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Sample records for lung cancer subtypes

  1. Selective expression of transthyretin in subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuai; Sun, Suozhu; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng; Liu, Liyun

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is expressed primarily in liver, choroid plexus of brain and pancreatic islet A and B cells. It is also synthesized in some endocrine tumors. In the present study, the protein expression of TTR in lung cancer tissues and cell lines was investigated by western blot. The mRNA expression of TTR in 24 pairs of frozen lung cancer tissues was examined by RT-PCR. The specific expression and cellular distribution of TTR were also evaluated in 104 paraffin-embedded lung cancer samples and 3 normal lung tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, the subcellular localization and expression of TTR were further analyzed in lung cancer cell lines. With the exception of mucinous adenocarcinoma, the expression of TTR protein was observed in all tested subtypes of lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma displayed the highest positive expression rate of TTR, accounting for 84.4 %, and the positive expression rate of TTR was up to 85.7 % at stages III and IV. The secretory bubbles with strong TTR staining were observed in luminal cells of lung cancer. Furthermore, the localization of TTR in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells and the secretion of TTR into extracellular milieu were also confirmed. Taken together, TTR is selectively synthesized in lung cancer cells and can be secreted extracellularly. PMID:26943652

  2. Opposite Effects of M1 and M2 Macrophage Subtypes on Lung Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ang; Hsiao, Yi-Jing; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Chen, Yu-Yun; Liu, Yi-Chia; Hong, Tsai-Hsia; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J.W.; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages in a tumor microenvironment have been characterized as M1- and M2-polarized subtypes. Here, we discovered the different macrophages’ impacts on lung cancer cell A549. The M2a/M2c subtypes promoted A549 invasion and xenograft tumor growth. The M1 subtype suppressed angiogenesis. M1 enhanced the sensitivity of A549 to cisplatin and decreased the tube formation activity and cell viability of A549 cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. Different macrophage subtypes regulated genes involved in the immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, coagulation, cell adhesion, and apoptosis pathways in A549 cells, which was a pattern that correlated with the altered behaviors of the A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that the identified M1/M2 gene signatures were significantly correlated with the extended overall survival of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that M1/M2 gene expression signature may be used as a prognostic indicator for lung cancer patients, and M1/M2 polarization may be a target of investigation of immune-modulating therapies for lung cancer in the future. PMID:26399191

  3. Variation in lung cancer risk by smoky coal subtype in Xuanwei, China

    SciTech Connect

    Lan, Q.; He, X.Z.; Shen, M.; Tian, L.W.; Liu, L.Z.; Lai, H.; Chen, W.; Berndt, S.I.; Hosgood, H.D.; Lee, K.M.; Zheng, T.Z.; Blair, A.; Chapman, R.S.

    2008-11-01

    Lung cancer rates in Xuanwei County have been among the highest in China for both males and females and have been causally associated with exposure to indoor smoky (bituminous) coal emissions that contain very high levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. There are numerous coal mines across the County. Although lung cancer risk is strongly associated with the use of smoky coal as a whole, variation in risk by smoky coal subtype has not been characterized as yet. We conducted a population-based case-control study of 498 lung cancer cases and 498 controls, individually matched to case subjects on age and sex to examine risk by coal subtype. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for coal subtype were calculated by conditional logistic regression, adjusting for potential confounders. Overall, smoky coal use was positively and statistically significantly associated with lung cancer risk, when compared with the use of smokeless coal or wood (OR = 7.7, 95% CI = 4.5-13.3). Furthermore, there was a marked heterogeneity in risk estimates for specific subtypes of smoky coal (test for heterogeneity: p = 5.17 x 10{sup -10}). Estimates were highest for coal of the Laibin (OR = 24.8, 95 % CI = 12.4-49.6) and Longtan (OR = 11.6, 95 % CI = 5.0-27.2) coal types and lower for coal from other subtypes. These findings strongly suggest that in Xuanwei and elsewhere, the carcinogenic potential of coal combustion products can exhibit substantial local variation by specific coal source.

  4. Socio-economic status and lung cancer risk including histologic subtyping--a longitudinal study.

    PubMed

    Ekberg-Aronsson, Marie; Nilsson, Peter M; Nilsson, Jan-Ake; Pehrsson, Kerstin; Löfdahl, Claes-Göran

    2006-01-01

    We investigated prospectively the risk of lung cancer in relation to socio-economic status (SES) in 22,387 middle-aged individuals who attended a screening program in the city of Malmö, Sweden between 1974 and 1992. We also examined the relationship between SES and histologic subtype in smokers. By 2003, a total of 550 lung cancer cases had been identified. Relative risks (RR) were calculated with adjustment for age, current smoking, inhalation habits and marital status at baseline in the low SES group compared to high SES group. Among smokers, the RR (95% confidence interval (CI)) for lung cancer in the low SES group of men was 1.39 (1.11-1.73), and women 1.56 (1.04-2.34). Also among smokers, low SES was associated with an increased risk of squamous cell carcinoma in men; RR 1.89 (1.16-2.81) and women; RR 7.10 (1.63-30.86), and with an increased risk of mesothelioma in men RR 9.97 (1.29-76.96). We conclude that low SES groups run an increased risk of lung cancer despite accounting for smoking habits. Furthermore, low SES was positively associated with squamous cell carcinoma and mesothelioma. Our results suggest that the association between low SES and lung cancer could be mediated by unaccounted for smoking exposure, lifestyle or occupational hazards.

  5. Increased trefoil factor 3 levels in the serum of patients with three major histological subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yiqing; Yang, Yie; Ma, Dedong; Xiao, Wei

    2012-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related deaths in the world. The trefoil factor (TFF) family is composed of three thermostable, and protease-resistant proteins, named TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3. TFF protein levels have been found to be related to the development of various types of cancer. However, it is still unclear whether TFF proteins are differentially expressed in the serum of different histological subtypes of lung cancer compared to healthy individuals. In this study, we investigated the levels of TFF proteins in serum and lung tissues of 130 lung cancer patients (58 squamous cell lung carcinoma cases, 43 adenocarcinoma cases and 29 SCLC cases) and 60 healthy individuals. It was found that TFF1 and TFF2 have similar or slightly higher levels in these three subtypes of lung cancer compared to healthy individuals, while TFF3 levels were significantly higher in the examined lung cancer cases compared to healthy individuals. Immunoblot analyses of TFF1, TFF2 and TFF3 indicated that lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines have a higher expression of the TFF3 protein, but not of TFF1 or TFF2 proteins, compared to tissues from healthy individuals or from the normal cell line. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis indicated higher levels of TFF3, but not TFF1 and TFF2, transcripts in lung cancer tissues or cell lines. These results show increased TFF3 levels in serum and lung tissues, suggesting that TFF3 may serve as a promising, easily detected biomarker of lung cancer.

  6. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  7. In-Silico Prediction of Key Metabolic Differences between Two Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rezola, Alberto; Pey, Jon; Rubio, Ángel; Planes, Francisco J.

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism expresses the phenotype of living cells and understanding it is crucial for different applications in biotechnology and health. With the increasing availability of metabolomic, proteomic and, to a larger extent, transcriptomic data, the elucidation of specific metabolic properties in different scenarios and cell types is a key topic in systems biology. Despite the potential of the elementary flux mode (EFM) concept for this purpose, its use has been limited so far, mainly because their computation has been infeasible for genome-scale metabolic networks. In a recent work, we determined a subset of EFMs in human metabolism and proposed a new protocol to integrate gene expression data, spotting key 'characteristic EFMs' in different scenarios. Our approach was successfully applied to identify metabolic differences among several human healthy tissues. In this article, we evaluated the performance of our approach in clinically interesting situation. In particular, we identified key EFMs and metabolites in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma subtypes of non-small cell lung cancers. Results are consistent with previous knowledge of these major subtypes of lung cancer in the medical literature. Therefore, this work constitutes the starting point to establish a new methodology that could lead to distinguish key metabolic processes among different clinical outcomes. PMID:25093336

  8. In-silico prediction of key metabolic differences between two non-small cell lung cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rezola, Alberto; Pey, Jon; Rubio, Ángel; Planes, Francisco J

    2014-01-01

    Metabolism expresses the phenotype of living cells and understanding it is crucial for different applications in biotechnology and health. With the increasing availability of metabolomic, proteomic and, to a larger extent, transcriptomic data, the elucidation of specific metabolic properties in different scenarios and cell types is a key topic in systems biology. Despite the potential of the elementary flux mode (EFM) concept for this purpose, its use has been limited so far, mainly because their computation has been infeasible for genome-scale metabolic networks. In a recent work, we determined a subset of EFMs in human metabolism and proposed a new protocol to integrate gene expression data, spotting key 'characteristic EFMs' in different scenarios. Our approach was successfully applied to identify metabolic differences among several human healthy tissues. In this article, we evaluated the performance of our approach in clinically interesting situation. In particular, we identified key EFMs and metabolites in adenocarcinoma and squamous-cell carcinoma subtypes of non-small cell lung cancers. Results are consistent with previous knowledge of these major subtypes of lung cancer in the medical literature. Therefore, this work constitutes the starting point to establish a new methodology that could lead to distinguish key metabolic processes among different clinical outcomes. PMID:25093336

  9. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  10. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  11. Differential effects of MTSS1 on invasion and proliferation in subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Dong-Jin; Chen, Zhong-Shu; Liao, Qian-De; Feng, Jian-Xiong; Zhang, Xue-Yu; Yin, Ta-Yao

    2016-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for >80% of all cases of lung cancer and can be divided into lung adenocarcinoma (LAC), large-cell carcinoma (LCC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Accumulating evidence suggests that MTSS1, which is a newly discovered protein associated with tumor progression and metastasis, may have differential roles in cancer malignancy. As it has been demonstrated that MTSS1 is overexpressed in NSCLC and may be an independent prognostic factor in patients with SCC, the present study explored the differential roles of MTSS1 in the invasion and proliferation of different subtypes of NSCLC. Stable overexpression and knockdown of MTSS1 was performed in human NSCLC H920 (LAC), H1581 (LCC) and SW900 cell lines (SCC), and western blot, cell invasion, proliferation and FAK activity analyses were used to investigate the effects. Overexpression of MTSS1 enhanced the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, and these effects were abolished by treatment with selective FAK inhibitor 14, which did not affect the expression of MTSS1. Notably, overexpression of MTSS1 inhibited invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells, and this effect was enhanced by the selective FAK inhibitor. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased the invasion and proliferation abilities of H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased invasion and proliferation in SW900 cells. Furthermore, while overexpression of MTSS1 induced FAK phosphorylation and activity in H920 and H1581 cells, MTSS1 overexpression inhibited FAK phosphorylation/activity in SW900 cells. Knockdown of MTSS1 decreased FAK phosphorylation/activity in H920 and H1581 cells, whereas knockdown increased these processes in SW900 cells. To the best of our knowledge, the present study was the first to demonstrate that MTSS1 has differential roles in various subtypes of NSCLC, acting via a FAK-dependent mechanism. The results indicated that MTSS1 may enhance invasion and proliferation in LAC and LCC

  12. Selective tropism of Seneca Valley virus for variant subtype small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Poirier, J T; Dobromilskaya, Irina; Moriarty, Whei F; Peacock, Craig D; Hann, Christine L; Rudin, Charles M

    2013-07-17

    We assessed the efficacy of Seneca Valley virus (SVV-001), a neuroendocrine cancer-selective oncolytic picornavirus, in primary heterotransplant mouse models of small cell lung cancer (SCLC), including three lines each of classic and variant SCLC. Half-maximal effective concentrations for cell lines derived from three variant heterotransplants ranged from 1.6×10(-3) (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1×10(-3) to 2.5×10(-3)) to 3.9×10(-3) (95% CI = 2.8×10(-3) to 5.5×10(-3)). Sustained tumor growth inhibition in vivo was only observed in variant lines (two-sided Student t test, P < .005 for each). Doses of 10(14) vp/kg were able to completely and durably eradicate tumors in a variant SCLC heterotransplant model in two of six mice. Gene expression profiling revealed that permissive lines are typified by lower expression of the early neurogenic transcription factor ASCL1 and, conversely, by higher expression of the late neurogenic transcription factor NEUROD1. This classifier demonstrates a sensitivity of .89, specificity of .92, and accuracy of .91. The NEUROD1 to ASCL1 ratio may serve as a predictive biomarker of SVV-001 efficacy.

  13. Hidden Treasures in “Ancient” Microarrays: Gene-Expression Portrays Biology and Potential Resistance Pathways of Major Lung Cancer Subtypes and Normal Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Kerkentzes, Konstantinos; Lagani, Vincenzo; Tsamardinos, Ioannis; Vyberg, Mogens; Røe, Oluf Dimitri

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Novel statistical methods and increasingly more accurate gene annotations can transform “old” biological data into a renewed source of knowledge with potential clinical relevance. Here, we provide an in silico proof-of-concept by extracting novel information from a high-quality mRNA expression dataset, originally published in 2001, using state-of-the-art bioinformatics approaches. Methods: The dataset consists of histologically defined cases of lung adenocarcinoma (AD), squamous (SQ) cell carcinoma, small-cell lung cancer, carcinoid, metastasis (breast and colon AD), and normal lung specimens (203 samples in total). A battery of statistical tests was used for identifying differential gene expressions, diagnostic and prognostic genes, enriched gene ontologies, and signaling pathways. Results: Our results showed that gene expressions faithfully recapitulate immunohistochemical subtype markers, as chromogranin A in carcinoids, cytokeratin 5, p63 in SQ, and TTF1 in non-squamous types. Moreover, biological information with putative clinical relevance was revealed as potentially novel diagnostic genes for each subtype with specificity 93–100% (AUC = 0.93–1.00). Cancer subtypes were characterized by (a) differential expression of treatment target genes as TYMS, HER2, and HER3 and (b) overrepresentation of treatment-related pathways like cell cycle, DNA repair, and ERBB pathways. The vascular smooth muscle contraction, leukocyte trans-endothelial migration, and actin cytoskeleton pathways were overexpressed in normal tissue. Conclusion: Reanalysis of this public dataset displayed the known biological features of lung cancer subtypes and revealed novel pathways of potentially clinical importance. The findings also support our hypothesis that even old omics data of high quality can be a source of significant biological information when appropriate bioinformatics methods are used. PMID:25325012

  14. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  15. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  16. Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stromal cells have contrasting effects on proliferation and phenotype of cancer stem cells from different subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Vulcano, Francesca; Milazzo, Luisa; Ciccarelli, Carmela; Eramo, Adriana; Sette, Giovanni; Mauro, Annunziata; Macioce, Giampiero; Martinelli, Andrea; La Torre, Renato; Casalbore, Patrizia; Hassan, Hamisa Jane; Giampaolo, Adele

    2016-07-15

    Studies on the role of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) on tumor growth have reported both a tumor promoting and a suppressive effect. The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of MSC isolated from Wharton's jelly of umbilical cord (WJMSC) on lung cancer stem cells (LCSC) derived from human lung tumors: two adenocarcinomas (AC) and two squamous cell carcinomas (SCC). LCSC derived from SCC and AC expressed, to varying extents, the more relevant stem cell markers. The effect of WJMSC on LCSC was investigated in vitro using conditioned medium (WJ-CM): a proliferation increase in AC-LCSC was observed, with an increase in the ALDH+ and in the CD133+ cell population. By contrast, WJ-CM hampered the growth of SCC-LCSC, with an increase in the pre-G1 phase indicating the induction of apoptosis. Furthermore, the ALDH+ and CD133+ population was also reduced. In vivo, subcutaneous co-transplantation of AC-LCSC/WJMSC generated larger tumors than AC-LCSC alone, characterized by an increased percentage of CD133+ and CD166+ cells. By contrast, co-transplantation of WJMSC and SCC-LCSC did not affect the tumor size. Our results strongly suggest that WJMSC exert, both in vitro and in vivo, contrasting effects on LCSC derived from different lung tumor subtypes. PMID:27343631

  17. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  18. Distinctive Patterns of Initially Presenting Metastases and Clinical Outcomes According to the Histological Subtypes in Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong Soo; Kim, Yeon S.; Kay, Chul S.; Kim, Sung H.; Yeo, Chang D.; Kim, Jin W.; Kim, Seung Joon; Kim, Young K.; Ko, Yoon H.; Kang, Jin H.; Lee, Kyo Y.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract This study was designed to compare the primary patterns of metastases and clinical outcomes between adenocarcinoma (Adenoca) and squamous cell carcinoma (SQ) in initially diagnosed stage IV non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Between June 2007 and June 2013, a total of 427 eligible patients were analyzed. These patients were histologically confirmed as Adenoca or SQ and underwent systemic imaging studies, including 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography and brain imaging. Synchronous metastatic sites were categorized into 7 areas, and whole-body metastatic scores were calculated from 1 to 7 by summation of each involved region. We compared the patient, tumor, and metastatic characteristics according to the histological subtypes, and examined clinical outcomes. The enrolled study cohort comprised 81% (n = 346) Adenoca patients and 19% (n = 81) SQ patients. The median age of the study population was 65 years (range, 30–94 years), and 263 (61.6%) patients were male. The most common metastatic sites were thoracic lymph nodes (LNs) (84.3%), followed by lung to lung/lymphangitic spread (59%) and bone (54.8%). The distribution of patient characteristics revealed that age ≥65 years (69.1% vs 50.6%; P = 0.003) and male sex (84% vs 56.4%; P < 0.001) were more frequently found in SQ patients. Regarding metastatic features, bone metastasis (60.4% vs 30.9%; P < 0.001), lung to lung/lymphangitic metastasis (63% vs 42%; P = 0.001), and brain metastasis (35% vs 16%; P = 0.001) were significantly and more frequently found in Adenoca patients. Patients with high metastatic scores (score 3–6) were more frequently found to have Adenoca (91.6% vs 73.4%; P < 0.001). In multivariate prognostic evaluation, sex (P = 0.001), age (P < 0.001), histology (P < 0.001), LN status (P = 0.032), pleural/pericardial metastasis (P = 0.003), abdomen/pelvis metastasis (P < 0.001), axilla

  19. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  20. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  1. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  2. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  4. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  5. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  6. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  7. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  8. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  9. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Deffebach, Mark E; Humphrey, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer in high-risk individuals with annual low-dose computed tomography has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and is recommended by multiple health care organizations. Lung cancer screening is not a specific test; it is a process that involves appropriate selection of high-risk individuals, careful interpretation and follow-up of imaging, and annual testing. Screening should be performed in the context of a multidisciplinary program experienced in the diagnosis and management of lung nodules and early-stage lung cancer.

  10. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  11. Cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rucińska, M; Skrzydlewski, Z; Zaremba, E; Furman, M; Kasacka, I

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, microcellular carcinoma, macrocellular carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) show procoagulant activity. It mainly depends on the presence of cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer cells.

  12. Brain metastases free survival differs between breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Berghoff, A; Bago-Horvath, Z; De Vries, C; Dubsky, P; Pluschnig, U; Rudas, M; Rottenfusser, A; Knauer, M; Eiter, H; Fitzal, F; Dieckmann, K; Mader, R M; Gnant, M; Zielinski, C C; Steger, G G; Preusser, M; Bartsch, R

    2012-01-01

    Background: Brain metastases (BM) are frequently diagnosed in patients with HER-2-positive metastatic breast cancer; in addition, an increasing incidence was reported for triple-negative tumours. We aimed to compare brain metastases free survival (BMFS) of breast cancer subtypes in patients treated between 1996 until 2010. Methods: Brain metastases free survival was measured as the interval from diagnosis of extracranial breast cancer metastases until diagnosis of BM. HER-2 status was analysed by immunohistochemistry and reanalysed by fluorescent in situ hybridisation if a score of 2+ was gained. Oestrogen-receptor (ER) and progesterone-receptor (PgR) status was analysed by immunohistochemistry. Brain metastases free survival curves were estimated with the Kaplan–Meier method and compared with the log-rank test. Results: Data of 213 patients (46 luminal/124 HER-2/43 triple-negative subtype) with BM from breast cancer were available for the analysis. Brain metastases free survival differed significantly between breast cancer subtypes. Median BMFS in triple-negative tumours was 14 months (95% CI: 11.34–16.66) compared with 18 months (95% CI: 14.46–21.54) in HER-2-positive tumours (P=0.001) and 34 months (95% CI: 23.71–44.29) in luminal tumours (P=0.001), respectively. In HER-2-positive patients, co-positivity for ER and HER-2 prolonged BMFS (26 vs 15 m; P=0.033); in luminal tumours, co-expression of ER and PgR was not significantly associated with BMFS. Brain metastases free survival in patients with lung metastases was significantly shorter (17 vs 21 months; P=0.014). Conclusion: Brain metastases free survival in triple-negative breast cancer, as well as in HER-2-positive/ER-negative, is significantly shorter compared with HER-2/ER co-positive or luminal tumours, mirroring the aggressiveness of these breast cancer subtypes. PMID:22233926

  13. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  14. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  15. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  16. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries.

  17. Glycosyltransferase Gene Expression Profiles Classify Cancer Types and Propose Prognostic Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Naidoo, Kevin J

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant glycosylation in tumours stem from altered glycosyltransferase (GT) gene expression but can the expression profiles of these signature genes be used to classify cancer types and lead to cancer subtype discovery? The differential structural changes to cellular glycan structures are predominantly regulated by the expression patterns of GT genes and are a hallmark of neoplastic cell metamorphoses. We found that the expression of 210 GT genes taken from 1893 cancer patient samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microarray data are able to classify six cancers; breast, ovarian, glioblastoma, kidney, colon and lung. The GT gene expression profiles are used to develop cancer classifiers and propose subtypes. The subclassification of breast cancer solid tumour samples illustrates the discovery of subgroups from GT genes that match well against basal-like and HER2-enriched subtypes and correlates to clinical, mutation and survival data. This cancer type glycosyltransferase gene signature finding provides foundational evidence for the centrality of glycosylation in cancer. PMID:27198045

  18. Glycosyltransferase Gene Expression Profiles Classify Cancer Types and Propose Prognostic Subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashkani, Jahanshah; Naidoo, Kevin J.

    2016-05-01

    Aberrant glycosylation in tumours stem from altered glycosyltransferase (GT) gene expression but can the expression profiles of these signature genes be used to classify cancer types and lead to cancer subtype discovery? The differential structural changes to cellular glycan structures are predominantly regulated by the expression patterns of GT genes and are a hallmark of neoplastic cell metamorphoses. We found that the expression of 210 GT genes taken from 1893 cancer patient samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) microarray data are able to classify six cancers; breast, ovarian, glioblastoma, kidney, colon and lung. The GT gene expression profiles are used to develop cancer classifiers and propose subtypes. The subclassification of breast cancer solid tumour samples illustrates the discovery of subgroups from GT genes that match well against basal-like and HER2-enriched subtypes and correlates to clinical, mutation and survival data. This cancer type glycosyltransferase gene signature finding provides foundational evidence for the centrality of glycosylation in cancer.

  19. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  20. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  1. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of N2 means cancer has spread to the middle part of the chest (called the mediastinum). A rating ... so that the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung and/or lymph node ... biopsied are your lungs, bones, and brain. These types of biopsies can be done with ...

  2. Justice and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, yet research funding is by far the lowest for lung cancer than for any other cancer compared with respective death rates. Although this discrepancy should appear alarming, one could argue that lung cancer deserves less attention because it is more attributable to poor life choices than other common cancers. Accordingly, the general question that I ask in this article is whether victims of more avoidable diseases, such as lung cancer, deserve to have their needs taken into less consideration than those of less avoidable diseases, on the grounds of either retributive or distributive justice. Such unequal treatment may be the "penalty" one incurs for negligent or reckless behavior. However, I hope to show that such unequal treatment cannot be supported by any coherent accounts of retributive or distributive justice.

  3. Justice and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, yet research funding is by far the lowest for lung cancer than for any other cancer compared with respective death rates. Although this discrepancy should appear alarming, one could argue that lung cancer deserves less attention because it is more attributable to poor life choices than other common cancers. Accordingly, the general question that I ask in this article is whether victims of more avoidable diseases, such as lung cancer, deserve to have their needs taken into less consideration than those of less avoidable diseases, on the grounds of either retributive or distributive justice. Such unequal treatment may be the "penalty" one incurs for negligent or reckless behavior. However, I hope to show that such unequal treatment cannot be supported by any coherent accounts of retributive or distributive justice. PMID:23449364

  4. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  5. Industrial Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Maxwell

    1982-01-01

    There are many known chemical and physical causes of industrial lung cancer. Their common feature is a long latent period—usually ten to 40 years—between initial exposure to the carcinogen and clinical recognition of the lesion. Occupationally induced lung cancer is indistinguishable from lung cancer of unknown etiology or that caused by cigaret smoking. Smoking alone is responsible for a very large proportion of all lung cancer and it potentiates the effect of most other carcinogens. Most cases of lung cancer in the next 20-30 years will be the result of exposures which have already occurred. In these cases, early diagnosis of pre-invasive resectable lesions offers the only hope for prolonging life. PMID:21286559

  6. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  7. The consensus molecular subtypes of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Guinney, Justin; Dienstmann, Rodrigo; Wang, Xin; de Reyniès, Aurélien; Schlicker, Andreas; Soneson, Charlotte; Marisa, Laetitia; Roepman, Paul; Nyamundanda, Gift; Angelino, Paolo; Bot, Brian M; Morris, Jeffrey S; Simon, Iris M; Gerster, Sarah; Fessler, Evelyn; De Sousa E Melo, Felipe; Missiaglia, Edoardo; Ramay, Hena; Barras, David; Homicsko, Krisztian; Maru, Dipen; Manyam, Ganiraju C; Broom, Bradley; Boige, Valerie; Perez-Villamil, Beatriz; Laderas, Ted; Salazar, Ramon; Gray, Joe W; Hanahan, Douglas; Tabernero, Josep; Bernards, Rene; Friend, Stephen H; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Medema, Jan Paul; Sadanandam, Anguraj; Wessels, Lodewyk; Delorenzi, Mauro; Kopetz, Scott; Vermeulen, Louis; Tejpar, Sabine

    2015-11-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a frequently lethal disease with heterogeneous outcomes and drug responses. To resolve inconsistencies among the reported gene expression-based CRC classifications and facilitate clinical translation, we formed an international consortium dedicated to large-scale data sharing and analytics across expert groups. We show marked interconnectivity between six independent classification systems coalescing into four consensus molecular subtypes (CMSs) with distinguishing features: CMS1 (microsatellite instability immune, 14%), hypermutated, microsatellite unstable and strong immune activation; CMS2 (canonical, 37%), epithelial, marked WNT and MYC signaling activation; CMS3 (metabolic, 13%), epithelial and evident metabolic dysregulation; and CMS4 (mesenchymal, 23%), prominent transforming growth factor-β activation, stromal invasion and angiogenesis. Samples with mixed features (13%) possibly represent a transition phenotype or intratumoral heterogeneity. We consider the CMS groups the most robust classification system currently available for CRC-with clear biological interpretability-and the basis for future clinical stratification and subtype-based targeted interventions.

  8. Maternal lung cancer and testicular cancer risk in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Kaijser, Magnus; Akre, Olof; Cnattingius, Sven; Ekbom, Anders

    2003-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that smoking during pregnancy could increase the offspring's risk for testicular cancer. This hypothesis is indirectly supported by both ecological studies and studies of cancer aggregations within families. However, results from analytical epidemiological studies are not consistent, possibly due to methodological difficulties. To further study the association between smoking during pregnancy and testicular cancer, we did a population-based cohort study on cancer risk among offspring of women diagnosed with lung cancer. Through the use of the Swedish Cancer Register and the Swedish Second-Generation Register, we identified 8,430 women who developed lung cancer between 1958 and 1997 and delivered sons between 1941 and 1979. Cancer cases among the male offspring were then identified through the Swedish Cancer Register. Standardized incidence ratios were computed, using 95% confidence intervals. We identified 12,592 male offspring of mothers with a subsequent diagnosis of lung cancer, and there were 40 cases of testicular cancer (standardized incidence ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.58). The association was independent of maternal lung cancer subtype, and the risk of testicular cancer increased stepwise with decreasing time interval between birth and maternal lung cancer diagnosis. Our results support the hypothesis that exposure to cigarette smoking in utero increases the risk of testicular cancer.

  9. TCGA researchers identify 4 subtypes of stomach cancer

    Cancer.gov

    Stomach cancers fall into four distinct molecular subtypes, researchers with The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Network have found. Scientists report that this discovery could change how researchers think about developing treatments for stomach cancer, also c

  10. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 224,390 % of All New Cancer Cases 13.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 158,080 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 415,707 people living with lung and bronchus ...

  11. Breast cancer intrinsic subtype classification, clinical use and future trends

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu; Yang, Yankun; Liu, Xiuxia; Zhan, Jinling; Shi, Bozhi

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is composed of multiple subtypes with distinct morphologies and clinical implications. The advent of microarrays has led to a new paradigm in deciphering breast cancer heterogeneity, based on which the intrinsic subtyping system using prognostic multigene classifiers was developed. Subtypes identified using different gene panels, though overlap to a great extent, do not completely converge, and the avail of new information and perspectives has led to the emergence of novel subtypes, which complicate our understanding towards breast tumor heterogeneity. This review explores and summarizes the existing intrinsic subtypes, patient clinical features and management, commercial signature panels, as well as various information used for tumor classification. Two trends are pointed out in the end on breast cancer subtyping, i.e., either diverging to more refined groups or converging to the major subtypes. This review improves our understandings towards breast cancer intrinsic classification, current status on clinical application, and future trends. PMID:26693050

  12. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  13. Oncotargets in different renal cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Moch, Holger; Montironi, Rodolfo; Lopez-Beltran, Antonio; Cheng, Liang; Mischo, Axel

    2015-01-01

    Renal cell cancer is a heterogeneous group of cancers with different histologic subtypes. The majority of renal tumors in adults are clear cell renal cell carcinomas, which are characterized by von Hippel- Lindau (VHL) gene alterations. Recent advances in defining the genetic landscape of renal cancer has shown the genetic heterogeneity of clear cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) and the presence of at least 3 additional ccRCC tumor suppressor genes on chromosome 3p. Due to inactivation of VHL, renal cancer cells produce the HIF-responsive growth factor VEGF. The PI3K--mTORC1 signaling axis also represents a target for therapy. The new systemic therapies, including tyrosine kinase inhibitors, monoclonal antibodies, and mTOR inhibitors, aim to suppress angiogenesis with vascular endothelial growth factor as a target. Various VEGF-inhibitors are approved for the treatment of ccRCC and we discuss recent advancements in the treatment of metastatic ccRCC. Other gene alterations have been identified in hereditary cancer syndromes, e.g. FLCN, TSC1, TSC2, TFE3, TFEB, MITF, FH, SDHB, SDHD, MET, and PTEN and we review their role in renal tumor carcinogenesis, prognosis, and targeted therapy. By reviewing the associations between morphologic features and molecular genetics of renal cancer we provide insight into the basis for targeted renal cancer therapy.

  14. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  15. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  16. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  17. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  18. Lung Cancer Statistics.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Siegel, Rebecca L; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the United States. It is also the leading cause of cancer death among men and the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Lung cancer rates and trends vary substantially by sex, age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography because of differences in historical smoking patterns. Lung cancer mortality rates in the United States are highest among males, blacks, people of lower socioeconomic status, and in the mid-South (e.g., Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee). Globally, rates are highest in countries where smoking uptake began earliest, such as those in North America and Europe. Although rates are now decreasing in most of these countries (e.g., United States, United Kingdom, Australia), especially in men, they are increasing in countries where smoking uptake occurred later. Low- and middle-income countries now account for more than 50% of lung cancer deaths each year. This chapter reviews lung cancer incidence and mortality patterns in the United States and globally.

  19. [Lung cancer, smoking and genetic modifications].

    PubMed

    Popescu, Iulian

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer represents a heterogeneity entity consisting of different histopathologic, clinic and therapeutic subtypes. Smoking is the most well-known risk factor, but the mechanisms of occurrence of lung cancer are not completely understood yet. The effects of smoking are related to the young age of beginning of smoking, the daily dose and the length of smoking, but they also depend of the individual heredity due to the gene polymorphism. Smoking induces several deleterious mechanisms: inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes, activation of proto-oncogenes, increase in telomerase's activity.

  20. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts.

  1. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  2. Challenges in studying the etiology of breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Troester, Melissa A; Swift-Scanlan, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    Research that classifies breast tumors into homogenous subgroups could ultimately help to define public health prevention strategies for aggressive breast cancer subtypes. However, etiologic research on molecular breast cancer subtypes must overcome several challenges. Stratifying breast cancers into subgroups can reduce statistical power and, therefore, may require non-traditional analytical methods. Integrating results across studies is hampered by varying definitions of molecular subtypes, with some studies using triple negative status and others using specific markers to define basal-like cancers. In addition, triple negative and basal-like breast cancers appear to show strong associations with race, so the varied racial and ethnic composition of different datasets can make comparison across studies challenging. In spite of these challenges, some strong and consistent associations between triple negative or basal-like breast cancer and demographic variables are emerging, and there are hints that prevention strategies for this aggressive subtype of breast cancer may also be attainable.

  3. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The survival from bronchogenic carcinoma is highly dependent upon stage at the time of treatment. This is particularly true for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma, but holds true for small cell carcinoma as well. The problem presented to the medical profession has been to find a practical means of detecting lung cancer while it is still at an early stage. Three studies in progress have indicated that a larger proportion of the patients may be found to have early stage lung cancer when screened with a combination of chest X-rays and sputum cytology. However, the detection of these early stage cases has not yet been translated into an improvement in the overall mortality rate from lung cancer. PMID:6278787

  4. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  5. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trials

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trials that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  6. [Lung cancer in elderly patients: lung cancer and lung function].

    PubMed

    Tanita, Tatsuo

    2005-07-01

    The incidence of bronchogenic carcinoma is increasing as life expectancy rises. With increase in the aged population in Japan, the number of patients suffering from lung cancer and candidates for lung resections are increasing. In this paper, the author lists up indispensable procedures for diagnosis, namely, lung function tests, unilateral pulmonary arterial occlusion test and exercise tolerance test. The cut-offs for identifying candidates for elderly patients for lung resections can be applied the same cut-offs for younger patients. Also the author indicates the importance of postoperative management for lung lobe resections. In order to prevent postoperative problems such as congestive heart failure that might be a fetal complication, the most useful check values after the lung surgery for elderly patients are rate of transfusion and urine volume. In conclusion, when elderly patients assert their rights to undergo lung surgery, we, the thoracic surgeons, should reply their requests under the equal quality of safe surgery as that for younger patients. Besides, it is desirable that even elderly patients, over 80 years old, who undergo lung surgery should guarantee their quality of daily life after surgery.

  7. Radon and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.91 references.

  8. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.

  9. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  10. Molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    During the last 15 years, traditional breast cancer classifications based on histopathology have been reorganized into the luminal A, luminal B, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and basal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling. Each molecular subtype has shown varying risk for progression, response to treatment, and survival outcomes. Research linking the imaging phenotype with the molecular subtype has revealed that non-calcified, relatively circumscribed masses with posterior acoustic enhancement are common in the basal-like subtype, spiculated masses with a poorly circumscribed margin and posterior acoustic shadowing in the luminal subtype, and pleomorphic calcifications in the HER2-enriched subtype. Understanding the clinical implications of the molecular subtypes and imaging phenotypes could help radiologists guide precision medicine, tailoring medical treatment to patients and their tumor characteristics. PMID:27599892

  11. Validation of the Lung Subtyping Panel in Multiple Fresh-Frozen and Formalin-Fixed, Paraffin-Embedded Lung Tumor Gene Expression Data Sets.

    PubMed

    Faruki, Hawazin; Mayhew, Gregory M; Fan, Cheng; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Parker, Scott; Kam-Morgan, Lauren; Eisenberg, Marcia; Horten, Bruce; Hayes, D Neil; Perou, Charles M; Lai-Goldman, Myla

    2016-06-01

    Context .- A histologic classification of lung cancer subtypes is essential in guiding therapeutic management. Objective .- To complement morphology-based classification of lung tumors, a previously developed lung subtyping panel (LSP) of 57 genes was tested using multiple public fresh-frozen gene-expression data sets and a prospectively collected set of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumor samples. Design .- The LSP gene-expression signature was evaluated in multiple lung cancer gene-expression data sets totaling 2177 patients collected from 4 platforms: Illumina RNAseq (San Diego, California), Agilent (Santa Clara, California) and Affymetrix (Santa Clara) microarrays, and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Gene centroids were calculated for each of 3 genomic-defined subtypes: adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and neuroendocrine, the latter of which encompassed both small cell carcinoma and carcinoid. Classification by LSP into 3 subtypes was evaluated in both fresh-frozen and formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tumor samples, and agreement with the original morphology-based diagnosis was determined. Results .- The LSP-based classifications demonstrated overall agreement with the original clinical diagnosis ranging from 78% (251 of 322) to 91% (492 of 538 and 869 of 951) in the fresh-frozen public data sets and 84% (65 of 77) in the formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded data set. The LSP performance was independent of tissue-preservation method and gene-expression platform. Secondary, blinded pathology review of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded samples demonstrated concordance of 82% (63 of 77) with the original morphology diagnosis. Conclusions .- The LSP gene-expression signature is a reproducible and objective method for classifying lung tumors and demonstrates good concordance with morphology-based classification across multiple data sets. The LSP panel can supplement morphologic assessment of lung cancers, particularly

  12. DNA methylation epigenotypes in breast cancer molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Identification of gene expression-based breast cancer subtypes is considered a critical means of prognostication. Genetic mutations along with epigenetic alterations contribute to gene-expression changes occurring in breast cancer. So far, these epigenetic contributions to sporadic breast cancer subtypes have not been well characterized, and only a limited understanding exists of the epigenetic mechanisms affected in those particular breast cancer subtypes. The present study was undertaken to dissect the breast cancer methylome and to deliver specific epigenotypes associated with particular breast cancer subtypes. Methods By using a microarray approach, we analyzed DNA methylation in regulatory regions of 806 cancer-related genes in 28 breast cancer paired samples. We subsequently performed substantial technical and biologic validation by pyrosequencing, investigating the top qualifying 19 CpG regions in independent cohorts encompassing 47 basal-like, 44 ERBB2+ overexpressing, 48 luminal A, and 48 luminal B paired breast cancer/adjacent tissues. With the all-subset selection method, we identified the most subtype-predictive methylation profiles in multivariable logistic regression analysis. Results The approach efficiently recognized 15 individual CpG loci differentially methylated in breast cancer tumor subtypes. We further identified novel subtype-specific epigenotypes that clearly demonstrate the differences in the methylation profiles of basal-like and human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2)-overexpressing tumors. Conclusions Our results provide evidence that well-defined DNA methylation profiles enable breast cancer subtype prediction and support the utilization of this biomarker for prognostication and therapeutic stratification of patients with breast cancer. PMID:20920229

  13. Identification of different subtypes of breast cancer using tissue microarray.

    PubMed

    Munirah, M A; Siti-Aishah, M A; Reena, M Z; Sharifah, N A; Rohaizak, M; Norlia, A; Rafie, M K M; Asmiati, A; Hisham, A; Fuad, I; Shahrun, N S; Das, S

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer may be classified into luminal A, luminal B, HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes based on gene expression profiling or immunohistochemical (IHC) characteristics. The main aim of the present study was to classify breast cancer into molecular subtypes based on immunohistochemistry findings and correlate the subtypes with clinicopathological factors. Two hundred and seventeen primary breast carcinomas tumor tissues were immunostained for ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR, CK8/18, p53 and Ki67 using tissue microarray technique. All subtypes were significantly associated with Malay ethnic background (p=0.035) compared to other racial origins. The most common subtypes of breast cancers were luminal A and was significantly associated with low histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 negativity (p=0.003) compared to HER2+/ER-, basal-like and normal-like subtypes with high histological grade (p<0.000) and p53 positivity (p=0.003). Luminal B subtype had the smallest mean tumor size (p=0.009) and also the highest mean number of lymph nodes positive (p=0.032) compared to other subtypes. All markers except EGFR and Ki67 were significantly associated with the subtypes. The most common histological type was infiltrating ductal carcinoma, NOS. Majority of basal-like subtype showed comedo-type necrosis (68.8%) and infiltrative margin (81.3%). Our studies suggest that IHC can be used to identify the different subtypes of breast cancer and all subtypes were significantly associated with race, mean tumor size, mean number of lymph node positive, histological grade and all immunohistochemical markers except EGFR and Ki67.

  14. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  15. Cancer Hallmarks, Biomarkers and Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Dai, Xiaofeng; Xiang, Liangjian; Li, Ting; Bai, Zhonghu

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a complex disease encompassing multiple tumor entities, each characterized by distinct morphology, behavior and clinical implications. Besides estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2, novel biomarkers have shown their prognostic and predictive values, complicating our understanding towards to the heterogeneity of such cancers. Ten cancer hallmarks have been proposed by Weinberg to characterize cancer and its carcinogenesis. By reviewing biomarkers and breast cancer molecular subtypes, we propose that the divergent outcome observed from patients stratified by hormone status are driven by different cancer hallmarks. 'Sustaining proliferative signaling' further differentiates cancers with positive hormone receptors. 'Activating invasion and metastasis' and 'evading immune destruction' drive the differentiation of triple negative breast cancers. 'Resisting cell death', 'genome instability and mutation' and 'deregulating cellular energetics' refine breast cancer classification with their predictive values. 'Evading growth suppressors', 'enabling replicative immortality', 'inducing angiogenesis' and 'tumor-promoting inflammation' have not been involved in breast cancer classification which need more focus in the future biomarker-related research. This review novels in its global view on breast cancer heterogeneity, which clarifies many confusions in this field and contributes to precision medicine. PMID:27390604

  16. A phase I trial of an oral subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, chidamide, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xingsheng; Wang, Lin; Lin, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; Dou, Guifang; Meng, Zhiyun; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective This phase I study was to evaluate safety, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and preliminary antitumor activity of chidamide, a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Ten patients received oral chidamide 20, 25, or 30 mg twice per week continuously with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) and carboplatin [area under the curve (AUC) 5 mg/mL/min] administered in a 3-week cycle. Patients with response and stable disease after four cycles maintained chidamide monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis after the first single oral of chidamide and first combination treatment in cycle 1 from all patients. Results Two dose-limiting toxicities were recorded in the 30 mg cohort, including thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia in the first cycle. Grade 3/4 neutropenia in any cycle was observed in all patients, but was not associated with significant complications. Other grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities included thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. No significant changes were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters for both chidamide and paclitaxel. One patient in the 20 mg cohort had confirmed partial response (PR). Two out of 5 patients with brain metastases had intracranial complete remission after 4-cycle treatment. Conclusions Chidamide combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin was generally tolerated without unanticipated toxicities or clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions. The recommended dose for chidamide in this combination was established at 20 mg, and a phase II trial is ongoing with this regimen in patients with advanced NSCLC. PMID:27647973

  17. A phase I trial of an oral subtype-selective histone deacetylase inhibitor, chidamide, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xingsheng; Wang, Lin; Lin, Lin; Han, Xiaohong; Dou, Guifang; Meng, Zhiyun; Shi, Yuankai

    2016-01-01

    Objective This phase I study was to evaluate safety, maximum tolerated dose, pharmacokinetics and preliminary antitumor activity of chidamide, a novel subtype-selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, in combination with paclitaxel and carboplatin in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods Ten patients received oral chidamide 20, 25, or 30 mg twice per week continuously with paclitaxel (175 mg/m2) and carboplatin [area under the curve (AUC) 5 mg/mL/min] administered in a 3-week cycle. Patients with response and stable disease after four cycles maintained chidamide monotherapy until disease progression or unacceptable toxicity. Blood samples were collected for pharmacokinetic analysis after the first single oral of chidamide and first combination treatment in cycle 1 from all patients. Results Two dose-limiting toxicities were recorded in the 30 mg cohort, including thrombocytopenia and prolonged neutropenia in the first cycle. Grade 3/4 neutropenia in any cycle was observed in all patients, but was not associated with significant complications. Other grade 3/4 hematologic toxicities included thrombocytopenia and leucopenia. No significant changes were observed in pharmacokinetic parameters for both chidamide and paclitaxel. One patient in the 20 mg cohort had confirmed partial response (PR). Two out of 5 patients with brain metastases had intracranial complete remission after 4-cycle treatment. Conclusions Chidamide combined with paclitaxel and carboplatin was generally tolerated without unanticipated toxicities or clinically relevant pharmacokinetic interactions. The recommended dose for chidamide in this combination was established at 20 mg, and a phase II trial is ongoing with this regimen in patients with advanced NSCLC.

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  19. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  20. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer-the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide-biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes' squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  1. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel Alberto; Wakelee, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is predominantly associated with cigarette smoking; however, a substantial minority of patients with the disease have never smoked. In the US it is estimated there are 17,000-26,000 annual deaths from lung cancer in never smokers, which as a separate entity would be the seventh leading cause of cancer mortality. Controversy surrounds the question of whether or not the incidence of lung cancer in never-smokers is increasing, with more data to support this observation in Asia. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in never smokers including second hand smoke, indoor air pollution, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility among others. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histology of lung cancer in never smokers and in comparison to lung cancer in smokers appears less complex with a higher likelihood to have targetable driver mutations. PMID:26667338

  2. Lineage factors and differentiation states in lung cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Cheung, W K C; Nguyen, D X

    2015-11-19

    Lung cancer encompasses a heterogeneous group of malignancies. Here we discuss how the remarkable diversity of major lung cancer subtypes is manifested in their transforming cell of origin, oncogenic dependencies, phenotypic plasticity, metastatic competence and response to therapy. More specifically, we review the increasing evidence that links this biological heterogeneity to the deregulation of cell lineage-specific pathways and the transcription factors that ultimately control them. As determinants of pulmonary epithelial differentiation, these poorly characterized transcriptional networks may underlie the etiology and biological progression of distinct lung cancers, while providing insight into innovative therapeutic strategies.

  3. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Penelope A; Shepherd, Frances A

    2008-06-01

    Reports of tumor regression after infection date back as far as 1550 bc. In the twentieth century, Dr. William Coley, witnessing regression of a malignant tumor in one of his patients after a bacterial infection, developed the first cancer treatment vaccine derived from killed bacteria, with some reported success. However, despite decades of research, no specific, active tumor vaccine has been approved for the treatment of cancer. In lung cancer, initial attempts to modulate the immune system with nonspecific therapies were unsuccessful. However, more sophisticated specific vaccines have now been developed, and an increasing number are being evaluated in randomized phase 3 trials, raising hopes that vaccines may be an additional novel therapy for patients with lung cancer. This article reviews the following seven vaccines, which have entered randomized trials: L-BLP25 (Stimuvax), BEC-2, 1E10, PF-3512676 (Promune), melanoma-associated antigen A3 immunotherapeutic, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic cancer cellular immunotherapy, and belagenpumatucel-L (Lucanix).

  4. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2000-05-01

    Screening for lung cancer serves to prevent deaths from this disease insofar as earlier resections are associated with higher rates of cure. There is good reason to believe that this is the case: in stage I, the 5-year survival rate with resection is 70%, whereas without resection the corresponding rate is only 10%. Before this evidence emerged, various authoritative organizations and agencies in North America advised against screening for lung cancer on the grounds of the results of several RCTs. As for CXR, I argue that the study results are consistent with up to 40% reduction in the fatality rate. Moreover, modern helical CT screening provides for detecting much smaller tumors than were detected in those studies. It is time to revoke the conclusion that screening for lung cancer does not serve to prevent deaths from this disease, and to quantify the usefulness of CT screening in particular. As for the requisite research, the prevailing orthodoxy has it that RCTs are to be used, but I argue that more meaningful results are obtainable, more rapidly and much less expensively, by the use of noncomparative (and hence unrandomized) studies. PMID:10855255

  5. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 males and 189,613 females). Meanwhile, the crude mortality of lung cancer in China was 37.00 per 100,000 population (50.04 per 100,000 men and 23.33 per 100,000 women). Consistent with the change in developed countries, adenocarcinoma has become the most predominant histological subtype of lung cancer in China. For the majority advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, especially patients with adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy became increasing important in the treatment. Chinese researcher have done a lot work in terms of lung cancer molecular epidemiology, therefore, in this review, we further summarized the epidemiology of driver genes in NSCLC, hoping to help clinicians to better screen certain driver genes in China for treatment decisions. PMID:25806311

  6. Label-free proteomic analysis of breast cancer molecular subtypes.

    PubMed

    Panis, Carolina; Pizzatti, Luciana; Herrera, Ana Cristina; Corrêa, Stephany; Binato, Renata; Abdelhay, Eliana

    2014-11-01

    To better characterize the cellular pathways involved in breast cancer molecular subtypes, we performed a proteomic study using a label-free LC-MS strategy for determining the proteomic profile of Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, HER2-positive, and triple-negative (TN) breast tumors compared with healthy mammary tissue. This comparison aimed to identify the aberrant processes specific for each subtype and might help to refine our understanding regarding breast cancer biology. Our results address important molecular features (both specific and commonly shared) that explain the biological behavior of each subtype. Changes in proteins related to cytoskeletal organization were found in all tumor subtypes, indicating that breast tumors are under constant structural modifications to invade and metastasize. We also found changes in cell-adhesion processes in all molecular subtypes, corroborating that invasiveness is a common property of breast cancer cells. Luminal-HER2 and HER2 tumors also presented altered cell cycle regulation, as shown by the several DNA repair-related proteins. An altered immune response was also found as a common process in the Luminal A, Luminal-HER2, and TN subtypes, and complement was the most important pathway. Analysis of the TN subtype revealed blood coagulation as the most relevant biological process.

  7. Cholinergic Targets in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Eliot R

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancers express an autocrine cholinergic loop in which secreted acetylcholine can stimulate tumor growth through both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Because activation of mAChR and nAChR stimulates growth; tumor growth can be stimulated by both locally synthesized acetylcholine as well as acetylcholine from distal sources and from nicotine in the high percentage of lung cancer patients who are smokers. The stimulation of lung cancer growth by cholinergic agonists offers many potential new targets for lung cancer therapy. Cholinergic signaling can be targeted at the level of choline transport; acetylcholine synthesis, secretion and degradation; and nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. In addition, the newly describe family of ly-6 allosteric modulators of nicotinic signaling such as lynx1 and lynx2 offers yet another new approach to novel lung cancer therapeutics. Each of these targets has their potential advantages and disadvantages for the development of new lung cancer therapies which are discussed in this review. PMID:26818857

  8. A gene signature based method for identifying subtypes and subtype-specific drivers in cancer with an application to medulloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Subtypes are widely found in cancer. They are characterized with different behaviors in clinical and molecular profiles, such as survival rates, gene signature and copy number aberrations (CNAs). While cancer is generally believed to have been caused by genetic aberrations, the number of such events is tremendous in the cancer tissue and only a small subset of them may be tumorigenic. On the other hand, gene expression signature of a subtype represents residuals of the subtype-specific cancer mechanisms. Using high-throughput data to link these factors to define subtype boundaries and identify subtype-specific drivers, is a promising yet largely unexplored topic. Results We report a systematic method to automate the identification of cancer subtypes and candidate drivers. Specifically, we propose an iterative algorithm that alternates between gene expression clustering and gene signature selection. We applied the method to datasets of the pediatric cerebellar tumor medulloblastoma (MB). The subtyping algorithm consistently converges on multiple datasets of medulloblastoma, and the converged signatures and copy number landscapes are also found to be highly reproducible across the datasets. Based on the identified subtypes, we developed a PCA-based approach for subtype-specific identification of cancer drivers. The top-ranked driver candidates are found to be enriched with known pathways in certain subtypes of MB. This might reveal new understandings for these subtypes. This article is an extended abstract of our ICCABS '12 paper (Chen et al. 2012), with revised methods in iterative subtyping, the use of canonical correlation analysis for driver-identification, and an extra dataset (Northcott90 dataset) for cross-validations. Discussions of the algorithm performance and of the slightly different gene lists identified are also added. Conclusions Our study indicates that subtype-signature defines the subtype boundaries, characterizes the subtype

  9. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules. PMID:26842724

  10. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules. PMID:26842724

  11. Three-Dimensional Gene Map of Cancer Cell Types: Structural Entropy Minimisation Principle for Defining Tumour Subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Angsheng; Yin, Xianchen; Pan, Yicheng

    2016-02-01

    In this study, we propose a method for constructing cell sample networks from gene expression profiles, and a structural entropy minimisation principle for detecting natural structure of networks and for identifying cancer cell subtypes. Our method establishes a three-dimensional gene map of cancer cell types and subtypes. The identified subtypes are defined by a unique gene expression pattern, and a three-dimensional gene map is established by defining the unique gene expression pattern for each identified subtype for cancers, including acute leukaemia, lymphoma, multi-tissue, lung cancer and healthy tissue. Our three-dimensional gene map demonstrates that a true tumour type may be divided into subtypes, each defined by a unique gene expression pattern. Clinical data analyses demonstrate that most cell samples of an identified subtype share similar survival times, survival indicators and International Prognostic Index (IPI) scores and indicate that distinct subtypes identified by our algorithms exhibit different overall survival times, survival ratios and IPI scores. Our three-dimensional gene map establishes a high-definition, one-to-one map between the biologically and medically meaningful tumour subtypes and the gene expression patterns, and identifies remarkable cells that form singleton submodules.

  12. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation.

  13. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  14. Autoradiographic visualization of muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and guinea pig lung

    SciTech Connect

    Mak, J.C.; Barnes, P.J. )

    1990-06-01

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes have been localized in human and guinea pig lung sections by an autoradiographic technique, using (3H)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate (( 3H)QNB) and selective muscarinic antagonists. (3H)QNB was incubated with tissue sections for 90 min at 25 degrees C, and nonspecific binding was determined by incubating adjacent serial sections in the presence of 1 microM atropine. Binding to lung sections had the characterization expected for muscarinic receptors. Autoradiography revealed that muscarinic receptors were widely distributed in human lung, with dense labeling over submucosal glands and airway ganglia, and moderate labeling over nerves in intrapulmonary bronchi and of airway smooth muscle of large and small airways. In addition, alveolar walls were uniformly labeled. In guinea pig lung, labeling of airway smooth muscle was similar, but in contrast to human airways, epithelium was labeled but alveolar walls were not. The muscarinic receptors of human airway smooth muscle from large to small airways were entirely of the M3-subtype, whereas in guinea pig airway smooth muscle, the majority were the M3-subtype with a very small population of the M2-subtype present. In human bronchial submucosal glands, M1- and M3-subtypes appeared to coexist in the proportions of 36 and 64%, respectively. In human alveolar walls the muscarinic receptors were entirely of the M1-subtype, which is absent from the guinea pig lung. No M2-receptors were demonstrated in human lung. The localization of M1-receptors was confirmed by direct labeling with (3H)pirenzepine. With the exception of the alveolar walls in human lung, the localization of muscarinic receptor subtypes on structures in the lung is consistent with known functional studies.

  15. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  16. Patient-Specific Data Fusion Defines Prognostic Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Markowetz, Florian

    2011-01-01

    Different data types can offer complementary perspectives on the same biological phenomenon. In cancer studies, for example, data on copy number alterations indicate losses and amplifications of genomic regions in tumours, while transcriptomic data point to the impact of genomic and environmental events on the internal wiring of the cell. Fusing different data provides a more comprehensive model of the cancer cell than that offered by any single type. However, biological signals in different patients exhibit diverse degrees of concordance due to cancer heterogeneity and inherent noise in the measurements. This is a particularly important issue in cancer subtype discovery, where personalised strategies to guide therapy are of vital importance. We present a nonparametric Bayesian model for discovering prognostic cancer subtypes by integrating gene expression and copy number variation data. Our model is constructed from a hierarchy of Dirichlet Processes and addresses three key challenges in data fusion: (i) To separate concordant from discordant signals, (ii) to select informative features, (iii) to estimate the number of disease subtypes. Concordance of signals is assessed individually for each patient, giving us an additional level of insight into the underlying disease structure. We exemplify the power of our model in prostate cancer and breast cancer and show that it outperforms competing methods. In the prostate cancer data, we identify an entirely new subtype with extremely poor survival outcome and show how other analyses fail to detect it. In the breast cancer data, we find subtypes with superior prognostic value by using the concordant results. These discoveries were crucially dependent on our model's ability to distinguish concordant and discordant signals within each patient sample, and would otherwise have been missed. We therefore demonstrate the importance of taking a patient-specific approach, using highly-flexible nonparametric Bayesian methods. PMID

  17. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  18. Variations of chromosome 2 gene expressions among patients with lung cancer or non-cancer.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lianmin; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Jian; Wang, Haiyun; Dong, Nian; Su, Xiaoqiong; Xu, Menglin; Wang, Xiangdong

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common malignancies worldwide. The present study aimed to investigate specific genotypes of different subtypes or stages of lung cancer through gene expression variations of chromosome 2 genes, trying to identify predictors for diagnosis or prognosis of lung cancer. About 537 patients with lung adenocarcinoma (ADC), 140 patients with lung squamous carcinoma (SQC), 9 patients with lung large cell carcinoma (LCC), 56 patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC), and 590 patients without cancer were analyzed in present study. Co-expressed, subtype-specific, and stage-specific chromosome 2 genes were identified and further analyzed by bioinformatic methods. As a result, 15 or 10 genes were significantly up- or down-regulated in all four subtypes of lung cancer. GKN1, LOC100131510, prominin-2 (PROM2), IL37, and SNORA41 were identified as ADC-specific up-regulated genes; SQC-specific up-regulated genes included HOXD family (HOXD1, HOXD3, HOXD4, HOXD8, and HOXD9) and UGT1A family (UGT1A1, UGT1A3, UGT1A4, UGT1A5, UGT1A7, UGT1A8, UGT1A9, and UGT1A10); and LCC- or SCLC-specific genes were also identified. Nine genes were significantly up-expressed at all four stages of ADC while 230 genes at all three stages of SQC. MFSD2B, CCL20 and STAT1, or STARD7 and ZNF512 genes may be risk or protect factors in prognosis of ADC, while HTR2B, DPP4, and TGFBRAP1 genes may be risk factors in prognosis of SQC. Our results suggested that a number of altered chromosome 2 genes have the subtype or stage specificities of lung cancer and may be considered as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers.

  19. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Shimizu, H

    1977-12-01

    The relationship between incidence of lung cancer and the volume of traffic as indicated by auto exhaust concentration was examined; the results, though suggestive, did not yield consistent evidence of the association between them. Traffic jams in Nagoya began 15 years ago, a period that may not be long enough to provide definitive data on the incidence of lung cancer. The high standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of lung cancer was observed in cities with a population of less than 1 million and guns (rural areas) along the coast, although those in the metropolitan areas with populations of more than 1 million were average. The SMR did not correlate with various socioeconomic conditions and industrial air pollution. Meteorologic or geologic conditions and ocean currents were not associated with SMR of lung cancer by city and gun. The population of a gun or of some cities was not large enough to be statistically significant, and the mortality rate of lung cancer was not always stable.

  20. Polonium and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  1. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  2. Bronchoscopy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emslander, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cancer site in men and women with a high incidence and mortality rate. Most patients are diagnosed when the disease has already spread. An early, detection and immediate and accurate histological or cytological diagnosis are essential for a hopeful outcome. In most patients, bronchoscopy is the method of choice in establishing a suspected lung neoplasm. With the rigid and flexible method, two complementary techniques are available. The methods bear a very low mortality rate if sufficient monitoring and resuscitative instrumentation is available. Rigid bronchoscopy offers the possibility of obtaining large biopsy specimens from the tumorous tissue and provides an effective tool in the control of major haemorrhage. However, it cannot be used for the inspection of further peripherally located parts of the bronchial system and needs general anaesthesia. In contrast, the flexible method can be quickly and readily performed at practically any location using portable equipment. Bronchi can be inspected up to the 8th order and with bronchial washing, forceps biopsy, brush biopsy and fluorescence bronchoscopy techniques with a high diagnostic yield are available. This holds true, especially if these sampling techniques are used as complementary methods. PMID:18493335

  3. Lung adenocarcinoma, mixed subtype: histopathologic basis for high-resolution computed tomography findings.

    PubMed

    Terasaki, Hiroshi; Kato, Seiya; Matsuno, Yoshihiro; Kusumoto, Masahiko; Niki, Toshiro; Hayashi, Akihiro; Terasaki, Kinuyo; Hayabuchi, Naofumi

    2011-02-01

    "Adenocarcinoma, mixed subtype" is the most common histologic subtype of lung adenocarcinomas in the World Health Organization classification of 2004. For small peripheral adenocarcinomas, for example, those measuring 2 cm or less in greatest diameter, invasive areas can present various histologic patterns. The purpose of this study is to present the radiologic features of small peripheral lung adenocarcinomas with or without a bronchioloalveolar component and with or without invasive areas, in comparison with histopathologic findings. For this purpose, a detailed evaluation of the characteristics of solid regions in ground-glass opacity on high-resolution computerized tomographic images of lung adenocarcinoma is useful.

  4. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018

  5. Immunohistochemical characterisation of molecular subtypes in endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Łapińska-Szumczyk, Sylwia M; Supernat, Anna M; Majewska, Hanna I; Gulczyński, Jacek; Biernat, Wojciech; Wydra, Dariusz; Żaczek, Anna J

    2015-01-01

    Four molecular subtypes have lately been established in endometrial cancer basing on estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 status: ER+/PR+/HER2+, ER+/PR+/HER2-, ER-/PR-/HER2+ and ER-/PR-/HER2-. The subtypes have shown diversity in terms of prognosis, clinicopathological and molecular characteristics, with ER+/PR+/HER2- and ER-/PR-/HER2+ group exhibiting exceptionally benign and aggressive behavior, respectively. We have further characterized the subtypes in the context of pathways known to drive endometrial carcinogenesis: phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway (ERBB/PI3K pathway), TP53 system, and the mismatch repair (MMR) mechanism. Analysis of tumor heterogeneity was also included. ER+/PR+/HER2+ was characterized by active ERBB/PI3K pathway occurring in 58% of cases. Subtype ER-/PR-/HER2+ was characterized by the most frequent TP53 mutations (83% of cases). Triple negative phenotype utterly lacked active ERBB/PI3K pathway. Analyzed major pathways rarely correlated with clinicopathologial data but mutated TP53 and retained MMR did correlate with shorter overall survival (both P<0.01). The presence of tumor heterogeneity was most frequent in ER-/PR-/HER2+ subtype (53% of all cases). The presented results further emphasize that the molecular subtype distinction, along with MMR and TP53 status, could be a useful diagnostic tool in guiding individualized therapy. PMID:26885170

  6. Differentiation of Cancer Cell Origin and Molecular Subtype by Plasma Membrane N-Glycan Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hua, Serenus; Saunders, Mary; Dimapasoc, Lauren M.; Jeong, Seung Hyup; Kim, Bum Jin; Kim, Suhee; So, Minkyung; Lee, Kwang-Sik; Kim, Jae Han; Lam, Kit S.; Lebrilla, Carlito B.; An, Hyun Joo

    2014-01-01

    In clinical settings, biopsies are routinely used to determine cancer type and grade based on tumor cell morphology, as determined via histochemical or immunohistochemical staining. Unfortunately, in a significant number of cases, traditional biopsy results are either inconclusive or do not provide full subtype differentiation, possibly leading to inefficient or ineffective treatment. Glycomic profiling of the cell membrane offers an alternate route towards cancer diagnosis. In this study, isomer-sensitive nano-LC/MS was used to directly obtain detailed profiles of the different N-glycan structures present on cancer cell membranes. Membrane N-glycans were extracted from cells representing various subtypes of breast, lung, cervical, ovarian, and lymphatic cancer. Chip-based porous graphitized carbon nano-LC/MS was used to separate, identify, and quantify the native N-glycans. Structure-sensitive N-glycan profiling identified hundreds of glycan peaks per cell line, including multiple isomers for most compositions. Hierarchical clusterings based on Pearson correlation coefficients were used to quickly compare and separate each cell line according to originating organ and disease subtype. Based simply on the relative abundances of broad glycan classes (e.g. high mannose, complex/hybrid fucosylated, complex/hybrid sialylated, etc.) most cell lines were readily differentiated. More closely-related cell lines were differentiated based on several-fold differences in the abundances of individual glycans. Based on characteristic N-glycan profiles, primary cancer origins and molecular subtypes could be distinguished. These results demonstrate that stark differences in cancer cell membrane glycosylation can be exploited to create an MS-based biopsy, with potential applications towards cancer diagnosis and direction of treatment. PMID:24303873

  7. Breast cancer molecular subtypes: from TNBC to QNBC

    PubMed Central

    Hon, Jane Date C; Singh, Baljit; Sahin, Aysegul; Du, Gang; Wang, Jinhua; Wang, Vincent Y; Deng, Fang-Ming; Zhang, David Y; Monaco, Marie E; Lee, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Treatment protocols for breast cancer depend predominantly on receptor status with respect to estrogen (estrogen receptor alpha), progesterone (progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor [human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)]. The presence of one or more of these receptors suggests that a treatment targeting these pathways might be effective, while the absence of, or in the case of HER2, lack of overexpression of, all of these receptors, termed triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), indicates a need for the more toxic chemotherapy. In an effort to develop targeted therapies for TNBC, it will be necessary to differentiate among specific TNBC subtypes. The subset of TNBC that expresses androgen receptor (AR) has been determined to express genes consistent with a luminal subtype and therefore may be amenable to therapies targeting either AR, itself, or other pathways typical of a luminal subtype. Recent investigations of the AR signal pathway within breast cancer lead to AR as a significant target for breast cancer therapy with several clinical trials currently in progress. The subclass of TNBC that lacks AR, which we have termed quadruple negative breast cancer (QNBC) currently lacks a defined targetable pathway. Unlike AR-positive TNBC, QNBC predominantly exhibits a basal-like molecular subtype. Several subtypes and related pathway proteins are preferentially expressed in QNBC that may serve as effective targets for treatment, such as ACSL4, SKP2 and EGFR. ACSL4 expression has been demonstrated to be inversely correlated with expression of hormone/growth factor receptors and may thus serve as a biomarker for QNBC as well as a target for therapy. In the following review we summarize some of the current efforts to develop alternatives to chemotherapy for TNBC and QNBC. PMID:27725895

  8. Clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Prat, Aleix; Pineda, Estela; Adamo, Barbara; Galván, Patricia; Fernández, Aranzazu; Gaba, Lydia; Díez, Marc; Viladot, Margarita; Arance, Ana; Muñoz, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Gene-expression profiling has had a considerable impact on our understanding of breast cancer biology. During the last 15 years, 5 intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer (Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2-enriched, Basal-like and Claudin-low) have been identified and intensively studied. In this review, we will focus on the current and future clinical implications of the intrinsic molecular subtypes beyond the current pathological-based classification endorsed by the 2013 St. Gallen Consensus Recommendations. Within hormone receptor-positive and HER2-negative early breast cancer, the Luminal A and B subtypes predict 10-year outcome regardless of systemic treatment administered as well as residual risk of distant recurrence after 5 years of endocrine therapy. Within clinically HER2-positive disease, the 4 main intrinsic subtypes can be identified and dominate the biological and clinical phenotype. From a clinical perspective, patients with HER2+/HER2-enriched disease seem to benefit the most from neoadjuvant trastuzumab, or dual HER2 blockade with trastuzumab/lapatinib, in combination with chemotherapy, and patients with HER2+/Luminal A disease seem to have a relative better outcome compared to the other subtypes. Finally, within triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC), the Basal-like disease predominates (70-80%) and, from a biological perspective, should be considered a cancer-type by itself. Importantly, the distinction between Basal-like versus non-Basal-like within TNBC might predict survival following (neo)adjvuvant multi-agent chemotherapy, bevacizumab benefit in the neoadjuvant setting (CALGB40603), and docetaxel vs. carboplatin benefit in first-line metastatic disease (TNT study). Overall, this data suggests that intrinsic molecular profiling provides clinically relevant information beyond current pathology-based classifications.

  9. Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Erica B; Jalal, Shadia I

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer of neuroendocrine origin, which is strongly associated with cigarette smoking. Patients typically present with a short duration of symptoms and frequently (60-65 %) with metastatic disease. SCLC is a heterogeneous disease including extremely chemosensitive and chemoresistant clones. For this reason, a high percentage of patients respond to first-line chemotherapy but rapidly succumb to the disease. SCLC is generally divided into two stages, limited and extensive. Standard treatment of limited stage disease includes combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for four cycles, thoracic radiation initiated early with the first cycle of chemotherapy, and consideration of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in the subset of patients with good response. Surgery may play a role in TNM stages I and II. In extensive disease, platinum agents and etoposide, used in combination, are again the first-line standard of care in the USA. However, thoracic radiation therapy is used predominately in patients where local control is important and PCI is of uncertain benefit. Despite these treatments, prognosis remains poor and novel therapies are needed to improve survival in this disease. PMID:27535400

  10. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance. PMID:23606351

  11. MicroRNA as tools and therapeutics in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Barger, Jennifer F; Nana-Sinkam, S Patrick

    2015-07-01

    Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer related deaths. The lack of specific and accurate tools for early diagnosis and minimal targeted therapeutics both contribute to poor outcomes. The recent discovery of microRNAs (miRNAs) revealed a novel mechanism for post-transcriptional regulation in cancer and has created new opportunities for the development of diagnostics, prognostics and targeted therapeutics. In lung cancer, miRNA expression profiles distinguish histological subtypes, predict chemotherapeutic response and are associated with prognosis, metastasis and survival. Furthermore, miRNAs circulate in body fluids and hence may serve as important biomarkers for early diagnosis or stratify patients for personalized therapeutic strategies. Here, we provide an overview of the miRNAs implicated in lung cancer, with an emphasis on their clinical utility.

  12. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  13. Basal Breast Cancer: A Complex and Deadly Molecular Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Bertucci, F; Finetti, P; Birnbaum, D

    2012-01-01

    During the last decade, gene expression profiling of breast cancer has revealed the existence of five molecular subtypes and allowed the establishment of a new classification. The basal subtype, which represents 15-25% of cases, is characterized by an expression profile similar to that of myoepithelial normal mammary cells. Basal tumors are frequently assimilated to triple-negative (TN) breast cancers. They display epidemiological and clinico-pathological features distinct from other subtypes. Their pattern of relapse is characterized by frequent and early relapses and visceral locations. Despite a relative sensitivity to chemotherapy, the prognosis is poor. Recent characterization of their molecular features, such as the dysfunction of the BRCA1 pathway or the frequent expression of EGFR, provides opportunities for optimizing the systemic treatment. Several clinical trials dedicated to basal or TN tumors are testing cytotoxic agents and/or molecularly targeted therapies. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge of this aggressive and hard-to-treat subtype of breast cancer. PMID:22082486

  14. Screening for occult lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, T. H.; MacIntosh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot screening program for the early detection of lung cancer was carried out in Saskatchewan in 1968 using chest roentgenography and cytologic examination of sputum samples. The yield from 23 000 men aged 40 years and over was only 10 cases. Nine of the men had advanced disease. One had occult lung cancer. A period of 31 months elapsed between the discovery of malignant cells in this patient's sputum and roentgenographic localization of the tumour. Following pneumonectomy he has survived with no discernible residual or metastatic tumour for 12 years. The morphologic changes in the resected lung provided a basis for discussing the preclinical phase of squamous cancer of the lung, the treatment of occult cancer and multicentric primary pulmonary tumours. The survey would have been more successful with a narrower target group and more frequent examination. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6299495

  15. Nanomedicine: Sniffing out lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzone, Peter

    2009-10-01

    A sensor consisting of an array of gold nanoparticles can distinguish the breath of lung cancer patients from the breath of healthy individuals without the need to pre-treat or dehumidify the samples.

  16. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... other segments of the American population. However, lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic men and the second-leading cause among Hispanic women. November is Lung Cancer Awareness ...

  17. Molecular subtyping of breast cancer: opportunities for new therapeutic approaches.

    PubMed

    Mullan, P B; Millikan, R C

    2007-12-01

    Evidence is accumulating that breast cancer is not one disease but many separate diseases. DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling has demonstrated subtypes with distinct phenotypic features and clinical responses. Prominent among the new subtypes is 'basal-like' breast cancer, one of the 'intrinsic' subtypes defined by negativity for the estrogen, progesterone, and HER2/neu receptors and positivity for cytokeratins-5/6. Focusing on basal-like breast cancer, we discuss how molecular technologies provide new chemotherapy targets, optimising treatment whilst sparing patients from unnecessary toxicity. Clinical trials are needed that incorporate long-term follow-up of patients with well-characterised tumour markers. Whilst the absence of an obvious dominant oncogene driving basal-like breast cancer and the lack of specific therapeutic agents are serious stumbling blocks, this review will highlight several promising therapeutic candidates currently under evaluation. Thus, new molecular technologies should provide a fundamental foundation for better understanding breast and other cancers which may be exploited to save lives. (Part of a Multi-author Review). PMID:17957336

  18. Breast Cancer Subtypes in Patients Aged 70 Years and Older.

    PubMed

    Königsberg, Robert; Pfeiler, Georg; Hammerschmid, Nicole; Holub, Oliver; Glössmann, Kerstin; Larcher-Senn, Julian; Dittrich, Christian

    2016-05-27

    Recurrence and survival pattern in breast cancer (bc) patients (pts) ≥ 70 years subcategorized according to subtype and age are still an area of uncertainty. Tumor characteristics, patient demographics, therapies applied, and recurrence pattern were compared between luminal A (LA), luminal B (LB), Her2/neu overexpressing (Her+) and triple-negative (TN) bc subtypes and the age subcategories 70-74, 75-79, ≥80 years. Based on univariate Cox-regression-analyses distant-disease-free-survival (DDFS) differed significantly for bc subtypes (p = 0.0002), notably for Her+ vs. LA (p = 0.0014), TN vs. LA (p < 0.001), and TN vs. LB (p = 0.0086). Not age, but Her+ and TN represented prognostic factors for DDFS. PMID:27215407

  19. Lung cancer working group report.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Nagahiro; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Ichinose, Yukito; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Mok, Tony Shu Kam; Ohe, Yuichiro; Park, Keunchil; Wu, Yi-Long

    2010-09-01

    Asia needs a guideline for non-small-cell lung cancer because of differences in medical care, medical care insurance, ethnic variation and drug approval lag within Asian countries and compared with Western countries. Due to ethnic differences, drug dosages are often higher in the USA than in Japan. EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer was detected in 32% of Asians but only 6% of non-Asians, while differences in irinotecan metabolism cause higher frequencies of toxicity (leukopenia, diarrhea) in Asians. Pharmacodynamic ethnic differences in relation to paclitaxel/carboplatin resulted in longer median survival and a higher 1-year survival rate for Japanese-advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients compared with Americans. To solve the problem of drug lag, pharmaceutical companies must perform multinational Asian clinical trials with quick accrual of patients, while regulatory authorities must establish high-quality, efficient approval processes, and achieve regulatory harmonization. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network promotes creation of national clinical practice guidelines, and Korea, China and Thailand adapted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Many Asian countries still lack such guidelines, and there are no pan-Asian guidelines for non-small-cell lung cancer. Japan developed its own non-small-cell lung cancer guidelines and also a gefitinib guidance. The study group members concluded that immediate establishment of an Asian non-small-cell lung cancer guideline will be difficult because of the differences among the countries. Asian collaborative trials on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer need to be started at an early date to generate Asian data.

  20. Palliative Procedures in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Emi; Sista, Akhilesh K.; Pua, Bradley B.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care aims to optimize comfort and function when cure is not possible. Image-guided interventions for palliative treatment of lung cancer is aimed at local control of advanced disease in the affected lung, adjacent mediastinal structures, or distant metastatic sites. These procedures include endovascular therapy for superior vena cava syndrome, bronchial artery embolization for hemoptysis associated with lung cancer, and ablation of osseous metastasis. Pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications of these palliative treatments, procedural techniques, complications, and possible future interventions are discussed in this article. PMID:24436537

  1. Biomarkers and targeted systemic therapies in advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mukesh; Ernani, Vinicius; Owonikoko, Taofeek K

    2015-11-01

    The last decade has witnessed significant growth in therapeutic options for patients diagnosed with lung cancer. This is due in major part to our improved technological ability to interrogate the genomics of cancer cells, which has enabled the development of biologically rational anticancer agents. The recognition that lung cancer is not a single disease entity dates back many decades to the histological subclassification of malignant neoplasms of the lung into subcategories of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). While SCLC continues to be regarded as a single histologic and therapeutic category, the NSCLC subset has undergone additional subcategorizations with distinct management algorithms for specific histologic and molecular subtypes. The defining characteristics of these NSCLC subtypes have evolved into important tools for prognosis and for predicting the likelihood of benefit when patients are treated with anticancer agents.

  2. Lung cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ze-hong; White, James; Zhang, Lin-bo

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most dreaded of all cancers because of the higher mortality rates associated with it worldwide. The various subtypes of lung cancer respond differently to a particular treatment regime, which makes the therapeutic interventions all the more complicated. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. They are considered as the factors responsible for the cases of tumor relapse. The CSCs may have significant role in the development of lung tumorigenesis based on the identification of the CSCs which respond during injury. The properties of multi-potency and self-renewal are shared in common by the lung CSCs with the normal pluripotent stem cells which can be isolated using the similar markers. This review deals with the origin and characteristics of the lung cancer stem cells. The role of different markers used to isolate lung CSCs like CD44, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), CD133 and ABCG2 (ATP binding cassette sub family G member 2) have been discussed in detail. Analysis of the developmental signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog in the regulation and maintenance of the lung CSCs have been done. Finally, before targeting the lung CSC biomarkers for potential therapeutics, challenges faced in lung cancer stem cell research need to be taken into account. With the accepted notion that the CSCs are to blame for cancer relapse and drug resistance, targeting them can be an important aspect of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  3. Lung cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Munden, Reginald F; Godoy, Myrna C B

    2013-10-01

    Results from the National Lung Screening Trial have confirmed that lung cancer mortality is reduced using low-dose CT screening. Opening a lung cancer screening program requires a multidisciplinary approach. While the fundamental aspects of a screening program are similar, such as scheduling, performing, and managing follow-up, there are aspects of a lung cancer screening program that are unique. This article will discuss factors important in establishing a state of the art lung cancer screening program.

  4. Early detection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  5. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  6. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  7. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  8. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  9. Genomics Study of Gastric Cancer and Its Molecular Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Yuen, Siu Tsan; Leung, Suet Yi

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is a heterogeneous disease encompassing diverse morphological (intestinal versus diffuse) and molecular subtypes (MSI, EBV, TP53 mutation). Recent advances in genomic technology have led to an improved understanding of the driver gene mutational profile, gene expression, and epigenetic alterations that underlie each of the subgroups, with therapeutic implications in some of these alterations. There have been attempts to classify gastric cancers based on these genomic features, with an aim to improve prognostication and predict responsiveness to specific drug therapy. The eventual aims of these genomic studies are to develop deep biological insights into the carcinogenic pathway in each of these subtypes. Future large-scale drug screening strategies may then be able to link these genomic features to drug responsiveness, eventually leading to genome-guided personalized medicine with improved cure rates. PMID:27573784

  10. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  11. Identification of Genetic Mutations in Human Lung Cancer by Targeted Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Hongxiang; Wang, Xiaowei; Zhang, Zhenrong; Tang, Chuanning; Ye, Hua; Jones, Lindsey; Lou, Feng; Zhang, Dandan; Jiang, Shouwen; Sun, Hong; Dong, Haichao; Zhang, Guangchun; Liu, Zhiyuan; Dong, Zhishou; Guo, Baishuai; Yan, He; Yan, Chaowei; Wang, Lu; Su, Ziyi; Li, Yangyang; Nandakumar, Vijayalakshmi; Huang, Xue F; Chen, Si-Yi; Liu, Deruo

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the most prevalent malignancy and the primary cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Unique mutations patterns can be found in lung cancer subtypes, in individual cancers, or within a single tumor, and drugs that target these genetic mutations and signal transduction pathways are often beneficial to patients. In this study, we used the Ion Torrent AmpliSeq Cancer Panel to sequence 737 loci from 45 cancer-related genes and oncogenes to identify genetic mutations in 48 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) human lung cancer samples from Chinese patients. We found frequent mutations in EGFR, KRAS, PIK3CA, and TP53 genes. Moreover, we observed that a portion of the lung cancer samples harbored two or more mutations in these key genes. This study demonstrates the feasibility of using the Ion Torrent sequencing to efficiently identify genetic mutations in individual tumors for targeted lung cancer therapy. PMID:26244006

  12. Solid Predominant Histologic Subtype in Resected Stage I Lung Adenocarcinoma Is an Independent Predictor of Early, Extrathoracic, Multisite Recurrence and of Poor Postrecurrence Survival

    PubMed Central

    Ujiie, Hideki; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie E.; Buitrago, Daniel; Sima, Camelia S.; Lee, Ming-Ching; Huang, James; Travis, William D.; Rizk, Nabil P.; Rudin, Charles M.; Jones, David R.; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To examine the significance of the proposed International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer, American Thoracic Society, and European Respiratory Society (IASLC/ATS/ERS) histologic subtypes of lung adenocarcinoma for patterns of recurrence and, among patients who recur following resection of stage I lung adenocarcinoma, for postrecurrence survival (PRS). Patients and Methods We reviewed patients with stage I lung adenocarcinoma who had undergone complete surgical resection from 1999 to 2009 (N = 1,120). Tumors were subtyped by using the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification. The effects of the dominant subtype on recurrence and, among patients who recurred, on PRS were investigated. Results Of 1,120 patients identified, 188 had recurrent disease, 103 of whom died as a result of lung cancer. Among patients who recurred, 2-year PRS was 45%, and median PRS was 26.1 months. Compared with patients with nonsolid tumors, patients with solid predominant tumors had earlier (P = .007), more extrathoracic (P < .001), and more multisite (P = .011) recurrences. Multivariable analysis of primary tumor factors revealed that, among patients who recurred, solid predominant histologic pattern in the primary tumor (hazard ratio [HR], 1.76; P = .016), age older than 65 years (HR, 1.63; P = .01), and sublobar resection (HR, 1.6; P = .01) were significantly associated with worse PRS. Presence of extrathoracic metastasis (HR, 1.76; P = .013) and age older than 65 years at the time of recurrence (HR, 1.7; P = .014) were also significantly associated with worse PRS. Conclusion In patients with stage I primary lung adenocarcinoma, solid predominant subtype is an independent predictor of early recurrence and, among those patients who recur, of worse PRS. Our findings provide a rationale for investigating adjuvant therapy and identify novel therapeutic targets for patients with solid predominant lung adenocarcinoma. PMID:26261257

  13. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A J; Pope, C A

    1995-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies over the last 40 years suggest rather consistently that general ambient air pollution, chiefly due to the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, may be responsible for increased rates of lung cancer. This evidence derives from studies of lung cancer trends, studies of occupational groups, comparisons of urban and rural populations, and case-control and cohort studies using diverse exposure metrics. Recent prospective cohort studies observed 30 to 50% increases in lung cancer rates associated with exposure to respirable particles. While these data reflect the effects of exposures in past decades, and despite some progress in reducing air pollution, large numbers of people in the United States continue to be exposed to pollutant mixtures containing known or suspected carcinogens. It is not known how many people in the United States are exposed to levels of fine respirable particles that have been associated with lung cancer in recent epidemiologic studies. These observations suggest that the most widely cited estimates of the proportional contribution of air pollution to lung cancer occurrence in the United States based largely on the results of animal studies, may be too low. It is important that better epidemiologic research be conducted to allow improved estimates of lung cancer risk from air pollution among the general population. The development and application of new epidemiologic methods, particularly the improved characterization of population-wide exposure to mixtures of air pollutants and the improved design of ecologic studies, could improve our ability to measure accurately the magnitude of excess cancer associated with air pollution. PMID:8741787

  15. Medical imaging in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heelan, R.T.; Bains, M.S.; Yeh, S.

    1987-10-01

    The routine imaging work-up of suspected lung cancer should include posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs and, in most cases, a computed tomographic (CT) scan of the entire thorax and adrenal glands. In asymptomatic patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung, there is justification for doing routine contrast-enhanced CT examination of the brain. Further imaging workup will be suggested by the patient's history, physical findings, and laboratory findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in patients with lung cancer is being investigated, but current studies comparing it with CT demonstrate no definite advantage at this time, with the possible exception of the lung apex in which T1 weighted thin-section coronal views are useful.

  16. Epidemiology of lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in China. Along with socioeconomic development, environmental problems have intensified and the burden of lung cancer continues to increase. Methods In this study, national cancer registry data was used for evaluating incidence, mortality, time trend, and prediction. Results In China in 2010, 605 900 patients were diagnosed and 486 600 patients died of lung cancer. Throughout the last three decades, the mortality of lung cancer has dramatically increased, as shown in national death surveys. From 2000 to 2010, age specific incidence of lung cancer increased in most age groups. It is estimated that in 2015, the total number of new cases of lung cancer will reach 733 300. Conclusions Lung cancer is a serious disease affecting public health and an effective control strategy is needed in China. PMID:26273360

  17. Novel therapeutic targets on the horizon for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Wan-Ling; Jain, Amit; Takano, Angela; Newell, Evan W; Iyer, N Gopalakrishna; Lim, Wan-Teck; Tan, Eng-Huat; Zhai, Weiwei; Hillmer, Axel M; Tam, Wai-Leong; Tan, Daniel S W

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, and is classically divided into two major histological subtypes: non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC). Although NSCLC and SCLC are considered distinct entities with different genomic landscapes, emerging evidence highlights a convergence in therapeutically relevant targets for both histologies. In adenocarcinomas with defined alterations such as EGFR mutations and ALK translocations, targeted therapies are now first-line standard of care. By contrast, many experimental and targeted agents remain largely unsuccessful for SCLC. Intense preclinical research and clinical trials are underway to exploit unique traits of lung cancer, such as oncogene dependency, DNA damage response, angiogenesis, and cellular plasticity arising from presence of cancer stem cell lineages. In addition, the promising clinical activity observed in NSCLC in response to immune checkpoint blockade has spurred great interest in the field of immunooncology, with the scope to develop a diverse repertoire of synergistic and personalised immunotherapeutics. In this Review, we discuss novel therapeutic agents for lung cancer that are in early-stage development, and how prospective clinical trials and drug development may be shaped by a deeper understanding of this heterogeneous disease. PMID:27511159

  18. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  19. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  20. Identifying Etiologically Distinct Sub-Types of Cancer: A Demonstration Project Involving Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Begg, Colin B; Orlow, Irene; Zabor, Emily C; Arora, Arshi; Sharma, Ajay; Seshan, Venkatraman E; Bernstein, Jonine L

    2015-01-01

    With the advent of increasingly detailed molecular portraits of tumor specimens, much attention has been directed toward identifying clinically distinct subtypes of cancer. Subtyping of tumors can also be accomplished with the goal of identifying distinct etiologies. We demonstrate the use of new methodologies to identify genes that distinguish etiologically heterogeneous subtypes of breast cancer using data from the case–control Cancer and Steroid Hormone Study. Tumor specimens were evaluated using a breast cancer expression panel of 196 genes. Using a statistical measure that distinguishes the degree of etiologic heterogeneity in tumor subtypes, each gene is ranked on the basis of its ability to distinguish etiologically distinct subtypes. This is accomplished independently using case–control comparisons and by examining the concordance odds ratios in double primaries. The estrogen receptor gene, and others in this pathway with expression levels that correlated strongly with estrogen receptor levels, demonstrate high degrees of etiologic heterogeneity in both methods. Our results are consistent with a growing literature that confirms the distinct etiologies of breast cancers classified on the basis of estrogen receptor expression levels. This proof-of-principle project demonstrates the viability of new strategies to identify genomic features that distinguish subtypes of cancer from an etiologic perspective. PMID:25974664

  1. Electrochemical treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Y.L.; Xue, F.Z.; Ge, B.S.; Zhao, F.R.; Shi, B.; Zhang, W.

    1997-03-01

    A pilot study of electrochemical treatment (ECT) as a therapy for 386 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken. There were 103 stage 2 cases, 89 stage 3a cases, 122 stage 3b cases, and 72 stage 4 cases. Two ECT methods were used. For peripherally located lung cancer, platinum electrodes were inserted transcutaneously into the tumor under x-ray or CT guidance. For central type lung cancer or for those inoperable during thoracotomy, electrodes were inserted intraoperatively directly into the cancer. Voltage was 6--8 V, current was 40--100 mA, and electric charge was 100 coulombs per cm of tumor diameter. The number of electrodes was determined from the size of cancer mass, because the diameter of effective area around each electrode is approximately 3 cm. The short-term (6 months after ECT) results of the 386 lung cancer cases were: complete response (CR), 25.6% (99/386); partial response (PR), 46.4% (179/386); no change (NC), 15.3% (59/386); and progressive disease (PD), 12.7% (49/386). The total effective rate (CR + PR) was 72% (278/386). The 1, 3, and 5 year overall survival rates were 86.3% (333/386), 58.8% (227/386), and 29.5% (114/386), respectively. The main complication was traumatic pneumothorax, with an incidence rate of 14.8% (57/386). These clinical results show that ECT is simple, safe, effective, and minimally traumatic. ECT provides an alternative method for treating lung cancers that are conventionally inoperable, that are not responsive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or that cannot be resected after thoracotomy. Long-term survival rates suggest that ECT warrants further investigation.

  2. Impact of Micropapillary Histologic Subtype in Selecting Limited Resection vs Lobectomy for Lung Adenocarcinoma of 2cm or Smaller

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We sought to analyze the prognostic significance of the new International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer (IASLC), American Thoracic Society (ATS), and European Respiratory Society (ERS) lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) classification for patients undergoing resection for small (≤2cm) lung ADC and to investigate whether histologic subtyping can predict recurrence after limited resection (LR) vs lobectomy (LO). Methods Comprehensive histologic subtyping was performed according to the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification on all consecutive patients who underwent LR or LO for small lung ADC between 1995 and 2009 at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. Clinical characteristics and pathologic data were retrospectively evaluated for 734 consecutive patients (LR: 258; LO: 476). Cumulative incidence of recurrence (CIR) was calculated using competing risks analysis and compared across groups using Grey’s test. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Application of IASLC/ATS/ERS lung ADC histologic subtyping to predict recurrence demonstrates that, in the LR group but not in the LO group, micropapillary (MIP) component of 5% or greater was associated with an increased risk of recurrence, compared with MIP component of less than 5% (LR: 5-year CIR = 34.2%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 23.5% to 49.7% vs 5-year CIR = 12.4%, 95% CI = 6.9% to 22.1%, P < .001; LO: 5-year CIR = 19.1%, 95% CI = 12.0% to 30.5% vs 15-year CIR = 12.9%, 95% CI = 7.6% to 21.9%, P = .13). In the LR group, among patients with tumors with an MIP component of 5% or greater, most recurrences (63.4%) were locoregional; MIP component of 5% or greater was statistically significantly associated with increased risk of local recurrence when the surgical margin was less than 1cm (5-year CIR = 32.0%, 95% CI = 18.6% to 46.0% for MIP ≥ 5% vs 5-year CIR = 7.6%, 95% CI = 2.3% to 15.6% for MIP < 5%; P = .007) but not when surgical margin was 1cm or greater (5-year CIR = 13.0%, 95% CI = 4.1% to 22

  3. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Squamous Cell Lung Cancer: From Tumor Genomics to Cancer Therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, David R.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Sos, Martin L.; Lara, Primo N.; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the last several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common NSCLC histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC. PMID:25979930

  5. Occupational exposure and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kvåle, G; Bjelke, E; Heuch, I

    1986-02-15

    The importance of occupation held longest as a risk factor for lung cancer was examined in a prospective study in Norway of 11,995 men, among whom 125 cases occurred in a follow-up from 1966 through 1978. Based on information about occupation held longest, the respondents were classified into 3 groups according to suspected exposure to respiratory carcinogens at the workplace. After stratification for age, place of residence and cigarette smoking, we found a highly significant relative risk of 2.6 for those judged to have experienced definite exposure versus the group with no workplace exposure. The apparent risk-enhancing effect of occupational exposure was observed for all histologic subtypes. Stratification including a socioeconomic factor score led to a moderate reduction in the relative risk estimate. High risk estimates still obtained, however, for a limited number of occupations, the highest for workers in the mining and quarrying industries. Although the interpretation of the observed effect associated with a crude index of occupational exposure may be difficult, our results suggest that between 13 and 27% of the lung cancer cases observed among Norwegian men in the relevant time period can be attributed to harmful work-place exposure. PMID:3943919

  6. Occupational exposure and lung cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Kvåle, G; Bjelke, E; Heuch, I

    1986-02-15

    The importance of occupation held longest as a risk factor for lung cancer was examined in a prospective study in Norway of 11,995 men, among whom 125 cases occurred in a follow-up from 1966 through 1978. Based on information about occupation held longest, the respondents were classified into 3 groups according to suspected exposure to respiratory carcinogens at the workplace. After stratification for age, place of residence and cigarette smoking, we found a highly significant relative risk of 2.6 for those judged to have experienced definite exposure versus the group with no workplace exposure. The apparent risk-enhancing effect of occupational exposure was observed for all histologic subtypes. Stratification including a socioeconomic factor score led to a moderate reduction in the relative risk estimate. High risk estimates still obtained, however, for a limited number of occupations, the highest for workers in the mining and quarrying industries. Although the interpretation of the observed effect associated with a crude index of occupational exposure may be difficult, our results suggest that between 13 and 27% of the lung cancer cases observed among Norwegian men in the relevant time period can be attributed to harmful work-place exposure.

  7. Impact of cytokine expression in the pre-implanted donor lung on the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction subtypes.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Takahashi, H; Kaneda, H; Binnie, M; Azad, S; Sato, M; Waddell, T K; Cypel, M; Liu, M; Keshavjee, S

    2013-12-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation continues to be challenged by the development of chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between cytokine expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs and the posttransplant development of CLAD and its subtypes, bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS) and restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS). Of 109 patients who underwent bilateral lung or heart-lung transplantation and survived for more than 3 months, 50 BOS, 21 RAS and 38 patients with No CLAD were identified by pulmonary function test results. Using donor lung tissue biopsies sampled from each patient, expression levels of IL-6, IL-1β, IL-8, IL-10, interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA were measured. IL-6 expression levels were significantly higher in pre-implanted lungs of patients that ultimately developed BOS compared to RAS and No CLAD (p = 0.025 and 0.011, respectively). Cox regression analysis demonstrated an association between high IL-6 expression levels and BOS development (hazard ratio = 4.98; 95% confidence interval = 2.42-10.2, p < 0.001). In conclusion, high IL-6 mRNA expression levels in pre-implanted donor lungs were associated with the development of BOS, not RAS. This association further supports the contention that early graft injury impacts on both late graft function and early graft function. PMID:24164971

  8. Air pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Böhm, G M

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro researches (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

  9. Air pollution and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

  10. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  11. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  12. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R

    1978-01-01

    Lung cancer is consistently more common in urban areas than in rural. The excess cannot be accounted for by specific occupational hazards but some of it might be due to the presence of carcinogens in urban air. The excess cannot be wholly due to such agents, because the excess in nonsmokers is small and variable. Cigarette consumption has also been greater in urban areas, but it is difficult to estimate how much of the excess it can account for. Occupational studies confirm that pollutants present in town air are capable of causing lung cancer in man and suggest that the pollutants and cigarette smoke act synergistically. The trends in the mortality from lung cancer in young and middle-aged men in England and Wales provide uncertain evidence but support the belief that atmospheric pollution has contributed to the production of the disease. In the absence of cigarette smoking, the combined effect of all atmospheric carcinogens is not responsible for more than about 5 cases of lung cancer per 100,000 persons per year in European populations. PMID:648488

  13. Lung Cancer Staging and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jones, Kirk D; Jablons, David M

    2016-01-01

    The seventh edition of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) TNM staging system was developed by the International Association for the Staging of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project by a coordinated international effort to develop data-derived TNM classifications with significant survival differences. Based on these TNM groupings, current 5-year survival estimates in NSLCC range from 73 % in stage IA disease to 13 % in stage IV disease. TNM stage remains the most important prognostic factor in predicting recurrence rates and survival times, followed by tumor histologic grade, and patient sex, age, and performance status. Molecular prognostication in lung cancer is an exploding area of research where interest has moved beyond TNM stage and into individualized genetic tumor analysis with immunohistochemistry, microarray, and mutation profiles. However, despite intense research efforts and countless publications, no molecular prognostic marker has been adopted into clinical use since most fail in subsequent cross-validation with few exceptions. The recent interest in immunotherapy for NSCLC has identified new biomarkers with early evidence that suggests that PD-L1 is a predictive marker of a good response to new immunotherapy drugs but a poor prognostic indicator of overall survival. Future prognostication of outcomes in NSCLC will likely be based on a combination of TNM stage and molecular tumor profiling and yield more precise, individualized survival estimates and treatment algorithms. PMID:27535389

  14. Gene Signature in Sessile Serrated Polyps Identifies Colon Cancer Subtype.

    PubMed

    Kanth, Priyanka; Bronner, Mary P; Boucher, Kenneth M; Burt, Randall W; Neklason, Deborah W; Hagedorn, Curt H; Delker, Don A

    2016-06-01

    Sessile serrated colon adenoma/polyps (SSA/P) are found during routine screening colonoscopy and may account for 20% to 30% of colon cancers. However, differentiating SSA/Ps from hyperplastic polyps (HP) with little risk of cancer is challenging and complementary molecular markers are needed. In addition, the molecular mechanisms of colon cancer development from SSA/Ps are poorly understood. RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) was performed on 21 SSA/Ps, 10 HPs, 10 adenomas, 21 uninvolved colon, and 20 control colon specimens. Differential expression and leave-one-out cross-validation methods were used to define a unique gene signature of SSA/Ps. Our SSA/P gene signature was evaluated in colon cancer RNA-Seq data from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) to identify a subtype of colon cancers that may develop from SSA/Ps. A total of 1,422 differentially expressed genes were found in SSA/Ps relative to controls. Serrated polyposis syndrome (n = 12) and sporadic SSA/Ps (n = 9) exhibited almost complete (96%) gene overlap. A 51-gene panel in SSA/P showed similar expression in a subset of TCGA colon cancers with high microsatellite instability. A smaller 7-gene panel showed high sensitivity and specificity in identifying BRAF-mutant, CpG island methylator phenotype high, and MLH1-silenced colon cancers. We describe a unique gene signature in SSA/Ps that identifies a subset of colon cancers likely to develop through the serrated pathway. These gene panels may be utilized for improved differentiation of SSA/Ps from HPs and provide insights into novel molecular pathways altered in colon cancer arising from the serrated pathway. Cancer Prev Res; 9(6); 456-65. ©2016 AACR.

  15. TG4010 and Nivolumab in Patients With Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-16

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein.

  17. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein. PMID:24252206

  18. Biomarkers along the continuum of care in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Holdenrieder, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Blood-based biomarkers are valuable diagnostic tools for the management of lung cancer patients. They support not only differential diagnosis and histological subtyping, but are also applied for estimation of prognosis, stratification for specific therapies, monitoring of therapy response, surveillance monitoring and early detection of residual or progressive disease. Early diagnosis of lung cancer in high risk populations (screening) is a promising future indication but poses high medical and economic challenges to marker performance. The five mostly used classical 'tumor markers' show characteristic profiles of sensitivity and specificity for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) like cytokeratin 19-fragments (CYFRA 21-1), carcino-embryonic antigen (CEA) and squamous cancer cell antigen (SCCA) as well as for small cell lung cancer (SCLC) like progastrin-releasing peptide (ProGRP) and neuron-specific enolase (NSE). Combined use and pattern recognition approaches enable highly accurate diagnosis, subtyping and therapy monitoring. For the interpretation of serial measurements on an individual level, marker-specific algorithms have to be developed. So-called companion diagnostics identify druggable molecular changes in signaling pathways of tumor tissue that can be addressed by targeted therapies. New highly sensitive technologies enable the convenient and serial molecular characterization on circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) in the blood, too. This approach is helpful when biopsies are not available and to overcome tumor molecular heterogeneity and plasticity. As only a portion of patients have such druggable molecular changes, future strategies will imply the combined use of classical and new ctDNA-based biomarkers to optimize the management of lung cancer patients during the course of disease. PMID:27542002

  19. Sequence analysis of mutations and translocations across breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Banerji, Shantanu; Cibulskis, Kristian; Rangel-Escareno, Claudia; Brown, Kristin K.; Carter, Scott L.; Frederick, Abbie M.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Sivachenko, Andrey Y.; Sougnez, Carrie; Zou, Lihua; Cortes, Maria L.; Fernandez-Lopez, Juan C.; Peng, Shouyong; Ardlie, Kristin G.; Auclair, Daniel; Bautista-Piña, Veronica; Duke, Fujiko; Francis, Joshua; Jung, Joonil; Maffuz-Aziz, Antonio; Onofrio, Robert C.; Parkin, Melissa; Pho, Nam H.; Quintanar-Jurado, Valeria; Ramos, Alex H.; Rebollar-Vega, Rosa; Rodriguez-Cuevas, Sergio; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.; Schumacher, Steven E.; Stransky, Nicolas; Thompson, Kristin M.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Baselga, Jose; Beroukhim, Rameen; Polyak, Kornelia; Sgroi, Dennis C.; Richardson, Andrea L.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Gerardo; Lander, Eric S.; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Garraway, Levi A.; Golub, Todd R.; Melendez-Zajgla, Jorge; Toker, Alex; Getz, Gad; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Meyerson, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in women worldwide with an estimated 1.38 million new cases and 458,000 deaths in 2008 alone1. This malignancy represents a heterogeneous group of tumours with characteristic molecular features, prognosis, and responses to available therapy2–4. Recurrent somatic alterations in breast cancer have been described including mutations and copy number alterations, notably ERBB2 amplifications, the first successful therapy target defined by a genomic aberration5. Prior DNA sequencing studies of breast cancer genomes have revealed additional candidate mutations and gene rearrangements 6–10. Here we report the whole-exome sequences of DNA from 103 human breast cancers of diverse subtypes from patients in Mexico and Vietnam compared to matched-normal DNA, together with whole-genome sequences of 22 breast cancer/normal pairs. Beyond confirming recurrent somatic mutations in PIK3CA11, TP536, AKT112, GATA313, and MAP3K110, we discovered recurrent mutations in the CBFB transcription factor gene and deletions of its partner RUNX1. Furthermore, we have identified a recurrent MAGI3-AKT3 fusion enriched in triple-negative breast cancer lacking estrogen and progesterone receptors and ERBB2 expression. The Magi3-Akt3 fusion leads to constitutive activation of Akt kinase, which is abolished by treatment with an ATP-competitive Akt small-molecule inhibitor. PMID:22722202

  20. Luminal B breast cancer subtype displays a dicotomic epigenetic pattern.

    PubMed

    Bediaga, Naiara G; Beristain, Elena; Calvo, Borja; Viguri, María A; Gutierrez-Corres, Borja; Rezola, Ricardo; Ruiz-Diaz, Irune; Guerra, Isabel; de Pancorbo, Marian M

    2016-01-01

    Luminal B breast tumors have aggressive clinical and biological features, and constitute the most heterogeneous molecular subtype, both clinically and molecularly. Unfortunately, the immunohistochemistry correlate of the luminal B subtype remains still imprecise, and it has now become of paramount importance to define a classification scheme capable of segregating luminal tumors into clinically meaningful subgroups that may be used clinically to guide patient management. With the aim of unraveling the DNA methylation profiles of the luminal subtypes currently being most used in the clinical setting, we have quantified the DNA methylation level of 27,578 CpG sites in 17 luminal B (ER+, Ki67 ≥ 20 % or PgR < 20 % and HER2-), 8 luminal A (ER+ and Ki67 > 20 %) and 4 luminal B-HER2+ (ER+ and HER2+) breast cancer samples by using the Illumina Infinium methylation microarray approach. Unsupervised hierarchical clustering revealed that DNA methylation stratifies luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features. One subgroup of luminal B samples showed a methylator phenotype and clustered with the lumB-HER tumors, while the other showed less methylated events, clustered with the luminal A. A 3 CpG marker panel capable of discriminating methylator versus non-methylator luminal B samples was identified and further validated in an independent cohort of patients. Our results provide evidence that DNA methylation and, more specifically, a panel of 3 CpG markers, enables the stratification of luminal B samples in two categories with differing epigenetic and clinical features and support the utilization of this panel for therapeutic stratification of patients with luminal breast cancer. PMID:27330889

  1. Lung cancer and peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    SERENO, MARÍA; RODRÍGUEZ-ESTEBAN, ISABEL; GÓMEZ-RAPOSO, CÉSAR; MERINO, MARÍA; LÓPEZ-GÓMEZ, MIRIAM; ZAMBRANA, FRANCISCO; CASADO, ENRIQUE

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently one of the most common malignancies in the world and peritoneal involvement is rare in these types of tumors. Clinical manifestations of these metastases are also uncommon and include intestinal perforation and obstruction. The present study reviewed certain aspects of the complication of peritoneal involvement and illustrated it with four cases of patients that were diagnosed with primary lung carcinoma and secondary peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The outcome of these patients is poor and they rarely respond to chemotherapy. Surgery is successful in the majority of cases. PMID:24137394

  2. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  3. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    López, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  4. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  6. [Molecular diagnostics of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ryska, A; Dziadziuszko, R; Olszewski, W; Berzinec, P; Öz, B; Gottfried, M; Cufer, T; Samarzija, M; Plank, L; Ostoros, Gy; Tímár, J

    2015-09-01

    Development of the target therapies of lung cancer was a rapid process which fundamentally changed the pathological diagnosis as well. Furthermore, molecular pathology became essential part of the routine diagnostics of lung cancer. These changes generated several practical problems and in underdeveloped countries or in those with reimbursement problems have been combined with further challenges. The central and eastern region of Europe are characterized by similar problems in this respect which promoted the foundation of NSCLC Working Group to provide up to date protocols or guidelines. This present paper is a summary of the molecular pathology and target therapy guidelines written with the notion that it has to be upgraded continuously according to the development of the field.

  7. [Cannabis smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; de Chazeron, I; Meurice, J-C

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but it is mainly smoked mixed with tobacco. The combined smoking of cannabis and tobacco is a common-place phenomenon in our society. However, its use is responsible for severe pulmonary consequences. The specific impact of smoking cannabis is difficult to assess precisely and to distinguish from the effect of tobacco. Marijuana smoke contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carcinogens at higher concentration than tobacco smoke. Cellular, tissue, animal and human studies, and also epidemiological studies, show that marijuana smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Cannabis exposure doubles the risk of developing lung cancer. This should encourage clinicians to identify cannabis use and to offer patients support in quitting.

  8. Transformation from non-small-cell lung cancer to small-cell lung cancer: molecular drivers and cells of origin.

    PubMed

    Oser, Matthew G; Niederst, Matthew J; Sequist, Lecia V; Engelman, Jeffrey A

    2015-04-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. The two broad histological subtypes of lung cancer are small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), which is the cause of 15% of cases, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), which accounts for 85% of cases and includes adenocarcinoma, squamous-cell carcinoma, and large-cell carcinoma. Although NSCLC and SCLC are commonly thought to be different diseases owing to their distinct biology and genomic abnormalities, the idea that these malignant disorders might share common cells of origin has been gaining support. This idea has been supported by the unexpected findings that a subset of NSCLCs with mutated EGFR return as SCLC when resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors develops. Additionally, other case reports have described the coexistence of NSCLC and SCLC, further challenging the commonly accepted view of their distinct lineages. Here, we summarise the published clinical observations and biology underlying tumours with combined SCLC and NSCLC histology and cancers that transform from adenocarcinoma to SCLC. We also discuss pre-clinical studies pointing to common potential cells of origin, and speculate how the distinct paths of differentiation are determined by the genomics of each disease.

  9. Lung cancer risk associated with cancer in relatives.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G L; Falk, R T; Pickle, L W; Mason, T J; Buffler, P A

    1991-01-01

    Family history data from an incident case-control study of lung cancer conducted in the Texas Gulf Coast region between 1976 and 1980 were analyzed to evaluate the contribution of cancer in first-degree relatives to lung cancer risk. Odds ratios (OR) increased slightly as the number of relatives with any cancer increased (reaching 1.5 with 4 or more relatives with cancer). Risks were higher for tobacco-related cancers (OR = 1.5 for 2 or more relatives with these tumors) and greatest for first-degree relatives with lung cancer (OR = 2.8 for lung cancer in 2 or more relatives). For cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the lung, risks with 3 or more relatives with any cancer were increased 2-fold (OR = 1.8 and 1.9 respectively), and a significantly elevated risk was found for having a first-degree relative with lung cancer for each histologic type (ORs from 1.7-2.1). Having a spouse with lung cancer increased lung cancer risk (OR = 2.5), and cases with lung cancer reported in a first-degree relative were diagnosed at an earlier age, as were case siblings with lung cancer.

  10. Recent advances and clinical implications of the micropapillary histological subtype in lung adenocarcinomas.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Ching; Buitrago, Daniel H; Kadota, Kyuichi; Jones, David R; Adusumilli, Prasad S

    2014-06-01

    Micropapillary (MIP) histologic subtype included in the classification of lung adenocarcinomas (ADCs) is associated with both size- and stage-independent poor prognoses. MIP pattern in lung ADCs, even at small, early stages, correlates with high lymphovascular invasion, visceral pleural invasion and lymph node metastases. Recently, we reported that patients with a MIP component are at a higher risk of locoregional recurrence after limited resection. Identification of a MIP pattern is only possible with permanent pathologic sections; preoperative imaging, cytology or intraoperative frozen section specimens remain unreliable. The intermixed, heterogenous morphology of lung ADC presents a technical challenge in investigating the molecular biology of cells with MIP morphology. A comprehensive understanding of the biology of MIP morphology is vital for therapeutic interventions.

  11. Molecular signature and pathway analysis of human primary squamous and adenocarcinoma lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Daraselia, Nikolai; Wang, Yipeng; Budoff, Adam; Lituev, Alexander; Potapova, Olga; Vansant, Gordon; Monforte, Joseph; Mazo, Ilya; Ossovskaya, Valeria S

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common type of lung cancer, with a poor response to chemotherapy and low survival rate. This unfavorable treatment response is likely to derive from both late diagnosis and from complex, incompletely understood biology, and heterogeneity among NSCLC subtypes. To define the relative contributions of major cellular pathways to the biogenesis of NSCLC and highlight major differences between NSCLC subtypes, we studied the molecular signatures of lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), based on analysis of gene expression and comparison of tumor samples with normal lung tissue. Our results suggest the existence of specific molecular networks and subtype-specific differences between lung ADC and SCC subtypes, mostly found in cell cycle, DNA repair, and metabolic pathways. However, we also observed similarities across major gene interaction networks and pathways in ADC and SCC. These data provide a new insight into the biology of ADC and SCC and can be used to explore novel therapeutic interventions in lung cancer chemoprevention and treatment. PMID:22206048

  12. Identifying molecular subtypes in human colon cancer using gene expression and DNA methylation microarray data

    PubMed Central

    REN, ZHONGLU; WANG, WENHUI; LI, JINMING

    2016-01-01

    Identifying colon cancer subtypes based on molecular signatures may allow for a more rational, patient-specific approach to therapy in the future. Classifications using gene expression data have been attempted before with little concordance between the different studies carried out. In this study we aimed to uncover subtypes of colon cancer that have distinct biological characteristics and identify a set of novel biomarkers which could best reflect the clinical and/or biological characteristics of each subtype. Clustering analysis and discriminant analysis were utilized to discover the subtypes in two different molecular levels on 153 colon cancer samples from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Data Portal. At gene expression level, we identified two major subtypes, ECL1 (expression cluster 1) and ECL2 (expression cluster 2) and a list of signature genes. Due to the heterogeneity of colon cancer, the subtype ECL1 can be further subdivided into three nested subclasses, and HOTAIR were found upregulated in subclass 2. At DNA methylation level, we uncovered three major subtypes, MCL1 (methylation cluster 1), MCL2 (methylation cluster 2) and MCL3 (methylation cluster 3). We found only three subtypes of CpG island methylator phenotype (CIMP) in colon cancer instead of the four subtypes in the previous reports, and we found no sufficient evidence to subdivide MCL3 into two distinct subgroups. PMID:26647925

  13. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development. PMID:26909576

  14. Genomic analyses identify molecular subtypes of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Peter; Chang, David K; Nones, Katia; Johns, Amber L; Patch, Ann-Marie; Gingras, Marie-Claude; Miller, David K; Christ, Angelika N; Bruxner, Tim J C; Quinn, Michael C; Nourse, Craig; Murtaugh, L Charles; Harliwong, Ivon; Idrisoglu, Senel; Manning, Suzanne; Nourbakhsh, Ehsan; Wani, Shivangi; Fink, Lynn; Holmes, Oliver; Chin, Venessa; Anderson, Matthew J; Kazakoff, Stephen; Leonard, Conrad; Newell, Felicity; Waddell, Nick; Wood, Scott; Xu, Qinying; Wilson, Peter J; Cloonan, Nicole; Kassahn, Karin S; Taylor, Darrin; Quek, Kelly; Robertson, Alan; Pantano, Lorena; Mincarelli, Laura; Sanchez, Luis N; Evers, Lisa; Wu, Jianmin; Pinese, Mark; Cowley, Mark J; Jones, Marc D; Colvin, Emily K; Nagrial, Adnan M; Humphrey, Emily S; Chantrill, Lorraine A; Mawson, Amanda; Humphris, Jeremy; Chou, Angela; Pajic, Marina; Scarlett, Christopher J; Pinho, Andreia V; Giry-Laterriere, Marc; Rooman, Ilse; Samra, Jaswinder S; Kench, James G; Lovell, Jessica A; Merrett, Neil D; Toon, Christopher W; Epari, Krishna; Nguyen, Nam Q; Barbour, Andrew; Zeps, Nikolajs; Moran-Jones, Kim; Jamieson, Nigel B; Graham, Janet S; Duthie, Fraser; Oien, Karin; Hair, Jane; Grützmann, Robert; Maitra, Anirban; Iacobuzio-Donahue, Christine A; Wolfgang, Christopher L; Morgan, Richard A; Lawlor, Rita T; Corbo, Vincenzo; Bassi, Claudio; Rusev, Borislav; Capelli, Paola; Salvia, Roberto; Tortora, Giampaolo; Mukhopadhyay, Debabrata; Petersen, Gloria M; Munzy, Donna M; Fisher, William E; Karim, Saadia A; Eshleman, James R; Hruban, Ralph H; Pilarsky, Christian; Morton, Jennifer P; Sansom, Owen J; Scarpa, Aldo; Musgrove, Elizabeth A; Bailey, Ulla-Maja Hagbo; Hofmann, Oliver; Sutherland, Robert L; Wheeler, David A; Gill, Anthony J; Gibbs, Richard A; Pearson, John V; Waddell, Nicola; Biankin, Andrew V; Grimmond, Sean M

    2016-03-01

    Integrated genomic analysis of 456 pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas identified 32 recurrently mutated genes that aggregate into 10 pathways: KRAS, TGF-β, WNT, NOTCH, ROBO/SLIT signalling, G1/S transition, SWI-SNF, chromatin modification, DNA repair and RNA processing. Expression analysis defined 4 subtypes: (1) squamous; (2) pancreatic progenitor; (3) immunogenic; and (4) aberrantly differentiated endocrine exocrine (ADEX) that correlate with histopathological characteristics. Squamous tumours are enriched for TP53 and KDM6A mutations, upregulation of the TP63∆N transcriptional network, hypermethylation of pancreatic endodermal cell-fate determining genes and have a poor prognosis. Pancreatic progenitor tumours preferentially express genes involved in early pancreatic development (FOXA2/3, PDX1 and MNX1). ADEX tumours displayed upregulation of genes that regulate networks involved in KRAS activation, exocrine (NR5A2 and RBPJL), and endocrine differentiation (NEUROD1 and NKX2-2). Immunogenic tumours contained upregulated immune networks including pathways involved in acquired immune suppression. These data infer differences in the molecular evolution of pancreatic cancer subtypes and identify opportunities for therapeutic development.

  15. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  16. Kernel mixture survival models for identifying cancer subtypes, predicting patient's cancer types and survival probabilities.

    PubMed

    Ando, Tomohiro; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2004-01-01

    One important application of microarray gene expression data is to study the relationship between the clinical phenotype of cancer patients and gene expression profiles on the whole-genome scale. The clinical phenotype includes several different types of cancers, survival times, relapse times, drug responses and so on. Under the situation that the subtypes of cancer have not been previously identified or known to exist, we develop a new kernel mixture modeling method that performs simultaneously identification of the subtype of cancer, prediction of the probabilities of both cancer type and patient's survival, and detection of a set of marker genes on which to base a diagnosis. The proposed method is successfully performed on real data analysis and simulation studies.

  17. Lung cancer screening: subsequent evidences of national lung screening trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Sik

    2014-08-01

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6.7% decrease in all-cause mortality. The NLST is the only trial showing positive results in a high-risk population, such as in patients with old age and heavy ever smokers. Lung cancer screening using a low-dose chest computed tomography might be beneficial for the high-risk group. However, there may also be potential adverse outcomes in terms of over diagnosis, bias and cost-effectiveness. Until now, lung cancer screening remains controversial. In this review, we wish to discuss the evolution of lung cancer screening and summarize existing evidences and recommendations.

  18. Year-in-Review of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the last several years, we have made slow but steady progress in understanding molecular biology of lung cancer. This review is focused on advances in understanding the biology of lung cancer that have led to proof of concept studies on new therapeutic approaches. The three selected topics include genetics, epigenetics and non-coding RNA. This new information represents progress in the integration of molecular mechanisms that to identify more effective ways to target lung cancer. PMID:23166546

  19. MORPHOMETRIC SUBTYPING FOR A PANEL OF BREAST CANCER CELL LINES

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Ju; Chang, Hang; Fontenay, Gerald; Wang, Nicholas J.; Gray, Joe W.; Parvin, Bahram

    2009-05-08

    A panel of cell lines of diverse molecular background offers an improved model system for high-content screening, comparative analysis, and cell systems biology. A computational pipeline has been developed to collect images from cell-based assays, segment individual cells and colonies, represent segmented objects in a multidimensional space, and cluster them for identifying distinct subpopulations. While each segmentation strategy can vary for different imaging assays, representation and subpopulation analysis share a common thread. Application of this pipeline to a library of 41 breast cancer cell lines is demonstrated. These cell lines are grown in 2D and imaged through immunofluorescence microscopy. Subpopulations in this panel are identified and shown to correlate with previous subtyping literature that was derived from transcript data.

  20. Review of radon and lung cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Hornung, R.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Radon, a long-established cause of lung cancer in uranium and other underground miners, has recently emerged as a potentially important cause of lung cancer in the general population. The evidence for widespread exposure of the population to radon and the well-documented excess of lung cancer among underground miners exposed to radon decay products have raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also be a cause of lung cancer in the general population. To date, epidemiological data on the lung cancer risk associated with environmental exposure to radon have been limited. Consequently, the lung cancer hazard posed by radon exposure in indoor air has been addressed primarily through risk estimation procedures. The quantitative risks of lung cancer have been estimated using exposure-response relations derived from the epidemiological investigations of uranium and other underground miners. We review five of the more informative studies of miners and recent risk projection models for excess lung cancer associated with radon. The principal models differ substantially in their underlying assumptions and consequently in the resulting risk projections. The resulting diversity illustrates the substantial uncertainty that remains concerning the most appropriate model of the temporal pattern of radon-related lung cancer. Animal experiments, further follow-up of the miner cohorts, and well-designed epidemiological studies of indoor exposure should reduce this uncertainty. 18 references.

  1. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India.

  2. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  4. Molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes using large-scale text mining

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Thyroid cancer is the most common endocrine tumor with a steady increase in incidence. It is classified into multiple histopathological subtypes with potentially distinct molecular mechanisms. Identifying the most relevant genes and biological pathways reported in the thyroid cancer literature is vital for understanding of the disease and developing targeted therapeutics. Results We developed a large-scale text mining system to generate a molecular profiling of thyroid cancer subtypes. The system first uses a subtype classification method for the thyroid cancer literature, which employs a scoring scheme to assign different subtypes to articles. We evaluated the classification method on a gold standard derived from the PubMed Supplementary Concept annotations, achieving a micro-average F1-score of 85.9% for primary subtypes. We then used the subtype classification results to extract genes and pathways associated with different thyroid cancer subtypes and successfully unveiled important genes and pathways, including some instances that are missing from current manually annotated databases or most recent review articles. Conclusions Identification of key genes and pathways plays a central role in understanding the molecular biology of thyroid cancer. An integration of subtype context can allow prioritized screening for diagnostic biomarkers and novel molecular targeted therapeutics. Source code used for this study is made freely available online at https://github.com/chengkun-wu/GenesThyCan. PMID:25521965

  5. Fruits and vegetables and lung cancer: Findings from the European Prospective Investigation into Cancer and Nutrition.

    PubMed

    Miller, Anthony B; Altenburg, Hans-Peter; Bueno-de-Mesquita, Bas; Boshuizen, Hendriek C; Agudo, Antonio; Berrino, Franco; Gram, Inger Torhild; Janson, Lars; Linseisen, Jacob; Overvad, Kim; Rasmuson, Torgney; Vineis, Paolo; Lukanova, Annekatrin; Allen, Naomi; Amiano, Pilar; Barricarte, Aurelio; Berglund, Göran; Boeing, Heiner; Clavel-Chapelon, Françoise; Day, Nicholas E; Hallmans, Göran; Lund, Eiliv; Martinez, Carmen; Navarro, Carmen; Palli, Domenico; Panico, Salvatore; Peeters, Petra H M; Quirós, José Ramón; Tjønneland, Anne; Tumino, Rosario; Trichopoulou, Antonia; Trichopoulos, Dimitrios; Slimani, Nadia; Riboli, Elio; Palli, Dominico

    2004-01-10

    Intake of fruits and vegetables is thought to protect against the development of lung cancer. However, some recent cohort and case-control studies have shown no protective effect. We have assessed the relation between fruit and vegetable intake and lung cancer incidence in the large prospective investigation on diet and cancer, the European Prospective Investigation Into Cancer and Nutrition (EPIC). We studied data from 478,021 individuals that took part in the EPIC study, who were recruited from 10 European countries and who completed a dietary questionnaire during 1992-1998. Follow-up was to December 1998 or 1999, but for some centres with active follow-up to June 2002. During follow-up, 1,074 participants were reported to have developed lung cancer, of whom 860 were eligible for our analysis. We used the Cox proportional hazard model to determine the effect of fruit and vegetable intake on the incidence of lung cancer. We paid particular attention to adjustment for smoking. Relative risk estimates were obtained using fruit and vegetable intake categorised by sex-specific, cohort-wide quintiles. After adjustment for age, smoking, height, weight and gender, there was a significant inverse association between fruit consumption and lung cancer risk: the hazard ratio for the highest quintile of consumption relative to the lowest being 0.60 (95% Confidence Interval 0.46-0.78), p for trend 0.0099. The association was strongest in the Northern Europe centres, and among current smokers at baseline, and was strengthened when the 293 lung cancers diagnosed in the first 2 years of follow-up were excluded from the analysis. There was no association between vegetable consumption or vegetable subtypes and lung cancer risk. The findings from this analysis can be regarded as re-enforcing recommendations with regard to enhanced fruit consumption for populations. However, the effect is likely to be small compared to smoking cessation.

  6. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers (LCINS) has lately been recognized as a unique disease based on rapidly gained knowledge from genomic changes to treatment responses. The focus of this article is on current knowledge and challenges with regard to LCINS expanded from recent reviews highlighting five areas: (1) distribution of LCINS by temporal trends, geographic regions, and populations; (2) three well-recognized environmental risk factors; (3) other plausible environmental risk factors; (4) prior chronic lung diseases and infectious diseases as risk factors; and (5) lifestyles as risk or protective factors. This article will also bring attention to recently published literature in two pioneering areas: (1) histological characteristics, clinical features with emerging new effective therapies, and social and psychological stigma; and (2) searching for susceptibility genes using integrated genomic approaches. PMID:21500120

  7. Personalized therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Andre L; Eng, Juliana

    2014-12-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous advancement in the therapy for lung cancer, predominantly seen in adenocarcinoma, ranging from the introduction of histology-based drugs to the discovery of targetable mutations. These events have led to a personalized therapeutic approach with the delivery of drugs that target specific oncogenic pathways active in a given tumor with the intent of acquiring the best response rate. The discovery of sensitizing mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene as the basis for clinical response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors led to a systematic search for other molecular targets in lung cancer. Currently, there are several molecular alterations that can be targeted by experimental drugs. These new discoveries would not be possible without a parallel technological evolution in diagnostic molecular pathology. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a technology that allows for the evaluation of multiple molecular alterations in the same sample using a small amount of tissue. Selective evaluation of targeted cancer genes, instead of whole-genome evaluation, is the approach that is best suited to enter clinical practice. This technology allows for the detection of most molecular alteration with a single test, thus saving tissue for future discoveries. The use of NGS is expected to increase and gain importance in clinical and experimental approaches, since it can be used as a diagnostic tool as well as for new discoveries. The technique may also help us elucidate the interplay of several genes and their alteration in the mechanism of drug response and resistance.

  8. Enhanced Quitline Intervention in Smoking Cessation for Patients With Non-Metastatic Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tobacco Use Disorder

  9. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Lung Cancer This booklet is about lung cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the lungs and basics about lung cancer Treatment for lung ...

  10. Diagnosis and Molecular Classification of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease composed of diverse histological and molecular types with clinical relevance. The advent of large-scale molecular profiling has been helpful to identify novel molecular targets that can be applied to the treatment of particular lung cancer patients and has helped to reshape the pathological classification of lung cancer. Novel directions include the immunotherapy revolution, which has opened the door for new opportunities for cancer therapy and is also redefining the classification of multiple tumors, including lung cancer. In the present chapter, we will review the main current basis of the pathological diagnosis and classification of lung cancer incorporating the histopathological and molecular dimensions of the disease. PMID:27535388

  11. Lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, L.S.; Husen, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    Lung cancer has been a rare disease among the Indians of the southwestern United States. However, the advent of uranium mining in the area has been associated with an increased incidence of lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners. This study centers on Navajo men with lung cancer who were admitted to the hospital from February 1965 to May 1979. Of a total of 17 patients with lung cancer, 16 were uranium miners, and one was a nonminer. The mean value of cumulative radon exposure for this group was 1139.5 working level months (WLMs). The predominant cancer type was the small cell undifferentiated category (62.5 percent). The low frequency of cigarette smoking in this group supports the view that radiation is the primary cause of lung cancer among uranium miners and that cigarette smoking acts as a promoting agent.

  12. Oncogenic cooperation and coamplification of developmental transcription factor genes in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Jude; Liu, Qing; Bakleh, Amy; Krasnitz, Alex; Nguyen, Ken C Q; Lakshmi, B; Gerald, William L; Powers, Scott; Mu, David

    2007-10-16

    We used high-resolution array analysis to discover a recurrent lung cancer amplicon located at 14q13.3. Low-level gain of this region was detected in 15% of lung cancer samples, and high-level amplification was detected in an additional 4% of samples. High-level focal amplification appears to be specific to lung cancers, because it was not detected in >500 samples of other tumor types. Mapping of the commonly amplified region revealed there are three genes in the core region, all of which encode transcription factors with either established lung developmental function (TTF1/NKX2-1, NKX2-8) or potential lung developmental function (PAX9). All three genes were overexpressed to varying degrees in amplified samples, although TTF1/NKX2-1 was not expressed in the squamous cancer subtype, consistent with previous reports. Remarkably, overexpression of any pairwise combination of these genes showed pronounced synergy in promoting the proliferation of immortalized human lung epithelial cells. Analysis of human lung cancer cell lines by both RNAi and ectopic overexpression further substantiates an oncogenic role for these transcription factors. These results, taken together with previous reports of oncogenic alterations of transcription factors involved in lung development (p63, CEBPA), suggest genetic alterations that directly interfere with transcriptional networks normally regulating lung development may be a more common feature of lung cancer than previously realized.

  13. Distinct expression patterns of alveolar "alarmins" in subtypes of chronic lung allograft dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Saito, T; Liu, M; Binnie, M; Sato, M; Hwang, D; Azad, S; Machuca, T N; Zamel, R; Waddell, T K; Cypel, M; Keshavjee, S

    2014-06-01

    The long-term success of lung transplantation is limited by chronic lung allograft dysfunction (CLAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the alveolar alarmin profiles in CLAD subtypes, restrictive allograft syndrome (RAS) and bronchiolitis obliterans syndrome (BOS). Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were collected from 53 recipients who underwent double lung or heart-lung transplantation, including patients with RAS (n = 10), BOS (n = 18) and No CLAD (n = 25). Protein levels of alarmins such as S100A8, S100A9, S100A8/A9, S100A12, S100P, high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) and soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products (sRAGE) in BAL fluid were measured. RAS and BOS showed higher expressions of S100A8, S100A8/A9 and S100A12 compared with No CLAD (p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001, p < 0.0001 in RAS vs. No CLAD, p = 0.0006, p = 0.0044, p = 0.0086 in BOS vs. No CLAD, respectively). Moreover, RAS showed greater up-regulation of S100A9, S100A8/A9, S100A12, S100P and HMGB1 compared with BOS (p = 0.0094, p = 0.038, p = 0.041, p = 0.035 and p = 0.010, respectively). sRAGE did not show significant difference among the three groups (p = 0.174). Our results demonstrate distinct expression patterns of alveolar alarmins in RAS and BOS, suggesting that RAS and BOS may represent biologically different subtypes. Further refinements in biologic profiling will lead to a better understanding of CLAD. PMID:24787265

  14. Chemoprevention studies within lung cancer screening programmes.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, G; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, A; Infante, M; Bonanni, B

    2015-01-01

    While aggressive tobacco control and help to stop smoking are essential weapons in the fight against lung cancer, screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk populations and chemoprevention may also contribute to reducing lung cancer deaths. Persons undergoing LDCT screening are an ideal population to be tested for agents potentially able to prevent the development of lung cancer by the regression of precancerous lesions, which are routinely monitored as part of the screening process. Peripheral subsolid nodules appear as particularly suitable targets, since many are adenocarcinoma precursors. A study on inhaled budesonide (a potential chemopreventive drug) for 1 year found that the mean size of non-solid lung nodules was significantly reduced over 5 years of follow-up, compared to inhaled placebo, in a population of high-risk individuals with indeterminate lung nodules not requiring immediate specific investigation for lung cancer and detected as part of a lung cancer screening program with LDCT. A new randomised placebo-controlled phase-II trial to test the ability of aspirin to induce the regression of non-solid and partially solid nodules detected by LDCT screening has been started. The effect of aspirin on a miRNA signature able to predict the presence of both cancer and precancerous lesions in high-risk asymptomatic individuals is also being monitored in the trial. This signature was previously shown to predict the presence of both lung cancer and non-solid lung nodules in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:26635901

  15. Diagnosing lung cancer using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Liang; Yang, Yaliang; Xing, Jiong; Thrall, Michael J.; Wang, Zhiyong; Li, Fuhai; Luo, Pengfei; Wong, Kelvin K.; Zhao, Hong; Wong, Stephen T. C.

    2011-03-01

    Lung carcinoma is the most prevalent type of cancer in the world, and it is responsible for more deaths than other types of cancer. During diagnosis, a pathologist primarily aims to differentiate small cell carcinoma from non-small cell carcinoma on biopsy and cytology specimens, which is time consuming due to the time required for tissue processing and staining. To speed up the diagnostic process, we investigated the feasibility of using coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscopy as a label-free strategy to image lung lesions and differentiate subtypes of lung cancers. Different mouse lung cancer models were developed by injecting human lung cancer cell lines, including adenocarcinoma, squamous cell carcinoma, and small cell carcinoma, into lungs of the nude mice. CARS images were acquired from normal lung tissues and different subtypes of cancer lesions ex vivo using intrinsic contrasts from symmetric CH2 bonds. These images showed good correlation with the hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stained sections from the same tissue samples with regard to cell size, density, and cell-cell distance. These features are routinely used in diagnosing lung lesions. Our results showed that the CARS technique is capable of providing a visualizable platform to differentiate different kinds of lung cancers using the same pathological features without histological staining and thus has the potential to serve as a more efficient examination tool for diagnostic pathology. In addition, incorporating with suitable fiber-optic probes would render the CARS technique as a promising approach for in vivo diagnosis of lung cancer.

  16. Classification and Pathology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min

    2016-07-01

    Advancement in the understanding of lung tumor biology enables continued refinement of lung cancer classification, reflected in the recently introduced 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. In small biopsy or cytology specimens, special emphasis is placed on separating adenocarcinomas from the other lung cancers to effectively select tumors for targeted molecular testing. In resection specimens, adenocarcinomas are further classified based on architectural pattern to delineate tissue types of prognostic significance. Neuroendocrine tumors are divided into typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma based on a combination of features, especially tumor cell proliferation rate. PMID:27261908

  17. [Developing surgical options for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Sihvo, Eero

    2016-01-01

    The selection of correct treatment for lung cancer is multidisciplinary collaboration and requires careful assessment of the extent of the tumor and the condition of the patient. In localized non-small cell lung cancer, mere surgery or surgery in combination with adjuvant therapies are the best options for curing the disease. The trend in modern surgery is mini-invasiveness and preservation of lung tissue. Accordingly, any unit conducting lung cancer operations should have access to all modern techniques in order to provide each patient with optimal, patient-tailored surgical therapy. PMID:27132298

  18. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  19. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  20. Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) سرطان الرئة - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Lung Cancer Karcinom pluća - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Lung Cancer 肺癌 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  1. Plasma Biomarker Profiles Differ Depending on Breast Cancer Subtype but RANTES is Consistently Increased

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzales, Rachel M.; Daly, Don S.; Tan, Ruimin; Marks, Jeffrey R.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2011-07-01

    Background: Current biomarkers for breast cancer have little potential for detection. We determined if breast cancer subtypes influence circulating protein biomarkers. Methods: A sandwich-ELISA microarray platform was used to evaluate 23 candidate biomarkers in plasma samples that were obtained from subjects with either benign breast disease or invasive breast cancer. All plasma samples were collected at the time of biopsy, after a referral due to a suspicious screen (e.g., mammography). Cancer samples were evaluated based on breast cancer subtypes, as defined by the HER2 and estrogen receptor statuses. Results: Ten proteins were statistically altered in at least one breast cancer subtype, including four epidermal growth factor receptor ligands, two matrix metalloproteases, two cytokines, and two angiogenic factors. Only one cytokine, RANTES, was significantly increased (P<0.01 for each analysis) in all four subtypes, with areas under receiver operating characteristic curves (AUC) that ranged from 0.76 to 0.82, depending on cancer subtype. The best AUC values were observed for analyses that combined data from multiple biomarkers, with values ranging from 0.70 to 0.99, depending on the cancer subtype. Although the results for RANTES are consistent with previous publications, the multi-assay results need to be validated in independent sample sets. Conclusions: Different breast cancer subtypes produce distinct biomarker profiles, and circulating protein biomarkers have potential to differentiate between true and false positive screens for breast cancer. Impact: Subtype-specific biomarker panels may be useful for detecting breast cancer or as an adjunct assay to improve the accuracy of current screening methods.

  2. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  3. Metabolic profiling of breast cancer: Differences in central metabolism between subtypes of breast cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Willmann, Lucas; Schlimpert, Manuel; Halbach, Sebastian; Erbes, Thalia; Stickeler, Elmar; Kammerer, Bernd

    2015-09-01

    Although the concept of aerobic glycolysis in cancer was already reported in the 1930s by Otto Warburg, the understanding of metabolic pathways remains challenging especially due to the heterogeneity of cancer. In consideration of four different time points (1, 2, 4, and 7 days of incubation), GC-MS profiling of metabolites was performed on cell extracts and supernatants of breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-231, -453, BT-474) with different sub classification and the breast epithelial cell line MCF-10A. To the exclusion of trypsinization, direct methanolic extraction, cell scraping and cell disruption was executed to obtain central metabolites. Major differences in biochemical pathways have been observed in the breast cancer cell lines compared to the breast epithelial cell line, as well as between the breast cancer cell lines themselves. Characteristics of breast cancer subtypes could be correlated to their individual metabolic profiles. PLS-DA revealed the discrimination of breast cancer cell lines from MCF-10A based on elevated amino acid levels. The observed metabolic signatures have great potential as biomarker for breast cancer as well as an improved understanding of subtype specific phenomenons of breast cancer. PMID:26218769

  4. Development and Evaluation of a Lung Cancer Screening Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Hart, Katelyn; Tofthagen, Cindy; Wang, Hsiao-Lan

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer; however, it often is not diagnosed until the advanced stages. Early-stage lung cancer is curable, but screening tools are not usually implemented in practice because of a lack of provider awareness. A lung cancer screening decision aid may increase screening use and, ultimately, reduce lung cancer deaths.
. PMID:27668377

  5. Neuronal Acetylcholine Nicotinic Receptors as New Targets for Lung Cancer Treatment.

    PubMed

    Mucchietto, Vanessa; Crespi, Arianna; Fasoli, Francesca; Clementi, Francesco; Gotti, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Smoking accounts for approximately 70% of the cases of non- small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 90% of the cases of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC), although some patients develop lung cancer without a history of smoking. Nicotine is the most active addictive component of tobacco smoke. It does not initiate tumorigenesis in humans and rodents, but it alters the pathophysiology of lung cells by inducing the secretion of growth factors, neurotransmitters and cytokines, and promotes tumour growth and metastases by inducing cell cycle progression, migration, invasion, angiogenesis and the evasion of apoptosis. Most of these effects are a result of nicotine binding and activation of cell-surface neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and downstream intracellular signalling cascades, and many are blocked by nAChR subtype-selective antagonists. Recent genome-wide association studies have revealed single nucleotide polymorphisms of nAChR subunits that influence nicotine dependence and lung cancer. This review describes the molecular basis of nAChR structural and functional diversity in normal and cancer lung cells, and the genetic alterations facilitating smoking-induced lung cancers. It also summarises current knowledge concerning the intracellular pathways activated by nicotine and other compounds present in tobacco smoke. PMID:26845123

  6. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomanno, Geno; Bechtel, Joel J.

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the incidence of cigarette smoking is decreasing in the United States it appears to be increasing worldwide. The five-year survival rate has not improved in cases with advanced disease, but several articles have indicated that survival can be improved in cases diagnosed early by sputum cytology and chest x-ray. In cases diagnosed while the lesion is in the in-situ stage or measures less than 1 cm in diameter, surgical excision and/or radiation therapy improves survival; therefore, the early diagnosis of high-risk patients should be vigorously pursued. A recent study at a community hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado, presented 45 lung cancer cases diagnosed with positive sputum cytology and negative chest x-ray, and indicates that early diagnosis does improve survival. This study has been conducted during the past six years; 16 cases have survived three years and six cases show five-year survival.

  8. A novel subtype classification and risk of breast cancer by histone modification profiling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohua; Hu, Hanyang; He, Lin; Yu, Xueyuan; Liu, Xiangyu; Zhong, Rong; Shu, Maoguo

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer has been classified into several intrinsic molecular subtypes on the basis of genetic and epigenetic factors. However, knowledge about histone modifications that contribute to the classification and development of biologically distinct breast cancer subtypes remains limited. Here we compared the genome-wide binding patterns of H3K4me3 and H3K27me3 between human mammary epithelial cells and three breast cancer cell lines representing the luminal, HER2, and basal subtypes. We characterized thousands of unique binding events as well as bivalent chromatin signatures unique to each cancer subtype, which were involved in different epigenetic regulation programs and signaling pathways in breast cancer progression. Genes linked to the unique histone mark features exhibited subtype-specific expression patterns, both in cancer cell lines and primary tumors, some of which were confirmed by qPCR in our primary cancer samples. Finally, histone mark-based gene classifiers were significantly correlated with relapse-free survival outcomes in patients. In summary, we have provided a valuable resource for the identification of novel biomarkers of subtype classification and clinical prognosis evaluation in breast cancers. PMID:27178334

  9. Molecular Subtyping of Serous Ovarian Cancer Based on Multi-omics Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhe; Huang, Ke; Gu, Chenglei; Zhao, Luyang; Wang, Nan; Wang, Xiaolei; Zhao, Dongsheng; Zhang, Chenggang; Lu, Yiming; Meng, Yuanguang

    2016-01-01

    Classification of ovarian cancer by morphologic features has a limited effect on serous ovarian cancer (SOC) treatment and prognosis. Here, we proposed a new system for SOC subtyping based on the molecular categories from the Cancer Genome Atlas project. We analyzed the DNA methylation, protein, microRNA, and gene expression of 1203 samples from 599 serous ovarian cancer patients. These samples were divided into nine subtypes based on RNA-seq data, and each subtype was found to be associated with the activation and/or suppression of the following four biological processes: immunoactivity, hormone metabolic, mesenchymal development and the MAPK signaling pathway. We also identified four DNA methylation, two protein expression, six microRNA sequencing and four pathway subtypes. By integrating the subtyping results across different omics platforms, we found that most RNA-seq subtypes overlapped with one or two subtypes from other omics data. Our study sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of SOC and provides a new perspective for the more accurate stratification of its subtypes. PMID:27184229

  10. Study of Ponatinib in Patients With Lung Cancer Preselected Using Different Candidate Predictive Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis by Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Dongliang; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes an extreme threat to human health, and the mortality rate due to lung cancer has not decreased during the last decade. Prognosis or early diagnosis could help reduce the mortality rate. If microRNA and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), as well as the corresponding autoantibodies, can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis, such high sensitivity of biosensors makes the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer realizable. This review provides an overview of tumor-associated biomarker identifying methods and the biosensor technology available today. Laboratorial researches utilizing biosensors for early lung cancer diagnosis will be highlighted. PMID:23892596

  12. Genomic heterogeneity of multiple synchronous lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Lin; Yin, Guangliang; Zhang, Jianhua; Zheng, Shan; Cheung, Hannah; Wu, Ning; Lu, Ning; Mao, Xizeng; Yang, Longhai; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhang, Li; Seth, Sahil; Chen, Huang; Song, Xingzhi; Liu, Kan; Xie, Yongqiang; Zhou, Lina; Zhao, Chuanduo; Han, Naijun; Chen, Wenting; Zhang, Susu; Chen, Longyun; Cai, Wenjun; Li, Lin; Shen, Miaozhong; Xu, Ningzhi; Cheng, Shujun; Yang, Huanming; Lee, J. Jack; Correa, Arlene; Fujimoto, Junya; Behrens, Carmen; Chow, Chi-Wan; William, William N.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Wang, Jun; Lin, Dongmei; Liu, Xiangyang; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gao, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synchronous lung cancers (MSLCs) present a clinical dilemma as to whether individual tumours represent intrapulmonary metastases or independent tumours. In this study we analyse genomic profiles of 15 lung adenocarcinomas and one regional lymph node metastasis from 6 patients with MSLC. All 15 lung tumours demonstrate distinct genomic profiles, suggesting all are independent primary tumours, which are consistent with comprehensive histopathological assessment in 5 of the 6 patients. Lung tumours of the same individuals are no more similar to each other than are lung adenocarcinomas of different patients from TCGA cohort matched for tumour size and smoking status. Several known cancer-associated genes have different mutations in different tumours from the same patients. These findings suggest that in the context of identical constitutional genetic background and environmental exposure, different lung cancers in the same individual may have distinct genomic profiles and can be driven by distinct molecular events. PMID:27767028

  13. MicroRNA–mRNA interactions underlying colorectal cancer molecular subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Cantini, Laura; Isella, Claudio; Petti, Consalvo; Picco, Gabriele; Chiola, Simone; Ficarra, Elisa; Caselle, Michele; Medico, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) transcriptional subtypes have been recently identified by gene expression profiling. Here we describe an analytical pipeline, microRNA master regulator analysis (MMRA), developed to search for microRNAs potentially driving CRC subtypes. Starting from a microRNA–mRNA tumour expression data set, MMRA identifies candidate regulator microRNAs by assessing their subtype-specific expression, target enrichment in subtype mRNA signatures and network analysis-based contribution to subtype gene expression. When applied to a CRC data set of 450 samples, assigned to subtypes by 3 different transcriptional classifiers, MMRA identifies 24 candidate microRNAs, in most cases downregulated in the stem/serrated/mesenchymal (SSM) poor prognosis subtype. Functional validation in CRC cell lines confirms downregulation of the SSM subtype by miR-194, miR-200b, miR-203 and miR-429, which share target genes and pathways mediating this effect. These results show that, by combining statistical tests, target prediction and network analysis, MMRA effectively identifies microRNAs functionally associated to cancer subtypes. PMID:27305450

  14. Risk assessment of second primary cancer according to histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Cédric; Jégu, Jérémie; Mounier, Morgane; Dandoit, Mylène; Colonna, Marc; Daubisse-Marliac, Laetitia; Trétarre, Brigitte; Ganry, Olivier; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bara, Simona; Bouvier, Véronique; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Monnereau, Alain; Casasnovas, Olivier; Velten, Michel; Troussard, Xavier; Maynadié, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases that are known to carry a considerable risk of second primary cancer (SPC). However, little attention has been paid to SPC risk assessment according to NHL subtypes. Data from 10 French population-based cancer registries were used to establish a cohort of 7546 patients with a first diagnosis of NHL (eight subtypes) between 1989 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of metachronous SPC were estimated. Among the 7546 patients diagnosed with a NHL, the overall SPC risk was 25% higher than that in the reference population (SIR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.36). In univariate analysis, the SPC risk differed by lymphoma subtype. Interestingly, multivariate analysis showed that SPC risk did not differ significantly across NHL subtypes after adjustment for the other covariates (p = 0.786). Patients with NHL have an increased risk of SPC that is not influenced by the histological NHL subtype.

  15. Residential Radon Appears to Prevent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2011-01-01

    Residential radon has been found to be associated with lung cancer in epidemiological/ecological studies and the researchers have inappropriately concluded that residential radon causes lung cancer. Their conclusion relates to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis-based, risk-assessment paradigm; however, the LNT hypothesis has been invalidated in numerous studies. It is shown in this paper that our hormetic relative risk (HRR) model is consistent with lung cancer data where detailed measurements of radon in each home were carried out. Based on the HRR model, low-level radon radioactive progeny is credited for activated natural protection (ANP) against lung cancer including smoking-related lung cancer. The proportion B(x) (benefit function) of ANP beneficiaries increases as the average radon level x increases to near the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 4 picocuries/L (approximately 150 Bq m−3). As the average level of radon increases to somewhat above the action level, ANP beneficiaries progressively decrease to zero (B(x) decreases to 0), facilitating the occurrence of smoking-related lung cancers as well as those related to other less important risk factors. Thus, residential radon does not appear to cause lung cancer but rather to protect, in an exposure-level-dependent manner, from its induction by other agents (e.g., cigarette-smoke-related carcinogens). PMID:22461755

  16. MicroRNA In Lung Cancer: Novel Biomarkers and Potential Tools for Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Inamura, Kentaro; Ishikawa, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and women worldwide. The lack of specific and sensitive tools for early diagnosis as well as still-inadequate targeted therapies contribute to poor outcomes. MicroRNAs are small non-coding RNAs, which regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by translational repression or degradation of target mRNAs. A growing body of evidence suggests various roles of microRNAs including development and progression of lung cancer. In lung cancer, several studies have showed that certain microRNA profiles classified lung cancer subtypes, and that specific microRNA expression signatures distinguished between better-prognosis and worse-prognosis lung cancers. Furthermore, microRNAs circulate in body fluids, and therefore may serve as promising biomarkers for early diagnosis of lung cancer as well as for predicting prognosis of patients. In the present review, we briefly summarize microRNAs in the development and progression of lung cancer, focusing on possible applications of microRNAs as novel biomarkers and tools for treatment. PMID:27005669

  17. The Utilization of Cytologic Fine-Needle Aspirates of Lung Cancer for Molecular Diagnostic Testing

    PubMed Central

    Roh, Michael H.

    2015-01-01

    In this era of precision medicine, our understanding and knowledge of the molecular landscape associated with lung cancer pathogenesis continues to evolve. This information is being increasingly exploited to treat advanced stage lung cancer patients with tailored, targeted therapy. During the management of these patients, minimally invasive procedures to obtain samples for tissue diagnoses are desirable. Cytologic fine-needle aspirates are often utilized for this purpose and are important not only for rendering diagnoses to subtype patients’ lung cancers, but also for ascertaining molecular diagnostic information for treatment purposes. Thus, cytologic fine-needle aspirates must be utilized and triaged judiciously to achieve both objectives. In this review, strategies in utilizing fine-needle aspirates will be discussed in the context of our current understanding of the clinically actionable molecular aberrations underlying non-small cell lung cancer and the molecular assays applied to these samples in order to obtain treatment-relevant molecular diagnostic information. PMID:26076721

  18. Identifying aggressive forms of endometrioid-type endometrial cancer: new insights into molecular subtyping

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yuexin; Broaddus, Russell R.; Zhang, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Summary Clinical heterogeneity represents a great challenge for cancer therapeutics. Molecular classification of patients into different subtypes based on genetic or epigenetic characteristics has the potential to revolutionize the clinical care and mechanistic understanding of a wide spectrum of cancers, including endometrial carcinoma, the most common gynecological cancer affecting women. PMID:25494844

  19. Identifying Cancer Subtypes from miRNA-TF-mRNA Regulatory Networks and Expression Data

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Lin; Wang, Rujing; Sun, Bingyu; Li, Jiuyong

    2016-01-01

    Background Identifying cancer subtypes is an important component of the personalised medicine framework. An increasing number of computational methods have been developed to identify cancer subtypes. However, existing methods rarely use information from gene regulatory networks to facilitate the subtype identification. It is widely accepted that gene regulatory networks play crucial roles in understanding the mechanisms of diseases. Different cancer subtypes are likely caused by different regulatory mechanisms. Therefore, there are great opportunities for developing methods that can utilise network information in identifying cancer subtypes. Results In this paper, we propose a method, weighted similarity network fusion (WSNF), to utilise the information in the complex miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network in identifying cancer subtypes. We firstly build the regulatory network where the nodes represent the features, i.e. the microRNAs (miRNAs), transcription factors (TFs) and messenger RNAs (mRNAs) and the edges indicate the interactions between the features. The interactions are retrieved from various interatomic databases. We then use the network information and the expression data of the miRNAs, TFs and mRNAs to calculate the weight of the features, representing the level of importance of the features. The feature weight is then integrated into a network fusion approach to cluster the samples (patients) and thus to identify cancer subtypes. We applied our method to the TCGA breast invasive carcinoma (BRCA) and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) datasets. The experimental results show that WSNF performs better than the other commonly used computational methods, and the information from miRNA-TF-mRNA regulatory network contributes to the performance improvement. The WSNF method successfully identified five breast cancer subtypes and three GBM subtypes which show significantly different survival patterns. We observed that the expression patterns of the features in some mi

  20. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening ...

  1. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug and aspirin use in relation to lung cancer risk among postmenopausal women

    PubMed Central

    Baik, Christina S; Brasky, Theodore M; Pettinger, Mary; Luo, Juhua; Gong, Zhihong; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Prentice, Ross L

    2015-01-01

    Background Results from prospective studies suggest that non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAID) may decrease lung cancer risk; however, any protective effect appears to be most evident in men. Methods We evaluated the associations between NSAID use and lung cancer incidence in postmenopausal women in the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) adjusting for female specific potential confounders such as hormone therapy in addition to smoking histories and other potential confounders. We identified 143,841 women from ages 50 to 79 and 1,902 centrally confirmed lung cancer cases were included in the analysis. We used Cox regression models to estimate hazard ratios and their 95% confidence intervals. Results Compared to non-use, regular NSAID use was not associated with overall lung cancer incidence (NSAID use >10 years HR 0.87, 95% CI 0.71–1.08, p-trend =0.13). No statistically significant associations were found when examined by histological subtypes and although there was a trend of decreased risk with longer duration of NSAID use in the adenocarcinoma subtype, this was not statistically significant (NSAID use >10 years HR 0.80, 95% CI 0.58–1.10, p trend = 0.07). Conclusion Our study did not show that NSAID use is associated with lung cancer risk in women even after adjusting for female-specific confounders. There was a trend of decreased risk in the adenocarcinoma subtype; however, this was not statistically significant. Impact Future studies will need to take in account the various molecular subtypes of non-small cell lung cancer to further elucidate the role of NSAIDS in lung cancer, especially for the adenocarcinoma subtype. PMID:25670808

  2. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  3. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  4. Retrospective Analysis of Lung Transplant Recipients Found to Have Unexpected Lung Cancer in Explanted Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Cypel, Marcelo; de Perrot, Marc; Pierre, Andrew; Waddell, Tom; Singer, Lianne; Roberts, Heidi; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected lung cancer is sometimes found in explanted lungs. The objective of this study was to review these patients and their outcomes to better understand and optimize management protocols for lung transplant candidates with pulmonary nodules. Retrospective analysis of pretransplant imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients who were found to have lung cancer in their explanted lungs was performed. From January 2003 to December 2012, 13 of 853 lung transplant recipients were found to have unexpected lung cancer in their explanted lung (1.52%). Of them, 9 cases were for interstitial lung disease (2.8%; 9/321 recipients) and 4 cases were for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.57%; 4/255 recipients). The median period between computed tomographic scan and lung transplantation was 2.40 months (range: 0.5-19.2). On computed tomographic scan, only 3 cases were shown to possibly have a neoplasm by the radiologist. The staging of these lung cancers was as follows: 3 cases of IA, 1 case of IB, 5 cases of IIA, 1 case of IIIA, and 3 cases of IV. Of 13 cases, 9 died owing to cancer progression. On the contrary, only 1 stage I case with small cell lung cancer showed cancer recurrence. The median survival time was 339 days, and the 3-year survival rate was 11.0%. In conclusion, most of the patients with unexpected lung cancer showed poor prognosis except for the early-stage disease. The establishment of proper protocol for management of such nodules is important to improve the management of candidates who are found to have pulmonary nodules on imaging. PMID:26074103

  5. Role of positron emission tomography-computed tomography in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Pankaj Kumar; Singh, Saurabh Kumar; Prakash, Gaurav; Jakhetiya, Ashish; Pandey, Durgatosh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. Non-small cell carcinoma and small cell carcinoma are the main histological subtypes and constitutes around 85% and 15% of all lung cancer respectively. Multimodality treatment plays a key role in the successful management of lung cancer depending upon the histological subtype, stage of disease, and performance status. Imaging modalities play an important role in the diagnosis and accurate staging of the disease, in assessing the response to neoadjuvant therapy, and in the follow-up of the patients. Last decade has witnessed voluminous upsurge in the use of positron emission tomography-computed tomography (PET-CT); role of PET-CT has widened exponentially in the management of lung cancer. The present article reviews the role of 18-fluoro-deoxyglucose PET-CT in the management of non small cell lung cancer with emphasis on staging of the disease and the assessment of response to neoadjuvant therapy based on available literature. PMID:27018223

  6. Greater absolute risk for all subtypes of breast cancer in the US than Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Horne, Hisani N; Beena Devi, C R; Sung, Hyuna; Tang, Tieng Swee; Rosenberg, Philip S; Hewitt, Stephen M; Sherman, Mark E; Anderson, William F; Yang, Xiaohong R

    2015-01-01

    Hormone receptor (HR) negative breast cancers are relatively more common in low-risk than high-risk countries and/or populations. However, the absolute variations between these different populations are not well established given the limited number of cancer registries with incidence rate data by breast cancer subtype. We, therefore, used two unique population-based resources with molecular data to compare incidence rates for the 'intrinsic' breast cancer subtypes between a low-risk Asian population in Malaysia and high-risk non-Hispanic white population in the National Cancer Institute's surveillance, epidemiology, and end results 18 registries database (SEER 18). The intrinsic breast cancer subtypes were recapitulated with the joint expression of the HRs (estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor) and human epidermal growth factor receptor-2 (HER2). Invasive breast cancer incidence rates overall were fivefold greater in SEER 18 than in Malaysia. The majority of breast cancers were HR-positive in SEER 18 and HR-negative in Malaysia. Notwithstanding the greater relative distribution for HR-negative cancers in Malaysia, there was a greater absolute risk for all subtypes in SEER 18; incidence rates were nearly 7-fold higher for HR-positive and 2-fold higher for HR-negative cancers in SEER 18. Despite the well-established relative breast cancer differences between low-risk and high-risk countries and/or populations, there was a greater absolute risk for HR-positive and HR-negative subtypes in the US than Malaysia. Additional analytical studies are sorely needed to determine the factors responsible for the elevated risk of all subtypes of breast cancer in high-risk countries like the United States.

  7. Radiation-associated lung cancer: a comparison of the histology of lung cancers in uranium miners and survivors of the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki.

    PubMed

    Land, C E; Shimosato, Y; Saccomanno, G; Tokuoka, S; Auerbach, O; Tateishi, R; Greenberg, S D; Nambu, S; Carter, D; Akiba, S

    1993-05-01

    A binational panel of Japanese and American pulmonary pathologists reviewed tissue slides of lung cancer cases diagnosed among Japanese A-bomb survivors and American uranium miners and classified the cases according to histological subtype. Blind reviews were completed on slides from 92 uranium miners and 108 A-bomb survivors, without knowledge of population, sex, age, smoking history, or level of radiation exposure. Consensus diagnoses were obtained with respect to principal subtype, including squamous-cell cancer, small-cell cancer, adenocarcinoma, and less frequent subtypes. The results were analyzed in terms of population, radiation dose, and smoking history. As expected, the proportion of squamous-cell cancer was positively related to smoking history in both populations. The relative frequencies of small-cell cancer and adenocarcinoma were very different in the two populations, but this difference was accounted for adequately by differences in radiation dose or, more specifically, dose-based relative risk estimates based on published data. Radiation-induced cancers appeared more likely to be of the small-cell subtype, and less likely to be adenocarcinomas, in both populations. The data appeared to require no additional explanation in terms of radiation quality (alpha particles vs gamma rays), uniform or local irradiation, inhaled vs external radiation source, or other population difference. PMID:8387679

  8. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approa | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  9. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-02-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches.

  10. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26958493

  11. Lung cancer screening guidelines: common ground and differences

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for almost one-third of all cancer related deaths. Lung cancer risk persists even after smoking cessation and so many lung cancers now are diagnosed in former smokers. Five-year survival of lung cancer has marginally improved over decades and significantly lags behind that of colon, breast and prostate cancer. Over the past one decade, lung cancer screening trials have shown promising results. Results from National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST), have shown a significant 20% reduction in mortality with annual low dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. Based on these results, annual LDCT testing has been recommended for lung cancer screening in high risk population. However, development and acceptance of lung cancer screening as a public health policy is still in the nascent stages. Major concerns relate to risk of radiation, overdiagnosis bias, proportion of false positives and cost benefit analysis. This article reviews the literature pertaining to lung cancer screening guidelines and above mentioned concerns. PMID:25806292

  12. Management of Lung Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Rao, Archana; Sharma, Namita; Gajra, Ajeet

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the USA. The median age at diagnosis of lung cancer is 70 years, and thus, about one-half of patients with lung cancer fall into the elderly subgroup. There is dearth of high level of evidence regarding the management of lung cancer in the elderly in the three broad stages of the disease including early-stage, locally advanced, and metastatic disease. A major reason for the lack of evidence is the underrepresentation of elderly in prospective randomized clinical trials. Due to the typical decline in physical and physiologic function associated with aging, most elderly do not meet the stringent eligibility criteria set forth in age-unselected clinical trials. In addition to performance status, ideally, comorbidity, cognitive, and psychological function, polypharmacy, social support, and patient preferences should be taken into account before applying prevailing treatment paradigms often derived in younger, healthier patients to the care of the elderly patient with lung cancer. The purpose of this chapter was to review the existing evidence of management of early-stage, locally advanced disease, and metastatic lung cancer in the elderly. PMID:27535398

  13. Primary adenocarcinoma of the lung--histological subtypes and outcome after surgery, using the IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of lung adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Oskarsdottir, Gudrun Nina; Bjornsson, Johannes; Jonsson, Steinn; Isaksson, Helgi J; Gudbjartsson, Tomas

    2016-05-01

    Adenocarcinoma is the most common histological type of lung carcinoma. Recently the histologic classification of adenocarcinomas in the lung was modified to better reflect biologic properties and prognosis. We reviewed the histology of all primary lung adenocarcinomas operated on in Iceland during a 20-year period and assessed the impact of histology on survival. This nationwide study included 285 patients (mean age 67 years, 57% female), who underwent resection in Iceland from 1991 to 2010. Tumors were reclassified according to the current IASLC/ATS/ERS classification system. Overall survival was estimated by the Kaplan-Meier method and Cox regression analysis used to evaluate prognostic factors of overall mortality. Acinar predominant adenocarcinoma was the most common histological subtype (46%) followed by solid-predominant (SPA) with mucin production comprised (23%). Non-invasive carcinomas were rare. A difference in survival between the histological adenocarcinoma subtypes was not seen (p = 0.32) and multivariate analysis showed that advanced stage and age predicted worse outcome, but histologic subtyping of adenocarcinoma did not. In this nation-wide study there was not a statistical difference in survival according to adenocarcinoma subtypes and the histological subtype did not predict mortality. Preinvasive and minimally invasive adenocarcinomas were rare.

  14. Biological determinants of bladder cancer gene expression subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Aine, Mattias; Eriksson, Pontus; Liedberg, Fredrik; Sjödahl, Gottfrid; Höglund, Mattias

    2015-01-01

    Molecular stratification of tumors by gene expression profiling has been applied to a large number of human malignancies and holds great promise for personalized treatment. Comprehensive classification schemes for urothelial carcinoma have been proposed by three separate groups but have not previously been evaluated simultaneously in independent data. Here we map the interrelations between the proposed molecular subtypes onto the intrinsic structure of a rich independent dataset and show that subtype stratification within each scheme can be explained in terms of a set of common underlying biological processes. We highlight novel biological and genomic drivers of urothelial carcinoma molecular subtypes and show that tumors carrying genomic aberrations characteristic of distinct molecular pathways converge on a common top level phenotype corresponding to the two major molecular subtypes of non-muscle invasive disease. PMID:26051783

  15. Intrinsic breast tumor subtypes, race, and long-term survival in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Tse, Chiu-Kit; Perou, Charles M.; Carey, Lisa A.; Foulkes, William D.; Dressler, Lynn G.; Geradts, Joseph; Millikan, Robert C.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previous research identified differences in breast cancer-specific mortality across four "intrinsic" tumor subtypes: luminal A, luminal B, basal-like, and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 positive/estrogen receptor negative (HER2+/ER−). Experimental Design We used immunohistochemical markers to subtype 1149 invasive breast cancer patients (518 African American, 631 white) in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, a population-based study of women diagnosed with breast cancer. Vital status was determined through 2006 using the National Death Index, with median follow-up of 9 years. Results Cancer subtypes luminal A, luminal B, basal-like and HER2+/ER- were distributed as 64%, 11%, 11% and 5% for whites, and 48%, 8%, 22% and 7% for African Americans, respectively. Breast cancer mortality was higher for patients with HER2+/ER- and basal-like breast cancer compared to luminal A and B. African Americans had higher breast-cancer specific mortality than whites, but the effect of race was statistically significant only among women with luminal A breast cancer. However, when compared to the luminal A subtype within racial categories, mortality for patients with basal-like breast cancer was higher among whites (HR=2.0, 95% CI: 1.2, 3.4) than African Americans (HR=1.5, 95% CI: 1.0, 2.4), with the strongest effect seen in postmenopausal white women (HR=3.9, 95% CI: 1.5, 10.0). Conclusions Our results confirm the association of basal-like breast cancer with poor prognosis, and suggest that basal-like breast cancer is not an inherently more aggressive disease in African American women compared to whites. Additional analyses are needed in populations with known treatment profiles to understand the role of tumor subtypes and race in breast cancer mortality, and in particular our finding that among women with luminal A breast cancer, African Americans have higher mortality than whites. PMID:21169259

  16. Integrated Classification of Prostate Cancer Reveals a Novel Luminal Subtype with Poor Outcome.

    PubMed

    You, Sungyong; Knudsen, Beatrice S; Erho, Nicholas; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Takhar, Mandeep; Al-Deen Ashab, Hussam; Davicioni, Elai; Karnes, R Jeffrey; Klein, Eric A; Den, Robert B; Ross, Ashley E; Schaeffer, Edward M; Garraway, Isla P; Kim, Jayoung; Freeman, Michael R

    2016-09-01

    Prostate cancer is a biologically heterogeneous disease with variable molecular alterations underlying cancer initiation and progression. Despite recent advances in understanding prostate cancer heterogeneity, better methods for classification of prostate cancer are still needed to improve prognostic accuracy and therapeutic outcomes. In this study, we computationally assembled a large virtual cohort (n = 1,321) of human prostate cancer transcriptome profiles from 38 distinct cohorts and, using pathway activation signatures of known relevance to prostate cancer, developed a novel classification system consisting of three distinct subtypes (named PCS1-3). We validated this subtyping scheme in 10 independent patient cohorts and 19 laboratory models of prostate cancer, including cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Analysis of subtype-specific gene expression patterns in independent datasets derived from luminal and basal cell models provides evidence that PCS1 and PCS2 tumors reflect luminal subtypes, while PCS3 represents a basal subtype. We show that PCS1 tumors progress more rapidly to metastatic disease in comparison with PCS2 or PCS3, including PSC1 tumors of low Gleason grade. To apply this finding clinically, we developed a 37-gene panel that accurately assigns individual tumors to one of the three PCS subtypes. This panel was also applied to circulating tumor cells (CTC) and provided evidence that PCS1 CTCs may reflect enzalutamide resistance. In summary, PCS subtyping may improve accuracy in predicting the likelihood of clinical progression and permit treatment stratification at early and late disease stages. Cancer Res; 76(17); 4948-58. ©2016 AACR.

  17. eMBI: Boosting Gene Expression-based Clustering for Cancer Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhenjia; Ashby, Cody; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Shuzhong; Huang, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Identifying clinically relevant subtypes of a cancer using gene expression data is a challenging and important problem in medicine, and is a necessary premise to provide specific and efficient treatments for patients of different subtypes. Matrix factorization provides a solution by finding checker-board patterns in the matrices of gene expression data. In the context of gene expression profiles of cancer patients, these checkerboard patterns correspond to genes that are up- or down-regulated in patients with particular cancer subtypes. Recently, a new matrix factorization framework for biclustering called Maximum Block Improvement (MBI) is proposed; however, it still suffers several problems when applied to cancer gene expression data analysis. In this study, we developed many effective strategies to improve MBI and designed a new program called enhanced MBI (eMBI), which is more effective and efficient to identify cancer subtypes. Our tests on several gene expression profiling datasets of cancer patients consistently indicate that eMBI achieves significant improvements in comparison with MBI, in terms of cancer subtype prediction accuracy, robustness, and running time. In addition, the performance of eMBI is much better than another widely used matrix factorization method called nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and the method of hierarchical clustering, which is often the first choice of clinical analysts in practice. PMID:25374455

  18. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  19. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  20. Genetic variation in cell cycle regulatory gene AURKA and association with intrinsic breast cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Nicholas J; Bensen, Jeannette T; Poole, Charles; Troester, Melissa A; Gammon, Marilie D; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C; Olshan, Andrew F

    2015-12-01

    AURKA is a putative low-penetrance tumor susceptibility gene due to its prominent role in cell cycle regulation and centrosomal function. Germline variation in AURKA was evaluated for association with breast cancer and intrinsic breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (Cau). Tag and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on AURKA were genotyped in 1946 cases and 1747 controls. In race-stratified analyses adjusted for age and African ancestry, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate SNP associations with breast cancer. In a race-combined analysis with similar adjustment, these associations were also examined by intrinsic breast cancer subtype. Using dominant models, most AURKA SNPs demonstrated no association with breast cancer in the race-stratified analyses. Among AA, rs6092309 showed an inverse association with breast cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53-0.90). In the race-combined analyses, rs6099128 had reduced ORs for luminal A (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60-0.95) and basal-like breast cancer (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37-0.80). Rs6092309 showed a similar pattern of association with each subtype. Three SNPs (rs6014711, rs911162, rs1047972) had positive associations with basal-like breast cancer, and ORs reduced or close to 1.00 for other subtypes. Our results suggest inverse associations between some AURKA SNPs and overall breast cancer in AA. We found differential associations by specific subtypes and by race. Replication of these findings in larger AA populations would allow more powerful race-stratified subtype analyses.

  1. Genetic Variation in Cell Cycle Regulatory Gene AURKA and Association With Intrinsic Breast Cancer Subtype

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Nicholas J.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Troester, Melissa A.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.; Olshan, Andrew F.

    2014-01-01

    AURKA is a putative low-penetrance tumor susceptibility gene due to its prominent role in cell cycle regulation and centrosomal function. Germline variation in AURKA was evaluated for association with breast cancer and intrinsic breast cancer subtypes in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of African Americans (AA) and Caucasians (Cau). Tag and candidate single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) on AURKA were genotyped in 1946 cases and 1747 controls. In race-stratified analyses adjusted for age and African ancestry, odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were calculated to evaluate SNP associations with breast cancer. In a race-combined analysis with similar adjustment, these associations were also examined by intrinsic breast cancer subtype. Using dominant models, most AURKA SNPs demonstrated no association with breast cancer in the race-stratified analyses. Among AA, rs6092309 showed an inverse association with breast cancer (OR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.53–0.90). In the race-combined analyses, rs6099128 had reduced ORs for luminal A (OR = 0.76, 95% CI = 0.60–0.95) and basal-like breast cancer (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.37–0.80). Rs6092309 showed a similar pattern of association with each subtype. Three SNPs (rs6014711, rs911162, rs1047972) had positive associations with basal-like breast cancer, and ORs reduced or close to 1.00 for other subtypes. Our results suggest inverse associations between some AURKA SNPs and overall breast cancer in AA. We found differential associations by specific subtypes and by race. Replication of these findings in larger AA populations would allow more powerful race-stratified subtype analyses. PMID:25328151

  2. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  3. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  4. Tobacco smoke carcinogens and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S S

    1999-07-21

    The complexity of tobacco smoke leads to some confusion about the mechanisms by which it causes lung cancer. Among the multiple components of tobacco smoke, 20 carcinogens convincingly cause lung tumors in laboratory animals or humans and are, therefore, likely to be involved in lung cancer induction. Of these, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone are likely to play major roles. This review focuses on carcinogens in tobacco smoke as a means of simplifying and clarifying the relevant information that provides a mechanistic framework linking nicotine addiction with lung cancer through exposure to such compounds. Included is a discussion of the mechanisms by which tobacco smoke carcinogens interact with DNA and cause genetic changes--mechanisms that are reasonably well understood--and the less well defined relationship between exposure to specific tobacco smoke carcinogens and mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Molecular epidemiologic studies of gene-carcinogen interactions and lung cancer--an approach that has not yet reached its full potential--are also discussed, as are inhalation studies of tobacco smoke in laboratory animals and the potential role of free radicals and oxidative damage in tobacco-associated carcinogenesis. By focusing in this review on several important carcinogens in tobacco smoke, the complexities in understanding tobacco-induced cancer can be reduced, and new approaches for lung cancer prevention can be envisioned. PMID:10413421

  5. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  6. Lung cancer screening: promise and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christine D; Aberle, Denise R; Wood, Douglas E

    2012-01-01

    The results of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) have provided the medical community and American public with considerable optimism about the potential to reduce lung cancer mortality with imaging-based screening. Designed as a randomized trial, the NLST has provided the first evidence of screening benefit by showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all-cause mortality with low dose helical computed tomography (LDCT) screening relative to chest X-ray. The major harms of LDCT screening include the potential for radiation-induced carcinogenesis; high false-positivity rates in individuals without lung cancer, and overdiagnosis. Following the results of the NLST, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) published the first of multiple lung cancer screening guidelines under development by major medical organizations. These recommendations amalgamated screening cohorts, practices, interpretations, and diagnostic follow-up based on the NLST and other published studies to provide guidance for the implementation of LDCT screening. There are major areas of opportunity to optimize implementation. These include standardizing practices in the screening setting, optimizing risk profiles for screening and for managing diagnostic evaluation in individuals with indeterminate nodules, developing interdisciplinary screening programs in conjunction with smoking cessation, and approaching all stakeholders systematically to ensure the broadest education and dissemination of screening benefits relative to risks. The incorporation of validated biomarkers of risk and preclinical lung cancer can substantially enhance the effectiveness screening programs. PMID:24451779

  7. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown on Acellular Rat Lung Matrix Create Perfusable Tumor Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Ott, Harald C.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix allows lung cancer to form its shape and grow. Recent studies on organ reengineering for orthotopic transplantation have provided a new avenue for isolating purified native matrix to use for growing cells. Whether human lung cancer cells grown in a decellularized rat lung matrix would create perfusable human lung cancer nodules was tested. Methods Rat lungs were harvested and native cells were removed using sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100 in a decellularization chamber to create a decellularized rat lung matrix. Human A549, H460, or H1299 lung cancer cells were placed into the decellularized rat lung matrix and grown in a customized bioreactor with perfusion of oxygenated media for 7 to 14 days. Results Decellularized rat lung matrix showed preservation of matrix architecture devoid of all rat cells. All three human lung cancer cell lines grown in the bioreactor developed tumor nodules with intact vasculature. Moreover, the lung cancer cells developed a pattern of growth similar to the original human lung cancer. Conclusions Overall, this study shows that human lung cancer cells form perfusable tumor nodules in a customized bioreactor on a decellularized rat lung matrix created by a customized decellularization chamber. The lung cancer cells grown in the matrix had features similar to the original human lung cancer. This ex vivo model can be used potentially to gain a deeper understanding of the biologic processes involved in human lung cancer. PMID:22385822

  8. Occupational Exposures and Lung Cancer Risk among Minnesota Taconite Mining Workers

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Elizabeth M; Alexander, Bruce H; MacLehose, Richard F; Nelson, Heather H; Ryan, Andrew D; Ramachandran, Gurumurthy; Mandel, Jeffrey H

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the association between employment duration, elongate mineral particle (EMP) exposure, and silica exposure and the risk of lung cancer in the taconite mining industry. Methods We conducted a nested case control study of lung cancer within a cohort of Minnesota taconite iron mining workers employed by any of the mining companies in operation in 1983. Lung cancer cases were identified by vital records and cancer registry data through 2010. Two age-matched controls were selected from risk sets of cohort members alive and lung cancer free at the time of case diagnosis. Calendar time-specific exposure estimates were made for every job and were used to estimate workers’ cumulative exposures. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated using conditional logistic regression. We evaluated total lung cancer risk and risk of histological subtype by total work duration and by cumulative EMP and silica exposure by quartile of the exposure distribution. Results A total of 1,706 cases and 3,381 controls were included in the analysis. After adjusting for work in hematite mining, asbestos exposure, and sex, the OR for total duration of employment was 0.99 (95% CI: 0.96–1.01). The ORs for quartile 4 versus 1 of EMP and silica exposure were 0.82 (95% CI: 0.57–1.19) and 0.97 (95% CI: 0.70–1.35) respectively. The risk of each histological subtype of lung cancer did not change with increasing exposure. Conclusions This study suggests that the estimated taconite mining exposures do not increase the risk for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25977445

  9. Lung cancer screening overdiagnosis: reports of overdiagnosis in screening for lung cancer are grossly exaggerated.

    PubMed

    Mortani Barbosa, Eduardo J

    2015-08-01

    The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a mortality reduction benefit associated with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer. There has been considerable debate regarding the benefits and harms of LDCT lung cancer screening, including the challenges related to its practical implementation. One of the controversies regards overdiagnosis, which conceptually denotes diagnosing a cancer that, either because of its indolent, low-aggressiveness biologic behavior or because of limited life expectancy, is unlikely to result in significant morbidity during the patient's remainder lifetime. In theory, diagnosing and treating these cancers offer no measurable benefit while incurring costs and risks. Therefore, if a screening test detects a substantial number of overdiagnosed cancers, it is less likely to be effective. It has been argued that LDCT screening for lung cancer results in an unacceptably high rate of overdiagnosis. This article aims to defend the opposite stance. Overdiagnosis does exist and to a certain extent is inherent to any cancer-screening test. Nonetheless, the concept is less dualistic and more nuanced than it has been suggested. Furthermore, the average estimates of overdiagnosis in LDCT lung cancer screening based on the totality of published data are likely much lower than the highest published estimates, if a careful definition of a positive screening test reflecting our current understanding of lung cancer biology is utilized. This article presents evidence on why reports of overdiagnosis in lung cancer screening have been exaggerated.

  10. PSMB8 and PBK as potential gastric cancer subtype-specific biomarkers associated with prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Chae Hwa; Park, Hye Ji; Choi, Yu Ri; Kim, Ahrong; Kim, Hye Won; Choi, Jin Hwa; Hwang, Chung Su; Lee, So Jung; Choi, Chang In; Jeon, Tae Yong; Kim, Dae Hwan; Kim, Gwang Ha; Park, Do Youn

    2016-01-01

    Gastric adenocarcinoma is a common form of cancer associated with a poor prognosis. We analyzed microarray profiling data from 48 patients with gastric adenocarcinoma to characterize gastric cancer subtypes and identify biomarkers associated with prognosis. We identified two major subtypes of gastric adenocarcinoma differentially associated with overall survival (P = 0.025). Genes that were differentially expressed were identified using specific criteria (P < 0.001 and >1.5-fold); expression of 294 and 116 genes was enriched in good and poor prognosis subtypes, respectively. Genes related to translational elongation and cell cycle were upregulated in the poor prognosis group. Of these genes, upregulation of proteasome subunit beta type 8 PSMB8 and PDZ binding kinase PBK was confirmed by real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis. PSMB8 or PBK knockdown had no effect on gastric cancer cell proliferation but suppressed cell migration and invasion, respectively. Furthermore, immunohistochemistry analysis of 385 gastric cancer patients revealed that increased nuclear expression of PSMB8 and PBK was correlated with depth of invasion, lymph node metastasis, and lower survival rates. Taken together, two gastric adenocarcinoma subtypes were predictive of prognosis. PSMB8 and PBK were predictive of gastric cancer prognosis and could be potential gastric cancer subtype-specific biomarkers. PMID:26894977

  11. Lung Cancer Serum Biomarker Discovery Using Label Free LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xuemei; Hood, Brian L.; Zhao, Ting; Conrads, Thomas P.; Sun, Mai; Gopalakrishnan, Vanathi; Grover, Himanshu; Day, Roger S.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Wilson, David O.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Bigbee, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death with poor survival due to the late stage at which lung cancer is typically diagnosed. Given the clinical burden from lung cancer, and the relatively favorable survival associated with early stage lung cancer, biomarkers for early detection of lung cancer are of important potential clinical benefit. Methods We performed a global lung cancer serum biomarker discovery study using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) in a set of pooled non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) case sera and matched controls. Immunoaffinity subtraction was used to deplete the top most abundant serum proteins; the remaining serum proteins were subjected to trypsin digestion and analyzed in triplicate by LC-MS/MS. The tandem mass spectrum data were searched against the human proteome database and the resultant spectral counting data were used to estimate the relative abundance of proteins across the case/control serum pools. The spectral counting derived abundances of some candidate biomarker proteins were confirmed with multiple reaction monitoring MS assays. Results A list of 49 differentially abundant candidate proteins was compiled by applying a negative binomial regression model to the spectral counting data (p<0.01). Functional analysis with Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tools showed significant enrichment of inflammatory response proteins, key molecules in cell-cell signaling and interaction network and differential physiological responses for the two common NSCLC subtypes. Conclusions We identified a set of candidate serum biomarkers with statistically significant differential abundance across the lung cancer case/control pools which, when validated, could improve lung cancer early detection. PMID:21304412

  12. Role of STAT3 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pranabananda; Sabri, Nafiseh; Li, Jinghong; Li, Willis X

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease. It is responsible for the high cancer mortality rates in the US and worldwide. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms operative in lung cancer is an important first step in developing effective therapies. Accumulating evidence over the last 2 decades suggests a critical role for Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) as a point of convergence for various signaling pathways that are dysregulated in the disease. In this review, we discuss possible molecular mechanisms involving STAT3 in lung tumorigenesis based on recent literature. We consider possible roles of STAT3 in cancer cell proliferation and survival, in the tumor immune environment, and in epigenetic regulation and interaction of STAT3 with other transcription factors. We also discuss the potential role of STAT3 in tumor suppression, which complicates strategies of targeting STAT3 in cancer therapy. PMID:26413424

  13. Cancer genes in lung cancer: racial disparities: are there any?

    PubMed

    El-Telbany, Ahmed; Ma, Patrick C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent "oncogenic drivers" in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity

  14. Refinement of Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Molecular Subtypes: Implications for Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Selection

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, Brian D.; Jovanović, Bojana; Chen, Xi; Estrada, Monica V.; Johnson, Kimberly N.; Shyr, Yu; Moses, Harold L.; Sanders, Melinda E.; Pietenpol, Jennifer A.

    2016-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is a heterogeneous disease that can be classified into distinct molecular subtypes by gene expression profiling. Considered a difficult-to-treat cancer, a fraction of TNBC patients benefit significantly from neoadjuvant chemotherapy and have far better overall survival. Outside of BRCA1/2 mutation status, biomarkers do not exist to identify patients most likely to respond to current chemotherapy; and, to date, no FDA-approved targeted therapies are available for TNBC patients. Previously, we developed an approach to identify six molecular subtypes TNBC (TNBCtype), with each subtype displaying unique ontologies and differential response to standard-of-care chemotherapy. Given the complexity of the varying histological landscape of tumor specimens, we used histopathological quantification and laser-capture microdissection to determine that transcripts in the previously described immunomodulatory (IM) and mesenchymal stem-like (MSL) subtypes were contributed from infiltrating lymphocytes and tumor-associated stromal cells, respectively. Therefore, we refined TNBC molecular subtypes from six (TNBCtype) into four (TNBCtype-4) tumor-specific subtypes (BL1, BL2, M and LAR) and demonstrate differences in diagnosis age, grade, local and distant disease progression and histopathology. Using five publicly available, neoadjuvant chemotherapy breast cancer gene expression datasets, we retrospectively evaluated chemotherapy response of over 300 TNBC patients from pretreatment biopsies subtyped using either the intrinsic (PAM50) or TNBCtype approaches. Combined analysis of TNBC patients demonstrated that TNBC subtypes significantly differ in response to similar neoadjuvant chemotherapy with 41% of BL1 patients achieving a pathological complete response compared to 18% for BL2 and 29% for LAR with 95% confidence intervals (CIs; [33, 51], [9, 28], [17, 41], respectively). Collectively, we provide pre-clinical data that could inform clinical

  15. Breast cancer subtypes and previously established genetic risk factors: A Bayesian approach

    PubMed Central

    O’Brien, Katie M.; Cole, Stephen R.; Engel, Lawrence S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Poole, Charles; Herring, Amy H.; Millikan, Robert C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Gene expression analyses indicate that breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease with at least 5 immunohistologic subtypes. Despite growing evidence that these subtypes are etiologically and prognostically distinct, few studies have investigated whether they have divergent genetic risk factors. To help fill in this gap in our understanding, we examined associations between breast cancer subtypes and previously established susceptibility loci among white and African-American women in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study. Methods We used Bayesian polytomous logistic regression to estimate odds ratios (ORs) and 95% posterior intervals (PIs) for the association between each of 78 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and 5 breast cancer subtypes. Subtypes were defined using 5 immunohistochemical markers: estrogen receptors (ER), progesterone receptors (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptors 1 and 2 (HER1/2) and cytokeratin (CK) 5/6. Results Several SNPs in TNRC9/TOX3 were associated with luminal A (ER/PR+, HER2−) or basal-like breast cancer (ER−, PR−, HER2−, HER1 or CK 5/6+), and one SNP (rs3104746) was associated with both. SNPs in FGFR2 were associated with luminal A, luminal B (ER/PR+, HER2+), or HER2+/ER− disease, but none were associated with basal-like disease. We also observed subtype differences in the effects of SNPs in 2q35, 4p, TLR1, MAP3K1, ESR1, CDKN2A/B, ANKRD16, and ZM1Z1. Conclusion and Impact We found evidence that genetic risk factors for breast cancer vary by subtype and further clarified the role of several key susceptibility genes. PMID:24177593

  16. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  18. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Bandoh, Shuji; Tadokoro, Akira; Ishii, Tomoya; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are signs or symptoms that occur as a result of organ or tissue damage at locations remote from the site of the primary tumor or metastases. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer can impair various organ functions and include neurologic, endocrine, dermatologic, rheumatologic, hematologic, and ophthalmological syndromes, as well as glomerulopathy and coagulopathy (Trousseau’s syndrome). The histological type of lung cancer is generally dependent on the associated syndrome, the two most common of which are humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in squamous cell carcinoma and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in small cell lung cancer. The symptoms often precede the diagnosis of the associated lung cancer, especially when the symptoms are neurologic or dermatologic. The proposed mechanisms of paraneoplastic processes include the aberrant release of humoral mediators, such as hormones and hormone-like peptides, cytokines, and antibodies. Treating the underlying cancer is generally the most effective therapy for paraneoplastic syndromes, and treatment soon after symptom onset appears to offer the best potential for symptom improvement. In this article, we review the diagnosis, potential mechanisms, and treatments of a wide variety of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer. PMID:25114839

  19. Clinical and prognostic significance of coagulation assays in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Tas, Faruk; Kilic, Leyla; Serilmez, Murat; Keskin, Serkan; Sen, Fatma; Duranyildiz, Derya

    2013-03-01

    Activation of coagulation and fibrinolysis is frequently encountered among cancer patients. Such tumors are supposed to be associated with higher risk of invasion, metastases and eventually worse outcome. The aim of this study is to explore the prognostic value of blood coagulation tests for lung cancer patients. The study comprised 110 lung cancer patients. Pretreatment blood coagulation tests including PT, aPTT, PTA, INR, D-dimer, fibrinogen levels and platelet counts were evaluated. The plasma level of all coagulation tests revealed statistically significant difference between patient and control group (p < 0.001). There was a significant association between D-Dimer levels and histological subtypes of NSCLC, pointing an elevated plasma D-dimer level in squamous cell cancer (p = 0.035). Patients with extensive stage SCLC exhibited evidently higher levels of D-Dimer, INR and PLT (p = 0.037, p = 0.042, p = 0.04, respectively). Prolongation of PT and INR had statistically significant adverse effect on survival (p = 0.05 and p = 0.014, respectively). Although prolonged aPTT and high levels of D-dimer was associated with worse survival, the difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.117, p = 0.104). Multivariate analysis revealed INR as the sole independent prognostic variable among coagulation parameters (p = 0.05). In conclusion, elevation of PT and INR are associated with decreased survival in lung cancer patients.

  20. Lung cancer screening: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia

    2015-05-01

    European studies have contributed significantly to the understanding of lung cancer screening. Smoking within screening, quality of life, nodule management, minimally invasive treatments, cancer prevention programs, and risk models have been extensively investigated by European groups. Mortality data from European screening studies have not been encouraging so far, but long-term results of the NELSON study are eagerly awaited. Investigations on molecular markers of lung cancer are ongoing in Europe; preliminary results suggest they may become an important screening tool in the future.

  1. Transcriptomic classification of genetically engineered mouse models of breast cancer identifies human subtype counterparts

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease consisting of multiple molecular subtypes. Genetically engineered mouse models are a useful resource for studying mammary cancers in vivo under genetically controlled and immune competent conditions. Identifying murine models with conserved human tumor features will facilitate etiology determinations, highlight the effects of mutations on pathway activation, and should improve preclinical drug testing. Results Transcriptomic profiles of 27 murine models of mammary carcinoma and normal mammary tissue were determined using gene expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering analysis identified 17 distinct murine subtypes. Cross-species analyses using three independent human breast cancer datasets identified eight murine classes that resemble specific human breast cancer subtypes. Multiple models were associated with human basal-like tumors including TgC3(1)-Tag, TgWAP-Myc and Trp53-/-. Interestingly, the TgWAPCre-Etv6 model mimicked the HER2-enriched subtype, a group of human tumors without a murine counterpart in previous comparative studies. Gene signature analysis identified hundreds of commonly expressed pathway signatures between linked mouse and human subtypes, highlighting potentially common genetic drivers of tumorigenesis. Conclusions This study of murine models of breast carcinoma encompasses the largest comprehensive genomic dataset to date to identify human-to-mouse disease subtype counterparts. Our approach illustrates the value of comparisons between species to identify murine models that faithfully mimic the human condition and indicates that multiple genetically engineered mouse models are needed to represent the diversity of human breast cancers. The reported trans-species associations should guide model selection during preclinical study design to ensure appropriate representatives of human disease subtypes are used. PMID:24220145

  2. Molecular understanding of lung cancers-A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chinnappan Ravinder; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence, particularly epidemiologic evidence of overall lung cancer burden in the world. And molecular understanding of lung cancer at various levels by dominant and suppressor oncogenes. PMID:25183110

  3. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  4. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  5. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  6. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  7. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  8. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  9. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  10. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  11. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  12. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  13. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  14. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  15. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  16. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  17. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  18. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Association between mammographic density and basal-like and luminal A breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Mammographic density is a strong risk factor for breast cancer overall, but few studies have examined the association between mammographic density and specific subtypes of breast cancer, especially aggressive basal-like breast cancers. Because basal-like breast cancers are less frequently screen-detected, it is important to understand how mammographic density relates to risk of basal-like breast cancer. Methods We estimated associations between mammographic density and breast cancer risk according to breast cancer subtype. Cases and controls were participants in the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS) who also had mammograms recorded in the Carolina Mammography Registry (CMR). A total of 491 cases had mammograms within five years prior to and one year after diagnosis and 528 controls had screening or diagnostic mammograms close to the dates of selection into CBCS. Mammographic density was reported to the CMR using Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System categories. The expression of estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 1 and 2 (HER1 and HER2), and cytokeratin 5/6 (CK5/6) were assessed by immunohistochemistry and dichotomized as positive or negative, with ER+ and/or PR+, and HER2- tumors classified as luminal A and ER-, PR-, HER2-, HER1+ and/or CK5/6+ tumors classified as basal-like breast cancer. Triple negative tumors were defined as negative for ER, PR and HER2. Of the 491 cases 175 were missing information on subtypes; the remaining cases included 181 luminal A, 17 luminal B, 48 basal-like, 29 ER-/PR-/HER2+, and 41 unclassified subtypes. Odds ratios comparing each subtype to all controls and case-case odds ratios comparing mammographic density distributions in basal-like to luminal A breast cancers were estimated using logistic regression. Results Mammographic density was associated with increased risk of both luminal A and basal-like breast cancers, although estimates were imprecise. The

  20. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Nyante, Sarah J; Gammon, Marilie D; Kaufman, Jay S; Bensen, Jeannette T; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C

    2011-09-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case-control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  1. Common genetic variation in adiponectin, leptin, and leptin receptor and association with breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Nyante, Sarah J.; Gammon, Marilie D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Bensen, Jeannette T.; Lin, Dan Yu; Barnholtz-Sloan, Jill S.; Hu, Yijuan; He, Qianchuan; Luo, Jingchun; Millikan, Robert C.

    2012-01-01

    Adipocytokines are produced by visceral fat, and levels may be associated with breast cancer risk. We investigated whether single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in adipocytokine genes adiponectin (ADIPOQ), leptin (LEP), and the leptin receptor (LEPR) were associated with basal-like or luminal A breast cancer subtypes. 104 candidate and tag SNPs were genotyped in 1776 of 2022 controls and 1972 (200 basal-like, 679 luminal A) of 2311 cases from the Carolina Breast Cancer Study (CBCS), a population-based case–control study of whites and African Americans. Breast cancer molecular subtypes were determined by immunohistochemistry. Genotype odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated using unconditional logistic regression. Haplotype ORs and 95% CIs were estimated using Hapstat. Interactions with waist-hip ratio were evaluated using a multiplicative interaction term. Ancestry was estimated from 144 ancestry informative markers (AIMs), and included in models to control for population stratification. Candidate SNPs LEPR K109R (rs1137100) and LEPR Q223R (rs1137101) were positively associated with luminal A breast cancer, whereas ADIPOQ +45 T/G (rs2241766), ADIPOQ +276 G/T (rs1501299), and LEPR K656N (rs8129183) were not associated with either subtype. Few patterns were observed among tag SNPs, with the exception of 3 LEPR SNPs (rs17412175, rs9436746, and rs9436748) that were in moderate LD and inversely associated with basal-like breast cancer. However, no SNP associations were statistically significant after adjustment for multiple comparisons. Haplotypes in LEP and LEPR were associated with both basal-like and luminal A subtypes. There was no evidence of interaction with waist-hip ratio. Data suggest associations between LEPR candidate SNPs and luminal A breast cancer in the CBCS and LEPR intron 2 tag SNPs and basal-like breast cancer. Replication in additional studies where breast cancer subtypes have been defined is necessary to confirm these

  2. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  3. TP53 Mutation Spectrum in Smokers and Never Smoking Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Halvorsen, Ann R.; Silwal-Pandit, Laxmi; Meza-Zepeda, Leonardo A.; Vodak, Daniel; Vu, Phuong; Sagerup, Camilla; Hovig, Eivind; Myklebost, Ola; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Brustugun, Odd T.; Helland, Åslaug

    2016-01-01

    Background: TP53 mutations are among the most common mutations found in lung cancers, identified as an independent prognostic factor in many types of cancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the frequency and prognostic impact of TP53 mutations in never-smokers and in different histological subtypes of lung cancer. Methods: We analyzed tumor tissue from 394 non-small cell carcinomas including adenocarcinomas (n = 229), squamous cell carcinomas (n = 112), large cell carcinomas (n = 30), and others (n = 23) for mutations in TP53 by the use of Sanger sequencing (n = 394) and next generation sequencing (n = 100). Results: TP53 mutations were identified in 47.2% of the samples, with the highest frequency (65%) of mutations among squamous cell carcinomas. Among never-smokers, 36% carried a TP53 mutation, identified as a significant independent negative prognostic factor in this subgroup. For large cell carcinomas, a significantly prolonged progression free survival was found for those carrying a TP53 mutation. In addition, the frequency of frameshift mutations was doubled in squamous cell carcinomas (20.3%) compared to adenocarcinomas (9.1%). Conclusion: TP53 mutation patterns differ between the histological subgroups of lung cancers, and are also influenced by smoking history. This indicates that the histological subtypes in lung cancer are genetically different, and that smoking-induced TP53 mutations may have a different biological impact than TP53 mutations occurring in never-smokers. PMID:27242894

  4. Molecular breast cancer subtypes and therapies in a public hospital of Northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The frequencies of molecular breast cancer subtypes vary among different human populations. The Northeastern region of Brazil has a mixed population of African, Indigenous and European ancestry. This retrospective study investigated breast cancer subtypes and applied therapies in a public hospital of Northeastern Brazil. Methods Data of 633 patients with invasive breast cancer from 2005 to 2011 were obtained from medical records. Status of hormone receptor (HR), HER2 and Ki67 expression index of 269 out of 633 patients were used to define subtypes of Luminal A and B, HER2 and triple negative (TN) breast cancer. Expression index of Ki67 ≥ 14% was applied to distinguish Luminal A from Luminal B subtypes. Results Overall, 185 (68.77%) and 132 (49.07%) patients showed positive hormone receptor (HR+) and positive HER2 (HER2+) tumors. The mean age ranged from 53.33 to 58.25 years for patients with tumors of Luminal B and Luminal A subtypes, respectively (p = 0.0182). In general, 67.39% of patients with TN tumors aged over 50 and 19.57% aged between 31 and 40 years (p = 0.0046). The rate of small tumors (T1: ≤ 2.0 cm) varied from 22.73% to 52.46% for TN and Luminal A subtypes (p = 0.0088). The rate of high graded (G3) tumors was increased for HER2 and TN subtypes (35.29% and 34.28%) compared to Luminal A and Luminal B subtypes (3.92% and 12.62%), respectively (p < 0.0001). The five-year survival rate ranged from 92.86% to 75.00%, for Luminal A, HER2 and TN subtypes, respectively (HR: 0.260 to 1.015; 95% CI: 0.043 to 3.594; p = 0.2589). Patients with HER2 positive (HER2+) breast tumors did not receive immunotherapy and chemotherapy application varied from 54.84% to 86.49% for Luminal A and HER2 subtypes, respectively (p = 0.0131). Conclusions The results of this study revealed a high percentage of HER2+ breast tumors and an increased rate of patients with TN tumors aged over 50 years. This emphasizes the need for establishing

  5. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  6. Results of Lung Cancer Surgery for Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Haruaki; Ichinose, Junji; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Junichi; Anraku, Masaki; Nakajima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Growing number of elderly lung cancer patients reflecting a lengthening life span has become a serious problem. Purpose of this study was to elucidate the short and long-term outcome of the surgery for octogenarians, and to evaluate the role of lung cancer surgery for this high age group. Methods: The patients with lung cancer aged 80 years or more who underwent the surgery at our institute from January 1998 through December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed by chart review, and the operative mortality, morbidity and the long-term survival were assessed. Results: Out of a total of 1107 patients with primary lung cancer who received surgery during the study period, 94 were octogenarians (8.5%). Sixty-nine patients (73.4%) had preoperative co-morbidity including hypertension in 50 (53.2%), coincidence of other malignancy in 35 (37.2%), anti-coagulant therapy in 29 (30.9%). Twenty-six patients (27.7%) had major or minor postoperative morbidity, and one (1.1%) died due to bronchopleural fistula. Overall-5-year survival rate was 57.5%. Univariative and multivariative analysis using Cox proportional hazard model revealed that male gender and non-adenocarcinoma histology were significant risk factors for poor prognosis. Conclusion: Gender and histology should be taken into account in preoperative evaluation of indication for lung cancer in octogenarians. PMID:25740447

  7. Plasma miR-19b and miR-183 as Potential Biomarkers of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Skvortsova, Tatyana E.; Ponomaryova, Anastasia A.; Rykova, Elena Yu; Cherdyntseva, Nadezhda V.; Polovnikov, Evgeny S.; Pashkovskaya, Oksana A.; Pokushalov, Evgeny A.; Vlassov, Valentin V.; Laktionov, Pavel P.

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease that often manifests at the point when treatment is not effective. Introduction of blood-based complementary diagnostics using molecular markers may enhance early detection of this disease and help reduce the burden of lung cancer. Here we evaluated the diagnostic potential of seven plasma miRNA biomarkers (miR-21, -19b, -126, -25, -205, -183, -125b) by quantitative reverse transcription PCR. Influence clinical and demographical characteristics, including age, tumor stage and cancer subtype on miRNA levels was investigated. Four miRNAs were significantly dysregulated (miR-19b, -21, -25, -183) in lung cancer patients. Combination of miR-19b and miR-183 provided detection of lung cancer with 94.7% sensitivity and 95.2% specificity (AUC = 0.990). Thus, miRNAs have shown the potential to discriminate histological subtypes of lung cancer and reliably distinguish lung cancer patients from healthy individuals. PMID:27768748

  8. BCL2 as a Subtype-Specific Prognostic Marker for Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eom, Yong Hwa; Kim, Hyung Suk; Lee, Ahwon; Song, Byung Joo

    2016-01-01

    Purpose B-cell lymphoma 2 (BCL2) is an antiapoptosis protein and an important clinical breast cancer prognostic marker. As the role of BCL2 is dependent on the estrogen receptor (ER) status, this effect might differ according to molecular subtypes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between the prognostic outcomes and BCL2 expression among the molecular subtypes. Methods We retrieved the data of 1,356 patients who were newly diagnosed with malignant breast cancer between November 2006 and November 2011. Immunohistochemistry was used to measure ER, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), Ki-67, and BCL2 expression. We classified breast cancer into five molecular subtypes based on the 13th St. Gallen International Expert Consensus, including luminal A, luminal B (HER2-negative), luminal B (HER2-positive), HER2-overexpression, and triple-negative subtypes. We analyzed the clinicopathological features and assessed the correlation between BCL2 expression and clinical outcomes, such as relapse-free survival (RFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) according to the five molecular subtypes. Results A total of 605 cases of breast cancer (53.8%) showed BCL2 expression. BCL2-positive expression was associated with young age (<50 years, p=0.036), lower histological grade (p<0.001), low Ki-67 level (<14%, p<0.001), hormone receptor positivity (p<0.001), HER2 negativity (p<0.001), luminal breast cancer (p<0.001), and low recurrence rate (p=0.016). BCL2-positive expression was also associated with favorable 5-year RFS (p=0.008, 91.4%) and DSS (p=0.036, 95.6%) in all the patients. BCL2-positive expression in luminal A breast cancer resulted in significantly favorable 5-year RFS and DSS (p=0.023 and p=0.041, respectively). However, BCL2 expression was not associated with the prognosis in the other subtypes. Conclusion The prognostic role of BCL2 expression in breast cancer is subtype-specific. BCL2 expression differs according to

  9. An in silico analytical study of lung cancer and smokers datasets from gene expression omnibus (GEO) for prediction of differentially expressed genes.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Atif Noorul; Ahmad, Mohammad Wakil; Madar, Inamul Hasan; Grace, B Leena; Hasan, Tarique Noorul

    2015-01-01

    Smoking is the leading cause of lung cancer development and several genes have been identified as potential biomarker for lungs cancer. Contributing to the present scientific knowledge of biomarkers for lung cancer two different data sets, i.e. GDS3257 and GDS3054 were downloaded from NCBI׳s GEO database and normalized by RMA and GRMA packages (Bioconductor). Diffrentially expressed genes were extracted by using and were R (3.1.2); DAVID online tool was used for gene annotation and GENE MANIA tool was used for construction of gene regulatory network. Nine smoking independent gene were found whereas average expressions of those genes were almost similar in both the datasets. Five genes among them were found to be associated with cancer subtypes. Thirty smoking specific genes were identified; among those genes eight were associated with cancer sub types. GPR110, IL1RN and HSP90AA1 were found directly associated with lung cancer. SEMA6A differentially expresses in only non-smoking lung cancer samples. FLG is differentially expressed smoking specific gene and is related to onset of various cancer subtypes. Functional annotation and network analysis revealed that FLG participates in various epidermal tissue developmental processes and is co-expressed with other genes. Lung tissues are epidermal tissues and thus it suggests that alteration in FLG may cause lung cancer. We conclude that smoking alters expression of several genes and associated biological pathways during development of lung cancers.

  10. Biomarkers and transcriptome profiling of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yu, Sung-Liang; Li, Ker-Chau; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. High-throughput technologies such as microarrays provide an opportunity to explore biomarkers for cancer prevention, prognosis and treatment guidance. Recent studies have revealed many biomarkers with the potential for clinical application. However, major limitations still exist. Although useful data on cancer genomics has accumulated rapidly, there has also been a simultaneous tendency for amplification of the complex relationships among the enormous number of variables that need to be considered. Disentangling these complex gene-gene interactions requires new approaches to data analysis to reveal information that has been obscured by traditional methods. Here, we review the current findings on biomarker identification in lung cancer, address their limitations and discuss some future directions for improvements in this area of research.

  11. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed.

  12. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed. PMID:26703803

  13. Contemplating Genetic Feedback Regarding Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shepperd, James A.; Novell, Corinne A.; O'Neill, Suzanne C.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; McBride, Colleen M.; Lipkus, Isaac M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We examined three theoretical models (self-enhancement theory, consistency theory, and combined model) for understanding how expectations and test result favorability influence smokers' desire for a retest following hypothetical genetic test results. Method College smokers (N = 128) read a brochure describing a biomarker for lung cancer (the GSTM1 gene) then reported whether they thought they had the gene (indicating lower lung cancer risk) or were missing the gene (indicating higher lung cancer risk). Participants then reported whether they would get retested if they received favorable GSTM1 results versus unfavorable GSTM1 results. Results Participants were most likely to want a retest, suggesting rejection of the results, if they expected favorable news yet received unfavorable news. Conclusion The findings supported the combined model such that smokers expressed greatest interest in a retest when they imagined genetic risk feedback that challenges both enhancement and consistency motives. PMID:24222509

  14. Smoking cessation and lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Tønnesen, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Smoking behavior may have a substantial influence on the overall effect of lung cancer screening. Non-randomized studies of smoking behavior during screening have indicated that computer tomography (CT) screening induces smoking cessation. Randomized studies have further elaborated that this effect has to do with participation in screening alone and not dependent on the CT scan. Participants in both CT and control arm in randomized screening trials had higher smoking abstinence rate compared to that of the general population. A positive screening test seems to further promote smoking cessation and decrease smoking relapse rate. Also low smoking dependency and high motivation to quit smoking at baseline predicted smoking abstinence in screening trials. Lung cancer screening therefore seems to be a teachable moment for smoking cessation. Targeted smoking cessation counselling should be an integrated part of future lung cancer screening trials. PMID:27195275

  15. Smoking cessation and lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Tønnesen, Philip; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-04-01

    Smoking behavior may have a substantial influence on the overall effect of lung cancer screening. Non-randomized studies of smoking behavior during screening have indicated that computer tomography (CT) screening induces smoking cessation. Randomized studies have further elaborated that this effect has to do with participation in screening alone and not dependent on the CT scan. Participants in both CT and control arm in randomized screening trials had higher smoking abstinence rate compared to that of the general population. A positive screening test seems to further promote smoking cessation and decrease smoking relapse rate. Also low smoking dependency and high motivation to quit smoking at baseline predicted smoking abstinence in screening trials. Lung cancer screening therefore seems to be a teachable moment for smoking cessation. Targeted smoking cessation counselling should be an integrated part of future lung cancer screening trials. PMID:27195275

  16. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  18. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  19. Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159289.html Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That Study ... HealthDay News) -- A new smartphone app may help lung cancer patients live longer and better by monitoring ...

  20. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer. If lung ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  1. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Cancer.gov

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  2. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  3. Differential involvement of RASSF2 hypermethylation in breast cancer subtypes and their prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Janices, Noemi; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Torrea, Natalia; Liechtenstein, Therese; Escors, David; Cordoba, Alicia; Vicente-Garcia, Francisco; Jauregui, Isabel; De La Cruz, Susana; Illarramendi, José Juan; Coca, Valle; Berdasco, Maria; Kochan, Grazyna; Ibañez, Berta; Lera, José Miguel; Guerrero-Setas, David

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is a heterogeneous disease that can be subdivided into clinical, histopathological and molecular subtypes (luminal A-like, luminal B-like/HER2-negative, luminal B-like/HER2-positive, HER2-positive, and triple-negative). The study of new molecular factors is essential to obtain further insights into the mechanisms involved in the tumorigenesis of each tumor subtype. RASSF2 is a gene that is hypermethylated in breast cancer and whose clinical value has not been previously studied. The hypermethylation of RASSF1 and RASSF2 genes was analyzed in 198 breast tumors of different subtypes. The effect of the demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine in the re-expression of these genes was examined in triple-negative (BT-549), HER2 (SK-BR-3), and luminal cells (T-47D). Different patterns of RASSF2 expression for distinct tumor subtypes were detected by immunohistochemistry. RASSF2 hypermethylation was much more frequent in luminal subtypes than in non-luminal tumors (p = 0.001). The re-expression of this gene by lentiviral transduction contributed to the differential cell proliferation and response to antineoplastic drugs observed in luminal compared with triple-negative cell lines. RASSF2 hypermethylation is associated with better prognosis in multivariate statistical analysis (P = 0.039). In conclusion, RASSF2 gene is differently methylated in luminal and non-luminal tumors and is a promising suppressor gene with clinical involvement in breast cancer. PMID:26284587

  4. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  5. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E.; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F.; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M.; Yang, Gillian R.; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer. PMID:25114235

  6. Clear Cell Carcinoma of the Breast: A Rare Breast Cancer Subtype – Case Report and Literature Review

    PubMed Central

    Ratti, Vilma; Pagani, Olivia

    2015-01-01

    Background Glycogen-rich clear cell breast carcinoma is a rare histological breast cancer subtype. Its prognosis may vary depending on specific clinical and pathological characteristics such as low grade, strong positivity of estrogen receptor (ER) expression and early diagnosis. Case Presentation We present the case of a 53-year-old woman with a bleeding 10-cm-diameter mass in the left breast. The histological examination showed a poorly differentiated tumor with malignant cells characterized by abundant clear cytoplasm. The diagnosis of clear cell carcinoma was based on the histological characteristics of the tumor, and a nonmammary origin was initially ruled out. The tumor was triple negative [i.e. ER, progesterone receptor (PR) and HER2 negative]. Four months after the initial locoregional treatment, the patient developed lung and distant lymph node metastases. Conclusions Glycogen-rich clear cell carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor. Early diagnosis, absence of lymph node metastases and ER/PR positivity are associated with a better prognosis, as in other common breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26600782

  7. The lung cancer nurse role in the management of paraneoplastic syndromes in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with lung cancer are well recognised, are often complex to diagnose, and have minimal evidence to promote nursing and medical management. This paper aims to help guide lung cancer nurses to identify the most common and rarer PNS together with basic clinical management advice to help develop nursing assessments and interventions. The issues regarding the pathway of care at diagnosis together with palliative and supportive care requirements will be addressed and will aim to promote best practice in patients diagnosed with PNS and lung cancer. PMID:27413699

  8. Variation in lung cancer resources and workload: results from the first national lung cancer organisational audit.

    PubMed

    Cusworth, K; O'Dowd, E; Hubbard, R; Beckett, P; Peake, M D; Woolhouse, I

    2015-10-01

    We report the findings of the first national lung cancer organisational audit. The results demonstrate marked variation in service provision and workload of some lung cancer specialists. For example, over half of the clinical nurse specialists report case volumes over recommended numbers. Some trusts have no access to key treatments such as video assisted thoracoscopy (VAT) lobectomy and stereotactic radiotherapy. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated an association between higher surgical resection rates and the on-site availability of advanced staging and therapeutic modalities, for example, PET scan and VAT lobectomy. We conclude by making a number of recommendations to address the variation in lung cancer care. PMID:26043732

  9. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  10. The relationship between COPD and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durham, A.L.; Adcock, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Both COPD and lung cancer are major worldwide health concerns owing to cigarette smoking, and represent a huge, worldwide, preventable disease burden. Whilst the majority of smokers will not develop either COPD or lung cancer, they are closely related diseases, occurring as co-morbidities at a higher rate than if they were independently triggered by smoking. Lung cancer and COPD may be different aspects of the same disease, with the same underlying predispositions, whether this is an underlying genetic predisposition, telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction or premature aging. In the majority of smokers, the burden of smoking may be dealt with by the body’s defense mechanisms: anti-oxidants such as superoxide dismutases, anti-proteases and DNA repair mechanisms. However, in the case of both diseases these fail, leading to cancer if mutations occur or COPD if damage to the cell and proteins becomes too great. Alternatively COPD could be a driving factor in lung cancer, by increasing oxidative stress and the resulting DNA damage, chronic exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, repression of the DNA repair mechanisms and increased cellular proliferation. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these processes in primary cells from patients with these diseases along with better disease models is essential for the development of new treatments. PMID:26363803

  11. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  12. Transthyretin as a potential biomarker for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection

    PubMed Central

    DING, HONGMEI; LIU, JIANHUA; XUE, RONG; ZHAO, PENG; QIN, YI; ZHENG, FANG; SUN, XUGUO

    2014-01-01

    Satisfactory biomarkers for screening and early diagnosis of lung cancer remain scarce and require further investigation. The aim of the present study was to examine the changes of the biochemical and protein composition in the serum and pleural effusion from lung cancer and lung infection (bacterial pneumonia) patients. A total of 92 patients with lung cancer, 38 with bacterial pneumonia and 42 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The serum levels of cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and transthyretin (TTR) in the lung cancer patients were higher than that of the lung infection patients (P<0.05). The levels of TTR were higher, whereas the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was lower in the pleural effusion from the lung cancer patients compared to the lung infection patients (P<0.05). Furthermore, the pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios in the lung cancer patients were higher, whereas the ratios of ADA were lower (P<0.05). By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, four major peaks corresponding to native TTR, Sul-TTR, Cys-TTR and Cysgly-TTR were observed in the serum of the lung cancer and lung infection patients. A significant increase was found in the proportion of Cysgly-TTR in the pleural effusion from the patients with lung cancer. The data indicated that a combination of pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios and modified TTR may be beneficial for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection. PMID:25054025

  13. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  14. S0536: Cetuximab, Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  15. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Geographic differences in the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background To compare the distribution of the intrinsic molecular subtypes of breast cancer based on immunohistochemical profile in the five major geographic regions of Brazil, a country of continental dimension, with a wide racial variation of people. Methods The study was retrospective observational. We classified 5,687 invasive breast cancers by molecular subtype based on immunohistochemical expression of estrogen-receptor (ER), progesterone-receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), and Ki-67 proliferation index. Cases were classified as luminal A (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 negative, Ki-67 < 14%), luminal B (ER and/or PR positive, HER2 negative, and Ki-67 > 14%), triple-positive (ER and/or PR positive and HER2 positive), HER2-enriched (ER and PR negative, and HER2- positive), and triple-negative (TN) (ER negative, PR negative, and HER2- negative). Comparisons of the ages of patients and molecular subtypes between different geographic regions were performed. Results South and Southeast regions with a higher percentage of European ancestry and higher socioeconomic status presented with the highest proportion of luminal tumors. The North region presented with more aggressive subtypes (HER2-enriched and triple-negative), while the Central-West region predominated triple-positive carcinomas. The Northeast—a region with a high African influence—presented intermediate frequency of the different molecular subtypes. The differences persisted in subgroups of patients under and over 50 years. Conclusions The geographic regions differ according to the distribution of molecular subtypes of breast cancer. However, other differences, beside those related to African ancestry, such as socioeconomic, climatic, nutritional, and geographic, have to be considered to explain our results. The knowledge of the differences in breast cancer characteristics among the geographic regions may help to organize healthcare programs in large countries

  18. Respiratory tract cancers: lung and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, Paolo; Piffer, Silvano

    2004-01-01

    The trend analysis of lung cancer in the database of the Italian Network of Cancer Registries (pool AIRT), showed, among males (52,267 incident cases and 46, 726 deaths included in the study) a statistically significant decrease of incidence and mortality in the period 1986-1997; incidence rates decreased by about 1.4%/year and mortality rates by about 1.6%/year. Among females, lung cancer trends are rather different from that of males, according to diverging trends in tobacco smoking exposures; in fact, both incidence (+1.2%/year) and mortality (+0.9%/year) are increasing. Incidence of mesothelioma (1594 cases), showed for the period 1986-1997, a statistically significant increase among both males and females; standardised rates increased, more than 4% every year. As regards to deaths due to pleural malignant cancers (1393 among males and 664 among females) their trend was stable in the analysed period.

  19. Risk assessment of second primary cancer according to histological subtype of non-Hodgkin lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Cédric; Jégu, Jérémie; Mounier, Morgane; Dandoit, Mylène; Colonna, Marc; Daubisse-Marliac, Laetitia; Trétarre, Brigitte; Ganry, Olivier; Guizard, Anne-Valérie; Bara, Simona; Bouvier, Véronique; Woronoff, Anne-Sophie; Monnereau, Alain; Casasnovas, Olivier; Velten, Michel; Troussard, Xavier; Maynadié, Marc

    2015-01-01

    Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) represents a heterogeneous group of diseases that are known to carry a considerable risk of second primary cancer (SPC). However, little attention has been paid to SPC risk assessment according to NHL subtypes. Data from 10 French population-based cancer registries were used to establish a cohort of 7546 patients with a first diagnosis of NHL (eight subtypes) between 1989 and 2004. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) of metachronous SPC were estimated. Among the 7546 patients diagnosed with a NHL, the overall SPC risk was 25% higher than that in the reference population (SIR = 1.25, 95% confidence interval 1.15-1.36). In univariate analysis, the SPC risk differed by lymphoma subtype. Interestingly, multivariate analysis showed that SPC risk did not differ significantly across NHL subtypes after adjustment for the other covariates (p = 0.786). Patients with NHL have an increased risk of SPC that is not influenced by the histological NHL subtype. PMID:25641432

  20. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  1. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  2. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc.

  3. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc. PMID:24823631

  4. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  5. Identification of Copy Number Aberrations in Breast Cancer Subtypes Using Persistence Topology

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Javier; Borrman, Tyler; Cavalcante, Raymond; Gonzalez, Georgina; Park, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are of biological and medical interest because they help identify regulatory mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and evolution. Identification of tumor-driving CNAs (driver CNAs) however remains a challenging task, because they are frequently hidden by CNAs that are the product of random events that take place during tumor evolution. Experimental detection of CNAs is commonly accomplished through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assays followed by supervised and/or unsupervised statistical methods that combine the segmented profiles of all patients to identify driver CNAs. Here, we extend a previously-presented supervised algorithm for the identification of CNAs that is based on a topological representation of the data. Our method associates a two-dimensional (2D) point cloud with each aCGH profile and generates a sequence of simplicial complexes, mathematical objects that generalize the concept of a graph. This representation of the data permits segmenting the data at different resolutions and identifying CNAs by interrogating the topological properties of these simplicial complexes. We tested our approach on a published dataset with the goal of identifying specific breast cancer CNAs associated with specific molecular subtypes. Identification of CNAs associated with each subtype was performed by analyzing each subtype separately from the others and by taking the rest of the subtypes as the control. Our results found a new amplification in 11q at the location of the progesterone receptor in the Luminal A subtype. Aberrations in the Luminal B subtype were found only upon removal of the basal-like subtype from the control set. Under those conditions, all regions found in the original publication, except for 17q, were confirmed; all aberrations, except those in chromosome arms 8q and 12q were confirmed in the basal-like subtype. These two chromosome arms, however, were detected only upon removal of three patients

  6. Identification of Copy Number Aberrations in Breast Cancer Subtypes Using Persistence Topology

    PubMed Central

    Arsuaga, Javier; Borrman, Tyler; Cavalcante, Raymond; Gonzalez, Georgina; Park, Catherine

    2015-01-01

    DNA copy number aberrations (CNAs) are of biological and medical interest because they help identify regulatory mechanisms underlying tumor initiation and evolution. Identification of tumor-driving CNAs (driver CNAs) however remains a challenging task, because they are frequently hidden by CNAs that are the product of random events that take place during tumor evolution. Experimental detection of CNAs is commonly accomplished through array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) assays followed by supervised and/or unsupervised statistical methods that combine the segmented profiles of all patients to identify driver CNAs. Here, we extend a previously-presented supervised algorithm for the identification of CNAs that is based on a topological representation of the data. Our method associates a two-dimensional (2D) point cloud with each aCGH profile and generates a sequence of simplicial complexes, mathematical objects that generalize the concept of a graph. This representation of the data permits segmenting the data at different resolutions and identifying CNAs by interrogating the topological properties of these simplicial complexes. We tested our approach on a published dataset with the goal of identifying specific breast cancer CNAs associated with specific molecular subtypes. Identification of CNAs associated with each subtype was performed by analyzing each subtype separately from the others and by taking the rest of the subtypes as the control. Our results found a new amplification in 11q at the location of the progesterone receptor in the Luminal A subtype. Aberrations in the Luminal B subtype were found only upon removal of the basal-like subtype from the control set. Under those conditions, all regions found in the original publication, except for 17q, were confirmed; all aberrations, except those in chromosome arms 8q and 12q were confirmed in the basal-like subtype. These two chromosome arms, however, were detected only upon removal of three patients

  7. Prognostic evaluation of the B cell/IL-8 metagene in different intrinsic breast cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Hanker, Lars C; Rody, Achim; Holtrich, Uwe; Pusztai, Lajos; Ruckhaeberle, Eugen; Liedtke, Cornelia; Ahr, Andre; Heinrich, Tomas M; Sänger, Nicole; Becker, Sven; Karn, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported that a ratio of high B cell and low IL-8 metagene expression identified 32 % of triple negative breast cancers (TNBC) with good prognosis and was the only significant predictor in multivariate analysis including routine clinicopathological variables. However, the clinical relevance of this signature in other breast cancer subtypes remains unclear. We compiled Affymetrix gene expression datasets from 4,467 primary breast cancer samples and excluded 329 triple negative samples which were used as discovery cohort in our previous study. Molecular classification of the remaining 4,138 samples was performed by two methods, including single genes (ER, PgR, HER2, and Ki67) and a centroid-based method using the intrinsic gene list. The prognostic value within the respective subtypes was assessed by analyzing the event-free survival of patients as a function of the B cell/IL-8 metagene ratio using previously published cutoff. ER-negative subtypes had the highest expression of the B cell and the IL-8 metagenes. The IL-8/B cell signature assigned a considerable fraction of samples (range 20.7-42.0 %) into the "good prognosis" group. However, a significant prognostic value was only observed in the subgroup of triple negative breast cancer (P = 0.035). The prognostic value of the B cell/IL-8 ratio is mainly confined to the basal-like and TNBC subtypes of breast cancer. This result underlines the importance of subtype-specific analyses and suggests a sequential multistep approach to developing and applying outcome predictors in the clinic.

  8. Epstein-Barr virus-positive gastric cancer: a distinct molecular subtype of the disease?

    PubMed

    Jácome, Alexandre Andrade Dos Anjos; Lima, Enaldo Melo de; Kazzi, Ana Izabela; Chaves, Gabriela Freitas; Mendonça, Diego Cavalheiro de; Maciel, Marina Mara; Santos, José Sebastião Dos

    2016-04-01

    Approximately 90% of the world population is infected by Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). Usually, it infects B lymphocytes, predisposing them to malignant transformation. Infection of epithelial cells occurs rarely, and it is estimated that about to 10% of gastric cancer patients harbor EBV in their malignant cells. Given that gastric cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide, with a global annual incidence of over 950,000 cases, EBV-positive gastric cancer is the largest group of EBV-associated malignancies. Based on gene expression profile studies, gastric cancer was recently categorized into four subtypes; EBV-positive, microsatellite unstable, genomically stable and chromosomal instability. Together with previous studies, this report provided a more detailed molecular characterization of gastric cancer, demonstrating that EBV-positive gastric cancer is a distinct molecular subtype of the disease, with unique genetic and epigenetic abnormalities, reflected in a specific phenotype. The recognition of characteristic molecular alterations in gastric cancer allows the identification of molecular pathways involved in cell proliferation and survival, with the potential to identify therapeutic targets. These findings highlight the enormous heterogeneity of gastric cancer, and the complex interplay between genetic and epigenetic alterations in the disease, and provide a roadmap to implementation of genome-guided personalized therapy in gastric cancer. The present review discusses the initial studies describing EBV-positive gastric cancer as a distinct clinical entity, presents recently described genetic and epigenetic alterations, and considers potential therapeutic insights derived from the recognition of this new molecular subtype of gastric adenocarcinoma.

  9. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  10. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  11. Metastatic patterns of breast cancer subtypes: what radiologists should know in the era of personalized cancer medicine.

    PubMed

    Chikarmane, S A; Tirumani, S H; Howard, S A; Jagannathan, J P; DiPiro, P J

    2015-01-01

    There is accumulating evidence that molecular phenotyping of breast cancer determines the timing, pattern, and outcome of metastatic disease. The most clinically relevant subtypes are hormonal-positive [oestrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR) positive], HER2 expressing, and triple-negative breast cancers (TNBCs). ER/PR-positive breast cancers demonstrate the best prognosis; however, metastases, in particular osseous disease, may develop much later. HER2-expressing breast cancers, although aggressive, have improved outcomes due to the advent of HER2-targeted therapies, with increased risk of central nervous system (CNS) relapses later. Finally, TNBCs present in younger women, BRCA1 mutations carriers, and carry the worst overall prognosis, with high incidence of CNS metastases, especially during the first 5 years of diagnosis. It is important for radiologists to understand the nuances of these breast cancer subtypes to predict metastatic behaviours and guide possible imaging surveillance.

  12. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  13. Molecular Features of Subtype-Specific Progression from Ductal Carcinoma In Situ to Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lesurf, Robert; Aure, Miriam Ragle; Mørk, Hanne Håberg; Vitelli, Valeria; Lundgren, Steinar; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Kristensen, Vessela; Wärnberg, Fredrik; Hallett, Michael; Sørlie, Therese

    2016-07-26

    Breast cancer consists of at least five main molecular "intrinsic" subtypes that are reflected in both pre-invasive and invasive disease. Although previous studies have suggested that many of the molecular features of invasive breast cancer are established early, it is unclear what mechanisms drive progression and whether the mechanisms of progression are dependent or independent of subtype. We have generated mRNA, miRNA, and DNA copy-number profiles from a total of 59 in situ lesions and 85 invasive tumors in order to comprehensively identify those genes, signaling pathways, processes, and cell types that are involved in breast cancer progression. Our work provides evidence that there are molecular features associated with disease progression that are unique to the intrinsic subtypes. We additionally establish subtype-specific signatures that are able to identify a small proportion of pre-invasive tumors with expression profiles that resemble invasive carcinoma, indicating a higher likelihood of future disease progression. PMID:27396337

  14. Eczema as the first manifestation of a lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjiao; Wang, Renben; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer combined with eczema is a rare disease. We report a case of 58-year-old man with eczema as the first manifestation of a lung cancer. Skin examination revealed diffuse erythema, dander, itchy rash, and scratch. Chest contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a heterogeneously enhanced irregular mass in the right lung. Punch biopsy of the tumor confirms squamous cell lung cancer. Eczema vanished nearly completely after one cycle of chemotherapy.

  15. Role of acetylcholinesterase in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hui-Jun; Wu, Ren-Pei; Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Ling-Juan; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a key role in catalytic hydrolysis of cholinergic neurotransmitters. Intensive research has proven the involvement of this protein in novel functions, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and proliferation. In addition, several recent studies have indicated that acetylcholinesterase is potentially a marker and regulator of apoptosis. Importantly, AChE is also a promising tumor suppressor. In this review, we briefly summarize the involvement of AChE in apoptosis and cancer, focusing on the role of AChE in lung cancer, as well as the therapeutic consideration of AChE for cancer therapy. PMID:26273392

  16. Deaths in Canada from lung cancer due to involuntary smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Collishaw, N E; Kirkbride, J; Mao, Y

    1987-01-01

    Recently published evidence indicates that involuntary smoking causes an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Information was compiled on the proportion of people who had never smoked among victims of lung cancer, the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers married to smokers and the prevalence of such exposure. On the basis of these data we estimate that 50 to 60 of the deaths from lung cancer in Canada in 1985 among people who had never smoked were caused by spousal smoking; about 90% occurred in women. The total number of deaths from lung cancer attributable to exposure to tobacco smoke from spouses and other sources (mainly the workplace) was derived by applying estimated age- and sex-specific rates of death from lung cancer attributable to such exposure to the population of Canadians who have never smoked; about 330 deaths from lung cancer annually are attributable to such exposure. PMID:3567810

  17. Breath sensors for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2015-03-15

    The scope of the applications of breath sensors is abundant in disease diagnosis. Lung cancer diagnosis is a well-fitting health-related application of this technology, which is of utmost importance in the health sector, because lung cancer has the highest death rate among all cancer types, and it brings a high yearly global burden. The aim of this review is first to provide a rational basis for the development of breath sensors for lung cancer diagnostics from a historical perspective, which will facilitate the transfer of the idea into the rapidly evolving sensors field. Following examples with diagnostic applications include colorimetric, composite, carbon nanotube, gold nanoparticle-based, and surface acoustic wave sensor arrays. These select sensor applications are widened by the state-of-the-art developments in the sensors field. Coping with sampling sourced artifacts and cancer staging are among the debated topics, along with the other concerns like proteomics approaches and biomimetic media utilization, feature selection for data classification, and commercialization.

  18. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  19. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored.

  20. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratigos, Michalis; Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  1. Occupational exposure to diesel and gasoline emissions and lung cancer in Canadian men.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Paul J; Parent, Marie-Élise; Sahni, Vanita; Johnson, Kenneth C

    2011-07-01

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies diesel exhaust as a probable human carcinogen; this decision is based largely from lung cancer evidence. Gasoline exhaust is classified as a possible carcinogen. Epidemiological studies are needed that improve upon some of the limitations of previous research with respect to the characterization of exposure, and the control for the potential confounding influence of smoking and other occupational exposures. Our objective was to investigate associations between occupational exposure to diesel and gasoline engine emissions and lung cancer. We used a case-control study design that involved men 40 years of age and older at the time of interview. Analyses are based on 1681 incident cases of lung cancer and 2,053 population controls. A self-reported questionnaire elicited a lifetime occupational history, including general tasks, and information on other potential risk factors. Occupational exposures to diesel and gasoline emissions, crystalline silica, and asbestos were assigned to each job held by study subjects by industrial hygienists who were blind to case-control status. Exposure metrics for diesel and gasoline emissions that were modeled included: ever exposure, cumulative exposure, and concentration of exposure. We found a dose-response relationship between cumulative occupational exposure to diesel engine emissions and lung cancer. This association was more pronounced for the squamous and large cell subtypes with adjusted odds ratios across the three increasing tertiles of cumulative lifetime exposure relative to those with no exposure of 0.99, 1.25, and 1.32 (p=0.04) for squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.06, 1.19, 1.68 (p=0.02) for large cell carcinoma. While the association with cumulative exposure to gasoline was weakly positive, it was not statistically significant. Our findings suggest that exposure to diesel engine emissions increases the risk of lung cancer particularly for squamous and large cell

  2. Molecular subtype profiling of invasive breast cancers weakly positive for estrogen receptor.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Brandon S; Kos, Zuzana; Asleh-Aburaya, Karama; Wang, Xiu Qing; Leung, Samuel; Gao, Dongxia; Won, Jennifer; Chow, Christine; Rachamadugu, Rakesh; Stijleman, Inge; Wolber, Robert; Gilks, C Blake; Myles, Nickolas; Thomson, Tom; Hayes, Malcolm M; Bernard, Philip S; Nielsen, Torsten O; Chia, Stephen K L

    2016-02-01

    The estrogen receptor (ER) is a key predictive biomarker in the treatment of breast cancer. There is uncertainty regarding the use of hormonal therapy in the setting of weakly positive ER by immunohistochemistry (IHC). We report intrinsic subtype classification on a cohort of ER weakly positive early-stage breast cancers. Consecutive cases of breast cancer treated by primary surgical resection were retrospectively identified from 4 centers that engage in routine external proficiency testing for breast biomarkers. ER-negative (Allred 0 and 2) and ER weakly positive (Allred 3-5) cases were included. Gene expression profiling was performed using qRT-PCR. Intrinsic subtype prediction was made based upon the PAM50 gene expression signature. 148 cases were included in the series: 60 cases originally diagnosed as ER weakly positive and 88 ER negative. Of the cases originally assessed as ER weakly positive, only 6 (10 %) were confirmed to be of luminal subtype by gene expression profiling; the remaining 90 % of cases were classified as basal-like or HER2-enriched subtypes. This was not significantly different than the fraction of luminal cases identified in the IHC ER-negative cohort (5 (5 %) luminal, 83(95 %) non-luminal). Recurrence-free, and overall, survival rates were similar in both groups (p = 0.4 and 0.5, respectively) despite adjuvant hormonal therapy prescribed in the majority (59 %) of weakly positive ER cases. Weak ER expression by IHC is a poor correlate of luminal subtype in invasive breast cancer. In the setting of highly sensitive and robust IHC methodology, cutoffs for ER status determination and subsequent systemic therapy should be revisited. PMID:26846986

  3. Heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex demonstrated by the selective antagonist AF-DX 116

    SciTech Connect

    Bloom, J.W.; Halonen, M.; Seaver, N.A.; Yamamura, H.I.

    1987-07-27

    Recent studies have demonstrated that the majority of muscarinic receptors in rabbit peripheral lung homogenates bind pirenzepine with high affinity (putative M1 subtype). In experiments of AF-DX 116 inhibiting (TH)(-)quinuclidinyl benzilate or (TH)pirenzepine, the authors found similar inhibitory constants for AF-DX 116 binding in rat heart and rabbit peripheral lung that were 4-fold smaller (i.e. of higher affinity) than the inhibitory constant for rat cerebral cortex. This results demonstrates heterogeneity of the M1 muscarinic receptor subtype between peripheral lung and cerebral cortex. 20 references, 1 figure, 2 tables.

  4. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. PMID:27178690

  5. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass.

    PubMed

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral. PMID:27683028

  6. [Minimally Invasive Open Surgery for Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shunichi

    2016-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made to reduce the invasiveness of surgical procedures by surgeons for a long time. Surgeons always keep it in mind that the basic principle performing less invasive surgical procedures for malignant tumors is to decrease the invasiveness for patients without compromising oncological curability and surgical safety. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been used increasingly as a minimally invasive approach to lung cancer surgery. Whereas, whether VATS lobectomy is a less invasive procedure and has equivalent or better clinical effect compared with open lobectomy for patients with lung cancer remains controversial because of the absence of randomized prospective studies. The degree of difficulty for anatomical lung resection depends on the degree of the fissure development, mobility of hilar lymph nodes, and the degree of pleural adhesions. During pulmonary surgery, thoracic surgeons always have to deal with not only these difficulties but other unexpected events such as intraoperative bleeding. Recently, we perform pulmonary resection for lung cancer with minimally invasive open surgery (MIOS) approach. In this article, we introduce the surgical procedure of MIOS and demonstrate short-term results. Off course, the efficacy of MIOS needs to be further evaluated with long-term results. PMID:27440030

  7. Phenotypic and molecular characterization of the claudin-low intrinsic subtype of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction In breast cancer, gene expression analyses have defined five tumor subtypes (luminal A, luminal B, HER2-enriched, basal-like and claudin-low), each of which has unique biologic and prognostic features. Here, we comprehensively characterize the recently identified claudin-low tumor subtype. Methods The clinical, pathological and biological features of claudin-low tumors were compared to the other tumor subtypes using an updated human tumor database and multiple independent data sets. These main features of claudin-low tumors were also evaluated in a panel of breast cancer cell lines and genetically engineered mouse models. Results Claudin-low tumors are characterized by the low to absent expression of luminal differentiation markers, high enrichment for epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition markers, immune response genes and cancer stem cell-like features. Clinically, the majority of claudin-low tumors are poor prognosis estrogen receptor (ER)-negative, progesterone receptor (PR)-negative, and epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-negative (triple negative) invasive ductal carcinomas with a high frequency of metaplastic and medullary differentiation. They also have a response rate to standard preoperative chemotherapy that is intermediate between that of basal-like and luminal tumors. Interestingly, we show that a group of highly utilized breast cancer cell lines, and several genetically engineered mouse models, express the claudin-low phenotype. Finally, we confirm that a prognostically relevant differentiation hierarchy exists across all breast cancers in which the claudin-low subtype most closely resembles the mammary epithelial stem cell. Conclusions These results should help to improve our understanding of the biologic heterogeneity of breast cancer and provide tools for the further evaluation of the unique biology of claudin-low tumors and cell lines. PMID:20813035

  8. Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation is associated with HER2 enriched subtype of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Park, So Yeon; Seo, An Na; Jung, Hae Yoen; Gwak, Jae Moon; Jung, Namhee; Cho, Nam-Yun; Kang, Gyeong Hoon

    2014-01-01

    The changes in DNA methylation status in cancer cells are characterized by hypermethylation of promoter CpG islands and diffuse genomic hypomethylation. Alu and long interspersed nucleotide element-1 (LINE-1) are non-coding genomic repetitive sequences and methylation of these elements can be used as a surrogate marker for genome-wide methylation status. This study was designed to evaluate the changes of Alu and LINE-1 hypomethylation during breast cancer progression from normal to pre-invasive lesions and invasive breast cancer (IBC), and their relationship with characteristics of IBC. We analyzed the methylation status of Alu and LINE-1 in 145 cases of breast samples including normal breast tissue, atypical ductal hyperplasia/flat epithelial atypia (ADH/FEA), ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) and IBC, and another set of 129 cases of IBC by pyrosequencing. Alu methylation showed no significant changes during multistep progression of breast cancer, although it tended to decrease during the transition from DCIS to IBC. In contrast, LINE-1 methylation significantly decreased from normal to ADH/FEA, while it was similar in ADH/FEA, DCIS and IBC. In IBC, Alu hypomethylation correlated with negative estrogen receptor (ER) status, and LINE-1 hypomethylation was associated with negative ER status, ERBB2 (HER2) amplification and p53 overexpression. Alu and LINE-1 methylation status was significantly different between breast cancer subtypes, and the HER2 enriched subtype had lowest methylation levels. In survival analyses, low Alu methylation status tended to be associated with poor disease-free survival of the patients. Our findings suggest that LINE-1 hypomethylation is an early event and Alu hypomethylation is probably a late event during breast cancer progression, and prominent hypomethylation of Alu and LINE-1 in HER2 enriched subtype may be related to chromosomal instability of this specific subtype.

  9. Association Between Insulin Resistance and Luminal B Subtype Breast Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Sanggeun; Park, Seho; Park, Hyung Seok; Kim, Sanghwa; Kim, Jee Ye; Kim, Seung Il

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Currently, there is limited information on the clinical characteristics of breast cancer patients with insulin resistance. Hence, the purpose of this study was to investigate the association between insulin resistance and clinicopathological factors in newly diagnosed breast cancer patients without diabetes. We assessed 760 patients with breast cancer treated between 2012 and 2014. We compared the clinicopathological characteristics between patients with and without insulin resistance using univariate and multivariate analyses, including after stratification by menopausal status. Insulin resistance was defined according to the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. Of 760 patients, 26.4% had insulin resistance. Age, menopausal status, body mass index, tumor size, histologic grade, Ki-67 expression, and breast cancer subtype significantly differed according to the presence of insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis revealed that postmenopausal status and obesity were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In postmenopausal women, older age, obesity, larger tumor size, advanced stage, and high proliferative luminal B subtype were significantly associated with insulin resistance. In contrast, in premenopausal patients, only obesity was related to insulin resistance. Multivariate analysis indicated that insulin resistance was independently correlated with obesity, larger tumor size, and the luminal B/human epidermal growth factor receptor-2-negative subtype in postmenopausal but not premenopausal patients. Insulin resistance was significantly associated with larger tumors and proliferative luminal B subtype breast cancer in postmenopausal women only. These findings suggest that insulin resistance could mechanistically induce tumor progression and might be a good prognostic factor, and that it could represent a therapeutic target in postmenopausal patients with breast cancer. PMID:26945364

  10. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population. PMID:27156441

  11. Diagnostic Value of Combining Tumor and Inflammatory Markers in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Ho Il; Kwon, Oh-Ran; Kang, Kyung Nam; Shin, Yong Sung; Shin, Ho Sang; Yeon, Eun Hee; Kwon, Keon Young; Hwang, Ilseon; Jeon, Yoon Kyung; Kim, Yongdai; Kim, Chul Woo

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite major advances in lung cancer treatment, early detection remains the most promising way of improving outcomes. To detect lung cancer in earlier stages, many serum biomarkers have been tested. Unfortunately, no single biomarker can reliably detect lung cancer. We combined a set of 2 tumor markers and 4 inflammatory or metabolic markers and tried to validate the diagnostic performance in lung cancer. Methods We collected serum samples from 355 lung cancer patients and 590 control subjects and divided them into training and validation datasets. After measuring serum levels of 6 biomarkers (human epididymis secretory protein 4 [HE4], carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA], regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted [RANTES], apolipoprotein A2 [ApoA2], transthyretin [TTR], and secretory vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 [sVCAM-1]), we tested various sets of biomarkers for their diagnostic performance in lung cancer. Results In a training dataset, the area under the curve (AUC) values were 0.821 for HE4, 0.753 for CEA, 0.858 for RANTES, 0.867 for ApoA2, 0.830 for TTR, and 0.552 for sVCAM-1. A model using all 6 biomarkers and age yielded an AUC value of 0.986 and sensitivity of 93.2% (cutoff at specificity 94%). Applying this model to the validation dataset showed similar results. The AUC value of the model was 0.988, with sensitivity of 93.33% and specificity of 92.00% at the same cutoff point used in the validation dataset. Analyses by stages and histologic subtypes all yielded similar results. Conclusions Combining multiple tumor and systemic inflammatory markers proved to be a valid strategy in the diagnosis of lung cancer. PMID:27722145

  12. Prognostic Molecular Subtypes of Low-Grade Cancer of the Appendix

    PubMed Central

    Levine, Edward A; Votanopoulos, Konstantinos I; Qasem, Shadi A; Philip, John; Cummins, Kathleen A; Chou, Jeff W; Ruiz, Jimmy; D’Agostino, Ralph; Shen, Perry; Miller, Lance D

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Appendiceal cancer (AC) patients treated with cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) often demonstrate an unpredictable variability in their survival outcomes. Biomarkers predictive of CRS/HIPEC efficacy could better guide treatment decisions. We hypothesized that variation in the transcriptional programming of AC tumors might distinguish molecular subtypes with differential outcomes after CRS/HIPEC. STUDY DESIGN Gene expression profiles of 2 AC cohorts were analyzed using Affymetrix whole-genome expression microarrays. Hierarchical clustering methods, Kaplan-Meier analysis, and Cox regression models were used to discover and validate prognostic molecular subtypes of AC. Gene set enrichment analysis was used to infer pathologic attributes of the molecular subtypes. RESULTS Unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of tumor expression profiles revealed a 139-gene cassette that distinguished 2 molecular subtypes (based on low vs high expression of the gene cassette) with statistically significant survival differences (disease-specific survival, p = 0.0075; progression-free survival, p = 0.0072). In a second AC cohort, the 139-gene cassette reproducibly partitioned tumors into subtypes with significant survival differences. Tumors showing high relative expression of the genes comprising the cassette associated with poor survival outcomes (disease-specific survival, p = 0.047; progression-free survival, p = 0.0079), and exhibited gene expression patterns enriched for oncogenic processes and pathways. The prognostic value of the molecular subtypes was specific for low-grade appendiceal tumors (disease-specific survival, p = 0.028; progression-free survival, p = 0.0016), and remained significant in the presence of conventional prognostic markers, including grade, surgical resection score, Eastern Cooperative Oncology Group status, and age. CONCLUSIONS The 139-gene cassette can have actionable clinical utility for

  13. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether surgery will be helpful for you EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THER APY External beam radiation therapy is the safe delivery of high- ... your cancer. A linear accelerator focuses the radiation beam to a precise location in your body for ...

  14. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Amanda K; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  15. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  16. Frequent and Focal FGFR1 Amplification Associates With Therapeutically Tractable FGFR1 Dependency in Squamous-cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Jonathan; Sos, Martin L.; Seidel, Danila; Peifer, Martin; Zander, Thomas; Heuckmann, Johannes M.; Ullrich, Roland T.; Menon, Roopika; Maier, Sebastian; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Wagener, Patrick; Fischer, Florian; Heynck, Stefanie; Koker, Mirjam; Schöttle, Jakob; Leenders, Frauke; Gabler, Franziska; Dabow, Ines; Querings, Silvia; Heukamp, Lukas C.; Balke-Want, Hyatt; Ansén, Sascha; Rauh, Daniel; Baessmann, Ingelore; Altmüller, Janine; Wainer, Zoe; Conron, Matthew; Wright, Gavin; Russell, Prudence; Solomon, Ben; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lorimier, Philippe; Sollberg, Steinar; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Engel-Riedel, Walburga; Ludwig, Corinna; Petersen, Iver; Sänger, Jörg; Clement, Joachim; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Thunnissen, Erik; Smit, Egbert; Heideman, Daniëlle; Cappuzzo, Federico; Ligorio, Claudia; Damiani, Stefania; Hallek, Michael; Beroukhim, Rameen; Pao, William; Klebl, Bert; Baumann, Matthias; Buettner, Reinhard; Ernestus, Karen; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Nürnberg, Peter; Perner, Sven; Thomas, Roman K.

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains one of the leading causes for cancer-related death in developed countries. In lung adenocarcinomas, EGFR mutations and EML4-ALK fusions are associated with response to EGFR and ALK inhibition. By contrast, therapeutically exploitable genetic alterations have been lacking in squamous-cell lung cancer. We conducted a systematic search for alterations that are therapeutically amenable and performed high-resolution gene-copy number analyses in a set of 232 lung cancer specimens. We identified frequent and focal FGFR1 amplification in squamous-cell lung cancer (n=155), but not in other lung cancer subtypes, and confirmed its presence in an independent cohort of squamous-cell lung cancer samples employing FISH (22% of cases). Using cell-based screening with the FGFR inhibitor (PD173074) in a large (n=83) panel of lung cancer cell lines, we demonstrated that this compound inhibited growth (p=0.0002) and induced apoptosis (p=0.008) specifically in those lung cancer cells carrying amplified FGFR1. We validated the dependency on FGFR1 of FGFR1-amplified cell lines by knockdown of FGFR1 and by ectopic expression of a resistance allele of FGFR1 (FGFR1V561M), which rescued FGFR1-amplified cells from PD173074-mediated cytotoxicity. Finally we showed that inhibition of FGFR1 with a small molecule led to significant tumor shrinkage in vivo. Focal FGFR1 amplification is common in squamous-cell lung cancer and associated with tumor growth and survival, suggesting that FGFR inhibitors may be a viable therapeutic option in this cohort of patients. PMID:21160078

  17. Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, ... the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies air pollution as a cancer-causing agent. "This study, along ...

  18. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Rita; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Chang, Shen-Chih; Lazarus, Philip; Teare, M. Dawn; Woll, Penella J.; Orlow, Irene; Cox, Brian; Brhane, Yonathan; Liu, Geoffrey; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled using random effects models. Subgroup analyses were done for sex, histology and tobacco smoking status. The shapes of dose-response associations were examined using restricted cubic spline regression. The overall pooled OR for habitual versus nonhabitual or never users was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.66–1.38). Compared to nonhabitual or never users, the summary OR was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63–1.24) for individuals who smoked 1 or more joint-equivalents of cannabis per day and 0.94 (95%CI: 0.67–1.32) for those consumed at least 10 joint-years. For adenocarcinoma cases the ORs were 1.73 (95%CI: 0.75–4.00) and 1.74 (95%CI: 0.85–3.55), respectively. However, no association was found for the squamous cell carcinoma based on small numbers. Weak associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were observed in never tobacco smokers. Spline modeling indicated a weak positive monotonic association between cumulative cannabis use and lung cancer, but precision was low at high exposure levels. Results from our pooled analyses provide little evidence for an increased risk of lung cancer among habitual or long-term cannabis smokers, although the possibility of potential adverse effect for heavy consumption cannot be excluded. PMID:24947688

  19. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Rita; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Chang, Shen-Chih; Lazarus, Philip; Teare, M Dawn; Woll, Penella J; Orlow, Irene; Cox, Brian; Brhane, Yonathan; Liu, Geoffrey; Hung, Rayjean J

    2015-02-15

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled using random effects models. Subgroup analyses were done for sex, histology and tobacco smoking status. The shapes of dose-response associations were examined using restricted cubic spline regression. The overall pooled OR for habitual versus nonhabitual or never users was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.66-1.38). Compared to nonhabitual or never users, the summary OR was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63-1.24) for individuals who smoked 1 or more joint-equivalents of cannabis per day and 0.94 (95%CI: 0.67-1.32) for those consumed at least 10 joint-years. For adenocarcinoma cases the ORs were 1.73 (95%CI: 0.75-4.00) and 1.74 (95%CI: 0.85-3.55), respectively. However, no association was found for the squamous cell carcinoma based on small numbers. Weak associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were observed in never tobacco smokers. Spline modeling indicated a weak positive monotonic association between cumulative cannabis use and lung cancer, but precision was low at high exposure levels. Results from our pooled analyses provide little evidence for an increased risk of lung cancer among habitual or long-term cannabis smokers, although the possibility of potential adverse effect for heavy consumption cannot be excluded.

  20. Telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes and lung cancer risk: a large case-control study in Caucasians.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Espiridion, Beatriz; Chen, Meng; Chang, Joe Y; Lu, Charles; Chang, David W; Roth, Jack A; Wu, Xifeng; Gu, Jian

    2014-05-01

    Telomere dysfunction is a crucial event in malignant transformation and tumorigenesis. Telomere length in peripheral blood leukocytes has been associated with lung cancer risk, but the relationship has remained controversial. In this study, we investigated whether the association might be confounded by study of different histological subtypes of lung cancer. We measured relative telomere lengths in patients in a large case-control study of lung cancer and performed stratified analyses according to the two major histologic subtypes [adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC)]. Notably, patients with adenocarcinoma had longer telomeres than controls, whereas patients with SCC had shorter telomeres compared with controls. Long telomeres were associated with increased risk of adenocarcinoma, with the highest risk associated with female sex, younger age (<60 years), and lighter smoking (<30 pack-years). In contrast, long telomeres were protective against SCC, particularly in male patients. Our results extend the concept that telomere length affects risk of lung cancer in a manner that differs with histologic subtype.

  1. Curcumin and lung cancer--a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hiren J; Patel, Vipul; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2014-12-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the most important component of the spice turmeric and is derived from the rhizome of the East Indian plant Curcuma longa. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, as it is nontoxic and has a variety of therapeutic properties including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic activities. Recently, curcumin has been widely studied for its anticancer properties via its effects on a variety of biological pathways involved in apoptosis, tumor proliferation, chemo- and radiotherapy sensitization, tumor invasion, and metastases. Curcumin can be an effective adjunct in treating solid organ tumors due to its properties of regulating oncogenes like p53, egr-1, c-myc, bcl-XL, etc.; transcription factors like NF-kB, STAT-3, and AP-1; protein kinases like MAPK; and enzymes like COX and LOX. Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Seventy-five percent of lung cancer presents at an advanced stage where the existing treatment is not very effective and may result in tremendous patient morbidity. As a result, there is a significant interest in developing adjunctive chemotherapies to augment currently available treatment protocols, which may allow decreased side effects and toxicity without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Curcumin is one such potential candidate, and this review presents an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo studies of curcumin in lung cancer.

  2. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  3. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  4. Lung cancer: Current status and prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, C.F.; Carr, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 papers. Some of the titles are: Activation of cellular ras genes in human neoplasms; The valve of definitive radiation therapy of unresectable squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the lung; Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer, and Current status of immunotherapy for lung cancer.

  5. The association of subtypes of breast cancer with tumour characteristics and reproductive factors in 1326 Mexican women

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Rodríguez, Gabriel; Aranda-Moreno, Catalina; Olivares-Corichi, Ivonne M.

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study In breast cancer, oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR), and HER2 (HER2/Neu) expression status are used to classify neoplasms into subtypes: Luminal A, Luminal B, HER2/Neu type, and Basallike. The aim of the present study was to establish the molecular subtypes of breast cancers and their association with tumour characteristics and reproductive factors in Mexican women. Material and methods A total of 1326 biopsies of breast tumour tissues were analysed for ER, PR, and HER2/Neu by immunohistochemistry (IHC). Information regarding age, tumour characteristics, and node involvement profiles were collected. Results IHC established that the most common subtype of breast cancer was Luminal A (64.93%), followed by Basal-Like (13.88%), Luminal B (12.52%), and HER2/Neu (8.67%). T2-size tumours (> 2 cm but < 5 cm) were present in 47.59% of all patients. Univariate analysis showed that lymph node positivity (p = 0.009), stage (p = 0.013), and placement of the tumour (p = 0.001) were factors associated with breast cancer subtype. Conclusions Our data show that IHC is useful for distinguishing different subtypes of breast cancer and that Luminal A is the most common breast cancer subtype in the Mexican population. All subtypes were associated with unfavourable clinicopathological features, suggesting that late diagnosis is an important contributor to high mortality rates in the Mexican population. PMID:26843843

  6. Reproducible copy number variation patterns among single circulating tumor cells of lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xiaohui; Zhuo, Minglei; Su, Zhe; Duan, Jianchun; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhijie; Zong, Chenghang; Bai, Hua; Chapman, Alec R; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Liya; An, Tongtong; Ma, Qi; Wang, Yuyan; Wu, Meina; Sun, Yu; Wang, Shuhang; Li, Zhenxiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Yong, Jun; Su, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Youyong; Bai, Fan; Xie, X Sunney; Wang, Jie

    2013-12-24

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) enter peripheral blood from primary tumors and seed metastases. The genome sequencing of CTCs could offer noninvasive prognosis or even diagnosis, but has been hampered by low single-cell genome coverage of scarce CTCs. Here, we report the use of the recently developed multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles for whole-genome amplification of single CTCs from lung cancer patients. We observed characteristic cancer-associated single-nucleotide variations and insertions/deletions in exomes of CTCs. These mutations provided information needed for individualized therapy, such as drug resistance and phenotypic transition, but were heterogeneous from cell to cell. In contrast, every CTC from an individual patient, regardless of the cancer subtypes, exhibited reproducible copy number variation (CNV) patterns, similar to those of the metastatic tumor of the same patient. Interestingly, different patients with the same lung cancer adenocarcinoma (ADC) shared similar CNV patterns in their CTCs. Even more interestingly, patients of small-cell lung cancer have CNV patterns distinctly different from those of ADC patients. Our finding suggests that CNVs at certain genomic loci are selected for the metastasis of cancer. The reproducibility of cancer-specific CNVs offers potential for CTC-based cancer diagnostics.

  7. Reproducible copy number variation patterns among single circulating tumor cells of lung cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Xiaohui; Zhuo, Minglei; Su, Zhe; Duan, Jianchun; Gao, Yan; Wang, Zhijie; Zong, Chenghang; Bai, Hua; Chapman, Alec R.; Zhao, Jun; Xu, Liya; An, Tongtong; Ma, Qi; Wang, Yuyan; Wu, Meina; Sun, Yu; Wang, Shuhang; Li, Zhenxiang; Yang, Xiaodan; Yong, Jun; Su, Xiao-Dong; Lu, Youyong; Bai, Fan; Xie, X. Sunney; Wang, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) enter peripheral blood from primary tumors and seed metastases. The genome sequencing of CTCs could offer noninvasive prognosis or even diagnosis, but has been hampered by low single-cell genome coverage of scarce CTCs. Here, we report the use of the recently developed multiple annealing and looping-based amplification cycles for whole-genome amplification of single CTCs from lung cancer patients. We observed characteristic cancer-associated single-nucleotide variations and insertions/deletions in exomes of CTCs. These mutations provided information needed for individualized therapy, such as drug resistance and phenotypic transition, but were heterogeneous from cell to cell. In contrast, every CTC from an individual patient, regardless of the cancer subtypes, exhibited reproducible copy number variation (CNV) patterns, similar to those of the metastatic tumor of the same patient. Interestingly, different patients with the same lung cancer adenocarcinoma (ADC) shared similar CNV patterns in their CTCs. Even more interestingly, patients of small-cell lung cancer have CNV patterns distinctly different from those of ADC patients. Our finding suggests that CNVs at certain genomic loci are selected for the metastasis of cancer. The reproducibility of cancer-specific CNVs offers potential for CTC-based cancer diagnostics. PMID:24324171

  8. Parity, Lactation, and Breast Cancer Subtypes in African American Women: Results from the AMBER Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Viscidi, Emma; Troester, Melissa A.; Hong, Chi-Chen; Schedin, Pepper; Bethea, Traci N.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Borges, Virginia; McKinnon, Craig; Haiman, Christopher A.; Lunetta, Kathryn; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Rosenberg, Lynn; Olshan, Andrew F.; Ambrosone, Christine B.

    2014-01-01

    Background African American (AA) women have a disproportionately high incidence of estrogen receptor–negative (ER-) breast cancer, a subtype with a largely unexplained etiology. Because childbearing patterns also differ by race/ethnicity, with higher parity and a lower prevalence of lactation in AA women, we investigated the relation of parity and lactation to risk of specific breast cancer subtypes. Methods Questionnaire data from two cohort and two case-control studies of breast cancer in AA women were combined and harmonized. Case patients were classified as ER+ (n = 2446), ER- (n = 1252), or triple negative (ER-, PR-, HER2-; n = 567) based on pathology data; there were 14180 control patients. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated in polytomous logistic regression analysis with adjustment for study, age, reproductive and other risk factors. Results ORs for parity relative to nulliparity was 0.92 (95% CI = 0.81 to 1.03) for ER+, 1.33 (95% CI = 1.11 to 1.59) for ER-, and 1.37 (95% CI = 1.06 to 1.70) for triple-negative breast cancer. Lactation was associated with a reduced risk of ER- (OR = 0.81, 95% CI = 0.69 to 0.95) but not ER+ cancer. ER- cancer risk increased with each additional birth in women who had not breastfed, with an OR of 1.68 (95% CI = 1.15 to 2.44) for 4 or more births relative to one birth with lactation. Conclusions The findings suggest that parous women who have not breastfed are at increased risk of ER- and triple-negative breast cancer. Promotion of lactation may be an effective tool for reducing occurrence of the subtypes that contribute disproportionately to breast cancer mortality. PMID:25224496

  9. Silicosis and lung cancer among Chinese granite workers.

    PubMed

    Chia, S E; Chia, K S; Phoon, W H; Lee, H P

    1991-06-01

    Of the 184 cases of silicosis registered between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1984 in Singapore, all the relevant information was available for 159, which were linked to the population-based National Cancer Register for lung cancer. Nine cases of lung cancer were found. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was computed with the age- and calendar-specific incidence of lung cancer rates of Chinese males in Singapore as a basis. Excess risk of lung cancer was found (SIR 2.01, 95% confidence interval 0.92-3.81). Adjustment for smoking showed that it alone could not account for the excess lung cancer risk. There was an increasing, but not significant, trend with increasing severity of silicosis and exposure duration. The results suggest that the severity of silicosis and possibly exposure to free silica may have contributed to the excess of lung cancer among the cases of silicosis studied.

  10. DIETARY AGENTS FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a prominent cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. The main reason for high mortality due to lung cancer is attributable to the fact that the diagnosis is generally made when it has spread beyond a curable stage and cannot be treated surgically or with radiation therapy. Therefore, new approaches like dietary modifications could be extremely useful in reducing lung cancer incidences. Several fruits and vegetables offer a variety of bioactive compounds to afford protection against several diseases, including lung cancer. A number of research studies involving dietary agents provide strong evidence for their role in the prevention and treatment of lung cancer, and have identified their molecular mechanisms of action and potential targets. In this review article, we summarize data from in-vitro and in-vivo studies and where available, in clinical trials, on the effects of some of the most promising dietary agents against lung cancer. PMID:25644088

  11. Prevention and management of lung cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qun-Ying; Wu, Guo-Ming; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chen, Liang-An; Li, Wei-Min; Li, Shi-Yue; Wang, Kai; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Jing; Gong, Xin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In China, the incidence of lung cancer has grown rapidly, resulting in a large social and economic burden. Several researchers have devoted their studies to lung cancer and have demonstrated that there are many risk factors for lung cancer in China, including tobacco use, environmental pollution, food, genetics, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the lung cancer incidence is still growing rapidly in China, and there is an even higher incidence among the younger generation. One explanation may be the triple-neglect situation, in which medical policies that neglect prevention, diagnosis, and supportive care have increased patients' mortality and reduced their quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of prevention and early diagnosis not only by focusing more attention on treatment but also by drawing more attention to supportive care for patients with lung cancer.

  12. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  13. Targeted therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer: past, present and future

    PubMed Central

    Forde, Patrick M; Ettinger, David S

    2013-01-01

    Therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer has developed significantly with new awareness of histologic subtype as an important factor in guiding treatment and the development of targeted agents for molecular subgroups harboring critical mutations that spur on cancer growth. In this comprehensive review, we look back at developments in targeted therapy for advanced non-small-cell lung cancer, reviewing in detail efforts, both successful and in some cases less so, to target EGFR, VEGF and ALK. This review provides an overview of where the field stands at present and the areas we feel are most likely to provide challenges and potential successes in the next 5 years including immune checkpoint inhibition, epigenetic therapy and driver mutation targeting. PMID:23773106

  14. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  15. Genetic Testing for Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Theodore W; Stefanek, Michael; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2002-01-01

    Advances in genetics have increased our ability to assess an individual's genetic risk for disease. There is a hypothesis that genetic test results will motivate high-risk individuals to reduce harmful exposures, to increase their surveillance for disease, or to seek preventive treatments. However, genetic testing for genes associated with an increased risk of lung cancer would not change physicians' recommendations regarding smoking cessation. Limited studies suggest that test results that demonstrate an increased risk of lung cancer do not improve smoking cessation success. These test results may even distort an individual's risk perceptions. Before recommending genetic testing to assess risk for disease, physicians need to consider whether knowledge about genetic susceptibility will alter patient management. PMID:12472931

  16. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of underground uranium and hard-rock miners, as well as animal experiments, indicate that the decay products of radon gas are a contributory cause of lung cancer. While one might expect that residential radon (progeny) exposure might be linked to an increase in lung cancer rates, sufficient evidence from residential studies is required to support this assumption. To date this evidence has not been definitive enough. There are differences in age, sex, dust exposure, and smoking between groups exposed in mines and in homes. A number of published studies have addressed this question; a number of studies are under way. The composite results from these studies may be useful in reducing the uncertainty. This paper summarizes and critiques results and discusses several methodological issues related to the studies.

  17. Spectral characteristic analysis of lung cancer serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao Zhou; Jin, Huiqiang; Liu, Huasheng; Ding, Jianhua; Lin, Junxiu

    2001-10-01

    Spectral changes of lung cancer serum in the process of tumor evolution were investigated in this study. We kept close watch on the tumor progression of a group of patients, and measured their serum spectra using 488.0nm and 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser once a week. There was no apparent change observed in fluorescence spectrum in different period. However, the relative intensity of three Raman peaks (mode A, B and C) decreased every week later. For quantitative analysis of such changes, a parameter Ir (relative intensity of C Raman peak) was introduced and Ir-value was calculated. Calculation showed that Ir-value was degressive with tumor evolution, but (beta) (Ir5145 /Ir4880) varied irregularly. To the end, no Raman peak was observed. We assumed that three Raman peaks were derived from beta carotene. It indicated that the content of beta carotene decreased with the aggravation of lung cancer.

  18. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  19. Lung cancer-a fractal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Frances E; Cianci, Gianguido C; Cipriani, Nicole A; Hensing, Thomas A; Zhang, Hannah J; Chen, Chin-Tu; Murgu, Septimiu D; Vokes, Everett E; Vannier, Michael W; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Fractals are mathematical constructs that show self-similarity over a range of scales and non-integer (fractal) dimensions. Owing to these properties, fractal geometry can be used to efficiently estimate the geometrical complexity, and the irregularity of shapes and patterns observed in lung tumour growth (over space or time), whereas the use of traditional Euclidean geometry in such calculations is more challenging. The application of fractal analysis in biomedical imaging and time series has shown considerable promise for measuring processes as varied as heart and respiratory rates, neuronal cell characterization, and vascular development. Despite the advantages of fractal mathematics and numerous studies demonstrating its applicability to lung cancer research, many researchers and clinicians remain unaware of its potential. Therefore, this Review aims to introduce the fundamental basis of fractals and to illustrate how analysis of fractal dimension (FD) and associated measurements, such as lacunarity (texture) can be performed. We describe the fractal nature of the lung and explain why this organ is particularly suited to fractal analysis. Studies that have used fractal analyses to quantify changes in nuclear and chromatin FD in primary and metastatic tumour cells, and clinical imaging studies that correlated changes in the FD of tumours on CT and/or PET images with tumour growth and treatment responses are reviewed. Moreover, the potential use of these techniques in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer are discussed.

  20. Active and passive smoking in relation to lung cancer incidence in the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study prospective cohort†

    PubMed Central

    Wang, A.; Kubo, J.; Luo, J.; Desai, M.; Hedlin, H.; Henderson, M.; Chlebowski, R.; Tindle, H.; Chen, C.; Gomez, S.; Manson, J. E.; Schwartz, A. G.; Wactawski-Wende, J.; Cote, M.; Patel, M. I.; Stefanick, M. L.; Wakelee, H. A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the leading cause of worldwide cancer deaths. While smoking is its leading risk factor, few prospective cohort studies have reported on the association of lung cancer with both active and passive smoking. This study aimed to determine the relationship between lung cancer incidence with both active and passive smoking (childhood, adult at home, and at work). Patients and methods The Women's Health Initiative Observational Study (WHI-OS) was a prospective cohort study conducted at 40 US centers that enrolled postmenopausal women from 1993 to 1999. Among 93 676 multiethnic participants aged 50–79, 76 304 women with complete smoking and covariate data comprised the analytic cohort. Lung cancer incidence was calculated by Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by smoking status. Results Over 10.5 mean follow-up years, 901 lung cancer cases were identified. Compared with never smokers (NS), lung cancer incidence was much higher in current [hazard ratio (HR) 13.44, 95% confidence interval (CI) 10.80–16.75] and former smokers (FS; HR 4.20, 95% CI 3.48–5.08) in a dose-dependent manner. Current and FS had significantly increased risk for all lung cancer subtypes, particularly small-cell and squamous cell carcinoma. Among NS, any passive smoking exposure did not significantly increase lung cancer risk (HR 0.88, 95% CI 0.52–1.49). However, risk tended to be increased in NS with adult home passive smoking exposure ≥30 years, compared with NS with no adult home exposure (HR 1.61, 95% CI 1.00–2.58). Conclusions In this prospective cohort of postmenopausal women, active smoking significantly increased risk of all lung cancer subtypes; current smokers had significantly increased risk compared with FS. Among NS, prolonged passive adult home exposure tended to increase lung cancer risk. These data support continued need for smoking prevention and cessation interventions, passive smoking research, and further study of lung cancer risk factors

  1. Differential expression of neurogenes among breast cancer subtypes identifies high risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Nogueira, Patricia; Bragado, Paloma; Almendro, Vanessa; Ametller, Elisabet; Rios, Jose; Choudhury, Sibgat

    2016-01-01

    The nervous system is now recognized to be a relevant component of the tumor microenvironment. Receptors for neuropeptides and neurotransmitters have been identified in breast cancer. However, very little is known about the role of neurogenes in regulating breast cancer progression. Our purpose was to identify neurogenes associated with breast cancer tumorigenesis with a potential to be used as biomarker and/or targets for treatment. We used three databases of human genes: GeneGo, GeneCards and Eugenes to generate a list of 1266 relevant neurogenes. Then we used bioinformatics tools to interrogate two published breast cancer databases SAGE and MicMa (n=96) and generated a list of 7 neurogenes that are differentially express among breast cancer subtypes. The clinical potential was further investigated using the GOBO database (n=1881). We identified 6 neurogenes that are differentially expressed among breast cancer subtypes and whose expression correlates with prognosis. Histamine receptor1 (HRH1), neuropilin2 (NRP2), ephrin-B1 (EFNB1), neural growth factor receptor (NGFR) and amyloid precursor protein (APP) were differentially overexpressed in basal and HER2-enriched tumor samples and syntaxin 1A (STX1A) was overexpressed in HER2-enriched and luminal B tumors. Analysis of HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A expression using the GOBO database showed that their expression significantly correlated with a shorter overall survival (p < 0.0001) and distant metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). In contrast, elevated co-expression of NGFR, EFNB1 and APP was associated with longer overall (p < 0.0001) and metastasis-free survival (p < 0.0001). We propose that HRH1, NRP2, and STX1A can be used as prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for basal and HER2-enriched breast cancer subtypes. PMID:26673618

  2. [Lung Cancer as an Occupational Disease].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Woitowitz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently encountered cancer types. According to the latest WHO data, about 10 % of this disease are due to occupational exposure to cancerogens. Asbestos is still the number one carcinogen. Further frequent causes include quarz and ionizing radiation (uranium mining). Probable causes of the disease can be identified only with the help of detailed occupational history taken by a medical specialist and qualified exposure assessment. Without clarifying the cause of the disease, there is neither a correct insurance procedure nor compensation for the victim, and furthermore, required preventive measures cannot be initiated. PMID:27512930

  3. Discovery – Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives: The NLST

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded the National Lung Screening Trial, an eight-year study that used new technology to detect small, aggressive tumors early enough to surgically remove them. This approach reduced lung cancer deaths among participants by 20 percent.

  4. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. The Discovery of Novel Biomarkers Improves Breast Cancer Intrinsic Subtype Prediction and Reconciles the Labels in the METABRIC Data Set

    PubMed Central

    Milioli, Heloisa Helena; Vimieiro, Renato; Riveros, Carlos; Tishchenko, Inna; Berretta, Regina; Moscato, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Background The prediction of breast cancer intrinsic subtypes has been introduced as a valuable strategy to determine patient diagnosis and prognosis, and therapy response. The PAM50 method, based on the expression levels of 50 genes, uses a single sample predictor model to assign subtype labels to samples. Intrinsic errors reported within this assay demonstrate the challenge of identifying and understanding the breast cancer groups. In this study, we aim to: a) identify novel biomarkers for subtype individuation by exploring the competence of a newly proposed method named CM1 score, and b) apply an ensemble learning, as opposed to the use of a single classifier, for sample subtype assignment. The overarching objective is to improve class prediction. Methods and Findings The microarray transcriptome data sets used in this study are: the METABRIC breast cancer data recorded for over 2000 patients, and the public integrated source from ROCK database with 1570 samples. We first computed the CM1 score to identify the probes with highly discriminative patterns of expression across samples of each intrinsic subtype. We further assessed the ability of 42 selected probes on assigning correct subtype labels using 24 different classifiers from the Weka software suite. For comparison, the same method was applied on the list of 50 genes from the PAM50 method. Conclusions The CM1 score portrayed 30 novel biomarkers for predicting breast cancer subtypes, with the confirmation of the role of 12 well-established genes. Intrinsic subtypes assigned using the CM1 list and the ensemble of classifiers are more consistent and homogeneous than the original PAM50 labels. The new subtypes show accurate distributions of current clinical markers ER, PR and HER2, and survival curves in the METABRIC and ROCK data sets. Remarkably, the paradoxical attribution of the original labels reinforces the limitations of employing a single sample classifiers to predict breast cancer intrinsic subtypes

  6. Hyperspectral imaging of skin and lung cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdeva, Larisa A.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Alonova, Marina V.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of cancer control requires design of new approaches for instrumental diagnostics, as the accuracy of cancer detection on the first step of diagnostics in clinics is slightly more than 50%. In this study, we present a method of visualization and diagnostics of skin and lung tumours based on registration and processing of tissues hyperspectral images. In a series of experiments registration of hyperspectral images of skin and lung tissue samples is carried out. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, nevi and benign tumours are studied in skin ex vivo and in vivo experiments; adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas are studied in ex vivo lung experiments. In a series of experiments the typical features of diffuse reflection spectra for pathological and normal tissues were found. Changes in tissues morphology during the tumour growth lead to the changes of blood and pigments concentration, such as melanin in skin. That is why tumours and normal tissues maybe differentiated with information about spectral response in 500-600 nm and 600 - 670 nm areas. Thus, hyperspectral imaging in the visible region may be a useful tool for cancer detection as it helps to estimate spectral properties of tissues and determine malignant regions for precise resection of tumours.

  7. Dietary factors in lung cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M T; Kolonel, L N; Wilkens, L R; Yoshizawa, C N; Le Marchand, L; Hankin, J H

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis-generating analysis of the role of diet on survival was conducted among a sample of 463 men and 212 women with histologically-confirmed lung cancer. Interview information was obtained from two population-based case-control studies of lung cancer conducted on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, between 1979 and 1985. The interview consisted of a quantitative dietary history to assess the usual intake of foods 1 year prior to diagnosis, a complete tobacco history, and other demographic and lifestyle information. Records from the Hawaii Tumor Registry were reviewed for data on stage, histology, and follow-up status of these patients. A food group analysis showed a significant reduction in the risk of death with increasing consumption of all vegetables combined among women (P for trend = 0.03), but not among men. The covariate-adjusted median survival times for women from the highest to the lowest quartiles of vegetable intake were 33, 21, 15, and 18 months, respectively. The results also suggested an association of fruit intake and survival among women (P for trend = 0.02), although a similar effect was not found among men. Increased consumption of certain foods, such as tomatoes and oranges among men, and broccoli and, perhaps, tomatoes among women, appeared to improve survival. This exploratory analysis provides mixed indications that certain components of vegetables and fruits may prolong survival in lung cancer patients. PMID:1591072

  8. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) and standard chest X-ray. Both chest X-rays and low-dose helical CT scans have been used to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined. NLST enrolled 53,454 current or former heavy smokers from 33 sites and coordinating centers across the United States. | The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20% lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.

  9. Neuroendocrine prostate cancer: subtypes, biology, and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Aggarwal, Rahul; Zhang, Tian; Small, Eric J; Armstrong, Andrew J

    2014-05-01

    Neuroendocrine prostate cancer (NEPC) encompasses various clinical contexts, ranging from the de novo presentation of small cell prostatic carcinoma to a treatment-emergent transformed phenotype that arises from typical adenocarcinoma of the prostate. The development of resistance to potent androgen receptor signaling inhibition may be associated with the emergence of aggressive phenotype, advanced castration-resistant NEPC. Clinically, small cell prostate cancer and NEPC are often manifested by the presence of visceral or large soft tissue metastatic disease, a disproportionately low serum prostate-specific antigen level relative to the overall burden of disease, and a limited response to targeting of the androgen signaling axis. These tumors are often characterized by loss of androgen receptor expression, loss of retinoblastoma tumor suppressor copy number or expression, amplification of Aurora kinase A and N-Myc, and activation of the PI3K pathway. However, a consensus phenotype-genotype definition of NEPC has yet to emerge, and molecularly based biomarkers are needed to expand on traditional morphologic and immunohistochemical markers of NEPC to fully define the spectrum of this aggressive, androgen receptor-independent disease. Emerging studies implicate a shared clonal origin with prostatic adenocarcinoma in many cases, with the adaptive emergence of unique cellular programming and gene expression profiles. Ongoing clinical studies are focused on developing novel targeted therapeutic approaches for this high-risk, lethal subset of disease, to improve on the limited durations of response often observed with traditional platinum-based chemotherapy.

  10. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  11. US Incidence of Breast Cancer Subtypes Defined by Joint Hormone Receptor and HER2 Status

    PubMed Central

    Altekruse, Sean F.; Li, Christopher I.; Chen, Vivien W.; Clarke, Christina A.; Ries, Lynn A. G.; Cronin, Kathleen A.

    2014-01-01

    Background In 2010, Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) registries began collecting human epidermal growth factor 2 (HER2) receptor status for breast cancer cases. Methods Breast cancer subtypes defined by joint hormone receptor (HR; estrogen receptor [ER] and progesterone receptor [PR]) and HER2 status were assessed across the 28% of the US population that is covered by SEER registries. Age-specific incidence rates by subtype were calculated for non-Hispanic (NH) white, NH black, NH Asian Pacific Islander (API), and Hispanic women. Joint HR/HER2 status distributions by age, race/ethnicity, county-level poverty, registry, stage, Bloom–Richardson grade, tumor size, and nodal status were evaluated using multivariable adjusted polytomous logistic regression. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results Among case patients with known HR/HER2 status, 36810 (72.7%) were found to be HR+/HER2−, 6193 (12.2%) were triple-negative (HR−/HER2−), 5240 (10.3%) were HR+/HER2+, and 2328 (4.6%) were HR−/HER2+; 6912 (12%) had unknown HR/HER2 status. NH white women had the highest incidence rate of the HR+/HER2− subtype, and NH black women had the highest rate of the triple-negative subtype. Compared with women with the HR+/HER2− subtype, triple-negative patients were more likely to be NH black and Hispanic; HR+/HER2+ patients were more likely to be NH API; and HR−/HER2+ patients were more likely to be NH black, NH API, and Hispanic. Patients with triple-negative, HR+/HER2+, and HR−/HER2+ breast cancer were 10% to 30% less likely to be diagnosed at older ages compared with HR+/HER2− patients and 6.4-fold to 20.0-fold more likely to present with high-grade disease. Conclusions In the future, SEER data can be used to monitor clinical outcomes in women diagnosed with different molecular subtypes of breast cancer for a large portion (approximately 28%) of the US population. PMID:24777111

  12. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M; Le Péchoux, C; Postmus, P E; Sorensen, J B; Felip, E

    2011-09-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through discussion at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement in SCLC is reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update.

  13. Nutrition habits, physical activity, and lung cancer: an authoritative review.

    PubMed

    Koutsokera, Alexandra; Kiagia, Maria; Saif, Muhammad W; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Because of high incidence rates and low survival rates, it is important to study the risk factors that may help prevent the disease from developing. It has been well established that cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for lung cancer. Nonetheless it is likely that there are other modifiable risk factors that would assist in the prevention of lung cancer. Research on factors such as nutrition and physical activity and their influence on lung cancer has been carried out for nearly 3 decades. A systematic review in the MEDLINE database of published studies was conducted, focusing on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and large prospective studies. The association between physical activity and lung cancer has been conflicting. Among the researched studies, 10 showed an inverse association, whereas 11 reported no association. A meta-analysis that was conducted from 1996 to October 2003 showed that leisure physical activity (LPA) prevents lung cancer. Data from 11 cohort and case-control studies showed an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer. Evidence from case-control studies suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer, although several more recent studies have presented doubts about these findings. The possible association of physical activity, nutrition, and the risk of lung cancer development remains controversial. Further prospective studies should be conducted to determine the potential influence of these 2 risk factors.

  14. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Korea: Recent Trends

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer causes the most cancer deaths in Korea. Although the smoking rate has begun to decrease, the prevalence of lung cancer is still increasing. We reviewed the national lung cancer registry data and the data published about lung cancer in Korea. In 2012, the crude incidence rate of lung cancer was 43.9 per 100,000. The age-standardized mortality rate of lung cancer was 19.8 per 100,000. The 5-year relative survival rate for lung cancer was 11.3% from 1993 to 1995 and increased to 21.9% in the period from 2008 to 2012. Lung cancer occurring in never-smokers was estimated to increase in Korea. Adenocarcinoma is steadily increasing in both women and men and has replaced squamous cell carcinoma as the most common type of lung cancer in Korea. In patients with adenocarcinoma, the frequency of EGFR mutations was 43% (range, 20%–56%), while that of the EMK4-ALK gene was less than 5%. PMID:27064578

  15. Lung cancer in chromate-exposed aerospace workers.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B H; Checkoway, H; Wechsler, L; Heyer, N J; Muhm, J M; O'Keeffe, T P

    1996-12-01

    A retrospective cohort study evaluated the risk of lung cancer in aerospace workers with minimum of 6 months' employment in jobs with chromium [VI] exposure (n = 2429). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) estimated the risk of lung cancer by duration of employment in chromate-exposure jobs and cumulative exposure based on industrial hygiene and work-history data. The overall SIR for lung cancer was 0.8 (observed [Obs] = 15). Lung cancer risk was inversely related to estimates of cumulative chromate exposure and duration of employment as a painter. Although based on few cases, an elevated lung cancer risk was found in subjects who had worked for 5 or more years as a chrome plater or surface processor tank tender (Obs = 2, SIR = 1.9) and sander/masker or polisher (Obs = 3, SIR = 2.7). A clear association was not observed between chromate exposure and the risk of lung cancer in this population of workers.

  16. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY OF LUNG CANCER: THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Berim, Ilya G; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Though incidence is declining, the prognosis of lung cancer remains poor. This is likely due to lack of early detection and only recent developments in selective cancer therapies. Key immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer include CD4+ T-lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. The growing understanding of these cells indicates a highly complex and intertwined network of their involvement in each stage of lung cancer. Immune cell types and numbers affect prognosis and could offer an opportunity for clinical therapeutic applications. However, an incomplete understanding of immune cell involvement and the underlying processes in lung cancer still remain. More investigation focusing on the role of the immune cells will further the understanding of lung carcinogenesis and develop novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment and management of patients with more specialized and selective lung cancer. PMID:25351434

  17. Cell cycle progression score is a marker for five-year lung cancer-specific mortality risk in patients with resected stage I lung adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Eguchi, Takashi; Kadota, Kyuichi; Chaft, Jamie; Evans, Brent; Kidd, John; Tan, Kay See; Dycoco, Joe; Kolquist, Kathryn; Davis, Thaylon; Hamilton, Stephanie A.; Yager, Kraig; Jones, Joshua T.; Travis, William D.; Jones, David R.; Hartman, Anne-Renee; Adusumilli, Prasad S.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The goals of our study were (a) to validate a molecular expression signature (cell cycle progression [CCP] score and molecular prognostic score [mPS; combination of CCP and pathological stage {IA or IB}]) that identifies stage I lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) patients with a higher risk of cancer-specific death following curative-intent surgical resection, and (b) to determine whether mPS stratifies prognosis within stage I lung ADC histological subtypes. Methods Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded stage I lung ADC tumor samples from 1200 patients were analyzed for 31 proliferation genes by quantitative RT-PCR. Prognostic discrimination of CCP score and mPS was assessed by Cox proportional hazards regression, using 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality as the primary outcome. Results In multivariable analysis, CCP score was a prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.6 per interquartile range; 95% CI, 1.14–2.24; P=0.006). In a multivariable model that included mPS instead of CCP, mPS was a significant prognostic marker for 5-year lung cancer–specific mortality (HR=1.77; 95% CI, 1.18–2.66; P=0.006). Five-year lung cancer–specific survival differed between low-risk and high-risk mPS groups (96% vs 81%; P<0.001). In patients with intermediate-grade lung ADC of acinar and papillary subtypes, high mPS was associated with worse 5-year lung cancer–specific survival (P<0.001 and 0.015, respectively), compared with low mPS. Conclusion This study validates CCP score and mPS as independent prognostic markers for lung cancer–specific mortality and provides quantitative risk assessment, independent of known high-risk features, for stage I lung ADC patients treated with surgery alone. PMID:27153551

  18. Dissecting the Origin of Breast Cancer Subtype Stem Cell and the Potential Mechanism of Malignant Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dianming; Wang, Shuyuan; Yu, Xuexin; Dai, Enyu; Wang, Jing; Wang, Lihong; Jiang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the most common incident form of cancer in women including different subtypes. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been confirmed to exist in breast cancer. But the research on the origin of breast cancer subtype stem cells (BCSSCs) is still inadequate. Methods We identified the putative origin cells of BCSSCs through comparing gene signatures between BCSSCs and normal mammary cells from multiple perspectives: common signature, expression consistency, functional similarity and shortest path length. First, the potential origin cells were ranked according to these measures separately. Then Q statistic was employed to combine all rank lists into a unique list for each subtype, to prioritize the origin cells for each BCSSC. Next, we identified origin-related gene modules through integrating functional interaction network with differentially expressed genes. Finally, transcription factors of significant gene modules were predicted by MatchTM. Results The results showed that Luminal A CSC was most relevant to luminal progenitor cell or mature luminal cell; luminal B and HER2 CSC were most relevant to bipotent-enriched progenitor cell; basal-like CSC was most relevant to bipotent-enriched progenitor cell or mature luminal cell. Network modules analysis revealed genes related to mitochondrial respiratory chain (MRC) were significantly dysregulated during the origin of luminal B CSC. In addition, SOX10 emerged as a key regulator of MRC. Conclusions Our study supports substantive evidence for the possible origin of four kinds of BCSSCs. Dysfunction of MRC may contribute to the origin of luminal B CSC. These findings may have important implications to treat and prevent breast cancer. PMID:27768723

  19. Perspectives of African Americans on Lung Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Laura Tesler; Browning, Emily; Gagne, Joshua; Emmons, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disparities in incidence and mortality for lung cancer in African Americans are well documented; however, the extent to which disparities reflect differences in patient perceptions of tobacco and lung cancer treatment is unclear. The objective of this study was to explore African Americans’ knowledge of lung cancer, perceived risk, interest in smoking cessation, attitudes toward lung cancer treatment, and lung cancer diagnosis and treatment experiences. Patients and Methods. The cohort comprised 32 African-American current and former smokers without a cancer diagnosis who participated in focus groups and 10 African Americans with lung cancer who participated in in-depth interviews. Transcripts were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Results. Participants without a cancer diagnosis were aware of the link between smoking and lung cancer, the common symptoms of the disease, and its poor prognosis. They desired specific, personalized smoking-cessation information. If diagnosed, the majority reported, they would seek medical care. Most believed that insurance and socioeconomic factors were more likely to affect treatment access than racial discrimination. Participants with a cancer diagnosis were also aware of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. They felt their treatment plans were appropriate and trusted their physicians. Most did not believe that race affected their care. Conclusion. This qualitative study suggests that African-American smokers are aware of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer and are interested in smoking-cessation treatment. These data also indicate that lung cancer disparities are unlikely to be associated with differential willingness to receive care but that African Americans may perceive financial and insurance barriers to lung cancer treatment. PMID:25795634

  20. The causal relevance of body mass index in different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study.

    PubMed

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Haycock, Philip C; Relton, Caroline L; Martin, Richard M; Smith, George Davey; Kraft, Peter; Gao, Chi; Tworoger, Shelley; Le Marchand, Loïc; Wilkens, Lynne R; Park, Sungshim L; Haiman, Christopher; Field, John K; Davies, Michael; Marcus, Michael; Liu, Geoffrey; Caporaso, Neil E; Christiani, David C; Wei, Yongyue; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A; Severi, Gianluca; Goodman, Gary E; Hung, Rayjean J; Amos, Christopher I; McKay, James; Johansson, Mattias; Brennan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with lung cancer risk in observational studies, even though it increases the risk of several other cancers, which could indicate confounding by tobacco smoking or reverse causality. We used the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to circumvent these limitations of observational epidemiology by constructing a genetic instrument for BMI, based on results from the GIANT consortium, which was evaluated in relation to lung cancer risk using GWAS results on 16,572 lung cancer cases and 21,480 controls. Results were stratified by histological subtype, smoking status and sex. An increase of one standard deviation (SD) in BMI (4.65 Kg/m(2)) raised the risk for lung cancer overall (OR = 1.13; P = 0.10). This was driven by associations with squamous cell (SQ) carcinoma (OR = 1.45; P = 1.2 × 10(-3)) and small cell (SC) carcinoma (OR = 1.81; P = 0.01). An inverse trend was seen for adenocarcinoma (AD) (OR = 0.82; P = 0.06). In stratified analyses, a 1 SD increase in BMI was inversely associated with overall lung cancer in never smokers (OR = 0.50; P = 0.02). These results indicate that higher BMI may increase the risk of certain types of lung cancer, in particular SQ and SC carcinoma. PMID:27487993

  1. The causal relevance of body mass index in different histological types of lung cancer: A Mendelian randomization study

    PubMed Central

    Carreras-Torres, Robert; Haycock, Philip C.; Relton, Caroline L.; Martin, Richard M.; Smith, George Davey; Kraft, Peter; Gao, Chi; Tworoger, Shelley; Le Marchand, Loïc; Wilkens, Lynne R.; Park, Sungshim L.; Haiman, Christopher; Field, John K.; Davies, Michael; Marcus, Michael; Liu, Geoffrey; Caporaso, Neil E.; Christiani, David C.; Wei, Yongyue; Chen, Chu; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Severi, Gianluca; Goodman, Gary E.; Hung, Rayjean J.; Amos, Christopher I.; McKay, James; Johansson, Mattias; Brennan, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Body mass index (BMI) is inversely associated with lung cancer risk in observational studies, even though it increases the risk of several other cancers, which could indicate confounding by tobacco smoking or reverse causality. We used the two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to circumvent these limitations of observational epidemiology by constructing a genetic instrument for BMI, based on results from the GIANT consortium, which was evaluated in relation to lung cancer risk using GWAS results on 16,572 lung cancer cases and 21,480 controls. Results were stratified by histological subtype, smoking status and sex. An increase of one standard deviation (SD) in BMI (4.65 Kg/m2) raised the risk for lung cancer overall (OR = 1.13; P = 0.10). This was driven by associations with squamous cell (SQ) carcinoma (OR = 1.45; P = 1.2 × 10−3) and small cell (SC) carcinoma (OR = 1.81; P = 0.01). An inverse trend was seen for adenocarcinoma (AD) (OR = 0.82; P = 0.06). In stratified analyses, a 1 SD increase in BMI was inversely associated with overall lung cancer in never smokers (OR = 0.50; P = 0.02). These results indicate that higher BMI may increase the risk of certain types of lung cancer, in particular SQ and SC carcinoma. PMID:27487993

  2. Biological subtyping of early breast cancer: a study comparing RT-qPCR with immunohistochemistry.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Ralph M; Sihto, Harri; Isola, Jorma; Heikkilä, Päivi; Kellokumpu-Lehtinen, Pirkko-Liisa; Auvinen, Päivi; Turpeenniemi-Hujanen, Taina; Jyrkkiö, Sirkku; Lakis, Sotiris; Schlombs, Kornelia; Laible, Mark; Weber, Stefan; Eidt, Sebastian; Sahin, Ugur; Joensuu, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    The biological subtype of breast cancer influences the selection of systemic therapy. Distinction between luminal A and B cancers depends on consistent assessment of Ki-67, but substantial intra-observer and inter-observer variability exists when immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used. We compared RT-qPCR with IHC in the assessment of Ki-67 and other standard factors used in breast cancer subtyping. RNA was extracted from archival breast tumour tissue of 769 women randomly assigned to the FinHer trial. Cancer ESR1, PGR, ERBB2 and MKI67 mRNA content was quantitated with an RT-qPCR assay. Local pathologists assessed ER, PgR and Ki-67 expression using IHC. HER2 amplification was identified with chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) centrally. The results were correlated with distant disease-free survival (DDFS) and overall survival (OS). qPCR-based and IHC-based assessments of ER and PgR showed good concordance. Both low tumour MKI67 mRNA (RT-qPCR) and Ki-67 protein (IHC) levels were prognostic for favourable DDFS [hazard ratio (HR) 0.42, 95 % CI 0.25-0.71, P = 0.001; and HR 0.56, 0.37-0.84, P = 0.005, respectively] and OS. In multivariable analyses, cancer MKI67 mRNA content had independent influence on DDFS (adjusted HR 0.51, 95 % CI 0.29-0.89, P = 0.019) while Ki-67 protein expression had not any influence (P = 0.266) whereas both assessments influenced independently OS. Luminal B patients treated with docetaxel-FEC had more favourable DDFS and OS than those treated with vinorelbine-FEC when the subtype was defined by RT-qPCR (for DDFS, HR 0.52, 95 % CI 0.29-0.94, P = 0.031), but not when defined using IHC. Breast cancer subtypes approximated with RT-qPCR and IHC show good concordance, but cancer MKI67 mRNA content correlated slightly better with DDFS than Ki-67 expression. The findings based on MKI67 mRNA content suggest that patients with luminal B cancer benefit more from docetaxel-FEC than from vinorelbine-FEC. PMID:27220750

  3. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  4. Diagnosis of Jejunal Metastases from Lung Cancer Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Charlotte; Prim, Nathalie; Mennecier, Bertrand; Delvaux, Michel; Gangi, Afshin; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastases from lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report a case of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer revealed by abdominal pain and severe recurrent anaemia. The diagnosis was obtained with capsule endoscopy. This non-invasive procedure thus represents a valuable method contributing to a rapid and detailed diagnosis while reducing underdiagnosis, and it should thus be considered for lung cancer patients complaining of abdominal symptoms, which may indeed be related to gastrointestinal metastases. PMID:27790115

  5. Pharmacological profiling of kinase dependency in cell lines across triple-negative breast cancer subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fink, Lauren S.; Beatty, Alexander; Devarajan, Karthik; Peri, Suraj; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC), negative for estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and Her2 amplification, are resistant to standard targeted therapies and exhibit a poor prognosis. Furthermore, they are highly heterogeneous with respect to genomic alterations, and common therapeutic targets are lacking though substantial evidence implicates dysregulated kinase signaling. Recently, six subtypes of TNBC were identified based on gene expression and were proposed to predict sensitivity to a variety of therapeutic agents including kinase inhibitors. To test this hypothesis, we screened a large collection of well-characterized, small-molecule kinase inhibitors for growth inhibition in a panel of TNBC cell lines representing all six subtypes. Sensitivity to kinase inhibition correlated poorly with TNBC subtype. Instead, unsupervised clustering segregated TNBC cell lines according to clinically relevant features including dependence on epidermal growth factor signaling and mutation of the PTEN tumor suppressor. We further report the discovery of kinase inhibitors with selective toxicity to these groups. Overall, however, TNBC cell lines exhibited diverse sensitivity to kinase inhibition consistent with the lack of common driver mutations in this disease. While our findings support specific kinase dependencies in subsets of TNBC, they are not associated with gene expression-based subtypes. Instead we find that mutation status can be an effective predictor of sensitivity to inhibition of particular kinase pathways for subsets of TNBC. PMID:25344583

  6. KRAS and the Reality of Personalized Medicine in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kilgoz, Havva O; Bender, Guzide; Scandura, Joseph M; Viale, Agnes; Taneri, Bahar

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of mortality among all cancer types worldwide. The latest available global statistics of the World Health Organization report 1.59 million casualities in 2012. Worldwide, 1 in 5 cancer deaths are caused by lung cancer. In 2016, in the United States alone, there are an estimated 224,390 new cases of lung cancer, of which 158,080 are expected to result in death, as reported by the National Cancer Institute. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a histological subtype, comprises about 85% of all cases, which is nearly 9 out of 10 lung cancer patients. Efforts are under way to develop and improve targeted therapy strategies. Certain mutations are being clinically targeted, such as those in EGFR and ALK genes. However, one of the most frequently mutated genes in NSCLC is the Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (KRAS), which is currently not targetable. Approximately 25% of all types of NSCLC tumors contain KRAS mutations, which remain as an undruggable challenge. These mutations are indicative of poor prognosis and show negative response to standard chemotherapy. Furthermore, tumors harboring KRAS mutations are unlikely to respond to currently available targeted treatments such as tyrosine kinase inhibitors. Therefore, there is a definitive, urgent need to generate new targeted therapy approaches for KRAS mutations. Current strategies have major limitations and revolve around targeting molecules upstream and downstream of KRAS. Direct targeting is not available in the clinic. Combination therapies using multiple agents are being sought. Concentrated efforts are needed to accelerate basic research and consecutive clinical trials to achieve effective targeting of KRAS. PMID:27447490

  7. Impact of Risk Factors on Different Interval Cancer Subtypes in a Population-Based Breast Cancer Screening Programme

    PubMed Central

    Blanch, Jordi; Sala, Maria; Ibáñez, Josefa; Domingo, Laia; Fernandez, Belén; Otegi, Arantza; Barata, Teresa; Zubizarreta, Raquel; Ferrer, Joana; Castells, Xavier; Rué, Montserrat; Salas, Dolores

    2014-01-01

    Background Interval cancers are primary breast cancers diagnosed in women after a negative screening test and before the next screening invitation. Our aim was to evaluate risk factors for interval cancer and their subtypes and to compare the risk factors identified with those associated with incident screen-detected cancers. Methods We analyzed data from 645,764 women participating in the Spanish breast cancer screening program from 2000–2006 and followed-up until 2009. A total of 5,309 screen-detected and 1,653 interval cancers were diagnosed. Among the latter, 1,012 could be classified on the basis of findings in screening and diagnostic mammograms, consisting of 489 true interval cancers (48.2%), 235 false-negatives (23.2%), 172 minimal-signs (17.2%) and 114 occult tumors (11.3%). Information on the screening protocol and women's characteristics were obtained from the screening program registry. Cause-specific Cox regression models were used to estimate the hazard ratios (HR) of risks factors for interval cancer and incident screen-detected cancer. A multinomial regression model, using screen-detected tumors as a reference group, was used to assess the effect of breast density and other factors on the occurrence of interval cancer subtypes. Results A previous false-positive was the main risk factor for interval cancer (HR = 2.71, 95%CI: 2.28–3.23); this risk was higher for false-negatives (HR = 8.79, 95%CI: 6.24–12.40) than for true interval cancer (HR = 2.26, 95%CI: 1.59–3.21). A family history of breast cancer was associated with true intervals (HR = 2.11, 95%CI: 1.60–2.78), previous benign biopsy with a false-negatives (HR = 1.83, 95%CI: 1.23–2.71). High breast density was mainly associated with occult tumors (RRR = 4.92, 95%CI: 2.58–9.38), followed by true intervals (RRR = 1.67, 95%CI: 1.18–2.36) and false-negatives (RRR = 1.58, 95%CI: 1.00–2.49). Conclusion The role of women's characteristics differs among

  8. Effect of Imaging Parameter Thresholds on MRI Prediction of Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy Response in Breast Cancer Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Ella F.; Newitt, David C.; Kornak, John; Wilmes, Lisa J.; Esserman, Laura J.; Hylton, Nola M.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the predictive performance of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) markers in breast cancer patients by subtype. Sixty-four patients with locally advanced breast cancer undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy were enrolled in this study. Each patient received a dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE-MRI) at baseline, after 1 cycle of chemotherapy and before surgery. Functional tumor volume (FTV), the imaging marker measured by DCE-MRI, was computed at various thresholds of percent enhancement (PEt) and signal-enhancement ratio (SERt). Final FTV before surgery and percent changes of FTVs at the early and final treatment time points were used to predict patients’ recurrence-free survival. The full cohort and each subtype defined by the status of hormone receptor and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HR+/HER2-, HER2+, triple negative) were analyzed. Predictions were evaluated using the Cox proportional hazard model when PEt changed from 30% to 200% in steps of 10% and SERt changed from 0 to 2 in steps of 0.2. Predictions with high hazard ratios and low p-values were considered as strong. Different profiles of FTV as predictors for recurrence-free survival were observed in each breast cancer subtype and strong associations with survival were observed at different PEt/SERt combinations that resulted in different FTVs. Findings from this retrospective study suggest that the predictive performance of imaging markers based on FTV may be improved with enhancement thresholds being optimized separately for clinically-relevant subtypes defined by HR and HER2 receptor expression. PMID:26886725

  9. Immunogenic Subtypes of Breast Cancer Delineated by Gene Classifiers of Immune Responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Miller, Lance D; Chou, Jeff A; Black, Michael A; Print, Cristin; Chifman, Julia; Alistar, Angela; Putti, Thomas; Zhou, Xiaobo; Bedognetti, Davide; Hendrickx, Wouter; Pullikuth, Ashok; Rennhack, Jonathan; Andrechek, Eran R; Demaria, Sandra; Wang, Ena; Marincola, Francesco M

    2016-07-01

    The abundance and functional orientation of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer is associated with distant metastasis-free survival, yet how this association is influenced by tumor phenotypic heterogeneity is poorly understood. Here, a bioinformatics approach defined tumor biologic attributes that influence this association and delineated tumor subtypes that may differ in their ability to sustain durable antitumor immune responses. A large database of breast tumor expression profiles and associated clinical data was compiled, from which the ability of phenotypic markers to significantly influence the prognostic performance of a classification model that incorporates immune cell-specific gene signatures was ascertained. Markers of cell proliferation and intrinsic molecular subtype reproducibly distinguished two breast cancer subtypes that we refer to as immune benefit-enabled (IBE) and immune benefit-disabled (IBD). The IBE tumors, comprised mostly of highly proliferative tumors of the basal-like, HER2-enriched, and luminal B subtypes, could be stratified by the immune classifier into significantly different prognostic groups, while IBD tumors could not, indicating the potential for productive engagement of metastasis-protective immunity in IBE tumors, but not in IBD tumors. The prognostic stratification in IBE was independent of conventional variables. Gene network analysis predicted the activation of TNFα/IFNγ signaling pathways in IBE tumors and the activation of the transforming growth factor-β pathway in IBD tumors. This prediction supports a model in which breast tumors can be distinguished on the basis of their potential for metastasis-protective immune responsiveness. Whether IBE and IBD represent clinically relevant contexts for evaluating sensitivity to immunotherapeutic agents warrants further investigation. Cancer Immunol Res; 4(7); 600-10. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27197066

  10. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    Maasland, Denise H. E.; Brandt, Piet A. van den; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J.

    2015-01-01

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40–7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m2, compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m2. Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found. PMID:26634678

  11. CSIOVDB: a microarray gene expression database of epithelial ovarian cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Yang, He; Ye, Jieru; Low, Jeffrey; Choolani, Mahesh; Tan, David Shao Peng; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju

    2015-12-22

    Databases pertaining to various diseases provide valuable resources on particular genes of interest but lack the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status. CSIOVDB is a transcriptomic microarray database of 3,431 human ovarian cancers, including carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum, and metastasis to the ovary. The database also comprises stroma and ovarian surface epithelium from normal ovary tissue, as well as over 400 early-stage ovarian cancers. This unique database presents the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status for each ovarian cancer sample, with major ovarian cancer histologies (clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, low-grade serous, serous) represented. Clinico-pathological parameters available include tumor grade, surgical debulking status, clinical response and age. The database has 1,868 and 1,516 samples with information pertaining to overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively. The database also provides integration with the copy number, DNA methylation and mutation data from TCGA. CSIOVDB seeks to provide a resource for biomarker and therapeutic target exploration for ovarian cancer research. PMID:26549805

  12. CSIOVDB: a microarray gene expression database of epithelial ovarian cancer subtype.

    PubMed

    Tan, Tuan Zea; Yang, He; Ye, Jieru; Low, Jeffrey; Choolani, Mahesh; Tan, David Shao Peng; Thiery, Jean-Paul; Huang, Ruby Yun-Ju

    2015-12-22

    Databases pertaining to various diseases provide valuable resources on particular genes of interest but lack the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status. CSIOVDB is a transcriptomic microarray database of 3,431 human ovarian cancers, including carcinoma of the ovary, fallopian tube, and peritoneum, and metastasis to the ovary. The database also comprises stroma and ovarian surface epithelium from normal ovary tissue, as well as over 400 early-stage ovarian cancers. This unique database presents the molecular subtype and epithelial-mesenchymal transition status for each ovarian cancer sample, with major ovarian cancer histologies (clear cell, endometrioid, mucinous, low-grade serous, serous) represented. Clinico-pathological parameters available include tumor grade, surgical debulking status, clinical response and age. The database has 1,868 and 1,516 samples with information pertaining to overall and disease-free survival rates, respectively. The database also provides integration with the copy number, DNA methylation and mutation data from TCGA. CSIOVDB seeks to provide a resource for biomarker and therapeutic target exploration for ovarian cancer research.

  13. Body mass index and risk of subtypes of head-neck cancer: the Netherlands Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Maasland, Denise H E; van den Brandt, Piet A; Kremer, Bernd; Schouten, Leo J

    2015-12-04

    Low body mass index (BMI) has been associated with risk of head-neck cancer (HNC), but prospective data are scarce. We investigated the association between BMI, BMI at age 20 years and change in BMI during adulthood with risk of HNC and HNC subtypes. 120,852 participants completed a questionnaire on diet and other cancer risk factors, including anthropometric measurements, at baseline in 1986. After 20.3 years of follow-up, 411 HNC (127 oral cavity cancer (OCC), 84 oro-/hypopharyngeal cancer (OHPC), and 197 laryngeal cancer (LC)) cases and 3,980 subcohort members were available for case-cohort analysis using Cox proportional hazards models. BMI at baseline was inversely associated with risk of HNC overall, with a multivariate rate ratio of 3.31 (95% CI 1.40-7.82) for subjects with a BMI < 18.5 kg/m(2), compared to participants with a BMI of 18.5 to 25 kg/m(2). Among HNC subtypes, this association was strongest for OCC and OHPC. The association between BMI at age 20 and HNC risk appeared to be positive. In this large prospective cohort study, we found an inverse association between BMI at baseline and HNC risk. For BMI at age 20, however, a positive rather than inverse association was found.

  14. A case of three synchronous primary lung cancers within the same lung lobe

    PubMed Central

    Misiak, Piotr; Brocki, Marian

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old patient with three synchronous primary lung cancers within the same lung lobe. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography investigations revealed two suspicious nodular lesions in the upper lobe of the left lung. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed that one of the lesions was non-small cell lung cancer. The patient was qualified for surgical treatment, and left upper lobectomy plus lymphadenectomy was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of three primary cancers in the left lung: keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, and acinar adenocarcinoma, localized within the same lung lobe. The patient was classified as having stage T3N1M0 lung cancer (stage IIIA) according to the latest, 7th edition of the TNM classification. PMID:27516792

  15. QUANTITATIVE CT ANALYSIS, AIRFLOW OBSTRUCTION AND LUNG CANCER IN THE PITTSBURGH LUNG SCREENING STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David O; Leader, Joseph K; Fuhrman, Carl R; Reilly, John J; Sciurba, Frank C.; Weissfeld, Joel L

    2011-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between emphysema, airflow obstruction and lung cancer in a high risk population we performed quantitative analysis of screening computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods Subjects completed questionnaires, spirometry and low-dose helical chest CT. Analyses compared cases and controls according to automated quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airways measures. Results Our case-control study of 117 matched pairs of lung cancer cases and controls did not reveal any airway or lung parenchymal findings on quantitative analysis of screening CT scans that were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Airway measures including wall area %, lumen perimeter, lumen area and average wall HU, and parenchymal measures including lung fraction < −910 Hounsfield Units (HU), were not statistically different between cases and controls. Conclusions The relationship between visual assessment of emphysema and increased lung cancer risk could not be verified by quantitative analysis of low-dose screening CT scans in a high risk tobacco exposed population. PMID:21610523

  16. Correlating Tumor Stiffness with Immunohistochemical Subtypes of Breast Cancers: Prognostic Value of Comb-Push Ultrasound Shear Elastography for Differentiating Luminal Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Fazzio, Robert T.; Whaley, Dana H.; Ghosh, Karthik; Shah, Sejal; Fatemi, Mostafa

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of our study is to correlate quantitatively measured tumor stiffness with immunohistochemical (IHC) subtypes of breast cancer. Additionally, the influence of prognostic histologic features (cancer grade, size, lymph node status, and histological type and grade) to the tumor elasticity and IHC profile relationship will be investigated. Methods Under an institutional review board (IRB) approved protocol, B-mode ultrasound (US) and comb-push ultrasound shear elastography (CUSE) were performed on 157 female patients with suspicious breast lesions. Out of 157 patients 83 breast cancer patients confirmed by pathology were included in this study. The association between CUSE mean stiffness values and the aforementioned prognostic features of the breast cancer tumors were investigated. Results Our results demonstrate that the most statistically significant difference (p = 0.0074) with mean elasticity is tumor size. When considering large tumors (size ≥ 8mm), thus minimizing the statistical significance of tumor size, a significant difference (p< 0.05) with mean elasticity is obtained between luminal A of histological grade I and luminal B (Ki-67 > 20%) subtypes. Conclusion Tumor size is an independent factor influencing mean elasticity. The Ki-67 proliferation index and histological grade were dependent factors influencing mean elasticity for the differentiation between luminal subtypes. Future studies on a larger group of patients may broaden the clinical significance of these findings. PMID:27776153

  17. Wood dust exposure and lung cancer risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Hancock, David G; Langley, Mary E; Chia, Kwan Leung; Woodman, Richard J; Shanahan, E Michael

    2015-12-01

    Occupational lung cancers represent a major health burden due to their increasing prevalence and poor long-term outcomes. While wood dust is a confirmed human carcinogen, its association with lung cancer remains unclear due to inconsistent findings in the literature. We aimed to clarify this association using meta-analysis. We performed a search of 10 databases to identify studies published until June 2014. We assessed the lung cancer risk associated with wood dust exposure as the primary outcome and with wood dust-related occupations as a secondary outcome. Random-effects models were used to pool summary risk estimates. 85 publications were included in the meta-analysis. A significantly increased risk for developing lung cancer was observed among studies that directly assessed wood dust exposure (RR 1.21, 95% CI 1.05 to 1.39, n=33) and that assessed wood dust-related occupations (RR 1.15, 95% CI 1.07 to 1.23, n=59). In contrast, a reduced risk for lung cancer was observed among wood dust (RR 0.63, 95% CI 0.39 to 0.99, n=5) and occupation (RR 0.96, 95% CI 0.95 to 0.98, n=1) studies originating in Nordic countries, where softwood dust is the primary exposure. These results were independent of the presence of adjustment for smoking and exposure classification methods. Only minor differences in risk between the histological subtypes were identified. This meta-analysis provides strong evidence for an association between wood dust and lung cancer, which is critically influenced by the geographic region of the study. The reasons for this region-specific effect estimates remain to be clarified, but may suggest a differential effect for hardwood and softwood dusts.

  18. Association of Radiographic Emphysema and Airflow Obstruction with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David O.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Balkan, Arzu; Schragin, Jeffrey G.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Fisher, Stephen N.; Wilson, Jonathan; Leader, Joseph K.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Shapiro, Steven D.; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: To study the relationship between emphysema and/or airflow obstruction and lung cancer in a high-risk population. Objective: We studied lung cancer related to radiographic emphysema and spirometric airflow obstruction in tobacco-exposed persons who were screened for lung cancer using chest computed tomography (CT). Methods: Subjects completed questionnaires, spirometry, and low-dose helical chest CT. CT scans were scored for emphysema based on National Emphysema Treatment Trial criteria. Multiple logistic regressions estimated the independent associations between various factors, including radiographic emphysema and airflow obstruction, and subsequent lung cancer diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Among 3,638 subjects, 57.5, 18.8, 14.6, and 9.1% had no, trace, mild, and moderate–severe emphysema, and 57.3, 13.6, 22.8, and 6.4% had no, mild (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] I), moderate (GOLD II), and severe (GOLD III–IV) airflow obstruction. Of 3,638 subjects, 99 (2.7%) received a lung cancer diagnosis. Adjusting for sex, age, years of cigarette smoking, and number of cigarettes smoked daily, logistic regression showed the expected lung cancer association with the presence of airflow obstruction (GOLD I–IV, odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–3.27). A second logistic regression showed lung cancer related to emphysema (OR, 3.56; 95% CI, 2.21–5.73). After additional adjustments for GOLD class, emphysema remained a strong and statistically significant factor related to lung cancer (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.91–5.15). Conclusions: Emphysema on CT scan and airflow obstruction on spirometry are related to lung cancer in a high-risk population. Emphysema is independently related to lung cancer. Both radiographic emphysema and airflow obstruction should be considered when assessing lung cancer risk. PMID:18565949

  19. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  1. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  2. Classification of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Using Significance Analysis of Microarray-Gene Set Reduction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Wang, Linlin; Du, Bochuan; Wang, Tianjiao; Tian, Pu; Tian, Suyan

    2016-01-01

    Among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), adenocarcinoma (AC), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) are two major histology subtypes, accounting for roughly 40% and 30% of all lung cancer cases, respectively. Since AC and SCC differ in their cell of origin, location within the lung, and growth pattern, they are considered as distinct diseases. Gene expression signatures have been demonstrated to be an effective tool for distinguishing AC and SCC. Gene set analysis is regarded as irrelevant to the identification of gene expression signatures. Nevertheless, we found that one specific gene set analysis method, significance analysis of microarray-gene set reduction (SAMGSR), can be adopted directly to select relevant features and to construct gene expression signatures. In this study, we applied SAMGSR to a NSCLC gene expression dataset. When compared with several novel feature selection algorithms, for example, LASSO, SAMGSR has equivalent or better performance in terms of predictive ability and model parsimony. Therefore, SAMGSR is a feature selection algorithm, indeed. Additionally, we applied SAMGSR to AC and SCC subtypes separately to discriminate their respective stages, that is, stage II versus stage I. Few overlaps between these two resulting gene signatures illustrate that AC and SCC are technically distinct diseases. Therefore, stratified analyses on subtypes are recommended when diagnostic or prognostic signatures of these two NSCLC subtypes are constructed. PMID:27446945

  3. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  4. Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late To Quit | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late to Quit Past ... Table of Contents Because most people who get lung cancer were smokers, you may feel that doctors ...

  5. MDT lung cancer care: input from the Surgical Oncologist.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Biniam; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the multidisciplinary management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery remains the primary modality of choice for resectable lung cancer when the patient is able to tolerate lung resection physiologically. There have been recent advances in surgical diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Increasing use of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer has resulted in increased detection of small peripheral nodules or semi-solid ground glass opacities. Here, we review different modalities of localization techniques that have been used to aid surgical excisional biopsy when needle biopsy has failed to provide tissue diagnosis. We also report on the current debates regarding the use of sublobar resections for Stage I NSCLC as well as the surgical management of locally advanced NSCLC. Finally, we discuss the complex surgical management of T4 NSCLC lung cancers.

  6. Hormone-related pathways and risk of breast cancer subtypes in African American women.

    PubMed

    Haddad, Stephen A; Lunetta, Kathryn L; Ruiz-Narváez, Edward A; Bensen, Jeannette T; Hong, Chi-Chen; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara E; Yao, Song; Bandera, Elisa V; Rosenberg, Lynn; Haiman, Christopher A; Troester, Melissa A; Ambrosone, Christine B; Palmer, Julie R

    2015-11-01

    We sought to investigate genetic variation in hormone pathways in relation to risk of overall and subtype-specific breast cancer in women of African ancestry (AA). Genotyping and imputation yielded data on 143,934 SNPs in 308 hormone-related genes for 3663 breast cancer cases (1098 ER-, 1983 ER+, 582 ER unknown) and 4687 controls from the African American Breast Cancer Epidemiology and Risk (AMBER) Consortium. AMBER includes data from four large studies of AA women: the Carolina Breast Cancer Study, the Women's Circle of Health Study, the Black Women's Health Study, and the Multiethnic Cohort Study. Pathway- and gene-based analyses were conducted, and single-SNP tests were run for the top genes. There were no strong associations at the pathway level. The most significantly associated genes were GHRH, CALM2, CETP, and AKR1C1 for overall breast cancer (gene-based nominal p ≤ 0.01); NR0B1, IGF2R, CALM2, CYP1B1, and GRB2 for ER+ breast cancer (p ≤ 0.02); and PGR, MAPK3, MAP3K1, and LHCGR for ER- disease (p ≤ 0.02). Single-SNP tests for SNPs with pairwise linkage disequilibrium r (2) < 0.8 in the top genes identified 12 common SNPs (in CALM2, CETP, NR0B1, IGF2R, CYP1B1, PGR, MAPK3, and MAP3K1) associated with overall or subtype-specific breast cancer after gene-level correction for multiple testing. Rs11571215 in PGR (progesterone receptor) was the SNP most strongly associated with ER- disease. We identified eight genes in hormone pathways that contain common variants associated with breast cancer in AA women after gene-level correction for multiple testing. PMID:26458823

  7. Advances in molecular biology of lung disease: aiming for precision therapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rooney, Claire; Sethi, Tariq

    2015-10-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related mortality in the developed world, accounting for almost one-quarter of all cancer deaths. Traditional treatment algorithms have largely relied on histologic subtype and have comprised pragmatic chemotherapy regimens with limited efficacy. However, because our understanding of the molecular basis of disease in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has improved exponentially, it has become apparent that NSCLC can be radically subdivided, or molecularly characterized, based on recurrent driver mutations occurring in specific oncogenes. We know that the presence of such mutations leads to constitutive activation of aberrant signaling proteins that initiate, progress, and sustain tumorigenesis. This persistence of the malignant phenotype is referred to as "oncogene addiction." On this basis, a paradigm shift in treatment approach has occurred. Rational, targeted therapies have been developed, the first being tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which entered the clinical arena > 10 years ago. These were tremendously successful, significantly affecting the natural history of NSCLC and improving patient outcomes. However, the benefits of these drugs are somewhat limited by the emergence of adaptive resistance mechanisms, and efforts to tackle this phenomenon are ongoing. A better understanding of all types of oncogene-driven NSCLC and the occurrence of TKI resistance will help us to further develop second- and third-generation small molecule inhibitors and will expand our range of precision therapies for this disease.

  8. Implementation and organization of lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-01-01

    CT screening for lung cancer is now being implemented in the US and China on a widespread national scale but not in Europe so far. The review gives a status for the implementation process and the hurdles to overcome in the future. It also describes the guidelines and requirements for the structure and components of high quality CT screening programs. These are essential in order to achieve a successful program with the fewest possible harms and a possible mortality benefit like that documented in the American National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). In addition the importance of continued research in CT screening methods is described and discussed with focus on the great potential to further improve this method in the future for the benefit of patients and society. PMID:27195270

  9. Urothelial bladder cancer with cavitary lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anil; Lee, Jason; Born, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder tends to remain superficial; however, in 5% to 20% of cases, it progresses to muscle invasion and, more rarely, can metastasize. TCC of the bladder primarily spreads via regional lymphatics. The most common sites of distant metastases of TCC are the liver, lung, mediastinum and bone. Longterm survival of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is rare. Patterns of pulmonary metastasis include multiple nodules, a solitary mass or interstitial micronodule. When multiple nodules are present, they are round and well-circumscribed, without calcification or cavitation. An unusual case of rapidly metastatic TCC to the lung causing large cavitary masses and nodules is presented. Imaging performed after the patient began chemotherapy revealed widespread necrosis of the metastatic cavitary masses causing moderate volume hemoptysis. PMID:21766082

  10. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  11. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  12. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M; Ramus, Susan J; Cicek, Mine S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P; Wu, Anna H; Wozniak, Eva L; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Thompson, Pamela J; Tessier, Daniel C; Terry, Kathryn L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O; Southey, Melissa C; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A; Renner, Stefan P; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pike, Malcolm C; Phelan, Catherine M; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B; Narod, Steven A; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F A G; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W; Le, Nhu D; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kelemen, Linda E; Keeney, Gary L; Karlan, Beth Y; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T; Giles, Graham G; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M; Fasching, Peter A; Ekici, Arif B; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W; Cook, Linda S; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bandera, Elisa V; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Laird, Peter W; Goode, Ellen L; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes.

  13. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L.; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M.; Ramus, Susan J.; Cicek, Mine S.; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C.; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P.; Wu, Anna H.; Wozniak, Eva L.; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S.; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F.; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A.; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M.; Tworoger, Shelley S.; Thompson, Pamela J.; Tessier, Daniel C.; Terry, Kathryn L.; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O.; Southey, Melissa C.; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B.; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B.; Rzepecka, Iwona K.; Runnebaum, Ingo B.; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A.; Renner, Stefan P.; Poole, Elizabeth M.; Pike, Malcolm C.; Phelan, Catherine M.; Pelttari, Liisa M.; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H.; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B.; Narod, Steven A.; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Monteiro, Alvaro N.A.; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R.; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F.A. G.; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A.; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W.; Le, Nhu D.; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E.; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A.; Kelemen, Linda E.; Keeney, Gary L.; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R.; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K.; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K.; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T.; Giles, Graham G.; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Ekici, Arif B.; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F.; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A.; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W.; Cook, Linda S.; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H.; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A.; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S.; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Bandera, Elisa V.; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M.; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K.; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A.T.; Schildkraut, Joellen M.; Sellers, Thomas A.; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Laird, Peter W.; Goode, Ellen L.; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR) = 1.13, P = 3.1 × 10−10) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR = 0.77, P = 1.6 × 10−8) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  14. Epigenetic analysis leads to identification of HNF1B as a subtype-specific susceptibility gene for ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hui; Fridley, Brooke L; Song, Honglin; Lawrenson, Kate; Cunningham, Julie M; Ramus, Susan J; Cicek, Mine S; Tyrer, Jonathan; Stram, Douglas; Larson, Melissa C; Köbel, Martin; Ziogas, Argyrios; Zheng, Wei; Yang, Hannah P; Wu, Anna H; Wozniak, Eva L; Woo, Yin Ling; Winterhoff, Boris; Wik, Elisabeth; Whittemore, Alice S; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Weber, Rachel Palmieri; Vitonis, Allison F; Vincent, Daniel; Vierkant, Robert A; Vergote, Ignace; Van Den Berg, David; Van Altena, Anne M; Tworoger, Shelley S; Thompson, Pamela J; Tessier, Daniel C; Terry, Kathryn L; Teo, Soo-Hwang; Templeman, Claire; Stram, Daniel O; Southey, Melissa C; Sieh, Weiva; Siddiqui, Nadeem; Shvetsov, Yurii B; Shu, Xiao-Ou; Shridhar, Viji; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Severi, Gianluca; Schwaab, Ira; Salvesen, Helga B; Rzepecka, Iwona K; Runnebaum, Ingo B; Rossing, Mary Anne; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Lorna; Risch, Harvey A; Renner, Stefan P; Poole, Elizabeth M; Pike, Malcolm C; Phelan, Catherine M; Pelttari, Liisa M; Pejovic, Tanja; Paul, James; Orlow, Irene; Omar, Siti Zawiah; Olson, Sara H; Odunsi, Kunle; Nickels, Stefan; Nevanlinna, Heli; Ness, Roberta B; Narod, Steven A; Nakanishi, Toru; Moysich, Kirsten B; Monteiro, Alvaro N A; Moes-Sosnowska, Joanna; Modugno, Francesmary; Menon, Usha; McLaughlin, John R; McGuire, Valerie; Matsuo, Keitaro; Adenan, Noor Azmi Mat; Massuger, Leon F A G; Lurie, Galina; Lundvall, Lene; Lubiński, Jan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Levine, Douglas A; Leminen, Arto; Lee, Alice W; Le, Nhu D; Lambrechts, Sandrina; Lambrechts, Diether; Kupryjanczyk, Jolanta; Krakstad, Camilla; Konecny, Gottfried E; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kelemen, Linda E; Keeney, Gary L; Karlan, Beth Y; Karevan, Rod; Kalli, Kimberly R; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Ji, Bu-Tian; Jensen, Allan; Jakubowska, Anna; Iversen, Edwin; Hosono, Satoyo; Høgdall, Claus K; Høgdall, Estrid; Hoatlin, Maureen; Hillemanns, Peter; Heitz, Florian; Hein, Rebecca; Harter, Philipp; Halle, Mari K; Hall, Per; Gronwald, Jacek; Gore, Martin; Goodman, Marc T; Giles, Graham G; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Flanagan, James M; Fasching, Peter A; Ekici, Arif B; Edwards, Robert; Eccles, Diana; Easton, Douglas F; Dürst, Matthias; du Bois, Andreas; Dörk, Thilo; Doherty, Jennifer A; Despierre, Evelyn; Dansonka-Mieszkowska, Agnieszka; Cybulski, Cezary; Cramer, Daniel W; Cook, Linda S; Chen, Xiaoqing; Charbonneau, Bridget; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Campbell, Ian; Butzow, Ralf; Bunker, Clareann H; Brueggmann, Doerthe; Brown, Robert; Brooks-Wilson, Angela; Brinton, Louise A; Bogdanova, Natalia; Block, Matthew S; Benjamin, Elizabeth; Beesley, Jonathan; Beckmann, Matthias W; Bandera, Elisa V; Baglietto, Laura; Bacot, François; Armasu, Sebastian M; Antonenkova, Natalia; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Aben, Katja K; Liang, Dong; Wu, Xifeng; Lu, Karen; Hildebrandt, Michelle A T; Schildkraut, Joellen M; Sellers, Thomas A; Huntsman, David; Berchuck, Andrew; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Gayther, Simon A; Pharoah, Paul D P; Laird, Peter W; Goode, Ellen L; Pearce, Celeste Leigh

    2013-01-01

    HNF1B is overexpressed in clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer, and we observed epigenetic silencing in serous epithelial ovarian cancer, leading us to hypothesize that variation in this gene differentially associates with epithelial ovarian cancer risk according to histological subtype. Here we comprehensively map variation in HNF1B with respect to epithelial ovarian cancer risk and analyse DNA methylation and expression profiles across histological subtypes. Different single-nucleotide polymorphisms associate with invasive serous (rs7405776 odds ratio (OR)=1.13, P=3.1 × 10(-10)) and clear cell (rs11651755 OR=0.77, P=1.6 × 10(-8)) epithelial ovarian cancer. Risk alleles for the serous subtype associate with higher HNF1B-promoter methylation in these tumours. Unmethylated, expressed HNF1B, primarily present in clear cell tumours, coincides with a CpG island methylator phenotype affecting numerous other promoters throughout the genome. Different variants in HNF1B associate with risk of serous and clear cell epithelial ovarian cancer; DNA methylation and expression patterns are also notably distinct between these subtypes. These findings underscore distinct mechanisms driving different epithelial ovarian cancer histological subtypes. PMID:23535649

  15. Interpretation of lung cancer study outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Marida; Bidoli, Paolo; Pelizzoni, Davide; Canova, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. However, in the last few years we observed an important acceleration in drug development due to oncogenic driver tumors discovery. Sharing and putting together preclinical data from benchmark and data from clinical research is the scientific paradigm that allows real breakthrough in clinical practice in this field, but only a few targeted agents are worthy and practice changing. The clinical research and proper use of statistical methodology are the pillars to continue to achieve important goals like improvement of overall survival. A good medical oncologist should be able to critically read a scientific paper and move from the observed outcomes into clinical perspective. Despite clinical improvements, sometimes the union of promising targeted agents and optimistic expectations misrepresent the reality and the value of clinical research. In this article, we try to analyze the meaning of statistical assumptions from clinical trials, especially in lung cancer, through a critical review of the concept of value-based medicine. We also attempt to give the reader some practical tools to weigh scientific value of literature reports. PMID:26716052

  16. p53 in breast cancer subtypes and new insights into response to chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Bertheau, Philippe; Lehmann-Che, Jacqueline; Varna, Mariana; Dumay, Anne; Poirot, Brigitte; Porcher, Raphaël; Turpin, Elisabeth; Plassa, Louis-François; de Roquancourt, Anne; Bourstyn, Edwige; de Cremoux, Patricia; Janin, Anne; Giacchetti, Sylvie; Espié, Marc; de Thé, Hugues

    2013-08-01

    Despite an obvious central role of p53 in the hallmarks of cancer, TP53 status is not yet used for the management of breast cancer. Recent findings may lead to reconsider the role of p53 in breast cancer. TP53 mutations are the most frequent genetic alterations in breast cancer, observed in 30% of breast carcinomas. Their distribution is highly linked to molecular tumor subtypes found in 26% of luminal tumors (17% of luminal A, 41% of luminal B), in 50% of HER2 amplified tumors, in 69% of molecular apocrine breast carcinomas and in 88% of basal-like carcinomas. The type of mutation is linked to the tumor subtype with higher frequency of base-pair substitutions in luminal tumors, whereas molecular apocrine and basal-like tumors present much higher frequency of complex mutations (deletions/insertions). The timing of TP53 mutation also depends on the tumor subtype, being the first important event in luminal tumors but occurring after PTEN loss in basal-like tumors. Regarding response to cytotoxic chemotherapy, the situation is far from the p53-dependent apoptosis paradigm with subsequent clinical response. We reported that TP53 mutated non inflammatory locally advanced breast carcinomas had a high rate of complete pathological response to dose-dense doxorubicin-cyclophosphamide chemotherapy, while TP53 wild-type (WT) tumors never achieved complete response. Using human breast cancer xenograft models, we suggested that this could be due to the induction of senescence in TP53 WT tumor cells. A recent work confirmed these findings in MMTV-Wnt1 mammary tumors, showing that growth arrest and senescent phenotype, not apoptosis, were induced in TP53 WT tumors following doxorubicin treatment, while lack of arrest in mutant tumors resulted in aberrant mitoses, cell death and a superior clinical response. Furthermore, in ER positive (ER(+)) breast tumors, it has been recently reported that ER represses the p53-mediated apoptotic response induced by DNA damage. Taken together

  17. Lung cancer biology: a genetic and genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, M

    2009-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in most western countries and, as tobacco consumption is not significantly decreasing worldwide, will remain so in the coming decades. Thus, in addition to preventing uptake and encouraging cessation of the smoking habit, it is important to invest in understanding the biology of this type of cancer. Of particular interest are the recent efforts directed towards characterising the entire set of gene alterations in lung cancer. The present review describes the catalogue of known genetic alterations in lung cancer, their biological role and their use in clinical management.

  18. Occupational Lung Cancer Surveillance in South Korea, 2006-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Won, Jong Uk; Moon, Jai Dong; Kim, Young-Chul; Koh, Sang Baek; Yong, Suk Joong; Kim, Soo Geun; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Inah; Kim, Jung Il; Kim, Jung Won; Lee, Eui-cheol; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Dong Mug; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The lung cancer mortality in Korea has increased remarkably during the last 20 years, and has been the first leading cause of cancer-related deaths since 2000. The aim of the current study was to examine the time trends of occupational lung cancer and carcinogens exposure during the period 2006-2009 in South Korea, by assessing the proportion of occupational burden. Methods We defined occupational lung cancer for surveillance, and developed a reporting protocol and reporting website for the surveillance of occupational lung cancer. The study patients were chosen from 9 participating university hospitals in the following 7 areas: Seoul, Incheon, Wonju, Daejeon, Daegu, Busan, and Gwangju. Results The combined proportion of definite and probable occupational lung cancer among all lung cancers investigated in this study was 10.0%, 8.6%, 10.7%, and 15.8% in the years 2006 to 2009, respectively, with an average of 11.7% over the four-year study period. The main carcinogens were asbestos, crystalline silica, radon, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), diesel exhaust particles, chromium, and nickel. Conclusion We estimated that about 11.7% of the incident lung cancer was preventable. This reveals the potential to considerably reduce lung cancer by intervention in occupational fields. PMID:22953173

  19. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    PubMed Central

    Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Several features of lung cancer may potentially be exploited for targeting through inhibition of checkpoint kinases, including mutated p53, low ERCC1 levels, amplified Myc, tumor hypoxia and presence of lung cancer stem cells. Synergistic effects have also been reported between inhibitors of ATR/Chk1/Wee1 and conventional lung cancer treatments, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, or radiation. Altogether, inhibitors of ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are emerging as new cancer treatment agents, likely to be useful in lung cancer treatment. However, as lung tumors are very diverse, the inhibitors are unlikely to be effective in all patients, and more work is needed to determine how such inhibitors can be utilized in the most optimal ways. PMID:25774168

  20. Trends of lung cancer mortality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lazcano Ponce, E C; Tovar Guzman, V; Meneses Gonzalez, F; Rascon Pacheco, R A; Hernandez Avila, M

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is one of the most important public health problems in the world; 1,035,000 annual deaths are estimated each year and more than 80% of these are attributed to tobacco. The trend of lung cancer mortality in Mexico City from 1979 - 1993 was determined, as was the rate ratio of lung cancer mortality in 31 states in Mexico, taking Mexico City as a reference by means of a Poisson model. A strong linear regression model was used to evaluate the rate, where the dependent variable was LC mortality rate and the independent variable the year observed. In 15 years, 73,807 deaths from LC were reported, with an increase in mortality from 5.01 - 7.25 per 100,000 inhabitants. Mortality increases significantly after 60 years of age (B not equal to 0), p<.05) in men and in women. Mortality from LC was 70% in men, and more than 60% of deaths were reported after 65 years of age. Mortality risk is higher in the northern states of the country (e.g., Sonora, RR=2.40) than in the southern region (e.g., Oaxaca RR=0.40). In Mexico, almost 10,000 deaths by LC are estimated for the year 2010. Therefore, changes in lifestyle should be encouraged in order to decrease the smoking habit. The governmental tax on cigarettes should be increased, smoking restricted in squares and public spaces, and the risks should be announced on cigarette packages, among other measures. With respect to other emergent risk factors, the sources of industrial pollution and toxic emissions should be regulated.

  1. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Lung Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Wakelee, Heather; Anderson, Garnet L.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Chien, Jason W.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Gass, Margery; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Johnson, Karen C.; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Ockene, Judith K.; Chen, Chu; Hubbell, F. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Background In the post intervention period of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, estrogen plus progestin increased total cancer incidence and an adverse influence on lung cancer mortality was suggested. Methods We conducted post hoc analyses over the full follow-up period of the WHI randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating daily conjugated equine estrogen (CEE, 0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg) influence on lung cancer incidence and mortality in 16,608 postmenopausal women. Findings After 5.6 years intervention and 2.4 years additional follow-up (mean), there were 109 lung cancers in the hormone group and 85 in the placebo group (hazard ratio (HR) 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92, 1.63, P=0.16). While the difference was not statistically significant, for non-small cell lung cancer a possible divergence emerged over time, with more diagnoses in the CEE plus MPA group (96 vs 72 cases, respectively, HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.94, 1.73, P=0.12) and these cancers were more commonly poorly differentiated and more commonly had distant metastasis. Deaths from lung cancer were significantly increased in the CEE plus MPA group (73 vs 40 deaths, respectively, HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.16, 2.52, P=0.01) as were deaths from non-small cell lung cancer (62 vs 31 deaths, respectively, HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.22, 2.88, P=0.004). Small cell lung cancer incidence and mortality was comparable between randomization groups. Interpretation Use of estrogen plus progestin did not increase lung cancer incidence but significantly increased deaths from lung cancer. The effect may primarily be through influence on non-small cell lung cancer outcome. PMID:19767090

  2. Low penetrance breast cancer susceptibility loci are associated with specific breast tumor subtypes: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Broeks, Annegien; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Sherman, Mark E.; Couch, Fergus J.; Hopper, John L.; Dite, Gillian S.; Apicella, Carmel; Smith, Letitia D.; Hammet, Fleur; Southey, Melissa C.; Van ’t Veer, Laura J.; de Groot, Renate; Smit, Vincent T.H.B.M.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Jud, Sebastian; Ekici, Arif B.; Hartmann, Arndt; Hein, Alexander; Schulz-Wendtland, Ruediger; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Frederik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sinn, Hans-Peter; Sohn, Christof; Tchatchou, Sandrine; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Flyger, Henrik; Ørsted, David D.; Kaur-Knudsen, Diljit; Milne, Roger L.; Pérez, Jose I. Arias; Zamora, Pilar; Rodríguez, Primitiva Menéndez; Benítez, Javier; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Ko, Yon-Dschun; Hamann, Ute; Fischer, Hans-Peter; Brüning, Thomas; Pesch, Beate; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Bremer, Michael; Karstens, Johann H.; Hillemanns, Peter; Dörk, Thilo; Nevanlinna, Heli A.; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Heikkilä, Päivi; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Aaltonen, Kirsimari; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Kauppinen, Jaana M.; Kataja, Vesa; Auvinen, Päivi; Eskelinen, Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Spurdle, Amanda B.; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Holland, Helene; Lambrechts, Diether; Claes, Bart; Vandorpe, Thijs; Neven, Patrick; Wildiers, Hans; Flesch-Janys, Dieter; Hein, Rebecca; Löning, Thomas; Kosel, Matthew; Fredericksen, Zachary S.; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Baglietto, Laura; Severi, Gianluca; McLean, Catriona; Haiman, Christopher A.; Henderson, Brian E.; Le Marchand, Loic; Kolonel, Laurence N.; Grenaker Alnæs, Grethe; Kristensen, Vessela; Børresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Hunter, David J.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Andrulis, Irene L.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Devilee, Peter; Huijts, Petra E.A.; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van Asperen, Christi J.; Seynaeve, Caroline S.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Brinton, Louise; Peplonska, Beata; Figueroa, Jonine; Yang, Xiaohong R.; Hooning, Maartje J.; Hollestelle, Antoinette; Oldenburg, Rogier A.; Jager, Agnes; Kriege, Mieke; Ozturk, Bahar; van Leenders, Geert J.L.H.; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Humphreys, Keith; Liu, Jianjun; Cox, Angela; Connley, Daniel; Cramp, Helen E.; Cross, Simon S.; Balasubramanian, Sabapathy P.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Dunning, Alison M.; Easton, Douglas F.; Humphreys, Manjeet K.; Caldas, Carlos; Blows, Fiona; Driver, Kristy; Provenzano, Elena; Lubinski, Jan; Jakubowska, Anna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Cybulski, Cezary; Gorski, Bohdan; Gronwald, Jacek; Brennan, Paul; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Shen, Chen-Yang; Hsiung, Chia-Ni; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Chen, Shou-Tung; Hsu, Giu-Cheng; Hou, Ming-Feng; Huang, Chiun-Sheng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Pharoah, Paul D.P.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancers demonstrate substantial biological, clinical and etiological heterogeneity. We investigated breast cancer risk associations of eight susceptibility loci identified in GWAS and two putative susceptibility loci in candidate genes in relation to specific breast tumor subtypes. Subtypes were defined by five markers (ER, PR, HER2, CK5/6, EGFR) and other pathological and clinical features. Analyses included up to 30 040 invasive breast cancer cases and 53 692 controls from 31 studies within the Breast Cancer Association Consortium. We confirmed previous reports of stronger associations with ER+ than ER− tumors for six of the eight loci identified in GWAS: rs2981582 (10q26) (P-heterogeneity = 6.1 × 10−18), rs3803662 (16q12) (P = 3.7 × 10−5), rs13281615 (8q24) (P = 0.002), rs13387042 (2q35) (P = 0.006), rs4973768 (3p24) (P = 0.003) and rs6504950 (17q23) (P = 0.002). The two candidate loci, CASP8 (rs1045485, rs17468277) and TGFB1 (rs1982073), were most strongly related with the risk of PR negative tumors (P = 5.1 × 10−6 and P = 4.1 × 10−4, respectively), as previously suggested. Four of the eight loci identified in GWAS were associated with triple negative tumors (P ≤ 0.016): rs3803662 (16q12), rs889312 (5q11), rs3817198 (11p15) and rs13387042 (2q35); however, only two of them (16q12 and 2q35) were associated with tumors with the core basal phenotype (P ≤ 0.002). These analyses are consistent with different biological origins of breast cancers, and indicate that tumor stratification might help in the identification and characterization of novel risk factors for breast cancer subtypes. This may eventually result in further improvements in prevention, early detection and treatment. PMID:21596841

  3. Radiogenomic analysis of breast cancer: dynamic contrast enhanced - magnetic resonance imaging based features are associated with molecular subtypes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shijian; Fan, Ming; Zhang, Juan; Zheng, Bin; Wang, Xiaojia; Li, Lihua

    2016-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common malignant tumor with upgrading incidence in females. The key to decrease the mortality is early diagnosis and reasonable treatment. Molecular classification could provide better insights into patient-directed therapy and prognosis prediction of breast cancer. It is known that different molecular subtypes have different characteristics in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) examination. Therefore, we assumed that imaging features can reflect molecular information in breast cancer. In this study, we investigated associations between dynamic contrasts enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI) features and molecular subtypes in breast cancer. Sixty patients with breast cancer were enrolled and the MR images were pre-processed for noise reduction, registration and segmentation. Sixty-five dimensional imaging features including statistical characteristics, morphology, texture and dynamic enhancement in breast lesion and background regions were semiautomatically extracted. The associations between imaging features and molecular subtypes were assessed by using statistical analyses, including univariate logistic regression and multivariate logistic regression. The results of multivariate regression showed that imaging features are significantly associated with molecular subtypes of Luminal A (p=0.00473), HER2-enriched (p=0.00277) and Basal like (p=0.0117), respectively. The results indicated that three molecular subtypes are correlated with DCE-MRI features in breast cancer. Specifically, patients with a higher level of compactness or lower level of skewness in breast lesion are more likely to be Luminal A subtype. Besides, the higher value of the dynamic enhancement at T1 time in normal side reflect higher possibility of HER2-enriched subtype in breast cancer.

  4. Specific expression and methylation of SLIT1, SLIT2, SLIT3, and miR-218 in gastric cancer subtypes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mirang; Kim, Jong-Hwan; Baek, Su-Jin; Kim, Seon-Young; Kim, Yong Sung

    2016-06-01

    SLIT has been suggested as a key regulator of cancer development and a promising therapeutic target for cancer treatment. Herein, we analyzed expression and methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 in 11 gastric cancer cell lines, 96 paired gastric tumors and adjacent normal gastric tissues, and 250 gastric cancers provided by The Cancer Genome Atlas. Methylation of SLIT1/SLIT2/SLIT3 was found both in early gastric cancers, and in advanced gastric cancers. Even normal gastric tissue showed increased methylation of SLIT1 and SLIT3 that correlated with patient age. Furthermore, epigenetic inactivation of SLIT occurred in a gastric cancer subtype-dependent manner. SLIT2 and SLIT3 expression was reduced in Epstein-Barr virus-positive and microsatellite instability subtypes, but increased in the genomically stable subtype. Expression of miR‑218 correlated negatively with methylation of SLIT2 or SLIT3. These findings suggest that a molecular subtype-specific therapeutic strategy is needed for targeting SLITs and miR-218 in treatment of gastric cancer.

  5. The role of human papilloma virus in lung cancer: a review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Rezazadeh, Arash; Laber, Damian A; Ghim, Shin-Je; Jenson, Alfred Ben; Kloecker, Goetz

    2009-07-01

    Papillomaviruses are small nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect squamous epithelial cells. These viruses have been found in many organisms. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) give rise to a large spectrum of epithelial lesions, mainly benign hyperplasia (eg, warts and papillomas) with low malignant potential. There is a subgroup of HPV, the "high-risk" HPV, which is associated with precancerous and cancerous lesions. A small fraction of people infected with high-risk HPV will develop cancers that usually arise many years after the initial infection (Psyrri and Dimaio, Nat Clin Pract Oncol. 2008;5:24-31). Nonsmall cell lung cancer is a heterogeneous disease. The most common histologic subtypes include squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma. Despite different histologies, nonsmall cell lung cancers are often classified together because of similarities in approach and management of the disease. In this article, we reviewed the current literature on lung cancer and HPV. On the basis of this data, we suggested a possible mechanism of carcinogenesis induced by HPV.

  6. Integrated molecular portrait of non-small cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), a leading cause of cancer deaths, represents a heterogeneous group of neoplasms, mostly comprising squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), adenocarcinoma (AC) and large-cell carcinoma (LCC). The objectives of this study were to utilize integrated genomic data including copy-number alteration, mRNA, microRNA expression and candidate-gene full sequencing data to characterize the molecular distinctions between AC and SCC. Methods Comparative genomic hybridization followed by mutational analysis, gene expression and miRNA microarray profiling were performed on 123 paired tumor and non-tumor tissue samples from patients with NSCLC. Results At DNA, mRNA and miRNA levels we could identify molecular markers that discriminated significantly between the various histopathological entities of NSCLC. We identified 34 genomic clusters using aCGH data; several genes exhibited a different profile of aberrations between AC and SCC, including PIK3CA, SOX2, THPO, TP63, PDGFB genes. Gene expression profiling analysis identified SPP1, CTHRC1and GREM1 as potential biomarkers for early diagnosis of the cancer, and SPINK1 and BMP7 to distinguish between AC and SCC in small biopsies or in blood samples. Using integrated genomics approach we found in recurrently altered regions a list of three potential driver genes, MRPS22, NDRG1 and RNF7, which were consistently over-expressed in amplified regions, had wide-spread correlation with an average of ~800 genes throughout the genome and highly associated with histological types. Using a network enrichment analysis, the targets of these potential drivers were seen to be involved in DNA replication, cell cycle, mismatch repair, p53 signalling pathway and other lung cancer related signalling pathways, and many immunological pathways. Furthermore, we also identified one potential driver miRNA hsa-miR-944. Conclusions Integrated molecular characterization of AC and SCC helped identify clinically relevant markers

  7. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  8. Semaphorins and their receptors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potiron, Vincent A.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.

    2009-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted, transmembrane and GPI-linked proteins initially characterized in the development of the nervous system and axonal guidance. Semaphorins are expressed in many tissues where they regulate normal development, organ morphogenesis, immunity and angiogenesis. They affect the cytoskeleton, actin filament organization, microtubules and cell adhesion. Semaphorin signaling is transduced by plexins, which in the case of most class-3 semaphorins requires high affinity neuropilin receptors. The neuropilins also function as receptors for VEGF and other growth factors, and their expression is often abnormal in tumors. In cancer, semaphorins have both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting functions. We review here the current status of semaphorins and their receptors in tumor development with a focus on lung cancer. PMID:18625544

  9. Lung cancer in Japanese chromate workers.

    PubMed Central

    Ohsaki, Y; Abe, S; Kimura, K; Tsuneta, Y; Mikami, H; Murao, M

    1978-01-01

    We have treated ten patients with lung cancer among workers in a chromate factory between 1972 and 1976. Four further cases were also found through death certificates and medical records. Most were smokers and all were men. The average duration of exposure to chromate was 24 years (range 10 to 36). The cell type in our ten patients was squamous in seven and small anaplastic type in three. The primary sites were all in large bronchi. The incidence (person per year) calculated from the number of employees, duration of factory activity, number of cancer patients, and shortest duration of labour period among the patients was 657.9 per 100,000 compared to 13.3 per 100,000 in Japan as a whole. PMID:684674

  10. PESTICIDES AND LUNG CANCER RISK IN THE AGRICULTURAL HEALTH STUDY

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the relationship between 50 widely used agricultural pesticides and lung cancer incidence in the Agricultural Health Study, a prospective cohort study of 57,284 pesticide applicators, and 32,333 spouses of farmer applicators with no prior history of lung cancer. Self...

  11. Radon and lung cancer: assessing and mitigating the risk.

    PubMed

    Choi, Humberto; Mazzone, Peter

    2014-09-01

    Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas. Its progenies emit alpha particles capable of causing tissue damage. Radon exposure is estimated to be the second most common cause of lung cancer in the United States. Management of patients with a history of radon exposure should involve a lung cancer specialist.

  12. Analysis of intratumor heterogeneity unravels lung cancer evolution.

    PubMed

    de Bruin, Elza C; McGranahan, Nicholas; Swanton, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a disease with dismal outcome. We recently reported a detailed intratumor heterogeneity analysis in 7 non-small cell lung cancer samples, revealing spatially separated driver events as well as the temporal dynamics of mutational processes and demonstrating an important role for APOBEC-mediated heterogeneity later in disease evolution. PMID:27308463

  13. Malnutrition in lung cancer: incidence, prognostic implications, and pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kisner, D L

    1982-01-01

    Malnutrition and weight loss are common in patients with lung cancer. Weight loss is an independent prognostic factor for survival in lung cancer treatment studies. Metabolic disturbances probably play a dominant role in weight loss in these patients rather than reduced food intake. The identification of the pertinent etiologic metabolic abnormalities and development of specific therapeutic intervention should be goals for future research.

  14. The Changing Landscape of Lung Cancer Research and Treatment

    Cancer.gov

    Along with the Lung Cancer Social Media (#LCSM) community, the National Cancer Institute will be co-hosting a lively and interactive Google Hangout on Air about the changing landscape of lung cancer research and treatment. During the chat, viewers will have the opportunity to pose questions to a panel of lung cancer experts including NCI's Dr. Shakun Malik, the head of thoracic oncology therapeutics, Roy S. Herbst, MD, PhD, Chief of Medical Oncology, Yale Cancer Center and Smilow Cancer Hospital at Yale-New Haven and David Tom Cooke MD FACS, Head, Section of General Thoracic Surgery University of California, Davis. You can also learn more and follow along on the #LCSM Chat page. The chat will be moderated by lung cancer advocate and #LCSM co-founder, Janet Freeman-Daily. To ask questions of our experts, simply use the #LCSM hashtag during the chat.

  15. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation. PMID:27261915

  16. Stereotactic Body Radiotherapy and Ablative Therapies for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Abbas, Ghulam; Danish, Adnan; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    The treatment paradigm for early stage lung cancer and oligometastatic disease to the lung is rapidly changing. Ablative therapies, especially stereotactic body radiation therapy, are challenging the surgical gold standard and have the potential to be the standard for operable patients with early stage lung cancer who are high risk due to co- morbidities. The most commonly used ablative modalities include stereotactic body radiation therapy, microwave ablation, and radiofrequency ablation.

  17. Low-Dose CT Screening for Lung Cancer: Computer-aided Detection of Missed Lung Cancers.

    PubMed

    Liang, Mingzhu; Tang, Wei; Xu, Dong Ming; Jirapatnakul, Artit C; Reeves, Anthony P; Henschke, Claudia I; Yankelevitz, David

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To update information regarding the usefulness of computer-aided detection (CAD) systems with a focus on the most critical category, that of missed cancers at earlier imaging, for cancers that manifest as a solid nodule. Materials and Methods By using a HIPAA-compliant institutional review board-approved protocol where informed consent was obtained, 50 lung cancers that manifested as a solid nodule on computed tomographic (CT) scans in annual rounds of screening (time 1) were retrospectively identified that could, in retrospect, be identified on the previous CT scans (time 0). Four CAD systems were compared, which were referred to as CAD 1, CAD 2, CAD 3, and CAD 4. The total number of accepted CAD-system-detected nodules at time 0 was determined by consensus of two radiologists and the number of CAD-system-detected nodules that were rejected by the radiologists was also documented. Results At time 0 when all the cancers had been missed, CAD system detection rates for the cancers were 56%, 70%, 68%, and 60% (κ = 0.45) for CAD systems 1, 2, 3, and 4, respectively. At time 1, the rates were 74%, 82%, 82%, and 78% (κ = 0.32), respectively. The average diameter of the 50 cancers at time 0 and time 1 was 4.8 mm and 11.4 mm, respectively. The number of CAD-system-detected nodules that were rejected per CT scan for CAD systems 1-4 at time 0 was 7.4, 1.7, 0.6, and 4.5 respectively. Conclusion CAD systems detected up to 70% of lung cancers that were not detected by the radiologist but failed to detect about 20% of the lung cancers when they were identified by the radiologist, which suggests that CAD may be useful in the role of second reader. (©) RSNA, 2016.

  18. Etiology of lung cancer at the Gejiu tin mine, China

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, S.Q.

    1987-01-01

    There were 1,724 lung cancer cases registered at the Yunnan Tin Corporation in the period 1954-1986, of which 90% had a history of working underground. Previous exposure to radon, and radon daughters and arsenic is considered to be responsible for the high incidence of lung cancer in these miners. Arsenic may come from inhalation of arsenic-containing ore dust or other environmental arsenic pollution. It appears that radon exposure accounts to a greater extent than arsenic for the increase of lung cancer in these miners. Pathological study was made of 100 surgically resected lung cancer specimens. In this way the distribution and composition of dust retention was determined in relation to peripheral lung cancer.

  19. [Graphic Evolution Witness the Development of Lung Cancer Translational Research].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chao; Zhong, Wenzhao

    2016-06-20

    Lung cancer treatment has altered from conventional chemotherapy to targeted treatment, which now has been turned to the immunotherapy. Translational research has played an irreplaceable role during this progression which graphic evolution has witnessed. The evolution has gone through forest plot, KM-curve, waterfall plot, spider plot and timeline-area, showing us the refining concept and gradual process of lung cancer treatment undergoing from community towards individual. Even though the latest immunotherapy is getting increasingly hot, the result isn't quite expected. Meanwhile, the limitations of conventional treatment still exist which require further research. This article will primarily illustrate the development of translational research of lung cancer via the aspect of curve evolution and analysis some abortive clinical trials in lung cancer surgery for inspiring the next graphic style and lung cancer treatment. PMID:27335306

  20. Mortality study of beryllium industry workers' occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, T.F.

    1980-02-01

    A cohort of 3685 white males employed during 1937 to 1948 in two major industries manufacturing beryllium was followed to the end of 1976 to evaluate lung cancer mortality experience. Lung cancer mortality among beryllium-exposed workers was contrasted with that of workers employed in the viscose rayon industry. Study results demonstrated that lung cancer mortality among berylliumm-exposed workers was significantly greater than that expected on the basis of lung cancer mortality experience of workers in the viscose rayon industry having similar employment patterns. The results of the present study are consistent with earlier animal bioassay studies and recent epidemiologic studies indicating that beryllium is carcinogenic. The results of the present study are not consistent with speculation attributing the excessive lung cancer mortality among beryllium-exposed workers to personal characteristics of individuals having unstable employment patterns.

  1. [Epidemiology, prevention and risk morbidity factors for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Radziszewska, Aneta; Karczmarek-Borowska, Bożenna; Grądalska-Lampart, Monika; Filip, Agata A

    2015-02-01

    Lung cancer incidence kept increasing dynamically in male population until the late 90s and then there was a sudden drop in the cases and this tendency has been maintained up till now. What seems upsetting, however, is the fact that for female population there is a constant growth in the lung cancer morbidity. Needless to say, Poland still belongs to the countries with high lung cancer incidence and lung cancer mortality. In 2011 the standardized morbidity rate in Poland accounted for 50,0/100 000 in male population and 17,3/100 000 in female population. In Podkarpacie Voivodeship it was 43,6/100 000 for males and 11,8/100 000 for females respectively. Lung cancer incidence and lung cancer mortality seem to increase together with age, and for people 65 and more this type of cancer accounts for approximately 50% of all cancer cases and cancer caused deaths. In spite of various research conducted and great medical progress little can be done to cure lung cancer. The percentage of 5-year survivals increased for males from 10,8% in years 2000-2002 to 11,9% in years 2003-2005, and for females from 15,7% to 16,9%. The main cause of lung cancer is certainly active and passive smoking. It is highly possible that environmental factors are also responsible for lung cancer cases. Among the most devastating are such factors as asbestos, arsenic, aromatic hydrocarbons, individual lifestyle and nutrition, genetic predisposition and finally the pollution, particularly of the air.

  2. Utility of subtyping intestinal metaplasia as marker of gastric cancer risk. A review of the evidence

    PubMed Central

    González, Carlos A.; Sanz-Anquela, José M.; Gisbert, Javier P.; Correa, Pelayo

    2013-01-01

    The identification and surveillance of patients with preneoplastic lesions at high risk of progressing to gastric cancer (GC) represents the most effective way of reducing the burden of GC. The incomplete type of intestinal metaplasia (IM) could be considered as the best candidate for surveillance. However, the usefulness of subtyping of IM has been considered by some authors as limited and inconsistent. A search was carried out to identify all cross-sectional (n=14) and follow-up (n=10) studies that assessed the risk of GC among subjects with different types of IM. Out of the 14 cross-sectional studies, 13 reported that the prevalence of incomplete IM was statistically significantly higher in GC than in other gastric lesions. Out of the ten follow-up studies, six found a statistically significant association between incomplete IM and subsequent GC risk. The relative risks of GC were from 4- to 11-fold higher for the presence of incomplete type in comparison to complete type or in comparison to the absence of incomplete type, among the studies that reported the magnitude of the risk. According to this comprehensive review, most of the scientific evidence supports the utility of subtyping IM as a predictor of GC risk. Recognizing its usefulness by gastroenterologists should encourage pathologists to subtype IM. PMID:23280711

  3. The value of proteomics in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hiltermann, Thijo J. N.; Groen, Harry J. M.

    2015-01-01

    Many studies have identified the prognostic and predictive value of proteins or peptides in lung cancer but most failed to provide strong evidence for their clinical applicability. The strongest predictive proteins seem to be fatty acid-binding protein heart (H-FABP), and the 8-peak mass spectrography signature of VeriStrat. When focusing on VeriStrat, a ‘VeriStrat good’ profile did not discriminate between chemotherapy and erlotinib. The ‘VeriStrat poor’ profile showed a better outcome to chemotherapy than to erlotinib. VeriStrat is a prognostic test and only the “poor profile” discriminates for the type of therapy that should be chosen. Whether it adds useful information in patients with advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and wild type EGFR mutations is still doubtful. The position of the VeriStrat test in clinical practice is still not clear and we are waiting for prospective studies where biomarker test are involved in clinical decision. PMID:25815290

  4. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production. PMID:24477002

  5. Antioxidants accelerate lung cancer progression in mice.

    PubMed

    Sayin, Volkan I; Ibrahim, Mohamed X; Larsson, Erik; Nilsson, Jonas A; Lindahl, Per; Bergo, Martin O

    2014-01-29

    Antioxidants are widely used to protect cells from damage induced by reactive oxygen species (ROS). The concept that antioxidants can help fight cancer is deeply rooted in the general population, promoted by the food supplement industry, and supported by some scientific studies. However, clinical trials have reported inconsistent results. We show that supplementing the diet with the antioxidants N-acetylcysteine (NAC) and vitamin E markedly increases tumor progression and reduces survival in mouse models of B-RAF- and K-RAS-induced lung cancer. RNA sequencing revealed that NAC and vitamin E, which are structurally unrelated, produce highly coordinated changes in tumor transcriptome profiles, dominated by reduced expression of endogenous antioxidant genes. NAC and vitamin E increase tumor cell proliferation by reducing ROS, DNA damage, and p53 expression in mouse and human lung tumor cells. Inactivation of p53 increases tumor growth to a similar degree as antioxidants and abolishes the antioxidant effect. Thus, antioxidants accelerate tumor growth by disrupting the ROS-p53 axis. Because somatic mutations in p53 occur late in tumor progression, antioxidants may accelerate the growth of early tumors or precancerous lesions in high-risk populations such as smokers and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease who receive NAC to relieve mucus production.

  6. Personalized Radiation Therapy (PRT) for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews and discusses approaches and strategies of personalized radiation therapy (PRT) for lung cancers at four different levels: (1) clinically established PRT based on a patient's histology, stage, tumor volume and tumor locations; (2) personalized adaptive radiation therapy (RT) based on image response during treatment; (3) PRT based on biomarkers; (4) personalized fractionation schedule. The current RT practice for lung cancer is partially individualized according to tumor histology, stage, size/location, and combination with use of systemic therapy. During-RT PET-CT image guided adaptive treatment is being tested in a multicenter trial. Treatment response detected by the during-RT images may also provide a strategy to further personalize the remaining treatment. Research on biomarker-guided PRT is ongoing. The biomarkers include genomics, proteomics, microRNA, cytokines, metabolomics from tumor and blood samples, and radiomics from PET, CT, SPECT images. Finally, RT fractionation schedule may also be personalized to each individual patient to maximize therapeutic gain. Future PRT should be based on comprehensive considerations of knowledge acquired from all these levels, as well as consideration of the societal value such as cost and effectiveness.

  7. Personalized Radiation Therapy (PRT) for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Jin, Jian-Yue; Kong, Feng-Ming Spring

    2016-01-01

    This chapter reviews and discusses approaches and strategies of personalized radiation therapy (PRT) for lung cancers at four different levels: (1) clinically established PRT based on a patient's histology, stage, tumor volume and tumor locations; (2) personalized adaptive radiation therapy (RT) based on image response during treatment; (3) PRT based on biomarkers; (4) personalized fractionation schedule. The current RT practice for lung cancer is partially individualized according to tumor histology, stage, size/location, and combination with use of systemic therapy. During-RT PET-CT image guided adaptive treatment is being tested in a multicenter trial. Treatment response detected by the during-RT images may also provide a strategy to further personalize the remaining treatment. Research on biomarker-guided PRT is ongoing. The biomarkers include genomics, proteomics, microRNA, cytokines, metabolomics from tumor and blood samples, and radiomics from PET, CT, SPECT images. Finally, RT fractionation schedule may also be personalized to each individual patient to maximize therapeutic gain. Future PRT should be based on comprehensive considerations of knowledge acquired from all these levels, as well as consideration of the societal value such as cost and effectiveness. PMID:26703805

  8. Treatment of small cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zöchbauer-Müller, S; Pirker, R; Huber, H

    1999-01-01

    Small cell lung cancers, comprising approximately 20% of lung cancers, are rapidly growing and disseminating carcinomas which are initially chemosensitive but acquire drug resistance during the course of disease. Thus, outcome is poor with median survival of 10-16 months for patients with limited and 7-11 months for patients with extensive disease. Polychemotherapy with established drugs (platins, etoposide, anthracyclines, cyclophosphamide, ifosfamide and Vinca alkaloids) plays the major role in the treatment of this disease and results in overall response rates between 80%-95% for limited disease and 60%-80% for extensive disease. Dose-intensified chemotherapy and high-dose chemotherapy with peripheral blood progenitor cell support were tested in several trials but their exact impact on outcome remains to be determined. New drugs including the taxanes (paclitaxel, docetaxel), the topoisomerase I inhibitors (topotecan, irinotecan), vinorelbine and gemcitabine are currently evaluated in clinical trials. In limited disease, thoracic radiotherapy improves survival and prophylactic cranial irradiation should be administered to those with a reasonable chance of cure. PMID:10676558

  9. Practical use of advanced mouse models for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Safari, Roghaiyeh; Meuwissen, Ralph

    2015-01-01

    To date a variety of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC) mouse models have been developed that mimic human lung cancer. Chemically induced or spontaneous lung cancer in susceptible inbred strains has been widely used, but the more recent genetically engineered somatic mouse models recapitulate much better the genotype-phenotype correlations found in human lung cancer. Additionally, improved orthotopic transplantation of primary human cancer tissue fragments or cells into lungs of immune-compromised mice can be valuable tools for preclinical research such as antitumor drug tests. Here we give a short overview of most somatic mouse models for lung cancer that are currently in use. We accompany each different model with a description of its practical use and application for all major lung tumor types, as well as the intratracheal injection or direct injection of fresh or freeze-thawed tumor cells or tumor cell lines into lung parenchyma of recipient mice. All here presented somatic mouse models are based on the ability to (in) activate specific alleles at a time, and in a tissue-specific cell type, of choice. This spatial-temporal controlled induction of genetic lesions allows the selective introduction of main genetic lesions in an adult mouse lung as found in human lung cancer. The resulting conditional somatic mouse models can be used as versatile powerful tools in basic lung cancer research and preclinical translational studies alike. These distinctively advanced lung cancer models permit us to investigate initiation (cell of origin) and progression of lung cancer, along with response and resistance to drug therapy. Cre/lox or FLP/frt recombinase-mediated methods are now well-used techniques to develop tissue-restricted lung cancer in mice with tumor-suppressor gene and/or oncogene (in)activation. Intranasal or intratracheal administration of engineered adenovirus-Cre or lentivirus-Cre has been optimized for introducing Cre

  10. Analysis of Lung Flute–collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:26309391

  11. Analysis of Lung Flute-collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis. PMID:26309391

  12. Analysis of Lung Flute-collected Sputum for Lung Cancer Diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Su, Jian; Anjuman, Nigar; Guarnera, Maria A; Zhang, Howard; Stass, Sanford A; Jiang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Molecular analysis of sputum can help diagnose lung cancer. We have demonstrated that Lung Flute can be used to collect sputum from individuals who cannot spontaneously expectorate sputum. The objective of this study is to further evaluate the performance of the Lung Flute by comparing the characteristics of parallel samples collected with and without the Lung Flute and the usefulness for diagnosis of lung cancer. Fifty-six early-stage lung cancer patients (40 current smokers and 16 former smokers) and 73 cancer-free individuals (52 current smokers and 21 former smokers) were instructed to spontaneously cough and use Lung Flute for sputum sampling. Sputum cytology and polymerase chain reaction analysis of three miRNAs (miRs-21, 31, and 210) were performed in the specimens. All 92 current smokers and 11 (28.7%) of 37 former smokers spontaneously expectorated sputum and also produced sputum when using the Lung Flute. Twenty-seven former smokers (70.3%) who could not spontaneously expectorate sputum, however, were able to produce sputum when using the Lung Flute. The specimens were of low respiratory origin without contamination from other sources, eg, saliva. There was no difference of sputum volume and cell populations, diagnostic efficiency of cytology, and analysis of the miRNAs in the specimens collected by the two approaches. Analysis of the sputum miRNAs produced 83.93% sensitivity and 87.67% specificity for identifying lung cancer. Therefore, sputum collected by the Lung Flute has comparable features as spontaneously expectorated sputum. Using the Lung Flute enables former smokers who cannot spontaneously expectorate to provide adequate sputum to improve sputum collection for lung cancer diagnosis.

  13. Immunoproteasomes and immunotherapy-a smoking gun for lung cancer?

    PubMed

    Spits, Menno; Neefjes, Jacques

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in both women and men with some 221,200 new cases and 158,040 deaths reported in 2015. Almost 90% of these are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and these patients have a very poor prognosis. Recently a new treatment option for NSCLC appeared that strongly improved treatment responses-immunotherapy. Here we review the various forms of immunotherapy and how immune modification of proteasomes in lung cancer may support the immune system in controlling NSCLC. These immunoproteasomes then support recognition of NSCLC and may act as a biomarker for selecting responding patients to immunotherapy. PMID:27501321

  14. Lung cancer and exposure to radon in women - New Jersey

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenberg, J.B.; Klotz, J.B.; Wilcox, H.B.; Gel-del-Real, M.; Stemhagen, A. ); Nicholls, G.P. )

    1989-11-17

    In 1985, the New Jersey State Department of Health (NJDOH) initiated an epidemiologic study of lung cancer and exposure to radon in New Jersey women. In collaboration with the New Jersey State Department of Environmental Protection and the National Cancer Institute, NJDOH examined whether exposure to radon in homes is associated with increased lung cancer risk. This study was based on a previous statewide case-control study of risk for lung cancer. The data indicated that year-round exposures in living areas were two to five times lower than basement measurements taken during heating season. The difference increased with higher concentrations.

  15. Immunoproteasomes and immunotherapy—a smoking gun for lung cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Spits, Menno

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most prevalent cancer in both women and men with some 221,200 new cases and 158,040 deaths reported in 2015. Almost 90% of these are non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and these patients have a very poor prognosis. Recently a new treatment option for NSCLC appeared that strongly improved treatment responses—immunotherapy. Here we review the various forms of immunotherapy and how immune modification of proteasomes in lung cancer may support the immune system in controlling NSCLC. These immunoproteasomes then support recognition of NSCLC and may act as a biomarker for selecting responding patients to immunotherapy. PMID:27501321

  16. Lung Cancer in Railroad Workers Exposed to Diesel Exhaust

    PubMed Central

    Garshick, Eric; Laden, Francine; Hart, Jaime E.; Rosner, Bernard; Smith, Thomas J.; Dockery, Douglas W.; Speizer, Frank E.

    2004-01-01

    Diesel exhaust has been suspected to be a lung carcinogen. The assessment of this lung cancer risk has been limited by lack of studies of exposed workers followed for many years. In this study, we assessed lung cancer mortality in 54,973 U.S. railroad workers between 1959 and 1996 (38 years). By 1959, the U.S. railroad industry had largely converted from coal-fired to diesel-powered locomotives. We obtained work histories from the U.S. Railroad Retirement Board, and ascertained mortality using Railroad Retirement Board, Social Security, and Health Care Financing Administration records. Cause of death was obtained from the National Death Index and death certificates. There were 43,593 total deaths including 4,351 lung cancer deaths. Adjusting for a healthy worker survivor effect and age, railroad workers in jobs associated with operating trains had a relative risk of lung cancer mortality of 1.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.30–1.51). Lung cancer mortality did not increase with increasing years of work in these jobs. Lung cancer mortality was elevated in jobs associated with work on trains powered by diesel locomotives. Although a contribution from exposure to coal combustion products before 1959 cannot be excluded, these results suggest that exposure to diesel exhaust contributed to lung cancer mortality in this cohort. PMID:15531439

  17. Childhood body mass index and height and risk of histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer

    PubMed Central

    Aarestrup, J; Gamborg, M; Ulrich, L G; Sørensen, T I A; Baker, J L

    2016-01-01

    Background: Endometrial cancer risk factors include adult obesity and taller stature, but the influence of size earlier in life is incompletely understood. We examined whether childhood body mass index (BMI; kg m−2) and height were associated with histologic subtypes of endometrial cancer. Methods: From the Copenhagen School Health Records Register, 155 505 girls born 1930–1989 with measured weights and heights from 7 to 13 years were linked to health registers. BMI and height were transformed to age-specific z-scores. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals were estimated by Cox regressions. Results: A total of 1020 endometrial cancers were recorded. BMI was non-linearly associated with all endometrial cancers, oestrogen-dependent cancers and the subtype of endometrioid adenocarcinomas; associations were statistically significant and positive above a z-score=0 and non-significant below zero. Compared with a 7-year-old girl with a BMI z-score=0, an equally tall girl who was 3.6 kg heavier (BMI z-score=1.5) had a hazard ratio=1.53 (95% confidence interval: 1.29–1.82) for endometrioid adenocarcinoma. BMI was not associated with non-oestrogen-dependent cancers, except at the oldest childhood ages. Height at all ages was statistically significant and positively associated with all endometrial cancers, except non-oestrogen-dependent cancers. At 7 years, per ~5.2 cm (1 z-score), the risk of endometrioid adenocarcinoma was 1.18 (95% confidence interval: 1.09–1.28). Among non-users of unopposed oestrogens, associations between BMI and endometrioid adenocarcinoma strengthened, but no effects on height associations were observed. Conclusions: Endometrial carcinogenesis is linked to early-life body size, suggesting that childhood BMI and height may be useful indicators for the risk of later development of endometrial cancer and might aid in the early prevention of obesity-related endometrial cancers. PMID:27121254

  18. Brain metastasis in lung cancer: Building a molecular and systems-level understanding to improve outcomes.

    PubMed

    Ebben, Johnathan D; You, Ming

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is a clinically difficult disease with rising disease burden around the world. Unfortunately, most lung cancers present at a clinically advanced stage. Of these cancers, many also present with brain metastasis which complicates the clinical picture. This review summarizes current knowledge on the molecular basis of lung cancer brain metastases. We start from the clinical perspective, aiming to provide a clinical context for a significant problem that requires much deeper scientific investigation. We review new research governing the metastatic process, including tumor cell signaling, establishment of a receptive tumor niches in the brain and evaluate potential new therapeutic options that take advantage of these new scientific advances. Lung cancer remains the largest single cause of cancer mortality in the United States (Siegel et al., 2015). This continues to be the clinical picture despite significant advances in therapy, including the advent of targeted molecular therapies and newly adopted immunotherapies for certain subtypes of lung cancer. In the vast majority of cases, lung cancer presents as advanced disease; in many instances, this advanced disease state is intimately associated with micro and macrometastatic disease (Goldberg et al., 2015). For both non-small cell lung cancer and small cell lung cancer patients, the predominant metastatic site is the brain, with up to 68% of patients with mediastinal lymph node metastasis eventually demonstrating brain metastasis (Wang et al., 2009).The frequency (incidence) of brain metastasis is highest in lung cancers, relative to other common epithelial malignancies (Schouten et al., 2002). Other studies have attempted to predict the risk of brain metastasis in the setting of previously non-metastatic disease. One of the largest studies to do this, analyzing historical data from 1973 to 2011 using the SEER database revealed a 9% risk of patients with previously non-metastatic NSCLC developing brain

  19. Family history of breast and ovarian cancer and triple negative subtype in hispanic/latina women.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Kristin; Thompson, Patricia A; Wertheim, Betsy C; Martin, Lorena; Komenaka, Ian K; Bondy, Melissa; Daneri-Navarro, Adrian; Meza-Montenegro, Maria Mercedes; Gutierrez-Millan, Luis Enrique; Brewster, Abenaa; Madlensky, Lisa; Tobias, Malaika; Natarajan, Loki; Martínez, María Elena

    2014-01-01

    Familial breast and ovarian cancer prevalence was assessed among 1150 women of Mexican descent enrolled in a case-only, binational breast cancer study. Logistic regression was conducted to compare odds of triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) to non-TNBC according to family history of breast and breast or ovarian cancer among 914 of these women. Prevalence of breast cancer family history in a first- and first- or second-degree relative was 13.1% and 24.1%, respectively; that for breast or ovarian cancer in a first-degree relative was 14.9%. After adjustment for age and country of residence, women with a first-degree relative with breast cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with TNBC than non-TNBC (OR=1.98; 95% CI, 1.26-3.11). The odds of TNBC compared to non-TNBC were 1.93 (95% CI, 1.26-2.97) for women with a first-degree relative with breast or ovarian cancer. There were non-significant stronger associations between family history and TNBC among women diagnosed at age <50 compared to ≥50 years for breast cancer in a first-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.14) and a first- or second-degree relative (P-interaction = 0.07). Findings suggest that familial breast cancers are associated with triple negative subtype, possibly related to BRCA mutations in Hispanic/Latina women, which are strongly associated with TNBC. Family history is an important tool to identify Hispanic/Latina women who may be at increased risk of TNBC, and could benefit from prevention and early detection strategies. PMID:25713754

  20. Risk factors for lung cancer among nonsmoking Illinois residents.

    PubMed

    Keller, J E; Howe, H L

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible risk factors for lung cancer among nonsmokers. The Illinois State Cancer Registry was used to identify all nonsmoking lung cancer cases diagnosed between 1985 and 1987. Subjects were classified as nonsmokers only if their medical record specifically stated that they had never smoked during their lifetime. These cases were compared with nonsmoking colon cancer cases. White male nonsmoking lung cancer cases were more likely to have worked in the construction industry than controls [odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3] and to have worked in the bus service and urban transit industry (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.0-6.9), in the trucking service industry (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6), and in blast furnaces, steelworks, and rolling and finishing mills (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.6). White female cases were more likely to have worked as registered nurses than were the controls (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.5). Negative associations between lung cancer and farming were found in both white males (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5-0.7) and white females (OR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.01-0.6). Several other less plausible associations between employment and lung cancer were also found. To determine whether urban residence and associated air pollution increased the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers, rates among nonsmokers in Cook County were compared with those in the remainder of Illinois. Cook County rates of nonsmoking lung cancer were elevated among white females and nonwhite females, but not among males. Residences of the white female and nonwhite female lung cancer cases were mapped to determine whether clustering within Chicago had occurred. The absence of observable clustering suggests that the excess of female lung cancer cases in Cook County is not attributable to pollution. PMID:8432260

  1. Risk factors for lung cancer among nonsmoking Illinois residents.

    PubMed

    Keller, J E; Howe, H L

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine possible risk factors for lung cancer among nonsmokers. The Illinois State Cancer Registry was used to identify all nonsmoking lung cancer cases diagnosed between 1985 and 1987. Subjects were classified as nonsmokers only if their medical record specifically stated that they had never smoked during their lifetime. These cases were compared with nonsmoking colon cancer cases. White male nonsmoking lung cancer cases were more likely to have worked in the construction industry than controls [odds ratio (OR) = 1.6, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 1.2-2.3] and to have worked in the bus service and urban transit industry (OR = 2.6, 95% CI = 1.0-6.9), in the trucking service industry (OR = 2.1, 95% CI = 1.3-3.6), and in blast furnaces, steelworks, and rolling and finishing mills (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.6). White female cases were more likely to have worked as registered nurses than were the controls (OR = 1.9, 95% CI = 1.0-3.5). Negative associations between lung cancer and farming were found in both white males (OR = 0.6, 95% CI = 0.5-0.7) and white females (OR = 0.1, 95% CI = 0.01-0.6). Several other less plausible associations between employment and lung cancer were also found. To determine whether urban residence and associated air pollution increased the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers, rates among nonsmokers in Cook County were compared with those in the remainder of Illinois. Cook County rates of nonsmoking lung cancer were elevated among white females and nonwhite females, but not among males. Residences of the white female and nonwhite female lung cancer cases were mapped to determine whether clustering within Chicago had occurred. The absence of observable clustering suggests that the excess of female lung cancer cases in Cook County is not attributable to pollution.

  2. Ubc9 promotes invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Hui; Niu, Huiyan; Peng, Yang; Wang, Jiahe; He, Ping

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality worldwide. The mortality is high mainly due to the lack of known effective screening procedures; there is a high tendency for early spread and systemic therapies do not cure metastatic disease. Thus, it is important to investigate the molecular mechanism(s) of lung cancer development and, specifically, to identify an effective method by which to inhibit the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer. Ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme 9 (Ubc9), the sole conjugating enzyme for sumoylation, regulates protein function and plays a key role in tumorigenesis. Whether Ubc9 is involved in the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer remains unknown. Herein, we report that Ubc9 exhibits an important role in lung cancer invasion and metastasis. We first investigated the biological effect of Ubc9 on lung cancer by cloning the Ubc9 gene into a eukaryotic expression plasmid and stably expressing it in the human small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H446 in order to observe any biological changes. We further analyzed the effect of Ubc9 in an in vivo experiment, injecting NCI-H446 cells stably overexpressing Ubc9 into nude mice and analyzing their metastatic ability. Our results demonstrated that Ubc9 is expressed at higher levels in primary lung cancer tissue and metastatic nodules as compared to premalignant and/or normal tissue. Furthermore, we demonstrated that upregulation of Ubc9 expression promotes migration and invasion. Ubc9 likely plays an important role in cancer progression by promoting invasion and metastasis in lung cancer. PMID:23381475

  3. Stem cells and lung cancer: future therapeutic targets?

    PubMed

    Alison, Malcolm R; Lebrenne, Arielle C; Islam, Shahriar

    2009-09-01

    In both the UK and USA more people die of lung cancer than any other type of cancer. Lung cancer's high mortality rate is also reflected on a global scale, with lung cancer accounting for more than 1 million deaths per year. In tissues with ordered structure such a lung epithelia, it is likely that the cancers have their origins in normal adult stem cells, and then the tumours themselves are maintained by a population of malignant stem cells - so-called cancer stem cells. This review examines both these postulates in animal models and in the clinical setting, noting that stem cell niches appear to foster tumour development, and that drug resistance can often be attributed to malignant cells with stem cell properties. PMID:19653862

  4. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mullapudi, Nandita; Ye, Bin; Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D; Spivack, Simon D

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)-non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  5. Genome Wide Methylome Alterations in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Masako; Fazzari, Melissa; Han, Weiguo; Shi, Miao K.; Marquardt, Gaby; Lin, Juan; Wang, Tao; Keller, Steven; Zhu, Changcheng; Locker, Joseph D.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant cytosine 5-methylation underlies many deregulated elements of cancer. Among paired non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC), we sought to profile DNA 5-methyl-cytosine features which may underlie genome-wide deregulation. In one of the more dense interrogations of the methylome, we sampled 1.2 million CpG sites from twenty-four NSCLC tumor (T)–non-tumor (NT) pairs using a methylation-sensitive restriction enzyme- based HELP-microarray assay. We found 225,350 differentially methylated (DM) sites in adenocarcinomas versus adjacent non-tumor tissue that vary in frequency across genomic compartment, particularly notable in gene bodies (GB; p<2.2E-16). Further, when DM was coupled to differential transcriptome (DE) in the same samples, 37,056 differential loci in adenocarcinoma emerged. Approximately 90% of the DM-DE relationships were non-canonical; for example, promoter DM associated with DE in the same direction. Of the canonical changes noted, promoter (PR) DM loci with reciprocal changes in expression in adenocarcinomas included HBEGF, AGER, PTPRM, DPT, CST1, MELK; DM GB loci with concordant changes in expression included FOXM1, FERMT1, SLC7A5, and FAP genes. IPA analyses showed adenocarcinoma-specific promoter DMxDE overlay identified familiar lung cancer nodes [tP53, Akt] as well as less familiar nodes [HBEGF, NQO1, GRK5, VWF, HPGD, CDH5, CTNNAL1, PTPN13, DACH1, SMAD6, LAMA3, AR]. The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate The unique findings from this study include the discovery of numerous candidate methylation sites in both PR and GB regions not previously identified in NSCLC, and many non-canonical relationships to gene expression. These DNA methylation features could potentially be developed as risk or diagnostic biomarkers, or as candidate targets for newer methylation locus-targeted preventive or therapeutic agents. PMID:26683690

  6. Cadmium and lung cancer mortality accounting for simultaneous arsenic exposure

    PubMed Central

    Park, Robert M; Stayner, Leslie T; Petersen, Martin R; Finley-Couch, Melissa; Hornung, Richard; Rice, Carol

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Prior investigations identified an association between airborne cadmium and lung cancer but questions remain regarding confounding by arsenic, a well-established lung carcinogen. Methods A cadmium smelter population exhibiting excess lung cancer was re-analysed using a retrospective exposure assessment for arsenic (As), updated mortality (1940–2002), a revised cadmium (Cd) exposure matrix and improved work history information. Results Cumulative exposure metrics for both cadmium and arsenic were strongly associated making estimation of their independent effects difficult. Standardised mortality ratios (SMRs) were modelled with Poisson regression with the contribution of arsenic to lung cancer risk constrained by exposure–response estimates previously reported. The results demonstrate (1) a statistically significant effect of Cd independent of As (SMR=3.2 for 10 mg-year/m3 Cd, p=0.012), (2) a substantial healthy worker effect for lung cancer (for unexposed workers, SMR=0.69) and (3) a large deficit in lung cancer mortality among Hispanic workers (SMR=0.27, p=0.009), known to have low lung cancer rates. A supralinear dose-rate effect was observed (contribution to risk with increasing exposure intensity has declining positive slope). Lung cancer mortality was somewhat better predicted using a cadmium burden metric with a half-life of about 20–25 years. Conclusions These findings support an independent effect for cadmium in risk of lung cancer mortality. 1/1000 excess lifetime risk of lung cancer death is predicted from an airborne exposure of about 2.4 μg/m3 Cd. PMID:22271639

  7. About the Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer Research Group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approaches to clinical prevention studies including cancer immunoprevention.Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials ProgramThe group jointly administers the Phase 0/I/II Cancer Prevention Clinical Trials Program evaluating new agents, surrogate biomarkers, and technologies to identify premalignant lesions, and related cancers.  |

  8. Lung cancer and angiogenesis imaging using synchrotron radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Jun; Sun, Jianqi; Gu, Xiang; Xiao, Tiqiao; Liu, Ping; Xu, Lisa X.

    2010-04-01

    Early detection of lung cancer is the key to a cure, but a difficult task using conventional x-ray imaging. In the present study, synchrotron radiation in-line phase-contrast imaging was used to study lung cancer. Lewis lung cancer and 4T1 breast tumor metastasis in the lung were imaged, and the differences were clearly shown in comparison to normal lung tissue. The effect of the object-detector distance and the energy level on the phase-contrast difference was investigated and found to be in good agreement with the theory of in-line phase-contrast imaging. Moreover, 3D image reconstruction of lung tumor angiogenesis was obtained for the first time using a contrast agent, demonstrating the feasibility of micro-angiography with synchrotron radiation for imaging tumor angiogenesis deep inside the body.

  9. Predicting Diagnostic Gene Biomarkers for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Bin; Shao, Yang; Long, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the primary reason for death due to cancer worldwide, and non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common subtype of lung cancer. Most patients die from complications of NSCLC due to poor diagnosis. In this paper, we aimed to predict gene biomarkers that may be of use for diagnosis of NSCLC by integrating differential gene expression analysis with functional association network analysis. We first constructed an NSCLC-specific functional association network by combining gene expression correlation with functional association. Then, we applied a network partition algorithm to divide the network into gene modules and identify the most NSCLC-specific gene modules based on their differential expression pattern in between normal and NSCLC samples. Finally, from these modules, we identified genes that exhibited the most impact on the expression of their functionally associated genes in between normal and NSCLC samples and predicted them as NSCLC biomarkers. Literature review of the top predicted gene biomarkers suggested that most of them were already considered critical for development of NSCLC. PMID:27579312

  10. Preferentially Expressed Antigen of Melanoma Prevents Lung Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Zhengwang; Li, Lei; Lin, Zaijun; Xu, Wei; Han, Shuai; Cao, Wenjiao; Xu, Yunfei; Song, Dianwen; Yang, Xinghai; Xiao, Jianru

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death worldwide. The poor survival rate is largely due to the extensive local invasion and metastasis. However, the mechanisms underlying the invasion and metastasis of lung cancer cells remain largely elusive. In this study, we examined the role of preferentially expressed antigen of melanoma (PRAME) in lung cancer metastasis. Our results show that PRAME is downregulated in lung adenocarcinoma and lung bone metastasis compared with normal human lung. Knockdown of PRAME decreases the expression of E-Cadherin and promotes the proliferation, invasion, and metastasis of lung cancer cells by regulating multiple critical genes, most of which are related to cell migration, including MMP1, CCL2, CTGF, and PLAU. Clinical data analysis reveals that the expression of MMP1 correlates with the clinical features and outcome of lung adenocarcinoma. Taken together, our data demonstrate that PRAME plays a role in preventing the invasion and metastasis of lung adenocarcinoma and novel diagnostic or therapeutic strategies can be developed by targeting PRAME. PMID:27391090

  11. A 30-year perspective on psychosocial issues in lung cancer: how lung cancer "Came out of the Closet".

    PubMed

    Weiss, Talia; Weinberger, Mark; Schwerd, Arielle M; Holland, Jimmie

    2012-11-01

    Psychological responses to lung cancer have changed over the past 30 years as perceptions of the disease have changed. Previously seen as a fatal diagnosis, it is now regarded as a cancer whose treatment is increasingly effective as the science of the disease advances. The stigma of smoking is diminishing as more is learned about genetic factors and as more nonsmokers are diagnosed. Support groups are now widely available. The increasing social support and greater knowledge of lung cancer provide a more supportive environment in which patients cope with lung cancer today compared with 30 years ago.

  12. Pulmonary Endogenous Fluorescence Allows the Distinction of Primary Lung Cancer from the Perilesional Lung Parenchyma

    PubMed Central

    Benoit, Charlotte; Farcy, René; Garcia, Stéphane; Secq, Veronique; Gaubert, Jean-Yves; Trousse, Delphine; Orsini, Bastien; Doddoli, Christophe; Moniz-Koum, Helene; Thomas, Pascal Alexandre; D’journo, Xavier Benoit

    2015-01-01

    Background Pre-therapeutic pathological diagnosis is a crucial step of the management of pulmonary nodules suspected of being non small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), especially in the frame of currently implemented lung cancer screening programs in high-risk patients. Based on a human ex vivo model, we hypothesized that an embedded device measuring endogenous fluorescence would be able to distinguish pulmonary malignant lesions from the perilesional lung tissue. Methods Consecutive patients who underwent surgical resection of pulmonary lesions were included in this prospective and observational study over an 8-month period. Measurements were performed back table on surgical specimens in the operative room, both on suspicious lesions and the perilesional healthy parenchym