Science.gov

Sample records for lunch program served

  1. [Assessment of lunch served in the Workers' Food Program, Brazil].

    PubMed

    Savio, Karin Eleonora Oliveira; Costa, Teresa Helena Macedo da; Miazaki, Edina; Schmitz, Bethsáida de Abreu Soares

    2005-04-01

    In the light of the Workers' Food Program (WFP) growth and its recent review of nutritional parameters regulations, the study aimed at evaluating food intake in WFP through dietary assessment of lunch served in the program and workers' nutritional status. A cross-sectional study was carried out in a representative sample of workers in Brasilia, Federal District, Brazil. A total of 1,044 subjects who had lunch at 52 food and nutrition units were evaluated. Social-economic and demographic data were collected as well as anthropometric measures for calculating the Body Mass Index. Food intake was assessed by dish weight and direct observation of dish composition. Of all subjects, 43% had excess weight, 33.7% were overweight and 9.3% were obese. Males were most affected. Median lunch energy intake was 515 kcal in women and 736 kcal in men. Median dietary fiber intake was 6.0 g among women and 8.3 g among men, and median cholesterol intake was over 90 mg among subjects with excess weight. The results indicate that the study population who is often seen as healthy is at nutritional risk. Workers in WFP should be targeted for health promotion strategies using especially nutritionists' skills as educators.

  2. Lunch Is Served.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schweitzer, Diane K.

    2002-01-01

    Schools are encouraging investment in cafeterias that can be used for a variety of purposes. The successful redesign of the George Rogers Clark Middle School/High School cafeteria in Hammond, Indiana, resulted in an up-scale-style dining area where students could also connect to the Internet for homework and research during breakfast and lunch.…

  3. National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program is a federally assisted meal program operating in over 101,000 public and non-profit private schools and residential child care institutions. It provides nutritionally balanced, low-cost or free lunches to more than 30.5 million children each school day in 2008. In 1998, Congress expanded the National School Lunch…

  4. Second Servings and a La Carte Sales to Elementary Children in the National School Lunch Program and Potential Implications for Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    The sale of second servings and/or a la carte purchases made by elementary students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) was investigated in this mixed methods case study. The percentage of elementary students in one school district who purchase second servings and/or a la carte items, in addition to the regularly purchased…

  5. Second Servings and a La Carte Sales to Elementary Children in the National School Lunch Program and Potential Implications for Childhood Obesity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilder, Amanda J.

    2012-01-01

    The sale of second servings and/or a la carte purchases made by elementary students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) was investigated in this mixed methods case study. The percentage of elementary students in one school district who purchase second servings and/or a la carte items, in addition to the regularly purchased…

  6. School Lunch Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zucchino, Lori; Ranney, Christine K.

    1990-01-01

    Reductions in participation in National School Lunch Program in 1981-82 are of concern to hunger groups and legislators. Extent to which Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Acts (OBRA) of 1980-81 contributes to participation decline was measured by simulation model in New York State. Results suggest that OBRA increased participation; declining…

  7. The National School Lunch Program: Background, Trends, and Issues. ERS Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Katherine; Newman, Constance; Clauson, Annette; Guthrie, Joanne; Buzby, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is one of the largest food and nutrition assistance programs in the United States, feeding millions of children every day. School meal providers face the task of serving nutritious and appealing school lunches, including free and reduced-price lunches for low-income students, and doing so under budget…

  8. School lunch program for health promotion among children in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Nobuko; Miyoshi, Miki

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, the present school lunch program has been implemented under the "School Lunch Act" enacted in 1954. The main purpose of the school lunch program is to promote healthy development of the minds and bodies of school children. Later, "The School Lunch Act" was revised in 2008 and its aim was changed to "promoting Shokuiku". As of May 2009, approximately 10 million school children participate in the school lunch program. This program itself is an educational activity. School children are responsible for serving lunch and clearing the dishes. They could also learn proper manners, by having meals together with classmates. Furthermore, understanding of balanced diet and food culture can be enhanced through learning the menu of each meal. Recently, as eating disorders and obesity increase among adults and school children, there is rising concern on development of lifestyle-related diseases. Under this circumstance, the Basic Law on Shokuiku was enacted in 2005. Besides, in order to enhance Shokuiku to school children, the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology established the Diet and Nutrition Teacher System in April 2007. It is reported that, in those schools with Diet and Nutrition Teachers, a positive impact has been observed in terms of awareness and interest in diet among teachers and guardians. It is also reported that proportion of children skipping breakfast has decreased, and quality of life has been improved. In this way, the Japanese school lunch program system is essential for fostering healthy mind and bodies for the next generation.

  9. Amounts served and consumed of school lunch differed by gender in Japanese elementary schools

    PubMed Central

    Yoshita, Katsushi; Jun, Kyungyul; Ishihara, Yoko; Taketa, Yasuko; Naruse, Akiko; Nagai, Narumi; Ishida, Hiromi

    2010-01-01

    School lunches serve to improve nutritional status and to promote the health of children. The purpose of this study was to investigate the portion sizes of school lunches served and consumed in Japanese elementary schools. In addition, gender difference in servings and consumption were also studied. A cross-sectional study was undertaken between October 2007 and February 2008 in schools located in Tokyo and Okayama, Japan. A total of 192 fifth-grade children attending four elementary schools participated in this study. Weighed plate waste methods and observation were used to collect dietary data for two non-consecutive days. The proportion of children who chose staple foods along with main dishes and/or side dishes for at least one day was higher in boys than in girls (respectively, for staple food: 42.1% vs. 9.3%, for main dish and/or side dish: 68.4% vs. 44.3%, P < 0.001). The ratio of initial amount served to amount offered was 0.88 ± 0.11 for boys and 0.84 ± 0.10 for girls (P < 0.05). The ratio of amount consumed to amount offered was 1.04 ± 0.19 for boys and 0.88 ± 0.12 for girls (P < 0.001). Weight was related to amount consumed both in boys (r = 0.222, P < 0.05) and in girls (r = 0.201, P < 0.05). These findings suggest that the nutritional standards of school lunch programs should take into account gender differences. Clearly, boys were more likely to consume more than the initial amounts served due to their higher propensity to take second helpings. Boys feel few reservations about taking second helpings to adjust their total intake. However, school lunch plans should take into consideration girls' reluctance to do so, by serving appropriate initial portion sizes. PMID:21103086

  10. State Strategies to Help Schools Make the Most of Their National School Lunch Program. Issue Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulheron, Joyal; Vonasek, Kara

    2010-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is the second largest federally subsidized food assistance program, serving approximately 31 million lunches each day. Nearly all public and private schools offer the federally reimbursed school meals program, which cost the federal government $9.3 billion to operate in 2008. This Issue Brief highlights the…

  11. Elementary Parent Perceptions of Packing Lunches and the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Alisha R.; Misyak, Sarah; Duffey, Kiyah J.; Atzaba-Poria, Naama; Hosig, Kathy; Davis, George C.; McFerren, Mary M.; Serrano, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: In 2010, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act updated the nutrition standards for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The improved standards impact children who participate in the NSLP, but not the children who are bringing a packed lunch from home. Recent research suggests packed lunches are lower in nutritional quality…

  12. Elementary Parent Perceptions of Packing Lunches and the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Alisha R.; Misyak, Sarah; Duffey, Kiyah J.; Atzaba-Poria, Naama; Hosig, Kathy; Davis, George C.; McFerren, Mary M.; Serrano, Elena L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: In 2010, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act updated the nutrition standards for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The improved standards impact children who participate in the NSLP, but not the children who are bringing a packed lunch from home. Recent research suggests packed lunches are lower in nutritional quality…

  13. How to Make School Lunch Programs Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrick, Len

    Food waste, student rejection of Type A meals, and the difficulty of keeping school food service departments in the black have been the three major problems in the school lunch program. The Las Vegas Fast Food Combo Program provides an answer. By providing the foods students want to eat--foods of the type advertised everywhere--and making that…

  14. How to Make School Lunch Programs Pay.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrick, Len

    Food waste, student rejection of Type A meals, and the difficulty of keeping school food service departments in the black have been the three major problems in the school lunch program. The Las Vegas Fast Food Combo Program provides an answer. By providing the foods students want to eat--foods of the type advertised everywhere--and making that…

  15. Toddlers and preschoolers consume more dietary fiber when high-fiber lunch items are served.

    PubMed

    Zuercher, Jennifer L; Kranz, Sibylle

    2012-02-01

    Increasing fiber intake by consuming high fiber foods, which are also high in other nutrients, can improve diet quality and reduce the risk for disease. However, most children do not meet fiber intake recommendations. Food provided at child care centers is a major source of daily nutrients, including fiber, for a large portion of children in the U.S. The aim of this study was to determine if serving novel, high fiber lunch items would successfully increase fiber intakes in toddlers and preschoolers. Four high-fiber entrées were developed and served to children (n=54) at lunch in a local child care center. Consumption was compared to usually served lunches and fiber intake recommendations. Toddlers consumed 89% of their recommended calories at the lunch meal and an average of 72% of the entrees; preschoolers consumed 74% of their recommended calories and 59% of the entrée, on average. Each entrée was high in fiber, providing, on average, 3.2 ± 1.6g fiber for toddlers and 4.1 ±1.9g fiber for preschoolers. These high fiber lunches contributed significantly more fiber than the usual lunch foods for most children. Data indicate that children are accepting of high fiber, novel lunch items, thus indicating that serving high fiber lunch items at child care may increase dietary fiber intake in children.

  16. Lunches Selected and Consumed from the National School Lunch Program in Schools Designated As HealthierUS School Challenge Schools Are More Nutritious than Lunches Brought from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Saade, Catherine; Shaw, Emily; Englund, Tim; Cashman, Linda; Taylor, Katie Weigt; Watkins, Tracee; Rushing, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient content of National School Lunch Program (NSLP) lunches and lunches brought from home (LBFH) lunches in elementary schools participating in the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC). Methods: Participants included students in grades 2-5 in four Washington state HUSSC…

  17. Lunches Selected and Consumed from the National School Lunch Program in Schools Designated As HealthierUS School Challenge Schools Are More Nutritious than Lunches Brought from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Saade, Catherine; Shaw, Emily; Englund, Tim; Cashman, Linda; Taylor, Katie Weigt; Watkins, Tracee; Rushing, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the nutrient content of National School Lunch Program (NSLP) lunches and lunches brought from home (LBFH) lunches in elementary schools participating in the HealthierUS School Challenge (HUSSC). Methods: Participants included students in grades 2-5 in four Washington state HUSSC…

  18. Case Study of National School Lunch Program Verification Outcomes in Large Metropolitan School Districts. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-04-AV3.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burghardt, John; Silva, Tim; Hulsey, Lara

    2004-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP) provide federal financial assistance and commodities to schools serving lunches and breakfasts that meet required nutrition standards. Under the NSLP and the SBP, millions of American students receive a free or reduced-price lunch and/or breakfast every school day.…

  19. Characterizing Lunch Meals Served and Consumed by Preschool Children in Head Start

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Stuff, Janice E; Fisher, Jennifer O; Mendoza, Jason A; O’Neil, Carol E

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the variability of food portions served and consumed by preschoolers in African-Americans and Hispanic-Americans attending Head Start (HS). Design Cross-Sectional. Setting Food consumption by preschoolers (n=796) enrolled in 16 HS centers in Houston, Texas (51% boys, 42% African-American, mean age 4 years) were assessed during three days of lunch meals using digital photography. Descriptive statistics and multi-level regression models, adjusting for classroom and school clustering effects, were determined. Subjects HS preschoolers 3–5 years. Results Mean amount served was 2428 kilojoule (kJ) (580 kilocalories [kcal]), and 572 grams. Mean intake was 1421 kJ (339 kcal), and 331 grams: 20% protein, 46% carbohydrate, 34% fat. Plate waste was 43% (range: 38% [fruit] to 61% [vegetables]). Mean coefficient of variation (CV) of food served was 29%: 33% entrée, 44% vegetables, 60% fruit, and 76% starches. Mean CV of food consumed was 46%: 58% entrée, 86% fruit, 96% vegetables, and 111% starches. Total gram amount of food served was positively correlated with consumption (r = 0.43, p<0.001). Conclusion Plate waste and variation in amounts served and consumed was substantial; amounts served were associated with amounts consumed. Large portion sizes may contribute to pediatric obesity by promoting excessive intake at meals. Understanding factors influencing portion sizes provide insight about specific intervention strategies that can be used in obesity prevention programs. PMID:23701867

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of HHFKA Nutrition Standards for School Lunch Servings and Patterns of Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echon, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to provide baseline data and characteristics of food served and consumed prior to the recently mandated nutrition standards as authorized by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). Methods: Over 600,000 school lunch menus with associated food production records from 61 elementary schools…

  1. Quantitative Evaluation of HHFKA Nutrition Standards for School Lunch Servings and Patterns of Consumption

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Echon, Roger M.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this paper is to provide baseline data and characteristics of food served and consumed prior to the recently mandated nutrition standards as authorized by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA). Methods: Over 600,000 school lunch menus with associated food production records from 61 elementary schools…

  2. Plate Waste and Attitudes among High School Lunch Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Jessica; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) What foods high school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are discarding the most? (2) How much of these foods they are discarding? and (3) What are their perceptions towards school lunch? Methods: Researchers measured plate waste at two high…

  3. Using School Lunch Programs To Promote Positive Dietary Habits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    The variety of school lunch foods available has dramatically expanded as school food managers strive to increase sales and generate revenue. Though lunchtime offerings are often based on student preferences versus nutritional value, with a small investment of effort and commitment to student well-being, schools can create lunch programs that…

  4. Using School Lunch Programs To Promote Positive Dietary Habits.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoff, Mary E.

    2002-01-01

    The variety of school lunch foods available has dramatically expanded as school food managers strive to increase sales and generate revenue. Though lunchtime offerings are often based on student preferences versus nutritional value, with a small investment of effort and commitment to student well-being, schools can create lunch programs that…

  5. Plate Waste and Attitudes among High School Lunch Program Participants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Jessica; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine: (1) What foods high school students participating in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) are discarding the most? (2) How much of these foods they are discarding? and (3) What are their perceptions towards school lunch? Methods: Researchers measured plate waste at two high…

  6. Letter about the School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNatt, Missy

    2009-01-01

    One subject on which students are rarely shy to express an opinion is school lunches, which the author turns into a teachable moment for U.S. history classes. Historically, school lunches have played an important role in providing nutrition for low-income students. On February 7, 1946, in response to an urgent bulletin sent to all Florida school…

  7. Letter about the School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNatt, Missy

    2009-01-01

    One subject on which students are rarely shy to express an opinion is school lunches, which the author turns into a teachable moment for U.S. history classes. Historically, school lunches have played an important role in providing nutrition for low-income students. On February 7, 1946, in response to an urgent bulletin sent to all Florida school…

  8. Middle-school students' school lunch consumption does not meet the new Institute of Medicine's National School Lunch Program recommendations

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to compare the school lunch consumption of Texas middle-school students with the 2009 Institute of Medicine's (IOM) school meal report recommendations. These new lunch menu patterns increase fruit to one serving and vegetables to two servings, with 50 percent wholegra...

  9. 77 FR 43232 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-24

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  10. 78 FR 45178 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-26

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  11. 76 FR 43256 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-20

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  12. 75 FR 41796 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-19

    ... Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National... of reimbursement for a half-pint of milk served to non-needy children in a school or institution which participates in the Special Milk Program for Children. The payments and rates are prescribed on an...

  13. Food Safety in the National School Lunch Program. USDA Food and Nutrition Service

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2010

    2010-01-01

    Schools that serve meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) are required to maintain proper sanitation and health standards in conformance with all applicable State and local laws and regulations. In addition, schools are required to obtain two school food safety inspections per school year, which are…

  14. 20 CFR 664.240 - May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under... Services § 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School...

  15. 20 CFR 664.240 - May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under... for Youth Services § 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the...

  16. 20 CFR 664.240 - May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under... for Youth Services § 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the...

  17. 20 CFR 664.240 - May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under... Services § 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School...

  18. 20 CFR 664.240 - May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the National School Lunch Program as a substitute for the income eligibility criteria under... for Youth Services § 664.240 May a local program use eligibility for free lunches under the...

  19. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  20. Food Group Preferences of Elementary School Children Participating in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cashman, Linda; Tripurana, Madhuri; Englund, Tim; Bergman, Ethan A.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of the study was to assess the food group preferences of second through fifth grade children based on ethnic background, gender, and grade. Food group preferences were determined by the amount of various food groups consumed in meals served as part of the National School Lunch Program at selected schools. Research…

  1. Efforts to Improve School Lunch Programs--Are They Paying Off?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-09-09

    help support these programs. GAO is recom- mending that Agriculture take a fresh look at its nutritional goal for the lunch program and either take...lunch program problems. HIGH SCHOOL LUNCHES DO NOT MEET NUTRITIONAL GOALS None of the high school lunch formats (conven- tional, fast food, or salad) in...See pp. 5 to 9.) Upgrading the lunches’ nutritional quality to meet all the goals may be difficult and may not be feasible in all cases because

  2. Lunch eating behavior of preschool children. Effects of age, gender, and type of beverage served.

    PubMed

    Wilson, J F

    To examine the eating behavior of preschool children offered chocolate-flavored or plain milk at lunch, food consumption by 135 children, aged 18-66 months, was measured. Four different menus were served six times during a 12-week period, each menu being presented twice with each of three test beverages, plain milk (18.1 kcal/oz), sucrose-sweetened chocolate milk (29.4 kcal/oz), or aspartame-sweetened chocolate milk (18.6 kcal/oz). The type of milk beverage served had no significant effect on the consumption of other food items offered at that meal. Subjects did drink significantly more chocolate milk than plain milk during all meals and consequently consumed significantly more energy during those meals in which sucrose-sweetened chocolate milk was served. A macronutrient analysis of lunch-time food intake for each menu revealed significant differences in protein, fat, and carbohydrate content among the four menus. Older children consumed significantly more milk and more energy per lunch-time meal than did younger preschoolers, but no other consistent age-related differences were observed. No significant gender differences were detected in any of the statistical analyses conducted. These findings suggest that young children do not reduce the intake of other food items at a meal to compensate for the increased energy intake that results from excessive sucrose-sweetened milk consumption. Aspartame-sweetened milk increases milk intake in small children without providing them with the additional calories of sucrose-sweetened milk.

  3. FRAC's Guide to the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food Research and Action Center, Washington, DC.

    In 1972 the School Breakfast Program was revised and made available to all schools in the country. The program also provides meal subsidies, surplus commodities, and equipment money. This guide is designed to help community members become aware of the programs and their benefits and to organize local school lunch and breakfast campaigns. The guide…

  4. FRAC's Guide to the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food Research and Action Center, Washington, DC.

    In 1972 the School Breakfast Program was revised and made available to all schools in the country. The program also provides meal subsidies, surplus commodities, and equipment money. This guide is designed to help community members become aware of the programs and their benefits and to organize local school lunch and breakfast campaigns. The guide…

  5. Food waste in a school nutrition program after implementation of new lunch program guidelines.

    PubMed

    Byker, Carmen J; Farris, Alisha R; Marcenelle, Michael; Davis, George C; Serrano, Elena L

    2014-01-01

    To assess the amount of food waste by meal components according to the new National School Lunch Program guidelines among pre-kindergarten and kindergarten students. For 5 consecutive school days in 1 elementary school, the research team collected school lunch trays and separated meal components into bins relative to each food or beverage appearing on the school's daily menu. Bins were weighed in grams and converted to ounces and cups at the end of each lunch period. The researchers examined 304 meals from 1 pre-kindergarten class and 5 kindergarten classes. Of 4,988 oz of food and beverages served, 2,261 oz (45.3%) were wasted during 1 full school week, totaling 141 lb. The greatest amount of food waste was generated from vegetables, the main entree, and milk, respectively. Strategies to reduce food waste in school lunch should be researched and implemented. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Conventional vs. formulated foods in school lunches. II. Cost of food served, eaten, and wasted.

    PubMed

    Head, M K; Weeks, R J

    1977-12-01

    School lunches containing all conventional foods were designed to provide one-third or one-half the recommended allowances for elementary students. The same nutrient levels were planned in meals containing some formulated items. Each type of meal was served for five days, and total food costs and costs of food served, consumed, and wasted were calculated. At the same nutritional level, mean preparation costs of partially formulated meals were lower than for meals composed of all conventional foods. Meals providing one-half the allowances and containing formulated items cost slightly less than totally conventional meals which provided one-third of the allowances. Cost of waste was lower with partially formulated meals.

  7. Food Consumption and Nutrition Evaluation: The National School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Food and Nutrition Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    The purpose of this study of food consumption in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) was to: (1) conduct a comprehensive review of literature on plate waste in school foodservice and other institutional foodservice facilities, (2) report the results of a pilot study designed to determine the degree of plate waste in the NSLP and its…

  8. Health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs.

    PubMed

    Gietzen, D; Vermeersch, J A

    1980-01-01

    School health records of 332 children through the eighth grade were examined in a retrospective comparative analysis of physical health status and school achievement of children from Head Start and Free School Lunch Programs. The objective was to determine if nutrition early in the lives of children as a part of a comprehensive health and education program such as Head Start produces greater or different benefits for disadvantaged children than nutrition intervention later through free lunches when the child enters school. Cross-sectional longitudinal, and case-study approaches were used in the analysis. A group of no-food-program disadvantaged children and a group of advantaged children served as comparisons. Results showed that advantaged children performed better on all parameters of school achievement and health status compared with the disadvantaged children, regardless of the form of intervention. Measures of school achievement of Head Start and Free Lunch children did not differ from those of the disadvantaged comparison group, but there were significant differences in measures of health status between the disadvantaged groups. Fewer boys from Project Head Start fell below the 25th percentile for height compared with boys in the Free Lunch Program. Head Start children also scored higher in physical fitness and had fewer reported absences from school due to illness.

  9. Problems in the Management of the National School Lunch Program in Washington School Districts. Bulletin 817.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, David W.; And Others

    To find major problems with the National School Lunch Program, a study was conducted with 1,015 students, their parents, and 16 school lunch supervisors in 18 Washington school districts. When interviewed, only 2% of the students said the lunch program did not need any changes. The needed changes most often mentioned were for "different kinds…

  10. 78 FR 39163 - Certification of Compliance With Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch Program Under...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-01

    ...-0025] RIN 0584-AE15 Certification of Compliance With Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch... of Compliance with Meal Requirements for the National School Lunch Program under the Healthy, Hunger... rule amended National School Lunch Program regulations to conform to requirements contained in the...

  11. Profiles of Participants in the National School Lunch Program: Data from Two National Surveys. Economic Information Bulletin Number 17

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Constance; Ralston, Katherine

    2006-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) serves more than 29 million children each day, but there is little information on the characteristics of those children. This study reports new estimates of NSLP participant characteristics using two national surveys: the 2001 Panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP) and the 1999-2002…

  12. 76 FR 35301 - National School Lunch Program: School Food Service Account Revenue Amendments Related to the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-17

    ...This rule amends National School Lunch Program (NSLP) regulations to conform to requirements contained in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (Pub. L. 111-296) regarding equity in school lunch pricing and revenue from nonprogram foods sold in schools. This rule requires school food authorities (SFAs) participating in the NSLP to provide the same level of financial support for lunches......

  13. Nutritional comparison of packed and school lunches in pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children following the implementation of the 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program standards.

    PubMed

    Farris, Alisha R; Misyak, Sarah; Duffey, Kiyah J; Davis, George C; Hosig, Kathy; Atzaba-Poria, Naama; McFerren, Mary M; Serrano, Elena L

    2014-01-01

    Approximately 40% of children bring a packed lunch to school. Little is known about the quality of these lunches. This study examined the nutritional quality of packed lunches compared with school lunches for pre-kindergarten and kindergarten children after the implementation of 2012-2013 National School Lunch Program standards. The researchers collected observational data for packed and school lunches from 3 schools in rural Virginia for 5 consecutive school days and analyzed them for macro and micro nutrients. Of the 1,314 observations collected; 42.8% were packed lunches (n = 562) and 57.2% were school lunches (n = 752). Energy, fat, saturated fat, sugar, vitamin C, and iron were significantly higher whereas protein, sodium, fiber, vitamin A, and calcium were significantly lower for packed lunches than school lunches. Packed lunches were of less nutritional quality than school lunches. Additional research is needed to explore factors related to choosing packed over school lunches. Copyright © 2014 Society for Nutrition Education and Behavior. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Food and Nutrients Intake in the School Lunch Program among School Children in Shanghai, China

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhenru; Gao, Runying; Bawuerjiang, Nadila; Zhang, Yali; Huang, Xiaoxu; Cai, Meiqin

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the intake of food and nutrients among primary, middle, and high schools students in Shanghai, and provide recommendations for possible amendments in new school lunch standards of Shanghai. Twenty schools were included in the school lunch menu survey. Of those, seven schools enrolled 5389 students and conducted physical measurement of plate waste and a questionnaire survey. The amount of food and nutrients was compared according to the new China National Dietary Guideline for School Children (2016) and Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes (2013). The provision of livestock and poultry meat in menus was almost 5–8 times the recommended amount. The amount of seafood was less than the recommended amount, and mostly came from half-processed food. The average percentage of energy from fat was more than 30% in students of all grades. The greatest amount of food wasted was vegetables with 53%, 42%, and 31%, respectively, among primary, middle and high school students. Intake of Vitamin A, Vitamin B2, calcium, and iron was about 50% of the recommended proportion. Only 24.0% students were satisfied with the taste of school lunches. Higher proportions of livestock and poultry meat and low intake of vegetables have become integral problems in school lunch programs. Additionally, more attention needs to be paid to the serving size in primary schools with five age groups. PMID:28590431

  15. Food and Nutrients Intake in the School Lunch Program among School Children in Shanghai, China.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhenru; Gao, Runying; Bawuerjiang, Nadila; Zhang, Yali; Huang, Xiaoxu; Cai, Meiqin

    2017-06-07

    This study aimed to evaluate the intake of food and nutrients among primary, middle, and high schools students in Shanghai, and provide recommendations for possible amendments in new school lunch standards of Shanghai. Twenty schools were included in the school lunch menu survey. Of those, seven schools enrolled 5389 students and conducted physical measurement of plate waste and a questionnaire survey. The amount of food and nutrients was compared according to the new China National Dietary Guideline for School Children (2016) and Chinese Dietary Reference Intakes (2013). The provision of livestock and poultry meat in menus was almost 5-8 times the recommended amount. The amount of seafood was less than the recommended amount, and mostly came from half-processed food. The average percentage of energy from fat was more than 30% in students of all grades. The greatest amount of food wasted was vegetables with 53%, 42%, and 31%, respectively, among primary, middle and high school students. Intake of Vitamin A, Vitamin B₂, calcium, and iron was about 50% of the recommended proportion. Only 24.0% students were satisfied with the taste of school lunches. Higher proportions of livestock and poultry meat and low intake of vegetables have become integral problems in school lunch programs. Additionally, more attention needs to be paid to the serving size in primary schools with five age groups.

  16. What's for Lunch? II. A 1990 Survey of Options in the School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morris, Patricia McGrath; And Others

    This report provides information on the content of school lunches offered to middle school children in the public schools. A total of 163 middle schools in 42 states responded to the school lunch survey. Survey findings are given on: (1) the contents of the main course, vegetable and fruit offerings, desserts, and beverages; and (2) lunches…

  17. Student-Faculty Lunch Program to Increase Mentoring and Facilitate Cross-Program Relationships in School of Nursing.

    PubMed

    Lewinski, Allison; Wainwright, Kristin; Gordon, Helen; Derouin, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Let's DU Lunch is a pilot program launched to explore the impact of a low-cost, student-faculty lunch program to increase mentoring and facilitate cross-program relationships. This program gave students the opportunity to go to lunch with a faculty member of their choice. A total of 71 students and 25 faculty participated. This program provided the opportunity for positive student-faculty interaction and mentoring and facilitated cross-program relationships.

  18. Impact of Connecticut Legislation Incentivizing Elimination of Unhealthy Competitive Foods on National School Lunch Program Participation

    PubMed Central

    Luedicke, Joerg; Dorsey, Marice; Fiore, Susan S.; Henderson, Kathryn E.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. We analyzed the impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing voluntary school district–level elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation. Methods. We analyzed data on free, reduced, and paid participation in the NSLP from 904 schools within 154 Connecticut school districts from the 2004–2005 to the 2009–2010 school year, resulting in 5064 observations of annual school-level meal participation. We used multilevel regression modeling techniques to estimate the impact of the state competitive food legislation on the count of NSLP lunches served per student in each school. Results. Overall, the state statute was associated with an increase in school lunch participation. We observed increases between 7% and 23% for middle- and high-school meal programs, and a slight decrease of 2.5% for the elementary school free meal eligibility category, leading to an estimated revenue increase of roughly $30 000 for an average school district per school year. Conclusions. This study provides support for national implementation of proposed rigorous competitive food standards that can improve the health of students while supporting local school district finances. PMID:23678930

  19. Impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program participation.

    PubMed

    Long, Michael W; Luedicke, Joerg; Dorsey, Marice; Fiore, Susan S; Henderson, Kathryn E

    2013-07-01

    We analyzed the impact of Connecticut legislation incentivizing voluntary school district-level elimination of unhealthy competitive foods on National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation. We analyzed data on free, reduced, and paid participation in the NSLP from 904 schools within 154 Connecticut school districts from the 2004-2005 to the 2009-2010 school year, resulting in 5064 observations of annual school-level meal participation. We used multilevel regression modeling techniques to estimate the impact of the state competitive food legislation on the count of NSLP lunches served per student in each school. Overall, the state statute was associated with an increase in school lunch participation. We observed increases between 7% and 23% for middle- and high-school meal programs, and a slight decrease of 2.5% for the elementary school free meal eligibility category, leading to an estimated revenue increase of roughly $30 000 for an average school district per school year. This study provides support for national implementation of proposed rigorous competitive food standards that can improve the health of students while supporting local school district finances.

  20. Preliminary Report on the Feasibility of Computer Matching in the National School Lunch Program. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-05-PDM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Nancy; Logan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The USDA provides reimbursement for meals served under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) to millions of children each school day. Children in families with income at or below 130 percent of the Federal poverty level are eligible for free meals, and children in families with income between 130 and 185…

  1. Preliminary Report on the Feasibility of Computer Matching in the National School Lunch Program. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Report No. CN-05-PDM.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cole, Nancy; Logan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    The USDA provides reimbursement for meals served under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP) to millions of children each school day. Children in families with income at or below 130 percent of the Federal poverty level are eligible for free meals, and children in families with income between 130 and 185…

  2. The School Lunch Lobby: A Charmed Federal Food Program that No Longer Just Feeds the Hungry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Consistent with the intent of the original school-lunch program, created by Congress in 1946 to provide "nutritious agricultural commodities" to children, the major purpose of today's school-lunch program is to ensure that children, especially those from poor and low-income families, have nutritious food at school. Even as contentious and partisan…

  3. The National School Lunch Program: Background, Trends, and Issues. Economic Research Report Number 61

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ralston, Katherine; Newman, Constance; Clauson, Annette; Guthrie, Joanne; Buzby, Jean

    2008-01-01

    The National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is the Nation's second largest food and nutrition assistance program. In 2006, it operated in over 101,000 public and nonprofit private schools and provided over 28 million low-cost or free lunches to children on a typical school day at a Federal cost of $8 billion for the year. This report provides…

  4. The School Lunch Lobby: A Charmed Federal Food Program that No Longer Just Feeds the Hungry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haskins, Ron

    2005-01-01

    Consistent with the intent of the original school-lunch program, created by Congress in 1946 to provide "nutritious agricultural commodities" to children, the major purpose of today's school-lunch program is to ensure that children, especially those from poor and low-income families, have nutritious food at school. Even as contentious and partisan…

  5. Satisfaction of Middle School Lunch Program Participants and Non-Participants with the School Lunch Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephanie; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine middle school students' satisfaction with the school lunch experience, using two validated surveys; the Middle/Junior High School Student Participation Survey and the Middle/Junior High School Student Non-Participation Survey, both developed by the National Food Service Management…

  6. Satisfaction of Middle School Lunch Program Participants and Non-Participants with the School Lunch Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Stephanie; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie; Auld, Garry

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine middle school students' satisfaction with the school lunch experience, using two validated surveys; the Middle/Junior High School Student Participation Survey and the Middle/Junior High School Student Non-Participation Survey, both developed by the National Food Service Management…

  7. Food Service Perspectives on National School Lunch Program Implementation

    PubMed Central

    Tabak, Rachel G.; Moreland-Russell, Sarah

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Explore barriers and facilitators to implementation of the new National School Lunch Program (NSLP) policy guidelines. Methods Interviews with eight food service directors using an interview guide informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Results Food service personnel; parents, teachers, school staff; and students were important stakeholders. Characteristics of the new NSLP policy guidelines were reported to create increased demands; resources alleviated some barriers. Directors reported increased food and labor costs, food sourcing challenges, decreased student participation, and organizational constraints as barriers to implementation. Creativity in menu planning facilitated success. Conclusions Factors within the food service department, characteristics of implementing individuals and the new NSLP policy guidelines, and stakeholder involvement in the implementation process relate to successful implementation. PMID:26417607

  8. Food Service Perspectives on National School Lunch Program Implementation.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Rachel G; Moreland-Russell, Sarah

    2015-09-01

    Explore barriers and facilitators to implementation of the new National School Lunch Program (NSLP) policy guidelines. Interviews with eight food service directors using an interview guide informed by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research. Food service personnel; parents, teachers, school staff; and students were important stakeholders. Characteristics of the new NSLP policy guidelines were reported to create increased demands; resources alleviated some barriers. Directors reported increased food and labor costs, food sourcing challenges, decreased student participation, and organizational constraints as barriers to implementation. Creativity in menu planning facilitated success. Factors within the food service department, characteristics of implementing individuals and the new NSLP policy guidelines, and stakeholder involvement in the implementation process relate to successful implementation.

  9. Making Room on the Tray: Fruits and Vegetables in the National School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bellinger, Mark; And Others

    This document presents findings of the latest annual report on school lunches conducted by Public Voice for Food Health Policy. The study examines access to fresh fruits and vegetables in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in terms of nutrition, distribution, and food safety. Data were obtained through telephone surveys of 200 school…

  10. Nutrient Contribution of the School Lunch Program: Implications for Healthy People 2000.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farris, Rosanne P.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Describes a 15-year study of cardiovascular disease-related nutrients in a school lunch program. According to the findings, although school lunches contributed less than one-third of total daily nutrients, intakes of diet components related to cardiovascular disease risk were excessive. (SM)

  11. Recess before Lunch Programs in Elementary Schools: Perceptions and Practices of School Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, Wendy; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the perceptions of school nutrition directors, principals/assistant principals, and teachers regarding issues important to consider when scheduling recess in relation to lunch, and to describe practices related to successfully implementing a recess before lunch program. Methods: A…

  12. Recess before Lunch Programs in Elementary Schools: Perceptions and Practices of School Professionals

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bounds, Wendy; Nettles, Mary Frances; Johnson, James T.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The objectives of this study were to examine the perceptions of school nutrition directors, principals/assistant principals, and teachers regarding issues important to consider when scheduling recess in relation to lunch, and to describe practices related to successfully implementing a recess before lunch program. Methods: A…

  13. Effects of the National School Lunch Program on Bone Growth in Japanese Elementary School Children.

    PubMed

    Kohri, Toshiyuki; Kaba, Naoko; Itoh, Tatsuki; Sasaki, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The Japanese school lunch program with milk was designed to supply 33-50% of the necessary nutrients per day and 50% of the recommended dietary allowance for calcium, which is difficult to obtain from Japanese meals. Although this program contributes to the mental and physical development of children, the effect of these meals on the bone growth in children remains unknown. Therefore, we compared the effect of school lunch with milk on bone growth between elementary school children attending schools that did not enforce the school lunch with milk program (box-lunch group) and those attending schools that did enforce the program (school-lunch group). The study subjects included fourth-grade children during the 2009-2013 school years, of whom 329 children were in the school-lunch group and 484 children in the box-lunch group. The bone area ratio of the right calcaneus was evaluated using quantitative ultrasound (Benus III). Dietary intakes were assessed using brief self-administered diet history questionnaires. The subjects were asked to record their activities for 3 d so that the mean physical activity intensity and the time spent sleeping could be estimated. The bone area ratios (%) were significantly higher in the school-lunch group than in the box-lunch group (males 31.0±0.3 vs. 30.3±0.2; females 30.6±0.2 vs. 29.7±0.2). This tendency did not change even after adjustment for confounding factors associated with bone growth. The results suggest that nutrients supplied by the Japanese school lunch program contributed to increased bone growth in elementary school children.

  14. An Innovative Method of Measuring Changes in Access to Healthful Foods in School Lunch Programs: Findings from a Pilot Evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Hawkes, Allison P.; Weinberg, Stacy L.; Janusz, Ruth; Demont-Heinrich, Christine; Vogt, Richard L.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction A large local health department in Colorado partnered with 15 school districts to develop an approach to evaluate changes in access to healthy foods in reimbursable school lunches and a la carte offerings. Materials and Methods School district nutrition managers were engaged at the start of this project. Health department dietitians developed criteria to classify food items as “Lower Fat and less added Sugar” (LFS) and “Higher Fat and more added Sugar” (HFS) based on the percentage of calories from fat and grams of added sugar. Lunch production sheets were obtained for two time periods, food items and the number of planned servings recorded. LFS and HFS planned servings were summed for each time period, and a LFS to HFS ratio calculated by dividing LFS planned servings by HFS planned servings. Additional analyses included calculating LFS: HFS ratios by school district, and for a la carte offerings. Results In 2009, the LFS: HFS ratio was 2.08, in 2011, 3.71 (P<0.0001). The method also detected changes in ratios at the school district level. For a la carte items, in 2009 the ratio of LFS: HFS was 0.53, and in 2011, 0.61 (not statistically significant). Conclusions This method detected an increase in the LFS: HFS ratio over time and demonstrated that the school districts improved access to healthful food/drink by changing the contents of reimbursable school lunches. The evaluation method discussed here can generate information that districts can use in helping sustain and expand their efforts to create healthier environments for children and adults. Although federal regulations now cover all food and beverages served during the school day, there are still opportunities to improve and measure changes in food served in other settings such as child care centers, youth correction facilities, or in schools not participating in the National School Lunch Program. PMID:26800523

  15. An Innovative Method of Measuring Changes in Access to Healthful Foods in School Lunch Programs: Findings from a Pilot Evaluation.

    PubMed

    Hawkes, Allison P; Weinberg, Stacy L; Janusz, Ruth; Demont-Heinrich, Christine; Vogt, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    A large local health department in Colorado partnered with 15 school districts to develop an approach to evaluate changes in access to healthy foods in reimbursable school lunches and a la carte offerings. School district nutrition managers were engaged at the start of this project. Health department dietitians developed criteria to classify food items as "Lower Fat and less added Sugar" (LFS) and "Higher Fat and more added Sugar" (HFS) based on the percentage of calories from fat and grams of added sugar. Lunch production sheets were obtained for two time periods, food items and the number of planned servings recorded. LFS and HFS planned servings were summed for each time period, and a LFS to HFS ratio calculated by dividing LFS planned servings by HFS planned servings. Additional analyses included calculating LFS: HFS ratios by school district, and for a la carte offerings. In 2009, the LFS: HFS ratio was 2.08, in 2011, 3.71 (P<0.0001). The method also detected changes in ratios at the school district level. For a la carte items, in 2009 the ratio of LFS: HFS was 0.53, and in 2011, 0.61 (not statistically significant). This method detected an increase in the LFS: HFS ratio over time and demonstrated that the school districts improved access to healthful food/drink by changing the contents of reimbursable school lunches. The evaluation method discussed here can generate information that districts can use in helping sustain and expand their efforts to create healthier environments for children and adults. Although federal regulations now cover all food and beverages served during the school day, there are still opportunities to improve and measure changes in food served in other settings such as child care centers, youth correction facilities, or in schools not participating in the National School Lunch Program.

  16. Sound Nutrition Suffers When Salt and Fat Dominate the Lunch Tray.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montgomery, Anne

    1988-01-01

    Lunches served in many school cafeterias are low in fiber and high in fat and salt. Some food service directors are willing to transform standard programs into models of healthful eating. School lunches teach children what is nutritionally desirable. (MLF)

  17. An outbreak of gastroenteritis linked to a buffet lunch served at a Canberra restaurant.

    PubMed

    Sloan-Gardner, Timothy S; Glynn-Robinson, Anna-Jane; Roberts-Witteveen, April; Krsteski, Radomir; Rogers, Keith; Kaye, Andrew; Moffatt, Cameron R M

    2014-12-31

    In 2013, an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness occurred following a buffet lunch at a restaurant in Canberra. An investigation was conducted to identify the cause of illness and to implement appropriate public health measures to prevent further disease. We conducted a retrospective cohort study via telephone interviews, using a structured questionnaire developed from the restaurant buffet menu. A case was defined as someone who ate the buffet lunch at the restaurant on the implicated date and developed any symptoms of gastrointestinal illness (such as diarrhoea, abdominal pain and nausea) following the consumption of food. A total of 74% (225/303) of known attendees were interviewed, of whom 56% (125/225) had become ill. The median incubation period and duration of illness were 13 and 19 hours respectively. The most commonly reported symptoms were diarrhoea (94%, 118/125) and abdominal pain (82%, 103/125). A toxin-mediated gastrointestinal illness was suspected based on the incubation period, duration of illness and the symptoms. The environmental health investigation identified a lack of designated hand washing facilities in the kitchen, an absence of thermometers for measuring food temperatures and several maintenance and minor cleaning issues. A number of food samples were taken for microbiological analysis. Multivariable analysis showed that illness was significantly associated with consuming curried prawns (OR 18.4, 95% CI 8.6-39.3, P < 0.001) and Caesar salad (OR 3.6, 95% CI 1.8-7.5, P 0.001). Enterotoxin-producing Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus cereus were identified in leftover samples of cooked buffet food, but this food was not epidemiologically implicated. The investigation suggested that a breakdown in cleanliness, temperature control and food handling practices may have resulted in contamination of the buffet food. In order to prevent such outbreaks in the future, caterers and restaurateurs need to ensure they have the appropriate facilities and

  18. 76 FR 66849 - Applying for Free and Reduced Price Meals in the National School Lunch Program and School...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-28

    ... the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program and for Benefits in the Special Milk... the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and the School Breakfast Program (SBP), and for free milk under the Special Milk Program for Children. Please note that while the application and...

  19. Characterizing lunch meals served and consumed by pre-school children in Head Start

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The objective of this study was to examine the variability of food portions served and consumed by African-American and Hispanic-American pre-school children attending Head Start. It was a cross-sectional design. The participants were 796 pre-schoolers (3-5 years of age) enrolled in sixteen Head Sta...

  20. Feeding the Future: The Global Emergence of School Lunch Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Jennifer Geist

    2009-01-01

    My dissertation is motivated by a puzzle of international social policy and norm emergence and diffusion. Today, children in one hundred and forty-one countries receive free or subsidized school lunches. Yet less than a century ago, no state had a national child nutrition policy. Feeding children was clearly not considered a state responsibility a…

  1. Feeding the Future: The Global Emergence of School Lunch Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Jennifer Geist

    2009-01-01

    My dissertation is motivated by a puzzle of international social policy and norm emergence and diffusion. Today, children in one hundred and forty-one countries receive free or subsidized school lunches. Yet less than a century ago, no state had a national child nutrition policy. Feeding children was clearly not considered a state responsibility a…

  2. Kindergarteners' Entree Intake Increases when Served a Larger Entree Portion in School Lunch: A Quasi-Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, Samantha; Safaii, SeAnne; Croschere, Tom; Branen, Laurel J.; Wiest, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of portion size on children's intake and self-regulation of food has gained attention; however, few studies have examined portion sizes in school lunch. This study investigated kindergarteners' intake when they were given different entree portion sizes from the lunch menu. Methods: Plate waste was used as a proxy to…

  3. Kindergarteners' Entree Intake Increases when Served a Larger Entree Portion in School Lunch: A Quasi-Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramsay, Samantha; Safaii, SeAnne; Croschere, Tom; Branen, Laurel J.; Wiest, Michelle

    2013-01-01

    Background: The influence of portion size on children's intake and self-regulation of food has gained attention; however, few studies have examined portion sizes in school lunch. This study investigated kindergarteners' intake when they were given different entree portion sizes from the lunch menu. Methods: Plate waste was used as a proxy to…

  4. School Lunch or Sack Lunch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainville, Alice Jo

    2003-01-01

    Study of elementary school lunches in 10 public schools in Michigan compares the nutritional value of school lunches with sack lunches. Finds that school lunches are lower in fat, more nutritious, and provide more variety than sack lunches. (PKP)

  5. School Lunch or Sack Lunch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainville, Alice Jo

    2003-01-01

    Study of elementary school lunches in 10 public schools in Michigan compares the nutritional value of school lunches with sack lunches. Finds that school lunches are lower in fat, more nutritious, and provide more variety than sack lunches. (PKP)

  6. SCHOOL LUNCH AND LEARNING.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JENSEN, VERNA; LOGAN, EUNICE

    A COMPREHENSIVE PRESENTATION OF IDEAS IS MADE IN THIS PUBLICATION TO HELP THE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL ORGANIZE AND CONDUCT A SCHOOL LUNCH PROGRAM, AND TO FURNISH THE CLASSROOM TEACHER PRACTICAL SUGGESTIONS FOR ENRICHING THE TOTAL CLASSROOM PROGRAM THROUGH SCHOOL LUNCH EXPERIENCES. SCHOOL LUNCH IS THE TOPIC OF THE FIRST SECTION AND INCLUDES SUB-TOPICS…

  7. Psychosocial Outcomes of "Lunch Is in the Bag", a Parent Program for Packing Healthful Lunches for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweitzer, Sara J.; Briley, Margaret E.; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Staskel, Deanna M.; Almansour, Fawaz D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study evaluated effects of "Lunch is in the Bag" on behavioral constructs and their predictive relationship to lunch-packing behaviors of parents of young children. Methods: Six child care centers were pair-matched and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 3) and comparison (n = 3) groups. Parent/child dyads participated.…

  8. Psychosocial Outcomes of "Lunch Is in the Bag", a Parent Program for Packing Healthful Lunches for Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweitzer, Sara J.; Briley, Margaret E.; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Harrist, Ronald B.; Staskel, Deanna M.; Almansour, Fawaz D.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: This pilot study evaluated effects of "Lunch is in the Bag" on behavioral constructs and their predictive relationship to lunch-packing behaviors of parents of young children. Methods: Six child care centers were pair-matched and randomly assigned to intervention (n = 3) and comparison (n = 3) groups. Parent/child dyads participated.…

  9. Food Stamp and School Lunch Programs Alleviate Food Insecurity in Rural America. Fact Sheet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Kristin; Savage, Sarah

    2007-01-01

    The Food Stamp and the National School Lunch Programs play a vital role in helping poor, rural Americans obtain a more nutritious diet and alleviate food insecurity and hunger. This fact sheet looks at the extent to which rural America depends on these programs and describes characteristics of beneficiaries of these federal nutrition assistance…

  10. Characteristics of the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Program Participation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban Inst., Washington, DC.

    This report uses data collected during the National Evaluation of School Nutrition Project (NESNP-II) in 1983-84 to describe the characteristics of students and households eligible for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and School Breakfast Program (SBP), and the characteristics of NSLP and SBP participants and their households. The NESNP-II…

  11. School breakfast program but not school lunch program participation is associated with lower body mass index.

    PubMed

    Gleason, Philip M; Dodd, Allison Hedley

    2009-02-01

    Rates of overweight and obesity have increased dramatically during the past 2 decades. Children obtain a large fraction of their food energy while at school. To estimate the relationship between participation in school meal programs and children's body mass index (BMI) and their likelihood of being overweight or obese, testing the hypothesis that school meal participation influences students' weight status, as measured by their BMI and indicators of overweight and obesity. A cross-sectional design in which a regression model was used to estimate the association between participation in the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program and children's BMI and risk of overweight or obesity, controlling for a wide range of student and school characteristics. Participants included a nationally representative sample from the third School Nutrition Dietary Assessment Study of 2,228 students in grades 1 through 12 for whom height and weight measurements were obtained. These students, along with their parents, each completed a survey. Multivariate regression models were used to examine the relationship between usual school meal participation and BMI and indicators of whether students were overweight or obese. These models controlled for students' demographic and socioeconomic characteristics, levels of physical activity, usual eating habits, screen time, and school characteristics. No evidence was found of any relationship between usual school lunch participation and any of four different measures of weight status based on students' BMI. School breakfast participation was associated with significantly lower BMI, particularly among non-Hispanic, white students. There was no evidence that either the school breakfast or lunch program is contributing to rising rates of childhood obesity. In fact, School Breakfast Program participation may be a protective factor, by encouraging students to consume breakfast more regularly.

  12. The practices and needs of dietitian in school lunch program in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Wong, Yueching; Chang, Yu-Jhen

    2012-01-01

    Nutrition-related problems among school-age children nowadays become potentially serious. In order to prevent obesity and other nutritionally related diseases in the young generation, a school lunch program has been proposed and conducted in Taiwan. It is to ensure that students' nutritional intake meets the daily requirement and to help students develop correct eating habits and maintain a healthy lifestyle. A professional dietitian who has a clear concept regarding food material utilization, cooking methods and nutritional values thus becomes important. However, the majority of schools in Taiwan are unable to offer the post of dietitian due to budgetary constraints and lack of organization. The responsibility of a dietitian is usually held by teachers, school nurses and other administrative staff. This problem has hindered the nutritional education in schools and made school lunches less beneficial to the children's nutritional needs. For the current status of dietitians in schools, a large gap is found between the currently supplied school lunches and the nutritionally standardized school lunches. It also exists in relation to education and hygiene. One of the solutions requires an infrastructure to support plans and policy, reasonable adequate budget, well human affairs establishment and coordination of all aspects. While the needed infrastructure is being proposed, an access to the professionalism of the currently employed dietitians can be strategically explored by constructing an education system. Through the system, schools without on-campus dietitians will be able to utilize their expertise with which the improvement of school lunches can be expectedly accomplished.

  13. Students' and Principals' Survey Reactions to the 1976-1977 Minneapolis Public School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Paul S.

    A survey of students' and principals' reactions to the Minneapolis public school lunch program is described, and the results and comments are presented. Meals are prepared on site at ten secondary schools, and prepacked at the nutrition center and reheated before service at other schools. Questionnaires were completed by 1,582 students in 25…

  14. The contribution of the USDA school breakfast and lunch program meals to student daily dietary intake

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    In the United States, the National School Breakfast (SBP) and School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals are provided for free or at a reduced price to eligible children, and are a nutrition safety net for low income children. Consuming both meals could provide 58% of daily intake. This paper evaluates the c...

  15. 78 FR 47274 - National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service National School Lunch, Special Milk, and School Breakfast Programs, National Average Payments/Maximum Reimbursement Rates Correction In notice document 2013-17990, appearing on...

  16. 78 FR 40625 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; Approval of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... / Monday, July 8, 2013 / Rules and Regulations#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Food and Nutrition Service 7 CFR Parts 210 and 220 RIN 0584-AD59 Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs; Approval of Information Collection Request AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA...

  17. Methods and Challenges Related to Implementing the New National School Lunch Program Regulations in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Getty, Victoria M.; Johnson, Hattie L.; Case, Megan; Herr, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 resulted in updated National School Lunch Program (NSLP) regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The purpose of this research was to investigate the approaches used by school foodservice managers and directors in Indiana in complying with the new regulations and to identify…

  18. The Effects of the National School Lunch Program on Education and Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinrichs, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of participating in the National School Lunch Program in the middle of the 20th century on adult health outcomes and educational attainment. I utilize an instrumental variables strategy that exploits a change in the formula used by the federal government to allocate funding to the states. Identification is achieved…

  19. A Study on Linear Programming Applications for the Optimization of School Lunch Menus. Summation Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Findorff, Irene K.

    This document summarizes the results of a project at Tulane University that was designed to adapt, test, and evaluate a computerized information and menu planning system utilizing linear programing techniques for use in school lunch food service operations. The objectives of the menu planning were to formulate menu items into a palatable,…

  20. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  1. Methods and Challenges Related to Implementing the New National School Lunch Program Regulations in Indiana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Getty, Victoria M.; Johnson, Hattie L.; Case, Megan; Herr, Susan J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 resulted in updated National School Lunch Program (NSLP) regulations from the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The purpose of this research was to investigate the approaches used by school foodservice managers and directors in Indiana in complying with the new regulations and to identify…

  2. From Charity to Security: The Emergence of the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Jennifer Geist

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the historical formation of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in the United States and argues that programme emergence depended on the ability of policy entrepreneurs to link the economic concerns of agricultural production with the ideational concern of national security. Using a historical institutionalist framework…

  3. Students' and Principals' Survey Reactions to the 1976-1977 Minneapolis Public School Lunch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Higgins, Paul S.

    A survey of students' and principals' reactions to the Minneapolis public school lunch program is described, and the results and comments are presented. Meals are prepared on site at ten secondary schools, and prepacked at the nutrition center and reheated before service at other schools. Questionnaires were completed by 1,582 students in 25…

  4. Participation in the National School Lunch Program: Importance of School-Level and Neighborhood Contextual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirtcheva, Donka M.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effect of stigma (proxied by school-level peer participation), neighborhood food environment, and demographic characteristics on participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The 1997 and 2003 waves of the Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of…

  5. Fostering Hand Washing before Lunch by Students Attending a Special Needs Young Adult Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which…

  6. The "take a nurse to lunch" program. A unique focus group improves and promotes food services.

    PubMed

    1998-10-01

    Dan Booth is the director of hospitality services for MaineGeneral Health. For this 450-bed health care organization, he directs six departments, which include environmental services, food and nutrition, security, laundry services, telecommunications, and transportation. In this article he describes how his Take a Nurse to Lunch program operates, what its benefits are, and how it was implemented.

  7. From Charity to Security: The Emergence of the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rutledge, Jennifer Geist

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the historical formation of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in the United States and argues that programme emergence depended on the ability of policy entrepreneurs to link the economic concerns of agricultural production with the ideational concern of national security. Using a historical institutionalist framework…

  8. Management Methods Applied to Lunch Program. What Food Management Companies Can Do for You - 2

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davidson, Kenneth R.

    1974-01-01

    In Joliet, Illinois, a food management system based on increased student participation in the school lunch program, was so successful that the controls developed to manage it were adopted as standard operating procedure in overall school system management. (Author/MLF)

  9. Participation in the National School Lunch Program: Importance of School-Level and Neighborhood Contextual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mirtcheva, Donka M.; Powell, Lisa M.

    2009-01-01

    Background: This study examined the effect of stigma (proxied by school-level peer participation), neighborhood food environment, and demographic characteristics on participation in the U.S. Department of Agriculture National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The 1997 and 2003 waves of the Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of…

  10. 78 FR 40625 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-08

    ... Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010; Approval of... ``National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy... meet certain direct certification performance benchmarks and to develop and implement continuous...

  11. Changes in foods selected and consumed after implementation of the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns in southeast Texas

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We compared elementary students' school lunches selected and consumed before (Spring, 2011) and after (Spring, 2013) implementation of the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns in the fall of 2012. Students in eight elementary schools in one Southeast Texas school district were observed du...

  12. Kindergarteners' entrée intake increases when served a larger entrée portion in school lunch: a quasi-experiment.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Samantha; Safaii, Seanne; Croschere, Tom; Branen, Laurel J; Wiest, Michelle

    2013-04-01

    The influence of portion size on children's intake and self-regulation of food has gained attention; however, few studies have examined portion sizes in school lunch. This study investigated kindergarteners' intake when they were given different entrée portion sizes from the lunch menu. Plate waste was used as a proxy to measure intake. A standardized lunch of chicken nuggets, rice, green beans, applesauce, and milk was served every Tuesday for 5 consecutive weeks at a Kinder Center. All menu items and the self-selection of 2, 3, or 4 nuggets were served the first week as a pilot. In the second and fourth weeks, trained servers preportioned kindergarteners' plates with 4 nuggets. In the third and fifth weeks, kindergarteners verbally self-selected 2, 3, or 4 chicken nuggets. A Mann-Whitney test was used to determine a significant difference in intake between the 2 days kindergarteners were allowed to select the portion size and the 2 days they were preportioned. A significant difference (p < .009) in intake was found between the self-selection of entrée portion size and the preportioned entrée regardless of sex or whether kindergarteners attended the am or pm session. No significant difference was found in milk, fruit, vegetable, or rice intake between choice and nonchoice lunches. In this study, kindergarteners ate more chicken nuggets when they were offered a larger portion size. Further investigation is needed on the impact of letting kindergarteners self-select portion sizes, and the potential negative outcomes of larger portion sizes on children's caloric consumption in elementary schools. © 2013, American School Health Association.

  13. Food Buying Guide for Type A School Lunches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Mary Ann; And Others

    This guide provides information for planning and calculating quantities of food to be purchased and used by schools serving Type A lunches in the National School Lunch Program. This edition includes changes resulting from new developments in food production and processing as well as changes in marketing procedures, packages, and quality of foods…

  14. Food Buying Guide for Type A School Lunches.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Mary Ann; And Others

    This guide provides information for planning and calculating quantities of food to be purchased and used by schools serving Type A lunches in the National School Lunch Program. This edition includes changes resulting from new developments in food production and processing as well as changes in marketing procedures, packages, and quality of foods…

  15. The effects of the National School Lunch Program on education and health.

    PubMed

    Hinrichs, Peter

    2010-01-01

    This paper estimates the effects of participating in the National School Lunch Program in the middle of the 20th century on adult health outcomes and educational attainment. I utilize an instrumental variables strategy that exploits a change in the formula used by the federal government to allocate funding to the states. Identification is achieved by the fact that different birth cohorts were exposed to different degrees to the original formula and the new formula, along with the fact that the change of the formula affected states differentially by per capita income. Participation in the program as a child appears to have few long-run effects on health, but the effects on educational attainment are sizable. These results may suggest that subsidized lunches induced children to attend school but displaced food consumption from other sources. Alternatively, the program may have had short-run health effects that dissipated over time but that facilitated higher educational attainment.

  16. 76 FR 2493 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-13

    ...This rule proposes to revise the meal patterns and nutrition requirements for the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program to align them with the 2005 ``Dietary Guidelines for Americans,'' as required by the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act. The proposed changes are based on recommendations from the National Academies' Institute of Medicine set forth in the report ``School Meals: Building Blocks for Healthy Children.'' This proposed rule would increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat fluid milk in school meals; reduce the levels of sodium and saturated fat in meals; and help meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. Implementation of this proposed rule would result in more nutritious school meals that improve the dietary habits of school children and protect their health.

  17. Packed lunches compared to school lunches

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considerable effort has been put forth to improve the nutritional quality of school meals provided by the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). However, a large percentage of children do not obtain their meals from school but instead bring lunch from home. Little research has focused on the content ...

  18. Validation of the school lunch recall questionnaire to capture school lunch intake of third- to fifth-grade students.

    PubMed

    Paxton, Amy; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Fleming, Phyllis; Ammerman, Alice

    2011-03-01

    Children's dietary intake is a key variable in evaluations of school-based interventions. Current methods for assessing children's intake, such as 24-hour recalls and meal observations, are time- and resource-intensive. As part of a study to evaluate the impact of farm-to-school programs, the school lunch recall was developed from a need for a valid and efficient tool to assess school lunch intake among large samples of children. A self-administered paper-and-pencil questionnaire, the school lunch recall prompts for school lunch items by asking children whether they chose a menu item, how much of it they ate, how much they liked it, and whether they would choose it again. The school lunch recall was validated during summer school in 2008 with 18 third- to fifth-grade students (8 to 11 years old) in a North Carolina elementary school. For 4 consecutive days, trained observers recorded foods and amounts students ate during school lunch. Students completed the school lunch recall immediately after lunch. Thirty-seven total observation school lunch recall sets were analyzed. Comparison of school lunch recalls against observations indicated high accuracy, with means of 6% for omission rate (items observed but unreported), 10% for intrusion rate (items unobserved but reported), and 0.63 servings for total inaccuracy (a measure that combines errors for reporting items and amounts). For amounts, accuracy was high for matches (0.06 and 0.01 servings for absolute and arithmetic differences, respectively) but lower for omissions (0.47 servings) and intrusions (0.54 servings). In this pilot study, the school lunch recall was a valid, efficient tool for assessing school lunch intake for a small sample of third- to fifth-grade students. Copyright © 2011 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Occurrence of selected perfluorinated alkyl acids in lunch meals served at school canteens in Italy and their relevance for children's intake.

    PubMed

    Dellatte, Elena; Brambilla, Gianfranco; De Filippis, Stefania Paola; di Domenico, Alessandro; Pulkrabova, Jana; Eschauzier, Christian; Klenow, Stefanie; Heinemeyer, Gerhard; de Voogt, Pim

    2013-01-01

    Ready-to-eat servings may be more contaminated with perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) than the corresponding unprocessed foods due to the presence of PFAAs in and transfer from food contact materials (FCM) and cookware. Therefore, the presence of selected PFAAs in meals served weekly at lunch time in six Italian school canteens was assessed. Five towns were selected representing different areas with local water and food supply. Daily lunch menus were sampled and pooled to form a composite. Analyses were carried out on the weekly composite from each canteen. UPLC-MS/MS quantification limits were in the 6.0-12 pg g⁻¹ range for the selected PFAAs (PFHxA, PFOA, PFNA, PFDA, PFUnDA, PFHxS, branched and non-branched PFOS). Non-branched PFOS was quantified in four out of six composites, with levels ranging from 14 to 25 pg g⁻¹, while PFOA and PFDA were determined in two out of six in the range 6.5-8.2 pg g⁻¹. Theoretical estimates and analytical results in the same order of magnitude indicate a negligible contribution from food processing and serving to meal contamination. When composite analytical data are transposed into dietary estimates, it is shown that Italian school-age children have intakes in the range of 0.3-1.1 and 0.5-1.4 ng kg⁻¹ bw day⁻¹ for PFOA and PFOS respectively, well below the corresponding tolerable daily intakes (TDIs).

  20. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  1. Examining Variations in Fourth-Grade Children's Participation in School Breakfast and Lunch Programs by Student and Program Demographics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children's participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, gender, and school-breakfast location. Methods: Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during either…

  2. Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program participation in elementary schools in the United States and availability of fruits and vegetables in school lunch meals.

    PubMed

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Turner, Lindsey; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2012-06-01

    Dietary intake among children in the United States falls short of national recommendations. Schools can play an important role in improving children's preferences and food consumption patterns. The US Department of Agriculture's Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (FFVP) aims to improve children's nutrient intake patterns by offering fresh fruits and vegetables as snacks outside the reimbursable meals programs in elementary schools that serve large numbers of low-income children. Using a nationally representative sample of public elementary schools, this cross-sectional study investigated FFVP participation patterns among schools by demographic and school characteristics. Further, the study investigated the association between FFVP participation and availability of fresh fruits, salads, and vegetables at lunch as reported by school administrators and foodservice staff. Data collected via a mail-back survey from 620 public elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program during 2009-2010 were analyzed. Almost 70% of the FFVP-participating schools had a majority of students (>50%) eligible for free and reduced-cost meals. Participating in US Department of Agriculture Team Nutrition Program and having a registered dietitian or a nutritionist on staff were significantly associated with FFVP participation. Based on the results from logistic regression analyses schools participating in the FFVP were significantly more likely (odds ratio 2.07; 95% CI 1.12 to 3.53) to serve fresh fruit during lunch meals. Slightly >25% of public elementary schools across the United States participated in the FFVP, and participation was associated with healthier food availability in school lunches.

  3. Low-income Children's participation in the National School Lunch Program and household food insufficiency.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jin; Barnidge, Ellen

    2016-02-01

    Assessing the impact of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) on household food insufficiency is critical to improve the implementation of public food assistance and to improve the nutrition intake of low-income children and their families. To examine the association of receiving free/reduced-price lunch from the NSLP with household food insufficiency among low-income children and their families in the United States, the study used data from four longitudinal panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation (SIPP; 1996, 2001, 2004, and 2008), which collected information on household food insufficiency covering both summer and non-summer months. The sample included 15, 241 households with at least one child (aged 5-18) receiving free/reduced-price lunch from the NSLP. A dichotomous measure describes whether households have sufficient food to eat in the observed months. Fixed-effects regression analysis suggests that the food insufficiency rate is .7 (95%CI: .1, 1.2) percentage points higher in summer months among NSLP recipients. Since low-income families cannot participate in the NSLP in summer when the school is not in session, the result indicates the NSLP participation is associated with a reduction of food insufficiency risk by nearly 14%. The NSLP plays a significant role to protect low-income children and their families from food insufficiency. It is important to increase access to school meal programs among children at risk of food insufficiency in order to ensure adequate nutrition and to mitigate the health problems associated with malnourishment among children.

  4. Food Waste in the National School Lunch Program 1978-2015: A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Byker Shanks, Carmen; Banna, Jinan; Serrano, Elena L

    2017-08-11

    Food waste studies have been used for more than 40 years to assess nutrient intake, dietary quality, menu performance, food acceptability, cost, and effectiveness of nutrition education in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Describe methods used to measure food waste and respective results in the NSLP across time. A systematic review using PubMed, Science Direct, Informaworld, and Institute of Scientific Information Web of Knowledge was conducted using the following search terms: waste, school lunch, plate waste, food waste, kitchen, half method, quarter method, weight, and photography. Studies published through June 2015 were included. The systematic review followed preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses recommendations. The final review included 53 articles. Food waste methodologies included in-person visual estimation (n=11), digital photography (n=11), direct weighing (n=23), and a combination of in-person visual estimation, digital photography, and/or direct weighing (n=8). A majority of studies used a pre-post intervention or cross-sectional design. Fruits and vegetables were the most researched dietary component on the lunch tray and yielded the greatest amount of waste across studies. Food waste is commonly assessed in the NSLP, but the methods are diverse and reporting metrics are variable. Future research should focus on establishing more uniform metrics to measure and report on food waste in the NSLP. Consistent food waste measurement methods will allow for better comparisons between studies. Such measures may facilitate better decision making about NSLP practices, programs, and policies that influence student consumption patterns across settings and interventions. Copyright © 2017 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. School Breakfast and School Lunch Programs. Hearing before the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. United States Senate, One Hundred Fifth Congress, First Session on the School Breakfast and Lunch Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    These hearing transcripts present testimony to the Senate Committee on Agriculture regarding the School Lunch and Breakfast Programs. Statements were made by several senators, the president of the American School Food Service Association (Connecticut); a school food service program director (Florida); the director of nutrition and education for…

  6. How Nutritious Are Children's Packed School Lunches? A Comparison of Lunches Brought from Home and School Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minaya, Sarah; Rainville, Alice Jo

    2016-01-01

    Through reinforcement of policies and nutrition standards linked to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), school environments play an important role in preventing childhood obesity. The NSLP includes mandated nutrition standards that specify recommended servings of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, dairy and protein, as well as limits on…

  7. How Nutritious Are Children's Packed School Lunches? A Comparison of Lunches Brought from Home and School Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Minaya, Sarah; Rainville, Alice Jo

    2016-01-01

    Through reinforcement of policies and nutrition standards linked to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), school environments play an important role in preventing childhood obesity. The NSLP includes mandated nutrition standards that specify recommended servings of vegetables, fruit, whole grains, dairy and protein, as well as limits on…

  8. Accuracy of food photographs for quantifying food servings in a lunch meal setting among Danish children and adults.

    PubMed

    Biltoft-Jensen, A; Holmgaard Nielsen, T; Hess Ygil, K; Christensen, T; Fagt, S

    2017-06-27

    Visual aids, such as food photographs, are widely used in estimating food quantities in dietary surveys. The present study aimed to assess how accurately Danish adults and children can estimate food portion sizes using 37 series of photographs illustrating four to six different portion sizes under real-life conditions; determine whether adults were more accurate than children; and estimate the error caused by using portion size photographs to estimate weights of foods consumed in macronutrient calculation. Six hundred and twenty-two adults and 109 children were recruited in three workplace canteens and in two schools, respectively, to estimate their lunchtime portions based on photographs. Participants were instructed to keep the foods separated on their plate when taking lunch. Participants thereafter estimated their own portions by looking at the relevant series of photographs. The actual food portions were then weighed. The proportion of correct estimations was 42% overall (range 19-77%). The mean difference (%) between estimated and actual weight was 17% (range 1-111%). Small portion size photographs were more often used correctly compared to larger portion photographs. Children had as many correct estimations as adults, although they overestimated portions more. Participants using fractions of (or more than) one photograph to estimate the portion of a food had significantly larger errors. When calculating the macronutrient content of a weekly menu using the estimated portion sizes, protein had the largest error (29%). When used in a real-life situation, the portion size photographs validated in the present study showed a certain inaccuracy compared to the actual weights. © 2017 The British Dietetic Association Ltd.

  9. Nutritional Guidelines for School Lunch Programs: A Survey of Islamic Schools and Recommendations for Creating a Culture of Healthful Eating

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Sumiya; Saeed, Ziena; Diwan, Hanifa Hameed; Hussain, Iqra; Amer, Sarah; Haq, Mohamed M.

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To determine the status of lunch programs in Islamic schools in the United States and develop recommendations for improving them. Study Design: The Islamic Medical Association of North America (IMANA) conducted a survey of lunch programs by mailing questionnaires to 100 Islamic schools in the United States. Muslims in Dietetics and Nutrition (MIDAN) developed lunch menus using American and ethnic foods conforming to nationally recommended guidelines. Results: Forty-eight Islamic schools responded to the survey, revealing that 20 schools follow guidelines and only six have dietitians advising on menu planning. Based on this survey, IMANA, with the assistance of MIDAN, has developed a summary of guidelines that schools can follow. These guidelines include sample menus of American and ethnic foods, recommendations for creating a n environment for healthful eating, and sources for funding school lunch programs. Conclusions: IMANA and MIDAN, recognizing the scientific significance and religious relevance of a nutritious diet, have developed these recommendations. This information is provided to aid Islamic schools in implementing guidelines for nutritionally balanced school lunch menus and in creating a culture that fosters a healthful lifestyle. PMID:23610485

  10. Developing a Best Practice Guide for Increasing High School Student Participation and Satisfaction in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Castillo, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to identify and confirm best practices for increasing high school student participation and satisfaction in school nutrition (SN) programs operating under the regulations of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: Using a modified best practices research model (BPRM; Mold & Gregory,…

  11. Developing a Best Practice Guide for Increasing High School Student Participation and Satisfaction in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Castillo, Alexandra

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to identify and confirm best practices for increasing high school student participation and satisfaction in school nutrition (SN) programs operating under the regulations of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: Using a modified best practices research model (BPRM; Mold & Gregory,…

  12. Rock on Cafe: achieving sustainable systems changes in school lunch programs.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Yvonne; Denniston, Ray; Morgan, Molly; Bordeau, Mark

    2009-04-01

    The rising rate of overweight poses a significant threat to the health of children. Because roughly one third of a child's dietary intake occurs during school hours and because both health and academic outcomes have been linked to children's nutrition, school nutrition policies and programs have been identified as a key area for intervention. This article describes the components, processes, and initial successes of a grassroots effort and innovative project to improve the nutritional quality of the School Lunch Program through a sustainable systems intervention and policy change across a regional area of upstate New York. The Rock on Cafe intervention was partially funded by the Steps to a Healthier New York program and promises to be a model for creating a school environment that supports healthy dietary behaviors among children.

  13. Healthier choices and increased participation in a middle school lunch program: effects of nutrition policy changes in San Francisco.

    PubMed

    Wojcicki, Janet M; Heyman, Melvin B

    2006-09-01

    In order to address overall nutritional health, including increases in numbers of overweight children and adolescents, the San Francisco Unified School District implemented a progressive nutrition policy beginning in August 2003. We review this policy and focus on its impact on school and district revenues and students' participation in the federally subsidized school lunch program. We examined changes in menu items and the consequent effects of these changes on student eating patterns and school revenues at Aptos Middle School in San Francisco. This case study and additional district data show that provision of healthy menu options led to increased student participation in the federal school lunch program.

  14. Fostering hand washing before lunch by students attending a special needs young adult program.

    PubMed

    Walmsley, Christopher; Mahoney, Amanda; Durgin, Amy; Poling, Alan

    2013-01-01

    A multiple baseline across groups design was used to investigate the effects of a treatment package on hand washing before lunch by five students with disabilities who attended a young adult educational program. To evaluate hand washing, a lotion called Glo Germ was applied to participants' hands. Glo Germ is visible under a black light, which allowed the quality of hand washing to be assessed by comparing the amount visible before and after hand washing using a 3-point scale. Following a baseline period in which hand washing was assessed, participants were exposed to a hand washing training procedure, which improved one participant's hand washing. Next, a lottery system was imposed in which the number of lottery tickets earned each day depended on the quality of hand washing, specifically, on the rating assigned (0, 1, or 2). This condition was associated with improved hand washing by the other four participants. Finally, a condition adding feedback to the lottery system resulted in further improvements in the quality of hand washing for all participants. Follow up data indicated modest maintenance of hand washing after lunch. These results suggest that treatment packages similar to that used in the present study merit further investigation and that Glo Germ is of value in ascertaining the quality of hand washing.

  15. Nutrition standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2012-01-26

    This final rule updates the meal patterns and nutrition standards for the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs to align them with the Dietary Guidelines for Americans. This rule requires most schools to increase the availability of fruits, vegetables, whole grains, and fat-free and low-fat fluid milk in school meals; reduce the levels of sodium, saturated fat and trans fat in meals; and meet the nutrition needs of school children within their calorie requirements. These improvements to the school meal programs, largely based on recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine of the National Academies, are expected to enhance the diet and health of school children, and help mitigate the childhood obesity trend.

  16. Oversight on the School Lunch Program. Hearing on the Implementation of the National School Lunch Program before the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. United States Senate, One Hundred Second Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry.

    This hearing on the status of the national School Lunch Program opens with statements from Senator Patrick Leahy, the committee chairman, and three other senators. Testimony or prepared statements were received from the chef of the Barre Town (Vermont) Elementary School, representatives of the American School Food Service Association; the head of…

  17. A Descriptive Analysis of Supply Factors and Prices for USDA Foods in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cora

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) receive a portion of their annual federal funding as commodity entitlement foods--now called USDA Foods--rather than cash payments. Due to rising food prices in recent years, it has been recommended that schools compare the costs and benefits of commodity and…

  18. A Descriptive Analysis of Supply Factors and Prices for USDA Foods in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cora

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) receive a portion of their annual federal funding as commodity entitlement foods--now called USDA Foods--rather than cash payments. Due to rising food prices in recent years, it has been recommended that schools compare the costs and benefits of commodity and…

  19. Associations between Participation in the National School Lunch Program, Food Insecurity, and Child Well-Being. JCPR Working Paper.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunifon, Rachel; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    This study examined the association between food insecurity, participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and child well-being. Participants were children age 6-12 years in families in which at least one child participated in the NSLP. Data came from the 1997 Child Development Supplement to the Panel Study of Income Dynamics. Food…

  20. A Comparative Cost Analysis of Commodity Foods from the U. S. Department of Agriculture in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Cora

    2009-01-01

    Schools that participate in the National School Lunch Program receive a portion of their federal funding as commodity foods rather than cash payments. This research compared the product costs and estimated total procurement costs of commodity and commercial foods from the school district perspective using data from 579 Minnesota ordering sites in…

  1. Differential improvements in student fruit and vegetable selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program regulations: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Cullen, Karen W.; Chen, Tzu-An; Dave, Jayna M.; Jensen, Helen

    2014-01-01

    Background This study investigated changes in student food selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns during fall, 2011. Design Eight elementary and four intermediate schools in one Houston area school district were matched on free/reduced price (FRP) meal eligibility and randomized into control or intervention conditions. Intervention Both intervention and control school cafeterias served the same menu. The intervention school cafeterias posted the new meal pattern daily; students could select one fruit and two vegetable servings per reimbursable meal. Control school students could only select the previous meal pattern: a total of two fruit and vegetable servings per meal. Main outcome measures Students were observed during lunch: gender, foods selected/consumed were recorded. Diet analysis software was used to calculate energy/food groups selected/consumed. Statistical analyses performed Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel Chi-square tests examined differences in the percent of students selecting each meal component by condition, controlling for gender, grade, and school FRP. ANCOVA assessed differences in amount of energy/food groups selected and consumed, and differences in percent of food groups consumed. Results Observations were conducted for 1149 elementary and 427 intermediate students. Compared with students in the control schools, significantly more intervention elementary and intermediate school students selected total (P<0.001, P<0.05) and starchy vegetables (P<0.001; P<0.01); more intervention intermediate school students selected fruit (P<0.001), legumes (P<0.05), and protein foods (P<0.01). There were significantly greater amounts of these foods selected and consumed, but no differences in the proportion of the foods consumed by condition. Fewer calories were consumed by elementary and intermediate school intervention students. Conclusions More intervention students selected fruit and vegetables at lunch, and

  2. Associations Between School Meals Offered Through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program and Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among Ethnically Diverse, Low-Income Children

    PubMed Central

    Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Burgess-Champoux, Teri; Haines, Jess; Hannan, Peter J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Despite evidence in support of the health benefits associated with fruit and vegetable (FV) intake, national data indicate that FV consumption among school-aged children is below recommended levels, particularly among low-income children. School meals offered through the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program can provide an important contribution to child FV intake. This study examines the proportion of fruits and vegetables consumed from school meals programs among ethnically diverse, low socioeconomic status children. METHODS Participants (n = 103) included fourth to sixth grade boys and girls from 4 urban elementary schools in St. Paul, Minnesota serving primarily low-income populations. Research staff interviewed children during school hours and recorded dietary intake via 24-hour recall. Analysis included descriptive statistics using cross tabulations and means. RESULTS Average reported mean (SD) daily FV intake was 3.6 (2.5) servings, with 80% of children consuming fewer than 5 daily servings of FV. On average, children consumed over half of their daily FV intake within school. Children with low FV intake (<5 FV servings daily) consumed a higher proportion of their daily intake at school than children with higher FV intake (≥5 FV servings daily) (39% vs 59%; p = .002). CONCLUSIONS Child FV intake is below recommended levels. School meals provide an important contribution to the daily FV intake among ethnically diverse, low socioeconomic status children, particularly among those with the lowest FV intake. School meals programs promoting FV intake within the school environment may provide an opportunity to encourage increased FV consumption. PMID:20840658

  3. Direct Certification in the National School Lunch Program: State Implementation Progress. Report to Congress. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Special Nutrition Programs Report No. CN-09-DC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranalli, Dennis; Harper, Edward; O'Connell, Rosemary; Hirschman, Jay; Cole, Nancy; Moore, Quinn; Coffee-Borden, Brandon

    2009-01-01

    This report responds to the legislative requirement of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L.110-246) to assess the effectiveness of State and local efforts to directly certify children for free school meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Direct certification is a process conducted by the States and by local…

  4. Exemplary Programs Serving Special Populations. Volume II.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burac, Zipura T.; Yanello, Robert

    This monograph describes briefly five exemplary programs chosen in 1991 by the Technical Assistance for Special Populations Program of the National Center for Research in Vocational Education. The first section of the monograph contains background information on the search for exemplary programs, including a discussion of how the framework for…

  5. Lunch Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savino, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Affluent and disadvantaged children stand in lunch lines and dine in school cafeterias as equals at the Bay Shore Schools (NY). Thanks to a computerized "LunchBox" point-of-sale system, cashiers know children by name, their birthdays, who suffers from which food allergies, and which children are entitled to free or reduced-price meals.…

  6. Lunch Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Savino, Ann

    1998-01-01

    Affluent and disadvantaged children stand in lunch lines and dine in school cafeterias as equals at the Bay Shore Schools (NY). Thanks to a computerized "LunchBox" point-of-sale system, cashiers know children by name, their birthdays, who suffers from which food allergies, and which children are entitled to free or reduced-price meals.…

  7. 77 FR 4087 - Nutrition Standards in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... children. In addition, the six-cent per lunch performance-based reimbursement increase included in the... estimated about $1.5 billion over 5 years will be provided in performance-based funding. I. Background The...

  8. The Response of the National School Lunch Program and Food Stamp Program in Southern Louisiana in the Wake of Hurricances Katrina and Rita

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to identify the successes and barriers to implementing the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and Food Stamp Program (FSP) after Hurricanes Katrina and Rita. Hurricanes Katrina and Rita decimated the Gulf Coast in August and September 2005. To identify the successes and barriers...

  9. Associations between School Meals Offered through the National School Lunch Program and the School Breakfast Program and Fruit and Vegetable Intake among Ethnically Diverse, Low-Income Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson-O'Brien, Ramona; Burgess-Champoux, Teri; Haines, Jess; Hannan, Peter J.; Neumark-Sztainer, Dianne

    2010-01-01

    Background: Despite evidence in support of the health benefits associated with fruit and vegetable (FV) intake, national data indicate that FV consumption among school-aged children is below recommended levels, particularly among low-income children. School meals offered through the School Breakfast Program and National School Lunch Program can…

  10. Lunch, recess and nutrition: responding to time incentives in the cafeteria.

    PubMed

    Price, Joseph; Just, David R

    2015-02-01

    In this study, we evaluate if moving recess before lunch has an effect on the amount of fruits and vegetables elementary school students eat as part of their school-provided lunch. Participants were 1st-6th grade students from three schools that switched recess from after to before lunch and four similar schools that continued to hold recess after lunch. We collected data for an average of 14 days at each school (4 days during spring 2011, May 3 through June 1, 2011 and 9 days during fall 2011, September 19 through November 11, 2011). All of the schools were in Orem, UT. Data was collected for all students receiving a school lunch and was based on observational plate waste data. We find that moving recess before lunch increased consumption of fruits and vegetables by 0.16 servings per child (a 54% increase) and increased the fraction of children eating at least one serving of fruits or vegetables by 10 percentage points (a 45% increase). In contrast, the schools in our control group actually experienced a small reduction in fruit and vegetable consumption during the same time period. Our results show the benefits of holding recess before lunch and suggest that if more schools implement this policy, there would be significant increases in fruit and vegetable consumption among students who eat school lunch as part of the National School Lunch Program. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Why School Lunch Is "Nasty!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Julian, Liam

    2010-01-01

    The history of the school lunch program is laden with the political wrangling and compromises that usually beset massive government initiatives, and as with other government initiatives, the results of the wrangling and compromises have tended to be sadly durable. The school lunch program has consistently been viewed and managed not primarily as a…

  12. Investigating the historic long-term population health impact of the US National School Lunch Program.

    PubMed

    Peterson, Cora

    2014-12-01

    The present research aimed to compare historic participation in the US National School Lunch Program (NSLP) during childhood and subsequent prevalence of overweight and obesity among adults at the population level. Regression models examined cross-sectional, state- and age-based panel data constructed from multiple sources, including the Behavioural Risk Factor Surveillance System, US Congressional Record, US Census and the US Department of Agriculture. Models controlled for cohorts' racial/ethnic composition and state poverty rates. Adult-age cohorts (18-34, 35-49, 50-64 and 18-64 years) by US state over a 25-year period (1984-2008). The cohorts' prevalence of overweight and obesity was compared with the cohorts' estimated NSLP participation during schooling (1925-2007; the NSLP began in 1946). Among adults aged 18-64 years, a one percentage-point increase in estimated NSLP participation during schooling between 1925 and 2007 was significantly associated with a 0·29 percentage-point increase in the cohort's later prevalence of overweight and obesity. Analysis of narrower age cohorts and different schooling periods produced mixed results. The NSLP might have influenced population health historically. Longitudinal analysis of individuals from studies now underway will likely facilitate more robust conclusions about the NSLP's long-term health impact based on more recent experiences.

  13. The contribution of the USDA school breakfast and lunch program meals to student daily dietary intake.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Karen Weber; Chen, Tzu-An

    2017-03-01

    In the United States, the National School Breakfast (SBP) and School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals are provided for free or at a reduced price to eligible children, and are a nutrition safety net for low income children. Consuming both meals could provide 58% of daily intake. This paper evaluates the contribution of SBP and NSLP meals to the dietary intakes of 5-18 year old children participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES) from 2007 through 2012. The participants completed 24-hour dietary recalls. Least-square means and standard errors of the mean for energy and food group intakes for the total day and by school meal, and the percent of daily energy and food groups contributed by school meals were computed by analysis of covariance, with BMI, ethnicity, sex, age and poverty level as covariates. Of the 7800 participating children aged 5-18 years in the entire dataset, 448 consumed both SBP-NSLP meals on a weekday. Almost one-half (47%) of the day's energy intake was provided by the two school meals. For the major food groups, the contribution of school meals ranged from between 40.6% for vegetables to 77.1% for milk. Overall, these results provide important information on contribution of the SBP and NSLP meals to low income children's daily dietary intake.

  14. School lunches and lunches brought from home: A comparative analysis

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Considerable effort has been put forth to improve the nutritional quality of school meals by the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). However, a large percentage of children do not obtain their meals from school and instead bring lunch from home. Little research has focused on the content of these ...

  15. Bring a Parent to Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Folsom-Cordova Unified School District, Folsom, CA.

    Cordova Villa and Reymouth Schools (Folsom-Cordova Unified School District, California) have developed a program to accomplish a positive community involvement in the educational process by inviting parents to enjoy lunch and to use the playground facilities with their children during the lunch hour. Parents have a chance to talk to their children…

  16. Enrolling in Medicaid through the National School Lunch Program: outcome of a pilot project in California schools.

    PubMed

    Cousineau, Michael R; Wada, Eriko O; Hogan, Laura

    2007-01-01

    California has several health insurance programs for children. However, the system for enrolling into these programs is complex and difficult to manage for many families. Express Lane Eligibility is designed to streamline the Medicaid (called Medi-Cal in California) enrollment process by linking it to the National School Lunch Program. If a child is eligible for free lunch and the parents consent, the program provides two months of presumptive eligibility for Medi-Cal and a simplified application process for continuation in Medi-Cal. For those who are ineligible, it provides a referral to other programs. An evaluation of Express Lane shows that while many children were presumptively enrolled, nearly half of the applicants were already enrolled in Medi-Cal. Many Express Enrolled children failed to complete the full Medi-Cal enrollment process. Few were referred to the State Children's Health Insurance Program or county programs. Express Lane is less useful as a broad screening strategy, but can be one of many tools that communities use to enroll children in health insurance.

  17. Differential Improvements in Student Fruit and Vegetable Selection and Consumption in Response to the New National School Lunch Program Regulations: A Pilot Study.

    PubMed

    Cullen, Karen W; Chen, Tzu-An; Dave, Jayna M; Jensen, Helen

    2015-05-01

    To investigate changes in student food selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns during fall 2011. Eight elementary and four intermediate schools in one Houston area school district were matched on free/reduced-price meal eligibility and randomized into control or intervention conditions. Both intervention and control school cafeterias served the same menu. The intervention school cafeterias posted the new meal pattern daily; students could select one fruit and two vegetable servings per reimbursable meal. Control school students could only select the previous meal pattern: a total of two fruit and vegetable servings per meal. Students were observed during lunch: student sex and foods selected/consumed were recorded. Diet analysis software was used to calculate energy/food groups selected/consumed. Cochran-Mantel-Haenszel χ² tests examined differences in the percent of students selecting each meal component by condition, controlling for sex, grade, and school free/reduced-price meal eligibility. Analysis of covariance assessed differences in amount of energy/food groups selected and consumed, and differences in percent of food groups consumed. Observations were conducted for 1,149 elementary and 427 intermediate students. Compared with students in the control schools, significantly more intervention elementary and intermediate school students selected total (P<0.001, P<0.05) and starchy vegetables (P<0.001, P<0.01); more intervention intermediate school students selected fruit (P<0.001), legumes (P<0.05), and protein foods (P<0.01). There were significantly greater amounts of these foods selected and consumed, but no differences in the proportion of the foods consumed by condition. Fewer calories were consumed by elementary and intermediate school intervention students. More intervention students selected fruit and vegetables at lunch and consumed them compared with control condition students. Future studies with

  18. Menu Workbook and Food Buying Guide. National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arizona State Dept. of Education, Phoenix.

    The goal of every school food service program is to serve nutritionally adequate, attractive, acceptable, and moderately priced meals. Recognizing that the quality of the meal depends upon the knowledge, ability, and judgment of the person planning menus, this guide provides information on the menu planning and meal service options available in…

  19. Offer Versus Serve. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Health and Drug Education and Services.

    A growing awareness about food supplies, food shortages, and conservation of natural resources has resulted in public concern over food waste within the National School Lunch Program. Prior to 1976, all participating students were required to take all five items offered on a planned menu. In October 1975, the Offer v. Serve Provision was enacted…

  20. Offer Versus Serve. Training Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York State Education Dept., Albany. Bureau of Health and Drug Education and Services.

    A growing awareness about food supplies, food shortages, and conservation of natural resources has resulted in public concern over food waste within the National School Lunch Program. Prior to 1976, all participating students were required to take all five items offered on a planned menu. In October 1975, the Offer v. Serve Provision was enacted…

  1. Challenges in Serving Rural American Children through the Summer Food Service Program. Issue Brief No. 13

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wauchope, Barbara; Stracuzzi, Nena

    2010-01-01

    Many families rely on U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded school lunch and breakfast programs to make the family's food budget stretch, improving their food security throughout the school year. These programs feed about 31 million students annually. During the summer where schools are not in session, food security decreases. The USDA…

  2. Quality and cost of student lunches brought from home.

    PubMed

    Caruso, Michelle L; Cullen, Karen W

    2015-01-01

    The nutritional quality and cost of lunches brought from home are overlooked and understudied aspects of the school food environment. To examine the quality and cost of lunches brought from home by elementary and intermediate school students. An observational study was conducted in 12 schools (8 elementary and 4 intermediate) in one Houston, Texas, area school district from October 6, 2011, to December 5, 2011. Participants included 242 elementary and 95 intermediate school students who brought lunches from home. Lunches brought from home. Foods brought and amounts eaten were recorded along with student grade level and sex. Nutrient and food group content were calculated and compared with current National School Lunch Program (NSLP) guidelines. Per-serving prices for each item were collected from 3 grocery stores in the study area and averaged. Compared with the NSLP guidelines, lunches brought from home contained more sodium (1110 vs ≤640 mg for elementary and 1003 vs ≤710 mg for intermediate students) and fewer servings of fruits (0.33 cup for elementary and 0.29 cup for intermediate students vs 0.50 cup per the NSLP guidelines), vegetables (0.07 cup for elementary and 0.11 cup for intermediate students vs 0.75 cup per the NSLP guidelines), whole grains (0.22-oz equivalent for elementary and 0.31-oz equivalent for intermediate students vs 0.50-oz minimum per the NLSP guidelines), and fluid milk (0.08 cup for elementary and 0.02 cup for intermediate students vs 1 cup per the NSLP guidelines). About 90% of lunches from home contained desserts, snack chips, and sweetened beverages, which are not permitted in reimbursable school meals. The cost of lunches from home averaged $1.93 for elementary and $1.76 for intermediate students. Students from lower-income intermediate schools brought significantly higher-priced ($1.94) lunches than did students from middle-income schools ($1.63). Lunches brought from home compared unfavorably with current NSLP guidelines

  3. A Community College Program Serving Female Displaced Workers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sherman, Ruth

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the Bunker Hill Community College program designed to draw on the experience of female dislocated workers. Discusses the types of women this program serves. Provides an example of each type of woman. Discusses the enormous employment problems of dislocated female workers and how education might help them overcome these difficulties. (JS)

  4. Exemplary Dissemination Programs for Intermediate Units Serving Rural Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edington, Everett; Hays, Leonard

    Utilizing information derived from documents, site visits, correspondence, and personal interviews re: 6 intermediate education units serving rural schools which were initially identified via a mail survey, this report describes intermediate education units with exemplary information dissemination programs. Varying considerably, each program is…

  5. Microbial examination of nonheated foods served in feeding programs of elementary schools, Iksan City, Jeonbuk Province, Korea.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Jee-Hoon; Ko, Jinyoung; Park, Hyoseok; Yang, Soonwook; Kim, Hoikyung

    2011-09-01

    More than 90% of elementary school students in Korea have lunch provided by a school feeding program. This study examined nonheated foods, foods in which final ingredients were added after cooking ("heated/nonheated foods"), and desserts for microbial contamination levels and the presence of foodborne pathogens. We obtained a total of 77 food samples belonging to the above three groups from four elementary schools located in Iksan, Jeonbuk, Korea, from June to July 2010. Among the samples, 15% of nonheated foods and 9% of heated/nonheated foods contained > 6 log CFU of aerobic bacteria per g. Unacceptable coliform counts according to Korean national standards (3 log CFU/g) were also observed in 30, 4.5, and 26% of nonheated foods, heated/nonheated foods, and desserts, respectively. The foodborne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7, Bacillus cereus, and Cronobacter sakazakii were found in two, one, and two of the total samples, respectively. Detection of E. coli O157:H7 indicates a low level of safety in the school lunches served in Korean elementary schools. To improve food safety, hazard analysis critical control point guidelines should be applied to school food service establishments to lower the microbial risks in foods served to children.

  6. Establishing a Web-Based Data Collection System for National School Lunch and National School Breakfast Program Data. Technical Report. E-FAN-04-005-3

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Loren; Kenyon, Anne; Heinrich, Todd; Zullo, Dea

    2004-01-01

    This report is a followup to an initiative to establish a central website to collect data from States on the National School Lunch and the School Breakfast Programs. A central website could be used by researchers and program administrators to compare and analyze data across State and local areas for participation trends in local school district…

  7. Efforts To Improve School Lunch Programs. Are They Paying Off? Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comptroller General of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This General Accounting Office (GAO) report examines the problems encountered by school food service programs in their efforts to meet the Department of Agriculture's nutrient requirements for school lunches while increasing student participation and reducing food waste and program costs. The report is based on an evaluation of two senior high…

  8. The School Lunch Lottery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that those interested in advocating healthier school lunches use a "School Lunch Lottery" to convince parents and administrators that change is necessary. During the lottery, key players are invited to experience one of three different school lunch options--a typical school lunch; a healthy bag lunch; and a school cafeteria…

  9. The School Lunch Lottery

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Curriculum Review, 2008

    2008-01-01

    This article suggests that those interested in advocating healthier school lunches use a "School Lunch Lottery" to convince parents and administrators that change is necessary. During the lottery, key players are invited to experience one of three different school lunch options--a typical school lunch; a healthy bag lunch; and a school cafeteria…

  10. Serving the Homeless through Recreation Programs. Research Update.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kunstler, Robin

    1993-01-01

    Literature review examines problems faced by homeless adults and children and discusses how recreation programs can serve them. The recreation and leisure profession can offer to the healthy child development through play and recreation, physical fitness, stress management, socialization, opportunities to learn goal-setting, self-esteem building,…

  11. Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Fruit and Vegetable Selection in Northeastern Elementary Schoolchildren, 2012–2013

    PubMed Central

    Yon, Bethany A.; Taylor, Jennifer C.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children's fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is an important goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) National School Lunch Program. Since 2012, the USDA's requirement that children select FVs at lunch as part of the reimbursable school meal has been met with concern and evidence of food waste. We compared elementary schoolchildren's FV selection, consumption, and waste before (10 school visits, 498 tray observations) and after (11 school visits, 944 tray observations) implementation of this requirement using validated dietary assessment measures. More children selected FVs in higher amounts when FVs were required compared with when they were optional (0.69 cups vs. 0.89 cups, p<0.001); however, consumption decreased slightly (0.51 cups vs. 0.45 cups, p=0.01) and waste increased (0.25 cups vs. 0.39 cups, p<0.001) when FVs were required compared with when they were optional. More exposure to FVs in schools through programmatic efforts and in the home environment may help familiarize children with FV offerings and encourage consumption. PMID:26327723

  12. Impact of the National School Lunch Program on Fruit and Vegetable Selection in Northeastern Elementary Schoolchildren, 2012-2013.

    PubMed

    Amin, Sarah A; Yon, Bethany A; Taylor, Jennifer C; Johnson, Rachel K

    2015-01-01

    Increasing children's fruit and vegetable (FV) consumption is an important goal of the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA's) National School Lunch Program. Since 2012, the USDA's requirement that children select FVs at lunch as part of the reimbursable school meal has been met with concern and evidence of food waste. We compared elementary schoolchildren's FV selection, consumption, and waste before (10 school visits, 498 tray observations) and after (11 school visits, 944 tray observations) implementation of this requirement using validated dietary assessment measures. More children selected FVs in higher amounts when FVs were required compared with when they were optional (0.69 cups vs. 0.89 cups, p<0.001); however, consumption decreased slightly (0.51 cups vs. 0.45 cups, p=0.01) and waste increased (0.25 cups vs. 0.39 cups, p<0.001) when FVs were required compared with when they were optional. More exposure to FVs in schools through programmatic efforts and in the home environment may help familiarize children with FV offerings and encourage consumption.

  13. 7 CFR 240.3 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for program schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... section 6(e) of the Act for the National School Lunch Program, FNS shall determine the difference between... Lunch Program in any of the schools of the State, FNS shall withhold from the funds payable to that State under this section an amount equal to the ratio of the number of lunches served in schools in...

  14. 7 CFR 240.3 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for program schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... section 6(e) of the Act for the National School Lunch Program, FNS shall determine the difference between... Lunch Program in any of the schools of the State, FNS shall withhold from the funds payable to that State under this section an amount equal to the ratio of the number of lunches served in schools in...

  15. 7 CFR 240.3 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for program schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... section 6(e) of the Act for the National School Lunch Program, FNS shall determine the difference between... Lunch Program in any of the schools of the State, FNS shall withhold from the funds payable to that State under this section an amount equal to the ratio of the number of lunches served in schools in...

  16. 7 CFR 240.3 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for program schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... section 6(e) of the Act for the National School Lunch Program, FNS shall determine the difference between... Lunch Program in any of the schools of the State, FNS shall withhold from the funds payable to that State under this section an amount equal to the ratio of the number of lunches served in schools in...

  17. 7 CFR 240.3 - Cash in lieu of donated foods for program schools.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... section 6(e) of the Act for the National School Lunch Program, FNS shall determine the difference between... Lunch Program in any of the schools of the State, FNS shall withhold from the funds payable to that State under this section an amount equal to the ratio of the number of lunches served in schools in...

  18. Fast Food Gets an "A" in School Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Modern Schools, 1975

    1975-01-01

    A revolutionary, fast-food school lunch program has raised participation by 202 percent, created a half-million dollar surplus in the school food service account, and meets the federal school lunch program requirement. (Author/MLF)

  19. School Lunch Program: Efforts Needed To Improve Nutrition and Encourage Healthy Eating. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Requesters.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Kay E.; Miller, Robert B.; Whitman-Miner, Dianne L.; Wallace, Shana B.; Fucile, Tamara L.; Schwimer, Daniel A.; Angulo, Karyn I.; Stenersen, Stanley G.

    Over 15 percent of children are overweightdouble the rate in 1980. Children's diets are high in fat but low in fruits, vegetables, and other nutritious foods. The National School Lunch Program has had a continuing role in providing students with nutritious meals; however students must choose to eat the nutritious food and limit less healthful…

  20. Nutrient Intake and Nutritional Status Indicators of Participant and Nonparticipant Pupils of a Parent-Supported School Lunch Program in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walingo, Mary K.; Musamali, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare nutrient intake and indicators of nutritional status of western Kenyan pupil participants and nonparticipants of a parent-supported school lunch program. Design: Pupils and their caregivers were interviewed to assess their 24-hour dietary intake and the socioeconomic status of the family. Pupils' weights and heights were…

  1. Associations between Participation in the National School Lunch Program, Food Insecurity, and Child Well-Being. Discussion Paper No. 1249-02

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunifon, Rachel; Kowaleski-Jones, Lori

    2002-01-01

    This paper examines the associations between food insecurity, participation in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), and children's well-being. We address problems of selection by restricting our sample to children in families in which at least one child participates in the NSLP. Results suggest that food insecurity is associated with…

  2. Differential improvements in student fruit and vegetable selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program regulations: A pilot study

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Our objective was to investigate changes in student food selection and consumption in response to the new National School Lunch Program meal patterns during fall 2011. Eight elementary and four intermediate schools in one Houston area school district were matched on free/reduced-price meal eligibili...

  3. Implementing an Effective and Efficient System to Manage the National School Lunch Program in a Private PreK-12 School: An Action Research Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rafidi, Jessica A.

    2012-01-01

    To ensure the health of children in the United States, and to encourage the domestic consumption of nutritious agricultural commodities, President Harry S. Truman signed the National School Lunch Act. The Act, a federally assisted meal program established as a national security measure, was signed on June 4, 1946. Today, the National School Lunch…

  4. An Exploratory Study Examining the National School Lunch Program; How It Functions on a Daily Basis; and How It May Be Improved

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bereza, John Matthew

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to make transparent the current National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The first mission of this project is to clarify how the NSLP functions on a day-to-day basis in Columbus, Ohio. Columbus is used as a sample city, yet the aim of this research is to be transferable to other locations. The second objective is to…

  5. Nutrient Intake and Nutritional Status Indicators of Participant and Nonparticipant Pupils of a Parent-Supported School Lunch Program in Kenya

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walingo, Mary K.; Musamali, Betty

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To compare nutrient intake and indicators of nutritional status of western Kenyan pupil participants and nonparticipants of a parent-supported school lunch program. Design: Pupils and their caregivers were interviewed to assess their 24-hour dietary intake and the socioeconomic status of the family. Pupils' weights and heights were…

  6. Lunch is in the bag: increasing fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in sack lunches of preschool-aged children.

    PubMed

    Sweitzer, Sara J; Briley, Margaret E; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Hoelscher, Deanna M; Harrist, Ronald B; Staskel, Deanna M; Almansour, Fawaz D

    2010-07-01

    Fruits, vegetables, and whole grains are important sources of nutrients for healthy growth and development of young children. Recent evidence suggests that sack lunches packed by parents for children to consume at child-care centers do not regularly meet the goal of one serving of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains. Lunch Is In The Bag is a child-care center-based nutrition education program targeted at parents of preschool-aged children to increase the number of servings of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains in sack lunches sent from home that was pilot tested in fall 2008. In a quasiexperimental design, six child-care centers were paired by size before being randomly assigned to intervention (n=3) and comparison (n=3) groups. The parents of caregivers with primary responsibility for preparing the sack lunches of the 3- to 5-year-old children attending the centers were enrolled as parent-child dyads. The intervention included parent handouts, classroom activities, education stations, and teacher training. The contents of the lunch sacks for both the intervention group and comparison group were recorded for 3 nonconsecutive days before and immediately after the intervention period to measure the number of servings of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains. A total of 132 parent-child dyads completed the study, 81 in the intervention group and 51 in the comparison group. Direct observation of children's lunches from the intervention group showed an increase in predicted mean number of servings of vegetables, from 0.41 to 0.65 (P<0.001) and whole grains, from 0.54 to 1.06 (P<0.001). No significant difference was observed in the mean number of servings of fruit. Lunch Is In The Bag, which is designed to fit in the child-care environment and targets parents of 3- to 5-year-old children, is a feasible intervention for improving the nutritional quality of sack lunches. Copyright 2010 American Dietetic Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutritional quality of lunches consumed by Korean workers: Comparison between institutional and commercial lunches

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Won Gyoung; Choi, Injoo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES The nutritional quality of lunches is an important factor related to workers' health. This study examined the nutritional quality of Korean workers' lunches with a focus on comparing institutional and commercial lunches. SUBJECTS/METHODS The data from a 1-day, 24-hour dietary recall from the 5th Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (2010-2012) were analyzed. A total of 2,192 subjects aged 19 to 64 years, who had consumed lunches served by institutional or commercial food service vendors, were included for analysis. The nutritional quality of the lunches of the institutional lunch group (n=626) and the commercial lunch group (n=1,566) was compared in terms of the number of servings, food groups, nutrient intake, Nutrient Adequacy Ratio (NAR), and Mean Adequacy Ratio (MAR). RESULTS The NAR and MAR were significantly higher in the institutional lunches than in the commercial lunches, but more than half of workers in both groups obtained over 65% of their energy from carbohydrate. The average sodium intake from the lunches exceeded the daily intake goal (2,000 mg) in both groups. More than half of workers in both groups presented less than one-third of their respective recommended daily intake of riboflavin and calcium. With the exception of riboflavin, the nutrient intake from lunches accounted for more than 35% of the daily nutrient intake. CONCLUSIONS The overall nutritional quality of institutional lunches was higher than that of commercial lunches. However, institutional lunches had room for improvement in terms of nutritional quality. PMID:27909558

  8. Nutrient intake and nutritional status indicators of participant and nonparticipant pupils of a parent-supported school lunch program in Kenya.

    PubMed

    Walingo, Mary K; Musamali, Betty

    2008-01-01

    To compare nutrient intake and indicators of nutritional status of western Kenyan pupil participants and nonparticipants of a parent-supported school lunch program. Pupils and their caregivers were interviewed to assess their 24-hour dietary intake and the socioeconomic status of the family. Pupils' weights and heights were measured. Eight randomly selected schools with parent-supported school lunch programs in Emuhaya, western Kenya. 320 pupils aged between 10 and 12 years in Standard 5 and Standard 6 were disaggregated into school lunch participants (n = 160) and nonparticipants (n = 160). Pupils' energy and protein intake; nutritional status indicators; household socioeconomic characteristics. Independent t test for comparison of group means; chi-square for socioeconomic characteristics. Level of significance was P = .05. Energy and protein consumption of participants was higher than that of the nonparticipants. Severe underweight, severe stunting, and severe wasting were significantly higher among the nonparticipants. Hunger and a higher absenteeism rate from school were more commonly reported among the nonparticipants. This study demonstrates the interaction of poverty, nutrition status, and education. To improve the nutritional status and academic performance of the students whose parents cannot afford to participate in school lunch programs, funding from external sources is essential.

  9. Food choice, plate waste and nutrient intake of elementary- and middle-school students participating in the US National School Lunch Program.

    PubMed

    Smith, Stephanie L; Cunningham-Sabo, Leslie

    2014-06-01

    To (i) evaluate food choices and consumption patterns of elementary- and middle-school students who participate in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) and (ii) compare students' average nutrient intake from lunch with NSLP standards. Plate waste from elementary- and middle-school students' lunch trays was measured in autumn 2010 using a previously validated digital photography method. Percentage waste was estimated to the nearest 10 % for the entrée, canned fruit, fresh fruit, vegetable, grain and milk. Univariate ANOVA determined differences in percentage waste between schools, grades and genders. Daily nutrient intake was calculated using the district's menu analysis and percentage waste. Elementary and middle schools in northern Colorado (USA). Students, grades 1-8. Plate waste was estimated from 899 lunch trays; 535 elementary- and 364 middle-school students. Only 45 % of elementary- and 34 % middle-school students selected a vegetable. Elementary-school students wasted more than a third of grain, fruit and vegetable menu items. Middle-school students left nearly 50 % of fresh fruit, 37 % of canned fruit and nearly a third of vegetables unconsumed. Less than half of the students met the national meal standards for vitamins A and C, or Fe. Few students' lunch consumption met previous or new, strengthened NSLP lunch standards. Due to the relatively low intake of vegetables, intakes of vitamins A and C were of particular concern. Effective behavioural interventions, combined with marketing, communications and behavioural economics, will likely be necessary to encourage increased vegetable intake to meet the new meal standards.

  10. Microbiological Testing Results of Boneless and Ground Beef Purchased for the National School Lunch Program, 2011 to 2014.

    PubMed

    Doerscher, Darin R; Lutz, Terry L; Whisenant, Stephen J; Smith, Kerry R; Morris, Craig A; Schroeder, Carl M

    2015-09-01

    The Agricultural Marketing Service (AMS) purchases boneless and ground beef for distribution to recipients through federal nutrition assistance programs, including the National School Lunch Program, which represents 93% of the overall volume. Approximately every 2,000 lb (ca. 907 kg) of boneless beef and 10,000 lb (ca. 4,535 kg) of ground beef are designated a "lot" and tested for Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella, standard plate count organisms (SPCs), E. coli, and coliforms. Any lot of beef positive for E. coli O157:H7 or for Salmonella, or any beef with concentrations of organisms exceeding critical limits for SPCs (100,000 CFU g(-1)), E. coli (500 CFU g(-1)), or coliforms (1,000 CFU g(-1)) is rejected for purchase by AMS and must be diverted from federal nutrition assistance programs. From July 2011 through June 2014, 537,478,212 lb (ca. 243,795,996 kg) of boneless beef and 428,130,984 lb (ca. 194,196,932 kg) of ground beef were produced for federal nutrition assistance programs. Of the 230,359 boneless beef samples collected over this period, 82 (0.04%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 924 (0.40%) were positive for Salmonella, 222 (0.10%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 69 (0.03%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 123 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Of the 46,527 ground beef samples collected over this period, 30 (0.06%) were positive for E. coli O157:H7, 360 (0.77%) were positive for Salmonella, 20 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for SPCs, 22 (0.05%) exceeded the critical limit for E. coli, and 17 (0.04%) exceeded the critical limit for coliforms. Cumulatively, these data suggest beef produced for the AMS National School Lunch Program is done so under an adequate food safety system, as indicated by the low percentage of lots that were pathogen positive or exceeded critical limits for indicator organisms.

  11. Deconstructing Serendipity: Focus, Purpose, and Authorship in Lunch Buddy Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Henrie, Joye L.

    2010-01-01

    Lunch buddy mentoring is a particular kind of school-based mentoring program: college student mentors meet twice weekly during school lunch with mentees, and a new mentor is provided each semester. The program is designed to benefit elementary school children who are highly aggressive or chronically bullied. Novel to lunch buddy mentoring is a…

  12. Deconstructing Serendipity: Focus, Purpose, and Authorship in Lunch Buddy Mentoring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavell, Timothy A.; Henrie, Joye L.

    2010-01-01

    Lunch buddy mentoring is a particular kind of school-based mentoring program: college student mentors meet twice weekly during school lunch with mentees, and a new mentor is provided each semester. The program is designed to benefit elementary school children who are highly aggressive or chronically bullied. Novel to lunch buddy mentoring is a…

  13. DOE's Minority Serving Institutions Partnership Program: Building a Sustainable Pipeline

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kusnezov, Dimitri

    2013-04-01

    We set out to build a sustainable pipeline between the Department of Energy sites and Minority Serving Institutions in areas of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM), starting this year with Historically Black Colleges and Universities. The program is built around the concept of sustainability. This program is targeted at the intersection of DOE site interests and MSI goals. It will be sufficiently flexible in its organization to reflect the unique regional priorities that Universities have in faculty research and developing STEM disciplines and skills, and DOE site targets for research and critical skill development. The main elements of the consortium approach will be outlined, from K-12, MSIs, DOE sites and Industrial partners, together with the potential metrics for measuring progress.

  14. National School Lunch Program participation and sex differences in body mass index trajectories of children from low-income families.

    PubMed

    Hernandez, Daphne C; Francis, Lori A; Doyle, Emily A

    2011-04-01

    To investigate participation patterns in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) among low-income children from kindergarten to fifth grade and to examine the ways in which participation influences sex differences in the trajectories of body mass index (BMI) through the eighth grade. Longitudinal, secondary data analysis. Sample of low-income US children who entered kindergarten in 1998. Girls (n = 574) and boys (n = 566) from low-income families who participated in the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, Kindergarten Cohort. Participation in the NSLP. Temporary and persistent patterns of NSLP participation, and age-specific and sex-specific BMI raw scores calculated at 5 data points. Among the low-income children who attended schools that participated in the NSLP, both the children who persistently participated in the program and those who temporarily participated in the program displayed similar socioeconomically disadvantaged factors. Nonlinear mixed models indicated a larger rate of change in BMI (ie, an increase) among low-income, participating girls than among low-income, nonparticipating girls; however, mean BMIs did not significantly differ between low-income girls who participated and those who did not participate. No significant differences were observed among low-income boys. Results suggest that participation in the NSLP is associated with rapid weight gain for low-income girls but not for low-income boys.

  15. Direct Certification in the National School Lunch Program: State Implementation Progress School Year 2010-2011. Report to Congress. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series. Special Nutrition Programs Report Number CN-11-DC

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, Quinn; Conway, Kevin; Kyler, Brandon

    2011-01-01

    This report responds to the legislative requirement of the Food, Conservation, and Energy Act of 2008 (P.L.110-246) to assess the effectiveness of State and local efforts to directly certify children for free school meals under the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Direct certification is a process conducted by the States and by local…

  16. Nutrition Education for School Lunch Managers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boise City Independent School District, ID.

    This collection of lessons and teaching suggestions is designed to aid local school lunch managers in fulfilling compliance with the requirement that school lunch programs and personnel participate in nutrition education. Provided in the first section of the booklet are general instructions for using the booklet, a guide to lesson plans for…

  17. Offer versus Serve or Serve Only: Does Service Method Affect Elementary Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goggans, Margaret Harbison; Lambert, Laurel; Chang, Yunhee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of the Offer versus Serve (OVS) provision in the National School Lunch Program would result in a significant difference in fruit and vegetable consumption by fourth and fifth grade elementary students, and in plate waste cost. Methods: Weighed and visual plate waste data…

  18. Offer versus Serve or Serve Only: Does Service Method Affect Elementary Children's Fruit and Vegetable Consumption?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goggans, Margaret Harbison; Lambert, Laurel; Chang, Yunhee

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine if the use of the Offer versus Serve (OVS) provision in the National School Lunch Program would result in a significant difference in fruit and vegetable consumption by fourth and fifth grade elementary students, and in plate waste cost. Methods: Weighed and visual plate waste data…

  19. Meeting Total Fat Requirements for School Lunches: Influence of School Policies and Characteristics. ERS Report Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Constance; Guthrie, Joanne; Mancino, Lisa; Ralston, Katherine; Musiker, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Concerns about child obesity have raised questions about the quality of meals served in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Local, State, and Federal policymakers responded to these concerns beginning in the mid-1990s by instituting a range of policies and standards to improve the quality of USDA-subsidized meals. While most of USDA's…

  20. The Impact of a One-to-One Laptop Computer Program on the Literacy Achievement of Eighth-Grade Students with Differing Measured Cognitive Skill Levels Who Are Eligible and Not Eligible for Free or Reduced Price Lunch Program Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Eric G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a one-to-one laptop computer program on the literacy achievement of eighth-grade students with above average, average, and below average measured cognitive skill levels who are eligible and not eligible for free or reduced price lunch program participation. The study analyzed, student…

  1. The Impact of a One-to-One Laptop Computer Program on the Literacy Achievement of Eighth-Grade Students with Differing Measured Cognitive Skill Levels Who Are Eligible and Not Eligible for Free or Reduced Price Lunch Program Participation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Eric G.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the impact of a one-to-one laptop computer program on the literacy achievement of eighth-grade students with above average, average, and below average measured cognitive skill levels who are eligible and not eligible for free or reduced price lunch program participation. The study analyzed, student…

  2. The Four Billion Dollar Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sautter, R. Craig

    1978-01-01

    Discusses problems with the National School Lunch Program, including the high proportion of food thrown away by students, problems with food preparation, nutritional standards, and competition from junk foods. Suggestions for nutrition education are offered and organizations and books for further reference are listed. (JMB)

  3. Examining variations in fourth-grade children’s participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by student and program demographics

    PubMed Central

    Guinn, Caroline H.; Baxter, Suzanne Domel; Finney, Christopher J.; Hitchcock, David B.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives Analyses were conducted to examine variations in fourth-grade children’s participation in school-breakfast and school-lunch programs by weekday, month, socioeconomic status, absenteeism, sex, and school-breakfast location. Methods Fourth-grade children were participants in a dietary-reporting validation study during the 2005–2006 or 2006–2007 school years in 17 or 8 schools, respectively, in one South Carolina school district. For the two respective school years, school-breakfast location was the classroom for six and seven schools, and for the remaining schools, the cafeteria. District administrative records provided information about 180 possible days of participation in the school-breakfast and school-lunch programs for each of 1,060 children (91% Black, 52% girls). The state’s Office of Research and Statistics linked data on school-meal participation with information about individual children’s socioeconomic status (eligibility for free or reduced-price school meals) and annual absenteeism from school. Results For school-provided breakfast, logistic regression showed participation rate differences by weekday (smallest for Monday [56.1%], largest for Wednesday [57.8%], p<0.0001), month (smallest for April [53.5%], largest for September [60.8%], p<0.0001), socioeconomic status (smallest for full-price status [27.5%], largest for free-meal status [63.4%], p<0.0001), school-breakfast location (smaller for breakfast located in the cafeteria [38%] than classroom [71%], p<0.0001), and absenteeism (p<0.0001). For school-provided lunch, logistic regression showed participation rate differences by weekday (smallest for Friday [81.9%], largest for Thursday [83.3%], p<0.0001), month (smallest for May [78.7%], largest for August [86.0%], p<0.0001), socioeconomic status (smallest for full-price status [72.1%], largest for free-meal status [84.9%], p<0.0001), and absenteeism (p<0.0001). There were no differences in participation rate by sex

  4. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Eliminating Applications Through Community Eligibility as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-29

    This final rule establishes requirements for State agencies, local educational agencies, and schools operating the Community Eligibility Provision, a reimbursement option that allows the service of school meals to all children at no-cost in high poverty schools without collecting household applications. By eliminating the household application process and streamlining meal counting and claiming procedures through the Community Eligibility Provision, local educational agencies may substantially reduce administrative burden related to operating the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs. This rule codifies many requirements that were implemented through policy guidance following enactment of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, as well as provisions of the proposed rule. These requirements will result in consistent, national implementation of the Community Eligibility Provision.

  5. Direct Certification in the National School Lunch Program Expands Access for Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Philip

    2008-01-01

    Under the policy of direct certification for free school meals, school districts use information shared by state agencies about household eligibility for means-tested programs in the state in order to determine the potential eligibility for free meals of students enrolled in the district. This information allows districts to automatically approve…

  6. 78 FR 12221 - National School Lunch Program: Direct Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-22

    ... Certification Continuous Improvement Plans Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 AGENCY: Food... Program (NSLP) regulations to incorporate provisions of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 designed... Public Law 111-296, the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA), amended section 9(b)(4) of the...

  7. School Lunch Breakthrough: Politics, Technology Spur Expansion of Food Programs. An Education U.S.A. Special Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gould, Geoff

    In this document, the author traces the history of, explains the revisions to, and points up the political issues involved in the National School Lunch Act of 1964 and the Child Nutrition Act of 1966. The author cites research that establishes the adverse effect of malnutrition on the learning process, outlines basic concepts for nutrition…

  8. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  9. Get Well Care: Guidelines for Programs Serving Mildly Ill Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montanari, Ellen Orton, Ed.

    Although child care programs for mildly ill children are proliferating around the country, very few states have developed regulations for these types of programs, and no states have developed standards or guidelines. Based upon this concern, a group of medical and early childhood professionals, parents, and directors of programs for mildly ill…

  10. Parental perception of the nutritional quality of school meals and its association with students' school lunch participation.

    PubMed

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam

    2014-03-01

    This study explores the association between parental perception of the nutritional quality of school meals and whether students eat lunch served at school. We use data from five low-income cities in New Jersey that have high minority populations. Students whose parents perceive the quality of school meals to be healthy have greater odds of eating meals served at school. Recent changes in guidelines for the United States Department of Agriculture's National School Lunch Program met with resistance from several fronts. Advocates for and implementers of improved school meals may benefit from partnering with parents to increase the acceptance and utilization of improved school offerings.

  11. 76 FR 16747 - Applications for New Awards; Hispanic-Serving Institutions STEM and Articulation Programs

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-25

    ... Applications for New Awards; Hispanic-Serving Institutions STEM and Articulation Programs AGENCY: Office of... Institutions STEM and Articulation Programs Notice inviting applications for new awards using fiscal year (FY... Programs: The Hispanic-Serving Institutions STEM and Articulation programs authorized under section 371 of...

  12. Beneficial effect of high energy intake at lunch rather than dinner on weight loss in healthy obese women in a weight-loss program: a randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Madjd, Ameneh; Taylor, Moira A; Delavari, Alireza; Malekzadeh, Reza; Macdonald, Ian A; Farshchi, Hamid R

    2016-10-01

    The association between the time of nutrient intake and health has been described in a few studies. To our knowledge, no study has evaluated the relation between high energy intakes at lunch compared with at dinner on weight loss in overweight and obese subjects. We compared the effect of high energy intake at lunch with that at dinner on weight loss and cardiometabolic risk factors in women during a weight-loss program. Overweight and obese women [n = 80; body mass index (BMI; in kg/m(2)): 27-35; age: 18-45 y] were asked to eat either a main meal at lunch (LM) or a main meal at dinner (DM) for 12 wk while in a weight-loss program. A total of 80 participants were randomly assigned to one of 2 intervention groups. Sixty-nine subjects (86%) completed the trial (34 subjects in the DM group, and 35 subjects in the LM group). Baseline variables were not significantly different between groups. A significant reduction in anthropometric measurements and significant improvements in cardiometabolic risk characteristics were observed over 12 wk in both groups. Compared with the DM group, the LM group had greater mean ± SD reductions in weight (LM: -5.85 ± 1.96 kg; DM: -4.35 ± 1.98 kg; P = 0.003), BMI (LM: 2.27± 0.76; DM: 1.68 ± 0.76; P = 0.003), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (LM: -0.66 ± 0.33; DM: -0.46 ± 0.24; P = 0.001), and fasting insulin (LM: -2.01 ± 1.10 mIU/mL; DM: -1.16 ± 0.72 mIU/mL; P < 0.001) after 12 wk. However, there were no significant differences for fasting plasma glucose and lipid profiles within both groups after 12 wk. The consumption of higher energy intake at lunch compared with at dinner may result in favorable changes in weight loss in overweight and obese women after a weight-loss program of 12 wk. The consumption may also offer clinical benefits to improve insulin resistance. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02399280. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  13. Serving the Preschool Gifted Child: "Programming and Resources"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukierkorn, Jesse R.; Karnes, Frances A.; Manning, Sandra J.; Houston, Heather; Besnoy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Highlighting the unique educational needs of gifted and high ability preschoolers, this article guides the reader to consider the characteristics of young gifted children along with appropriate assessment practices in planning educational programming. A triarchic approach to programs and services for gifted preschoolers is outlined with major…

  14. Serving the Preschool Gifted Child: "Programming and Resources"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cukierkorn, Jesse R.; Karnes, Frances A.; Manning, Sandra J.; Houston, Heather; Besnoy, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    Highlighting the unique educational needs of gifted and high ability preschoolers, this article guides the reader to consider the characteristics of young gifted children along with appropriate assessment practices in planning educational programming. A triarchic approach to programs and services for gifted preschoolers is outlined with major…

  15. Happy Meals: When Lunch Subsidies Are Chopped, Kids Eat Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Explains why privately-run lunch programs are providing better nutritional value at less cost than state-run programs. Several examples are provided of schools where lunch program privatization has increased participation and cafeteria discipline, improved nutritional and food quality, and has done so with financial efficiency. (GR)

  16. Happy Meals: When Lunch Subsidies Are Chopped, Kids Eat Better.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Stephen

    1995-01-01

    Explains why privately-run lunch programs are providing better nutritional value at less cost than state-run programs. Several examples are provided of schools where lunch program privatization has increased participation and cafeteria discipline, improved nutritional and food quality, and has done so with financial efficiency. (GR)

  17. What's for Lunch?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Edward J., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Activities on the nutritional value of school lunches are provided, focusing on government nutritional guidelines and how the school cafeteria tries to meet them. Students learned nutrition and rationale/complexities behind putting together appetizing and nutritious school lunches. Includes lists of agencies providing nutrition information to…

  18. Meeting Total Fat Requirements for School Lunches: Influence of School Policies and Characteristics. Economic Research Report Number 87

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Constance; Guthrie, Joanne; Mancino, Lisa; Ralston, Katherine; Musiker, Melissa

    2009-01-01

    Concerns about child obesity have raised questions about the quality of meals served in the National School Lunch Program. Local, State, and Federal policymakers responded to these concerns beginning in the mid-1990s by instituting a range of policies and standards to improve the quality of U.S. Department of Agriculture-subsidized meals. Schools…

  19. The Nature of Programs Serving Preschool Handicapped Children in North Dakota. No. 15.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dell, Amy Glasser

    Fifty-one surveys designed to gather qualitative information on preschool programs in North Dakota were completed and returned by preschool teachers. Questionnaires focused on five major topics: population served, staff, parent involvement, program curriculum, and teacher and program needs. Results indicate that many teachers served fewer than 10…

  20. Ways to Improve Your School Food Services Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrick, Len

    The speaker describes the fast food operation he has implemented in his school district. The program has increased the number of lunches served, reduced costs to the students, eliminated waste, shows a surplus, and meets federal standards for Type A lunches. The program features special sandwiches, milkshakes, and fries. (IRT)

  1. New Millenium Program Serving Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fuk

    1999-01-01

    A cross-Enterprise program is to identify and validate flight breakthrough technologies that will significantly benefit future space science and earth science missions. The breakthrough technologies are: enable new capabilities to meet earth and space science needs and reducing costs of future missions. The flight validation are: mitigates risks to first users and enables rapid technology infusion into future missions.

  2. Assessment and Accountability for Programs Serving Young Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hebbeler, Kathleen; Barton, Lauren R.; Mallik, Sangeeta

    2008-01-01

    States currently are in the process of developing child and family outcome measurement systems for young children with disabilities to meet federal data reporting requirements for the Part C (Infants and Toddlers with Disabilities) and Part B Preschool Grants program supported through the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act. This article…

  3. Effectiveness of Four Instructional Programs Designed to Serve English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentino, Rachel A.; Reardon, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the differences in academic achievement trajectories from elementary through middle school among English Learner (EL) students in four different instructional programs: English Immersion (EI), Transitional Bilingual (TB), Developmental Bilingual (DB), and Dual Immersion (DI). Comparing students with the same parental…

  4. Effectiveness of Four Instructional Programs Designed to Serve English Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentino, Rachel A.; Reardon, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    This article investigates the differences in academic achievement trajectories from elementary through middle school among English Learner (EL) students in four different instructional programs: English Immersion (EI), Transitional Bilingual (TB), Developmental Bilingual (DB), and Dual Immersion (DI). Comparing students with the same parental…

  5. Serving Vulnerable Families: The Important Work of Head Start Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vinci, Yasmina

    2012-01-01

    The Obama Administration's most recent regulation on designation renewal of Early/Head Start grantees opens opportunities for early childhood programs in some communities to compete with existing grantees for the federal funding. Understanding some of the behind-the-scenes work that goes into Head Start may be helpful to centers deciding whether…

  6. Oversight Hearings on the School Lunch Program. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-Fourth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    Presentations and prepared statements, letters, and supplemental material recorded at 15 Congressional hearings are contained in this document. The purpose of the hearings was to review the school lunch and school breakfast programs and see that these programs function as Congress intended. Statements are recorded from school principals, nurses,…

  7. NASA's MEaSUREs Program Serving the Earth Science Community

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramapriyan, H. K.; Tsaoussi, L.; Olding, S. W.

    2014-12-01

    A major need stated by the NASA Earth science research strategy is to develop long-term, consistent, and calibrated data and products that are valid across multiple missions and satellite sensors. NASA has invested in the creation of consistent time series satellite data sets over decades, through both mission science team-based and measurement-based data product reprocessing and through solicitations for merged data products. The NOAA/NASA Pathfinder Program, carried out in the mid-1990's, resulted in the reprocessing of four long time-series datasets from existing archives. The Research, Education and Applications Solutions Network (REASoN) Program, initiated in 2002, consisted of several projects that provided data products, information systems and services capabilities, and/or advanced data systems technologies, to address strategic needs in Earth science research, applications, and education. The Program named Making Earth System data records for Use in Research for Earth Science, or MEaSUREs has had two requests for proposals, the first in 2006 and the second in 2012. With this Program, the Earth Science Division has focused on generating datasets for particular Earth science research measurement needs, and refers to such datasets as Earth System Data Records (ESDRs). Climate Data Records (CDRs) are a particular case of ESDRs. An ESDR is defined as a unified and coherent set of observations of a given parameter of the Earth system, which is optimized to meet specific requirements in addressing science questions. Most of the MEaSUREs projects are five years long. They produce ESDRs using mature, peer-reviewed algorithms. The products are vetted by the user community in the respective scientific disciplines. They are made available publicly by the projects during their execution period. Before the projects end, the ESDRs are transferred to one of the NASA-assigned Distributed Active Archive Centers for longer-term archiving and distribution. Tens of millions of

  8. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional Quality, Consumption, and Cost of Snacks Served in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, Robert G.; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6?pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks…

  9. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional Quality, Consumption, and Cost of Snacks Served in Afterschool Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, Robert G.; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Gabrielle; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3-6?pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks…

  10. The New Millenium Program: Serving Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fuk K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has exciting plans for space science and Earth observations during the next decade. A broad range of advanced spacecraft and measurement technologies will be needed to support these plans within the existing budget and schedule constraints. Many of these technology needs are common to both NASA's Office of Earth Science (OES) and Office of Space Sciences (OSS). Even though some breakthrough technologies have been identified to address these needs, project managers have traditionally been reluctant to incorporate them into flight programs because their inherent development risk. To accelerate the infusion of new technologies into its OES and OSS missions, NASA established the New Millennium Program (NMP). This program analyzes the capability needs of these enterprises, identifies candidate technologies to address these needs, incorporates advanced technology suites into validation flights, validates them in the relevant space environment, and then proactively infuses the validated technologies into future missions to enhance their capabilities while reducing their life cycle cost. The NMP employs a cross-enterprise Science Working Group, the NASA Enterprise science and technology roadmaps to define the capabilities needed by future Earth and Space science missions. Additional input from the science community is gathered through open workshops and peer-reviewed NASA Research Announcement (NRAs) for advanced measurement concepts. Technology development inputs from the technology organizations within NASA, other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers (FFRDC's), U.S. industry, and academia are sought to identify breakthrough technologies that might address these needs. This approach significantly extends NASA's technology infrastructure. To complement other flight test programs that develop or validate of individual components, the NMP places its highest priority on system-level validations of technology suites in the relevant space

  11. The New Millenium Program: Serving Earth and Space Sciences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, Fuk K.

    2000-01-01

    NASA has exciting plans for space science and Earth observations during the next decade. A broad range of advanced spacecraft and measurement technologies will be needed to support these plans within the existing budget and schedule constraints. Many of these technology needs are common to both NASA's Office of Earth Science (OES) and Office of Space Sciences (OSS). Even though some breakthrough technologies have been identified to address these needs, project managers have traditionally been reluctant to incorporate them into flight programs because their inherent development risk. To accelerate the infusion of new technologies into its OES and OSS missions, NASA established the New Millennium Program (NMP). This program analyzes the capability needs of these enterprises, identifies candidate technologies to address these needs, incorporates advanced technology suites into validation flights, validates them in the relevant space environment, and then proactively infuses the validated technologies into future missions to enhance their capabilities while reducing their life cycle cost. The NMP employs a cross-enterprise Science Working Group, the NASA Enterprise science and technology roadmaps to define the capabilities needed by future Earth and Space science missions. Additional input from the science community is gathered through open workshops and peer-reviewed NASA Research Announcement (NRAs) for advanced measurement concepts. Technology development inputs from the technology organizations within NASA, other government agencies, federally funded research and development centers (FFRDC's), U.S. industry, and academia are sought to identify breakthrough technologies that might address these needs. This approach significantly extends NASA's technology infrastructure. To complement other flight test programs that develop or validate of individual components, the NMP places its highest priority on system-level validations of technology suites in the relevant space

  12. Oversight on Alternatives to Commodity Donation in the National School Lunch Program. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor. House of Representatives, Ninety-Ninth Congress, Second Session.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC.

    This congressional hearing on the school lunch program dealt with the question of what would happen in those school districts that wanted to exercise an option to either take cash in lieu of commodities from the Department of Agriculture, or commodity letters of credit. Prepared statements are presented from Gene Miller, school food service…

  13. The Role of Minority Serving Institutions and REU Programs for Enhancing Diversity in Astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stassun, K. G.

    2002-12-01

    In this Special Session we will highlight the important role of Minority Serving Institutions in preparing future minority astronomers. Minority Serving Institutions include Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs), and Tribal Colleges and Universities (TCUs). We will also stress the role that REU (Research Experiences for Undergraduates) programs can have in enhancing diversity in astronomy. The session will feature a panel of invited speakers from Minority Serving Institutions and REU programs who will present viewpoints, strategies, and discussion on processes that encourage and mentor individuals who elect to pursue science-related careers including astronomy and astrophysics. Specific objectives for the Session include: Report to the AAS membership on the important role played by Minority Serving Institutions, where these institutions are, the populations they serve; Introduce the AAS membership to representatives from various Minority Serving Institutions, including an HBCU, an HSI, a TCU, and a community college, and to representatives from REU programs; Provide an opportunity for representatives from these institutions to describe their role in preparing minority undergraduates in the sciences, how their programs bridge to PhD-granting programs in astronomy, and ways they suggest for the AAS to help enhance these bridges; Provide an opportunity for AAS members to dialogue with these representatives, hopefully resulting in specific ``action items" that will serve to strengthen partnerships with Minority Serving Institutions.

  14. Doing without: serving allied health programs at universities without medical schools.

    PubMed

    Devin, Robin B

    2009-01-01

    This article compares libraries in the United States that serve allied health programs at universities without medical schools. Although these university libraries all serve a similar array of health sciences programs, the organization of their library services differ dramatically. There is also little similarity in their collections, particularly in their choice of indexing and abstracting databases. Yet librarians serving as liaisons to allied health programs at universities without medical schools face comparable challenges in meeting the needs of their users. All reported concerns about gaps in their collections and felt hard pressed to provide optimal library service.

  15. Salty or Sweet? Nutritional quality, consumption, and cost of snacks served in afterschool programs

    PubMed Central

    Beets, Michael W.; Weaver, R. Glenn; Tilley, Falon; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Huberty, Jennifer; Ward, Dianne S.; Freedman, Darcy A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Snacks served in afterschool programs (ASPs, 3–6pm) represent an important opportunity to promote healthy eating. ASP policies suggest a fruit/vegetable is served daily, while sugar-sweetened foods/beverages and artificially-flavored snacks are eliminated. Limited information exists on the types of snacks served in ASPs, if snacks meet existing nutrition policies, whether children eat the snacks, and their cost. METHODS Direct observation of snacks served and consumed was collected in 20 ASPs serving over 1,700 elementary-age children. The number of days snacks were served/week was evaluated for compliance with nutrition policies. Costs of snacks were collected via receipts. RESULTS Programs served desserts and artificially-flavored salty-snacks on 2.7 and 2.1 days/week. Fruits and vegetables were served 0.6 and 0.1 days/wk, respectively. Sugar-sweetened-beverages were served 1.8 days/wk. Of the children (N=383) observed, 75–100% consumed the snack served, with 95% and 100% of served fruits/vegetables consumed. No ASP served fruit/vegetables daily, 18 served sugar-sweetened foods, 16 served artificially-flavored snacks, and 14 served sugar-sweetened-beverages. Desserts and salty-snacks cost $0.27–$0.32/snack vs. $0.38–$0.40/snack for vegetables/fruits. CONCLUSIONS The quality of snacks failed to meet nutrition policies and consists of predominately high-sugar and artificially-flavored options. Strategies to improve snack offerings in ASPs while addressing price barriers are required. PMID:25564980

  16. Louisiana Standards for Programs Serving Four-Year-Old Children: Bulletin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Picard, Cecil J.

    As part of Louisiana's efforts to expand and improve the quality of its early childhood programs, a committee of educators from across the state collaborated to develop standards for programs serving 4-year-olds. This guide presents program standards to assist the ongoing development, evaluation, and improvement of early childhood center-based…

  17. Beyond the Numbers: Data Use for Continuous Improvement of Programs Serving Disconnected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Austin; Lerner, Jennifer Brown; Browning, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a series of in-depth case studies to examine how three programs which serve a disconnected youth population are utilizing data as a tool for continuous program improvement and ongoing accountability. The report features the following programs: (1) Roca, an organization in Massachusetts which engages the highest-risk youth in…

  18. Beyond the Numbers: Data Use for Continuous Improvement of Programs Serving Disconnected Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Austin; Lerner, Jennifer Brown; Browning, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    This publication is a series of in-depth case studies to examine how three programs which serve a disconnected youth population are utilizing data as a tool for continuous program improvement and ongoing accountability. The report features the following programs: (1) Roca, an organization in Massachusetts which engages the highest-risk youth in…

  19. What's for Lunch?: A Restaurant Critic Goes to the School Cafeteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews school lunches around Boston. He discusses a significant fact about school lunches today, which is the "free" and "reduced" lunch program. The most promising developments he saw came from two opposite directions: (1) from food conglomerates reformulating snack foods to eliminate transfats,…

  20. What's for Lunch?: A Restaurant Critic Goes to the School Cafeteria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zanger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author reviews school lunches around Boston. He discusses a significant fact about school lunches today, which is the "free" and "reduced" lunch program. The most promising developments he saw came from two opposite directions: (1) from food conglomerates reformulating snack foods to eliminate transfats,…

  1. Profiles of Children Served in Early Intervention Programs for Behavioral Disorders: Early Literacy and Behavioral Characteristics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trout, Alexandra Lynn; Epstein, Michael H.; Nelson, Ron; Synhorst, Lori; Hurley, Kristin Duppong

    2006-01-01

    Special education legislation has placed an increased emphasis on early intervention programs for children at risk for early literacy delays and behavioral disorders. Given this trend, it is important to understand the characteristics of students identified and served in at-risk programs. This study presents the findings from a cluster analysis on…

  2. Kendall Demonstration Elementary School: The Special Opportunities Programs. Who It Serves and Why.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owner, Susan Zylstra

    1982-01-01

    The Special Opportunities Program (SOP) at the Kendall Demonstration Elementary School in Washington, DC, serves hearing impaired students (two to 14 years old) who have special learning problems on additional handicaps, including developmental disabilities. The SOP is also integrated with the regular program, which eases mainstreaming. (SEW)

  3. Supporting Minority-Serving Institutions in Their Program Improvement Efforts: A Responsive Technical Assistance Approach

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bay, Mary; Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.; Guillory, Barbara L.

    2012-01-01

    To reform a special education teacher preparation program can be gratifying, difficult, complex, political, and urgently needed. The Monarch Center, a federally funded technical assistance center, was established to guide and support minority-serving institutions in their efforts to improve their teacher preparation programs. Four guidelines…

  4. Predictors of research use among staff in aboriginal addiction treatment programs serving women.

    PubMed

    Davey, Caitlin J; Niccols, Alison; Henderson, Joanna; Dobbins, Maureen; Sword, Wendy; Dell, Colleen; Wylie, Tammie; Sauve, Ernest

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the predictors of research use among staff from Aboriginal addiction programs serving women. A total of 89 staff from 26 Aboriginal addiction programs completed an online survey that included items assessing the theory of planned behavior constructs (attitudes, subjective norms, perceived behavioral control), intent to use research, and research use. Consistent with the theory of planned behavior, research use was predicted by attitudes, subjective norms, and perceived behavioral control. Intent to use research was not a mediator, demonstrating partial applicability of the theory of planned behavior to staff in Aboriginal addiction programs serving women.

  5. White Paper on School-Lunch Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Science in the Public Interest, Washington, DC.

    Recommendations are made on how school lunch programs can provide better nutrition and promote healthier eating habits. Recommendations consist of goals with both short-term and mid-term objectives. The short-term objectives should be implemented over the next 2 to 4 years; the mid-term objectives should be implemented by the year 2000 or sooner…

  6. White Paper on School-Lunch Nutrition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Center for Science in the Public Interest, Washington, DC.

    Recommendations are made on how school lunch programs can provide better nutrition and promote healthier eating habits. Recommendations consist of goals with both short-term and mid-term objectives. The short-term objectives should be implemented over the next 2 to 4 years; the mid-term objectives should be implemented by the year 2000 or sooner…

  7. Dwindling Lunch Lines.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frisby-La Rue, Jeannine

    1982-01-01

    The commitment made by the National School Lunch Act of 1946 is questioned. One of the Reagan administration's methods of balancing the budget appears to be contradictory to the promise of safeguarding the health and well-being of the nation's children. (GK)

  8. Cristoforetti during Lunch

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2014-11-28

    iss042e017276 (11/28/2014) --- European Space Agency Astronaut Samantha Cristoforetti prepares to place her lunch in the rehydration unit at mealtime aboard the International Space Station. The Johnson Space Centers Space Food Laboratory creates healthy and tasty menu's for the Astronauts.

  9. Impacts of Scheduling Recess before Lunch in Elementary Schools: A Case Study Approach of Plate Waste and Perceived Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Catherine H.; Strohbehn, Garth W.; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Litchfield, Ruth A.; Scheidel, Carrie; Delger, Patti

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Recess Before Lunch (RBL) for elementary students is considered a best practice related to increased nutrient intakes at lunch, decreased afternoon behavioral issues, and increased afternoon learning efficiency; however, school characteristics, such as amount of time for lunch, offer vs. serve, and scheduling factors can…

  10. Impacts of Scheduling Recess before Lunch in Elementary Schools: A Case Study Approach of Plate Waste and Perceived Behaviors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohbehn, Catherine H.; Strohbehn, Garth W.; Lanningham-Foster, Lorraine; Litchfield, Ruth A.; Scheidel, Carrie; Delger, Patti

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Recess Before Lunch (RBL) for elementary students is considered a best practice related to increased nutrient intakes at lunch, decreased afternoon behavioral issues, and increased afternoon learning efficiency; however, school characteristics, such as amount of time for lunch, offer vs. serve, and scheduling factors can…

  11. National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program: Nutrition Standards for All Foods Sold in School as Required by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. Final rule and interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2016-07-29

    This rule adopts as final, with some modifications, the National School Lunch Program and School Breakfast Program regulations set forth in the interim final rule published in the Federal Register on June 28, 2013. The requirements addressed in this rule conform to the provisions in the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 regarding nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools, other than food sold under the lunch and breakfast programs. Most provisions of this final rule were implemented on July 1, 2014, a full year subsequent to publication of the interim final rule. This was in compliance with section 208 of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010, which required that State and local educational agencies have at least one full school year from the date of publication of the interim final rule to implement the competitive food provisions. Based on comments received on the interim final rule and implementation experience, this final rule makes a few modifications to the nutrition standards for all foods sold in schools implemented on July 1, 2014. In addition, this final rule codifies specific policy guidance issued after publication of the interim rule. Finally, this rule retains the provision related to the standard for total fat as interim and requests further comment on this single standard.

  12. 76 FR 78095 - Applying for Free and Reduced Price Meals in the National School Lunch Program and School...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... the Special Milk Program, and Technical Amendments AGENCY: Food and Nutrition Service, USDA. ACTION..., Food assistance programs, Grant programs--education, Grant programs--health, Infants and children, Milk... FREE AND REDUCED PRICE MEALS AND FREE MILK IN SCHOOLS 0 1. The authority citation for Part...

  13. Lewis Cafeteria at Lunch Time

    NASA Image and Video Library

    1952-08-21

    NACA staff members queue up in the Lewis Flight Propulsion Laboratory cafeteria in August 1952. The cafeteria originally opened in November 1942 inside the south end of the Engine Research Building. A non-profit Exchange was established to handle the finances, while Helen Thompson, a German born pastry cook, ran the day-to-day operations. Employees could also purchase her bakery to take home with them. Services were expanded to include a lunch counter and a food cart that ferried meals to the facilities. By the end of World War II the cafeteria was serving nearly 1600 meals daily in a space designed for half of that. In 1951 a new wing was added to the Utilities Building to accommodate an expanded cafeteria, seen in this photograph. In the mid-1960s an auxiliary unit was built in the new Development Engineering Building located across Brookpark Road.

  14. 20 CFR 668.100 - What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ...? 668.100 Section 668.100 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Purposes and Policies § 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American... programs is to support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native...

  15. 20 CFR 668.100 - What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ...? 668.100 Section 668.100 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Purposes and Policies § 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American... programs is to support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native...

  16. 20 CFR 668.100 - What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ...? 668.100 Section 668.100 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Purposes and Policies § 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American... programs is to support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native...

  17. The Status of Child Nutrition Programs in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Daniel C.; Vigil, Herminia J.

    More than 50 million meals are served annually to Colorado's children through the National School Lunch Program, School Breakfast Program, Special Milk Program, and Summer Food Service Program for children. Most of this report is comprised of tables showing average daily participation, meals served, and other statistics about school meal programs…

  18. School Resources and Engagement in Technical Assistance Programs Is Associated with Higher Prevalence of Salad Bars in Elementary School Lunches in the United States.

    PubMed

    Ohri-Vachaspati, Punam; Turner, Lindsey; Adams, Marc A; Bruening, Meg; Chaloupka, Frank J

    2016-03-01

    Salad bars have been promoted as a strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption in schools. To examine school-level resources and programs associated with the presence of salad bars in elementary schools and to assess whether there were differential changes in salad bar prevalence based on school-level resources and programs before and after the new US Department of Agriculture schools meals standards were proposed (January 2011) and implemented (July 2012). Repeated cross-sectional design. Data were collected annually between 2006-2007 and 2013. Nationally representative sample of 3,956 elementary schools participating in the National School Lunch Program. School personnel (ie, administrators and foodservice staff) provided data using a mail-back survey. Presence of salad bars in school was the primary outcome variable. School-level programs and resources were investigated as independent variables. Weighted logistic regression analyses examined associations between dependent and independent variables controlling for school demographic characteristics. Prevalence of salad bars increased significantly from 17.1% in 2006-2007 to 29.6% in 2012-2013. The prevalence of salad bars was significantly higher among schools that participated in the Team Nutrition program (odds ratio [OR] 1.37, 95% CI 1.10 to 1.70), the Fresh Fruit and Vegetable Program (OR 1.48, 95% CI 1.13 to 1.95), a Farm to School program (OR 1.77, 95% CI 1.36 to 2.33), and where school meals were provided by a foodservice management company (OR 1.46, 95% CI 1.08 to 1.97). No association was found for schools with full-service kitchen, school gardens, those offering nutrition education, or those with dietitians/nutritionists on staff. Prevalence of salad bars increased significantly after the US Department of Agriculture school meal guidelines were proposed and implemented. It is likely that schools are using salad bars to offer a variety of fruits and vegetables to students, and

  19. Job Stressors and Teacher Job Satisfaction in Programs Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adera, Beatrice A.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher turnover is problem that continues to plague the field of special education, given the associated costs when a teacher leaves his or her job. The challenges associated with recruitment and retention of quality teachers, especially in programs serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have been attributed to a variety…

  20. On Their Own: Runaway and Homeless Youth and Programs that Serve Them.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pires, Sheila A.; Silber, Judith Tolmach

    This monograph discusses runaway and homeless youth and the programs that serve them in seven large and medium-sized cities throughout the United States. The monograph focuses on the characteristics and service needs of these youths and the demands they pose for service providers. It examines how the population and the service environment have…

  1. Adult Basic Education Curriculum Guide for ABE Programs Serving Psychiatrically Ill Adult Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collier, Ezma V.

    This curriculum guide is designed for use in adult basic education (ABE) programs serving psychiatrically ill adult students. Covered in the individual units are the following topics: personal hygiene and grooming, nutrition and health, money and money management, transportation and safety, government and law, values clarification, and…

  2. Job Stressors and Teacher Job Satisfaction in Programs Serving Students with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adera, Beatrice A.; Bullock, Lyndal M.

    2010-01-01

    Teacher turnover is problem that continues to plague the field of special education, given the associated costs when a teacher leaves his or her job. The challenges associated with recruitment and retention of quality teachers, especially in programs serving students with emotional and behavioral disorders (E/BD) have been attributed to a variety…

  3. Extension's Evolving Alignment of Programs Serving Families and Youth: Organizational Change and Its Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braverman, Marc T.; Franz, Nancy K.; Rennekamp, Roger A.

    2012-01-01

    Extension is experiencing a trend toward closer alignment of its programs serving families and youth, notably Family and Consumer Sciences and 4-H Youth Development. Projects are more multidisciplinary and comprehensive than in the past, and, in many states, FCS and 4-HYD are also becoming more administratively integrated. Several reasons for this…

  4. From Research to Practice: Strategies for Supporting School Readiness in Programs Serving Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Fostering healthy social and emotional development provides the foundation for school readiness in programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families. In this article, the author explores four key concepts that make the link between social and emotional development and early learning: 1) Cognitive and social-emotional development are…

  5. A Psychiatric Primer for Programs Serving People with Developmental Disabilities. Monograph #101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dal Pozzo, Earlene; Bernstein, Gail S.

    Intended for personnel in programs serving persons with developmental disabilities, the booklet provides basic information about the major psychiatric disorders and their treatment. Five sections cover: the major disorders; medications--uses and problems; assessment; cooordination of services; and psychiatric emergencies. Major disorders such as…

  6. From Research to Practice: Strategies for Supporting School Readiness in Programs Serving Infants and Toddlers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powers, Stefanie

    2012-01-01

    Fostering healthy social and emotional development provides the foundation for school readiness in programs serving infants, toddlers, and their families. In this article, the author explores four key concepts that make the link between social and emotional development and early learning: 1) Cognitive and social-emotional development are…

  7. A Nutrition Training Program for Social Workers Serving the Homebound Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Karen; Scharf, Marjorie

    1985-01-01

    Homebound elderly adults experience more nutrition-related problems than their active age peers. This paper reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a demonstration program for training social workers serving the homebound in a large urban area agency on aging. Evaluations indicated that the training was favorably received and…

  8. A Psychiatric Primer for Programs Serving People with Developmental Disabilities. Monograph #101.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dal Pozzo, Earlene; Bernstein, Gail S.

    Intended for personnel in programs serving persons with developmental disabilities, the booklet provides basic information about the major psychiatric disorders and their treatment. Five sections cover: the major disorders; medications--uses and problems; assessment; cooordination of services; and psychiatric emergencies. Major disorders such as…

  9. A Nutrition Training Program for Social Workers Serving the Homebound Elderly.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glanz, Karen; Scharf, Marjorie

    1985-01-01

    Homebound elderly adults experience more nutrition-related problems than their active age peers. This paper reports on the development, implementation, and evaluation of a demonstration program for training social workers serving the homebound in a large urban area agency on aging. Evaluations indicated that the training was favorably received and…

  10. Medicare's Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program in Surgery May Disproportionately Affect Minority-serving Hospitals.

    PubMed

    Shih, Terry; Ryan, Andrew M; Gonzalez, Andrew A; Dimick, Justin B

    2015-06-01

    To project readmission penalties for hospitals performing cardiac surgery and examine how these penalties will affect minority-serving hospitals. The Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program will potentially expand penalties for higher-than-predicted readmission rates to cardiac procedures in the near future. The impact of these penalties on minority-serving hospitals is unknown. We examined national Medicare beneficiaries undergoing coronary artery bypass grafting in 2008 to 2010 (N = 255,250 patients, 1186 hospitals). Using hierarchical logistic regression, we calculated hospital observed-to-expected readmission ratios. Hospital penalties were projected according to the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program formula using only coronary artery bypass grafting readmissions with a 3% maximum penalty of total Medicare revenue. Hospitals were classified into quintiles according to proportion of black patients treated. Minority-serving hospitals were defined as hospitals in the top quintile whereas non-minority-serving hospitals were those in the bottom quintile. Projected readmission penalties were compared across quintiles. Forty-seven percent of hospitals (559 of 1186) were projected to be assessed a penalty. Twenty-eight percent of hospitals (330 of 1186) would be penalized less than 1% of total Medicare revenue whereas 5% of hospitals (55 of 1186) would receive the maximum 3% penalty. Minority-serving hospitals were almost twice as likely to be penalized than non-minority-serving hospitals (61% vs 32%) and were projected almost triple the reductions in reimbursement ($112 million vs $41 million). Minority-serving hospitals would disproportionately bear the burden of readmission penalties if expanded to include cardiac surgery. Given these hospitals' narrow profit margins, readmission penalties may have a profound impact on these hospitals' ability to care for disadvantaged patients.

  11. Increasing portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school lunch program can increase fruit and vegetable consumption.

    PubMed

    Miller, Nicole; Reicks, Marla; Redden, Joseph P; Mann, Traci; Mykerezi, Elton; Vickers, Zata

    2015-08-01

    Increasing portion size can increase children's consumption of food. The goal of this study was to determine whether increasing the portion sizes of fruits and vegetables in an elementary school cafeteria environment would increase children's consumption of them. We measured each child's consumption of the fruit and vegetables served in a cafeteria line on a control day (normal cafeteria procedures) and on two intervention days. When we increased the portion size of 3 of the 4 fruits and vegetables by about 50%, children who took those foods increased their consumption of them. Although this was an effective strategy for increasing fruit and vegetable consumption among students who took those foods, many children chose not to take any fruits or vegetables. Further efforts are needed to increase children's selection and consumption of fruits and vegetables in an environment of competing foods of higher palatability.

  12. Serving up Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    When low-income students returned to Chicago public schools this fall, many had better access to technology, thanks to a public-private partnership. Chicago families with children enrolled in the National School Lunch Program are eligible for subsidized computers and Internet connections through an agreement between the city and telecom giant…

  13. Serving up Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rich, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    When low-income students returned to Chicago public schools this fall, many had better access to technology, thanks to a public-private partnership. Chicago families with children enrolled in the National School Lunch Program are eligible for subsidized computers and Internet connections through an agreement between the city and telecom giant…

  14. School Lunch Program: Role and Impacts of Private Food Service Companies. United States General Accounting Office Report to Congressional Committees.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    General Accounting Office, Washington, DC. Resources, Community, and Economic Development Div.

    In the Healthy Meals for Healthy Americans Act of 1994, Congress directed the Government Accounting Office (GAO) to examine the use of private food establishments and caterers by schools participating in federal programs for school meals. In conducting its review, the GAO relied primarily on questionnaires returned by food authorities that had…

  15. Changes in the content of children's school lunches across the school week.

    PubMed

    Miles, Cara L; Matthews, Jan; Brennan, Lee; Mitchell, Sarah

    2010-12-01

    the school setting is an important context for the development of children's eating behaviours. As most Australian children (86%) bring their lunch from home, knowledge of what parents provide in home-prepared school lunches can inform efforts to improve their nutritional quality. This study investigated the content of children's home-prepared school lunches, considered variation across the school week, and explored gender and grade level differences. this observational analysis of children's home-prepared school lunches was conducted in children attending the first three years of school at one of five northern Melbourne metropolitan schools. One hundred and seventy parents (response rate 12%) gave consent for their child's lunch to be audited up to five times (minimum of three) across a one-month period. The food and beverage items of students' school lunches were audited using the School Food Checklist. the average home-prepared school lunch contained a sandwich, a piece of fruit and one and a half servings of extras (low nutritional value and/or high in added fat, salt or sugar). Servings of bread declined (Wilks' Λ=0.82, p=0.01) from Monday to Friday and there were more servings of extras (Wilks' Λ=0.79, p<0.01) on Monday than Wednesday. Younger children's lunches contained fewer servings of fruit (F(2,71.93)=4.84, p=0.03), vegetables (F(2,78.97)=3.86, p<0.05) and bread (F(2,140)=4.36, p=0.02) than those of older children. Girls' lunches contained significantly more vegetables than boys' lunches, (t(154.51)=-2.21, p=0.03). lunches were high in extras and low in servings of vegetables and other healthy snacks with minor variations in the quantity of bread and extras across the school week.

  16. Foods and beverages offered in US public secondary schools through the National School Lunch Program from 2011-2013: Early evidence of improved nutrition and reduced disparities.

    PubMed

    Terry-McElrath, Yvonne M; O'Malley, Patrick M; Johnston, Lloyd D

    2015-09-01

    To present data on trends in foods and beverages offered through the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) in public middle and high schools in the years immediately preceding and following implementation of new NSLP standards. From 2011 to 2013, primary data collection through the annual Youth, Education, and Society study involved use of mailed questionnaires to obtain data on NSLP meals from schools attended by nationally representative samples of US 8(th), 10(th), and 12(th) grade students (N=792 middle schools and 751 high schools). Each school was weighted to represent the percentage of target grade students enrolled, thus allowing analyses examining changes over time in the percentage of students enrolled in (attending) schools with specified NSLP measure outcomes, as well as disparities in NSLP measures based on school characteristics. Significantly more US secondary students attended schools with specified NSLP measures in 2013 than in 2011; increases were observed at both middle and high school levels. Increase rates for some NSLP measures were moderated by school characteristics; where this was the case, moderating associations decreased prior NSLP nutrition environment disparities that were especially evident in smaller schools and schools with higher percentages of minority students. Meaningful improvements have been made in the nutritional content of NSLP meals offered to US secondary students; these improvements have reduced prior NSLP meal disparities associated with school characteristics. Schools will need continued help with implementation and compliance monitoring in order to have the best opportunity to improve the nutrition environments for US students. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Development of an ADP Training Program to Serve the EPA Data Processing Community.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-07-29

    package and interprCLing output. CLASS SIZE: 10 - 15 COURSE OFFERING LOCATION Any EPA office or lab with access to a computing facility which runs the BMI ...Rort rc:_ EPA Contract-#-68-O1-3357 < PDevelopment of an ADP Training Program to Serve the EPA Data Processing Community: Submitted to Prepared by Mr...Street Technical Operations Branch Alexandria, Virginia 22314 EPA /WSH Washington, DC 20460 ClI- LU Jul-,219, 1976 -- ADVANCED COBOL TARGET AUDIENCE To

  18. Making Lunch a Theatrical Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Verrill, Cynthia A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a "lunch theater" project implemented at Hampstead Central School in Hampstead, New Hampshire. Groups of first through fourth graders rehearsed and performed songs, dances, magic, comedy, gymnastics, and student-written skits during their respective lunch periods for an audience of fellow students, staff, and teachers. Students…

  19. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING... Learn and Serve America programs? The Corporation will evaluate programs based on the following: (a)...

  20. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING... Learn and Serve America programs? The Corporation will evaluate programs based on the following: (a)...

  1. Middle School Cafeteria Food Choice and Waste Prior to Implementation of Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Changes in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Priscilla; Bednar, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The study objective was to document choices of entrées, vegetables, fruits, grains/breads, and beverages on lunch trays and to determine the amount of each that was discarded after mealtime. Methods: A convenience sample of two urban middle school cafeterias in Texas participated in the study which took place in the 2010-2011…

  2. Middle School Cafeteria Food Choice and Waste Prior to Implementation of Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act Changes in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, Priscilla; Bednar, Carolyn

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The study objective was to document choices of entrées, vegetables, fruits, grains/breads, and beverages on lunch trays and to determine the amount of each that was discarded after mealtime. Methods: A convenience sample of two urban middle school cafeterias in Texas participated in the study which took place in the 2010-2011…

  3. 20 CFR 668.100 - What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA programs...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ...? 668.100 Section 668.100 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Policies § 668.100 What is the purpose of the programs established to serve Native American peoples (INA... support comprehensive employment and training activities for Indian, Alaska Native and Native...

  4. Coevolutionary Free Lunches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Macready, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the foundations of optimization has begun to uncover its underlying rich structure. In particular, the "No Free Lunch" (NFL) theorems [WM97] state that any two algorithms are equivalent when their performance is averaged across all possible problems. This highlights the need for exploiting problem-specific knowledge to achieve better than random performance. In this paper we present a general framework covering most search scenarios. In addition to the optimization scenarios addressed in the NFL results, this framework covers multi-armed bandit problems and evolution of multiple co-evolving agents. As a particular instance of the latter, it covers "self-play" problems. In these problems the agents work together to produce a champion, who then engages one or more antagonists in a subsequent multi-player game In contrast to the traditional optimization case where the NFL results hold, we show that in self-play there are free lunches: in coevolution some algorithms have better performance than other algorithms, averaged across all possible problems. However in the typical coevolutionary scenarios encountered in biology, where there is no champion, NFL still holds.

  5. Coevolutionary Free Lunches

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolpert, David H.; Macready, William G.

    2005-01-01

    Recent work on the mathematical foundations of optimization has begun to uncover its rich structure. In particular, the "No Free Lunch" (NFL) theorems state that any two algorithms are equivalent when their performance is averaged across all possible problems. This highlights the need for exploiting problem-specific knowledge to achieve better than random performance. In this paper we present a general framework covering more search scenarios. In addition to the optimization scenarios addressed in the NFL results, this framework covers multi-armed bandit problems and evolution of multiple co-evolving players. As a particular instance of the latter, it covers "self-play" problems. In these problems the set of players work together to produce a champion, who then engages one or more antagonists in a subsequent multi-player game. In contrast to the traditional optimization case where the NFL results hold, we show that in self-play there are free lunches: in coevolution some algorithms have better performance than other algorithms, averaged across all possible problems. We consider the implications of these results to biology where there is no champion.

  6. Younger elementary students waste more school lunch foods than older elementary students

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Children may not receive the nutritional benefits from school lunch meals if they do not eat the foods served. This study investigated whether there were differences in school lunch foods consumed and wasted by grade level of elementary school students. In this cross-sectional study, anonymous meal ...

  7. Serving a diverse population: the role of speech-language pathology professional preparation programs.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Sharon R; Gonzalez, Lori S

    2002-01-01

    A national survey of 228 program directors was conducted to determine how master's level professional preparation programs are meeting the challenge of preparing speech-language pathologists to provide quality services to an increasingly diverse population. A total of 91 respondents provided information regarding their programs' efforts to address diversity by increasing the diversity of speech-language pathology professionals, preparing students in research for diverse populations, and providing students with the didactic knowledge and clinical experience required to serve diverse populations. Results indicated that professional preparation programs continue to lag in their enrollment of minority students, but there are efforts actively to recruit and retain students from diverse groups. Much variation in preparation in research was found across programs. Graduate students are being presented with information concerning diversity issues, but clinical experiences vary greatly according to the geographic location of the preparation program and individual practicum placements. Implications of these findings for speech-language pathology preparation programs and other allied health programs are discussed.

  8. The Irvine Paraprofessional Program: promising practice for serving students with ADHD.

    PubMed

    Kotkin, R

    1998-01-01

    The Irvine Paraprofessional Program (IPP) looks promising for serving elementary-school children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) in the general education classroom. This article describes the components of the IPP, preliminary research studies that support its efficacy, and the benefits of the model. The IPP is a 12-week intensive intervention that includes (a) direct intervention to children with ADHD by specially trained paraprofessionals, (b) teacher consultation by the school psychologist on the use of effective classroom management strategies, (c) school-based reinforcement, and (d) social skills training. Preliminary studies suggest that paraprofessionals can effect positive changes in children with ADHD that can be maintained by the teacher once the paraprofessional is removed from the classroom. The purpose of this article is to provide a description of the IPP as an effective model for serving children with ADHD in the general education classroom.

  9. National Recognition Program for Exemplary Vocational Education Programs Serving Special Needs Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wermuth, Thomas R.; Coyle-Williams, Maureen

    1989-01-01

    Professionals who work in the area of vocational education for students with special needs were surveyed to determine how they identify exemplary programs. Those students include those who are handicapped, disabled, dropouts, of limited English proficiency, immigrants, displaced homemakers, dislocated workers, disadvantaged, single or teen…

  10. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  11. Do School Lunches Contribute to Childhood Obesity?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schanzenbach, Diane Whitmore

    2009-01-01

    This paper assesses whether school lunches contribute to childhood obesity. I employ two methods to isolate the causal impact of school lunches on obesity. First, using panel data, I ?nd that children who consume school lunches are more likely to be obese than those who brown bag their lunches even though they enter kindergarten with the same…

  12. The Status of Child Nutrition Programs in Colorado.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McMillan, Daniel C.; Vigil, Herminia J.

    The health and learning potential of Colorado's children are enhanced by the benefits of several child nutrition programs. The oldest and largest of these programs is the National School Lunch Program (NSLP), which served an average of more than 268,000 meals per day in October, 1992. Other programs include the School Breakfast Program (SBP),…

  13. An Analysis of Programs Serving Men of Color in the Community College: An Examination of Funding Streams, Interventions, and Objectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keflezighi, Fnann; Sebahari, Levi; Wood, J. Luke

    2016-01-01

    It is difficult to assess the effectiveness of community college initiatives serving men of color when there is a lack of understanding of the nature of the programming taking place. The purpose of this study was to understand the funding streams, interventions, and objectives of programs serving men of color in the community college. This study…

  14. Fast Food Gets an "A" in School Lunch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fredrick, Len

    This book, by the creator of the Clark County (Nevada) School District fast foods program, describes a fast food program that was introduced into the schools and the rationale that prompted its creation. The program is based on "combo" lunches that consist of a sandwich, salad or fries, and milk or a special "milk shake." This…

  15. Understanding the Prevalence of Geo-Like Degree Programs at Minority Serving Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McDaris, J. R.; Manduca, C. A.; Larsen, K.

    2014-12-01

    Over the decade 2002-12, the percentage of students from underrepresented minorities (URM) graduating with geoscience degrees has increased by 50%. In 2012, of the nearly 6,000 geoscience Bachelor's degrees, 8% were awarded to students from URM. But that same year across all of STEM, 18% of Bachelors went to these students, and URM made up 30% of the US population overall. Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs) play an important role in increasing the diversity of geoscience graduates where there are appropriate degree programs or pathways to programs. To better understand opportunities at these institutions, the InTeGrate project collected information on degree programs at MSIs. A summer 2013 survey of websites for three types of MSIs confirmed that, while stand-alone Geology, Geoscience, or Environmental Science departments are present, there are a larger number of degree programs that include elements of geoscience or related disciplines (geography, GIS, etc.) offered in interdisciplinary departments (e.g. Natural Sciences and Math) or cognate science departments (Physics, Engineering, etc.). Approximately one-third of Hispanic Serving Institutions and Tribal Colleges and one-fifth of Historically Black Colleges and Universities offer at least one degree that includes elements of geoscience. The most common programs were Geology and Environmental Science (94 and 88 degrees respectively), but 21 other types of program were also found. To better profile the nature of these programs, 11 interviews were conducted focusing on strategies for attracting, supporting, and preparing minority students for the workforce. In conjunction with the February 2014 Broadening Access to the Earth and Environmental Sciences workshop, an additional 6 MSI profiles were obtained as well as 22 profiles from non-MSIs. Several common strategies emerge: Proactive marketing and outreach to local high schools and two-year colleges Community building, mentoring and advising, academic support

  16. The Lunch-Wheel Spin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mason, Julia A.; Jones, Graham A.

    1994-01-01

    Describes a problem formulated by fourth-grade students about having more pizza for lunch, and the clarifying, predicting, modeling, simulating, comparing, and extending activities that occurred in addressing the problem from a probabilistic perspective. (MKR)

  17. A comparison of fruits, vegetables, sugar-sweetened beverages, and desserts in the packed lunches of elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Farris, Alisha R; Misyak, Sarah; Duffey, Kiyah J; Mann, Georgianna R; Davis, George C; Hosig, Kathy; Atzaba-Poria, Naama; McFerren, Mary M; Serrano, Elena L

    2015-06-01

    An estimated 40% of children bring a packed lunch to school. These lunches are not required to meet nutrition standards. The aim of this study was to compare differences in the nutritional quality of elementary packed lunches by the presence or absence of sugar-sweetened beverages (SSB), desserts, and fruits and vegetables (FVs). Observational data for prekindergarten and kindergarten packed lunches were collected from three schools in rural Virginia for 5 consecutive school days and analyzed for macro- and micronutrients and by the presence or absence of food and beverage items. Of the 561 packed lunch observations collected, 41.7% contained no FV, 41.2% contained an SSB, and 61.1% contained a dessert. The nutrient profile of packed lunches with at least one fruit or vegetable had significantly higher levels of carbohydrate, fiber, sugar, vitamin A, and vitamin C. Packed lunches containing an SSB had significantly higher levels of sugar and vitamin C and significantly lower levels of protein, fiber, vitamin A, calcium, and iron. Packed lunches containing a dessert had significantly higher levels of energy, carbohydrate, fat, saturated fat, sodium, sugar, vitamin C, and iron and significantly lower levels of vitamin A. Additional research is needed to fully understand parent and child motivations for packing lunches and the decision processes that influence the inclusion of food items. The development of packed lunch interventions, encouragement of National School Lunch Program participation, or enactment of school policies to increase the nutritional value of packed lunches is warranted.

  18. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  19. Serving Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Link, Geoffrey; Beggs, Marjorie; Seiderman, Ethel

    Parent Services Project (PSP), the first comprehensive program of resources and mental health activities for parents offered at child care centers in the San Francisco Bay Area (California), has expanded to centers in six states, serving over 19,000 families. This report describes the program's history, aims, and achievements, along with specific…

  20. Oversight Hearings on Vocational Education, School Lunch, Asbestos in Schools, Elementary and Secondary Education Programs. Hearings before the Subcommittee on Elementary, Secondary, and Vocational Education of the Committee on Education and Labor, House of Representatives, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session (Ashland, Kentucky, May 13, 1983; Lexington, Kentucky, May 14, 1983).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. House Committee on Education and Labor.

    These Congressional hearings contain testimony dealing with vocational education, school lunch programs, asbestos in schools, and elementary and secondary educational programs. Included among those agencies and organizations represented at the hearings were the following: Ashland Vocational and Technical School in Ashland, Kentucky; Cabell County…

  1. Hearings Before the Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs of the United States Senate, Ninety-Second Congress, First Session on Nutrition and Human Needs. Part 7--Crisis in the National School Lunch Program. Hearings Held Washington, D.C., September 7, 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs.

    The Senate Select Committee on Nutrition and Human Needs held hearings on the crisis in the National School Lunch Program (September 7, 1971). This transcript on the hearings includes statements by members of the Committee and the testimony of four witnesses who are involved in the administration of various school food programs. In the appendixes,…

  2. DOE/HACU connections: The Hispanic Serving Institutions FEDIX/MOLIS program. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1998-09-01

    The Hispanic Association of Colleges and Universities (HACU) was funded by the Department of Energy (DOE) to strengthen and expand the participation of Hispanic Serving Institutions (HSIs) in the FEDIX and MOLIS database systems begun in February of 1994. The project was a collaborative effort with Federal Information, Inc. (now named RAMS-FIE, Inc.), which maintains the FEDIX/MOLIS databases. The original purpose of the DOE/HACU Connections project was to expand the participation of HSIs in the MOLIS database, to train HSI faculty and staff on FEDIX and MOLIS, and to increase the use of the FEDIX database by HSIs. The expanded participation of HSIs provided their faculty, administrators, and students the opportunity to learn about the wide variety of DOE and other participating federal agencies research, contract, grant, and educational programs information available on FEDIX. Similarly, the expanded participation of HSIs provided DOE and other participating federal agencies with greater information regarding HSI research and training capabilities and interests. A key outcome of this DOE/HACU effort was the impact of the training provided to the HSI faculty and administrators. Recent studies, including one by HACU, Improving Utilization of the Information Highway by Hispanic Serving Institutions, indicate that the Hispanic community as a whole and the HSIs have significantly less access to the Internet and computers than the majority of other institutions of Higher Education (IHEs). Thus the training offered by the project at HSIs served both to introduce the opportunities on FEDIX/MOLIS and to highlight the opportunities on the Internet as well as highlight the lack of telecommunication technology resources.

  3. Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP): training persons with dementia to serve as group activity leaders.

    PubMed

    Camp, Cameron J; Skrajner, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of an activity implemented by means of Resident-Assisted Montessori Programming (RAMP). Four persons with early-stage dementia were trained to serve as leaders for a small-group activity played by nine persons with more advanced dementia. Assessments of leaders' ability to learn the procedures of leading a group, as well as their satisfaction with this role, were taken, as were measures of players' engagement and affect during standard activities programming and RAMP activities. Leaders demonstrated the potential to fill the role of group activity leader effectively, and they expressed a high level of satisfaction with this role. Players' levels of positive engagement and pleasure during the RAMP activity were higher than during standard group activities. This study suggests that to the extent that procedural learning is available to persons with early-stage dementia, especially when they are assisted with external cueing, these individuals can successfully fill the role of volunteers when working with persons with more advanced dementia. This can provide a meaningful social role for leaders and increase access to high quality activities programming for large numbers of persons with dementia. Copyright 2004 The Gerontological Society of America

  4. Let's Do Lunch: A Business/School Partnership That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dianne; Scaduto, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This business/school partnership program uses adult volunteers from a local business to facilitate the personal and emotional development of students at high risk of dropping out of school. After a 30-minute training session, volunteers eat lunch with an assigned student partner once a week for 14 weeks. Benefits of the program are seen for both…

  5. Let's Do Lunch: A Business/School Partnership That Works.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Friedman, Dianne; Scaduto, John J.

    1995-01-01

    This business/school partnership program uses adult volunteers from a local business to facilitate the personal and emotional development of students at high risk of dropping out of school. After a 30-minute training session, volunteers eat lunch with an assigned student partner once a week for 14 weeks. Benefits of the program are seen for both…

  6. Early Education Quality Improvement Project Profiles of Excellence: Exemplary Programs Serving West Virginia's Young Children and Their Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West Virginia Governor's Cabinet on Children and Families, Charleston.

    This document describes the 25 exemplary programs serving young children and their families in West Virginia. The programs were participating in the final stages of a process for state recognition as an exemplary program by the Early Education Quality Improvement Project Committee of the Governor's Early Childhood Implementation Commission in West…

  7. The Importance of Improving the Nutritional Quality of Packed Lunches in U.S. Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misyak, Sarah; Farris, Alisha; Mann, Georgianna; Serrano, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Schools represent an ideal venue to influence dietary habits of large numbers of children. While the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is mandated to meet clear nutrition standards for calories, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, sodium, fat, and saturated fat, there are no nutritional requirements for packed lunches. This Current Issue…

  8. Vending Reimbursable Lunches to High School Students: A Study of Two Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carr, Deborah H.; Cross, Evelina W.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives: The objectives were to investigate the operational requirements for offering healthful vended reimbursable lunches to students and to identify barriers to implementation. Methods: A descriptive case study method was utilized to explore the operations of two school nutrition programs offering vended reimbursable lunches. Two school…

  9. School Lunch Programme in Japan. NIER Occasional Paper 02/82.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Inst. for Educational Research, Tokyo (Japan).

    This report summarizes the history of the school lunch program from its inception as a relief measure in 1889 through formalization by the national School Lunch Law of 1954 and describes its present scope, organization, finances, objectives, and problems. Intended to improve the physical and mental development of students as well as Japanese…

  10. The Importance of Improving the Nutritional Quality of Packed Lunches in U.S. Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Misyak, Sarah; Farris, Alisha; Mann, Georgianna; Serrano, Elena

    2015-01-01

    Schools represent an ideal venue to influence dietary habits of large numbers of children. While the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) is mandated to meet clear nutrition standards for calories, whole grains, fruits, vegetables, milk, sodium, fat, and saturated fat, there are no nutritional requirements for packed lunches. This Current Issue…

  11. A Framework for Conducting a National Study of Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Novins, Douglas K.; Moore, Laurie A.; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A.; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E.

    2013-01-01

    Background Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. Objectives and Methods We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n = 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Results Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. Conclusion and Scientific Significance This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies. PMID:22931088

  12. A framework for conducting a national study of substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska native communities.

    PubMed

    Novins, Douglas K; Moore, Laurie A; Beals, Janette; Aarons, Gregory A; Rieckmann, Traci; Kaufman, Carol E

    2012-09-01

    Because of their broad geographic distribution, diverse ownership and operation, and funding instability, it is a challenge to develop a framework for studying substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities at a national level. This is further complicated by the historic reluctance of American Indian and Alaska Native communities to participate in research. We developed a framework for studying these substance abuse treatment programs (n ≈ 293) at a national level as part of a study of attitudes toward, and use of, evidence-based treatments among substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities with the goal of assuring participation of a broad array of programs and the communities that they serve. Because of the complexities of identifying specific substance abuse treatment programs, the sampling framework divides these programs into strata based on the American Indian and Alaska Native communities that they serve: (1) the 20 largest tribes (by population); (2) urban AI/AN clinics; (3) Alaska Native Health Corporations; (4) other Tribes; and (5) other regional programs unaffiliated with a specific AI/AN community. In addition, the recruitment framework was designed to be sensitive to likely concerns about participating in research. This systematic approach for studying substance abuse and other clinical programs serving AI/AN communities assures the participation of diverse AI/AN programs and communities and may be useful in designing similar national studies.

  13. Serving Students with Disabilities in State-Level Virtual K-12 Public School Programs. inForum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muller, Eve

    2009-01-01

    Because the virtual public school landscape is relatively new--and changing and expanding at such a rapid rate--very little is known about how these schools are currently serving students with disabilities. The purpose of this document is to describe how state-level virtual public school programs are serving students with disabilities and to…

  14. The Medicare Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program: Potential Unintended Consequences for Hospitals Serving Vulnerable Populations

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Qian; Koenig, Lane; Faerberg, Jennifer; Steinberg, Caroline Rossi; Vaz, Christopher; Wheatley, Mary P

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the impact of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) on hospitals serving vulnerable populations. Data Sources/Study Setting Medicare inpatient claims to calculate condition-specific readmission rates. Medicare cost reports and other sources to determine a hospital's share of duals, profit margin, and characteristics. Study Design Regression analyses and projections were used to estimate risk-adjusted readmission rates and financial penalties under the HRRP. Findings were compared across groups of hospitals, determined based on their share of duals, to assess differential impacts of the HRRP. Principal Findings Both patient dual-eligible status and a hospital's dual-eligible share of Medicare discharges have a positive impact on risk-adjusted hospital readmission rates. Under current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service methodology, which does not adjust for socioeconomic status, high-dual hospitals are more likely to have excess readmissions than low-dual hospitals. As a result, HRRP penalties will disproportionately fall on high-dual hospitals, which are more likely to have negative all-payer margins, raising concerns of unintended consequences of the program for vulnerable populations. Conclusions Policies to reduce hospital readmissions must balance the need to ensure continued access to quality care for vulnerable populations. PMID:24417309

  15. The Medicare Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program: potential unintended consequences for hospitals serving vulnerable populations.

    PubMed

    Gu, Qian; Koenig, Lane; Faerberg, Jennifer; Steinberg, Caroline Rossi; Vaz, Christopher; Wheatley, Mary P

    2014-06-01

    To explore the impact of the Hospital Readmissions Reduction Program (HRRP) on hospitals serving vulnerable populations. Medicare inpatient claims to calculate condition-specific readmission rates. Medicare cost reports and other sources to determine a hospital's share of duals, profit margin, and characteristics. Regression analyses and projections were used to estimate risk-adjusted readmission rates and financial penalties under the HRRP. Findings were compared across groups of hospitals, determined based on their share of duals, to assess differential impacts of the HRRP. Both patient dual-eligible status and a hospital's dual-eligible share of Medicare discharges have a positive impact on risk-adjusted hospital readmission rates. Under current Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Service methodology, which does not adjust for socioeconomic status, high-dual hospitals are more likely to have excess readmissions than low-dual hospitals. As a result, HRRP penalties will disproportionately fall on high-dual hospitals, which are more likely to have negative all-payer margins, raising concerns of unintended consequences of the program for vulnerable populations. Policies to reduce hospital readmissions must balance the need to ensure continued access to quality care for vulnerable populations. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. Developing Earth System Science Courses and Programs at Minority Serving Institutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, D. R.; Jackson, C.; Ruzek, M.

    2004-12-01

    In the current NASA/USRA ESSE21 Program, emphasis is placed on the development of Earth System Science courses and degree offerings in Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs). Of the 18 colleges/universities being supported by NASA through USRA, 10 colleges/universities are MSIs. While there is recognition of the need for Earth system science courses, minors and degree programs by NASA and other agencies, within MSIs, a central challenge is how to provide a vision of the future opportunities in ESS and STEM disciplines that attracts and motivates students to these studies. Students need career guidance, role models and mentoring to encourage entry into STEM in general, and Earth system science in particular. Then there is the question of how to bring interested faculty together in institutions to form a critical mass that would forego the breadth and depth of disciplinary interests to undertake the development of multi/cross and interdisciplinary courses, minors and degree programs in ESS. Within the ESSE21 Diversity Working Group, the question has been raised as to how will MSIs ever be mainstream participants in ESS without teaching and engaging in research in remote sensing, modeling of the Earth's climate system and other like endeavors. Two other related questions raised within the Working Group are what are the long-term objectives of MSI adoption of ESS and what course corrections are needed to make ESS viable at MSIs. Within these considerations there are unresolved questions concerning the need and availability of resources from NASA, other agencies and local institutions. Apart from these larger considerations, efforts are underway within the ESSE21 Program that provide for sharing of resources among participants, organization of and access to materials that already exist, online resources, course outlines and successful listings for online resources by topics for particular courses and subject areas. The Lesson Learned Working Group, as well as the program

  17. Consuming Identities: Law, School Lunches, and What it Means to be American.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, Melissa

    2014-01-01

    Food, eating, and the rituals surrounding food impact people as individuals, as groups, and as citizens. Through direct regulation, food aid, subsidies, and property rights, law shapes and even determines food choices in America. With it, law shapes, reflects, and may even--at times--dictate American identities. Perhaps nowhere is the law's impact on food and identity more immediately apparent than in the context of the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Federally subsidized school meals feed over fifty million students a day and serve over seven billion school meals annually. Whether it is pork's removal from snack lists being likened to "fatwa" or cafeterias segregating paying and non-paying students, the lessons of school meals go far beyond nutritional content and send resounding messages about civic values, inclusion, and exclusion. In recent years school meals have come under increasing scrutiny, but as legislative consideration of nutritional goals in the school lunch program has improved, discussion of political, social, and cultural goals has lagged. This Article is the first to examine the social and political dimensions of school meals, and concludes that current treatment of these values in food regulation undermines key values in American civil society. The school lunch program teaches students a simplified, uniform, and even discriminatory account of what it means to eat and be American. Students under this regime must choose to either be American and sit down at the table with the "normal" kids or retain your beliefs, your identity, and perhaps even your health and well-being. This is a choice no child should have to make--especially not on an empty stomach.

  18. The Effect of Nutrition Education on Third Graders' School Lunch Consumption in a School Offering Food Pyramid Choice Menus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1998

    Elementary school lunches planned and served under Oregon's Food Pyramid Choice Menus (FPCM) system are based on the Dietary Guidelines for Americans, and they comply with the current U.S. Department of Agriculture menu standards for school lunches. The study discussed in this report was conducted from February through April 1997; data were…

  19. Serving Those That Serve.

    PubMed

    Torrens Armstrong, Anna

    2017-03-01

    Since 1986, health promotion has had a place within the U.S. Department of Defense. Emphasizing the leading health indicators of Healthy People, the role of health promotion has continued to support the U.S. Armed Forces in perhaps one of the most challenging decades of wartime operations. Serving a sizable population with both typical and mission-related health issues, health promotion plays a critical role in maintaining and improving health. The purpose of this article is to highlight military health promotion by offering insight into the day-to-day life of a "boots on the ground" military health educator, reviewing the challenges and opportunities of working with a unique population. A summary of a variety of military specific initiatives is provided. Additionally, the article highlights the barriers and benefits to military health promotion. Last, the article concludes with a call to action to consider the role of all health educators in serving those that serve.

  20. Evaluation of the National School Lunch Program Application/Verification Pilot Projects Volume III: Impacts on Participation. Nutrition Assistance Program Report Series Report No. CN-04-AV5

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gleason, Philip; Hulsey, Lara; Burghardt, John

    2004-01-01

    This report, the third in its series, examined the implementation of the pilots, assessed their costs, and estimated their impacts on a set of outcomes designed to measure the success of the school meal programs in providing free or reduced-price meals to their target population without providing benefits to ineligible students. This report…

  1. Using GIS to enhance programs serving emancipated youth leaving foster care.

    PubMed

    Batsche, Catherine J; Reader, Steven

    2012-02-01

    This article describes a GIS prototype designed to assist with the identification and evaluation of housing that is affordable, safe, and effective in supporting the educational goals and parental status of youth transitioning from foster care following emancipation. Spatial analysis was used to identify rental properties based on three inclusion criteria (affordability, proximity to public transportation, and proximity to grocery stores), three exclusion criteria (areas of high crime, prostitution, and sexual predator residence), and three suitability criteria (proximity to health care, mental health care, and youth serving organizations). The results were applied to four different scenarios to test the utility of the model. Of the 145 affordable rental properties, 27 met the criteria for safe and effective housing. Of these, 19 were located near bus routes with direct service to post-secondary education or vocational training programs. Only 6 were considered appropriate to meet the needs of youth who had children of their own. These outcomes highlight the complexities faced by youth when they attempt to find affordable and suitable housing following emancipation. The LEASE prototype demonstrates that spatial analysis can be a useful tool to assist with planning services for youth making the transition to independent living. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. School lunch waste among middle school students: nutrients consumed and costs.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S Bryn; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2013-02-01

    The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policymakers, students, and their families. Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a 2-year pilot study (2007-2009) in which a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percentage of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in these Boston middle schools. For most meal components, substantially less than 85% was consumed. There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards, and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students might benefit if additional focus were given to the quality and palatability of school meals. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. School Lunch Waste among Middle School Students: Implications for Nutrients Consumed and Food Waste Costs

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Juliana F.W.; Richardson, Scott; Austin, S. Bryn; Economos, Christina D.; Rimm, Eric B.

    2013-01-01

    Background The National School Lunch Program has been guided by modest nutrient standards, and the palatability of meals, which drives consumption, receives inadequate attention. School food waste can have important nutritional and cost implications for policy makers, students, and their families. Purpose Nutrient losses and economic costs associated with school meal waste were examined. The study also assessed if school foods served were valid proxies for foods consumed by students. Methods Plate waste measurements were collected from middle school students in Boston attending two Chef Initiative schools (n=1609) and two control schools (n=1440) during a two-year pilot study (2007-2009) where a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to make healthier school meals. The costs associated with food waste were calculated and the percent of foods consumed was compared with a gold standard of 85% consumption. Analyses were conducted in 2010-2011. Results Overall, students consumed less than the required/recommended levels of nutrients. An estimated $432,349 of food (26.1% of the total food budget) was discarded by middle school students annually at lunch in Boston middle schools. For most meal components, significantly less than 85% was consumed. Conclusions There is substantial food waste among middle school students in Boston. Overall, students' nutrient consumption levels were below school meal standards and foods served were not valid proxies for foods consumed. The costs associated with discarded foods are high; if translated nationally for school lunches, roughly $1,238,846,400 annually is wasted. Students would benefit if additional focus was given to the quality and palatability of school meals. PMID:23332326

  4. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Evaluation Requirements § 2516.840 By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual...

  5. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Evaluation Requirements § 2516.840 By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual...

  6. 45 CFR 2516.840 - By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual Learn and Serve America programs?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... individual Learn and Serve America programs? 2516.840 Section 2516.840 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) CORPORATION FOR NATIONAL AND COMMUNITY SERVICE SCHOOL-BASED SERVICE-LEARNING PROGRAMS Evaluation Requirements § 2516.840 By what standards will the Corporation evaluate individual...

  7. The New School Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how food service providers and district administrators find creative ways to provide better meals as part of a healthier school food movement. Throughout the nation, food service providers have cut down on the amount of processed foods served to students by replacing these items with more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole…

  8. The New School Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, Brian D.

    2009-01-01

    This article describes how food service providers and district administrators find creative ways to provide better meals as part of a healthier school food movement. Throughout the nation, food service providers have cut down on the amount of processed foods served to students by replacing these items with more fresh fruits and vegetables, whole…

  9. "Lunch Is Gross": Gaining Access to Powerful Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatto, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This ethnographic study documents how a space for critical literacy practices emerged as one teacher attempted to make literacy learning authentic. The school lunch program in an urban elementary district provided the theme for an authentic and focused literacy unit. Throughout this focus unit, the students not only met state standards but also…

  10. School Lunch and Breakfast Cost Study. Summary of Findings.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glantz, Frederic B.; And Others

    This document provides findings of a study that examined in detail the cost of producing reimbursable meals in the National School Lunch and Breakfast Programs (NSL and SBP) during school year 1992-93. The study examined the costs charged to SFAs (reported costs) and those costs incurred by the school district in support of SFA operations, but not…

  11. School Lunch and Breakfast Cost Study. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glantz, Frederic B.; And Others

    This document presents findings of a study that examined in detail the cost of producing reimbursable meals in the National School Lunch and School Breakfast Programs (NSL and SBP) during school year 1992-93. The study examined the costs charged to SFAs (reported costs) and those costs incurred by the school district in support of SFA operations,…

  12. Choosing To Eat School Lunch: Child, Parent, or Joint Decision?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyer, Mary Kay; Lambert, Laurel; Blackwell, Ann

    2002-01-01

    A parent telephone survey (n=300) was conducted to identify the primary customer of elementary school food programs. Results show that the decision to eat school lunch was most frequently made jointly by parent and child and the factor most frequently influencing the decision was the nutritional value of the meal. (Contains 15 references.) (JOW)

  13. "Lunch Is Gross": Gaining Access to Powerful Literacies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gatto, Lynn

    2013-01-01

    This ethnographic study documents how a space for critical literacy practices emerged as one teacher attempted to make literacy learning authentic. The school lunch program in an urban elementary district provided the theme for an authentic and focused literacy unit. Throughout this focus unit, the students not only met state standards but also…

  14. Chefs move to schools. A pilot examination of how chef-created dishes can increase school lunch participation and fruit and vegetable intake.

    PubMed

    Just, David R; Wansink, Brian; Hanks, Andrew S

    2014-12-01

    To demonstrate the feasibility of introducing a main dish designed by a professional chef in the National School Lunch Program and to document the impact on child participation, a chef was recruited to design pizza to be served in an upstate New York school district. The pizza was designed to meet both the cost and ingredient requirements of the NSLP. High school students were significantly more likely to select the pizza prepared by the chef. While the chef had no significant impact on main dish consumption given selection, more students took a vegetable and vegetable consumption increased by 16.5%. This pilot study demonstrates the plausibility of using chefs to boost participation in the school lunch program, and potentially increase nutrition through side selection, among high school students. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Productivity in nutrition programs for the elderly that utilize an assembly-serve production system.

    PubMed

    Lieux, E M; Manning, C K

    1991-02-01

    Observations of labor activities of workers performing foodservice functions were made in eight senior centers at 5-minute intervals for 3 consecutive days. On-site preparation was limited to rethermalization of frozen entrees and portioning of bulk-delivered items. Time spent was assigned or allocated to either congregate or home-delivered meal service on the basis of number of meals served. Time in each component of direct work, indirect work, and delay was divided by meals served to provide the productivity ratio, labor minutes per meal. Comparisons were also made on the basis of number of meals served. An average of 12.78 minutes per meal was used to serve congregate meals and 21.05 minutes per meal for home-delivered meals. Two of the eight centers differed significantly in time used for direct work and total work to serve congregate-meal participants. There was no difference between centers in time used to serve homebound clients. The number of meals served did not influence productivity for either meal service site. These findings establish baseline data for the amount of time needed in one production system to serve meals to center participants and homebound clients. Managers of senior centers can use information about this food production and delivery system to make decisions about the most cost-effective method to provide meals.

  16. Creation of the sole regional laser lead extraction program serving Atlantic Canada: initial experience

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Kenneth J.; O’Keefe, Scott; Légaré, Jean-Francois

    2016-01-01

    Background An increasing need for laser lead extraction has grown in parallel with the increase of implantation of pacing and defibrillating devices. We reviewed the initial experience of a regional laser-assisted lead extraction program serving Atlantic Canada. Methods We retrospectively reviewed the cases of all consecutive patients who underwent laser lead extraction at the Maritime Heart Centre in Halifax, NS, between 2006 and 2015. We conducted univariate and Kaplan–Meier survivorship analyses. Results During the 9-year study period, 108 consecutive patients underwent laser lead extractions (218 leads extracted). The most common indication for extraction was infection (84.3%). Most patients were older than 60 years (73.1%) and had leads chronically implanted; the explanted leads were an average of 7.5 ± 6.8 years old. Procedural and clinical success (resolution of preoperative symptoms) rates and mortality were 96.8%, 97.2%, and 0.9%, respectively. Sternotomy procedures were performed in 3 instances: once for vascular repair due to perforation and twice to ensure that all infected lead material was removed. No minor complications required surgical intervention. Survival after discharge was 98.4% at 30 days and 94% at 12 months. Conclusion Atlantic Canada’s sole surgical extraction centre achieved high extraction success with a low complication rate. Lead extraction in an operative setting provides for immediate surgical intervention and is essential for the survival of patients with complicated cases. Surgeons must weigh the risks versus benefits in patients older than 60 years who have chronically implanted leads (> 1 yr) and infection. PMID:26999473

  17. A Prototype Two-tier Mentoring Program for Undergraduate Summer Interns from Minority-Serving Institutions at the University of Alaska Fairbanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gens, R.; Prakash, A.; Ozbay, G.; Sriharan, S.; Balazs, M. S.; Chittambakkam, A.; Starkenburg, D. P.; Waigl, C.; Cook, S.; Ferguson, A.; Foster, K.; Jones, E.; Kluge, A.; Stilson, K.

    2013-12-01

    The University of Alaska Fairbanks (UAF) is partnering with Delaware State University, Virginia State University, Elizabeth City State University, Bethune-Cookman University, and Morgan State University on a U.S. Department of Agriculture - National Institute for Food and Agriculture funded grant for ';Enhancing Geographic Information System Education and Delivery through Collaboration: Curricula Design, Faculty, Staff, and Student Training and Development, and Extension Services'. As a part of this grant, in summer 2013, UAF hosted a week long workshop followed by an intense two week undergraduate internship program. Six undergraduate students from partnering Universities worked with UAF graduate students as their direct mentors. This cohort of undergraduate mentees and graduate student mentors were in-turn counseled by the two UAF principal investigators who served as ';super-mentors'. The role of each person in the two-tier mentoring system was well defined. The super-mentors ensured that there was consistency in the way the internship was setup and resources were allocated. They also ensured that there were no technical glitches in the research projects and that there was healthy communication and interaction among participants. Mentors worked with the mentees ahead of time in outlining a project that aligned with the mentees research interest, provided basic reading material to the interns to get oriented, prepared the datasets required to start the project, and guided the undergraduates throughout the internship. Undergraduates gained hands-on experience in geospatial data collection and application of tools in their projects related to mapping geomorphology, landcover, geothermal sites, fires, and meteorological conditions. Further, they shared their research results and experiences with a broad university-wide audience at the end of the internship period. All participants met at lunch-time for a daily science talk from external speakers. The program offered

  18. Directory of Public Schools Served by the Public Schools Assistance Programs, Bureau of Indian Affairs for Fiscal Year 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bureau of Indian Affairs (Dept. of Interior), Albuquerque, NM.

    Presenting summary and detailed enrollment data, this directory of public schools served by the public assistance program of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) indicates that as of fiscal year 1976, the total number of school districts served by the gIA was 612 with a total enrollment of 1,047,638 of which 120,497 or 12% were American Indians.…

  19. Lunch and Recess: The "Eye of the Storm"--Using Targeted Interventions for Students with Behavioral Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cuccaro, Carlo; Geitner, Geri

    2007-01-01

    A group of fifth-grade students who had persistent problems at lunch and recess were identified and provided with direct instruction in pro-social skills. These skills were taught by the authors in a two-week program that they called the "Alternative to Lunch Program for Students" (ALPS). This action research study measured the impact of…

  20. Effectiveness of the Lunch is in the Bag program on communication between the parent, child and child-care provider around fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods: A group-randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shreela V; Rashid, Tasnuva; Ranjit, Nalini; Byrd-Williams, Courtney; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Roberts-Gray, Cynthia; Briley, Margaret; Sweitzer, Sara; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of the parent- and early care education (ECE) center-based Lunch is in the Bag program on communication between parent, child, and their ECE center providers around fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods (FVWG). A total of n=30 ECE center; 577 parent-child dyads participated in this group-randomized controlled trial conducted from 2011 to 2013 in Texas (n=15 ECE center, 327 dyads intervention group; n=15 ECE center, 250 dyads comparison group). Parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication was measured using a parent-reported survey administered at baseline and end of the five-week intervention period. Multilevel linear regression analysis was used to compare the pre-to-post intervention changes in the parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication scales. Significance was set at p<0.05. At baseline, parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication scores were low. There was a significant increase post-intervention in the parent-ECE center provider communication around vegetables (Adjusted β=0.78, 95%CI: 0.13, 1.43, p=0.002), and around fruit (Adjusted β=0.62, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.20, p=0.04) among the parents in the intervention group as compared to those in the comparison group. There were no significant intervention effects on parent-child communication. Lunch is in the Bag had significant positive effects on improving communication between the parents and ECE center providers around FVWG. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effectiveness of the Lunch is in the Bag program on communication between the parent, child and child-care provider around fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods: a group-randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    Rashid, Tasnuva; Ranjit, Nalini; Byrd-Williams, Courtney; Chuang, Ru-Jye; Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Briley, Margaret; Sweitzer, Sara; Hoelscher, Deanna M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of the parent- and early care education (ECE) center-based Lunch is in the Bag program on communication between parent, child, and their ECE center providers around fruits, vegetables and whole grain foods (FVWG). Method A total of n=30 ECE center; 577 parent-child dyads participated in this group-randomized controlled trial conducted from 2011–2013 in Texas (n=15 ECE center, 327 dyads intervention group; n=15 ECE center, 250 dyads comparison group). Parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication was measured using a parent-reported survey administered at baseline and end of the five-week intervention period. Multilevel linear regression analysis was used to compare the pre-to-post intervention changes in the parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication scales. Significance was set at p<0.05. Results At baseline, parent-child and parent-ECE center provider communication scores were low. There was a significant increase post-intervention in the parent-ECE center provider communication around vegetables (Adjusted β = 0.78, 95%CI: 0.13, 1.43, p=0.002), and around fruit (Adjusted β = 0.62, 95%CI: 0.04, 0.20, p=0.04) among the parents in the intervention group as compared to those in the comparison group. There were no significant intervention effects on parent-child communication. Conclusion Lunch is in the Bag had significant positive effects on improving communication between the parents and ECE center providers around FVWG. PMID:26190371

  2. Intervention leads to improvements in the nutrient profile of snacks served in afterschool programs: a group randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Beets, Michael W; Turner-McGrievy, Brie; Weaver, R Glenn; Huberty, Jennifer; Moore, Justin B; Ward, Dianne S; Freedman, Darcy A

    2016-09-01

    Widely adopted nutrition policies for afterschool programs (ASPs) focus on serving a fruit/vegetable daily and eliminating sugar-sweetened foods/beverages. The impact of these policies on the nutrient profile of snacks served is unclear. Evaluate changes in macro/micronutrient content of snacks served in ASPs. A 1-year group randomized controlled trial was conducted in 20 ASPs serving over 1700 elementary-age children. Intervention ASPs received a multistep adaptive framework intervention. Direct observation of snack served was collected and nutrient information determined using the USDA Nutrient Database, standardized to nutrients/100 kcal. By post-assessment, intervention ASPs reduced total kcal/snack served by 66 kcal (95CI -114 to -19 kcal) compared to control ASPs. Total fiber (+1.7 g/100 kcal), protein (+1.4 g/100 kcal), polyunsaturated fat (+1.2 g/100 kcal), phosphorous (+49.0 mg/100 kcal), potassium (+201.8 mg/100 kcal), and vitamin K (+21.5 μg/100 kcal) increased in intervention ASPs, while added sugars decreased (-5.0 g/100 kcal). Nutrition policies can lead to modest daily caloric reductions and improve select macro/micronutrients in snacks served. Long-term, these nutritional changes may contribute to healthy dietary habits.

  3. Let's Do Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassuto, Leonard

    2013-01-01

    In master's programs, and especially at the doctoral level, graduate students depend on their advisers more than on anyone else in their careers. Students do more work for their adviser's eyes than for anyone else's, and the adviser's approval is the key to the door that leads to the next place, whether full-time employment or more school. For…

  4. The Lunch Bunch.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Ronald L.

    1993-01-01

    Realizing that custodians needed help with cafeteria cleanup and lunchtime discipline, a Michigan elementary school developed a Custodial Assistant Program enlisting the energies of 12 fifth and sixth graders who needed help in improving self-concept and behavior. In exchange for cleaning the cafeteria and playground, these students receive many…

  5. The Ticket to Work Program: Employment Networks' Views on Serving Beneficiaries Who are Blind or Visually Impaired

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Capella-McDonnall, Michele E.

    2005-01-01

    This article reports on a survey of the opinions of employment networks (ENs) about serving social security beneficiaries who are blind or visually impaired under the Ticket to Work program. Although most of the 267 ENs who participated in the survey expressed concerns about working with those who are blind or visually impaired, they did not seem…

  6. Pen 2 Paper 2 Power: Lessons from an Arts-Based Literacy Program Serving Somali Immigrant Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lozenski, Brian; Smith, Chelda

    2012-01-01

    This study illustrates the ways in which the practices of two instructors in an arts-based, after-school literacy program serving Somali youth provide insights for teaching urban immigrant students. It draws on a qualitative self-study that examines the experiences and practices of the researchers in the development and implementation of a program…

  7. Best Practices for Serving Students with Special Food and/or Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Alexandra; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research project was to identify goals and establish best practices for school nutrition (SN) programs that serve students with special food and/or nutrition needs based on the four practice categories identified in previous National Food Service Management Institute, Applied Research Division (NFSMI, ARD)…

  8. Strategies for Community Rehabilitation Programs to Serve Consumers Who Are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened or Deafblind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Gail; Harmon, Marguerite; Johnson, Lynnette; Knopf, Elise; Latz, Rubin; Parnes, Alan; Currie-Richardson, Diane; Sligar, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This book provides guidance for administrators and service delivery staff of Community Rehabilitation Programs to serve consumers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened or deafblind. This publication follows an outline based on standards from CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities), the national accrediting agency for…

  9. Best Practices for Serving Students with Special Food and/or Nutrition Needs in School Nutrition Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castillo, Alexandra; Carr, Deborah; Nettles, Mary Frances

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this research project was to identify goals and establish best practices for school nutrition (SN) programs that serve students with special food and/or nutrition needs based on the four practice categories identified in previous National Food Service Management Institute, Applied Research Division (NFSMI, ARD)…

  10. Research and Demonstration for a Comprehensive Package of Computer Programs to Serve Community College Learning Resource Centers. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weiss, Jack A.

    One of 15 members of the Northern Illinois Learning Resources Cooperative (NILRC), Elgin Community College served as host institution for a project to design, develop, test, and install computer programs in a community college resource center environment. The service functions identified for systems development included circulation, serial…

  11. INTERDISCIPLINARY APPROACH TO PREPARING HOME ECONOMICS LEADERS FOR EMERGING PROGRAMS SERVING DISADVANTAGED YOUTH AND ADULTS. FINAL REPORT, APPENDIX C.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    GARRETT, PAULINE GILLETTE

    SIXTY-FIVE SELECTIONS, IN NOTE OR OUTLINE FORM, FROM PRESENTATIONS BY CONSULTANTS AIDING IN PREPARING LEADERS FOR EMERGING PROGRAMS SERVING THE DISADVANTAGED ARE INCLUDED IN THIS APPENDIX. THE SUBJECT MATTER RANGES FROM SPECIFIC TECHNIQUES FOR TEACHING SUCH SKILLS AS READING TO GENERAL INFORMATION SUCH AS BASIC UNDERSTANDINGS NECESSARY FOR…

  12. Strategies for Community Rehabilitation Programs to Serve Consumers Who Are Deaf, Hard of Hearing, Late Deafened or Deafblind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Faulkner, Gail; Harmon, Marguerite; Johnson, Lynnette; Knopf, Elise; Latz, Rubin; Parnes, Alan; Currie-Richardson, Diane; Sligar, Steven

    2004-01-01

    This book provides guidance for administrators and service delivery staff of Community Rehabilitation Programs to serve consumers who are deaf, hard of hearing, late deafened or deafblind. This publication follows an outline based on standards from CARF (Commission on Accreditation of Rehabilitation Facilities), the national accrediting agency for…

  13. 42 CFR 62.75 - Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service? 62.75 Section 62.75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL...

  14. 42 CFR 62.75 - Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service? 62.75 Section 62.75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL...

  15. 42 CFR 62.75 - Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service? 62.75 Section 62.75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL...

  16. 42 CFR 62.75 - Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service? 62.75 Section 62.75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL...

  17. 42 CFR 62.75 - Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Will individuals serving under the Special Repayment Program receive credit for partial service? 62.75 Section 62.75 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES FELLOWSHIPS, INTERNSHIPS, TRAINING NATIONAL...

  18. Learning from the Best: A Profile of America's Finest Vocational Programs Serving People with Disabilities, 1987.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    J.M. Foundation, New York, NY.

    The monograph describes 11 exemplary programs selected in 1987 by the J. M. (Jeremiah Milbank) Foundation from 154 programs providing vocational services to persons with disabilities. Programs were selected in four categories: community-based work adjustment, consortium-based transition, supported work in small communities, and work services for…

  19. Implementing Successful and Culturally Sensitive Peer Helping Programs in Schools Serving Native American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggert, Jon E.; Mellott, Ramona N.; Selvey, Cherri A.; Martin, William E., Jr.; Stolle, Darrell; Bailey, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Outlines steps used in implementing Project ASSIST [Aiding School Systems in Establishing SAP (Student Assistance Programs) Training], a culturally sensitive, school-based, peer helping program for Native-American youth that addressed substance abuse. Data from a needs assessment and program evaluation indicated that more successful schools had…

  20. Implementing Successful and Culturally Sensitive Peer Helping Programs in Schools Serving Native American Youth.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggert, Jon E.; Mellott, Ramona N.; Selvey, Cherri A.; Martin, William E., Jr.; Stolle, Darrell; Bailey, Stephen

    1999-01-01

    Outlines steps used in implementing Project ASSIST [Aiding School Systems in Establishing SAP (Student Assistance Programs) Training], a culturally sensitive, school-based, peer helping program for Native-American youth that addressed substance abuse. Data from a needs assessment and program evaluation indicated that more successful schools had…

  1. Learn & Serve Higher Education Programs in Minnesota: The Impact and Sustainability of Service-Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gormley, Kevin J.

    An evaluation was conducted of 12 higher education service-learning programs at 9 colleges and universities and 1 nonprofit agency in Minnesota. Research was based on interviews with individuals involved in local programs (program directors, faculty, participants, community agency personnel, and service recipients). Analysis of interview responses…

  2. Youth Employment Programs: A Survey of National Voluntary Youth Serving Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Assembly of National Voluntary Health and Social Welfare Organizations, New York, NY.

    This report presents a survey of local youth-serving agencies affiliated with the National Collaboration for Youth to determine to what degree and in what way the agencies are involved in providing employment and training activities for youth. The eleven agencies focused on are American Red Cross Youth Services; Boys' Clubs of America; Boy Scouts…

  3. Promising programs to serve low-income families in poverty neighborhoods.

    PubMed

    Austin, Michael J; Lemon, Kathy

    2005-01-01

    This review of promising programs to address the challenges facing low-income families living in distressed neighborhoods reveals three key themes: (1) Earnings and asset development programs are used to increase the economic self-sufficiency of low-income families and include: place-based employment programs, a focus on good jobs, the use of work incentives, programs that promote banking, car and home ownership, and the use of the Earned Income Tax Credit; (2) Family strengthening programs are used to improve health and educational outcomes, as well as link families to needed support and benefit services and include: nurse home visitation, parenting education, early childhood educational programs, and facilitating the receipt of support services; and (3) Neighborhood strengthening programs are used to improve features of the neighborhood, collaboration among service providers, and resident involvement in neighborhood affairs and include: the use of community development corporations, comprehensive community initiatives and community organizing strategies.

  4. Public Daycare Noncompliance with Prescribed Lunch Menus and Dietary Guidelines.

    PubMed

    Alves, Marcia Aurelina Oliveira; Morais, Tania Beninga

    2015-01-01

    In Brazil, menus for public child daycare centers (PDC) must be planned by a nutritionist in order to meet the infants' nutritional needs and to conform to dietary recommendations. Failure to follow them may jeopardize the infants' health and growth. Therefore, the objectives of this study were to investigate the compliance of actually served lunch menus with the prescribed menus, according to age (7- to 12-month-olds and 13- to 24-month-olds) and whether prescribed and served menus followed the recommended dietary guidelines. Five PDCs were randomly selected for observation, out of 14 existing in the city of Concordia, Brazil. Data collection was carried out during 6 consecutive weeks in September (fall/winter menus) and October (spring/summer menus) in order to cover the menus representative of the entire year. Of 60 lunches recorded, only 20% of them matched the prescribed ones entirely; none of the lunches served to infants aged 7-12 months did so. Fourteen food items were prescribed 157 times throughout the year. Omission (number of times on menu but not served) was the most frequent form of noncompliance in the younger group: 62.4% (98/157). Foods more frequently omitted by the cooks were beef, pork, chicken, and lentils. Compliance with dietary guidelines was higher in the prescribed menus and in those actually served to the 13- to 24-month-old age group. Infants in the 7- to 12-month-old group may be more vulnerable to nutritional inadequacies because menus served to them were less compliant with the prescribed menus. Dietetics professionals should improve the variety of foods on the menus as well as supervise their execution.

  5. Case Studies of Programs Serving Adults. OPTIONS. Expanding Educational Services for Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Warmbrod, Catharine P.; Liming, Roxi A.

    This book is part of OPTIONS, a packaged set of materials developed to provide postsecondary administrators, program planners, curriculum developers, counselors, and instructors with up-to-date, reliable information. This publication describes 61 exemplary practices and programs that have successfully improved or expanded educational services for…

  6. The ABE/AMH Manual. An Instructional Guide for ABE Programs Serving Mentally Handicapped Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Scott C.; Edgar, S. Keith

    This handbook provides adult basic education teachers with instructional materials for working with adult mentally handicapped students. Section 1 examines planning programs for adult mentally retarded students (getting started, specific considerations, various kinds of program sites) and implementing instruction (staff selection and training).…

  7. Outcomes for a Transitional Living Program Serving LGBTQ Youth in New York City

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nolan, Theresa C.

    2006-01-01

    Providing stable housing for runaway and homeless youth is a major function of a transitional living program. This article introduces the focus of one program working with LGBTQ youth in New York City and discusses some issues to consider when working with this population. The article also presents data associated with young people's lives after…

  8. U.S. Office of Education Programs Serving Hispanic Americans, Fiscal Year 1977.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavez, Gilbert; Cardona, Carmen C.

    Compiled annually, the report gives the geographic locations and grant size of programs funded by the U.S. Office of Education which have impact on Hispanic Americans. These programs are provided under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act Titles I and II, Civil Rights Act of 1964 Title IV, Bureau of School Systems, Bureau of Occupational and…

  9. The ABE/AMH Manual. An Instructional Guide for ABE Programs Serving Mentally Handicapped Adults.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehman, Scott C.; Edgar, S. Keith

    This handbook provides adult basic education teachers with instructional materials for working with adult mentally handicapped students. Section 1 examines planning programs for adult mentally retarded students (getting started, specific considerations, various kinds of program sites) and implementing instruction (staff selection and training).…

  10. Functional Foods Programs Serve as a Vehicle to Provide Nutrition Education to Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirignano, Sherri M.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in consumer interest in functional foods provides an opportunity for FCS educators to use this topic in Extension programming to promote current nutrition recommendations. The Functional Foods for Life Educational Programs (FFL) are a curriculum of six evidence-based mini-seminars that highlight specific functional foods that have the…

  11. Identifying and Serving the Young Gifted: A Program for Reaching Classroom Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burke, Lorena

    1989-01-01

    A program was developed to increase teachers' and caregivers' understanding of the characteristics of young gifted children, and to provide an overview of brain development and function. The program used a variety of techniques, including yoga, guided visualization, creativity and flexible thinking skills, story writing, and kinesiology, to…

  12. Serving the Needs of At-Risk Refugee Youth: A Program Evaluation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBrien, J. Lynn

    2006-01-01

    Refugee students, although frequently subsumed under the "immigrant" heading, often suffer from effects of significant trauma that can make them more vulnerable than children of voluntary immigrant families. This study evaluated a program created specifically for refugee youth at-risk for academic failure and "social death." The program goals…

  13. Serving Latino Farmworker Students in Michigan Summer Migrant Programs: Directors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocke, Karen; Westine, Carl; Applegate, Brooks; VanDonkelaar, Ilse Schweitzer

    2016-01-01

    This survey and interview-based study examined the perspectives of 30 of the 38 migrant directors in Michigan, covering 26 summer migrant programs. Among the findings of this study were an unexpected inverse relationship between the size of programs and the frequency and number of external services and referrals they are able to provide for…

  14. A National Evaluation of Residential Camp Programs Serving Persons with Disabilities. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, Steve A.; Arick, Joel; Fullerton, Ann

    A study conducted a nationwide evaluation of 15 residential camp programs designed for children, youth, and young adults with mild to severe disabilities. The study involved 2,184 campers (ages 7-19) with disabilities and was undertaken to further validate evaluation instrumentation, evaluate residential camp programs for children with…

  15. Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies: A Compendium of Program Ideas for Serving Low-Income Women.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies Coalition, Washington, DC.

    The Healthy Mothers, Healthy Babies survey conducted in spring 1985 drew responses from over 1,500 programs active in maternal and child health efforts directed toward low-income women and their families. The executive summary of this report identifies the major goals, common strategies, and needs of program respondents. Chapter 1 summarizes a…

  16. Earn, Learn...Serve? Federal Work-Study Program Confronts Midlife Crises as It Nears 40.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marzick, Abbey

    2003-01-01

    Suggests that although research indicates that integrating work experience with schools is a key workforce development strategy, the Federal Work-Study (FWS) program, which provides campuses with matching funds to support part-time jobs for financially needy students, is being threatened. Describes the FWS program, noting that a growing body of…

  17. Functional Foods Programs Serve as a Vehicle to Provide Nutrition Education to Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirignano, Sherri M.

    2011-01-01

    An increase in consumer interest in functional foods provides an opportunity for FCS educators to use this topic in Extension programming to promote current nutrition recommendations. The Functional Foods for Life Educational Programs (FFL) are a curriculum of six evidence-based mini-seminars that highlight specific functional foods that have the…

  18. Critical Features of Program Improvement: Lessons from Five Minority Serving Universities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lopez-Reyna, Norma A.; Snowden, Peggy A.; Stuart, Nicole M.; Baumgartner, Dana; Maiorano, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    Nationwide, personnel preparation programs are responding to the changing population demographics and its impact on Pre K-12 classrooms. Needs surveys conducted by the Monarch Center over the past ten years have consistently yielded a need for support in redesigning program course and fieldwork components to better prepare their teachers and other…

  19. Serving Latino Farmworker Students in Michigan Summer Migrant Programs: Directors' Perspectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vocke, Karen; Westine, Carl; Applegate, Brooks; VanDonkelaar, Ilse Schweitzer

    2016-01-01

    This survey and interview-based study examined the perspectives of 30 of the 38 migrant directors in Michigan, covering 26 summer migrant programs. Among the findings of this study were an unexpected inverse relationship between the size of programs and the frequency and number of external services and referrals they are able to provide for…

  20. Beverage Selections and Impact on Healthy Eating Index Scores in Elementary Children's Lunches from School and from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Ogan, Dana; Watkins, Tracee; Barbee, Mary; Rushing, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purposes of this study were to: 1) analyze beverage selections of elementary students consuming National School Lunch Program meals (NSLP) and lunches brought from home (LBFH), 2) compare overall meal quality (MQ) of NSLP and LBFH by food components using Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), and 3) investigate the impact…

  1. Beverage Selections and Impact on Healthy Eating Index Scores in Elementary Children's Lunches from School and from Home

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Ogan, Dana; Watkins, Tracee; Barbee, Mary; Rushing, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purposes of this study were to: 1) analyze beverage selections of elementary students consuming National School Lunch Program meals (NSLP) and lunches brought from home (LBFH), 2) compare overall meal quality (MQ) of NSLP and LBFH by food components using Healthy Eating Index 2010 (HEI-2010), and 3) investigate the impact…

  2. Reaching Non-Traditional and Under-Served Communities through Global Astronomy Month Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simmons, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Global Astronomy Month (GAM), organized each year by Astronomers Without Borders (AWB), has become the world's largest annual celebration of astronomy. Launched as a follow-up to the unprecedented success of the 100 Hours of Astronomy Cornerstone Project of IYA2009, GAM quickly attracted not only traditional partners in astronomy and space science outreach, but also unusual partners from very different fields. GAM's third annual edition, GAM2012, included worldwide programs for the sight-impaired, astronomy in the arts, and other non-traditional programs. The special planetarium program, OPTICKS, combined elements such as Moonbounce (sending images to the Moon and back) and artistic elements in a unique presentation of the heavens. Programs were developed to present the heavens to the sight-impaired as well. The Cosmic Concert, in which a new musical piece is composed each year, combined with background images of celestial objects, and presented during GAM, has become an annual event. Several astronomy themed art video projects were presented online. AWB's Astropoetry Blog held a very successful contest during GAM2012 that attracted more than 70 entries from 17 countries. Students were engaged by participation in special GAM campaigns of the International Asteroid Search Campaign. AWB and GAM have both developed into platforms where innovative programs can develop, and interdisciplinary collaborations can flourish. As AWB's largest program, GAM brings the audience and resources that provide a boost for these new types of programs. Examples, lessons learned, new projects, and plans for the future of AWB and GAM will be presented.

  3. Accelerated RN-to-BSN Service-Learning Program Serves the Vulnerable.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Margaret

    The definition, implementation, and benefits support the value of service-learning for nursing education. However, accelerated RN-to-BSN programs may have difficulty requiring service-learning experiences. This article offers a biblical rationale for service with vulnerable populations and an example of how service-learning is implemented into the curriculum of an accelerated, nontraditional, online/onsite RN-BSN completion program at a Christian university.

  4. Correlates of Motivational Interviewing Use Among Substance Use Treatment Programs Serving American Indians/Alaska Natives.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Daniel; Moore, Laurie A; Rieckmann, Traci; Croy, Calvin D; Venner, Kamilla; Moghaddam, Jacquelene; Gueco, Rebekah; Novins, Douglas K

    2017-02-24

    Motivational interviewing (MI) offers a treatment modality that can help meet the treatment needs of American Indians/Alaska Natives (AI/ANs) with substance use disorders. This report presents results from a national survey of 192 AI/AN substance abuse treatment programs with regard to their use of MI and factors related to its implementation, including program characteristics, workforce issues, clinician perceptions of MI, and how clinicians learned about MI. Sixty-six percent of programs reported having implemented the use of MI in their programs. In the final logistic regression model, the odds of implementing MI were significantly higher when programs were tribally owned (OR = 2.946; CI95 1.014, 8.564), where more than 50% of staff were Certified Alcohol and Drug Counselors (CADCs) (OR = 5.469; CI95 1.330, 22.487), and in programs in which the survey respondent perceived that MI fit well with their staff's expertise and training (OR = 3.321; CI95 1.287, 8.569).

  5. Power lunch: Teaming to train

    SciTech Connect

    Sartoris, B.E. ); Snow, E.A.; Whitehead, J.K. )

    1991-05-01

    In 1990, the Hanford Site, a US Department of Energy project, changed missions from defense production to environmental restoration. An engineering group at Westinghouse Hanford Company, prime contractor at the Hanford Site, hired a trainer to help publish documents and develop group-specific courses. Boeing Computer Services Richland, subcontractor providing publications services, hired editor trainers. Kaiser Engineers Hanford, another subcontractor, provides site-wide Quality training. Four trainers, friends, met weekly for lunch: These meetings evolved into training exchanges. This presentation illustrates ways that inter- or intra-company teaming can work to improve technical communication. Additional benefits are significant cost and time savings to all companies involved.

  6. Outcomes for a transitional living program serving LGBTQ youth in New York City.

    PubMed

    Nolan, Theresa C

    2006-01-01

    Providing stable housing for runaway and homeless youth is a major function of a transitional living program. This article introduces the focus of one program working with LGBTQ youth in New York City and discusses some issues to consider when working with this population. The article also presents data associated with young people's lives after discharge. In any discussion of outcomes, both reason for discharge and length of stay play important roles in whether or not an exit is safe. Regardless of these two elements, the places youth move to when leaving programs are crucial to their safety and well-being. The exit can be safe even when a young person is discharged early from a program. This article presents types of exits, as well as status of employment and school enrollment at exit. Some youth and staff-identified lessons gained in the program also are discussed in detail. Types of aftercare services sought by discharged youth are specified. This article also describes any differences in outcomes for youth with and without foster care experience.

  7. 1980-81 Overlap Study: Number of Students Served by Single and Multiple Compensatory Education Programs. Publication No. 80.86.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin Independent School District, TX. Office of Research and Evaluation.

    In order to provide information for compensatory education program planners and coordinators, the Austin (Texas) Independent School District was studied in 1980-81 to estimate the number of children being served by one or more compensatory education programs. These programs served 14,355 students at 80 elementary or secondary district campuses:…

  8. Serve Our Seniors, Inc.--a demonstration program for proposed California menu guidelines for senior nutrition. California Department of Aging.

    PubMed

    Wilson, S; Barry, J

    1993-01-01

    Revised menu guidelines, written by the California Department of Aging (CDA) for senior nutrition programs, were tested by Serve Our Seniors, Inc. in a demonstration program from January '91 through June '92. Results showed improved nutrient value of the meals through increasing fiber, and decreasing sugar and fat. New menus were accepted by senior participants with little resistance. Project food costs increased 4%. Guidelines were used in a variety of project kitchens, with minimal staff training. Limited storage was a problem. Vendors were encouraged to identify appropriate foods and control costs.

  9. Needs-based health promotion program serves as HMO marketing tool.

    PubMed Central

    Donaldson, M S; Nicklason, J A; Ott, J E

    1985-01-01

    A needs assessment survey was originally conducted at the George Washington University Health Plan in 1981 and repeated in 1983 for evaluation and redirection. The survey resulted in a program which attempted to address the perceived needs of its members. The response, not only of the patients, but also of both the HMO clinical and marketing staffs, resulted in further program development, and established role for health promotion in HMO marketing, and a model of preventive care teaching in ambulatory primary care medicine. PMID:3923532

  10. 5 Reasons to Pack Your Lunch

    MedlinePlus

    ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Healthy School Lunch Planner Smart Supermarket Shopping Figuring Out Fat and Calories Go, Slow, and Whoa! A Quick Guide to Healthy Eating What Is a Healthy Lunch I Can Bring From Home? How Much Food Should I Eat? 5 Ways ...

  11. Educational Triage: A Comparative Study of Two High School Principals Serving Program Improvement Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Kyle Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The guiding question for this qualitative study centered on what it means to be a principal in a high school that has been put on notice as a failure and labeled "Program Improvement" (PI). The evidence shed light on the unique challenges, role expectations, and varying social conditions faced by two female principals as they managed…

  12. Serving Science and Technology: Five Programs around the Globe. Technical Report 95-5-001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Thomas; And Others

    This report presents the unique educational challenges of five programs in English for Science and Technology (EST) in Japan, Mexico, the Czech Republic/United States, Israel, and Hong Kong, including the challenges stemming from different educational/political systems and financial/technical resources. The five presentations cover typical EST…

  13. Using Participatory Action Research To Evaluate Programs Serving People with Severe Disabilities: Reflections from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Karen A.; Folchman, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses challenges in using participatory action research (PAR) in the evaluation of programs that provide services and supports to people with severe disabilities. Challenges include the need for modification of the model, time constraints, issues around power and position, and inclusion of individuals with severe disabilities.…

  14. Impact of Maltreatment on Children Served in Community Mental Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walrath, Christine M.; Ybarra, Michele L.; Sheehan, Angela K.; Holden, E. Wayne; Burns, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Despite a decline in the incidence of child abuse over the last decade, victimization rates remain troubling. This study used a subset of data from the national evaluation of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program to investigate and compare the demographic, psychosocial, and service use…

  15. A Taxonomy of Writing across the Curriculum Programs: Evolving to Serve Broader Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, William; Rutz, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Early status reports on WAC call for engagement with the disciplines, robust research about writing, and a transformation from missionary work to a more wide-ranging model. A Taxonomy of WAC describes common characteristics of WAC programs as well as organizing those characteristics into a progression from initiation to change agency. (Contains 1…

  16. 34 CFR 606.1 - What is the Developing Hispanic-Serving Institutions Program?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... of, Hispanic students; and (b) Expand and enhance the academic offerings, program quality, and institutional stability of colleges and universities that are educating the majority of Hispanic college students and helping large numbers of Hispanic students and other low-income individuals...

  17. Serving Clientele with Disabilities: An Assessment of Texas FCS Agents' Needs for Implementing Inclusive Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Rick L.; Grenwelge, Cheryl; Benz, Michael R.; Zhang, Dalun; Resch, J. Aaron; Mireles, Gerardo; Mahadevan, Lakshmi

    2012-01-01

    This article reports on a qualitative study to assess Texas Family Consumer Science (FCS) Extension professionals' experiences working with individuals with disabilities and their perceived skills in promoting and delivering inclusive educational programming for this audience. Study results indicate that overall Extension educators viewed…

  18. Project WISE: Building STEM-Focused Youth-Programs that Serve the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLisi, Gregory A.; McMillin, Keith A.; Virostek, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of Project WISE, a multi-institutional partnership that assembles interdisciplinary teams of undergraduate and high school students charged with developing STEM-focused community youth-programs. Our goal is twofold: (i.) to promote young women's interest in STEM-oriented careers through an early, positive…

  19. Serving Science and Technology: Five Programs around the Globe. Technical Report 95-5-001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orr, Thomas; And Others

    This report presents the unique educational challenges of five programs in English for Science and Technology (EST) in Japan, Mexico, the Czech Republic/United States, Israel, and Hong Kong, including the challenges stemming from different educational/political systems and financial/technical resources. The five presentations cover typical EST…

  20. Making a Difference: Operational Guidelines for Adult Education Programs Serving JOBS Participants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Education Agency, Austin.

    This guide is designed to assist adult education cooperatives in implementing educational services for recipients of Aid to Families with Dependent Children participating in the Job Opportunities and Basic Skills (JOBS) program. It addresses the educational services to be provided by the cooperatives per the interagency cooperation contract…

  1. Project WISE: Building STEM-Focused Youth-Programs that Serve the Community

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiLisi, Gregory A.; McMillin, Keith A.; Virostek, Margaret E.

    2011-01-01

    We describe the design and implementation of Project WISE, a multi-institutional partnership that assembles interdisciplinary teams of undergraduate and high school students charged with developing STEM-focused community youth-programs. Our goal is twofold: (i.) to promote young women's interest in STEM-oriented careers through an early, positive…

  2. The Classroom Notetaker: How To Organize a Program Serving Students with Hearing Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jimmie Joan

    This guide describes how to establish a notetaking program to benefit students with hearing impairments in mainstream settings. Chapter 1 discusses the need for notetakers and includes subjects such as providing equal access, high-tech and low-tech notetaking, how the notes can be used, and who can use the notes. Chapter 2 provides information on…

  3. Supporting Museums--Serving Communities: An Evaluation of the Museums for America Program. Full Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Apley, Alice; Frankel, Susan; Goldman, Elizabeth; Streitburger, Kim

    2011-01-01

    The Institute of Museum and Library Services is the primary source of federal support for the nation's museums. Museums for America (MFA) is the largest IMLS grant program for museums; it supports institutions by investing in high-priority, high-value activities that are clearly linked to the institution's strategic plan and enhance its value to…

  4. Which Students to Serve? Universal or Targeted Eligibility for Postsecondary Opportunity Programs. WISCAPE Policy Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vaade, Elizabeth; McCready, Bo

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic changes in the higher education landscape and the recent recession have intensified the challenges students face in postsecondary enrollment and completion. In response, some states, communities, and institutions have developed "postsecondary opportunity programs (POPs)"--comprehensive college access and success programs…

  5. The Classroom Notetaker: How To Organize a Program Serving Students with Hearing Impairments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Jimmie Joan

    This guide describes how to establish a notetaking program to benefit students with hearing impairments in mainstream settings. Chapter 1 discusses the need for notetakers and includes subjects such as providing equal access, high-tech and low-tech notetaking, how the notes can be used, and who can use the notes. Chapter 2 provides information on…

  6. Serving the Future: An Update on Adolescent Pregnancy Prevention Programs in Developing Countries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Gary; And Others

    This survey analyzed the nature and level of services in adolescent pregnancy prevention in the developing countries of Latin America, Africa, and Asia. While focusing on programs to prevent adolescent pregnancy, many of the groups surveyed were also responding to the Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome (AIDS) epidemic in their work with youth.…

  7. Educational Triage: A Comparative Study of Two High School Principals Serving Program Improvement Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Garrity, Kyle Matthew

    2013-01-01

    The guiding question for this qualitative study centered on what it means to be a principal in a high school that has been put on notice as a failure and labeled "Program Improvement" (PI). The evidence shed light on the unique challenges, role expectations, and varying social conditions faced by two female principals as they managed…

  8. Impact of Maltreatment on Children Served in Community Mental Health Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walrath, Christine M.; Ybarra, Michele L.; Sheehan, Angela K.; Holden, E. Wayne; Burns, Barbara J.

    2006-01-01

    Despite a decline in the incidence of child abuse over the last decade, victimization rates remain troubling. This study used a subset of data from the national evaluation of the Comprehensive Community Mental Health Services for Children and Their Families Program to investigate and compare the demographic, psychosocial, and service use…

  9. Using Participatory Action Research To Evaluate Programs Serving People with Severe Disabilities: Reflections from the Field.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Karen A.; Folchman, Ruth

    1998-01-01

    This article discusses challenges in using participatory action research (PAR) in the evaluation of programs that provide services and supports to people with severe disabilities. Challenges include the need for modification of the model, time constraints, issues around power and position, and inclusion of individuals with severe disabilities.…

  10. A Taxonomy of Writing across the Curriculum Programs: Evolving to Serve Broader Agendas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Condon, William; Rutz, Carol

    2012-01-01

    Early status reports on WAC call for engagement with the disciplines, robust research about writing, and a transformation from missionary work to a more wide-ranging model. A Taxonomy of WAC describes common characteristics of WAC programs as well as organizing those characteristics into a progression from initiation to change agency. (Contains 1…

  11. Putting It All Together: Guiding Principles for Quality After-School Programs Serving Preteens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rachel A.; Goldsmith, Julie; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Successfully navigating early adolescence depends, in large part, on the availability of safe and engaging activities and supportive relationships with adults, yet many preteens have limited access to positive supports and opportunities such as high-quality after-school programs that could put them on a path to success. Funders, policymakers and…

  12. Putting It All Together: Guiding Principles for Quality After-School Programs Serving Preteens

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Metz, Rachel A.; Goldsmith, Julie; Arbreton, Amy J. A.

    2008-01-01

    Successfully navigating early adolescence depends, in large part, on the availability of safe and engaging activities and supportive relationships with adults, yet many preteens have limited access to positive supports and opportunities such as high-quality after-school programs that could put them on a path to success. Funders, policymakers and…

  13. Youth and the Workplace: Second-Chance Programs and the Hard-to-Serve.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Thomas J.; And Others

    The task of addressing the complex and deeply rooted problems faced by the nation's at-risk youth is one that largely falls outside the scope of traditional institutions. Investment in the development and operation of "second-chance" education and employment programs has historically been inadequate, haphazard, and uncertain. The gains…

  14. A Comparative Analysis of Selected Federal Programs Serving Young Children. Steps toward Making These Programs Work in Your State.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Barbara J.

    Intended to help state planners understand and coordinate their program efforts, the guide provides an analysis of major federally funded programs for handicapped and at-risk children from birth to age 6. The following programs and their legislative authority are considered: Medicaid (Title XIX of the Social Security Act); The Early and Periodic…

  15. Elementary and Middle School Children's Acceptance of Lower Calorie Flavored Milk as Measured by Milk Shipment and Participation in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yon, Bethany A.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) new nutrition standards for school meals include sweeping changes setting upper limits on calories served and limit milk offerings to low fat or fat-free and, if flavored, only fat-free. Milk processors are lowering the calories in flavored milks. As changes to milk impact…

  16. Elementary and Middle School Children's Acceptance of Lower Calorie Flavored Milk as Measured by Milk Shipment and Participation in the National School Lunch Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yon, Bethany A.; Johnson, Rachel K.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The United States Department of Agriculture's (USDA) new nutrition standards for school meals include sweeping changes setting upper limits on calories served and limit milk offerings to low fat or fat-free and, if flavored, only fat-free. Milk processors are lowering the calories in flavored milks. As changes to milk impact…

  17. Bureau of School Lunches Past, Present, Future: An Overview, Working Note No. 4 in a Series: School Food Service in New York City.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Office of the Deputy Chancellor.

    This paper describes the early history, present status, and future trends of the Bureau of School Lunches of the New York City Board of Education. A review of its early history indicates that although various citizen groups and the Department of Welfare served lunches to needy children prior to 1946, it was the passage of the National School Lunch…

  18. Effect of food service nutrition improvements on elementary school cafeteria lunch purchase patterns.

    PubMed

    Cluss, Patricia A; Fee, Luann; Culyba, Rebecca J; Bhat, Kiran B; Owen, Kay

    2014-06-01

    Schools can play a major role in prevention and intervention for childhood obesity. We describe changes in elementary school cafeteria lunch sales patterns resulting from nutritional improvements in menu offerings that were part of a community-wide focus on health. Elementary school lunch sales data were collected for 1 week in each of 7 years in a district serving a predominantly poor, rural, and Caucasian student population, with high rates of obesity. Post hoc data analyses described lunch sales patterns and related food service costs over the project years. The percentage of high calorie/low nutrition foods sold decreased from 22% of all sales in 2005 to 0% in 2011. High-calorie snack purchases decreased from 535 items to 0 items. The sale of fresh fruits increased by 12%. There was only a slight decline in the percentage of children who purchased cafeteria lunches over the years and a 15.2% cost increase for purchasing healthier food supplies. Elementary school children purchased healthier lunches when healthier menu items were offered and when less healthy foods were eliminated from the menu. There was no significant decline in the number of students who purchased lunches as nutritional improvements were made. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  19. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.). Secondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which reflects Mississippi's statutory requirement that instructional programs be based on core curricula and performance-based assessment, contains outlines of the instructional units required in local instructional management plans and daily lesson plans for horticulture I and II. Presented first are a program description and…

  20. Program-Wide Behavior Support Plans for Programs Serving Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing in Illinois

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sinnott, Cheri

    2009-01-01

    Positive behavior interventions and Supports (PBIS) programs are being introduced in school districts throughout Illinois and the rest of the United States, resulting in decreased behavioral incidents and increased academic achievement. Programs for students who are deaf or hard of hearing benefit from implementation of this type of…

  1. Use of Evidence-Based Treatments in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Serving American Indian and Alaska Native Communities

    PubMed Central

    Novins, Douglas K.; Croy, Calvin D.; Moore, Laurie A.; Rieckmann, Traci

    2016-01-01

    Background Research and health surveillance activities continue to document the substantial disparities in the impacts of substance abuse on the health of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. While Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) hold substantial promise for improving treatment for AI/ANs with substance use problems (as they do for non-AI/ANs), anecdotal reports suggest that their use is limited. In this study, we examine the awareness of, attitudes towards, and use of EBTs in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Methods Data are drawn from the first national survey of tribal substance abuse treatment programs. Clinicians or clinical administrators from 192 programs completed the survey. Participants were queried about their awareness of, attitudes towards, and use of 9 psychosocial and 3 medication EBTs. Results Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (82.2%), Motivational Interviewing (68.6%), and Relapse Prevention Therapy (66.8%) were the most commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs; medications for psychiatric comorbidity was the most commonly implemented medication treatment (43.2%). Greater EBT knowledge and use were associated with both program (e.g., funding) and staff (e.g., educational attainment) characteristics. Only two of the commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs (Motivational Interviewing and Relapse Prevention Therapy) were endorsed as culturally appropriate by a majority of programs that had implemented them (55.9% and 58.1%, respectively). Conclusions EBT knowledge and use is higher in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities than has been previously estimated. However, many users of these EBTs continue to have concerns about their cultural appropriateness, which likely limits their further dissemination. PMID:26898185

  2. Use of evidence-based treatments in substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

    PubMed

    Novins, Douglas K; Croy, Calvin D; Moore, Laurie A; Rieckmann, Traci

    2016-04-01

    Research and health surveillance activities continue to document the substantial disparities in the impacts of substance abuse on the health of American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) people. While Evidence-Based Treatments (EBTs) hold substantial promise for improving treatment for AI/ANs with substance use problems (as they do for non-AI/ANs), anecdotal reports suggest that their use is limited. In this study, we examine the awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of EBTs in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities. Data are drawn from the first national survey of tribal substance abuse treatment programs. Clinicians or clinical administrators from 192 programs completed the survey. Participants were queried about their awareness of, attitudes toward, and use of 9 psychosocial and 3 medication EBTs. Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (82.2%), Motivational Interviewing (68.6%), and Relapse Prevention Therapy (66.8%) were the most commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs; medications for psychiatric comorbidity was the most commonly implemented medication treatment (43.2%). Greater EBT knowledge and use were associated with both program (e.g., funding) and staff (e.g., educational attainment) characteristics. Only two of the commonly implemented psychosocial EBTs (Motivational Interviewing and Relapse Prevention Therapy) were endorsed as culturally appropriate by a majority of programs that had implemented them (55.9% and 58.1%, respectively). EBT knowledge and use is higher in substance abuse treatment programs serving AI/AN communities than has been previously estimated. However, many users of these EBTs continue to have concerns about their cultural appropriateness, which likely limits their further dissemination. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Predicting survival with the Palliative Performance Scale in a minority-serving hospice and palliative care program.

    PubMed

    Weng, Li-Chueh; Huang, Hsiu-Li; Wilkie, Diana J; Hoenig, Noreen A; Suarez, Marie L; Marschke, Michael; Durham, Jan

    2009-04-01

    Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) scores have shown potential for prognosticating survival in Caucasian samples, but have not been studied for prognostic value in cancer patients from minority groups. Using data obtained from a retrospective chart audit of 492 cancer patients admitted over an 18-month period to a minority-serving home-based hospice and palliative care program, we examined the relationship between PPS scores and length of survival (survival days). Patients with PPS scores of 10% to 30% had fewer survival days than those with scores of 40% and those with scores of 50% to 100% (median=6, 19, and 34 days, respectively; F=25.02, P<0.001). A PPS score of 40% serves as a reliable inclusion criterion for a study requiring two weeks for completion, whereas 50% to 100% is required for a three-week study. Findings from a predominantly minority sample are similar to those from predominantly Caucasian samples.

  4. Predicting Survival with the Palliative Performance Scale in a Minority-Serving Hospice and Palliative Care Program

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Li-Chueh; Hsiu-Li-Huang; Wilkie, Diana J.; Hoenig, Noreen A.; Suarez, Marie L.; Marschke, Michael; Durham, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Palliative Performance Scale (PPS) scores have shown potential for prognosticating survival in Caucasian samples, but have not been studied for prognostic value in cancer patients from minority groups. Using data obtained from a retrospective chart audit of 492 cancer patients admitted over an 18-month period to a minority-serving home-based hospice and palliative care program, we examined the relationship between PPS scores and length of survival (survival days). Patients with PPS scores of 10% to 30% had fewer survival days than those with scores of 40% and those with scores of 50% to 100% (median = 6, 19, and 34 days, respectively; F = 25.02, P < 0.001). A PPS score of 40% serves as a reliable inclusion criterion for a study requiring two weeks for completion, while 50% to 100% is required for a three-week study. Findings from a predominantly minority sample are similar to those from predominantly Caucasian samples. PMID:18823751

  5. A Validation Study of the Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2014 Version, at School Lunch.

    PubMed

    Krehbiel, Caroline F; DuPaul, George J; Hoffman, Jessica A

    2017-05-01

    Obtaining valid and reliable estimates of usual dietary intake at a reasonable cost is a challenge in school-based nutrition research. The Automated Self-Administered 24-Hour Dietary Recall for Children, 2014 version (ASA24 Kids-2014), a self-administered, computerized 24-hour dietary recall, offers improved feasibility over traditional interviewer-administered 24-hour recalls. This mixed-methods study examined ASA24 Kids-2014's validity for measuring dietary intake from National School Lunch Program lunches. After 24% attrition, 96 middle-school students from three urban schools in eastern Pennsylvania participated in the study. A subsample of 27 participants completed qualitative interviews. Data were collected in the spring of 2014. Self-reported ASA24 Kids-2014 data were compared to direct observations of school lunch, which served as the criterion measure. Dependent variables included eight meal components selected from the National School Lunch Program guidelines (fruit, vegetables, grains, protein-rich foods, dairy, oils, solid fats, and added sugars). A supplemental interview collected qualitative data regarding students' perceptions of content and substantive validity. The Wilcoxon signed rank test and Spearman's ρ examined criterion-related validity; qualitative content analysis examined content and substantive validity. Participants inaccurately recalled food items eaten at lunch, as 58% of foods were reported in error. However, among foods recalled correctly, no statistically significant differences emerged for estimates of portions consumed for six meal components (fruit, vegetables, grains, protein-rich foods, oils, and added sugars). In addition, statistically significant positive correlations emerged between ASA24 Kids-2014 and direct observation for all estimates. Qualitative data identified students' interest and motivation, comprehension, memory, and English-language fluency as relevant sources of error. Middle school students have difficulty

  6. State Plan for Summer Food Service Program--1978. School Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    This plan presents required state and federal information for the administration and procedures for the 1978 Summer Food Service Program in Kansas. In 1977, the program increased its availability to low income children through a 41 percent increase of the sponsors and a 54 percent increase of sites where the children were served breakfast, lunch,…

  7. Long-term impact of a chef on school lunch consumption: findings from a 2-year pilot study in Boston middle schools.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Juliana F W; Smit, Liesbeth A; Parker, Ellen; Austin, S Bryn; Frazier, A Lindsay; Economos, Christina D; Rimm, Eric B

    2012-06-01

    School cafeterias can play an important role in providing healthy meals. Although schools participating in the National School Lunch Program are required to meet minimum program standards, advocates recommend that innovations be sought to enhance menu dietary quality. This study evaluated the Chef Initiative, a 2-year pilot study in two Boston middle schools, designed to increase the availability and consumption of healthier school foods. Between 2007 and 2009, a professional chef trained cafeteria staff to prepare healthier school lunches (ie, more whole grains, fresh/frozen fruits and vegetables, and less sugar, salt, saturated fats, and trans fats). Meal nutrient compositions were monitored from 2007 to 2009, and a plate waste study conducted in the spring of 2009 compared food selection and consumption patterns among students at Chef Initiative schools, with students receiving standard school lunches at two matched control schools. Paired t tests and descriptive statistics were used to examine differences in menus and mixed-model analysis of variance was used to analyze differences in students' food selection and consumption between Chef Initiative and control schools. Overall, the Chef Initiative schools provided healthier lunches and the percent of foods consumed at Chef Initiative and control schools were similar (61.6% vs 57.3%; P=0.63). Of the areas targeted, there was greater whole-grain selection and vegetable consumption; 51% more students selected whole grains (P=0.02) and students consumed 0.36 more vegetable servings/day (P=0.01) at Chef Initiative schools. The potential of chefs collaborating with cafeteria staff to improve the availability, selection, and consumption of healthier meals is promising. Copyright © 2012 Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Direct Certification in the National School Lunch Program State Implementation Progress, School Year 2010-2011. Report to Congress--Summary

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    US Department of Agriculture, 2011

    2011-01-01

    This report responds to the requirement of Public Law 110-246 to assess the effectiveness of State and local efforts to directly certify children for free school meals. Under direct certification, children are determined eligible for free school meals without the need for household applications by using data from other means-tested programs. The…

  9. Comparison of Nutrient Content and Cost of Home-Packed Lunches to Reimbursable School Lunch Nutrient Standards and Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cara M.; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee; Gustof, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare nutrient content and cost of home-packed lunches to nutrient standards and prices for reimbursable school lunches. Methods: Researchers observed food and beverage contents of 333 home packed lunches at four north Texas elementary schools. Nutritionist Pro was used to analyze lunches for calories,…

  10. Comparison of Nutrient Content and Cost of Home-Packed Lunches to Reimbursable School Lunch Nutrient Standards and Prices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Cara M.; Bednar, Carolyn; Kwon, Junehee; Gustof, Alissa

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare nutrient content and cost of home-packed lunches to nutrient standards and prices for reimbursable school lunches. Methods: Researchers observed food and beverage contents of 333 home packed lunches at four north Texas elementary schools. Nutritionist Pro was used to analyze lunches for calories,…

  11. Boulder Valley Schools Teen Parenting Program: An Exemplary Vocational Education Program Serving a Population with Special Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Williams, Maureen; Wermuth, Tom

    1990-01-01

    The Boulder Valley (Colorado) Teen Parenting Program is designed to meet the educational and vocational needs of pregnant or parenting adolescents. It focuses on the following goals: (1) decreasing the dropout rate of teen parents; (2) improving the health and well-being of children born to teen parents; (3) decreasing repeat pregnancies of teen…

  12. Fast Food Combos Make Type A Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stashower, Gloria

    1974-01-01

    Clark County school district in Las Vegas, Nevada, has combination lunches available for high school students that meet Type A nutrition requirements but which resemble the commercial fast food menus teenagers prefer. (MLF)

  13. Pack A Waste-Free Lunch

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This page includes EPA's resources for students and teachers interested in hosting a waste-free lunch day at school. These resources include instructions, helpful tips, and directions for tracking success.

  14. 5 Reasons to Pack Your Lunch

    MedlinePlus

    ... soup; hummus and pita bread; or some crisp, farm-stand apples. 3. Energy. If you have a ... MORE ON THIS TOPIC Healthy School Lunch Planner Smart Supermarket Shopping Figuring Out Fat and Calories Go, ...

  15. A bill to amend the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act to provide children from rural areas with better access to meals served through the summer food service program for children and certain child care programs.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Lugar, Richard G. [R-IN

    2010-02-25

    Senate - 02/25/2010 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  16. Alternate lunch patterns in high schools. I. Labor requirements and meal costs.

    PubMed

    Harper, J M; Shigetomi, C T; Mackin, S D; Iyer, P A; Jansen, G R

    1980-08-01

    Meal costs were compared in forty-eight high schools as a function of the lunch pattern. The patterns evaluated were: Type A "offer vs. serve," traditional Type A, four food groups (Basic 4), and free choice. Participation in school lunch increased with free choice, resulting in a reduction in labor and total meal costs. Sixteen per cent of foodservice work involved administration, 37 per cent preparation, 16 per cent service, 25 per cent clean-up, and 6 per cent other, which did not vary with the menu pattern.

  17. The Adolescent Family Life Program: A Multisite Evaluation of Federally Funded Projects Serving Pregnant and Parenting Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Ashley, Olivia Silber; LeTourneau, Kathryn L.; Williams, Julia Cassie; Jones, Sarah B.; Hampton, Joel; Scott, Alicia Richmond

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. We evaluated the effectiveness of care demonstration projects supported by the Title XX Adolescent Family Life (AFL) program, which serves pregnant and parenting adolescents in an effort to mitigate the risks associated with adolescent childbearing. Methods. This cross-site evaluation involved 12 projects and 1038 adolescents who received either enhanced services funded by the AFL program or usual care. We examined the effects of enhanced services on health, educational, and child care outcomes approximately 6 months to 2 years after intake and explored moderation of program effects by time since intake and project characteristics associated with outcomes. Results. The odds of using long-acting reversible contraception (odds ratio [OR] = 1.58) and receiving regular child care (OR = 1.50) in the past month were higher in the intervention group than in the comparison group. Odds of a repeat pregnancy were lower (OR = 0.39) among intervention group adolescents than among comparison group adolescents within 12 months of intake. Several project characteristics were associated with adolescent health outcomes. Conclusions. These projects show promise in improving effective contraceptive use, increasing routine child care, and yielding short-term decreases in repeat pregnancy. PMID:22897549

  18. Cost-free and sustainable incentive increases healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch.

    PubMed

    Pittman, D W; Parker, J S; Getz, B R; Jackson, C M; Le, T-A P; Riggs, S B; Shay, J M

    2012-01-01

    We aimed to develop a cost-free and sustainable program to influence healthier eating decisions during elementary school lunch. Baseline food and beverage choices were assessed for 9 days during lunch service at two racially and economically diverse elementary schools in Spartanburg County, SC, USA. After being informed that the labeled items on the daily lunch menu represented the healthiest choice, students were allowed to ring a call bell in the cafeteria for public recognition when they chose all of the identified healthiest food and beverage items during lunch service. Using menus matched to the baseline phase, food and beverage choices were measured during a 9-day intervention phase. After 30 days, food and beverage choices were reassessed during a 3-day follow-up phase. Healthiest food & beverage choices increased 49% with >60% of students choosing non-flavored milk over flavored milk during the intervention phase. There was no difference in the success of the program between the two schools. The program continued and healthy eating decisions were significantly sustained at a 30-day follow-up assessment. Public recognition through bell ringing appears to be an effective practice to sustain increases in healthy eating decisions during elementary school lunch and warrants expansion to larger scale, longitudinal trials.

  19. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  20. Effect of Nutrition Changes on Foods Selected by Students in a Middle School-Based Diabetes Prevention Intervention Program: The HEALTHY Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mobley, Connie C.; Stadler, Diane D.; Staten, Myrlene A.; El Ghormli, Laure; Gillis, Bonnie; Hartstein, Jill; Siega-Riz, Anna Maria; Virus, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Background: The HEALTHY primary prevention trial developed an integrated multicomponent intervention program to moderate risk factors for type 2 diabetes in middle schools. The nutrition component aimed to improve the quality of foods and beverages served to students. Changes in the School Breakfast Program (SBP), National School Lunch Program…

  1. Teaching Tolerance with Mix It Up!: Student Reactions to an Unusual Lunch Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindzierski, Corinne M.; Leavitt-Noble, Kimberly; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Marable, Michele A.; Wallace, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Programs have been developed to eliminate social boundaries among school children, and thereby promote cohesive classroom environments. One example of such a program is Mix It Up at Lunch Day, which is a simple call to action that asks students to take a new seat in the cafeteria. By taking a risk for one day, students can cross the lines of…

  2. The Income Volatility See-Saw: Implications for School Lunch. Economic Research Report Number 23

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newman, Constance

    2006-01-01

    Income volatility challenges the effectiveness of the safety net that USDA food assistance programs provide low-income families. This study examines income volatility among households with children and the implications of volatility for eligibility in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). The results show that income volatility was higher for…

  3. Teaching Tolerance with Mix It Up!: Student Reactions to an Unusual Lunch Period

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kindzierski, Corinne M.; Leavitt-Noble, Kimberly; Dutt-Doner, Karen; Marable, Michele A.; Wallace, Nancy

    2013-01-01

    Programs have been developed to eliminate social boundaries among school children, and thereby promote cohesive classroom environments. One example of such a program is Mix It Up at Lunch Day, which is a simple call to action that asks students to take a new seat in the cafeteria. By taking a risk for one day, students can cross the lines of…

  4. Measuring the Impact of MSI-Funded Programs on Student Success: Findings from the Evaluation of Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teranishi, Robert; Martin, Margary; Pazich, Loni Bordoloi; Alcantar, Cynthia M.; Nguyen, Tu-Lien Kim

    2014-01-01

    This report shares findings from a three-year longitudinal study of three Asian American and Native American Pacific Islander-Serving Institutions (AANAPISIs)--one of the newest minority serving institution (MSI) designations--and provides evidence for the impact of federally-funded campus programs on persistence, degree attainment, and transfer…

  5. [Influence of documenting lunch menu details on subsequent snack intake].

    PubMed

    Yamasaki, Mariko; Takaki, Yuya; Saito, Hitomi; Sato, Suguru; Aoyama, Kenjiro

    2014-12-01

    In this study we examined the effect on subsequent snack intake of having participants document their lunch menus. In Experiment 1, we asked all participants to have lunch as usual. However, some were instructed to document their lunch menus before eating. These participants demonstrated lower snack intake than control condition participants who had not documented their lunch menus. In Experiment 2, participants in both groups ate snacks freely while viewing TV, which functioned as a stimulus interfering with recall of lunch menus. There was no difference in snack intake between participants who had documented their lunch menus and those who had not.

  6. Pre-ordering lunch at work. Results of the what to eat for lunch study.

    PubMed

    Stites, Shana D; Singletary, S Brook; Menasha, Adeena; Cooblall, Clarissa; Hantula, Donald; Axelrod, Saul; Figueredo, Vincent M; Phipps, Etienne J

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate an intervention that combined mindful eating and online pre-ordering to promote healthier lunch purchases at work. The study took place at an urban hospital with 26 employees who were overweight or obese. The design included a contemporaneous comparison with delayed-treatment control and a three-phase prospective study. A minimum 4-week baseline period preceded a 4-week full-intervention, in which participants received mindful eating training, pre-ordered their lunches, and received price discounts toward lunch purchases. In a 4-week reduced intervention phase, participants pre-ordered lunches without price discounts. Participant lunch purchases were tracked electronically at the point of purchase. The primary outcome measures were the amounts of kilocalories and fat grams in purchased lunches. In contemporaneous comparisons, the treatment group purchased lunches with an average of 144.6 fewer kilocalories (p = 0.01) and 8.9 fewer grams of fat (p = 0.005) compared to controls. In multivariable longitudinal analyses, participants decreased the average number of calories in their meals by 114.6 kcal per lunch and the average grams of fat by 5.4 per lunch during the partial-intervention compared to the baseline (p < 0.001). At the end of the study, a moderate increase was observed in participants' overall mindful eating behaviors as compared to the beginning of the study (p < 0.001). The majority of participants (92%) said they would use the pre-ordering system if offered in the future. Combined mindful eating training and online pre-ordering appears a feasible and useful worksite intervention to improve food choices by employees. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Nutrient Density and the Cost of Vegetables from Elementary School Lunches123

    PubMed Central

    Ishdorj, Ariun; Capps, Oral; Murano, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Vegetables are the major source of the dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A and C that are crucial in the diets of children. This study assessed the nutrient content of vegetables offered through the National School Lunch Program and examined the relation between the overall nutrient density of vegetable subgroups and the costs of nutrients offered and wasted before and after the changes in school meal standards. Using data collected from 3 elementary schools before and after the changes in school meal standards, we found that vegetable plate waste increased from 52% to 58%. Plate waste for starchy vegetables, exclusive of potatoes, was relatively high compared with other subgroups; however, plate waste for white potatoes was the lowest among any type of vegetable. Energy density; cost per 100 g, per serving, and per 100 kcal; and percentage daily value were calculated and used to estimate nutrient density value and nutrient density per dollar. Cost per 100 kcal was highest for red/orange vegetables followed by dark green vegetables; however, nutrient density for red/orange vegetables was the highest in the group and provided the most nutrients per dollar compared with other subgroups. Given that many vegetables are less energy dense, measuring vegetable costs per 100 g and per serving by accounting for nutrient density perhaps is a better way of calculating the cost of vegetables in school meals. PMID:26773034

  8. Nutrient Density and the Cost of Vegetables from Elementary School Lunches.

    PubMed

    Ishdorj, Ariun; Capps, Oral; Murano, Peter S

    2016-01-01

    Vegetables are the major source of the dietary fiber, magnesium, potassium, and vitamins A and C that are crucial in the diets of children. This study assessed the nutrient content of vegetables offered through the National School Lunch Program and examined the relation between the overall nutrient density of vegetable subgroups and the costs of nutrients offered and wasted before and after the changes in school meal standards. Using data collected from 3 elementary schools before and after the changes in school meal standards, we found that vegetable plate waste increased from 52% to 58%. Plate waste for starchy vegetables, exclusive of potatoes, was relatively high compared with other subgroups; however, plate waste for white potatoes was the lowest among any type of vegetable. Energy density; cost per 100 g, per serving, and per 100 kcal; and percentage daily value were calculated and used to estimate nutrient density value and nutrient density per dollar. Cost per 100 kcal was highest for red/orange vegetables followed by dark green vegetables; however, nutrient density for red/orange vegetables was the highest in the group and provided the most nutrients per dollar compared with other subgroups. Given that many vegetables are less energy dense, measuring vegetable costs per 100 g and per serving by accounting for nutrient density perhaps is a better way of calculating the cost of vegetables in school meals. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  9. Supplementary Services and Guided Instruction for Graduates of High School Special Education Programs. Report and Evaluation of Project SERVE (Year 1).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olsen, Kathlyn; Atkins, Wayne

    Presented are the results of a follow-up study conducted to evaluate the effectiveness of Project SERVE, a program designed to provide post high school vocational training for 13 educable mentally retarded (EMR) students. Outlined in an introductory section are a statement of the problem (total absence of post high school programming for the more…

  10. 75 FR 63689 - National School Lunch Week, 2010

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-15

    ... Proclamation 8583--National School Lunch Week, 2010 Proclamation 8584--Columbus Day, 2010 #0; #0; #0... School Lunch Week, 2010 By the President of the United States of America A Proclamation No child should... learning capacity, and instilled life-long healthy habits. This year, during National School Lunch Week, we...

  11. 77 FR 64019 - National School Lunch Week, 2012

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-17

    ... October 17, 2012 Part III The President Proclamation 8888--National School Lunch Week, 2012 #0; #0; #0... School Lunch Week, 2012 By The President Of The United States Of America A Proclamation Our children are.... During National School Lunch Week, we recognize all those whose dedicated work and care make good...

  12. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    .... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money” 13 when the employees work overtime, the cost of the lunches and the supper money may both be... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily...

  13. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    .... However, if an employer furnishes a free lunch every day and, in addition, occasionally pays “supper money” 13 when the employees work overtime, the cost of the lunches and the supper money may both be... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily...

  14. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section 548... Basic Rates § 548.304 Excluding value of lunches furnished. (a) Section 548.3(d) authorizes as... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal...

  15. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section 548... Basic Rates § 548.304 Excluding value of lunches furnished. (a) Section 548.3(d) authorizes as... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal...

  16. 29 CFR 548.304 - Excluding value of lunches furnished.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Excluding value of lunches furnished. 548.304 Section 548... Basic Rates § 548.304 Excluding value of lunches furnished. (a) Section 548.3(d) authorizes as... employees to omit from the computation of overtime the cost of a free daily lunch or other single daily meal...

  17. Longitudinal Behavioral Effects of a School-Based Fruit and Vegetable Promotion Program

    PubMed Central

    Franko, Debra L.; Thompson, Douglas R.; Power, Thomas J.; Stallings, Virginia A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective This study examined the longitudinal effects of a school-based program on kindergarten and first grade children's fruit and vegetable (F&V) consumption. Methods The program included lunchroom, classroom, school-wide, and family components. The primary dependent variable, F&V consumed at lunch, was assessed using weighed plate waste. Hierarchical linear models were used to analyze the differences between intervention and control groups and to account for repeated measurements. Results Children in the experimental group consumed more F&V (F = 29 g; V = 6 g; 0.43 portions/lunch; 0.28 servings/lunch) at the end of Year 1 compared with children in the control group. At the end of Year 2, children in the experimental group consumed more fruit (21 g; 0.23 portions/lunch; 0.15 servings/lunch), but not more vegetables compared with children in the control group. Conclusions The intervention resulted in increased F&V consumption, with more pronounced and enduring effects for fruits than vegetables. PMID:19439567

  18. Serving Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brook, Les, Ed.

    This book contains 15 articles about various aspects of community further education (FE) programs in Great Britain, including program rationales/benefits, administration, and delivery. The following articles are included: "Foreword" (Bradshaw); "Commitment to Community Is Good Business and Practical Politics" (Brook); "Can…

  19. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  20. Mississippi Curriculum Framework for Horticulture Technology Cluster (Program CIP: 01.0601--Horticulture Serv. Op. & Mgmt., Gen.) (Program CIP: 01.0605--Landscaping Op. & Mgmt.). Postsecondary Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mississippi Research and Curriculum Unit for Vocational and Technical Education, State College.

    This document, which is intended for use by community and junior colleges throughout Mississippi, contains curriculum frameworks for the course sequences in the horticulture technology programs cluster. Presented in the introductory section are a framework of programs and courses, description of the programs, and suggested course sequences for…

  1. School lunches v. packed lunches: a comparison of secondary schools in England following the introduction of compulsory school food standards.

    PubMed

    Stevens, Lesley; Nicholas, Jo; Wood, Lesley; Nelson, Michael

    2013-06-01

    To compare food choices and nutrient intakes of pupils taking a school lunch or a packed lunch in eighty secondary schools in England, following the introduction of the food-based and nutrient-based standards for school food. Cross-sectional data collected between October 2010 and April 2011. Pupils' lunchtime food choices were recorded over five consecutive days. Secondary schools, England. A random selection of 5925 pupils having school lunches and 1805 pupils having a packed lunch in a nationally representative sample of eighty secondary schools in England. The differences in the specific types of food and drink consumed by the two groups of pupils are typical of differences between a hot and cold meal. On average, school lunches as eaten contained significantly more energy, carbohydrate, protein, fibre, vitamin A, folate, Fe and Zn than packed lunches, and 8 % less Na. Although neither school lunches nor packed lunches provided the balance of nutrients required to meet the nutrient-based standards (based on about one-third of daily energy and nutrient requirements), school lunches generally had a healthier nutrient profile, with lower Na and percentage of energy from fat, and higher fibre and micronutrient content. These differences were greater than those reported prior to the introduction of compulsory standards for school lunches. In order to ensure more pupils have a healthy lunch, schools could introduce and enforce a packed lunch policy or make school meals the only option at lunchtime.

  2. Middle School Student Perceptions of School Lunch Following Revised Federal School Meal Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjosen, Maria M.; Moore, Carolyn E.; Cullen, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a healthy meal. Methods: Anonymous…

  3. Middle school student perceptions of school lunch following revised federal school meal guidelines

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a health...

  4. School Lunch before and after Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Taylor, Katie Weigt; Watkins, Tracee; Schepman, Stephen; Rushing, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study compares the mean nutrients selected and consumed in National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals before and after implementation of the new nutrition standards mandated by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) in July 2012. Four elementary schools achieving Healthier US Schools Challenge awards serving…

  5. Influence of School Environment on Student Lunch Participation and Competitive Food Sales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Ruth E.; Wenz, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The school nutrition environment includes food policy and practices, advertising, and presence of competitive foods (CF). CF provide schools with revenue; however, CF decrease National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation and reimbursement as well as the nutrient density of children's diets. Local wellness policies (LWPs)…

  6. The Non-Participation Survey: Understanding Why High School Students Choose Not to Eat School Lunch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asperin, Amelia Estepa; Nettles, Mary Frances; Carr, Deborah H.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this project was to develop and validate a survey that will enable school nutrition (SN) directors and managers to identify and address issues affecting the non-participation of high school students in the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Methods: The research was conducted in two phases. Qualitative data…

  7. Influence of School Environment on Student Lunch Participation and Competitive Food Sales

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Litchfield, Ruth E.; Wenz, Betsy

    2011-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The school nutrition environment includes food policy and practices, advertising, and presence of competitive foods (CF). CF provide schools with revenue; however, CF decrease National School Lunch Program (NSLP) participation and reimbursement as well as the nutrient density of children's diets. Local wellness policies (LWPs)…

  8. From Policy to Practice: Parent Perceptions of the 2010 Federal School Lunch Mandate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Elchert, Daniel M.; Leicht, Erika A.; Scheidel, Carrie A.; Delger, Patti J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate parent awareness and perceptions of changes to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) implemented as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHKA) of 2010. Methods: An online survey of parents of school age (K-12) children in a Midwestern state was conducted (n = 2,189). The…

  9. School Lunch before and after Implementation of the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bergman, Ethan A.; Englund, Tim; Taylor, Katie Weigt; Watkins, Tracee; Schepman, Stephen; Rushing, Keith

    2014-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: This study compares the mean nutrients selected and consumed in National School Lunch Program (NSLP) meals before and after implementation of the new nutrition standards mandated by the Healthy Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 (HHFKA) in July 2012. Four elementary schools achieving Healthier US Schools Challenge awards serving…

  10. Recess before Lunch in Elementary Schools: Development of a Best Practice Checklist

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rainville, Alice Jo; Lofton, Kristi L.; Carr, Deborah H.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to determine the best practices (quality indicators) related to recess placement before lunch in elementary schools; compile a best practices checklist that can be used as an assessment tool for school nutrition programs; and validate and evaluate the usefulness of the best practices checklist.…

  11. From Policy to Practice: Parent Perceptions of the 2010 Federal School Lunch Mandate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Golembiewski, Elizabeth H.; Askelson, Natoshia M.; Elchert, Daniel M.; Leicht, Erika A.; Scheidel, Carrie A.; Delger, Patti J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: The purpose of this study was to investigate parent awareness and perceptions of changes to the National School Lunch Program (NSLP) implemented as a result of the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act (HHKA) of 2010. Methods: An online survey of parents of school age (K-12) children in a Midwestern state was conducted (n = 2,189). The…

  12. Middle School Student Perceptions of School Lunch Following Revised Federal School Meal Guidelines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kjosen, Maria M.; Moore, Carolyn E.; Cullen, Karen W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study assessed student perceptions of school meals under the new federal meal patterns for the National School Lunch Program (NSLP). Student feedback is instrumental in developing strategies to increase and maintain NSLP participation, satisfaction, and ultimately provide students with a healthy meal. Methods: Anonymous…

  13. Building School Connectedness through Shared Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Eva; Walton, Mat; Stephens, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: School connectedness is a well-established protective factor for young people's physical, mental, and social health. The purpose of this paper is to explore the promotion of school connectedness through the practice of shared lunches within a secondary school context in New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: An ethnographic methodology…

  14. Building School Connectedness through Shared Lunches

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neely, Eva; Walton, Mat; Stephens, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: School connectedness is a well-established protective factor for young people's physical, mental, and social health. The purpose of this paper is to explore the promotion of school connectedness through the practice of shared lunches within a secondary school context in New Zealand. Design/methodology/approach: An ethnographic methodology…

  15. Efficacy of the Lunch is in the Bag intervention to increase parents' packing of healthy bag lunches for young children: a cluster-randomized trial in early care and education centers.

    PubMed

    Roberts-Gray, Cindy; Briley, Margaret E; Ranjit, Nalini; Byrd-Williams, Courtney E; Sweitzer, Sara J; Sharma, Shreela V; Palafox, Maria Romo; Hoelscher, Deanna M

    2016-01-08

    Lunches that parents pack for their young children to eat at school or the Early Care and Education (ECE) center fall short of recommended standards. Lunch is in the Bag is a multi-level behavioral nutrition intervention to increase parents' packing of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains in their children's lunches. Designed for implementation in ECE centers, the five-week long intervention is followed three months later with a one-week booster. Efficacy of Lunch is in the Bag was tested in cluster randomized trial. Participants were 633 families from 30 ECE centers (15 intervention, 15 control) across Austin, San Antonio, and Houston, Texas, USA. Primary outcomes were servings of fruit, vegetables, and whole grains observed in the children's parent-packed bag lunches. Servings of refined grains, meats/beans/eggs/nuts, dairy, chips, and sweets also were observed. Data were collected at baseline, post-intervention (6-week follow-up), pre-booster (22-weeks follow-up), and post-booster (28-week follow-up). Time-by-treatment interactions were analyzed separately for each of the food groups using multi-level models to compare changes from baseline. Analyses were adjusted for relevant demographic variables and clustering within centers and parents. The intervention effected increases from baseline to 6-week follow-up in vegetables (0.17 servings, SE = 0.04, P < 0.001) and whole grains (0.30 servings, SE = 0.13, P = 0.018). The increase in whole grains was maintained through the 28-week follow-up (0.34 servings, SE = 0.13, P = 0.009). Fruit averaged more than 1.40 servings with no differences between groups or across time. The intervention prevented increase in sweets (-0.43 servings, SE = 0.11, P < .001, at the 22-week follow-up). Parents persisted, however, in packing small amounts of vegetables (averages of 0.41 to 0.52 servings) and large amounts of sweets and chips (averages of 1.75 to 1.99 servings). The need for and positive effects

  16. Estimated Nutritive Value of Low-Price Model Lunch Sets Provided to Garment Workers in Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Makurat, Jan; Pillai, Aarati; Wieringa, Frank T.; Chamnan, Chhoun; Krawinkel, Michael B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The establishment of staff canteens is expected to improve the nutritional situation of Cambodian garment workers. The objective of this study is to assess the nutritive value of low-price model lunch sets provided at a garment factory in Phnom Penh, Cambodia. Methods: Exemplary lunch sets were served to female workers through a temporary canteen at a garment factory in Phnom Penh. Dish samples were collected repeatedly to examine mean serving sizes of individual ingredients. Food composition tables and NutriSurvey software were used to assess mean amounts and contributions to recommended dietary allowances (RDAs) or adequate intake of energy, macronutrients, dietary fiber, vitamin C (VitC), iron, vitamin A (VitA), folate and vitamin B12 (VitB12). Results: On average, lunch sets provided roughly one third of RDA or adequate intake of energy, carbohydrates, fat and dietary fiber. Contribution to RDA of protein was high (46% RDA). The sets contained a high mean share of VitC (159% RDA), VitA (66% RDA), and folate (44% RDA), but were low in VitB12 (29% RDA) and iron (20% RDA). Conclusions: Overall, lunches satisfied recommendations of caloric content and macronutrient composition. Sets on average contained a beneficial amount of VitC, VitA and folate. Adjustments are needed for a higher iron content. Alternative iron-rich foods are expected to be better suited, compared to increasing portions of costly meat/fish components. Lunch provision at Cambodian garment factories holds the potential to improve food security of workers, approximately at costs of <1 USD/person/day at large scale. Data on quantitative total dietary intake as well as physical activity among workers are needed to further optimize the concept of staff canteens. PMID:28754003

  17. A bill to amend the Richard B. Russell National School Lunch Act to prohibit schools that participate in the Federal school meal programs from serving foods that contain trans fats derived from partially hydrogenated oils.

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Sen. Gillibrand, Kirsten E. [D-NY

    2009-07-22

    Senate - 07/22/2009 Read twice and referred to the Committee on Agriculture, Nutrition, and Forestry. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  18. 7 CFR 240.8 - Payments to program schools, service institutions, nonresidential child care institutions and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... authority of such a school on a monthly basis in an amount equal to the number of lunches served (as reported in accordance with § 210.13(a) of this chapter) times the value per lunch elected by the school... lunches served during that period which meet the nutritional requirements specified in § 210.10 of this...

  19. 7 CFR 240.8 - Payments to program schools, service institutions, nonresidential child care institutions and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... authority of such a school on a monthly basis in an amount equal to the number of lunches served (as reported in accordance with § 210.13(a) of this chapter) times the value per lunch elected by the school... lunches served during that period which meet the nutritional requirements specified in § 210.10 of this...

  20. 7 CFR 240.8 - Payments to program schools, service institutions, nonresidential child care institutions and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... authority of such a school on a monthly basis in an amount equal to the number of lunches served (as reported in accordance with § 210.13(a) of this chapter) times the value per lunch elected by the school... lunches served during that period which meet the nutritional requirements specified in § 210.10 of this...

  1. 7 CFR 240.8 - Payments to program schools, service institutions, nonresidential child care institutions and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... authority of such a school on a monthly basis in an amount equal to the number of lunches served (as reported in accordance with § 210.13(a) of this chapter) times the value per lunch elected by the school... lunches served during that period which meet the nutritional requirements specified in § 210.10 of this...

  2. Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) position statement: SBM supports retaining healthy school lunch policies.

    PubMed

    Buscemi, Joanna; Odoms-Young, Angela; Yaroch, Amy L; Hayman, Laura L; Robertson, Trina P; Fitzgibbon, Marian L

    2015-09-01

    Schools are recognized as venues for population-based health promotion and chronic disease prevention initiatives targeting children, and the school food environment is a central component. The Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010 utilized research-based findings and expert recommendations to significantly improve school lunch standards in the kindergarten to twelfth grade (K-12) setting to enhance the nutritional intake and ultimately the health of children. The new guidelines include increasing the availability of whole grains, fruits, and vegetables; requiring children to select a fruit or vegetable daily; and restricting serving sizes. There is currently no evidence that the revised standards have increased school lunch plate waste. However, there is evidence that children are consuming more healthful foods. The Society of Behavioral Medicine (SBM) supports retaining current school lunch standards set by the Healthy, Hunger-Free Kids Act of 2010. SBM also supports increasing the evidence-based by evaluating the implementation and impact of the school lunch revisions.

  3. The Head Start Child Development and Early Learning Framework: Promoting Positive Outcomes in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children 3-5 Years Old

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Office of Head Start, US Department of Health and Human Services, 2010

    2010-01-01

    This report presents a revision of the Head Start Child Outcomes Framework (2000), renamed The Head Start Child Development and Learning Framework: Promoting Positive Outcomes in Early Childhood Programs Serving Children 3-5 Years Old. The Framework outlines the essential areas of development and learning that are to be used by Head Start programs…

  4. "Multi-County Diagnostic-Instructional Program for Young Deaf Children" (Serving Lee, Collier, Hendry and Charlotte Counties).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee County Board of Public Instruction, Fort Myers, FL.

    Described is a 1 year program designed to provide a sequential diagnostic-instructional program for 16 young deaf and hearing impaired children in four Florida counties. Objectives of the program are said to have included the development of language and communication skills, inservice education for staff members, parent activities to encourage…

  5. Components and Characteristics of Youth Development Programs: The Voices of Youth-Serving Policymakers, Practitioners, Researchers, and Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban, Jennifer Brown

    2008-01-01

    Due to its increasing popularity, youth development (YD) has become a buzzword that is attached to a variety of programs. Several attempts have been made to articulate a unified definition of YD that would enable the field to progress toward measuring the effectiveness of YD programs. In order to determine what constitutes a YD program, we must…

  6. Focusing on food during lunch enhances lunch memory and decreases later snack intake.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Suzanne; Donohoe, Jessica E

    2011-08-01

    We investigated whether eating lunch mindfully, in contrast to eating with distractions or no particular focus, reduces later snack intake and if this is related to a measure of meal memory. The design was between-subjects with three conditions. Twenty-nine female undergraduate students either ate a fixed lunch while (1) focusing on the sensory characteristics of the food as they ate (food focus group), (2) reading a newspaper article about food (food thoughts control group) or (3) in the absence of any secondary task (neutral control group). Cookie intake later that afternoon was measured as well as rated vividness of memory of the lunch. Participants ate significantly fewer cookies in the food focus group than in both the food thoughts control group or the neutral control group. Rated appetite before the snack session was lower in the food focus group than in the other two groups and rated vividness of lunch memory was higher. Rated vividness of lunch memory was negatively correlated with snack intake. These results suggest that enhancing meal memory by paying attention to food while eating can reduce later intake and are consistent with the suggestion that memory plays an important role in appetite control.

  7. Serving Students with Significant Disabilities in Two-Year Colleges: ABLE Program, Longview Community College, Lee's Summit, MO.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gugerty, John, Ed.; Knutsen, Caryl, Ed.

    This report is an outcome of a project designed to seek, screen, evaluate, describe, and disseminate highly effective approaches used by two-year colleges to serve students with significant disabilities. "Two-year colleges" included academic institutions, technical colleges, and vocational institutes. From a pool of 18 applicants, the…

  8. The PILI@Work Program: a translation of the diabetes prevention program to Native Hawaiian-serving worksites in Hawai'i.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Claire K M; Miyamoto, Robin E S; Antonio, Mapuana; Zhang, Guangxing; Paloma, Diane; Basques, DeAnna; Braun, Kathryn L; Kaholokula, Joseph Keawe'aimoku

    2016-06-01

    A previously translated Diabetes Prevention Program Lifestyle Intervention (DPP-LI) was adapted for delivery as a worksite-based intervention, called PILI@Work, to address obesity disparities in Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. This study examined the effectiveness of PILI@Work and factors associated with weight loss at post-intervention. Overweight/obese employees of 15 Native Hawaiian-serving organizations received the 3-month component of PILI@Work. Assessments included weight, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, physical activity and functioning, fat intake, locus of weight control, social support, and self-efficacy. Weight, systolic/diastolic blood pressure, physical functioning, physical activity frequency, fat intake, family support, and eating self-efficacy improved from pre- to post-intervention. Regression analysis indicated that worksite type, decreased diastolic blood pressure, increased physical activity, and more internalized locus of weight control were significantly associated with 3-month weight loss. PILI@Work initiated weight loss in Native Hawaiians/Pacific Islanders. DPP-LI translated to worksite settings and tailored for specific populations can be effective for addressing obesity.

  9. Serving the Needs of Struggling Developmental Education Students: The Development of a Program Planning Guidebook for Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnet, Kimberly Jean

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation describes the process of creating a guidebook that developmental education administrators can use to build their capacity as leaders, learners, and program planners. The guidebook is the product of a qualitative study designed to better understand how community college administrators who have program planning responsibilities for…

  10. Coordinating Volunteers Serving Local Governments. An Evaluation of the C/C/R Volunteer Coordination Programs Funded by ACTION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Team Associates Inc., Washington, DC.

    The City/County/Regional Government Volunteer Programs Coordinator Program was inaugurated by ACTION as one of several projects to test whether the Federal government can play an expanded role in the volunteer movement. ACTION invited interested city, county, and regional governments to submit proposals for participation in a series of 1-year,…

  11. Effectiveness of Four Instructional Programs Designed to Serve English Language Learners: Variation by Ethnicity and Initial English Proficiency

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentino, Rachel A.; Reardon, Sean F.

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates the differences in academic achievement trajectories from elementary through middle school among English Learner students in four different instructional programs: English Immersion, Transitional Bilingual, Developmental Bilingual, and Dual Immersion programs. Comparing students with the same parental preferences but who…

  12. Colleges Serving Aboriginal Learners and Communities: 2010 Environmental Scan. Trends, Programs, Services, Partnerships, Challenges and Lessons Learned

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association of Canadian Community Colleges, 2010

    2010-01-01

    In 2005, the Association of Canadian Community Colleges (ACCC) released the first report on college Aboriginal programs and services entitled Canadian Colleges and Institutes--Meeting the Needs of Aboriginal Learners. The 2005 report provided an overview of the programs and services offered and described how colleges work with Aboriginal…

  13. Serving the Needs of Struggling Developmental Education Students: The Development of a Program Planning Guidebook for Community College Administrators

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bohnet, Kimberly Jean

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation describes the process of creating a guidebook that developmental education administrators can use to build their capacity as leaders, learners, and program planners. The guidebook is the product of a qualitative study designed to better understand how community college administrators who have program planning responsibilities for…

  14. Prolonged chewing at lunch decreases later snack intake.

    PubMed

    Higgs, Suzanne; Jones, Alison

    2013-03-01

    Prolonged chewing of food can reduce meal intake. However, whether prolonged chewing influences intake at a subsequent eating occasion is unknown. We hypothesised that chewing each mouthful for 30s would reduce afternoon snack intake more than (a) an habitual chewing control condition, and (b) an habitual chewing condition with a pauses in between each mouthful to equate the meal durations. We further hypothesised that this effect may be related to effects of prolonged chewing on lunch memory. Forty three participants ate a fixed lunch of sandwiches in the laboratory. They were randomly allocated to one of the three experimental groups according to a between-subjects design. Appetite, mood and lunch enjoyment ratings were taken before and after lunch and before snacking. Snack intake of candies at a taste test 2h after lunch was measured as well as rated vividness of lunch memory. Participants in the prolonged chewing group ate significantly fewer candies than participants in the habitual chewing group. Snack intake by the pauses group did not differ from either the prolonged or habitual chewing groups. Participants in the prolonged chewing group were less happy and enjoyed their lunch significantly less than participants in other conditions. Appetite ratings were not different across groups. Rated vividness of lunch memory was negatively correlated with intake but there was no correlation with rated lunch enjoyment. Prolonged chewing of a meal can reduce later snack intake and further investigation of this technique for appetite control is warranted. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Competing values in serving older and vulnerable adults: adult protective services, mandated reporting, and domestic violence programs.

    PubMed

    Cramer, Elizabeth P; Brady, Shane R

    2013-01-01

    State mandatory reporting statutes may directly or indirectly list domestic violence programs as among those that are mandated reporters of cases of suspected abuse, neglect, or exploitation of older individuals and those with disabilities. Domestic violence programs, however, may not consider themselves to be mandated reporters, because the responsibility of reporting abuse may be contrary to their programmatic philosophy. In the Commonwealth of Virginia, the potential conflict between domestic violence programs and Adult Protective Services about the issue of mandated reporting has created tension between these organizations as each entity continues interpreting the issues and policies of mandated reporting through its own lens. The authors draw out some of the reasons for the conflict as well as make recommendations for improving relationships between the two organizations, which will ultimately benefit vulnerable adults who are experiencing abuse.

  16. Visiting Mom: A pilot evaluation of a prison-based visiting program serving incarcerated mothers and their minor children.

    PubMed

    Schubert, Erin C; Duininck, Megan; Shlafer, Rebecca J

    2016-01-01

    We describe an evaluation of a prison visiting program, Extended Visiting (EV), for incarcerated mothers and their children. Mothers (N = 24) and caregivers (N = 19) were interviewed regarding experiences with the program. Mothers identified benefits including maintaining a relationship with children, physical contact, motivation, privacy, peer support, and personal growth. Caregivers echoed mothers' appreciation for the opportunity to maintain mother-child relationships and physical contact. Mothers identified barriers including desire for overnight visits and more age-appropriate activities. Caregivers perceived travel time and costs and children's adverse reactions as barriers. When comparing EV to typical visiting, participants unanimously preferred EV.

  17. Visiting Mom: A pilot evaluation of a prison-based visiting program serving incarcerated mothers and their minor children

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, Erin C.; Duininck, Megan; Shlafer, Rebecca J.

    2016-01-01

    We describe an evaluation of a prison visiting program, Extended Visiting (EV), for incarcerated mothers and their children. Mothers (N = 24) and caregivers (N = 19) were interviewed regarding experiences with the program. Mothers identified benefits including maintaining a relationship with children, physical contact, motivation, privacy, peer support, and personal growth. Caregivers echoed mothers’ appreciation for the opportunity to maintain mother-child relationships and physical contact. Mothers identified barriers including desire for overnight visits and more age-appropriate activities. Caregivers perceived travel time and costs and children’s adverse reactions as barriers. When comparing EV to typical visiting, participants unanimously preferred EV. PMID:27867281

  18. Evidence-Based Practices, Attitudes, and Beliefs in Substance Abuse Treatment Programs Serving American Indians and Alaska Natives: A Qualitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Larios, Sandra E.; Wright, Serena; Jernstrom, Amanda; Lebron, Dorothy; Sorensen, James L.

    2012-01-01

    Substance abuse disproportionately impacts American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities in the United States. For the increasing numbers of AI/AN individuals who enter and receive treatment for their alcohol or other drug problem it is imperative that the service they receive be effective. This study used qualitative methodology to examine attitudes toward evidence-based practices, also known as evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in minority-serving substance abuse treatment programs in the San Francisco Bay area. Twenty-two interviews were conducted in the study, of which seven were with program directors and substance abuse counselors at two urban AI/AN focused sites. These clinics were more likely than other minority-focused programs to have experience with research and knowledge about adapting EBTs. Only in the AI/AN specific sites did an issue arise concerning visibility, that is, undercounting AI/AN people in national and state databases. Similar to other minority-focused programs, these clinics described mistrust, fear of exploitation from the research community, and negative attitudes towards EBTs. The underutilization of EBTs in substance abuse programs is prevalent and detrimental to the health of patients who would benefit from their use. Future research should explore how to use this research involvement and experience with adaptation to increase the adoption of EBTs in AI/AN serving clinics. PMID:22400469

  19. Evidence-based practices, attitudes, and beliefs in substance abuse treatment programs serving American Indians and Alaska Natives: a qualitative study.

    PubMed

    Larios, Sandra E; Wright, Serena; Jernstrom, Amanda; Lebron, Dorothy; Sorensen, James L

    2011-01-01

    Substance abuse disproportionately impacts American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) communities in the United States. For the increasing numbers of AI/AN individuals who enter and receive treatment for their alcohol or other drug problem it is imperative that the service they receive be effective. This study used qualitative methodology to examine attitudes toward evidence-based practices, also known as evidence-based treatments (EBTs) in minority-serving substance abuse treatment programs in the San Francisco Bay area. Twenty-two interviews were conducted in the study, of which seven were with program directors and substance abuse counselors at two urban AI/AN focused sites. These clinics were more likely than other minority-focused programs to have experience with research and knowledge about adapting EBTs. Only in the AI/AN specific sites did an issue arise concerning visibility, that is, undercounting AI/AN people in national and state databases. Similar to other minority-focused programs, these clinics described mistrust, fear of exploitation from the research community, and negative attitudes towards EBTs. The underutilization of EBTs in substance abuse programs is prevalent and detrimental to the health of patients who would benefit from their use. Future research should explore how to use this research involvement and experience with adaptation to increase the adoption of EBTs in AI/AN serving clinics.

  20. Creating a Narrative-Based Practice Culture across a Youth Serving Agency: The Phoenix Youth Program's Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Little, Alison; Hartman, Lesley; Ungar, Michael

    2008-01-01

    This article details a series of seven workshops held to stimulate conversations about narrative therapy and its application to work with youth in non-clinical residential and community settings. These workshops were facilitated by clinical social workers and a psychologist for a team of program managers with whom they worked in a multi-service…