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Sample records for luminal signal target

  1. Cytosolic N-terminal arginine-based signals together with a luminal signal target a type II membrane protein to the plant ER

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic cells, the membrane compartments that constitute the exocytic pathway are traversed by a constant flow of lipids and proteins. This is particularly true for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the main "gateway of the secretory pathway", where biosynthesis of sterols, lipids, membrane-bound and soluble proteins, and glycoproteins occurs. Maintenance of the resident proteins in this compartment implies they have to be distinguished from the secretory cargo. To this end, they must possess specific ER localization determinants to prevent their exit from the ER, and/or to interact with receptors responsible for their retrieval from the Golgi apparatus. Very few information is available about the signal(s) involved in the retention of membrane type II protein in the ER but it is generally accepted that sorting of ER type II cargo membrane proteins depends on motifs mainly located in their cytosolic tails. Results Here, using Arabidopsis glucosidase I as a model, we have identified two types of signals sufficient for the location of a type II membrane protein in the ER. A first signal is located in the luminal domain, while a second signal corresponds to a short amino acid sequence located in the cytosolic tail of the membrane protein. The cytosolic tail contains at its N-terminal end four arginine residues constitutive of three di-arginine motifs (RR, RXR or RXXR) independently sufficient to confer ER localization. Interestingly, when only one di-arginine motif is present, fusion proteins are located both in the ER and in mobile punctate structures, distinct but close to Golgi bodies. Soluble and membrane ER protein markers are excluded from these punctate structures, which also do not colocalize with an ER-exit-site marker. It is hypothesized they correspond to sites involved in Golgi to ER retrotransport. Conclusion Altogether, these results clearly show that cytosolic and luminal signals responsible for ER retention could coexist in a same type

  2. Luminal-B breast cancer and novel therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression profiling has led to a new molecular classification of breast cancer characterized by four intrinsic subtypes: basal-like, HER2-positive, luminal A, and luminal B. Despite expressing estrogen receptor, the luminal-B subtype confers increased risk of early relapse with endocrine therapy compared with the luminal-A subtype. Although luminal-B definitions vary, the hallmark appears to be increased expression of proliferation-related genes. Several biological pathways are identified as possible contributors to the poor outcomes, and novel agents targeting these pathways are being developed with aims to improve survival. We review the definition of luminal-B breast cancer, its pathological and clinical features, and potential targets for treatment. PMID:22217398

  3. Luminal Ca2+ dynamics during IP3R mediated signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Lucia F.; Ponce Dawson, Silvina

    2016-06-01

    The role of cytosolic Ca2+ on the kinetics of Inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptors (IP3Rs) and on the dynamics of IP3R-mediated Ca2+ signals has been studied at large both experimentally and by modeling. The role of luminal Ca2+ has not been investigated with that much detail although it has been found that it is relevant for signal termination in the case of Ca2+ release through ryanodine receptors. In this work we present the results of observing the dynamics of luminal and cytosolic Ca2+ simultaneously in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Combining observations and modeling we conclude that there is a rapid mechanism that guarantees the availability of free Ca2+ in the lumen even when a relatively large Ca2+ release is evoked. Comparing the dynamics of cytosolic and luminal Ca2+ during a release, we estimate that they are consistent with a 80% of luminal Ca2+ being buffered. The rapid availability of free luminal Ca2+ correlates with the observation that the lumen occupies a considerable volume in several regions across the images.

  4. Contour interaction for foveal acuity targets at different luminances.

    PubMed

    Bedell, Harold E; Siderov, John; Waugh, Sarah J; Zemanová, Romana; Pluháček, František; Musilová, Lenka

    2013-08-30

    Single-letter visual acuity is impaired by nearby flanking stimuli, a phenomenon known as contour interaction. We showed previously that when foveal acuity is degraded by a reduction of letter contrast, both the magnitude and angular spatial extent of foveal contour interaction remain unchanged. In this study, we asked whether contour interaction also remains unchanged when foveal visual acuity is degraded by a reduction of the target's background luminance. Percent correct letter identification was measured for isolated, near-threshold black Sloan letters and for letters surrounded by 4 flanking bars in 10 normal observers, 5 at Anglia Ruskin University, UK (ARU) and 5 at Palacky University, Czech Republic (PU). A stepwise reduction in the background luminance over 3 log units resulted in an approximately threefold increase in the near-threshold letter size. At each background luminance, black flanking bars with a width equal to 1 letter stroke were presented at separations between approximately 0.45 and 4.5 min arc (ARU) or 0.32 and 3.2 min arc (PU). The results indicate that the angular extent of contour interaction remains unchanged at approximately 4 min arc at all background luminances. On the other hand, the magnitude of contour interaction decreases systematically as luminance is reduced, from approximately a 50% reduction to a 30% reduction in percent correct. The constant angular extent and decreasing magnitude of contour interaction with a reduction of background luminance suggest foveal contour interaction is mediated by luminance-dependent lateral inhibition within a fixed angular region.

  5. The impact of target luminance and radiance on night vision device visual performance testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marasco, Peter L.; Task, H. Lee

    2003-09-01

    Visual performance through night-vision devices (NVDs) is a function of many parameters such as target contrast, objective and eyepiece lens focus, signal/noise of the image intensifier tube, quality of the image intensifier, night-vision goggle (NVG) gain, and NVG output luminance to the eye. The NVG output luminance depends on the NVG sensitive radiance emitted (or reflected) from the visual acuity target (usually a vision testing chart). The primary topic of this paper is the standardization (or lack thereof) of the radiance levels used for NVG visual acuity testing. The visual acuity chart light level might be determined in either photometric (luminance) units or radiometric (radiance) units. The light levels are often described as "starlight," "quarter moon," or "optimum" light levels and may not actually provide any quantitative photometric or radiometric information. While these terms may be useful to pilots and the users of night-vision devices, they are inadequate for accurate visual performance testing. This is because there is no widely accepted agreement in the night vision community as to the radiance or luminance level of the target that corresponds to the various named light levels. This paper examines the range of values for "starlight," "quarter moon," and "optimum" light commonly used by the night vision community and referenced in the literature. The impact on performance testing of variations in target luminance/radiance levels is also examined. Arguments for standardizing on NVG-weighted radiometric units for testing night-vision devices instead of photometric units are presented. In addition, the differences between theoretical weighted radiance and actual weighted radiance are also discussed.

  6. Combining S-cone and luminance signals adversely affects discrimination of objects within backgrounds

    PubMed Central

    Jennings, Ben J.; Tsattalios, Konstantinos; Chakravarthi, Ramakrishna; Martinovic, Jasna

    2016-01-01

    The visual system processes objects embedded in complex scenes that vary in both luminance and colour. In such scenes, colour contributes to the segmentation of objects from backgrounds, but does it also affect perceptual organisation of object contours which are already defined by luminance signals, or are these processes unaffected by colour’s presence? We investigated if luminance and chromatic signals comparably sustain processing of objects embedded in backgrounds, by varying contrast along the luminance dimension and along the two cone-opponent colour directions. In the first experiment thresholds for object/non-object discrimination of Gaborised shapes were obtained in the presence and absence of background clutter. Contrast of the component Gabors was modulated along single colour/luminance dimensions or co-modulated along multiple dimensions simultaneously. Background clutter elevated discrimination thresholds only for combined S-(L + M) and L + M signals. The second experiment replicated and extended this finding by demonstrating that the effect was dependent on the presence of relatively high S-(L + M) contrast. These results indicate that S-(L + M) signals impair spatial vision when combined with luminance. Since S-(L + M) signals are characterised by relatively large receptive fields, this is likely to be due to an increase in the size of the integration field over which contour-defining information is summed. PMID:26856308

  7. The SDSS-IV Extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey: Luminous Red Galaxy Target Selection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Abhishek; Licquia, Timothy C.; Newman, Jeffrey A.; Ross, Ashley J.; Myers, Adam D.; Dawson, Kyle S.; Kneib, Jean-Paul; Percival, Will J.; Bautista, Julian E.; Comparat, Johan; Tinker, Jeremy L.; Schlegel, David J.; Tojeiro, Rita; Ho, Shirley; Lang, Dustin; Rao, Sandhya M.; McBride, Cameron K.; Ben Zhu, Guangtun; Brownstein, Joel R.; Bailey, Stephen; Bolton, Adam S.; Delubac, Timothée; Mariappan, Vivek; Blanton, Michael R.; Reid, Beth; Schneider, Donald P.; Seo, Hee-Jong; Carnero Rosell, Aurelio; Prada, Francisco

    2016-06-01

    We describe the algorithm used to select the luminous red galaxy (LRG) sample for the extended Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey (eBOSS) of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey IV (SDSS-IV) using photometric data from both the SDSS and the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer. LRG targets are required to meet a set of color selection criteria and have z-band and i-band MODEL magnitudes z < 19.95 and 19.9 < i < 21.8, respectively. Our algorithm selects roughly 50 LRG targets per square degree, the great majority of which lie in the redshift range 0.6 < z < 1.0 (median redshift 0.71). We demonstrate that our methods are highly effective at eliminating stellar contamination and lower-redshift galaxies. We perform a number of tests using spectroscopic data from SDSS-III/BOSS ancillary programs to determine the redshift reliability of our target selection and its ability to meet the science requirements of eBOSS. The SDSS spectra are of high enough signal-to-noise ratio that at least ˜89% of the target sample yields secure redshift measurements. We also present tests of the uniformity and homogeneity of the sample, demonstrating that it should be clean enough for studies of the large-scale structure of the universe at higher redshifts than SDSS-III/BOSS LRGs reached.

  8. On the necessity of correcting peripheral target luminance for pupillary area

    SciTech Connect

    Bedell, H.E.; Katz, L.M.

    1982-10-01

    Despite the decrease in pupillary area for peripheral targets, retinal illuminance remains fairly constant to about 80 deg visual angle. Constant illuminance is maintained in the retinal periphery because the light that enters the pupil is concentrated into smaller retinal images. The correction of the peripheral target luminances for pupillary area is therefore unnecessary except under certain conditions.

  9. Paracrine Met signaling triggers epithelial–mesenchymal transition in mammary luminal progenitors, affecting their fate

    PubMed Central

    Di-Cicco, Amandine; Petit, Valérie; Chiche, Aurélie; Bresson, Laura; Romagnoli, Mathilde; Orian-Rousseau, Véronique; Vivanco, Maria dM; Medina, Daniel; Faraldo, Marisa M; Glukhova, Marina A; Deugnier, Marie-Ange

    2015-01-01

    HGF/Met signaling has recently been associated with basal-type breast cancers, which are thought to originate from progenitor cells residing in the luminal compartment of the mammary epithelium. We found that ICAM-1 efficiently marks mammary luminal progenitors comprising hormone receptor-positive and receptor-negative cells, presumably ductal and alveolar progenitors. Both cell populations strongly express Met, while HGF is produced by stromal and basal myoepithelial cells. We show that persistent HGF treatment stimulates the clonogenic activity of ICAM1-positive luminal progenitors, controlling their survival and proliferation, and leads to the expression of basal cell characteristics, including stem cell potential. This is accompanied by the induction of Snai1 and Snai2, two major transcription factors triggering epithelial–mesenchymal transition, the repression of the luminal-regulatory genes Elf5 and Hey1, and claudin down-regulation. Our data strongly indicate that paracrine Met signaling can control the function of luminal progenitors and modulate their fate during mammary development and tumorigenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06104.001 PMID:26165517

  10. Motor preparation of manual aiming at a visual target manipulated in size, luminance contrast, and location.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, Masami; Imanaka, Kuniyasu

    2007-01-01

    We conducted two experiments to investigate whether the motor preparation of manual aiming to a visual target is affected by either the physical characteristics (size or luminance contrast) or spatial characteristics (location) of the target. Reaction time (RT) of both finger lifting (ie stimulus-detection time) and manual aiming (ie movement-triggering time) to the onset of the target was measured. The difference of RT (DRT) between two tasks (ie the difference of task complexity) was examined to clarify the temporal characteristics of manual aiming per se during visuomotor integration. Results show classical characteristics: RT decreased as either the target size or luminance contrast increased. Furthermore, the task-complexity and target-location factors significantly interacted with each other, where the aiming RT was longer than the finger-lifting RT and the effects of target location on RT differed for each task. However, the task factor did not interact with either the size or luminance-contrast factor, implying that the motor preparation of manual aiming is associated with the spatial characteristics rather than the physical characteristics of the target. Inspection of DRT revealed that the time needed for motor preparation for an ipsilateral target was significantly shorter than that for a contralateral target. This was the case both for the left and for the right hand. Foveal targets required longer processing time, implying a disadvantageous function of motor preparation for the gazed target. The left-hand superiority for the target appearing in the left visual field was also observed. Such lateralised effect and left-hand advantage to the left visual field in manual aiming suggest that visuospatial information processing is activated during the preparation of aiming action, with faster processing in the right hemisphere.

  11. Luminance and chromatic signals interact differently with melanopsin activation to control the pupil light response

    PubMed Central

    Barrionuevo, Pablo A.; Cao, Dingcai

    2016-01-01

    Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) express the photopigment melanopsin. These cells receive afferent inputs from rods and cones, which provide inputs to the postreceptoral visual pathways. It is unknown, however, how melanopsin activation is integrated with postreceptoral signals to control the pupillary light reflex. This study reports human flicker pupillary responses measured using stimuli generated with a five-primary photostimulator that selectively modulated melanopsin, rod, S-, M-, and L-cone excitations in isolation, or in combination to produce postreceptoral signals. We first analyzed the light adaptation behavior of melanopsin activation and rod and cones signals. Second, we determined how melanopsin is integrated with postreceptoral signals by testing with cone luminance, chromatic blue-yellow, and chromatic red-green stimuli that were processed by magnocellular (MC), koniocellular (KC), and parvocellular (PC) pathways, respectively. A combined rod and melanopsin response was also measured. The relative phase of the postreceptoral signals was varied with respect to the melanopsin phase. The results showed that light adaptation behavior for all conditions was weaker than typical Weber adaptation. Melanopsin activation combined linearly with luminance, S-cone, and rod inputs, suggesting the locus of integration with MC and KC signals was retinal. The melanopsin contribution to phasic pupil responses was lower than luminance contributions, but much higher than S-cone contributions. Chromatic red-green modulation interacted with melanopsin activation nonlinearly as described by a “winner-takes-all” process, suggesting the integration with PC signals might be mediated by a postretinal site. PMID:27690169

  12. Luminal and systemic signals trigger intestinal adaptation in the juvenile python.

    PubMed

    Secor, S M; Whang, E E; Lane, J S; Ashley, S W; Diamond, J

    2000-12-01

    Juvenile pythons undergo large rapid upregulation of intestinal mass and intestinal transporter activities upon feeding. Because it is also easy to do surgery on pythons and to maintain them in the laboratory, we used a python model to examine signals and agents for intestinal adaptation. We surgically isolated the middle third of the small intestine from enteric continuity, leaving its mesenteric nerve and vascular supply intact. Intestinal continuity was restored by an end-to-end anastomosis between the proximal and distal thirds. Within 24 h of the snake's feeding, the reanastomosed proximal and distal segments (receiving luminal nutrients) had upregulated amino acid and glucose uptakes by up to 15-fold, had doubled intestinal mass, and thereby soon achieved total nutrient uptake capacities equal to those of the normal fed full-length intestine. At this time, however, the isolated middle segment, receiving no luminal nutrients, experienced no changes from the fasted state in either nutrient uptakes or in morphology. By 3 days postfeeding, the isolated middle segment had upregulated nutrient uptakes to the same levels as the reanastomosed proximal and distal segments, but it still lacked any appreciable morphological response. These contrasting results for the reanastomosed intestine and for the isolated middle segment suggest that luminal nutrients and/or pancreatic biliary secretions are the agents triggering rapid upregulation of transporters and of intestinal mass and that systemic nerve or hormonal signals later trigger transporter regulation but no trophic response.

  13. "Pop-out" of targets modulated in luminance or colour: the effect of intrinsic and extrinsic uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Baldassi, Stefano; Burr, David C

    2004-06-01

    Targets defined by attributes such as colour or brightness are said to "pop-out" from a cluttered scene, with little or no dependency on the size of the set to be searched, while search for other attributes can depend strongly on set-size. We measured contrast thresholds for increments and decrements in luminance or colour and show that they increase strongly with set-size (as previously observed for orientation). However, in some conditions, where the potential distractors were not salient visual targets, there was no dependency of set-size at all ("pop-out"). All the data can be modelled by assuming two main sources of uncertainty: the intrinsic uncertainty due to the number of detectors monitored during a specific task and the extrinsic uncertainty introduced by increasing the number of items displayed. The strength of the effect is well explained by a simple signal detection theory "signed-max" model suited for two-tailed tasks [Journal of Vision 2 (8), 559]. The results suggest that "pop-out" is not peculiar to luminance or colour, but may occur in conditions when the intrinsic uncertainty is so high as to saturate the effects of further uncertainty sources.

  14. Faster target selection in preview visual search depends on luminance onsets: behavioral and electrophysiological evidence.

    PubMed

    Kiss, Monika; Eimer, Martin

    2011-08-01

    To investigate how target detection in visual search is modulated when a subset of distractors is presented in advance (preview search), we measured search performance and the N2pc component as an electrophysiological marker of attentional target selection. Targets defined by a color/shape conjunction were detected faster and the N2pc emerged earlier in preview search relative to a condition in which all items were presented simultaneously. Behavioral and electrophysiological preview benefits disappeared when stimuli were equiluminant with their background, in spite of the fact that targets were feature singletons among the new items in preview search. The results demonstrate that previewing distractors expedites the spatial selection of targets at early sensory-perceptual stages, and that these preview benefits depend on rapid attentional capture by luminance onsets.

  15. Crystal structures reveal transient PERK luminal domain tetramerization in endoplasmic reticulum stress signaling.

    PubMed

    Carrara, Marta; Prischi, Filippo; Nowak, Piotr R; Ali, Maruf Mu

    2015-06-03

    Stress caused by accumulation of misfolded proteins within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) elicits a cellular unfolded protein response (UPR) aimed at maintaining protein-folding capacity. PERK, a key upstream component, recognizes ER stress via its luminal sensor/transducer domain, but the molecular events that lead to UPR activation remain unclear. Here, we describe the crystal structures of mammalian PERK luminal domains captured in dimeric state as well as in a novel tetrameric state. Small angle X-ray scattering analysis (SAXS) supports the existence of both crystal structures also in solution. The salient feature of the tetramer interface, a helix swapped between dimers, implies transient association. Moreover, interface mutations that disrupt tetramer formation in vitro reduce phosphorylation of PERK and its target eIF2α in cells. These results suggest that transient conversion from dimeric to tetrameric state may be a key regulatory step in UPR activation.

  16. The Visibility of Point Sources as a Function of Background Luminance, Target Luminance, Eccentricity, Wavelength, and Flicker Rate

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    the German scientist, Ernst Heinrich Weber (1795-1878), states that the increase in stimulus which is necessary to produce a just noticeable...thresholds at 60° eccentricity. 3 predict thresholds in the Weber range. Its threshold predictions as a function of eccentricity are based on...such as VIDEM that assume a constant Weber fraction tend to underestimate visual thresholds at low ambient luminances and overestimate them at

  17. Influence of the luminance signal and red-green and yellow-blue opponent chromatic signals in figural-stimuli stereograms.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, J R; Rubiño, M; Díaz, J A; Jiménez del Barco, L

    1995-09-01

    The influence of color signals on stereopsis has been studied using figural-stimuli stereograms with variations introduced according to the opponent chromatic channels (red-green and yellow-blue), derived from Boynton's color-vision model. We used wallpaper stereograms, which enable the rank-order disparity ranges of the chromatic and luminance signals to be compared with the rank-order disparity range of proximity, a particular spatial configuration of the stereogram in which there are no variations in chromaticity and/or luminance. The results indicate that both chromatic signals contribute to stereopsis as does the luminance signal, contradicting the model of Hubel and Livingstone. The results also show there are no clear dependencies upon the kind of signal processed, as luminance and chromatic variations are processed with the same efficiency.

  18. Common profiles of Notch signaling differentiate disease-free survival in luminal type A and triple negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Orzechowska, Magdalena; Jędroszka, Dorota; Bednarek, Andrzej K

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer (BC) is characterized by high heterogeneity regarding its biology and clinical characteristics. The Notch pathway regulates such processes as organ modeling and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). The aim of the study was to determine the effect of differential expression of Notch members on disease-free survival (DFS) in luminal type A (lumA) and triple negative (TN) BC. The differential expression of 19 Notch members was examined in a TCGA BC cohort. DFS analysis was performed using the log-rank test (p<0.05). Biological differences between DFS groups were determined with Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA) (tTest, FDR<0.25). Common expression profiles according to Notch signaling were examined using ExpressCluster (K-means, mean centered, Euclidean distance metric). The overexpression of HES1, LFNG and PSEN1 was found to be favorable for DFS in lumA, and lowered expression favorable for DFS in TN. GSEA analysis showed that differential Notch signaling is associated with cell cycle, tissue architecture and remodeling. Particularly, targets of E2F, early stage S phase transcription factor, were upregulated in the lumA unfavorable group and the TN favorable group differentiated on a basis of HES1 and PSEN1 expression. Summarizing, our analysis show significance of Notch signaling in BRCA progression through triggering EMT. Moreover, identification of numerous genes which overexpression is associated with disease recurrence may serve as a source of potential targets for a new anticancer therapy. PMID:27888801

  19. Targeting FGFR Signaling in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Touat, Mehdi; Ileana, Ecaterina; Postel-Vinay, Sophie; André, Fabrice; Soria, Jean-Charles

    2015-06-15

    The fibroblast growth factor signaling pathway (FGFR signaling) is an evolutionary conserved signaling cascade that regulates several basic biologic processes, including tissue development, angiogenesis, and tissue regeneration. Substantial evidence indicates that aberrant FGFR signaling is involved in the pathogenesis of cancer. Recent developments of deep sequencing technologies have allowed the discovery of frequent molecular alterations in components of FGFR signaling among several solid tumor types. Moreover, compelling preclinical models have demonstrated the oncogenic potential of these aberrations in driving tumor growth, promoting angiogenesis, and conferring resistance mechanisms to anticancer therapies. Recently, the field of FGFR targeting has exponentially progressed thanks to the development of novel agents inhibiting FGFs or FGFRs, which had manageable safety profiles in early-phase trials. Promising treatment efficacy has been observed in different types of malignancies, particularly in tumors harboring aberrant FGFR signaling, thus offering novel therapeutic opportunities in the era of precision medicine. The most exciting challenges now focus on selecting patients who are most likely to benefit from these agents, increasing the efficacy of therapies with the development of novel potent compounds and combination strategies, and overcoming toxicities associated with FGFR inhibitors. After examination of the basic and translational research studies that validated the oncogenic potential of aberrant FGFR signaling, this review focuses on recent data from clinical trials evaluating FGFR targeting therapies and discusses the challenges and perspectives for the development of these agents.

  20. miR-221/222 control luminal breast cancer tumor progression by regulating different targets.

    PubMed

    Dentelli, Patrizia; Traversa, Matteo; Rosso, Arturo; Togliatto, Gabriele; Olgasi, Cristina; Marchiò, Caterina; Provero, Paolo; Lembo, Antonio; Bon, Giulia; Annaratone, Laura; Sapino, Anna; Falcioni, Rita; Brizzi, Maria Felice

    2014-01-01

    α6β4 integrin is an adhesion molecule for laminin receptors involved in tumor progression. We present a link between β4 integrin expression and miR-221/222 in the most prevalent human mammary tumor: luminal invasive carcinomas (Lum-ICs). Using human primary tumors that display different β4 integrin expression and grade, we show that miR-221/222 expression inversely correlates with tumor proliferating index, Ki67. Interestingly, most high-grade tumors express β4 integrin and low miR-221/222 levels. We ectopically transfected miR-221/222 into a human-derived mammary tumor cell line that recapitulates the luminal subtype to investigate whether miR-221/222 regulates β4 expression. We demonstrate that miR-221/222 overexpression results in β4 expression downregulation, breast cancer cell proliferation, and invasion inhibition. The role of miR-221/222 in driving β4 integrin expression is also confirmed via mutating the miR-221/222 seed sequence for β4 integrin 3'UTR. Furthermore, we show that these 2 miRNAs are also key breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion regulators, via the post-transcriptional regulation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 5A (STAT5A) and of a disintegrin and metalloprotease-17 (ADAM-17). We further confirm these data by silencing ADAM-17, using a dominant-negative or an activated STAT5A form. miR-221/222-driven β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 did not occur in MCF-10A cells, denoted "normal" breast epithelial cells, indicating that the mechanism is cancer cell-specific.   These results provide the first evidence of a post-transcriptional mechanism that regulates β4 integrin, STAT5A, and ADAM-17 expression, thus controlling breast cancer cell proliferation and invasion. Pre-miR-221/222 use in the aggressive luminal subtype may be a powerful therapeutic anti-cancer strategy.

  1. MicroRNA-139 suppresses proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells by targeting Topoisomerase II alpha

    SciTech Connect

    Hua, Wei; Sa, Ke-Di; Zhang, Xiang; Jia, Lin-Tao; Zhao, Jing; Yang, An-Gang; Zhang, Rui; Fan, Jing; Bian, Ka

    2015-08-07

    The classification of molecular subtypes of breast cancer improves the prognostic accuracy and therapeutic benefits in clinic. However, because of the complexity of breast cancer, more biomarkers and functional molecules need to be explored. Here, analyzing the data in a huge cohort of breast cancer patients, we found that Topoisomerase II alpha (TOP2a), an important target of chemotherapy is a biomarker for prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients, but not in basal like or HER2 positive breast cancer patients. We identified that miR-139, a previous reported anti-metastatic microRNA targets 3’-untranslated region (3′UTR) of TOP2a mRNA. Further more, we revealed that the forced expression of miR-139 reduces the TOP2a expression at both mRNA and protein levels. And our functional experiments showed that the ectopic expression of miR-139 remarkably inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells, while exogenous TOP2a expression could rescue inhibition of cell proliferation mediated by miR-139. Collectively, our present study demonstrates the miR-139-TOP2a regulatory axis is important for proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. This functional link may help us to further understand the specificity of subtypes of breast cancer and optimize the strategy of cancer treatment. - Highlights: • High levels of TOP2a expression are closely associated with poor prognosis in luminal type breast cancer patients. • TOP2a is a novel target of miR-139. • Overexpression of miR-139 inhibits proliferation in luminal type breast cancer cells. • TOP2a is essential for miR-139-induced growth arrest in luminal type breast cancer cells.

  2. The effects of time, luminance, and high contrast targets: revisiting grating acuity in the domestic cat.

    PubMed

    Clark, Daria L; Clark, Robert A

    2013-11-01

    Based on optical clarity and retinal cone density, the cat has a potential acuity of 20-30 cycles per degree (cpd), yet most behavioral studies estimate feline acuity between 3 and 9 cpd. Those studies, however, were limited by restrictive experimental conditions that may have inadvertently lowered the estimated grating acuity. Two domestic cats previously trained on a two-choice visual discrimination task were retrained on a grating detection/discrimination task with unlimited time, high luminance, high contrast targets, and adequate space to prevent poor accommodation from affecting the results. Initially, vertical gratings of increasing cpd were tested until failure. Then, horizontal gratings of increasing cpd were tested until failure. Finally, the finest horizontal grating resolved was confirmed with a third test requiring 24 correct out of 36 consecutive trials, yielding a binomial probability less than 0.02 of non-random occurrence. M1, a 7-year-old male gray tabby with +2.00 OU refraction, tested for a grating detection acuity of 15 cpd for both vertical and horizontal gratings (binomial probability = 0.009). F1, a 2-year-old female gray tabby with +0.25 OU refraction, tested for a grating orientation discrimination acuity of 20 cpd for both vertical and horizontal gratings (binomial probability = 0.004). These results demonstrate that a young cat with good focus is capable of discriminating 20 cpd, in close agreement with the physiologic maximum. Uncorrected focusing errors appear to degrade visual performance. Optimum experimental conditions resulted in better grating acuity measurements than previously reported, emphasizing the importance of environmental factors in feline behavioral testing.

  3. Duodenal luminal nutrient sensing

    PubMed Central

    Rønnestad, Ivar; Akiba, Yasutada; Kaji, Izumi; Kaunitz, Jonathan D

    2016-01-01

    The gastrointestinal mucosa is exposed to numerous chemical substances and microorganisms, including macronutrients, micronutrients, bacteria, endogenous ions, and proteins. The regulation of mucosal protection, digestion, absorption and motility is signaled in part by luminal solutes. Therefore, luminal chemosensing is an important mechanism enabling the mucosa to monitor luminal conditions, such as pH, ion concentrations, nutrient quantity, and microflora. The duodenal mucosa shares luminal nutrient receptors with lingual taste receptors in order to detect the five basic tastes, in addition to essential nutrients, and unwanted chemicals. The recent ‘de-orphanization’ of nutrient sensing G protein-coupled receptors provides an essential component of the mechanism by which the mucosa senses luminal nutrients. In this review, we will update the mechanisms of and underlying physiological and pathological roles in luminal nutrient sensing, with a main focus on the duodenal mucosa. PMID:25113991

  4. A MAP OF THE INTEGRATED SACHS-WOLFE SIGNAL FROM LUMINOUS RED GALAXIES

    SciTech Connect

    Granett, Benjamin R.; Neyrinck, Mark C.; Szapudi, Istvan

    2009-08-10

    We construct a map of the time derivative of the gravitational potential traced by Sloan Digital Sky Survey luminous red galaxies (LRGs). The potential decays on large scales due to cosmic acceleration, leaving an imprint on cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation through the integrated Sachs-Wolfe (ISW) effect. With a template fit, we directly measure this signature on the CMB at a 2{sigma} confidence level. The measurement is consistent with the cross-correlation statistic, strengthening the claim that dark energy is indeed the cause of the correlation. This new approach potentially simplifies the cosmological interpretation. Our constructed linear ISW map shows no evidence for degree-scale cold and hot spots associated with supervoid and supercluster structures. This suggests that the linear ISW effect in a concordance {lambda}CDM cosmology is insufficient to explain the strong CMB imprints from these structures that we previously reported.

  5. Notch signaling functions as a binary switch for the determination of glandular and luminal fates of endodermal epithelium during chicken stomach development.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshimasa; Wakamatsu, Yoshio; Kohyama, Jun; Okano, Hideyuki; Fukuda, Kimiko; Yasugi, Sadao

    2005-06-01

    During development of the chicken proventriculus (glandular stomach), gut endoderm differentiates into glandular and luminal epithelium. We found that Delta1-expressing cells, undifferentiated cells and Notch-activated cells colocalize within the endodermal epithelium during early gland formation. Inhibition of Notch signaling using Numb or dominant-negative form of Su(H) resulted in a luminal differentiation, while forced activation of Notch signaling promoted the specification of immature glandular cells, but prevented the subsequent differentiation and the invagination of the glands. These results suggest that Delta1-mediated Notch signaling among endodermal cells functions as a binary switch for determination of glandular and luminal fates, and regulates patterned differentiation of glands in the chicken proventriculus.

  6. Targeting the TGFβ signalling pathway in disease

    PubMed Central

    Akhurst, Rosemary J.; Hata, Akiko

    2012-01-01

    Many drugs that target transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) signalling have disease applications. Preclinical and clinical studies indicate the utility of these agents in fibrosis and oncology, particularly in augmentation of existing cancer therapies, such as radiation and chemotherapy, as well as in tumour vaccines. There are also reports of specialized applications, such as the reduction of vascular symptoms of Marfan syndrome. Here, we consider why the TGFβ signalling pathway is a drug target, the potential clinical applications of TGFβ inhibition, the issues arising with anti-TGFβ therapy and how these might be tackled using personalized approaches to dosing, monitoring of biomarkers as well as brief and/or localized drug-dosing regimens. PMID:23000686

  7. Aequorin targeted to the endoplasmic reticulum reveals heterogeneity in luminal Ca++ concentration and reports agonist- or IP3-induced release of Ca++.

    PubMed Central

    Button, D; Eidsath, A

    1996-01-01

    A chimeric protein (ERaeq) comprised of the invariant chain (Ii) of class II major histocompatability complex (MHC-II) and aequorin was localized in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of transfected human embryonal kidney 293 cells. The targeted aequorin resided in the lumen of the ER membrane system, including the nuclear cistern, and following addition of the chromophore coelenterazine underwent Ca(++)-activated chemiluminescence. The majority of chemiluminescence produced by coelenterazine treatment of ERaeq-expressing 293 cells was consumed rapidly (within 2-4 min) upon re-addition of Ca++ to coelenterazine-loaded cells, a finding consistent with very high Ca++ concentrations (approximately 10(-5)-10(-3) M Ca++ ion) inside the ER. However, following the initial rapid consumption of ERaeq chemiluminescence, the activity that remained (10-30% of total sample luminescence of permeabilized cells or 50-70% of total sample luminescence of intact cells) was found to produce a stable baseline corresponding to a Ca++ ion concentration < or = 1-2 microM. The stable baseline of luminescence observed following rapid consumption of the majority of the sample's activity was not derived from re-binding of fresh chromophore to spent photoprotein, suggesting that a minority fraction of the ER membrane system within which the ERaeq chimera was distributed contained a relatively low Ca++ concentration. Addition of IP3 to digitonin-permeabilized cells, or agonist treatment of intact cells decreased this residual signal. Luminescence recordings from cells expressing an ER-targeted aequorin with relatively high affinity for Ca++ thus reveal heterogeneity in luminal ER Ca++ concentration and permit observation of receptor- and IP3-activated release of Ca++ from the ER membrane system. Images PMID:8868470

  8. Targets of light signalling in Trichoderma reesei

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tropical ascomycete Trichoderma reesei (Hypocrea jecorina) represents one of the most efficient plant cell wall degraders. Regulation of the enzymes required for this process is affected by nutritional signals as well as other environmental signals including light. Results Our transcriptome analysis of strains lacking the photoreceptors BLR1 and BLR2 as well as ENV1 revealed a considerable increase in the number of genes showing significantly different transcript levels in light and darkness compared to wild-type. We show that members of all glycoside hydrolase families can be subject to light dependent regulation, hence confirming nutrient utilization including plant cell wall degradation as a major output pathway of light signalling. In contrast to N. crassa, photoreceptor mediated regulation of carbon metabolism in T. reesei occurs primarily by BLR1 and BLR2 via their positive effect on induction of env1 transcription, rather than by a presumed negative effect of ENV1 on the function of the BLR complex. Nevertheless, genes consistently regulated by photoreceptors in N. crassa and T. reesei are significantly enriched in carbon metabolic functions. Hence, different regulatory mechanisms are operative in these two fungi, while the light dependent regulation of plant cell wall degradation appears to be conserved. Analysis of growth on different carbon sources revealed that the oxidoreductive D-galactose and pentose catabolism is influenced by light and ENV1. Transcriptional regulation of the target enzymes in these pathways is enhanced by light and influenced by ENV1, BLR1 and/or BLR2. Additionally we detected an ENV1-regulated genomic cluster of 9 genes including the D-mannitol dehydrogenase gene lxr1, with two genes of this cluster showing consistent regulation in N. crassa. Conclusions We show that one major output pathway of light signalling in Trichoderma reesei is regulation of glycoside hydrolase genes and the degradation of hemicellulose

  9. Targeting RTK Signaling Pathways in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Regad, Tarik

    2015-01-01

    The RAS/MAP kinase and the RAS/PI3K/AKT pathways play a key role in the regulation of proliferation, differentiation and survival. The induction of these pathways depends on Receptor Tyrosine Kinases (RTKs) that are activated upon ligand binding. In cancer, constitutive and aberrant activations of components of those pathways result in increased proliferation, survival and metastasis. For instance, mutations affecting RTKs, Ras, B-Raf, PI3K and AKT are common in perpetuating the malignancy of several types of cancers and from different tissue origins. Therefore, these signaling pathways became prime targets for cancer therapy. This review aims to provide an overview about the most frequently encountered mutations, the pathogenesis that results from such mutations and the known therapeutic strategies developed to counteract their aberrant functions. PMID:26404379

  10. Luminal cholinergic signalling in airway lining fluid: a novel mechanism for activating chloride secretion via Ca2+-dependent Cl− and K+ channels

    PubMed Central

    Hollenhorst, Monika I; Lips, Katrin S; Wolff, Miriam; Wess, Jürgen; Gerbig, Stefanie; Takats, Zoltan; Kummer, Wolfgang; Fronius, Martin

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Recent studies detected the expression of proteins involved in cholinergic metabolism in airway epithelial cells, although the function of this non-neuronal cholinergic system is not known in detail. Thus, this study focused on the effect of luminal ACh as a regulator of transepithelial ion transport in epithelial cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH RT-PCR experiments were performed using mouse tracheal epithelial cells for ChAT and organic cation transporter (OCT) transcripts. Components of tracheal airway lining fluid were analysed with desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) MS. Effects of nicotine on mouse tracheal epithelial ion transport were examined with Ussing-chamber experiments. KEY RESULTS Transcripts encoding ChAT and OCT1–3 were detected in mouse tracheal epithelial cells. The DESI experiments identified ACh in the airway lining fluid. Luminal ACh induced an immediate, dose-dependent increase in the transepithelial ion current (EC50: 23.3 µM), characterized by a transient peak and sustained plateau current. This response was not affected by the Na+-channel inhibitor amiloride. The Cl−-channel inhibitor niflumic acid or the K+-channel blocker Ba2+ attenuated the ACh effect. The calcium ionophore A23187 mimicked the ACh effect. Luminal nicotine or muscarine increased the ion current. Experiments with receptor gene-deficient animals revealed the participation of muscarinic receptor subtypes M1 and M3. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS The presence of luminal ACh and activation of transepithelial ion currents by luminal ACh receptors identifies a novel non-neuronal cholinergic pathway in the airway lining fluid. This pathway could represent a novel drug target in the airways. PMID:22300281

  11. Luminous supernovae.

    PubMed

    Gal-Yam, Avishay

    2012-08-24

    Supernovae, the luminous explosions of stars, have been observed since antiquity. However, various examples of superluminous supernovae (SLSNe; luminosities >7 × 10(43) ergs per second) have only recently been documented. From the accumulated evidence, SLSNe can be classified as radioactively powered (SLSN-R), hydrogen-rich (SLSN-II), and hydrogen-poor (SLSN-I, the most luminous class). The SLSN-II and SLSN-I classes are more common, whereas the SLSN-R class is better understood. The physical origins of the extreme luminosity emitted by SLSNe are a focus of current research.

  12. Targeting NRF2 signaling for cancer chemoprevention

    SciTech Connect

    Kwak, Mi-Kyoung; Kensler, Thomas W.

    2010-04-01

    Modulation of the metabolism and disposition of carcinogens through induction of cytoprotective enzymes is one of several promising strategies to prevent cancer. Chemopreventive efficacies of inducers such as dithiolethiones and sulforaphane have been extensively studied in animals as well as in humans. The KEAP1-NRF2 system is a key, but not unilateral, molecular target for these chemopreventive agents. The transcription factor NRF2 (NF-E2-related factor 2) is a master regulator of the expression of a subset of genes, which produce proteins responsible for the detoxication of electrophiles and reactive oxygen species as well as the removal or repair of some of their damage products. It is believed that chemopreventive enzyme inducers affect the interaction between KEAP1 and NRF2 through either mediating conformational changes of the KEAP1 protein or activating phosphorylation cascades targeting the KEAP1-NRF2 complex. These events in turn affect NRF2 stability and trafficking. Recent advances elucidating the underlying structural biology of KEAP1-NRF2 signaling and identification of the gene clusters under the transcriptional control of NRF2 are facilitating understanding of the potential pleiotropic effects of NRF2 activators and discovery of novel classes of potent chemopreventive agents such as the triterpenoids. Although there is appropriately a concern regarding a deleterious role of the KEAP1-NRF2 system in cancer cell biology, especially as the pathway affects cell survival and drug resistance, the development and the use of NRF2 activators as chemopreventive agents still holds a great promise for protection of normal cells from a diversity of environmental stresses that contribute to the burden of cancer and other chronic, degenerative diseases.

  13. Luminous presence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawson, Paula

    2008-02-01

    The Luminous Presence project examines the use of standard film language in the framing, angle and of points of view of holographic subjects though eight digital holographic stereograms; seven 25 x 25 cm, Hail, Water, Rain, Snow, Sun, Text, Imprint and 1.5 x 1 m, Luminous Presences i. However, before embarking on a discussion of how filmic language can be used in digital holograms it is first important to explain why this line of investigation could be fruitful. Undoubtedly several of the compositional practices which sprung up and evolved throughout the development of the diverse forms of the holographic medium have contributed to a unique hologram pictorial language, however it is well known that the reading of visual imagery of any type relies a great deal on the viewer's knowledge of and experience of other images .The lens-recorded imagery of film is a far more familiar language than that of holograms and the correlation between certain filmic pictorial conventions and emotional responses are well documented and understood. ii . In short the language of film contains a highly nuanced vocabulary of shot types and lens types (which may be criticised as being formulaic) yet are effective in lending emotion to figures.

  14. Automatic target recognition employing signal compression.

    PubMed

    Ragothaman, Pradeep; Mikhael, Wasfy B; Muise, Robert R; Mahalanobis, Abhijit

    2007-07-20

    Quadratic correlation filters (QCFs) have been used successfully to detect and recognize targets embedded in background clutter. Recently, a QCF called the Rayleigh quotient quadratic correlation filter (RQQCF) was formulated for automatic target recognition (ATR) in IR imagery. Using training images from target and clutter classes, the RQQCF explicitly maximized a class separation metric. What we believe to be a novel approach is presented for ATR that synthesizes the RQQCF using compressed images. The proposed approach considerably reduces the computational complexity and storage requirements while retaining the high recognition accuracy of the original RQQCF technique. The advantages of the proposed scheme are illustrated using sample results obtained from experiments on IR imagery.

  15. Echo signal modeling of imaging LADAR target simulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Rui; Shi, Rui; Wang, Xin; Li, Zhuo

    2014-11-01

    LADAR guidance technology is one of the most promising precision guidance technologies. In the aim of simulating the return waveform of the target, a 3D geometrical model of a target is built and mathematical model of target echo signal for imaging LADAR target simulator is established by using the coordinate transformation, radar equation and ranging equation. First, the 3D geometrical data of the object model is obtained by 3D geometrical modeling. Then, target coordinate system and viewpoint coordinate system are created respectively. 3D geometrical model is built in the target coordinate system. The 3D geometrical model is transformed to the viewpoint coordinate system based on the derived relationship between the two coordinate systems. Furthermore, the range information of the target could be obtained under viewpoint coordinate system. Thus, the data of the target echo signal can be obtained by using radar equation and ranging equation. Finally, the echo signal can be exported through corresponding data interface. In order to validate the method proposed in this paper, the echo signal generated by a typical target is computed and compared with the theory solutions. The signals can be applied to drive target simulator to generate a physical target LADAR image.

  16. Targeting sonic hedgehog signaling in neurological disorders.

    PubMed

    Patel, Sita Sharan; Tomar, Sunil; Sharma, Diksha; Mahindroo, Neeraj; Udayabanu, Malairaman

    2017-03-01

    Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling influences neurogenesis and neural patterning during the development of central nervous system. Dysregulation of Shh signaling in brain leads to neurological disorders like autism spectrum disorder, depression, dementia, stroke, Parkinson's diseases, Huntington's disease, locomotor deficit, epilepsy, demyelinating disease, neuropathies as well as brain tumors. The synthesis, processing and transport of Shh ligand as well as the localization of its receptors and signal transduction in the central nervous system has been carefully reviewed. Further, we summarize the regulation of small molecule modulators of Shh pathway with potential in neurological disorders. In conclusion, further studies are warranted to demonstrate the potential of positive and negative regulators of the Shh pathway in neurological disorders.

  17. Nhe1 is a luminal Na+/H+ exchanger in mouse choroid plexus and is targeted to the basolateral membrane in Ncbe/Nbcn2-null mice.

    PubMed

    Damkier, Helle Hasager; Prasad, Vikram; Hübner, Christian Andreas; Praetorius, Jeppe

    2009-06-01

    The choroid plexus epithelium (CPE) secretes the major fraction of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The Na(+)-HCO(3)(-) transporter Ncbe/Nbcn2 in the basolateral membrane of CPE cells is important for Na(+)-dependent pH(i) increases and probably for CSF secretion. In the current study, the anion transport inhibitor DIDS had no effect on the residual pH(i) recovery in acidified CPE from Ncbe/Nbcn2 knockout mouse by 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF)-fluorescence microscopy in the presence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+DIDS 109% of control, P = 0.76, n = 5). Thus Ncbe/Nbcn2 mediates the DIDS-sensitive Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery in the CPE. The Na(+)/H(+) exchanger-1 Nhe1 is proposed to mediate similar functions as Ncbe/Nbcn2 in CPE. Here, we immunolocalize the Nhe1 protein to the luminal membrane domain in mouse and human CPE. The Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery of Nhe1 wild-type (Nhe1-wt) mice in the absence of CO(2)/HCO(3)(-) was abolished in the Nhe1 knockout CPE (Nhe1-ko 0.37% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.0007, n = 5). In Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko mice, Nhe1 was targeted to the basolateral membrane. Nevertheless, the luminal Na(+)-dependent pH(i) recovery was increased in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko compared with wild-type littermates (Nhe1-ko 146% of Nhe1-wt, P = 0.007, n = 5). Whereas the luminal Nhe activity was inhibited by the Nhe blocker EIPA (10 microM) in the Ncbe/Nbcn2-wt, it was insensitive to the inhibitor in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko (Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko+EIPA 100% of control, P = 0.98, n = 5). This indicates that a luminal EIPA-insensitive Nhe was induced in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE and that EIPA-sensitive Nhe activity was basolateral. The Nhe1 translocation in Ncbe/Nbcn2-ko CPE may reflect a compensatory response, which provides the cells with better means of regulating pH(i) or transporting Na(+) after Ncbe/Nbcn2 disruption.

  18. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Hedgehog signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Tian, Ye; Yang, Yanling; Hao, Jijun

    2017-03-17

    Hedgehog signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway which is essential in embryonic and postnatal development as well as adult organ homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of Hedgehog signaling is implicated in many diseases including cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made in the past to develop potential therapeutic agents that specifically target the Hedgehog signaling for cancer treatment. Here, we review the therapeutic agents for inhibition of the Hedgehog signaling and their clinical advances in cancer treatment.

  19. Targeting extracellular ROS signaling of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Georg

    2014-04-01

    Expression of membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX1) represents a characteristic feature of malignant cells. NOX1-derived extracellular superoxide anions are the basis for autocrine stimulation of proliferation, but also drive the HOCl and the NO/peroxynitrite signaling pathways. This may cause the elimination of transformed cells. Tumor cells express membrane-associated catalase that efficiently protects the cells against apoptosis-inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) signaling. Membrane-associated superoxide dismutase (SOD) plays a co-modulatory protective role that is functionally interrelated with the protective effect mediated by catalase. Due to the co-localization of NOX1, catalase and SOD on the outer membrane of tumor cells, specific inhibition of membrane-associated SOD causes superoxide anion-dependent inhibition of catalase. This establishes a strong apoptotic signaling through the NO/peroxynitrite pathway. In parallel, it causes a drastic decrease in the concentration of proliferation-stimulating H2O2. Knowledge of the biochemical network on the surface of tumor cells should, therefore, allow development of specific novel strategies for tumor therapy, based on the specific features of tumor cell-specific extracellular ROS interactions.

  20. CD49f and CD61 identify Her2/neu-induced mammary tumor initiating cells that are potentially derived from luminal progenitors and maintained by the integrin-TGFβ signaling

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Pang-Kuo; Kanojia, Deepak; Liu, Xinfeng; Singh, Udai P.; Berger, Franklin G.; Wang, Qian; Chen, Hexin

    2011-01-01

    HER2/Neu is overexpressed in 20-30% of breast cancers and associated with aggressive phenotypes and poor prognosis. For deciphering the role of HER2/Neu in breast cancer, mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV)-Her2/neu transgenic mice that develop mammary tumors resembling human HER2-subtype breast cancer have been established. Several recent studies have revealed that HER2/Neu is overexpressed in and regulates self renewal of breast tumor initiating cells (TICs). However, in the MMTV-Her2/neu transgenic mouse model, the identity of TICs remains elusive, despite previous studies showing supportive evidence for existence of TICs in Her2/neu-induced mammary tumors. Through systematic screening and characterization, we identified surface markers CD49f, CD61 and ESA were aberrantly overexpressed in Her2-overexpressing mammary tumor cells. Analysis of these markers as well as CD24 detected anomalous expansion of the luminal progenitor population in preneoplastic mammary glands of Her2/neu-transgenic mice, indicating that aberrant luminal progenitors originated Her2-induced mammary tumors. The combined markers, CD49f and CD61, further delineated the CD49fhighCD61high-sorted fraction as a TIC-enriched population, which displayed increased tumorsphere formation ability, enhanced tumorigenicity both in vitro and in vivo and drug resistance to pacitaxel and doxorubicin. Moreover, the TIC-enriched population manifested increased TGFβ signaling and exhibited gene expression signatures of stemness, TGFβ signaling and Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition. Our findings that self-renewal and clonogenicity of TICs were suppressed by pharmacologically inhibiting the TGFβ signaling further indicate that the TGFβ pathway is vital for maintenance of the TIC population. Finally, we showed that the integrin β3 (CD61) signaling pathway was required for sustaining active TGFβ signaling and self-renewal of TICs. We for the first time developed a technique to highly enrich TICs from mammary

  1. Target of rapamycin signaling mediates vacuolar fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Stauffer, Bobbiejane; Powers, Ted

    2017-02-01

    In eukaryotic cells, cellular homeostasis requires that different organelles respond to intracellular as well as environmental signals and modulate their behavior as conditions demand. Understanding the molecular mechanisms required for these changes remains an outstanding goal. One such organelle is the lysosome/vacuole, which undergoes alterations in size and number in response to environmental and physiological stimuli. Changes in the morphology of this organelle are mediated in part by the equilibrium between fusion and fission processes. While the fusion of the yeast vacuole has been studied intensively, the regulation of vacuolar fission remains poorly characterized by comparison. In recent years, a number of studies have incorporated genome-wide visual screens and high-throughput microscopy to identify factors required for vacuolar fission in response to diverse cellular insults, including hyperosmotic and endoplasmic reticulum stress. Available evidence now demonstrates that the rapamycin-sensitive TOR network, a master regulator of cell growth, is required for vacuolar fragmentation in response to stress. Importantly, many of the genes identified in these studies provide new insights into potential links between the vacuolar fission machinery and TOR signaling. Together these advances both extend our understanding of the regulation of vacuolar fragmentation in yeast as well as underscore the role of analogous events in mammalian cells.

  2. Role of signal peptides in targeting of proteins in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Mackle, M M; Zilinskas, B A

    1994-01-01

    Proteins of cyanobacteria may be transported across one of two membrane systems: the typical eubacterial cell envelope (consisting of an inner membrane, periplasmic space, and an outer membrane) and the photosynthetic thylakoids. To investigate the role of signal peptides in targeting in cyanobacteria, Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was transformed with vectors carrying the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene fused to coding sequences for one of four different signal peptides. These included signal peptides of two proteins of periplasmic space origin (one from Escherichia coli and the other from Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942) and two other signal peptides of proteins located in the thylakoid lumen (one from a cyanobacterium and the other from a higher plant). The location of the gene fusion products expressed in Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7942 was determined by a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of subcellular fractions. The distribution pattern for gene fusions with periplasmic signal peptides was different from that of gene fusions with thylakoid lumen signal peptides. Primary sequence analysis revealed conserved features in the thylakoid lumen signal peptides that were absent from the periplasmic signal peptides. These results suggest the importance of the signal peptide in protein targeting in cyanobacteria and point to the presence of signal peptide features conserved between chloroplasts and cyanobacteria for targeting of proteins to the thylakoid lumen. Images PMID:8144451

  3. Circumferential targeted renal sympathetic nerve denervation with preservation of the renal arterial wall using intra-luminal ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Austin; Coleman, Leslie; Sakakura, Kenichi; Ladich, Elena; Virmani, Renu

    2015-03-01

    An intra-luminal ultrasound catheter system (ReCor Medical's Paradise System) has been developed to provide circumferential denervation of the renal sympathetic nerves, while preserving the renal arterial intimal and medial layers, in order to treat hypertension. The Paradise System features a cylindrical non-focused ultrasound transducer centered within a balloon that circulates cooling fluid and that outputs a uniform circumferential energy pattern designed to ablate tissues located 1-6 mm from the arterial wall and protect tissues within 1 mm. RF power and cooling flow rate are controlled by the Paradise Generator which can energize transducers in the 8.5-9.5 MHz frequency range. Computer simulations and tissue-mimicking phantom models were used to develop the proper power, cooling flow rate and sonication duration settings to provide consistent tissue ablation for renal arteries ranging from 5-8 mm in diameter. The modulation of these three parameters allows for control over the near-field (border of lesion closest to arterial wall) and far-field (border of lesion farthest from arterial wall, consisting of the adventitial and peri-adventitial spaces) depths of the tissue lesion formed by the absorption of ultrasonic energy and conduction of heat. Porcine studies have confirmed the safety (protected intimal and medial layers) and effectiveness (ablation of 1-6 mm region) of the system and provided near-field and far-field depth data to correlate with bench and computer simulation models. The safety and effectiveness of the Paradise System, developed through computer model, bench and in vivo studies, has been demonstrated in human clinical studies.

  4. Targeting the Hedgehog signaling pathway in cancer: beyond Smoothened.

    PubMed

    Gonnissen, Annelies; Isebaert, Sofie; Haustermans, Karin

    2015-06-10

    An essential role for Hedgehog (Hh) signaling in human cancer has been established beyond doubt. At present, targeting Hh signaling has mainly been investigated with SMO inhibitors. Unfortunately, resistance against currently used SMO inhibitors has already been observed in basal cell carcinoma (BCC) patients. Therefore, the use of Hh inhibitors targeting the signaling cascade more downstream of SMO could represent a more promising strategy. Furthermore, besides the classical canonical way of Hh signaling activation, non-canonical activation of the GLI transcription factors by multiple important signaling pathways (e.g. MAPK, PI3K, TGFβ) has also been described, pinpointing the importance of targeting the transcription factors GLI1/2. The most promising agent in this context is probably the GLI1/2 inhibitor GANT61 which has been investigated preclinically in numerous tumor types in the last few years. In this review, the emerging role of Hh signaling in cancer is critically evaluated focusing on the potential of targeting Hh signaling more downstream of SMO, i.e. at the level of the GLI transcription factors. Furthermore, the working mechanism and therapeutic potential of the most extensively studied GLI inhibitor in human cancer, i.e. GANT61, is discussed in detail. In conclusion, GANT61 appears to be highly effective against human cancer cells and in xenograft mouse models, targeting almost all of the classical hallmarks of cancer and could hence represent a promising treatment option for human cancer.

  5. Mammalian circadian signaling networks and therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Liu, Andrew C; Lewis, Warren G; Kay, Steve A

    2007-10-01

    Virtually all cells in the body have an intracellular clockwork based on a negative feedback mechanism. The circadian timekeeping system in mammals is a hierarchical multi-oscillator network, with the suprachiasmatic nuclei (SCN) acting as the central pacemaker. The SCN synchronizes to daily light-dark cycles and coordinates rhythmic physiology and behavior. Synchronization in the SCN and at the organismal level is a key feature of the circadian clock system. In particular, intercellular coupling in the SCN synchronizes neuron oscillators and confers robustness against perturbations. Recent advances in our knowledge of and ability to manipulate circadian rhythms make available cell-based clock models, which lack strong coupling and are ideal for target discovery and chemical biology.

  6. Target image search using fMRI signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Shi; Song, Sutao; Zhan, Yu; Zhang, Jiacai

    2014-03-01

    Recent neural signal decoding studies based on functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) have identified the specific image presenting to the subject from a set of potential images, and some studies extend neural decoding into image reconstruction, i.e. image contents that the subject perceived were decoded from the fMRI signals recorded during the subject looking at images. In this paper, we decoded the target images using fMRI signals and described a target image searching method based on the relationship between target image stimuli and fMRI activity. We recorded fMRI data during a serial visual stimuli image presentation task, some of the stimuli images were target images and the rest images were non-target ones. Our fMRI data analysis results showed that in the serial visual presentation task, target images elicited a stereotypical response in the fMRI, which can be detected by multi-voxel pattern analysis (MVPA). Classifiers designed with support vector machine (SVM) used this response to decipher target images from non-target images. The leave-one-run-out cross-validation showed that we can pick out the target images with a possibility far above the chance level, which indicate that there's a neural signatures correlated with the target image recognition process in the human systems.

  7. Targeting the Notch signaling pathway in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Guo, Huajiao; Lu, Yi; Wang, Jianhua; Liu, Xia; Keller, Evan T; Liu, Qian; Zhou, Qinghua; Zhang, Jian

    2014-11-01

    Despite advances in surgery, imaging, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy, the poor overall cancer-related death rate remains unacceptable. Novel therapeutic strategies are desperately needed. Nowadays, targeted therapy has become the most promising therapy and a welcome asset to the cancer therapeutic arena. There is a large body of evidence demonstrating that the Notch signaling pathway is critically involved in the pathobiology of a variety of malignancies. In this review, we provide an overview of emerging data, highlight the mechanism of the Notch signaling pathway in the development of a wide range of cancers, and summarize recent progress in therapeutic targeting of the Notch signaling pathway.

  8. Nonlinear photoacoustic signal amplification from single targets in absorption background☆

    PubMed Central

    Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Menyaev, Yulian A.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2013-01-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) detection of single absorbing targets such as nanoparticles or cells can be limited by absorption background. We show here that this problem can be overcome by using the nonlinear photoacoustics based on the differences in PA signal dependences on the laser energy from targets and background. Among different nonlinear phenomena, we focused on laser generation of nanobubbles as more efficient PA signal amplifiers from strongly absorbing, highly localized targets in the presence of spatially homogenous absorption background generating linear signals only. This approach was demonstrated by using nonlinear PA flow cytometry platform for label-free detection of circulating melanoma cells in blood background in vitro and in vivo. Nonlinearly amplified PA signals from overheated melanin nanoclusters in melanoma cells became detectable above still linear blood background. Nonlinear nanobubble-based photoacoustics provide new opportunities to significantly (5–20-fold) increase PA contrast of single nanoparticles, cells, viruses and bacteria in complex biological environments. PMID:24921062

  9. Lidar Luminance Quantizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quilligan, Gerard; DeMonthier, Jeffrey; Suarez, George

    2011-01-01

    This innovation addresses challenges in lidar imaging, particularly with the detection scheme and the shapes of the detected signals. Ideally, the echoed pulse widths should be extremely narrow to resolve fine detail at high event rates. However, narrow pulses require wideband detection circuitry with increased power dissipation to minimize thermal noise. Filtering is also required to shape each received signal into a form suitable for processing by a constant fraction discriminator (CFD) followed by a time-to-digital converter (TDC). As the intervals between the echoes decrease, the finite bandwidth of the shaping circuits blends the pulses into an analog signal (luminance) with multiple modes, reducing the ability of the CFD to discriminate individual events

  10. Feature long axis size and local luminance contrast determine ship target acquisition performance: strong evidence for the TOD case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bijl, Piet; Toet, Alexander; Kooi, Frank L.

    2016-10-01

    Visual images of a civilian target ship on a sea background were produced using a CAD model. The total set consisted of 264 images and included 3 different color schemes, 2 ship viewing aspects, 5 sun illumination conditions, 2 sea reflection values, 2 ship positions with respect to the horizon and 3 values of atmospheric contrast reduction. In a perception experiment, the images were presented on a display in a long darkened corridor. Observers were asked to indicate the range at which they were able to detect the ship and classify the following 5 ship elements: accommodation, funnel, hull, mast, and hat above the bridge. This resulted in a total of 1584 Target Acquisition (TA) range estimates for two observers. Next, the ship contour, ship elements and corresponding TA ranges were analyzed applying several feature size and contrast measures. Most data coincide on a contrast versus angular size plot using (1) the long axis as characteristic ship/ship feature size and (2) local Weber contrast as characteristic ship/ship feature contrast. Finally, the data were compared with a variety of visual performance functions assumed to be representative for Target Acquisition: the TOD (Triangle Orientation Discrimination), MRC (Minimum Resolvable Contrast), CTF (Contrast Threshold Function), TTP (Targeting Task Performance) metric and circular disc detection data for the unaided eye (Blackwell). The results provide strong evidence for the TOD case: both position and slope of the TOD curve match the ship detection and classification data without any free parameter. In contrast, the MRC and CTF are too steep, the TTP and disc detection curves are too shallow and all these curves need an overall scaling factor in order to coincide with the ship and ship feature recognition data.

  11. Therapeutics Targeting FGF Signaling Network in Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2016-12-01

    Fibroblast growth factor (FGF) signaling through its receptors, FGFR1, FGFR2, FGFR3, or FGFR4, regulates cell fate, angiogenesis, immunity, and metabolism. Dysregulated FGF signaling causes human diseases, such as breast cancer, chondrodysplasia, gastric cancer, lung cancer, and X-linked hypophosphatemic rickets. Recombinant FGFs are pro-FGF signaling therapeutics for tissue and/or wound repair, whereas FGF analogs and gene therapy are under development for the treatment of cardiovascular disease, diabetes, and osteoarthritis. FGF traps, anti-FGF/FGFR monoclonal antibodies (mAbs), and small-molecule FGFR inhibitors are anti-FGF signaling therapeutics under development for the treatment of cancer, chondrodysplasia, and rickets. Here, I discuss the benefit-risk and cost-effectiveness issues of precision medicine targeting FGFRs, ALK, EGFR, and FLT3. FGFR-targeted therapy should be optimized for cancer treatment, focusing on genomic tests and recurrence.

  12. Controversies in cancer stem cells: targeting embryonic signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Naoko; Ivy, S Percy

    2010-06-15

    Selectively targeting cancer stem cells (CSC) or tumor-initiating cells (TIC; from this point onward referred to as CSCs) with novel agents is a rapidly emerging field of oncology. Our knowledge of CSCs and their niche microenvironments remains a nascent field. CSC's critical dependence upon self-renewal makes these regulatory signaling pathways ripe for the development of experimental therapeutic agents. Investigational agents targeting the Notch, Hedgehog, and Wnt pathways are currently in late preclinical development stages, with some early phase 1-2 testing in human subjects. This series of articles will provide an overview and summary of the current state of knowledge of CSCs, their interactive microenvironment, and how they may serve as important targets for antitumor therapies. We also examine the scope and stage of development of early experimental agents that specifically target these highly conserved embryonic signaling pathways.

  13. The eukaryotic signal sequence, YGRL, targets the chlamydial inclusion

    PubMed Central

    Kabeiseman, Emily J.; Cichos, Kyle H.; Moore, Elizabeth R.

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how host proteins are targeted to pathogen-specified organelles, like the chlamydial inclusion, is fundamentally important to understanding the biogenesis of these unique subcellular compartments and how they maintain autonomy within the cell. Syntaxin 6, which localizes to the chlamydial inclusion, contains an YGRL signal sequence. The YGRL functions to return syntaxin 6 to the trans-Golgi from the plasma membrane, and deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 also prevents the protein from localizing to the chlamydial inclusion. YGRL is one of three YXXL (YGRL, YQRL, and YKGL) signal sequences which target proteins to the trans-Golgi. We designed various constructs of eukaryotic proteins to test the specificity and propensity of YXXL sequences to target the inclusion. The YGRL signal sequence redirects proteins (e.g., Tgn38, furin, syntaxin 4) that normally do not localize to the chlamydial inclusion. Further, the requirement of the YGRL signal sequence for syntaxin 6 localization to inclusions formed by different species of Chlamydia is conserved. These data indicate that there is an inherent property of the chlamydial inclusion, which allows it to recognize the YGRL signal sequence. To examine whether this “inherent property” was protein or lipid in nature, we asked if deletion of the YGRL signal sequence from syntaxin 6 altered the ability of the protein to interact with proteins or lipids. Deletion or alteration of the YGRL from syntaxin 6 does not appreciably impact syntaxin 6-protein interactions, but does decrease syntaxin 6-lipid interactions. Intriguingly, data also demonstrate that YKGL or YQRL can successfully substitute for YGRL in localization of syntaxin 6 to the chlamydial inclusion. Importantly and for the first time, we are establishing that a eukaryotic signal sequence targets the chlamydial inclusion. PMID:25309881

  14. Signal Transduction in the Chronic Leukemias: Implications for Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Wesam; Van Etten, Richard A.

    2013-01-01

    The chronic leukemias, including chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), the Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), have been characterized extensively for abnormalities of cellular signaling pathways. This effort has led to the elucidation of the central role of dysregulated tyrosine kinase signaling in the chronic myeloid neoplasms and of constitutive B-cell receptor signaling in CLL. This, in turn, has stimulated the development of small molecule inhibitors of these signaling pathways for therapy of chronic leukemia. Although the field is still in its infancy, the clinical results with these agents have ranged from encouraging (CLL) to spectacular (CML). In this review, we summarize recent studies that have helped to define the signaling pathways critical to the pathogenesis of the chronic leukemias. We also discuss correlative studies emerging from clinical trials of drugs targeting these pathways. PMID:23307472

  15. Cotranslational signal independent SRP preloading during membrane targeting

    PubMed Central

    Chartron, Justin W.; Hunt, Katherine C. L.; Frydman, Judith

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome-associated factors must faithfully decode the limited information available in nascent polypeptides to direct them to their correct cellular fate1. It is unclear how the low complexity information exposed by the nascent chain suffices for accurate recognition by the many factors competing for the limited surface near the ribosomal exit site2,3. Questions remain even for the well-studied cotranslational targeting cycle to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), involving recognition of linear hydrophobic Signal Sequences (SS) or Transmembrane Domains (TMD) by the Signal Recognition Particle (SRP)4,5. Intriguingly, SRP is in low abundance relative to the large number of ribosome nascent chain complexes (RNCs), yet it accurately selects those destined to the ER6. Despite their overlapping specificities, SRP and the cotranslational Hsp70 SSB display exquisite mutually exclusive selectivity in vivo for their cognate RNCs7,8. To understand cotranslational nascent chain recognition in vivo, we interrogated the cotranslational membrane targeting cycle using ribosome profiling (herein Ribo-seq)9 coupled with biochemical fractionation of ribosome populations. Unexpectedly, SRP preferentially binds secretory RNCs before targeting signals are translated. We show non-coding mRNA elements can promote this signal-independent SRP pre-recruitment. Our study defines the complex kinetic interplay between elongation and determinants in the polypeptide and mRNA modulating SRP-substrate selection and membrane targeting. PMID:27487213

  16. Progress in Small Molecule and Biologic Therapeutics Targeting Ghrelin Signaling.

    PubMed

    McGovern, Kayleigh R; Darling, Joseph E; Hougland, James L

    2016-01-01

    Ghrelin is a circulating peptide hormone involved in regulation of a wide array of physiological processes. As an endogenous ligand for growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR1a), ghrelin is responsible for signaling involved in energy homeostasis, including appetite stimulation, glucose metabolism, insulin signaling, and adiposity. Ghrelin has also been implicated in modulation of several neurological processes. Dysregulation of ghrelin signaling is implicated in diseases related to these pathways, including obesity, type II diabetes, and regulation of appetite and body weight in patients with Prader-Willi syndrome. Multiple steps in the ghrelin signaling pathway are available for targeting in the development of therapeutics for these diseases. Agonists and antagonists of GHS-R1a have been widely studied and have shown varying levels of effectiveness within ghrelin-related physiological pathways. Agents targeting ghrelin directly, either through depletion of ghrelin levels in circulation or inhibitors of ghrelin O-acyltransferase whose action is required for ghrelin to become biologically active, are receiving increasing attention as potential therapeutic options. We discuss the approaches utilized to target ghrelin signaling and highlight the current challenges toward developing small-molecule agents as potential therapeutics for ghrelin-related diseases.

  17. Key cancer cell signal transduction pathways as therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Bianco, Roberto; Melisi, Davide; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2006-02-01

    Growth factor signals are propagated from the cell surface, through the action of transmembrane receptors, to intracellular effectors that control critical functions in human cancer cells, such as differentiation, growth, angiogenesis, and inhibition of cell death and apoptosis. Several kinases are involved in transduction pathways via sequential signalling activation. These kinases include transmembrane receptor kinases (e.g., epidermal growth factor receptor EGFR); or cytoplasmic kinases (e.g., PI3 kinase). In cancer cells, these signalling pathways are often altered and results in a phenotype characterized by uncontrolled growth and increased capability to invade surrounding tissue. Therefore, these crucial transduction molecules represent attractive targets for cancer therapy. This review will summarize current knowledge of key signal transduction pathways, that are altered in cancer cells, as therapeutic targets for novel selective inhibitors. The most advanced targeted agents currently under development interfere with function and expression of several signalling molecules, including the EGFR family; the vascular endothelial growth factor and its receptors; and cytoplasmic kinases such as Ras, PI3K and mTOR.

  18. TNFα reverse signaling promotes sympathetic axon growth and target innervation

    PubMed Central

    Kisiswa, Lilian; Osório, Catarina; Erice, Clara; Vizard, Thomas; Wyatt, Sean; Davies, Alun M

    2013-01-01

    Reverse signaling via members of the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily is increasingly recognized among cells of the immune system where it controls multiple aspects of immune function. Here we document TNFα reverse signaling in the nervous system for the first time and show that it plays a crucial role in establishing sympathetic innervation. During postnatal development, sympathetic axons express TNFα as they grow and branch in their target tissues which in turn express TNFR1. In culture, soluble forms of TNFR1 act directly on postnatal sympathetic axons to promote growth and branching by a mechanism that depends on membrane integrated TNFα and downstream MEK/ERK activation. Sympathetic innervation density is significantly reduced in several tissues in postnatal and adult mice lacking either TNFα or TNFR1. These findings reveal that target-derived TNFR1 acts as a reverse signaling ligand for membrane-integrated TNFα to promote sympathetic axon growth and branching. PMID:23749144

  19. OLED lightings with optical feedback for luminance difference compensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, D. K.; Park, J. W.

    2013-12-01

    We have employed an optical feedback circuit in an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) lighting system to ensure uniform light output across large-area OLED lighting tiles. In a lighting system with several large-area OLED lighting tiles involved, the panel aging (luminance decrease) may appear differently in each, resulting in a falling-off in lighting quality. To tackle this, light output from each OLED tile is monitored by the optical feedback circuit that consists of a photodetector, I-V converter, 10-bit analogue-digital converter (ADC), and comparator. A photodetector mounted on a glass side generates a feedback signal (current) by detecting side-emitting OLED light. To monitor bottom-emitting output light by detecting side-emitting OLED light, a mapping table between the ADC value and the luminance of bottom emission has been established. If the ADC value is lower or higher than the reference one corresponding to the target luminance of OLED tiles, a micro controller unit adjusts the pulse width modulation used for the control of the power supplied to OLED tiles in such a way that the ADC value obtained from optical feedback is the same as the reference one. As a result, the target luminance of each individual OLED tile is kept unchanged. With the optical feedback circuit included in the lighting system, we have observed less than 2% difference in relative intensity of neighboring OLED tiles.

  20. Targeting kinase signaling pathways with constrained peptide scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Hanold, Laura E; Fulton, Melody D; Kennedy, Eileen J

    2017-02-07

    Kinases are amongst the largest families in the human proteome and serve as critical mediators of a myriad of cell signaling pathways. Since altered kinase activity is implicated in a variety of pathological diseases, kinases have become a prominent class of proteins for targeted inhibition. Although numerous small molecule and antibody-based inhibitors have already received clinical approval, several challenges may still exist with these strategies including resistance, target selection, inhibitor potency and in vivo activity profiles. Constrained peptide inhibitors have emerged as an alternative strategy for kinase inhibition. Distinct from small molecule inhibitors, peptides can provide a large binding surface area that allows them to bind shallow protein surfaces rather than defined pockets within the target protein structure. By including chemical constraints within the peptide sequence, additional benefits can be bestowed onto the peptide scaffold such as improved target affinity and target selectivity, cell permeability and proteolytic resistance. In this review, we highlight examples of diverse chemistries that are being employed to constrain kinase-targeting peptide scaffolds and highlight their application to modulate kinase signaling as well as their potential clinical implications.

  1. An effect of contrast and luminance on visual representational momentum for location.

    PubMed

    Hubbard, Timothy L; Ruppel, Susan E

    2014-01-01

    Effects of the contrast of target luminance and background luminance, and of the absolute level of target luminance, on representational momentum for the remembered final location of a previously viewed moving target were examined. Targets were high in contrast or luminance, decreasing in contrast or luminance, increasing in contrast or luminance, or low in contrast or luminance; the background was black or white. Representational momentum for target location was larger if targets were high or increasing in contrast or luminance and smaller if targets were low or decreasing in contrast or luminance. Representational momentum for target location was larger if targets were presented on a white background than on a black background. Implications for theories of localization and for theories of representational momentum are discussed.

  2. Hedgehog signaling pathway as a therapeutic target for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Haixia; Li, Jinghua; Feng, Limin

    2016-02-01

    Ovarian cancer is the most lethal cause of death among gynecological malignancies. Despite advancements in surgery and chemotherapy treatment strategies, the prognosis of ovarian cancer patients remains poor; a majority of patients relapse and eventually succumb to this disease. Therefore, novel therapeutic approaches to improve patient outcome are urgently needed. The hedgehog signaling pathway is vital for embryonic development and tissue homeostasis, and its deregulation is implicated in cancer cell growth, survival, differentiation, and metastasis. The critical role of hedgehog signaling in multiple biologic processes raises concerns about its potential therapeutic use in cancer. Consequently, many studies are focusing on hedgehog signaling as an attractive target in cancer treatment. In this review, we present an overview of the hedgehog pathway and its pathological aberrations in ovarian cancer. We also discuss inhibitors of the hedgehog signaling pathway that are currently being investigated in the laboratory and in early clinical trials; as well as the clinical challenges these inhibitors face.

  3. Pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS signaling in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Hsiao-Ching; Huang, Po-Hsien; Kulp, Samuel K; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2017-03-01

    The clear importance of mutated KRAS as a therapeutic target has driven the investigation of multiple approaches to inhibit oncogenic KRAS signaling at different molecular levels. However, no KRAS-targeted therapy has reached the clinic to date, which underlies the intrinsic difficulty in developing effective, direct inhibitors of KRAS. Thus, this article provides an overview of the history and recent progress in the development of pharmacological strategies to target oncogenic KRAS with small molecule agents. Mechanistically, these KRAS-targeted agents can be classified into the following four categories. (1) Small-molecule RAS-binding ligands that prevent RAS activation by binding within or outside the nucleotide-binding motif. (2) Inhibitors of KRAS membrane anchorage. (3) Inhibitors that bind to RAS-binding domains of RAS-effector proteins. (4) Inhibitors of KRAS expression. The advantage and limitation of each type of these anti-KRAS agents are discussed.

  4. Intracellular signaling by phospholipase D as a therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Steed, P M; Chow, A H

    2001-09-01

    The pharmaceutical industry has recently focused on intracellular signaling as a means to integrate the multiple facets of complex disease states, such as inflammation, because these pathways respond to numerous extracellular signals and coordinate a collection of cell responses contributing to pathology. One critical aspect of intracellular signaling is regulation of key cell functions by lipid mediators, in particular the generation of a key mediator, phosphatidic acid (PA) via the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine by phospholipase D (PLD). Research in this field has intensified, due in part to the recent cloning and partial characterization of the two PLD isoforms in mammalian cells, and this work has contributed significantly to our understanding of events downstream of PA generation. It is these effector functions of PLD activity that make this pathway attractive as a therapeutic target while the biochemical properties of the PLD isozymes make them amenable to small molecule intervention. Recent studies indicate that PA, and its immediate metabolites diacylglycerol and lyso-PA, affect numerous cellular pathways including ligand-mediated secretion, cytoskeletal reorganisations, respiratory burst, prostaglandin release, cell migration, cytokine release, and mitogenesis. This review summarises the data implicating signaling via PLD in these cell functions, obtained from: (i) molecular analyses of PLD/effector interactions, (ii) correlation between PA production and cell responses, (iii) experimental manipulation of PA levels, (iv) inhibition of PLD regulators, and (v) direct inhibition of PA production. The utility of targeting PLD signaling for the treatment of acute/chronic inflammation and other indications is discussed in light of these data.

  5. Signaling Pathways in Schizophrenia: emerging targets and therapeutic strategies

    PubMed Central

    Karam, Caline S; Ballon, Jacob S; Bivens, Nancy M; Freyberg, Zachary; Girgis, Ragy R; Lizardi-Ortiz, Jose E; Markx, Sander; Lieberman, Jeffrey A; Javitch, Jonathan A

    2013-01-01

    Dopamine D2 receptor antagonism is a unifying property of all antipsychotic drugs in clinical use for schizophrenia. While often effective at ameliorating psychosis, these drugs are largely ineffective at treating negative and cognitive symptoms. Increasing attention is being focused on the complex genetics of the illness and the signaling pathways implicated in its pathophysiology. We review targeted approaches for pharmacotherapy involving the glutamatergic, GABAergic and cholinergic pathways. We also describe a number of the major genetic findings that identify signaling pathways representing potential targets for novel pharmacological intervention. These include genes in the 22q11 locus, DISC1, neuregulin/ERB4, and components of the Akt/GSK-3 pathway. PMID:20579747

  6. Cyclic Nucleotide Phosphodiesterases: important signaling modulators and therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Ahmad, Faiyaz; Murata, Taku; Simizu, Kasumi; Degerman, Eva; Maurice, Donald; Manganiello, Vincent

    2014-01-01

    By catalyzing hydrolysis of cAMP and cGMP, cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases are critical regulators of their intracellular concentrations and their biological effects. Since these intracellular second messengers control many cellular homeostatic processes, dysregulation of their signals and signaling pathways initiate or modulate pathophysiological pathways related to various disease states, including erectile dysfunction, pulmonary hypertension, acute refractory cardiac failure, intermittent claudication, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and psoriasis. Alterations in expression of PDEs and PDE-gene mutations (especially mutations in PDE6, PDE8B, PDE11A and PDE4) have been implicated in various diseases and cancer pathologies. PDEs also play important role in formation and function of multi-molecular signaling/regulatory complexes called signalosomes. At specific intracellular locations, individual PDEs, together with pathway-specific signaling molecules, regulators, and effectors, are incorporated into specific signalosomes, where they facilitate and regulate compartmentalization of cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways and specific cellular functions. Currently, only a limited number of PDE inhibitors (PDE3, PDE4, PDE5 inhibitors) are used in clinical practice. Future paths to novel drug discovery include the crystal structure-based design approach, which has resulted in generation of more effective family-selective inhibitors, as well as burgeoning development of strategies to alter compartmentalized cyclic nucleotide signaling pathways by selectively targeting individual PDEs and their signalosome partners. PMID:25056711

  7. Adiponectin signaling and function in insulin target tissues

    PubMed Central

    Ruan, Hong; Dong, Lily Q.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity-linked type 2 diabetes is one of the paramount causes of morbidity and mortality worldwide, posing a major threat on human health, productivity, and quality of life. Despite great progress made towards a better understanding of the molecular basis of diabetes, the available clinical counter-measures against insulin resistance, a defect that is central to obesity-linked type 2 diabetes, remain inadequate. Adiponectin, an abundant adipocyte-secreted factor with a wide-range of biological activities, improves insulin sensitivity in major insulin target tissues, modulates inflammatory responses, and plays a crucial role in the regulation of energy metabolism. However, adiponectin as a promising therapeutic approach has not been thoroughly explored in the context of pharmacological intervention, and extensive efforts are being devoted to gain mechanistic understanding of adiponectin signaling and its regulation, and reveal therapeutic targets. Here, we discuss tissue- and cell-specific functions of adiponectin, with an emphasis on the regulation of adiponectin signaling pathways, and the potential crosstalk between the adiponectin and other signaling pathways involved in metabolic regulation. Understanding better just why and how adiponectin and its downstream effector molecules work will be essential, together with empirical trials, to guide us to therapies that target the root cause(s) of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. PMID:26993044

  8. NF-κB Signaling: Multiple angles to target OA

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Kenneth B.; Otero, Miguel; Olivotto, Eleonora; Borzi, Rosa Maria; Goldring, Mary B.

    2011-01-01

    In the context of OA disease, NF-κB transcription factors can be triggered by a host of stress-related stimuli including pro-inflammatory cytokines, excessive mechanical stress and ECM degradation products. Activated NF-κB regulates the expression of many cytokines and chemokines, adhesion molecules, inflammatory mediators, and several matrix degrading enzymes. NF-κB also influences the regulated accumulation and remodeling of ECM proteins and has indirect positive effects on downstream regulators of terminal chondrocyte differentiation (including β-catenin and Runx2). Although driven partly by pro-inflammatory and stress-related factors, OA pathogenesis also involves a “loss of maturational arrest” that inappropriately pushes chondrocytes towards a more differentiated, hypertrophic-like state. Growing evidence points to NF-κB signaling as not only playing a central role in the pro-inflammatory stress-related responses of chondrocytes to extra- and intra-cellular insults, but also in the control of their differentiation program. Thus unlike other signaling pathways the NF-κB activating kinases are potential therapeutic OA targets for multiple reasons. Targeted strategies to prevent unwanted NF-κB activation in this context, which do not cause side effects on other proteins or signaling pathways, need to be focused on the use of highly specific drug modalities, siRNAs or other biological inhibitors that are targeted to the activating NF-κB kinases IKKα or IKKβ or specific activating canonical NF-κB subunits. However, work remains in its infancy to evaluate the effects of efficacious, targeted NF-κB inhibitors in animal models of OA disease in vivo and to also target these strategies only to affected cartilage and joints to avoid other undesirable systemic effects. PMID:20199390

  9. Targeting fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Ann-Lii; Shen, Ying-Chun; Zhu, Andrew X

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the primary type of liver cancer, and both the age-adjusted incidence and mortality of HCC have steadily increased in recent years. Advanced HCC is associated with a very poor survival rate. Despite accumulating data regarding the risk factors for HCC, the mechanisms that contribute to HCC tumorigenesis remain poorly understood. Signaling through the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family is involved in fibrosis and its progression to cirrhosis of the liver, which is a risk factor for the development of HCC. Furthermore, several alterations in FGF/FGF receptor (FGFR) signaling correlate with the outcomes of HCC patients, suggesting that signaling through this family of proteins contributes to the development or progression of HCC tumors. Currently, there are no established systemic treatments for patients with advanced HCC in whom sorafenib treatment has failed or who were unable to tolerate it. Recently, several multikinase inhibitors that target FGFRs have demonstrated some early evidence of antitumor activity in phase I/II trials. Therefore, this review discusses the molecular implications of FGFR-mediated signaling in HCC and summarizes the clinical evidence for novel FGFR-targeted therapies for HCC currently being studied in clinical trials.

  10. Some new luminance-gradient effects.

    PubMed

    Zavagno, D

    1999-01-01

    Three compelling luminance-gradient effects are described. The first effect concerns a brightness enhancement and a luminous mist spreading out from a central area having the same luminance as the white background and surrounded by four rectangular inducers shaded with a linear luminance gradient. The second effect is perceived with a photographically reversed configuration, and concerns what may be considered a brightness reduction or the enhancement of a darkness quality of a target area of the visual scene. The third effect concerns the perception of a self-luminous disk inside a somewhat foggy medium. The effects are worthy of further examination because they challenge current theories of luminosity perception and brightness perception in general.

  11. Protein kinase A signaling as an anti-aging target.

    PubMed

    Enns, Linda C; Ladiges, Warren

    2010-07-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) is a multi-unit protein kinase that mediates signal transduction of G-protein-coupled receptors through its activation by adenyl cyclase (AC)-mediated cAMP. The vital importance of PKA signaling to cellular function is reflected in the widespread expression of PKA subunit genes. As one of its many functions, PKA plays a key role in the regulation of metabolism and triglyceride storage. The PKA pathway has become of great interest to the study of aging, since mutations that cause a reduction in PKA signaling have been shown to extend lifespan in yeast, and to both delay the incidence and severity of age-related disease, and to promote leanness and longevity, in mice. There is increasing interest in the potential for the inhibition or redistribution of adiposity to attenuate aging, since obesity is associated with impaired function of most organ systems, and is a strong risk factor for shortened life span. Its association with coronary heart disease, hypertension, type 2 diabetes, cancer, sleep apnea and osteoarthritis is leading to its accession as a major cause of global ill health. Therefore, gene signaling pathways such as PKA that promote adiposity are potential inhibitory targets for aging intervention. Since numerous plant compounds have been found that both prevent adipogenesis and inhibit PKA signaling, a focused investigation into their effects on biological systems and the corresponding molecular mechanisms would be of high relevance to the discovery of novel and non-toxic compounds that promote healthy aging.

  12. Apparent speed increases at low luminance

    PubMed Central

    Vaziri-Pashkam, Maryam; Cavanagh, Patrick

    2009-01-01

    To investigate the effect of luminance on apparent speed, subjects adjusted the speed of a low-luminance rotating grating (0.31 cd/m2) to match that of a high-luminance one (1260 cd/m2). Above 4 Hz, subjects overestimated the speed of the low-luminance grating. This overestimation increased as a function of temporal rate and reached 30% around 10 Hz temporal rates. The speed overestimation became significant once the lower luminance was 2.4 log units lower than the high luminance comparison. Next the role of motion smear in speed overestimation was examined. First it was shown that the length of the perceived motion smear increased at low luminances. Second, the length of the visible smear was manipulated by changing the presentation time of the stimuli. Speed overestimation was reduced at shorter presentation times. Third the speed of a blurred stimulus was compared to a stimulus with sharp edges and the blurred stimulus was judged to move faster. These results indicate that the length of motion smear following a target contributes to its perceived speed and that this leads to speed overestimation at low luminance where motion traces lengthen because of increased persistence. PMID:19146275

  13. Targeting signals and subunit interactions in coated vesicle adaptor complexes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    There are two clathrin-coated vesicle adaptor complexes in the cell, one associated with the plasma membrane and one associated with the TGN. The subunit composition of the plasma membrane adaptor complex is alpha-adaptin, beta-adaptin, AP50, and AP17; while that of the TGN adaptor complex is gamma-adaptin, beta'-adaptin, AP47, and AP19. To search for adaptor targeting signals, we have constructed chimeras between alpha-adaptin and gamma-adaptin within their NH2-terminal domains. We have identified stretches of sequence in the two proteins between amino acids approximately 130 and 330-350 that are essential for targeting. Immunoprecipitation reveals that this region determines whether a construct coassemblies with AP50 and AP17, or with AP47 and AP19. These observations suggest that these other subunits may play an important role in targeting. In contrast, beta- and beta'-adaptins are clearly not involved in this event. Chimeras between the alpha- and gamma-adaptin COOH-terminal domains reveal the presence of a second targeting signal. We have further investigated the interactions between the adaptor subunits using the yeast two-hybrid system. Interactions can be detected between the beta/beta'-adaptins and the alpha/gamma- adaptins, between the beta/beta'-adaptins and the AP50/AP47 subunits, between alpha-adaptin and AP17, and between gamma-adaptin and AP19. These results indicate that the adaptor subunits act in concert to target the complex to the appropriate membrane. PMID:7593184

  14. Transsynaptic Teneurin Signaling in Neuromuscular Synapse Organization and Target Choice

    PubMed Central

    Mosca, Timothy J.; Hong, Weizhe; Dani, Vardhan S.; Favaloro, Vincenzo; Luo, Liqun

    2012-01-01

    Synapse assembly requires transsynaptic signals between the pre- and postsynapse1, but the understanding of essential organizational molecules remains incomplete2. Teneurins are conserved, EGF-repeat containing transmembrane proteins with large extracellular domains3. Here we show that two Drosophila Teneurins, Ten-m and Ten-a, are required for neuromuscular synapse organization and target selection. Ten-a is presynaptic while Ten-m is mostly postsynaptic; neuronal Ten-a and muscle Ten-m form a complex in vivo. Pre- or postsynaptic Teneurin perturbations cause severe synapse loss and impair many facets of organization transsynaptically and cell-autonomously. These include defects in active zone apposition, release sites, membrane and vesicle organization, and synaptic transmission. Moreover, the presynaptic microtubule and postsynaptic spectrin cytoskeletons are severely disrupted, suggesting a mechanism whereby Teneurins organize the cytoskeleton, which in turn affects other aspects of synapse development. Supporting this, Ten-m physically interacts with α-spectrin. Genetic analyses of teneurin and neuroligin reveal their differential roles that synergize to promote synapse assembly. Finally, at elevated endogenous levels, Ten-m regulates specific motoneuron-muscle target selection. Our study identifies the Teneurins as a key bi-directional transsynaptic signal in general synapse organization, and demonstrates that such a molecule can also regulate target selection. PMID:22426000

  15. Intracellular signals of lung cancer cells as possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Kumano, Keiki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several molecularly targeted therapies have been developed as part of lung cancer treatment; they have produced dramatically good results. However, among the many oncogenes that have been identified to be involved in the development of lung cancers, a number of oncogenes are not covered by these advanced therapies. For the treatment of lung cancers, which is a group of heterogeneous diseases, persistent effort in developing individual therapies based on the respective causal genes is important. In addition, for the development of a novel therapy, identification of the lung epithelial stem cells and the origin cells of lung cancer, and understanding about candidate cancer stem cells in lung cancer tissues, their intracellular signaling pathways, and the mechanism of dysregulation of the pathways in cancer cells are extremely important. However, the development of drug resistance by cancer cells, despite the use of molecularly targeted drugs for the causal genes, thus obstructing treatment, is a well-known phenomenon. In this article, we discuss major causal genes of lung cancers and intracellular signaling pathways involving those genes, and review studies on origin and stem cells of lung cancers, as well as the possibility of developing molecularly targeted therapies based on these studies. PMID:25707772

  16. Bacterial type I signal peptidases as antibiotic targets.

    PubMed

    Smitha Rao, C V; Anné, Jozef

    2011-11-01

    Despite an alarming increase in morbidity and mortality caused by multidrug-resistant bacteria, the number of antibiotics available to efficiently combat them is dwindling. Consequently, there is a pressing need for new drugs, preferably with novel modes of action to avert the problem of cross-resistance. Several new targets have been proposed, including proteins essential in the protein secretion pathway such as the type I signal peptidase (SPase), indispensable for the release of the signal peptide during secretion of Sec- and Tat-dependent proteins. The type I SPase is considered to be an attractive target because it is essential, substantially different from the eukaryotic counterpart, and its active site is located at the outer leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane, permitting relatively easy access to potential inhibitors. A few SPase inhibitors have already been identified, but their suitability as drugs is yet to be confirmed. An overview is given on the currently known SPase inhibitors, how they can give valuable information on the structural, biochemical and target validation aspects of the SPases, the approaches to identify them, and their future potential as drugs.

  17. FGFR Signaling as a Target for Lung Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Desai, Arpita; Adjei, Alex A

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death in developed countries. Recently, molecular targeted therapies have shown promising results in the management of lung cancer. These therapies require a clear understanding of the relevant pathways that drive carcinogenesis and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) signaling axis is one such pathway that plays a central role in normal cellular function. Alterations in this pathway have been found in many cancers. In this review article, we focus on the role of this pathway in lung cancer. We present the molecular structure of FGFR, the interaction of the receptor with its ligands (the fibroblast growth factors), its downstream signaling, and aberrations in the FGFR pathway. We also discuss clinical trials involving selective and multikinase FGFR inhibitors in lung cancer treatment.

  18. Targeting MAPK Signaling in Age-Related Macular Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Kyosseva, Svetlana V.

    2016-01-01

    Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is a major cause of irreversible blindness affecting elderly people in the world. AMD is a complex multifactorial disease associated with demographic, genetics, and environmental risk factors. It is well established that oxidative stress, inflammation, and apoptosis play critical roles in the pathogenesis of AMD. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways are activated by diverse extracellular stimuli, including growth factors, mitogens, hormones, cytokines, and different cellular stressors such as oxidative stress. They regulate cell proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. This review addresses the novel findings from human and animal studies on the relationship of MAPK signaling with AMD. The use of specific MAPK inhibitors may represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of this debilitating eye disease. PMID:27385915

  19. Lung cancer therapeutics that target signaling pathways: an update.

    PubMed

    Ray, M Roshni; Jablons, David; He, Biao

    2010-10-01

    Claiming more than 150,000 lives each year, lung cancer is the deadliest cancer in the USA. First-line treatments in lung cancer include surgical resection and chemotherapy, the latter of which offers only modest survival benefits at the expense of often severe and debilitating side effects. Recent advances in elucidating the molecular biology of lung carcinogenesis have elucidated novel drug targets, and treatments are rapidly evolving into specialized agents that hone in on specific aspects of the disease. Of particular interest is blocking tumor growth by targeting the physiological processes surrounding angiogenesis, pro-tumorigenic growth factor activation, anti-apoptotic cascades and other cancer-promoting signal transduction events. This article looks at several areas of interest to lung cancer therapeutics and considers the current state of affairs surrounding the development of these therapies.

  20. Targeting Signaling Pathways in Cancer Stem Cells for Cancer Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, Li

    2017-01-01

    The Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways are inherent signaling pathways in normal embryogenesis, development, and hemostasis. However, dysfunctions of these pathways are evident in multiple tumor types and malignancies. Specifically, aberrant activation of these pathways is implicated in modulation of cancer stem cells (CSCs), a small subset of cancer cells capable of self-renewal and differentiation into heterogeneous tumor cells. The CSCs are accountable for tumor initiation, growth, and recurrence. In this review, we focus on roles of Wnt, Hedgehog, and Notch pathways in CSCs' stemness and functions and summarize therapeutic studies targeting these pathways to eliminate CSCs and improve overall cancer treatment outcomes. PMID:28356914

  1. Targeting cancer by binding iron: Dissecting cellular signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Goldie Y.L.; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Richardson, Vera; Merlot, Angelica M.; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    Newer and more potent therapies are urgently needed to effectively treat advanced cancers that have developed resistance and metastasized. One such strategy is to target cancer cell iron metabolism, which is altered compared to normal cells and may facilitate their rapid proliferation. This is supported by studies reporting the anti-neoplastic activities of the clinically available iron chelators, desferrioxamine and deferasirox. More recently, ligands of the di-2-pyridylketone thiosemicarbazone (DpT) class have demonstrated potent and selective anti-proliferative activity across multiple cancer-types in vivo, fueling studies aimed at dissecting their molecular mechanisms of action. In the past five years alone, significant advances have been made in understanding how chelators not only modulate cellular iron metabolism, but also multiple signaling pathways implicated in tumor progression and metastasis. Herein, we discuss recent research on the targeting of iron in cancer cells, with a focus on the novel and potent DpT ligands. Several key studies have revealed that iron chelation can target the AKT, ERK, JNK, p38, STAT3, TGF-β, Wnt and autophagic pathways to subsequently inhibit cellular proliferation, the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and metastasis. These developments emphasize that these novel therapies could be utilized clinically to effectively target cancer. PMID:26125440

  2. Therapeutic targets in the Wnt signaling pathway: Feasibility of targeting TNIK in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Mari; Sawa, Masaaki; Yamada, Tesshi

    2015-12-01

    The genetic and epigenetic alterations occurring during the course of multistage colorectal carcinogenesis have been extensively studied in the last few decades. One of the most notable findings is that the great majority of colorectal cancers (>80%) have mutations in the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) tumor suppressor gene. Loss of functional APC protein results in activation of canonical Wnt/β-catanin signaling and initiates intestinal carcinogenesis. Mutational inactivation of APC is the first genetic event, but colorectal cancer cells retain their dependency on constitutive Wnt signal activation even after accumulation of other genetic events. Accordingly, pharmacological blocking of Wnt signaling has been considered an attractive therapeutic approach for colorectal cancer. Several therapeutics targeting various molecular components of the Wnt signaling pathway, including porcupine, frizzled receptors and co-receptor, tankyrases, and cAMP response element binding protein (CREB)-binding protein (CBP), have been developed, and some of those are currently being evaluated in early-phase clinical trials. Traf2- and Nck-interacting protein kinase (TNIK) has been identified as a regulatory component of the T-cell factor-4 and β-catenin transcriptional complex independently by two research groups. TNIK regulates Wnt signaling in the most downstream part of the pathway, and its inhibition is expected to block the signal even in colorectal cancer cells with APC gene mutation. Here we discuss some of the TNIK inhibitors under preclinical development.

  3. How different are luminal A and basal breast cancers?

    PubMed

    Bertucci, François; Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Buttarelli, Max; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Chaffanet, Max; Maraninchi, Dominique; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel

    2009-03-15

    Heterogeneity of breast cancer makes its evolution difficult to predict, and its treatment far from being optimal. At least 5 main molecular subtypes exist. Two major subtypes are luminal A and basal subtypes, which have opposite features, notably survival. To characterize these 2 subtypes better, with the hope of better understanding their different biology and clinical outcome, we have profiled a series of 138 tumours (80 luminal A and 58 basal) using Affymetrix whole-genome DNA microarrays. We have identified 5,621 probe sets as differentially expressed between the 2 subtypes in our series. These differences were validated in 6 independent public series (more than 600 tumours) profiled using different DNA microarrays platforms. Analysis of functions and pathways related to these probe sets, and the extent of the observed differences, confirmed that the 2 subtypes represent very distinct entities. Genes associated with proliferation, cell cycle, cell motility, angiogenesis, and NFkB signalling were overexpressed in basal tumours. Genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, TGFB signalling, and oestrogen receptor (ER) signalling were overexpressed in luminal A samples. Half of the genes overexpressed in luminal tumours contained ER-binding sites. The number of differentially expressed genes was as high as the set of genes discriminating 2 cancers of different anatomical origin (breast and colon) or discriminating acute myeloid and lymphoid leukaemia. We provide a comprehensive list of genes/pathways that define potential diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic targets for these 2 subtypes, which should be treated differently given the profound differences observed at the molecular level.

  4. Fisetin regulates obesity by targeting mTORC1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Jung, Chang Hwa; Kim, Heemun; Ahn, Jiyun; Jeon, Tae-Il; Lee, Dae-Hee; Ha, Tae-Youl

    2013-08-01

    Fisetin, a flavonol present in vegetables and fruits, possesses antioxidative and anti-inflammatory properties. In this study, we have demonstrated that fisetin prevents diet-induced obesity through regulation of the signaling of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1), a central mediator of cellular growth, cellular proliferation and lipid biosynthesis. To evaluate whether fisetin regulates mTORC1 signaling, we investigated the phosphorylation and kinase activity of the 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) and mTORC1 in 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Fisetin treatment of preadipocytes reduced the phosphorylation of S6K1 and mTORC1 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. To further our understanding of how fisetin negatively regulates mTORC1 signaling, we analyzed the phosphorylation of S6K1, mTOR and Akt in fisetin-treated TSC2-knockdown cells. The results suggested that fisetin treatment inhibits mTORC1 activity in an Akt-dependent manner. Recent studies have shown that adipocyte differentiation is dependent on mTORC1 activity. Fisetin treatment inhibited adipocyte differentiation, consistent with the negative effect of fisetin on mTOR. The inhibitory effect of fisetin on adipogenesis is dependent of mTOR activity, suggesting that fisetin inhibits adipogenesis and the accumulation of intracellular triglycerides during adipocyte differentiation by targeting mTORC1 signaling. Fisetin supplementation in mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) significantly attenuated HFD-induced increases in body weight and white adipose tissue. We also observed that fisetin efficiently suppressed the phosphorylation of Akt, S6K1 and mTORC1 in adipose tissue. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of mTORC1 signaling by fisetin prevents adipocyte differentiation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes and obesity in HFD-fed mice. Therefore, fisetin may be a useful phytochemical agent for attenuating diet-induced obesity.

  5. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in diabetic cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Chong, Zhao Zhong; Maiese, Kenneth

    2012-07-16

    Diabetes mellitus currently affects more than 170 million individuals worldwide and is expected to afflict another 200 million individuals in the next 30 years. Complications of diabetes as a result of oxidant stress affect multiple systems throughout the body, but involvement of the cardiovascular system may be one of the most severe in light of the impact upon cardiac and vascular function that can result in rapid morbidity and mortality for individuals. Given these concerns, the signaling pathways of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) offer exciting prospects for the development of novel therapies for the cardiovascular complications of diabetes. In the cardiovascular and metabolic systems, mTOR and its multi-protein complexes of TORC1 and TORC2 regulate insulin release and signaling, endothelial cell survival and growth, cardiomyocyte proliferation, resistance to β-cell injury, and cell longevity. Yet, mTOR can, at times, alter insulin signaling and lead to insulin resistance in the cardiovascular system during diabetes mellitus. It is therefore vital to understand the complex relationship mTOR and its downstream pathways hold during metabolic disease in order to develop novel strategies for the complications of diabetes mellitus in the cardiovascular system.

  6. Honokiol inhibits melanoma stem cells by targeting notch signaling.

    PubMed

    Kaushik, Gaurav; Venugopal, Anand; Ramamoorthy, Prabhu; Standing, David; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Umar, Shahid; Jensen, Roy A; Anant, Shrikant; Mammen, Joshua M V

    2015-12-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive disease with limited therapeutic options. Here, we determined the effects of honokiol (HNK), a biphenolic natural compound on melanoma cells and stemness. HNK significantly inhibited melanoma cell proliferation, viability, clonogenicity and induced autophagy. In addition, HNK significantly inhibited melanosphere formation in a dose dependent manner. Western blot analyses also demonstrated reduction in stem cell markers CD271, CD166, Jarid1b, and ABCB5. We next examined the effect of HNK on Notch signaling, a pathway involved in stem cell self-renewal. Four different Notch receptors exist in cells, which when cleaved by a series of enzymatic reactions catalyzed by Tumor Necrosis Factor-α-Converting Enzyme (TACE) and γ-secretase protein complex, results in the release of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD), which then translocates to the nucleus and induces target gene expression. Western blot analyses demonstrated that in HNK treated cells there is a significant reduction in the expression of cleaved Notch-2. In addition, there was a reduction in the expression of downstream target proteins, Hes-1 and cyclin D1. Moreover, HNK treatment suppressed the expression of TACE and γ-secretase complex proteins in melanoma cells. To confirm that suppression of Notch-2 activation is critical for HNK activity, we overexpressed NICD1, NICD2, and performed HNK treatment. NICD2, but not NICD1, partially restored the expression of Hes-1 and cyclin D1, and increased melanosphere formation. Taken together, these data suggest that HNK is a potent inhibitor of melanoma cells, in part, through the targeting of melanoma stem cells by suppressing Notch-2 signaling.

  7. Therapeutically targeting mitochondrial redox signalling alleviates endothelial dysfunction in preeclampsia

    PubMed Central

    McCarthy, Cathal; Kenny, Louise C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant placentation generating placental oxidative stress is proposed to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of preeclampsia. Unfortunately, therapeutic trials of antioxidants have been uniformly disappointing. There is provisional evidence implicating mitochondrial dysfunction as a source of oxidative stress in preeclampsia. Here we provide evidence that mitochondrial reactive oxygen species mediates endothelial dysfunction and establish that directly targeting mitochondrial scavenging may provide a protective role. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells exposed to 3% plasma from women with pregnancies complicated by preeclampsia resulted in a significant decrease in mitochondrial function with a subsequent significant increase in mitochondrial superoxide generation compared to cells exposed to plasma from women with uncomplicated pregnancies. Real-time PCR analysis showed increased expression of inflammatory markers TNF-α, TLR-9 and ICAM-1 respectively in endothelial cells treated with preeclampsia plasma. MitoTempo is a mitochondrial-targeted antioxidant, pre-treatment of cells with MitoTempo protected against hydrogen peroxide-induced cell death. Furthermore MitoTempo significantly reduced mitochondrial superoxide production in cells exposed to preeclampsia plasma by normalising mitochondrial metabolism. MitoTempo significantly altered the inflammatory profile of plasma treated cells. These novel data support a functional role for mitochondrial redox signaling in modulating the pathogenesis of preeclampsia and identifies mitochondrial-targeted antioxidants as potential therapeutic candidates. PMID:27604418

  8. Targeted inhibition of Src kinase signaling attenuates pancreatic tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaraj, Nagathihalli S.; Smith, J. Joshua; Revetta, Frank; Washington, M. Kay; Merchant, Nipun B.

    2012-01-01

    Elevated Src expression correlates with malignant potential and metastatic disease in many tumors including pancreas cancer. We sought to characterize the molecular effects of Src kinase inhibition with dasatinib (BMS-354825) a novel, multi-targeted kinase inhibitor that targets Src family kinases, in pancreas ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA). We identified sensitive and resistant PDA cell lines to dasatinib treatment and tested the molecular effects of Src inhibition in vitro and in vivo. We show for the first time that cellular localization of Src expression impacts survival in patients with PDA. Pancreas tumors with increased membranous expression of Src result in decreased survival compared with tumors that have increased cytoplasmic Src expression. Src kinase inhibition with dasatinib markedly inhibits cell proliferation, migration, invasion, cell cycle progression and anchorage independent growth and stimulates apoptosis. This is accompanied by decreased phosphorylation of Src, FAK, paxillin, AKT, STAT3, ERK, JNK and MAPK, as well as decreased cyclinD1 expression in a time and concentration-dependent manner. Furthermore, siRNA to Src results in significant decrease in cell proliferation, invasion and migration of pancreas cancer cells. Dasatinib treatment also inhibits in vivo pancreas tumor growth. Mechanisms of resistance to Src inhibition appear to be related to a lack of inhibition of STAT3 and MAPK signaling. These results establish a mechanistic rationale for Src inhibition with dasatinib as a therapeutic target in the treatment of pancreas cancer and identify potential biomarkers of resistance to Src inhibition. PMID:20682659

  9. Structure, Regulation, Signaling, and Targeting of Abl Kinases in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Abl kinases are prototypic cytoplasmic tyrosine kinases and are involved in a variety of chromosomal aberrations in different cancers. This causes the expression of Abl fusion proteins, such as Bcr-Abl, that are constitutively activated and drivers of tumorigenesis. Over the past decades, biochemical and functional studies on the molecular mechanisms of Abl regulation have gone hand in hand with progression of our structural understanding of autoinhibited and active Abl conformations. In parallel, Abl oncoproteins have become prime molecular targets for cancer therapy, using adenosine triphosphate (ATP)–competitive kinase inhibitors, such as imatinib. Abl-targeting drugs serve as a paradigm for our understanding of kinase inhibitor action, specificity, and resistance development. In this review article, I will review the molecular mechanisms that are responsible for the regulation of Abl kinase activity and how oncogenic Abl fusions signal. Furthermore, past and ongoing efforts to target Abl oncoproteins using ATP-competitive and allosteric inhibitors, as well as future possibilities using combination therapy, will be discussed. PMID:23226581

  10. Regulation of neuronal PKA signaling through AKAP targeting dynamics.

    PubMed

    Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Smith, Karen E; Gorski, Jessica A; Horne, Eric A; Gibson, Emily S; Gomez, Lisa L

    2006-07-01

    Central to organization of signaling pathways are scaffolding, anchoring and adaptor proteins that mediate localized assembly of multi-protein complexes containing receptors, second messenger-generating enzymes, kinases, phosphatases, and substrates. At the postsynaptic density (PSD) of excitatory synapses, AMPA (AMPAR) and NMDA (NMDAR) glutamate receptors are linked to signaling proteins, the actin cytoskeleton, and synaptic adhesion molecules on dendritic spines through a network of scaffolding proteins that may play important roles regulating synaptic structure and receptor functions in synaptic plasticity underlying learning and memory. AMPARs are rapidly recruited to dendritic spines through NMDAR activation during induction of long-term potentiation (LTP) through pathways that also increase the size and F-actin content of spines. Phosphorylation of AMPAR-GluR1 subunits by the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) helps stabilize AMPARs recruited during LTP. In contrast, induction of long-term depression (LTD) leads to rapid calcineurin-protein phosphatase 2B (CaN) mediated dephosphorylation of PKA-phosphorylated GluR1 receptors, endocytic removal of AMPAR from synapses, and a reduction in spine size. However, mechanisms for coordinately regulating AMPAR localization, phosphorylation, and synaptic structure by PKA and CaN are not well understood. A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) 79/150 is a PKA- and CaN-anchoring protein that is linked to NMDARs and AMPARs through PSD-95 and SAP97 membrane-associated guanylate kinase (MAGUK) scaffolds. Importantly, disruption of PKA-anchoring in neurons and functional analysis of GluR1-MAGUK-AKAP79 complexes in heterologous cells suggests that AKAP79/150-anchored PKA and CaN may regulate AMPARs in LTD. In the work presented at the "First International Meeting on Anchored cAMP Signaling Pathways" (Berlin-Buch, Germany, October 15-16, 2005), we demonstrate that AKAP79/150 is targeted to dendritic spines by an N-terminal basic

  11. Transcription factors and target genes of pre-TCR signaling.

    PubMed

    López-Rodríguez, Cristina; Aramburu, Jose; Berga-Bolaños, Rosa

    2015-06-01

    Almost 30 years ago pioneering work by the laboratories of Harald von Boehmer and Susumo Tonegawa provided the first indications that developing thymocytes could assemble a functional TCRβ chain-containing receptor complex, the pre-TCR, before TCRα expression. The discovery and study of the pre-TCR complex revealed paradigms of signaling pathways in control of cell survival and proliferation, and culminated in the recognition of the multifunctional nature of this receptor. As a receptor integrated in a dynamic developmental process, the pre-TCR must be viewed not only in the light of the biological outcomes it promotes, but also in context with those molecular processes that drive its expression in thymocytes. This review article focuses on transcription factors and target genes activated by the pre-TCR to drive its different outcomes.

  12. Endocannabinoid signaling and energy metabolism: a target for dietary intervention.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeffrey; Li, Yong; Watkins, Bruce A

    2011-06-01

    The endocannabinoid (EC) signaling (ECS) system involves the activation of receptors targeted by endogenously produced ligands called endocannabinoids that trigger specific physiologic events in various organs and tissues throughout the body. ECs are lipid mediators that bind to specific receptors and elicit cell signaling. The focus of this review is to discuss the responses that direct pathways of systemic energy metabolism. Recent findings have indicated that an imbalance of the ECS contributes to visceral fat accumulation and disrupts energy homeostasis, which are characteristics of the metabolic syndrome. Constant activation of ECS has been linked to metabolic processes that are associated with the hypothalamus and peripheral tissues of obese patients. In contrast, inhibition of ECS results in weight loss in animal and human subjects. Despite these findings, the mechanism involved in the dysregulation of ECS is unclear. Interestingly, the level of endogenous ligands, derived from arachidonic acid, can be directly manipulated by nutrient intervention, in that a diet rich in long-chain ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids will decrease the production of ligands to modulate the activation of target receptors. In contrast, a diet that is high in ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids will cause an increase in ECS activation and stimulate tissue specific activities that decrease insulin sensitivity in muscle and promote fat accumulation in the adipose tissue. The purpose of this review is to explain the components of ECS, its role in adipose and muscle energy metabolism, and how nutritional approaches with dietary ω-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids may reverse the dysregulation of this system to improve insulin sensitivity and control body fat.

  13. Evolutionary conservation of a microbody targeting signal that targets proteins to peroxisomes, glyoxysomes, and glycosomes

    PubMed Central

    1991-01-01

    Peroxisomes, glyoxysomes, glycosomes, and hydrogenosomes have each been classified as microbodies, i.e., subcellular organelles with an electron-dense matrix that is bound by a single membrane. We investigated whether these organelles might share a common evolutionary origin by asking if targeting signals used for translocation of proteins into these microbodies are related. A peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS) consisting of the COOH-terminal tripeptide serine-lysine- leucine-COOH has been identified in a number of peroxisomal proteins (Gould, S.J., G.-A. Keller, N. Hosken, J. Wilkinson, and S. Subramani. 1989. J. Cell Biol. 108:1657-1664). Antibodies raised to a peptide ending in this sequence (SKL-COOH) recognize a number of peroxisomal proteins. Immunocryoelectron microscopy experiments using this anti-SKL antibody revealed the presence of proteins containing the PTS within glyoxysomes of cells from Pichia pastoris, germinating castor bean seeds, and Neurospora crassa, as well as within the glycosomes of Trypanosoma brucei. Western blot analysis of purified organelle fractions revealed the presence of many proteins containing this PTS in both glyoxysomes and glycosomes. These results indicate that at least one of the signals, and therefore the mechanism, for protein translocation into peroxisomes, glyoxysomes, and glycosomes has been conserved, lending support to a common evolutionary origin for these microbodies. Hydrogenosomes, the fourth type of microbody, did not contain proteins that cross-reacted with the anti-PTS antibody, suggesting that this organelle is unrelated to microbodies. PMID:1831458

  14. Regression of Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy: Signaling Pathways and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Jianglong; Kang, Y. James

    2012-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy is a key risk factor for heart failure. It is associated with increased interstitial fibrosis, cell death and cardiac dysfunction. The progression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy has long been considered as irreversible. However, recent clinical observations and experimental studies have produced evidence showing the reversal of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Left ventricle assist devices used in heart failure patients for bridging to transplantation not only improve peripheral circulation but also often cause reverse remodeling of the geometry and recovery of the function of the heart. Dietary supplementation with physiologically relevant levels of copper can reverse pathological cardiac hypertrophy in mice. Angiogenesis is essential and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a constitutive factor for the regression. The action of VEGF is mediated by VEGF receptor-1, whose activation is linked to cyclic GMP-dependent protein kinase-1 (PKG-1) signaling pathways, and inhibition of cyclic GMP degradation leads to regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Most of these pathways are regulated by hypoxia-inducible factor. Potential therapeutic targets for promoting the regression include: promotion of angiogenesis, selective enhancement of VEGF receptor-1 signaling pathways, stimulation of PKG-1 pathways, and sustention of hypoxia-inducible factor transcriptional activity. More exciting insights into the regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy are emerging. The time of translating the concept of regression of pathological cardiac hypertrophy to clinical practice is coming. PMID:22750195

  15. Osteocytic signalling pathways as therapeutic targets for bone fragility.

    PubMed

    Plotkin, Lilian I; Bellido, Teresita

    2016-10-01

    Osteocytes are differentiated osteoblasts that become surrounded by matrix during the process of bone formation. Acquisition of the osteocyte phenotype is achieved by profound changes in gene expression that facilitate adaptation to the changing cellular environment and constitute the molecular signature of osteocytes. During osteocytogenesis, the expression of genes that are characteristic of the osteoblast are altered and the expression of genes and/or proteins that impart dendritic cellular morphology, regulate matrix mineralization and control the function of cells at the bone surface are ordely modulated. The discovery of mutations in human osteocytic genes has contributed, in a large part, to our understanding of the role of osteocytes in bone homeostasis. Osteocytes are targets of the mechanical force imposed on the skeleton and have a critical role in integrating mechanosensory pathways with the action of hormones, which thereby leads to the orchestrated response of bone to environmental cues. Current, therapeutic approaches harness this accumulating knowledge by targeting osteocytic signalling pathways and messengers to improve skeletal health.

  16. Signal Transduction and Molecular Targets of Selected Flavonoids

    PubMed Central

    Bode, Ann M.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Diet exerts a major influence on the risk for developing cancer and heart disease. Food factors such as flavonoids are alleged to protect cells from premature aging and disease by shielding DNA, proteins, and lipids from oxidative damage. Recent Advances: Our work has focused on clarifying the effects of dietary components on cancer cell proliferation and tumor growth, discovering mechanisms to explain the effects, and identifying the specific molecular targets of these compounds. Our strategy for identifying specific molecular targets of phytochemicals involves the use of supercomputer technology combined with protein crystallography, molecular biology, and experimental laboratory verification. Critical Issues: One of the greatest challenges for scientists is to reduce the accumulation of distortion and half truths reported in the popular media regarding the health benefits of certain foods or food supplements. The use of these is not new, but interest has increased dramatically because of perceived health benefits that are presumably acquired without unpleasant side effects. Flavonoids are touted to exert many beneficial effects in vitro. However, whether they can produce these effects in vivo is disputed. Future Directions: The World Health Organization indicates that one third of all cancer deaths are preventable and that diet is closely linked to prevention. Based on this idea and epidemiological findings, attention has centered on dietary phytochemicals as an effective intervention in cancer development. However, an unequivocal link between diet and cancer has not been established. Thus, identifying cancer preventive dietary agents with specific molecular targets is essential to move forward toward successful cancer prevention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 19, 163–180. PMID:23458437

  17. Application of the CLEAN Detector to Low Signal to Noise Ratio Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-01

    address low signal to noise ( SNR ) targets. The Reformulated CLEAN Detector is presented which is shown to allow the detection of low SNR targets in the...results of the author’s two previous papers on application of the CLEAN Algorithm to the condition of low signal to noise ratio ( SNR ) targets. The first...paper expands on the author?s previous work by adapting the CLEAN algorithm to address low signal to noise ( SNR ) targets. The Reformulated CLEAN

  18. GABAergic Signaling as Therapeutic Target for Autism Spectrum Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Cellot, Giada; Cherubini, Enrico

    2014-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid (GABA), the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the adult brain, early in postnatal life exerts a depolarizing and excitatory action. This depends on accumulation of chloride inside the cell via the cation–chloride importer NKCC1, being the expression of the chloride exporter KCC2 very low at birth. The developmentally regulated expression of KCC2 results in extrusion of chloride with age and a shift of GABA from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction. The depolarizing action of GABA leads to intracellular calcium rise through voltage-dependent calcium channels and/or N-methyl-d-aspartate receptors. GABA-mediated calcium signals regulate a variety of developmental processes from cell proliferation migration, differentiation, synapse maturation, and neuronal wiring. Therefore, it is not surprising that some forms of neuro-developmental disorders such as autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are associated with alterations of GABAergic signaling and impairment of the excitatory/inhibitory balance in selective neuronal circuits. In this review, we will discuss how changes of GABAA-mediated neurotransmission affect several forms of ASDs including the Fragile X, the Angelman, and Rett syndromes. Then, we will describe various animal models of ASDs with GABAergic dysfunctions, highlighting their behavioral deficits and the possibility to rescue them by targeting selective components of the GABAergic synapse. In particular, we will discuss how in some cases, reverting the polarity of GABA responses from the depolarizing to the hyperpolarizing direction with the diuretic bumetanide, a selective blocker of NKCC1, may have beneficial effects on ASDs, thus opening new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of these devastating disorders. PMID:25072038

  19. Targeting hedgehog signaling in myelofibrosis and other hematologic malignancies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of myelofibrosis (MF), a BCR-ABL–negative myeloproliferative neoplasm, is challenging. The only current potentially curative option, allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant, is recommended for few patients. The remaining patients are treated with palliative therapies to manage MF-related anemia and splenomegaly. Identification of a mutation in the Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) gene (JAK2 V617F) in more than half of all patients with MF has prompted the discovery and clinical development of inhibitors that target JAK2. Although treatment with JAK2 inhibitors has been shown to improve symptom response and quality of life in patients with MF, these drugs do not alter the underlying disease; therefore, novel therapies are needed. The hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway has been shown to play a role in normal hematopoiesis and in the tumorigenesis of hematologic malignancies. Moreover, inhibitors of the Hh pathway have been shown to inhibit growth and self-renewal capacity in preclinical models of MF. In a mouse model of MF, combined inhibition of the Hh and JAK pathways reduced JAK2 mutant allele burden, reduced bone marrow fibrosis, and reduced white blood cell and platelet counts. Preliminary clinical data also suggest that inhibition of the Hh pathway, alone or in combination with JAK2 inhibition, may enable disease modification in patients with MF. Future studies, including one combining the Hh pathway inhibitor sonidegib and the JAK2 inhibitor ruxolitinib, are underway in patients with MF and will inform whether this combination approach can lead to true disease modification. PMID:24598114

  20. Targeting B-cell receptor signaling kinases in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: the promise of entospletinib

    PubMed Central

    Sharman, Jeff; Di Paolo, Julie

    2016-01-01

    The B-cell receptor signaling pathway has emerged as an important therapeutic target in chronic lymphocytic leukemia and other B-cell malignancies. Novel agents have been developed targeting the signaling enzymes spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK), Bruton’s tyrosine kinase, and phosphoinositide 3-kinase delta. This review discusses the rationale for targeting these enzymes, as well as the preclinical and clinical evidence supporting their role as therapeutic targets, with a particular focus on SYK inhibition with entospletinib. PMID:27247756

  1. Low number of luminance levels in the luminance noise increases color discrimination thresholds estimated with pseudoisochromatic stimuli.

    PubMed

    Souza, Givago S; Malone, Felecia L; Crawford, Teera L; Miquilini, Letícia; Salomão, Raílson C; Guimarães, Diego L; Ventura, Dora F; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L

    2014-01-01

    In pseudoisochromatic stimuli the presence of spatial and luminance noise forces the subject to discriminate the target from the background solely on the basis of chromaticity difference. Color-blind subjects may show difficulty to identify the target due to the elimination of borders and brightness clues caused by the luminance and spatial noise. Few studies have fully described the features of pseudoisochromatic stimuli. Fewer investigators have focused their studies in the effects of specific pseudoisochromatic parameters on color discrimination. We used the Cambridge Color Test (CCT) to investigate the influence on color discrimination thresholds due to the number of luminance levels present in the luminance noise. The CCT default has six luminance steps; however, in our investigation a total of eight different conditions were tested from 2 to 16 luminance steps. It was found that the CCT provided very robust values for color discrimination thresholds, which were degraded only for very small number of luminance steps. When the number of steps was increased, the color discrimination thresholds improved from 2 to 6 luminance steps and gradually reached a plateau for 10 or more luminance steps. The area of color discrimination ellipses as a function of luminance steps matches the relative proportion of ineffective contrasts between mosaic patches as a function of luminance steps, assuming that contrast becomes ineffective for values 18.6% or less. The lower number of color and luminance interactions in these conditions could explain the measured increase of color discrimination thresholds. The primary conclusion from this investigation was that results from pseudoisochromatic tests should have their parameters described in more detail. This type of description would allow a better understanding of the results provided, interpretations, and therefore cross study comparison of results obtained from different laboratories.

  2. Low number of luminance levels in the luminance noise increases color discrimination thresholds estimated with pseudoisochromatic stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Givago S.; Malone, Felecia L.; Crawford, Teera L.; Miquilini, Letícia; Salomão, Raílson C.; Guimarães, Diego L.; Ventura, Dora F.; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Silveira, Luiz Carlos L.

    2014-01-01

    In pseudoisochromatic stimuli the presence of spatial and luminance noise forces the subject to discriminate the target from the background solely on the basis of chromaticity difference. Color-blind subjects may show difficulty to identify the target due to the elimination of borders and brightness clues caused by the luminance and spatial noise. Few studies have fully described the features of pseudoisochromatic stimuli. Fewer investigators have focused their studies in the effects of specific pseudoisochromatic parameters on color discrimination. We used the Cambridge Color Test (CCT) to investigate the influence on color discrimination thresholds due to the number of luminance levels present in the luminance noise. The CCT default has six luminance steps; however, in our investigation a total of eight different conditions were tested from 2 to 16 luminance steps. It was found that the CCT provided very robust values for color discrimination thresholds, which were degraded only for very small number of luminance steps. When the number of steps was increased, the color discrimination thresholds improved from 2 to 6 luminance steps and gradually reached a plateau for 10 or more luminance steps. The area of color discrimination ellipses as a function of luminance steps matches the relative proportion of ineffective contrasts between mosaic patches as a function of luminance steps, assuming that contrast becomes ineffective for values 18.6% or less. The lower number of color and luminance interactions in these conditions could explain the measured increase of color discrimination thresholds. The primary conclusion from this investigation was that results from pseudoisochromatic tests should have their parameters described in more detail. This type of description would allow a better understanding of the results provided, interpretations, and therefore cross study comparison of results obtained from different laboratories. PMID:25566106

  3. Regulation of HIV-Gag expression and targeting to the endolysosomal/secretory pathway by the luminal domain of lysosomal-associated membrane protein (LAMP-1) enhance Gag-specific immune response.

    PubMed

    Godinho, Rodrigo Maciel da Costa; Matassoli, Flavio Lemos; Lucas, Carolina Gonçalves de Oliveira; Rigato, Paula Ordonhez; Gonçalves, Jorge Luiz Santos; Sato, Maria Notomi; Maciel, Milton; Peçanha, Ligia Maria Torres; August, J Thomas; Marques, Ernesto Torres de Azevedo; de Arruda, Luciana Barros

    2014-01-01

    We have previously demonstrated that a DNA vaccine encoding HIV-p55gag in association with the lysosomal associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1) elicited a greater Gag-specific immune response, in comparison to a DNA encoding the native gag. In vitro studies have also demonstrated that LAMP/Gag was highly expressed and was present in MHCII containing compartments in transfected cells. In this study, the mechanisms involved in these processes and the relative contributions of the increased expression and altered traffic for the enhanced immune response were addressed. Cells transfected with plasmid DNA constructs containing p55gag attached to truncated sequences of LAMP-1 showed that the increased expression of gag mRNA required p55gag in frame with at least 741 bp of the LAMP-1 luminal domain. LAMP luminal domain also showed to be essential for Gag traffic through lysosomes and, in this case, the whole sequence was required. Further analysis of the trafficking pathway of the intact LAMP/Gag chimera demonstrated that it was secreted, at least in part, associated with exosome-like vesicles. Immunization of mice with LAMP/gag chimeric plasmids demonstrated that high expression level alone can induce a substantial transient antibody response, but targeting of the antigen to the endolysosomal/secretory pathways was required for establishment of cellular and memory response. The intact LAMP/gag construct induced polyfunctional CD4+ T cell response, which presence at the time of immunization was required for CD8+ T cell priming. LAMP-mediated targeting to endolysosomal/secretory pathway is an important new mechanistic element in LAMP-mediated enhanced immunity with applications to the development of novel anti-HIV vaccines and to general vaccinology field.

  4. Toxicological disruption of signaling homeostasis: Tyrosine phosphatses as targets

    EPA Science Inventory

    The protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTP) comprised a diverse group of enzymes whose activity opposes that of the tyrosine kinases. As such, the PTP have critical roles in maintaining signaling quiescence in resting cells and in restoring homeostasis by effecting signal termination...

  5. Identification of peroxisomal targeting signals located at the carboxy terminus of four peroxisomal proteins

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    As part of an effort to understand how proteins are imported into the peroxisome, we have sought to identify the peroxisomal targeting signals in four unrelated peroxisomal proteins: human catalase, rat hydratase:dehydrogenase, pig D-amino acid oxidase, and rat acyl-CoA oxidase. Using gene fusion experiments, we have identified a region of each protein that can direct heterologous proteins to peroxisomes. In each case, the peroxisomal targeting signal is contained at or near the carboxy terminus of the protein. For catalase, the peroxisomal targeting signal is located within the COOH-terminal 27 amino acids of the protein. For hydratase:dehydrogenase, D-amino acid oxidase, and acyl-CoA oxidase, the targeting signals are located within the carboxy- terminal 15, 14, and 15 amino acids, respectively. A tripeptide of the sequence Ser-Lys/His-Leu is present in each of these targeting signals as well as in the peroxisomal targeting signal identified in firefly luciferase (Gould, S.J., G.-A. Keller, and S. Subramani. 1987. J. Cell Biol. 105:2923-2931). When the peroxisomal targeting signal of the hydratase:dehydrogenase is mutated so that the Ser-Lys-Leu tripeptide is converted to Ser-Asn-Leu, it can no longer direct proteins to peroxisomes. We suggest that this tripeptide is an essential element of at least one class of peroxisomal targeting signals. PMID:2901422

  6. ErbB3 downregulation enhances luminal breast tumor response to antiestrogens

    PubMed Central

    Morrison, Meghan M.; Hutchinson, Katherine; Williams, Michelle M.; Stanford, Jamie C.; Balko, Justin M.; Young, Christian; Kuba, Maria G.; Sánchez, Violeta; Williams, Andrew J.; Hicks, Donna J.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Prat, Aleix; Perou, Charles M.; Earp, H. Shelton; Massarweh, Suleiman; Cook, Rebecca S.

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant regulation of the erythroblastosis oncogene B (ErbB) family of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) and their ligands is common in human cancers. ErbB3 is required in luminal mammary epithelial cells (MECs) for growth and survival. Since breast cancer phenotypes may reflect biological traits of the MECs from which they originate, we tested the hypothesis that ErbB3 drives luminal breast cancer growth. We found higher ERBB3 expression and more frequent ERBB3 gene copy gains in luminal A/B breast cancers compared with other breast cancer subtypes. In cell culture, ErbB3 increased growth of luminal breast cancer cells. Targeted depletion of ErbB3 with an anti-ErbB3 antibody decreased 3D colony growth, increased apoptosis, and decreased tumor growth in vivo. Treatment of clinical breast tumors with the antiendocrine drug fulvestrant resulted in increased ErbB3 expression and PI3K/mTOR signaling. Depletion of ErbB3 in fulvestrant-treated tumor cells reduced PI3K/mTOR signaling, thus decreasing tumor cell survival and tumor growth. Fulvestrant treatment increased phosphorylation of all ErbB family RTKs; however, phospho-RTK upregulation was not seen in tumors treated with both fulvestrant and anti-ErbB3. These data indicate that upregulation of ErbB3 in luminal breast cancer cells promotes growth, survival, and resistance to fulvestrant, thus suggesting ErbB3 as a target for breast cancer treatment. PMID:23999432

  7. Role of epigenetic modifications in luminal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Hafiz, Hany A; Horwitz, Kathryn B

    2015-08-01

    Luminal breast cancers represent approximately 75% of cases. Explanations into the causes of endocrine resistance are complex and are generally ascribed to genomic mechanisms. Recently, attention has been drawn to the role of epigenetic modifications in hormone resistance. We review these here. Epigenetic modifications are reversible, heritable and include changes in DNA methylation patterns, modification of histones and altered microRNA expression levels that target the receptors or their signaling pathways. Large-scale analyses indicate distinct epigenomic profiles that distinguish breast cancers from normal and benign tissues. Taking advantage of the reversibility of epigenetic modifications, drugs that target epigenetic modifiers, given in combination with chemotherapies or endocrine therapies, may represent promising approaches to restoration of therapy responsiveness in these cases.

  8. Evaluation of Cysteinyl Leukotriene Signaling as a Therapeutic Target for Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Lorraine; Butler, Clare T.; Murphy, Adrian; Moran, Bruce; Gallagher, William M.; O'Sullivan, Jacintha; Kennedy, Breandán N.

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer is the third most common cancer worldwide and is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Current pharmacotherapy options include cytotoxic chemotherapy, anti-VEGF, and anti-EGFR targeting drugs, but these are limited by toxic side effects, limited responses and ultimately resistance. Cysteinyl leukotriene (CysLT) signaling regulates intestinal homeostasis with mounting evidence suggesting that CysLT signaling also plays a role in the pathogenesis of colorectal cancer. Therefore, CysLT signaling represents a novel target for this malignancy. This review evaluates reported links between CysLT signaling and established hallmarks of cancer in addition to its pharmacological potential as a new therapeutic target. PMID:27709113

  9. Intelligibility of Target Signals in Sequential and Simultaneous Segregation Tasks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    segregation is less clear. Recently, Mackersie et. al., (2001) demonstrated a strong correlation between speech reception thresholds (SRT) and tonal fusion...either alternated with or masked by noise. For example, at 0 dB signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), word intelligibility is not significantly altered when...the 0 Hz noise condition despite the nominally higher signal to noise ratio (0 dB versus -8 dB). This difference is consistent with previous results

  10. Targeting the WNT Signaling Pathway in Cancer Therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tai, David; Wells, Keith; Arcaroli, John; Vanderbilt, Chad; Aisner, Dara L; Messersmith, Wells A; Lieu, Christopher H

    2015-10-01

    The WNT signaling cascade is integral in numerous biological processes including embryonic development, cell cycle regulation, inflammation, and cancer. Hyperactivation of WNT signaling secondary to alterations to varying nodes of the pathway have been identified in multiple tumor types. These alterations converge into increased tumorigenicity, sustained proliferation, and enhanced metastatic potential. This review seeks to evaluate the evidence supporting the WNT pathway in cancer, the therapeutic strategies in modulating this pathway, and potential challenges in drug development.

  11. Multitarget tracking and monopulse signal processing for spawning targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Willett, Peter K.; Blair, William D.; Ogle, Terry

    2004-08-01

    A monopulse radar is able to derive accurate angular measurements via intelligent processing of its sum and difference channel returns. Recently there have emerged techniques for angular estimation of several unresolved targets, meaning targets that are, in principle, merged within the same radar beam, can be extracted separately. The key is the joint exploitation of information in several range bins. Here we show the performance of this approach in a high-fidelity simulation: we observe considerable improvement in track RMSE, but little corresponding gain in track completeness. Coupled with a hidden Markov model on target number, however, the performance is impressive.

  12. Wavelet-Based Signal and Image Processing for Target Recognition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-01-01

    in target recognition applications. Classical spatial and frequency domain image processing algorithms were generalized to process discrete wavelet ... transform (DWT) data. Results include adaptation of classical filtering, smoothing and interpolation techniques to DWT. From 2003 the research

  13. Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel Signal Transduction Modifications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-07-14

    AD_________________ Award Number: W81XWH-07-1-0471 TITLE: Targeted Lymphoma Cell Death by Novel...opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position...ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE 14-07-2010 2. REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 15 JUN 2009 - 14 JUN 2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Targeted Lymphoma Cell

  14. Targeting the Ron-DEK Signaling Axis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    The first objective of Task 2 was to test DEK-targeting 1716 Herpes Simplex Viruses (1716HSV) on breast cancer cells. A panel of vectors was...characterized transgenic model wherein wild type Ron is overexpressed selectively in the mammary epithelium by the mouse mammary tumor virus ...degree of knockdown that could be achieved. Three DEK targeting viruses were tested for DEK knockdown in HeLa cells. These included GFP-expressing

  15. Targeting the Ron-DEK Signaling Axis in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-01

    The first objective of Task 2 was to test DEK-targeting 1716 Herpes Simplex Viruses (1716HSV) on breast cancer cells. A panel of vectors was...characterized transgenic model wherein wild type Ron is overexpressed selectively in the mammary epithelium by the mouse mammary tumor virus ...of knockdown that could be achieved. Three DEK targeting viruses were tested for DEK knockdown in HeLa cells. These included GFP-expressing viruses

  16. Notch signaling deregulation in multiple myeloma: A rational molecular target

    PubMed Central

    Garavelli, Silvia; Platonova, Natalia; Paoli, Alessandro; Basile, Andrea; Taiana, Elisa; Neri, Antonino; Chiaramonte, Raffaella

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent therapeutic advances, multiple myeloma (MM) is still an incurable neoplasia due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to therapy. Myeloma cell localization in the bone marrow milieu allows direct interactions between tumor cells and non-tumor bone marrow cells which promote neoplastic cell growth, survival, bone disease, acquisition of drug resistance and consequent relapse. Twenty percent of MM patients are at high-risk of treatment failure as defined by tumor markers or presentation as plasma cell leukemia. Cumulative evidences indicate a key role of Notch signaling in multiple myeloma onset and progression. Unlike other Notch-related malignancies, where the majority of patients carry gain-of-function mutations in Notch pathway members, in MM cell Notch signaling is aberrantly activated due to an increased expression of Notch receptors and ligands; notably, this also results in the activation of Notch signaling in surrounding stromal cells which contributes to myeloma cell proliferation, survival and migration, as well as to bone disease and intrinsic and acquired pharmacological resistance. Here we review the last findings on the mechanisms and the effects of Notch signaling dysregulation in MM and provide a rationale for a therapeutic strategy aiming at inhibiting Notch signaling, along with a complete overview on the currently available Notch-directed approaches. PMID:26308486

  17. Targeting BMP signalling in cardiovascular disease and anaemia

    PubMed Central

    Morrell, Nicholas W.; Bloch, Donald B.; ten Dijke, Peter; Goumans, Marie-Jose T.H.; Hata, Akiko; Smith, Jim; Yu, Paul B.; Bloch, Kenneth D.

    2016-01-01

    Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and their receptors, known to be essential regulators of embryonal patterning and organogenesis, are also critical for the regulation of cardiovascular structure and function. In addition to their contributions to syndromic disorders of heart and vascular development, BMP signalling is increasingly recognized for its influence on endocrine-like functions in postnatal cardiovascular and metabolic homeostasis. In this Review, we discuss several critical and novel aspects of BMP signalling in cardiovascular health and disease, which highlight the cell- and context-specific nature of BMP signalling. Based on advancing knowledge of the physiological roles and regulation of BMP signaling, we indicate opportunities for therapeutic intervention in a range of cardiovascular conditions including atherosclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension, and well as for anaemia of chronic disease. Depending on the context and the repertoire of ligands and receptors involved in specific disease processes, the selective inhibition or enhancement of signaling via particular BMP ligands (such as in atherosclerosis and pulmonary arterial hypertension, respectively) might be beneficial. The development of selective small molecule antagonists of BMP receptors, and the identification of ligands selective for BMP receptor complexes expressed in the vasculature provide the most immediate opportunities for new therapies. PMID:26461965

  18. AKAP signaling complexes: pointing towards the next generation of therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Esseltine, Jessica L; Scott, John D

    2013-12-01

    A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs) streamline signal transduction by localizing signaling enzymes with their substrates. Great strides have been made in elucidating the role of these macromolecular signaling complexes as new binding partners and novel AKAPs are continually being uncovered. The mechanics and dynamics of these multi-enzyme assemblies suggest that AKAP complexes are viable targets for therapeutic intervention. This review will highlight recent advances in AKAP research focusing on local signaling events that are perturbed in disease.

  19. Enzalutamide: targeting the androgen signalling pathway in metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Schalken, Jack; Fitzpatrick, John M

    2016-02-01

    Significant progress has been made in the understanding of the underlying cancer biology of castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) with the androgen receptor (AR) signalling pathway remaining implicated throughout the prostate cancer disease continuum. Reactivation of the AR signalling pathway is considered to be a key driver of CRPC progression and, as such, the AR is a logical target for therapy in CRPC. The objective of this review was to understand the importance of AR signalling in the treatment of patients with metastatic CRPC (mCRPC) and to discuss the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway. A search was conducted to identify articles relating to the role of AR signalling in CRPC and therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway. Current understanding of prostate cancer has identified the AR signalling pathway as a logical target for the treatment of CRPC. Available therapies that inhibit the AR signalling pathway include AR blockers, androgen biosynthesis inhibitors, and AR signalling inhibitors. Enzalutamide, the first approved AR signalling inhibitor, has a novel mode of action targeting AR signalling at three key stages. The direct mode of action of enzalutamide has been shown to translate into clinical responses in patients with mCRPC. In conclusion, the targeting of the AR signalling pathway in patients with mCRPC results in numerous clinical benefits. As the number of treatment options increase, more trials evaluating the sequencing and combination of treatments are required. This review highlights the continued importance of targeting a key driver in the progression of CRPC, AR signalling, and the clinical benefits associated with inhibition of the AR signalling pathway in the treatment of patients with CRPC.

  20. Targeting the PDGF signaling pathway in tumor treatment.

    PubMed

    Heldin, Carl-Henrik

    2013-12-20

    Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) isoforms and PDGF receptors have important functions in the regulation of growth and survival of certain cell types during embryonal development and e.g. tissue repair in the adult. Overactivity of PDGF receptor signaling, by overexpression or mutational events, may drive tumor cell growth. In addition, pericytes of the vasculature and fibroblasts and myofibroblasts of the stroma of solid tumors express PDGF receptors, and PDGF stimulation of such cells promotes tumorigenesis. Inhibition of PDGF receptor signaling has proven to useful for the treatment of patients with certain rare tumors. Whether treatment with PDGF/PDGF receptor antagonists will be beneficial for more common malignancies is the subject for ongoing studies.

  1. Deubiquitinases as a signaling target of oxidative stress

    PubMed Central

    Cotto-Rios, Xiomaris M.; Békés, Miklos; Chapman, Jessica; Ueberheide, Beatrix; Huang, Tony T.

    2012-01-01

    SUMMARY Deubiquitinating enzymes (DUBs) constitute a large family of cysteine proteases that have broad impact on numerous biological and pathological processes, including the regulation of genomic stability. DUBs are often assembled onto multiprotein complexes to assist in their localization and substrate selection, yet it remains unclear how the enzymatic activity of DUBs is modulated by intracellular signals. Herein, we show that bursts of reactive oxygen species (ROS) reversibly inactivate DUBs through the oxidation of the catalytic cysteine residue. Importantly, USP1, a key regulator of genomic stability, is reversibly inactivated upon oxidative stress. This, in part, explains the rapid nature of PCNA monoubiquitination-dependent DNA damage tolerance in response to oxidative DNA damage in replicating cells. We propose that DUBs of the cysteine protease family act as ROS sensors in human cells and that ROS-mediated DUB inactivation is a critical mechanism for fine-tuning stress-activated signaling pathways. PMID:23219552

  2. Infrared Target Detection: Signal and Noise Sensitivity Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-12-01

    Appendix A: Noise Effective Electrical Bandwidth . . 54 Appendix B: MathCAD Computer Program. .......... 56 Appendix C: Scenario Inputs...............65...18:127- 2 U). Because imaging systems create a reproduction of many localized areas of a scene, the variation between each localized area affects the...signal plus noise. 05 Approach As stated before the problem is to identify, characterize, and determine the effect of the statistical variations of the

  3. System for Automatic Detection and Analysis of Targets in FMICW Radar Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rejfek, Luboš; Mošna, Zbyšek; Urbář, Jaroslav; Koucká Knížová, Petra

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents the automatic system for the processing of the signals from the frequency modulated interrupted continuous wave (FMICW) radar and describes methods for the primary signal processing. Further, we present methods for the detection of the targets in strong noise. These methods are tested both on the real and simulated signals. The real signals were measured using the developed at the IAP CAS experimental prototype of FMICW radar with operational frequency 35.4 GHz. The measurement campaign took place at the TU Delft, the Netherlands. The obtained results were used for development of the system for the automatic detection and analysis of the targets measured by the FMICW radar.

  4. Improved pointing at trackable targets by integrating control valve signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, R. W.; Laverty, C. R.; Colby, M. J.

    1982-01-01

    A compact, low-cost add-on electronic module has been developed for the STRAP III control system to improve pointing at trackable targets. The module provides peak-to-peak limit cycle excursions of + or - 5 arcseconds while tracking a +3 magnitude or brighter star. This is achieved without using rate-integrating gyroscopes, thus reducing payload length, weight, cost, and preparation time. This module has flown successfully five times. In May 1981, it improved the performance of a two-startracker attitude control system with TV camera and joystick control which pointed at a nontrackable target. This paper describes the operation of the module, how it alters the ordinary STRAP III operation, and how it was developed using an analog-computer-based rocket flight simulator.

  5. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Targets Crossroads in Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Bart; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infections with a high-risk type human papillomavirus (hrHPV) can progress to cancer. High-risk HPVs infect keratinocytes (KCs) and successfully suppress host immunity for up to two years despite the fact that KCs are well equipped to detect and initiate immune responses to invading pathogens. Viral persistence is achieved by active interference with KCs innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To this end hrHPV utilizes proteins encoded by its viral genome, as well as exploits cellular proteins to interfere with signaling of innate and adaptive immune pathways. This results in impairment of interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine production and subsequent immune cell attraction, as well as resistance to incoming signals from the immune system. Furthermore, hrHPV avoids the killing of infected cells by interfering with antigen presentation to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, hrHPV has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid detection and clearance by both the innate and adaptive immune system, the molecular mechanisms of which will be dealt with in detail in this review. PMID:26008697

  6. Cancer Cell Signaling Pathways Targeted by Spice-Derived Nutraceuticals

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R.; Aggarwal, Bharat B.

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1′-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, car-damonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer. PMID:22149093

  7. Cancer cell signaling pathways targeted by spice-derived nutraceuticals.

    PubMed

    Sung, Bokyung; Prasad, Sahdeo; Yadav, Vivek R; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2012-01-01

    Extensive research within the last half a century has revealed that cancer is caused by dysregulation of as many as 500 different gene products. Most natural products target multiple gene products and thus are ideally suited for prevention and treatment of various chronic diseases, including cancer. Dietary agents such as spices have been used extensively in the Eastern world for a variety of ailments for millennia, and five centuries ago they took a golden journey to the Western world. Various spice-derived nutraceuticals, including 1'-acetoxychavicol acetate, anethole, capsaicin, cardamonin, curcumin, dibenzoylmethane, diosgenin, eugenol, gambogic acid, gingerol, thymoquinone, ursolic acid, xanthohumol, and zerumbone derived from galangal, anise, red chili, black cardamom, turmeric, licorice, fenugreek, clove, kokum, ginger, black cumin, rosemary, hop, and pinecone ginger, respectively, are the focus of this review. The modulation of various transcription factors, growth factors, protein kinases, and inflammatory mediators by these spice-derived nutraceuticals are described. The anticancer potential through the modulation of various targets is also the subject of this review. Although they have always been used to improve taste and color and as a preservative, they are now also used for prevention and treatment of a wide variety of chronic inflammatory diseases, including cancer.

  8. MicroRNAs-novel therapeutic targets of eicosanoid signalling.

    PubMed

    Ochs, Meike J; Steinhilber, Dieter; Suess, Beatrix

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as important regulators in human physiological and pathological processes. We summarize the current knowledge about the role of miRNA involved in the control of inflammatory responses with a special focus on eicosanoid signalling. Cyclooxygenase 2 - the key enzyme of the prostanoid pathway - is regulated by different miRNAs such as miRNA-101, miR199a, miR26b and miR-146a. In contrast to this, the understanding of miRNA regulation on enzymes of the leukotriene biosynthesis is just at the beginning. The knowledge of miRNAs regulating enzymes of the eicosanoid pathway offers a new way for the development of new therapeutic concepts for the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  9. Targeting the BLyS-APRIL signaling pathway in SLE.

    PubMed

    La Cava, Antonio

    2013-09-01

    The B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS)-A PRoliferation-Inducing Ligand (APRIL) signaling pathway has an important role in the selection, maturation and survival of B cells and plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). The inhibition of BLyS, a survival factor for transitional and mature B cells, has recently proven to be successful in large phase III clinical trials that led to the approval of an anti-BLyS monoclonal antibody (belimumab) for the treatment of SLE. Yet, there is currently a need to both understand better the mechanisms of action of belimumab in SLE and better define the subsets of patients that are more likely to respond to the drug.

  10. Targeting the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin signaling network in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Martelli, A M; Evangelisti, C; Follo, M Y; Ramazzotti, G; Fini, M; Giardino, R; Manzoli, L; McCubrey, J A; Cocco, L

    2011-01-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) comprise a subset of hierarchically organized, rare cancer cells with the ability to initiate cancer in xenografts of genetically modified murine models. CSCs are thought to be responsible for tumor onset, self-renewal/maintenance, mutation accumulation, and metastasis. The existence of CSCs could explain the high frequency of neoplasia relapse and resistance to all of currently available therapies, including chemotherapy. The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is a key regulator of physiological cell processes which include proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, motility, metabolism, and autophagy. Nevertheless, aberrantly upregulated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling characterizes many types of cancers where it negatively influences prognosis. Several lines of evidence indicate that this signaling system plays a key role also in CSC biology. Of note, CSCs are more sensitive to pathway inhibition with small molecules when compared to healthy stem cells. This observation provides the proof-of-principle that functional differences in signaling transduction pathways between CSCs and healthy stem cells can be identified. Here, we review the evidence which links the signals deriving from the PI3K/Akt/mTOR network with CSC biology, both in hematological and solid tumors. We then highlight how therapeutic targeting of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling with small molecule inhibitors could improve cancer patient outcome, by eliminating CSCs.

  11. Targeting Notch signaling as a novel therapy for retinoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Asnaghi, Laura; Tripathy, Arushi; Yang, Qian; Kaur, Harpreet; Hanaford, Allison; Yu, Wayne; Eberhart, Charles G.

    2016-01-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy of childhood. Notch plays a key role in retinal cells from which retinoblastomas arise, and we therefore studied the role of Notch signaling in promoting retinoblastoma proliferation. Moderate or strong nuclear expression of Hes1 was found in 10 of 11 human retinoblastoma samples analyzed immunohistochemically, supporting a role for Notch in retinoblastoma growth. Notch pathway components were present in WERI Rb1 and Y79 retinoblastoma lines, with Jag2 and DLL4 more highly expressed than other ligands, and Notch1 and Notch2 more abundant than Notch3. The cleaved/active form of Notch1 was detectable in both lines. Inhibition of the pathway, achieved using a γ-secretase inhibitor (GSI) or by downregulating Jag2, DLL4 or CBF1 using short hairpin RNA, potently reduced growth, proliferation and clonogenicity in both lines. Upregulation of CXCR4 and CXCR7 and downregulation of PI3KC2β were identified by microarray upon Jag2 suppression. The functional importance of PI3KC2β was confirmed using shRNA. Synergy was found by combining GSI with Melphalan at their IC50. These findings indicate that Notch pathway is active in WERI Rb1 and Y79, and in most human retinoblastoma samples, and suggest that Notch antagonists may represent a new approach to more effectively treat retinoblastoma. PMID:27661116

  12. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-08-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities.

  13. Targeting of sonic hedgehog-Gli signaling: A potential therapeutic target for patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Song, Lingqin; Wang, Weifeng; Liu, Di; Zhao, Yang; He, Jianjun; Wang, Xijing; Dai, Zhijun; Zhang, Huimin; Li, Xiao

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant cancer among women. The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling pathway serves a key role in malignant cancer cell growth and migration. However, little is known with regard to the specific function of the Hh signaling pathway in human breast cancer. The current study investigated the specific role of Hh signaling in the human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. Expression of components of Shh-Gli signaling, as well as the Gli-responsive genes B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) and cyclin D1, were investigated in MDA-MB-231 cells using western blotting. The effects of Shh-Gli signaling on MDA-MB-231 proliferation were analyzed by MTT assay. The role of E-cadherin in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process was determined by western blot while matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-9/MMP-2 secretion was studied by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The results indicated that Shh-Gli signaling was activated in MDA-MB-231 cells, significantly enhancing cell viability. Overexpression of Gli positively regulated the transcription of Bcl-2 and cyclin D1 thereby regulating MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation and survival. Treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells with human sonic hedgehog, n-terminus for 72 h significantly reduced E-cadherin protein levels and enhanced secretion of MMP-9 and MMP-2. These findings suggest that Shh-Gli signaling is significantly activated in human breast cancer cells, and is accompanied by enhanced cell viability, proliferation and migration capacities. PMID:27446389

  14. Sixteen-kinase gene expression identifies luminal breast cancers with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Pascal; Cervera, Nathalie; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Chabannon, Christian; Charpin, Colette; Chaffanet, Max; Jacquemier, Jocelyne; Viens, Patrice; Birnbaum, Daniel; Bertucci, François

    2008-02-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease made of various molecular subtypes with different prognosis. However, evolution remains difficult to predict within some subtypes, such as luminal A, and treatment is not as adapted as it should be. Refinement of prognostic classification and identification of new therapeutic targets are needed. Using oligonucleotide microarrays, we profiled 227 breast cancers. We focused our analysis on two major breast cancer subtypes with opposite prognosis, luminal A (n = 80) and basal (n = 58), and on genes encoding protein kinases. Whole-kinome expression separated luminal A and basal tumors. The expression (measured by a kinase score) of 16 genes encoding serine/threonine kinases involved in mitosis distinguished two subgroups of luminal A tumors: Aa, of good prognosis and Ab, of poor prognosis. This classification and its prognostic effect were validated in 276 luminal A cases from three independent series profiled across different microarray platforms. The classification outperformed the current prognostic factors in univariate and multivariate analyses in both training and validation sets. The luminal Ab subgroup, characterized by high mitotic activity compared with luminal Aa tumors, displayed clinical characteristics and a kinase score intermediate between the luminal Aa subgroup and the luminal B subtype, suggesting a continuum in luminal tumors. Some of the mitotic kinases of the signature represent therapeutic targets under investigation. The identification of luminal A cases of poor prognosis should help select appropriate treatment, whereas the identification of a relevant kinase set provides potential targets.

  15. The Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) Signaling Pathway as a Discovery Target in Stroke.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Nan, Guangxian

    2016-05-01

    Protein kinases are critical modulators of a variety of intracellular and extracellular signal transduction pathways, and abnormal phosphorylation events can contribute to disease progression in a variety of diseases. As a result, protein kinases have emerged as important new drug targets for small molecule therapeutics. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway transmits signals from the cell membrane to the nucleus in response to a variety of different stimuli. Because this pathway controls a broad spectrum of cellular processes, including growth, inflammation, and stress responses, it is accepted as a therapeutic target for cancer and peripheral inflammatory disorders. There is also increasing evidence that MAPK is an important regulator of ischemic and hemorrhagic cerebral vascular disease, raising the possibility that it might be a drug discovery target for stroke. In this review, we discuss the MAPK signaling pathway in association with its activation in stroke-induced brain injury.

  16. Caveolins: targeting pro-survival signaling in the heart and brain

    PubMed Central

    Stary, Creed M.; Tsutsumi, Yasuo M.; Patel, Piyush M.; Head, Brian P.; Patel, Hemal H.; Roth, David M.

    2012-01-01

    The present review discusses intracellular signaling moieties specific to membrane lipid rafts (MLRs) and the scaffolding proteins caveolin and introduces current data promoting their potential role in the treatment of pathologies of the heart and brain. MLRs are discreet microdomains of the plasma membrane enriched in gylcosphingolipids and cholesterol that concentrate and localize signaling molecules. Caveolin proteins are necessary for the formation of MLRs, and are responsible for coordinating signaling events by scaffolding and enriching numerous signaling moieties in close proximity. Specifically in the heart and brain, caveolins are necessary for the cytoprotective phenomenon termed ischemic and anesthetic preconditioning. Targeted overexpression of caveolin in the heart and brain leads to induction of multiple pro-survival and pro-growth signaling pathways; thus, caveolins represent a potential novel therapeutic target for cardiac and neurological pathologies. PMID:23060817

  17. Luminal breast cancer: from biology to treatment.

    PubMed

    Ignatiadis, Michail; Sotiriou, Christos

    2013-09-01

    Oestrogen receptor (ER)-positive--or luminal--tumours represent around two-thirds of all breast cancers. Luminal breast cancer is a highly heterogeneous disease comprising different histologies, gene-expression profiles and mutational patterns, with very varied clinical courses and responses to systemic treatment. Despite adjuvant endocrine therapy and chemotherapy treatment for patients at high risk of relapse, both early and late relapses still occur, a fact that highlights the unmet medical needs of these patients. Ongoing research aims to identify those patients who can be spared adjuvant chemotherapy and who will benefit from extended adjuvant hormone therapy. This research also aims to explore the role of adjuvant bisphosphonates, to interrogate new agents for targeting minimal residual disease, and to address endocrine resistance. Data from next-generation sequencing studies have given us new insight into the biology of luminal breast cancer and, together with advances in preclinical models and the availability of newer targeted agents, have led to the testing of rationally chosen combination treatments in clinical trials. However, a major challenge will be to make sense of the large amount of patient genomic data that is becoming increasingly available. This analysis will be critical to our understanding how intertumour and intratumour heterogeneity can influence treatment response and resistance.

  18. Endocrine disrupting chemicals targeting estrogen receptor signaling: Identification and mechanisms of action

    PubMed Central

    Shanle, Erin K.; Xu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Many endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) adversely impact estrogen signaling by interacting with two estrogen receptors (ERs): ERα and ERβ. Though the receptors have similar ligand binding and DNA binding domains, ERα and ERβ have some unique properties in terms of ligand selectivity and target gene regulation. EDCs that target ER signaling can modify genomic and non-genomic ER activity through direct interactions with ERs, indirectly through transcription factors like the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), or through modulation of metabolic enzymes that are critical for normal estrogen synthesis and metabolism. Many EDCs act through multiple mechanisms as exemplified by chemicals that bind both AhR and ER, such as 3-methylcholanthrene. Other EDCs that target ER signaling include phytoestrogens, bisphenolics, and organochlorine pesticides and many alter normal ER signaling through multiple mechanisms. EDCs can also display tissue-selective ER agonist and antagonist activities similar to selective estrogen receptor modulators (SERMs) designed for pharmaceutical use. Thus, biological effects of EDCs need to be carefully interpreted because EDCs can act through complex tissue-selective modulation of ERs and other signaling pathways in vivo. Current requirements by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency require some in vitro and cell-based assays to identify EDCs that target ER signaling through direct and metabolic mechanisms. Additional assays may be useful screens for identifying EDCs that act through alternative mechanisms prior to further in vivo study. PMID:21053929

  19. Target recognition by maximizing heterogeneity of signal samples collected for discrimination with respect to an observed signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nechval, Nicholas A.

    1995-07-01

    This paper deals with the problem of how to identify targets or signals in noise, which represents, mathematically, the problem of classifying an observed target data sample as coming from one of several populations. Some of the information about the alternative distributions of populations has been obtained from signal data samples collected for discrimination. Each sample is declared to be realization of a specific stochastic process. By this step each sample is attached to just one out of a set of possible signals with distinct characteristics. We are dealing with the case when the alternative distributions of populations are multivariate normal with different mean vectors and covariance matrices. It is assumed that all parameters are unknown. Also, the univariate case is considered. It is shown how certain tests of homogeneity or normality of several samples of the data can be used to transform a set of signal data samples into some statistic that measures either distance from homogeneity or distance from normality of these samples, respectively. This statistic is then used to construct sample based discriminant rule which either maximizes distance from homogeneity or minimizes distance from normality, respectively, with respect to an observed signal. The above discriminant rules are applied to obtain new procedures of target recognition which are relatively simple to carry out and can be easily used, say, for bird recognition by radar in order to preclude the possibility of collisions between aircraft and birds, etc. In those situations when we deal with small samples of the data, the procedures proposed herein are recommended. An illustrative numerical example is given.

  20. The cornerstone K-RAS mutation in pancreatic adenocarcinoma: From cell signaling network, target genes, biological processes to therapeutic targeting.

    PubMed

    Jonckheere, Nicolas; Vasseur, Romain; Van Seuningen, Isabelle

    2017-03-01

    RAS belongs to the super family of small G proteins and plays crucial roles in signal transduction from membrane receptors in the cell. Mutations of K-RAS oncogene lead to an accumulation of GTP-bound proteins that maintains an active conformation. In the pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC), one of the most deadly cancers in occidental countries, mutations of the K-RAS oncogene are nearly systematic (>90%). Moreover, K-RAS mutation is the earliest genetic alteration occurring during pancreatic carcinogenetic sequence. In this review, we discuss the central role of K-RAS mutations and their tremendous diversity of biological properties by the interconnected regulation of signaling pathways (MAPKs, NF-κB, PI3K, Ral…). In pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, transcriptome analysis and preclinical animal models showed that K-RAS mutation alters biological behavior of PDAC cells (promoting proliferation, migration and invasion, evading growth suppressors, regulating mucin pattern, and miRNA expression). K-RAS also impacts tumor microenvironment and PDAC metabolism reprogramming. Finally we discuss therapeutic targeting strategies of K-RAS that have been developed without significant clinical success so far. As K-RAS is considered as the undruggable target, targeting its multiple effectors and target genes should be considered as potential alternatives.

  1. Signal processing and target discrimination algorithms for a rosette scan tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morin, Andre

    A prototype of an infrared rosette scan tracker has been developed to evaluate the immunity of this type of tracker against decoys which can be deployed from a target aircraft. The performance of the tracker depends on the signal processing and the target discrimination algorithms employed to control the tracker. Because of the low resolution of the resulting target image, the rosette scanner does not have the ability to recognize the targets by their shape characteristics. In addition, targets which are too close appear simultaneously in the tracker instantaneous field of view. These targets are then detected in one single pulse signal. To prevent the tracker from breaking its lock onto its target, the transients in amplitude and width of the selected pulses are detected when decoys are deployed from the target. The occurrence of such transients initiates the computation of the drift between the estimated target position and the center of the pulse for the two axes to determine the direction in which the decoy was deployed. The performance of this processing technique is illustrated and some improvements are suggested.

  2. High-luminance LEDs replace incandescent lamps in new applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David L.

    1997-04-01

    The advent of high luminance AlInGaP and InGaN LED technologies has prompted the use of LED devices in new applications formally illuminated by incandescent lamps. The luminous efficiencies of these new LED technologies equals or exceeds that attainable with incandescent sources, with reliability factors that far exceed those of incandescent sources. The need for a highly efficient, dependable, and cost effective replacement for incandescent lamps is being fulfilled with high luminance LED lamps. This paper briefly described some of the new applications incorporating high luminance LED lamps, traffic signals and roadway signs for traffic management, automotive exterior lighting, active matrix and full color displays for commercial advertising, and commercial aircraft panel lighting and military aircraft NVG compatible lighting.

  3. Targeted interception of signaling reactive oxygen species in the vascular endothelium

    PubMed Central

    Han, Jingyan; Shuvaev, Vladimir V; Muzykantov, Vladimir R

    2017-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are implicated as injurious and as signaling agents in human maladies including inflammation, hyperoxia, ischemia-reperfusion and acute lung injury. ROS produced by the endothelium play an important role in vascular pathology. They quench, for example, nitric oxide, and mediate pro-inflammatory signaling. Antioxidant interventions targeted for the vascular endothelium may help to control these mechanisms. Animal studies have demonstrated superiority of targeting ROS-quenching enzymes catalase and superoxide dismutase to endothelial cells over nontargeted formulations. A diverse arsenal of targeted antioxidant formulations devised in the last decade shows promising results for specific quenching of endothelial ROS. In addition to alleviation of toxic effects of excessive ROS, these targeted interventions suppress pro-inflammatory mechanisms, including endothelial cytokine activation and barrier disruption. These interventions may prove useful in experimental biomedicine and, perhaps, in translational medicine. PMID:22834201

  4. Actionable pathways: interactive discovery of therapeutic targets using signaling pathway models

    PubMed Central

    Salavert, Francisco; Hidago, Marta R.; Amadoz, Alicia; Çubuk, Cankut; Medina, Ignacio; Crespo, Daniel; Carbonell-Caballero, Jose; Dopazo, Joaquín

    2016-01-01

    The discovery of actionable targets is crucial for targeted therapies and is also a constituent part of the drug discovery process. The success of an intervention over a target depends critically on its contribution, within the complex network of gene interactions, to the cellular processes responsible for disease progression or therapeutic response. Here we present PathAct, a web server that predicts the effect that interventions over genes (inhibitions or activations that simulate knock-outs, drug treatments or over-expressions) can have over signal transmission within signaling pathways and, ultimately, over the cell functionalities triggered by them. PathAct implements an advanced graphical interface that provides a unique interactive working environment in which the suitability of potentially actionable genes, that could eventually become drug targets for personalized or individualized therapies, can be easily tested. The PathAct tool can be found at: http://pathact.babelomics.org. PMID:27137885

  5. Diverse amino acid residues function within the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal. Implications for the role of accessory residues upstream of the type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal.

    PubMed

    Mullen, R T; Lee, M S; Flynn, C R; Trelease, R N

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether the plant type 1 peroxisomal targeting signal (PTS1) utilizes amino acid residues that do not strictly adhere to the serine-lysine-leucine (SKL) motif (small-basic-hydrophobic residues). Selected residues were appended to the C terminus of chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) and were tested for their ability to target CAT fusion proteins to glyoxysomes in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.) cv Bright Yellow 2 suspension-cultured cells. CAT was redirected from the cytosol into glyoxysomes by a wide range of residues, i.e. A/C/G/S/T-H/K/ L/N/R-I/L/M/Y. Although L and N at the -2 position (-SLL, -ANL) do not conform to the SKL motif, both functioned, but in a temporally less-efficient manner. Other SKL divergent residues, however, did not target CAT to glyoxysomes, i.e. F or P at the -3 position (-FKL, -PKL), S or T at the -2 position (-SSI, STL), or D at the -1 position (-SKD). The targeting inefficiency of CAT-ANL could be ameliorated when K was included at the -4 position (-KANL). In summary, the plant PTS1 mostly conforms to the SKL motif. For those PTS1s that possess nonconforming residue(s), other residues upstream of the PTS1 appear to function as accessory sequences that enhance the temporal efficiency of peroxisomal targeting.

  6. The Inositide Signaling Pathway As a Target for Treating Gastric Cancer and Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hong Jun; Lee, Suk-young; Oh, Sang Cheul

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer and colorectal cancer are the leading cause of cancer mortality and have a dismal prognosis. The introduction of biological agents to treat these cancers has resulted in improved outcomes, and combination chemotherapy with targeted agents and conventional chemotherapeutic agents is regarded as standard therapy. Additional newly clarified mechanisms of oncogenesis and resistance to targeted agents require the development of new biologic agents. Aberrant activation of the inositide signaling pathway by a loss of function PTEN mutation or gain of function mutation/amplification of PIK3CA is an oncogenic mechanism in gastric cancer and colorectal cancer. Clinical trials with biologic agents that target the inositide signaling pathway are being performed to further improve treatment outcomes of patients with advanced gastric cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). In this review we summarize the inositide signaling pathway, the targeted agents that inhibit abnormal activation of this signaling pathway and the clinical trials currently being performed in patients with advanced or metastatic gastric cancer and metastatic CRC using these targeted agents. PMID:27242542

  7. Strategies Targeting cAMP Signaling in the Treatment of Polycystic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Peter C.

    2014-01-01

    Polycystic kidney disease (PKD) is a leading cause of ESRD worldwide. In PKD, excessive cell proliferation and fluid secretion, pathogenic interactions of mutated epithelial cells with an abnormal extracellular matrix and alternatively activated interstitial macrophages, and the disruption of mechanisms controlling tubular diameter contribute to cyst formation. Studies with animal models suggest that several diverse pathophysiologic mechanisms, including dysregulation of intracellular calcium levels and cAMP signaling, mediate these cystogenic mechanisms. This article reviews the evidence implicating calcium and cAMP as central players in a network of signaling pathways underlying the pathogenesis of PKD and considers the therapeutic relevance of treatment strategies targeting cAMP signaling. PMID:24335972

  8. Emerging translational approaches to target STAT3 signalling and its impact on vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Dutzmann, Jochen; Daniel, Jan-Marcus; Bauersachs, Johann; Hilfiker-Kleiner, Denise; Sedding, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Acute and chronic inflammation responses characterize the vascular remodelling processes in atherosclerosis, restenosis, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and angiogenesis. The functional and phenotypic changes in diverse vascular cell types are mediated by complex signalling cascades that initiate and control genetic reprogramming. The signalling molecule's signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) plays a key role in the initiation and continuation of these pathophysiological changes. This review highlights the pivotal involvement of STAT3 in pathological vascular remodelling processes and discusses potential translational therapies, which target STAT3 signalling, to prevent and treat cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, current clinical trials using highly effective and selective inhibitors of STAT3 signalling for distinct diseases, such as myelofibrosis and rheumatoid arthritis, are discussed with regard to their vascular (side-) effects and their potential to pave the way for a direct use of these molecules for the prevention or treatment of vascular diseases. PMID:25784694

  9. The Role of Cyclic Nucleotide Signaling Pathways in Cancer: Targets for Prevention and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, Alexandra M.; Piazza, Gary A.; Tinsley, Heather N.

    2014-01-01

    For more than four decades, the cyclic nucleotides cyclic AMP (cAMP) and cyclic GMP (cGMP) have been recognized as important signaling molecules within cells. Under normal physiological conditions, cyclic nucleotides regulate a myriad of biological processes such as cell growth and adhesion, energy homeostasis, neuronal signaling, and muscle relaxation. In addition, altered cyclic nucleotide signaling has been observed in a number of pathophysiological conditions, including cancer. While the distinct molecular alterations responsible for these effects vary depending on the specific cancer type, several studies have demonstrated that activation of cyclic nucleotide signaling through one of three mechanisms—induction of cyclic nucleotide synthesis, inhibition of cyclic nucleotide degradation, or activation of cyclic nucleotide receptors—is sufficient to inhibit proliferation and activate apoptosis in many types of cancer cells. These findings suggest that targeting cyclic nucleotide signaling can provide a strategy for the discovery of novel agents for the prevention and/or treatment of selected cancers. PMID:24577242

  10. Screening of nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii based on nuclear localization signals.

    PubMed

    Moon, Dong Chan; Gurung, Mamata; Lee, Jung Hwa; Lee, Yong Seok; Choi, Chi Won; Kim, Seung Il; Lee, Je Chul

    2012-05-01

    Nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins is an emerging pathogenic mechanism in bacteria. However, due to the absence of an appropriate screening system for nuclear targeting proteins, systematic approaches to nuclear targeting of bacterial proteins and subsequent host cell pathology are limited. In this study, we developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in Acinetobacter baumannii using a combination of bioinformatic analysis based on nuclear localization signal (NLS) and the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system. Among 3367 open reading frames of A. baumannii ATCC 17978, 34 functional or hypothetical proteins were predicted to carry the putative NLS sequences. Of the 29 clones generated by the Gateway(®) recombinational cloning system, 14 proteins tagged with green fluorescent protein (GFP) were targeted to nuclei of host cells. Among the 14 nuclear targeting proteins, S21, L20, and L32 ribosomal proteins and transposase carried putative nuclear export signal (NES) sequences, but only transposase harbored the functional NES. After translocation to nuclei of host cells, four A. baumannii proteins induced cytotoxicity. In conclusion, we have developed a screening system for nuclear targeting proteins in A. baumannii. This system may open the way to a new field of bacterial pathogenesis.

  11. Dissection of local Ca(2+) signals inside cytosol by ER-targeted Ca(2+) indicator.

    PubMed

    Niwa, Fumihiro; Sakuragi, Shigeo; Kobayashi, Ayana; Takagi, Shin; Oda, Yoichi; Bannai, Hiroko; Mikoshiba, Katsuhiko

    2016-10-07

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) is a versatile intracellular second messenger that operates in various signaling pathways leading to multiple biological outputs. The diversity of spatiotemporal patterns of Ca(2+) signals, generated by the coordination of Ca(2+) influx from the extracellular space and Ca(2+) release from the intracellular Ca(2+) store the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), is considered to underlie the diversity of biological outputs caused by a single signaling molecule. However, such Ca(2+) signaling diversity has not been well described because of technical limitations. Here, we describe a new method to report Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution. We report that OER-GCaMP6f, a genetically encoded Ca(2+) indicator (GECI) targeted to the outer ER membrane, can monitor Ca(2+) release from the ER at higher spatiotemporal resolution than conventional GCaMP6f. OER-GCaMP6f was used for in vivo Ca(2+) imaging of C. elegans. We also found that the spontaneous Ca(2+) elevation in cultured astrocytes reported by OER-GCaMP6f showed a distinct spatiotemporal pattern from that monitored by plasma membrane-targeted GCaMP6f (Lck-GCaMP6f); less frequent Ca(2+) signal was detected by OER-GCaMP6f, in spite of the fact that Ca(2+) release from the ER plays important roles in astrocytes. These findings suggest that targeting of GECIs to the ER outer membrane enables sensitive detection of Ca(2+) release from the ER at subcellular resolution, avoiding the diffusion of GECI and Ca(2+). Our results indicate that Ca(2+) imaging with OER-GCaMP6f in combination with Lck-GCaMP6f can contribute to describing the diversity of Ca(2+) signals, by enabling dissection of Ca(2+) signals at subcellular resolution.

  12. Aptamer/target binding-induced triple helix forming for signal-on electrochemical biosensing.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yinfei; Liu, Jinquan; He, Dinggen; He, Xiaoxiao; Wang, Kemin; Shi, Hui; Wen, Li

    2015-10-01

    Owing to its diversified structures, high affinity, and specificity for binding a wide range of non-nucleic acid targets, aptamer is a useful molecular recognition tool for the design of various biosensors. Herein, we report a new signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform which is based on an aptamer/target binding-induced strand displacement and triple-helix forming. The biosensing platform is composed of a signal transduction probe (STP) modified with a methylene blue (MB) and a sulfhydryl group, a triplex-forming oligonucleotides probe (TFO) and a target specific aptamer probe (Apt). Through hybridization with the TFO probe and the Apt probe, the self-assembled STP on Au electrode via Au-S bonding keeps its rigid structure. The MB on the STP is distal to the Au electrode surface. It is eT off state. Target binding releases the Apt probe and liberates the end of the MB tagged STP to fold back and form a triplex-helix structure with TFO (STP/TFO/STP), allowing MB to approach the Au electrode surface and generating measurable electrochemical signals (eT ON). As test for the feasibility and universality of this signal-on electrochemical biosensing platform, two aptamers which bind to adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and human α-thrombin (Tmb), respectively, are selected as models. The detection limit of ATP was 7.2 nM, whereas the detection limit of Tmb was 0.86 nM.

  13. Ultrasensitive fluorescence polarization DNA detection by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Guan, Yi-Meng; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2011-03-28

    Single stranded DNA sequences can be detected by target assisted exonuclease III-catalyzed signal amplification fluorescence polarization (TAECA-FP). The method offers an impressive detection limit of 83 aM within one hour for DNA detection and exhibits high discrimination ability even against a single base mismatch.

  14. MicroRNA-145 suppresses hepatocellular carcinoma by targeting IRS1 and its downstream Akt signaling

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yelin; Hu, Chen; Cheng, Jun; Chen, Binquan; Ke, Qinghong; Lv, Zhen; Wu, Jian; Zhou, Yanfeng

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • MiR-145 expression is down-regulated in HCC tissues and inversely related with IRS1 levels. • MiR-145 directly targets IRS1 in HCC cells. • Restored expression of miR-145 suppressed HCC cell proliferation and growth. • MiR-145 induced IRS1 under-expression potentially reduced downstream AKT signaling. - Abstract: Accumulating evidences have proved that dysregulation of microRNAs (miRNAs) is involved in cancer initiation and progression. In this study, we showed that miRNA-145 level was significantly decreased in hepatocellular cancer (HCC) tissues and cell lines, and its low expression was inversely associated with the abundance of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1), a key mediator in oncogenic insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling. We verified IRS1 as a direct target of miR-145 using Western blotting and luciferase reporter assay. Further, the restoration of miR-145 in HCC cell lines suppressed cancer cell growth, owing to down-regulated IRS1 expression and its downstream Akt/FOXO1 signaling. Our results demonstrated that miR-145 could inhibit HCC through targeting IRS1 and its downstream signaling, implicating the loss of miR-145 regulation may be a potential molecular mechanism causing aberrant oncogenic signaling in HCC.

  15. MicroRNAs targeting TGFβ signalling underlie the regulatory T cell defect in multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Severin, Mary E; Lee, Priscilla W; Liu, Yue; Selhorst, Amanda J; Gormley, Matthew G; Pei, Wei; Yang, Yuhong; Guerau-de-Arellano, Mireia; Racke, Michael K; Lovett-Racke, Amy E

    2016-06-01

    Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signalling is critical for regulatory T cell development and function, and regulatory T cell dysregulation is a common observation in autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis. In a comprehensive miRNA profiling study of patients with multiple sclerosis naïve CD4 T cells, 19 differentially expressed miRNAs predicted to target the TGFβ signalling pathway were identified, leading to the hypothesis that miRNAs may be responsible for the regulatory T cell defect observed in patients with multiple sclerosis. Patients with multiple sclerosis had reduced levels of TGFβ signalling components in their naïve CD4 T cells. The differentially expressed miRNAs negatively regulated the TGFβ pathway, resulting in a reduced capacity of naïve CD4 T cells to differentiate into regulatory T cells. Interestingly, the limited number of regulatory T cells, that did develop when these TGFβ-targeting miRNAs were overexpressed, were capable of suppressing effector T cells. As it has previously been demonstrated that compromising TGFβ signalling results in a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire insufficient to control autoimmunity, and patients with multiple sclerosis have a reduced regulatory T cell repertoire, these data indicate that the elevated expression of multiple TGFβ-targeting miRNAs in naïve CD4 T cells of patients with multiple sclerosis impairs TGFβ signalling, and dampens regulatory T cell development, thereby enhancing susceptibility to developing multiple sclerosis.

  16. Targeting miR-155 suppresses proliferation and induces apoptosis of HL-60 cells by targeting Slug/PUMA signal.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hui; Dong, Ziyan; Liu, Jiang-Feng; Chuang, Wei; Gao, Li-Zhen; Ren, Yu-Guo

    2016-10-27

    Recent studies have shown that high miR-155 expression was associated with poor prognosis in patients with acute myelogeneous leukemia (AML). Furthermore, targeting miR-155 results in monocytic differentiation and apoptosis. However, the exact role and mechanisms of miR-155 in human AML remains speculative. HL-60 cells were treated with anti-miR-155 for 72 h. Cell growth and apoptosis in vitro were detected by MTT, BrdU proliferation, colony formation and flow cytometry assay. The effect of anti-miR-155 on growth of HL-60 cells was also evaluated in a leukemia mouse model. Slug cDNA and PUMA siRNA trannsfection was used to assess the signal pathway. Different protein expression was detected by western blot assay and quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assay. The results shown that targeting miR-155 resulted in a 24-fold decrease of miR-155 expression compared to negative control in the HL-60 cells. Targeting miR-155 significantly downregulated Slug and upregulated PUMA expression, and decreased HL-60 cell growth by 70% , impaired colony formation by approximately 60%, and increased HL-60 cell apoptosis by 45%. Targeting PUMA reversed miR-155 sliencing-induced proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 cells. Restoration of Slug decreased PUMA expression. In murine engraftment models of HL-60 cells, we showed that targeting miR-155 was able to reduce tumor growth. This was accompanied with decreased Slug expression and increased PUMA expression in these tumors. Collectively, our findings strongly suggest targeting miR-155 exhibited in vivo and in vitro antileukemic activities in AML through a novel mechanism resulting in inhibition of Slug expression and increase of PUMA expression.

  17. Identification of novel plant peroxisomal targeting signals by a combination of machine learning methods and in vivo subcellular targeting analyses.

    PubMed

    Lingner, Thomas; Kataya, Amr R; Antonicelli, Gerardo E; Benichou, Aline; Nilssen, Kjersti; Chen, Xiong-Yan; Siemsen, Tanja; Morgenstern, Burkhard; Meinicke, Peter; Reumann, Sigrun

    2011-04-01

    In the postgenomic era, accurate prediction tools are essential for identification of the proteomes of cell organelles. Prediction methods have been developed for peroxisome-targeted proteins in animals and fungi but are missing specifically for plants. For development of a predictor for plant proteins carrying peroxisome targeting signals type 1 (PTS1), we assembled more than 2500 homologous plant sequences, mainly from EST databases. We applied a discriminative machine learning approach to derive two different prediction methods, both of which showed high prediction accuracy and recognized specific targeting-enhancing patterns in the regions upstream of the PTS1 tripeptides. Upon application of these methods to the Arabidopsis thaliana genome, 392 gene models were predicted to be peroxisome targeted. These predictions were extensively tested in vivo, resulting in a high experimental verification rate of Arabidopsis proteins previously not known to be peroxisomal. The prediction methods were able to correctly infer novel PTS1 tripeptides, which even included novel residues. Twenty-three newly predicted PTS1 tripeptides were experimentally confirmed, and a high variability of the plant PTS1 motif was discovered. These prediction methods will be instrumental in identifying low-abundance and stress-inducible peroxisomal proteins and defining the entire peroxisomal proteome of Arabidopsis and agronomically important crop plants.

  18. Active targeting in a random porous medium by chemical swarm robots with secondary chemical signaling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grančič, Peter; Štěpánek, František

    2011-08-01

    The multibody dynamics of a system of chemical swarm robots in a porous environment is investigated. The chemical swarm robots are modeled as Brownian particles capable of delivering an encapsulated chemical payload toward a given target location and releasing it in response to an external stimulus. The presence of chemical signals (chemo-attractant) in the system plays a crucial role in coordinating the collective movement of the particles via chemotaxis. For a number of applications, such as distributed chemical processing and targeted drug delivery, the understanding of factors that govern the collective behavior of the particles, especially their ability to localize a given target, is of immense importance. A hybrid modeling methodology based on the combination of the Brownian dynamics method and diffusion problem coupled through the chemotaxis phenomena is used to analyze the impact of a varying signaling threshold and the strength of chemotaxis on the ability of the chemical robots to fulfill their target localization mission. The results demonstrate that the selected performance criteria (the localization half time and the success rate) can be improved when an appropriate signaling process is chosen. Furthermore, for an optimum target localization strategy, the topological complexity of the porous environment needs to be reflected.

  19. Signal integration: a framework for understanding the efficacy of therapeutics targeting the human EGFR family

    PubMed Central

    Shepard, H. Michael; Brdlik, Cathleen M.; Schreiber, Hans

    2008-01-01

    The human EGFR (HER) family is essential for communication between many epithelial cancer cell types and the tumor microenvironment. Therapeutics targeting the HER family have demonstrated clinical success in the treatment of diverse epithelial cancers. Here we propose that the success of HER family–targeted monoclonal antibodies in cancer results from their ability to interfere with HER family consolidation of signals initiated by a multitude of other receptor systems. Ligand/receptor systems that initiate these signals include cytokine receptors, chemokine receptors, TLRs, GPCRs, and integrins. We further extrapolate that improvements in cancer therapeutics targeting the HER family are likely to incorporate mechanisms that block or reverse stromal support of malignant progression by isolating the HER family from autocrine and stromal influences. PMID:18982164

  20. Cannabinoid Receptor 2 Signaling in Neurodegenerative Disorders: From Pathogenesis to a Promising Therapeutic Target

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, Tommaso; Calcagnini, Silvio; Pace, Lorenzo; De Marco, Federico; Romano, Adele; Gaetani, Silvana

    2017-01-01

    As a consequence of an increasingly aging population, the number of people affected by neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Huntington's disease, is rapidly increasing. Although the etiology of these diseases has not been completely defined, common molecular mechanisms including neuroinflammation, excitotoxicity and mitochondrial dysfunction have been confirmed and can be targeted therapeutically. Moreover, recent studies have shown that endogenous cannabinoid signaling plays a number of modulatory roles throughout the central nervous system (CNS), including the neuroinflammation and neurogenesis. In particular, the up-regulation of type-2 cannabinoid (CB2) receptors has been found in a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Thus, the modulation of CB2 receptor signaling may represent a promising therapeutic target with minimal psychotropic effects that can be used to modulate endocannabinoid-based therapeutic approaches and to reduce neuronal degeneration. For these reasons this review will focus on the CB2 receptor as a promising pharmacological target in a number of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:28210207

  1. Targeting glycoprotein VI and the immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Stegner, David; Haining, Elizabeth J; Nieswandt, Bernhard

    2014-08-01

    Coronary artery thrombosis and ischemic stroke are often initiated by the disruption of an atherosclerotic plaque and consequent intravascular platelet activation. Thus, antiplatelet drugs are central in the treatment and prevention of the initial, and subsequent, vascular events. However, novel pharmacological targets for platelet inhibition remain an important goal of cardiovascular research because of the negative effect of existing antiplatelet drugs on primary hemostasis. One promising target is the platelet collagen receptor glycoprotein VI. Blockade or antibody-mediated depletion of this receptor in circulating platelets is beneficial in experimental models of thrombosis and thrombo-inflammatory diseases, such as stroke, without impairing hemostasis. In this review, we summarize the importance of glycoprotein VI and (hem)immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif signaling in hemostasis, thrombosis, and thrombo-inflammatory processes and discuss the targeting strategies currently under development for inhibiting glycoprotein VI and its signaling.

  2. Impact of targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling in head and neck cancers.

    PubMed

    Limesand, Kirsten H; Chibly, Alejandro Martinez; Fribley, Andrew

    2013-10-01

    The IGF system has been shown to have either negative or negligible impact on clinical outcomes of tumor development depending on specific tumor sites or stages. This review focuses on the clinical impact of IGF signaling in head and neck cancer, the effects of IGF targeted therapies, and the multi-dimensional role of IRS 1/2 signaling as a potential mechanism in resistance to targeted therapies. Similar to other tumor sites, both negative and positive correlations between levels of IGF-1/IGF-1-R and clinical outcomes in head and neck cancer have been reported. In addition, utilization of IGF targeted therapies has not demonstrated significant clinical benefit; therefore the prognostic impact of the IGF system on head and neck cancer remains uncertain.

  3. Calcipotriol Targets LRP6 to Inhibit Wnt Signaling in Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Arensman, Michael D.; Nguyen, Phillip; Kershaw, Kathleen M.; Lay, Anna R.; Ostertag-Hill, Claire A.; Sherman, Mara H.; Downes, Michael; Liddle, Christopher; Evans, Ronald M.; Dawson, David W.

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is an aggressive malignancy in need of more effective treatment approaches. One potential therapeutic target is Wnt/β-catenin signaling, which plays important roles in PDAC tumor initiation and progression. Among Wnt inhibitors with suitable in vivo biological activity is vitamin D, which is known to antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in colorectal cancer and have anti-tumor activity in PDAC. For this study the relationship between vitamin D signaling, Wnt/β-catenin activity and tumor cell growth in PDAC was investigated through the use of calcipotriol, a potent non-hypercalcemic vitamin D analog. PDAC tumor cell growth inhibition by calcipotriol was positively correlated with vitamin D receptor (VDR) expression and Wnt/β-catenin activity. Furthermore, vitamin D and Wnt signaling activity were found to be reciprocally linked through feedback regulation. Calcipotriol inhibited autocrine Wnt/β-catenin signaling in PDAC cell lines in parallel with decreased protein levels of the low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 6 (LRP6), a requisite co-receptor for ligand-dependent canonical Wnt signaling. Decrease in LRP6 protein seen with calcipotriol was mediated through a novel mechanism involving transcriptional upregulation of low-density lipoprotein receptor adaptor protein 1 (LDLRAP1). Finally, changes in LRP6 or LDLRAP1 expression directly altered Wnt reporter activity, supporting their roles as regulators of ligand-dependent Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Implications This study provides a novel biochemical target through which vitamin D signaling exerts inhibitory effects on Wnt/β-catenin signaling, as well as potential biomarkers for predicting and following tumor response to vitamin D-based therapy. PMID:26224368

  4. Rationale and Means to Target Pro-Inflammatory Interleukin-8 (CXCL8) Signaling in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Laura M.; Maxwell, Pamela J.; Waugh, David J.J.

    2013-01-01

    It is well established that chronic inflammation underpins the development of a number of human cancers, with pro-inflammatory signaling within the tumor microenvironment contributing to tumor progression and metastasis. CXCL8 is an ELR+ pro-inflammatory CXC-chemokine which mediates its effects via signaling through two G protein-coupled receptors, CXCR1 and CXCR2. Elevated CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling within the tumor microenvironment of numerous cancers is known to enhance tumor progression via activation of signaling pathways promoting proliferation, angiogenesis, migration, invasion and cell survival. This review provides an overview of established roles of CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer and subsequently, discusses the possible strategies of targeting CXCL8-CXCR1/2 signaling in cancer, covering indirect strategies (e.g., anti-inflammatories, NFκB inhibitors) and direct CXCL8 or CXCR1/2 inhibition (e.g., neutralizing antibodies, small molecule receptor antagonists, pepducin inhibitors and siRNA strategies). Reports of pre-clinical cancer studies and clinical trials using CXCL8-CXCR1/2-targeting strategies for the treatment of inflammatory diseases will be discussed. The future translational opportunities for use of such agents in oncology will be discussed, with emphasis on exploitation in stratified populations. PMID:24276377

  5. Cell signalling in insulin secretion: the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea.

    PubMed

    Seino, S

    2012-08-01

    Clarification of the molecular mechanisms of insulin secretion is crucial for understanding the pathogenesis and pathophysiology of diabetes and for development of novel therapeutic strategies for the disease. Insulin secretion is regulated by various intracellular signals generated by nutrients and hormonal and neural inputs. In addition, a variety of glucose-lowering drugs including sulfonylureas, glinide-derivatives, and incretin-related drugs such as dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPP-4) inhibitors and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists are used for glycaemic control by targeting beta cell signalling for improved insulin secretion. There has been a remarkable increase in our understanding of the basis of beta cell signalling over the past two decades following the application of molecular biology, gene technology, electrophysiology and bioimaging to beta cell research. This review discusses cell signalling in insulin secretion, focusing on the molecular targets of ATP, cAMP and sulfonylurea, an essential metabolic signal in glucose-induced insulin secretion (GIIS), a critical signal in the potentiation of GIIS, and the commonly used glucose-lowering drug, respectively.

  6. Targeting the B cell receptor signaling pathway in B lymphoid malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Buchner, Maike; Müschen, Markus

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW Normal B cells that failed to productively rearrange immunoglobulin V region genes, encoding a functional B cell receptor (BCR) are destined to die. Likewise, the majority of B cell malignancies remain dependent on functional BCR signaling, while in some subtypes BCR expression is missing and, apparently, counterselected. Here we summarize recent the experimental evidence for the importance of BCR signaling and clinical concepts to target the BCR pathway in B cell leukemia and lymphoma. RECENT FINDINGS While the dependency on pre-BCR signaling in pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) seems to be limited to few ALL subtypes (e.g. TCF3-PBX1), most mature B cell lymphomas rely on BCR signaling provided by different stimuli e.g. tonic B cell signaling, chronic (auto)-antigen exposure, and self-binding properties of the BCR. The finding that in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), BCRs bind to an epitope on the BCR itself unravels a novel concept for CLL pathogenesis. SUMMARY Targeting of the B cell receptor tyrosine kinases SYK, BTK, and PI3K achieve promising clinical responses in various mature B cell malignancies and might also be useful in defined subsets of ALL. However, further understanding of the BCR signal integration in the different disease groups are required to accurately predict, which groups of patients will benefit from BCR pathway-inhibition. PMID:24811161

  7. JAK-STAT Signaling as a Target for Inflammatory and Autoimmune Diseases: Current and Future Prospects.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Shubhasree; Biehl, Ann; Gadina, Massimo; Hasni, Sarfaraz; Schwartz, Daniella M

    2017-04-01

    The Janus kinase/signal transduction and activator of transcription (JAK-STAT) signaling pathway is implicated in the pathogenesis of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis, psoriasis, and inflammatory bowel disease. Many cytokines involved in the pathogenesis of autoimmune and inflammatory diseases use JAKs and STATs to transduce intracellular signals. Mutations in JAK and STAT genes cause a number of immunodeficiency syndromes, and polymorphisms in these genes are associated with autoimmune diseases. The success of small-molecule JAK inhibitors (Jakinibs) in the treatment of rheumatologic disease demonstrates that intracellular signaling pathways can be targeted therapeutically to treat autoimmunity. Tofacitinib, the first rheumatologic Jakinib, is US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved for rheumatoid arthritis and is currently under investigation for other autoimmune diseases. Many other Jakinibs are in preclinical development or in various phases of clinical trials. This review describes the JAK-STAT pathway, outlines its role in autoimmunity, and explains the rationale/pre-clinical evidence for targeting JAK-STAT signaling. The safety and clinical efficacy of the Jakinibs are reviewed, starting with the FDA-approved Jakinib tofacitinib, and continuing on to next-generation Jakinibs. Recent and ongoing studies are emphasized, with a focus on emerging indications for JAK inhibition and novel mechanisms of JAK-STAT signaling blockade.

  8. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C.

    2015-01-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules. PMID:25755281

  9. WNT/β-Catenin Signaling Regulates Multiple Steps of Myogenesis by Regulating Step-Specific Targets.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akiko; Pelikan, Richard C; Iwata, Junichi

    2015-05-01

    Molecules involved in WNT/β-catenin signaling show specific spatiotemporal expression and play vital roles in myogenesis; however, it is still largely unknown how WNT/β-catenin signaling regulates each step of myogenesis. Here, we show that WNT/β-catenin signaling can control diverse biological processes of myogenesis by regulating step-specific molecules. In order to identify the temporally specific roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling molecules in muscle development and homeostasis, we used in vitro culture systems for both primary mouse myoblasts and C2C12 cells, which can differentiate into myofibers. We found that a blockade of WNT/β-catenin signaling in the proliferating cells decreases proliferation activity, but does not induce cell death, through the regulation of genes cyclin A2 (Ccna2) and cell division cycle 25C (Cdc25c). During muscle differentiation, the inhibition of WNT/β-catenin signaling blocks myoblast fusion through the inhibition of the Fermitin family homolog 2 (Fermt2) gene. Blocking WNT/β-catenin signaling in the well-differentiated myofibers results in the failure of maintenance of their structure by disruption of cadherin/β-catenin/actin complex formation, which plays a crucial role in connecting a myofiber's cytoskeleton to the surrounding extracellular matrix. Thus, our results indicate that WNT/β-catenin signaling can regulate multiple steps of myogenesis, including cell proliferation, myoblast fusion, and homeostasis, by targeting step-specific molecules.

  10. Mitochondrial and chloroplastic targeting signals of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase.

    PubMed

    McKinnon, David J; Brzezowski, Pawel; Wilson, Kenneth E; Gray, Gordon R

    2009-12-01

    Many mitochondrial and chloroplast proteins are encoded in the nucleus and subsequently imported into the organelles via active protein transport systems. While usually highly specific, some proteins are dual-targeted to both organelles. In tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum L.), the cDNA encoding the mitochondrial isoform of NADP+-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NADP+-ICDH) contains two translational ATG start sites, suggesting the possibility of tandem targeting signals. In this work, the putative mitochondrial and chloroplastic targeting signals from NADP+-ICDH were fused to a yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) reporter to generate a series of constructs and introduced into tobacco leaves by Agrobacterium-mediated transient transformation. The subsequent sub-cellular locations of the ICDH:YFP fusion proteins were then examined using confocal microscopy. Constructs predicted to be targeted to the chloroplast all localized to the chloroplast. However, this was not the case for all of the constructs that were predicted to be mitochondrial targeted. Although some constructs localized to mitochondria as expected, others appeared to be chloroplast localized. This was attributed to an additional 50 amino acid residues of the mature NADP+-ICDH protein that were present in those constructs, generated from either 'Xanthi' or 'Petit Havana' cultivars of tobacco. The results of this study raise interesting questions regarding the targeting and processing of organellar isoforms of NADP+-ICDH.

  11. Target detection, shape discrimination, and signal characteristics of an echolocating false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens).

    PubMed

    Brill, R L; Pawloski, J L; Helweg, D A; Au, W W; Moore, P W

    1992-09-01

    This study demonstrated the ability of a false killer whale (Pseudorca crassidens) to discriminate between two targets and investigated the parameters of the whale's emitted signals for changes related to test conditions. Target detection performance comparable to the bottlenose dolphin's (Tursiops truncatus) has previously been reported for echolocating false killer whales. No other echolocation capabilities have been reported. A false killer whale, naive to conditioned echolocation tasks, was initially trained to detect a cylinder in a "go/no-go" procedure over ranges of 3 to 8 m. The transition from a detection task to a discrimination task was readily achieved by introducing a spherical comparison target. Finally, the cylinder was successfully compared to spheres of two different sizes and target strengths. Multivariate analyses were used to evaluate the parameters of emitted signals. Duncan's multiple range tests showed significant decreases (df = 185, p less than 0.05) in both source level and bandwidth in the transition from detection to discrimination. Analysis of variance revealed a significant decrease in the number of clicks over test conditions [F(5.26) = 5.23, p less than 0.0001]. These data suggest that the whale relied on cues relevant to target shape as well as target strength, that changes in source level and bandwidth were task-related, that the decrease in clicks was associated with learning experience, and that Pseudorca's ability to discriminate shapes using echolocation may be comparable to that of Tursiops truncatus.

  12. Predicting a Luminous Red Nova

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Noord, Daniel; Molnar, Larry; Kinemuchi, Karen; Steenwyk, Steven; Alexander, Cara; Spedden, Chris; Kobulnicky, Henry

    2016-05-01

    Luminous Red Novae (LRN) are rare transient events believed to be caused by the merger of a main sequence contact binary. Since the discovery of the prototype, V838 Mon, only a handful of LRN events have been observed. Tylenda et al. (2011) analyzed the OGLE data preceding the 2008 Novae of V1309 Sco and found that it exhibited a similar light curve to that of a contact binary with one interesting exception, the orbital period of V1309 Sco showed exponential period change going to zero. Unfortunately the system was discovered to be a binary after the merger, preventing any targeted observations to narrow down how the system entered this unusual state. However the extreme period change observed in V1309 Sco gives us a signature to look for in other contact binaries, allowing the discovery of merger candidates for follow up. We will present an analysis of light curves and spectra of KIC 9832227 (NSVS 5597755) that show it is a contact binary system with a negative period derivative that is becoming more extreme with time. These data span more than 15 years and are taken from the NSVS, ASAS, WASP, and Kepler surveys, with ongoing measurements from the Calvin College Observatory and the Apache Point Observatory. The ongoing period change observed in the system is consistent with the exponential model fit from V1309 Sco and the rate of period change has surpassed that of all other measured contact binaries with the exception of V1309 Sco. If the exponential period decay continues the system will likely merge between 2019 and 2022 resulting in a naked eye nova. If this event occurs, this star will present the unprecedented opportunity to study a LRN progenitor and to follow the evolution of the merger.

  13. Hedgehog signaling pathway as a new therapeutic target in pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Onishi, Hideya; Katano, Mitsuo

    2014-03-07

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most aggressive and difficult cancers to treat. Despite numerous research efforts, limited success has been achieved in the therapeutic management of patients with this disease. In the current review, we focus on one component of morphogenesis signaling, Hedgehog (Hh), with the aim of developing novel, effective therapies for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Hh signaling contributes to the induction of a malignant phenotype in pancreatic cancer and is responsible for maintaining pancreatic cancer stem cells. In addition, we propose a novel concept linking Hh signaling and tumor hypoxic conditions, and discuss the effects of Hh inhibitors in clinical trials. The Hh signaling pathway may represent a potential therapeutic target for patients with refractory pancreatic cancer.

  14. Fibroblast growth factor receptor signaling as therapeutic targets in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yashiro, Masakazu; Matsuoka, Tasuku

    2016-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factor receptors (FGFRs) regulate a variety of cellular functions, from embryogenesis to adult tissue homeostasis. FGFR signaling also plays significant roles in the proliferation, invasion, and survival of several types of tumor cells. FGFR-induced alterations, including gene amplification, chromosomal translocation, and mutations, have been shown to be associated with the tumor initiation and progression of gastric cancer, especially in diffuse-type cancers. Therefore, the FGFR signaling pathway might be one of the therapeutic targets in gastric cancer. This review aims to provide an overview of the role of FGFR signaling in tumorigenesis, tumor progression, proliferation, and chemoresistance. We also discuss the accumulating evidence that demonstrates the effectiveness of using clinical therapeutic agents to inhibit FGFR signaling for the treatment of gastric cancer. PMID:26937130

  15. Targeting tissue-specific metabolic signaling pathways in aging: the promise and limitations.

    PubMed

    Hu, Fang; Liu, Feng

    2014-01-01

    It has been well established that most of the age-related diseases such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular disease, osteoporosis, and atherosclerosis are all closely related to metabolic dysfunction. On the other hand, interventions on metabolism such as calorie restriction or genetic manipulations of key metabolic signaling pathways such as the insulin and mTOR signaling pathways slow down the aging process and improve healthy aging. These findings raise an important question as to whether improving energy homeostasis by targeting certain metabolic signaling pathways in specific tissues could be an effective anti-aging strategy. With a more comprehensive understanding of the tissue-specific roles of distinct metabolic signaling pathways controlling energy homeostasis and the cross-talks between these pathways during aging may lead to the development of more effective therapeutic interventions not only for metabolic dysfunction but also for aging.

  16. mTORC1 signaling and IL-17 expression: Defining pathways and possible therapeutic targets.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wenkai; Yin, Jie; Duan, Jielin; Liu, Gang; Tan, Bie; Yang, Guan; Wu, Guoyao; Bazer, Fuller W; Peng, Yuanyi; Yin, Yulong

    2016-02-01

    IL-17 mediates immune responses against extracellular pathogens, and it is associated with the development and pathogenesis of various autoimmune diseases. The expression of IL-17 is regulated by various intracellular signaling cascades. Recently, it has been shown that mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, comprised mainly of mTORC1 signaling, plays a critical role in IL-17 expression. Here, we review the current knowledge regarding mechanisms by which mTORC1 regulates IL-17 expression. mTORC1 positively modulates IL-17 expression through several pathways, i.e. STAT3, -HIF-1α, -S6K1, and -S6K2. Amino acids (AAs) also regulate IL-17 expression by being the energy source for Th17 cells, and by activating mTORC1 signaling. Altogether, the AA-mTORC1-IL-17 axis has broad therapeutic implications for IL-17-associated diseases, such as EAE, allergies, and colitis.

  17. A novel multipitch measurement algorithm for acoustic signals of moving targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Jingchang; Guo, Feng; Zu, Xingshui; Li, Haiyan; Liu, Huawei; Li, Baoqing

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, a novel multipitch measurement (MPM) method is proposed for acoustic signals. Starting from the analysis of moving targets' acoustic signatures, a pitch-based harmonics representation model of acoustic signal is put forward. According to the proposed harmonics model, a modified greatest common divisor (MGCD) method is developed to obtain an initial multipitch set (IMS). Subsequently, the harmonic number vector (HNV) associated with the IMS is determined by maximizing the objective function formulated as a multi-impulse-train weighted symmetric average magnitude sum function (SAMSF) of the observed signal. The frequencies of SAMSF are determined by the target acoustic signal, the periods of the multi-impulse-train are governed by the estimated IMS harmonics and the maximization of the objective function is figured out through a time-domain matching of periodicities of the multi-impulse-train with that of the SAMSF. Finally, by using the obtained IMS and its HNV, a precise fundamental frequency set is achieved. Evaluation of the algorithm performances in comparison with state-of-the-art methods indicates that MPM is practical for the multipitch extraction of moving targets.

  18. Signaling cross-talk in the resistance to HER family receptor targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, H; Chang, S-S; Hsu, J L; Hung, M-C

    2014-02-27

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and human EGFR 2 (HER2) have an important role in the initiation and progression of various types of cancer. Inhibitors targeting these receptor tyrosine kinases are some of the most successful targeted anticancer drugs widely used for cancer treatment; however, cancer cells have mechanisms of intrinsic and acquired drug resistance that pose as major obstacles in drug efficacy. Extensive studies from both clinical and laboratory research have identified several molecular mechanisms underlying resistance. Among them is the role of signaling cross-talk between the EGFR/HER2 and other signaling pathways. In this review, we focus particularly on this signaling cross-talk at the receptor, mediator and effector levels, and further discuss alternative approaches to overcome resistance. In addition to well-recognized signaling cross-talk involved in the resistance, we also introduce the cross-talk between EGFR/HER2-mediated pathways and pathways triggered by other types of receptors, including those of the Notch, Wnt and TNFR/IKK/NF-κB pathways, and discuss the potential role of targeting this cross-talk to sensitize cells to EGFR/HER2 inhibitors.

  19. To fingolimod and beyond: The rich pipeline of drug candidates that target S1P signaling.

    PubMed

    Chew, Wee Siong; Wang, Wei; Herr, Deron R

    2016-11-01

    Sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) is an extracellular lipid signaling molecule that acts as a selective, high-affinity ligand for a family of five G protein-coupled receptors. This signaling system was first identified twenty years ago, and has since been shown to regulate a diverse range of physiological processes and disease states, such as cardiovascular development, immune function, hypoxic responses, and cancer. The therapeutic potential of targeting this system took center stage when it was demonstrated that the immune modulator, fingolimod (FTY720/Gilenya), exerts it lymphopenic effect by acting on S1P receptors, primarily on S1P receptor 1 (S1P1). In 2010, fingolimod became the first oral medication approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). Since then, second-generation S1P receptor modulators have been under development in an effort to provide improved safety and efficacy profiles for MS, and to broaden their use to other autoimmune indications. Beyond the development of S1P1-modulators, there has been considerable effort in targeting other components of the S1P signaling pathway for the treatment of other diseases, such as cardiovascular disease, sepsis, and cancer. This manuscript provides an overview of the clinical and preclinical development of drugs targeting S1P signaling.

  20. Targeting Oct1 genomic function inhibits androgen receptor signaling and castration-resistant prostate cancer growth.

    PubMed

    Obinata, D; Takayama, K; Fujiwara, K; Suzuki, T; Tsutsumi, S; Fukuda, N; Nagase, H; Fujimura, T; Urano, T; Homma, Y; Aburatani, H; Takahashi, S; Inoue, S

    2016-12-08

    Androgen receptor (AR) functions as a ligand-dependent transcription factor to regulate its downstream signaling for prostate cancer progression. AR complex formation by multiple transcription factors is important for enhancer activity and transcriptional regulation. However, the significance of such collaborative transcription factors has not been fully understood. In this study, we show that Oct1, an AR collaborative factor, coordinates genome-wide AR signaling for prostate cancer growth. Using global analysis by chromatin immunoprecipitation sequencing (ChIP-seq), we found that Oct1 is recruited to AR-binding enhancer/promoter regions and facilitates androgen signaling. Moreover, a major target of AR/Oct1 complex, acyl-CoA synthetase 3 (ACSL3), contributes to tumor growth in nude mice, and its high expression is associated with poor prognosis in prostate cancer patients. Next, we examined the therapeutic effects of pyrrole-imidazole polyamides that target the Oct1-binding sequence identified in the center of the ACSL3 AR-binding site. We observed that treatment with Oct1 polyamide severely blocked the Oct1 binding at the ACSL3 enhancer responsible for its transcriptional activity and ACSL3 induction. In addition, Oct1 polyamides suppressed castration-resistant tumor growth and specifically repressed global Oct1 chromatin association and androgen signaling in prostate cancer cells, with few nonspecific effects on basal promoter activity. Thus, targeting Oct1 binding could be a novel therapeutic strategy for AR-activated castration-resistant prostate cancer.

  1. Advances in targeting insulin-like growth factor signaling pathway in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    You, Liangkun; Liu, Changyu; Tang, Hexiao; Liao, Yongde; Fu, Shengling

    2014-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factors (IGFs), along with their receptors and binding proteins, play key roles in human cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. There is now substantial evidence suggesting that the IGF system is involved in the pathogenesis and progression of various malignancies. Recent studies have shown that targeting of the IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R) signaling pathway might be a novel approach for the treatment of cancer. Presently numerous agents featuring different mechanisms of IGF targeting methods such as IGF-1R monoclonal antibodies, IGF-1R tyrosine kinase inhibitors and IGF ligand specific antibodies are being investigated in more than 170 clinical trials and appear to have potential therapeutic efficacy. However, advanced trials reiterate the importance of predictive biomarkers to guide the clinical efforts of these agents. As a result, current research strategies are emerging to identify the most suitable subpopulations of patients that might benefit from these treatments. Furthermore, newly presented toxicity and growth hormone response and implication of hybrid receptors in IGF signaling pathway pose unprecedented challenges in the design and application of anti-IGF agents. On the other hand, cross-talk in downstream signaling between IGF-1R and other tumor promoting pathways and the development of multi-target agents might encourage the IGF-1R-targeted therapies further into comprehensive treatments of cancer. With both challenges and prospects ahead, this paper reviewed the progress in this particular field.

  2. Targeting cell death signalling in cancer: minimising ‘Collateral damage'

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Joanna L; MacFarlane, Marion

    2016-01-01

    Targeting apoptosis for the treatment of cancer has become an increasingly attractive strategy, with agents in development to trigger extrinsic apoptosis via TRAIL signalling, or to prevent the anti-apoptotic activity of BCL-2 proteins or inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Although the evasion of apoptosis is one of the hallmarks of cancer, many cancers have intact apoptotic signalling pathways, which if unblocked could efficiently kill cancerous cells. However, it is becoming increasing clear that without a detailed understanding of both apoptotic and non-apoptotic signalling, and the key proteins that regulate these pathways, there can be dose-limiting toxicity and adverse effects associated with their modulation. Here we review the main apoptotic pathways directly targeted for anti-cancer therapy and the unforeseen consequences of their modulation. Furthermore, we highlight the importance of an in-depth mechanistic understanding of both the apoptotic and non-apoptotic functions of those proteins under investigation as anti-cancer drug targets and outline some novel approaches to sensitise cancer cells to apoptosis, thereby improving the efficacy of existing therapies when used in combination with novel targeted agents. PMID:27140313

  3. Targeting Calcium Signaling Induces Epigenetic Reactivation of Tumor Suppressor Genes in Cancer.

    PubMed

    Raynal, Noël J-M; Lee, Justin T; Wang, Youjun; Beaudry, Annie; Madireddi, Priyanka; Garriga, Judith; Malouf, Gabriel G; Dumont, Sarah; Dettman, Elisha J; Gharibyan, Vazganush; Ahmed, Saira; Chung, Woonbok; Childers, Wayne E; Abou-Gharbia, Magid; Henry, Ryan A; Andrews, Andrew J; Jelinek, Jaroslav; Cui, Ying; Baylin, Stephen B; Gill, Donald L; Issa, Jean-Pierre J

    2016-03-15

    Targeting epigenetic pathways is a promising approach for cancer therapy. Here, we report on the unexpected finding that targeting calcium signaling can reverse epigenetic silencing of tumor suppressor genes (TSG). In a screen for drugs that reactivate silenced gene expression in colon cancer cells, we found three classical epigenetic targeted drugs (DNA methylation and histone deacetylase inhibitors) and 11 other drugs that induced methylated and silenced CpG island promoters driving a reporter gene (GFP) as well as endogenous TSGs in multiple cancer cell lines. These newly identified drugs, most prominently cardiac glycosides, did not change DNA methylation locally or histone modifications globally. Instead, all 11 drugs altered calcium signaling and triggered calcium-calmodulin kinase (CamK) activity, leading to MeCP2 nuclear exclusion. Blocking CamK activity abolished gene reactivation and cancer cell killing by these drugs, showing that triggering calcium fluxes is an essential component of their epigenetic mechanism of action. Our data identify calcium signaling as a new pathway that can be targeted to reactivate TSGs in cancer.

  4. Cannabinoid CB2 receptor ligand profiling reveals biased signalling and off-target activity

    PubMed Central

    Soethoudt, Marjolein; Grether, Uwe; Fingerle, Jürgen; Grim, Travis W.; Fezza, Filomena; de Petrocellis, Luciano; Ullmer, Christoph; Rothenhäusler, Benno; Perret, Camille; van Gils, Noortje; Finlay, David; MacDonald, Christa; Chicca, Andrea; Gens, Marianela Dalghi; Stuart, Jordyn; de Vries, Henk; Mastrangelo, Nicolina; Xia, Lizi; Alachouzos, Georgios; Baggelaar, Marc P.; Martella, Andrea; Mock, Elliot D.; Deng, Hui; Heitman, Laura H.; Connor, Mark; Di Marzo, Vincenzo; Gertsch, Jürg; Lichtman, Aron H.; Maccarrone, Mauro; Pacher, Pal; Glass, Michelle; van der Stelt, Mario

    2017-01-01

    The cannabinoid CB2 receptor (CB2R) represents a promising therapeutic target for various forms of tissue injury and inflammatory diseases. Although numerous compounds have been developed and widely used to target CB2R, their selectivity, molecular mode of action and pharmacokinetic properties have been poorly characterized. Here we report the most extensive characterization of the molecular pharmacology of the most widely used CB2R ligands to date. In a collaborative effort between multiple academic and industry laboratories, we identify marked differences in the ability of certain agonists to activate distinct signalling pathways and to cause off-target effects. We reach a consensus that HU910, HU308 and JWH133 are the recommended selective CB2R agonists to study the role of CB2R in biological and disease processes. We believe that our unique approach would be highly suitable for the characterization of other therapeutic targets in drug discovery research. PMID:28045021

  5. Promising Druggable Target in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma: Wnt Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Aminuddin, Amnani; Ng, Pei Yuen

    2016-01-01

    Canonical Wnt signaling pathway, also known as Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, is a crucial mechanism for cellular maintenance and development. It regulates cell cycle progression, apoptosis, proliferation, migration, and differentiation. Dysregulation of this pathway correlates with oncogenesis in various tissues including breast, colon, pancreatic as well as head and neck cancers. Furthermore, the canonical Wnt signaling pathway has also been described as one of the critical signaling pathways for regulation of normal stem cells as well as cancer cells with stem cell-like features, termed cancer stem cells (CSC). In this review, we will briefly describe the basic mechanisms of Wnt signaling pathway and its crucial roles in the normal regulation of cellular processes as well as in the development of cancer. Next, we will highlight the roles of canonical Wnt signaling pathway in the regulation of CSC properties namely self-renewal, differentiation, metastasis, and drug resistance abilities, particularly in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Finally, we will examine the findings of several recent studies which explore druggable targets in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway which could be valuable to improve the treatment outcome for head and neck cancer. PMID:27570510

  6. The similarity between N-terminal targeting signals for protein import into different organelles and its evolutionary relevance

    PubMed Central

    Kunze, Markus; Berger, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    The proper distribution of proteins between the cytosol and various membrane-bound compartments is crucial for the functionality of eukaryotic cells. This requires the cooperation between protein transport machineries that translocate diverse proteins from the cytosol into these compartments and targeting signal(s) encoded within the primary sequence of these proteins that define their cellular destination. The mechanisms exerting protein translocation differ remarkably between the compartments, but the predominant targeting signals for mitochondria, chloroplasts and the ER share the N-terminal position, an α-helical structural element and the removal from the core protein by intraorganellar cleavage. Interestingly, similar properties have been described for the peroxisomal targeting signal type 2 mediating the import of a fraction of soluble peroxisomal proteins, whereas other peroxisomal matrix proteins encode the type 1 targeting signal residing at the extreme C-terminus. The structural similarity of N-terminal targeting signals poses a challenge to the specificity of protein transport, but allows the generation of ambiguous targeting signals that mediate dual targeting of proteins into different compartments. Dual targeting might represent an advantage for adaptation processes that involve a redistribution of proteins, because it circumvents the hierarchy of targeting signals. Thus, the co-existence of two equally functional import pathways into peroxisomes might reflect a balance between evolutionary constant and flexible transport routes. PMID:26441678

  7. Differential usage of signal transduction pathways defines two types of serum response factor target gene.

    PubMed

    Gineitis, D; Treisman, R

    2001-07-06

    Activation of the transcription factor serum response factor (SRF) is dependent on Rho-controlled changes in actin dynamics. We used pathway-specific inhibitors to compare the roles of actin dynamics, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling, and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in signaling either to SRF itself or to four cellular SRF target genes. Serum, lysophosphatidic acid, platelet-derived growth factor, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) each activated transcription of a stably integrated SRF reporter gene dependent on functional RhoA GTPase. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase-ERK kinase (MEK) signalling reduced activation of the SRF reporter by all stimuli by about 50%, except for PMA, which was effectively blocked. Inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase slightly reduced reporter activation by serum and lysophosphatidic acid but substantially inhibited activation by platelet-derived growth factor and PMA. Reporter induction by all stimuli was absolutely dependent on actin dynamics. Regulation of the SRF (srf) and vinculin (vcl) genes was similar to that of the SRF reporter gene; activation by all stimuli was Rho-dependent and required actin dynamics but was largely independent of MEK activity. In contrast, activation of fos and egr1 occurred independently of RhoA and actin polymerization but was almost completely dependent on MEK activation. These results show that at least two classes of SRF target genes can be distinguished on the basis of their relative sensitivity to RhoA-actin and MEK-ERK signaling pathways.

  8. '2A-Like' Signal Sequences Mediating Translational Recoding: A Novel Form of Dual Protein Targeting.

    PubMed

    Roulston, Claire; Luke, Garry A; de Felipe, Pablo; Ruan, Lin; Cope, Jonathan; Nicholson, John; Sukhodub, Andriy; Tilsner, Jens; Ryan, Martin D

    2016-08-01

    We report the initial characterization of an N-terminal oligopeptide '2A-like' sequence that is able to function both as a signal sequence and as a translational recoding element. Owing to this translational recoding activity, two forms of nascent polypeptide are synthesized: (i) when 2A-mediated translational recoding has not occurred: the nascent polypeptide is fused to the 2A-like N-terminal signal sequence and the fusion translation product is targeted to the exocytic pathway, and, (ii) a translation product where 2A-mediated translational recoding has occurred: the 2A-like signal sequence is synthesized as a separate translation product and, therefore, the nascent (downstream) polypeptide lacks the 2A-like signal sequence and is localized to the cytoplasm. This type of dual-functional signal sequence results, therefore, in the partitioning of the translation products between the two sub-cellular sites and represents a newly described form of dual protein targeting.

  9. Novel transcript nort is a downstream target gene of the Notch signaling pathway in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Tsutsumi, Makiko; Itoh, Motoyuki

    2007-01-01

    The Notch signaling pathway plays important roles in the regulation of diverse developmental processes. Although many Notch-signal target genes with different specificities have been identified, their regulation and functions are not fully understood. Here, we conducted a microarray screen to search for novel downstream target genes of the Notch pathway in zebrafish. From the screen, we isolated nort (Notch-regulated transcript) as a transcript whose expression was reduced by the inhibition of Notch signaling. The expression level of nort increased when Notch signaling was activated. nort was expressed in hypoblast cells and the developing nervous system. We found its expression pattern to be similar to that of her4, but it showed some differences, at least in the anterior and posterior neural plate at the 3-somite stage. The nort transcript did not contain any long open-reading frame (ORF) of more than 300 nt, and its ORF-encoded sequence showed no significant homology with the proteins in databases. However, nort has one SPS (suppressor of hairless paired binding site) in its 5'-flanking region. These data suggest that nort is a putative noncoding RNA regulated by Notch signaling.

  10. Glycans in post-Golgi apical targeting: sorting signals or structural props?

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Boulan, E; Gonzalez, A

    1999-08-01

    A recent model proposed that N-glycans serve as apical targeting signals for soluble and membrane proteins in epithelial cells and neurons by interacting with lectin sorters in the trans-Golgi network. However, we believe that a number of experimental observations support an alternative hypothesis, that N-glycans play a facilitative role, by providing structural support or preventing aggregation of the proteins for example, thereby allowing interaction of proteinaceous apical sorting signals with the sorting machinery. This article discusses the experimental data currently available and how they relate to the proposed models.

  11. p27: a barometer of signaling deregulation and potential predictor of response to targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Wander, Seth A; Zhao, Dekuang; Slingerland, Joyce M

    2011-01-01

    Phosphorylation of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27 by upstream mitogenic signaling pathways regulates its stability, localization, and biological function. In human cancers, loss of the antiproliferative action of p27 can arise through reduced protein levels and/or cytoplasmic mislocalization, leading to increased cell proliferation and/or cell migration, respectively. Reduced p27 expression levels and p27 mislocalization have potential prognostic and therapeutic implications in various types of human cancers. This review highlights mechanisms of functional deregulation of p27 by oncogenic signaling that provide an important molecular rationale for pathway targeting in cancer treatment.

  12. Targeting CB2-GPR55 receptor heteromers modulates cancer cell signaling.

    PubMed

    Moreno, Estefanía; Andradas, Clara; Medrano, Mireia; Caffarel, María M; Pérez-Gómez, Eduardo; Blasco-Benito, Sandra; Gómez-Cañas, María; Pazos, M Ruth; Irving, Andrew J; Lluís, Carme; Canela, Enric I; Fernández-Ruiz, Javier; Guzmán, Manuel; McCormick, Peter J; Sánchez, Cristina

    2014-08-08

    The G protein-coupled receptors CB2 (CB2R) and GPR55 are overexpressed in cancer cells and human tumors. Because a modulation of GPR55 activity by cannabinoids has been suggested, we analyzed whether this receptor participates in cannabinoid effects on cancer cells. Here we show that CB2R and GPR55 form heteromers in cancer cells, that these structures possess unique signaling properties, and that modulation of these heteromers can modify the antitumoral activity of cannabinoids in vivo. These findings unveil the existence of previously unknown signaling platforms that help explain the complex behavior of cannabinoids and may constitute new targets for therapeutic intervention in oncology.

  13. Substrate-Activated Conformational Switch on Chaperones Encodes aTargeting Signal in Type III Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Li; Ai, Xuanjun; Portaliou, Athina G.; Minetti, Conceicao A.S.A.; Remeta, David P.; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Targeting of type III secretion proteins at the injectisome is an important process in bacterial virulence. Nevertheless, how the injectisome specifically recognizes TTS substrates among all bacterial proteins is unknown. A TTS peripheral membrane ATPase protein located at the base of the injectisome has been implicated in the targeting process. We have investigated the targeting of the EspA filament protein and its cognate chaperone CesAB to the EscN ATPase of the enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC). We show that EscN selectively engages the EspA-loaded CesAB, but not the unliganded CesAB. Structure analysis revealed that the targeting signal is encoded in a disorder-order structural transition in CesAB that is elicited only upon binding of its physiological substrate, EspA. Abrogation of the interaction between the CesAB–EspA complex and EscN resulted in severe secretion and infection defects. We further show that the targeting and secretion signals are distinct and the two processes are likely regulated by different mechanisms. PMID:23523349

  14. Local luminance effect on spatial summation in the foveal vision and its implication on image artifact classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chien-Chung; Lin, San-Yuan; Han, Hui-Ya G.; Kuo, Sheng-Tzung; Huang, Kuo-Chung

    2006-02-01

    We investigated the spatial summation effect on pedestals with difference luminance. The targets were luminance modulation defined by Gaussian functions. The size of the Gaussian spot was determined by the scale parameter (standard deviation, σ) which ranged from 0.13°to 1.04°. The local luminance pedestal (2° radius) had mean luminance ranged from 2.9 to 29cd/m2. The no-pedestal condition had a mean luminance 58cd/m2. We used a QUEST adaptive threshold seeking procedure and 2AFC paradigm to measure the target contrast threshold at different target sizes (spatial summation curve) and pedestal luminance. The target threshold decreased as the target spatial extent increased with a slope -0.5 on log-log coordinates. However, if the target size was large enough (σ>0.3°), there was little, if any, threshold reduction as the target size further increased. The spatial summation curve had the same shape at all pedestal luminance levels. The effect of the pedestal was to shift the summation curve vertically on log-log coordinates. Hence, the size and the luminance effects on target detection are separable. The visibility of the Gaussian spot can be modeled by a function with a form f(L)*g(σ) where f(L) is a function of local luminance and g(σ) is a function of size.

  15. Characterization of FGFR signaling pathway as therapeutic targets for sarcoma patients.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wen-Ya; Zheng, Hong; Du, Xiao-Ling; Yang, Ji-Long

    2016-06-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family plays important roles in regulating cell growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. Deregulation of the FGF/FGFR signaling pathway has been associated with multiple development syndromes and cancers, and thus therapeutic strategies targeting FGFs and FGFR in human cancer are currently being explored. However, few studies on the FGF/FGFR pathway have been conducted in sarcoma, which has a poor outcome with traditional treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Hence, in the present review, we provide an overview of the role of the FGF/FGFR pathway signal in sarcoma and FGFR inhibitors, which might be new targets for the treatment of sarcomas according to recent research.

  16. The Bcl10/Malt1 signaling pathway as a drug target in lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Jost, P; Peschel, C; Ruland, J

    2006-10-01

    The development of lymphomas and leukemias is frequently caused by chromosomal translocations that deregulate cellular pathways of differentiation, proliferation or survival. The molecules that are involved in these aberrations provide rational targets for selective drug therapies. Recently, several disease specific translocations have been identified in human MALT lymphoma. These aberrations either upregulate the expression of BCL10 or MALT1 or induce the formation of API2-MALT1 fusion proteins. Genetic and biochemical experiments identified BCL10 and MALT1 as central components of an oligomerization-ubiquitinylation-phosphorylation cascade that activates the transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to antigen receptor ligation. Deregulation of the signaling cascade is directly associated with antigen independent MALT lymphoma growth. Here we provide an overview of the physiological and pathological functions of BCL10/MALT1 signal transduction and discuss the potential of this pathway as a drug target.

  17. Differential Targeting of Gβγ-Subunit Signaling with Small Molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonacci, Tabetha M.; Mathews, Jennifer L.; Yuan, Chujun; Lehmann, David M.; Malik, Sundeep; Wu, Dianqing; Font, Jose L.; Bidlack, Jean M.; Smrcka, Alan V.

    2006-04-01

    G protein βγ subunits have potential as a target for therapeutic treatment of a number of diseases. We performed virtual docking of a small-molecule library to a site on Gβγ subunits that mediates protein interactions. We hypothesized that differential targeting of this surface could allow for selective modulation of Gβγ subunit functions. Several compounds bound to Gβγ subunits with affinities from 0.1 to 60 μM and selectively modulated functional Gβγ-protein-protein interactions in vitro, chemotactic peptide signaling pathways in HL-60 leukocytes, and opioid receptor-dependent analgesia in vivo. These data demonstrate an approach for modulation of G protein-coupled receptor signaling that may represent an important therapeutic strategy.

  18. Characterization of FGFR signaling pathway as therapeutic targets for sarcoma patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Wen-Ya; Zheng, Hong; Du, Xiao-Ling; Yang, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    The fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) family plays important roles in regulating cell growth, proliferation, survival, differentiation and angiogenesis. Deregulation of the FGF/FGFR signaling pathway has been associated with multiple development syndromes and cancers, and thus therapeutic strategies targeting FGFs and FGFR in human cancer are currently being explored. However, few studies on the FGF/FGFR pathway have been conducted in sarcoma, which has a poor outcome with traditional treatments such as surgery, chemotherapy, and radiotherapy. Hence, in the present review, we provide an overview of the role of the FGF/FGFR pathway signal in sarcoma and FGFR inhibitors, which might be new targets for the treatment of sarcomas according to recent research. PMID:27458533

  19. A waveform detector that targets template–decorrelated signals and achieves its predicted performance, Part I: Demonstration with IMS data

    SciTech Connect

    Carmichael, Joshua Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Here, waveform correlation detectors used in seismic monitoring scan multichannel data to test two competing hypotheses: that data contain (1) a noisy, amplitude-scaled version of a template waveform, or, (2) only noise. In reality, seismic wavefields include signals triggered by non-target sources (background seismicity) and targets signals that are only partially correlated with the waveform template.

  20. Teratogen-mediated inhibition of target tissue response to Shh signaling.

    PubMed

    Cooper, M K; Porter, J A; Young, K E; Beachy, P A

    1998-06-05

    Veratrum alkaloids and distal inhibitors of cholesterol biosynthesis have been studied for more than 30 years as potent teratogens capable of inducing cyclopia and other birth defects. Here, it is shown that these compounds specifically block the Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway. These teratogens did not prevent the sterol modification of Shh during autoprocessing but rather inhibited the response of target tissues to Shh, possibly acting through the sterol sensing domain within the Patched protein regulator of Shh response.

  1. Insulin, IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling in neurodegenerative disorders: targets for disease modification?

    PubMed

    Bassil, Fares; Fernagut, Pierre-Olivier; Bezard, Erwan; Meissner, Wassilios G

    2014-07-01

    Insulin and Insulin Growth Factor-1 (IGF-1) play a major role in body homeostasis and glucose regulation. They also have paracrine/autocrine functions in the brain. The Insulin/IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to the control of neuronal excitability, nerve cell metabolism and cell survival. Glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1), known as an insulinotropic hormone has similar functions and growth like properties as insulin/IGF-1. Growing evidence suggests that dysfunction of these pathways contribute to the progressive loss of neurons in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Parkinson's disease (PD), the two most frequent neurodegenerative disorders. These findings have led to numerous studies in preclinical models of neurodegenerative disorders targeting insulin/IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling with currently available anti-diabetics. These studies have shown that administration of insulin, IGF-1 and GLP-1 agonists reverses signaling abnormalities and has positive effects on surrogate markers of neurodegeneration and behavioral outcomes. Several proof-of-concept studies are underway that attempt to translate the encouraging preclinical results to patients suffering from AD and PD. In the first part of this review, we discuss physiological functions of insulin/IGF-1 and GLP-1 signaling pathways including downstream targets and receptors distribution within the brain. In the second part, we undertake a comprehensive overview of preclinical studies targeting insulin/IGF-1 or GLP-1 signaling for treating AD and PD. We then detail the design of clinical trials that have used anti-diabetics for treating AD and PD patients. We close with future considerations that treat relevant issues for successful translation of these encouraging preclinical results into treatments for patients with AD and PD.

  2. Targeting stem cell signaling pathways for drug discovery: advances in the Notch and Wnt pathways.

    PubMed

    An, Songzhu Michael; Ding, Qiang; Zhang, Jie; Xie, JingYi; Li, LingSong

    2014-06-01

    Signaling pathways transduce extracellular stimuli into cells through molecular cascades to regulate cellular functions. In stem cells, a small number of pathways, notably those of TGF-β/BMP, Hedgehog, Notch, and Wnt, are responsible for the regulation of pluripotency and differentiation. During embryonic development, these pathways govern cell fate specifications as well as the formation of tissues and organs. In adulthood, their normal functions are important for tissue homeostasis and regeneration, whereas aberrations result in diseases, such as cancer and degenerative disorders. In complex biological systems, stem cell signaling pathways work in concert as a network and exhibit crosstalk, such as the negative crosstalk between Wnt and Notch. Over the past decade, genetic and genomic studies have identified a number of potential drug targets that are involved in stem cell signaling pathways. Indeed, discovery of new targets and drugs for these pathways has become one of the most active areas in both the research community and pharmaceutical industry. Remarkable progress has been made and several promising drug candidates have entered into clinical trials. This review focuses on recent advances in the discovery of novel drugs which target the Notch and Wnt pathways.

  3. Dendritic cell specific targeting of MyD88 signalling pathways in vivo.

    PubMed

    Arnold-Schrauf, Catharina; Berod, Luciana; Sparwasser, Tim

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are key regulators of both innate and adaptive immunity. During infection, DCs recognise pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) via pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) including the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family. TLRs mainly signal via the adaptor protein MyD88. This signalling pathway is required for immune protection during many infections, which are lethal in the absence of MyD88. However, the cell type specific importance of this pathway during both innate and adaptive immune responses against pathogens in vivo remains ill-defined. We discuss recent findings from conditional KO or gain-of-function mouse models targeting TLR/MyD88 signalling pathways in DCs and other myeloid cells during infection. While the general assumption that MyD88-dependent recognition by DCs is essential for inducing protective immunity holds true in some instances, the results surprisingly indicate a much more complex context-dependent requirement for this pathway in DCs and other myeloid or lymphoid cell-types in vivo. Furthermore, we highlight the advantages of Cre-mediated DC targeting approaches and their possible limitations. We also present future perspectives on the development of new genetic mouse models to target distinct DC subsets in vivo. Such models will serve to understand the functional heterogeneity of DCs in vivo.

  4. Epigenetic and genetic deregulation in cancer target distinct signaling pathway domains

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Yang; Teschendorff, Andrew E.

    2017-01-01

    Cancer is characterized by both genetic and epigenetic alterations. While cancer driver mutations and copy-number alterations have been studied at a systems-level, relatively little is known about the systems-level patterns exhibited by their epigenetic counterparts. Here we perform a pan-cancer wide systems-level analysis, mapping candidate cancer-driver DNA methylation (DNAm) alterations onto a human interactome. We demonstrate that functional DNAm alterations in cancer tend to map to nodes of lower connectivity and inter-connectivity, compared to the corresponding alterations at the genomic level. We find that epigenetic alterations are relatively over-represented in extracellular and transmembrane signaling domains, whereas cancer genes undergoing amplification or deletion tend to be enriched within the intracellular domain. A pan-cancer wide meta-analysis identifies WNT and chemokine signaling, as two key pathways where epigenetic deregulation preferentially targets extracellular components. We further pinpoint specific chemokine ligands/receptors whose epigenetic deregulation associates with key epigenetic enzymes, representing potential targets for epigenetic therapy. Our results suggest that epigenetic deregulation in cancer not only targets tissue-specific transcription factors, but also modulates signaling within the extra-cellular domain, providing novel system-level insight into the potential distinctive role of genetic and epigenetic alterations in cancer. PMID:27899617

  5. Methylglyoxal activates the target of rapamycin complex 2-protein kinase C signaling pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Wataru; Inoue, Yoshiharu

    2015-04-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr(1125) and Ser(1143). Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1(T1125) affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser(1143), in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser(473). Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes.

  6. MAPK Signaling in Cardiovascular Health and Disease: Molecular Mechanisms and Therapeutic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Muslin, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Intracellular mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling cascades likely play an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiac and vascular disease. A substantial amount of basic science research has defined many of the details of MAPK pathway organization and activation, but the role of individual signaling proteins in the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases is still being elucidated. In this review, the role of the MAPKs extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), C-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 MAPK in cardiac hypertrophy, cardiac remodeling after myocardial infarction, atherosclerosis and vascular restenosis will be examined with attention paid to genetically-modified murine model systems and to the use of pharmacologic inhibitors of protein kinases. Despite the complexities of this field of research, attractive targets for pharmacological therapy are emerging. PMID:18752467

  7. Methylglyoxal Activates the Target of Rapamycin Complex 2-Protein Kinase C Signaling Pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Nomura, Wataru

    2015-01-01

    Methylglyoxal is a typical 2-oxoaldehyde derived from glycolysis. We show here that methylglyoxal activates the Pkc1-Mpk1 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascade in a target of rapamycin complex 2 (TORC2)-dependent manner in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We demonstrate that TORC2 phosphorylates Pkc1 at Thr1125 and Ser1143. Methylglyoxal enhanced the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, which transmitted the signal to the downstream Mpk1 MAP kinase cascade. We found that the phosphorylation status of Pkc1T1125 affected the phosphorylation of Pkc1 at Ser1143, in addition to its protein levels. Methylglyoxal activated mammalian TORC2 signaling, which, in turn, phosphorylated Akt at Ser473. Our results suggest that methylglyoxal is a conserved initiator of TORC2 signaling among eukaryotes. PMID:25624345

  8. Genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways targeted

    PubMed Central

    Domingues, Patrícia; González-Tablas, María; Otero, Álvaro; Pascual, Daniel; Ruiz, Laura; Miranda, David; Sousa, Pablo; Gonçalves, Jesús María; Lopes, María Celeste; Orfao, Alberto; Tabernero, María Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Meningiomas are usually considered to be benign central nervous system tumors; however, they show heterogenous clinical, histolopathological and cytogenetic features associated with a variable outcome. In recent years important advances have been achieved in the identification of the genetic/molecular alterations of meningiomas and the signaling pathways involved. Thus, monosomy 22, which is often associated with mutations of the NF2 gene, has emerged as the most frequent alteration of meningiomas; in addition, several other genes (e.g. AKT1, KLF4, TRAF7, SMO) and chromosomes have been found to be recurrently altered often in association with more complex karyotypes and involvement of multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the current knowledge about the most relevant genes involved and the signaling pathways targeted by such alterations. In addition, we summarize those proposals that have been made so far for classification and prognostic stratification of meningiomas based on their genetic/genomic features. PMID:25965831

  9. Target of Rapamycin (TOR) Regulates Growth in Response to Nutritional Signals.

    PubMed

    Weisman, Ronit

    2016-10-01

    All organisms can respond to the availability of nutrients by regulating their metabolism, growth, and cell division. Central to the regulation of growth in response to nutrient availability is the target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling that is composed of two structurally distinct complexes: TOR complex 1 (TORC1) and TOR complex 2 (TORC2). The TOR genes were first identified in yeast as target of rapamycin, a natural product of a soil bacterium, which proved beneficial as an immunosuppressive and anticancer drug and is currently being tested for a handful of other pathological conditions including diabetes, neurodegeneration, and age-related diseases. Studies of the TOR pathway unraveled a complex growth-regulating network. TOR regulates nutrient uptake, transcription, protein synthesis and degradation, as well as metabolic pathways, in a coordinated manner that ensures that cells grow or cease growth in response to nutrient availability. The identification of specific signals and mechanisms that stimulate TOR signaling is an active and exciting field of research that has already identified nitrogen and amino acids as key regulators of TORC1 activity. The signals, as well as the cellular functions of TORC2, are far less well understood. Additional open questions in the field concern the relationships between TORC1 and TORC2, as well as the links with other nutrient-responsive pathways. Here I review the main features of TORC1 and TORC2, with a particular focus on yeasts as model organisms.

  10. Engineering self-contained DNA circuit for proximity recognition and localized signal amplification of target biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Ang, Yan Shan; Yung, Lin-Yue Lanry

    2014-08-01

    Biomolecular interactions have important cellular implications, however, a simple method for the sensing of such proximal events is lacking in the current molecular toolbox. We designed a dynamic DNA circuit capable of recognizing targets in close proximity to initiate a pre-programmed signal transduction process resulting in localized signal amplification. The entire circuit was engineered to be self-contained, i.e. it can self-assemble onto individual target molecules autonomously and form localized signal with minimal cross-talk. α-thrombin was used as a model protein to evaluate the performance of the individual modules and the overall circuit for proximity interaction under physiologically relevant buffer condition. The circuit achieved good selectivity in presence of non-specific protein and interfering serum matrix and successfully detected for physiologically relevant α-thrombin concentration (50 nM-5 μM) in a single mixing step without any further washing. The formation of localized signal at the interaction site can be enhanced kinetically through the control of temperature and probe concentration. This work provides a basic general framework from which other circuit modules can be adapted for the sensing of other biomolecular or cellular interaction of interest.

  11. Phospholipase D Signaling Pathways and Phosphatidic Acid as Therapeutic Targets in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bruntz, Ronald C.; Lindsley, Craig W.

    2014-01-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein–coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions. PMID:25244928

  12. Phospholipase D signaling pathways and phosphatidic acid as therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Bruntz, Ronald C; Lindsley, Craig W; Brown, H Alex

    2014-10-01

    Phospholipase D is a ubiquitous class of enzymes that generates phosphatidic acid as an intracellular signaling species. The phospholipase D superfamily plays a central role in a variety of functions in prokaryotes, viruses, yeast, fungi, plants, and eukaryotic species. In mammalian cells, the pathways modulating catalytic activity involve a variety of cellular signaling components, including G protein-coupled receptors, receptor tyrosine kinases, polyphosphatidylinositol lipids, Ras/Rho/ADP-ribosylation factor GTPases, and conventional isoforms of protein kinase C, among others. Recent findings have shown that phosphatidic acid generated by phospholipase D plays roles in numerous essential cellular functions, such as vesicular trafficking, exocytosis, autophagy, regulation of cellular metabolism, and tumorigenesis. Many of these cellular events are modulated by the actions of phosphatidic acid, and identification of two targets (mammalian target of rapamycin and Akt kinase) has especially highlighted a role for phospholipase D in the regulation of cellular metabolism. Phospholipase D is a regulator of intercellular signaling and metabolic pathways, particularly in cells that are under stress conditions. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the regulation of phospholipase D activity and its modulation of cellular signaling pathways and functions.

  13. Quinomycin A targets Notch signaling pathway in pancreatic cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Dandawate, Prasad R; Dhar, Animesh; Tawfik, Ossama W; Parab, Rajashri R; Mishra, Prabhu Dutt; Ranadive, Prafull; Sharma, Rajiv; Mahajan, Girish; Umar, Shahid; Weir, Scott J; Sugumar, Aravind; Jensen, Roy A; Padhye, Subhash B; Balakrishnan, Arun; Anant, Shrikant; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam

    2016-01-19

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) appear to explain many aspects of the neoplastic evolution of tumors and likely account for enhanced therapeutic resistance following treatment. Dysregulated Notch signaling, which affects CSCs plays an important role in pancreatic cancer progression. We have determined the ability of Quinomycin to inhibit CSCs and the Notch signaling pathway. Quinomycin treatment resulted in significant inhibition of proliferation and colony formation in pancreatic cancer cell lines, but not in normal pancreatic epithelial cells. Moreover, Quinomycin affected pancreatosphere formation. The compound also decreased the expression of CSC marker proteins DCLK1, CD44, CD24 and EPCAM. In addition, flow cytometry studies demonstrated that Quinomycin reduced the number of DCLK1+ cells. Furthermore, levels of Notch 1-4 receptors, their ligands Jagged1, Jagged2, DLL1, DLL3, DLL4 and the downstream target protein Hes-1 were reduced. The γ-secretase complex proteins, Presenilin 1, Nicastrin, Pen2, and APH-1, required for Notch activation also exhibited decreased expression. Ectopic expression of the Notch Intracellular Domain (NICD) partially rescued the cells from Quinomycin mediated growth suppression. To determine the effect of Quinomycin on tumor growth in vivo, nude mice carrying tumor xenografts were administered Quinomycin intraperitoneally every day for 21 days. Treatment with the compound significantly inhibited tumor xenograft growth, coupled with significant reduction in the expression of CSC markers and Notch signaling proteins. Together, these data suggest that Quinomycin is a potent inhibitor of pancreatic cancer that targets the stem cells by inhibiting Notch signaling proteins.

  14. Ubiquitylation as a Rheostat for TCR Signaling: From Targeted Approaches Toward Global Profiling.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Claire E; Lewis, Emma L; Oliver, Paula M

    2015-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signaling must be precisely tuned to limit collateral damage and prevent reactivity to self, while still allowing robust protective immune responses that control pathogen invasion. One process that can be used to promote, modify, or terminate TCR signaling is ubiquitylation. During ubiquitylation, ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through a multistep process, in which E3 ubiquitin ligases promote the formation of ubiquitin chains on selected substrates. Ubiquitylation can facilitate protein-protein interactions, direct a protein to a specific subcellular location, or initiate protein destruction. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitylation is a reversible process - deubiquitylating enzymes counteract ligase function by removing ubiquitin chains. This reversibility also allows for ubiquitin chain "editing." Based on an emerging wealth of information from genetic loss-of-function studies showing that deregulation of ubiquitylation pathways leads to immune dysfunction, it has become increasingly apparent that the dynamic process of ubiquitylation is critical for normal immune cell function. In this review, we will describe how ubiquitylation acts as a key modulator and integrator of signaling downstream of TCR engagement. Specifically, we highlight the known roles of the substrate-specific E3 ligases and deubiquitylating enzymes in TCR signaling and T cell activation. While it is clear that ubiquitin enzymes tune T cell signaling and T cell function, elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins modulate T cells has met with significant challenges. Identifying substrates of these enzymes has been a particular challenge, and thus substrates of many E3 ligases and deubiquitylating enzymes remain largely unknown. To that end, we discuss the promise, and some practical considerations, of using proteomics-based techniques for unbiased identification of putative substrates of ubiquitin cascade proteins within primary T

  15. Ubiquitylation as a Rheostat for TCR Signaling: From Targeted Approaches Toward Global Profiling

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Claire E.; Lewis, Emma L.; Oliver, Paula M.

    2015-01-01

    T cell receptor (TCR) signaling must be precisely tuned to limit collateral damage and prevent reactivity to self, while still allowing robust protective immune responses that control pathogen invasion. One process that can be used to promote, modify, or terminate TCR signaling is ubiquitylation. During ubiquitylation, ubiquitin is covalently attached to target proteins through a multistep process, in which E3 ubiquitin ligases promote the formation of ubiquitin chains on selected substrates. Ubiquitylation can facilitate protein–protein interactions, direct a protein to a specific subcellular location, or initiate protein destruction. Like phosphorylation, ubiquitylation is a reversible process – deubiquitylating enzymes counteract ligase function by removing ubiquitin chains. This reversibility also allows for ubiquitin chain “editing.” Based on an emerging wealth of information from genetic loss-of-function studies showing that deregulation of ubiquitylation pathways leads to immune dysfunction, it has become increasingly apparent that the dynamic process of ubiquitylation is critical for normal immune cell function. In this review, we will describe how ubiquitylation acts as a key modulator and integrator of signaling downstream of TCR engagement. Specifically, we highlight the known roles of the substrate-specific E3 ligases and deubiquitylating enzymes in TCR signaling and T cell activation. While it is clear that ubiquitin enzymes tune T cell signaling and T cell function, elucidating the molecular mechanisms by which these proteins modulate T cells has met with significant challenges. Identifying substrates of these enzymes has been a particular challenge, and thus substrates of many E3 ligases and deubiquitylating enzymes remain largely unknown. To that end, we discuss the promise, and some practical considerations, of using proteomics-based techniques for unbiased identification of putative substrates of ubiquitin cascade proteins within

  16. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Rimkus, Tadas K; Carpenter, Richard L; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-02-15

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  17. Targeting the Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Pathway: Review of Smoothened and GLI Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Rimkus, Tadas K.; Carpenter, Richard L.; Qasem, Shadi; Chan, Michael; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2016-01-01

    The sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling pathway is a major regulator of cell differentiation, cell proliferation, and tissue polarity. Aberrant activation of the Shh pathway has been shown in a variety of human cancers, including, basal cell carcinoma, malignant gliomas, medulloblastoma, leukemias, and cancers of the breast, lung, pancreas, and prostate. Tumorigenesis, tumor progression and therapeutic response have all been shown to be impacted by the Shh signaling pathway. Downstream effectors of the Shh pathway include smoothened (SMO) and glioma-associated oncogene homolog (GLI) family of zinc finger transcription factors. Both are regarded as important targets for cancer therapeutics. While most efforts have been devoted towards pharmacologically targeting SMO, developing GLI-targeted approach has its merit because of the fact that GLI proteins can be activated by both Shh ligand-dependent and -independent mechanisms. To date, two SMO inhibitors (LDE225/Sonidegib and GDC-0449/Vismodegib) have received FDA approval for treating basal cell carcinoma while many clinical trials are being conducted to evaluate the efficacy of this exciting class of targeted therapy in a variety of cancers. In this review, we provide an overview of the biology of the Shh pathway and then detail the current landscape of the Shh-SMO-GLI pathway inhibitors including those in preclinical studies and clinical trials. PMID:26891329

  18. Targeting EGF-receptor-signalling in squamous cell carcinomas of the head and neck

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, C W M; Morgan, M A; Eckardt, A

    2007-01-01

    Despite significant advances in the use of surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy to treat squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN), prognosis has improved little over the past 30 years. There is a clear need for novel, more effective therapies to prevent relapse, control metastases and improve overall survival. Improved understanding of SCCHN disease biology has led to the introduction of molecularly targeted treatment strategies in these cancers. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is expressed at much higher levels in SCCHN tumours than in normal epithelial tissue, and EGFR expression correlates with poor prognosis. Therefore, much effort is currently directed toward targeting aberrant EGFR activity (e.g. cell signalling) in SCCHN. This review discusses the efficacy of novel therapies targeting the EGFR (e.g. anti-EGFR antibodies and EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors) that are currently tested in SCCHN patients. PMID:17224925

  19. Drug discovery approaches to target Wnt signaling in cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Curtin, Joshua C; Lorenzi, Matthew V

    2010-11-01

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) represent a unique subset of cells within a tumor that possess self-renewal capacity and pluripotency, and can drive tumor initiation and maintenance. First identified in hematological malignancies, CSCs are now thought to play an important role in a wide variety of solid tumors such as NSCLC, breast and colorectal cancer. The role of CSCs in driving tumor formation illustrates the dysregulation of differentiation in tumorigenesis. The Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog (HH) pathways are developmental pathways that are commonly activated in many types of cancer. While substantial progress has been made in developing therapeutics targeting Notch and HH, the Wnt pathway has remained an elusive therapeutic target. This review will focus on the clinical relevance of the Wnt pathway in CSCs and tumor cell biology, as well as points of therapeutic intervention and recent advances in targeting Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  20. Monodisperse Magnetite Nanoparticles Coupled with Nuclear Localization Signal Peptide for Cell-Nucleus Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Chenjie; Xie, Jin; Kohler, Nathan; Walsh, Edward G.; Chin, Y. Eugene; Sun, Shouheng

    2009-01-01

    Functionalization of monodisperse superparamagnetic magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles for cell specific targeting is crucial for cancer diagnostics and therapeutics. Targeted magnetic nanoparticles can be used to enhance the tissue contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), to improve the efficiency in anticancer drug delivery, and to eliminate tumor cells by magnetic fluid hyperthermia. Herein we report the nucleus-targeting Fe3O4 nanoparticles functionalized with protein and nuclear localization signal (NLS) peptide. These NLS-coated nanoparticles were introduced into the HeLa cell cytoplasm and nucleus, where the particles were monodispersed and non-aggregated. The success of labeling was examined and identified by fluorescence microscopy and MRI. The work demonstrates that monodisperse magnetic nanoparticles can be readily functionalized and stabilized for potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications. PMID:18080259

  1. Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin compute node to a target compute node

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.; Parker, Jeffrey J.

    2011-05-24

    Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin node to a target node includes: sending, by an origin DMA engine, an RTS message, the RTS message specifying an application message for transfer to the target node from the origin node; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, a remote get message containing a data descriptor for the message and a completion notification descriptor, the completion notification descriptor specifying a local direct put transfer operation for transferring data locally on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine in an injection FIFO buffer, the data descriptor followed by the completion notification descriptor; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in dependence upon the completion notification descriptor.

  2. Yeast carboxypeptidase Y vacuolar targeting signal is defined by four propeptide amino acids

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    The amino-terminal propeptide of carboxypeptidase Y (CPY) is necessary and sufficient for targeting this glycoprotein to the vacuole of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 16 amino acid stretch of the propeptide was subjected to region-directed mutagenesis using randomized oligonucleotides. Mutations altering any of four contiguous amino acids, Gln-Arg-Pro-Leu, resulted in secretion of the encoded CPY precursor (proCPY), demonstrating that these residues form the core of the vacuolar targeting signal. Cells that simultaneously synthesize both wild-type and sorting-defective forms of proCPY efficiently sort and deliver only the wild-type molecule to the vacuole. These results indicate that the PRC1 missorting mutations are cis-dominant, implying that the mutant forms of proCPY are secreted as a consequence of failing to interact with the sorting apparatus, rather than a general poisoning of the vacuolar protein targeting system. PMID:2199455

  3. Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin compute node to a target compute node

    DOEpatents

    Blocksome, Michael A.

    2011-02-15

    Signaling completion of a message transfer from an origin node to a target node includes: sending, by an origin DMA engine, an RTS message, the RTS message specifying an application message for transfer to the target node from the origin node; receiving, by the origin DMA engine, a remote get message containing a data descriptor for the message and a completion notification descriptor, the completion notification descriptor specifying a local memory FIFO data transfer operation for transferring data locally on the origin node; inserting, by the origin DMA engine in an injection FIFO buffer, the data descriptor followed by the completion notification descriptor; transferring, by the origin DMA engine to the target node, the message in dependence upon the data descriptor; and notifying, by the origin DMA engine, the application that transfer of the message is complete in dependence upon the completion notification descriptor.

  4. Spectral and spatial selectivity of luminance vision in reef fish

    PubMed Central

    Siebeck, Ulrike E.; Wallis, Guy Michael; Litherland, Lenore; Ganeshina, Olga; Vorobyev, Misha

    2014-01-01

    Luminance vision has high spatial resolution and is used for form vision and texture discrimination. In humans, birds and bees luminance channel is spectrally selective—it depends on the signals of the long-wavelength sensitive photoreceptors (bees) or on the sum of long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones (humans), but not on the signal of the short-wavelength sensitive (blue) photoreceptors. The reasons of such selectivity are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to reveal the inputs of cone signals to high resolution luminance vision in reef fish. Sixteen freshly caught damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, were trained to discriminate stimuli differing either in their color or in their fine patterns (stripes vs. cheques). Three colors (“bright green”, “dark green” and “blue”) were used to create two sets of color and two sets of pattern stimuli. The “bright green” and “dark green” were similar in their chromatic properties for fish, but differed in their lightness; the “dark green” differed from “blue” in the signal for the blue cone, but yielded similar signals in the long-wavelength and middle-wavelength cones. Fish easily learned to discriminate “bright green” from “dark green” and “dark green” from “blue” stimuli. Fish also could discriminate the fine patterns created from “dark green” and “bright green”. However, fish failed to discriminate fine patterns created from “blue” and “dark green” colors, i.e., the colors that provided contrast for the blue-sensitive photoreceptor, but not for the long-wavelength sensitive one. High resolution luminance vision in damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, does not have input from the blue-sensitive cone, which may indicate that the spectral selectivity of luminance channel is a general feature of visual processing in both aquatic and terrestrial animals. PMID:25324727

  5. Spectral and spatial selectivity of luminance vision in reef fish.

    PubMed

    Siebeck, Ulrike E; Wallis, Guy Michael; Litherland, Lenore; Ganeshina, Olga; Vorobyev, Misha

    2014-01-01

    Luminance vision has high spatial resolution and is used for form vision and texture discrimination. In humans, birds and bees luminance channel is spectrally selective-it depends on the signals of the long-wavelength sensitive photoreceptors (bees) or on the sum of long- and middle-wavelength sensitive cones (humans), but not on the signal of the short-wavelength sensitive (blue) photoreceptors. The reasons of such selectivity are not fully understood. The aim of this study is to reveal the inputs of cone signals to high resolution luminance vision in reef fish. Sixteen freshly caught damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, were trained to discriminate stimuli differing either in their color or in their fine patterns (stripes vs. cheques). Three colors ("bright green", "dark green" and "blue") were used to create two sets of color and two sets of pattern stimuli. The "bright green" and "dark green" were similar in their chromatic properties for fish, but differed in their lightness; the "dark green" differed from "blue" in the signal for the blue cone, but yielded similar signals in the long-wavelength and middle-wavelength cones. Fish easily learned to discriminate "bright green" from "dark green" and "dark green" from "blue" stimuli. Fish also could discriminate the fine patterns created from "dark green" and "bright green". However, fish failed to discriminate fine patterns created from "blue" and "dark green" colors, i.e., the colors that provided contrast for the blue-sensitive photoreceptor, but not for the long-wavelength sensitive one. High resolution luminance vision in damselfish, Pomacentrus amboinensis, does not have input from the blue-sensitive cone, which may indicate that the spectral selectivity of luminance channel is a general feature of visual processing in both aquatic and terrestrial animals.

  6. Targeting insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yuzhe; Yee, Douglas

    2012-01-01

    The insulin and insulin like growth factor (IGF) signaling systems are implicated in breast cancer biology. Thus, disrupting IGF/insulin signaling has been shown to have promise in a number of preclinical models. However, human clinical trials have been less promising. Despite evidence of some activity in early phase trials, randomized phase III studies have thus far been unable to show a benefit of blocking IGF signaling in combination with conventional strategies. In breast cancer, combination anti IGF/insulin signaling agents with hormone therapy has not yet proven to have benefit. This inability to translate the preclinical findings into useful clinical strategies calls attention to the need for a deeper understanding of this complex pathway. Development of predictive biomarkers and optimal inhibitory strategies of the IGF/insulin system should yield better clinical strategies. Furthermore, unraveling the interaction between the IGF/insulin pathway and other critical signaling pathways in breast cancer biology, namely estrogen receptor-α (ERα) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) pathways, provides additional new concepts in designing combination therapies. In this review, we will briefly summarize the current strategies targeting the IGF/insulin system, discuss the possible reasons of success or failure of the existing therapies, and provide potential future direction for research and clinical trials. PMID:23054135

  7. Ghrelin receptor signaling: a promising therapeutic target for metabolic syndrome and cognitive dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Cong, Wei-na; Golden, Erin; Pantaleo, Nick; White, Caitlin M.; Maudsley, Stuart; Martin, Bronwen

    2010-01-01

    The neuroendocrine hormone ghrelin is an octanoylated 28-residue peptide that exerts numerous physiological functions. Ghrelin exerts its effects on the body mainly through a highly conserved G protein-coupled receptor known as the growth hormone secretagagogue receptor subtype 1a (GHS-R1a). Ghrelin and GSH-R1a are widely expressed in both peripheral and central tissues/organs, and ghrelin signaling plays a critical role in maintaining energy balance and neuronal health. The multiple orexigenic effects of ghrelin and its receptor have been studied in great detail, and GHS-R1a-mediated ghrelin signaling has long been a promising target for the treatment of metabolic disorders, such as obesity. In addition to its well-characterized metabolic effects, there is also mounting evidence that ghrelin-mediated GHS-R1a signaling exerts neuroprotective effects on the brain. In this review, we will summarize some of the effects of ghrelin-mediated GSH-R1a signaling on peripheral energy balance and cognitive function. We will also discuss the potential pharmacotherapeutic role of GSH-R1a-mediated ghrelin signaling for the treatment of complex neuroendocrine disorders. PMID:20632971

  8. Targeting signal transduction pathways of cancer stem cells for therapeutic opportunities of metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Iqbal, Waqas; Alkarim, Saleh; AlHejin, Ahmed; Mukhtar, Hasan; Saini, Kulvinder S

    2016-01-01

    Tumor comprises of heterogeneous population of cells where not all the disseminated cancer cells have the prerogative and “in-build genetic cues” to form secondary tumors. Cells with stem like properties complemented by key signaling molecules clearly have shown to exhibit selective growth advantage to form tumors at distant metastatic sites. Thus, defining the role of cancer stem cells (CSC) in tumorigenesis and metastasis is emerging as a major thrust area for therapeutic intervention. Precise relationship and regulatory mechanisms operating in various signal transduction pathways during cancer dissemination, extravasation and angiogenesis still remain largely enigmatic. How the crosstalk amongst circulating tumor cells (CTC), epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) process and CSC is coordinated for initiating the metastasis at secondary tissues, and during cancer relapse could be of great therapeutic interest. The signal transduction mechanisms facilitating the dissemination, infiltration of CSC into blood stream, extravasations, progression of metastasis phenotype and angiogenesis, at distant organs, are the key pathologically important vulnerabilities being elucidated. Therefore, current new drug discovery focus has shifted towards finding “key driver genes” operating in parallel signaling pathways, during quiescence, survival and maintenance of stemness in CSC. Understanding these mechanisms could open new horizons for tackling the issue of cancer recurrence and metastasis-the cause of ~90% cancer associated mortality. To design futuristic & targeted therapies, we propose a multi-pronged strategy involving small molecules, RNA interference, vaccines, antibodies and other biotechnological modalities against CSC and the metastatic signal transduction cascade. PMID:27486983

  9. 78 FR 69710 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION... consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  10. 78 FR 66785 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Notice of receipt... consecutive weeks of ] a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  11. 78 FR 70964 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Combined license... for four consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation...

  12. 78 FR 68100 - Luminant Generation Company, LLC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Luminant Generation Company, LLC AGENCY: U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC). ACTION... consecutive weeks of a combined license (COL) application from Luminant Generation Company, LLC....

  13. Retinal ganglion cell adaptation to small luminance fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Daniel K; Graña, Gilberto; Passaglia, Christopher L

    2010-08-01

    To accommodate the wide input range over which the visual system operates within the narrow output range of spiking neurons, the retina adjusts its sensitivity to the mean light level so that retinal ganglion cells can faithfully signal contrast, or relative deviations from the mean luminance. Given the large operating range of the visual system, the majority of work on luminance adaptation has involved logarithmic changes in light level. We report that luminance gain controls are recruited for remarkably small fluctuations in luminance as well. Using spike recordings from the rat optic tract, we show that ganglion cell responses to a brief flash of light are modulated in amplitude by local background fluctuations as little as 15% contrast. The time scale of the gain control is rapid (<125 ms), at least for on cells. The retinal locus of adaptation precedes the ganglion cell spike generator because response gain changes of on cells were uncorrelated with firing rate. The mechanism seems to reside within the inner retinal network and not in the photoreceptors, because the adaptation profiles of on and off cells differed markedly. The response gain changes follow Weber's law, suggesting that network mechanisms of luminance adaptation described in previous work modulates retinal ganglion cell sensitivity, not just when we move between different lighting environments, but also as our eyes scan a visual scene. Finally, we show that response amplitude is uniformly reduced for flashes on a modulated background that has spatial contrast, indicating that another gain control that integrates luminance signals nonlinearly over space operates within the receptive field center of rat ganglion cells.

  14. Calibration of imaging luminance measuring devices (ILMD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Liying; Zheng, Feng; Zhu, Lingxi; Li, Ye; Huan, Kewei; Shi, Xiaoguang

    2015-11-01

    A method of calibration of imaging luminance measuring devices has been studied. By the device-independent color space transformation, the color image by digital camera could be converted to the CIE's absolute color space lab. Then, the calibration model is fitted between ln(L/t) and luminance. At last, luminance image is obtained and the dynamic range of luminance image could be adjusted by shutter speed.

  15. The Type I Interferon Signaling Pathway Is a Target for Glucocorticoid Inhibition ▿

    PubMed Central

    Flammer, Jamie R.; Dobrovolna, Jana; Kennedy, Megan A.; Chinenov, Yurii; Glass, Christopher K.; Ivashkiv, Lionel B.; Rogatsky, Inez

    2010-01-01

    Type I interferon (IFN) is essential for host defenses against viruses; however, dysregulated IFN signaling is causally linked to autoimmunity, particularly systemic lupus erythematosus. Autoimmune disease treatments rely on glucocorticoids (GCs), which act via the GC receptor (GR) to repress proinflammatory cytokine gene transcription. Conversely, cytokine signaling through cognate Jak/STAT pathways is reportedly unaffected or even stimulated by GR. Unexpectedly, we found that GR dramatically inhibited IFN-stimulated gene (ISG) expression in macrophages. The target of inhibition, the heterotrimeric STAT1-STAT2-IRF9 (ISGF3) transcription complex, utilized the GR cofactor GRIP1/TIF2 as a coactivator. Consequently, GRIP1 knockdown, genetic ablation, or depletion by GC-activated GR attenuated ISGF3 promoter occupancy, preinitiation complex assembly, and ISG expression. Furthermore, this regulatory loop was restricted to cell types such as macrophages expressing the GRIP1 protein at extremely low levels, and pharmacological disruption of the GR-GRIP1 interaction or transient introduction of GRIP1 restored RNA polymerase recruitment to target ISGs and the subsequent IFN response. Thus, type I IFN is a cytokine uniquely controlled by GR at the levels of not only production but also signaling through antagonism with the ISGF3 effector function, revealing a novel facet of the immunosuppressive properties of GCs. PMID:20679482

  16. Peptide Immunoaffinity Enrichment and Targeted Mass Spectrometry Enables Multiplex, Quantitative Pharmacodynamic Studies of Phospho-Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Whiteaker, Jeffrey R.; Zhao, Lei; Yan, Ping; Ivey, Richard G.; Voytovich, Uliana J.; Moore, Heather D.; Lin, Chenwei; Paulovich, Amanda G.

    2015-01-01

    In most cell signaling experiments, analytes are measured one Western blot lane at a time in a semiquantitative and often poorly specific manner, limiting our understanding of network biology and hindering the translation of novel therapeutics and diagnostics. We show the feasibility of using multiplex immuno-MRM for phospho-pharmacodynamic measurements, establishing the potential for rapid and precise quantification of cell signaling networks. A 69-plex immuno-MRM assay targeting the DNA damage response network was developed and characterized by response curves and determinations of intra- and inter-assay repeatability. The linear range was ≥3 orders of magnitude, the median limit of quantification was 2.0 fmol/mg, the median intra-assay variability was 10% CV, and the median interassay variability was 16% CV. The assay was applied in proof-of-concept studies to immortalized and primary human cells and surgically excised cancer tissues to quantify exposure–response relationships and the effects of a genomic variant (ATM kinase mutation) or pharmacologic (kinase) inhibitor. The study shows the utility of multiplex immuno-MRM for simultaneous quantification of phosphorylated and nonmodified peptides, showing feasibility for development of targeted assay panels to cell signaling networks. PMID:25987412

  17. E3 ubiquitin ligase Mule targets β-catenin under conditions of hyperactive Wnt signaling

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Brauer, Carmen; Khatun, Rahima; Elia, Andrew J.; Thu, Kelsie L.; Ramachandran, Parameswaran; Baniasadi, Shakiba P.; Hao, Zhenyue; Jones, Lisa D.; Haight, Jillian; Sheng, Yi; Mak, Tak W.

    2017-01-01

    Wnt signaling, named after the secreted proteins that bind to cell surface receptors to activate the pathway, plays critical roles both in embryonic development and the maintenance of homeostasis in many adult tissues. Two particularly important cellular programs orchestrated by Wnt signaling are proliferation and stem cell self-renewal. Constitutive activation of the Wnt pathway resulting from mutation or improper modulation of pathway components contributes to cancer development in various tissues. Colon cancers frequently bear inactivating mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli (APC) gene, whose product is an important component of the destruction complex that regulates β-catenin levels. Stabilization and nuclear localization of β-catenin result in the expression of a panel of Wnt target genes. We previously showed that Mule/Huwe1/Arf-BP1 (Mule) controls murine intestinal stem and progenitor cell proliferation by modulating the Wnt pathway via c-Myc. Here we extend our investigation of Mule’s influence on oncogenesis by showing that Mule interacts directly with β-catenin and targets it for degradation under conditions of hyperactive Wnt signaling. Our findings suggest that Mule uses various mechanisms to fine-tune the Wnt pathway and provides multiple safeguards against tumorigenesis. PMID:28137882

  18. IR/IGF1R signaling as potential target for treatment of high-grade osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background High-grade osteosarcoma is an aggressive tumor most often developing in the long bones of adolescents, with a second peak in the 5th decade of life. Better knowledge on cellular signaling in this tumor may identify new possibilities for targeted treatment. Methods We performed gene set analysis on previously published genome-wide gene expression data of osteosarcoma cell lines (n=19) and pretreatment biopsies (n=84). We characterized overexpression of the insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) signaling pathways in human osteosarcoma as compared with osteoblasts and with the hypothesized progenitor cells of osteosarcoma – mesenchymal stem cells. This pathway plays a key role in the growth and development of bone. Since most profound differences in mRNA expression were found at and upstream of the receptor of this pathway, we set out to inhibit IR/IGF1R using OSI-906, a dual inhibitor for IR/IGF1R, on four osteosarcoma cell lines. Inhibitory effects of this drug were measured by Western blotting and cell proliferation assays. Results OSI-906 had a strong inhibitory effect on proliferation of 3 of 4 osteosarcoma cell lines, with IC50s below 100 nM at 72 hrs of treatment. Phosphorylation of IRS-1, a direct downstream target of IGF1R signaling, was inhibited in the responsive osteosarcoma cell lines. Conclusions This study provides an in vitro rationale for using IR/IGF1R inhibitors in preclinical studies of osteosarcoma. PMID:23688189

  19. SOX18 Is a Novel Target Gene of Hedgehog Signaling in Cervical Carcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Popovic, Jelena; Schwirtlich, Marija; Rankovic, Branislava; Stevanovic, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Although there is much evidence showing functional relationship between Hedgehog pathway, in particular Sonic hedgehog, and SOX transcription factors during embryonic development, scarce data are available regarding their crosstalk in cancer cells. SOX18 protein plays an important role in promoting tumor angiogenesis and therefore emerged as a promising potential target in antiangiogenic tumor therapy. Recently it became evident that expression of SOX18 gene in tumors is not restricted to endothelium of accompanying blood and lymphatic vessels, but in tumor cells as well.In this paper we have identified human SOX18 gene as a novel target gene of Hedgehog signaling in cervical carcinoma cell lines. We have presented data showing that expression of SOX18 gene is regulated by GLI1 and GLI2 transcription factors, final effectors of Hedgehog signaling, and that modulation of Hedgehog signaling activity in considerably influence SOX18 expression. We consider important that Hedgehog pathway inhibitors reduced SOX18 expression, thus showing, for the first time, possibility for manipulationwith SOX18 gene expression. In addition, we analyzed the role of SOX18 in malignant potential of cervical carcinoma cell line, and showed that its overexpression has no influence on cells proliferation and viability, but substantially promotes migration and invasion of cells in vitro. Pro-migratory effect of SOX18 suggests its role in promoting malignant spreading, possibly in response to Hedgehog activation. PMID:26588701

  20. Network quantification of EGFR signaling unveils potential for targeted combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Klinger, Bertram; Sieber, Anja; Fritsche-Guenther, Raphaela; Witzel, Franziska; Berry, Leanne; Schumacher, Dirk; Yan, Yibing; Durek, Pawel; Merchant, Mark; Schäfer, Reinhold; Sers, Christine; Blüthgen, Nils

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling network is activated in most solid tumors, and small-molecule drugs targeting this network are increasingly available. However, often only specific combinations of inhibitors are effective. Therefore, the prediction of potent combinatorial treatments is a major challenge in targeted cancer therapy. In this study, we demonstrate how a model-based evaluation of signaling data can assist in finding the most suitable treatment combination. We generated a perturbation data set by monitoring the response of RAS/PI3K signaling to combined stimulations and inhibitions in a panel of colorectal cancer cell lines, which we analyzed using mathematical models. We detected that a negative feedback involving EGFR mediates strong cross talk from ERK to AKT. Consequently, when inhibiting MAPK, AKT activity is increased in an EGFR-dependent manner. Using the model, we predict that in contrast to single inhibition, combined inactivation of MEK and EGFR could inactivate both endpoints of RAS, ERK and AKT. We further could demonstrate that this combination blocked cell growth in BRAF- as well as KRAS-mutated tumor cells, which we confirmed using a xenograft model. PMID:23752269

  1. Signaling intermediates (MAPK and PI3K) as therapeutic targets in NSCLC.

    PubMed

    Ciuffreda, Ludovica; Incani, Ursula Cesta; Steelman, Linda S; Abrams, Stephen L; Falcone, Italia; Curatolo, Anais Del; Chappell, William H; Franklin, Richard A; Vari, Sabrina; Cognetti, Francesco; McCubrey, James A; Milella, Michele

    2014-01-01

    The RAS/RAF/MEK/ ERK and the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathways govern fundamental physiological processes, such as cell proliferation, differentiation, metabolism, cytoskeleton reorganization and cell death and survival. Constitutive activation of these signal transduction pathways is a required hallmark of cancer and dysregulation, on either genetic or epigenetic grounds, of these pathways has been implicated in the initiation, progression and metastastic spread of lung cances. Targeting components of the MAPK and PI3K cascades is thus an attractive strategy in the development of novel therapeutic approaches to treat lung cancer, although the use of single pathway inhibitors has met with limited clinical success so far. Indeed, the presence of intra- and inter-pathway compensatory loops that re-activate the very same cascade, either upstream or downstream the point of pharmacological blockade, or activate the alternate pathway following the blockade of one signaling cascade has been demonstrated, potentially driving preclinical (and possibly clinical) resistance. Therefore, the blockade of both pathways with combinations of signaling inhibitors might result in a more efficient anti-tumor effect, and thus potentially overcome and/or delay clinical resistance, as compared with single agent. The current review aims at summarizing the current status of preclinical and clinical research with regard to pathway crosstalks between the MAPK and PI3K cascades in NSCLC and the rationale for combined therapeutic pathway targeting.

  2. Targeting Signal Transduction Pathways in Metastatic Breast Cancer: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Rosen, Lee S.; Ashurst, Helen Louise

    2010-01-01

    Greater understanding of the underlying etiology and biology of breast cancer is enabling the clinical development of targeted therapies for metastatic breast cancer (MBC). Following the successful introduction of trastuzumab, the first human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) biologically targeted therapy to become widely used in MBC patients, other agents have been developed. Novel agents include monoclonal antibodies such as pertuzumab, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, and tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) such as lapatinib, which target intracellular pathways such as that of the epidermal growth factor receptor. There is also growing clinical experience with antiangiogenic agents, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. These include the monoclonal antibody bevacizumab, which targets vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, and multitargeted TKIs with antiangiogenic and antiproliferative activities, such as sunitinib. Combination treatment with multiple agents targeting both the HER family and angiogenic pathways (e.g., trastuzumab plus bevacizumab) is also showing activity in the clinical setting. Despite recent advances, there are unanswered questions regarding the management of MBC with targeted agents. Future studies are necessary to determine the optimal combinations, doses, and schedules required to maximize clinical activity while minimizing toxicity. Despite the temptation to use a targeted agent in all patients, identification of patient subgroups most likely to benefit must be a key goal and will be critical to the successful future use of these treatments. The aim of this review is to summarize some of the key signaling pathways involved in tumor progression and some of the novel therapies that are in development for MBC. PMID:20200040

  3. Color Discrimination Is Affected by Modulation of Luminance Noise in Pseudoisochromatic Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Cormenzana Méndez, Iñaki; Martín, Andrés; Charmichael, Teaire L.; Jacob, Mellina M.; Lacerda, Eliza M. C. B.; Gomes, Bruno D.; Fitzgerald, Malinda E. C.; Ventura, Dora F.; Silveira, Luiz C. L.; O'Donell, Beatriz M.; Souza, Givago S.

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoisochromatic stimuli have been widely used to evaluate color discrimination and to identify color vision deficits. Luminance noise is one of the stimulus parameters used to ensure that subject's response is due to their ability to discriminate target stimulus from the background based solely on the hue between the colors that compose such stimuli. We studied the influence of contrast modulation of the stimulus luminance noise on threshold and reaction time color discrimination. We evaluated color discrimination thresholds using the Cambridge Color Test (CCT) at six different stimulus mean luminances. Each mean luminance condition was tested using two protocols: constant absolute difference between maximum and minimum luminance of the luminance noise (constant delta protocol, CDP), and constant contrast modulation of the luminance noise (constant contrast protocol, CCP). MacAdam ellipses were fitted to the color discrimination thresholds in the CIE 1976 color space to quantify the color discrimination ellipses at threshold level. The same CDP and CCP protocols were applied in the experiment measuring RTs at three levels of stimulus mean luminance. The color threshold measurements show that for the CDP, ellipse areas decreased as a function of the mean luminance and they were significantly larger at the two lowest mean luminances, 10 cd/m2 and 13 cd/m2, compared to the highest one, 25 cd/m2. For the CCP, the ellipses areas also decreased as a function of the mean luminance, but there was no significant difference between ellipses areas estimated at six stimulus mean luminances. The exponent of the decrease of ellipse areas as a function of stimulus mean luminance was steeper in the CDP than CCP. Further, reaction time increased linearly with the reciprocal of the length of the chromatic vectors varying along the four chromatic half-axes. It decreased as a function of stimulus mean luminance in the CDP but not in the CCP. The findings indicated that visual

  4. Color Discrimination Is Affected by Modulation of Luminance Noise in Pseudoisochromatic Stimuli.

    PubMed

    Cormenzana Méndez, Iñaki; Martín, Andrés; Charmichael, Teaire L; Jacob, Mellina M; Lacerda, Eliza M C B; Gomes, Bruno D; Fitzgerald, Malinda E C; Ventura, Dora F; Silveira, Luiz C L; O'Donell, Beatriz M; Souza, Givago S

    2016-01-01

    Pseudoisochromatic stimuli have been widely used to evaluate color discrimination and to identify color vision deficits. Luminance noise is one of the stimulus parameters used to ensure that subject's response is due to their ability to discriminate target stimulus from the background based solely on the hue between the colors that compose such stimuli. We studied the influence of contrast modulation of the stimulus luminance noise on threshold and reaction time color discrimination. We evaluated color discrimination thresholds using the Cambridge Color Test (CCT) at six different stimulus mean luminances. Each mean luminance condition was tested using two protocols: constant absolute difference between maximum and minimum luminance of the luminance noise (constant delta protocol, CDP), and constant contrast modulation of the luminance noise (constant contrast protocol, CCP). MacAdam ellipses were fitted to the color discrimination thresholds in the CIE 1976 color space to quantify the color discrimination ellipses at threshold level. The same CDP and CCP protocols were applied in the experiment measuring RTs at three levels of stimulus mean luminance. The color threshold measurements show that for the CDP, ellipse areas decreased as a function of the mean luminance and they were significantly larger at the two lowest mean luminances, 10 cd/m(2) and 13 cd/m(2), compared to the highest one, 25 cd/m(2). For the CCP, the ellipses areas also decreased as a function of the mean luminance, but there was no significant difference between ellipses areas estimated at six stimulus mean luminances. The exponent of the decrease of ellipse areas as a function of stimulus mean luminance was steeper in the CDP than CCP. Further, reaction time increased linearly with the reciprocal of the length of the chromatic vectors varying along the four chromatic half-axes. It decreased as a function of stimulus mean luminance in the CDP but not in the CCP. The findings indicated that visual

  5. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Miles A.; Moss, Marcia L.; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-01-01

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, “decoy” antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling. PMID:26477568

  6. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain.

    PubMed

    Miller, Miles A; Moss, Marcia L; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S; Griffith, Linda G; Lauffenburger, Douglas A

    2015-10-19

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, "decoy" antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling.

  7. Targeting autocrine HB-EGF signaling with specific ADAM12 inhibition using recombinant ADAM12 prodomain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Miles A.; Moss, Marcia L.; Powell, Gary; Petrovich, Robert; Edwards, Lori; Meyer, Aaron S.; Griffith, Linda G.; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.

    2015-10-01

    Dysregulation of ErbB-family signaling underlies numerous pathologies and has been therapeutically targeted through inhibiting ErbB-receptors themselves or their cognate ligands. For the latter, “decoy” antibodies have been developed to sequester ligands including heparin-binding epidermal growth factor (HB-EGF); however, demonstrating sufficient efficacy has been difficult. Here, we hypothesized that this strategy depends on properties such as ligand-receptor binding affinity, which varies widely across the known ErbB-family ligands. Guided by computational modeling, we found that high-affinity ligands such as HB-EGF are more difficult to target with decoy antibodies compared to low-affinity ligands such as amphiregulin (AREG). To address this issue, we developed an alternative method for inhibiting HB-EGF activity by targeting its cleavage from the cell surface. In a model of the invasive disease endometriosis, we identified A Disintegrin and Metalloproteinase 12 (ADAM12) as a protease implicated in HB-EGF shedding. We designed a specific inhibitor of ADAM12 based on its recombinant prodomain (PA12), which selectively inhibits ADAM12 but not ADAM10 or ADAM17. In endometriotic cells, PA12 significantly reduced HB-EGF shedding and resultant cellular migration. Overall, specific inhibition of ligand shedding represents a possible alternative to decoy antibodies, especially for ligands such as HB-EGF that exhibit high binding affinity and localized signaling.

  8. Modification of gibberellin signalling (metabolism & signal transduction) in sugar beet: analysis of potential targets for crop improvement.

    PubMed

    Mutasa-Gottgens, Effie; Qi, Aiming; Mathews, Ann; Thomas, Stephen; Phillips, Andrew; Hedden, Peter

    2009-04-01

    Sugar beet, Beta vulgaris spp. vulgaris is a biennial long day plant with an obligate requirement for vernalization (prolonged exposure to low temperature). As a spring crop in temperate European climates, it is vulnerable to vernalization-induced premature bolting and flowering, resulting in reduced crop yield and quality. Gibberellins (GAs) play important roles in key physiological processes including stem elongation (bolting) and flowering and are, therefore, potential targets for controlling reproductive growth in sugar beet. We show that the BvGA20ox gene, which encodes an enzyme necessary for GA biosynthesis, was transcriptionally activated in apices of sugar beet plants after vernalization and that GA metabolism can be manipulated to delay bolting in vernalized plants. We demonstrate that down-regulation of GA responses by transformation with the Arabidopsis thaliana gai gene (which represses GA signalling), under its own promoter (pgai::gai) or deactivation of GA by over-expression of the Phaseolus coccineus (bean) GA2ox1 gene, which inactivates GA, increased the required post vernalization thermal time (an accurate and stable measure of physiological time), to bolt by approximately 300 degrees Cd. This resulted in agronomically significant bolting time delays of approximately 2 weeks and 3 weeks in the pgai::gai and 35S::PcGA2ox1 plants, respectively. Our data represent the first transgenic sugar beet model to (1) show that GA signalling can be used to improve crops by manipulation of the transition to reproductive growth; and (2) provide evidence that GA is required for seed set in sugar beet.

  9. Recent Advances in Targeting the EGFR Signaling Pathway for the Treatment of Metastatic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Yuji; Suyama, Koichi; Baba, Hideo

    2017-04-02

    Outcomes for metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) patients have been improved by treatment with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (anti-EGFR) antibodies, particularly when combined with predictive biomarkers to select patients lacking RAS mutations. New technologies such as liquid biopsy and next-generation sequencing have revealed that potential mechanisms of resistance to anti-EGFR therapies act through acquired mutations of KRAS and the EGFR ectodomain. Mutations in cross-talking molecular effectors that participate in downstream EGFR signaling are also negative predictors for anti-EGFR therapy. In the current review, we describe recent advances in anti-EGFR therapy and discuss new treatment strategies to target downstream RAS-MAPK signaling in mCRC.

  10. Juvenile hormone connects larval nutrition with target of rapamycin signaling in the mosquito Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Shiao, Shin-Hong; Hansen, Immo A; Zhu, Jinsong; Sieglaff, Douglas H; Raikhel, Alexander S

    2008-01-01

    Anautogenous mosquitoes require blood meals to promote egg development. If adequate nutrients are not obtained during larval development, the resulting "small" sized adult mosquitoes require multiple blood meals for egg development; markedly increasing host-vector contacts and the likelihood of disease transmission. Nutrient-sensitive target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling is a key signaling pathway that links elevated hemolymph amino acid levels derived from the blood meal to the expression of yolk protein precursors in the fat body. Here we report that the blood-meal-induced activation of the TOR-signaling pathway and subsequent egg maturation depends on the accumulation of adequate nutritional reserves during larval development. We have established well-nourished, "standard" mosquitoes and malnourished, "small" mosquitoes as models to address this nutrient sensitive pathway. This regulatory mechanism involves juvenile hormone (JH), which acts as a mediator of fat body competence, permitting the response to amino acids derived from the blood meal. We demonstrate that treatment with JH results in recovery of the TOR molecular machinery, Aedes aegypti cationic amino acid transporter 2 (AaiCAT2), TOR, and S6 kinase (S6K), in fat bodies of small mosquitoes, enabling them to complete their first gonotrophic cycle after a single blood meal. These findings establish a direct link between nutrient reserves and the establishment of TOR signaling in mosquitoes.

  11. Synaptotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease: the Wnt signaling pathway as a molecular target.

    PubMed

    Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Grabowski, Catalina P; Colombres, Marcela

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence supports a role of the Wnt pathway in neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). A relationship between amyloid-beta-peptide (Abeta)-induced neurotoxicity and a decrease in the cytoplasmatic levels of beta-catenin has been proposed. Also, the inhibition of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK-3beta), a central modulator of the pathway, protects rat hippocampal neurons from Abeta-induced damage. Interestingly, during the progression of AD, it has been described that active GSK-3beta is found in neuronal cell bodies and neurites, co-localizing with pre-neurofibrillary tangles observed in disease brains. Since Abeta oligomers are associated with the post-synaptic region and we have found that the non-canonical Wnt signaling modulates PSD-95 and glutamate receptors, we propose that the synaptic target for Abeta oligomers in AD is the postsynaptic region and at the molecular level is the non-canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Altogether, our evidence suggests that a sustained loss of Wnt signaling function may be involved in the Abeta-dependent neurodegeneration observed in AD brains and that the activation of this signaling pathway could be of therapeutic interest in AD.

  12. Inhibition of Nod2 Signaling and Target Gene Expression by Curcumin

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Shurong; Zhao, Ling; Kim, Kihoon; Lee, Dong Seok; Hwang, Daniel H.

    2008-01-01

    Nod2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that detects a conserved moiety of bacterial peptidoglycan and subsequently activates proinflammatory signaling pathways. Mutations in Nod2 have been implicated to be linked to inflammatory granulomatous disorders, such as Crohn's disease and Blau syndrome. Many phytochemicals possess anti-inflammatory properties. However, it is not known whether any of these phytochemicals might modulate Nod2-mediated immune responses and thus might be of therapeutic value for the intervention of these inflammatory diseases. In this report, we demonstrate that curcumin, a polyphenol found in the plant Curcuma longa, and parthenolide, a sesquiterpene lactone, suppress both ligand-induced and lauric acid-induced Nod2 signaling, leading to the suppression of nuclear factor-κB activation and target gene interleukin-8 expression. We provide molecular and biochemical evidence that the suppression is mediated through the inhibition of Nod2 oligomerization and subsequent inhibition of downstream signaling. These results demonstrate for the first time that curcumin and parthenolide can directly inhibit Nod2-mediated signaling pathways at the receptor level and suggest that Nod2-mediated inflammatory responses can be modulated by these phytochemicals. It remains to be determined whether these phytochemicals possess protective or therapeutic efficacy against Nod2-mediated inflammatory disorders. PMID:18413660

  13. Molecular Targeting of ERKs/RSK2 Signaling Axis in Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Sun-Mi; Cho, Sung Jun; Cho, Yong-Yeon

    2015-01-01

    RSK2 is a downstream signaling protein of ERK1 and ERK2 and plays a key role in physiological homeostasis. For this reason, RSK2 is a highly conserved protein among the p90RSK family members. In its location in the signaling pathway, RSK2 is a kinase just upstream of transcription and epigenetic factors, and a few kinases involved in cell cycle regulation and protein synthesis. Moreover, activation of RSK2 by growth factors is directly involved in cell proliferation, anchorage-independent cell transformation and cancer development. Direct evidences regarding the etiological roles of RSK2 in cancer development in humans have been published by our research group illustrating that elevated total- and phospho-RSK2 protein levels mediated by ERK1 and ERK2 are higher in skin cancer tissues compared to normal skin tissues. Notably, it has been shown that RSK2 ectopic expression in JB6 Cl41 cells induces cell proliferation and anchorage- independent cell transformation. Importantly, knockdown of RSK2 suppresses Ras-mediated foci formation and anchorage-independent colony growth of cancer cells. Kaempferol is a one of the natural compounds showing selectivity in inhibiting RSK2 activity in epidermal growth factor-induced G1/S cell cycle transition and cell transformation. Thus, ERKs/RSK2 signaling axis is an important target signaling molecule in chemoprevention. PMID:26473154

  14. Chromospheres of Luminous Cool Stars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dupree, Andrea K.; Avrett, Eugene

    2015-08-01

    Ultraviolet imaging of Alpha Orionis (Betelgeuse) reveals a complex variable chromospheric structure. Such atmospheres in luminous cool stars can affect features in the optical spectrum. Constructing semi-empiricalmodel atmospheres of luminous stars including the temperature rise due to a chromosphere allows us to predict potential effects on optical transitions. The radiative transfer code, PANDORA, calculates line strengths in a LTE or non-LTE formulation, spherical symmetry, and includes velocity fields when present. Various aspects of the line calculations and their impact on equivalent widths will be discussed including developing appropriate chromospheric models, comparison to a pure radiative equilibrium model, transitions sensitive to non-LTE and the effects of a realistic spherical non-LTE approximation as compared to a plane-parallel approximation. We discuss the extent to which a chromosphere can impact the determination of stellar abundances.

  15. Exosomes: mobile platforms for targeted and synergistic signaling across cell boundaries.

    PubMed

    Vyas, Neha; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2016-11-08

    Intercellular communications play a vital role during tissue patterning, tissue repair, and immune reactions, in homeostasis as well as in disease. Exosomes are cell-derived secreted vesicles, extensively studied for their role in intercellular communication. Exosomes have the intrinsic ability to package multiple classes of proteins and nucleic acids within their lumens and on their membranes. Here, we explore the hypothesis that exosomal targeting may represent a cellular strategy that has evolved to deliver specific combinations of signals to specific target cells and influence normal or pathological processes. This review aims to evaluate the available evidence for this hypothesis and to identify open questions whose answers will illuminate our understanding and applications of exosome biology.

  16. Therapeutics targeting angiogenesis: genetics and epigenetics, extracellular miRNAs and signaling networks (Review).

    PubMed

    Katoh, Masaru

    2013-10-01

    Angiogenesis is a process of neovascular formation from pre-existing blood vessels, which consists of sequential steps for vascular destabilization, angiogenic sprouting, lumen formation and vascular stabilization. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), fibroblast growth factor (FGF), angiopoietin, Notch, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β), Hedgehog and WNT signaling cascades orchestrate angiogenesis through the direct or indirect regulation of quiescence, migration and the proliferation of endothelial cells. Small-molecule compounds and human/humanized monoclonal antibodies interrupting VEGF signaling have been developed as anti-angiogenic therapeutics for cancer and neovascular age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Gene or protein therapy delivering VEGF, FGF2 or FGF4, as well as cell therapy using endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) have been developed as pro-angiogenic therapeutics for ischemic heart disease and peripheral vascular disease. Anti-angiogenic therapy for cancer and neovascular AMD is more successful than pro-angiogenic therapy for cardiovascular diseases, as VEGF-signal interruption is technically feasible compared with vascular re-construction. Common and rare genetic variants are detected using array-based technology and personal genome sequencing, respectively. Drug and dosage should be determined based on personal genotypes of VEGF and other genes involved in angiogenesis. As epigenetic alterations give rise to human diseases, polymer-based hydrogel film may be utilized for the delivery of drugs targeting epigenetic processes and angiogenesis as treatment modalities for cardiovascular diseases. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in exosomes and microvesicles are applied as functional biomarkers for diagnostics and prognostics, while synthetic miRNAs in polymer-based nanoparticles are applicable for therapeutics. A more profound understanding of the spatio

  17. NFAT Targets Signaling Molecules to Gene Promoters in Pancreatic β-Cells

    PubMed Central

    Borenstein-Auerbach, Nofit; McGlynn, Kathleen; Kunnathodi, Faisal; Shahbazov, Rauf; Syed, Ilham; Kanak, Mazhar; Takita, Morihito; Levy, Marlon F.; Naziruddin, Bashoo

    2015-01-01

    Nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) is activated by calcineurin in response to calcium signals derived by metabolic and inflammatory stress to regulate genes in pancreatic islets. Here, we show that NFAT targets MAPKs, histone acetyltransferase p300, and histone deacetylases (HDACs) to gene promoters to differentially regulate insulin and TNF-α genes. NFAT and ERK associated with the insulin gene promoter in response to glucagon-like peptide 1, whereas NFAT formed complexes with p38 MAPK (p38) and Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) upon promoters of the TNF-α gene in response to IL-1β. Translocation of NFAT and MAPKs to gene promoters was calcineurin/NFAT dependent, and complex stability required MAPK activity. Knocking down NFATc2 expression, eliminating NFAT DNA binding sites, or interfering with NFAT nuclear import prevented association of MAPKs with gene promoters. Inhibiting p38 and JNK activity increased NFAT-ERK association with promoters, which repressed TNF-α and enhanced insulin gene expression. Moreover, inhibiting p38 and JNK induced a switch from NFAT-p38/JNK-histone acetyltransferase p300 to NFAT-ERK-HDAC3 complex formation upon the TNF-α promoter, which resulted in gene repression. Histone acetyltransferase/HDAC exchange was reversed on the insulin gene by p38/JNK inhibition in the presence of glucagon-like peptide 1, which enhanced gene expression. Overall, these data indicate that NFAT directs signaling enzymes to gene promoters in islets, which contribute to protein-DNA complex stability and promoter regulation. Furthermore, the data suggest that TNF-α can be repressed and insulin production can be enhanced by selectively targeting signaling components of NFAT-MAPK transcriptional/signaling complex formation in pancreatic β-cells. These findings have therapeutic potential for suppressing islet inflammation while preserving islet function in diabetes and islet transplantation. PMID:25496032

  18. Targeting the TLR4 signaling pathway by polyphenols: A novel therapeutic strategy for neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Rahimifard, Mahban; Maqbool, Faheem; Moeini-Nodeh, Shermineh; Niaz, Kamal; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Braidy, Nady; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel

    2017-02-21

    A wide array of cell signaling mediators and their interactions play vital roles in neuroinflammation associated with ischemia, brain trauma, developmental disorders and age-related neurodegeneration. Along with neurons, microglia and astrocytes are also affected by the inflammatory cascade by releasing pro-inflammatory cytokines, chemokines and reactive oxygen species. The release of pro-inflammatory mediators in response to neural dysfunction may be helpful, neutral or even deleterious to normal cellular survival. Moreover, the important role of NF-κB factors in the central nervous system (CNS) through toll-like receptor (TLR) activation has been well established. This review demonstrates recent findings regarding therapeutic aspects of polyphenolic compounds for the treatment of neuroinflammation, with the aim of regulating TLR4. Polyphenols including flavonoids, phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, stilbenes and lignans, can target TLR4 signaling pathways in multiple ways. Toll interacting protein expression could be modulated by epigallocatechin-3-gallate. Resveratrol may also exert neuroprotective effects via the TLR4/NF-κB/STAT signaling cascade. Its role in activation of cascade via interfering with TLR4 oligomerization upon receptor stimulation has also been reported. Curcumin, another polyphenol, can suppress overexpression of inflammatory mediators via inhibiting the TLR4-MAPK/NF-κB pathway. It can also reduce neuronal apoptosis via a mechanism concerning the TLR4/MyD88/NF-κB signaling pathway in microglia/macrophages. Despite a symphony of in vivo and in vitro studies, many molecular and pharmacological aspects of neuroinflammation remain unclear. It is proposed that natural compounds targeting TLR4 may serve as important pharmacophores for the development of potent drugs for the treatment of neurological disorders.

  19. Therapeutics targeting CD90-integrin-AMPK-CD133 signal axis in liver cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wei-Ching; Chang, Yung-Sheng; Hsu, Hui-Ping; Yen, Meng-Chi; Huang, Hau-Lun; Cho, Chien-Yu; Wang, Chih-Yang; Weng, Tzu-Yang; Lai, Po-Ting; Chen, Ching-Shih; Lin, Yih-Jyh; Lai, Ming-Derg

    2015-12-15

    CD90 is used as a marker for cancer stem cell in liver cancer. We aimed to study the mechanism by which CD90 promoted liver cancer progression and identify the new therapeutic targets on CD90 signal pathway. Ectopic expression of CD90 in liver cancer cell lines enhanced anchorage-independent growth and tumor progression. Furthermore, CD90 promoted sphere formation in vitro and upregulated the expression of the cancer stem cell marker CD133. The CD133 expression was higher in CD45-CD90+ cells in liver cancer specimen. The natural carcinogenic molecules TGF-β-1, HGF, and hepatitis B surface antigen increased the expression of CD90 and CD133. Inhibition of CD90 by either shRNA or antibody attenuated the induction of CD133 and anchorage-independent growth. Lentiviral delivery of CD133 shRNA abolished the tumorigenicity induced by CD90. Ectopic expression of CD90 induced mTOR phosphorylation and AMPK dephosphorylation. Mutation of integrin binding-RLD domain in CD90 attenuated the induction of CD133 and anchorage-independent growth. Similar results were observed after silencing β3 integrin. Signaling analyses revealed that AMPK/mTOR and β3 integrin were required for the induction of CD133 and tumor formation by CD90. Importantly, the energy restriction mimetic agent OSU-CG5 reduced the CD90 population in fresh liver tumor sample and repressed the tumor growth. In contrast, sorafenib did not decrease the CD90+ population. In conclusion, the signal axis of CD90-integrin-mTOR/AMPK-CD133 is critical for promoting liver carcinogenesis. Molecules inhibiting the signal axis, including OSU-CG5 and other inhibitors, may serve as potential novel cancer therapeutic targets in liver cancer.

  20. Notch signaling: targeting cancer stem cells and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Pochampally, Radhika; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Miele, Lucio

    2013-09-06

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal, and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported. This review describes the role of Notch in the "stemness" program in cancer cells and in metastases, together with a brief update on the Notch inhibitors currently under investigation in oncology. These agents may be useful in targeting cancer stem cells and to reverse the EMT process.

  1. Development of anticancer agents targeting the Wnt/β-catenin signaling

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiangqian; Hao, Jijun

    2015-01-01

    Wnt/β-catenin signaling plays indispensable roles in both embryonic development and adult homeostasis. Abnormal regulation of this pathway is implicated in many types of cancer. Consequently, substantial efforts have made to develop therapeutic agents as anticancer drugs by specifically targeting the Wnt/β-catenin pathway. Here we systematically review the potential therapeutic agents that have been developed to date for inhibition of the Wnt/β-catenin cascade as well as current status of clinical trials of some of these agents. PMID:26396911

  2. Notch signaling: targeting cancer stem cells and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition

    PubMed Central

    Espinoza, Ingrid; Pochampally, Radhika; Xing, Fei; Watabe, Kounosuke; Miele, Lucio

    2013-01-01

    Notch signaling is an evolutionarily conserved pathway involved in cell fate control during development, stem cell self-renewal, and postnatal tissue differentiation. Roles for Notch in carcinogenesis, the biology of cancer stem cells, tumor angiogenesis, and epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) have been reported. This review describes the role of Notch in the “stemness” program in cancer cells and in metastases, together with a brief update on the Notch inhibitors currently under investigation in oncology. These agents may be useful in targeting cancer stem cells and to reverse the EMT process. PMID:24043949

  3. Jab1 is a target of EGFR signaling in ERα-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiaxu; Barnes, Rebecca O; West, Nathan R; Olson, Melanie; Chu, Jenny E; Watson, Peter H

    2008-01-01

    Introduction c-Jun activation domain-binding protein-1 (Jab1) is a multifunctional signaling protein that previously has been shown to be a master regulator of a poor prognostic gene signature in invasive breast cancer and to mediate the action of S100A7. Since epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), like S100A7, is often expressed in estrogen receptor-alpha-negative (ERα-) breast cancer, we set out to investigate the role of Jab1 in mediating EGFR signaling, another facet of the ERα- phenotype. Methods MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 ERα-/EGFR+ cell lines were assessed for localization of Jab1 and levels of downstream genes by immunofluorescence and nuclear protein extract assay following treatment with epidermal growth factor (EGF) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway inhibitor. A cohort of 424 human breast tumors was also assessed by immunohistochemistry. Results EGF treatment of cell lines resulted in increased Jab1 nuclear expression. This effect was inhibited by the ERK pathway inhibitor, PD98059. EGF treatment was also associated with colocalization of pERK (phosphorylated ERK) and Jab1 as well as regulation of the Jab1 downstream target gene, p27. When Jab1 activity was knocked down, p27 levels were restored to pre-EGF treatment level. Analysis of EGFR and Jab1 expression in a cohort of invasive breast tumors by tissue microarray and immunohistochemistry confirmed a relationship between EGFR and increased nuclear Jab1 within the ERα- subset (n = 154, P = 0.019). The same association was also confirmed for S100A7 and Jab1 (P = 0.036), and high Jab1 nuclear expression was most frequent in tumors that were positive for both EGFR and S100A7 (P = 0.004). Conclusion Jab1 is a target of EGFR signaling in ERα- cell lines and breast tumors and therefore may be a common central factor and potential therapeutic target for important cell signaling pathways in ERα- breast cancer. PMID:18534028

  4. Targeting of pollen tubes to ovules is dependent on nitric oxide (NO) signaling.

    PubMed

    Prado, Ana Margarida; Colaço, Renato; Moreno, Nuno; Silva, Ana Catarina; Feijó, José A

    2008-07-01

    The guidance signals that drive pollen tube navigation inside the pistil and micropyle targeting are still, to a great extent, unknown. Previous studies in vitro showed that nitric oxide (NO) works as a negative chemotropic cue for pollen tube growth in lily (Lilium longiflorum). Furthermore, Arabidopsis thaliana Atnos1 mutant plants, which show defective NO production, have reduced fertility. Here, we focus in the role of NO in the process of pollen-pistil communication, using Arabidopsis in-vivo and lily semi-vivo assays. Cross-pollination between wild-type and Atnos1 plants shows that the mutation affects the pistil tissues in a way that is compatible with abnormal pollen tube guidance. Moreover, DAF-2DA staining for NO in kanadi floral mutants showed the presence of NO in an asymmetric restricted area around the micropyle. The pollen-pistil interaction transcriptome indicates a time-course-specific modulation of transcripts of AtNOS1 and two Nitrate Reductases (nr1 and nr2), which collectively are thought to trigger a putative NO signaling pathway. Semi-vivo assays with isolated ovules and lily pollen further showed that NO is necessary for micropyle targeting to occur. This evidence is supported by CPTIO treatment with subsequent formation of balloon tips in pollen tubes facing ovules. Activation of calcium influx in pollen tubes partially rescued normal pollen tube morphology, suggesting that this pathway is also dependent on Ca(2+) signaling. A role of NO in modulating Ca(2+) signaling was further substantiated by direct imaging the cytosolic free Ca(2+) concentration during NO-induced re-orientation, where two peaks of Ca(2+) occur-one during the slowdown/stop response, the second during re-orientation and growth resumption. Taken together, these results provide evidence for the participation of NO signaling events during pollen-pistil interaction. Of special relevance, NO seems to directly affect the targeting of pollen tubes to the ovule's micropyle by

  5. Nuclease-aided target recycling signal amplification strategy for ochratoxin A monitoring.

    PubMed

    Lv, Lei; Li, Donghao; Cui, Chengbi; Zhao, Yangyang; Guo, Zhijun

    2017-01-15

    Ochratoxin A (OTA), a toxin produced by Aspergillus ochraceus and Penicillium verrucosum, is one of the most abundant food-contaminating mycotoxins worldwide. OTA mainly exerts nephrotoxicity, immunotoxicity, mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, teratogenicity, and neurotoxicity. This paper describes a simple and sensitive aptamer/single-walled carbon nanohorn (SWCNH)-based assay for OTA detection. SWCNHs can protect DNA from DNase I cleavage. However, aptamers can be detached from the surface of SWCNHs through specific target binding, exposing them to enzymatic cleavage and releases the target for a new cycle. Cycling of targets leads to significant signal amplification and low limit of detection (LOD), resulting in a nearly 20-fold reduction in LOD for OTA assay compared with non-target recycling under the same experimental parameters. This technique responded specifically to OTA without interference from other analogues (Ochratoxin B, Ochratoxin C, warfarin, and N-acetyl-l-phenylalanine). Moreover, the application of this technique in real sample has been verified using red wine samples spiked with a series of OTA concentrations. This aptasensor offers a great practical importance in food safety and can be widely extended for detection of other toxins by replacing the sequence of the recognition aptamer.

  6. Reliable motion detection of small targets in video with low signal-to-clutter ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Nichols, S.A.; Naylor, R.B.

    1995-07-01

    Studies show that vigilance decreases rapidly after several minutes when human operators are required to search live video for infrequent intrusion detections. Therefore, there is a need for systems which can automatically detect targets in live video and reserve the operator`s attention for assessment only. Thus far, automated systems have not simultaneously provided adequate detection sensitivity, false alarm suppression, and ease of setup when used in external, unconstrained environments. This unsatisfactory performance can be exacerbated by poor video imagery with low contrast, high noise, dynamic clutter, image misregistration, and/or the presence of small, slow, or erratically moving targets. This paper describes a highly adaptive video motion detection and tracking algorithm which has been developed as part of Sandia`s Advanced Exterior Sensor (AES) program. The AES is a wide-area detection and assessment system for use in unconstrained exterior security applications. The AES detection and tracking algorithm provides good performance under stressing data and environmental conditions. Features of the algorithm include: reliable detection with negligible false alarm rate of variable velocity targets having low signal-to-clutter ratios; reliable tracking of targets that exhibit motion that is non-inertial, i.e., varies in direction and velocity; automatic adaptation to both infrared and visible imagery with variable quality; and suppression of false alarms caused by sensor flaws and/or cutouts.

  7. Reliable motion detection of small targets in video with low signal-to-clutter ratios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichols, Scott A.; Naylor, R. B.

    1995-09-01

    Studies show that vigilance decreases rapidly after several minutes when human operators are required to search live video for infrequent intrusion detections. Therefore, there is a need for systems which can automatically detect targets in live video and reserve the operator's attention for assessment only. Thus far, automated systems have not simultaneously provided adequate detection sensitivity, false alarm suppression, and ease of setup when used in external, unconstrained environments. This unsatisfactory performance can be exacerbated by poor video imagery with low contrast, high noise, dynamic clutter, image misregistration, and/or the presence of small, slow, or erratically moving targets. This paper describes a highly adaptive video motion detection and tracking algorithm provides good performance under stressing data and environmental conditions. Features of the algorithm include: reliable detection with negligible false alarm rate of variable velocity targets having low signal-to- clutter ratios; reliable tracking of targets that exhibit motion that is non-inertial, i.e. varies in direction and velocity; automatic adaptation to both infrared and visible imagery with variable quality; and suppression of false alarms caused by sensor flaws and/or cutouts.

  8. Targeting the PI3K/AKT/mTOR Signaling Axis in Children with Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, David; Brown, Valerie I.; Grupp, Stephan A.; Teachey, David T.

    2014-01-01

    The phosphatidylinositiol 3-kinase (PI3K), AKT, mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway (PI3K/AKT/mTOR) is frequently dysregulated in disorders of cell growth and survival, including a number of pediatric hematologic malignancies. The pathway can be abnormally activated in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myelogenous leukemia (AML), and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), as well as in some pediatric lymphomas and lymphoproliferative disorders. Most commonly, this abnormal activation occurs as a consequence of constitutive activation of AKT, providing a compelling rationale to target this pathway in many of these conditions. A variety of agents, beginning with the rapamycin analogue (rapalog) sirolimus, have been used successfully to target this pathway in a number of pediatric hematologic malignancies. Rapalogs demonstrate significant preclinical activity against ALL, which has led to a number of clinical trials. Moreover, rapalogs can synergize with a number of conventional cytotoxic agents and overcome pathways of chemotherapeutic resistance for drugs commonly used in ALL treatment, including methotrexate and corticosteroids. Based on preclinical data, rapalogs are also being studied in AML, CML, and non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma. Recently, significant progress has been made using rapalogs to treat pre-malignant lymphoproliferative disorders, including the autoimmune lymphoproliferative syndrome (ALPS); complete remissions in children with otherwise therapy-resistant disease have been seen. Rapalogs only block one component of the pathway (mTORC1), and newer agents are under preclinical and clinical development that can target different and often multiple protein kinases in the PI3K/AKT/mTOR pathway. Most of these agents have been tolerated in early-phase clinical trials. A number of PI3K inhibitors are under investigation. Of note, most of these also target other protein kinases. Newer agents are under development that target both m

  9. Real-time colorimetric detection of target DNA using isothermal target and signaling probe amplification and gold nanoparticle cross-linking assay.

    PubMed

    Jung, Cheulhee; Chung, Ji Won; Kim, Un Ok; Kim, Min Hwan; Park, Hyun Gyu

    2011-01-15

    We describe a facile gold nanoparticle (AuNP)-mediated colorimetric method for real-time detection of target DNA in conjugation with our unique isothermal target and signaling probe amplification (iTPA) method, comprising novel ICA (isothermal chain amplification) and CPT (cycling probe technology). Under isothermal conditions, the iTPA simultaneously amplifies the target and signaling probe through two displacement events induced by a combination of four specially designed primers, the strand displacement activity of DNA polymerase, and the RNA degrading activity of RNase H. The resulting target amplicons are hybridized with gold nanoparticle cross-linking assay (GCA) probes having a DNA-RNA-DNA chimeric form followed by RNA cleavage by RNase H in the CPT step. The intact GCA probes were designed to cross-link two sets of DNA-AuNPs conjugates in the absence of target DNA, inducing aggregation (blue color) of AuNPs. On the contrary, the presence of target DNA leads to cleavage of the GCA probes in proportion to the amount of amplified target DNA and the solution remains red in color without aggregation of AuNPs. Relying on this strategy, 10(2) copies of target Chlamydia trachomatis plasmid were successfully detected in a colorimetric manner. Importantly, all the procedures employed up to the final detection of the target DNA were performed under isothermal conditions without requiring any detection instruments. Therefore, this strategy would greatly benefit convenient, real-time monitoring technology of target DNA under restricted environments.

  10. Rapamycin and glucose-target of rapamycin (TOR) protein signaling in plants.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Sheen, Jen

    2012-01-20

    Target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase is an evolutionarily conserved master regulator that integrates energy, nutrients, growth factors, and stress signals to promote survival and growth in all eukaryotes. The reported land plant resistance to rapamycin and the embryo lethality of the Arabidopsis tor mutants have hindered functional dissection of TOR signaling in plants. We developed sensitive cellular and seedling assays to monitor endogenous Arabidopsis TOR activity based on its conserved S6 kinase (S6K) phosphorylation. Surprisingly, rapamycin effectively inhibits Arabidopsis TOR-S6K1 signaling and retards glucose-mediated root and leaf growth, mimicking estradiol-inducible tor mutants. Rapamycin inhibition is relieved in transgenic plants deficient in Arabidopsis FK506-binding protein 12 (FKP12), whereas FKP12 overexpression dramatically enhances rapamycin sensitivity. The role of Arabidopsis FKP12 is highly specific as overexpression of seven closely related FKP proteins fails to increase rapamycin sensitivity. Rapamycin exerts TOR inhibition by inducing direct interaction between the TOR-FRB (FKP-rapamycin binding) domain and FKP12 in plant cells. We suggest that variable endogenous FKP12 protein levels may underlie the molecular explanation for longstanding enigmatic observations on inconsistent rapamycin resistance in plants and in various mammalian cell lines or diverse animal cell types. Integrative analyses with rapamycin and conditional tor and fkp12 mutants also reveal a central role of glucose-TOR signaling in root hair formation. Our studies demonstrate the power of chemical genetic approaches in the discovery of previously unknown and pivotal functions of glucose-TOR signaling in governing the growth of cotyledons, true leaves, petioles, and primary and secondary roots and root hairs.

  11. Illuminating luminal B: QSOX1 as a subtype-specific biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex and heterogeneous disease that affects about one out of every eight women. In the last decade, several advancements have been made that have increased our understanding of breast cancer and have allowed us to more accurately diagnose and treat this disease in a more targeted manner. For example, gene expression profiling enabled the classification of breast cancers into four main subtypes - basal-like, HER2+ (human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive), luminal A and luminal B - and this classification is used to direct the use of targeted therapies such as tamoxifen or trastuzumab. The luminal subtypes are generally characterized as being estrogen receptor-positive and targetable with anti-hormone therapies. However, whereas luminal A cancers have a good prognosis, luminal B cancers are associated with early relapse following endocrine therapy and a prognosis that is similar to that of the aggressive basal subtype. It is thus imperative that luminal B cancers be better characterized so that therapeutic targets and biomarkers for this disease type can be realized. In the previous issue of Breast Cancer Research, Katchman and colleagues address this need by demonstrating that quiescin sulfydryl oxidase 1 (QSOX1), a secreted enzyme involved in post-translational modifications, is associated with poor prognosis in patients with luminal B breast cancer. The authors further determined that this protein promotes breast cancer proliferation and invasion. Collectively, these studies suggest that QSOX1 is a predictive biomarker for luminal cancers and that it may be a useful target for elusive luminal B disease. PMID:23680167

  12. The evolution of regulators of G protein signalling proteins as drug targets - 20 years in the making: IUPHAR Review 21.

    PubMed

    Sjögren, B

    2017-03-01

    Regulators of G protein signalling (RGS) proteins are celebrating the 20th anniversary of their discovery. The unveiling of this new family of negative regulators of G protein signalling in the mid-1990s solved a persistent conundrum in the G protein signalling field, in which the rate of deactivation of signalling cascades in vivo could not be replicated in exogenous systems. Since then, there has been tremendous advancement in the knowledge of RGS protein structure, function, regulation and their role as novel drug targets. RGS proteins play an important modulatory role through their GTPase-activating protein (GAP) activity at active, GTP-bound Gα subunits of heterotrimeric G proteins. They also possess many non-canonical functions not related to G protein signalling. Here, an update on the status of RGS proteins as drug targets is provided, highlighting advances that have led to the inclusion of RGS proteins in the IUPHAR/BPS Guide to PHARMACOLOGY database of drug targets.

  13. Targeting notch signaling pathway in cancer: clinical development advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Takebe, Naoko; Nguyen, Dat; Yang, Sherry X

    2014-02-01

    Notch signaling plays an important role in development and cell fate determination, and it is deregulated in human hematologic malignancies and solid tumors. This review includes a brief introduction of the relevant pathophysiology of Notch signaling pathway and primarily focuses on the clinical development of promising agents that either obstruct Notch receptor cleavages such as γ-secretase inhibitors (GSIs) or interfere with the Notch ligand-receptor interaction by monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Antitumor activity by GSIs and mAbs administered as single agent in early phases of clinical trials has been observed in advanced or metastatic thyroid cancer, non-small cell lung cancer, intracranial tumors, sarcoma or desmoid tumors, colorectal cancer with neuroendocrine features, melanoma and ovarian cancer. A number of mechanism-based adverse events particularly gastrointestinal toxicities emerged and mitigation strategies are developed after testing multiple GSIs and Notch targeting mAbs. We also discuss pharmacodynamic biomarkers in conjunction with methods of assessment of the molecular target inhibition validation. Biomarkers of efficacy or benefit may be of importance for a successful development of this class of drugs.

  14. Haemophilus ducreyi targets Src family protein tyrosine kinases to inhibit phagocytic signaling.

    PubMed

    Mock, Jason R; Vakevainen, Merja; Deng, Kaiping; Latimer, Jo L; Young, Jennifer A; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Greenberg, Steven; Hansen, Eric J

    2005-12-01

    Haemophilus ducreyi, the etiologic agent of the sexually transmitted disease chancroid, has been shown to inhibit phagocytosis of both itself and secondary targets in vitro. Immunodepletion of LspA proteins from H. ducreyi culture supernatant fluid abolished this inhibitory effect, indicating that the LspA proteins are necessary for the inhibition of phagocytosis by H. ducreyi. Fluorescence microscopy revealed that macrophages incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi, but not with a lspA1 lspA2 mutant, were unable to complete development of the phagocytic cup around immunoglobulin G-opsonized targets. Examination of the phosphotyrosine protein profiles of these two sets of macrophages showed that those incubated with wild-type H. ducreyi had greatly reduced phosphorylation levels of proteins in the 50-to-60-kDa range. Subsequent experiments revealed reductions in the catalytic activities of both Lyn and Hck, two members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases that are known to be involved in the proximal signaling steps of Fcgamma receptor-mediated phagocytosis. Additional experiments confirmed reductions in the levels of both active Lyn and active Hck in three different immune cell lines, but not in HeLa cells, exposed to wild-type H. ducreyi. This is the first example of a bacterial pathogen that suppresses Src family protein tyrosine kinase activity to subvert phagocytic signaling in hostcells.

  15. Effects of DNA probe and target flexibility on the performance of a "signal-on" electrochemical DNA sensor.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yao; Lai, Rebecca Y

    2014-09-02

    We report the effect of the length and identity of a nontarget binding spacer in both the probe and target sequences on the overall performance of a folding-based electrochemical DNA sensor. Six near-identical DNA probes were used in this study; the main differences between these probes are the length (6, 10, or 14 bases) and identity (thymine (T) or adenine (A)) of the spacer connecting the two target binding domains. Despite the differences, the signaling mechanism of these sensors remains essentially the same. The methylene blue (MB)-modified probe assumes a linear unstructured conformation in the absence of the target; upon hybridization to the target, the probe adopts a "close" conformation, resulting in an increase in the MB current. Among the six sensors, the T14 and A14 sensors showed the largest signal increase upon target hybridization, highlighting the significance of probe flexibility on sensor performance. In addition to the target without a midsequence spacer, 12 other targets, each with a different oligo-T or oligo-A spacer, were used to elucidate the effect of target flexibility on the sensors' signaling capacity. For all six sensors, hybridization to targets with a 2- or 3-base spacer resulted in the largest signal increase. Higher signal enhancement was also observed with targets with an oligo-A spacer. For this sensor design, addition of a long nontarget binding spacer to the probe sequence is advantageous, as it provides flexibility for optimal target capture. The length of the spacer in the target sequence, however, should be adequately long to enable efficient hybridization yet does not introduce undesirable electrostatic and crowding effects.

  16. Targeting FLT3-ITD signaling mediates ceramide-dependent mitophagy and attenuates drug resistance in AML.

    PubMed

    Dany, Mohammed; Gencer, Salih; Nganga, Rose; Thomas, Raquela J; Oleinik, Natalia; Baron, Kyla D; Szulc, Zdzislaw M; Ruvolo, Peter; Kornblau, Steven; Andreeff, Michael; Ogretmen, Besim

    2016-10-13

    Signaling pathways regulated by mutant Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3)-internal tandem duplication (ITD), which mediate resistance to acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell death, are poorly understood. Here, we reveal that pro-cell death lipid ceramide generation is suppressed by FLT3-ITD signaling. Molecular or pharmacologic inhibition of FLT3-ITD reactivated ceramide synthesis, selectively inducing mitophagy and AML cell death. Mechanistically, FLT3-ITD targeting induced ceramide accumulation on the outer mitochondrial membrane, which then directly bound autophagy-inducing light chain 3 (LC3), involving its I35 and F52 residues, to recruit autophagosomes for execution of lethal mitophagy. Short hairpin RNA (shRNA)-mediated knockdown of LC3 prevented AML cell death in response to FLT3-ITD inhibition by crenolanib, which was restored by wild-type (WT)-LC3, but not mutants of LC3 with altered ceramide binding (I35A-LC3 or F52A-LC3). Mitochondrial ceramide accumulation and lethal mitophagy induction in response to FLT3-ITD targeting was mediated by dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) activation via inhibition of protein kinase A-regulated S637 phosphorylation, resulting in mitochondrial fission. Inhibition of Drp1 prevented ceramide-dependent lethal mitophagy, and reconstitution of WT-Drp1 or phospho-null S637A-Drp1 but not its inactive phospho-mimic mutant (S637D-Drp1), restored mitochondrial fission and mitophagy in response to crenolanib in FLT3-ITD(+) AML cells expressing stable shRNA against endogenous Drp1. Moreover, activating FLT3-ITD signaling in crenolanib-resistant AML cells suppressed ceramide-dependent mitophagy and prevented cell death. FLT3-ITD(+) AML drug resistance is attenuated by LCL-461, a mitochondria-targeted ceramide analog drug, in vivo, which also induced lethal mitophagy in human AML blasts with clinically relevant FLT3 mutations. Thus, these data reveal a novel mechanism which regulates AML cell death by ceramide-dependent mitophagy in response

  17. Arcing and rf signal generation during target irradiation by a high-energy, pulsed neutral particle beam

    SciTech Connect

    Robiscoe, R.T.

    1988-02-01

    We present a theory describing the dynamics of arc discharges in bulk dielectric materials on board space-based vehicles. Such ''punch-through'' arcs can occur in target satellites irradiated by high-energy (250 MeV), pulsed (100 mA x 10 ms) neutral particle beams. We treat the arc as a capacitively limited avalanche current in the target dielectric material, and we find expressions for the arc duration, charge transport, currents, and discharge energy. These quantities are adjusted to be consistent with known scaling laws for the area of charge depleted by the arc. After a brief account of the statistical distribution of voltages at which the arc starts and stops, we calculate the signal strength and frequency spectrum of the electromagnetic radiation broadcast by the arc. We find that arcs from thick ()similarreverse arrowto)1 cm) targets can generate rf signals detectable up to 1000 km from the target, bu a radio receiver operating at frequency 80 MHz, bandwidth 100 kHz, and detection threshold -105 dBm. These thick-target arc signals are 10 to 20 dB above ambient noise at the receiver, and they provide target hit assessment if the signal spectrum can be sampled at several frequencies in the nominal range 30-200 MHz. Thin-target ()similarreverse arrowto)1 mm) arc signals are much weaker, but when they are detecable in conjunction with thick-target signals, target discrimination is possible by comparing the signal frequency spectra. 24 refs., 12 figs.

  18. miR-204 Targets PERK and Regulates UPR Signaling and β-Cell Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Guanlan; Chen, Junqin; Jing, Gu; Grayson, Truman B; Shalev, Anath

    2016-08-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetes and the associated β-cell apoptosis. Although microRNAs (miRNAs) have been widely studied in various diseases including diabetes, the role of miRNAs in ER stress and β-cell apoptosis has only started to be elucidated. We recently showed that diabetes increases β-cell miR-204 and have now discovered that miR-204 directly targets the 3'untranslated region of protein kinase R-like ER kinase (PERK), 1 of the 3 ER transmembrane sensors and a key factor of the unfolded protein response (UPR). In addition, by using primary human islets, mouse islets, and INS-1 β-cells, we found that miR-204 decreased PERK expression as well as its downstream factors, activating transcription factor 4 and CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein, whereas it had no effect on the other 2 ER transmembrane sensors, activating transcription factor 6 and inositol-requiring enzyme-1α. Interestingly, we discovered that miR-204 also inhibited PERK signaling in the context of ER stress, and this exacerbated ER stress-induced β-cell apoptosis. This effect could be mimicked by PERK inhibitors supporting the notion that the miR-204-mediated inhibition of PERK and UPR signaling was conferring these detrimental effects on cell survival. Taken together, we have identified PERK as a novel target of miR-204 and show that miR-204 inhibits PERK signaling and increases ER stress-induced cell death, revealing for the first time a link between this miRNA and UPR.

  19. Recent progress in fungus-derived bioactive agents for targeting of signaling machinery in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xiukun; Farooqi, Ammad Ahmad; Ismail, Muhammad

    2015-01-01

    It is becoming increasingly understood that tumor cells may have different mutations and dependencies on diverse intracellular signaling cascades for survival or metastatic potential. Overexpression of oncogenes, inactivation of tumor suppressor genes, genetic/epigenetic mutations, genomic instability, and loss of apoptotic cell death are some of the mechanisms that have been widely investigated in molecular oncology. We partition this multicomponent review into the most recent evidence on the anticancer activity of fungal substances obtained from in vitro and xenografted models, and these fungal substances modulate expression of oncogenic and tumor suppressor miRNAs. There are some outstanding questions regarding fungus-derived chemical-induced modulation of intracellular signaling networks in different cancer cell lines and preclinical models. Certain hints have emerged, emphasizing mechanisms via which apoptosis can be restored in TRAIL-resistant cancer cells. Reconceptualization of the knowledge obtained from these emerging areas of research will enable us to potentially identify natural agents with notable anticancer activity and minimal off-target effects. Integration of experimentally verified evidence obtained from cancer cell line gene expression with large-scale functional screening results and pharmacological sensitivity data will be helpful in identification of therapeutics with substantial efficacy. New tools and technologies will further deepen our understanding of the signaling networks that underlie the development of cancer, metastasis, and resistance to different therapeutics at both a personal and systems-wide level. PMID:25848216

  20. Immunotoxin targeting glypican-3 regresses liver cancer via dual inhibition of Wnt signalling and protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Tang, Zhewei; Zhang, Yi-Fan; Feng, Mingqian; Qian, Min; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Ho, Mitchell

    2015-03-11

    Glypican-3 is a cell surface glycoprotein that associates with Wnt in liver cancer. We develop two antibodies targeting glypican-3, HN3 and YP7. The first antibody recognizes a functional epitope and inhibits Wnt signalling, whereas the second antibody recognizes a C-terminal epitope but does not inhibit Wnt signalling. Both are fused to a fragment of Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE38) to create immunotoxins. Interestingly, the immunotoxin based on HN3 (HN3-PE38) has superior antitumor activity as compared with YP7 (YP7-PE38) both in vitro and in vivo. Intravenous administration of HN3-PE38 alone, or in combination with chemotherapy, induces regression of Hep3B and HepG2 liver tumour xenografts in mice. This study establishes glypican-3 as a promising candidate for immunotoxin-based liver cancer therapy. Our results demonstrate immunotoxin-induced tumour regression via dual mechanisms: inactivation of cancer signalling via the antibody and inhibition of protein synthesis via the toxin.

  1. Dietary phytochemicals for possible preventive and therapeutic option of uterine fibroids: Signaling pathways as target.

    PubMed

    Islam, Md Soriful; Segars, James H; Castellucci, Mario; Ciarmela, Pasquapina

    2017-02-01

    A growing interest has emerged on dietary phytochemicals to control diverse pathological conditions. Unfortunately, dietary phytochemical research in uterine fibroids is still under construction. Uterine fibroids/leiomyomas are benign tumors developing from the myometrium of the uterus in premenopausal women. They may occur in more than 70% of women, and approximately 25% of women show clinically significant symptoms. These include heavy and prolonged menstrual bleeding, pelvic pressure (urinary frequency, incontinence, and difficulty with urination), pelvic pain, pelvic mass, infertility, and reproductive dysfunction. Due to lack of medical treatments surgery has been definitive choice for fibroid management. Moreover, surgery negatively affects women's quality of life, and its associated cost appears to be expensive. The molecular mechanism of fibroids development and growth is not fully elucidated. However, accumulated evidence shows that several signaling pathways, including Smad 2/3, PI3K/AKT/mTOR, ERK 1/2 and β-catenin are involved in the leiomyoma pathogenesis, indicating that they could serve as targets for prevention and/or treatment of this tumor. Therefore, in this review, we discuss the involvement of signaling pathways in leiomyoma development and growth, and introduce some potential dietary phytochemicals that could modulate those signaling pathways.

  2. Targeting of Ras-mediated FGF signaling suppresses Pten-deficient skin tumor.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Grinu; Hannan, Abdul; Hertzler-Schaefer, Kristina; Wang, Fen; Feng, Gen-Sheng; Zhong, Jian; Zhao, Jean J; Downward, Julian; Zhang, Xin

    2016-11-15

    Deficiency in PTEN (phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10) is the underlying cause of PTEN hamartoma tumor syndrome and a wide variety of human cancers. In skin epidermis, we have previously identified an autocrine FGF signaling induced by loss of Pten in keratinocytes. In this study, we demonstrate that skin hyperplasia requires FGF receptor adaptor protein Frs2α and tyrosine phosphatase Shp2, two upstream regulators of Ras signaling. Although the PI3-kinase regulatory subunits p85α and p85β are dispensable, the PI3-kinase catalytic subunit p110α requires interaction with Ras to promote hyperplasia in Pten-deficient skin, thus demonstrating an important cross-talk between Ras and PI3K pathways. Furthermore, genetic and pharmacological inhibition of Ras-MAPK pathway impeded epidermal hyperplasia in Pten animals. These results reveal a positive feedback loop connecting Pten and Ras pathways and suggest that FGF-activated Ras-MAPK pathway is an effective therapeutic target for preventing skin tumor induced by aberrant Pten signaling.

  3. Targeting the Hippo Signaling Pathway for Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Juan, Wen Chun; Hong, Wanjin

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo signaling pathway is a highly-conserved developmental pathway that plays an essential role in organ size control, tumor suppression, tissue regeneration and stem cell self-renewal. The YES-associated protein (YAP) and the transcriptional co-activator with PDZ-binding motif (TAZ) are two important transcriptional co-activators that are negatively regulated by the Hippo signaling pathway. By binding to transcription factors, especially the TEA domain transcription factors (TEADs), YAP and TAZ induce the expression of growth-promoting genes, which can promote organ regeneration after injury. Therefore, controlled activation of YAP and TAZ can be useful for regenerative medicine. However, aberrant activation of YAP and TAZ due to deregulation of the Hippo pathway or overexpression of YAP/TAZ and TEADs can promote cancer development. Hence, pharmacological inhibition of YAP and TAZ may be a useful approach to treat tumors with high YAP and/or TAZ activity. In this review, we present the mechanisms regulating the Hippo pathway, the role of the Hippo pathway in tissue repair and cancer, as well as a detailed analysis of the different strategies to target the Hippo signaling pathway and the genes regulated by YAP and TAZ for regenerative medicine and cancer therapy. PMID:27589805

  4. Hippo signaling pathway in liver and pancreas: the potential drug target for tumor therapy.

    PubMed

    Kong, Delin; Zhao, Yicheng; Men, Tong; Teng, Chun-Bo

    2015-02-01

    Cell behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis, are intricately controlled during organ development and tissue regeneration. In the past 9 years, the Hippo signaling pathway has been delineated to play critical roles in organ size control, tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis through regulating cell behaviors. In mammals, the core modules of the Hippo signaling pathway include the MST1/2-LATS1/2 kinase cascade and the transcriptional co-activators YAP/TAZ. The activity of YAP/TAZ is suppressed by cytoplasmic retention due to phosphorylation in the canonical MST1/2-LATS1/2 kinase cascade-dependent manner or the non-canonical MST1/2- and/or LATS1/2-independent manner. Hippo signaling pathway, which can be activated or inactivated by cell polarity, contact inhibition, mechanical stretch and extracellular factors, has been demonstrated to be involved in development and tumorigenesis of liver and pancreas. In addition, we have summarized several small molecules currently available that can target Hippo-YAP pathway for potential treatment of hepatic and pancreatic cancers, providing clues for other YAP initiated cancers therapy as well.

  5. The Na/K-ATPase-mediated signal transduction as a target for new drug development.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zijian; Xie, Joe

    2005-09-01

    The Na/K-ATPase, or Na+ pump, is a member of the P-type ATPase superfamily. In addition to pumping ions, the Na/K-ATPase is a receptor that not only regulates the function of protein kinases, but also acts as a scaffold, capable of tethering different proteins into a signalplex. The signaling Na/K-ATPase resides in caveolae and forms a "binary receptor" with the tyrosine kinase Src. Endogenous cardiotonic steroids and digitalis drugs such as ouabain act as agonists and provoke this binary receptor, resulting in tyrosine phosphorylation of the proteins that are either associated with, or in close proximity to, the signaling Na/K-ATPase. Subsequently, this initiates protein kinase cascades including ERKs and PKC isozymes. It also increases mitochondrial production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and regulates intracellular calcium concentration. Like other receptors, activation of the Na/K-ATPase/Src by ouabain induces the endocytosis of the plasma membrane Na/K-ATPase. Significantly, this newly appreciated signaling function of the Na/K-ATPase appears to play an important role in the pathogenesis of many cardiovascular diseases, therefore serving as an important target for development of novel therapeutic agents.

  6. Dual signal amplification for highly sensitive electrochemical detection of uropathogens via enzyme-based catalytic target recycling.

    PubMed

    Su, Jiao; Zhang, Haijie; Jiang, Bingying; Zheng, Huzhi; Chai, Yaqin; Yuan, Ruo; Xiang, Yun

    2011-11-15

    We report an ultrasensitive electrochemical approach for the detection of uropathogen sequence-specific DNA target. The sensing strategy involves a dual signal amplification process, which combines the signal enhancement by the enzymatic target recycling technique with the sensitivity improvement by the quantum dot (QD) layer-by-layer (LBL) assembled labels. The enzyme-based catalytic target DNA recycling process results in the use of each target DNA sequence for multiple times and leads to direct amplification of the analytical signal. Moreover, the LBL assembled QD labels can further enhance the sensitivity of the sensing system. The coupling of these two effective signal amplification strategies thus leads to low femtomolar (5fM) detection of the target DNA sequences. The proposed strategy also shows excellent discrimination between the target DNA and the single-base mismatch sequences. The advantageous intrinsic sequence-independent property of exonuclease III over other sequence-dependent enzymes makes our new dual signal amplification system a general sensing platform for monitoring ultralow level of various types of target DNA sequences.

  7. Mitochondria Death/Survival Signaling Pathways in Cardiotoxicity Induced by Anthracyclines and Anticancer-Targeted Therapies

    PubMed Central

    Montaigne, David; Hurt, Christopher; Neviere, Remi

    2012-01-01

    Anthracyclines remain the cornerstone of treatment in many malignancies but these agents have a cumulative dose relationship with cardiotoxicity. Development of cardiomyopathy and congestive heart failure induced by anthracyclines are typically dose-dependent, irreversible, and cumulative. Although past studies of cardiotoxicity have focused on anthracyclines, more recently interest has turned to anticancer drugs that target many proteins kinases, such as tyrosine kinases. An attractive model to explain the mechanism of this cardiotoxicity could be myocyte loss through cell death pathways. Inhibition of mitochondrial transition permeability is a valuable tool to prevent doxorubicin-induced cardiotoxicity. In response to anthracycline treatment, activation of several protein kinases, neuregulin/ErbB2 signaling, and transcriptional factors modify mitochondrial functions that determine cell death or survival through the modulation of mitochondrial membrane permeability. Cellular response to anthracyclines is also modulated by a myriad of transcriptional factors that influence cell fate. Several novel targeted chemotherapeutic agents have been associated with a small but worrying risk of left ventricular dysfunction. Agents such as trastuzumab and tyrosine kinase inhibitors can lead to cardiotoxicity that is fundamentally different from that caused by anthracyclines, whereas biological effects converge to the mitochondria as a critical target. PMID:22482055

  8. Identification of a VxP targeting signal in the flagellar Na+/K+-ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Laird, Joseph G.; Pan, Yuan; Modestou, Modestos; Yamaguchi, David M.; Song, Hongman; Sokolov, Maxim; Baker, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) participates in setting electrochemical gradients, cardiotonic steroid signaling, and cellular adhesion. Distinct isoforms of NKA are found in different tissues and subcellular localization patterns. For example, NKA α1 is widely expressed, NKA α3 is enriched in neurons, and NKA α4 is a testes specific isoform found in sperm flagella. In some tissues, ankyrin, a key component of the membrane cytoskeleton, can regulate the trafficking of NKA. In the retina, NKA and ankyrin-B are expressed in multiple cell types and immunostaining for each is striking in the synaptic layers. Labeling for NKA is also prominent along the inner segment plasma membrane of photoreceptors. NKA co-immunoprecipitates with ankyrin-B, but on a subcellular level co-localization of these two proteins varies dependent on the cell type. We used transgenic X. laevis tadpoles to evaluate the subcellular trafficking of NKA in photoreceptors. GFP-NKA α3 and α1 localized to the inner segment plasma membrane, but α4 localized to outer segments. We identified a VxP motif responsible for the outer segment targeting by using a series of chimeric and mutant NKA constructs. This motif is similar to previously identified ciliary targeting motifs. Given the structural similarities between outer segments and flagella, our findings shed light on the subcellular targeting of this testes specific NKA isoform. PMID:26373354

  9. Therapeutic microRNAs targeting the NF-kappa B Signaling Circuits of Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lingying; Yuan, Ye; Wu, Shiyong

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) not only directly regulate NF-κB expression, but also up- or down-regulate NF-κB activity via upstream and downstream signaling pathways of NF-κB. In many cancer cells, miRNA expressions are altered accompanied with an elevation of NF-κB, which often plays a role in promoting cancer development and progression as well as hindering the effectiveness of chemo and radiation therapies. Thus NF-κB-targeting miRNAs have been identified and characterized as potential therapeutics for cancer treatment and sensitizers of chemo and radiotherapies. However, due to cross-targeting and instability of miRNAs, some limitations of using miRNA as cancer therapeutics still exist. In this review, the mechanisms for miRNA-mediated alteration of NF-κB expression and activation in different types of cancers will be discussed. The results of therapeutic use of NF-κB-targeting miRNA for cancer treatment will be examined. Some limitations, challenges and potential strategies in future development of miRNA as cancer therapeutics are also assessed. PMID:25220353

  10. A single mechanism for both luminance and chromatic grating vernier tasks: evidence from temporal summation.

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Lee, Barry B

    2004-01-01

    Vernier thresholds are determined by luminance rather than chromatic contrast when both are present in vernier targets. The role of luminance and chromatic mechanisms in vernier performance under equiluminant conditions remains uncertain. Temporal summation functions for vernier thresholds with luminance and red-green equiluminant gratings were compared to those for detection thresholds with similar stimuli. Vernier thresholds showed similar temporal summation for luminance and chromatic gratings, which is consistent with a single mechanism underlying vernier performance in the two conditions. However, detection thresholds showed a shorter temporal summation duration for luminance gratings than for chromatic gratings, which suggests that two different mechanisms underlie detection thresholds. Analysis of physiological data supports the hypothesis that the frequency-doubled response of ganglion cells in the magnocellular pathway can provide accurate spatiotemporal information for vernier performance at equiluminance.

  11. P-Rex1 links mammalian target of rapamycin signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Negrete, Ivette; Carretero-Ortega, Jorge; Rosenfeldt, Hans; Hernández-García, Ricardo; Calderón-Salinas, J Victor; Reyes-Cruz, Guadalupe; Gutkind, J Silvio; Vázquez-Prado, José

    2007-08-10

    Polarized cell migration results from the transduction of extra-cellular cues promoting the activation of Rho GTPases with the intervention of multidomain proteins, including guanine exchange factors. P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 are Rac GEFs connecting Gbetagamma and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase signaling to Rac activation. Their complex architecture suggests their regulation by protein-protein interactions. Novel mechanisms of activation of Rho GTPases are associated with mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a serine/threonine kinase known as a central regulator of cell growth and proliferation. Recently, two independent multiprotein complexes containing mTOR have been described. mTORC1 links to the classical rapamycin-sensitive pathways relevant for protein synthesis; mTORC2 links to the activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal events via undefined mechanisms. Here we demonstrate that P-Rex1 and P-Rex2 establish, through their tandem DEP domains, interactions with mTOR, suggesting their potential as effectors in the signaling of mTOR to Rac activation and cell migration. This possibility was consistent with the effect of dominant-negative constructs and short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of P-Rex1, which decreased mTOR-dependent leucine-induced activation of Rac and cell migration. Rapamycin, a widely used inhibitor of mTOR signaling, did not inhibit Rac activity and cell migration induced by leucine, indicating that P-Rex1, which we found associated to both mTOR complexes, is only active when in the mTORC2 complex. mTORC2 has been described as the catalytic complex that phosphorylates AKT/PKB at Ser-473 and elicits activation of Rho GTPases and cytoskeletal reorganization. Thus, P-Rex1 links mTOR signaling to Rac activation and cell migration.

  12. Hedgehog signaling pathway and its targets for treatment in basal cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Cucchi, Danilo; Occhione, Maria Anna; Gulino, Alberto; De Smaele, Enrico

    2012-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) of the skin is the most common type of cancer and accounts for up to 40% of all cancers in the US, with a growing incidence rate over recent decades in all developed countries. Surgery is curative for most patients, although it leaves unaesthetic scars, but those that develop locally advanced or metastatic BCC require different therapeutic approaches. Furthermore, patients with BCC present a high risk of developing additional tumors. The increasing economic burden and the morbidity of BCC render primary interest in the development of targeted treatments for this disease. Among the molecular signals involved in the development of BCC, the critical role of the morphogenetic Hedgehog (Hh) pathway has become evident. This pathway is found altered and activated in almost all BCCs, both sporadic and inherited. Given the centrality of the Hh pathway in the pathophysiology of BCC, the primary efforts to identify molecular targets for the topical or systemic treatment of this cancer have focused on the Hh components. Several Hh inhibitors have been so far identified – from the first identified natural cyclopamine to the recently Food and Drug Administration-approved synthetic vismodegib – most of which target the Hh receptor Smoothened (either its function or its translocation to the primary cilium). Other molecules await further characterization (bisamide compounds), while drugs currently approved for other diseases such as itraconazole (an antimicotic agent) and vitamin D3 have been tested on BCC with encouraging results. The outcomes of the numerous ongoing clinical trials are expected to expand the field in the very near future. Further research is needed to obtain drugs targeting downstream components of the Hh pathway (eg, Gli) or to exploit combinatorial therapies (eg, with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitors or retinoids) in order to overcome potential drug resistance. PMID:27186130

  13. NF-κB signaling pathway as target for antiplatelet activity.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Rojas, Armando; Palomo, Iván

    2016-07-01

    In different nucleated cells, NF-κB has long been considered a prototypical proinflammatory signaling pathway with the expression of proinflammatory genes. Although platelets lack a nucleus, a number of functional transcription factors are involved in activated platelets, such as NF-κB. In platelet activation NF-κB regulation events include IKKβ phosphorylation, IκBα degradation, and p65 phosphorylation. Multiple pathways contribute to platelet activation and NF-κB is a common pathway in this activation. Therefore, in platelet activation the modulation of NF-κB pathway could be a potential new target in the treatment of inflammation-related vascular disease therapy (antiplatelet and antithrombotic activities).

  14. Fault diagnosis engineering in molecular signaling networks: an overview and applications in target discovery.

    PubMed

    Abdi, Ali; Emamian, Effat S

    2010-05-01

    Fault diagnosis engineering is a key component of modern industrial facilities and complex systems, and has gone through considerable developments in the past few decades. In this paper, the principles and concepts of molecular fault diagnosis engineering are reviewed. In this area, molecular intracellular networks are considered as complex systems that may fail to function, due to the presence of some faulty molecules. Dysfunction of the system due to the presence of a single or multiple molecules can ultimately lead to the transition from the normal state to the disease state. It is the goal of molecular fault diagnosis engineering to identify the critical components of molecular networks, i.e., those whose dysfunction can interrupt the function of the entire network. The results of the fault analysis of several signaling networks are discussed, and possible connections of the findings with some complex human diseases are examined. Implications of molecular fault diagnosis engineering for target discovery and drug development are outlined as well.

  15. The dynamics of Rho GTPase signaling and implications for targeting cancer and the tumor microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Pajic, Marina; Herrmann, David; Vennin, Claire; Conway, James RW; Chin, Venessa T; Johnsson, Anna-Karin E; Welch, Heidi CE; Timpson, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Numerous large scale genomics studies have demonstrated that cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, characterized by acquired changes in the structure and DNA sequence of tumor genomes. More recently, the role of the equally complex tumor microenvironment in driving the aggressiveness of this disease is increasingly being realized. Tumor cells are surrounded by activated stroma, creating a dynamic environment that promotes cancer development, metastasis and chemoresistance. The Rho family of small GTPases plays an essential role in the regulation of cell shape, cytokinesis, cell adhesion, and cell motility. Importantly, these processes need to be considered in the context of a complex 3-dimensional (3D) environment, with reciprocal feedback and cross-talk taking place between the tumor cells and host environment. Here we discuss the role of molecular networks involving Rho GTPases in cancer, and the therapeutic implications of inhibiting Rho signaling in both cancer cells and the emerging concept of targeting the surrounding stroma. PMID:26103062

  16. Honokiol in combination with radiation targets notch signaling to inhibit colon cancer stem cells.

    PubMed

    Ponnurangam, Sivapriya; Mammen, Joshua M V; Ramalingam, Satish; He, Zhiyun; Zhang, Youcheng; Umar, Shahid; Subramaniam, Dharmalingam; Anant, Shrikant

    2012-04-01

    Cancer stem cells are implicated in resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapy. Honokiol, a biphenolic compound has been used in traditional Chinese medicine for treating various ailments. In this study, we determined the ability of honokiol to enhance the sensitivity of colon cancer stem cells to IR. The combination of honokiol and IR suppressed proliferation and colony formation while inducing apoptosis of colon cancer cells in culture. There were also reduced numbers and size of spheroids, which was coupled with reduced expression of cancer stem cell marker protein DCLK1. Flow cytometry studies confirmed that the honokiol-IR combination reduced the number of DCLK1+ cells. In addition, there were reduced levels of activated Notch-1, its ligand Jagged-1, and the downstream target gene Hes-1. Furthermore, expression of components of the Notch-1 activating γ-secretase complex, presenilin 1, nicastrin, Pen2, and APH-1 was also suppressed. On the other hand, the honokiol effects were mitigated when the Notch intracellular domain was expressed. To determine the effect of honokiol-IR combination on tumor growth in vivo, nude mice tumor xenografts were administered honokiol intraperitoneally and exposed to IR. The honokiol-IR combination significantly inhibited tumor xenograft growth. In addition, there were reduced levels of DCLK1 and the Notch signaling-related proteins in the xenograft tissues. Together, these data suggest that honokiol is a potent inhibitor of colon cancer growth that targets the stem cells by inhibiting the γ-secretase complex and the Notch signaling pathway. These studies warrant further clinical evaluation for the combination of honokiol and IR for treating colon cancers.

  17. Structural Insights Into the Recognition of Peroxisomal Targeting Signal 1 By Trypanosoma Brucei Peroxin 5

    SciTech Connect

    Sampathkumar, P.; Roach, C.; Michels, P.A.M.; Hol, W.G.J.

    2009-05-27

    Glycosomes are peroxisome-like organelles essential for trypanosomatid parasites. Glycosome biogenesis is mediated by proteins called 'peroxins,' which are considered to be promising drug targets in pathogenic Trypanosomatidae. The first step during protein translocation across the glycosomal membrane of peroxisomal targeting signal 1 (PTS1)-harboring proteins is signal recognition by the cytosolic receptor peroxin 5 (PEX5). The C-terminal PTS1 motifs interact with the PTS1 binding domain (P1BD) of PEX5, which is made up of seven tetratricopeptide repeats. Obtaining diffraction-quality crystals of the P1BD of Trypanosoma brucei PEX5 (TbPEX5) required surface entropy reduction mutagenesis. Each of the seven tetratricopeptide repeats appears to have a residue in the alpha(L) conformation in the loop connecting helices A and B. Five crystal structures of the P1BD of TbPEX5 were determined, each in complex with a hepta- or decapeptide corresponding to a natural or nonnatural PTS1 sequence. The PTS1 peptides are bound between the two subdomains of the P1BD. These structures indicate precise recognition of the C-terminal Leu of the PTS1 motif and important interactions between the PTS1 peptide main chain and up to five invariant Asn side chains of PEX5. The TbPEX5 structures reported here reveal a unique hydrophobic pocket in the subdomain interface that might be explored to obtain compounds that prevent relative motions of the subdomains and interfere selectively with PTS1 motif binding or release in trypanosomatids, and would therefore disrupt glycosome biogenesis and prevent parasite growth.

  18. CAF-1 promotes Notch signaling through epigenetic control of target gene expression during Drosophila development.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhongsheng; Wu, Honggang; Chen, Hanqing; Wang, Ruoqi; Liang, Xuehong; Liu, Jiyong; Li, Changqing; Deng, Wu-Min; Jiao, Renjie

    2013-09-01

    The histone chaperone CAF-1 is known for its role in DNA replication-coupled histone deposition. However, loss of function causes lethality only in higher multicellular organisms such as mice and flies, but not in unicellular organisms such as yeasts, suggesting that CAF-1 has other important functions than histone deposition during animal development. Emerging evidence indicates that CAF-1 also has a role in higher order chromatin organization and heterochromatin-mediated gene expression; it remains unclear whether CAF-1 has a role in specific signaling cascades to promote gene expression during development. Here, we report that knockdown of one of the subunits of Drosophila CAF-1, dCAF-1-p105 (Caf1-105), results in phenotypes that resemble those of, and are augmented synergistically by, mutations of Notch positive regulatory pathway components. Depletion of dCAF-1-p105 leads to abrogation of cut expression and to downregulation of other Notch target genes in wing imaginal discs. dCAF-1-p105 is associated with Suppressor of Hairless [Su(H)] and regulates its binding to the enhancer region of E(spl)mβ. The association of dCAF-1-p105 with Su(H) on chromatin establishes an active local chromatin status for transcription by maintaining a high level of histone H4 acetylation. In response to induced Notch activation, dCAF-1 associates with the Notch intracellular domain to activate the expression of Notch target genes in cultured S2 cells, manifesting the role of dCAF-1 in Notch signaling. Together, our results reveal a novel epigenetic function of dCAF-1 in promoting Notch pathway activity that regulates normal Drosophila development.

  19. Adult brightness vs. luminance as models of infant photometry: variability, biasability, and spectral characteristics for the two age groups favor the luminance model.

    PubMed

    Teller, Davida Y; Pereverzeva, Maria; Civan, Andrea L

    2003-01-01

    When infants fail to make chromatic discriminations, do the characteristics of their performance minima coincide more closely with the properties of adult luminance matches or heterochromatic brightness matches? In addition to their spectral properties, adult luminance matches are typically characterized by relatively small individual differences, whereas brightness matches are believed to be both more variable and more biasable. Two complementary experiments were carried out on adults and 8-week-old infant subjects. Both groups were tested with small (1.5 degrees to 4 degrees ) red and blue test fields of varying luminances, embedded in a white surround. In adults, heterochromatic brightness matches were measured. Individual differences spanned about 0.5 log units, and brightness matches could be biased by as much as 0.8 log units by varying the range of test field luminances. In infants, the locations of performance minima were measured. Individual differences spanned less than 0.1 log units, the mean performance minima coincided with predictions based on V10(lambda), and the location of the performance minimum was nearly unaffected by the range of test field luminances used. Thus by all three criteria, these data suggest that infants' performance minima are mediated by luminance rather than by brightness signals. To date there remains no evidence that the infant visual system computes a brightness signal.

  20. Targeting protein-protein interactions within the cyclic AMP signaling system as a therapeutic strategy for cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Louisa C Y; Maurice, Donald H; Baillie, George S

    2013-03-01

    The cAMP signaling system can trigger precise physiological cellular responses that depend on the fidelity of many protein-protein interactions, which act to bring together signaling intermediates at defined locations within cells. In the heart, cAMP participates in the fine control of excitation-contraction coupling, hence, any disregulation of this signaling cascade can lead to cardiac disease. Due to the ubiquitous nature of the cAMP pathway, general inhibitors of cAMP signaling proteins such as PKA, EPAC and PDEs would act non-specifically and universally, increasing the likelihood of serious 'off target' effects. Recent advances in the discovery of peptides and small molecules that disrupt the protein-protein interactions that underpin cellular targeting of cAMP signaling proteins are described and discussed.

  1. Potassium selectivity of frog gastric luminal membrane.

    PubMed

    Kasbekar, D K

    1986-06-01

    Transmural potential difference (PD) and resistance (R) changes after luminal or serosal instillation of K+ were determined under various conditions in chambered preparations of frog gastric mucosae. Potassium selectivity of the luminal membrane is indicated by the rapid reversal of the inverted PD of mucosae bathed in NaCl-free, choline sulfate (Ch2SO4)-Ringer on the serosal side and unbuffered hypertonic Ch2SO4 solution on the luminal side on luminal K+ instillation. The delta PD responses are significantly attenuated, however, in histamine-stimulated mucosae bathed in hypotonic or in burimamide-inhibited mucosae bathed in hyper- and hypotonic luminal media, which suggests that the K+ selectivity of the luminal membrane resides largely in the tubular cell apical membrane. Imposing a serosal-to-luminal transmucosal K+ gradient in both histamine-stimulated and omeprazole-inhibited mucosae also reversed the normal orientation of PD but not in those inhibited with burimamide. In the latter, the PD inversion was attenuated but maintained its normal orientation. These data suggest that burimamide, but not omeprazole, acts by blocking luminal membrane K+ conductance. The inverted PD in mucosae bathed in Cl-free media may thus be due partially or fully to K+ diffusion driven by the cell-to-lumen K+ gradient via the luminal K+ conductance pathway. These findings have implications for the controversy surrounding the postulated electrogenicity of the gastric proton pump.

  2. The Potential of Vitamin D-Regulated Intracellular Signaling Pathways as Targets for Myeloid Leukemia Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Studzinski, George P.

    2015-01-01

    The current standard regimens for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are curative in less than half of patients; therefore, there is a great need for innovative new approaches to this problem. One approach is to target new treatments to the pathways that are instrumental to cell growth and survival with drugs that are less harmful to normal cells than to neoplastic cells. In this review, we focus on the MAPK family of signaling pathways and those that are known to, or potentially can, interact with MAPKs, such as PI3K/AKT/FOXO and JAK/STAT. We exemplify the recent studies in this field with specific relevance to vitamin D and its derivatives, since they have featured prominently in recent scientific literature as having anti-cancer properties. Since microRNAs also are known to be regulated by activated vitamin D, this is also briefly discussed here, as are the implications of the emerging acquisition of transcriptosome data and potentiation of the biological effects of vitamin D by other compounds. While there are ongoing clinical trials of various compounds that affect signaling pathways, more studies are needed to establish the clinical utility of vitamin D in the treatment of cancer. PMID:26239344

  3. Resveratrol suppresses human hepatocellular carcinoma via targeting HGF-c-Met signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Gao, Feng; Deng, Gang; Liu, Wenbin; Zhou, Kechao; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Resveratrol, one of the major polyphenols found in red wine, is suggested to have a role as a chemo-prevention or chemotherapy agent in various human cancer models. Herein, we report that resveratrol has a profound antitumor effect on human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cells by down-regulation of the HGF-c-Met signaling pathway. Resveratrol inhibited anchorage-dependent and -independent growth of HCC cells in a dose-dependent manner. Short-term resveratrol exposure substantially decreased HGF-induced c-Met signaling pathway activation, and long-term exposure to resveratrol markedly inhibited c-Met expression on the cell membrane. Additionally, resveratrol suppressed HGF-induced cell invasion, and knockdown of c-Met decreased the sensitivity of HCC cells to resveratrol treatment. Finally, the antitumor activity of resveratrol was validated in xenograft model and resveratrol prominently restrained tumor growth in vivo. In summary, our results suggested that c-Met offers a candidate molecular target for hepatocellular carcinoma management.

  4. A sequential multi-target Mps1 phosphorylation cascade promotes spindle checkpoint signaling

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Zhejian; Gao, Haishan; Jia, Luying; Li, Bing; Yu, Hongtao

    2017-01-01

    The master spindle checkpoint kinase Mps1 senses kinetochore-microtubule attachment and promotes checkpoint signaling to ensure accurate chromosome segregation. The kinetochore scaffold Knl1, when phosphorylated by Mps1, recruits checkpoint complexes Bub1–Bub3 and BubR1–Bub3 to unattached kinetochores. Active checkpoint signaling ultimately enhances the assembly of the mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) consisting of BubR1–Bub3, Mad2, and Cdc20, which inhibits the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome bound to Cdc20 (APC/CCdc20) to delay anaphase onset. Using in vitro reconstitution, we show that Mps1 promotes APC/C inhibition by MCC components through phosphorylating Bub1 and Mad1. Phosphorylated Bub1 binds to Mad1–Mad2. Phosphorylated Mad1 directly interacts with Cdc20. Mutations of Mps1 phosphorylation sites in Bub1 or Mad1 abrogate the spindle checkpoint in human cells. Therefore, Mps1 promotes checkpoint activation through sequentially phosphorylating Knl1, Bub1, and Mad1. This sequential multi-target phosphorylation cascade makes the checkpoint highly responsive to Mps1 and to kinetochore-microtubule attachment. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22513.001 PMID:28072388

  5. ATP as a multi-target danger signal in the brain

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Ricardo J.; Tomé, Angelo R.; Cunha, Rodrigo A.

    2015-01-01

    ATP is released in an activity-dependent manner from different cell types in the brain, fulfilling different roles as a neurotransmitter, neuromodulator, in astrocyte-to-neuron communication, propagating astrocytic responses and formatting microglia responses. This involves the activation of different ATP P2 receptors (P2R) as well as adenosine receptors upon extracellular ATP catabolism by ecto-nucleotidases. Notably, brain noxious stimuli trigger a sustained increase of extracellular ATP, which plays a key role as danger signal in the brain. This involves a combined action of extracellular ATP in different cell types, namely increasing the susceptibility of neurons to damage, promoting astrogliosis and recruiting and formatting microglia to mount neuroinflammatory responses. Such actions involve the activation of different receptors, as heralded by neuroprotective effects resulting from blockade mainly of P2X7R, P2Y1R and adenosine A2A receptors (A2AR), which hierarchy, cooperation and/or redundancy is still not resolved. These pleiotropic functions of ATP as a danger signal in brain damage prompt a therapeutic interest to multi-target different purinergic receptors to provide maximal opportunities for neuroprotection. PMID:25972780

  6. Inhibition of target of rapamycin signaling by rapamycin in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Crespo, José L; Díaz-Troya, Sandra; Florencio, Francisco J

    2005-12-01

    The macrolide rapamycin specifically binds the 12-kD FK506-binding protein (FKBP12), and this complex potently inhibits the target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase. The identification of TOR in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) revealed that TOR is conserved in photosynthetic eukaryotes. However, research on TOR signaling in plants has been hampered by the natural resistance of plants to rapamycin. Here, we report TOR inactivation by rapamycin treatment in a photosynthetic organism. We identified and characterized TOR and FKBP12 homologs in the unicellular green alga Chlamydomonas reinhardtii. Whereas growth of wild-type Chlamydomonas cells is sensitive to rapamycin, cells lacking FKBP12 are fully resistant to the drug, indicating that this protein mediates rapamycin action to inhibit cell growth. Unlike its plant homolog, Chlamydomonas FKBP12 exhibits high affinity to rapamycin in vivo, which was increased by mutation of conserved residues in the drug-binding pocket. Furthermore, pull-down assays demonstrated that TOR binds FKBP12 in the presence of rapamycin. Finally, rapamycin treatment resulted in a pronounced increase of vacuole size that resembled autophagic-like processes. Thus, our findings suggest that Chlamydomonas cell growth is positively controlled by a conserved TOR kinase and establish this unicellular alga as a useful model system for studying TOR signaling in photosynthetic eukaryotes.

  7. Targeting the cis-dimerization of LINGO-1 with low MW compounds affects its downstream signalling

    PubMed Central

    Cobret, L; De Tauzia, M L; Ferent, J; Traiffort, E; Hénaoui, I; Godin, F; Kellenberger, E; Rognan, D; Pantel, J; Bénédetti, H; Morisset-Lopez, S

    2015-01-01

    Background and Purpose The transmembrane protein LINGO-1 is a negative regulator in the nervous system mainly affecting axonal regeneration, neuronal survival, oligodendrocyte differentiation and myelination. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating its functions are poorly understood. In the present study, we investigated the formation and the role of LINGO-1 cis-dimers in the regulation of its biological activity. Experimental Approach LINGO-1 homodimers were identified in both HEK293 and SH-SY5Y cells using co-immunoprecipitation experiments and BRET saturation analysis. We performed a hypothesis-driven screen for identification of small-molecule protein–protein interaction modulators of LINGO-1 using a BRET-based assay, adapted for screening. The compound identified was further assessed for effects on LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways using Western blotting analysis and AlphaScreen technology. Key Results LINGO-1 was present as homodimers in primary neuronal cultures. LINGO-1 interacted homotypically in cis-orientation and LINGO-1 cis-dimers were formed early during LINGO-1 biosynthesis. A BRET-based assay allowed us to identify phenoxybenzamine as the first conformational modulator of LINGO-1 dimers. In HEK-293 cells, phenoxybenzamine was a positive modulator of LINGO-1 function, increasing the LINGO-1-mediated inhibition of EGF receptor signalling and Erk phosphorylation. Conclusions and Implications Our data suggest that LINGO-1 forms constitutive cis-dimers at the plasma membrane and that low MW compounds affecting the conformational state of these dimers can regulate LINGO-1 downstream signalling pathways. We propose that targeting the LINGO-1 dimerization interface opens a new pharmacological approach to the modulation of its function and provides a new strategy for drug discovery. PMID:25257685

  8. Oncogenic role and therapeutic target of leptin signaling in breast cancer and cancer stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Shanchun; Liu, Mingli; Wang, Guangdi; Torroella-Kouri, Marta; Gonzalez-Perez, Ruben R.

    2012-01-01

    Significant correlations between obesity and incidence of various cancers have been reported. Obesity, considered a mild inflammatory process, is characterized by a high level of secretion of several cytokines from adipose tissue. These molecules have disparate effects, which could be relevant to cancer development. Among the inflammatory molecules, leptin, mainly produced by adipose tissue and overexpressed with its receptor (Ob-R) in cancer cells is the most studied adipokine. Mutations of leptin or Ob-R genes associated with obesity or cancer are rarely found. However, leptin is an anti-apoptotic molecule in many cell types, and its central roles in obesity-related cancers are based on its pro-angiogenic, pro-inflammatory and mitogenic actions. Notably, these leptin actions are commonly reinforced through entangled crosstalk with multiple oncogenes, cytokines and growth factors. Leptin-induced signals comprise several pathways commonly triggered by many cytokines (i.e, canonical: JAK2/STAT; MAPK/ERK1/2 and PI-3K/AKT1 and, non-canonical signaling pathways: PKC, JNK and p38 MAP kinase). Each of these leptin-induced signals is essential to its biological effects on food intake, energy balance, adiposity, immune and endocrine systems, as well as oncogenesis. This review is mainly focused on the current knowledge of the oncogenic role of leptin in breast cancer. Additionally, leptin pro-angiogenic molecular mechanisms and its potential role in breast cancer stem cells will be reviewed. Strict biunivocal binding-affinity and activation of leptin/Ob-R complex makes it a unique molecular target for prevention and treatment of breast cancer, particularly in obesity contexts. PMID:22289780

  9. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Ruifeng; Li, Aiqing; Cho, Hee-yeon; Lee, Boyoung; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-01-01

    Inducible gene expression appears to be an essential event that couples light to entrainment of the master mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Recently, we reported that light triggers phase-dependent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, a major regulator of protein synthesis, in the SCN, thus raising the possibility that mTOR-evoked mRNA translation contributes to clock entrainment. Here, we employed a combination of cellular, molecular and behavioral assays to address this question. To this end, we show that the in vivo infusion of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin led to a significant attenuation of the phase-delaying effect of early night light. Conversely, disruption of mTOR during the late night augmented the phase-advancing effect of light. To assess the role of mTOR signaling within the context of molecular entrainment, the effects of rapamycin on light-induced expression of PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 were examined. At both the early and late night time points, abrogation of mTOR signaling led to a significant attenuation of light-evoked PERIOD protein expression. Our results also reveal that light-induced mTOR activation leads to translation of mRNAs with a 5′-terminal oligopyrimidine tract such as eukaryotic elongation factor 1 A (eEF1A) and the immediate early gene JunB. Together, these data indicate that the mTOR pathway functions as potent and selective regulator of light-evoked protein translation and SCN clock entrainment. PMID:20445056

  10. Mammalian target of rapamycin signaling modulates photic entrainment of the suprachiasmatic circadian clock.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ruifeng; Li, Aiqing; Cho, Hee-yeon; Lee, Boyoung; Obrietan, Karl

    2010-05-05

    Inducible gene expression appears to be an essential event that couples light to entrainment of the master mammalian circadian clock located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus. Recently, we reported that light triggers phase-dependent activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, a major regulator of protein synthesis, in the SCN, thus raising the possibility that mTOR-evoked mRNA translation contributes to clock entrainment. Here, we used a combination of cellular, molecular, and behavioral assays to address this question. To this end, we show that the in vivo infusion of the mTOR inhibitor rapamycin led to a significant attenuation of the phase-delaying effect of early-night light. Conversely, disruption of mTOR during the late night augmented the phase-advancing effect of light. To assess the role of mTOR signaling within the context of molecular entrainment, the effects of rapamycin on light-induced expression of PERIOD1 and PERIOD2 were examined. At both the early- and late-night time points, abrogation of mTOR signaling led to a significant attenuation of light-evoked PERIOD protein expression. Our results also reveal that light-induced mTOR activation leads to the translation of mRNAs with a 5'-terminal oligopyrimidine tract such as eukaryotic elongation factor 1A and the immediate early gene JunB. Together, these data indicate that the mTOR pathway functions as potent and selective regulator of light-evoked protein translation and SCN clock entrainment.

  11. Structural Basis for Conserved Regulation and Adaptation of the Signal Recognition Particle Targeting Complex.

    PubMed

    Wild, Klemens; Bange, Gert; Motiejunas, Domantas; Kribelbauer, Judith; Hendricks, Astrid; Segnitz, Bernd; Wade, Rebecca C; Sinning, Irmgard

    2016-07-17

    The signal recognition particle (SRP) is a ribonucleoprotein complex with a key role in targeting and insertion of membrane proteins. The two SRP GTPases, SRP54 (Ffh in bacteria) and FtsY (SRα in eukaryotes), form the core of the targeting complex (TC) regulating the SRP cycle. The architecture of the TC and its stimulation by RNA has been described for the bacterial SRP system while this information is lacking for other domains of life. Here, we present the crystal structures of the GTPase heterodimers of archaeal (Sulfolobus solfataricus), eukaryotic (Homo sapiens), and chloroplast (Arabidopsis thaliana) SRP systems. The comprehensive structural comparison combined with Brownian dynamics simulations of TC formation allows for the description of the general blueprint and of specific adaptations of the quasi-symmetric heterodimer. Our work defines conserved external nucleotide-binding sites for SRP GTPase activation by RNA. Structural analyses of the GDP-bound, post-hydrolysis states reveal a conserved, magnesium-sensitive switch within the I-box. Overall, we provide a general model for SRP cycle regulation by RNA.

  12. Newcastle Disease Virus V Protein Targets Phosphorylated STAT1 to Block IFN-I Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Qiu, Xusheng; Fu, Qiang; Meng, Chunchun; Yu, Shengqing; Zhan, Yuan; Dong, Luna; Song, Cuiping; Sun, Yingjie; Tan, Lei; Hu, Shunlin; Wang, Xiaoquan; Liu, Xiaowen; Peng, Daxin; Liu, Xiufan; Ding, Chan

    2016-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) V protein is considered as an effector for IFN antagonism, however, the mechanism remains unknown. In this study, the expression of STAT1 and phospho-STAT1 in cells infected with NDV or transfected with V protein-expressing plasmids were analyzed. Our results showed that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 reduction in the cells depends on the stimulation of IFN-α. In addition, a V-deficient genotype VII recombinant NDV strain rZJ1-VS was constructed using reverse genetic technique to confirm the results. The rZJ1-VS lost the ability to reduce phospho-STAT1 and induced higher expression of IFN-responsive genes in infected cells. Furthermore, treatment with an ubiquitin E1 inhibitor PYR-41 demonstrated that phospho-STAT1 reduction was caused by degradation, but not de-phosphorylation. We conclude that NDV V protein targets phospho-STAT1 degradation to block IFN-α signaling, which adds novel knowledge to the strategies used by paramyxoviruses to evade IFN. PMID:26859759

  13. Targeting VIP and PACAP receptor signalling: new therapeutic strategies in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Yossan-Var; Waschek, James A

    2011-01-01

    MS (multiple sclerosis) is a chronic autoimmune and neurodegenerative pathology of the CNS (central nervous system) affecting approx. 2.5 million people worldwide. Current and emerging DMDs (disease-modifying drugs) predominantly target the immune system. These therapeutic agents slow progression and reduce severity at early stages of MS, but show little activity on the neurodegenerative component of the disease. As the latter determines permanent disability, there is a critical need to pursue alternative modalities. VIP (vasoactive intestinal peptide) and PACAP (pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide) have potent anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective actions, and have shown significant activity in animal inflammatory disease models including the EAE (experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis) MS model. Thus, their receptors have become candidate targets for inflammatory diseases. Here, we will discuss the immunomodulatory and neuroprotective actions of VIP and PACAP and their signalling pathways, and then extensively review the structure–activity relationship data and biophysical interaction studies of these peptides with their cognate receptors. PMID:21895607

  14. Targeting the NFκB signaling pathways for breast cancer prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Nag, Subhasree A; Zhang, Ruiwen

    2015-01-01

    The activation of nuclear factor-kappaB (NFκB), a proinflammatory transcription factor, is a commonly observed phenomenon in breast cancer. It facilitates the development of a hormone-independent, invasive, high-grade, and late-stage tumor phenotype. Moreover, the commonly used cancer chemotherapy and radiotherapy approaches activate NFκB, leading to the development of invasive breast cancers that show resistance to chemotherapy, radiotherapy, and endocrine therapy. Inhibition of NFκB results in an increase in the sensitivity of cancer cells to the apoptotic effects of chemotherapeutic agents and radiation and restoring hormone sensitivity, which is correlated with increased disease-free survival in patients with breast cancer. In this review article, we focus on the role of the NFκB signaling pathways in the development and progression of breast cancer and the validity of NFκB as a potential target for breast cancer prevention and therapy. We also discuss the recent findings that NFκB may have tumor suppressing activity in certain cancer types. Finally, this review also covers the state-of-the-art development of NFκB inhibitors for cancer therapy and prevention, the challenges in targeting validation, and pharmacology and toxicology evaluations of these agents from the bench to the bedside.

  15. Revolution in GPCR signalling: opioid receptor heteromers as novel therapeutic targets: IUPHAR review 10.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Wakako; Gomes, Ivone; Devi, Lakshmi A

    2014-09-01

    GPCRs can interact with each other to form homomers or heteromers. Homomers involve interactions with the same receptor type while heteromers involve interactions between two different GPCRs. These receptor-receptor interactions modulate not only the binding but also the signalling and trafficking properties of individual receptors. Opioid receptor heteromerization has been extensively investigated with the objective of identifying novel therapeutic targets that are as potent as morphine but without the side effects associated with chronic morphine use. In this context, studies have described heteromerization between the different types of opioid receptors and between opioid receptors and a wide range of GPCRs including adrenoceptors, cannabinoid, 5-HT, metabotropic glutamate and sensory neuron-specific receptors. Recent advances in the field involving the generation of heteromer-specific reagents (antibodies or ligands) or of membrane-permeable peptides that disrupt the heteromer interaction are helping to elucidate the physiological role of opioid receptor heteromers and the contribution of the partner receptor to the side effects associated with opioid use. For example, studies using membrane-permeable peptides targeting the heteromer interface have implicated μ and δ receptor heteromers in the development of tolerance to morphine, and heteromers of μ and gastrin-releasing peptide receptors in morphine-induced itch. In addition, a number of ligands that selectively target opioid receptor heteromers exhibit potent antinociception with a decrease in the side effects commonly associated with morphine use. In this review, we summarize the latest findings regarding the biological and functional characteristics of opioid receptor heteromers both in vitro and in vivo.

  16. Role of Akt signaling in resistance to DNA-targeted therapy

    PubMed Central

    Avan, Abolfazl; Narayan, Ravi; Giovannetti, Elisa; Peters, Godefridus J

    2016-01-01

    The Akt signal transduction pathway controls most hallmarks of cancer. Activation of the Akt cascade promotes a malignant phenotype and is also widely implicated in drug resistance. Therefore, the modulation of Akt activity is regarded as an attractive strategy to enhance the efficacy of cancer therapy and irradiation. This pathway consists of phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K), mammalian target of rapamycin, and the transforming serine-threonine kinase Akt protein isoforms, also known as protein kinase B. DNA-targeted agents, such as platinum agents, taxanes, and antimetabolites, as well as radiation have had a significant impact on cancer treatment by affecting DNA replication, which is aberrantly activated in malignancies. However, the caveat is that they may also trigger the activation of repairing mechanisms, such as upstream and downstream cascade of Akt survival pathway. Thus, each target can theoretically be inhibited in view of improving the potency of conventional treatment. Akt inhibitors, e.g., MK-2206 and perifosine, or PI3K modulators, e.g., LY294002 and Wortmannin, have shown some promising results in favor of sensitizing the cancer cells to the therapy in vitro and in vivo, which have provided the rationale for incorporation of these novel agents into multimodality treatment of different malignancies. Nevertheless, despite the acceptable safety profile of some of these agents in the clinical studies, with regard to the efficacy, the results are still too preliminary. Hence, we need to wait for the upcoming data from the ongoing trials before utilizing them into the standard care of cancer patients. PMID:27777878

  17. Targeting the p53 signaling pathway in cancer therapy - The promises, challenges, and perils

    PubMed Central

    Stegh, Alexander H.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Research over the past three decades has identified p53 as a multifunctional transcription factor, which regulates the expression of >2,500 target genes. p53 impacts myriad, highly diverse cellular processes, including the maintenance of genomic stability and fidelity, metabolism, longevity, and represents one of the most important and extensively studied tumor suppressors. Activated by various stresses, foremost genotoxic damage, hypoxia, heat shock and oncogenic assault, p53 blocks cancer progression by provoking transient or permanent growth arrest, by enabling DNA repair or by advancing cellular death programs. This potent and versatile anti-cancer activity profile, together with genomic and mutational analyses documenting inactivation of p53 in more than 50% of human cancers, motivated drug development efforts to (re-) activate p53 in established tumors. Areas covered In this review the complexities of p53 signaling in cancer are summarized. Current strategies and challenges to restore p53’s tumor suppressive function in established tumors, i.e. adenoviral gene transfer and small molecules to activate p53, to inactivate p53 inhibitors and to restore wild type function of p53 mutant proteins are discussed. Expert opinion It is indubitable that p53 represents an attractive target for the development of anti-cancer therapies. Whether p53 is ‘druggable’, however, remains an area of active research and discussion, as p53 has pro-survival functions and chronic p53 activation accelerates aging, which may compromise the long-term homeostasis of an organism. Thus, the complex biology and dual functions of p53 in cancer prevention and age-related cellular responses pose significant challenges on the development of p53-targeting cancer therapies. PMID:22239435

  18. Pharmacotherapeutic targeting of the endocannabinoid signaling system: drugs for obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Vemuri, V Kiran; Janero, David R; Makriyannis, Alexandros

    2008-03-18

    Endogenous signaling lipids ("endocannabinoids") functionally related to Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol, the psychoactive ingredient of marijuana (Cannabis), are important biomediators and metabolic regulators critical to mammalian (patho)physiology. The growing family of endocannabinoids, along with endocannabinoid biosynthetic and inactivating enzymes, transporters, and at least two membrane-bound, G-protein coupled receptors, comprise collectively the mammalian endocannabinoid signaling system. The ubiquitous and diverse regulatory actions of the endocannabinoid system in health and disease have supported the regulatory approval of natural products and synthetic agents as drugs that alter endocannabinoid-system activity. More recent data support the concept that the endocananbinoid system may be modulated for therapeutic gain at discrete pharmacological targets with safety and efficacy. Potential medications based on the endocannabinoid system have thus become a central focus of contemporary translational research for varied indications with important unmet medical needs. One such indication, obesity, is a global pandemic whose etiology has a pathogenic component of endocannabinoid-system hyperactivity and for which current pharmacological treatment is severely limited. Application of high-affinity, selective CB1 cannabinoid receptor ligands to attenuate endocannabinoid signaling represents a state-of-the-art approach for improving obesity pharmacotherapy. To this intent, several selective CB1 receptor antagonists with varied chemical structures are currently in advanced preclinical or clinical trials, and one (rimonabant) has been approved as a weight-management drug in some markets. Emerging preclinical data suggest that CB1 receptor neutral antagonists may represent breakthrough medications superior to antagonists/inverse agonists such as rimonabant for therapeutic attenuation of CB1 receptor transmission. Since obesity is a predisposing condition for the

  19. SurA Is Involved in the Targeting to the Outer Membrane of a Tat Signal Sequence-Anchored Protein

    PubMed Central

    Rondelet, Arnaud

    2012-01-01

    The twin arginine translocation (Tat) pathway exports folded proteins from the cytoplasm to the periplasm of bacteria. The targeting of the exported proteins to the Tat pathway relies on a specific amino-terminal signal sequence, which is cleaved after exportation. In the phytopathogen Dickeya dadantii, the pectin lyase homologue PnlH is exported by the Tat pathway without cleavage of its signal sequence, which anchors PnlH into the outer membrane. In proteobacteria, the vast majority of outer membrane proteins consists of β-barrel proteins and lipoproteins. Thus, PnlH represents a new kind of outer membrane protein. In Escherichia coli, periplasmic chaperones SurA, Skp, and DegP work together with the β-barrel assembly machinery (Bam) to target and insert β-barrel proteins into the outer membrane. In this work, we showed that SurA is required for an efficient targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. Moreover, we were able to detect an in vitro interaction between SurA and the PnlH signal sequence. Since the PnlH signal sequence contains a highly hydrophobic region, we propose that SurA protects it from the hydrophobic periplasm during targeting of PnlH to the outer membrane. We also studied the nature of the information carried by the PnlH signal sequence responsible for its targeting to the outer membrane after exportation by the Tat system. PMID:22961852

  20. Distinct Pathways Regulated by RET and Estrogen Receptor in Luminal Breast Cancer Demonstrate the Biological Basis for Combination Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Spanheimer, Philip M.; Cyr, Anthony R.; Gillum, Matthew P.; Woodfield, George W.; Askeland, Ryan W.; Weigel, Ronald J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives We investigated directed therapy based on TFAP2C-regulated pathways to inform new therapeutic approaches for treatment of luminal breast cancer. Background TFAP2C regulates the expression of genes characterizing the luminal phenotype including ESR1 and RET, but pathway cross talk and potential for distinct elements have not been characterized. Methods Activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and AKT was assessed using phosphorylation-specific Western blot. Cell proliferation was measured with MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] after siRNA (small interfering RNA) gene knockdown or drug treatment. Cell cycle, Ki-67, and cleaved caspase 3 were measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. Tumorigenesis was assessed in mice xenografts. Results Knockdown of TFAP2C or RET inhibited GDNF (glial cell line–derived neurotrophic factor)–mediated activation of ERK and AKT in MCF-7 cells. Similarly, sunitinib, a small-molecule inhibitor of RET, blocked GDNF-mediated activation of ERK and AKT. Inhibition of RET either by gene knockdown or by treatment with sunitinib or vandetanib reduced RET-dependent growth of luminal breast cancer cells. Interestingly, knockdown of TFAP2C, which controls both ER (estrogen receptor) and RET, demonstrated a greater effect on cell growth than either RET or ER alone. Parallel experiments using treatment with tamoxifen and sunitinib confirmed the increased effectiveness of dual inhibition of the ER and RET pathways in regulating cell growth. Whereas targeting the ER pathway altered cell proliferation, as measured by Ki-67 and S-phase, anti-RET primarily increased apoptosis, as demonstrated by cleaved caspase 3 and increased TUNEL (terminal deoxyneucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling) expression in xenografts. Conclusions ER and RET primarily function through distinct pathways regulating proliferation and cell survival, respectively. The findings inform a therapeutic

  1. Decreased LRIG1 in fulvestrant-treated luminal breast cancer cells permits ErbB3 upregulation and increased growth.

    PubMed

    Morrison, M M; Williams, M M; Vaught, D B; Hicks, D; Lim, J; McKernan, C; Aurisicchio, L; Ciliberto, G; Simion, C; Sweeney, C; Cook, R S

    2016-03-03

    ErbB3, a member of the ErbB family of receptor tyrosine kinases, is a potent activator of phosphatidyl inositol-3 kinase (PI3K) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling, driving tumor cell survival and therapeutic resistance in breast cancers. In luminal breast cancers, ErbB3 upregulation following treatment with the antiestrogen fulvestrant enhances PI3K/mTOR-mediated cell survival. However, the mechanism by which ErbB3 is upregulated in fulvestrant-treated cells is unknown. We found that ErbB3 protein levels and cell surface presentation were increased following fulvestrant treatment, focusing our attention on proteins that regulate ErbB3 at the cell surface, including Nrdp1, NEDD4 and LRIG1. Among these, only LRIG1 correlated positively with ERα, but inversely with ErbB3 in clinical breast cancer data sets. LRIG1, an estrogen-inducible ErbB downregulator, was decreased in a panel of fulvestrant-treated luminal breast cancer cells. Ectopic LRIG1 expression from an estrogen-independent promoter uncoupled LRIG1 from estrogen regulation, thus sustaining LRIG1 and maintaining low ErbB3 levels in fulvestrant-treated cells. An LRIG1 mutant lacking the ErbB3 interaction motif was insufficient to downregulate ErbB3. Importantly, LRIG1 overexpression improved fulvestrant-mediated growth inhibition, whereas cells expressing the LRIG1 mutant were poorly sensitive to fulvestrant, despite effective ERα downregulation. Consistent with these results, LRIG1 expression correlated positively with increased disease-free survival in antiestrogen-treated breast cancer patients. These data suggest that ERα-dependent expression of LRIG1 dampens ErbB3 signaling in luminal breast cancer cells, and by blocking ERα activity with fulvestrant, LRIG1 is decreased thus permitting ErbB3 accumulation, enhanced ErbB3 signaling to cell survival pathways and blunting therapeutic response to fulvestrant.

  2. [Novel signal transduction pathways: the molecular basis for targeted cancer therapies in Hedgehog/Notch/Wnt pathway].

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toshio; Nakagawa, Kazuhiko

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant activation of the Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog pathways via mutations or ligand overexpression has been implicated in a large number of cancer types where they are involved in functions ranging from tumor initiation to cancer stem cell (CSC) maintenance and angiogenesis. Agents targeting each one of these three pathways have now reached clinical trials, and the first one of these, Vismodegib, a hedgehog pathway inhibitor, was approved in 2012 by US FDA for the treatment of advanced basal cell carcinoma. Development of agents that target critical steps in these pathways as novel signal transduction pathways will be complicated by signaling cross-talk. The role that embryonic signaling pathways play in the function of CSCs, the development of new anti-CSC therapeutic agents, and the complexity of potential CSC signaling cross-talk are being explored coupled with early phase I clinical studies.

  3. Structure-based Discovery of Novel Small Molecule Wnt Signaling Inhibitors by Targeting the Cysteine-rich Domain of Frizzled*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ho-Jin; Bao, Ju; Miller, Ami; Zhang, Chi; Wu, Jibo; Baday, Yiressy C.; Guibao, Cristina; Li, Lin; Wu, Dianqing; Zheng, Jie J.

    2015-01-01

    Frizzled is the earliest discovered glycosylated Wnt protein receptor and is critical for the initiation of Wnt signaling. Antagonizing Frizzled is effective in inhibiting the growth of multiple tumor types. The extracellular N terminus of Frizzled contains a conserved cysteine-rich domain that directly interacts with Wnt ligands. Structure-based virtual screening and cell-based assays were used to identify five small molecules that can inhibit canonical Wnt signaling and have low IC50 values in the micromolar range. NMR experiments confirmed that these compounds specifically bind to the Wnt binding site on the Frizzled8 cysteine-rich domain with submicromolar dissociation constants. Our study confirms the feasibility of targeting the Frizzled cysteine-rich domain as an effective way of regulating canonical Wnt signaling. These small molecules can be further optimized into more potent therapeutic agents for regulating abnormal Wnt signaling by targeting Frizzled. PMID:26504084

  4. Effect of structure on sensing performance of a target induced signaling probe shifting DNA-based (TISPS-DNA) sensor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiang; Yu, Zhigang; Li, Fengqin; Xu, Yanmei; He, Xunjun; Xu, Lan; Shi, Wenbing; Zhang, Guiling; Yan, Hong

    2017-05-15

    A type of "signal on" displacement-based sensors named target induced signaling probe shifting DNA-based (TISPS-DNA) sensor were developed for a designated DNA detection. The signaling mechanism of the signaling probe (SP) shifting different from the classical conformation/flexibility change mode endows the sensor with high sensitivity. Through using thiolated or no thiolated capturing probe (CP), two 3-probe sensing structures, sensor-1 and sensor-2, were designed and constructed. The systematical comparing research results show that both sensors exhibit some similarities or big differences in sensing performance. On the one hand, the similarity in structures determines the similarity in some aspects of signaling mechanism, background signal, signal changing form, anti-fouling ability and versatility; on the other hand, the slight difference in structures also results in two opposite hybridization modes of gradual increasing resistance and gradual decreasing resistance which can affect the hybridization efficiency between the assistant probe (AP) and the SP, further producing some big differences in sensing performance, for example, apparently different signal enhancement (SE) change, point mutation discrimination ability and response speed. Under the optimized fabrication and detection conditions, both sensors feature high sensitivity for target DNAs with the detection limits of ∼10 fM for sensor-1 and ∼7 fM for sensor-2, respectively. Among many acquired sensing virtues, the sensor-1 shows a peculiar specificity adjustability which is also a highlight in this work.

  5. Targeting Slit-Roundabout signaling inhibits tumor angiogenesis in chemical-induced squamous cell carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Li-Jing; Zhao, Yuan; Han, Bing; Ma, Yu-Guang; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Ding-Ming; Mao, Jian-Wen; Tang, Fu-Tian; Li, Wei-Dong; Yang, Yang; Wang, Rui; Geng, Jian-Guo

    2008-03-01

    Slit is a secreted protein known to function through the Roundabout (Robo) receptor as a repellent for axon guidance and neuronal migration, and as an inhibitor in leukocyte chemotaxis. We have previously shown that Slit2 is also secreted by a variety of human cancer cells whereby it acts as a chemoattractant to vascular endothelial cells for tumor angiogenesis. We used a blocking antibody to investigate the role of Slit-Robo signaling in tumor angiogenesis during oral carcinogenesis. In this report we undertook a multistage model of 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene-induced squamous cell carcinoma in the hamster buccal pouch. R5, a monoclonal antibody against the first immunoglobulin domain of Robo1, was used to study whether R5 blocks the Slit-Robo interaction and furthermore inhibits tumor angiogenesis and growth in our model. In addition, the expression of Slit2, von Willebrand factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor were examined using human tissue of oral cheek mucosa with oral squamous cell carcinoma. Our data showed that Slit2 was expressed minimally in normal and hyperplastic mucosa, moderately in dysplastic mucosa, and highly in neoplastic mucosa obtained from hamster buccal pouch. We also found that increased Slit2 expression was associated with higher tumor angiogenesis, as reflected by increased vascular endothelial growth factor expression and microvessel density. A similar Slit2 expression profile was found in human tissue. Importantly, interruption of the Slit2-Robo interaction using R5 inhibited tumor angiogenesis and growth in our in vivo model, which indicates that Slit2-mediated tumor angiogenesis is a critical process underlying the carcinogenesis of chemical-induced squamous cell carcinoma. Therefore, targeting Slit-Robo signaling may offer a novel antiangiogenesis approach for oral cancer therapy.

  6. Galectin-3, histone deacetylases, and Hedgehog signaling: Possible convergent targets in schistosomiasis-induced liver fibrosis.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Felipe Leite; Carneiro, Katia; Brito, José Marques; Cabanel, Mariana; Pereira, Jonathas Xavier; Paiva, Ligia de Almeida; Syn, Wingkin; Henderson, Neil C; El-Cheikh, Marcia Cury

    2017-02-01

    , and Hh signaling during progressive liver fibrosis in S. mansoni-infected mice. Further studies focused on macrophage roles could elucidate these questions and clear the potential utility of these molecules as antifibrotic targets.

  7. Galectin-3, histone deacetylases, and Hedgehog signaling: Possible convergent targets in schistosomiasis-induced liver fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Felipe Leite; Carneiro, Katia; Brito, José Marques; Cabanel, Mariana; Pereira, Jonathas Xavier; Paiva, Ligia de Almeida; Syn, Wingkin; Henderson, Neil C.; El-Cheikh, Marcia Cury

    2017-01-01

    , and Hh signaling during progressive liver fibrosis in S. mansoni-infected mice. Further studies focused on macrophage roles could elucidate these questions and clear the potential utility of these molecules as antifibrotic targets. PMID:28231240

  8. Targeting mTOR and p53 signaling inhibits muscle invasive bladder cancer in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Madka, Venkateshwar; Mohammed, Altaf; Li, Qian; Zhang, Yuting; Biddick, Laura; Patlolla, Jagan M.R.; Lightfoot, Stan; Towner, Rheal A.; Wu, Xue-Ru; Steele, Vernon E.; Kopelovich, Levy; Rao, Chinthalapally V.

    2015-01-01

    Urothelial tumors, accompanied by mutations of the tumor suppressor protein TP53 and dysregulation of mTOR signaling, are frequently associated with aggressive growth and invasiveness. We investigated whether targeting these two pathways would inhibit urothelial tumor growth and progression. Six-week-old transgenic UPII-SV40T male mice (n=15/group) were fed control diet (AIN-76A) or experimental diets containing mTOR inhibitor (rapamycin, 8 or 16 ppm), p53 stabilizing agent (CP31398 [CP], 150 ppm), or a combination. Mice were euthanized at 40 weeks of age. Urinary bladders were collected and evaluated to determine tumor weight and histopathology. Each agent alone, and in combination, significantly inhibited tumor growth. Treatment with rapamycin alone decreased tumor weight up to 67% (p<0.0001). Similarly, CP showed ~77% (p<0.0001) suppression of tumor weight. The combination of low-dose rapamycin and CP led to ~83% (p<0.0001) inhibition of tumor weight. There was no significant difference in tumor weights between rapamycin and CP treatments (p>0.05). However, there was a significant difference between 8 ppm rapamycin and the combination treatment. Tumor invasion was also significantly inhibited in 53% (p<0.005) and 66% (p<0.0005) mice after 8 ppm and 16 ppm rapamycin respectively. While tumor invasion was suppressed in 73% (p<0.0001) mice when CP was combined with 8 ppm rapamycin. These results suggest that targeting two or more pathways achieve better treatment efficacy than a single-agent high-dose strategy that could increase the risk of side effects. A combination of CP and rapamycin may be a promising method of inhibiting muscle-invasive urothelial TCC. PMID:26577454

  9. Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid, inhibits tumor angiogenesis by targeting Rho GTPases and ERK signaling pathways

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Xiufeng; Yi, Tingfang; Yi, Zhengfang; Cho, Sung Gook; Qu, Weijing; Pinkaew, Decha; Fujise, Ken; Liu, Mingyao

    2009-01-01

    Morelloflavone, a biflavonoid extracted from Garcinia dulcis, has shown anti-oxidative, antiviral, and anti-inflammatory properties. However, the function and the mechanism of this compound in cancer treatment and tumor angiogenesis have not been elucidated to date. In this study, we postulated that morelloflavone might have the ability to inhibit angiogenesis, the pivotal step in tumor growth, invasiveness and metastasis. We demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-induced cell proliferation, migration, invasion, and capillary-like tube formation of primary cultured human umbilical endothelial cells (HUVECs) in a dose-dependent manner. Morelloflavone effectively inhibited microvessel sprouting of endothelial cells in the rat aortic ring assay and the formation of new blood microvessels induced by VEGF in the mouse Matrigel plug assay. Furthermore, morelloflavone inhibited tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis of prostate cancer cells (PC-3) in xenograft mouse tumor model in vivo, suggesting that morelloflavone inhibited tumorigenesis by targeting angiogenesis. To understand the underlying mechanism of morelloflavone on the inhibitory effect of tumor growth and angiogenesis, we demonstrated that morelloflavone could inhibit the activation of both RhoA and Rac1 GTPases, but have little effect on the activation of Cdc42 GTPase. Additionally, morelloflavone inhibited the phosphorylation and activation of Raf/MEK/ERK pathway kinases without affecting VEGFR2 activity. Together, our results indicate that morelloflavone exerts anti-angiogenic action by targeting the activation of Rho-GTPases and ERK signaling pathways. These findings are the first to reveal the novel functions of morelloflavone in tumor angiogenesis and its molecular basis for the anticancer action. PMID:19147565

  10. The molecular effect of metastasis suppressors on Src signaling and tumorigenesis: new therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Wensheng; Kovacevic, Zaklina; Peng, Zhihai; Jin, Runsen; Wang, Puxiongzhi; Yue, Fei; Zheng, Minhua; Huang, Michael L-H.; Jansson, Patric J.; Richardson, Vera; Kalinowski, Danuta S.; Lane, Darius J.R.; Merlot, Angelica M.; Sahni, Sumit; Richardson, Des R.

    2015-01-01

    A major problem for cancer patients is the metastasis of cancer cells from the primary tumor. This involves: (1) migration through the basement membrane; (2) dissemination via the circulatory system; and (3) invasion into a secondary site. Metastasis suppressors, by definition, inhibit metastasis at any step of the metastatic cascade. Notably, Src is a non-receptor, cytoplasmic, tyrosine kinase, which becomes aberrantly activated in many cancer-types following stimulation of plasma membrane receptors (e.g., receptor tyrosine kinases and integrins). There is evidence of a prominent role of Src in tumor progression-related events such as the epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and the development of metastasis. However, the precise molecular interactions of Src with metastasis suppressors remain unclear. Herein, we review known metastasis suppressors and summarize recent advances in understanding the mechanisms of how these proteins inhibit metastasis through modulation of Src. Particular emphasis is bestowed on the potent metastasis suppressor, N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) and its interactions with the Src signaling cascade. Recent studies demonstrated a novel mechanism through which NDRG1 plays a significant role in regulating cancer cell migration by inhibiting Src activity. Moreover, we discuss the rationale for targeting metastasis suppressor genes as a sound therapeutic modality, and we review several examples from the literature where such strategies show promise. Collectively, this review summarizes the essential interactions of metastasis suppressors with Src and their effects on progression of cancer metastasis. Moreover, interesting unresolved issues regarding these proteins as well as their potential as therapeutic targets are also discussed. PMID:26431493

  11. Survivin, a novel target of the Hedgehog/GLI signaling pathway in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Vlčková, K; Ondrušová, L; Vachtenheim, J; Réda, J; Dundr, P; Zadinová, M; Žáková, P; Poučková, P

    2016-01-01

    Survivin, an important antiapoptotic protein, is expressed in tumors, whereas in normal tissues the expression of this protein is extremely low, defining a role for survivin as a cancer gene. Survivin exhibits multifunctional activity in tumor cells. However, why survivin expression is sharply and invariably restricted to tumor tissue remains unclear. Here, we identified 11 putative consensus binding sites for GLI transcription factors in the survivin promoter and characterized the promoter activity. Inhibitors of the Hedgehog/GLI pathway, cyclopamine and GANT61, decreased the promoter activity in reporter assays. ΔNGLI2 (which lacks the repressor domain) was the most potent vector in activating the survivin promoter–reporter. Moreover, GANT61, a GLI1/2 inhibitor, repressed endogenous survivin protein and mRNA expression in most cells across a large panel of tumor cell lines. Chromatin immunoprecipitation showed GLI2 binding to the survivin promoter. The ectopic GLI2-evoked expression of endogenous survivin was observed in normal human fibroblasts. GANT61 decreased survivin level in nude mice tumors, mimicking the activity of GANT61 in cultured cells. The immunohistochemistry and double immunofluorescence of human tumors revealed a correlation between the tissue regions showing high GLI2 and survivin positivity. Thus, these results demonstrated that survivin is a classical transcriptional target of GLI2, a Hedgehog pathway signaling effector. This potentially reflects the high expression of survivin in human tumor cells. As the Hedgehog pathway is upregulated in virtually all types of cancer cells, these findings substantially contribute to the explanation of uniform survivin expression in tumors as a potential target for the development of a more effective treatment of cancers through the inhibition of GLI2 to restrain survivin activity. PMID:26775700

  12. Structural basis of focal adhesion targeting domain-mediated signaling in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mohanty, Pallavi; Bhatnagar, Sonika

    2017-02-01

    The focal adhesion targeting (FAT) domain of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) exists in monomeric closed (c) or arm exchanged (ae) dimeric state. FAT interaction with Grb2 necessitates an intermediate open (o) state that interacts with Grb2 and activates signaling pathways leading to pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Targeted molecular dynamics (TMD) simulation was carried out in order to capture the structure of the intermediate formed by opening of Helix1 (H1) from monomeric cFAT leading to the formation of monomeric aeFAT. During TMD, H1 separated from the four helices bundle of cFAT, completely unfolded and performed a full turn before folding back to a helix inclined at an acute angle to the helical bundle in aeFAT. The entire transition can be described in six distinct intermediate structural stages. The most significant correlation of H1 motion was observed with Loop3 (L3) and is the likely reason for the complete disruption of the FAT interaction with paxillin during the transition. High-affinity analogs of the paxillin LD4 region can be a promising strategy to drive the equilibrium towards cFAT, thus antagonizing FAT-Grb2 association. During transition, the overall shift in orientation of all the four helices rejects paxillin binding and approves Grb2 association. Exposure and β-turn conformation of the YENV motif (residues 925-928) in oFAT-facilitated phosphorylation and Grb2 binding. Docking, MD simulation and conservation analysis of oFAT-Grb2 complex provided insight into the structural determinants of binding and specificity. Our work provides a structural basis for pharmacological modulation of dynamic conformational changes and interactions of FAT.

  13. Functional Amyloid Signaling via the Inflammasome, Necrosome, and Signalosome: New Therapeutic Targets in Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Parry, Traci L.; Melehani, Jason H.; Ranek, Mark J.; Willis, Monte S.

    2015-01-01

    As the most common cause of death and disability, globally, heart disease remains an incompletely understood enigma. A growing number of cardiac diseases are being characterized by the presence of misfolded proteins underlying their pathophysiology, including cardiac amyloidosis and dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). At least nine precursor proteins have been implicated in the development of cardiac amyloidosis, most commonly caused by multiple myeloma light chain disease and disease-causing mutant or wildtype transthyretin (TTR). Similarly, aggregates with PSEN1 and COFILIN-2 have been identified in up to one-third of idiopathic DCM cases studied, indicating the potential predominance of misfolded proteins in heart failure. In this review, we present recent evidence linking misfolded proteins mechanistically with heart failure and present multiple lines of new therapeutic approaches that target the prevention of misfolded proteins in cardiac TTR amyloid disease. These include multiple small molecule pharmacological chaperones now in clinical trials designed specifically to support TTR folding by rational design, such as tafamidis, and chaperones previously developed for other purposes, such as doxycycline and tauroursodeoxycholic acid. Last, we present newly discovered non-pathological “functional” amyloid structures, such as the inflammasome and necrosome signaling complexes, which can be activated directly by amyloid. These may represent future targets to successfully attenuate amyloid-induced proteotoxicity in heart failure, as the inflammasome, for example, is being therapeutically inhibited experimentally in autoimmune disease. Together, these studies demonstrate multiple novel points in which new therapies may be used to primarily prevent misfolded proteins or to inhibit their downstream amyloid-mediated effectors, such as the inflammasome, to prevent proteotoxicity in heart failure. PMID:26664897

  14. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rüdiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkBshc/shc and trkCshc/shc mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkBshc/shc mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkCshc/shc mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms. PMID:11877382

  15. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rudiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkB(shc/shc) and trkC(shc/shc) mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkB(shc/shc) mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkC(shc/shc) mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  16. The relationship of visual extinction to luminance-contrast imbalances between left and right hemifield stimuli.

    PubMed

    Geeraerts, Sarah; Michiels, Karla; Lafosse, Christophe; Vandenbussche, Erik; Verfaillie, Karl

    2005-01-01

    Visual extinction was investigated in six right brain-damaged patients with left visual neglect, using a psychophysical paradigm. Orientation discrimination thresholds were determined for both left and right hemifield gratings presented either in isolation or simultaneously with a contralateral distractor grating. To minimize the influence of possible sensory-perceptual deficits, the luminances of both target and distractor gratings were chosen to be 20 times the luminances necessary to discriminate between horizontal and vertical grating orientations. When the visibility of target and distractor gratings was subjectively equalized in this way, neglect patients still showed a significant extinction effect, i.e. a significant interference of the right hemifield distractor with left hemifield orientation sensitivity. By manipulating the luminances of left and right hemifield gratings during bilateral simultaneous stimulus presentation, we demonstrated the role of luminance-contrast imbalances in eliciting visual extinction. Both decreasing the right distractor luminance and increasing the left target stimulus luminance resulted in an elimination of the observed extinction effects. These results show that not the absolute salience of one of two simultaneously presented stimuli, but the relative salience of both stimuli, is the crucial factor for inducing extinction.

  17. Circadian regulation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in the mouse suprachiasmatic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Cao, R; Anderson, F E; Jung, Y-J; Dziema, H; Obrietan, K

    2011-05-05

    Circadian (24-h) rhythms influence virtually every aspect of mammalian physiology. The main rhythm generation center is located in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) of the hypothalamus, and work over the past several years has revealed that rhythmic gene transcription and post-translational processes are central to clock timing. In addition, rhythmic translation control has also been implicated in clock timing; however the precise cell signaling pathways that drive this process are not well known. Here we report that a key translation activation cascade, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway, is under control of the circadian clock in the SCN. Using phosphorylated S6 ribosomal protein (pS6) as a marker of mTOR activity, we show that the mTOR cascade exhibits maximal activity during the subjective day, and minimal activity during the late subjective night. Importantly, expression of S6 was not altered as a function of circadian time. Rhythmic S6 phosphorylation was detected throughout the dorsoventral axis of the SCN, thus suggesting that rhythmic mTOR activity was not restricted to a subset of SCN neurons. Rather, rhythmic pS6 expression appeared to parallel the expression pattern of the clock gene period1 (per1). Using a transgenic per1 reporter gene mouse strain, we found a statistically significant cellular level correlation between pS6 and per1 gene expression over the circadian cycle. Further, photic stimulation triggered a coordinate upregulation of per1 and mTOR activation in a subset of SCN cells. Interestingly, this cellular level correlation between mTOR activity and per1 expression appears to be specific, since a similar expression profile for pS6 and per2 or c-FOS was not detected. Finally, we show that mTOR activity is downstream of the ERK/MAPK signal transduction pathway. Together these data reveal that mTOR pathway activity is under the control of the SCN clock, and suggests that mTOR signaling may contribute to distinct aspects of the

  18. Targeting of a novel Ca+2/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II is essential for extracellular signal-regulated kinase-mediated signaling in differentiated smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Marganski, William A; Gangopadhyay, Samudra S; Je, Hyun-Dong; Gallant, Cynthia; Morgan, Kathleen G

    2005-09-16

    Subcellular targeting of kinases controls their activation and access to substrates. Although Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII) is known to regulate differentiated smooth muscle cell (dSMC) contractility, the importance of targeting in this regulation is not clear. The present study investigated the function in dSMCs of a novel variant of the gamma isoform of CaMKII that contains a potential targeting sequence in its association domain (CaMKIIgamma G-2). Antisense knockdown of CaMKIIgamma G-2 inhibited extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK) activation, myosin phosphorylation, and contractile force in dSMCs. Confocal colocalization analysis revealed that in unstimulated dSMCs CaMKIIgamma G-2 is bound to a cytoskeletal scaffold consisting of interconnected vimentin intermediate filaments and cytosolic dense bodies. On activation with a depolarizing stimulus, CaMKIIgamma G-2 is released into the cytosol and subsequently targeted to cortical dense plaques. Comparison of phosphorylation and translocation time courses indicates that, after CaMKIIgamma G-2 activation, and before CaMKIIgamma G-2 translocation, vimentin is phosphorylated at a CaMKII-specific site. Differential centrifugation demonstrated that phosphorylation of vimentin in dSMCs is not sufficient to cause its disassembly, in contrast to results in cultured cells. Loading dSMCs with a decoy peptide containing the polyproline sequence within the association domain of CaMKIIgamma G-2 inhibited targeting. Furthermore, prevention of CaMKIIgamma G-2 targeting led to significant inhibition of ERK activation as well as contractility. Thus, for the first time, this study demonstrates the importance of CaMKII targeting in dSMC signaling and identifies a novel targeting function for the association domain in addition to its known role in oligomerization.

  19. Transition of target-location signaling in activity of macaque lateral intraparietal neurons during delayed-response visual search.

    PubMed

    Nishida, Satoshi; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Ogawa, Tadashi

    2014-09-15

    Neurons in the lateral intraparietal area (LIP) are involved in signaling the location of behaviorally relevant objects during visual discrimination and working memory maintenance. Although previous studies have examined these cognitive processes separately, they often appear as inseparable sequential processes in real-life situations. Little is known about how the neural representation of the target location is altered when both cognitive processes are continuously required for executing a task. We investigated this issue by recording single-unit activity from LIP of monkeys performing a delayed-response visual search task in which they were required to discriminate the target from distractors in the stimulus period, remember the location at which the extinguished target had been presented in the delay period, and make a saccade to that location in the response period. Target-location signaling was assessed using response modulations contingent on whether the target location was inside or opposite the receptive field. Although the population-averaged response modulation was consistent and changed only slightly during a trial, the across-neuron pattern of response modulations showed a marked and abrupt change around 170 ms after stimulus offset due to concurrent changes in the response modulations of a subset of LIP neurons, which manifested heterogeneous patterns of activity changes during the task. Our findings suggest that target-location signaling by the across-neuron pattern of LIP activity discretely changes after the stimulus disappearance under conditions that continuously require visual discrimination and working memory to perform a single behavioral task.

  20. Specific micro-RNA expression patterns distinguish the basal and luminal subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Andrea E.; Choi, Woonyoung; Su, Xiaoping; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David J.

    2016-01-01

    The roles of non-coding RNAs in controlling clinical and biological heterogeneity in bladder cancer remain unclear. We used TCGA's published dataset (n = 405 tumors) as a discovery cohort and created a new validation cohort to define the miRNA expression patterns in the basal and luminal molecular subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We identified 63 miRNAs by PAM, which optimally identified basal and luminal tumors. The targets of the top luminal miRNAs were activators of EMT (ZEB1, ZEB2) and basal subtype transcription (IL-6, EGFR, STAT3), whereas the targets of the top basal miRNAs were involved in adipogenesis pathways and luminal breast cancer (ERBB2, ERBB3). We also identified a 15-miRNA signature that identified stromally infiltrated basal and luminal MIBCs corresponding to the “cluster IV/immune undifferentiated/claudin-low” and “cluster II/luminal immune” subtypes identified previously, which likely contain samples with higher infiltration rates. Using the 63-miRNA signature, we accurately assigned MIBCs to the basal and luminal subtypes and confirmed that patients with basal tumors had shorter overall survival. The results strongly suggest that miRNAs contribute to the control of the gene expression patterns observed in basal and luminal MIBCs and that they can be used as biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets. PMID:27845906

  1. Specific micro-RNA expression patterns distinguish the basal and luminal subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Andrea E; Choi, Woonyoung; Su, Xiaoping; Siefker-Radtke, Arlene; Czerniak, Bogdan; Dinney, Colin; McConkey, David J

    2016-12-06

    The roles of non-coding RNAs in controlling clinical and biological heterogeneity in bladder cancer remain unclear. We used TCGA's published dataset (n = 405 tumors) as a discovery cohort and created a new validation cohort to define the miRNA expression patterns in the basal and luminal molecular subtypes of muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC). We identified 63 miRNAs by PAM, which optimally identified basal and luminal tumors. The targets of the top luminal miRNAs were activators of EMT (ZEB1, ZEB2) and basal subtype transcription (IL-6, EGFR, STAT3), whereas the targets of the top basal miRNAs were involved in adipogenesis pathways and luminal breast cancer (ERBB2, ERBB3). We also identified a 15-miRNA signature that identified stromally infiltrated basal and luminal MIBCs corresponding to the "cluster IV/immune undifferentiated/claudin-low" and "cluster II/luminal immune" subtypes identified previously, which likely contain samples with higher infiltration rates. Using the 63-miRNA signature, we accurately assigned MIBCs to the basal and luminal subtypes and confirmed that patients with basal tumors had shorter overall survival. The results strongly suggest that miRNAs contribute to the control of the gene expression patterns observed in basal and luminal MIBCs and that they can be used as biomarkers and candidate therapeutic targets.

  2. BRAF inhibitors suppress apoptosis through off-target inhibition of JNK signaling

    PubMed Central

    Vin, Harina; Ojeda, Sandra S; Ching, Grace; Leung, Marco L; Chitsazzadeh, Vida; Dwyer, David W; Adelmann, Charles H; Restrepo, Monica; Richards, Kristen N; Stewart, Larissa R; Du, Lili; Ferguson, Scarlett B; Chakravarti, Deepavali; Ehrenreiter, Karin; Baccarini, Manuela; Ruggieri, Rosamaria; Curry, Jonathan L; Kim, Kevin B; Ciurea, Ana M; Duvic, Madeleine; Prieto, Victor G; Ullrich, Stephen E; Dalby, Kevin N; Flores, Elsa R; Tsai, Kenneth Y

    2013-01-01

    Vemurafenib and dabrafenib selectively inhibit the v-Raf murine sarcoma viral oncogene homolog B1 (BRAF) kinase, resulting in high response rates and increased survival in melanoma. Approximately 22% of individuals treated with vemurafenib develop cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) during therapy. The prevailing explanation for this is drug-induced paradoxical ERK activation, resulting in hyperproliferation. Here we show an unexpected and novel effect of vemurafenib/PLX4720 in suppressing apoptosis through the inhibition of multiple off-target kinases upstream of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), principally ZAK. JNK signaling is suppressed in multiple contexts, including in cSCC of vemurafenib-treated patients, as well as in mice. Expression of a mutant ZAK that cannot be inhibited reverses the suppression of JNK activation and apoptosis. Our results implicate suppression of JNK-dependent apoptosis as a significant, independent mechanism that cooperates with paradoxical ERK activation to induce cSCC, suggesting broad implications for understanding toxicities associated with BRAF inhibitors and for their use in combination therapies. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.00969.001 PMID:24192036

  3. Control of CREB expression in tumors: from molecular mechanisms and signal transduction pathways to therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Steven, André; Seliger, Barbara

    2016-01-01

    The cyclic AMP response element binding (CREB) protein has pleiotropic activities in physiologic processes. Due to its central position downstream of many growth signaling pathways CREB has the ability to influence cell survival, growth and differentiation of normal, but also of tumor cells suggesting an oncogenic potential of CREB. Indeed, increased CREB expression and activation is associated with tumor progression, chemotherapy resistance and reduced patients' survival. We summarize here the different cellular functions of CREB in tumors of distinct histology as well as its use as potential prognostic marker. In addition, the underlying molecular mechanisms to achieve constitutive activation of CREB including structural alterations, such as gene amplification and chromosomal translocation, and deregulation, which could occur at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational level, will be described. Since downregulation of CREB by different strategies resulted in inhibition of cell proliferation, invasion and induction of apoptosis, the role of CREB as a promising target for cancer therapy will be also discussed. PMID:26934558

  4. The flavonoid fisetin as an anticancer agent targeting the growth signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Rengarajan, Thamaraiselvan; Yaacob, Nik Soriani

    2016-10-15

    Epidemiological studies show that consumption of diets rich in fruits and vegetables is associated with lower risks of cancer. This evidence has kindled interest into research on bioactive food components and has till date resulted in the identification of many compounds with cancer preventive and therapeutic potential. Among such compounds is fisetin (3,7,3,4-tetrahydroxyflavone), a flavonol that is commonly found in many fruits and vegetables such as apples, persimmons, grapes, kiwis, strawberries, onions and cucumbers. Fisetin has been shown to inhibit or retard the growth of various cancer cells in culture and implanted tumors in vivo. Fisetin targets many components of intracellular signaling pathways including regulators of cell survival and apoptosis, tumor angiogenic and metastatic switches by modulating a distinct set of upstream kinases, transcription factors and their regulators. Current evidence supports the idea that fisetin is a promising agent for cancer treatment. This review summarizes reported anticancer effects of fisetin, and re-emphasizes its potential therapeutic role in the treatment of cancer.

  5. The marine fungal metabolite, AD0157, inhibits angiogenesis by targeting the Akt signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    García-Caballero, Melissa; Cañedo, Librada; Fernández-Medarde, Antonio; Medina, Miguel Ángel; Quesada, Ana R

    2014-01-16

    In the course of a screening program for the inhibitors of angiogenesis from marine sources, AD0157, a pyrrolidinedione fungal metabolite, was selected for its angiosupressive properties. AD0157 inhibited the growth of endothelial and tumor cells in culture in the micromolar range. Our results show that subtoxic doses of this compound inhibit certain functions of endothelial cells, namely, differentiation, migration and proteolytic capability. Inhibition of the mentioned essential steps of in vitro angiogenesis is in agreement with the observed antiangiogenic activity, substantiated by using two in vivo angiogenesis models, the chorioallantoic membrane and the zebrafish embryo neovascularization assays, and by the ex vivo mouse aortic ring assay. Our data indicate that AD0157 induces apoptosis in endothelial cells through chromatin condensation, DNA fragmentation, increases in the subG1 peak and caspase activation. The data shown here altogether indicate for the first time that AD0157 displays antiangiogenic effects, both in vitro and in vivo, that are exerted partly by targeting the Akt signaling pathway in activated endothelial cells. The fact that these effects are carried out at lower concentrations than those required for other inhibitors of angiogenesis makes AD0157 a new promising drug candidate for further evaluation in the treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related pathologies.

  6. Hypothalamic Leptin and Ghrelin Signaling as Targets for Improvement in Metabolic Control.

    PubMed

    Frago, Laura M; Chowen, Julie A

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic homeostasis requires a tight balance between energy intake and energy expenditure; hence, the physiological circuits implicated in the regulation of energy metabolism must be able to quickly adjust to changes in either side of the equation. Circulating orexigenic and anorexigenic factors, including ghrelin and leptin, are produced in the gastrointestinal tract and adipose tissue, respectively, in relation to an individual's nutritional status. These signals interact with central metabolic circuits to regulate the production and secretion of neuropeptides implicated in the control of appetite and energy expenditure. However, this physiological equilibrium can be perturbed by diverse processes, with weight gain occurring due to a positive energy balance and weight loss taking place if there is a negative energy balance. If a situation of positive energy balance continues for an extended period of time, excess weight is accumulated and this can eventually result in obesity. Obesity has become one of the most important health problems facing the industrialized world, indicating that metabolic equilibrium is frequently disrupted. Understanding how and why this occurs will allow new therapeutical targets to be identified.

  7. Target of rapamycin signaling regulates metabolism, growth, and life span in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Ren, Maozhi; Venglat, Prakash; Qiu, Shuqing; Feng, Li; Cao, Yongguo; Wang, Edwin; Xiang, Daoquan; Wang, Jinghe; Alexander, Danny; Chalivendra, Subbaiah; Logan, David; Mattoo, Autar; Selvaraj, Gopalan; Datla, Raju

    2012-12-01

    Target of Rapamycin (TOR) is a major nutrition and energy sensor that regulates growth and life span in yeast and animals. In plants, growth and life span are intertwined not only with nutrient acquisition from the soil and nutrition generation via photosynthesis but also with their unique modes of development and differentiation. How TOR functions in these processes has not yet been determined. To gain further insights, rapamycin-sensitive transgenic Arabidopsis thaliana lines (BP12) expressing yeast FK506 Binding Protein12 were developed. Inhibition of TOR in BP12 plants by rapamycin resulted in slower overall root, leaf, and shoot growth and development leading to poor nutrient uptake and light energy utilization. Experimental limitation of nutrient availability and light energy supply in wild-type Arabidopsis produced phenotypes observed with TOR knockdown plants, indicating a link between TOR signaling and nutrition/light energy status. Genetic and physiological studies together with RNA sequencing and metabolite analysis of TOR-suppressed lines revealed that TOR regulates development and life span in Arabidopsis by restructuring cell growth, carbon and nitrogen metabolism, gene expression, and rRNA and protein synthesis. Gain- and loss-of-function Ribosomal Protein S6 (RPS6) mutants additionally show that TOR function involves RPS6-mediated nutrition and light-dependent growth and life span in Arabidopsis.

  8. GSK621 Targets Glioma Cells via Activating AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Signalings

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Hong; Liu, Wei; Zhan, Shi-Kun; Pan, Yi-Xin; Bian, Liu-Guan; Sun, Bomin; Sun, Qing-Fang; Pan, Si-Jian

    2016-01-01

    Here, we studied the anti-glioma cell activity by a novel AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activator GSK621. We showed that GSK621 was cytotoxic to human glioma cells (U87MG and U251MG lines), possibly via provoking caspase-dependent apoptotic cell death. Its cytotoxicity was alleviated by caspase inhibitors. GSK621 activated AMPK to inhibit mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and downregulate Tetraspanin 8 (Tspan8) in glioma cells. AMPK inhibition, through shRNA knockdown of AMPKα or introduction of a dominant negative (T172A) AMPKα, almost reversed GSK621-induced AMPK activation, mTOR inhibition and Tspan8 degradation. Consequently, GSK621’s cytotoxicity in glioma cells was also significantly attenuated by AMPKα knockdown or mutation. Further studies showed that GSK621, at a relatively low concentration, significantly potentiated temozolomide (TMZ)’s sensitivity and lethality against glioma cells. We summarized that GSK621 inhibits human glioma cells possibly via activating AMPK signaling. This novel AMPK activator could be a novel and promising anti-glioma cell agent. PMID:27532105

  9. Targeting midkine and pleiotrophin signalling pathways in addiction and neurodegenerative disorders: recent progress and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Herradón, G; Pérez-García, C

    2014-01-01

    Midkine (MK) and pleiotrophin (PTN) are two neurotrophic factors that are highly up-regulated in different brain regions after the administration of various drugs of abuse and in degenerative areas of the brain. A deficiency in both MK and PTN has been suggested to be an important genetic factor, which confers vulnerability to the development of the neurodegenerative disorders associated with drugs of abuse in humans. In this review, evidence demonstrating that MK and PTN limit the rewarding effects of drugs of abuse and, potentially, prevent drug relapse is compiled. There is also convincing evidence that MK and PTN have neuroprotective effects against the neurotoxicity and development of neurodegenerative disorders induced by drugs of abuse. Exogenous administration of MK and/or PTN into the CNS by means of non-invasive methods is proposed as a novel therapeutic strategy for addictive and neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of new molecular targets downstream of the MK and PTN signalling pathways or pharmacological modulation of those already known may also provide a more traditional, but probably effective, therapeutic strategy for treating addictive and neurodegenerative disorders. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:23889475

  10. Notch signalling in adult neurons: a potential target for microtubule stabilization.

    PubMed

    Bonini, Sara Anna; Ferrari-Toninelli, Giulia; Montinaro, Mery; Memo, Maurizio

    2013-11-01

    Cytoskeletal dysfunction has been proposed during the last decade as one of the main mechanisms involved in the aetiology of several neurodegenerative diseases. Microtubules are basic elements of the cytoskeleton and the dysregulation of microtubule stability has been demonstrated to be causative for axonal transport impairment, synaptic contact degeneration, impaired neuronal function leading finally to neuronal loss. Several pathways are implicated in the microtubule assembly/disassembly process. Emerging evidence is focusing on Notch as a microtubule dynamics regulator. We demonstrated that activation of Notch signalling results in increased microtubule stability and changes in axonal morphology and branching. By contrast, Notch inhibition leads to an increase in cytoskeleton plasticity with intense neurite remodelling. Until now, several microtubule-binding compounds have been tested and the results have provided proof of concept that microtubule-binding agents or compounds with the ability to stabilize microtubules may have therapeutic potential for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease and other neurodegenerative diseases. In this review, based on its key role in cytoskeletal dynamics modulation, we propose Notch as a new potential target for microtubule stabilization.

  11. Targeting oncogenic interleukin-7 receptor signalling with N-acetylcysteine in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Marc R; Reed, Casie; Eisenberg, Amy R; Tseng, Jen-Chieh; Twizere, Jean-Claude; Daakour, Sarah; Yoda, Akinori; Rodig, Scott J; Tal, Noa; Shochat, Chen; Berezovskaya, Alla; DeAngelo, Daniel J; Sallan, Stephen E; Weinstock, David M; Izraeli, Shai; Kung, Andrew L; Kentsis, Alex; Look, A Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Activating mutations of the interleukin-7 receptor (IL7R) occur in approximately 10% of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (T-ALL). Most mutations generate a cysteine at the transmembrane domain leading to receptor homodimerization through disulfide bond formation and ligand-independent activation of STAT5. We hypothesized that the reducing agent N-acetylcysteine (NAC), a well-tolerated drug used widely in clinical practice to treat acetaminophen overdose, would reduce disulfide bond formation, and inhibit mutant IL7R-mediated oncogenic signalling. We found that treatment with NAC disrupted IL7R homodimerization in IL7R-mutant DND-41 cells as assessed by non-reducing Western blot, as well as in a luciferase complementation assay. NAC led to STAT5 dephosphorylation and cell apoptosis at clinically achievable concentrations in DND-41 cells, and Ba/F3 cells transformed by an IL7R-mutant construct containing a cysteine insertion. The apoptotic effects of NAC could be rescued in part by a constitutively active allele of STAT5. Despite using doses lower than those tolerated in humans, NAC treatment significantly inhibited the progression of human DND-41 cells engrafted in immunodeficient mice. Thus, targeting leukaemogenic IL7R homodimerization with NAC offers a potentially effective and feasible therapeutic strategy that warrants testing in patients with T-ALL.

  12. Moderately luminous Type II supernovae

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inserra, C.; Pastorello, A.; Turatto, M.; Pumo, M. L.; Benetti, S.; Cappellaro, E.; Botticella, M. T.; Bufano, F.; Elias-Rosa, N.; Harutyunyan, A.; Taubenberger, S.; Valenti, S.; Zampieri, L.

    2013-07-01

    Context. Core-collapse Supernovae (CC-SNe) descend from progenitors more massive than about 8 M⊙. Because of the young age of the progenitors, the ejecta may eventually interact with the circumstellar medium (CSM) via highly energetic processes detectable in the radio, X-ray, ultraviolet (UV) and, sometimes, in the optical domains. Aims: In this paper we present ultraviolet, optical and near infrared observations of five Type II SNe, namely SNe 2009dd, 2007pk, 2010aj, 1995ad, and 1996W. Together with few other SNe they form a group of moderately luminous Type II events. We investigate the photometric similarities and differences among these bright objects. We also attempt to characterise them by analysing the spectral evolutions, in order to find some traces of CSM-ejecta interaction. Methods: We collected photometry and spectroscopy with several telescopes in order to construct well-sampled light curves and spectral evolutions from the photospheric to the nebular phases. Both photometry and spectroscopy indicate a degree of heterogeneity in this sample. Modelling the data of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad allows us to constrain the explosion parameters and the properties of the progenitor stars. Results: The light curves have luminous peak magnitudes (-16.95 < MB < -18.70). The ejected masses of 56Ni for three SNe span a wide range of values (2.8 × 10-2 M⊙ < M(56Ni)< 1.4 × 10-1 M⊙), while for a fourth (SN 2010aj) we could determine a stringent upper limit (7 × 10-3 M⊙). Clues of interaction, such as the presence of high velocity (HV) features of the Balmer lines, are visible in the photospheric spectra of SNe 2009dd and 1996W. For SN 2007pk we observe a spectral transition from a Type IIn to a standard Type II SN. Modelling the observations of SNe 2009dd, 2010aj and 1995ad with radiation hydrodynamics codes, we infer kinetic plus thermal energies of about 0.2-0.5 foe, initial radii of 2-5 × 1013 cm and ejected masses of ~5.0-9.5 M⊙. Conclusions: These

  13. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1993-01-01

    This report describes research activities related to the Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS) sky survey. About 745 luminous stars were examined for the presence of interstellar dust heated by a nearby star. The 'cirrus' discovered by IRAS is thermal radiation from interstellar dust at moderate and high galactic latitudes. The IRAS locates the dust which must (at some level) scatter ultraviolet starlight, although it was expected that thermal emission would be found around virtually every star, most stars shown no detectable emission. And the emission found is not uniform. It is not that the star is embedded in 'an interstellar medium', but rather what is found are discrete clouds that are heated by starlight. An exception is the dearth of clouds near the very hottest stars, implying that the very hottest stars play an active role with respect to destroying or substantially modifying the dust clouds over time. The other possibility is simply that the hottest stars are located in regions lacking in dust, which is counter-intuitive. A bibliography of related journal articles is attached.

  14. Dust near luminous ultraviolet stars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, Richard C.

    1992-01-01

    More than 700 luminous stars in the infrared astronomical satellite (IRAS) Skyflux plates were examined for the presence of dust heated by a nearby star. This dust may be distinguished from the ubiquitous cool cirrus by its higher temperature and thus enhanced 60 micron emission. More than 120 dust clouds were found around only 106 of the stars with a volume filling factor of 0.006 and an intercloud separation of 46 pc. A region of dust smoothly distributed through the volume of space heated by the star could not be found and hence an upper limit of 0.05 cm(exp -3) is placed on the equivalent gas density in the intercloud regions. The clouds have an average density of 0.22 cm(exp -3) and a radius of 1.9 pc, albeit with wide variations in their properties. Two different scale heights of 140 and 540 pc were found. This was interpreted as evidence for different distributions of dust in and out of the galactic disk.

  15. Optical coherence tomography investigations of ceramic lumineers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luana O.; Graça, Natalia D. R. L.; Melo, Luciana S. A.; Silva, Claudio H. V.; Gomes, Anderson S. L.

    2016-02-01

    Lumineers are veneer laminates used as an alternative for aesthetic dental solutions of the highest quality, but the only current means of its performance assessment is visual inspection. The objective of this study was to use the Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) technique working in spectral domain to analyze in vivo in a single patient, 14 lumineers 180 days after cementation. It was possible to observe images in various kinds of changes in the cementing line and the laminate. It was concluded that the OCT is an effective and promising method to clinical evaluation of the cementing line in lumineers.

  16. MicroRNA-222 promotes tumorigenesis via targeting DKK2 and activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Qifeng; Shen, Ke; Zhao, Yang; He, Xiaoguang; Ma, Chenkai; Wang, Lin; Wang, Baocheng; Liu, Jianwen; Ma, Jie

    2013-06-19

    MiR-222 in glioma can regulate cell cycle progression and apoptosis. However, the relationship between miR-222 and Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway in glioma remains unknown. Here, we found that the Dickkopf-2 gene (DKK2) was a direct target of miR-222 by target prediction analysis and dual luciferase reporter assay. RNA interference silencing of DKK2 proved that miR-222 overexpression led to constitutive activation of β-catenin through inhibition of DKK2 expression in glioma cells. Furthermore, miR-222 siRNA significantly inhibited tumorigenesis in vivo. Finally, Western blot analysis showed that miR-222 could regulate the expression of β-catenin and the downstream genes of Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway. Taken together, our findings reveal a new regulatory mechanism of miR-222 and suggest that miR-222 might be a potential target in glioma therapy.

  17. IGF-IR signaling in epithelial to mesenchymal transition and targeting IGF-IR therapy: overview and new insights.

    PubMed

    Li, Heming; Batth, Izhar Singh; Qu, Xiujuan; Xu, Ling; Song, Na; Wang, Ruoyu; Liu, Yunpeng

    2017-01-30

    The insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) signaling induces epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) program and contributes to metastasis and drug resistance in several subtypes of tumors. In preclinical studies, targeting of the insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) showed promising anti-tumor effects. Unfortunately, high expectations for anti-IGF-IR therapy encountered challenge and disappointment in numerous clinical trials. This review summarizes the regulation of EMT by IGF-I/IGF-IR signaling pathway and drug resistance mechanisms of targeting IGF-IR therapy. Most importantly, we address several factors in the regulation of IGF-I/IGF-IR-associated EMT progression that may be potential predictive biomarkers in targeted therapy.

  18. The evolving roles of canonical WNT signaling in stem cells and tumorigenesis: Implications in targeted cancer therapies

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ke; Wang, Xin; Zhang, Hongmei; Wang, Zhongliang; Nan, Guoxin; Li, Yasha; Zhang, Fugui; Mohammed, Maryam K.; Haydon, Rex C.; Luu, Hue H.; Bi, Yang; He, Tong-Chuan

    2015-01-01

    The canonical WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway governs a myriad of biological processes underlying development and maintenance of adult tissue homeostasis, including regulation of stem cell self-renewal, cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. WNTs are secreted lipid-modified glycoproteins that act as short-range ligands to activate receptor-mediated signaling pathways. The hallmark of the canonical pathway is the activation of β-catenin mediated transcriptional activity. Canonical WNTs control the β-catenin dynamics as the cytoplasmic level of β-catenin is tightly regulated via phosphorylation by the ‘destruction complex’, consisting of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β), casein kinase 1α (CK1α), the scaffold protein AXIN, and the tumor suppressor adenomatous polyposis coli (APC). Aberrant regulation of this signaling cascade is associated with varieties of human diseases, especially cancers. Over the past decade, significant progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms of canonical WNT signaling. In this review, we focus on the current understanding of WNT signaling at the extracellular, cytoplasmic membrane, and intracellular/nuclear levels, including the emerging knowledge of crosstalk with other pathways. Recent progresses in developing novel WNT pathway-targeted therapies will also be reviewed. Thus, this review is intended to serve as a refresher of the current understanding about the physiologic and pathogenic roles of WNT/β-catenin signaling pathway, and to outline potential therapeutic opportunities by targeting the canonical WNT pathway. PMID:26618721

  19. Inhibition of notch signaling in glioblastoma targets cancer stem cells via an endothelial cell intermediate.

    PubMed

    Hovinga, Koos E; Shimizu, Fumiko; Wang, Rong; Panagiotakos, Georgia; Van Der Heijden, Maartje; Moayedpardazi, Hamideh; Correia, Ana Sofia; Soulet, Denis; Major, Tamara; Menon, Jayanthi; Tabar, Viviane

    2010-06-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is a highly heterogeneous malignant tumor. Recent data suggests the presence of a hierarchical organization within the GBM cell population that involves cancer cells with stem-like behavior, capable of repopulating the tumor and contributing to its resistance to therapy. Tumor stem cells are thought to reside within a vascular niche that provides structural and functional support. However, most GBM studies involve isolated tumor cells grown under various culture conditions. Here, we use a novel three-dimensional organotypic "explant" system of surgical GBM specimens that preserves cytoarchitecture and tumor stroma along with tumor cells. Notch inhibition in explants results in decreased proliferation and self-renewal of tumor cells but is also associated with a decrease in endothelial cells. When endothelial cells are selectively eliminated from the explants via a toxin conjugate, we also observed a decrease in self-renewal of tumor stem cells. These findings support a critical role for tumor endothelial cells in GBM stem cell maintenance, mediated at least in part by Notch signaling. The explant system further highlighted differences in the response to radiation between explants and isolated tumor neurospheres. Combination treatment with Notch blockade and radiation resulted in a substantial decrease in proliferation and in self-renewal in tumor explants while radiation alone was less effective. This data suggests that the Notch pathway plays a critical role in linking angiogenesis and cancer stem cell self-renewal and is thus a potential therapeutic target. Three-dimensional explant systems provide a novel approach for the study of tumor and microenvironment interactions.

  20. Detecting fixation on a target using time-frequency distributions of a retinal birefringence scanning signal

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The fovea, which is the most sensitive part of the retina, is known to have birefringent properties, i.e. it changes the polarization state of light upon reflection. Existing devices use this property to obtain information on the orientation of the fovea and the direction of gaze. Such devices employ specific frequency components that appear during moments of fixation on a target. To detect them, previous methods have used solely the power spectrum of the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT), which, unfortunately, is an integral method, and does not give information as to where exactly the events of interest occur. With very young patients who are not cooperative enough, this presents a problem, because central fixation may be present only during very short-lasting episodes, and can easily be missed by the FFT. Method This paper presents a method for detecting short-lasting moments of central fixation in existing devices for retinal birefringence scanning, with the goal of a reliable detection of eye alignment. Signal analysis is based on the Continuous Wavelet Transform (CWT), which reliably localizes such events in the time-frequency plane. Even though the characteristic frequencies are not always strongly expressed due to possible artifacts, simple topological analysis of the time-frequency distribution can detect fixation reliably. Results In all six subjects tested, the CWT allowed precise identification of both frequency components. Moreover, in four of these subjects, episodes of intermittent but definitely present central fixation were detectable, similar to those in Figure 4. A simple FFT is likely to treat them as borderline cases, or entirely miss them, depending on the thresholds used. Conclusion Joint time-frequency analysis is a powerful tool in the detection of eye alignment, even in a noisy environment. The method is applicable to similar situations, where short-lasting diagnostic events need to be detected in time series acquired by means of

  1. Caspase-3 Is Involved in the Signalling in Erythroid Differentiation by Targeting Late Progenitors

    PubMed Central

    Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; Darghouth, Dhouha; Faussat, Anne-Marie; Harmand, Laurence; Douay, Luc

    2013-01-01

    A role for caspase activation in erythroid differentiation has been established, yet its precise mode of action remains elusive. A drawback of all previous investigations on caspase activation in ex vivo erythroid differentiation is the lack of an in vitro model producing full enucleation of erythroid cells. Using a culture system which renders nearly 100% enucleated red cells from human CD34+ cells, we investigated the role of active caspase-3 in erythropoiesis. Profound effects of caspase-3 inhibition were found on erythroid cell growth and differentiation when inhibitors were added to CD34+ cells at the start of the culture and showed dose-response to the concentration of inhibitor employed. Enucleation was only reduced as a function of the reduced maturity of the culture and the increased cell death of mature cells while the majority of cells retained their ability to extrude their nuclei. Cell cycle analysis after caspase-3 inhibition showed caspase-3 to play a critical role in cell proliferation and highlighted a novel function of this protease in erythroid differentiation, i.e. its contribution to cell cycle regulation at the mitotic phase. While the effect of caspase-3 inhibitor treatment on CD34+ derived cells was not specific to the erythroid lineage, showing a similar reduction of cell expansion in myeloid cultures, the mechanism of action in both lineages appeared to be distinct with a strong induction of apoptosis causing the decreased yield of myeloid cells. Using a series of colony-forming assays we were able to pinpoint the stage at which cells were most sensitive to caspase-3 inhibition and found activated caspase-3 to play a signalling role in erythroid differentiation by targeting mature BFU-E and CFU-E but not early BFU-E. PMID:23658722

  2. Inhibition of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 signaling pathway reduces itch behaviour in mice.

    PubMed

    Obara, Ilona; Medrano, Maria C; Signoret-Genest, Jérémy; Jiménez-Díaz, Lydia; Géranton, Sandrine M; Hunt, Stephen P

    2015-08-01

    Activated mammalian target of rapamycin (P-mTOR) has been shown to maintain the sensitivity of subsets of small-diameter primary afferent A-nociceptors. Local or systemic inhibition of the mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway reduced punctate mechanical and cold sensitivity in neuropathic pain and therefore offered a new approach to chronic pain control. In this study, we have investigated the effects of the rapamycin analog temsirolimus (CCI-779) on itch. Bouts of scratching induced by the histamine-dependent pruritogenic compound 48/80 and histamine-independent pruritogens, chloroquine and SLIGRL-NH2, injected intradermally were significantly reduced by local (intradermal) or systemic (intraperitoneal, i.p.) pretreatment with CCI-779. We also investigated the action of metformin, a drug taken to control type 2 diabetes and recently shown to inhibit mTORC1 in vivo. Although the response to nonhistaminergic stimuli was reduced at all of the time points tested, scratching to compound 48/80 was modified by metformin only when the drug was injected 24 hours before this pruritogen. We also examined the colocalization of P-mTOR with gastrin-releasing peptide, a putative marker for some itch-sensitive primary afferents, and found that P-mTOR was coexpressed in less than 5% of gastrin-releasing peptide-positive fibers in the mouse skin. Taken together, the data highlight the role that P-mTOR-positive A-fibers play in itch signaling and underline the importance of the mTORC1 pathway in the regulation of homeostatic primary afferent functions such as pain and itch. The actions of the antidiabetic drug metformin in ameliorating nonhistamine-mediated itch also suggest a new therapeutic route for the control of this category of pruritus.

  3. Targeting renal purinergic signalling for the treatment of lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    PubMed

    Kishore, B K; Carlson, N G; Ecelbarger, C M; Kohan, D E; Müller, C E; Nelson, R D; Peti-Peterdi, J; Zhang, Y

    2015-06-01

    Lithium still retains its critical position in the treatment of bipolar disorder by virtue of its ability to prevent suicidal tendencies. However, chronic use of lithium is often limited by the development of nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a debilitating condition. Lithium-induced NDI is due to resistance of the kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP), leading to polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Purinergic signalling mediated by extracellular nucleotides (ATP/UTP), acting via P2Y receptors, opposes the action of AVP on renal collecting duct (CD) by decreasing the cellular cAMP and thus AQP2 protein levels. Taking a cue from this phenomenon, we discovered the potential involvement of ATP/UTP-activated P2Y2 receptor in lithium-induced NDI in rats and showed that P2Y2 receptor knockout mice are significantly resistant to Li-induced polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Extension of these studies revealed that ADP-activated P2Y12 receptor is expressed in the kidney, and its irreversible blockade by the administration of clopidogrel bisulphate (Plavix(®)) ameliorates Li-induced NDI in rodents. Parallel in vitro studies showed that P2Y12 receptor blockade by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 sensitizes CD to the action of AVP. Thus, our studies unravelled the potential beneficial effects of targeting P2Y2 or P2Y12 receptors to counter AVP resistance in lithium-induced NDI. If established in further studies, our findings may pave the way for the development of better and safer methods for the treatment of NDI by bringing a paradigm shift in the approach from the current therapies that predominantly counter the anti-AVP effects to those that enhance the sensitivity of the kidney to AVP action.

  4. Targeting Renal Purinergic Signalling for the Treatment of Lithium-induced Nephrogenic Diabetes Insipidus

    PubMed Central

    Kishore, B. K.; Carlson, N. G.; Ecelbarger, C. M.; Kohan, D. E.; Müller, C. E.; Nelson, R. D.; Peti-Peterdi, J.; Zhang, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Lithium still retains its critical position in the treatment of bipolar disorder by virtue of its ability to prevent suicidal tendencies. However, chronic use of lithium is often limited by the development nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI), a debilitating condition. Lithium-induced NDI is due to resistance of the kidney to arginine vasopressin (AVP), leading to polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Purinergic signalling mediated by extracellular nucleotides (ATP/UTP), acting via P2Y receptors, opposes the action of AVP on renal collecting duct (CD) by decreasing the cellular cAMP and thus AQP2 protein levels. Taking a cue from this phenomenon, we discovered the potential involvement of ATP/UTP-activated P2Y2 receptor in lithium-induced NDI in rats, and showed that P2Y2 receptor knockout mice are significantly resistant to Li-induced polyuria, natriuresis and kaliuresis. Extension of these studies revealed that ADP-activated P2Y12 receptor is expressed in the kidney, and its irreversible blockade by the administration of clopidogrel bisulfate (Plavix®) ameliorates Li-induced NDI in rodents. Parallel in vitro studies showed that P2Y12 receptor blockade by the reversible antagonist PSB-0739 sensitizes CD to the action of AVP. Thus, our studies unraveled the potential beneficial effects of targeting P2Y2 or P2Y12 receptors to counter AVP resistance in lithium-induced NDI. If established in further studies, our findings may pave the way for the development of better and safer methods for the treatment of NDI by bringing a paradigm shift in the approach from the current therapies that predominantly counter the anti-AVP effects to those that enhance the sensitivity of the kidney to AVP action. PMID:25877068

  5. Radiation-induced non-targeted response in vivo: role of the TGFβ-TGFBR1-COX-2 signalling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Y; Lam, R K K; Calaf, G M; Zhou, H; Amundson, S; Hei, T K

    2013-01-01

    Background: Previous studies from our group and others have shown that cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) has an essential role in radiation-induced non-targeted responses and genomic instability in vivo. However, the signalling pathways involved in such effects remain unclear. Methods: A 1 cm2 area (1 cm × 1 cm) in the lower abdominal region of gpt delta transgenic mice was irradiated with 5 Gy of 300 keV X-rays. Nimesulide, a selective COX-2 inhibitor, was given to mice for five consecutive days before irradiation. Changes in transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) and TGF-β receptor type-1 (TGFBR1) mediated signalling pathways, in the out of radiation field lung and liver tissues were examined. Results: While the plasma level of cytokines remained unchanged, the expression of TGF-β and its receptors was elevated in non-targeted lung tissues after partial body irradiation. In contrast to the predominant expression of TGF-β in stromal and alveolar cells, but not in bronchial epithelial cells, TGF-β receptors, especially TGFBR1 were significantly elevated in non-targeted bronchial epithelial cells, which is consistent with the induction of COX-2. The different expression levels of TGFBR1 between liver and lung resulted in a tissue specific induction of COX-2 in these two non-targeted tissues. Multiple TGF-β induced signalling pathways were activated in the non-targeted lung tissues. Conclusion: The TGFβ-TGFBR1-COX-2 Signalling Pathway has a critical role in radiation-induced non-targeted response in vivo. PMID:23412109

  6. Single sensor processing to obtain high resolution color component signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, William E. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method for generating color video signals representative of color images of a scene includes the following steps: focusing light from the scene on an electronic image sensor via a filter having a tri-color filter pattern; producing, from outputs of the sensor, first and second relatively low resolution luminance signals; producing, from outputs of the sensor, a relatively high resolution luminance signal; producing, from a ratio of the relatively high resolution luminance signal to the first relatively low resolution luminance signal, a high band luminance component signal; producing, from outputs of the sensor, relatively low resolution color component signals; and combining each of the relatively low resolution color component signals with the high band luminance component signal to obtain relatively high resolution color component signals.

  7. Target of rapamycin signalling mediates the lifespan-extending effects of dietary restriction by essential amino acid alteration.

    PubMed

    Emran, Sahar; Yang, Mingyao; He, Xiaoli; Zandveld, Jelle; Piper, Matthew D W

    2014-05-01

    Dietary restriction (DR), defined as a moderate reduction in food intake short of malnutrition, has been shown to extend healthy lifespan in a diverse range of organisms, from yeast to primates. Reduced signalling through the insulin/IGF-like (IIS) and Target of Rapamycin (TOR) signalling pathways also extend lifespan. InDrosophila melanogaster the lifespan benefits of DR can be reproduced by modulating only the essential amino acids in yeast based food. Here, we show that pharmacological downregulation of TOR signalling, but not reduced IIS, modulates the lifespan response to DR by amino acid alteration. Of the physiological responses flies exhibit upon DR, only increased body fat and decreased heat stress resistance phenotypes correlated with longevity via reduced TOR signalling. These data indicate that lowered dietary amino acids promote longevity via TOR, not by enhanced resistance to molecular damage, but through modified physiological conditions that favour fat accumulation.

  8. Eta Carinae and Other Luminous Blue Variables

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corcoran, M. F.

    2006-01-01

    Luminous Blue Variables (LBVs) are believed to be evolved, extremely massive stars close to the Eddington Limit and hence prone to bouts of large-scale, unstable mass loss. I discuss current understanding of the evolutionary state of these objects, the role duplicity may play and known physical characteristics of these stars using the X-ray luminous LBVs Eta Carinae and HD 5980 as test cases.

  9. Selective targeting of c-Abl via a cryptic mitochondrial targeting signal activated by cellular redox status in leukemic and breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Constance, Jonathan E.; Despres, Samuel D.; Nishida, Akemi; Lim, Carol S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose The tyrosine kinase c-Abl localizes to the mitochondria under cell stress conditions and promotes apoptosis. However, c-Abl has not been directly targeted to the mitochondria. Fusing c-Abl to a mitochondrial translocation signal (MTS) that is activated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) will selectively target the mitochondria of cancer cells exhibiting an elevated ROS phenotype. Mitochondrially targeted c-Abl will thereby induce malignant cell death. Methods Confocal microscopy was used to determine mitochondrial colocalization of ectopically expressed c-Abl-EGFP/cMTS fusion across three cell lines (K562, Cos-7, and 1471.1) with varying levels of basal (and pharmacologically modulated) ROS. ROS were quantified by indicator dye assay. The functional consequences of mitochondrial c-Abl were assessed by DNA accessibility to 7-AAD using flow cytometry. Results The cMTS and cMTS/c-Abl fusions colocalized to the mitochondria in leukemic (K562) and breast (1471.1) cancer phenotypes (but not Cos-7 fibroblasts) in a ROS and PKC dependent manner. Conclusions We confirm and extend oxidative stress activated translocation of the cMTS by demonstrating that the cMTS and Abl/cMTS fusion selectively target the mitochondria of K562 leukemia and mammary adenocarcinoma 1471.1 cells. c-Abl induced K562 leukemia cell death when targeted to the matrix but not the outer membrane of the mitochondria. PMID:22549737

  10. Compounds from the marine sponge Cribrochalina vasculum offer a way to target IGF-1R mediated signaling in tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Zovko, Ana; Novak, Metka; Hååg, Petra; Kovalerchick, Dimitry; Holmlund, Teresa; Färnegårdh, Katarina; Ilan, Micha; Carmeli, Shmuel; Lewensohn, Rolf; Viktorsson, Kristina

    2016-01-01

    In this work two acetylene alcohols, compound 1 and compound 2, which were isolated and identified from the sponge Cribrochalina vasculum, and which showed anti-tumor effects were further studied with respect to targets and action mechanisms. Gene expression analyses suggested insulin like growth factor receptor (IGF-1R) signaling to be instrumental in controlling anti-tumor efficacy of these compounds in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Indeed compounds 1 and 2 inhibited phosphorylation of IGF-1Rβ as well as reduced its target signaling molecules IRS-1 and PDK1 allowing inhibition of pro-survival signaling. In silico docking indicated that compound 1 binds to the kinase domain of IGF-1R at the same binding site as the well known tyrosine kinase inhibitor AG1024. Indeed, cellular thermal shift assay (CETSA) confirmed that C. vasculum compound 1 binds to IGF-1R but not to the membrane localized tyrosine kinase receptor EGFR. Importantly, we demonstrate that compound 1 causes IGF-1Rβ but not Insulin Receptor degradation specifically in tumor cells with no effects seen in normal diploid fibroblasts. Thus, these compounds hold potential as novel therapeutic agents targeting IGF-1R signaling for anti-tumor treatment. PMID:27384680

  11. Signal-on electrochemical detection of antibiotics at zeptomole level based on target-aptamer binding triggered multiple recycling amplification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongzhi; Wang, Yu; Liu, Su; Yu, Jinghua; Guo, Yuna; Xu, Ying; Huang, Jiadong

    2016-06-15

    In the work, a signal-on electrochemical DNA sensor based on multiple amplification for ultrasensitive detection of antibiotics has been reported. In the presence of target, the ingeniously designed hairpin probe (HP1) is opened and the polymerase-assisted target recycling amplification is triggered, resulting in autonomous generation of secondary target. It is worth noting that the produced secondary target could not only hybridize with other HP1, but also displace the Helper from the electrode. Consequently, methylene blue labeled HP2 forms a "close" probe structure, and the increase of signal is monitored. The increasing current provides an ultrasensitive electrochemical detection for antibiotics down to 1.3 fM. To our best knowledge, such work is the first report about multiple recycling amplification combing with signal-on sensing strategy, which has been utilized for quantitative determination of antibiotics. It would be further used as a general strategy associated with more analytical techniques toward the detection of a wide spectrum of analytes. Thus, it holds great potential for the development of ultrasensitive biosensing platform for the applications in bioanalysis, disease diagnostics, and clinical biomedicine.

  12. Activation of mammalian target of rapamycin signaling in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks: effects of dietary leucine and age.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huiling; Zheng, Aijuan; Liu, Guohua; Chang, Wenhuan; Zhang, Shu; Cai, Huiyi

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway is necessary for cellular protein synthesis regulation. Leucine was reported to stimulate muscle protein synthesis in mammalian embryos and neonates, but in higher animals (chickens) the effect of dietary leucine on mTOR signaling is unknown. Thus, we investigated the effects of dietary leucine and age on mRNA expression and phosphorylation of mTOR as well as its downstream targets, ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K1) and eukaryotic initiation factor 4E binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) in chick pectoral muscles. One hundred eighty newly hatched male chicks were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 dietary leucine treatment groups (1.43, 1.73, and 2.03% leucine) for 14 d, respectively. Each treatment group consisted of 6 cages with 10 chicks each. On d 3, 7, and 14, plasma insulin and leucine were measured and target gene expression and phosphorylation was assessed. Dietary leucine influenced plasma leucine but not insulin, and plasma leucine and insulin declined with chick age. The mTOR, S6K1, and 4E-BP1 mRNA expression and phosphorylation within chick pectoral muscles were upregulated with increased dietary leucine but downregulated with increased chick age. Thus, high dietary leucine activates target of rapamycin signaling pathways in skeletal muscle of neonatal chicks to stimulate muscle protein synthesis, and this pathway is attenuated with aging.

  13. Development of Small Molecules Targeting the Wnt Signaling Pathway in Cancer Stem Cells for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Lele; Li, Yuemin; He, Baoming; Gong, Yuan

    2015-09-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) was ranked third in morbidity and mortality in the United States in 2013. Although substantial progress has been made in surgical techniques and postoperative chemotherapy in recent years, the prognosis for colon cancer is still not satisfactory, mainly because of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The latest studies have shown that cancer stem cells (CSCs) play important roles in cancer recurrence and metastasis. Drugs that target CSCs might therefore have great therapeutic potential in prevention of cancer recurrence and metastasis. The wingless-int (Wnt) signaling pathway in CSCs has been suggested to play crucial roles in colorectal carcinogenesis, and has become a popular target for anti-CRC therapy. Dysregulation of the Wnt signaling pathway, mostly by inactivating mutations of the adenomatous polyposis coli tumor suppressor or oncogenic mutations of β-catenin, has been implicated as a key factor in colorectal tumorigenesis. Abnormal increases of β-catenin levels represents a common pathway in Wnt signaling activation and is also observed in other human malignancies. These findings highlight the importance of developing small-molecule drugs that target the Wnt pathway. Herein we provide an overview on the current development of small molecules that target the Wnt pathway in colorectal CSCs and discuss future research directions.

  14. VGLL4 targets a TCF4–TEAD4 complex to coregulate Wnt and Hippo signalling in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jiao, Shi; Li, Chuanchuan; Hao, Qian; Miao, Haofei; Zhang, Lei; Li, Lin; Zhou, Zhaocai

    2017-01-01

    Concerted co-regulation of multiple signalling pathways is crucial for tissue homoeostasis and tumorigenesis. Here we report that VGLL4, a previously identified YAP antagonist, also functions as a regulator of Wnt/β-catenin signalling. The expression of VGLL4 is significantly downregulated in clinical colorectal carcinoma (CRC) specimens, positively associated with patient survival rate, and inversely correlated with the expression of Wnt target genes in CRCs. Knockdown of VGLL4 enhances proliferation and tumour formation of CRC cells. A designed peptide mimicking the function of VGLL4 effectively inhibits CRC progression in a de novo mouse model. Mechanistically, TEAD4 associates with TCF4 to form a complex and cobind target genes. VGLL4 targets this TEAD4–TCF4 complex to interfere the functional interplay between TEAD4 and TCF4, suppressing the transactivation of TCF4. Collectively, our study indicates that Wnt/β-catenin and Hippo-YAP signalling are directly linked at transcription factor-level, and VGLL4 can target a TEAD4–TCF4 complex to co-regulate both pathways. PMID:28051067

  15. Ciliary transport regulates PDGF-AA/αα signaling via elevated mammalian target of rapamycin signaling and diminished PP2A activity.

    PubMed

    Umberger, Nicole L; Caspary, Tamara

    2015-01-15

    Primary cilia are built and maintained by intraflagellar transport (IFT), whereby the two IFT complexes, IFTA and IFTB, carry cargo via kinesin and dynein motors for anterograde and retrograde transport, respectively. Many signaling pathways, including platelet- derived growth factor (PDGF)-AA/αα, are linked to primary cilia. Active PDGF-AA/αα signaling results in phosphorylation of Akt at two residues: P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473), and previous work showed decreased P-Akt(S473) in response to PDGF-AA upon anterograde transport disruption. In this study, we investigated PDGF-AA/αα signaling via P-Akt(T308) and P-Akt(S473) in distinct ciliary transport mutants. We found increased Akt phosphorylation in the absence of PDGF-AA stimulation, which we show is due to impaired dephosphorylation resulting from diminished PP2A activity toward P-Akt(T308). Anterograde transport mutants display low platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR)α levels, whereas retrograde mutants exhibit normal PDGFRα levels. Despite this, neither shows an increase in P-Akt(S473) or P-Akt(T308) upon PDGF-AA stimulation. Because mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling is increased in ciliary transport mutant cells and mTOR signaling inhibits PDGFRα levels, we demonstrate that inhibition of mTORC1 rescues PDGFRα levels as well as PDGF-AA-dependent phosphorylation of Akt(S473) and Akt(T308) in ciliary transport mutant MEFs. Taken together, our data indicate that the regulation of mTORC1 signaling and PP2A activity by ciliary transport plays key roles in PDGF-AA/αα signaling.

  16. Ratio model serves suprathreshold color- luminance discrimination

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sankeralli, Marcel J.; Mullen, Kathy T.; Hine, Trevor J.

    2002-03-01

    We extended earlier results [J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 16, 2625 (1999)] to examine how the responses of the three postreceptoral mechanisms are combined to subserve discrimination of suprathreshold stimuli. Test thresholds were obtained in the presence of suprathreshold pedestals selected in different quadrants of the red-green/luminance and blue-yellow/luminance planes of cardinal color space. We showed that (1) test threshold was directly proportional to pedestal contrast for pedestal contrasts exceeding five times pedestal contrast threshold, and (2) there were exceptions to this proportionality, notably when the test and pedestal directions were fixed in the cardinal directions. Results support a ratio model of suprathreshold color-luminance discrimination, in which discrimination depends on a ratio of outputs of the postreceptoral mechanisms. We also observed that when test threshold was measured as a function of test color-space direction, masking by the achromatic component of the pedestal was less than that by the chromatic component. In addition, masking by a dark (negative luminance component) pedestal was lower than masking by a light (positive luminance) pedestal of a similar contrast. Our results demonstrated that (1) there is no fundamental difference between discrimination in the isoluminant and in the two chromoluminant cardinal planes, (2) there exists the possibility that discrimination in cardinal directions differs from that in noncardinal (intermediate) directions, and (3) suprathreshold discrimination of luminance differences may be more sensitive than that of chromatic differences for a given suprathreshold pedestal.

  17. Cellular targets of estrogen signaling in regeneration of inner ear sensory epithelia

    PubMed Central

    McCullar, Jennifer S.; Oesterle, Elizabeth C.

    2010-01-01

    Estrogen signaling in auditory and vestibular sensory epithelia is a newly emerging focus propelled by the role of estrogen signaling in many other proliferative systems. Understanding the pathways with which estrogen interacts can provide a means to identify how estrogen may modulate proliferative signaling in inner ear sensory epithelia. Reviewed herein are two signaling families, EGF and TGFβ. Both pathways are involved in regulating proliferation of supporting cells in mature vestibular sensory epithelia and have well characterized interactions with estrogen signaling in other systems. It is becoming increasingly clear that elucidating the complexity of signaling in regeneration will be necessary for development of therapeutics that can initiate regeneration and prevent progression to a pathogenic state. PMID:19450430

  18. Signal Processing of Ground Penetrating Radar Using Spectral Estimation Techniques to Estimate the Position of Buried Targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shrestha, Shanker Man; Arai, Ikuo

    2003-12-01

    Super-resolution is very important for the signal processing of GPR (ground penetration radar) to resolve closely buried targets. However, it is not easy to get high resolution as GPR signals are very weak and enveloped by the noise. The MUSIC (multiple signal classification) algorithm, which is well known for its super-resolution capacity, has been implemented for signal and image processing of GPR. In addition, conventional spectral estimation technique, FFT (fast Fourier transform), has also been implemented for high-precision receiving signal level. In this paper, we propose CPM (combined processing method), which combines time domain response of MUSIC algorithm and conventional IFFT (inverse fast Fourier transform) to obtain a super-resolution and high-precision signal level. In order to support the proposal, detailed simulation was performed analyzing SNR (signal-to-noise ratio). Moreover, a field experiment at a research field and a laboratory experiment at the University of Electro-Communications, Tokyo, were also performed for thorough investigation and supported the proposed method. All the simulation and experimental results are presented.

  19. Identification of Novel Targets of CSL-Dependent Notch Signaling in Hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Hamidi, Habib; Gustafason, Derek; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gasson, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Somatic activating mutations in the Notch1 receptor result in the overexpression of activated Notch1, which can be tumorigenic. The goal of this study is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic changes caused by the overexpression of ligand independent Notch 1 by using a tetracycline inducible promoter in an in vitro embryonic stem (ES) cells/OP9 stromal cells coculture system, recapitulating normal hematopoiesis. First, an in silico analysis of the promoters of Notch regulated genes (previously determined by microarray analysis) revealed that the motifs recognized by regulatory proteins known to mediate hematopoiesis were overrepresented. Notch 1 does not bind DNA but instead binds the CSL transcription factor to regulate gene expression. The in silico analysis also showed that there were putative CSL binding sites observed in the promoters of 28 out of 148 genes. A custom ChIP-chip array was used to assess the occupancy of CSL in the promoter regions of the Notch1 regulated genes in vivo and showed that 61 genes were bound by activated Notch responsive CSL. Then, comprehensive mapping of the CSL binding sites genome-wide using ChIP-seq analysis revealed that over 10,000 genes were bound within 10 kb of the TSS (transcription start site). The majority of the targets discovered by ChIP-seq belong to pathways that have been shown by others to crosstalk with Notch signaling. Finally, 83 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed by greater than 1.5-fold during the course of in vitro hematopoiesis. Thirty one miRNA were up-regulated and fifty two were down-regulated. Overexpression of Notch1 altered this pattern of expression of microRNA: six miRNAs were up-regulated and four were down regulated as a result of activated Notch1 overexpression during the course of hematopoiesis. Time course analysis of hematopoietic development revealed that cells with Notch 1 overexpression mimic miRNA expression of cells in a less mature stage, which

  20. Identification of novel targets of CSL-dependent Notch signaling in hematopoiesis.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Habib; Gustafason, Derek; Pellegrini, Matteo; Gasson, Judith

    2011-01-01

    Somatic activating mutations in the Notch1 receptor result in the overexpression of activated Notch1, which can be tumorigenic. The goal of this study is to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the phenotypic changes caused by the overexpression of ligand independent Notch 1 by using a tetracycline inducible promoter in an in vitro embryonic stem (ES) cells/OP9 stromal cells coculture system, recapitulating normal hematopoiesis. First, an in silico analysis of the promoters of Notch regulated genes (previously determined by microarray analysis) revealed that the motifs recognized by regulatory proteins known to mediate hematopoiesis were overrepresented. Notch 1 does not bind DNA but instead binds the CSL transcription factor to regulate gene expression. The in silico analysis also showed that there were putative CSL binding sites observed in the promoters of 28 out of 148 genes. A custom ChIP-chip array was used to assess the occupancy of CSL in the promoter regions of the Notch1 regulated genes in vivo and showed that 61 genes were bound by activated Notch responsive CSL. Then, comprehensive mapping of the CSL binding sites genome-wide using ChIP-seq analysis revealed that over 10,000 genes were bound within 10 kb of the TSS (transcription start site). The majority of the targets discovered by ChIP-seq belong to pathways that have been shown by others to crosstalk with Notch signaling. Finally, 83 miRNAs were significantly differentially expressed by greater than 1.5-fold during the course of in vitro hematopoiesis. Thirty one miRNA were up-regulated and fifty two were down-regulated. Overexpression of Notch1 altered this pattern of expression of microRNA: six miRNAs were up-regulated and four were down regulated as a result of activated Notch1 overexpression during the course of hematopoiesis. Time course analysis of hematopoietic development revealed that cells with Notch 1 overexpression mimic miRNA expression of cells in a less mature stage, which

  1. The roles of juvenile hormone, insulin/target of rapamycin, and ecydsone signaling in regulating body size in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mirth, Christen Kerry; Shingleton, Alexander William

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how organisms regulate their body size has interested biologists for decades. Recent work has shown that both insulin/target of rapamycin (TOR) signaling and the steroid hormone ecdysone act to regulate rates of growth and the duration of the growth period in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Our recent work has uncovered a third level of interaction, whereby juvenile hormone (JH) regulates levels of both ecdysone and insulin/TOR signaling to control growth rates. These studies highlight a complex network of interactions involved in regulating body and organ size. PMID:26842847

  2. Antifungal drug itraconazole targets VDAC1 to modulate the AMPK/mTOR signaling axis in endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Head, Sarah A.; Shi, Wei; Zhao, Liang; Gorshkov, Kirill; Pasunooti, Kalyan; Chen, Yue; Deng, Zhiyou; Li, Ruo-jing; Shim, Joong Sup; Tan, Wenzhi; Hartung, Thomas; Zhang, Jin; Zhao, Yingming; Colombini, Marco; Liu, Jun O.

    2015-01-01

    Itraconazole, a clinically used antifungal drug, was found to possess potent antiangiogenic and anticancer activity that is unique among the azole antifungals. Previous mechanistic studies have shown that itraconazole inhibits the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway, which is known to be a critical regulator of endothelial cell function and angiogenesis. However, the molecular target of itraconazole that mediates this activity has remained unknown. Here we identify the major target of itraconazole in endothelial cells as the mitochondrial protein voltage-dependent anion channel 1 (VDAC1), which regulates mitochondrial metabolism by controlling the passage of ions and small metabolites through the outer mitochondrial membrane. VDAC1 knockdown profoundly inhibits mTOR activity and cell proliferation in human umbilical vein cells (HUVEC), uncovering a previously unknown connection between VDAC1 and mTOR. Inhibition of VDAC1 by itraconazole disrupts mitochondrial metabolism, leading to an increase in the cellular AMP:ATP ratio and activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an upstream regulator of mTOR. VDAC1-knockout cells are resistant to AMPK activation and mTOR inhibition by itraconazole, demonstrating that VDAC1 is the mediator of this activity. In addition, another known VDAC-targeting compound, erastin, also activates AMPK and inhibits mTOR and proliferation in HUVEC. VDAC1 thus represents a novel upstream regulator of mTOR signaling in endothelial cells and a promising target for the development of angiogenesis inhibitors. PMID:26655341

  3. Traditional Chinese medicine suppresses left ventricular hypertrophy by targeting extracellular signal-regulated kinases signaling pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Yang, Xiaochen; Duan, Lian; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Shengjie; Li, Xiaoke

    2017-01-01

    Chinese herbal medicine Bu-Shen-Jiang-Ya decoction (BSJYD) is reported to be beneficial for hypertension. Over expression of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK) pathway plays an important role in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This study aimed to observe effects of BSJYD on LVH in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and explore its possible mechanism on regulation of ERK pathway. Sixty 12-week-old SHRs were randomly allocated into 5 groups: BSJYD high dose group, middle dose group, low dose group, captopril group, and control group. Besides, a control group of Wistar-Kyoto rats was established. All rats were treated for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), pathology, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) were measured. Western blotting and Real-time PCR were used to assess the expressions of BDNF, Ras, ERK1/2, and c-fox levels. SBP and HR were significantly decreased compared with the control group and LVMI was markedly improved by BSJYD treatment in a dose-dependent manner. BSJYD inhibited the expression of BDNF, Ras, ERK1/2, and c-fox mRNA in LVH. In conclusion, BSJYD suppressed hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting the expression of ERK pathway. These changes in gene expression may be a possible mechanism by which BSJYD provides myocardial protection from hypertension. PMID:28225023

  4. Traditional Chinese medicine suppresses left ventricular hypertrophy by targeting extracellular signal-regulated kinases signaling pathway in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xingjiang; Yang, Xiaochen; Duan, Lian; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Yun; Liu, Yongmei; Wang, Pengqian; Li, Shengjie; Li, Xiaoke

    2017-02-22

    Chinese herbal medicine Bu-Shen-Jiang-Ya decoction (BSJYD) is reported to be beneficial for hypertension. Over expression of extracellular signal regulated kinases (ERK) pathway plays an important role in left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). This study aimed to observe effects of BSJYD on LVH in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs) and explore its possible mechanism on regulation of ERK pathway. Sixty 12-week-old SHRs were randomly allocated into 5 groups: BSJYD high dose group, middle dose group, low dose group, captopril group, and control group. Besides, a control group of Wistar-Kyoto rats was established. All rats were treated for 8 weeks. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), heart rate (HR), pathology, and left ventricular mass index (LVMI) were measured. Western blotting and Real-time PCR were used to assess the expressions of BDNF, Ras, ERK1/2, and c-fox levels. SBP and HR were significantly decreased compared with the control group and LVMI was markedly improved by BSJYD treatment in a dose-dependent manner. BSJYD inhibited the expression of BDNF, Ras, ERK1/2, and c-fox mRNA in LVH. In conclusion, BSJYD suppressed hypertension-induced cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting the expression of ERK pathway. These changes in gene expression may be a possible mechanism by which BSJYD provides myocardial protection from hypertension.

  5. Color, form and luminance capture attention in visual search.

    PubMed

    Turatto, M; Galfano, G

    2000-01-01

    Extant models of visual attention predict that a salient element should produce a bottom-up activation leading to a stimulus-driven attentional capture (e.g. Cave, 1999). However, apart from onset, previous works manipulating set-size in visual search failed to provide empirical evidence for this kind of capture. By varying target-singelton distance method, based on a single set-size, we explored whether, in a serial search task, an attentional capture is triggered by static discontinuities such as those generated through the manipulation of color, form, and luminance. The results suggest that those physical properties are indeed able to capture attention automatically.

  6. Nonlinear mapping of the luminance in dual-layer high dynamic range displays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guarnieri, Gabriele; Ramponi, Giovanni; Bonfiglio, Silvio; Albani, Luigi

    2009-02-01

    It has long been known that the human visual system (HVS) has a nonlinear response to luminance. This nonlinearity can be quantified using the concept of just noticeable difference (JND), which represents the minimum amplitude of a specified test pattern an average observer can discern from a uniform background. The JND depends on the background luminance following a threshold versus intensity (TVI) function. It is possible to define a curve which maps physical luminances into a perceptually linearized domain. This mapping can be used to optimize a digital encoding, by minimizing the visibility of quantization noise. It is also commonly used in medical applications to display images adapting to the characteristics of the display device. High dynamic range (HDR) displays, which are beginning to appear on the market, can display luminance levels outside the range in which most standard mapping curves are defined. In particular, dual-layer LCD displays are able to extend the gamut of luminance offered by conventional liquid crystals towards the black region; in such areas suitable and HVS-compliant luminance transformations need to be determined. In this paper we propose a method, which is primarily targeted to the extension of the DICOM curve used in medical imaging, but also has a more general application. The method can be modified in order to compensate for the ambient light, which can be significantly greater than the black level of an HDR display and consequently reduce the visibility of the details in dark areas.

  7. Attentional Changes during Implicit Learning: Signal Validity Protects a Target Stimulus from the Attentional Blink

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Livesey, Evan J.; Harris, Irina M.; Harris, Justin A.

    2009-01-01

    Participants in 2 experiments performed 2 simultaneous tasks: one, a dual-target detection task within a rapid sequence of target and distractor letters; the other, a cued reaction time task requiring participants to make a cued left-right response immediately after each letter sequence. Under these rapid visual presentation conditions, it is…

  8. Unbiased Combinatorial Genomic Approaches to Identify Alternative Therapeutic Targets within the TSC Signaling Network

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    human cells, as their depletion selectively decreases the viability of TSC2 null cells. These candidates are now strong drug candidates for TSC. 15...SUBJECT TERMS Drosophila, TSC, Drug Targets, Combinatorial Screen, Cancer 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT 18. NUMBER OF...Drosophila model before determining which interactions were conserved using mammalian cell culture. 2. KEYWORDS: Drosophila, TSC, Drug Targets, Combinatorial

  9. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-11-29

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  10. The ER stress sensor PERK luminal domain functions as a molecular chaperone to interact with misfolded proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Peng; Li, Jingzhi; Sha, Bingdong

    2016-12-01

    PERK is one of the major sensor proteins which can detect the protein-folding imbalance generated by endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. It remains unclear how the sensor protein PERK is activated by ER stress. It has been demonstrated that the PERK luminal domain can recognize and selectively interact with misfolded proteins but not native proteins. Moreover, the PERK luminal domain may function as a molecular chaperone to directly bind to and suppress the aggregation of a number of misfolded model proteins. The data strongly support the hypothesis that the PERK luminal domain can interact directly with misfolded proteins to induce ER stress signaling. To illustrate the mechanism by which the PERK luminal domain interacts with misfolded proteins, the crystal structure of the human PERK luminal domain was determined to 3.2 Å resolution. Two dimers of the PERK luminal domain constitute a tetramer in the asymmetric unit. Superimposition of the PERK luminal domain molecules indicated that the β-sandwich domain could adopt multiple conformations. It is hypothesized that the PERK luminal domain may utilize its flexible β-sandwich domain to recognize and interact with a broad range of misfolded proteins.

  11. Activin Signaling Targeted by Insulin/dFOXO Regulates Aging and Muscle Proteostasis in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Hua; Kang, Ping; Hernandez, Ana Maria; Tatar, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Reduced insulin/IGF signaling increases lifespan in many animals. To understand how insulin/IGF mediates lifespan in Drosophila, we performed chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing analysis with the insulin/IGF regulated transcription factor dFOXO in long-lived insulin/IGF signaling genotypes. Dawdle, an Activin ligand, is bound and repressed by dFOXO when reduced insulin/IGF extends lifespan. Reduced Activin signaling improves performance and protein homeostasis in muscles of aged flies. Activin signaling through the Smad binding element inhibits the transcription of Autophagy-specific gene 8a (Atg8a) within muscle, a factor controlling the rate of autophagy. Expression of Atg8a within muscle is sufficient to increase lifespan. These data reveal how insulin signaling can regulate aging through control of Activin signaling that in turn controls autophagy, representing a potentially conserved molecular basis for longevity assurance. While reduced Activin within muscle autonomously retards functional aging of this tissue, these effects in muscle also reduce secretion of insulin-like peptides at a distance from the brain. Reduced insulin secretion from the brain may subsequently reinforce longevity assurance through decreased systemic insulin/IGF signaling. PMID:24244197

  12. Targeting Wnt signaling at the neuroimmune interface for dopaminergic neuroprotection/repair in Parkinson’s disease

    PubMed Central

    L’Episcopo, Francesca; Tirolo, Cataldo; Caniglia, Salvo; Testa, Nuccio; Morale, Maria Concetta; Serapide, Maria Francesca; Pluchino, Stefano; Marchetti, Bianca

    2014-01-01

    During the past three decades, the Wingless-type MMTV integration site (Wnt) signaling cascade has emerged as an essential system regulating multiple processes in developing and adult brain. Accumulating evidence points to a dysregulation of Wnt signaling in major neurodegenerative pathologies including Parkinson’s disease (PD), a common neurodegenerative disorder characterized by the progressive loss of midbrain dopaminergic (mDA) neurons and deregulated activation of astrocytes and microglia. This review highlights the emerging link between Wnt signaling and key inflammatory pathways during mDA neuron damage/repair in PD progression. In particular, we summarize recent evidence documenting that aging and neurotoxicant exposure strongly antagonize Wnt/β-catenin signaling in mDA neurons and subventricular zone (SVZ) neuroprogenitors via astrocyte–microglial interactions. Dysregulation of the crosstalk between Wnt/β-catenin signaling and anti-oxidant/anti-inflammatory pathways delineate novel mechanisms driving the decline of SVZ plasticity with age and the limited nigrostriatal dopaminergic self-repair in PD. These findings hold a promise in developing therapies that target Wnt/β-catenin signaling to enhance endogenous restoration and neuronal outcome in age-dependent diseases, such as PD. PMID:24431301

  13. Acoustic wavefield and Mach wave radiation of flashing arcs in strombolian explosion measured by image luminance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genco, Riccardo; Ripepe, Maurizio; Marchetti, Emanuele; Bonadonna, Costanza; Biass, Sebastien

    2014-10-01

    Explosive activity often generates visible flashing arcs in the volcanic plume considered as the evidence of the shock-front propagation induced by supersonic dynamics. High-speed image processing is used to visualize the pressure wavefield associated with flashing arcs observed in strombolian explosions. Image luminance is converted in virtual acoustic signal compatible with the signal recorded by pressure transducer. Luminance variations are moving with a spherical front at a 344.7 m/s velocity. Flashing arcs travel at the sound speed already 14 m above the vent and are not necessarily the evidence of a supersonic explosive dynamics. However, seconds later, the velocity of small fragments increases, and the spherical acousto-luminance wavefront becomes planar recalling the Mach wave radiation generated by large scale turbulence in high-speed jet. This planar wavefront forms a Mach angle of 55° with the explosive jet axis, suggesting an explosive dynamics moving at Mo = 1.22 Mach number.

  14. Lysine conservation and context in TGFbeta and Wnt signaling suggest new targets and general themes for posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Konikoff, Charlotte E; Wisotzkey, Robert G; Newfeld, Stuart J

    2008-10-01

    TGFbeta and Wnt pathways play important roles in the development of animals from sponges to humans. In both pathways posttranslational modification as a means of regulating their function, such as lysine modification by ubiquitination and sumoylation, has been observed. However, a gap exists between the immunological observation of posttranslational modification and the identification of the target lysine. To fill this gap, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of lysine conservation and context in TGFbeta and Wnt pathway receptors and signal transducers and suggest numerous high-probability candidates for posttranslational modification. Further comparison of results from both pathways suggests two general features for biochemical regulation of intercellular signaling: receptors are less frequent targets for modification than signal transduction agonists, and a lysine adjacent to an upstream hydrophobic residue may be a preferred context for modification. Overall the results suggest numerous applications for an evolutionary approach to the biochemical regulation of developmental pathways, including (1) streamlining of the identification of the target lysine, (2) determination of when members of a multigene family acquire distinct activities, (3) application to any conserved protein family, and (4) application to any modification of a specific amino acid.

  15. Series-nonuniform rational B-spline signal feedback: From chaos to any embedded periodic orbit or target point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Chenxi; Xue, Yong; Fang, Fang; Bai, Fangzhou; Yin, Peifeng; Wang, Binghong

    2015-07-01

    The self-controlling feedback control method requires an external periodic oscillator with special design, which is technically challenging. This paper proposes a chaos control method based on time series non-uniform rational B-splines (SNURBS for short) signal feedback. It first builds the chaos phase diagram or chaotic attractor with the sampled chaotic time series and any target orbit can then be explicitly chosen according to the actual demand. Second, we use the discrete timing sequence selected from the specific target orbit to build the corresponding external SNURBS chaos periodic signal, whose difference from the system current output is used as the feedback control signal. Finally, by properly adjusting the feedback weight, we can quickly lead the system to an expected status. We demonstrate both the effectiveness and efficiency of our method by applying it to two classic chaotic systems, i.e., the Van der Pol oscillator and the Lorenz chaotic system. Further, our experimental results show that compared with delayed feedback control, our method takes less time to obtain the target point or periodic orbit (from the starting point) and that its parameters can be fine-tuned more easily.

  16. Series-nonuniform rational B-spline signal feedback: From chaos to any embedded periodic orbit or target point.

    PubMed

    Shao, Chenxi; Xue, Yong; Fang, Fang; Bai, Fangzhou; Yin, Peifeng; Wang, Binghong

    2015-07-01

    The self-controlling feedback control method requires an external periodic oscillator with special design, which is technically challenging. This paper proposes a chaos control method based on time series non-uniform rational B-splines (SNURBS for short) signal feedback. It first builds the chaos phase diagram or chaotic attractor with the sampled chaotic time series and any target orbit can then be explicitly chosen according to the actual demand. Second, we use the discrete timing sequence selected from the specific target orbit to build the corresponding external SNURBS chaos periodic signal, whose difference from the system current output is used as the feedback control signal. Finally, by properly adjusting the feedback weight, we can quickly lead the system to an expected status. We demonstrate both the effectiveness and efficiency of our method by applying it to two classic chaotic systems, i.e., the Van der Pol oscillator and the Lorenz chaotic system. Further, our experimental results show that compared with delayed feedback control, our method takes less time to obtain the target point or periodic orbit (from the starting point) and that its parameters can be fine-tuned more easily.

  17. Lysine Conservation and Context in TGFβ and Wnt Signaling Suggest New Targets and General Themes for Posttranslational Modification

    PubMed Central

    Konikoff, Charlotte E.; Wisotzkey, Robert G.; Newfeld, Stuart J.

    2009-01-01

    TGFβ and Wnt pathways play important roles in the development of animals from sponges to humans. In both pathways posttranslational modification as a means of regulating their function, such as lysine modification by ubiquitination and sumoylation, has been observed. However, a gap exists between the immunological observation of posttranslational modification and the identification of the target lysine. To fill this gap, we conducted a phylogenetic analysis of lysine conservation and context in TGFβ and Wnt pathway receptors and signal transducers and suggest numerous high-probability candidates for posttranslational modification. Further comparison of results from both pathways suggests two general features for biochemical regulation of intercellular signaling: receptors are less frequent targets for modification than signal transduction agonists, and a lysine adjacent to an upstream hydrophobic residue may be a preferred context for modification. Overall the results suggest numerous applications for an evolutionary approach to the biochemical regulation of developmental pathways, including (1) streamlining of the identification of the target lysine, (2) determination of when members of a multigene family acquire distinct activities, (3) application to any conserved protein family, and (4) application to any modification of a specific amino acid. PMID:18797952

  18. Series-nonuniform rational B-spline signal feedback: From chaos to any embedded periodic orbit or target point

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Chenxi Xue, Yong; Fang, Fang; Bai, Fangzhou; Yin, Peifeng; Wang, Binghong

    2015-07-15

    The self-controlling feedback control method requires an external periodic oscillator with special design, which is technically challenging. This paper proposes a chaos control method based on time series non-uniform rational B-splines (SNURBS for short) signal feedback. It first builds the chaos phase diagram or chaotic attractor with the sampled chaotic time series and any target orbit can then be explicitly chosen according to the actual demand. Second, we use the discrete timing sequence selected from the specific target orbit to build the corresponding external SNURBS chaos periodic signal, whose difference from the system current output is used as the feedback control signal. Finally, by properly adjusting the feedback weight, we can quickly lead the system to an expected status. We demonstrate both the effectiveness and efficiency of our method by applying it to two classic chaotic systems, i.e., the Van der Pol oscillator and the Lorenz chaotic system. Further, our experimental results show that compared with delayed feedback control, our method takes less time to obtain the target point or periodic orbit (from the starting point) and that its parameters can be fine-tuned more easily.

  19. Synthesis and physicochemical characterization of novel phenotypic probes targeting the nuclear factor-kappa B signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Hershberger, Paul M; Peddibhotla, Satyamaheshwar; Sessions, E Hampton; Divlianska, Daniela B; Correa, Ricardo G; Pinkerton, Anthony B; Reed, John C

    2013-01-01

    Summary Activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) and related upstream signal transduction pathways have long been associated with the pathogenesis of a variety of inflammatory diseases and has recently been implicated in the onset of cancer. This report provides a synthetic and compound-based property summary of five pathway-related small-molecule chemical probes identified and optimized within the National Institutes of Health-Molecular Libraries Probe Center Network (NIH-MLPCN) initiative. The chemical probes discussed herein represent first-in-class, non-kinase-based modulators of the NF-κB signaling pathway, which were identified and optimized through either cellular phenotypic or specific protein-target-based screening strategies. Accordingly, the resulting new chemical probes may allow for better fundamental understanding of this highly complex biochemical signaling network and could advance future therapeutic translation toward the clinical setting. PMID:23766805

  20. Bioluminescence-Based High-Throughput Screen Identifies Pharmacological Agents That Target Neurotransmitter Signaling in Small Cell Lung Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Improgo, Ma. Reina D.; Johnson, Christopher W.; Tapper, Andrew R.; Gardner, Paul D.

    2011-01-01

    Background Frontline treatment of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) relies heavily on chemotherapeutic agents and radiation therapy. Though SCLC patients respond well to initial cycles of chemotherapy, they eventually develop resistance. Identification of novel therapies against SCLC is therefore imperative. Methods and Findings We have designed a bioluminescence-based cell viability assay for high-throughput screening of anti-SCLC agents. The assay was first validated via standard pharmacological agents and RNA interference using two human SCLC cell lines. We then utilized the assay in a high-throughput screen using the LOPAC1280 compound library. The screening identified several drugs that target classic cancer signaling pathways as well as neuroendocrine markers in SCLC. In particular, perturbation of dopaminergic and serotonergic signaling inhibits SCLC cell viability. Conclusions The convergence of our pharmacological data with key SCLC pathway components reiterates the importance of neurotransmitter signaling in SCLC etiology and points to possible leads for drug development. PMID:21931655

  1. Membrane-to-Nucleus Signals and Epigenetic Mechanisms for Myofibroblastic Activation and Desmoplastic Stroma: Potential Therapeutic Targets for Liver Metastasis?

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Ningling; Shah, Vijay H.; Urrutia, Raul

    2015-01-01

    Cancer associated fibroblasts (CAFs), the most abundant cells in the tumor microenvironment (TME), are a key source of extracellular matrix (ECM) that constitutes the desmoplastic stroma. Through remodeling of the reactive tumor stroma and paracrine actions, CAFs regulate cancer initiation, progression, and metastasis, as well as tumor resistance to therapies. The CAFs found in stroma-rich primary hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) and liver metastases of primary cancers of other organs predominantly originate from hepatic stellate cells (HSTCs), which are pericytes associated with hepatic sinusoids. During tumor invasion, HSTCs transdifferentiate into myofibroblasts in response to paracrine signals emanating from either tumor cells or a heterogenous cell population within the hepatic tumor microenvironment. Mechanistically, HSTC-to-myofibroblast transdifferentiation, also known as, HSTC activation, requires cell surface receptor activation, intracellular signal transduction, gene transcription and epigenetic signals, which combined ultimately modulate distinct gene expression profiles that give rise to and maintain a new phenotype. The current review, defines a paradigm that explains how HSTCs are activated into CAFs to promote liver metastasis. Furthermore, focus on the most relevant intracellular signaling networks and epigenetic mechanisms that control HSTC activation is provided. Finally, we discuss the feasibility of targeting CAF/activated HSTCs, in isolation or in conjunction with targeting cancer cells, which constitutes a promising and viable therapeutic approach for the treatment of primary stroma-rich liver cancers and liver metastasis. PMID:25548101

  2. Targeting atypical protein kinase C iota reduces viability in glioblastoma stem-like cells via a notch signaling mechanism.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Emma; Lang, Verena; Bohlen, Jonathan; Bethke, Frederic; Puccio, Laura; Tichy, Diana; Herold-Mende, Christel; Hielscher, Thomas; Lichter, Peter; Goidts, Violaine

    2016-10-15

    In a previous study, Protein Kinase C iota (PRKCI) emerged as an important candidate gene for glioblastoma (GBM) stem-like cell (GSC) survival. Here, we show that PKCι is overexpressed and activated in patient derived GSCs compared with normal neural stem cells and normal brain lysate, and that silencing of PRKCI in GSCs causes apoptosis, along with loss of clonogenicity and reduced proliferation. Notably, PRKCI silencing reduces tumor growth in vivo in a xenograft mouse model. PKCι has been intensively studied as a therapeutic target in non-small cell lung cancer, resulting in the identification of an inhibitor, aurothiomalate (ATM), which disrupts the PKCι/ERK signaling axis. However, we show that, although sensitive to pharmacological inhibition via a pseudosubstrate peptide inhibitor, GSCs are much less sensitive to ATM, suggesting that PKCι acts along a different signaling axis in GSCs. Gene expression profiling of PRKCI-silenced GSCs revealed a novel role of the Notch signaling pathway in PKCι mediated GSC survival. A proximity ligation assay showed that Notch1 and PKCι are in close proximity in GSCs. Targeting PKCι in the context of Notch signaling could be an effective way of attacking the GSC population in GBM.

  3. Molecular approaches toward targeted cancer prevention with some food plants and their products: inflammatory and other signal pathways.

    PubMed

    Khuda-Bukhsh, Anisur Rahman; Das, Sreemanti; Saha, Santu Kumar

    2014-01-01

    In recent years, there has been growing interest in cancer prevention by food plants and their products. Although several plant parts have potentials for chemoprevention and other therapeutic use, their molecular mechanisms of action are not always well understood. Extensive research has identified several molecular targets that can potentially be used for the prevention and/or treatment of cancer. In this review, we accumulate evidences of modulating abilities of some dietary plants and their products on several signaling pathways, including the inflammatory and apoptotic ones, which may be targeted for cancer therapy. We have mainly focused on several phytochemicals like resveratrol (red grapes and peanuts), allicin (garlic), lycopene (tomato), indole-3-carbinol (cruciferous vegetables), vitamin C (citrus fruits), [6]-gingerol (ginger), emodin (aloe), natural antioxidant mixture (spinach), beta carotenoids (carrots), sulphoraphane (mustard), ellagic acid (pomegranate), myrecitin (cranberry), carnosol (rosemary), vanillin (vanilla) and eugenol (cloves). They act through one or more signaling pathways like nuclear factor kappa B, cyclooxygenase-2, signal transducer and activator of transcription 3, Akt, mitogen activated protein kinase/extracellular regulated kinase, Bcl-2, caspases, poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, matrix metalloproteinase 2/9, and cyclin D1. Critical knowledge on these compounds and their signaling pathways may help in formulation of effective anticancer drugs.

  4. Pharmacological targeting of AKAP-directed compartmentalized cAMP signalling.

    PubMed

    Dema, Alessandro; Perets, Ekaterina; Schulz, Maike Svenja; Deák, Veronika Anita; Klussmann, Enno

    2015-12-01

    The second messenger cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) can bind and activate protein kinase A (PKA). The cAMP/PKA system is ubiquitous and involved in a wide array of biological processes and therefore requires tight spatial and temporal regulation. Important components of the safeguard system are the A-kinase anchoring proteins (AKAPs), a heterogeneous family of scaffolding proteins defined by its ability to directly bind PKA. AKAPs tether PKA to specific subcellular compartments, and they bind further interaction partners to create local signalling hubs. The recent discovery of new AKAPs and advances in the field that shed light on the relevance of these hubs for human disease highlight unique opportunities for pharmacological modulation. This review exemplifies how interference with signalling, particularly cAMP signalling, at such hubs can reshape signalling responses and discusses how this could lead to novel pharmacological concepts for the treatment of disease with an unmet medical need such as cardiovascular disease and cancer.

  5. Targeting Ligand-Dependent and Ligand-Independent Androgen Receptor Signaling in Prostate Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    sub 10nM range efficacy. Our primary objective was to establish a series of compounds blocking the AR ligand-dependent and ligand-independent gene ...of AR driven genes to be more comprehensive and more in line with what is currently known about AR-driven signaling in prostate cancer. We have...developed a robust panel of genes for AR signaling that is reflective of the clinical findings in both ligand dependent and ligand-independent androgen

  6. Nuclear and nucleolar localization signals and their targeting function in phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase PI4K230

    SciTech Connect

    Kakuk, Annamaria; Friedlaender, Elza; Vereb, Gyoergy; Lisboa, Duarte; Bagossi, Peter; Toth, Gabor; Gergely, Pal; Vereb, Gyoergy

    2008-08-01

    PI4K230, an isoform of phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase, known primarily as a cytoplasmic membrane-bound enzyme, was detected recently also in the nucleolus of several cells. Here we provide mechanistic insight on the targeting function of its putative nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequences using molecular modeling, digitonin-permeabilized HeLa cells and binding to various importins. The synthetic sequence {sup 916}NFNHIHKRIRRVADKYLSG{sup 934} comprising a putative monopartite NLS (NLS1), targeted covalently bound fluorescent BSA to the nucleoplasm via classical importin {alpha}/{beta} mechanism employing importins {alpha}1 and {alpha}3 but not {alpha}5. This transport was inhibited by wheat germ agglutinin and GTP{gamma}S. The sequence {sup 1414}SKKTNRGSQLHKYYMKRRTL{sup 1433}, a putative bipartite NLS (NLS2) proved ineffective in nuclear targeting if conjugated to fluorescently labeled BSA. Nonetheless, NLS2 or either of its basic clusters directed to the nucleolus soybean trypsin inhibitor that can pass the nuclear pore complex passively; moreover, an expressed 58 kDa fragment of PI4K230 (AA1166-1667) comprising NLS2 was also imported into the nucleus by import factors of reticulocyte lysate or by importin {alpha}1/{beta} or {alpha}3/{beta} complexes and localized to the nucleolus. We conclude that the putative bipartite NLS itself is a nucleolar targeting signal, and for nuclear import PI4K230 requires a larger sequence around it or, alternatively, the monopartite NLS.

  7. Targeting cFMS signaling to restore immune function and eradicate HIV reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerngross, Lindsey

    While combination anti-retroviral therapy (cART) has improved the length and quality of life of individuals living with HIV-1 infection, the prevalence of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND) has increased and remains a significant clinical concern. The neuropathogenesis of HAND is not completely understood, however, latent HIV infection in the central nervous system (CNS) and chronic neuroinflammation are believed to play a prominent role. CNS-associated macrophages and resident microglia are significant contributors to CNS inflammation and constitute the chief reservoir of HIV-1 infection in the CNS. Previous studies from our lab suggest monocyte/macrophage invasion of the CNS in HIV may be driven by altered monocyte/macrophage homeostasis. We have reported expansion of a monocyte subset (CD14+CD16 +CD163+) in peripheral blood of HIV+ patients that is phenotypically similar to macrophages/microglia that accumulate in the CNS as seen in post-mortem tissue. The factors driving the expansion of this monocyte subset are unknown, however, signaling through cFMS, a type III receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK), may play a role. Macrophage-colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), a ligand of cFMS, has been shown to be elevated in the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) of individuals with the most severe form of HAND, HIV-associated dementia (HAD). M-CSF promotes a Macrophage-2-like phenotype and increases CD16 and CD163 expression in cultured monocytes. M-CSF has also been shown to increase the susceptibility of macrophages to HIV infection and enhance virus production. These findings, in addition to the known function of M-CSF in promoting macrophage survival, supports a role for M-CSF in the development and maintenance of macrophage viral reservoirs in tissues where these cells accumulate, including the CNS. Interestingly, a second ligand for cFMS, IL-34, was recently identified and reported to share some functions with M-CSF, suggesting that both ligands may contribute to HIV

  8. New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Nwabo Kamdje, Armel Hervé; Seke Etet, Paul Faustin; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2014-12-16

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed.

  9. New targeted therapies for breast cancer: A focus on tumor microenvironmental signals and chemoresistant breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Kamdje, Armel Hervé Nwabo; Etet, Paul Faustin Seke; Vecchio, Lorella; Tagne, Richard Simo; Amvene, Jeremie Mbo; Muller, Jean-Marc; Krampera, Mauro; Lukong, Kiven Erique

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent female malignancy worldwide. Current strategies in breast cancer therapy, including classical chemotherapy, hormone therapy, and targeted therapies, are usually associated with chemoresistance and serious adverse effects. Advances in our understanding of changes affecting the interactome in advanced and chemoresistant breast tumors have provided novel therapeutic targets, including, cyclin dependent kinases, mammalian target of rapamycin, Notch, Wnt and Shh. Inhibitors of these molecules recently entered clinical trials in mono- and combination therapy in metastatic and chemo-resistant breast cancers. Anticancer epigenetic drugs, mainly histone deacetylase inhibitors and DNA methyltransferase inhibitors, also entered clinical trials. Because of the complexity and heterogeneity of breast cancer, the future in therapy lies in the application of individualized tailored regimens. Emerging therapeutic targets and the implications for personalized-based therapy development in breast cancer are herein discussed. PMID:25516852

  10. Hedgehog signaling pathway regulated the target genes for adipogenesis in silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Liang, Shuang; Chen, Rui-Ting; Zhang, Deng-Pan; Xin, Hu-Hu; Lu, Yan; Wang, Mei-Xian; Miao, Yun-Gen

    2015-10-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) signals regulate invertebrate and vertebrate development, yet the role of the pathway in adipose development remains poorly understood. In this report, we found that Hh pathway components are expressed in the fat body of silkworm larvae. Functional analysis of these components in a BmN cell line model revealed that activation of the Hh gene stimulated transcription of Hh pathway components, but inhibited the expression of the adipose marker gene AP2. Conversely, specific RNA interference-mediated knockdown of Hh resulted in increased AP2 expression. This further showed the regulation of Hh signal on the adipose marker gene. In silkworm larval models, enhanced adipocyte differentiation and an increase in adipocyte cell size were observed in silkworms that had been treated with a specific Hh signaling pathway antagonist, cyclopamine. The fat-body-specific Hh blockade tests were consistent with Hh signaling inhibiting silkworm adipogenesis. Our results indicate that the role of Hh signaling in inhibiting fat formation is conserved in vertebrates and invertebrates.

  11. Possible Integrative Actions of Leptin and Insulin Signaling in the Hypothalamus Targeting Energy Homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Thon, Mina; Hosoi, Toru; Ozawa, Koichiro

    2016-01-01

    Obesity has emerged as one of the most burdensome conditions in modern society. In this context, understanding the mechanisms controlling food intake is critical. At present, the adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and the pancreatic β-cell-derived hormone insulin are considered the principal anorexigenic hormones. Although leptin and insulin signal transduction pathways are distinct, their regulation of body weight maintenance is concerted. Resistance to the central actions of leptin or insulin is linked to the emergence of obesity and diabetes mellitus. A growing body of evidence suggests a convergence of leptin and insulin intracellular signaling at the insulin–receptor–substrate–phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase level. Moreover, numerous factors mediating the pathophysiology of leptin resistance, a hallmark of obesity, such as endoplasmic reticulum stress, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and suppressor of cytokine signaling 3 also contribute to insulin resistance. Recent studies have also indicated that insulin potentiates leptin-induced signaling. Thus, a greater understanding of the overlapping functions of leptin and insulin in the central nervous system is vital to understand the associated physiological and pathophysiological states. This mini-review focuses on the cross talk and integrative signaling of leptin and insulin in the regulation of energy homeostasis in the brain. PMID:27812350

  12. The endocannabinoid signaling system: a potential target for next-generation therapeutics for alcoholism

    PubMed Central

    Basavarajappa, Balapal S.

    2007-01-01

    Research into the endocannabinoid signaling system has grown exponentially in recent years following the discovery of cannabinoid receptors (CB) and their endogenous ligands, such as anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG). Important advances have been made in our understanding of the endocannabinoid signaling system in various aspects of alcoholism, including alcohol-seeking behavior. Alcohol increases the synthesis or impairs the degradation of endocannabinoids, leading to a locally elevated endocannabinoid tone within the brain. Elevated endocannabinoid tone might be expected to result in compensatory down-regulation of CB1 receptors or dampened signal transduction. Following release, endocannabinoids diffuse back to the presynaptic neuron where they act as short-range modulators of synaptic activity by altering neurotransmitter release and synaptic plasticity. Mice treated with the CB1 receptor antagonist SR141716A (rimonabant) or homozygous for a deletion of the CB1 receptor gene exhibit reduced voluntary alcohol intake. CB1 knockout mice also show increased alcohol sensitivity, withdrawal, and reduced conditioned place preference. Conversely, activation of CB1 receptor promotes alcohol intake. Recent studies also suggest that elevated endocannabinoid tone due to impaired degradation contributes to high alcohol preference and self-administration. These effects are reversed by local administration of rimonabant, suggesting the participation of the endocannabinoid signaling system in high alcohol preference and self-administration. These recent advances will be reviewed with an emphasis on the endocannabinoid signaling system for possible therapeutic interventions of alcoholism. PMID:17692039

  13. Blocking CD40-TRAF6 signaling is a therapeutic target in obesity-associated insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chatzigeorgiou, Antonios; Seijkens, Tom; Zarzycka, Barbara; Engel, David; Poggi, Marjorie; van den Berg, Susan; van den Berg, Sjoerd; Soehnlein, Oliver; Winkels, Holger; Beckers, Linda; Lievens, Dirk; Driessen, Ann; Kusters, Pascal; Biessen, Erik; Garcia-Martin, Ruben; Klotzsche-von Ameln, Anne; Gijbels, Marion; Noelle, Randolph; Boon, Louis; Hackeng, Tilman; Schulte, Klaus-Martin; Xu, Aimin; Vriend, Gert; Nabuurs, Sander; Chung, Kyoung-Jin; Willems van Dijk, Ko; Rensen, Patrick C. N.; Gerdes, Norbert; de Winther, Menno; Block, Norman L.; Schally, Andrew V.; Weber, Christian; Bornstein, Stefan R.; Nicolaes, Gerry; Chavakis, Triantafyllos; Lutgens, Esther

    2014-01-01

    The immune system plays an instrumental role in obesity and insulin resistance. Here, we unravel the role of the costimulatory molecule CD40 and its signaling intermediates, TNF receptor-associated factors (TRAFs), in diet-induced obesity (DIO). Although not exhibiting increased weight gain, male CD40−/− mice in DIO displayed worsened insulin resistance, compared with wild-type mice. This worsening was associated with excessive inflammation of adipose tissue (AT), characterized by increased accumulation of CD8+ T cells and M1 macrophages, and enhanced hepatosteatosis. Mice with deficient CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling in MHCII+ cells exhibited a similar phenotype in DIO as CD40−/− mice. In contrast, mice with deficient CD40-TRAF6 signaling in MHCII+ cells displayed no insulin resistance and showed a reduction in both AT inflammation and hepatosteatosis in DIO. To prove the therapeutic potential of inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 in obesity, DIO mice were treated with a small-molecule inhibitor that we designed to specifically block CD40-TRAF6 interactions; this compound improved insulin sensitivity, reduced AT inflammation, and decreased hepatosteatosis. Our study reveals that the CD40-TRAF2/3/5 signaling pathway in MHCII+ cells protects against AT inflammation and metabolic complications associated with obesity whereas CD40-TRAF6 interactions in MHCII+ cells aggravate these complications. Inhibition of CD40-TRAF6 signaling by our compound may provide a therapeutic option in obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:24492375

  14. Influence of adaptive-optics ocular aberration correction on visual acuity at different luminances and contrast polarities.

    PubMed

    Marcos, Susana; Sawides, Lucie; Gambra, Enrique; Dorronsoro, Carlos

    2008-10-06

    We evaluated the visual benefit of correcting astigmatism and high-order aberrations with adaptive optics (AO) on visual acuity (VA) measured at 7 different luminances (ranging from 0.8 to 50 cd/m(2)) and two contrast polarities (black letters on white background, BoW, and white letters on black background, WoB) on 7 subjects. For the BoW condition, VA increased with background luminance in both natural and AO-corrected conditions, and there was a benefit of AO correction at all luminances (by a factor of 1.29 on average across luminances). For WoB VA increased with foreground luminance but decreased for the highest luminances. In this reversed polarity condition AO correction increased VA by a factor of 1.13 on average and did not produce a visual benefit at high luminances. The improvement of VA (averaged across conditions) was significantly correlated (p = 0.04) with the amount of corrected aberrations (in terms of Strehl ratio). The improved performance with WoB targets with respect to BoW targets is decreased when correcting aberrations, suggesting a role of ocular aberrations in the differences in visual performance between contrast polarities.

  15. SUB-LUMINOUS {gamma}-RAY PULSARS

    SciTech Connect

    Romani, R. W.; Kerr, M.; Craig, H. A.; Johnston, S.; Cognard, I.; Smith, D. A.

    2011-09-01

    Most pulsars observed by the Fermi Large Area Telescope have {gamma}-ray luminosities scaling with spin-down power E-dot as L{sub {gamma}}{approx}(E-dot x 10{sup 33} erg s{sup -1}){sup 1/2}. However, there exist one detection and several upper limits an order of magnitude or more fainter than this trend. We describe these 'sub-luminous' {gamma}-ray pulsars and discuss the case for this being an orientation effect. Of the 12 known young radio pulsars with E-dot >10{sup 34} erg s{sup -1} and d {<=} 2 kpc several are substantially sub-luminous. The limited available geometrical constraints favor aligned geometries for these pulsars, although no one case for alignment is compelling. In this scenario GeV emission detected from such sub-luminous pulsars can be due to a lower altitude, lower-power accelerator gap.

  16. A targeted glycan-related gene screen reveals heparan sulfate proteoglycan sulfation regulates WNT and BMP trans-synaptic signaling.

    PubMed

    Dani, Neil; Nahm, Minyeop; Lee, Seungbok; Broadie, Kendal

    2012-01-01

    A Drosophila transgenic RNAi screen targeting the glycan genome, including all N/O/GAG-glycan biosynthesis/modification enzymes and glycan-binding lectins, was conducted to discover novel glycan functions in synaptogenesis. As proof-of-product, we characterized functionally paired heparan sulfate (HS) 6-O-sulfotransferase (hs6st) and sulfatase (sulf1), which bidirectionally control HS proteoglycan (HSPG) sulfation. RNAi knockdown of hs6st and sulf1 causes opposite effects on functional synapse development, with decreased (hs6st) and increased (sulf1) neurotransmission strength confirmed in null mutants. HSPG co-receptors for WNT and BMP intercellular signaling, Dally-like Protein and Syndecan, are differentially misregulated in the synaptomatrix of these mutants. Consistently, hs6st and sulf1 nulls differentially elevate both WNT (Wingless; Wg) and BMP (Glass Bottom Boat; Gbb) ligand abundance in the synaptomatrix. Anterograde Wg signaling via Wg receptor dFrizzled2 C-terminus nuclear import and retrograde Gbb signaling via synaptic MAD phosphorylation and nuclear import are differentially activated in hs6st and sulf1 mutants. Consequently, transcriptional control of presynaptic glutamate release machinery and postsynaptic glutamate receptors is bidirectionally altered in hs6st and sulf1 mutants, explaining the bidirectional change in synaptic functional strength. Genetic correction of the altered WNT/BMP signaling restores normal synaptic development in both mutant conditions, proving that altered trans-synaptic signaling causes functional differentiation defects.

  17. Benzo[a]pyrene-induced nitric oxide production acts as a survival signal targeting mitochondrial membrane potential.

    PubMed

    Hardonnière, Kévin; Huc, Laurence; Podechard, Normand; Fernier, Morgane; Tekpli, Xavier; Gallais, Isabelle; Sergent, Odile; Lagadic-Gossmann, Dominique

    2015-10-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), the prototype molecule of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, exhibits genotoxic and carcinogenic effects, which has led the International Agency for Research on Cancer to recognize it as a human carcinogen. Besides the well-known apoptotic signals triggered by B[a]P, survival signals have also been suggested to occur, both signals likely involved in cancer promotion. Our previous work showed that B[a]P induced an hyperpolarization of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) in rat hepatic epithelial F258 cells. Elevated ΔΨm plays a role in tumor development and progression, and nitric oxide (NO) has been suggested to be responsible for increases in ΔΨm. The present study therefore aimed at evaluating the impact of B[a]P on NO level in F258 cells, and at testing the putative role for NO as a survival signal, notably in link with ΔΨm. Our data demonstrated that B[a]P exposure resulted in an NO production which was dependent upon the activation of the inducible NO synthase. This enzyme activation involved AhR and possibly p53 activation. Preventing NO production not only increased B[a]P-induced cell death but also blocked mitochondrial hyperpolarization. This therefore points to a role for NO as a survival signal upon B[a]P exposure, possibly targeting ΔΨm.

  18. Sphingosine-1-Phosphate (S1P) and S1P Signaling Pathway: Therapeutic Targets in Autoimmunity and Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Hsing-Chuan; Han, May H

    2016-07-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and S1P receptors (S1PR) are ubiquitously expressed. S1P-S1PR signaling has been well characterized in immune trafficking and activation in innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the full extent of its involvement in the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases is not well understood. FTY720 (fingolimod), a non-selective S1PR modulator, significantly decreased annualized relapse rates in relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS). FTY720, which primarily targets S1P receptor 1 as a functional antagonist, arrests lymphocyte egress from secondary lymphoid tissues and reduces neuroinflammation in the central nervous system (CNS). Recent studies suggest that FTY720 also decreases astrogliosis and promotes oligodendrocyte differentiation within the CNS and may have therapeutic benefit to prevent brain atrophy. Since S1P signaling is involved in multiple immune functions, therapies targeting S1P axis may be applicable to treat autoimmune diseases other than MS. Currently, over a dozen selective S1PR and S1P pathway modulators with potentially superior therapeutic efficacy and better side-effect profiles are in the pipeline of drug development. Furthermore, newly characterized molecules such as apolipoprotein M (ApoM) (S1P chaperon) and SPNS2 (S1P transporter) are also potential targets for treatment of autoimmune diseases. Finally, the application of therapies targeting S1P and S1P signaling pathways may be expanded to treat several other immune-mediated disorders (such as post-infectious diseases, post-stroke and post-stroke dementia) and inflammatory conditions beyond their application in primary autoimmune diseases.

  19. Isoflavones and PPAR Signaling: A Critical Target in Cardiovascular, Metastatic, and Metabolic Disease

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rakesh P.; Barnes, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    Isoflavone intake through foods and dietary supplements has both health advocates and critics. The latter come from a concern about the estrogenic effects of isoflavones in certain species. However, careful removal of isoflavones and other estrogens from the diet of rodents leads to the metabolic syndrome. These results suggest that isoflavones have other mechanisms of action, potentially those involving regulation of fatty acid metabolism via the nuclear receptors PPARα and PPARγ. The goal of this paper was to examine the evidence for isoflavone/PPAR signaling and to identify diseases in which such signaling would have an important impact. It is therefore of note that investigators using a chemical structure approach to discover PPAR ligands identified isoflavones as the best structures in the library of compounds that they tested. Future studies will involve careful identification of the underlying mechanisms whereby isoflavones have their action via PPAR signaling. PMID:21461045

  20. The sensory circumventricular organs: brain targets for circulating signals controlling ingestive behavior.

    PubMed

    Fry, Mark; Ferguson, Alastair V

    2007-07-24

    Sensory circumventricular organs (CVOs) are specialized areas of the brain that lack a normal blood-brain barrier, and therefore are in constant contact with signaling molecules circulating in the bloodstream. Neurons of the CVOs are well endowed with a wide spectrum of receptors for hormones and other signaling molecules, and they have strong connections to hypothalamic and brainstem nuclei. Therefore, lying at the blood-brain interface, the sensory CVOs are in a unique position of being able to detect and integrate humoral and neural information and relay the resulting signals to autonomic control centers of the hypothalamus and medulla. This review focuses primarily on the roles played by the sensory CVOs in fluid balance and energy metabolism.

  1. Phosphodiesterases: Regulators of cyclic nucleotide signals and novel molecular target for movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sorabh; Kumar, Kushal; Deshmukh, Rahul; Sharma, Pyare Lal

    2013-08-15

    Movement disorders rank among the most common neurological disorders. During the last two decades substantial progress has been made in understanding of the pathological basis of these disorders. Although, several mechanisms have been proposed, downregulation of cyclic nucleotide mediated signaling cascade has consistently been shown to contribute to the striatal dysfunctioning as seen in movement disorders. Thus, counteracting dysregulated cyclic nucleotide signaling has been considered to be beneficial in movement disorders. Cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterases (PDEs) are the enzymes responsible for the breakdown of cyclic nucleotides and upregulation in PDE activity has been reported in various movement disorders. Thus, PDE inhibition is considered to be a novel strategy to restore cerebral cyclic nucleotide levels and their downstream signalling cascade. Indeed, various PDE inhibitors have been tested pre-clinically and were reported to be neuroprotective in various neurodegenerative disorders associated with movement disabilities. In this review, we have discussed a putative role of PDE inhibitors in movement disorders and associated abnormalities.

  2. The cyclic AMP signaling pathway: Exploring targets for successful drug discovery (Review)

    PubMed Central

    YAN, KUO; GAO, LI-NA; CUI, YUAN-LU; ZHANG, YI; ZHOU, XIN

    2016-01-01

    During development of disease, complex intracellular signaling pathways regulate an intricate series of events, including resistance to external toxins, the secretion of cytokines and the production of pathological phenomena. Adenosine 3′,5′-cyclic monophosphate (cAMP) is a nucleotide that acts as a key second messenger in numerous signal transduction pathways. cAMP regulates various cellular functions, including cell growth and differentiation, gene transcription and protein expression. This review aimed to provide an understanding of the effects of the cAMP signaling pathway and the associated factors on disease occurrence and development by examining the information from a new perspective. These novel insights aimed to promote the development of novel therapeutic approaches and aid in the development of new drugs. PMID:27035868

  3. Calcium-Sensing Receptor: A Key Target for Extracellular Calcium Signaling in Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Brian L.; Smith, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    Though both clinicians and scientists have long recognized the influence of extracellular calcium on the function of muscle and nervous tissue, recent insights reveal that the mechanisms allowing changes in extracellular calcium to alter cellular excitability have been incompletely understood. For many years the effects of calcium on neuronal signaling were explained only in terms of calcium entry through voltage-gated calcium channels and biophysical charge screening. More recently however, it has been recognized that the calcium-sensing receptor is prevalent in the nervous system and regulates synaptic transmission and neuronal activity via multiple signaling pathways. Here we review the multiplicity of mechanisms by which changes in extracellular calcium alter neuronal signaling and propose that multiple mechanisms are required to describe the full range of experimental observations. PMID:27065884

  4. Altered sympathetic nervous system signaling in the diabetic heart: emerging targets for molecular imaging

    PubMed Central

    Thackeray, James T; Beanlands, Rob S; DaSilva, Jean N

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes is commonly associated with increased risk of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Perturbations in sympathetic nervous system (SNS) signaling have been linked to the progression of diabetic heart disease. Glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids contribute to elevated sympathetic nervous activity and norepinephrine release. Reduced left ventricular compliance and impaired cardiac function lead to further SNS activation. Chronic elevation of cardiac norepinephrine culminates in altered expression of pre- and post-synaptic sympathetic signaling elements, changes in calcium regulatory proteins, and abnormal contraction-excitation coupling. Clinically, these factors manifest as altered resting heart rate, depressed heart rate variability, and impaired cardiac autonomic reflex, which may contribute to elevated cardiovascular risk. Development of molecular imaging probes enable a comprehensive evaluation of cardiac SNS signaling at the neuron, postsynaptic receptor, and intracellular second messenger sites of signal transduction, providing mechanistic insights into cardiac pathology. This review will examine the evidence for abnormal SNS signaling in the diabetic heart and establish the physiological consequences of these changes, drawing from basic biological research in isolated heart and rodent models of diabetes, as well as from clinical reports. Particular attention will be paid to the use of molecular imaging approaches to non-invasively characterize and evaluate sympathetic signal transduction in diabetes, including pre-synaptic norepinephrine reuptake assessment using 11C-meta-hydroxyephedrine (11C-HED) with PET or 123I-metaiodobenzylguanidine (123I-MIBG) with SPECT, and postsynaptic β-adrenoceptor density measurements using CGP12177 derivatives. Finally, the review will attempt to define the future role of these non-invasive nuclear imaging techniques in diabetes research and clinical care. PMID:23133819

  5. Mesopic luminance assessed with minimum motion photometry.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Sabine; MacLeod, Donald I A

    2011-08-25

    We measured the relative contribution of rods and cones to luminance across a range of photopic, mesopic, and scotopic adaptation levels and at various retinal eccentricities. We isolated the luminance channel by setting motion-based luminance nulls (minimum motion photometry) using annular stimuli. Luminance nulls between differently colored stimuli require equality in a weighted sum of rod and cone excitations. The relative cone weight increases smoothly from the scotopic range, where rods dominate, to photopic levels, where rod influence becomes negligible. The change from rod to cone vision does not occur uniformly over the visual field. The more peripheral the stimulus location, the higher is the light level required for cones to participate strongly. The relative cone contribution can be described by a sigmoid function of intensity, with two parameters that each depend on the eccentricity and spatial frequency of the stimulus. One parameter determines the "meso-mesopic" luminance--the center of the mesopic range, at which rod and cone contributions are balanced. This increases with eccentricity, reflecting an increase in the meso-mesopic luminance from 0.04 scotopic cd/m(2) at 2° eccentricity to 0.44 scotopic cd/m(2) at 18°. The second parameter represents the slope of the log-log threshold-versus-intensity curve (TVI curve) for rod vision. This parameter inversely scales the width of the mesopic range and increases only slightly with eccentricity (from 0.73 at 2° to 0.78 for vision at 18° off-axis).

  6. Spreading dilatation to luminal perfusion of ATP and UTP in rat isolated small mesenteric arteries

    PubMed Central

    Winter, Polly; Dora, Kim A

    2007-01-01

    Levels of ATP achieved within the lumen of vessels suggest a key autacoid role. P2Y receptors on the endothelium may represent the target for ATP, leading to hyperpolarization and associated relaxation of vascular smooth muscle through the endothelium-dependent hyperpolarizing factor (EDHF) pathway. EDHF signals radially from the endothelium to cause dilatation, and appears mechanistically distinct from the axial spread of dilatation, which we showed occurs independently of a change in endothelial cell Ca2+ in rat mesenteric arteries. Here we have investigated the potential of P2Y receptor stimulation to evoke spreading dilatation in rat resistance small arteries under physiological pressure and flow. Triple cannulation of isolated arteries enables focal application of purine and pyrimidine nucleotides to the endothelium, avoiding potential complicating actions of these agents on the smooth muscle. Nucleotides were locally infused through one branch of a bifurcation, causing near maximal local dilatation attributable to EDHF. Dilatation then spread rapidly into the adjacent feed artery and upstream against the direction of luminal flow, sufficient to increase flow into the feed artery. The rate of decay of this spreading dilatation was identical between nucleotides, and matched that to ACh, which acts only on the endothelium. In contrast, focal abluminal application of either ATP or UTP at the downstream end of cannulated arteries evoked constriction, which only in the case of ATP was also associated with modest spread of dilatation. The non-hydrolysable ADP analogue, ADPβS, acting at P2Y1 receptors, caused robust local and spreading dilatation responses whether applied to the luminal or abluminal surface of pressurized arteries. Dilatation to nucleotides was sensitive to inhibition with apamin and TRAM-34, selective blockers of small- and intermediate-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively. These data demonstrate that direct luminal stimulation of P

  7. Targeting prostate cancer based on signal transduction and cell cycle pathways

    PubMed Central

    Lee, John T.; Lehmann, Brian D.; Terrian, David M.; Chappell, William H.; Stivala, Franca; Libra, Massimo; Martelli, Alberto M.; Steelman, Linda S.

    2008-01-01

    Prostate cancer remains a leading cause of death in men despite increased capacity to diagnose at earlier stages. After prostate cancer has become hormone independent, which often occurs after hormonal ablation therapies, it is difficult to effectively treat. Prostate cancer may arise from mutations and dysregulation of various genes involved in regulation signal transduction (e.g., PTEN, Akt, etc.,) and the cell cycle (e.g., p53, p21Cip1, p27Kip1, Rb, etc.,). This review focuses on the aberrant interactions of signal transduction and cell cycle genes products and how they can contribute to prostate cancer and alter therapeutic effectiveness. PMID:18594202

  8. Desipramine targets astrocytes to attenuate synaptic plasticity via modulation of the ephrinA3/EphA4 signalling.

    PubMed

    Tanasic, Sascha; Mattusch, Corinna; Wagner, Eva Maria; Eder, Matthias; Rupprecht, Rainer; Rammes, Gerhard; Di Benedetto, Barbara

    2016-06-01

    Long-term potentiation (LTP), a major cellular correlate of memory storage, depends on activation of the ERK/MAPK signalling pathway, but the cell type-specific localization of activated MAPKs remains unknown. We found that in the CA1 field of the hippocampus, shortly after LTP induction, an increase in the number of MAPK-positive cells occurred specifically among astrocytes of the stratum radiatum, suggesting a putative role of astrocytes for LTP. Desipramine (DMI) is an antidepressant which is used to treat major depressive disorder, but also other pathologies such as neuropathic pain or attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder. Tricyclic antidepressants such as DMI may cause memory impairment as a side effect. However, biological underpinnings of this effect still remain unclear. Here, we show that DMI inhibited the astrocytic MAPK activation and thereby hindered synaptic potentiation. These effects correlated with a reduced neuronal activation in the stratum pyramidale, thereby prompting us to analyse a regulator of LTP located at the astrocyte-neuron interface in the stratum radiatum, namely the ephrinA3/EphA4 signalling pathway. DMI enhanced EphA4 clustering, which favoured an increased ephrinA3-mediated EphA4 phosphorylation and elevated EphA4 forward signalling. The co-administration of DMI with the Src inhibitor SU6656, which blocks EphA4 forward signalling, could partially reverse the LTP attenuation, further supporting the targeting of the ephrinA3/EphA4 pathway by DMI. Thus, our findings suggest a putative novel mechanism for DMI to modulate LTP through the regulation of the ephrinA3/EphA4 signalling pathway. A further exploration of the molecular and behavioral consequences of targeting ephrinA3/EphA4 might help to improve the clinical use of DMI.

  9. Integration of target and hand position signals in the posterior parietal cortex: effects of workspace and hand vision.

    PubMed

    Buneo, Christopher A; Andersen, Richard A

    2012-07-01

    Previous findings suggest the posterior parietal cortex (PPC) contributes to arm movement planning by transforming target and limb position signals into a desired reach vector. However, the neural mechanisms underlying this transformation remain unclear. In the present study we examined the responses of 109 PPC neurons as movements were planned and executed to visual targets presented over a large portion of the reaching workspace. In contrast to previous studies, movements were made without concurrent visual and somatic cues about the starting position of the hand. For comparison, a subset of neurons was also examined with concurrent visual and somatic hand position cues. We found that single cells integrated target and limb position information in a very consistent manner across the reaching workspace. Approximately two-thirds of the neurons with significantly tuned activity (42/61 and 30/46 for left and right workspaces, respectively) coded targets and initial hand positions separably, indicating no hand-centered encoding, whereas the remaining one-third coded targets and hand positions inseparably, in a manner more consistent with the influence of hand-centered coordinates. The responses of both types of neurons were largely invariant with respect to the presence or absence of visual hand position cues, suggesting their corresponding coordinate frames and gain effects were unaffected by cue integration. The results suggest that the PPC uses a consistent scheme for computing reach vectors in different parts of the workspace that is robust to changes in the availability of somatic and visual cues about hand position.

  10. Inhibition of Nod2 signaling and target gene expression by curcumin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nod2 is an intracellular pattern recognition receptor that detects a conserved moiety of bacterial peptidoglycan and subsequently activates proinflammatory signaling pathways. Mutations in Nod2 have been implicated to be linked to inflammatory granulomatous disorders, such as Crohn’s disease and Bla...

  11. Targeted loss of SHP1 in murine thymocytes dampens TCR signaling late in selection.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ryan J; Morris, Anna B; Neeld, Dennis K; Evavold, Brian D

    2016-09-01

    SHP1 is a tyrosine phosphatase critical to proximal regulation of TCR signaling. Here, analysis of CD4-Cre SHP1(fl/fl) conditional knockout thymocytes using CD53, TCRβ, CD69, CD4, and CD8α expression demonstrates the importance of SHP1 in the survival of post selection (CD53(+) ), single-positive thymocytes. Using Ca(2+) flux to assess the intensity of TCR signaling demonstrated that SHP1 dampens the signal strength of these same mature, postselection thymocytes. Consistent with its dampening effect, TCR signal strength was also probed functionally using peptides that can mediate selection of the OT-I TCR, to reveal increased negative selection mediated by lower-affinity ligand in the absence of SHP1. Our data show that SHP1 is required for the survival of mature thymocytes and the generation of the functional T-cell repertoire, as its absence leads to a reduction in the numbers of CD4(+) and CD8(+) naïve T cells in the peripheral lymphoid compartments.

  12. Peptides targeting Toll-like receptor signalling pathways for novel immune therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gomariz, R P; Gutiérrez-Cañas, I; Arranz, A; Carrión, M; Juarranz, Y; Leceta, J; Martínez, C

    2010-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are a family of key proteins that permit mammals to detect microbes and endogenous molecules, which are present in body fluids, cell membranes and cytoplasm. They confer mechanisms to the host for maintaining homeostasis, activating innate immunity and inducing signals that lead to the activation of adaptive immunity. TLR signalling induces the expression of pro-inflammatory and anti-viral genes through different and intricate pathways. However, persistent signalling can be dangerous and all members of the TLR family are involved in the pathogenesis of acute and chronic inflammation, autoimmunity, allergy, cancer and aging. The pharmaceutical industry has begun intensive work developing novel immunotherapeutic approaches based on both activation and inhibition of TLR triggering. Further, clinical trials are pending to evaluate TLR agonists as novel vaccine adjuvants and for the treatment of infectious diseases, allergic diseases and asthma. Since systemic, metabolic and neuroendocrine changes are elicited by inflammation, TLR activity is susceptible of regulation by hormones and neuroendocrine factors. Neuroendocrine mediators are important players in modulating different phases of TLR regulation contributing to the endogenous control of homeostasis through local, regional and systemic routes. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) is an important signal molecule of the neuroendocrine-immune network that has recently emerged as a potential candidate for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune disorders by controlling innate and adaptive immunity. This review shows current advances in the understanding of TLR modulation by VIP that could contribute to the use of this natural peptide as a therapeutic tool.

  13. LMO2 attenuates tumor growth by targeting the Wnt signaling pathway in breast and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Ye; Huang, Di; Wang, Zhaoyang; Wu, Chao; Zhang, Zhao; Wang, Dan; Li, Zongjin; Zhu, Tianhui; Yang, Shuang; Sun, Wei

    2016-01-01

    The proto-oncogene LIM-domain only 2 (lmo2) was traditionally considered to be a pivotal transcriptional regulator in hematopoiesis and leukemia. Recently, the cytosolic localization of LMO2 was revealed in multiple epithelial tissues and a variety of solid tumors. However, the function of LMO2 in these epithelia and solid tumors remains largely unclear. The Wnt signaling pathway is a crucial determinant of development, and abnormalities in several key segments of this pathway contribute to oncogenesis. The current study demonstrated that LMO2 participates in the regulation of canonical Wnt signaling in the cytoplasm by binding to Dishevelled-1/2 (DVL-1/2) proteins. These interactions occurred at the PDZ domain of Dishevelled, and LMO2 subsequently attenuated the activation of the key factor β-catenin in the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. Meanwhile, significantly decreased expression of LMO2 was detected in breast and colorectal cancers, and the downregulation of LMO2 in these cells increased cell proliferation and reduced apoptosis. Taken together, the data in this study revealed a novel crosstalk between LMO2 and the Wnt signaling pathway during tumorigenesis and suggested that LMO2 might be a tumor suppressor in certain solid tumors, in contrast to its traditional oncogenic role in the hematopoietic system. PMID:27779255

  14. The Sts Proteins Target Tyrosine Phosphorylated, Ubiquitinated Proteins within TCR Signaling Pathways

    SciTech Connect

    Carpino, N.; Chen, Y; Nassar, N; Oh, H

    2009-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) detects the presence of infectious pathogens and activates numerous intracellular signaling pathways. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination serve as key regulatory mechanisms downstream of the TCR. Negative regulation of TCR signaling pathways is important in controlling the immune response, and the Suppressor of TCR Signaling proteins (Sts-1 and Sts-2) have been shown to function as critical negative regulators of TCR signaling. Although their mechanism of action has yet to be fully uncovered, it is known that the Sts proteins possess intrinsic phosphatase activity. Here, we demonstrate that Sts-1 and Sts-2 are instrumental in down-modulating proteins that are dually modified by both protein tyrosine phosphorylation and ubiquitination. Specifically, both naive and activated T cells derived from genetically engineered mice that lack the Sts proteins display strikingly elevated levels of tyrosine phosphorylated, ubiquitinated proteins following TCR stimulation. The accumulation of the dually modified proteins is transient, and in activated T cells but not naive T cells is significantly enhanced by co-receptor engagement. Our observations hint at a novel regulatory mechanism downstream of the T cell receptor.

  15. Nuclear hormone receptor signals as new therapeutic targets for urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, H; Zheng, Y; Izumi, K

    2012-01-01

    Unlike prostate and breast cancers, urothelial carcinoma of the urinary bladder is not yet considered as an endocrine-related neoplasm, and hormonal therapy for bladder cancer remains experimental. Nonetheless, there is increasing evidence indicating that nuclear hormone receptor signals are implicated in the development and progression of bladder cancer. Androgen-mediated androgen receptor (AR) signals have been convincingly shown to induce bladder tumorigenesis. Androgens also promote the growth of AR-positive bladder cancer cells, although it is controversial whether AR plays a dominant role in bladder cancer progression. Both stimulatory and inhibitory functions of estrogen receptor signals in bladder cancer have been reported. Various studies have also demonstrated the involvement of other nuclear receptors, including progesterone receptor, glucocorticoid receptor, vitamin D receptor, and retinoid receptors, as well as some orphan receptors, in bladder cancer. This review summarizes and discusses available data suggesting the modulation of bladder carcinogenesis and cancer progression via nuclear hormone receptor signaling pathways. These pathways have the potential to be an extremely important area of bladder cancer research, leading to the development of effective chemopreventive/therapeutic approaches, using hormonal manipulation. Considerable uncertainty remains regarding the selection of patients who are likely to benefit from hormonal therapy and optimal options for the treatment.

  16. Inhibition of Pten deficient Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer by Targeting of the SET - PP2A Signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xiaoyong; Garcia, Consuelo; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Vitek, Michael P; Jansen, Marilyn; Christensen, Dale; Mulholland, David J

    2015-11-13

    The PP2A signaling axis regulates multiple oncogenic drivers of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We show that targeting the endogenous PP2A regulator, SET (I2PP2A), is a viable strategy to inhibit prostate cancers that are resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. Our data is corroborated by analysis of prostate cancer patient cohorts showing significant elevation of SET transcripts. Tissue microarray analysis reveals that elevated SET expression correlates with clinical cancer grading, duration of neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) and time to biochemical recurrence. Using prostate regeneration assays, we show that in vivo SET overexpression is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Knockdown of SET induced significant reductions in tumorgenesis both in murine and human xenograft models. To further validate SET as a therapeutic target, we conducted in vitro and in vivo treatments using OP449 - a recently characterized PP2A-activating drug (PAD). OP449 elicits robust anti-cancer effects inhibiting growth in a panel of enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Using the Pten conditional deletion mouse model of prostate cancer, OP449 potently inhibited PI3K-Akt signaling and impeded CRPC progression. Collectively, our data supports a critical role for the SET-PP2A signaling axis in CRPC progression and hormone resistant disease.

  17. Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase type IV is a target gene of the Wnt/beta-catenin signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Arrázola, Macarena S; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Colombres, Marcela; Toledo, Enrique M; Cruzat, Fernando; Pavez, Leonardo; Assar, Rodrigo; Aravena, Andrés; González, Mauricio; Montecino, Martín; Maass, Alejandro; Martínez, Servet; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C

    2009-12-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaMKIV) plays a key role in the regulation of calcium-dependent gene expression. The expression of CaMKIV and the activation of CREB regulated genes are involved in memory and neuronal survival. We report here that: (a) a bioinformatic analysis of 15,476 promoters of the human genome predicted several Wnt target genes, being CaMKIV a very interesting candidate; (b) CaMKIV promoter contains TCF/LEF transcription motifs similar to those present in Wnt target genes; (c) biochemical studies indicate that lithium and the canonical ligand Wnt-3a induce CaMKIV mRNA and protein expression levels in rat hippocampal neurons as well as CaMKIV promoter activity; (d) treatment of hippocampal neurons with Wnt-3a increases the binding of beta-catenin to the CaMKIV promoter: (e) In vivo activation of the Wnt signaling improve spatial memory impairment and restores the expression of CaMKIV in a mice double transgenic model for Alzheimer's disease which shows decreased levels of the kinase. We conclude that CaMKIV is regulated by the Wnt signaling pathway and that its expression could play a role in the neuroprotective function of the Wnt signaling against the Alzheimer's amyloid peptide.

  18. An Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanism drives antibody-mediated target-receptor signaling in cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Nicholas S; Yang, Becky; Yang, Annie; Loeser, Stefanie; Marsters, Scot; Lawrence, David; Li, Yun; Pitti, Robert; Totpal, Klara; Yee, Sharon; Ross, Sarajane; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Lu, Yanmei; Adams, Cam; Offringa, Rienk; Kelley, Bob; Hymowitz, Sarah; Daniel, Dylan; Meng, Gloria; Ashkenazi, Avi

    2011-01-18

    Antibodies to cell-surface antigens trigger activatory Fcγ receptor (FcγR)-mediated retrograde signals in leukocytes to control immune effector functions. Here, we uncover an FcγR mechanism that drives antibody-dependent forward signaling in target cells. Agonistic antibodies to death receptor 5 (DR5) induce cancer-cell apoptosis and are in clinical trials; however, their mechanism of action in vivo is not fully defined. Interaction of the DR5-agonistic antibody drozitumab with leukocyte FcγRs promoted DR5-mediated tumor-cell apoptosis. Whereas the anti-CD20 antibody rituximab required activatory FcγRs for tumoricidal function, drozitumab was effective in the context of either activatory or inhibitory FcγRs. A CD40-agonistic antibody required similar FcγR interactions to stimulate nuclear factor-κB activity in B cells. Thus, FcγRs can drive antibody-mediated receptor signaling in target cells.

  19. Inhibition of Pten deficient Castration Resistant Prostate Cancer by Targeting of the SET - PP2A Signaling axis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaoyong; Garcia, Consuelo; Fazli, Ladan; Gleave, Martin; Vitek, Michael P.; Jansen, Marilyn; Christensen, Dale; Mulholland, David J

    2015-01-01

    The PP2A signaling axis regulates multiple oncogenic drivers of castration resistant prostate cancer (CRPC). We show that targeting the endogenous PP2A regulator, SET (I2PP2A), is a viable strategy to inhibit prostate cancers that are resistant to androgen deprivation therapy. Our data is corroborated by analysis of prostate cancer patient cohorts showing significant elevation of SET transcripts. Tissue microarray analysis reveals that elevated SET expression correlates with clinical cancer grading, duration of neoadjuvant hormone therapy (NHT) and time to biochemical recurrence. Using prostate regeneration assays, we show that in vivo SET overexpression is sufficient to induce hyperplasia and prostatic intraepithelial neoplasia. Knockdown of SET induced significant reductions in tumorgenesis both in murine and human xenograft models. To further validate SET as a therapeutic target, we conducted in vitro and in vivo treatments using OP449 - a recently characterized PP2A-activating drug (PAD). OP449 elicits robust anti-cancer effects inhibiting growth in a panel of enzalutamide resistant prostate cancer cell lines. Using the Pten conditional deletion mouse model of prostate cancer, OP449 potently inhibited PI3K-Akt signaling and impeded CRPC progression. Collectively, our data supports a critical role for the SET-PP2A signaling axis in CRPC progression and hormone resistant disease. PMID:26563471

  20. Cathepsin-Mediated Alterations in TGFß-Related Signaling Underlie Disrupted Cartilage and Bone Maturation Associated With Impaired Lysosomal Targeting

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Aarnio, Megan; Kwan, Brian; Guihard, Pierre; Petrey, Aaron; Haskins, Mark; Blanchard, Frederic; Steet, Richard

    2015-01-01

    Hypersecretion of acid hydrolases is a hallmark feature of mucolipidosis II (MLII), a lysosomal storage disease caused by loss of carbohydrate-dependent lysosomal targeting. Inappropriate extracellular action of these hydrolases is proposed to contribute to skeletal pathogenesis, but the mechanisms that connect hydrolase activity to the onset of disease phenotypes remain poorly understood. Here we link extracellular cathepsin K activity to abnormal bone and cartilage development in MLII animals by demonstrating that it disrupts the balance of TGFß-related signaling during chondrogenesis. TGFß-like Smad2,3 signals are elevated and BMP-like Smad1,5,8 signals reduced in both feline and zebrafish MLII chondrocytes and osteoblasts, maintaining these cells in an immature state. Reducing either cathepsin K activity or expression of the transcriptional regulator Sox9a in MLII zebrafish significantly improved phenotypes. We further identify components of the large latent TGFß complex as novel targets of cathepsin K at neutral pH, providing a possible mechanism for enhanced Smad2,3 activation in vivo. These findings highlight the complexity of the skeletal disease associated with MLII and bring new insight to the role of secreted cathepsin proteases in cartilage development and growth factor regulation. PMID:26404503

  1. Ubiquilin-mediated Small Molecule Inhibition of Mammalian Target of Rapamycin Complex 1 (mTORC1) Signaling*

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Rory T.; Shi, Yuntao; Long, Marcus J. C.; Marr, Michael T.; Hedstrom, Lizbeth

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) is a master regulator of cellular metabolism, growth, and proliferation. mTORC1 has been implicated in many diseases such as cancer, diabetes, and neurodegeneration, and is a target to prolong lifespan. Here we report a small molecule inhibitor (Cbz-B3A) of mTORC1 signaling. Cbz-B3A inhibits the phosphorylation of eIF4E-binding protein 1 (4EBP1) and blocks 68% of translation. In contrast, rapamycin preferentially inhibits the phosphorylation of p70S6k and blocks 35% of translation. Cbz-B3A does not appear to bind directly to mTORC1, but instead binds to ubiquilins 1, 2, and 4. Knockdown of ubiquilin 2, but not ubiquilins 1 and 4, decreases the phosphorylation of 4EBP1, suggesting that ubiquilin 2 activates mTORC1. The knockdown of ubiquilins 2 and 4 decreases the effect of Cbz-B3A on 4EBP1 phosphorylation. Cbz-B3A slows cellular growth of some human leukemia cell lines, but is not cytotoxic. Thus Cbz-B3A exemplifies a novel strategy to inhibit mTORC1 signaling that might be exploited for treating many human diseases. We propose that Cbz-B3A reveals a previously unappreciated regulatory pathway coordinating cytosolic protein quality control and mTORC1 signaling. PMID:26740621

  2. MicroRNA-21 accelerates hepatocyte proliferation in vitro via PI3K/Akt signaling by targeting PTEN

    SciTech Connect

    Yan-nan, Bai; Zhao-yan, Yu; Li-xi, Luo; Jiang, Yi; Qing-jie, Xia

    2014-01-17

    Highlights: •miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes under proliferative status. •miR-21 expression level peaked at 12 h after stimulated by EGF. •miR-21 drive rapid S phase entry of primary hepatocytes. •PI3K/Akt signaling was modulated via targeting PTEN by miR-21. -- Abstract: MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are involved in controlling hepatocyte proliferation during liver regeneration. In this study, we established the miRNAs-expression patterns of primary hepatocytes in vitro under stimulation of epidermal growth factor (EGF), and found that microRNA-21 (miR-21) was appreciably up-regulated and peaked at 12 h. In addition, we further presented evidences indicating that miR-21 promotes primary hepatocyte proliferation through in vitro transfecting with miR-21 mimics or inhibitor. We further demonstrated that phosphatidylinositol 3′-OH kinase (PI3K)/Akt signaling was altered accordingly, it is, by targeting phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10, PI3K/Akt signaling is activated by miR-21 to accelerate hepatocyte rapid S-phase entry and proliferation in vitro.

  3. Hypothetical signals beyond the primary ISN He flow as perspective targets for IMAP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokol, J. M.; Bzowski, M.; Grzedzielski, S.; Swaczyna, P.; Kubiak, M. A.; Galli, A.; Wurz, P.; Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Fuselier, S. A.; McComas, D. J.

    2015-12-01

    Interstellar Boundary Explorer (IBEX) is a small Earth-orbiting spacecraft that successfully investigates the local interstellar medium that surrounds heliosphere. The IBEX-Lo sensor samples the primary population of interstellar neutral (ISN) helium with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In addition to this strong signal, which has been interpreted as a Maxwell-Boltzmann distribution of the ISN gas in front of heliosphere, the observations also revealed elevated wings above the background level both in longitude and latitude. This signal, dubbed the a Warm Breeze, is likely the secondary population of ISN He created in the outer heliosheath. In addition, IBEX sees an unexplained ubiquitous background in the lowest energy channels. In this study, we hypothesize departures from the assumptions adopted so far in the data interpretation that could solve remaining unexplained features in the IBEX data or may be pursued by future IMAP mission. We show that the Warm Breeze cannot be explained by a kappa distribution function of the ISN He source. We identify regions in the sky where signatures of the hypothetical kappa distribution of the ISN He atoms would show up. We speculate that the temperature of ISN He in front of the heliosphere is not isotropic and simulate the expected signatures of this anisotropy in the IBEX-Lo signal to identify the regions in the sky that are the most promising to analyze. We compare these results of the study with the IBEX detection capabilities and find that due to its very high signal-to-noise ratio IBEX would be able to see the indicators of the studied scenarios. However, its location close to the magnetosphere and its energy sensitivity threshold makes the discovery very challenging. We specify requirements for IMAP needed to discover the hypothesized departures of the ISN distribution function from standard assumptions and thus allowing a detailed study of plasma-neutral coupling processes in the interstellar medium.

  4. Novel multi-targeted ErbB family inhibitor afatinib blocks EGF-induced signaling and induces apoptosis in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Xinfang; Chen, Zhenghu; Zhao, Yanling; Yu, Yang; Guan, Shan; Woodfield, Sarah E.; Vasudevan, Sanjeev A.; Tao, Ling; Pang, Jonathan C.; Lu, Jiaxiong; Zhang, Huiyuan; Zhang, Fuchun; Yang, Jianhua

    2017-01-01

    Neuroblastoma is the most common extracranial solid tumor in children. The ErbB family of proteins is a group of receptor tyrosine kinases that promote the progression of various malignant cancers including neuroblastoma. Thus, targeting them with small molecule inhibitors is a promising strategy for neuroblastoma therapy. In this study, we investigated the anti-tumor effect of afatinib, an irreversible inhibitor of members of the ErbB family, on neuroblastoma. We found that afatinib suppressed the proliferation and colony formation ability of neuroblastoma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Afatinib also induced apoptosis and blocked EGF-induced activation of PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling in all neuroblastoma cell lines tested. In addition, afatinib enhanced doxorubicin-induced cytotoxicity in neuroblastoma cells, including the chemoresistant LA-N-6 cell line. Finally, afatinib exhibited antitumor efficacy in vivo by inducing apoptosis in an orthotopic xenograft neuroblastoma mouse model. Taken together, these results show that afatinib inhibits neuroblastoma growth both in vitro and in vivo by suppressing EGFR-mediated PI3K/AKT/mTOR signaling. Our study supports the idea that EGFR is a potential therapeutic target in neuroblastoma. And targeting ErbB family protein kinases with small molecule inhibitors like afatinib alone or in combination with doxorubicin is a viable option for treating neuroblastoma. PMID:27902463

  5. The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors

    PubMed Central

    Willingham, Stephen B.; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Gentles, Andrew J.; Sahoo, Debashis; Dalerba, Piero; Mitra, Siddhartha S.; Wang, Jian; Contreras-Trujillo, Humberto; Martin, Robin; Cohen, Justin D.; Lovelace, Patricia; Scheeren, Ferenc A.; Chao, Mark P.; Weiskopf, Kipp; Tang, Chad; Volkmer, Anne Kathrin; Naik, Tejaswitha J.; Storm, Theresa A.; Mosley, Adriane R.; Edris, Badreddin; Schmid, Seraina M.; Sun, Chris K.; Chua, Mei-Sze; Murillo, Oihana; Rajendran, Pradeep; Cha, Adriel C.; Chin, Robert K.; Kim, Dongkyoon; Adorno, Maddalena; Raveh, Tal; Tseng, Diane; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Enger, Per Øyvind; Steinberg, Gary K.; Li, Gordon; So, Samuel K.; Majeti, Ravindra; Harsh, Griffith R.; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N. H.; Sunwoo, John B.; Alizadeh, Ash A.; Clarke, Michael F.; Weissman, Irving L.

    2012-01-01

    CD47, a “don't eat me” signal for phagocytic cells, is expressed on the surface of all human solid tumor cells. Analysis of patient tumor and matched adjacent normal (nontumor) tissue revealed that CD47 is overexpressed on cancer cells. CD47 mRNA expression levels correlated with a decreased probability of survival for multiple types of cancer. CD47 is a ligand for SIRPα, a protein expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. In vitro, blockade of CD47 signaling using targeted monoclonal antibodies enabled macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells that were otherwise protected. Administration of anti-CD47 antibodies inhibited tumor growth in orthotopic immunodeficient mouse xenotransplantation models established with patient tumor cells and increased the survival of the mice over time. Anti-CD47 antibody therapy initiated on larger tumors inhibited tumor growth and prevented or treated metastasis, but initiation of the therapy on smaller tumors was potentially curative. The safety and efficacy of targeting CD47 was further tested and validated in immune competent hosts using an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. These results suggest all human solid tumor cells require CD47 expression to suppress phagocytic innate immune surveillance and elimination. These data, taken together with similar findings with other human neoplasms, show that CD47 is a commonly expressed molecule on all cancers, its function to block phagocytosis is known, and blockade of its function leads to tumor cell phagocytosis and elimination. CD47 is therefore a validated target for cancer therapies. PMID:22451913

  6. The CD47-signal regulatory protein alpha (SIRPa) interaction is a therapeutic target for human solid tumors.

    PubMed

    Willingham, Stephen B; Volkmer, Jens-Peter; Gentles, Andrew J; Sahoo, Debashis; Dalerba, Piero; Mitra, Siddhartha S; Wang, Jian; Contreras-Trujillo, Humberto; Martin, Robin; Cohen, Justin D; Lovelace, Patricia; Scheeren, Ferenc A; Chao, Mark P; Weiskopf, Kipp; Tang, Chad; Volkmer, Anne Kathrin; Naik, Tejaswitha J; Storm, Theresa A; Mosley, Adriane R; Edris, Badreddin; Schmid, Seraina M; Sun, Chris K; Chua, Mei-Sze; Murillo, Oihana; Rajendran, Pradeep; Cha, Adriel C; Chin, Robert K; Kim, Dongkyoon; Adorno, Maddalena; Raveh, Tal; Tseng, Diane; Jaiswal, Siddhartha; Enger, Per Øyvind; Steinberg, Gary K; Li, Gordon; So, Samuel K; Majeti, Ravindra; Harsh, Griffith R; van de Rijn, Matt; Teng, Nelson N H; Sunwoo, John B; Alizadeh, Ash A; Clarke, Michael F; Weissman, Irving L

    2012-04-24

    CD47, a "don't eat me" signal for phagocytic cells, is expressed on the surface of all human solid tumor cells. Analysis of patient tumor and matched adjacent normal (nontumor) tissue revealed that CD47 is overexpressed on cancer cells. CD47 mRNA expression levels correlated with a decreased probability of survival for multiple types of cancer. CD47 is a ligand for SIRPα, a protein expressed on macrophages and dendritic cells. In vitro, blockade of CD47 signaling using targeted monoclonal antibodies enabled macrophage phagocytosis of tumor cells that were otherwise protected. Administration of anti-CD47 antibodies inhibited tumor growth in orthotopic immunodeficient mouse xenotransplantation models established with patient tumor cells and increased the survival of the mice over time. Anti-CD47 antibody therapy initiated on larger tumors inhibited tumor growth and prevented or treated metastasis, but initiation of the therapy on smaller tumors was potentially curative. The safety and efficacy of targeting CD47 was further tested and validated in immune competent hosts using an orthotopic mouse breast cancer model. These results suggest all human solid tumor cells require CD47 expression to suppress phagocytic innate immune surveillance and elimination. These data, taken together with similar findings with other human neoplasms, show that CD47 is a commonly expressed molecule on all cancers, its function to block phagocytosis is known, and blockade of its function leads to tumor cell phagocytosis and elimination. CD47 is therefore a validated target for cancer therapies.

  7. MicroRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibroblasts proliferation via targeting VEGF-A/MAPK signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Tao, Hui; Chen, Ze-Wen; Yang, Jing-Jing; Shi, Kai-Hu

    2016-07-01

    Cardiac fibroblasts proliferation is the most important pathophysiological character of cardiac fibrosis while the underlying mechanisms are still incompletely known. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate gene expression by binding to specific sites. Studies have been indicated that miRNA-29a play a key role in cardiac fibrosis. VEGF-A carries out its functions through MAPK signaling pathway in cardiac fibrosis. Existing proofs predict that the VEGF-A is one of the potential targets of miRNA-29a. We therefore probe the role of miRNA-29a and its latent target VEGF-A during cardiac fibrosis. In our study, miRNA-29a was down-regulated while VEGF-A was up-regulated in cardiac fibrosis tissues. The rat cardiac fibroblasts that were transfected with miRNA-29a inhibitor exhibited low-expression of miRNA-29a, enhanced VEGF-A protein and mRNA expression. Nevertheless, the cardiac fibroblasts transfected with miRNA-29a mimics obtained the opposite expression result. Furthermore, over-expression of miRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibroblasts proliferation. In conclusion, these results suggested that miRNA-29a suppresses cardiac fibrosis and fibroblasts proliferation via targeting VEGF-A/MAPK signal pathway implicating that miRNA-29a might play a role in the treatment of cardiac fibrosis.

  8. Statistical Signal Processing for Remote Sensing of Targets: Proposal for Terrestrial Science Program

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-14

    applications. Electromagnetic Induction Frequency-domain electromagnetic induction (EMI) sensors have been shown to provide target signatures...here is on the front channel. The frequency domain data for each scan (the response due to a single electromagnetic pulse) is inverse transformed to

  9. Study of time-reversal-based signal processing applied to polarimetric GPR detection of elongated targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santos, Vinicius Rafael N.; Teixeira, Fernando L.

    2017-04-01

    Ground penetrating radar (GPR) is a useful sensing modality for mapping and identification of underground infrastructure networks, such as metal and concrete pipes (gas, water or sewer), phone conduits or cables, and other buried objects. Due to the polarization-dependent response of typical targets, it is of interest to investigate the optimum antenna arrangement and/or combination of arrangements that maximize the detection and classification capabilities of polarimetric GPR imaging systems. Here, we provide a preliminary study of time-reversal-based techniques applied to target detection by GPR utilizing different relative orientations of linear-polarized antenna elements (with respect to each other, as well as to the targets). We modeled three different pipe materials (metallic, plastic and concrete) and GPR systems operating at center frequencies of 100 MHz and 200 MHz. Full-wave numerical simulations are adopted to account for mutual coupling between targets. This type of assessment study may contribute to the improvement of GPR data interpretation of infrastructure networks in urban area surveys and in other engineering studies.

  10. Concepts of Protein Sorting or Targeting Signals and Membrane Topology in Undergraduate Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tang, Bor Luen; Teng, Felicia Yu Hsuan

    2005-01-01

    The process of protein biogenesis culminates in its correct targeting to specific subcellular locations where it serves a function. Contemporary molecular and cell biology investigations often involve the exogenous expression of epitope- or fluorescent protein-tagged recombinant molecules as well as subsequent analysis of protein-protein…

  11. Gamma-Secretase and Notch Signaling: Novel Therapeutic Targets In Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-05-01

    inflammation characteristic of auto- receptor-STATl-independent pathway for Tbx2l initiation, as these I.immune diseases such as multiple sclerosis, Crohn ...may be S effects the blocking of Notch signaling in vivo with GSI has on disease essential for the adoption of a TH1 cell fate by CD4+ cells. CD4...Unlimited The views, opinions and/or findings contained in this report are those of the author( s ) and should not be construed as an official

  12. Structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP (target of RNAIII-activating protein)

    PubMed Central

    Henrick, Kim; Hirshberg, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    The crystal structure of the signal transduction protein TRAP is reported at 1.85 Å resolution. The structure of TRAP consists of a central eight-stranded β-­barrel flanked asymmetrically by helices and is monomeric both in solution and in the crystal structure. A formate ion was found bound to TRAP identically in all four molecules in the asymmetric unit. PMID:22750855

  13. Pharmacological Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 Signaling Is a Promising Therapeutic Approach for the Treatment of Colorectal Cancer12

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Li-Ching; Teng, Hao-Wei; Shiau, Chung-Wai; Tai, Wei-Tien; Hung, Man-Hsin; Yang, Shung-Haur; Jiang, Jeng-Kai; Chen, Kuen-Feng

    2015-01-01

    STAT3 activation is associated with poor prognosis in human colorectal cancer (CRC). Our previous data demonstrated that regorafenib (Stivarga) is a pharmacological agonist of SH2 domain-containing phosphatase 1 (SHP-1) that enhances SHP-1 activity and induces apoptosis by targeting STAT3 signals in CRC. This study aimed to find a therapeutic drug that is more effective than regorafenib for CRC treatment. Here, we showed that SC-43 was more effective than regorafenib at inducing apoptosis in vitro and suppressing tumorigenesis in vivo. SC-43 significantly increased SHP-1 activity, downregulated p-STAT3Tyr705 level, and induced apoptosis in CRC cells. An SHP-1 inhibitor or knockdown of SHP-1 by siRNA both significantly rescued the SC-43–induced apoptosis and decreased p-STAT3Tyr705 level. Conversely, SHP-1 overexpression increased the effects of SC-43 on apoptosis and p-STAT3Tyr705 level. These data suggest that SC-43–induced apoptosis mediated through the loss of p-STAT3Tyr705 was dependent on SHP-1 function. Importantly, SC-43–enhanced SHP-1 activity was because of the docking potential of SC-43, which relieved the autoinhibited N-SH2 domain of SHP-1 and inhibited p-STAT3Tyr705 signals. Importantly, we observed that a significant negative correlation existed between SHP-1 and p-STAT3Tyr705expression in CRC patients (P = .038). Patients with strong SHP-1 and weak p-STAT3Tyr705 expression had significantly higher overall survival compared with patients with weak SHP-1 and strong p-STAT3Tyr705 expression (P = .029). In conclusion, SHP-1 is suitable to be a useful prognostic marker and a pharmacological target for CRC treatment. Targeting SHP-1-STAT3 signaling by SC-43 may serve as a promising pharmacotherapy for CRC. PMID:26476076

  14. Release of targeted p53 from the mitochondrion as an early signal during mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Green, M L; Pisano, M M; Prough, R A; Knudsen, T B

    2013-12-01

    Increased accumulation of p53 tumor suppressor protein is an early response to low-level stressors. To investigate the fate of mitochondrial-sequestered p53, mouse embryonic fibroblast cells (MEFs) on a p53-deficient genetic background were transfected with p53-EGFP fusion protein led by a sense (m53-EGFP) or antisense (c53-EGFP) mitochondrial import signal. Rotenone exposure (100nM, 1h) triggered the translocation of m53-EGFP from the mitochondrion to the nucleus, thus shifting the transfected cells from a mitochondrial p53 to a nuclear p53 state. Antibodies for p53 serine phosphorylation or lysine acetylation indicated a different post-translational status of recombinant p53 in the nucleus and mitochondrion, respectively. These data suggest that cycling of p53 through the mitochondria may establish a direct pathway for p53 signaling from the mitochondria to the nucleus during mitochondrial dysfunction. PK11195, a pharmacological ligand of mitochondrial TSPO (formerly known as the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor), partially suppressed the release of mitochondria-sequestered p53. These findings support the notion that p53 function mediates a direct signaling pathway from the mitochondria to nucleus during mitochondrial dysfunction.

  15. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies

    PubMed Central

    Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N.; Ambrosi, Cristina De; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M.; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-01-01

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis. We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions. Starting from an initial “physiologic condition”, the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model. Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal. PMID:25671297

  16. Curcumin Rescues Diabetic Renal Fibrosis by Targeting Superoxide-Mediated Wnt Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng; Hsu, Yung-Chien; Lei, Chen-Chou; Mau, Shu-Ching; Shih, Ya-Hsueh; Lin, Chun-Liang

    2016-03-01

    The purposes of this study were to investigate whether curcumin can weaken diabetic nephropathy by modulating both oxidative stress and renal injury from Wnt signaling mediation. Wnt5a/β-catenin depression and induction of superoxide synthesis are associated with high glucose (HG) induced transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1 and fibronectin expression in mesangial cells. Curcumin resumes HG depression of Wnt/β-catenin signaling and alleviates HG induction of superoxide, TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in renal mesangial cell. Exogenous curcumin alleviated urinary total proteinuria and serum superoxide level in diabetic rats. Based on laser-captured microdissection for quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction, it was found that diabetes significantly increased TGF-β1 and fibronectin expression in line with depressed Wnt5a expression. Curcumin treatment reduced the TGF-β1 and fibronectin activation and the inhibiting effect of diabetes on Wnt5a/β-catenin expression in renal glomeruli. Immunohistochemistry showed that curcumin treatment significantly reduced 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, TGF-β1 and fibronectin, and was in line with the restoration of the suppressed Wnt5a expression immunoreactivities in glomeruli of diabetic rats. Curcumin alleviated extracellular matrix accumulation in diabetic nephropathy by not only preventing the diabetes-mediated superoxide synthesis but also resuming downregulation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These findings suggest that regulation of Wnt activity by curcumin is a feasible alternative strategy to rescue diabetic renal injury.

  17. Advances in dynamic modeling of colorectal cancer signaling-network regions, a path toward targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Tortolina, Lorenzo; Duffy, David J; Maffei, Massimo; Castagnino, Nicoletta; Carmody, Aimée M; Kolch, Walter; Kholodenko, Boris N; De Ambrosi, Cristina; Barla, Annalisa; Biganzoli, Elia M; Nencioni, Alessio; Patrone, Franco; Ballestrero, Alberto; Zoppoli, Gabriele; Verri, Alessandro; Parodi, Silvio

    2015-03-10

    The interconnected network of pathways downstream of the TGFβ, WNT and EGF-families of receptor ligands play an important role in colorectal cancer pathogenesis.We studied and implemented dynamic simulations of multiple downstream pathways and described the section of the signaling network considered as a Molecular Interaction Map (MIM). Our simulations used Ordinary Differential Equations (ODEs), which involved 447 reactants and their interactions.Starting from an initial "physiologic condition", the model can be adapted to simulate individual pathologic cancer conditions implementing alterations/mutations in relevant onco-proteins. We verified some salient model predictions using the mutated colorectal cancer lines HCT116 and HT29. We measured the amount of MYC and CCND1 mRNAs and AKT and ERK phosphorylated proteins, in response to individual or combination onco-protein inhibitor treatments. Experimental and simulation results were well correlated. Recent independently published results were also predicted by our model.Even in the presence of an approximate and incomplete signaling network information, a predictive dynamic modeling seems already possible. An important long term road seems to be open and can be pursued further, by incremental steps, toward even larger and better parameterized MIMs. Personalized treatment strategies with rational associations of signaling-proteins inhibitors, could become a realistic goal.

  18. The mechanical activation of mTOR signaling: an emerging role for late endosome/lysosomal targeting.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Brittany L; Goodman, Craig A; Hornberger, Troy A

    2014-02-01

    It is well recognized that mechanical signals play a critical role in the regulation of skeletal muscle mass, and the maintenance of muscle mass is essential for mobility, disease prevention and quality of life. Furthermore, over the last 15 years it has become established that signaling through a protein kinase called the mammalian (or mechanistic) target of rapamycin (mTOR) is essential for mechanically-induced changes in protein synthesis and muscle mass, however, the mechanism(s) via which mechanical stimuli regulate mTOR signaling have not been defined. Nonetheless, advancements are being made, and an emerging body of evidence suggests that the late endosome/lysosomal (LEL) system might play a key role in this process. Therefore, the purpose of this review is to summarize this body of evidence. Specifically, we will first explain why the Ras homologue enriched in brain (Rheb) and phosphatidic acid (PA) are considered to be direct activators of mTOR signaling. We will then describe the process of endocytosis and its involvement in the formation of LEL structures, as well as the evidence which indicates that mTOR and its direct activators (Rheb and PA) are all enriched at the LEL. Finally, we will summarize the evidence that has implicated the LEL in the regulation of mTOR by various growth regulatory inputs such as amino acids, growth factors and mechanical stimuli.

  19. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, L sub FIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 10(exp 10) solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/L sub CO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  20. CO excitation in four IR luminous galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radford, Simon J. E.; Solomon, P. M.; Downes, Dennis

    1990-07-01

    The correlation between the CO and far infrared luminosities of spiral galaxies is well established. The luminosity ration, LFIR/L sub CO in IR luminous active galaxies is, however, systematically five to ten times higher than in ordinary spirals and molecular clouds in our Galaxy. Furthermore, the masses of molecular hydrogen in luminous galaxies are large, M (H2) approx. equals 1010 solar magnitude, which indicates the observed luminosity ratios are due to an excess of infrared output, rather than a deficiency of molecular gas. These large amounts of molecular gas may fuel luminous galaxies through either star formation or nuclear activity. This interpretation rests on applying the M (H2)/LCO ratio calibrated in our Galaxy to galaxies with strikingly different luminosity ratios. But are the physical conditions of the molecular gas different in galaxies with different luminosity ratios. And, if so, does the proportionality between CO and H2 also vary among galaxies. To investigate these questions researchers observed CO (2 to 1) and (1 to 0) emission from four luminous galaxies with the Institute for Radio Astronomy in the Millimeter range (IRAM) 30 m telescope. Researchers conclude that most of the CO emission from these Arp 193, Arp 220, and Mrk 231 arises in regions with moderate ambient densities similar to the clouds in the Milky Way molecular ring. The emission is neither from dense hot cloud cores nor from the cold low density gas characteristic of the envelopes of dark clouds.

  1. Luminous Binary Supersoft X-Ray Sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiStefano, Rosanne; Oliversen, Ronald J. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    This grant was for the study of Luminous Supersoft X-Ray Sources (SSSs). During the first year a number of projects were completed and new projects were started. The projects include: 1) Time variability of SSSs 2) SSSs in M31; 3) Binary evolution scenarios; and 4) Acquiring new data.

  2. A Novel MIF Signaling Pathway Drives the Malignant Character of Pancreatic Cancer by Targeting NR3C2.

    PubMed

    Yang, Shouhui; He, Peijun; Wang, Jian; Schetter, Aaron; Tang, Wei; Funamizu, Naotake; Yanaga, Katsuhiko; Uwagawa, Tadashi; Satoskar, Abhay R; Gaedcke, Jochen; Bernhardt, Markus; Ghadimi, B Michael; Gaida, Matthias M; Bergmann, Frank; Werner, Jens; Ried, Thomas; Hanna, Nader; Alexander, H Richard; Hussain, S Perwez

    2016-07-01

    Pancreatic cancers with aberrant expression of macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) are particularly aggressive. To identify key signaling pathways that drive disease aggressiveness in tumors with high MIF expression, we analyzed the expression of coding and noncoding genes in high and low MIF-expressing tumors in multiple cohorts of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) patients. The key genes and pathways identified were linked to patient survival and were mechanistically, functionally, and clinically characterized using cell lines, a genetically engineered mouse model, and PDAC patient cohorts. Here, we report evidence of a novel MIF-driven signaling pathway that inhibits the orphan nuclear receptor NR3C2, a previously undescribed tumor suppressor that impacts aggressiveness and survival in PDAC. Mechanistically, MIF upregulated miR-301b that targeted NR3C2 and suppressed its expression. PDAC tumors expressing high levels of MIF displayed elevated levels of miR-301b and reduced levels of NR3C2. In addition, reduced levels of NR3C2 expression correlated with poorer survival in multiple independent cohorts of PDAC patients. Functional analysis showed that NR3C2 inhibited epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and enhanced sensitivity to the gemcitabine, a chemotherapeutic drug used in PDAC standard of care. Furthermore, genetic deletion of MIF disrupted a MIF-mir-301b-NR3C2 signaling axis, reducing metastasis and prolonging survival in a genetically engineered mouse model of PDAC. Taken together, our results offer a preclinical proof of principle for candidate therapies to target a newly described MIF-miR-301b-NR3C2 signaling axis for PDAC management. Cancer Res; 76(13); 3838-50. ©2016 AACR.

  3. Targeting MicroRNAs Involved in the BDNF Signaling Impairment in Neurodegenerative Diseases.

    PubMed

    You, Hwa Jeong; Park, Jae Hyon; Pareja-Galeano, Helios; Lucia, Alejandro; Shin, Jae Il

    2016-12-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are becoming an ever-increasing problem in aging populations. Low levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have previously been associated with the pathogenesis of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been proposed as potential novel therapeutic targets for treating various diseases of the central nervous system (CNS), and interestingly, few studies have reported several miRNAs that downregulate the expression levels of BDNF. However, substantial challenges exist when attempting to translate these findings into practical anti-miRNA therapeutics, especially when the targets remain inside the CNS. Thus, in this review, we summarize the specific molecular mechanisms by which several miRNAs negatively modulate the expressions of BDNF, address the potential clinical difficulties that can be faced during the development of anti-miRNA-based therapeutics and propose strategies to overcome these challenges.

  4. DNA-only cascade: a universal tool for signal amplification, enhancing the detection of target analytes.

    PubMed

    Bone, Simon M; Hasick, Nicole J; Lima, Nicole E; Erskine, Simon M; Mokany, Elisa; Todd, Alison V

    2014-09-16

    Diagnostic tests performed in the field or at the site of patient care would benefit from using a combination of inexpensive, stable chemical reagents and simple instrumentation. Here, we have developed a universal "DNA-only Cascade" (DoC) to quantitatively detect target analytes with increased speed. The DoC utilizes quasi-circular structures consisting of temporarily inactivated deoxyribozymes (DNAzymes). The catalytic activity of the DNAzymes is restored in a universal manner in response to a broad range of environmental and biological targets. The present study demonstrates DNAzyme activation in the presence of metal ions (Pb(2+)), small molecules (deoxyadenosine triphosphate) and nucleic acids homologous to genes from Meningitis-causing bacteria. Furthermore, DoC efficiently discriminates nucleic acid targets differing by a single nucleotide. When detection of analytes is orchestrated by functional nucleic acids, the inclusion of DoC reagents substantially decreases time for detection and allows analyte quantification. The detection of nucleic acids using DoC was further characterized for its capability to be multiplexed and retain its functionality following long-term exposure to ambient temperatures and in a background of complex medium (human serum).

  5. Targeting Glutamatergic Signaling for the Development of Novel Therapeutics for Mood Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Vieira, R.; Salvadore, G.; Ibrahim, L.; DiazGranados, N.; Zarate, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    There have been no recent advances in drug development for mood disorders in terms of identifying drug targets that are mechanistically distinct from existing ones. As a result, existing antidepressants are based on decades-old notions of which targets are relevant to the mechanisms of antidepressant action. Low rates of remission, a delay of onset of therapeutic effects, continual residual depressive symptoms, relapses, and poor quality of life are unfortunately common in patients with mood disorders. Offering alternative options is requisite in order to reduce the individual and societal burden of these diseases. The glutamatergic system is a promising area of research in mood disorders, and likely to offer new possibilities in therapeutics. There is increasing evidence that mood disorders are associated with impairments in neuroplasticity and cellular resilience, and alterations of the glutamatergic system are known to play a major role in cellular plasticity and resilience. Existing ant