CMT neuropathy score, and negative correlation with nerve conduction velocity. In patients with ALS, increased CSA forearm/upper arm ratio of the median nerve was a characteristic finding to support the diagnosis. In patients with cervical radiculopathy, we could observe that decreased CSA and diameter of the nerve root corresponding to the findings of MRI and electromyography. These results demonstrate that the combination of electrophysiological study, diagnostic imaging, and nerve ultrasound could lead to accurate diagnosis of various neuromuscular diseases.

  19. Scalene Myofascial Pain Syndrome Mimicking Cervical Disc Prolapse: A Report of Two Cases

    PubMed Central

    Abd Jalil, Nizar; Awang, Mohammad Saufi; Omar, Mahamarowi

    2010-01-01

    Scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome wherein pain originates over the neck area and radiates down to the arm. This condition may present as primary or secondary to underlying cervical pathology. Although scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a well known medical entity, it is often misdiagnosed as being some other neck pain associated with radiculopathy, such as cervical disc prolapse, cervical spinal stenosis and thoracic outlet syndrome. Because scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimics cervical radiculopathy, this condition often leads to mismanagement, which can, in turn, result in persistent pain and suffering. In the worst-case scenarios, patients may be subjected to unjustifiable surgical intervention. Because the clinical findings in scalene myofascial pain syndrome are “pathognomonic”, clinicians should be aware of ways to recognize this disorder and be able to differentiate it from other conditions that present with neck pain and rediculopathy. We present two cases of unilateral scalene myofascial pain syndrome that significantly impaired the patients’ functioning and quality of life. This case report serves to create awareness about the existence of the syndrome and to highlight the potential morbidity due to clinical misdiagnosis. PMID:22135529

  20. Scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimicking cervical disc prolapse: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Abd Jalil, Nizar; Awang, Mohammad Saufi; Omar, Mahamarowi

    2010-01-01

    Scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a regional pain syndrome wherein pain originates over the neck area and radiates down to the arm. This condition may present as primary or secondary to underlying cervical pathology. Although scalene myofascial pain syndrome is a well known medical entity, it is often misdiagnosed as being some other neck pain associated with radiculopathy, such as cervical disc prolapse, cervical spinal stenosis and thoracic outlet syndrome. Because scalene myofascial pain syndrome mimics cervical radiculopathy, this condition often leads to mismanagement, which can, in turn, result in persistent pain and suffering. In the worst-case scenarios, patients may be subjected to unjustifiable surgical intervention. Because the clinical findings in scalene myofascial pain syndrome are "pathognomonic", clinicians should be aware of ways to recognize this disorder and be able to differentiate it from other conditions that present with neck pain and rediculopathy. We present two cases of unilateral scalene myofascial pain syndrome that significantly impaired the patients' functioning and quality of life. This case report serves to create awareness about the existence of the syndrome and to highlight the potential morbidity due to clinical misdiagnosis.

  1. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome.

  2. A Genetically Engineered Thermally Responsive Sustained Release Curcumin Depot to Treat Neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, S. Michael; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; McDaniel, Jonathan R.; Gooden, David M.; Gopalaswamy, Ramesh; Chilkoti, Ashutosh; Setton, Lori A.

    2014-01-01

    Radiculopathy, a painful neuroinflammation that can accompany intervertebral disc herniation, is associated with locally increased levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα). Systemic administration of TNF antagonists for radiculopathy in the clinic has shown mixed results, and there is growing interest in the local delivery of anti-inflammatory drugs to treat this pathology as well as similar inflammatory events of peripheral nerve injury. Curcumin, a known antagonist of TNFα in multiple cell types and tissues, was chemically modified and conjugated to a thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) to create an injectable depot for sustained, local delivery of curcumin to treat neuroinflammation. ELPs are biopolymers capable of thermally-triggered in situ depot formation that have been successfully employed as drug carriers and biomaterials in several applications. ELP-curcumin conjugates were shown to display high drug loading, rapidly release curcumin in vitro via degradable carbamate bonds, and retain in vitro bioactivity against TNFα-induced cytotoxicity and monocyte activation with IC50 only two-fold higher than curcumin. When injected proximal to the sciatic nerve in mice via intramuscular (i.m.) injection, ELP-curcumin conjugates underwent a thermally triggered soluble-insoluble phase transition, leading to in situ formation of a depot that released curcumin over 4 days post-injection and decreased plasma AUC 7-fold. PMID:23830979

  3. [Management of transient radicular pain after receiving an epidural blood patch for headaches due to spontaneous intracranial hypotension].

    PubMed

    Melo, M C; Revuelta, M E; Santeularia, T; Genové, M; Català, E

    2015-11-01

    Spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache is an uncommon disease that resolves spontaneously in most of the cases and in a short period of time. The initial treatment should be symptomatic. In some patients the symptomatology is extremely disabling, and in these cases both the diagnosis and treatment may be performed by an epidural blood patch. A 49-year-old Caucasian woman, with no previous record of epidural or intrathecal puncture, consulted in the Emergency Department complaining of a 9-day history of frontal headache and diplopia, along with nausea and vomiting. The patient was diagnosed with spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache. Considering the symptomatology and the uncontrolled pain, the Pain Unit of our hospital performed an epidural blood patch. In the first 24h the patient reported a remarkable relief of both headache and diplopia but developed a left lumbar radiculopathy that was treated successfully with supportive measures. Transient lumbar radiculopathy is a common and acceptable event secondary to the use of epidural blood patch as a treatment for spontaneous intracranial hypotension headache.

  4. Migrating opiate pump: atypical [corrected] cause of meralgia paresthetica.

    PubMed

    Windsor, Robert E; Thampi, Samuel

    2003-10-01

    This is a case report of a 60 year-old female who presented with pain on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. The patient had a history of placement of a Drug Administration System (DAS, Opiate pump) in August, 1998 for chronic lumbar radiculopathy and a multiply operated on spine which she had suffered with since October, 1991. She presented with the subacute onset of focal pain on the anterior aspect of her right superior iliac crest region and dysesthesias on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. There was no history of recent trauma, worsening low back pain, or any other sensori-motor change. There was no history of anterior iliac crest bone graft for her spinal fusion and she had no anterolateral thigh symptoms related to her lumbar radiculopathy. Her neurological examination was significant only for decreased sensation on the anterolateral aspect of her right thigh. On abdominal examination the DAS pump was found at a low-lying location and was closely abutting the anterior and medial aspect of her superior iliac spine. She underwent revision of the DAS pump site with obliteration of the inferior and lateral aspect of the pump pocket. Her symptoms improved by 30% immediately and completely dissipated within two month following the procedure. This is the first reported case of lateral femoral cutaneous nerve neuropathy with DAS use. Recognition of focal compressive neuropathy by distal migration of a DAS is important, as they are potentially treatable with recognition. PMID:16871302

  5. Anterior cervical discectomy and fusion with titanium cages for simple or multilevel herniated discs and spur of the cervical spine: Report of 2 cases and experience in Bali

    PubMed Central

    Mahadewa Tjokorda, G. B.; Nyoman, Golden; Sri, Maliawan; Junichi, Mizuno

    2016-01-01

    This report presents two cases of cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy due to multiple cervical herniated discs and spur formation that dealt with anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) using different titanium interbody cages. The description of the clinical presentation, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) appearances and management strategy are discussed. Both cases showed chronic neck pain and radiating pain from the shoulder to the arm. They had a history of blurry vision, cluster head ache, weakness, and numbness on the shoulder for 2 years. MRI revealed multiple herniated discs between C4-7 and accompanied by the spur formation leading to the narrowness of the spinal canal and its foramina bilaterally. ACDF were performed and complete decompression of the spinal canal and its foramina were carried out. Twin M-cages (Ammtec Inc.-Japan) were placed in the first case at C5-7 levels and single cage of Smith Robinson (SR) was placed in the second case at C5-6 levels. There were no more blurry vision, cluster headache, weakness, and numbness, immediately after surgery. To our knowledge, this is the first reported cases of ACDF, using twin M-cages and single SR cage in Indonesia, with improvement immediately after surgery. Cervical spondylosis can present with cervicobrachialgia and radiculopathy and surgical treatment produces good functional outcome. PMID:27695567

  6. Outcome of instrumented lumbar fusion for low grade spondylolisthesis; Evaluation of interbody fusion with & without cages

    PubMed Central

    Fathy, Mostafa; Fahmy, Mohamed; Fakhri, Mazen; Aref, Khaled; Abdin, Khaled; Zidan, Ihab

    2010-01-01

    Object: The aim is to evalute the outcome of posterior lumbar interbody fusion with autologous bone graft versus titanium Cages, BAK system (Bagby – Kuslich, Spine Tech, Inc. Minneapolis, MN) for low grade spondyloisthesis (Grade1,11). Interbody cages have been developed to replace tricortical Interbody grafts in posterior lumbar interbody fusion (PLIF) procedures. The cages provide immediate post operative stability and facilitate bony union with cancellous bone packed in the cage itself. METHOD: We Evaluated 50 consecutive patients in whom surgery was performed between June 2000 to June 2003 in the Main Alexandria University Hospital at EGYPT. Twenty five patients were operated using autologous bone graft and 25 patients using the BAK cages. The neuro–radiologic al work up consisted of; plain X – ray lumbosacral spine including dynamic films preoperative and postoperative follow up; C.T lumbosacral spine and MRI lumbosacral spine. The surgery was performed at L4-5 level in 34 cases and at L5-S1 level in 16 cases. The median follow up was 15 months. RESULTS: Satisfactory fusion was obtained at all levels at a minimum one year follow – up. The fusion rate was 96% (24 patients) for the cage group and 80% (20 patients) for bone graft group however clinical improvement was 64% (16 patients) for those with bone graft group. CONCLUSION: A higher fusion rates and a better clinical outcome have been obtained by Instrumented PLIF with titanium cages that with bone graft. Inderbody fusion cages help to stabilize spainal segment primarily by distracting them as well as by allowing bone ingrowth and fusion. The procedure is safe and effective with 96% fusion rate and 76% overall Satisfactory rate. The use of cages help to distract the space between the vertebral bodies making the correction of the degree of spondylolisthesis easier. Long term follow up revealed better fusion rate and better realignment and less resorption with cages than with bone grafts. PMID

  7. Dosimetric Comparison of Bone Marrow-Sparing Intensity-Modulated Radiotherapy Versus Conventional Techniques for Treatment of Cervical Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mell, Loren K.; Tiryaki, Hanifi; Ahn, Kang-Hyun; Mundt, Arno J.; Roeske, John C.; Aydogan, Bulent

    2008-08-01

    Purpose: To compare bone marrow-sparing intensity-modulated pelvic radiotherapy (BMS-IMRT) with conventional (four-field box and anteroposterior-posteroanterior [AP-PA]) techniques in the treatment of cervical cancer. Methods and Materials: The data from 7 cervical cancer patients treated with concurrent chemotherapy and IMRT without BMS were analyzed and compared with data using four-field box and AP-PA techniques. All plans were normalized to cover the planning target volume with the 99% isodose line. The clinical target volume consisted of the pelvic and presacral lymph nodes, uterus and cervix, upper vagina, and parametrial tissue. Normal tissues included bowel, bladder, and pelvic bone marrow (PBM), which comprised the lumbosacral spine and ilium and the ischium, pubis, and proximal femora (lower pelvis bone marrow). Dose-volume histograms for the planning target volume and normal tissues were compared for BMS-IMRT vs. four-field box and AP-PA plans. Results: BMS-IMRT was superior to the four-field box technique in reducing the dose to the PBM, small bowel, rectum, and bladder. Compared with AP-PA plans, BMS-IMRT reduced the PBM volume receiving a dose >16.4 Gy. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of ilium, lower pelvis bone marrow, and bowel receiving a dose >27.7, >18.7, and >21.1 Gy, respectively, but increased dose below these thresholds compared with the AP-PA plans. BMS-IMRT reduced the volume of lumbosacral spine bone marrow, rectum, small bowel, and bladder at all dose levels in all 7 patients. Conclusion: BMS-IMRT reduced irradiation of PBM compared with the four-field box technique. Compared with the AP-PA technique, BMS-IMRT reduced lumbosacral spine bone marrow irradiation and reduced the volume of PBM irradiated to high doses. Therefore BMS-IMRT might reduce acute hematologic toxicity compared with conventional techniques.

  8. Forelimb EMG-based trigger to control an electronic spinal bridge to enable hindlimb stepping after a complete spinal cord lesion in rats

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background A complete spinal cord transection results in loss of all supraspinal motor control below the level of the injury. The neural circuitry in the lumbosacral spinal cord, however, can generate locomotor patterns in the hindlimbs of rats and cats with the aid of motor training, epidural stimulation and/or administration of monoaminergic agonists. We hypothesized that there are patterns of EMG signals from the forelimbs during quadrupedal locomotion that uniquely represent a signal for the “intent” to step with the hindlimbs. These observations led us to determine whether this type of “indirect” volitional control of stepping can be achieved after a complete spinal cord injury. The objective of this study was to develop an electronic bridge across the lesion of the spinal cord to facilitate hindlimb stepping after a complete mid-thoracic spinal cord injury in adult rats. Methods We developed an electronic spinal bridge that can detect specific patterns of EMG activity from the forelimb muscles to initiate electrical-enabling motor control (eEmc) of the lumbosacral spinal cord to enable quadrupedal stepping after a complete spinal cord transection in rats. A moving window detection algorithm was implemented in a small microprocessor to detect biceps brachii EMG activity bilaterally that then was used to initiate and terminate epidural stimulation in the lumbosacral spinal cord. We found dominant frequencies of 180–220 Hz in the EMG of the forelimb muscles during active periods, whereas these frequencies were between 0–10 Hz when the muscles were inactive. Results and conclusions Once the algorithm was validated to represent kinematically appropriate quadrupedal stepping, we observed that the algorithm could reliably detect, initiate, and facilitate stepping under different pharmacological conditions and at various treadmill speeds. PMID:22691460

  9. Association of morphine-induced analgesic tolerance with changes in gene expression of GluN1 and MOR1 in rat spinal cord and midbrain

    PubMed Central

    Ahmadi, Shamseddin; Miraki, Fatemeh; Rostamzadeh, Jalal

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): We aimed to examine association of gene expression of MOR1 and GluN1 at mRNA level in the lumbosacral cord and midbrain with morphine tolerance in male Wistar rats. Materials and Methods: Analgesic effects of morphine administrated intraperitoneally at doses of 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 mg/kg were examined using a hot plate test in rats with and without a history of 15 days morphine (10 mg/kg) treatment. Morphine-induced analgesic tolerance was also assessed on days 1, 5, 10 and 15 of chronic morphine injections. Two groups with history of 15 days injections of saline or morphine (10 mg/kg) were decapitated on day 15 and their lumbosacral cord and midbrain were dissected for evaluating MOR1 and GluN1 gene expression. Results: The results of the hot plate test showed that morphine (5 and 10 mg/kg) induced significant analgesia in naïve rats but its analgesic effects in rats receiving 15 days injections of morphine (10 mg/kg) was decreased, indicating tolerance to morphine analgesia. The results also showed that the GluN1 gene expression in tolerant rats was decreased by 71% in the lumbosacral cord but increased by 110 % in the midbrain compared to the control group. However, no significant change was observed for the MOR1 gene expression in both areas. Conclusion: It can be concluded that tolerance following administration of morphine (10 mg/kg) for 15 days is associated with site specific changes in the GluN1 gene expression in the spinal cord and midbrain but the MOR1 gene expression is not affected. PMID:27803778

  10. Dysplastic spondylolysis is caused by mutations in the diastrophic dysplasia sulfate transporter gene

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Tao; Yang, Liu; Cai, Wanshi; Guo, Sen; Yu, Ping; Li, Jinchen; Hu, Xueyu; Yan, Ming; Shao, Qianzhi; Jin, Yan; Sun, Zhong Sheng; Luo, Zhuo-Jing

    2015-01-01

    Spondylolysis is a fracture in part of the vertebra with a reported prevalence of about 3–6% in the general population. Genetic etiology of this disorder remains unknown. The present study was aimed at identifying genomic mutations in patients with dysplastic spondylolysis as well as the potential pathogenesis of the abnormalities. Whole-exome sequencing and functional analysis were performed for patients with spondylolysis. We identified a novel heterozygous mutation (c.2286A > T; p.D673V) in the sulfate transporter gene SLC26A2 in five affected subjects of a Chinese family. Two additional mutations (e.g., c.1922A > G; p.H641R and g.18654T > C in the intron 1) in the gene were identified by screening a cohort of 30 unrelated patients with the disease. In situ hybridization analysis showed that SLC26A2 is abundantly expressed in the lumbosacral spine of the mouse embryo at day 14.5. Sulfate uptake activities in CHO cells transfected with mutant SLC26A2 were dramatically reduced compared with the wild type, confirming the pathogenicity of the two missense mutations. Further analysis of the gene–disease network revealed a convergent pathogenic network for the development of lumbosacral spine. To our knowledge, our findings provide the first identification of autosomal dominant SLC26A2 mutations in patients with dysplastic spondylolysis, suggesting a new clinical entity in the pathogenesis of chondrodysplasia involving lumbosacral spine. The analysis of the gene–disease network may shed new light on the study of patients with dysplastic spondylolysis and spondylolisthesis as well as high-risk individuals who are asymptomatic. PMID:26077908

  11. Modulation of human visceral sensitivity by noninvasive magnetoelectrical neural stimulation in health and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Algladi, Tarig; Harris, Mary; Whorwell, Peter J; Paine, Peter; Hamdy, Shaheen

    2015-07-01

    Visceral pain is a particularly difficult symptom to manage in patients with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). Our aim was to examine whether noninvasive neurostimulation applied to the motor cortex or lumbosacral region can modulate human visceral sensation. Sixteen healthy adult volunteers and 10 patients with IBS were evaluated. Single-pulse lumbosacral magnetic stimulation (LSMS) or transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to assess spinal root and cortical excitability as well as the effect of neurostimulation on anorectal sensation and pain, which were provoked by a local electrical stimulus. Initially, healthy volunteers received 6 stimulation paradigms in a randomised order (3 repetitive LSMS [1 Hz, 10 Hz, and sham]) and 3 repetitive TMS (1 Hz, 10 Hz, and sham) to investigate the effects on neural function and visceral sensation over 1 hour. The most effective cortical and spinal interventions were then applied in patients with IBS. Only 1-Hz rLSMS altered healthy anal motor excitability, increasing spinal (58 ± 12.3 vs 38.5 ± 5.7 μV, P = 0.04) but not cortical responses. Both 1-Hz rLSMS and 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation increased healthy rectal pain thresholds for up to an hour after intervention (P < 0.05). When applied to patients with IBS, rectal pain thresholds were increased across all time points after both 1-Hz rLSMS and 10-Hz repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (P < 0.05) compared with sham. The application of magnetoelectric stimuli to the cortical and lumbosacral areas modulates visceral sensation in healthy subjects and patients with IBS. This proof-of-concept study provides supportive evidence for neurostimulation in managing functional gastrointestinal disorders.

  12. Clinical, Electrophysiological Findings in Adult Patients with Non-traumatic Plexopathies

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Kiljun; Kang, Min Jae; Ko, Moon Ju; Do, Jong Gul; Sunwoo, Hyuk; Kwon, Tae Gun; Hwang, Jung Min; Park, Yoonhong

    2011-01-01

    Objective To ascertain the etiology of non-traumatic plexopathy and clarify the clinical, electrophysiological characteristics according to its etiology. Method We performed a retrospective analysis of 63 non-traumatic plexopathy patients that had been diagnosed by nerve conduction studies (NCS) and needle electromyography (EMG). Clinical, electrophysiological, imaging findings were obtained from medical records. Results We identified 36 cases with brachial plexopathy (BP) and 27 cases with lumbosacral plexopathy (LSP). The causes of plexopathy were neoplastic (36.1%), thoracic outlet syndrome (TOS) (25.0%), radiation induced (16.7%), neuralgic amyotrophy (8.3%), perioperative (5.6%), unknown (8.3%) in BP, while neoplastic (59.3%), radiation induced (22.2%), neuralgic amyotrophy (7.4%), psoas muscle abscess (3.7%), and unknown (7.4%) in LSP. In neoplastic plexopathy, pain presented as the first symptom in most patients (82.8%), with the lower trunk of the brachial plexus predominantly involved. In radiation induced plexopathy (RIP), pain was a common initial symptom, but the proportion was smaller (50%), and predominant involvements of bilateral lumbosacral plexus and whole trunk of brachial or lumbosacral plexus were characteristic. Myokymic discharges were noted in 41.7% patients with RIP. Abnormal NCS finding in the medial antebrachial cutaneous nerve was the most sensitive to diagnose TOS. Neuralgic amyotrophy of the brachial plexus showed upper trunk involvement in all cases. Conclusion By integrating anatomic, pathophysiologic knowledge with detailed clinical assessment and the results of ancillary studies, physicians can make an accurate diagnosis and prognosis. PMID:22506209

  13. Morphological and postural sexual dimorphism of the lumbar spine facilitates greater lordosis in females.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Jeannie F; Sparrey, Carolyn J; Been, Ella; Kramer, Patricia A

    2016-07-01

    Previous work suggests females are evolutionarily adapted to have greater lumbar lordosis than males to aid in pregnancy load-bearing, but no consensus exists. To explore further sex-differences in the lumbar spine, and to understand contradictions in the literature, we conducted a cross-sectional retrospective study of sex-differences in lumbar spine morphology and sacral orientation. In addition, our sample includes data for separate standing and supine samples of males and females to examine potential sex-differences in postural loading on lumbosacral morphology. We measured sagittal lumbosacral morphology on 200 radiographs. Measurements include: lumbar angle (L1-S1), lumbar vertebral body and disc wedging angles, sacral slope and pelvic incidence. Lumbar angle, representative of lordotic curvature between L1 and S1, was 7.3° greater in females than males, when standing. There were no significant sex-differences in lumbar angle when supine. This difference in standing lumbar angle can be explained by greater lordotic wedging of the lumbar vertebrae (L1-L5) in females. Additionally, sacral slope was greater in females than males, when standing. There were no significant sex-differences in pelvic incidence. Our results support that females have greater lumbar lordosis than males when standing, but not when supine - suggesting a potentially greater range of motion in the female spine. Furthermore, sex-differences in the lumbar spine appear to be supported by postural differences in sacral-orientation and morphological differences in the vertebral body wedging. A better understanding of sex-differences in lumbosacral morphology may explain sex-differences in spinal conditions, as well as promote necessary sex-specific treatments. PMID:26916466

  14. Faun tail nevus and spinal dysraphism: cosmetic improvement with alexandrite laser epilation.

    PubMed

    Kaptanoglu, Asli Feride; Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2011-12-01

    Faun-tail presents as an abnormal lumbosacral hypertrischosis and may be associated with spinal dysrasphism. In addition to the problems due to spinal anomalies, patient's physico-social life may also be affected. Here, we report a case of 13 years old female patient with Faun-tail in association with sypinal dysraphism, in which cosmetic improvement was achieved with the help of Alexandrite laser. Alexandrite laser can be the method of choice for permanent hair removal method due to its safe, effective and easy to apply properties.

  15. Congenital Insensitivity to Pain: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Kinsi; Grewal, Raji P.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital insensitivity to pain (CIP) is a rare autosomal recessive genetic disease caused by mutations in the SCN9A gene. We report a patient with the clinical features consistent with CIP in whom we detected a novel homozygous G2755T mutation in exon 15 of this gene. Routine electrophysiological studies are typically normal in patients with CIP. In our patient, these studies were abnormal and could represent the consequences of secondary complications of cervical and lumbosacral spine disease and associated severe Charcot's joints. PMID:25309764

  16. Severe low back pain as the initial symptom of venous thrombosis of the inferior vena cava

    PubMed Central

    Tabatabai, Mohsen Abdul Wahab; Butros, Victor Mikhaeel; Mahdi, Shihab Ahmed; Ahmad, Mohammad Javad

    2014-01-01

    A 45-year-old previously well male truck driver presented to the emergency department with severe low back pain; lumbosacral X-ray was normal and he was given analgaesics and discharged. The following day, he presented to the emergency department again, his pain had not responded to the analgaesics; this time he also presented with massive bilateral swelling of lower limbs and left testicle that started 3 h earlier. The pain was severe, dull and interfered with the patient's ability to walk. An urgent workup revealed extensive thrombosis of the inferior vena cava. PMID:25155491

  17. Impending Discectomy in a Patient with Zoster Induced Sciatica; An Instructive Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Sharifi Dalooei, Seyed Mohammad Ata

    2015-01-01

    Herpes zoster is a rare cause of non-discogenic sciatica. A combination of case rarity and name similarity was nearly leading to an inopportune surgery in a 21 years old woman. The clinical presentation was completely similar to a cauda equina syndrome associated with urinary incontinence and bilateral leg involvement. Concurrently, lumbosacral imaging of another patient with exactly similar name in the picture archiving communications system (PACS) has shown a huge L5-1 disc herniation. Careful attention to all diverse causes of sciatica and identifying details of the images could prevent improper discectomy in our patient. PMID:27307958

  18. Primary Epidural Varicosis as a Rare Cause of Sciatica: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Omidi-Kashani, Farzad; Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Fathi, Mahdi

    2015-01-01

    Non-discogenic sciatica can be caused by any lesion along the course of the lumbosacral nerve roots and sciatic nerve. We aim to present a rare case of refractory sciatica in an otherwise healthy 25-year-old man. He complained of left leg pain without significant back pain. Extensor hallucis longus muscle was weak on the left side with limited straight leg rising. On magnetic resonance imaging, a space-occupying lesion resembling a sequestrated disc was noted that after surgical decompression, epidural varicosis was demonstrated. PMID:26538785

  19. [Neural therapy and accupuncture in gynaecology and obstetrics].

    PubMed

    Becke, H

    1982-01-01

    A brief characterisation is made of the working principles underlying neural therapy under local anaesthesia or accupuncture. Common approaches to therapy are offered by disorders of autonomous regulation, including inflammatory processes, and by purely functional disorders.--There are many applications in gynaecology and obstetrics. A brief statistical information on lumbosacral pain is quoted as an example. Optimum performance can be expected from them, when used in combination with proven therapeutic methods. They provide a low-cost approach to reducing both the consumption of antibiotics and other pharmaceuticals as well as time of morbidity. PMID:6289567

  20. Morphological properties of vestibulospinal neurons in primates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, Richard; Johanson, Curt

    2003-01-01

    The lateral and medial vestibulospinal tracts constitute the major descending pathways controlling extensor musculature of the body. We examined the axon morphology and synaptic input patterns and targets in the cervical spinal segments from these tract cells using intracellular recording and biocytin labeling in the squirrel monkey. Lumbosacral projecting cells represent a private, and mostly rapid, communication pathway between the dorsal Deiters' nucleus and the motor circuits controlling the lower limbs and tail. The cervical projecting cells provide both redundant and variable synaptic input to spinal cell groups, suggesting both general and specific control of the head and neck reflexes.

  1. Spinal tumors induced by neonatal administration of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea in Wistar rats.

    PubMed

    Naito, M; Naito, Y; Ito, A

    1981-02-01

    The carcinogenic effect of N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea (ENU) administered by single neonatal injection (40 mg/kg) was examined in wistar rats. By 2 months after ENU administration, 30% of the examined animals had spinal cord tumors. After months all rats had neurogenic tumors, and the incidence of spinal tumor was as high as 86%. Spinal cord tumors were observed at all levels of the white matter of the spinal cord without any predilection site, though spinal root tumors were located exclusively on lumbosacral plexuses. Most of the spinal cord tumors were oligodedrogliomas or glioependymomas, whereas all the spinal root tumors were anaplastic schwannomas.

  2. Polydactyly and Other Minor Stigmata Associated with 46,XX/47, XX,D+ Mosaicism

    PubMed Central

    Bowen, P.; Lee, Catherine S. N.; Shea, D. R.; Armstrong, H. B.

    1970-01-01

    Mosaicism for normal and D-trisomic cells was found in a female child whose presenting abnormalities at birth were polydactyly of the left hand and foot, hemangiomata on the forehead and lumbosacral region, slightly peculiar facies and unusual dermal patterns. Her course during the first 27 months of life was characterized by normal growth, absence of clinical evidence of congenital heart disease, moderate developmental retardation, tonguetie and toe-walking. Trisomic cells were more numerous than normal cells in skin cultures, whereas the reverse was true for peripheral leukocytes. ImagesFIG. 1FIG. 2 PMID:5410414

  3. Dural arteriovenous fistula coexisting with a lumbar lipomeningocele. Case report.

    PubMed

    Rajeev, Kariyattil; Panikar, Dilip

    2005-11-01

    The authors describe the case of a 44-year-old woman who presented with recent onset of progressive paraparesis and bladder involvement; she had an asymptomatic lumbosacral lipomatous swelling that was present since birth. Magnetic resonance imaging confirmed the diagnosis of a lipomeningocele. It also revealed intramedullary hyperintensity on T2-weighted images and serpiginous flow voids suggestive of a dural arteriovenous fistula (DAVF) at the same level; the lesion was confirmed by spinal angiography. Both lesions were surgically managed, and the patient subsequently experienced neurological improvement. The coexistence of a DAVF and a lipomeningocele at the same level is unusual and can lead to treatment failure if missed.

  4. Delayed diagnosis of brain tumor in a patient with flexor spasms and spastic foot drop

    PubMed Central

    Paliwal, V. K.; Malhotra, H. S.; Sharma, R.; Shukla, Rakesh

    2008-01-01

    Flexor spasms are involuntary muscle contractions comprising dorsiflexion at the ankle and flexion at the knee and the hip, occurring as a result of nociceptive spinal release reflex. The presence of flexor spasms generally suggests a lesion in the spinal cord. Foot drop is usually seen with lesions of lumbosacral roots, peripheral nerves or muscles. We hereby present a patient with a rare combination of spastic foot drop and flexor spasms due to a brain tumor. The possible underlying pathophysiological mechanisms resulting in flexor spasms due to a cerebral lesion are briefly discussed. PMID:19893685

  5. Faun Tail Nevus and Spinal Dysraphism: Cosmetic Improvement with Alexandrite Laser Epilation

    PubMed Central

    Kaptanoglu, Erkan

    2011-01-01

    Faun-tail presents as an abnormal lumbosacral hypertrischosis and may be associated with spinal dysrasphism. In addition to the problems due to spinal anomalies, patient's physico-social life may also be affected. Here, we report a case of 13 years old female patient with Faun-tail in association with sypinal dysraphism, in which cosmetic improvement was achieved with the help of Alexandrite laser. Alexandrite laser can be the method of choice for permanent hair removal method due to its safe, effective and easy to apply properties. PMID:22346261

  6. Blepharo-cheilo-dontic (BCD) syndrome: expanding the phenotype, case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Ababneh, Farouq K; Al-Swaid, Abdulrahman; Elhag, Ahmed; Youssef, Talaat; Alsaif, Saif

    2014-06-01

    The combination of lagophthalmia, euryblepharon, ectropion of lower eyelids, distichiasis, bilateral cleft lip and palate, and oligodontia comprises the blepharo-cheilo-dontic (BCD) syndrome. This combination has been found sporadically or with positive family history and inherited as an autosomal dominant condition with variable expression. We described a Saudi boy with the cardinal signs consistent with the BCD syndrome. In addition to the common components of BCD syndrome that involve eyelids, lip, and teeth abnormalities, this patient is the third reported BCD case with imperforate anus, the second with thyroid agenesis, and the first with lumbosacral meningomyelocele. PMID:24719364

  7. Spina bifida cystica

    PubMed Central

    James, C. C. Michael

    1971-01-01

    There is an urgent need for criteria upon which to base the decision to close a myelomeningocoele soon after birth. Orthopaedic experience advises that early closure of the spinal lesion should not be done unless there is active flexion power at both hips. This criterion is offered with the knowledge that there may occasionally be other exceptional factors to contradict it, but it is based on experience of 96 personal cases aged between 18 months and 7 years. These cases are analysed and discussed. A further possible criterion for not closing the spinal lesion early is the presence of a gross lumbosacral kyphosis. PMID:4945864

  8. Application of osteopathic manipulative technique in the treatment of back pain during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Wolski, Hubert; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Lipiec, Joanna; Marszałek, Sławomir; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław M; Klejewski, Andrzej; Lisiński, Przemyslaw

    2015-03-01

    Changes in body posture, musculoskeletal disorders and somatic dysfunctions are frequently observed during pregnancy especially ligament, joint and myofascial impairment. The aim of the paper is to present the use of osteopathic manipulative treatment (OMT) for back and pelvic pain in pregnancy on the basis of a review of the available literature. MEDLINE and Cochrane Library were searched in January 2014 for relevant reports, randomized controlled trials, clinical and case studies of OMT use in pregnant women. Each eligible source was verified and analyzed by two independent reviewers. OMT procedures appear to be effective and safe for pelvic and spinal pain management in the lumbosacral area in pregnant women.

  9. Presence of accessory penis, colonic duplication and several other congenital anomalies in a child: a very rare association.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Sayan; Mondal, Prabodh Chandra; Pandey, Shashi Bhushan; Achar, Arun

    2014-10-01

    An accessory penis is a very rare anomaly. Only five cases have been reported thus far to our knowledge. We present the case of a child aged 2 years and 10 months who had a penis-like structure (containing phallus and glans) attached to the right buttock. Associated anomalies were a non-communicating type of colonic duplication, a paramedian stenosed anal opening, a horse-shoe kidney, posterior urethral valves, scoliosis of the lumbo-sacral spine, polydactyly and equino-varus deformity of the right foot. As far as we can tell, this is the first report of an accessory penis associated with colonic duplication and other congenital anomalies.

  10. Spontaneous cutaneous mast cell tumor with lymph node metastasis in a Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonii).

    PubMed

    He, Xi Jun; Uchida, Kazuyuki; Tochitani, Tomoaki; Uetsuka, Koji; Miwa, Yasutsugu; Nakayama, Hiroyuki

    2009-01-01

    A 4-year-old female Richardson's ground squirrel (Spermophilus richardsonii) presented with multicentric nodules arising from the skin of the middle of the tail and lumbosacral regions. Histologically, the nodules were composed of a proliferation of spindloid to pleomorphic cells that sometimes formed sheets and fascicular to storiform patterns. Diffuse infiltration of eosinophils was also noted. The results of immunohistochemistry indicated positive labeling for vimentin, mast cell tryptase, c-kit, and Ki-67. Toluidine blue stain revealed fine, metachromatic, cytoplasmic granules. The histologic diagnosis was mast cell tumor. The neoplasm recurred and metastasized to the right lumbar lymph node 1 month later.

  11. Open Surgery for Giant Bilateral Internal Iliac Artery Aneurysms with Compression of Neighboring Abdominal Structures: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Hideyuki; Katahira, Seiichiro; Hoshino, Takeshi; Hanzawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-01-01

    We describe a patient with successfully treated giant bilateral internal iliac artery aneurysms that were associated with acute renal failure secondary to bilateral hydronephrosis, lumbosacral plexopathy, and ileus. After hemodialysis for 1 month, the patient underwent graft replacement of the abdominal aorta and iliac arteries, including complete obliteration of the internal iliac artery branches, reconstruction of the inferior mesenteric artery, and ureterolysis. Weaning from hemodialysis was achieved and postoperative renal function improved. Although the patient had serious preoperative co-morbidities, emergency traditional open surgery should be the gold standard for securely releasing compression of the neighboring organs instead of endovascular treatment. PMID:26421081

  12. [The epidemiology of musculoskeletal changes due to biomechanical overload of the spine in the manual lifting of patients].

    PubMed

    Bordini, L; De Vito, G; Molteni, G; Boccardi, S

    1999-01-01

    The painful lumbosacral symptoms associated with manual lifting by nursing staff constitutes an increasingly important problem in Occupational Health. This category of workers is in fact particularly exposed to risk situations involving the lumbar region of the spine, due especially to the extreme variability of work on the shift, the nature of what is lifted and not always sufficient knowledge and proper performance of the movements. On the basis of a review of a series of studies made on this topic, it was possible to assess the incidence and prevalence of low back pain in selected populations and identify the postural risk to which nursing staff are exposed at work, stressing also the importance of a correct knowledge of manual lifting techniques, frequency and mode of performing them, and the psychological aspects (perception of the intensity of tasks and osteoarticular strain). It was also observed that the data on painful lumbosacral symptoms were underestimated due to the type of epidemiological investigations carried out (mostly cross-sectional) and that comparison of the data proposed was often difficult due to the different criteria of evaluation used to classify the painful symptoms and also to the various epidemiological parameters used (incidence, cumulative incidence, prevalence).

  13. Fast running restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column in mammals

    PubMed Central

    Galis, Frietson; Carrier, David R.; van Alphen, Joris; van der Mije, Steven D.; Van Dooren, Tom J. M.; Metz, Johan A. J.; ten Broek, Clara M. A.

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian vertebral column is highly variable, reflecting adaptations to a wide range of lifestyles, from burrowing in moles to flying in bats. However, in many taxa, the number of trunk vertebrae is surprisingly constant. We argue that this constancy results from strong selection against initial changes of these numbers in fast running and agile mammals, whereas such selection is weak in slower-running, sturdier mammals. The rationale is that changes of the number of trunk vertebrae require homeotic transformations from trunk into sacral vertebrae, or vice versa, and mutations toward such transformations generally produce transitional lumbosacral vertebrae that are incompletely fused to the sacrum. We hypothesize that such incomplete homeotic transformations impair flexibility of the lumbosacral joint and thereby threaten survival in species that depend on axial mobility for speed and agility. Such transformations will only marginally affect performance in slow, sturdy species, so that sufficient individuals with transitional vertebrae survive to allow eventual evolutionary changes of trunk vertebral numbers. We present data on fast and slow carnivores and artiodactyls and on slow afrotherians and monotremes that strongly support this hypothesis. The conclusion is that the selective constraints on the count of trunk vertebrae stem from a combination of developmental and biomechanical constraints. PMID:25024205

  14. Utilization of Facet Joint and Sacroiliac Joint Interventions in Medicare Population from 2000 to 2014: Explosive Growth Continues!

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Hirsch, Joshua A; Pampati, Vidyasagar; Boswell, Mark V

    2016-10-01

    Increasing utilization of interventional techniques in managing chronic spinal pain, specifically facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections, is a major concern of healthcare policy makers. We analyzed the patterns of utilization of facet and sacroiliac joint interventions in managing chronic spinal pain. The results showed significant increase of facet joint interventions and sacroiliac joint injections from 2000 to 2014 in Medicare FFS service beneficiaries. Overall, the Medicare population increased 35 %, whereas facet joint and sacroiliac joint interventions increased 313.3 % per 100,000 Medicare population with an annual increase of 10.7 %. While the increases were uniform from 2000 to 2014, there were some decreases noted for facet joint interventions in 2007, 2010, and 2013, whereas for sacroiliac joint injections, the decreases were noted in 2007 and 2013. The increases were for cervical and thoracic facet neurolysis at 911.5 % compared to lumbosacral facet neurolysis of 567.8 %, 362.9 % of cervical and thoracic facet joint blocks, 316.9 % of sacroiliac joints injections, and finally 227.3 % of lumbosacral facet joint blocks. PMID:27646014

  15. Utility of the omentum in sacral reconstruction following total sacrectomy due to recurrent and irradiated giant cell tumour of the spine.

    PubMed

    Unal, Cigdem; Eren, Guler Gamze; Isil, Eda; Alponat, Ahmet; Sarlak, Ahmet

    2012-01-01

    Reconstruction of the lumbosacral region after surgical excision of irradiated and recurrent spinal giant cell tumours remains a challenging problem. In this case report, we describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap in reconstruction of an irradiated and infected wide sacral defect of a 19-year-old male patient. The patient had radiotherapy and subsequent wide surgical resection after recurrence of the tumour. A myocutaneous flap from the gluteal area had failed previously. Local flap options could not be used because of the recent radiotherapy to the gluteal area. Since the patient had a laparotomy for tumour resection and a colostomy, abdominal muscles were not considered reliable for reconstructive procedures. A pedicled omentum flap was chosen as a reconstructive option because of its rich blood supply, large surface area, and angiogenic capacity. This report aims to describe the use of the pedicled omentum flap for reconstruction of the lumbosacral area following surgical resection of a spinal tumour, when gluteal and abdominal flap options for reconstruction are jeopardised.

  16. Fast running restricts evolutionary change of the vertebral column in mammals.

    PubMed

    Galis, Frietson; Carrier, David R; van Alphen, Joris; van der Mije, Steven D; Van Dooren, Tom J M; Metz, Johan A J; ten Broek, Clara M A

    2014-08-01

    The mammalian vertebral column is highly variable, reflecting adaptations to a wide range of lifestyles, from burrowing in moles to flying in bats. However, in many taxa, the number of trunk vertebrae is surprisingly constant. We argue that this constancy results from strong selection against initial changes of these numbers in fast running and agile mammals, whereas such selection is weak in slower-running, sturdier mammals. The rationale is that changes of the number of trunk vertebrae require homeotic transformations from trunk into sacral vertebrae, or vice versa, and mutations toward such transformations generally produce transitional lumbosacral vertebrae that are incompletely fused to the sacrum. We hypothesize that such incomplete homeotic transformations impair flexibility of the lumbosacral joint and thereby threaten survival in species that depend on axial mobility for speed and agility. Such transformations will only marginally affect performance in slow, sturdy species, so that sufficient individuals with transitional vertebrae survive to allow eventual evolutionary changes of trunk vertebral numbers. We present data on fast and slow carnivores and artiodactyls and on slow afrotherians and monotremes that strongly support this hypothesis. The conclusion is that the selective constraints on the count of trunk vertebrae stem from a combination of developmental and biomechanical constraints. PMID:25024205

  17. Aberrant reflexes and function of the pelvic organs following spinal cord injury in man.

    PubMed

    Craggs, Michael D; Balasubramaniam, Amirthe Vernie; Chung, Eric A L; Emmanuel, Anton V

    2006-06-30

    Spinal cord injuries can be devastating on quality of life and lost opportunities due to their impact on bladder, bowel and sexual functions. Supra-sacral spinal lesions can cause incontinence by interrupting those pathways, which normally coordinate the bladder, bowel and sphincters. From a scientific perspective, neural control of the pelvic organs is one of the most intriguing in the body, involving both somatic and autonomic pathways participating in an exquisitely fine integration of lumbo-sacral reflexes. This review details the interactions of somatic and autonomic lumbo-sacral pathways responsible for coordinating the bladder and sphincters, the nature of their aberration post-injury and those aspects of neural control of the pelvic organs that are amenable to neurophysiological examination in man. It will focus in greater detail on how measurement of pelvic floor and sphincter reflexes can be used to assess the modulatory effects of sacral autonomic pathways on sacral somatic reflexes and vice versa including the so called "guarding reflex" and vesical inhibitory reflexes. The effects of volitional modulation of these reflexes will be discussed in relation to people with both complete and incomplete lesions. Finally the possible utility of such neurophysiological measures for complementing the established neurological classification and the assessment of somatic sensory-motor impairment in spinal cord injury will be discussed.

  18. Perineal leiomyoma in a postmenopausal woman: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sui, Yan-Xia; Sun, Chao; Lv, Shu-Lan; Batchu, Nasra; Zou, Jun-Kai; Du, Jiang; Song, Qing; Li, Qi-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Leiomyomas in the female reproductive system are commonly located in the uterus and typically regress following the menopause. Vulval leiomyomas are rare, and to the best of our knowledge, perineal leiomyomas in postmenopausal women have not been previously reported in the literature. The present case describes a 60-year-old Chinese woman who experienced perineal tenderness and lumbosacral radiating pain. The patient, who went through the menopause 12 years previously, had presented with a painful perineal mass for 1 year, which was subsequently diagnosed as a postmenopausal perineal leiomyoma. The mass was locally resected, and histopathological examination of the lesion resulted in a diagnosis of benign epithelioid leiomyoma. Immunohistochemical staining identified that the leiomyoma was positive for estrogen receptor and negative for progesterone receptor expression. The patient was followed up for 1 year and did not experience any pain or recurrence. The symptoms of local and lumbosacral radiating pain are extremely rare and may be induced by peripheral nerve stimulation. The etiology of postmenopausal perineal leiomyoma may be associated with infection, dietary, stress and environmental factors, and the role of estrogen cannot be overemphasized in cases of postmenopausal leiomyoma. PMID:27602136

  19. The Gastrin-Releasing Peptide Receptor (GRPR) in the Spinal Cord as a Novel Pharmacological Target

    PubMed Central

    Takanami, Keiko; Sakamoto, Hirotaka

    2014-01-01

    Gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP) is a mammalian neuropeptide that acts through the G protein-coupled receptor, GRP receptor (GRPR). Increasing evidence indicates that GRPR-mediated signaling in the central nervous system plays an important role in many physiological processes in mammals. Additionally, we have recently reported that the GRP system within the lumbosacral spinal cord not only controls erection but also triggers ejaculation in male rats. This system of GRP neurons is sexually dimorphic, being prominent in male rats but vestigial or absent in females. It is suggested that the sexually dimorphic GRP/GRPR system in the lumbosacral spinal cord plays a critical role in the regulation of male sexual function. In parallel, it has been reported that the somatosensory GRP/GRPR system in the spinal cord contributes to the regulation of itch specific transmission independently of the pain transmission. Interestingly, these two distinct functions in the same spinal region are both regulated by the neuropeptide, GRP. In this report, we review findings on recently identified GRP/GRPR systems in the spinal cord. These GRP/GRPR systems in the spinal cord provide new insights into pharmacological treatments for psychogenic erectile dysfunction as well as for chronic pruritus. PMID:25426011

  20. Spinal instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Spivak, J M; Balderston, R A

    1994-03-01

    The past decade has seen a dramatic increase in the availability of spinal instrumentation devices, enabling surgeons to treat a variety of spinal disorders with improved results and lower morbidity. In each anatomic region new fixation systems exist. Improvement in fusion rates with supplemental plate fixation following anterior cervical diskectomies and reconstructions has been demonstrated; these devices can now be applied more safely than ever before. Posterior occipitocervical plating to the C-2 pedicle and C3-6 lateral masses can provide stable fixation despite incompetent posterior arch bony structures. Newer, more rigid anterior thoracolumbar instrumentation allows for correction of thoracolumbar and lumbar scoliosis along fewer levels and with better maintenance of lordosis and is also useful following anterior decompression for tumor and trauma. Segmental hook fixation of the posterior thoracolumbar spine has allowed for improved correction of deformity without increased morbidity or the need for postoperative bracing in many cases. Finally, the use of transpedicular screw fixation of the lumbosacral spine allows for excellent segmental fixation without intact posterior elements, including facet joints, and has significantly improved the fusion rate in lumbosacral fusions. PMID:8024965

  1. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury.

  2. Misdiagnosis of Sacral Stress Fracture: An Underestimated Cause of Low Back Pain in Pregnancy?

    PubMed Central

    Perdomo, Ambar Deschamps; Tomé-Bermejo, Félix; Piñera, Angel R.; Alvarez, Luis

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Female, 28 Final Diagnosis: Sacral stress fracture Symptoms: Lumbosacral pain during pregnancy Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Activity modification • conservative treatment Specialty: Orthopedics and Traumatology Objective: Challenging differential diagnosis Background: Sacral stress fracture during pregnancy is an uncommon condition with unclear pathophysiology, presenting with non-specific symptoms and clinical findings. To date, few cases have been published in the literature describing the occurrence of sacral stress fracture during pregnancy. Case Report: We report a 28-year-old primigravid patient who developed lumbosacral pain at the end of the second trimester. Symptoms were overlooked throughout pregnancy and the postpartum period, resulting in the development of secondary chronic gait and balance problems. Conclusions: Stress fracture of the sacrum should be included in the differential diagnosis of low back and sacral pain during pregnancy. Its prevalence is probably underestimated because of the lack of specificity of the symptoms. Plain radiographs are not appropriate due to radiation exclusion; magnetic resonance is the only method that can be applied safely. There is limited information on natural history but many patients are expected to have a benign course. However, misdiagnosis may lead to prolonged morbidity and the development of secondary gait abnormalities. Stress fracture of the sacrum should be included in the differential diagnosis of low back and sacral pain during pregnancy. A high index of suspicion is necessary to establish an early diagnosis and appropriate treatment. PMID:25656418

  3. Maternal Care Effects on the Development of a Sexually Dimorphic Motor System: The Role of Spinal Oxytocin

    PubMed Central

    Lenz, Kathryn M.; Sengelaub, Dale R.

    2010-01-01

    Maternal licking in rats affects the development of the spinal nucleus of the bulbocavernosus (SNB), a sexually dimorphic motor nucleus that controls penile reflexes involved with copulation. Reduced maternal licking results in decreased motoneuron number, size, and dendritic length in the adult SNB, as well as deficits in adult male copulatory behavior. Our previous findings that licking-like tactile stimulation influences SNB dendritic development and upregulates Fos expression in the lumbosacral spinal cord suggest that afferent signaling is changed by differences in maternal stimulation. Oxytocin afferents from the hypothalamus are a possible candidate, given previous research that has shown oxytocin is released following sensory stimulation, oxytocin modulates excitability in the spinal cord, and is a pro-erectile modulator of male sex behavior. In this experiment, we used immunofluorescence and immediate early gene analysis to assess whether licking-like tactile stimulation of the perineum activated parvocellular oxytocinergic neurons in the hypothalamus in neonates. We also used enzyme immunoassay to determine whether this same stroking stimulation produced an increase in spinal oxytocin levels. We found that stroking increased Fos immunolabeling in small oxytocin-positive cells in the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus, in comparison to unstroked or handled control pups. In addition, sixty seconds of licking-like perineal stimulation produced a transient 89% increase in oxytocin levels in the lumbosacral spinal cord. Together, these results suggest that oxytocin afferent activity may contribute to the effects of early maternal care on the masculinization of the SNB and resultant male copulatory behavior. PMID:20688065

  4. Should routine MRI of the lumbar spine be required prior to lumbar epidural steroid injection for sciatica pain?

    PubMed Central

    Ghaly, Ramis F.; Lissounov, Alexei; Candido, Kenneth D.; Knezevic, Nebojsa Nick

    2015-01-01

    Background: We describe three patients who received lumbar epidural steroid injections (LESI) for lumbosacral radicular pain that resulted in worsening of their symptoms. The procedures were performed following a review of remote diagnostic imaging studies. These cases demonstrate the lack of consensus in pain management domains for how to approach the workup and treatment of persistent/chronic low back pain, with a noted fragmentation in pain management strategies and applied therapies. Case Description: We present three patients; two female patients (37 and 38 years old) undergoing LESI for remotely diagnosed disc herniations, and one 61-year-old male receiving an LESI for a presumed, unverified lumbar intervertebral disc disorder. Following a worsening of symptoms after LESI, neurosurgical consultations ultimately determined the presence of, respectively, an epidural hematoma, a neurilemoma, and a lung cancer metastasis to the sacrum as the source of symptoms, instead of being due to the intervertebral disc pathology. Conclusions: We would like to emphasize several principles in the diagnosis and use of imaging of the lumbosacral region prior to undertaking invasive neuraxial procedures. PMID:25883840

  5. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury. PMID:27651782

  6. [Low back pain in pregnant women].

    PubMed

    Majchrzycki, Marian; Mrozikiewicz, Przemysław M; Kocur, Piotr; Bartkowiak-Wieczorek, Joanna; Hoffmann, Marcin; Stryła, Wanda; Seremak-Mrozikiewicz, Agnieszka; Grześkowiak, Edmund

    2010-11-01

    Pain of lumbosacral segment of the vertebral column and the pelvis concerns about 45% of all pregnant women. The change of the body posture during pregnancy is the result of gravity centre relocation, which affects the musculosceletal system. Development of the joint, ligament and myofascial dysfunctions, as well as the pain in the lumbosacral segment and the pelvis, are the most common reasons of spine pain. The aim of this review is to present the current state of knowledge about lumbar spine pain in pregnant women with special focus on the pain connected with muscular, joint and ligament disorders. Pregnancy is a serious burden for the female osteo-skeletal system. Lumbar pain with different location and intensification is the negative consequence of the position changes during pregnancy. Pharmacotherapy could be useful only in cases of intensive low back pain, with possible application of small spectrum of drugs that are safe during pregnancy. Physical therapy including manual therapy exercises, massage and techniques of local anesthesia are alternative methods in case of low back pain in pregnant women.

  7. [Range of neuromuscular involvement in 47 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Ghika-Schmid, F; Kuntzer, T; Chave, J P; Miklossy, J; Regli, F

    1994-05-14

    Over a 30 month period, 47 out of 749 patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus had various neuromuscular symptoms. Based on clinical and electrophysiological data, 47% had distal symmetric polyneuropathy, 11% chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP), 8.5% toxic neuropathy related to 2-3-dideoxyinosine (DDI), 8.5% cranial neuropathy, 8.5% mononeuropathy multiplex or isolated focal neuropathy, 8.5% progressive lumbosacral polyradiculopathy, and 8.5% myopathy. Half of the patients exhibited previous or concomitant signs of central nervous system involvement and 18 patients died during the study period. CIDP and cranial neuropathies usually appeared early in the course of the disease and consequently showed neurological improvement. Nerve conduction studies of DDI related toxic neuropathies showed distal axono-myelinic sensitivo-motor neuropathy, differing from CIDP by the absence of a conduction block. Distal symmetric polyneuropathies, frequent in the advanced systemic illness, do not systematically require an extended workup, but more unusual peripheral neuropathies which might be treatable necessitate further investigations (electromyography, radiology, serological blood tests; protein chemistry and routine workup of the cerebrospinal fluid). For example, progressive lumbosacral polyradiculopathies responded to early treatment, with a better outcome in one case of herpetic origin than in another case due to cytomegalovirus infection. Our observations suggest that myopathies in HIV infected patients should first be tackled by temporary interruption of virostatic medication, followed by muscle biopsy if the symptoms persist. PMID:8209201

  8. Fatty replacement of lower paraspinal muscles: normal and neuromuscular disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Hader, H.; Gadoth, N.; Heifetz, H.

    1983-11-01

    The physiologic replacement of the lower paraspinal muscles by fat was evaluated in 157 patients undergoing computed tomography for reasons unrelated to abnormalities of the locomotor system. Five patients with neuromuscular disorders were similarly evaluated. The changes were graded according to severity at three spinal levels: lower thoracic-upper lumbar, midlumbar, and lumbosacral. The results were analyzed in relation to age and gender. It was found that fatty replacement of paraspinal muscles is a normal age-progressive phenomenon most prominent in females. It progresses down the spine, being most advanced in the lumbosacral region. The severest changes in the five patients with neuromuscular disorders (three with poliomyelitis and two with progressive muscular dystrophy) consisted of complete muscle group replacement by fat. In postpoliomyelitis atrophy, the distribution was typically asymmetric and sometimes lacked clinical correlation. In muscular dystrophy, fatty replacement was symmetric, showing relative sparing of the psoas and multifidus muscles. In patients with neuromuscular diseases, computed tomography of muscles may be helpful in planning a better rehabilitation regimen.

  9. Prenatal diagnosis and fetopathological investigation of dorsolumbosacral agenesis.

    PubMed

    Nagy, Gyula Richárd; Csapó, Zsolt; Barakonyi, Emese; Nagy, Bálint; Rigó, János

    2009-01-01

    Sacral and lumbosacral spine agenesis, as characteristic signs of a rare congenital malformation--caudal regression syndrome--has been well described. However, dorsolumbosacral agenesis involving the lower thoracic, lumbar, and sacral vertebrae has rarely been reported, and prenatal diagnosis of this severe form has not been published yet. A 37-year-old woman (gravida 2, para 0) who had diabetes mellitus asked for termination of her pregnancy, because second-trimester ultrasound screening showed dorsolumbosacral agenesis of the fetus. Fetopathological examination confirmed the prenatal diagnosis and showed that the lower seven thoracic and all lumbosacral segments were absent. The noticed small "bony" structure in the lumbar region supported the idea that caudal regression syndrome can be regarded as a "multisegmental" spinal dysgenesis that involves the caudal part of the spine. Reliable prenatal diagnosis of dorsolumbosacral agenesis is possible by second-trimester ultrasound. The prenatal sonologist should always try to look for and assess abnormalities during examinations. Emphasis should be placed especially on those types that have a higher risk of being present in the fetus because of the known risk factors in the particular pregnancy. Fetopathological examination emphasized the suggestion that segmental spinal dysgenesis and caudal regression syndrome may represent two faces of a single spectrum of segmental malformations of the spine and spinal cord. PMID:19185430

  10. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation.

    PubMed

    Shen, Xiao-Yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury.

  11. Rebuilding motor function of the spinal cord based on functional electrical stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Xiao-yan; Du, Wei; Huang, Wei; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Rebuilding the damaged motor function caused by spinal cord injury is one of the most serious challenges in clinical neuroscience. The function of the neural pathway under the damaged sites can be rebuilt using functional electrical stimulation technology. In this study, the locations of motor function sites in the lumbosacral spinal cord were determined with functional electrical stimulation technology. A three-dimensional map of the lumbosacral spinal cord comprising the relationship between the motor function sites and the corresponding muscle was drawn. Based on the individual experimental parameters and normalized coordinates of the motor function sites, the motor function sites that control a certain muscle were calculated. Phasing pulse sequences were delivered to the determined motor function sites in the spinal cord and hip extension, hip flexion, ankle plantarflexion, and ankle dorsiflexion movements were successfully achieved. The results show that the map of the spinal cord motor function sites was valid. This map can provide guidance for the selection of electrical stimulation sites during the rebuilding of motor function after spinal cord injury. PMID:27651782

  12. ACCURACY OF RADIOGRAPHIC DETECTION OF THE CRANIAL MARGIN OF THE DORSAL LAMINA OF THE CANINE SACRUM.

    PubMed

    Blume, Lauren M; Worth, Andrew J; Cohen, Eli B; Bridges, Janis P; Hartman, Angela C

    2015-01-01

    An elongated sacral lamina has been described as one of the contributing factors for dogs with cauda equina syndrome due to degenerative lumbosacral stenosis (DLSS); however, published evidence is lacking on the accuracy of radiographic screening for the presence of this lesion. Objectives of this prospective, cross-sectional cadaver study were to describe the accuracy and repeatability of detection of the cranial sacral lamina margin on plain lateral radiographs of the lumbosacral junction in dogs. Twenty-five medium and large breed canine cadavers were radiographed before and after placement of a radiopaque hook in the cranial margin of the sacral lamina. Three independent evaluators placed digital markers at the perceived margin on preinterventional radiographs. The distance from perceived location to the true location on postinterventional radiographs was recorded for each dog and observer. A discordance threshold (distance between perceived and actual margin) of 1.5 mm was subjectively defined as clinically relevant. The three evaluators demonstrated good repeatability, although the accuracy for margin detection was only fair (mean discordance 1.7 mm). Evaluators demonstrated greater accuracy in identifying the landmark in juveniles (1.4 mm) vs. adults (1.8 mm; P < 0.01). Results of this study indicated that observer repeatability is good and accuracy is fair for correctly identifying the radiographic cranial margin of the sacral lamina in dogs. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting elongation of the sacral lamina in radiographs of dogs with suspected DLSS, especially adults. PMID:26304022

  13. [Spinal circuit motor plasticity mechanisms in long-term sports activity adaptation].

    PubMed

    Andriianova, E Iu; Lanskaia, O V

    2014-01-01

    Man interacts with the environment through motor activities getting considerable sensor information from numerous internal and external sources. There is significant evidence of I-a afferents sensor information being critical in initiating of functional and morphological transformations in the periods of both development and maturation of cortex and spinal cord. Ia fibers ability to transmit sensor information, generated by muscle and motor activities, causes plastic changes in the central nervous system, enabling man to acquire new skills and movements and develop them. Therefore, understanding of activity-dependent neural plasticity mechanisms is of great importance in developing methods to perfect motor function, for example, in doing sports. This article presents the results of investigation of activity-dependent changes in spinal cord circuits in athletes. There are new data of cervical and lumbosacral motor spinal system plasticity as a result of various longterm sports activities. It is shown, in particular, that, in comparison with non-athletes, in the spinal cord of ski-racers and basketball-players the representation area of upper and lower extremities muscles alpha-motorneurons with high reflex excitability is extended. Moreover,.the direction of the extension was specified by the upper segments activity. Besides, the volume of some revealed signs of cervical and lumbosacral spinal cord plasticity in the ski-racers, involved into moderate cyclic activity, was higher than that in the basketball-players, whose movements are more various.

  14. Diagnosis and treatment of low back pain: a joint clinical practice guideline from the American College of Physicians and the American Pain Society.

    PubMed

    Chou, Roger; Qaseem, Amir; Snow, Vincenza; Casey, Donald; Cross, J Thomas; Shekelle, Paul; Owens, Douglas K

    2007-10-01

    RECOMMENDATION 1: Clinicians should conduct a focused history and physical examination to help place patients with low back pain into 1 of 3 broad categories: nonspecific low back pain, back pain potentially associated with radiculopathy or spinal stenosis, or back pain potentially associated with another specific spinal cause. The history should include assessment of psychosocial risk factors, which predict risk for chronic disabling back pain (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 2: Clinicians should not routinely obtain imaging or other diagnostic tests in patients with nonspecific low back pain (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 3: Clinicians should perform diagnostic imaging and testing for patients with low back pain when severe or progressive neurologic deficits are present or when serious underlying conditions are suspected on the basis of history and physical examination (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 4: Clinicians should evaluate patients with persistent low back pain and signs or symptoms of radiculopathy or spinal stenosis with magnetic resonance imaging (preferred) or computed tomography only if they are potential candidates for surgery or epidural steroid injection (for suspected radiculopathy) (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 5: Clinicians should provide patients with evidence-based information on low back pain with regard to their expected course, advise patients to remain active, and provide information about effective self-care options (strong recommendation, moderate-quality evidence). RECOMMENDATION 6: For patients with low back pain, clinicians should consider the use of medications with proven benefits in conjunction with back care information and self-care. Clinicians should assess severity of baseline pain and functional deficits, potential benefits, risks, and relative lack of long-term efficacy and safety data

  15. Cervical total disc replacement using a novel compressible prosthesis: Results from a prospective Food and Drug Administration–regulated feasibility study with 24-month follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Lauryssen, Carl; Coric, Domagoj; Dimmig, Thomas; Musante, David; Ohnmeiss, Donna D.; Stubbs, Harrison A.

    2012-01-01

    Background Anterior cervical fusion, an established procedure to treat cervical radiculopathy, sacrifices the natural function of the disc, while placing increased stresses on adjacent spinal levels. In contrast, the cervical total disc replacement (cTDR) maintains motion and decreases adjacent-level stresses. The purpose of this study was to investigate the safety and effectiveness of a next-generation cTDR device in patients with symptomatic cervical radiculopathy. Methods This is a multicenter Food and Drug Administration–regulated feasibility study to evaluate safety and effectiveness of the M6-C Artificial Cervical Disc for the treatment of patients with symptomatic cervical radiculopathy at 1 or 2 levels from C3 to C7. Neck Disability Index (NDI), visual analog scales (VAS) assessing neck and arm pain, Short Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), safety, and radiographic outcomes were assessed preoperatively, at 6 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postoperatively. Results Thirty patients were enrolled at 3 clinical sites. Patients were implanted at either 1 or 2 levels. Mean NDI improved from 67.8 to 20.8 (P < .0001) at 24 months. Significant improvement was also observed through 24-month follow-up in neck and arm pain VAS (P < .0001) and in physical (P < .005) and mental component scores of the SF-36 at 3, 6, and 12 months (P < .008). There were no serious adverse events related to the device or procedure as adjudicated by an independent clinical events committee. Radiographically, disc space height increased more than 50% with a correlative increase in the postoperative disc angle. Range of motion decreased slightly from baseline during early follow-up but increased slightly and were maintained throughout the follow-up period. Conclusions The M6-C cervical artificial disc represents a new generation of cTDR design. Results of this study found the M6-C device to produce positive clinical and radiographic outcomes similar to other cTDRs, warranting further

  16. The nitric oxide-cyclic GMP pathway and synaptic plasticity in the rat superior cervical ganglion.

    PubMed Central

    Southam, E.; Charles, S. L.; Garthwaite, J.

    1996-01-01

    1. We have investigated the possibility that nitric oxide (NO) and soluble guanylyl cyclase, an enzyme that synthesizes guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) in response to NO, contributes to plasticity of synaptic transmission in the rat isolated superior cervical ganglion (SCG). 2. Exposure of ganglia to the NO donor, nitroprusside, caused a concentration-dependent accumulation of cyclic GMP which was augmented in the presence of the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine. The compound, 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), a selective inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase, completely blocked this cyclic GMP response. 3. As assessed by extracellular recording, nitroprusside (100 microM) and another NO donor, S-nitrosoglutathione (30 microM) increased the efficacy of ganglionic synaptic transmission in response to electrical stimulation of the preganglionic nerve, an effect that was reversible and which could be replicated by the cyclic GMP analogue, 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ganglionic depolarizations resulting from stimulation of nicotinic receptors with carbachol were not increased by nitroprusside. The potentiating actions of the NO donors on synaptic transmission, but not that of 8-bromo-cyclic GMP, were inhibited by ODQ. 4. Brief tetanic stimulation of the preganglionic nerve resulted in a long-term potentiation (LTP) of synaptic transmission that was unaffected by ODQ, either in the absence or presence of the NO synthase inhibitor, NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG, 100 microM). A lack of influence of L-NOARG was confirmed in intracellular recordings of LTP of the excitatory postsynaptic potential. Furthermore, under conditions where tetanically-induced LTP was saturated, nitroprusside was still able to potentiate synaptic transmission, as judged from extracellular recording. 5. We conclude that NO is capable of potentiating ganglionic neurotransmission and this effect is mediated through the stimulation of soluble guanylyl

  17. Competitive and non-competitive re-innervation of mammalian sympathetic neurones by native and foreign fibres.

    PubMed Central

    Purves, D

    1976-01-01

    The ability of native (sympathetic preganglionic) and foreign (vagal) nerve fibres to re-innervate neurones of the guinea-pig superior cervical ganglion, either alone or in competition with each other, has been studied by means of intracellular recording and electron microscopy. 1. Native fibres make synaptic contacts with nearly all ganglion cells within one month of cervical trunk section; within 6 months the degree of innervation, judged by measurement of excitatory post-synaptic potential (e.p.s.p.) amplitude and electron microscopical synapse counts, approaches normal. However, even after 15 months innervation was weaker than in normal control ganglia. 2. Vagal fibres are less successful during re-innervation. Although a similar number of foreign fibres grown into denervated ganglia and make contact with nearly all ganglion cells within a month, after 6-12 months e.p.s.p. amplitudes in response to foreign nerve stimulation remain relatively small, and counts of synapses are only about 60% as great as in ganglia re-innervated with the native nerve. 3. When both native and foreign fibres are allowed to re-innervate ganglion cells simultaneously, about half the neurones in the ganglion receive synapses from both sources after 1 month. The proportion of dually invervated cells remains roughly constant for at least 14 months. Neither set of preganglionic fibres dominates or displaces the other, although neurones generally are re-innervated more effectively by native than foreign fibres, as is true during non-competitive re-innervation. 4. Thus during re-innervation of mammalian sympathetic neurones native fibres are preferred to foreign ones only in the sense that roughly the same number of native fibres form many more synapses on ganglion cells than do vagal axons. A foreign synapse, once formed, is as stable as a native one, and shows no tendency to be replaced by native terminals. These findings are discussed in relation to other evidence which has suggested

  18. Bilateral Thoracic Ganglion Cyst : A Rare Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Kazanci, Burak; Tehli, Ozkan; Guclu, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Ganglion cysts usually arise from the tissues around the facet joints. It is usually associated with degenerative cahanges in facet joints. Bilateral thoracic ganglion cysts are very rare and there is no previous case that located in bilateral intervertebral foramen compressing the L1 nerve root associated with severe radiculopathy. We report a 53 years old woman who presented with bilateral groin pain and severe numbness. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed bilateral cystic mass in the intervertebral foramen between 12th thoracal and 1st lumbar vertebrae. The cystic lesions were removed after bilateral exposure of Th12-L1 foramens. The result of hystopathology confirmed the diagnosis as ganglion cyst. The ganglion cyst may compromise lumbar dorsal ganglion when it located in the intervertebral foramen. The surgeon should keep this rare entity in their mind for differential diagnosis. PMID:23908708

  19. The acute lumbar disc herniation: imaging diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Yussen, P S; Swartz, J D

    1993-12-01

    The acute lumbar herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) can often be diagnosed on good quality MRI or CT examination. Myelography, discography, and postmyelography/postdiscography CT ordinarily are reserved for equivocal and protracted cases. MRI is recommended as the initial study of choice except for older patients for whom CT may be more valuable because of the high incidence of osteophytosis. Patients with acute herniated nucleus pulposus (HNP) may have varied clinical symptoms depending on the level of the HNP, extent of the annulus tear/depth of penetration of nuclear material, and the direction of the disc herniation. HNP does not necessarily produce radiculopathy and may cause vague low back pain. This article reviews and analyzes the clinical symptoms and problems associated with HNP, as well as the pitfalls and differential diagnostic possibilities in interpretation. PMID:8297631

  20. Epidural Lysis of Adhesions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Frank; Jamison, David E.; Hurley, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    As our population ages and the rate of spine surgery continues to rise, the use epidural lysis of adhesions (LOA) has emerged as a popular treatment to treat spinal stenosis and failed back surgery syndrome. There is moderate evidence that percutaneous LOA is more effective than conventional ESI for both failed back surgery syndrome, spinal stenosis, and lumbar radiculopathy. For cervical HNP, cervical stenosis and mechanical pain not associated with nerve root involvement, the evidence is anecdotal. The benefits of LOA stem from a combination of factors to include the high volumes administered and the use of hypertonic saline. Hyaluronidase has been shown in most, but not all studies to improve treatment outcomes. Although infrequent, complications are more likely to occur after epidural LOA than after conventional epidural steroid injections. PMID:24478895

  1. Atlantoaxial Joint Interlocking Following Type II Odontoid Fracture Associated with Posterolateral Atlantoaxial Dislocation: a Case Report and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    He, Deng-Wei; Huang, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Li-Jun; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2016-08-01

    A rare case of atlantoaxial lateral mass joint interlocking secondary to traumatic posterolateral C1,2 complete dislocation associated with type II odontoid fracture is herein reported and the impact of atlantoaxial joint interlocking on fracture reduction discussed. A 72-year-old man presented with traumatic atlantoaxial lateral mass joint interlocking without spinal cord signal change, the diagnosis being confirmed by radiography and 3-D reconstruction digital anatomy. Posterior internal fixation was performed after failure to achieve closed reduction by skull traction. After many surgical attempts at setting had failed because of interlocking of the lateral mass joints, reduction was achieved by compressing the posterior parts of the atlantal and axial screws. Odontoid bone union and C1,2 posterior bone graft fusion were eventually obtained by the 12-month follow-up. The patient had a complete neurological recovery with no residual neck pain or radiculopathy.

  2. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance. PMID:27012088

  3. Assessment of Lumbar Spine Instability Using C-Arm Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Temes, Bill; Karas, Steve; Manwill, James

    2016-09-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Weight-bearing flexion/extension radiographs showed no change in a 13-mm (at L5-S1) spondylolisthesis measured with a neutral posture. Physical therapy with a focus on flexion-biased stabilization exercises was initiated. After failing to improve after 6 weeks, her referring physician ordered magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a 6-mm spondylolisthesis in a supine position. Additionally, the physical therapist performed an anterior stability test of L5 on S1 under C-arm fluoroscopy, which demonstrated a palpable shift of S1 posteriorly that was measured on imaging as a change from a 13-mm to a 17-mm spondylolisthesis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):810. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0415. PMID:27581181

  4. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain.

    PubMed

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Durão, Carlos; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event. PMID:27579204

  5. Minimally invasive CT guided treatment of intraspinal synovial cyst

    PubMed Central

    Kozar, Sergeja; Jeromel, Miran

    2014-01-01

    Background Intraspinal synovial cysts of vertebral facet joints are uncommon cause of radicular pain as well as neurological deficits. They can be managed both conservatively and surgically. Case report A 77-year old polymorbid patient presented with bilateral low back pain which worsened during the course of time and did not respond to the conservative treatment. A diagnosis of intraspinal synovial cyst was made using the magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Percutaneous computed tomography (CT) guided injection with installation of local anesthetic together with corticosteroid and rupture of the cyst was successfully used. A month after the procedure his pain improved, the usage of analgesics diminished and his over-all quality of life improved. Conclusions Percutaneous CT guided lumbar synovial cyst treatment is safe and reliable alternative to the surgical treatment in polymorbid patients with radiculopathy who are not able to tolerate general anesthesia and operation. PMID:24587777

  6. Transthyretin Leu12Pro is associated with systemic, neuropathic and leptomeningeal amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Brett, M; Persey, M R; Reilly, M M; Revesz, T; Booth, D R; Booth, S E; Hawkins, P N; Pepys, M B; Morgan-Hughes, J A

    1999-02-01

    We report a middle-aged woman with a novel transthyretin (TTR) variant, Leu12Pro. She had extensive amyloid deposition in the leptomeninges and liver as well as the involvement of the heart and peripheral nervous system which characterizes familial amyloid polyneuropathy caused by variant TTR. Clinical features attributed to her leptomeningeal amyloid included radiculopathy, central hypoventilation, recurrent subarachnoid haemorrhage, depression, seizures and periods of decreased consciousness. MRI showed a marked enhancement throughout her meninges and ependyma, and TTR amyloid deposition was confirmed by meningeal biopsy. The simultaneous presence of extensive visceral amyloid and clinically significant deposits affecting both the peripheral and central nervous system extends the spectrum of amyloid-related disease associated with TTR mutations. The unusual association of severe peripheral neuropathy with symptoms of leptomeningeal amyloid indicates that leptomeningeal amyloidosis should be considered part of the syndrome of TTR-related familial amyloid polyneuropathy. PMID:10071047

  7. [Degenerative adult scoliosis].

    PubMed

    García-Ramos, C L; Obil-Chavarría, C A; Zárate-Kalfópulos, B; Rosales-Olivares, L M; Alpizar-Aguirre, A; Reyes-Sánchez, A A

    2015-01-01

    Adult scoliosis is a complex three-dimensional rotational deformity of the spine, resulting from the progressive degeneration of the vertebral elements in middle age, in a previously straight spine; a Cobb angle greater than 10° in the coronal plane, which also alters the sagittal and axial planes. It originates an asymmetrical degenerative disc and facet joint, creating asymmetrical loads and subsequently deformity. The main symptom is axial, radicular pain and neurological deficit. Conservative treatment includes drugs and physical therapy. The epidural injections and facet for selectively blocking nerve roots improves short-term pain. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with intractable pain, radiculopathy and/ or neurological deficits. There is no consensus for surgical indications, however, it must have a clear understanding of the symptoms and clinical signs. The goal of surgery is to decompress neural elements with restoration, modification of the three-dimensional shape deformity and stabilize the coronal and sagittal balance.

  8. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation.

    PubMed

    Bursalı, Adem; Akyoldas, Goktug; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-07-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4-5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  9. The Biomechanics of Cervical Spondylosis

    PubMed Central

    Ferrara, Lisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  10. Myeloradiculitis with meningoencephalopathy and optic neuritis in a case of previous Chlamydia psittaci infection

    PubMed Central

    Punter, M N M; Varma, A R

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of optic neuritis and myelo-radiculopathy as a late association following Chlamydia psittaci infection. A 45-year-old female patient with a prior history of C psittaci pneumonia and subsequent reactive arthritis presented to the neurology unit with severe headache, constitutional symptoms and monocular disturbance in vision. Clinical examination revealed focal signs with brisk upper limb reflexes compared to lower limbs and mild left-sided pyramidal signs. Systemic inflammatory markers were raised and serological studies showed no evidence of re-infection. MRI showed multiple high signal foci within the brain parenchyma and pachymeningeal thickening and enhancement. There was marked clinical and haematological improvement with high dose corticosteroids. PMID:22802266

  11. Assessment of Lumbar Spine Instability Using C-Arm Fluoroscopy.

    PubMed

    Temes, Bill; Karas, Steve; Manwill, James

    2016-09-01

    A 47-year-old woman was referred to physical therapy with a diagnosis of lumbar radiculopathy. Weight-bearing flexion/extension radiographs showed no change in a 13-mm (at L5-S1) spondylolisthesis measured with a neutral posture. Physical therapy with a focus on flexion-biased stabilization exercises was initiated. After failing to improve after 6 weeks, her referring physician ordered magnetic resonance imaging, which revealed a 6-mm spondylolisthesis in a supine position. Additionally, the physical therapist performed an anterior stability test of L5 on S1 under C-arm fluoroscopy, which demonstrated a palpable shift of S1 posteriorly that was measured on imaging as a change from a 13-mm to a 17-mm spondylolisthesis. J Orthop Sports Phys Ther 2016;46(9):810. doi:10.2519/jospt.2016.0415.

  12. Manipulation of the coccyx with anesthesia for the management of coccydynia.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Scott S; Speece, Arthur J

    2012-12-01

    Coccydynia is pain in and around the coccyx, with trauma being the most common etiologic factor. The authors describe the case of a 60-year-old woman who was injured in an automobile accident several months before consultation. After the physician recorded the patient's history, performed a physical examination, and reviewed imaging reports, lumbar radiculopathy and somatic dysfunction of the lumbar and sacral vertebrae were diagnosed as the cause of her coccydynia. During a 6-week period, the patient underwent a series of 3 epidural steroid injections, osteopathic mobilization of the lumbar and sacral spine, and manual manipulation of the coccyx with anesthesia. After each treatment session, the patient reported a substantial improvement in radicular pain as well as a subjective increase in her lower extremity range of motion.

  13. [Analysis on 149 consecutive cases of intervertebral lumbar and cervical disc prolapse operated with microendoscopic (Metr'X) technique].

    PubMed

    Latorraca, A; Forni Niccolai Gamba, C

    2004-01-01

    Herniated disc patients represent a limited subset of patients with low back pain. Incidence of surgical intervention for lumbar disc pathology is 3% to 4%. The goal of surgery is to achieve neural decompression and relief neurological symptoms. Discectomy through laminotomy is the most common approach. More recently percutaneous approaches to lumbar discectomy, include the use of suction, laser and spinal endoscopy have evolved with mixed results. Microendoscopic discectomy (MED) combines endoscopic technology with the principles of microdiscectomy: open surgical principles are used through a tubular retractor using endoscopic visualization. We present our experience with MED in 149 patients who underwent this procedure. The patient population consisted of 83 men and 66 women aged 18 to 88 years. All patients had substantial relief of their radiculopathy. PMID:15105907

  14. Spinous Process Osteochondroma as a Rare Cause of Lumbar Pain

    PubMed Central

    Rosa, Bárbara; Campos, Pedro; Barros, André; Karmali, Samir; Ussene, Esperança; Alves da Silva, João; Coutinho, Nuno

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of a 5th Lumbar Vertebra (L5) spinous process osteochondroma as a rare cause of lumbar pain in an old patient. A 70-year-old male presented with progressive and disabling lower lumbar pain. Tenderness over the central and left paraspinal area of the lower lumbar region and a palpable mass were evident. CT scan showed a mass arising from the spinous process of L5. Marginal resection of the tumor was performed through a posterior approach. The histological study revealed an osteochondroma. After surgery, pain was completely relieved. After one year there was no evidence of local recurrence or symptoms. Osteochondromas rarely involve the spine, but when they do symptoms like pain, radiculopathy/myelopathy, or cosmetic deformity may occur. The imagiologic exam of election for diagnosis is CT scan. When symptomatic the treatment of choice is surgical resection. The most concerning complication of osteochondromas is malignant transformation, a rare event. PMID:27579204

  15. Ewing sarcoma mimicking a peripheral nerve sheath tumor.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, B D; Fox, B D; Viswanathan, A; Mitchell, A H; Powell, S Z; Cech, D A

    2010-10-01

    We describe the first patient with an extradural, extramedullary Ewing's sarcoma tumor mimicking a nerve sheath tumor with no overt evidence of metastasis. A 28-year-old woman with no past medical history presented with a progressive 3-year history of low back pain and right-sided lower extremity radiculopathy after having failed conservative therapies. MRI of the lumbar spine revealed a right-sided enhancing, dumbbell-shaped lesion at the right neural foramen appearing to originate from the L4 nerve root, suspicious for a peripheral nerve sheath tumor or schwannoma. The patient and findings are discussed in the context of the literature, including an update on the relatively recent diagnostic redesignation of the Ewing's sarcoma family tumors.

  16. Intractable Pruritus After Traumatic Spinal Cord Injury

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Deborah A; Jaffee, Kenneth M; Kundu, Anjana

    2009-01-01

    Background: This report describes a young woman with incomplete traumatic cervical spinal cord injury and intractable pruritus involving her dorsal forearm. Method: Case report. Findings: Anatomic distribution of the pruritus corresponded to the dermatomal distribution of her level of spinal cord injury and vertebral fusion. Symptoms were attributed to the spinal cord injury and possible cervical root injury. Pruritus was refractory to all treatments, including topical lidocaine, gabapentin, transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation, intravenous Bier block, stellate ganglion block, and acupuncture. Conclusions: Further understanding of neuropathic pruritus is needed. Diagnostic workup of intractable pruritus should include advanced imaging to detect ongoing nerve root compression. If diagnostic studies suggest radiculopathy, epidural steroid injection should be considered. Because the autonomic nervous system may be involved in complex chronic pain or pruritic syndromes, sympatholysis via such techniques as stellate ganglion block might be effective. PMID:19777867

  17. Island Latissimus Dorsi Muscle Flap and a Perforator Flap in Repairing Post-Gunshot Thoracic Spine CSF Fistula: Case Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Wanjala, Nangole F.; Stanley, Khainga Ominde

    2015-01-01

    Persistent posttraumatic CSF fluid leakage may present a challenge to manage. Failure to address the leakage may result in complications such as meningitis, septicemia, radiculopathy, muscle weakness, and back pains. While the majority of the leakages may be managed conservatively, large dura defects as a result of gunshot wounds or motor vehicle accidents are best managed by surgical interventions. This may range from primary closure of the defect to fascial grafts, adhesive glues, and flaps. We present our experience with the use of flaps in a patient who had sustained such wounds in the thoracic spine. An island latissimus dorsal flap and a perforator fasciocutaneous flap were used to close the defect. Postoperatively the patient recovered well and the wounds healed without any complications. PMID:26491596

  18. A Case Of Atypical Presentation of Thoracic Osteomyelitis & Paraspinal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Acharya, Utkarsh

    2008-01-01

    Here presented is a case involving a 44-year-old man with a chief complaint of sharp lateral right-sided rib pain with notable radiation to the anterior portion of the thorax and minor radiation around the lateral back. The etiology of the pain and radiculopathy, which was initially attributed to a right-sided rib fracture, was later accurately credited to a paraspinal abscess discovered on a lateral X-ray of the thoracic spine. Subsequently, studies including Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI), Computed Tomography (CT), and bone scan all confirmed the diagnosis of a paraspinal abscess between the right lobe and its neighboring T9 and T10 vertebrae. The mass was biopsied and methicillin sensitive Staphylococcus aureus was isolated. Appropriate surgical and medical intervention was possible due to the early diagnosis of the abscess. PMID:19148317

  19. Sciatica from a foraminal lumbar root schwannoma: case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Parekh, Aseem N

    2012-01-01

    Sciatica is commonly caused by lumbar prolapsed intervertebral disc (PID) and other spinal lesions. Uncommon causes like nerve root schwannoma are rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. Spinal schwannomas occur both sporadically and in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and "failure of conservative treatment."

  20. Diaphragm paralysis from cervical disc lesions.

    PubMed

    Cloward, R B

    1988-01-01

    An opera singer, who "made her living with her diaphragm", developed a post-traumatic unilateral radiculopathy due to cervical disc lesions, C3 to C6. During one year of severe neck and left arm pain she gradually lost the ability to sing difficult operatic passages which brought an end to her music career. Following a three level anterior cervical decompression and fusion, the neck and arm pain was immediately relieved. One week later her voice and singing ability returned to its full strength and power permitting her to resume her activities as a vocalist. The diagnosis of paresis of the left hemi-diaphragm as part of the cervical disc syndrome was implied by postoperative retrospective inference.

  1. Apoplectic presentation of a cauda equina paraganglioma

    PubMed Central

    Nagarjun, M. N.; Savardekar, Amey R.; Kishore, Kislay; Rao, Shilpa; Pruthi, Nupur; Rao, Malla Bhaskar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cauda equina paragangliomas (CEPs) are rare spinal tumors that are mostly misdiagnosed preoperatively as ependymomas or schwannomas on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Clinically, they usually present with the gradual onset of back pain and radiculopathy rather than an acute cauda equina syndrome. Case Description: A 36-year-old female presented with an acute flaccid paraparesis/cauda equina syndrome. Based upon MRI studies, the predominant differential diagnoses included ependymoma or schwannoma. The intraoperative findings revealed an acute intralesional hemorrhage or apoplexy, responsible for the acute clinical deterioration. Histopathology and immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed that the tumor was a paraganglioma. Conclusion: CEPs commonly present with mild symptoms and signs rather than the acute-onset of a flaccid paraparesis/cauda equina syndrome as seen in this case. Here, the authors review the radiological and histopathological characteristics of CEP and emphasize the role of IHC in differentiating “CEP” from the more common ependymomas. PMID:27127702

  2. The biomechanics of cervical spondylosis.

    PubMed

    Ferrara, Lisa A

    2012-01-01

    Aging is the major risk factor that contributes to the onset of cervical spondylosis. Several acute and chronic symptoms can occur that start with neck pain and may progress into cervical radiculopathy. Eventually, the degenerative cascade causes desiccation of the intervertebral disc resulting in height loss along the ventral margin of the cervical spine. This causes ventral angulation and eventual loss of lordosis, with compression of the neural and vascular structures. The altered posture of the cervical spine will progress into kyphosis and continue if the load balance and lordosis is not restored. The content of this paper will address the physiological and biomechanical pathways leading to cervical spondylosis and the biomechanical principles related to the surgical correction and treatment of kyphotic progression. PMID:22400120

  3. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Disc Herniation

    PubMed Central

    Bursalı, Adem; Guvenal, Ahmet Burak; Yaman, Onur

    2016-01-01

    Lumbar radiculopathy is generally caused by such well-recognized entity as lumbar disc herniation in neurosurgical practice; however rare pathologies such as thrombosed epidural varix may mimic them by causing radicular symptoms. In this case report, we present a 26-year-old man with the complaint of back and right leg pain who was operated for right L4–5 disc herniation. The lesion interpreted as an extruded disc herniation preoperatively was found to be a thrombosed epidural varix compressing the nerve root preoperatively. The nerve root was decompressed by shrinking the lesion with bipolar thermocoagulation and excision. The patient's complaints disappeared in the postoperative period. Thrombosed lumbar epidural varices may mimic lumbar disc herniations both radiologically and clinically. Therefore, must be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of lumbar disc herniations. Microsurgical techniques are mandatory for the treatment of these pathologies and decompression with thermocoagulation and excision is an efficient method. PMID:27446525

  4. Parkinsonism and Neurological Manifestations of Influenza Throughout the 20th and 21st Centuries

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Julie; Smeyne, Richard J.; Jang, Haeman; Miller, Bayard; Okun, Michael S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Given the recent paper by Jang et al. on “A Highly Pathogenic H5N1 Influenza Virus” which reported a novel animal model of parkinsonism, we aimed to perform a complete historical review of the 20th and 21st century literature on parkinsonism and neurological manifestations of influenza. Scope There were at least twelve major flu pandemics reported in the literature in the 20th and 21st century. Neurological manifestations most prevalent during the pandemics included delirium, encephalitis, ocular abnormalities, amyotrophy, myelopathy, radiculopathy, ataxia and seizures. Very little parkinsonism was reported with the exception of the 1917 cases originally described by von Economo. Conclusions To date there have been surprisingly few cases of neurological issues inclusive of parkinsonism associated with influenza pandemics. Given the recent animal model of H5N1 influenza associated parkinsonism, the medical establishment should be prepared to evaluate for the re-emergence of parkinsonism during future outbreaks. PMID:20650672

  5. Upper body pain and functional disorders in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stubblefield, Michael D; Keole, Nandita

    2014-02-01

    Upper body pain and dysfunction are common in survivors of breast cancer. Disorders of the upper body can result directly from breast cancer or from the surgery, chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or hormonal therapies used in its treatment. Although considerable information is available regarding impairments such as pain and restricted shoulder range of motion associated with breast cancer and its treatment, relatively little information is available about the specific neuromuscular, musculoskeletal, lymphovascular, and other diagnostic entities that underlie those impairments. This article will detail the common and specific causes of upper body pain and dysfunction in breast cancer survivors, including postsurgical pain, rotator cuff disease, adhesive capsulitis, arthralgias, cervical radiculopathy, brachial plexopathy, mononeuropathy, postmastectomy pain syndrome, lymphedema, axillary web syndrome, deep vein thrombosis, and cellulitis. Diagnostic specificity is a key first step to safely and effectively restore function and quality of life to breast cancer survivors. PMID:24360839

  6. Giant Spinal Schwannoma in a 76-year-old Woman--A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Zadro, Zvonko; Frketić, Ivan; Fudurić, Jurica; Zadro, Ana Sostarić; Skarica, Rade; Korusić, Anđelko; Zupcić, Miroslav; Nikolić, Igor; Jelec, Vjekoslav; Zupcić, Sandra Graf; Kolak, Toni

    2016-04-01

    A schwannoma is a benign nerve sheath tumor composed of Schwann cells. Spinal schwannoma originates from dorsal roots of the spinal cord, causing symptoms due to the compression of neighboring structures. We present a patient with a low back pain and left L2 and L3 radiculopathy. Neuroimaging techniques (CT, MRI) showed a large expansive mass in the left lumbar paraspinal area. The tumor was removed totally by the posterior approach and was verified to originate from the left L2 spinal nerve root. The histopathological examination revealed typical findings of a schwannoma. The pain was resolved promptly after the surgery, however the patient's neurological condition wasn't improved. Surgical treatment was a final treatment, and no additonal therapy was necessary. PMID:27301238

  7. Atlantoaxial Joint Interlocking Following Type II Odontoid Fracture Associated with Posterolateral Atlantoaxial Dislocation: a Case Report and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    He, Deng-Wei; Huang, Wen-Jun; Sheng, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Li-Jun; Fan, Shun-Wu

    2016-08-01

    A rare case of atlantoaxial lateral mass joint interlocking secondary to traumatic posterolateral C1,2 complete dislocation associated with type II odontoid fracture is herein reported and the impact of atlantoaxial joint interlocking on fracture reduction discussed. A 72-year-old man presented with traumatic atlantoaxial lateral mass joint interlocking without spinal cord signal change, the diagnosis being confirmed by radiography and 3-D reconstruction digital anatomy. Posterior internal fixation was performed after failure to achieve closed reduction by skull traction. After many surgical attempts at setting had failed because of interlocking of the lateral mass joints, reduction was achieved by compressing the posterior parts of the atlantal and axial screws. Odontoid bone union and C1,2 posterior bone graft fusion were eventually obtained by the 12-month follow-up. The patient had a complete neurological recovery with no residual neck pain or radiculopathy. PMID:27627726

  8. Sciatica from a Foraminal Lumbar Root Schwannoma: Case Report and Review of Literature

    PubMed Central

    Rustagi, Tarush; Badve, Siddharth; Parekh, Aseem N.

    2012-01-01

    Sciatica is commonly caused by lumbar prolapsed intervertebral disc (PID) and other spinal lesions. Uncommon causes like nerve root schwannoma are rarely considered in the differential diagnosis of sciatica. Spinal schwannomas occur both sporadically and in association with neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1; von Recklinghausen's disease). This case report describes lumbar foraminal schwannoma as an unusual cause of radiculopathy, presenting clinically as a lumbar disc prolapse. The diagnosis was confirmed on MRI scan. Patient had complete symptomatic recovery following surgical enucleation of the tumour mass from the L5 nerve root. This case report is of particular interest as it highlights the diagnostic confusion, which is bound to arise, because the clinical presentation closely mimics a lumbar PID. This often leads to delay in diagnosis and “failure of conservative treatment.” PMID:23259107

  9. Cauda Equina Intradural Extramedullary Cavernous Haemangioma: Case Report and Review of the Literature

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Mihai; Grigorean, Valentin Titus; Sinescu, Crina Julieta; Lupascu, Cristian Dumitru; Popescu, George; Sandu, Aurelia Mihaela; Plesea, Iancu Emil

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous haemangioma (cavernoma) is a benign vascular lesion, exceptionally located in cauda equina. We report a case, diagnosed and operated in the Department of Neurosurgery from Pitesti County Emergency Hospital, of a 60-year-old woman with history of lumbar region distress, who presented with low back pain, paravertebral muscle contracture, and bilateral lumbar radiculopathy, with sudden onset after lifting effort. The preoperative diagnosis was done using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the patient underwent surgery—two level laminectomy, dural incision, and tumor dissection from the cauda equina nerve roots under operatory microscope. Histopathological examination confirmed the positive diagnosis of cavernoma of cauda equina. The patient's outcome was favorable, without postoperative neurological deficits. PMID:24097094

  10. Synovial cyst of lumbar spine presenting as disc disease: a case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Reddy, P; Satyanarayana, S; Nanda, A

    2000-11-01

    Synovial cysts most commonly involve the joints of the extremities. These cysts are rarely found in the spinal canal or the vertebral facet joints. However, if manifested as such, they can pose serious diagnostic and therapeutic problems due to the presentation, which most often resembles nerve root or spinal cord compression. Acute low back pain and radiculopathy are often attributed to a herniated nucleus pulposus. This paper presents a case of synovial cyst in a 62-year-old woman with a 2-year history of refractory low back pain with distal radiation. A facet joint cyst was encountered upon neuroimaging, resulting in excision of the cyst. In this report, we discuss the differential diagnosis of synovial cysts, the role of computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the diagnosis, and treatment options for this uncommon entity. PMID:11125509

  11. Lumbar Spinal Stenosis: Who Should Be Fused? An Updated Review

    PubMed Central

    Hasankhani, Ebrahim Ghayem; Ashjazadeh, Amir

    2014-01-01

    Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is mostly caused by osteoarthritis (spondylosis). Clinically, the symptoms of patients with LSS can be categorized into two groups; regional (low back pain, stiffness, and so on) or radicular (spinal stenosis mainly presenting as neurogenic claudication). Both of these symptoms usually improve with appropriate conservative treatment, but in refractory cases, surgical intervention is occasionally indicated. In the patients who primarily complain of radiculopathy with an underlying biomechanically stable spine, a decompression surgery alone using a less invasive technique may be sufficient. Preoperatively, with the presence of indicators such as failed back surgery syndrome (revision surgery), degenerative instability, considerable essential deformity, symptomatic spondylolysis, refractory degenerative disc disease, and adjacent segment disease, lumbar fusion is probably recommended. Intraoperatively, in cases with extensive decompression associated with a wide disc space or insufficient bone stock, fusion is preferred. Instrumentation improves the fusion rate, but it is not necessarily associated with improved recovery rate and better functional outcome. PMID:25187873

  12. [Lumbar disc herniation--diagnosis and treatment].

    PubMed

    Corniola, M-V; Tessitore, E; Schaller, K; Gautschi, O P

    2014-12-10

    A lumbar disc herniation (LDH) is a condition frequently encountered in primary care medicine. It may give rise to a compression of one or more nerve roots, which can lead to a nerve root irritation, a so-called radiculopathy, with or without a sensorimotor deficit. The majority of LDHs can be supported by means of a conservative treatment consisting of physical therapy, ergotherapy, analgetics, anti-inflammatory therapy or corticosteroids, which may be eventually administered by infiltrations. If a clinico-radiological correlation is present and moderate neurological deficit appears suddenly, if it is progressive under conservative treatment or if pain is poorly controlled by well-conducted conservative treatment performed during four to six months, surgery is then recommended. PMID:25632633

  13. Cauda equina intradural extramedullary cavernous haemangioma: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Popescu, Mihai; Titus Grigorean, Valentin; Julieta Sinescu, Crina; Dumitru Lupascu, Cristian; Popescu, George; Mihaela Sandu, Aurelia; Emil Plesea, Iancu

    2013-01-01

    Cavernous haemangioma (cavernoma) is a benign vascular lesion, exceptionally located in cauda equina. We report a case, diagnosed and operated in the Department of Neurosurgery from Pitesti County Emergency Hospital, of a 60-year-old woman with history of lumbar region distress, who presented with low back pain, paravertebral muscle contracture, and bilateral lumbar radiculopathy, with sudden onset after lifting effort. The preoperative diagnosis was done using computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and the patient underwent surgery-two level laminectomy, dural incision, and tumor dissection from the cauda equina nerve roots under operatory microscope. Histopathological examination confirmed the positive diagnosis of cavernoma of cauda equina. The patient's outcome was favorable, without postoperative neurological deficits. PMID:24097094

  14. The athlete with muscular cramps: clinical approach.

    PubMed

    Maquirriain, Javier; Merello, Marcelo

    2007-07-01

    Muscle cramps are involuntary, painful, spasmodic contractions of the skeletal muscle. Although cramps are a common clinical complaint, their etiology and management have not been well established. Exercise-associated muscle cramps occur during or immediately following exercise, and they are associated with muscular fatigue and shortened muscle contraction. The main challenges for treating physicians are to identify whether the complaint represents a true muscle cramp as well as to rule out the presence of an underlying serious clinical condition. Muscle cramps may be a symptom of any of several conditions, including radiculopathies, Parkinson's disease, hypothyroidism, diabetes mellitus, vascular problems, electrolyte disorders, and metabolic myopathies. Cramps also may occur as a side effect of certain drugs (eg, lipid-lowering agents, antihypertensives, beta-agonists, insulin, oral contraceptives, alcohol). Most athletes who experience exercise-associated muscle cramps are healthy individuals without systemic illness. Therapy should focus on preventing premature fatigue by means of appropriate nutrition and adequate training.

  15. [Cervical disc herniation].

    PubMed

    Schnake, K J; Hoffmann, C-H; Kandziora, F

    2012-12-01

    The cervical disc herniation is characterized by prolapsed nucleus pulposus material through the annulus into the spinal canal. The local mechanical or chemical irritation of neural structures typically leads to symptoms of radiculopathy, cervicocephalgia or myelopathy. Pronounced sensorimotor deficits or intractable pain constitute surgical treatment. In all other cases conservative treatment is indicated, including pain medication, active and passive physiotherapy, and local injections, respectively. Anterior cervical discectomy and interbody fusion (ACDF) is still the surgical treatment of choice. Predominantly, cages with or without plates are in use to obtain solid fusion. The implantation of a total disc replacement is a viable alternative, if no contraindications exist. Other surgical techniques may be performed in proper selected cases. The overall clinical and radiological results of both surgical and conservative treatment are good. PMID:23296562

  16. Spinal cord stimulators and radiotherapy: first case report and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lorraine; Guha, Daipayan; Purdie, Thomas G; Bedard, Philippe; Easson, Alexandra; Liu, Fei-Fei; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulators (SCS) are a well-recognised treatment modality in the management of a number of chronic neuropathic pain conditions, particularly failed back syndrome and radiculopathies. The implantable pulse generator (IPG) component of the SCS is designed and operates in a similar fashion to that of a cardiac pacemaker. The IPG consists of an electrical generator, lithium battery, transmitter/receiver and a minicomputer. When stimulated, it generates pulsed electrical signals which stimulate the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, thus alleviating pain. Analogous to a cardiac pacemaker, it can be potentially damaged by ionising radiation from a linear accelerator, in patients undergoing radiotherapy. Herein we report our clinical management of the first reported case of a patient requiring adjuvant breast radiotherapy who had a SCS in situ. We also provide useful practical recommendations on the management of this scenario within a radiation oncology department. PMID:22024340

  17. Safe physiotherapy interventions in large cervical disc herniations.

    PubMed

    Keramat, Keramat Ullah; Gaughran, Aisling

    2012-01-01

    A 34-year-old woman was seen in a physiotherapy department with signs and symptoms of cervical radiculopathy. Loss of cervical lordosis and a large paracentral to intraforaminal disc prolapse (8 mm) at C5-C6 level was reported on MRI. She was taking diclofenac sodium, tramadol HCl, diazepam and pregabalin for the preceding 2 months and no significant improvement, except temporary relief, was reported. She was referred to physiotherapy while awaiting a surgical opinion from a neurosurgeon. In physiotherapy she was treated with mobilisation of the upper thoracic spine from C7 to T6 level. A cervical extension exercise was performed with prior voluntary extension of the thoracic spine and elevated shoulders. She was advised to continue the same at home. General posture advice was given. Signs and symptoms resolved within the following four sessions of treatment over 3 weeks. Surgical intervention was subsequently deemed unnecessary. PMID:22907861

  18. Treatment of contained lumbar disc herniations using radiofrequency assisted micro-tubular decompression and nucleotomy: four year prospective study results

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with radiculopathy caused by contained disc herniations are less likely to have good outcomes following discectomy surgery than patients with disc herniations that are not contained. The author presents his 4-year results from a prospective trial regarding the efficacy and safety of a tubular transforaminal radiofrequency-assisted manual decompression and annulus modulation of contained disc herniations in 58 patients. Methods Fifty-eight patients with lumbar radiculopathy due to a contained disc herniation were enrolled in a prospective clinical study. Visual analog scores (VAS) for back pain and leg pain, quality of life assessment, Macnab criteria, and SF-12 were collected from patients before treatment, at 2-years and 4-years post-treatment. Results At 4 years, results were obtained from 47 (81%) of patients. Compared to mean pre- treatment assessments, mean 4-year VAS for back pain improved from 8.6 to 2.3 points, and mean VAS for leg pain improved from 7.8 to 2.3. Eighty-three percent of respondents reported that they were “satisfied” or “very satisifed” with their quality of life at 4-years as per SF-12. At 4 years, recurrence was noted in 3 (6.4%) of respondents and no complications were reported. Conclusions The 2-year and 4-year study results are nearly identical, suggesting durable benefit out to 4 years. These results also suggest that in carefully selected patients with sustained contained disc herniations who have failed conservative treatments, manual decompression combined with radiofrequency-assisted decompression and annulus modulation are very likely to have good outcomes 4 years post-treatment. PMID:25694932

  19. Comparative Analysis of Cervical Arthroplasty Using Mobi-C® and Anterior Cervical Discectomy and Fusion Using the Solis® -Cage

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jin Hoon; Roh, Kwang Ho; Cho, Ji Young; Ra, Young Shin; Rhim, Seung Chul

    2008-01-01

    Objective Although anterior cervical discectomy and fusion (ACDF) is the standard treatment for degenerative cervical disc disease, concerns regarding adjacent level degeneration and loss of motion have suggested that arthroplasty may be a better alternative. We have compared clinical and radiological results in patients with cervical disc herniations treated with arthroplasty and ACDF. Methods We evaluated 53 patients treated for cervical disc herniations with radiculopathy, 21 of whom underwent arthroplasty and 32 of whom underwent ACDF. Clinical results included the Visual Analogue Scale (VAS) score for upper extremity radiculopathy, neck disability index (NDI), duration of hospital stay and convalescence time. All patients were assessed radiologically by measuring cervical lordosis, segmental lordosis and segmental range-of-movement (ROM) of operated and adjacent disc levels. Results Mean hospital stay (5.62 vs. 6.26 days, p<0.05) and interval between surgery and return to work (1.10 vs. 2.92 weeks, p<0.05) were significantly shorter in the arthroplasty than in the fusion group. Mean NDI and extremity VAS score improved after 12 months in both groups. Although it was not significant, segmental ROM of adjacent levels was higher in the fusion group than in the arthroplasty group. And, segmental motion of operated levels in arthroplasty group maintained more than preoperative value at last follow up. Conclusion Although clinical results were similar in the two groups, postoperative recovery was significantly shorter in the arthroplasty group. Although it was not significant, ROM of adjacent segments was less in the arthroplasty group. Motion of operated levels in arthroplasty group was preserved at last follow up. PMID:19096680

  20. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) Spacers for Anterior Cervical Fusion: A Retrospective Comparative Effectiveness Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lemcke, Johannes; Al-Zain, Ferass; Meier, Ullrich; Suess, Olaf

    2011-01-01

    Background: Anterior cervical decompression and fusion (ACDF) is the standard surgical treatment for radiculopathy and myelopathy. Polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has an elasticity similar to bone and thus appears well suited for use as the implant in ACDF procedures. The aim of this study is to examine the clinical and radiographic outcome of patients treated with standing alone PEEK spacers without bone morphogenic protein (BMP) or plating and to examine the influence of the different design of the two spacers on the rate of subsidence and dislocation. Methods: This retrospective comparative study reviewed 335 patients treated by ACDF in a specialized urban hospital for radiculopathy or myelopathy due to degenerative pathologies. The Intromed PEEK spacer was used in 181 patients from 3/2002 to 11/2004, and the AMT SHELL spacer was implanted in 154 patients from 4/2004 to 12/2007. The follow-up rate was 100% at three months post-op and 82.7% (277 patients) at one year. The patients were assessed with the Japanese Orthopedic Association (JOA) questionnaire and radiographically. Results: At the one-year follow-up there were 118/277 patients with an excellent clinical outcome on the JOA, 112/277 with a good outcome, 20/277 with a fair outcome, and 27/277 with a poor outcome. Subsidence was observed in 13.3% of patients with the Intromed spacer vs 8.4% of the patients with the AMT SHELL. Dislocation of the spacer was observed in 10 of the 181 patients with Intromed spacers but in none of the 154 patients with Shell spacers. Conclusion: The study demonstrates that ACDF with standing alone PEEK cages leads to excellent and good clinical outcomes. The differences we observed in the subsidence rate between the two spacers were not significant and cannot be related to a single design feature of the spacers. PMID:22016753