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Sample records for lung cancer xenograft

  1. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; Devorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-02-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts.

  2. Treatment of malignant effusion by oncolytic virotherapy in an experimental subcutaneous xenograft model of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Malignant pleural effusion (MPE) is associated with advanced stages of lung cancer and is mainly dependent on invasion of the pleura and expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) by cancer cells. As MPE indicates an incurable disease with limited palliative treatment options and poor outcome, there is an urgent need for new and efficient treatment options. Methods In this study, we used subcutaneously generated PC14PE6 lung adenocarcinoma xenografts in athymic mice that developed subcutaneous malignant effusions (ME) which mimic pleural effusions of the orthotopic model. Using this approach monitoring of therapeutic intervention was facilitated by direct observation of subcutaneous ME formation without the need of sacrificing mice or special imaging equipment as in case of MPE. Further, we tested oncolytic virotherapy using Vaccinia virus as a novel treatment modality against ME in this subcutaneous PC14PE6 xenograft model of advanced lung adenocarcinoma. Results We demonstrated significant therapeutic efficacy of Vaccinia virus treatment of both advanced lung adenocarcinoma and tumor-associated ME. We attribute the efficacy to the virus-mediated reduction of tumor cell-derived VEGF levels in tumors, decreased invasion of tumor cells into the peritumoral tissue, and to viral infection of the blood vessel-invading tumor cells. Moreover, we showed that the use of oncolytic Vaccinia virus encoding for a single-chain antibody (scAb) against VEGF (GLAF-1) significantly enhanced mono-therapy of oncolytic treatment. Conclusions Here, we demonstrate for the first time that oncolytic virotherapy using tumor-specific Vaccinia virus represents a novel and promising treatment modality for therapy of ME associated with advanced lung cancer. PMID:23635329

  3. Raman spectroscopy identifies radiation response in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Harder, Samantha J.; Isabelle, Martin; DeVorkin, Lindsay; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G.; Lum, Julian J.; Jirasek, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    External beam radiation therapy is a standard form of treatment for numerous cancers. Despite this, there are no approved methods to account for patient specific radiation sensitivity. In this report, Raman spectroscopy (RS) was used to identify radiation-induced biochemical changes in human non-small cell lung cancer xenografts. Chemometric analysis revealed unique radiation-related Raman signatures that were specific to nucleic acid, lipid, protein and carbohydrate spectral features. Among these changes was a dramatic shift in the accumulation of glycogen spectral bands for doses of 5 or 15 Gy when compared to unirradiated tumours. When spatial mapping was applied in this analysis there was considerable variability as we found substantial intra- and inter-tumour heterogeneity in the distribution of glycogen and other RS spectral features. Collectively, these data provide unique insight into the biochemical response of tumours, irradiated in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of RS for detecting distinct radiobiological responses in human tumour xenografts. PMID:26883914

  4. Biosynthesized Platinum Nanoparticles Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Lung-Cancer Cells in vitro and Delay the Growth of a Human Lung-Tumor Xenograft in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Yogesh, Bendale; Vineeta, Bendale; Rammesh, Natu; Saili, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Lung cancer remains a deadly disease with unsatisfactory overall survival. Cisplatin, a standard platinum (Pt)-based chemotherapeutic agent, has the potential to inhibit the growth of lung cancer. Its use, however, is occasionally limited by severe organ toxicity. However, until now, no systematic study has been conducted to verify its efficacy with proper experimental support in vivo. Therefore, we examined whether biosynthesized Pt nanoparticles (NPs) inhibited human lung cancer in vitro and in vivo to validate their use in alternative and complementary medicine. Methods: We evaluated the in vitro and the in vivo anticancer efficiencies of biosynthesized Pt NPs in a subcutaneous xenograft model with A549 cells. Severe combined immune deficient mice (SCID) were divided into four groups: group 1 being the vehicle control group and groups 2, 3 and 4 being the experimental groups. Once the tumor volume had reached 70 ─ 75 mm3, the progression profile of the tumor growth kinetics and the body weights of the mice were measured every week for 6 weeks after oral administration of Pt NPs. Doses of Pt NPs of 500, 1,000 and 2,000 mg/kg of body weight were administered to the experimental groups and a dose of honey was administered to the vehicle control group. The efficacy was quantified by using the delay in tumor growth following the administration of Pt NPs of A549 human-lung-cancer xenografts growing in SCID mice. Results: The in vitro cytotoxicity evaluation indicated that Pt NPs, in a dose-dependent manner, inhibited the growth of A549 cells, and the in vivo evaluation showed that Pt NPs at the mid and high doses effectively inhibited and delayed the growth of lung cancer in SCID mice. Conclusion: These findings confirm the antitumor properties of biosynthesized Pt NPs and suggest that they may be a cost-effective alternative for the treatment of patients with lung cancer. PMID:27386144

  5. Effects of green-synthesized silver nanoparticles on lung cancer cells in vitro and grown as xenograft tumors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    He, Yan; Du, Zhiyun; Ma, Shijing; Liu, Yue; Li, Dongli; Huang, Huarong; Jiang, Sen; Cheng, Shupeng; Wu, Wenjing; Zhang, Kun; Zheng, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have now been recognized as promising therapeutic molecules and are extending their use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. This study demonstrates for the first time the antitumor activity of green-synthesized AgNPs against lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. Cytotoxicity effect was explored on human lung cancer H1299 cells in vitro by MTT and trypan blue assays. Apoptosis was measured by morphological assessment, and nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB) transcriptional activity was determined by a luciferase reporter gene assay. The expressions of phosphorylated stat3, bcl-2, survivin, and caspase-3 were examined by Western blot analysis. AgNPs showed dose-dependent cytotoxicity and stimulation of apoptosis in H1299 cells. The effects on H1299 cells correlated well with the inhibition of NF-κB activity, a decrease in bcl-2, and an increase in caspase-3 and survivin expression. AgNPs significantly suppressed the H1299 tumor growth in a xenograft severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. The results demonstrate the anticancer activities of AgNPs, suggesting that they may act as potential beneficial molecules in lung cancer chemoprevention and chemotherapy, especially for early-stage intervention. PMID:27217750

  6. Bevacizumab radiosensitizes non-small cell lung cancer xenografts by inhibiting DNA double-strand break repair in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Gao, Hui; Xue, Jianxin; Zhou, Lin; Lan, Jie; He, Jiazhuo; Na, Feifei; Yang, Lifei; Deng, Lei; Lu, You

    2015-08-28

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the effects of biweekly bevacizumab administration on a tumor microenvironment and to investigate the mechanisms of radiosensitization that were induced by it. Briefly, bevacizumab was administered intravenously to Balb/c nude mice bearing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H1975 xenografts; in addition, bevacizumab was added to NSCLC or endothelial cells (ECs) in vitro, followed by irradiation (IR). The anti-tumor efficacy, anti-angiogenic efficacy and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were evaluated. The activation of signaling pathways was determined using immunoprecipitation (IP) and WB analyses. Finally, biweekly bevacizumab administration inhibited the growth of H1975 xenografts and induced vascular normalization periodically. Bevacizumab more significantly increased cellular DSB and EC apoptosis when administered 1 h prior to 12 Gy/1f IR than when administered 5 days prior to IR, thereby inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and growth. In vitro, bevacizumab more effectively increased DSBs and apoptosis prior to IR and inhibited the clonogenic survival of ECs but not NSCLC cells. Using IP and WB analyses, we confirmed that bevacizumab can directly inhibit the phosphorylation of components of the VEGR2/PI3K/Akt/DNA-PKcs signaling pathway that are induced by IR in ECs. In conclusion, bevacizumab radiosensitizes NSCLC xenografts mainly by inhibiting DSB repair in ECs rather than by inducing vascular normalization.

  7. Suppression of colorectal cancer subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis using nanoparticle-mediated drug delivery to tumor neovasculature.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhao, Mei; Liu, Ya-Rong; Luan, Xin; Guan, Ying-Yun; Lu, Qin; Yu, De-Hong; Bai, Fan; Chen, Hong-Zhuan; Fang, Chao

    2014-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is a validated approach for colorectal cancer (CRC) treatment. However, diverse adverse effects inevitably appear due to the off-target effect of the approved antiangiogenic inhibitors on the physiological functions and homeostasis. This study was to investigate a new tumor vessel targeting nanoparticulate drug delivery system, F56 peptide conjugated nanoparticles loading vincristine (F56-VCR-NP), for the effective treatment of CRC subcutaneous xenograft and experimental lung metastasis model. The controlled release behavior and in vivo pharmacokinetic profile of F56-VCR-NP were characterized. The tumor vessel targeting and antiangiogenic activity of F56-VCR-NP was evaluated in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC, a classical cell model mimicking tumor vascular EC), subcutaneous human HCT-15 xenograft in immunodeficient nude mice, and experimental CT-26 lung metastasis model in immunocompetent mice. The therapeutic efficacy (animal survival and toxicity) was further investigated in the model of CT-26 lung metastasis in mice. F56-VCR-NP could achieve 30-day controlled drug release in PBS (pH 7.4) and exhibited favorable long-circulating feature in vivo. F56-VCR-NP could accurately target the CRC neovasculature and elicit nanoparticle internalization in the tumor vascular EC, where the antiangiogenic VCR-induced dramatic EC apoptosis and necrosis of CRC tissue. F56-VCR-NP significantly prolonged the mouse survival with no obvious toxicity (weight loss and anepithymia) in the CT-26 lung metastasis mice model, and this pronounced antitumor effect was closely related with the decreased microvessel density in the metastases. The present nanoparticle-based targeted antiangiogenic therapy may provide a new promising approach for the therapy of CRC and lung metastasis, which deserves further translational research.

  8. 90Y-Labeled Anti-ROBO1 Monoclonal Antibody Exhibits Antitumor Activity against Small Cell Lung Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Fujiwara, Kentaro; Koyama, Keitaro; Suga, Kosuke; Ikemura, Masako; Saito, Yasutaka; Hino, Akihiro; Iwanari, Hiroko; Kusano-Arai, Osamu; Mitsui, Kenichi; Kasahara, Hiroyuki; Fukayama, Masashi; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Hamakubo, Takao; Momose, Toshimitsu

    2015-01-01

    Introduction ROBO1 is a membrane protein that contributes to tumor metastasis and angiogenesis. We previously reported that 90Y-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG) showed an antitumor effect against ROBO1-positive tumors. In this study, we performed a biodistribution study and radioimmunotherapy (RIT) against ROBO1-positive small cell lung cancer (SCLC) models. Methods For the biodistribution study, 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1 monoclonal antibody (111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG) was injected into ROBO1-positive SCLC xenograft mice via the tail vein. To evaluate antitumor effects, an RIT study was performed, and SCLC xenograft mice were treated with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG. Tumor volume and body weight were periodically measured throughout the experiments. The tumors and organs of mice were then collected, and a pathological analysis was carried out. Results As a result of the biodistribution study, we observed tumor uptake of 111In-anti-ROBO1 IgG. The liver, kidney, spleen, and lung showed comparably high accumulation of 111In-labeled anti-ROBO1. In the RIT study, 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG significantly reduced tumor volume compared with baseline. Pathological analyses of tumors revealed coagulation necrosis and fatal degeneration of tumor cells, significant reduction in the number of Ki-67-positive cells, and an increase in the number of apoptotic cells. A transient reduction of hematopoietic cells was observed in the spleen, sternum, and femur. Conclusions These results suggest that RIT with 90Y-anti-ROBO1 IgG is a promising treatment for ROBO1-positive SCLC. PMID:26017283

  9. Gene mutations in primary tumors and corresponding patient-derived xenografts derived from non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Shaohua; Cao, Mengru; Li, Hongyu; Hu, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shuhong; Pataer, Apar; Heymach, John V.; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Zhang, Qingxiu; Shaw, Kenna R.; Chen, Ken; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Michael; Hofstetter, Wayne; Mehran, Reza; Rice, David; Roth, Jack A.; Sepesi, Boris; Swisher, Stephen G.; Vaporciyan, Ara; Walsh, Garrett L.; Johnson, Faye M.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Molecular annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are useful for the preclinical investigation of anticancer drugs and individualized anticancer therapy. We established 23 PDXs from 88 surgical specimens of lung cancer patients and determined gene mutations in these PDXs and their paired primary tumors by ultradeep exome sequencing on 202 cancer-related genes. The numbers of primary tumors with deleterious mutations in TP53, KRAS, PI3KCA, ALK, STK11, and EGFR were 43.5%, 21.7%, 17.4%, 17.4%, 13.0%, and 8.7%, respectively. Other genes with deleterious mutations in ≥3 (13.0%) primary tumors were MLL3, SETD2, ATM, ARID1A, CRIPAK, HGF, BAI3, EP300, KDR, PDGRRA and RUNX1. Of 315 mutations detected in the primary tumors, 293 (93%) were also detected in their corresponding PDXs, indicating that PDXs have the capacity to recapitulate the mutations in primary tumors. Nevertheless, a substantial number of mutations had higher allele frequencies in the PDXs than in the primary tumors, or were not detectable in the primary tumor, suggesting the possibility of tumor cell enrichment in PDXs or heterogeneity in the primary tumors. The molecularly annotated PDXs generated from this study could be useful for future translational studies. PMID:25444907

  10. Gene mutations in primary tumors and corresponding patient-derived xenografts derived from non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Chuncheng; Wang, Li; Peng, Shaohua; Cao, Mengru; Li, Hongyu; Hu, Jing; Huang, Xiao; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Hui; Wu, Shuhong; Pataer, Apar; Heymach, John V; Eterovic, Agda Karina; Zhang, Qingxiu; Shaw, Kenna R; Chen, Ken; Futreal, Andrew; Wang, Michael; Hofstetter, Wayne; Mehran, Reza; Rice, David; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Swisher, Stephen G; Vaporciyan, Ara; Walsh, Garrett L; Johnson, Faye M; Fang, Bingliang

    2015-02-01

    Molecular annotated patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models are useful for the preclinical investigation of anticancer drugs and individualized anticancer therapy. We established 23 PDXs from 88 surgical specimens of lung cancer patients and determined gene mutations in these PDXs and their paired primary tumors by ultradeep exome sequencing on 202 cancer-related genes. The numbers of primary tumors with deleterious mutations in TP53, KRAS, PI3KCA, ALK, STK11, and EGFR were 43.5%, 21.7%, 17.4%, 17.4%, 13.0%, and 8.7%, respectively. Other genes with deleterious mutations in ≥3 (13.0%) primary tumors were MLL3, SETD2, ATM, ARID1A, CRIPAK, HGF, BAI3, EP300, KDR, PDGRRA and RUNX1. Of 315 mutations detected in the primary tumors, 293 (93%) were also detected in their corresponding PDXs, indicating that PDXs have the capacity to recapitulate the mutations in primary tumors. Nevertheless, a substantial number of mutations had higher allele frequencies in the PDXs than in the primary tumors, or were not detectable in the primary tumor, suggesting the possibility of tumor cell enrichment in PDXs or heterogeneity in the primary tumors. The molecularly annotated PDXs generated from this study could be useful for future translational studies.

  11. A HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope induces anti-tumor effects against human lung cancer in mouse xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Chiang, I-Ping; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is attractive for antigen-specific T cell-mediated anti-tumor therapy, especially in induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this report, we evaluated human CTL epitope-induced anti-tumor effects in human lung cancer xenograft models. The tumor associated antigen L6 (TAL6) is highly expressed in human lung cancer cell lines and tumor specimens as compared to normal lung tissues. TAL6 derived peptides strongly inhibited tumor growth, cancer metastasis and prolonged survival time in HLA-A2 transgenic mice immunized with a formulation of T-helper (Th) peptide, synthetic CpG ODN, and adjuvant Montanide ISA-51 (ISA-51). Adoptive transfer of peptide-induced CTL cells from HLA-A2 transgenic mice into human tumor xenograft SCID mice significantly inhibited tumor growth. Furthermore, combination of CTL-peptide immunotherapy and gemcitabine additively improved the therapeutic effects. This pre-clinical evaluation model provides a useful platform to develop efficient immunotherapeutic drugs to treat lung cancer and demonstrates a promising strategy with benefit of antitumor immune responses worthy of further development in clinical trials. PMID:26621839

  12. A HLA-A2-restricted CTL epitope induces anti-tumor effects against human lung cancer in mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Sher, Yuh-Pyng; Lin, Su-I; Chen, I-Hua; Liu, Hsin-Yu; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Chiang, I-Ping; Roffler, Steve; Chen, Hsin-Wei; Liu, Shih-Jen

    2016-01-01

    Cancer immunotherapy is attractive for antigen-specific T cell-mediated anti-tumor therapy, especially in induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. In this report, we evaluated human CTL epitope-induced anti-tumor effects in human lung cancer xenograft models. The tumor associated antigen L6 (TAL6) is highly expressed in human lung cancer cell lines and tumor specimens as compared to normal lung tissues. TAL6 derived peptides strongly inhibited tumor growth, cancer metastasis and prolonged survival time in HLA-A2 transgenic mice immunized with a formulation of T-helper (Th) peptide, synthetic CpG ODN, and adjuvant Montanide ISA-51 (ISA-51). Adoptive transfer of peptide-induced CTL cells from HLA-A2 transgenic mice into human tumor xenograft SCID mice significantly inhibited tumor growth. Furthermore, combination of CTL-peptide immunotherapy and gemcitabine additively improved the therapeutic effects. This pre-clinical evaluation model provides a useful platform to develop efficient immunotherapeutic drugs to treat lung cancer and demonstrates a promising strategy with benefit of antitumor immune responses worthy of further development in clinical trials. PMID:26621839

  13. Setting up a wide panel of patient-derived tumor xenografts of non-small cell lung cancer by improving the preanalytical steps.

    PubMed

    Ilie, Marius; Nunes, Manoel; Blot, Lydia; Hofman, Véronique; Long-Mira, Elodie; Butori, Catherine; Selva, Eric; Merino-Trigo, Ana; Vénissac, Nicolas; Mouroux, Jérôme; Vrignaud, Patricia; Hofman, Paul

    2015-02-01

    With the ongoing need to improve therapy for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) there has been increasing interest in developing reliable preclinical models to test novel therapeutics. Patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX) are considered to be interesting candidates. However, the establishment of such model systems requires highly specialized research facilities and introduces logistic challenges. We aimed to establish an extensive well-characterized panel of NSCLC xenograft models in the context of a long-distance research network after careful control of the preanalytical steps. One hundred fresh surgically resected NSCLC specimens were shipped in survival medium at room temperature from a hospital-integrated biobank to animal facilities. Within 24 h post-surgery, tumor fragments were subcutaneously xenografted into immunodeficient mice. PDX characterization was performed by histopathological, immunohistochemical, aCGH and next-generation sequencing approaches. For this model system, the tumor take rate was 35%, with higher rates for squamous carcinoma (60%) than for adenocarcinoma (13%). Patients for whom PDX tumors were obtained had a significantly shorter disease-free survival (DFS) compared to patients for whom no PDX tumors (P = 0.039) were obtained. We established a large panel of PDX NSCLC models with a high frequency of mutations (29%) in EGFR, KRAS, NRAS, MEK1, BRAF, PTEN, and PI3KCA genes and with gene amplification (20%) of c-MET and FGFR1. This new patient-derived NSCLC xenograft collection, established regardless of the considerable time required and the distance between the clinic and the animal facilities, recapitulated the histopathology and molecular diversity of NSCLC and provides stable and reliable preclinical models for human lung cancer research.

  14. Suppression of tumor growth in lung cancer xenograft model mice by poly(sorbitol-co-PEI)-mediated delivery of osteopontin siRNA.

    PubMed

    Cho, Won-Young; Hong, Seong-Ho; Singh, Bijay; Islam, Mohammad Ariful; Lee, Somin; Lee, Ah Young; Gankhuyag, Nomundelger; Kim, Ji-Eun; Yu, Kyeong-Nam; Kim, Kwang-Ho; Park, Young-Chan; Cho, Chong-Su; Cho, Myung-Haing

    2015-08-01

    Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated gene silencing represents a promising strategy for treating diseases such as cancer; however, specific gene silencing requires an effective delivery system to overcome the instability and low transfection efficiency of siRNAs. To address this issue, a polysorbitol-based transporter (PSOT) was prepared by low molecular weight branched polyethylenimine (bPEI) crosslinked with sorbitol diacrylate (SDA). Osteopontin (OPN) gene, which is highly associated with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) was targeted by siRNA therapy using siRNA targeting OPN (siOPN). Characterization study confirmed that PSOT formed compact complexes with siOPN and protected siOPN against degradation by RNase. PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated low cytotoxicity and enhanced transfection efficiency in vitro, suggesting that this carrier may be suitable for gene silencing. In the A549 and H460 lung cancer cell lines, PSOT/siOPN complexes demonstrated significant silencing efficiency at both RNA and protein levels. To study in vivo tumor growth suppression, two lung cancer cell-xenograft mouse models were prepared and PSOT/siOPN complexes were delivered into the mice through intravenous injection. The siOPN-treated groups demonstrated significantly reduced OPN expression at both the RNA and protein levels as well as suppression of tumor volume and weight. Taken together, siOPN delivery using PSOT may present an effective and novel therapeutic system for lung cancer treatment.

  15. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  16. Tumor growth affects the metabonomic phenotypes of multiple mouse non-involved organs in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shan; Tian, Yuan; Hu, Yili; Zhang, Nijia; Hu, Sheng; Song, Dandan; Wu, Zhengshun; Wang, Yulan; Cui, Yanfang; Tang, Huiru

    2016-01-01

    The effects of tumorigenesis and tumor growth on the non-involved organs remain poorly understood although many research efforts have already been made for understanding the metabolic phenotypes of various tumors. To better the situation, we systematically analyzed the metabolic phenotypes of multiple non-involved mouse organ tissues (heart, liver, spleen, lung and kidney) in an A549 lung cancer xenograft model at two different tumor-growth stages using the NMR-based metabonomics approaches. We found that tumor growth caused significant metabonomic changes in multiple non-involved organ tissues involving numerous metabolic pathways, including glycolysis, TCA cycle and metabolisms of amino acids, fatty acids, choline and nucleic acids. Amongst these, the common effects are enhanced glycolysis and nucleoside/nucleotide metabolisms. These findings provided essential biochemistry information about the effects of tumor growth on the non-involved organs. PMID:27329570

  17. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Lung Cancer What is Lung Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made ... button on your keyboard.) Two Major Types of Lung Cancer There are two major types of lung ...

  18. PKM2 Thr454 phosphorylation increases its nuclear translocation and promotes xenograft tumor growth in A549 human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenhai; Huang, Liangqian; Qiao, Pengyun; Jiang, Aifang; Wang, Li; Yang, Tingting; Tang, Shengjian; Zhang, Wei; Ren, Chune

    2016-05-13

    Pyruvate kinase M2 (PKM2) is a key enzyme of glycolysis which is highly expressed in many tumor cells, and plays an important role in the Warburg effect. In previous study, we found PIM2 phosphorylates PKM2 at Thr454 residue (Yu, etl 2013). However, the functions of PKM2 Thr454 modification in cancer cells still remain unclear. Here we find PKM2 translocates into the nucleus after Thr454 phosphorylation. Replacement of wild type PKM2 with a mutant (T454A) enhances mitochondrial respiration, decreases pentose phosphate pathway, and enhances chemosensitivity in A549 cells. In addition, the mutant (T454A) PKM2 reduces xenograft tumor growth in nude mice. These findings demonstrate that PKM2 T454 phosphorylation is a potential therapeutic target in lung cancer. PMID:27045080

  19. Design, synthesis, and validation of Axl-targeted monoclonal antibody probe for microPET imaging in human lung cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuanglong; Li, Dan; Guo, Jiacong; Canale, Nicolette; Li, Xiuqing; Liu, Ren; Krasnoperov, Valery; Gill, Parkash S; Conti, Peter S; Shan, Hong; Li, Zibo

    2014-11-01

    Accumulating experimental evidence indicates that overexpression of the oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinase, Axl, plays a key role in the tumorigenesis and metastasis of various types of cancer. The objective of this study is to design a novel imaging probe based on the monoclonal antibody, h173, for microPET imaging of Axl expression in human lung cancer. A bifunctional chelator, DOTA, was conjugated to h173, followed by radiolabeling with (64)Cu. The binding of DOTA-h173 to the Axl receptor was first evaluated by a cell uptake assay and flow cytometry analysis using human lung cancer cell lines. The probe (64)Cu-DOTA-h173 was further evaluated by microPET imaging, and ex vivo histology studies in the Axl-positive A549 tumors. In vitro cellular study showed that Axl probe, (64)Cu-DOTA-h173, was highly immuno-reactive with A549 cells. Western blot analysis confirmed that Axl is highly expressed in the A549 cell line. For microPET imaging, the A549 xenografts demonstrated a significantly higher (64)Cu-DOTA-h173 uptake compared to the NCI-H249 xenograft (a negative control model). Furthermore, (64)Cu-DOTA-h173 uptake in A549 is significantly higher than that of (64)Cu-DOTA-hIgG. Immuno-fluorescence staining was consistent with the in vivo micro-PET imaging results. In conclusion, (64)Cu-DOTA-h173 could be potentially used as a probe for noninvasive imaging of Axl expression, which could collect important information regarding tumor response to Axl-targeted therapeutic interventions.

  20. Brassinin inhibits STAT3 signaling pathway through modulation of PIAS-3 and SOCS-3 expression and sensitizes human lung cancer xenograft in nude mice to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jong Hyun; Kim, Chulwon; Sethi, Gautam; Ahn, Kwang Seok

    2015-01-01

    Persistent phosphorylation of signal transducers and activators of transcription 3 (STAT3) is frequently observed in tumor cells. We found that brassinin (BSN) suppressed both constitutive and IL-6-inducible STAT3 activation in lung cancer cells. Moreover, BSN induced PIAS-3 protein and mRNA, whereas the expression of SOCS-3 was reduced. Knockdown of PIAS-3 by small interfering RNA prevented inhibition of STAT3 and cytotoxicity by BSN. Overexpression of SOCS-3 in BSN-treated cells increased STAT3 phosphorylation and cell viability. BSN down-regulated STAT3-regulated gene products, inhibited proliferation, invasion, as well as induced apoptosis. Most importantly, when administered intraperitoneally, combination of BSN and paclitaxel significantly decreased the tumor development in a xenograft lung cancer mouse model associated with down-modulation of phospho-STAT3, Ki-67 and CD31. We suggest that BSN inhibits STAT3 signaling through modulation of PIAS-3 and SOCS-3, thereby attenuating tumor growth and increasing sensitivity to paclitaxel. PMID:25788267

  1. Intracellular expression of a single-chain antibody directed against type IV collagenase inhibits the growth of lung cancer xenografts in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wang, W; Zhang, S; Li, Y; Xu, L; Zhou, J; Zhen, Y

    2000-08-01

    It was documented that type IV collagenase with two subtypes of 72 ku/MMP-2 and 92 ku/MMP-9 plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis. The endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-retained, single chain Fv antibody fragment (scFv) was used to inhibit the function of type IV collagenase. For expression in mammalian cells, the assembled scFv M97 gene with ER retention signal encoding 6 additional amino acids (SEKDEL) was reamplified by PCR. The amplified fragments were cloned into the pcDNA3.1 vector. The resulting plasmid was sequenced and then introduced into PG cells, a highly metastatic human lung cancer cell line, by lipofectAMINE method. The result of intrabody gene therapy showed that type IV collegenase expression was down regulated significantly as measured by ELISA. The biological behavior of PG cell, such as the ability of in vitro invasion through Matrigel, colony formation on soft agar, was also inhibited by scFv M97 transfection. Animal experiments in a xenograft model of human lung cancer showed that scFv M97 transfection significantly prolonged the survival time of nude mice. The results indicate that intracellular antibody technology represents a novel and efficient way to abrogate selectively the activity of type IV collagenase. PMID:18726348

  2. Inhibition of Tumor Growth and Angiogenesis by a Lysophosphatidic Acid Antagonist in a Engineered Three-dimensional Lung Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xiaoyu; Prestwich, Glenn D

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND We developed an engineered three-dimensional (3-D) tumor xenograft model of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in nude mice, and used this model to evaluate a dual-activity inhibitor of lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) biosynthesis and receptor activation. METHODS First, BrP-LPA, a pan-antagonist for four LPA receptors and inhibitor of the lyosphospholipase D activity of autotaxin, was examined for inhibition of cell migration and cell invasion by human NSCLC A549 cells. Second, A549 cells were encapsulated in 3-D in three semi-synthetic ECMs based on chemically-modified glycosaminoglycans, and injected subcutaneously in nude mice. Tumor volume and vascularity were deteremined as a function of sECM composition. Third, engineered NSCLC xenografts were formed from A549 cells in either Extracel-HP or Matrigel, and mice were treated with four intraperitoneal injections of 3 mg/kg of BrP-LPA. RESULTS First, BrP-LPA inhibited cell migration and invasiveness of A549 cells in vitro. Second, tumor growth and microvessel formation for 3-D encapsulated A549 cells in vivo in nude mice increased in the order: buffer only < Extracel < Extracel-HP < Extracel-HP containing growth factors plus laminin. Third, tumor volumes increased rapidly in both Matrigel and Extracel-HP encapsulated A549 cells, and tumor growth was markedly inhibited by BrP-LPA treatment. Finally, tumor vascularization was dramatically reduced in the A549 tumors treated with BrP-LPA. CONCLUSIONS Engineered A549 lung tumors can be created by 3-D encapsulation in an ECM substitute with user controlled composition. The engineered tumors regress and lose vascularity in response to a dual activity inhibitor of the LPA signaling pathway. PMID:20143443

  3. Treatment of small-cell lung cancer xenografts with iodine-313-anti-neural cell adhesion molecule monoclonal antibody and evaluation of absorbed dose in tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Hosono, Makoto; Endo, Keigo; Hosono, Masako N.

    1994-02-01

    Human small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is considered a feasible target for immunotherapy using a radiolabeled monoclonal antibody (Mab). A murine Mab, NE150 (IgG1), reacts with the neural cell adhesion molecule, which is identical to cluster 1 antigen of SCLC. To estimate their therapeutic effects, NE150 and an isotype-matched control Mab were labeled with {sup 131}I and administered intravenously as a single dose into athymic mice inoculated with a NCI-H69 SCLC xenograft. The absorbed dose in organs was also examined based upon a long-term biodistribution study of {sup 131}I-NE150. Tumors initial volume 563.4 {plus_minus} 223.5 mm{sup 3} treated with 11.1 MBq (300 {mu}Ci) of {sup 131}I-NE150 diminished and became invisible at days 30-33, demonstrating a 60-day mean growth delay to reach a tripled initial volume compared with sham-treated tumors. Cumulative absorbed doses were estimated to be 2310, 410, 500, 330, and 790 cGy for the tumor, liver, kidney, spleen and lung, respectively. Iodine-131-NE150 had potent therapeutic effects against SCLC transplants in athymic mice, however, careful assessment of the side effects, improvement of radioiodination and chimerization of the Mab might be necessary to achieve efficient targeting in clinical therapeutic applications. 25 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. Tubeimoside-1 suppresses tumor angiogenesis by stimulation of proteasomal VEGFR2 and Tie2 degradation in a non-small cell lung cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Yuan; Körbel, Christina; Scheuer, Claudia; Nenicu, Anca; Menger, Michael D.; Laschke, Matthias W.

    2016-01-01

    Tubeimoside-1 (TBMS1) is a potent anti-tumor phytochemical. Its functional and molecular mode of action, however, remains elusive so far. Since angiogenesis is essential for tumor progression and metastasis, we herein investigated the anti-angiogenic effects of the compound. In a non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) xenograft model we found that treatment of CD1 nu/nu mice with TBMS1 (5mg/kg) significantly suppressed the growth and vascularization of NCI-H460 flank tumors. Moreover, TBMS1 dose-dependently reduced vascular sprouting in a rat aortic ring assay. In vitro, TBMS1 induced endothelial cell apoptosis without decreasing the viability of NSCLC tumor cells and inhibited the migration of endothelial cells by disturbing their actin filament organization. TBMS1 further stimulated the proteasomal degradation of vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR2) and Tie2 in endothelial cells, which down-regulated AKT/mTOR signaling. These findings indicate that TBMS1 represents a novel phytochemical for anti-angiogenic treatment of cancer and other angiogenesis-related diseases. PMID:26701724

  5. Tumor-specific targeting by Bavituximab, a phosphatidylserine-targeting monoclonal antibody with vascular targeting and immune modulating properties, in lung cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gerber, David E; Hao, Guiyang; Watkins, Linda; Stafford, Jason H; Anderson, Jon; Holbein, Blair; Öz, Orhan K; Mathews, Dana; Thorpe, Philip E; Hassan, Gedaa; Kumar, Amit; Brekken, Rolf A; Sun, Xiankai

    2015-01-01

    Bavituximab is a chimeric monoclonal antibody with immune modulating and tumor-associated vascular disrupting properties demonstrated in models of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The molecular target of Bavituximab, phosphatidylserine (PS), is exposed on the outer leaflet of the membrane bi-layer of malignant vascular endothelial cells and tumor cells to a greater extent than on normal tissues. We evaluated the tumor-targeting properties of Bavituximab for imaging of NSCLC xenografts when radiolabeled with (111)In through conjugation with a bifunctional chelating agent, 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA). In vitro binding of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab to PS was determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Biodistribution of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was conducted in normal rats, which provided data for dosimetry calculation. Single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) imaging was performed in athymic nude rats bearing A549 NSCLC xenografts. At the molar conjugation ratio of 0.54 DOTA per Bavituximab, the PS binding affinity of (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab was comparable to that of unmodified Bavituximab. Based on the quantitative SPECT/CT imaging data analysis, (111)In-DOTA-Bavituximab demonstrated tumor-specific uptake as measured by the tumor-tomuscle ratio, which peaked at 5.2 at 72 hr post-injection. In contrast, the control antibody only presented a contrast of 1.2 at the same time point.These findings may underlie the diagnostic efficacy and relative low rates of systemic vascular and immune-related toxicities of this immunoconjugate. Future applications of (111)In-DOTA-bavituximab may include prediction of efficacy, indication of tumor immunologic status, or characterization of radiographic findings. PMID:26550540

  6. The Influence of Tissue Ischemia Time on RNA Integrity and Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDX) Engraftment Rate in a Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer (NSCLC) Biobank

    PubMed Central

    Maletta, Francesca; Gaudiano, Marcello; Ercole, Elisabetta; Annaratone, Laura; Todaro, Maria; Boita, Monica; Filosso, Pier Luigi; Solidoro, Paolo; Delsedime, Luisa; Oliaro, Alberto; Sapino, Anna; Ruffini, Enrico; Inghirami, Giorgio

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Bio-repositories are invaluable resources to implement translational cancer research and clinical programs. They represent one of the most powerful tools for biomolecular studies of clinically annotated cohorts, but high quality samples are required to generate reliable molecular readouts and functional studies. The objective of our study was to define the impact of cancer tissue ischemia time on RNA and DNA quality, and for the generation of Patient-Derived Xenografts (PDXs). Methods One-hundred thirty-five lung cancer specimens were selected among our Institutional BioBank samples. Associations between different warm (surgical) and cold (ex-vivo) ischemia time ranges and RNA quality or PDXs engraftment rates were assessed. RNA quality was determined by RNA integrity number (RINs) values. Fresh viable tissue fragments were implanted subcutaneously in NSG mice and serially transplanted. Results RNAs with a RIN>7 were detected in 51% of the sample (70/135), with values of RIN significantly lower (OR 0.08, P = 0.01) in samples preserved for more than 3 hours before cryopreservation. Higher quality DNA samples had a concomitant high RIN. Sixty-three primary tumors (41 adenocarcinoma) were implanted with an overall engraftment rate of 33%. Both prolonged warm (>2 hours) and ex-vivo ischemia time (>10 hours) were associated to a lower engraftment rate (OR 0.09 P = 0.01 and OR 0.04 P = 0.008, respectively). Conclusion RNA quality and PDXs engraftment rate were adversely affected by prolonged ischemia times. Proper tissue collection and processing reduce failure rate. Overall, NSCLC BioBanking represents an innovative modality, which can be successfully executed in routine clinical settings, when stringent Standard Operating Procedures are adopted. PMID:26731692

  7. Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. It is a leading cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking causes most lung cancers. The more cigarettes you smoke per day and ...

  8. Impact of bevacizumab in combination with erlotinib on EGFR-mutated non-small cell lung cancer xenograft models with T790M mutation or MET amplification.

    PubMed

    Furugaki, Koh; Fukumura, Junko; Iwai, Toshiki; Yorozu, Keigo; Kurasawa, Mitsue; Yanagisawa, Mieko; Moriya, Yoichiro; Yamamoto, Kaname; Suda, Kenichi; Mizuuchi, Hiroshi; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Harada, Naoki

    2016-02-15

    Erlotinib (ERL), an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitor, shows notable efficacy against non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring EGFR mutations. Bevacizumab (BEV), a humanized monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial cell growth factor (VEGF), in combination with ERL (BEV+ERL) significantly extended progression-free survival in patients with EGFR-mutated NSCLC compared with ERL alone. However, the efficacy of BEV+ERL against EGFR-mutated NSCLC harboring T790M mutation or MET amplification, is unclear. Here, we examined the antitumor activity of BEV+ERL in four xenograft models of EGFR-mutated NSCLC (three harboring ERL resistance mutations). In the HCC827 models (exon 19 deletion: DEL), ERL significantly inhibited tumor growth by blocking EGFR signal transduction. Although there was no difference between ERL and BEV+ERL in maximum tumor growth inhibition, BEV+ERL significantly suppressed tumor regrowth during a drug-cessation period. In the HCC827-EPR model (DEL+T790M) and HCC827-vTR model (DEL+MET amplification), ERL reduced EGFR signal transduction and showed less pronounced but still significant tumor growth inhibition than in the HCC827 model. In these models, tumor growth inhibition was significantly stronger with BEV+ERL than with each single agent. In the NCI-H1975 model (L858R+T790M), ERL did not inhibit growth or EGFR signal transduction, and BEV+ERL did not inhibit growth more than BEV. BEV alone significantly decreased microvessel density in each tumor. In conclusion, addition of BEV to ERL did not enhance antitumor activity in primarily ERL-resistant tumors with T790M mutation; however, BEV+ERL enhanced antitumor activity in T790M mutation- or MET amplification-positive tumors as long as their growth remained significantly suppressed by ERL.

  9. Isoliquiritigenin Induces Apoptosis and Inhibits Xenograft Tumor Growth of Human Lung Cancer Cells by Targeting Both Wild Type and L858R/T790M Mutant EGFR*

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Sung Keun; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Lim, Do Young; Kim, Jong Eun; Singh, Puja; Lee, Sung-Young; Jeong, Chul-Ho; Lim, Tae-Gyu; Chen, Hanyong; Chi, Young-In; Kundu, Joydeb Kumar; Lee, Nam Hyouck; Lee, Charles C.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Bode, Ann M.; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang

    2014-01-01

    Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is associated with diverse genetic alterations including mutation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Isoliquiritigenin (ILQ), a chalcone derivative, possesses anticancer activities. In the present study, we investigated the effects of ILQ on the growth of tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI)-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells and elucidated its underlying mechanisms. Treatment with ILQ inhibited growth and induced apoptosis in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells. ILQ-induced apoptosis was associated with the cleavage of caspase-3 and poly-(ADP-ribose)-polymerase, increased expression of Bim, and reduced expression of Bcl-2. In vitro kinase assay results revealed that ILQ inhibited the catalytic activity of both wild type and double mutant (L858R/T790M) EGFR. Treatment with ILQ inhibited the anchorage-independent growth of NIH3T3 cells stably transfected with either wild type or double-mutant EGFR with or without EGF stimulation. ILQ also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2 in both TKI-sensitive and -resistant NSCLC cells, and attenuated the kinase activity of Akt1 and ERK2 in vitro. ILQ directly interacted with both wild type and double-mutant EGFR in an ATP-competitive manner. A docking model study showed that ILQ formed two hydrogen bonds (Glu-762 and Met-793) with wild type EGFR and three hydrogen bonds (Lys-745, Met-793, and Asp-855) with mutant EGFR. ILQ attenuated the xenograft tumor growth of H1975 cells, which was associated with decreased expression of Ki-67 and diminished phosphorylation of Akt and ERK1/2. Taken together, ILQ suppresses NSCLC cell growth by directly targeting wild type or mutant EGFR. PMID:25368326

  10. Knock down of the dual functional protein apurinic /apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 enhances the killing effect of hematoporphrphyrin derivative-mediated photodynamic therapy on non-small cell lung cancer cells in vitro and in a xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhen-Zhou; Li, Meng-Xia; Zhang, Yun-Song; Xiang, De-Bing; Dai, Nan; Zeng, Lin-Li; Li, Zeng-Peng; Wang, Ge; Wang, Dong

    2010-01-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered to be effective treatment for many cancers including lung cancer, head and neck cancers, and prostate cancer. It uses the combination of nontoxic photosensitizers and harmless visible light to generate reactive oxygen species and kill cells. However, DNA repair and reactive oxygen species-induced signaling pathway activation play crucial roles in cellular response to PDT and may also result in therapeutic limitation of PDT. To improve the cancer therapeutic efficacy of PDT, we targeted apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE1), which is essential for both DNA repair and redox regulation of gene transcription, as a potential candidate for PDT combined gene therapy. In our study, an adenovirus-mediated APE1 silencing strategy was introduced to test its therapeutic enhancement for the non-small cell lung cancer cell line A549 both in vitro and in vivo after hematoporphrphyrin derivative (HpD)-mediated PDT. The adenovirus vector Ad5/F35-shAPE1 was validated to significantly suppress the protein expression of APE1 in cultured A549 cell and in its xenograft of nude mice. Ad5/F35-shAPE1 effectively inhibited APE1 protein upregulation induced by PDT and resulted in an increase in A549 cell killing by photoirradiation compared with the hematoporphrphyrin derivative-PDT alone group. Ad5/F35-shAPE1 suppressed the DNA repair capacity for single-strand breaks and abolished the activation of some stress-related transcription factors such as hypoxia-induced factor (HIF)-1 that consequently lead to increased cell apoptosis after PDT. Additionally, knock down of APE1 enhanced the tumor suppression efficacy of PDT on the A549 xenograft. Our study indicated that APE1-targeted gene therapy combined with PDT is a promising strategy for enhancement of the efficacy of PDT in treatment of non-small cell lung cancer.

  11. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  12. 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Lung Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents ... for Desperate Housewives. (Photo ©2005 Kathy Hutchins / Hutchins) Lung Cancer Lung cancer causes more deaths than the ...

  13. Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  14. 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel conjugate nanoparticles for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Lei; Schorzman, Allison N; Ma, Ping; Madden, Andrew J; Zamboni, William C; Benhabbour, Soumya Rahima; Mumper, Russell J

    2014-01-01

    A nanoparticle (NP) formulation with 2'-(2-bromohexadecanoyl)-paclitaxel (Br-16-PX) conjugate was developed in these studies for the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The lipophilic paclitaxel conjugate Br-C16-PX was synthesized and incorporated into lipid NPs where the 16-carbon chain enhanced drug entrapment in the drug delivery system and improved in vivo pharmacokinetics. The electron-withdrawing bromine group was used to facilitate the conversion of Br-C16-PX to paclitaxel at the tumor site. The developed system was evaluated in luciferase-expressing A549 cells in vitro and in an orthotopic NSCLC mouse model. The results demonstrated that the Br-C16-PX NPs had a higher maximum tolerated dose (75 mg/kg) than Taxol (19 mg/kg) and provided significantly longer median survival (88 days versus 70 days, P<0.05) in the orthotopic NSCLC model. An improved pharmacokinetic profile was observed for the Br-C16-PX NPs at 75 mg/kg compared to Taxol at 19 mg/kg. The area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC)₀₋₉₆ h of Br-C16-PX from the NPs was 91.7-fold and 49.6-fold greater than Taxol in plasma and tumor-bearing lungs, respectively, which provided sustained drug exposure and higher antitumor efficacy in the NP-treated group.

  15. Strigolactone analogs act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Mayzlish-Gati, Einav; Laufer, Dana; Grivas, Christopher F; Shaknof, Julia; Sananes, Amiram; Bier, Ariel; Ben-Harosh, Shani; Belausov, Eduard; Johnson, Michael D; Artuso, Emma; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Ola; Prandi, Cristina; Khalaila, Isam; Pines, Mark; Yarden, Ronit I; Kapulnik, Yoram; Koltai, Hinanit

    2015-01-01

    Strigolactones (SLs) are a novel class of plant hormones. Previously, we found that analogs of SLs induce growth arrest and apoptosis in breast cancer cell lines. These compounds also inhibited the growth of breast cancer stem cell enriched-mammospheres with increased potency. Furthermore, strigolactone analogs inhibited growth and survival of colon, lung, prostate, melanoma, osteosarcoma and leukemia cancer cell lines. To further examine the anti-cancer activity of SLs in vivo, we have examined their effects on growth and viability of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts model either alone or in combination with paclitaxel. We show that strigolactone act as new anti-cancer agents in inhibition of breast cancer in xenograft model. In addition we show that SLs affect the integrity of the microtubule network and therefore may inhibit the migratory phenotype of the highly invasive breast cancer cell lines that were examined. PMID:26192476

  16. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ridge, Carole A.; McErlean, Aoife M.; Ginsberg, Michelle S.

    2013-01-01

    Incidence and mortality attributed to lung cancer has risen steadily since the 1930s. Efforts to improve outcomes have not only led to a greater understanding of the etiology of lung cancer, but also the histologic and molecular characteristics of individual lung tumors. This article describes this evolution by discussing the extent of the current lung cancer epidemic including contemporary incidence and mortality trends, the risk factors for development of lung cancer, and details of promising molecular targets for treatment. PMID:24436524

  17. Erlotinib Pretreatment Improves Photodynamic Therapy of Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma Xenografts via Multiple Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Gallagher-Colombo, Shannon M; Miller, Joann; Cengel, Keith A; Putt, Mary E; Vinogradov, Sergei A; Busch, Theresa M

    2015-08-01

    Aberrant expression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a common characteristic of many cancers, including non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC), head and neck squamous cell carcinoma, and ovarian cancer. Although EGFR is currently a favorite molecular target for the treatment of these cancers, inhibition of the receptor with small-molecule inhibitors (i.e., erlotinib) or monoclonal antibodies (i.e., cetuximab) does not provide long-term therapeutic benefit as standalone treatment. Interestingly, we have found that addition of erlotinib to photodynamic therapy (PDT) can improve treatment response in typically erlotinib-resistant NSCLC tumor xenografts. Ninety-day complete response rates of 63% are achieved when erlotinib is administered in three doses before PDT of H460 human tumor xenografts, compared with 16% after PDT-alone. Similar benefit is found when erlotinib is added to PDT of A549 NCSLC xenografts. Improved response is accompanied by increased vascular shutdown, and erlotinib increases the in vitro cytotoxicity of PDT to endothelial cells. Tumor uptake of the photosensitizer (benzoporphyrin derivative monoacid ring A; BPD) is increased by the in vivo administration of erlotinib; nevertheless, this elevation of BPD levels only partially accounts for the benefit of erlotinib to PDT. Thus, pretreatment with erlotinib augments multiple mechanisms of PDT effect that collectively lead to large improvements in therapeutic efficacy. These data demonstrate that short-duration administration of erlotinib before PDT can greatly improve the responsiveness of even erlotinib-resistant tumors to treatment. Results will inform clinical investigation of EGFR-targeting therapeutics in conjunction with PDT.

  18. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mao, Yousheng; Yang, Ding; He, Jie; Krasna, Mark J

    2016-07-01

    Lung cancer has been transformed from a rare disease into a global problem and public health issue. The etiologic factors of lung cancer become more complex along with industrialization, urbanization, and environmental pollution around the world. Currently, the control of lung cancer has attracted worldwide attention. Studies on the epidemiologic characteristics of lung cancer and its relative risk factors have played an important role in the tertiary prevention of lung cancer and in exploring new ways of diagnosis and treatment. This article reviews the current evolution of the epidemiology of lung cancer. PMID:27261907

  19. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Malcolm V.; Ford, Jean G.; Samet, Jonathan M.; Spivack, Simon D.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Ever since a lung cancer epidemic emerged in the mid-1900s, the epidemiology of lung cancer has been intensively investigated to characterize its causes and patterns of occurrence. This report summarizes the key findings of this research. Methods: A detailed literature search provided the basis for a narrative review, identifying and summarizing key reports on population patterns and factors that affect lung cancer risk. Results: Established environmental risk factors for lung cancer include smoking cigarettes and other tobacco products and exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke, occupational lung carcinogens, radiation, and indoor and outdoor air pollution. Cigarette smoking is the predominant cause of lung cancer and the leading worldwide cause of cancer death. Smoking prevalence in developing nations has increased, starting new lung cancer epidemics in these nations. A positive family history and acquired lung disease are examples of host factors that are clinically useful risk indicators. Risk prediction models based on lung cancer risk factors have been developed, but further refinement is needed to provide clinically useful risk stratification. Promising biomarkers of lung cancer risk and early detection have been identified, but none are ready for broad clinical application. Conclusions: Almost all lung cancer deaths are caused by cigarette smoking, underscoring the need for ongoing efforts at tobacco control throughout the world. Further research is needed into the reasons underlying lung cancer disparities, the causes of lung cancer in never smokers, the potential role of HIV in lung carcinogenesis, and the development of biomarkers. PMID:23649439

  20. Lung cancer in women.

    PubMed

    Coscio, Angela M; Garst, Jennifer

    2006-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer in both men and women; however, there are some clear gender-based differences. As the incidence of lung cancer is declining in men, the incidence of lung cancer is increasing in women. Women are more likely than men to have adenocarcinoma, a histologic subtype that correlates with worsened prognosis, but women have improved survival compared with men. Genetic predisposition and the presence of estrogen receptors in lung cancer cells may predispose women to developing lung cancer. Further studies are needed to understand the mechanism and significance of these findings. PMID:17254523

  1. Pim Kinases Promote Migration and Metastatic Growth of Prostate Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Santio, Niina M.; Eerola, Sini K.; Paatero, Ilkka; Yli-Kauhaluoma, Jari; Anizon, Fabrice; Moreau, Pascale; Tuomela, Johanna; Härkönen, Pirkko; Koskinen, Päivi J.

    2015-01-01

    Background and methods Pim family proteins are oncogenic kinases implicated in several types of cancer and involved in regulation of cell proliferation, survival as well as motility. Here we have investigated the ability of Pim kinases to promote metastatic growth of prostate cancer cells in two xenograft models for human prostate cancer. We have also evaluated the efficacy of Pim-selective inhibitors to antagonize these effects. Results We show here that tumorigenic growth of both subcutaneously and orthotopically inoculated prostate cancer xenografts is enhanced by stable overexpression of either Pim-1 or Pim-3. Moreover, Pim-overexpressing orthotopic prostate tumors are highly invasive and able to migrate not only to the nearby prostate-draining lymph nodes, but also into the lungs to form metastases. When the xenografted mice are daily treated with the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, both the volumes as well as the metastatic capacity of the tumors are drastically decreased. Interestingly, the Pim-promoted metastatic growth of the orthotopic xenografts is associated with enhanced angiogenesis and lymphangiogenesis. Furthermore, forced Pim expression also increases phosphorylation of the CXCR4 chemokine receptor, which may enable the tumor cells to migrate towards tissues such as the lungs that express the CXCL12 chemokine ligand. Conclusions Our results indicate that Pim overexpression enhances the invasive properties of prostate cancer cells in vivo. These effects can be reduced by the Pim-selective inhibitor DHPCC-9, which can reach tumor tissues without serious side effects. Thus, Pim-targeting therapies with DHPCC-9-like compounds may help to prevent progression of local prostate carcinomas to fatally metastatic malignancies. PMID:26075720

  2. Survivin inhibitor YM155 suppresses gastric cancer xenograft growth in mice without affecting normal tissues

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Xiao Jiao; Lin, Jia Cheng; Ding, Yan Fei; Zhu, Liming; Ye, Jing; Tu, Shui Ping

    2016-01-01

    Survivin overexpression is associated with poor prognosis of human gastric cancer, and is a target for gastric cancer therapy. YM155 is originally identified as a specific inhibitor of survivin. In this study, we investigated the antitumor effect of YM155 on human gastric cancer. Our results showed that YM155 treatment significantly inhibited cell proliferation, reduced colony formation and induced apoptosis of gastric cancer cells in a dose-dependent manner. Accordingly, YM155 treatment significantly decreased survivin expression without affecting XIAP expression and increased the cleavage of apoptosis-associated proteins caspase 3, 7, 8, 9. YM155 significantly inhibited sphere formation of gastric cancer cells, suppressed expansion and growth of the formed spheres (cancer stem cell-like cells, CSCs) and downregulated the protein levels of β-catenin, c-Myc, Cyclin D1 and CD44 in gastric cancer cells. YM155 infusion at 5 mg/kg/day for 7 days markedly inhibited growth of gastric cancer xenograft in a nude mouse model. Immunohistochemistry staining and Western Blot showed that YM155 treatment inhibited expression of survivin and CD44, induced apoptosis and reduced CD44+ CSCs in xenograft tumor tissues in vivo. No obvious pathological changes were observed in organs (e.g. heart, liver, lung and kidney) in YM155-treated mice. Our results demonstrated that YM155 inhibits cell proliferation, induces cell apoptosis, reduces cancer stem cell expansion, and inhibits xenograft tumor growth in gastric cancer cells. Our results elucidate a new mechanism by which YM155 inhibits gastric cancer growth by inhibition of CSCs. YM155 may be a promising agent for gastric cancer treatment. PMID:26771139

  3. Risks of Lung Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Treatment Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in the United States. Lung cancer is ... non- skin cancer in the United States. Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and in women. ...

  4. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Professionals Questions to Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer This page lists cancer ... in lung cancer that are not listed here. Drugs Approved for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Abitrexate ( ...

  5. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Deffebach, Mark E; Humphrey, Linda

    2015-10-01

    Screening for lung cancer in high-risk individuals with annual low-dose computed tomography has been shown to reduce lung cancer mortality by 20% and is recommended by multiple health care organizations. Lung cancer screening is not a specific test; it is a process that involves appropriate selection of high-risk individuals, careful interpretation and follow-up of imaging, and annual testing. Screening should be performed in the context of a multidisciplinary program experienced in the diagnosis and management of lung nodules and early-stage lung cancer.

  6. [Lung cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Sánchez González, M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is a very important disease, curable in early stages. There have been trials trying to show the utility of chest x-ray or computed tomography in Lung Cancer Screening for decades. In 2011, National Lung Screening Trial results were published, showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality in patients with low dose computed tomography screened for three years. These results are very promising and several scientific societies have included lung cancer screening in their guidelines. Nevertheless we have to be aware of lung cancer screening risks, such as: overdiagnosis, radiation and false positive results. Moreover, there are many issues to be solved, including choosing the appropriate group to be screened, the duration of the screening program, intervals between screening and its cost-effectiveness. Ongoing trials will probably answer some of these questions. This article reviews the current evidence on lung cancer screening.

  7. Cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Rucińska, M; Skrzydlewski, Z; Zaremba, E; Furman, M; Kasacka, I

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancers (squamous cell carcinoma, microcellular carcinoma, macrocellular carcinoma and adenocarcinoma) show procoagulant activity. It mainly depends on the presence of cancer procoagulant (CP) in lung cancer cells.

  8. Genomic profiling of patient-derived colon cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Won-Suk; Kim, Hye-Youn; Seok, Jae Yeon; Jang, Ho Hee; Park, Yeon Ho; Kim, So-Young; Shin, Dong Bok; Hong, Suntaek

    2014-12-01

    Recent evidence suggests that patient derived xenograft (PDX) models can maintain certain pathological and molecular features of the original disease. However, these characterizations are limited to immunohistochemistry or by tissue microarray analysis. We conducted a high-throughput sequencing of primary colon tumor and PDX has not been reported yet. Fresh primary colon cancer tissues that originate from surgery were implanted into the subcutaneous space of 6- to 8-week-old female BALB/c nu/nu or NOD/SCID mice and serially passaged in vivo. Ion AmpliSeq Cancer Hotspot Panel v2 (Ion Torrent) was used to detect frequent somatic mutations and similarity of molecular characteristics between the 10 patient tumors and matched PDX. Histologic and immunohistochemical analyses revealed a high degree of pathologic similarity including histologic architecture and expression of CEA, CK7, and CD20 between the patient and xenograft tumors. In 80% cases, all of the somatic mutations detected in primary tumor were concordantly detected in PDX models. However, 2 PDX models showed gained mutations such as PIK3CA or FBWX7 mutation. Ten patient-derived advanced colon cancer xenograft models were established. These models maintained the key characteristic features of the original tumors, suggesting useful tool for preclinical personalized medicine platform.

  9. Lung Cancer Indicators Recurrence

    Cancer.gov

    This study describes prognostic factors for lung cancer spread and recurrence, as well as subsequent risk of death from the disease. The investigators observed that regardless of cancer stage, grade, or type of lung cancer, patients in the study were more

  10. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Ann G; Cote, Michele L

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer continues to be one of the most common causes of cancer death despite understanding the major cause of the disease: cigarette smoking. Smoking increases lung cancer risk 5- to 10-fold with a clear dose-response relationship. Exposure to environmental tobacco smoke among nonsmokers increases lung cancer risk about 20%. Risks for marijuana and hookah use, and the new e-cigarettes, are yet to be consistently defined and will be important areas for continued research as use of these products increases. Other known environmental risk factors include exposures to radon, asbestos, diesel, and ionizing radiation. Host factors have also been associated with lung cancer risk, including family history of lung cancer, history of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and infections. Studies to identify genes associated with lung cancer susceptibility have consistently identified chromosomal regions on 15q25, 6p21 and 5p15 associated with lung cancer risk. Risk prediction models for lung cancer typically include age, sex, cigarette smoking intensity and/or duration, medical history, and occupational exposures, however there is not yet a risk prediction model currently recommended for general use. As lung cancer screening becomes more widespread, a validated model will be needed to better define risk groups to inform screening guidelines. PMID:26667337

  11. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries. PMID:27535387

  12. Lung Cancer Screening.

    PubMed

    Wu, Geena X; Raz, Dan J

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality in the United States and worldwide. Since lung cancer outcomes are dependent on stage at diagnosis with early disease resulting in longer survival, the goal of screening is to capture lung cancer in its early stages when it can be treated and cured. Multiple studies have evaluated the use of chest X-ray (CXR) with or without sputum cytologic examination for lung cancer screening, but none has demonstrated a mortality benefit. In contrast, the multicenter National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) from the United States found a 20 % reduction in lung cancer mortality following three consecutive screenings with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk current and former smokers. Data from European trials are not yet available. In addition to a mortality benefit, lung cancer screening with LDCT also offers a unique opportunity to promote smoking cessation and abstinence and may lead to the diagnoses of treatable chronic diseases, thus decreasing the overall disease burden. The risks of lung cancer screening include overdiagnosis, radiation exposure, and false-positive results leading to unnecessary testing and possible patient anxiety and distress. However, the reduction in lung cancer mortality is a benefit that outweighs the risks and major health organizations currently recommend lung cancer screening using age, smoking history, and quit time criteria derived from the NLST. Although more research is needed to clearly define and understand the application and utility of lung cancer screening in the general population, current data support that lung cancer screening is effective and should be offered to eligible beneficiaries.

  13. Regression of prostate cancer xenografts by RLIP76 depletion

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Sharad S.; Roth, Cherice; Leake, Kathryn; Singhal, Jyotsana; Yadav, Sushma; Awasthi, Sanjay

    2009-01-01

    RLIP76 plays a central role in radiation and chemotherapy resistance through its activity as a multi-specific ATP-dependent transporter which is over-expressed in a number of types of cancers. RLIP76 appears to be necessary for cancer cell survival because both in vitro cell culture and in vivo animal tumor studies show that depletion or inhibition of RLIP76 causes selective toxicity in malignant cells. RLIP76 induces apoptosis in cancer cells through the accumulation of endogenously formed GS-E. The results of our in vivo studies demonstrate that administration of RLIP76 antibodies, siRNA or anti-sense to mice bearing xenografts of PC-3 prostate cancer cells leads to near complete regression of established subcutaneous xenografts with no apparent toxic effects. Since anti-RLIP76 IgG (which inhibit RLIP76- mediated transport), siRNA and antisense (which deplete RLIP76) showed similar tumor regressing activities, our results indicate that the inhibition of RLIP76 transport activity at the cell surface is sufficient for observed anti-tumor activity. These studies indicate that RLIP76 serves a key effector function for the survival of prostate cancer cells and that it is a valid target for cancer therapy. PMID:19073149

  14. Genetics Home Reference: lung cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions lung cancer lung cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Lung cancer is a disease in which certain cells ...

  15. TUBERCULOSIS AND LUNG CANCER.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Atsuhisa

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence of pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and lung cancer as comorbidities has been extensively discussed in many studies. In the past, it was well known that lung cancer is a specific epidemiological successor of PTB and that lung cancer often develops in scars caused by PTB. In recent years, the relevance of the two diseases has drawn attention in terms of the close epidemiological connection and chronic inflammation-associated carcinogenesis. In Japanese case series studies, most lung cancer patients with tuberculous sequelae received supportive care alone in the past, but more recently, the use of aggressive lung cancer treatment is increasing. Many studies on PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities have revealed that active PTB is noted in 2-5% of lung cancer cases, whereas lung cancer is noted in 1-2% of active PTB cases. In such instances of comorbidity, many active PTB cases showed Type II (non-extensively cavitary disease) and Spread 2-3 (intermediate-extensive diseases) on chest X-rays, but standard anti-tuberculosis treatment easily eradicates negative conversion of sputum culture for M. tuberculosis; lung cancer cases were often stage III- IV and squamous cell carcinoma predominant, and the administration of aggressive treatment for lung cancer is increasing. The major clinical problems associated with PTB and lung cancer as comorbidities include delay in diagnosis (doctor's delay) and therapeutic limitations. The former involves two factors of radiographic interpretation: the principles of parsimony (Occam's razor) and visual search; the latter involves three factors of lung cancer treatment: infectivity of M.tuberculosis, anatomical limitation due to lung damage by tuberculosis, and drug-drug interactions between rifampicin and anti-cancer drugs, especially molecularly targeted drugs. The comorbidity of these two diseases is an important health-related issue in Japan. In the treatment of PTB, the possibility of concurrent lung cancer should be kept

  16. Staging of Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of N2 means cancer has spread to the middle part of the chest (called the mediastinum). A rating ... so that the surgeon can remove the cancerous part of the lung and/or lymph node ... biopsied are your lungs, bones, and brain. These types of biopsies can be done with ...

  17. Justice and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, yet research funding is by far the lowest for lung cancer than for any other cancer compared with respective death rates. Although this discrepancy should appear alarming, one could argue that lung cancer deserves less attention because it is more attributable to poor life choices than other common cancers. Accordingly, the general question that I ask in this article is whether victims of more avoidable diseases, such as lung cancer, deserve to have their needs taken into less consideration than those of less avoidable diseases, on the grounds of either retributive or distributive justice. Such unequal treatment may be the "penalty" one incurs for negligent or reckless behavior. However, I hope to show that such unequal treatment cannot be supported by any coherent accounts of retributive or distributive justice.

  18. Justice and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Aaron

    2013-04-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths, yet research funding is by far the lowest for lung cancer than for any other cancer compared with respective death rates. Although this discrepancy should appear alarming, one could argue that lung cancer deserves less attention because it is more attributable to poor life choices than other common cancers. Accordingly, the general question that I ask in this article is whether victims of more avoidable diseases, such as lung cancer, deserve to have their needs taken into less consideration than those of less avoidable diseases, on the grounds of either retributive or distributive justice. Such unequal treatment may be the "penalty" one incurs for negligent or reckless behavior. However, I hope to show that such unequal treatment cannot be supported by any coherent accounts of retributive or distributive justice. PMID:23449364

  19. Immunotherapy in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Emily H; Horn, Leora

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer has not traditionally been viewed as an immune-responsive tumor. However, it is becoming evident that tumor-induced immune suppression is vital to malignant progression. Immunotherapies act by enhancing the patient's innate immune response and hold promise for inducing long-term responses in select patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and small cell lung cancer (SCLC). Immune checkpoint inhibitors, in particular, inhibitors to cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated antigen 4 (CTLA-4) and programmed death 1 (PD-1) and programmed death receptor ligand 1 (PD-L1) have shown promise in early studies and are currently in clinical trials in both small cell lung cancer and non-small cell lung cancer patients. Two large randomized phase III trials recently demonstrated superior overall survival (OS) in patients treated with anti-PD-1 therapy compared to chemotherapy in the second-line setting.

  20. Industrial Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fitch, Maxwell

    1982-01-01

    There are many known chemical and physical causes of industrial lung cancer. Their common feature is a long latent period—usually ten to 40 years—between initial exposure to the carcinogen and clinical recognition of the lesion. Occupationally induced lung cancer is indistinguishable from lung cancer of unknown etiology or that caused by cigaret smoking. Smoking alone is responsible for a very large proportion of all lung cancer and it potentiates the effect of most other carcinogens. Most cases of lung cancer in the next 20-30 years will be the result of exposures which have already occurred. In these cases, early diagnosis of pre-invasive resectable lesions offers the only hope for prolonging life. PMID:21286559

  1. Occupational lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Coultas, D.B.; Samet, J.M. )

    1992-06-01

    The overall importance of occupational agents as a cause of lung cancer has been a controversial subject since the 1970s. A federal report, released in the late 1970s, projected a surprisingly high burden of occupational lung cancer; for asbestos and four other agents, from 61,000 to 98,000 cases annually were attributed to these agents alone. Many estimates followed, some much more conservative. For example, Doll and Peto estimated that 15% of lung cancer in men and 5% in women could be attributed to occupational exposures. A number of population-based case-control studies also provide relevant estimates. In a recent literature review, Vineis and Simonato cited attributable risk estimates for occupation and lung cancer that ranged from 4% to 40%; for asbestos alone, the estimates ranged from 1% to 5%. These estimates would be expected to vary across locations and over time. Nevertheless, these recent estimates indicate that occupation remains an important cause of lung cancer. Approaches to Prevention. Prevention of lung cancer mortality among workers exposed to agents or industrial processes that cause lung cancer may involve several strategies, including eliminating or reducing exposures, smoking cessation, screening, and chemo-prevention. For example, changes in industrial processes that have eliminated or reduced exposures to chloromethyl ethers and nickel compounds have provided evidence of reduced risk of lung cancer following these changes. Although occupational exposures are important causes of lung cancer, cigarette smoking is the most important preventable cause of lung cancer. For adults, the work site offers an important location to target smoking cessation efforts. In fact, the work site may be the only place to reach many smokers.

  2. Integrated Analysis of Transcriptome in Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hong; Zhu, Yinjie; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Junyi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Zhaomin; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model is a powerful technology in evaluating anti-cancer drugs and facilitating personalized medicines. Multiple research centers and commercial companies have put huge efforts into building PDX mouse models. However, PDX models have not been widely available and their molecular features have not been systematically characterized. In this study, we provided a comprehensive survey of PDX transcriptome by integrating analysis of 58 patients involving 8 different tumors. The median correlation coefficient between patients and xenografts is 0.94, which is higher than that between patients and cell line panel or between patients with the same tumor. Major differential gene expressions in PDX occur in the engraftment of human tumor tissue into mice, while gene expressions are relatively stable over passages. 48 genes are frequently differentially expressed in PDX mice of multiple cancers. They are enriched in extracellular matrix and immune response, and some are reported as targets for anticancer drugs. A simulation study showed that expression change between PDX and patient tumor (6%) would result in acceptable change in drug sensitivity (3%). Our findings demonstrate that PDX mice represent the gene-expression and drug-response features of primary tumors effectively, and it is recommended to monitoring the overall expression profiles and drug target genes in clinical application. PMID:25951608

  3. Integrated analysis of transcriptome in cancer patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Hong; Zhu, Yinjie; Tang, Xiaoyan; Li, Junyi; Li, Yuanyuan; Zhong, Zhaomin; Ding, Guohui; Li, Yixue

    2015-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) tumor model is a powerful technology in evaluating anti-cancer drugs and facilitating personalized medicines. Multiple research centers and commercial companies have put huge efforts into building PDX mouse models. However, PDX models have not been widely available and their molecular features have not been systematically characterized. In this study, we provided a comprehensive survey of PDX transcriptome by integrating analysis of 58 patients involving 8 different tumors. The median correlation coefficient between patients and xenografts is 0.94, which is higher than that between patients and cell line panel or between patients with the same tumor. Major differential gene expressions in PDX occur in the engraftment of human tumor tissue into mice, while gene expressions are relatively stable over passages. 48 genes are frequently differentially expressed in PDX mice of multiple cancers. They are enriched in extracellular matrix and immune response, and some are reported as targets for anticancer drugs. A simulation study showed that expression change between PDX and patient tumor (6%) would result in acceptable change in drug sensitivity (3%). Our findings demonstrate that PDX mice represent the gene-expression and drug-response features of primary tumors effectively, and it is recommended to monitoring the overall expression profiles and drug target genes in clinical application.

  4. Lung and Bronchus Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... at a Glance Show More At a Glance Estimated New Cases in 2016 224,390 % of All New Cancer Cases 13.3% Estimated Deaths in 2016 158,080 % of All Cancer ... of This Cancer : In 2013, there were an estimated 415,707 people living with lung and bronchus ...

  5. Lung Cancer Screening Update.

    PubMed

    Ruchalski, Kathleen L; Brown, Kathleen

    2016-07-01

    Since the release of the US Preventive Services Task Force and Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services recommendations for lung cancer screening, low-dose chest computed tomography screening has moved from the research arena to clinical practice. Lung cancer screening programs must reach beyond image acquisition and interpretation and engage in a multidisciplinary effort of clinical shared decision-making, standardization of imaging and nodule management, smoking cessation, and patient follow-up. Standardization of radiologic reports and nodule management will systematize patient care, provide quality assurance, further reduce harm, and contain health care costs. Although the National Lung Screening Trial results and eligibility criteria of a heavy smoking history are the foundation for the standard guidelines for low-dose chest computed tomography screening in the United States, currently only 27% of patients diagnosed with lung cancer would meet US lung cancer screening recommendations. Current and future efforts must be directed to better delineate those patients who would most benefit from screening and to ensure that the benefits of screening reach all socioeconomic strata and racial and ethnic minorities. Further optimization of lung cancer screening program design and patient eligibility will assure that lung cancer screening benefits will outweigh the potential risks to our patients. PMID:27306387

  6. Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala; Hu, Chaoxin; Maitra, Anirban; Pomper, Martin G

    2014-01-10

    Highlights: •Axl is overexpressed in a variety of cancers. •Axl overexpression confers invasive phenotype. •Axl imaging would be useful for therapeutic guidance and monitoring. •Axl expression imaging is demonstrated in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. •Graded levels of Axl expression imaging is feasible. -- Abstract: The receptor tyrosine kinase Axl is overexpressed in and leads to patient morbidity and mortality in a variety of cancers. Axl–Gas6 interactions are critical for tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis. The goal of this study was to investigate the feasibility of imaging graded levels of Axl expression in tumors using a radiolabeled antibody. We radiolabeled anti-human Axl (Axl mAb) and control IgG1 antibodies with {sup 125}I with high specific radioactivity and radiochemical purity, resulting in an immunoreactive fraction suitable for in vivo studies. Radiolabeled antibodies were investigated in severe combined immunodeficient mice harboring subcutaneous CFPAC (Axl{sup high}) and Panc1 (Axl{sup low}) pancreatic cancer xenografts by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging. Based on these results, the specificity of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb was also validated in mice harboring orthotopic Panc1 or CFPAC tumors and in mice harboring subcutaneous 22Rv1 (Axl{sup low}) or DU145 (Axl{sup high}) prostate tumors by ex vivo biodistribution and imaging studies at 72 h post-injection of the antibody. Both imaging and biodistribution studies demonstrated specific and persistent accumulation of [{sup 125}I]Axl mAb in Axl{sup high} (CFPAC and DU145) expression tumors compared to the Axl{sup low} (Panc1 and 22Rv1) expression tumors. Axl expression in these tumors was further confirmed by immunohistochemical studies. No difference in the uptake of radioactivity was observed between the control [{sup 125}I]IgG1 antibody in the Axl{sup high} and Axl{sup low} expression tumors. These data demonstrate the feasibility of imaging Axl expression in pancreatic

  7. Lung Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the breakdown of uranium in rocks and soil. It seeps up through the ground, and leaks ... substances increases the risk of lung cancer: Asbestos . Arsenic . Chromium. Nickel. Beryllium. Cadmium . Tar and soot. These ...

  8. Women and Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Horrigan Conners Center for Women’s Health and Gender Biology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Harvard Medical School, April, ... Lung Cancer in Women: The Differences in Epidemiology, Biology and Treatment Outcomes, Maria Patricia Rivera MD Expert ...

  9. Lycopene and Lung Cancer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Although epidemiological studies have shown dietary intake of lycopene is associated with decreased risk of lung cancer, the effect of lycopene on lung carcinogenesis has not been well studied. A better understanding of lycopene metabolism and the mechanistic basis of lycopene chemoprevention must ...

  10. Potentiation of platinum antitumor effects in human lung tumor xenografts by the angiogenesis inhibitor squalamine: effects on tumor neovascularization.

    PubMed

    Schiller, J H; Bittner, G

    1999-12-01

    Squalamine is a novel anti-angiogenic aminosterol that is postulated to inhibit neovascularization by selectively inhibiting the sodium-hydrogen antiporter exchanger. To determine how to most effectively use this agent in patients with cancer, we examined the antitumor effects of squalamine with or without cytotoxic agents in human lung cancer xenografts and correlated these observations with the degree of tumor neovascularization. No direct cytotoxic effects of squalamine against tumor cells were observed in vitro with or without cisplatin. Squalamine was effective in inhibiting the establishment of H460 human tumors in BALBc nude mice but was ineffective in inhibiting the growth of H460, CALU-6, or NL20T-A human tumor xenografts when administered i.p. to mice bearing established tumors. However, when combined with cisplatin or carboplatin, squalamine increased tumor growth delay by > or =1.5-fold in the three human lung carcinoma cell lines compared with cisplatin or carboplatin alone. No enhancement of antitumor activity was observed when squalamine was combined with paclitaxel, vinorelbine, gemcitabine, or docetaxel. Repeated cycles of squalamine plus cisplatin administration delayed H460 tumor growth >8.6-fold. Squalamine plus cisplatin reduced CD31 vessel formation by 25% compared with controls, squalamine alone, or cisplatin alone; however, no inhibition in CD31 vessel formation was observed when squalamine was combined with vinorelbine. These data demonstrate that the combination of squalamine and a platinum analog has significant preclinical antitumor activity against human lung cancer that is related to the anti-angiogenic effects of squalamine. PMID:10632372

  11. Lung Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... HPV-Associated Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Lung Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) ... incidence data are currently available. Rates of Getting Lung Cancer by State The number of people who ...

  12. [Pathology of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Theegarten, D; Hager, T

    2016-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in men and the second most frequent cause in women. The pathology of lung tumors is of special relevance concerning therapy and prognosis and current classification systems have to be taken into consideration. The results of molecular tissue subtyping allow further classification and therapeutic options. The histological entities are mainly associated with typical X‑ray morphological features. PMID:27495784

  13. Lung Cancer Statistics.

    PubMed

    Torre, Lindsey A; Siegel, Rebecca L; Jemal, Ahmedin

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death among both men and women in the United States. It is also the leading cause of cancer death among men and the second leading cause of cancer death among women worldwide. Lung cancer rates and trends vary substantially by sex, age, race/ethnicity, socioeconomic status, and geography because of differences in historical smoking patterns. Lung cancer mortality rates in the United States are highest among males, blacks, people of lower socioeconomic status, and in the mid-South (e.g., Kentucky, Mississippi, Arkansas, and Tennessee). Globally, rates are highest in countries where smoking uptake began earliest, such as those in North America and Europe. Although rates are now decreasing in most of these countries (e.g., United States, United Kingdom, Australia), especially in men, they are increasing in countries where smoking uptake occurred later. Low- and middle-income countries now account for more than 50% of lung cancer deaths each year. This chapter reviews lung cancer incidence and mortality patterns in the United States and globally.

  14. Downregulation of peroxiredoxin-1 by β-elemene enhances the radiosensitivity of lung adenocarcinoma xenografts.

    PubMed

    Li, Guoquan; Xie, Bingbing; Li, Xiaolong; Chen, Yinghai; Xu, Yinghui; Xu-Welliver, Meng; Zou, Lijuan

    2015-03-01

    β-elemene, the active component of elemene (1-methyl-1-vinyl-2,4-diisopropenyl-cyclohexane), is a naturally occurring compound isolated from the traditional Chinese medicinal herb Curcuma wenyujin. Studies have confirmed that β-elemene enhances the radiosensitivity of lung cancer cell lines such as A549, by multiple pathways; however, their underlying mechanisms and pathways are yet to be elucidated. In the present study, two-dimensional differential in-gel electrophoresis and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry were used to profile the different proteins in A549 cell xenograft models of both treatment groups. The protein/mRNA expression was assessed by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction and western blotting techniques in tumor samples from all treatment groups. As a critical player in redox regulation of cancer cells, inhibition of peroxiredoxin-1 (Prx-1) may be an effective option for enhancing the tumor response to radiation. We further verified Prx-1 expression at the transcription and translation levels. β-elemene at a dose of 45 mg/kg had little effect on the Prx-1 protein expression, which was correlated with a moderate antitumor effect. However, a 45 mg/kg dose of β-elemene significantly inhibited the Prx-1 mRNA expression, thereby suggesting a possible influence on the transcriptional process, and radiation significantly increased the Prx-1 mRNA/protein expression compared to the control group (p<0.01). Notably, Prx-1 mRNA/protein expression was significantly lower in the β-elemene/radiation co-treatment group compared to the baseline levels in the control group (p<0.01). These results suggest that radiation-induced Prx-1 expression is directly or indirectly suppressed by β-elemene, thus suggesting a new pathway by which to reverse radioresistance.

  15. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Sethi, Tarsheen K; El-Ghamry, Moataz N; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2012-03-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Radon exposure is the second leading cause of lung cancer, following tobacco smoke. Radon is not only an independent risk factor; it also increases the risk of lung cancer in smokers. Numerous cohort, case-control, and experimental studies have established the carcinogenic potential of radon. The possibility of radon having a causative effect on other cancers has been explored but not yet proven. One of the postulated mechanisms of carcinogenesis is DNA damage by alpha particles mediated by the production of reactive oxygen species. The latter are also thought to constitute one of the common mechanisms underlying the synergistic effect of radon and tobacco smoke. With an estimated 21,000 lung cancer deaths attributable to radon in the United States annually, the need for radon mitigation is well acknowledged. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has established an indoor limit of 4 picocuries (pCi)/L, and various methods are available for indoor radon reduction when testing shows higher levels. Radon mitigation should accompany smoking cessation measures in lung cancer prevention efforts.

  16. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  17. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Carter, D.

    1981-01-01

    The survival from bronchogenic carcinoma is highly dependent upon stage at the time of treatment. This is particularly true for squamous cell carcinoma, adenocarcinoma, and large cell carcinoma, but holds true for small cell carcinoma as well. The problem presented to the medical profession has been to find a practical means of detecting lung cancer while it is still at an early stage. Three studies in progress have indicated that a larger proportion of the patients may be found to have early stage lung cancer when screened with a combination of chest X-rays and sputum cytology. However, the detection of these early stage cases has not yet been translated into an improvement in the overall mortality rate from lung cancer. PMID:6278787

  18. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trial

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trial that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  19. The ALCHEMIST Lung Cancer Trials

    Cancer.gov

    A collection of material about the ALCHEMIST lung cancer trials that will examine tumor tissue from patients with early-stage, completely resected lung cancer for gene mutations in the EGFR and ALK genes, and a

  20. Tomato paste alters NF-κB and cancer-related mRNA expression in prostate cancer cells, xenografts, and xenograft microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Bastani, Nasser E; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2015-01-01

    Tomatoes may protect against prostate cancer development, possibly through targeting signaling pathways such as nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). We investigated whether tomato paste could modulate NF-κB activity and cancer-related gene expression in human derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and PC3 xenografts. PC3-cells were stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase construct, and treated with tomato extracts or vehicle control. Nude mice bearing PC3 xenografts were fed a Western-like diet with or without 10% tomato paste for 6.5 wk. The tomato diet significantly inhibited TNFα stimulated NF-κB activity in cultured PC3 cells, and modulated the expression of genes associated with inflammation, apoptosis, and cancer progression. Accumulation of lycopene occurred in liver, xenografts, and serum of mice fed tomato diet. Tomato paste in the diet did not affect tumor size in mice; however, there was a trend toward inhibition of NF-κB activity in the xenografts. The effect of tomato on gene expression was most prominent in the xenograft microenvironment, where among others NFKB2, STAT3, and STAT6 showed higher expression levels after tomato treatment. Our findings support biological activity of tomatoes in cancer-related inflammation. PMID:25664890

  1. [Lung cancer in elderly patients: lung cancer and lung function].

    PubMed

    Tanita, Tatsuo

    2005-07-01

    The incidence of bronchogenic carcinoma is increasing as life expectancy rises. With increase in the aged population in Japan, the number of patients suffering from lung cancer and candidates for lung resections are increasing. In this paper, the author lists up indispensable procedures for diagnosis, namely, lung function tests, unilateral pulmonary arterial occlusion test and exercise tolerance test. The cut-offs for identifying candidates for elderly patients for lung resections can be applied the same cut-offs for younger patients. Also the author indicates the importance of postoperative management for lung lobe resections. In order to prevent postoperative problems such as congestive heart failure that might be a fetal complication, the most useful check values after the lung surgery for elderly patients are rate of transfusion and urine volume. In conclusion, when elderly patients assert their rights to undergo lung surgery, we, the thoracic surgeons, should reply their requests under the equal quality of safe surgery as that for younger patients. Besides, it is desirable that even elderly patients, over 80 years old, who undergo lung surgery should guarantee their quality of daily life after surgery.

  2. Immunohistochemical demonstration of epidermal growth factor in human gastric cancer xenografts of nude mice.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyuki, T; Shimizu, Y; Onda, M; Tokunaga, A; Kiyama, T; Nishi, K; Mizutani, T; Matsukura, N; Tanaka, N; Akimoto, M

    1990-02-15

    Thirty-two surgical specimens and three cell lines of human gastric cancers were used for subcutaneous transplantation into nude mice, resulting in the establishment of eight (25%) xenografts from the surgical specimens and two (67%) from the cell lines. The localization of epidermal growth factor (EGF) in the surgical specimens and cell lines of the gastric cancers and their xenografts in nude mice was then investigated immunohistochemically. Epidermal growth factor was stained in the cytoplasm of the cancer cells, being detected in 16 (50%) of the 32 surgical specimens and in all of the cell lines. Seven (44%) of the sixteen EGF-positive surgical specimens and one (6%) of the 16 EGF-negative ones were tumorigenic in nude mice. All of the xenografts in nude mice were positive for EGF. The tumorigenicity of human gastric cancer xenografts in nude mice may, therefore, be correlated with the presence of EGF in cancer cells.

  3. Radon and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.91 references.

  4. Radon and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Samet, J M

    1989-05-10

    Radon, an inert gas released during the decay of uranium-238, is ubiquitous in indoor and outdoor air and contaminates many underground mines. Extensive epidemiologic evidence from studies of underground miners and complementary animal data have documented that radon causes lung cancer in smokers and nonsmokers. Radon must also be considered a potentially important cause of lung cancer for the general population, which is exposed through contamination of indoor air by radon from soil, water, and building materials. This review describes radon's sources, levels in U.S. homes, dosimetry, the epidemiologic evidence from studies of miners and the general population, and the principal, recent risk assessments.

  5. Lung Cancer Brain Metastases.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Sarah B; Contessa, Joseph N; Omay, Sacit B; Chiang, Veronica

    2015-01-01

    Brain metastases are common among patients with lung cancer and have been associated with significant morbidity and limited survival. However, the treatment of brain metastases has evolved as the field has advanced in terms of central nervous system imaging, surgical technique, and radiotherapy technology. This has allowed patients to receive improved treatment with less toxicity and more durable benefit. In addition, there have been significant advances in systemic therapy for lung cancer in recent years, and several treatments including chemotherapy, targeted therapy, and immunotherapy exhibit activity in the central nervous system. Utilizing systemic therapy for treating brain metastases can avoid or delay local therapy and often allows patients to receive effective treatment for both intracranial and extracranial disease. Determining the appropriate treatment for patients with lung cancer brain metastases therefore requires a clear understanding of intracranial disease burden, tumor histology, molecular characteristics, and overall cancer prognosis. This review provides updates on the current state of surgery and radiotherapy for the treatment of brain metastases, as well as an overview of systemic therapy options that may be effective in select patients with intracranial metastases from lung cancer.

  6. A multifunctional drug combination shows highly potent therapeutic efficacy against human cancer xenografts in athymic mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiu-Jun; Zheng, Yan-Bo; Li, Yi; Wu, Shu-Ying; Zhen, Yong-Su

    2014-01-01

    The tumor microenvironment plays a crucial role during tumor development. Integrated combination of drugs that target tumor microenvironment is a promising approach to anticancer therapy. Here, we report a multifunctional combination of low-cytotoxic drugs composed of dipyridamole, bestatin and dexamethasone (DBDx) which mainly acts on the tumor microenvironment shows highly potent antitumor efficacy in vivo. In mouse hepatoma H22 model, the triple drug combination showed synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy. The combination indices of various combinations of the triple drugs were between 0.2 and 0.5. DBDx inhibited the growth of a panel of human tumor xenografts and showed no obvious systemic toxicity. At tolerated doses, DBDx suppressed the growth of human hepatocellular carcinoma BEL-7402, HepG2, and lung adenocarcinoma A549 xenografts by 94.5%, 93.7% and 96.9%, respectively. Clonogenic assay demonstrated that DBDx showed weak cytotoxicity. Western blot showed that Flk1 and Nos3 were down-regulated in the DBDx-treated group. Proteomic analysis showed that DBDx mainly affected the metabolic process and immune system process; in addition, the angiogenesis and VEGF signaling pathway were also affected. Conclusively, DBDx, a multifunctional drug combination of three low-cytotoxic drugs, shows synergistic and highly potent antitumor efficacy evidently mediated by the modulation of tumor microenvironment. Based on its low-cytotoxic attributes and its broad-spectrum antitumor therapeutic efficacy, this multifunctional combination might be useful in the treatment of cancers, especially those refractory to conventional chemotherapeutics.

  7. Gamma-amino butyric acid inhibits the nicotine-imposed stimulatory challenge in xenograft models of non-small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Al-Wadei, H A N; Al-Wadei, M H; Ullah, M F; Schuller, H M

    2012-02-01

    Non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer; smoking is a documented risk factor. Nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-mediated intracellular signaling in response to nicotine has recently been implicated in the growth regulation of NSCLC. In the current study nude mice carrying xenografts of the human lung NSCLC cell lines NCI-H322 or NCI-H441 were used as animal models. Nicotine administration and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) treatment lasted for 30 days. Catecholamines, cortisol, GABA, and cAMP were analyzed in blood and tumor tissues by immunoassays. Expression of nicotinic receptors and effector proteins in the xenografts was assessed by Western blotting. Our data indicate that nicotine stimulated the growth of NSCLC xenografts via modulation of nAChR upregulation and activation of cAMP signaling. The nicotine-treated group showed an enhanced level of stress neurotransmitters and second messenger cAMP in serum, blood cellular fraction, and xenograft tissues. Activation of critical proteins in the oncogenic pathway, including CREB, ERK, Akt, and Src, and upregulation of α-4 and α-7 subunits of nAChR provided mechanistic insight for the observed stimulatory effect of nicotine. Interestingly, GABA, being an antagonist to cAMP signaling, showed a promising intervention by reversing the stimulatory effect of nicotine on cancer growth and all signaling pathways. GABA has potential to lower the risk of NSCLC among smokers and could be used to enhance the clinical outcome of standard cancer intervention strategies.

  8. Chemoprevention of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, Eva; Mao, Jenny T.; Lam, Stephen; Reid, Mary E.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer death in men and women in the United States. Cigarette smoking is the main risk factor. Former smokers are at a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer compared with lifetime never smokers. Chemoprevention refers to the use of specific agents to reverse, suppress, or prevent the process of carcinogenesis. This article reviews the major agents that have been studied for chemoprevention. Methods: Articles of primary, secondary, and tertiary prevention trials were reviewed and summarized to obtain recommendations. Results: None of the phase 3 trials with the agents β-carotene, retinol, 13-cis-retinoic acid, α-tocopherol, N-acetylcysteine, acetylsalicylic acid, or selenium has demonstrated beneficial and reproducible results. To facilitate the evaluation of promising agents and to lessen the need for a large sample size, extensive time commitment, and expense, surrogate end point biomarker trials are being conducted to assist in identifying the most promising agents for later-stage chemoprevention trials. With the understanding of important cellular signaling pathways and the expansion of potentially important targets, agents (many of which target inflammation and the arachidonic acid pathway) are being developed and tested which may prevent or reverse lung carcinogenesis. Conclusions: By integrating biologic knowledge, additional early-phase trials can be performed in a reasonable time frame. The future of lung cancer chemoprevention should entail the evaluation of single agents or combinations that target various pathways while working toward identification and validation of intermediate end points. PMID:23649449

  9. Experimental Lung Cancer Drug Shows Early Promise | Poster

    Cancer.gov

    By Frank Blanchard, Staff Writer A first-of-its-kind drug is showing early promise in attacking certain lung cancers that are hard to treat because they build up resistance to conventional chemotherapy. The drug, CO-1686, performed well in a preclinical study involving xenograft and transgenic mice, as reported in the journal Cancer Discovery. It is now being evaluated for safety and efficacy in Phase I and II clinical trials.

  10. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  11. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  12. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-κB and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-κB activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNFα-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-κB-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-κB activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model.

  13. Coffee inhibits nuclear factor-kappa B in prostate cancer cells and xenografts.

    PubMed

    Kolberg, Marit; Pedersen, Sigrid; Mitake, Maiko; Holm, Kristine Lillebø; Bøhn, Siv Kjølsrud; Blomhoff, Heidi Kiil; Carlsen, Harald; Blomhoff, Rune; Paur, Ingvild

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation contributes to prostate cancer and the transcription factor Nuclear Factor-kappa B (NF-κB) is constitutively active in most such cancers. We examine the effects of coffee on NF-κB and on the regulation of selected genes in human-derived prostate cancer cells (PC3) and in PC3 xenografts in athymic nude mice. PC3 cells stably transduced with an NF-κB-luciferase reporter were used both in vitro and for xenografts. NF-κB activity was measured by reporter assays, DNA binding and in vivo imaging. Gene expression was measured in PC3 cells, xenografts and tumor microenvironment by low-density arrays. Western blotting of activated caspases was used to quantify apoptosis. Coffee inhibited TNFα-induced NF-κB activity and DNA-binding in PC3 cells. Furthermore, coffee increased apoptosis and modulated expression of a number of inflammation- and cancer-related genes in TNFα-treated PC3 cells. In vivo imaging revealed a 31% lower NF-κB-luciferase activation in the xenografts of the mice receiving 5% coffee compared to control mice. Interestingly, we observed major changes in gene expression in the PC3 cells in xenografts as compared to PC3 cells in vitro. In PC3 xenografts, genes related to inflammation, apoptosis and cytoprotection were down-regulated in mice receiving coffee, and coffee also affected the gene expression in the xenograft microenvironment. Our data demonstrate that coffee inhibits NF-κB activity in PC3 cells in vitro and in xenografts. Furthermore, coffee modulates transcription of genes related to prostate cancer and inflammation. Our results are the first to suggest mechanistic links between coffee consumption and prostate cancer in an experimental mouse model. PMID:26419686

  14. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Gabriel Alberto; Wakelee, Heather

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is predominantly associated with cigarette smoking; however, a substantial minority of patients with the disease have never smoked. In the US it is estimated there are 17,000-26,000 annual deaths from lung cancer in never smokers, which as a separate entity would be the seventh leading cause of cancer mortality. Controversy surrounds the question of whether or not the incidence of lung cancer in never-smokers is increasing, with more data to support this observation in Asia. There are several factors associated with an increased risk of developing lung cancer in never smokers including second hand smoke, indoor air pollution, occupational exposures, and genetic susceptibility among others. Adenocarcinoma is the most common histology of lung cancer in never smokers and in comparison to lung cancer in smokers appears less complex with a higher likelihood to have targetable driver mutations. PMID:26667338

  15. Establishment of Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) Models of Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaomei; Lewis, Michael T

    2013-03-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models of human breast cancer are proving useful for preclinical evaluation of experimental therapeutics. However, until recently, generation of PDX models reflecting the full spectrum of human breast cancers has been an elusive goal. We recently developed a method for establishing serially transplantable, phenotypically stable, human breast cancer xenograft models in immunocompromised mice with comparatively high efficiency (overall ∼25%). These xenografts represent the major clinically defined subtypes of breast cancer [e.g. estrogen receptor positive (ER+), HER2 positive (HER2+), and "triple negative" (TN) breast cancers]. This method, and methods being developed in other laboratories, may soon allow for conducting "animal clinical trials" once sufficient numbers of clinically relevant models are generated. Curr. Protoc. Mouse Biol. 3:21-29 © 2013 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. Immunotherapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Bradbury, Penelope A; Shepherd, Frances A

    2008-06-01

    Reports of tumor regression after infection date back as far as 1550 bc. In the twentieth century, Dr. William Coley, witnessing regression of a malignant tumor in one of his patients after a bacterial infection, developed the first cancer treatment vaccine derived from killed bacteria, with some reported success. However, despite decades of research, no specific, active tumor vaccine has been approved for the treatment of cancer. In lung cancer, initial attempts to modulate the immune system with nonspecific therapies were unsuccessful. However, more sophisticated specific vaccines have now been developed, and an increasing number are being evaluated in randomized phase 3 trials, raising hopes that vaccines may be an additional novel therapy for patients with lung cancer. This article reviews the following seven vaccines, which have entered randomized trials: L-BLP25 (Stimuvax), BEC-2, 1E10, PF-3512676 (Promune), melanoma-associated antigen A3 immunotherapeutic, granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor-transduced allogeneic cancer cellular immunotherapy, and belagenpumatucel-L (Lucanix).

  17. Screening for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Miettinen, O S

    2000-05-01

    Screening for lung cancer serves to prevent deaths from this disease insofar as earlier resections are associated with higher rates of cure. There is good reason to believe that this is the case: in stage I, the 5-year survival rate with resection is 70%, whereas without resection the corresponding rate is only 10%. Before this evidence emerged, various authoritative organizations and agencies in North America advised against screening for lung cancer on the grounds of the results of several RCTs. As for CXR, I argue that the study results are consistent with up to 40% reduction in the fatality rate. Moreover, modern helical CT screening provides for detecting much smaller tumors than were detected in those studies. It is time to revoke the conclusion that screening for lung cancer does not serve to prevent deaths from this disease, and to quantify the usefulness of CT screening in particular. As for the requisite research, the prevailing orthodoxy has it that RCTs are to be used, but I argue that more meaningful results are obtainable, more rapidly and much less expensively, by the use of noncomparative (and hence unrandomized) studies. PMID:10855255

  18. Cholinergic Targets in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Spindel, Eliot R

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancers express an autocrine cholinergic loop in which secreted acetylcholine can stimulate tumor growth through both nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. Because activation of mAChR and nAChR stimulates growth; tumor growth can be stimulated by both locally synthesized acetylcholine as well as acetylcholine from distal sources and from nicotine in the high percentage of lung cancer patients who are smokers. The stimulation of lung cancer growth by cholinergic agonists offers many potential new targets for lung cancer therapy. Cholinergic signaling can be targeted at the level of choline transport; acetylcholine synthesis, secretion and degradation; and nicotinic and muscarinic receptors. In addition, the newly describe family of ly-6 allosteric modulators of nicotinic signaling such as lynx1 and lynx2 offers yet another new approach to novel lung cancer therapeutics. Each of these targets has their potential advantages and disadvantages for the development of new lung cancer therapies which are discussed in this review. PMID:26818857

  19. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce

  20. Paeoniflorin inhibits macrophage-mediated lung cancer metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qi; Chen, Gang-Ling; Li, Ya-Juan; Chen, Yang; Lin, Fang-Zhen

    2015-12-01

    Alternatively activated macrophages are more frequently involved in tumor growth, angiogenesis, and immunosuppression. A previous study showed that paeoniflorin, the major active constituent of Paeonia lactiflora Pallas, can inhibit tumor growth and lung metastases of Lewis lung tumor-bearing mice. This study tried to investigate whether paeoniflorin inhibited lung cancer metastasis by inhibiting the alternative activation of macrophages (M2 macrophage). Using a viability assay, the cytotoxicity of paeoniflorin on Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages were investigated. In vitro scratch wound and in vivo lung metastasis experiments were used to test the ability to inhibit the migration of paeoniflorin and the function of M2 macrophages. Flow cytometry was performed to test the cell cycle of Lewis lung cancer cells, and to test the M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages and subcutaneous transplantable tumor. It was found that paeoniflorin showed no inhibitory effect on the growth of Lewis lung cancer cells and peritoneal macrophages of mouse in vitro. Paeoniflorin could attenuate the migration of LLC stimulated by alternatively activated macrophages (stimulated for 24 h and 48 h, paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 or P < 0.05 vs control group). Paeoniflorin could decrease the cell populations at S phases (paeoniflorin 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and increase the cell populations at G0-G1 phases of Lewis lung cancer cells (paeoniflorin 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.05 vs control group) and reduce the numbers of M2 macrophages in peritoneal macrophages induced by IL-4 (paeoniflorin 1, 3, 10, 30, 100 μmol·L(-1), P < 0.01 vs Control group). Paeoniflorin could reduce lung metastasis of Lewis lung cancer cells xenograft and decrease the numbers of M2 macrophages in subcutaneous xenograft tumour in vivo (paeoniflorin 20, 40 mg·kg(-1), P < 0.01 vs control group). These results suggest that paeoniflorin could reduce

  1. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  2. American Cancer Society lung cancer screening guidelines.

    PubMed

    Wender, Richard; Fontham, Elizabeth T H; Barrera, Ermilo; Colditz, Graham A; Church, Timothy R; Ettinger, David S; Etzioni, Ruth; Flowers, Christopher R; Gazelle, G Scott; Kelsey, Douglas K; LaMonte, Samuel J; Michaelson, James S; Oeffinger, Kevin C; Shih, Ya-Chen Tina; Sullivan, Daniel C; Travis, William; Walter, Louise; Wolf, Andrew M D; Brawley, Otis W; Smith, Robert A

    2013-01-01

    Findings from the National Cancer Institute's National Lung Screening Trial established that lung cancer mortality in specific high-risk groups can be reduced by annual screening with low-dose computed tomography. These findings indicate that the adoption of lung cancer screening could save many lives. Based on the results of the National Lung Screening Trial, the American Cancer Society is issuing an initial guideline for lung cancer screening. This guideline recommends that clinicians with access to high-volume, high-quality lung cancer screening and treatment centers should initiate a discussion about screening with apparently healthy patients aged 55 years to 74 years who have at least a 30-pack-year smoking history and who currently smoke or have quit within the past 15 years. A process of informed and shared decision-making with a clinician related to the potential benefits, limitations, and harms associated with screening for lung cancer with low-dose computed tomography should occur before any decision is made to initiate lung cancer screening. Smoking cessation counseling remains a high priority for clinical attention in discussions with current smokers, who should be informed of their continuing risk of lung cancer. Screening should not be viewed as an alternative to smoking cessation.

  3. Drugs Approved for Lung Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for lung cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  4. MR imaging of human pancreatic cancer xenograft labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide in nude mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chao Ying; Pu, Yu; Liu, Gang; Shao, Yang; Ma, Qing Song; Zhang, Xiao Ming

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the MRI findings on tumor xenografts induced in nude mice by the inoculation of human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO), and to monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts. The labeled cancer cells were subcutaneously inoculated into 11 nude mice to induce tumor xenograft. The unlabeled cancer cells served as a control inoculated into nine nude mice. MR imaging was performed with a 1.5 T MR scanner for the tumor xenograft at the first, second and third week after the inoculation. We found that the tumor xenograft was induced in 100% nude mice on MR imaging for both groups in the first week after the inoculation. In the SPIO group, the tumors showed homogeneous hypointensity on T₁ - and T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images 1 week after inoculation. Two and 3 weeks after inoculation, the center of the tumors was still hypointense on all the above sequences. The tumor periphery was isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images. The tumors in control group were homogeneously hypointense or isointense on T₁ -weighted, and hyperintense on T₂ -weighted and FIESTA images in the first, second and third week after the inoculation. The size and signal-to-noise ratio of the tumor center in the SPIO group had decreased subsequent to the inoculation in all T₁ - and T₂ -weighted images and FIESTA. Our results showed the human pancreatic cancer cells labeled with SPIO can induce tumor xenograft in nude mice and MRI can monitor the kinetics of SPIO distribution in tumor xenografts.

  5. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  6. LUNG CANCER AND PULMONARY THROMBOEMBOLISM

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Ustamujic, Aida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Malignant diseases including lung cancer are the risk for development of pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE). Objective: To show the number of PTE in patients with lung cancer treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period: from 2012-2014. Material and methods: This is the retrospective study in which we present the number of various types of lung cancer treated in three-year period, number and per cent of PTE in different types of lung carcinoma, number and per cent of PTE of all diagnosed PTE in lung carcinoma according to the type of carcinoma. Results: In three-year period (from 2012 to 2014) 1609 patients with lung cancer were treated in Clinic for pulmonary diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” Clinical Centre of Sarajevo University. 42 patients: 25 men middle –aged 64.4 years and 17 women middle- aged 66.7 or 2.61% of all patients with lung cancer had diagnosed PTE. That was the 16. 7% of all patients with PTE treated in Clinic “Podhrastovi “in that three-year period. Of all 42 patients with lung cancer and diagnosed PTE 3 patients (7.14%) had planocellular cancer, 4 patients (9.53%) had squamocellular cancer, 9 (21.43%) had adenocarcinoma, 1 (2.38%) had NSCLC, 3 (7.14 %) had microcellular cancer, 1 (2.38%) had neuroendocrine cancer, 2 (4.76%) had large cell-macrocellular and 19 (45.24%) had histological non-differentiated lung carcinoma. Conclusion: Malignant diseases, including lung cancer, are the risk factor for development of PTE. It is important to consider the including anticoagulant prophylaxis in these patients and so to slow down the course of diseases in these patients. PMID:26622205

  7. [Grading of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bohle, R M; Schnabel, P A

    2016-07-01

    In comparison with other tumor entities there is no common generally accepted grading system for lung cancer with clearly defined criteria and clinical relevance. In the recent fourth edition of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification from 2015 of tumors of the lungs, pleura, thymus and heart, there is no generally applicable grading for pulmonary adenocarcinomas, squamous cell carcinomas or rarer forms of carcinoma. Since the new IASLC/ATS/ERS classification of adenocarcinomas published in 2011, 5 different subtypes with significantly different prognosis are proposed. This results in an architectural (histologic) grading, which is usually applied to resection specimens. For squamous cell carcinoma the number of different histological subtypes in the new WHO classification was reduced compared to earlier versions but without a common grading system. In recent publications nesting and budding were proposed as the main (histologic) criteria for a grading of squamous cell carcinomas. The grading of neuroendocrine tumors (NET) of the lungs in comparison with NET in other organs is presented in a separate article in this issue. Certain rare tumor types are high grade per definition: small cell, large cell and pleomorphic carcinomas, carcinosarcomas and pulmonary blastomas. In the future it is to be expected that these developments will be further refined, e. g. by adding further subtypes for adenocarcinomas and cytologic and/or nuclear criteria for adenocarcinoma and/or squamous cell carcinomas. PMID:27356985

  8. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Aoki, K; Shimizu, H

    1977-12-01

    The relationship between incidence of lung cancer and the volume of traffic as indicated by auto exhaust concentration was examined; the results, though suggestive, did not yield consistent evidence of the association between them. Traffic jams in Nagoya began 15 years ago, a period that may not be long enough to provide definitive data on the incidence of lung cancer. The high standardized mortality ratio (SMR) of lung cancer was observed in cities with a population of less than 1 million and guns (rural areas) along the coast, although those in the metropolitan areas with populations of more than 1 million were average. The SMR did not correlate with various socioeconomic conditions and industrial air pollution. Meteorologic or geologic conditions and ocean currents were not associated with SMR of lung cancer by city and gun. The population of a gun or of some cities was not large enough to be statistically significant, and the mortality rate of lung cancer was not always stable.

  9. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  10. Mesenchymal stem cell-based NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yin; Cheng, Ming; Yang, Zhen; Zeng, Chun-Yan; Chen, Jiang; Xie, Yong; Luo, Shi-Wen; Zhang, Kun-He; Zhou, Shu-Feng; Lu, Nong-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been recognized as promising delivery vehicles for gene therapy of tumors. Gastric cancer is the third leading cause of worldwide cancer mortality, and novel treatment modalities are urgently needed. NK4 is an antagonist of hepatocyte growth factor receptors (Met) which are often aberrantly activated in gastric cancer and thus represent a useful candidate for targeted therapies. This study investigated MSC-delivered NK4 gene therapy in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs were transduced with lentiviral vectors carrying NK4 complementary DNA or enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP). Such transduction did not change the phenotype of MSCs. Gastric cancer xenografts were established in BALB/C nude mice, and the mice were treated with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4. The tropism of MSCs toward gastric cancer cells was determined by an in vitro migration assay using MKN45 cells, GES-1 cells and human fibroblasts and their presence in tumor xenografts. Tumor growth, tumor cell apoptosis and intratumoral microvessel density of tumor tissue were measured in nude mice bearing gastric cancer xenografts treated with PBS, MSCs-GFP, Lenti-NK4, or MSCs-NK4 via tail vein injection. The results showed that MSCs migrated preferably to gastric cancer cells in vitro. Systemic MSCs-NK4 injection significantly suppressed the growth of gastric cancer xenografts. MSCs-NK4 migrated and accumulated in tumor tissues after systemic injection. The microvessel density of tumor xenografts was decreased, and tumor cellular apoptosis was significantly induced in the mice treated with MSCs-NK4 compared to control mice. These findings demonstrate that MSC-based NK4 gene therapy can obviously inhibit the growth of gastric cancer xenografts, and MSCs are a better vehicle for NK4 gene therapy than lentiviral vectors. Further studies are warranted to explore the efficacy and safety of the MSC-based NK4 gene therapy in

  11. Polonium and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties.

  12. Polonium and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zagà, Vincenzo; Lygidakis, Charilaos; Chaouachi, Kamal; Gattavecchia, Enrico

    2011-01-01

    The alpha-radioactive polonium 210 (Po-210) is one of the most powerful carcinogenic agents of tobacco smoke and is responsible for the histotype shift of lung cancer from squamous cell type to adenocarcinoma. According to several studies, the principal source of Po-210 is the fertilizers used in tobacco plants, which are rich in polyphosphates containing radio (Ra-226) and its decay products, lead 210 (Pb-210) and Po-210. Tobacco leaves accumulate Pb-210 and Po-210 through their trichomes, and Pb-210 decays into Po-210 over time. With the combustion of the cigarette smoke becomes radioactive and Pb-210 and Po-210 reach the bronchopulmonary apparatus, especially in bifurcations of segmental bronchi. In this place, combined with other agents, it will manifest its carcinogenic activity, especially in patients with compromised mucous-ciliary clearance. Various studies have confirmed that the radiological risk from Po-210 in a smoker of 20 cigarettes per day for a year is equivalent to the one deriving from 300 chest X-rays, with an autonomous oncogenic capability of 4 lung cancers per 10000 smokers. Po-210 can also be found in passive smoke, since part of Po-210 spreads in the surrounding environment during tobacco combustion. Tobacco manufacturers have been aware of the alpha-radioactivity presence in tobacco smoke since the sixties. PMID:21772848

  13. Bronchoscopy of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Emslander, H. P.

    1994-01-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cancer site in men and women with a high incidence and mortality rate. Most patients are diagnosed when the disease has already spread. An early, detection and immediate and accurate histological or cytological diagnosis are essential for a hopeful outcome. In most patients, bronchoscopy is the method of choice in establishing a suspected lung neoplasm. With the rigid and flexible method, two complementary techniques are available. The methods bear a very low mortality rate if sufficient monitoring and resuscitative instrumentation is available. Rigid bronchoscopy offers the possibility of obtaining large biopsy specimens from the tumorous tissue and provides an effective tool in the control of major haemorrhage. However, it cannot be used for the inspection of further peripherally located parts of the bronchial system and needs general anaesthesia. In contrast, the flexible method can be quickly and readily performed at practically any location using portable equipment. Bronchi can be inspected up to the 8th order and with bronchial washing, forceps biopsy, brush biopsy and fluorescence bronchoscopy techniques with a high diagnostic yield are available. This holds true, especially if these sampling techniques are used as complementary methods. PMID:18493335

  14. Frequent Infection of Human Cancer Xenografts with Murine Endogenous Retroviruses in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Naseer, Asif; Terry, Anne; Gilroy, Kathryn; Kilbey, Anna; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Bell, Margaret; Mason, Susan; Blyth, Karen; Cameron, Ewan; Neil, James C.

    2015-01-01

    Infection of human cancer xenografts in mice with murine leukemia viruses (MLVs) is a long-standing observation, but the likelihood of infection in vivo and its biological consequences are poorly understood. We therefore conducted a prospective study in commonly used xenograft recipient strains. From BALB/c nude mice engrafted with MCF7 human mammary carcinoma cells, we isolated a virus that was virtually identical to Bxv1, a locus encoding replication-competent xenotropic MLV (XMLV). XMLV was detected in 9/17 (53%) independently isolated explants. XMLV was not found in primary leukemias or in THP1 leukemia cells grown in Bxv1-negative NSG (NOD/SCID/γCnull) mice, although MCF7 explants harbored replication-defective MLV proviruses. To assess the significance of infection for xenograft behavior in vivo, we examined changes in growth and global transcription in MCF7 and the highly susceptible Raji Burkitt lymphoma cell line chronically infected with XMLV. Raji cells showed a stronger transcriptional response that included up-regulation of chemokines and effectors of innate antiviral immunity. In conclusion, the risk of de novo XMLV infection of xenografts is high in Bxv1 positive mice, while infection can have positive or negative effects on xenograft growth potential with significant consequences for interpretation of many xenograft studies. PMID:25912714

  15. Anthocyanin Induces Apoptosis of DU-145 Cells In Vitro and Inhibits Xenograft Growth of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ha, U-Syn; Bae, Woong Jin; Kim, Su Jin; Yoon, Byung Il; Hong, Sung Hoo; Lee, Ji Youl; Hwang, Tae-Kon; Hwang, Sung Yeoun; Wang, Zhiping

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the effects of anthocyanins extracted from black soybean, which have antioxidant activity, on apoptosis in vitro (in hormone refractory prostate cancer cells) and on tumor growth in vivo (in athymic nude mouse xenograft model). Materials and Methods The growth and viability of DU-145 cells treated with anthocyanins were assessed using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay and apoptosis was assessed by DNA laddering. Immunoblotting was conducted to evaluate differences in the expressions of p53, Bax, Bcl, androgen receptor (AR), and prostate specific antigen (PSA). To study the inhibitory effects of anthocyanins on tumor growth in vivo, DU-145 tumor xenografts were established in athymic nude mice. The anthocyanin group was treated with daily oral anthocyanin (8 mg/kg) for 14 weeks. After 2 weeks of treatment, DU-145 cells (2×106) were inoculated subcutaneously into the right flank to establish tumor xenografts. Tumor dimensions were measured twice a week using calipers and volumes were calculated. Results Anthocyanin treatment of DU-145 cells resulted in 1) significant increase in apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, 2) significant decrease in p53 and Bcl-2 expressions (with increased Bax expression), and 3) significant decrease in PSA and AR expressions. In the xenograft model, anthocyanin treatment significantly inhibit tumor growth. Conclusion This study suggests that anthocyanins from black soybean inhibit the progression of prostate cancer in vitro and in a xenograft model. PMID:25510742

  16. Occupational exposure and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Spyratos, Dionysios; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Machairiotis, Nikolaos; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Kougioumtzi, Ioanna; Dryllis, Georgios; Kallianos, Anastasios; Rapti, Aggeliki; Li, Chen; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death for male and the second most usual cancer for women after breast cancer. Currently there are available several non-specific cytotoxic agents and several targeted agents for lung cancer therapy. However; early stage diagnosis is still unavailable and several efforts are being made towards this direction. Novel biomarkers are being investigated along with new biopsy techniques. The occupational and environmental exposure to carcinogenic agents is an everyday phenomenon. Therefore until efficient early diagnosis is available, avoidance of exposure to carcinogenic agents is necessary. In the current mini-review occupational and environmental carcinogenic agents will be presented. PMID:24102018

  17. The inhibitory efficacy of methylseleninic acid against colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Data indicate that methylselenol is a critical selenium (Se) metabolite for anticancer activity in vivo. We tested the hypoththesis that oral dosing methylseleninic acid (MSeA), a methylselenol precursor, inhibits the growth of colon cancer xenografts in C57BL/6 mice fed a Se adequate diet. In this...

  18. Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, Erica B; Jalal, Shadia I

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive cancer of neuroendocrine origin, which is strongly associated with cigarette smoking. Patients typically present with a short duration of symptoms and frequently (60-65 %) with metastatic disease. SCLC is a heterogeneous disease including extremely chemosensitive and chemoresistant clones. For this reason, a high percentage of patients respond to first-line chemotherapy but rapidly succumb to the disease. SCLC is generally divided into two stages, limited and extensive. Standard treatment of limited stage disease includes combination chemotherapy with cisplatin and etoposide for four cycles, thoracic radiation initiated early with the first cycle of chemotherapy, and consideration of prophylactic cranial irradiation (PCI) in the subset of patients with good response. Surgery may play a role in TNM stages I and II. In extensive disease, platinum agents and etoposide, used in combination, are again the first-line standard of care in the USA. However, thoracic radiation therapy is used predominately in patients where local control is important and PCI is of uncertain benefit. Despite these treatments, prognosis remains poor and novel therapies are needed to improve survival in this disease. PMID:27535400

  19. Proteomic biomarkers in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M D; Nogal, A; Molina-Pinelo, S; Carnero, A; Paz-Ares, L

    2013-09-01

    The correct understanding of tumour development relies on the comprehensive study of proteins. They are the main orchestrators of vital processes, such as signalling pathways, which drive the carcinogenic process. Proteomic technologies can be applied to cancer research to detect differential protein expression and to assess different responses to treatment. Lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer-related death in the world. Mostly diagnosed at late stages of the disease, lung cancer has one of the lowest 5-year survival rates at 15 %. The use of different proteomic techniques such as two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE), isotope labelling (ICAT, SILAC, iTRAQ) and mass spectrometry may yield new knowledge on the underlying biology of lung cancer and also allow the development of new early detection tests and the identification of changes in the cancer protein network that are associated with prognosis and drug resistance. PMID:23606351

  20. Meta-analysis of the independent and cumulative effects of multiple genetic modifications on pig lung xenograft performance during ex vivo perfusion with human blood

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Donald G.; Quinn, Kevin J.; French, Beth M.; Schwartz, Evan; Kang, Elizabeth; Dahi, Siamak; Phelps, Carol J.; Ayares, David L.; Burdorf, Lars; Azimzadeh, Agnes M.; Pierson, Richard N.

    2014-01-01

    Background Genetically modified pigs are a promising potential source of lung xenografts. Ex-vivo xenoperfusion is an effective platform for testing the effect of new modifications, but typical experiments are limited by testing of a single genetic intervention and small sample sizes. The purpose of this study was to analyze the individual and aggregate effects of donor genetic modifications on porcine lung xenograft survival and injury in an extensive pig lung xenoperfusion series. Methods Data from 157 porcine lung xenoperfusion experiments using otherwise unmodified heparinized human blood were aggregated as either continuous or dichotomous variables. Lungs were wild type in 17 perfusions (11% of the study group), while 31 lungs (20% of the study group) had 1 genetic modification, 40 lungs (39%) had 2, and 47 lungs (30%) had 3 or more modifications. The primary endpoint was functional lung survival to 4 hours of perfusion. Secondary analyses evaluated previously identified markers associated with known lung xenograft injury mechanisms. In addition to comparison among all xenografts grouped by survival status, a subgroup analysis was performed of lungs incorporating the GalTKO.hCD46 genotype. Results Each increase in the number of genetic modifications was associated with additional prolongation of lung xenograft survival. Lungs that exhibited survival to 4 hours generally had reduced platelet activation and thrombin generation. GalTKO and the expression of hCD46, HO-1, hCD55 or hEPCR were associated with improved survival. hTBM, HLA-E, and hCD39 were associated with no significant effect on the primary outcome. Conclusion This meta-analysis of an extensive lung xenotransplantation series demonstrates that increasing the number of genetic modifications targeting known xenogeneic lung injury mechanisms is associated with incremental improvements in lung survival. While more detailed mechanistic studies are needed to explore the relationship between gene expression

  1. Screening for occult lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Barclay, T. H.; MacIntosh, J. H.

    1983-01-01

    A pilot screening program for the early detection of lung cancer was carried out in Saskatchewan in 1968 using chest roentgenography and cytologic examination of sputum samples. The yield from 23 000 men aged 40 years and over was only 10 cases. Nine of the men had advanced disease. One had occult lung cancer. A period of 31 months elapsed between the discovery of malignant cells in this patient's sputum and roentgenographic localization of the tumour. Following pneumonectomy he has survived with no discernible residual or metastatic tumour for 12 years. The morphologic changes in the resected lung provided a basis for discussing the preclinical phase of squamous cancer of the lung, the treatment of occult cancer and multicentric primary pulmonary tumours. The survey would have been more successful with a narrower target group and more frequent examination. Images FIG. 1 FIG. 2 FIG. 3 PMID:6299495

  2. Nanomedicine: Sniffing out lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazzone, Peter

    2009-10-01

    A sensor consisting of an array of gold nanoparticles can distinguish the breath of lung cancer patients from the breath of healthy individuals without the need to pre-treat or dehumidify the samples.

  3. Genetically Engineered Cancer Models, But Not Xenografts, Faithfully Predict Anticancer Drug Exposure in Melanoma Tumors

    PubMed Central

    Combest, Austin J.; Roberts, Patrick J.; Dillon, Patrick M.; Sandison, Katie; Hanna, Suzan K.; Ross, Charlene; Habibi, Sohrab; Zamboni, Beth; Müller, Markus; Brunner, Martin; Sharpless, Norman E.

    2012-01-01

    Background. Rodent studies are a vital step in the development of novel anticancer therapeutics and are used in pharmacokinetic (PK), toxicology, and efficacy studies. Traditionally, anticancer drug development has relied on xenograft implantation of human cancer cell lines in immunocompromised mice for efficacy screening of a candidate compound. The usefulness of xenograft models for efficacy testing, however, has been questioned, whereas genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) and orthotopic syngeneic transplants (OSTs) may offer some advantages for efficacy assessment. A critical factor influencing the predictability of rodent tumor models is drug PKs, but a comprehensive comparison of plasma and tumor PK parameters among xenograft models, OSTs, GEMMs, and human patients has not been performed. Methods. In this work, we evaluated the plasma and tumor dispositions of an antimelanoma agent, carboplatin, in patients with cutaneous melanoma compared with four different murine melanoma models (one GEMM, one human cell line xenograft, and two OSTs). Results. Using microdialysis to sample carboplatin tumor disposition, we found that OSTs and xenografts were poor predictors of drug exposure in human tumors, whereas the GEMM model exhibited PK parameters similar to those seen in human tumors. Conclusions. The tumor PKs of carboplatin in a GEMM of melanoma more closely resembles the tumor disposition in patients with melanoma than transplanted tumor models. GEMMs show promise in becoming an improved prediction model for intratumoral PKs and response in patients with solid tumors. PMID:22993143

  4. Lung Cancer and Hispanics: Know the Facts

    MedlinePlus

    ... other segments of the American population. However, lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death among Hispanic men and the second-leading cause among Hispanic women. November is Lung Cancer Awareness ...

  5. Lung cancer working group report.

    PubMed

    Saijo, Nagahiro; Fukuoka, Masahiro; Thongprasert, Sumitra; Ichinose, Yukito; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Mok, Tony Shu Kam; Ohe, Yuichiro; Park, Keunchil; Wu, Yi-Long

    2010-09-01

    Asia needs a guideline for non-small-cell lung cancer because of differences in medical care, medical care insurance, ethnic variation and drug approval lag within Asian countries and compared with Western countries. Due to ethnic differences, drug dosages are often higher in the USA than in Japan. EGFR mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer was detected in 32% of Asians but only 6% of non-Asians, while differences in irinotecan metabolism cause higher frequencies of toxicity (leukopenia, diarrhea) in Asians. Pharmacodynamic ethnic differences in relation to paclitaxel/carboplatin resulted in longer median survival and a higher 1-year survival rate for Japanese-advanced non-small-cell lung cancer patients compared with Americans. To solve the problem of drug lag, pharmaceutical companies must perform multinational Asian clinical trials with quick accrual of patients, while regulatory authorities must establish high-quality, efficient approval processes, and achieve regulatory harmonization. The National Comprehensive Cancer Network promotes creation of national clinical practice guidelines, and Korea, China and Thailand adapted the National Comprehensive Cancer Network guidelines. Many Asian countries still lack such guidelines, and there are no pan-Asian guidelines for non-small-cell lung cancer. Japan developed its own non-small-cell lung cancer guidelines and also a gefitinib guidance. The study group members concluded that immediate establishment of an Asian non-small-cell lung cancer guideline will be difficult because of the differences among the countries. Asian collaborative trials on treatment of non-small-cell lung cancer need to be started at an early date to generate Asian data.

  6. Palliative Procedures in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Masuda, Emi; Sista, Akhilesh K.; Pua, Bradley B.; Madoff, David C.

    2013-01-01

    Palliative care aims to optimize comfort and function when cure is not possible. Image-guided interventions for palliative treatment of lung cancer is aimed at local control of advanced disease in the affected lung, adjacent mediastinal structures, or distant metastatic sites. These procedures include endovascular therapy for superior vena cava syndrome, bronchial artery embolization for hemoptysis associated with lung cancer, and ablation of osseous metastasis. Pathophysiology, clinical presentation, indications of these palliative treatments, procedural techniques, complications, and possible future interventions are discussed in this article. PMID:24436537

  7. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology. PMID:23631600

  8. Global metabolite profiling of human colorectal cancer xenografts in mice using HPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Loftus, Neil J; Lai, Lindsay; Wilkinson, Robert W; Odedra, Rajesh; Wilson, Ian D; Barnes, Alan J

    2013-06-01

    Reversed-phase gradient LC-MS was used to perform untargeted metabonomic analysis on extracts of human colorectal cancer (CRC) cell lines (COLO 205, HT-29, HCT 116 and SW620) subcutaneously implanted into age-matched athymic nude male mice to study small molecule metabolic profiles and examine possible correlations with human cancer biopsies. Following high mass accuracy data analysis using MS and MS/MS, metabolites were identified by searching against major metabolite databases including METLIN, MASSBANK, The Human Metabolome Database, PubChem, Biospider, LipidMaps and KEGG. HT-29 and COLO 205 tumor xenografts showed a distribution of metabolites that differed from SW620 and HCT 116 xenografts (predominantly on the basis of relative differences in the amounts of amino acids and lipids detected). This finding is consistent with NMR-based analysis of human colorectal tissue, where the metabolite profiles of HT-29 tumors exhibit the greatest similarity to human rectal cancer tissue with respect to changes in the relative amounts of lipids and choline-containing compounds. As the metabolic signatures of cancer cells result from oncogene-directed metabolic reprogramming, the HT-29 xenografts in mice may prove to be a useful model to further study the tumor microenvironment and cancer biology.

  9. Lung cancer screening: state of the art.

    PubMed

    Munden, Reginald F; Godoy, Myrna C B

    2013-10-01

    Results from the National Lung Screening Trial have confirmed that lung cancer mortality is reduced using low-dose CT screening. Opening a lung cancer screening program requires a multidisciplinary approach. While the fundamental aspects of a screening program are similar, such as scheduling, performing, and managing follow-up, there are aspects of a lung cancer screening program that are unique. This article will discuss factors important in establishing a state of the art lung cancer screening program.

  10. Early detection of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Midthun, David E.

    2016-01-01

    Most patients with lung cancer are diagnosed when they present with symptoms, they have advanced stage disease, and curative treatment is no longer an option. An effective screening test has long been desired for early detection with the goal of reducing mortality from lung cancer. Sputum cytology, chest radiography, and computed tomography (CT) scan have been studied as potential screening tests. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in mortality with low-dose CT (LDCT) screening, and guidelines now endorse annual LDCT for those at high risk. Implementation of screening is underway with the desire that the benefits be seen in clinical practice outside of a research study format. Concerns include management of false positives, cost, incidental findings, radiation exposure, and overdiagnosis. Studies continue to evaluate LDCT screening and use of biomarkers in risk assessment and diagnosis in attempt to further improve outcomes for patients with lung cancer. PMID:27158468

  11. Quality of Life in Patients Undergoing Radiation Therapy for Primary Lung Cancer, Head and Neck Cancer, or Gastrointestinal Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-19

    Anal Cancer; Colorectal Cancer; Esophageal Cancer; Extrahepatic Bile Duct Cancer; Gallbladder Cancer; Gastric Cancer; Head and Neck Cancer; Liver Cancer; Lung Cancer; Pancreatic Cancer; Small Intestine Cancer

  12. Carotenoids and lung cancer prevention

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Understanding the molecular actions of carotenoids is critical for human studies involving carotenoids for prevention of lung cancer and cancers at other tissue sites. While the original hypothesis prompting the beta-carotene intervention trials was that beta-carotene exerts beneficial effects thro...

  13. Palliative Care in Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Shinde, Arvind M; Dashti, Azadeh

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cancer worldwide and is the leading cause of cancer death for both men and women in the USA. Symptom burden in patients with advanced lung cancer is very high and has a negative impact on their quality of life (QOL). Palliative care with its focus on the management of symptoms and addressing physical, psychosocial, spiritual, and existential suffering, as well as medically appropriate goal setting and open communication with patients and families, significantly adds to the quality of care received by advanced lung cancer patients. The Provisional Clinical Opinion (PCO) of American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) as well as the National Cancer Care Network's (NCCN) clinical practice guidelines recommends early integration of palliative care into routine cancer care. In this chapter, we will provide an overview of palliative care in lung cancer and will examine the evidence and recommendations with regard to a comprehensive and interdisciplinary approach to symptom management, as well as discussions of goals of care, advance care planning, and care preferences. PMID:27535397

  14. Lung Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing lung cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  15. Functional imaging in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Harders, S W; Balyasnikowa, S; Fischer, B M

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer represents an increasingly frequent cancer diagnosis worldwide. An increasing awareness on smoking cessation as an important mean to reduce lung cancer incidence and mortality, an increasing number of therapy options and a steady focus on early diagnosis and adequate staging have resulted in a modestly improved survival. For early diagnosis and precise staging, imaging, especially positron emission tomography combined with CT (PET/CT), plays an important role. Other functional imaging modalities such as dynamic contrast-enhanced CT (DCE-CT) and diffusion-weighted MR imaging (DW-MRI) have demonstrated promising results within this field. The purpose of this review is to provide the reader with a brief and balanced introduction to these three functional imaging modalities and their current or potential application in the care of patients with lung cancer. PMID:24289258

  16. Frizzled-8 as a putative therapeutic target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hua-qing; Xu, Mei-lin; Ma, Jie; Zhang, Yi; Xie, Cong-hua

    2012-01-06

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Fzd-8 is over-expressed in human lung cancer. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 inhibits proliferation and Wnt pathway in lung cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down of Fzd-8 suppresses tumor growth in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer shRNA knock-down Fzd-8 sensitizes lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. -- Abstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer related deaths worldwide. It is necessary to better understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung cancer in order to develop more effective therapeutics for the treatment of this disease. Recent reports have shown that Wnt signaling pathway is important in a number of cancer types including lung cancer. However, the role of Frizzled-8 (Fzd-8), one of the Frizzled family of receptors for the Wnt ligands, in lung cancer still remains to be elucidated. Here in this study we showed that Fzd-8 was over-expressed in human lung cancer tissue samples and cell lines. To investigate the functional importance of the Fzd-8 over-expression in lung cancer, we used shRNA to knock down Fzd-8 mRNA in lung cancer cells expressing the gene. We observed that Fzd-8 shRNA inhibited cell proliferation along with decreased activity of Wnt pathway in vitro, and also significantly suppressed A549 xenograft model in vivo (p < 0.05). Furthermore, we found that knocking down Fzd-8 by shRNA sensitized the lung cancer cells to chemotherapy Taxotere. These data suggest that Fzd-8 is a putative therapeutic target for human lung cancer and over-expression of Fzd-8 may be important for aberrant Wnt activation in lung cancer.

  17. Impacts of Exercise on Prognostic Biomarkers in Lung Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Healthy, no Evidence of Disease; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Receptor Tyrosine Kinase EphA5 Is a Functional Molecular Target in Human Lung Cancer*

    PubMed Central

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. Finally, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications. PMID:25623065

  19. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; Liu, Diane D.; Lee, J. Jack; Hong, Waun Ki; Ferrara, Fortunato; Bradbury, Andrew R. M.; Lobb, Roy R.; Edelman, Martin J.; Sidman, Richard L.; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Arap, Wadih; Pasqualini, Renata

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lung cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.

  20. Lung cancer and air pollution.

    PubMed

    Cohen, A J; Pope, C A

    1995-11-01

    Epidemiologic studies over the last 40 years suggest rather consistently that general ambient air pollution, chiefly due to the incomplete combustion of fossil fuels, may be responsible for increased rates of lung cancer. This evidence derives from studies of lung cancer trends, studies of occupational groups, comparisons of urban and rural populations, and case-control and cohort studies using diverse exposure metrics. Recent prospective cohort studies observed 30 to 50% increases in lung cancer rates associated with exposure to respirable particles. While these data reflect the effects of exposures in past decades, and despite some progress in reducing air pollution, large numbers of people in the United States continue to be exposed to pollutant mixtures containing known or suspected carcinogens. It is not known how many people in the United States are exposed to levels of fine respirable particles that have been associated with lung cancer in recent epidemiologic studies. These observations suggest that the most widely cited estimates of the proportional contribution of air pollution to lung cancer occurrence in the United States based largely on the results of animal studies, may be too low. It is important that better epidemiologic research be conducted to allow improved estimates of lung cancer risk from air pollution among the general population. The development and application of new epidemiologic methods, particularly the improved characterization of population-wide exposure to mixtures of air pollutants and the improved design of ecologic studies, could improve our ability to measure accurately the magnitude of excess cancer associated with air pollution. PMID:8741787

  1. Medical imaging in lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Heelan, R.T.; Bains, M.S.; Yeh, S.

    1987-10-01

    The routine imaging work-up of suspected lung cancer should include posteroanterior and lateral chest radiographs and, in most cases, a computed tomographic (CT) scan of the entire thorax and adrenal glands. In asymptomatic patients with adenocarcinoma of the lung, there is justification for doing routine contrast-enhanced CT examination of the brain. Further imaging workup will be suggested by the patient's history, physical findings, and laboratory findings. Magnetic resonance imaging of the chest in patients with lung cancer is being investigated, but current studies comparing it with CT demonstrate no definite advantage at this time, with the possible exception of the lung apex in which T1 weighted thin-section coronal views are useful.

  2. Picosecond pulsed electric fields induce apoptosis in a cervical cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Jia, Jia; Xiong, Zheng-Ai; Qin, Qin; Yao, Chen-Guo; Zhao, Xiao-Zhen

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the efficacy of picosecond pulsed electric fields (psPEF) on a cervical cancer xenograft. Human cervical cancer xenografts were established in nude mice by transplantation of HeLa cells, and the tumors were then treated with psPEF. The histological changes were observed by hematoxylin‑eosin staining and transmission electron microscopy. The rate of tumor cell apoptosis was determined using a terminal deoxynucleotidyl‑transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling assay. The mitochondrial transmembrane potential of the tumor cells was detected by laser scanning confocal microscopy, and the activity of caspase‑3, ‑8, ‑9 and ‑12 was determined. The inhibitory rate seven days post‑psPEF treatment was also calculated. The results showed that exposure to psPEF led to an increased rate of apoptosis, collapse of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, and activation of caspases. The inhibitory rate was 9.11% at day 7. The results of the present study indicate that psPEF may induce apoptosis in a cervical cancer xenograft through the endoplasmic reticulum stress and caspase‑dependent signaling pathways. PMID:25405328

  3. Berberine inhibits human tongue squamous carcinoma cancer tumor growth in a murine xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yung-Tsuan; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Li, Tsai-Chung; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Lai, Kuang-Chi; Liao, Ching-Lung; Lin, Jaung-Geng; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-09-01

    Our primary studies showed that berberine induced apoptosis in human tongue cancer SCC-4 cells in vitro. But there is no report to show berberine inhibited SCC-4 cancer cells in vivo on a murine xenograft animal model. SCC-4 tumor cells were implanted into mice and groups of mice were treated with vehicle, berberine (10mg/kg of body weight) and doxorubicin (4mg/kg of body weight). The tested agents were injected once per four days intraperitoneally (i.p.), with treatment starting 4 weeks prior to cells inoculation. Treatment with 4mg/kg of doxorubicin or with 10mg/kg of berberine resulted in a reduction in tumor incidence. Tumor size in xenograft mice treated with 10mg/kg berberine was significantly smaller than that in the control group. Our findings indicated that berbeirne inhibits tumor growth in a xenograft animal model. Therefore, berberine may represent a tongue cancer preventive agent and can be used in clinic. PMID:19303753

  4. Epidemiology of lung cancer in China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wanqing; Zheng, Rongshou; Zeng, Hongmei; Zhang, Siwei

    2015-01-01

    Background Lung cancer is the most common cancer and the leading cause of cancer death in China. Along with socioeconomic development, environmental problems have intensified and the burden of lung cancer continues to increase. Methods In this study, national cancer registry data was used for evaluating incidence, mortality, time trend, and prediction. Results In China in 2010, 605 900 patients were diagnosed and 486 600 patients died of lung cancer. Throughout the last three decades, the mortality of lung cancer has dramatically increased, as shown in national death surveys. From 2000 to 2010, age specific incidence of lung cancer increased in most age groups. It is estimated that in 2015, the total number of new cases of lung cancer will reach 733 300. Conclusions Lung cancer is a serious disease affecting public health and an effective control strategy is needed in China. PMID:26273360

  5. Inhibition of histone deacetylases by trans-cinnamic acid and its antitumor effect against colon cancer xenografts in athymic mice

    PubMed Central

    ZHU, BINGYAN; SHANG, BOYANG; LI, YI; ZHEN, YONGSU

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that trans-cinnamic acid (tCA) has a broad spectrum of biological activities, and exhibits antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer properties. In addition, tCA and a variety of its analogs have been detected as gut microbe-derived metabolites exerting various biological effects in the colon. The aim of this study was to assess the antitumor activity of tCA in vitro and in vivo, in particular its therapeutic efficacy against colon cancer xenografts in athymic mice. Furthermore, it aimed to examine the effects of tCA on histone deacetylases (HDACs) and to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Using an MTT assay, tCA was observed to inhibit the proliferation of several cancer cell lines, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) in HT29 colon carcinoma cells was ~1 mM. Western blot analysis demonstrated that tCA upregulated the expression of acetyl-H3 and acetyl-H4 proteins, which was consistent with the effects of the HDAC inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA). Furthermore, expression of Bcl-2 (a marker of cell proliferation) was reduced, and apoptosis was induced. Apoptosis was shown by the activation of cleavage of poly ADP ribose polymerase and the increased expression of Bax. Apoptosis was also confirmed using APC Annexin V and SYTOX Green Nucleic Acid Stain. In addition, the tCA-induced inhibition of the expression of HDAC markers and activation of apoptosis in tumor tissues were further confirmed by immunohistochemistry. Intragastric administration of tCA at doses of 1.0 and 1.5 mmol/kg body weight suppressed the growth of HT29 human colon carcinoma xenografts in athymic mice at well-tolerated doses. No toxic changes were found in the heart, lung, liver, kidney, colon or bone marrow following histopathological examination. This study indicated that tCA is effective against colon cancer xenograft in nude mice. The antitumor mechanism of tCA was mediated, at least in part, by inhibition of HDACs in cancer cells. As

  6. A natural small molecule, catechol, induces c-Myc degradation by directly targeting ERK2 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Do Young; Shin, Seung Ho; Lee, Mee-Hyun; Malakhova, Margarita; Kurinov, Igor; Wu, Qiong; Xu, Jinglong; Jiang, Yanan; Dong, Ziming; Liu, Kangdong; Lee, Kun Yeong; Bae, Ki Beom; Choi, Bu Young; Deng, Yibin; Bode, Ann; Dong, Zigang

    2016-01-01

    Various carcinogens induce EGFR/RAS/MAPK signaling, which is critical in the development of lung cancer. In particular, constitutive activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 (ERK2) is observed in many lung cancer patients, and therefore developing compounds capable of targeting ERK2 in lung carcinogenesis could be beneficial. We examined the therapeutic effect of catechol in lung cancer treatment. Catechol suppressed anchorage-independent growth of murine KP2 and human H460 lung cancer cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Catechol inhibited ERK2 kinase activity in vitro, and its direct binding to the ERK2 active site was confirmed by X-ray crystallography. Phosphorylation of c-Myc, a substrate of ERK2, was decreased in catechol-treated lung cancer cells and resulted in reduced protein stability and subsequent down-regulation of total c-Myc. Treatment with catechol induced G1 phase arrest in lung cancer cells and decreased protein expression related to G1-S progression. In addition, we showed that catechol inhibited the growth of both allograft and xenograft lung cancer tumors in vivo. In summary, catechol exerted inhibitory effects on the ERK2/c-Myc signaling axis to reduce lung cancer tumor growth in vitro and in vivo, including a preclinical patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model. These findings suggest that catechol, a natural small molecule, possesses potential as a novel therapeutic agent against lung carcinogenesis in future clinical approaches. PMID:27167001

  7. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health ... the PDQ Adult Treatment Editorial Board . Clinical Trial Information A clinical trial is a study to answer ...

  8. Risk Profiling May Improve Lung Cancer Screening

    Cancer.gov

    A new modeling study suggests that individualized, risk-based selection of ever-smokers for lung cancer screening may prevent more lung cancer deaths and improve the effectiveness and efficiency of screening compared with current screening recommendations

  9. Tobacco Smoking and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Furrukh, Muhammad

    2013-01-01

    Tobacco smoking remains the most established cause of lung carcinogenesis and other disease processes. Over the last 50 years, tobacco refinement and the introduction of filters have brought a change in histology, and now adenocarcinoma has become the most prevalent subtype. Over the last decade, smoking also has emerged as a strong prognostic and predictive patient characteristic along with other variables. This article briefly reviews scientific facts about tobacco, and the process and molecular pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis in smokers and never-smokers. The evidence from randomised trials about tobacco smoking’s impact on lung cancer outcomes is also reviewed. PMID:23984018

  10. The Zebrafish Xenograft Platform: Evolution of a Novel Cancer Model and Preclinical Screening Tool.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Jaime; Veinotte, Chansey J; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Animal xenografts of human cancers represent a key preclinical tool in the field of cancer research. While mouse xenografts have long been the gold standard, investigators have begun to use zebrafish (Danio rerio) xenotransplantation as a relatively rapid, robust and cost-effective in vivo model of human cancers. There are several important methodological considerations in the design of an informative and efficient zebrafish xenotransplantation experiment. Various transgenic fish strains have been created that facilitate microscopic observation, ranging from the completely transparent casper fish to the Tg(fli1:eGFP) fish that expresses fluorescent GFP protein in its vascular tissue. While human cancer cell lines have been used extensively in zebrafish xenotransplantation studies, several reports have also used primary patient samples as the donor material. The zebrafish is ideally suited for transplanting primary patient material by virtue of the relatively low number of cells required for each embryo (between 50 and 300 cells), the absence of an adaptive immune system in the early zebrafish embryo, and the short experimental timeframe (5-7 days). Following xenotransplantation into the fish, cells can be tracked using in vivo or ex vivo measures of cell proliferation and migration, facilitated by fluorescence or human-specific protein expression. Importantly, assays have been developed that allow for the reliable detection of in vivo human cancer cell growth or inhibition following administration of drugs of interest. The zebrafish xenotransplantation model is a unique and effective tool for the study of cancer cell biology.

  11. The Zebrafish Xenograft Platform: Evolution of a Novel Cancer Model and Preclinical Screening Tool.

    PubMed

    Wertman, Jaime; Veinotte, Chansey J; Dellaire, Graham; Berman, Jason N

    2016-01-01

    Animal xenografts of human cancers represent a key preclinical tool in the field of cancer research. While mouse xenografts have long been the gold standard, investigators have begun to use zebrafish (Danio rerio) xenotransplantation as a relatively rapid, robust and cost-effective in vivo model of human cancers. There are several important methodological considerations in the design of an informative and efficient zebrafish xenotransplantation experiment. Various transgenic fish strains have been created that facilitate microscopic observation, ranging from the completely transparent casper fish to the Tg(fli1:eGFP) fish that expresses fluorescent GFP protein in its vascular tissue. While human cancer cell lines have been used extensively in zebrafish xenotransplantation studies, several reports have also used primary patient samples as the donor material. The zebrafish is ideally suited for transplanting primary patient material by virtue of the relatively low number of cells required for each embryo (between 50 and 300 cells), the absence of an adaptive immune system in the early zebrafish embryo, and the short experimental timeframe (5-7 days). Following xenotransplantation into the fish, cells can be tracked using in vivo or ex vivo measures of cell proliferation and migration, facilitated by fluorescence or human-specific protein expression. Importantly, assays have been developed that allow for the reliable detection of in vivo human cancer cell growth or inhibition following administration of drugs of interest. The zebrafish xenotransplantation model is a unique and effective tool for the study of cancer cell biology. PMID:27165359

  12. Xenograft assessment of predictive biomarkers for standard head and neck cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Swick, Adam D; Smith, Molly A; Blitzer, Grace C; Yang, Robert Z; Saha, Sandeep; Harari, Paul M; Lambert, Paul F; Liu, Cheng Z; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-05-01

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains a challenging cancer to treat with overall 5-year survival on the order of 50-60%. Therefore, predictive biomarkers for this disease would be valuable to provide more effective and individualized therapeutic approaches for these patients. While prognostic biomarkers such as p16 expression correlate with outcome; to date, no predictive biomarkers have been clinically validated for HNSCC. We generated xenografts in immunocompromised mice from six established HNSCC cell lines and evaluated response to cisplatin, cetuximab, and radiation. Tissue microarrays were constructed from pre- and posttreatment tumor samples derived from each xenograft experiment. Quantitative immunohistochemistry was performed using a semiautomated imaging and analysis platform to determine the relative expression of five potential predictive biomarkers: epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), phospho-EGFR, phospho-Akt, phospho-ERK, and excision repair cross-complementation group 1 (ERCC1). Biomarker levels were compared between xenografts that were sensitive versus resistant to a specific therapy utilizing a two-sample t-test with equal standard deviations. Indeed the xenografts displayed heterogeneous responses to each treatment, and we linked a number of baseline biomarker levels to response. This included low ERCC1 being associated with cisplatin sensitivity, low phospho-Akt correlated with cetuximab sensitivity, and high total EGFR was related to radiation resistance. Overall, we developed a systematic approach to identifying predictive biomarkers and demonstrated several connections between biomarker levels and treatment response. Despite these promising initial results, this work requires additional preclinical validation, likely involving the use of patient-derived xenografts, prior to moving into the clinical realm for confirmation among patients with HNSCC.

  13. Electrochemical treatment of lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Xin, Y.L.; Xue, F.Z.; Ge, B.S.; Zhao, F.R.; Shi, B.; Zhang, W.

    1997-03-01

    A pilot study of electrochemical treatment (ECT) as a therapy for 386 patients with nonsmall cell lung cancer was undertaken. There were 103 stage 2 cases, 89 stage 3a cases, 122 stage 3b cases, and 72 stage 4 cases. Two ECT methods were used. For peripherally located lung cancer, platinum electrodes were inserted transcutaneously into the tumor under x-ray or CT guidance. For central type lung cancer or for those inoperable during thoracotomy, electrodes were inserted intraoperatively directly into the cancer. Voltage was 6--8 V, current was 40--100 mA, and electric charge was 100 coulombs per cm of tumor diameter. The number of electrodes was determined from the size of cancer mass, because the diameter of effective area around each electrode is approximately 3 cm. The short-term (6 months after ECT) results of the 386 lung cancer cases were: complete response (CR), 25.6% (99/386); partial response (PR), 46.4% (179/386); no change (NC), 15.3% (59/386); and progressive disease (PD), 12.7% (49/386). The total effective rate (CR + PR) was 72% (278/386). The 1, 3, and 5 year overall survival rates were 86.3% (333/386), 58.8% (227/386), and 29.5% (114/386), respectively. The main complication was traumatic pneumothorax, with an incidence rate of 14.8% (57/386). These clinical results show that ECT is simple, safe, effective, and minimally traumatic. ECT provides an alternative method for treating lung cancers that are conventionally inoperable, that are not responsive to chemotherapy or radiotherapy, or that cannot be resected after thoracotomy. Long-term survival rates suggest that ECT warrants further investigation.

  14. Molecular Pathology of Patient Tumors, Patient-Derived Xenografts, and Cancer Cell Lines.

    PubMed

    Guo, Sheng; Qian, Wubin; Cai, Jie; Zhang, Likun; Wery, Jean-Pierre; Li, Qi-Xiang

    2016-08-15

    The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) project has generated abundant genomic data for human cancers of various histopathology types and enabled exploring cancer molecular pathology per big data approach. We developed a new algorithm based on most differentially expressed genes (DEG) per pairwise comparisons to calculate correlation coefficients to be used to quantify similarity within and between cancer types. We systematically compared TCGA cancers, demonstrating high correlation within types and low correlation between types, thus establishing molecular specificity of cancer types and an alternative diagnostic method largely equivalent to histopathology. Different coefficients for different cancers in study may reveal that the degree of the within-type homogeneity varies by cancer types. We also performed the same calculation using the TCGA-derived DEGs on patient-derived xenografts (PDX) of different histopathology types corresponding to the TCGA types, as well as on cancer cell lines. We, for the first time, demonstrated highly similar patterns for within- and between-type correlation between PDXs and patient samples in a systematic study, confirming the high relevance of PDXs as surrogate experimental models for human diseases. In contrast, cancer cell lines have drastically reduced expression similarity to both PDXs and patient samples. The studies also revealed high similarity between some types, for example, LUSC and HNSCC, but low similarity between certain subtypes, for example, LUAD and LUSC. Our newly developed algorithm seems to be a practical diagnostic method to classify and reclassify a disease, either human or xenograft, with better accuracy than traditional histopathology. Cancer Res; 76(16); 4619-26. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27325646

  15. FR901228 in Treating Patients With Refractory or Progressive Small Cell Lung Cancer or Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-08-14

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  16. Primary esophageal and gastro-esophageal junction cancer xenograft models: clinicopathological features and engraftment.

    PubMed

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Sun, Bin; Panchal, Devang; Patel, Devalben; Tse, Alvina; Chen, Zhuo; Faluyi, Olusola O; Renouf, Daniel J; Girgis, Hala; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G; Tsao, Ming-Sound; Darling, Gail E; Ailles, Laurie E; El-Zimaity, Hala; Liu, Geoffrey

    2013-04-01

    There are very few xenograft models available for the study of esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancer. Using a NOD/SCID model, we implanted 90 primary E and GEJ tumors resected from patients and six endoscopic biopsy specimens. Of 69 resected tumors with histologically confirmed viable adenocarcinoma or squamous cell carcinoma, 22 (32%) was engrafted. One of 11 tumors, considered to have had a complete pathological response to neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, also engrafted. Of the 23 patients whose tumors were engrafted, 65% were male; 30% were early stage while 70% were late stage; 22% received neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation; 61% were GEJ cancers. Engraftment occurred in 18/54 (33%) adenocarcinomas and 5/16 (31%) squamous cell carcinomas. Small endoscopic biopsy tissue had a 50% (3/6) engraftment rate. Of the factors analyzed, pretreatment with chemo-radiation and well/moderate differentiation showed significantly lower correlation with engraftment (P<0.05). In the subset of patients who did not receive neo-adjuvant chemo-radiation, 18/41 (44%) engrafted compared with those with pretreatment where 5/29 (17%, P=0.02) engrafted. Primary xenograft lines may be continued through 4-12 passages. Xenografts maintained similar histology and morphological characteristics with only minor variations even after multiple passaging in most instances.

  17. Human Adipose Tissue-Derived Stromal/Stem Cells Promote Migration and Early Metastasis of Triple Negative Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Brian G.; Gimble, Jeffrey M.; Sheng, Mei; Anbalagan, Muralidharan; Jones, Ryan K.; Frazier, Trivia P.; Asher, Majdouline; Lacayo, Eduardo A.; Friedlander, Paul L.; Kutner, Robert; Chiu, Ernest S.

    2014-01-01

    Background Fat grafting is used to restore breast defects after surgical resection of breast tumors. Supplementing fat grafts with adipose tissue-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) is proposed to improve the regenerative/restorative ability of the graft and retention. However, long term safety for ASC grafting in proximity of residual breast cancer cells is unknown. The objective of this study was to determine the impact of human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of three donors, on a human breast cancer model that exhibits early metastasis. Methodology/Principal Findings Human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells represents “triple negative” breast cancer that exhibits early micrometastasis to multiple mouse organs [1]. Human ASCs were derived from abdominal adipose tissue from three healthy female donors. Indirect co-culture of MDA-MB-231 cells with ASCs, as well as direct co-culture demonstrated that ASCs had no effect on MDA-MB-231 growth. Indirect co-culture, and ASC conditioned medium (CM) stimulated migration of MDA-MB-231 cells. ASC/RFP cells from two donors co-injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells exhibited a donor effect for stimulation of primary tumor xenografts. Both ASC donors stimulated metastasis. ASC/RFP cells were viable, and integrated with MDA-MB-231/GFP cells in the tumor. Tumors from the co-injection group of one ASC donor exhibited elevated vimentin, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), IL-8, VEGF and microvessel density. The co-injection group exhibited visible metastases to the lung/liver and enlarged spleen not evident in mice injected with MDA-MB-231/GFP alone. Quantitation of the total area of GFP fluorescence and human chromosome 17 DNA in mouse organs, H&E stained paraffin sections and fluorescent microscopy confirmed multi-focal metastases to lung/liver/spleen in the co-injection group without evidence of ASC/RFP cells. Conclusions Human ASCs derived from abdominal lipoaspirates of two donors stimulated metastasis of MDA-MB-231

  18. GPR171 expression enhances proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Dho, So Hee; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Jeong, Dongjun; Kim, Chang-Jin; Chung, Kyung-Sook; Kim, Ji Young; Park, Bum-Chan; Park, Sung Sup; Kim, Seon-Young; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are among the most significant therapeutic targets and some of them promote the growth and metastasis of cancer. Here, we show that an increase in the levels of GPR171 is crucial for lung cancer tumor progression in vitro and in vivo. Immunostaining of clinical samples indicated that GPR171 was overexpressed in 46.8% of lung carcinoma tissues. Depletion of GPR171 with an anti-GPR171 antibody decreased proliferation of lung carcinoma cells and attenuated tumor progression in a mouse xenograft model. Knockdown of GPR171 also inhibited migration and invasion of the lung cancer cell lines. Notably, inhibition of GPR171 synergistically enhanced the tumoricidal activity of an epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitor in lung cancer cells. These results indicate that GPR171 blockade is a promising antineoplastic strategy and provide a preclinical rationale for combined inhibition of GPR171 and EGFR. PMID:26760963

  19. DNA Topoisomerase I-Targeted Chemotherapy of Human Colon Cancer in Xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giovanella, Beppino C.; Stehlin, John S.; Wall, Monroe E.; Wani, Mansukh C.; Nicholas, Allan W.; Liu, Leroy F.; Silber, Robert; Potmesil, Milan

    1989-11-01

    Drug development is needed to improve chemotherapy of patients with locally advanced or metastatic colon carcinoma, who otherwise have an unfavorable prognosis. DNA topoisomerase I, a nuclear enzyme important for solving topological problems arising during DNA replication and for other cellular functions, has been identified as a principal target of a plant alkaloid 20 (S)-camptothecin. Significantly increased concentrations of this enzyme, compared to that in normal colonic mucosa, were found in advanced stages of human colon adenocarcinoma and in xenografts of colon cancer carried by immunodeficient mice. Several synthetic analogs of camptothecin, selected by tests with the purified enzyme and tissue-culture screens, were evaluated in the xenograft model. Unlike other anticancer drugs tested, 20(RS)-9-amino-camptothecin (9-AC) induced disease-free remissions. The overall drug toxicity was low and allowed for repeated courses of treatment.

  20. Metformin Treatment Does Not Inhibit Growth of Pancreatic Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Lipner, Matthew B; Marayati, Raoud; Deng, Yangmei; Wang, Xianxi; Raftery, Laura; O'Neil, Bert H; Yeh, Jen Jen

    2016-01-01

    There is currently tremendous interest in developing anti-cancer therapeutics targeting cell signaling pathways important for both cancer cell metabolism and growth. Several epidemiological studies have shown that diabetic patients taking metformin have a decreased incidence of pancreatic cancer. This has prompted efforts to evaluate metformin, a drug with negligible toxicity, as a therapeutic modality in pancreatic cancer. Preclinical studies in cell line xenografts and one study in patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models were promising, while recently published clinical trials showed no benefit to adding metformin to combination therapy regimens for locally advanced and metastatic pancreatic cancer. PDX models in which patient tumors are directly engrafted into immunocompromised mice have been shown to be excellent preclinical models for biomarker discovery and therapeutic development. We evaluated the response of four PDX tumor lines to metformin treatment and found that all four of our PDX lines were resistant to metformin. We found that the mechanisms of resistance may occur through lack of sustained activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) or downstream reactivation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR). Moreover, combined treatment with metformin and mTOR inhibitors failed to improve responses in cell lines, which further indicates that metformin alone or in combination with mTOR inhibitors will be ineffective in patients, and that resistance to metformin may occur through multiple pathways. Further studies are required to better understand these mechanisms of resistance and inform potential combination therapies with metformin and existing or novel therapeutics.

  1. Investigational drug MLN0128, a novel TORC1/2 inhibitor, demonstrates potent oral antitumor activity in human breast cancer xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Gökmen-Polar, Yesim; Liu, Yi; Toroni, Rachel A; Sanders, Kerry L; Mehta, Rutika; Badve, Sunil; Rommel, Christian; Sledge, George W

    2012-12-01

    Aberrant activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling plays an important role in breast cancer progression and represents a potential therapeutic target for breast cancer. In this study, we report the impact of the investigational drug MLN0128, a potent and selective small molecule active-site TORC1/2 kinase inhibitor, on tumor growth and metastasis using human breast cancer xenograft models. We assessed in vitro antiproliferative activity of MLN0128 in a panel of breast cancer cell lines. We next evaluated the impact of MLN0128 on tumor growth, angiogenesis and metastasis using mammary fat pad xenograft models of a non-VEGF (ML20) and a VEGF-driven (MV165) MCF-7 sublines harboring PIK3CA mutations. MLN0128 potently inhibited cell proliferation in various breast cancer cell lines harboring PIK3CA (IC(50): 1.5-53 nM), PTEN (IC(50): 1-149 nM), KRAS, and/or BRAF mutations (IC(50): 13-162 nM), and in human endothelial cells (IC(50): 33-40 nM) in vitro. In vivo, MLN0128 decreased primary tumor growth significantly in both non-VEGF (ML20; p = 0.05) and VEGF-driven MCF-7 (MV165; p = 0.014) xenograft models. MLN0128 decreased the phosphorylation of Akt, S6, 4E-BP1, and NDRG1 in both models. In contrast, rapamycin increased Akt activity and failed to reduce the phosphorylation of 4E-BP1, PRAS40, and NDRG1. VEGF-induced lung metastasis in MV165 is inhibited by MLN0128 and rapamycin. In conclusion, MLN0128 inhibits TORC1/2-dependent signaling in preclinical models of breast cancer. MLN0128 appears to be superior in blocking mTORC1/2 signaling in contrast to rapamycin. Our findings support the clinical research of MLN0128 in patients with breast cancer and metastasis.

  2. Air pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Böhm, G M

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro researches (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

  3. Air pollution and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, G.M.

    1982-01-01

    Epidemiological evidence proves conclusively that lung cancer correlates with air pollution. However, data on lung cancer death rates and smoking show that mankind accepts the risk of long-term and low-level exposure to carcinogens. As a rule, immediate benefits are sought and remote hazards ignored. Fear of atmospheric contamination by radioactive fallout seems to be the main factor for awareness of air pollution. Experimental works help us to understand physics of particle deposition in the lungs (inertial impactation, sedimentation, Brownian movement), shed light on carcinogenesis (eg, bay region theory in case of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and surface charge changes regarding asbestos), show that atmospheric particulates accepted as harmless may act as co-carcinogens (eg, iron and benzo(a)pyrene) and stress the importance of in vitro research (bacterial mutation tests, organ cultures, sister chromatid exchange system) to screen pollutants for their malignant potential and study their pathogenesis.

  4. Phase II Etirinotecan Pegol in Refractory Brain Metastases & Advanced Lung Cancer / Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-18

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tumors Metastatic to Brain; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  5. Radiotherapy of inoperable lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Namer, M.; Lalanne, C.M.; Boublil, J.L.; Hery, M.; Chauvel, P.; Verschoore, J.; Aubanel, J.M.; Bruneton, J.N.

    1980-08-01

    Evaluation of loco-regional results obtained by radiotherapy for 31 patients with inoperable epidermoid lung cancer revealed objective remission (over 50%) in only 25% of patients. These results emphasize the limited effectiveness of radiotherapy in such cases and point out the need for increased research in radiotherapy techniques if survival rates are to be improved.

  6. Atmospheric pollution and lung cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Doll, R

    1978-01-01

    Lung cancer is consistently more common in urban areas than in rural. The excess cannot be accounted for by specific occupational hazards but some of it might be due to the presence of carcinogens in urban air. The excess cannot be wholly due to such agents, because the excess in nonsmokers is small and variable. Cigarette consumption has also been greater in urban areas, but it is difficult to estimate how much of the excess it can account for. Occupational studies confirm that pollutants present in town air are capable of causing lung cancer in man and suggest that the pollutants and cigarette smoke act synergistically. The trends in the mortality from lung cancer in young and middle-aged men in England and Wales provide uncertain evidence but support the belief that atmospheric pollution has contributed to the production of the disease. In the absence of cigarette smoking, the combined effect of all atmospheric carcinogens is not responsible for more than about 5 cases of lung cancer per 100,000 persons per year in European populations. PMID:648488

  7. Lung Cancer Staging and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Woodard, Gavitt A; Jones, Kirk D; Jablons, David M

    2016-01-01

    The seventh edition of the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) TNM staging system was developed by the International Association for the Staging of Lung Cancer (IASLC) Lung Cancer Staging Project by a coordinated international effort to develop data-derived TNM classifications with significant survival differences. Based on these TNM groupings, current 5-year survival estimates in NSLCC range from 73 % in stage IA disease to 13 % in stage IV disease. TNM stage remains the most important prognostic factor in predicting recurrence rates and survival times, followed by tumor histologic grade, and patient sex, age, and performance status. Molecular prognostication in lung cancer is an exploding area of research where interest has moved beyond TNM stage and into individualized genetic tumor analysis with immunohistochemistry, microarray, and mutation profiles. However, despite intense research efforts and countless publications, no molecular prognostic marker has been adopted into clinical use since most fail in subsequent cross-validation with few exceptions. The recent interest in immunotherapy for NSCLC has identified new biomarkers with early evidence that suggests that PD-L1 is a predictive marker of a good response to new immunotherapy drugs but a poor prognostic indicator of overall survival. Future prognostication of outcomes in NSCLC will likely be based on a combination of TNM stage and molecular tumor profiling and yield more precise, individualized survival estimates and treatment algorithms. PMID:27535389

  8. TG4010 and Nivolumab in Patients With Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-07

    Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage I Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage II Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. Receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is a functional molecular target in human lung cancer

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Staquicini, Fernanda I.; Qian, Ming D.; Salameh, Ahmad; Dobroff, Andrey S.; Edwards, Julianna K.; Cimino, Daniel F.; Moeller, Benjamin J.; Kelly, Patrick; Nunez, Maria I.; Tang, Ximing; et al

    2015-03-20

    Lung cancer is often refractory to radiotherapy, but molecular mechanisms of tumor resistance remain poorly defined. Here we show that the receptor tyrosine kinase EphA5 is specifically overexpressed in lung cancer and is involved in regulating cellular responses to genotoxic insult. In the absence of EphA5, lung cancer cells displayed a defective G1/S cell cycle checkpoint, were unable to resolve DNA damage, and became radiosensitive. Upon irradiation, EphA5 was transported into the nucleus where it interacted with activated ATM (ataxia-telangiectasia mutated) at sites of DNA repair. In conclusion, we demonstrate that a new monoclonal antibody against human EphA5 sensitized lungmore » cancer cells and human lung cancer xenografts to radiotherapy and significantly prolonged survival, thus suggesting the likelihood of translational applications.« less

  10. Knockdown of cullin 4A inhibits growth and increases chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; You, Liang; Jablons, David M; Li, Ya-Chin; Mao, Jian-Hua; Xu, Zhidong; Lung, Jr-Hau; Yang, Cheng-Ta; Liu, Shih-Tung

    2016-07-01

    Cullin 4A (Cul4A) has been observed to be overexpressed in various cancers. In this study, the role of Cul4A in the growth and chemosensitivity in lung cancer cells were studied. We showed that Cul4A is overexpressed in lung cancer cells and tissues. Knockdown of the Cul4A expression by shRNA in lung cancer cells resulted in decreased cellular proliferation and growth in lung cancer cells. Increased sensitivity to gemcitabine, a chemotherapy drug, was also noted in those Cul4A knockdown lung cancer cells. Moreover, increased expression of p21, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inducible early gene-1 (TIEG1) and TGF beta-induced (TGFBI) was observed in lung cancer cells after Cul4A knockdown, which may be partially related to increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine. G0/G1 cell cycle arrest was also noted after Cul4A knockdown. Notably, decreased tumour growth and increased chemosensitivity to gemcitabine were also noted after Cul4A knockdown in lung cancer xenograft nude mice models. In summary, our study showed that targeting Cul4A with RNAi or other techniques may provide a possible insight to the development of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  11. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker.

    PubMed

    Xiang, Dong; Zhang, Bicheng; Doll, Donald; Shen, Kui; Kloecker, Goetz; Freter, Carl

    2013-01-16

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein.

  12. Lung cancer screening: from imaging to biomarker

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Despite several decades of intensive effort to improve the imaging techniques for lung cancer diagnosis and treatment, primary lung cancer is still the number one cause of cancer death in the United States and worldwide. The major causes of this high mortality rate are distant metastasis evident at diagnosis and ineffective treatment for locally advanced disease. Indeed, approximately forty percent of newly diagnosed lung cancer patients have distant metastasis. Currently, the only potential curative therapy is surgical resection of early stage lung cancer. Therefore, early detection of lung cancer could potentially increase the chance of cure by surgery and underlines the importance of screening and detection of lung cancer. In the past fifty years, screening of lung cancer by chest X-Ray (CXR), sputum cytology, computed tomography (CT), fluorescence endoscopy and low-dose spiral CT (LDCT) has not improved survival except for the recent report in 2010 by the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST), which showed a 20 percent mortality reduction in high risk participants screened with LDCT compared to those screened with CXRs. Furthermore, serum biomarkers for detection of lung cancer using free circulating DNA and RNA, exosomal microRNA, circulating tumor cells and various lung cancer specific antigens have been studied extensively and novel screening methods are being developed with encouraging results. The history of lung cancer screening trials using CXR, sputum cytology and LDCT, as well as results of trials involving various serum biomarkers, are reviewed herein. PMID:24252206

  13. Generation of Prostate Cancer Patient Derived Xenograft Models from Circulating Tumor Cells.

    PubMed

    Williams, Estrelania S; Rodriguez-Bravo, Veronica; Rodriquez-Bravo, Veronica; Chippada-Venkata, Uma; De Ia Iglesia-Vicente, Janis; Gong, Yixuan; Galsky, Matthew; Oh, William; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Domingo-Domenech, Josep

    2015-10-20

    Patient derived xenograft (PDX) models are gaining popularity in cancer research and are used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biologic studies, and personalized medicine strategies. Circulating tumor cells (CTC) play a critical role in tumor metastasis and have been isolated from patients with several tumor types. Recently, CTCs have been used to generate PDX experimental models of breast and prostate cancer. This manuscript details the method for the generation of prostate cancer PDX models from CTCs developed by our group. Advantages of this method over conventional PDX models include independence from surgical sample collection and generating experimental models at various disease stages. Density gradient centrifugation followed by red blood cell lysis and flow cytometry depletion of CD45 positive mononuclear cells is used to enrich CTCs from peripheral blood samples collected from patients with metastatic disease. The CTCs are then injected into immunocompromised mice; subsequently generated xenografts can be used for functional studies or harvested for molecular characterization. The primary limitation of this method is the negative selection method used for CTC enrichment. Despite this limitation, the generation of PDX models from CTCs provides a novel experimental model to be applied to prostate cancer research.

  14. Establishment of patient-derived cancer xenografts in immunodeficient NOG mice.

    PubMed

    Chijiwa, Tsuyoshi; Kawai, Kenji; Noguchi, Akira; Sato, Hidemitsu; Hayashi, Akimune; Cho, Haruhiko; Shiozawa, Manabu; Kishida, Takeshi; Morinaga, Soichiro; Yokose, Tomoyuki; Katayama, Makoto; Takenaka, Nobuo; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Yamada, Roppei; Nakamura, Yoshiyasu; Ohtsu, Takashi; Takano, Yasuo; Imai, Kohzoh; Miyagi, Yohei; Nakamura, Masato

    2015-07-01

    Viable and stable human cancer cell lines and animal models combined with adequate clinical information are essential for future advances in cancer research and patient care. Conventional in vitro cancer cell lines are commonly available; however, they lack detailed information on the patient from which they originate, including disease phenotype and drug sensitivity. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX) with clinical information (so-called 'cancer xenopatients') are a promising advance that may accelerate the development of anticancer therapies. We established 61 PDX lines from 116 surgically removed tumor tissues inoculated subcutaneously into NOG mice (53% success rate). PDX lines were established from various types of epithelial tumors and also from sarcomas, including gastrointestinal stromal tumors and Ewing/PNET sarcomas. The metastatic tumors yielded PDX lines more effectively (65%) than the primary tumors (27%, P<0.001). In our PDX models, morphological characteristics, gene expression profiles, and genetic alteration patterns were all well preserved. In eight cases (7%), the transplantable xenografts for several generations were composed of large monotonous nonepithelial cells of human origin, revealed to be Epstein-Barr virus infection-associated lympho-proliferative lesions. Despite this, PDX linked with clinical information offer many advantages for preclinical studies investigating new anticancer drugs. The fast and efficient establishment of individual PDX may also contribute to future personalized anticancer therapies.

  15. Development of Small RNA Delivery Systems for Lung Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Fujita, Yu; Kuwano, Kazuyoshi; Ochiya, Takahiro

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) has emerged as a powerful tool for studying target identification and holds promise for the development of therapeutic gene silencing. Recent advances in RNAi delivery and target selection provide remarkable opportunities for translational medical research. The induction of RNAi relies on small silencing RNAs, which affect specific messenger RNA (mRNA) degradation. Two types of small RNA molecules, small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs), have a central function in RNAi technology. The success of RNAi-based therapeutic delivery may be dependent upon uncovering a delivery route, sophisticated delivery carriers, and nucleic acid modifications. Lung cancer is still the leading cause of cancer death worldwide, for which novel therapeutic strategies are critically needed. Recently, we have reported a novel platform (PnkRNA™ and nkRNA®) to promote naked RNAi approaches through inhalation without delivery vehicles in lung cancer xenograft models. We suggest that a new class of RNAi therapeutic agent and local drug delivery system could also offer a promising RNAi-based strategy for clinical applications in cancer therapy. In this article, we show recent strategies for an RNAi delivery system and suggest the possible clinical usefulness of RNAi-based therapeutics for lung cancer treatment. PMID:25756380

  16. Lung cancer and peritoneal carcinomatosis

    PubMed Central

    SERENO, MARÍA; RODRÍGUEZ-ESTEBAN, ISABEL; GÓMEZ-RAPOSO, CÉSAR; MERINO, MARÍA; LÓPEZ-GÓMEZ, MIRIAM; ZAMBRANA, FRANCISCO; CASADO, ENRIQUE

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is currently one of the most common malignancies in the world and peritoneal involvement is rare in these types of tumors. Clinical manifestations of these metastases are also uncommon and include intestinal perforation and obstruction. The present study reviewed certain aspects of the complication of peritoneal involvement and illustrated it with four cases of patients that were diagnosed with primary lung carcinoma and secondary peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC). The outcome of these patients is poor and they rarely respond to chemotherapy. Surgery is successful in the majority of cases. PMID:24137394

  17. Treatment Options by Stage (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer Prevention Lung Cancer Screening Research Small Cell Lung Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Small Cell Lung Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  18. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future. PMID:27362942

  19. Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mutation Enhances Expression of Cadherin-5 in Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Ming-Szu; Chen, I-Chuan; Lung, Jr-Hau; Lin, Paul-Yann; Li, Ya-Chin; Tsai, Ying-Huang

    2016-01-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation has been shown to play a critical role in tumor angiogenesis. In this study, we investigate the correlation between EGFR mutations and cadherin-5 (CDH5), which is an angiogenic factor, in lung cancer cells. Increased expression CDH5 is observed in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutations. Stable lung cancer cell lines expressing mutant (exon 19 deletion E746-A750, and exon 21 missense mutation L858R) and wild type EGFR genes are established. A significantly higher expression of CDH5 is observed in exon 19 deletion stable lung cancer cells and mouse xenografts. Further studies show that expression of CDH5 is decreased after the inhibition of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways in lung cancer cells with EGFR mutation. In addition, mutant EGFR genes potentiates angiogenesis in lung cancer cells, which is inhibited by CDH5 siRNA, and potentiates migration and invasion in lung cancer cells. Our study shows that mutant EGFR genes are associated with overexpression of CDH5 through increased phosphorylation of EGFR and downstream Akt pathways. Our result may provide an insight into the association of mutant EGFR and CDH5 expression in lung cancer and aid further development of target therapy for NSCLC in the future.

  20. Phosphoproteomics and Lung Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    López, Elena; Cho, William C. S.

    2012-01-01

    Massive evidence suggests that genetic abnormalities contribute to the development of lung cancer. These molecular abnormalities may serve as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers for this deadly disease. It is imperative to search these biomarkers in different tumorigenesis pathways so as to provide the most appropriate therapy for each individual patient with lung malignancy. Phosphoproteomics is a promising technology for the identification of biomarkers and novel therapeutic targets for cancer. Thousands of proteins interact via physical and chemical association. Moreover, some proteins can covalently modify other proteins post-translationally. These post-translational modifications ultimately give rise to the emergent functions of cells in sequence, space and time. Phosphoproteomics clinical researches imply the comprehensive analysis of the proteins that are expressed in cells or tissues and can be employed at different stages. In addition, understanding the functions of phosphorylated proteins requires the study of proteomes as linked systems rather than collections of individual protein molecules. In fact, proteomics approaches coupled with affinity chromatography strategies followed by mass spectrometry have been used to elucidate relevant biological questions. This article will discuss the relevant clues of post-translational modifications, phosphorylated proteins, and useful proteomics approaches to identify molecular cancer signatures. The recent progress in phosphoproteomics research in lung cancer will be also discussed. PMID:23202899

  1. Patient Derived Xenograft Models: An Emerging Platform for Translational Cancer Research

    PubMed Central

    Hidalgo, Manuel; Amant, Frederic; Biankin, Andrew V.; Budinská, Eva; Byrne, Annette T.; Caldas, Carlos; Clarke, Robert B.; de Jong, Steven; Jonkers, Jos; Mælandsmo, Gunhild Mari; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Seoane, Joan; Trusolino, Livio; Villanueva, Alberto

    2014-01-01

    Recently, there has been increasing interest in the development and characterization of patient derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models for cancer research. PDX models mostly retain the principal histological and genetic characteristics of their donor tumor and remain stable across passages. These models have been shown to be predictive of clinical outcomes and are being used for preclinical drug evaluation, biomarker identification, biological studies, and personalized medicine strategies. This paper summarizes the current state of the art in this field including methodological issues, available collections, practical applications, challenges and shortcoming, and future directions, and introduces a European consortium of PDX models. PMID:25185190

  2. Famitinib exerted powerful antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Sai; Zhang, Qiyue; He, Qiong; Zou, Jianling; Liu, Xijuan; Li, Na; Tian, Tiantian; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Famitinib (SHR1020), a novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has antitumor activity against several solid tumors via targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. The present study investigated famitinib's activity against human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured, and cell cycle analysis was performed following famitinib treatment using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol −2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and western blotting. Subsequently, cluster of differentiation 34 staining was used to evaluate microvessel density. BGC-823-derived xenografts in nude mice were established to assess drug efficacy in vivo. Famitinib inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in gastric cancer cell lines. In BGC-823 xenograft models, famitinib significantly slowed tumor growth in vivo via inhibition of angiogenesis. Compared with other chemotherapeutics such as 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin or paclitaxel alone, famitinib exhibited the greatest tumor suppression effect (>85% inhibition). The present study demonstrated for the first time that famitinib has efficacy against human gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo, which may lay the foundations for future clinical trials.

  3. Famitinib exerted powerful antitumor activity in human gastric cancer cells and xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Sai; Zhang, Qiyue; He, Qiong; Zou, Jianling; Liu, Xijuan; Li, Na; Tian, Tiantian; Zhu, Yan; Gao, Jing; Shen, Lin

    2016-01-01

    Famitinib (SHR1020), a novel multi-targeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has antitumor activity against several solid tumors via targeting vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2, c-Kit and platelet-derived growth factor receptor β. The present study investigated famitinib's activity against human gastric cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. Cell viability and apoptosis were measured, and cell cycle analysis was performed following famitinib treatment using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol −2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium assay, flow cytometry, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling assay and western blotting. Subsequently, cluster of differentiation 34 staining was used to evaluate microvessel density. BGC-823-derived xenografts in nude mice were established to assess drug efficacy in vivo. Famitinib inhibited cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest at the G2/M phase and caused cell apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner in gastric cancer cell lines. In BGC-823 xenograft models, famitinib significantly slowed tumor growth in vivo via inhibition of angiogenesis. Compared with other chemotherapeutics such as 5-fluorouracil, cisplatin or paclitaxel alone, famitinib exhibited the greatest tumor suppression effect (>85% inhibition). The present study demonstrated for the first time that famitinib has efficacy against human gastric cancer in vitro and in vivo, which may lay the foundations for future clinical trials. PMID:27602110

  4. An Integrative Approach to Precision Cancer Medicine Using Patient-Derived Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Sung-Yup; Kang, Wonyoung; Han, Jee Yun; Min, Seoyeon; Kang, Jinjoo; Lee, Ahra; Kwon, Jee Young; Lee, Charles; Park, Hansoo

    2016-01-01

    Cancer is a heterogeneous disease caused by diverse genomic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Despite recent advances in high-throughput sequencing technologies and development of targeted therapies, novel cancer drug development is limited due to the high attrition rate from clinical studies. Patient-derived xenografts (PDX), which are established by the transfer of patient tumors into immunodeficient mice, serve as a platform for co-clinical trials by enabling the integration of clinical data, genomic profiles, and drug responsiveness data to determine precisely targeted therapies. PDX models retain many of the key characteristics of patients’ tumors including histology, genomic signature, cellular heterogeneity, and drug responsiveness. These models can also be applied to the development of biomarkers for drug responsiveness and personalized drug selection. This review summarizes our current knowledge of this field, including methodologic aspects, applications in drug development, challenges and limitations, and utilization for precision cancer medicine. PMID:26831452

  5. Optimization of an indazole series of selective estrogen receptor degraders: Tumor regression in a tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Govek, Steven P; Nagasawa, Johnny Y; Douglas, Karensa L; Lai, Andiliy G; Kahraman, Mehmet; Bonnefous, Celine; Aparicio, Anna M; Darimont, Beatrice D; Grillot, Katherine L; Joseph, James D; Kaufman, Joshua A; Lee, Kyoung-Jin; Lu, Nhin; Moon, Michael J; Prudente, Rene Y; Sensintaffar, John; Rix, Peter J; Hager, Jeffrey H; Smith, Nicholas D

    2015-11-15

    Selective estrogen receptor degraders (SERDs) have shown promise for the treatment of ER+ breast cancer. Disclosed herein is the continued optimization of our indazole series of SERDs. Exploration of ER degradation and antagonism in vitro followed by in vivo antagonism and oral exposure culminated in the discovery of indazoles 47 and 56, which induce tumor regression in a tamoxifen-resistant breast cancer xenograft.

  6. CysLT(1)R antagonists inhibit tumor growth in a xenograft model of colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Savari, Sayeh; Liu, Minghui; Zhang, Yuan; Sime, Wondossen; Sjölander, Anita

    2013-01-01

    The expression of the inflammatory G-protein coupled receptor CysLT1R has been shown to be upregulated in colon cancer patients and associated with poor prognosis. The present study investigated the correlation between CysLT1R and colon cancer development in vivo using CysLT1R antagonists (ZM198,615 or Montelukast) and the nude mouse xenograft model. Two drug administration regimens were established. The first regimen was established to investigate the importance of CysLT1R in tumor initiation. Nude mice were inoculated with 50 µM CysLT1R antagonist-pretreated HCT-116 colon cancer cells and received continued treatment (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneally). The second regimen aimed to address the role of CysLT1R in tumor progression. Nude mice were inoculated with non-pretreated HCT-116 cells and did not receive CysLT1R antagonist treatment until recordable tumor appearance. Both regimens resulted in significantly reduced tumor size, attributed to changes in proliferation and apoptosis as determined by reduced Ki-67 levels and increased levels of p21(WAF/Cip1) (P<0.01), cleaved caspase 3, and the caspase-cleaved product of cytokeratin 18. Decreased levels of VEGF (P<0.01) and reduced vessel size (P<0.05) were also observed, the latter only in the ZM198,615-pretreatment group. Furthermore, we performed a series of in vitro studies using the colon cancer cell line HCT-116 and CysLT1R antagonists. In addition to significant reductions in cell proliferation, adhesion and colony formation, we observed induction of cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. The ability of Montelukast to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenograft was further validated by using two additional colon cancer cell lines, SW-480 and HT-29. Our results demonstrate that CysLT1R antagonists inhibit growth of colon cancer xenografts primarily by reducing proliferation and inducing apoptosis of the tumor cells.

  7. Bortezomib in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-08-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. Lung Cancer Awareness Week

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glennon, Catherine; Laczko, Lori

    2003-01-01

    Smoking is the most preventable cause of death in our society. Tobacco use is responsible for nearly one in five deaths in the United States and the cause of premature death of approximately 2 million individuals in developed countries. Smoking accounts for at least 30% of all cancer deaths and is a major cause of heart disease, cerebrovascular…

  9. [Molecular diagnostics of lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ryska, A; Dziadziuszko, R; Olszewski, W; Berzinec, P; Öz, B; Gottfried, M; Cufer, T; Samarzija, M; Plank, L; Ostoros, Gy; Tímár, J

    2015-09-01

    Development of the target therapies of lung cancer was a rapid process which fundamentally changed the pathological diagnosis as well. Furthermore, molecular pathology became essential part of the routine diagnostics of lung cancer. These changes generated several practical problems and in underdeveloped countries or in those with reimbursement problems have been combined with further challenges. The central and eastern region of Europe are characterized by similar problems in this respect which promoted the foundation of NSCLC Working Group to provide up to date protocols or guidelines. This present paper is a summary of the molecular pathology and target therapy guidelines written with the notion that it has to be upgraded continuously according to the development of the field.

  10. [Cannabis smoking and lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Underner, M; Urban, T; Perriot, J; de Chazeron, I; Meurice, J-C

    2014-06-01

    Cannabis is the most commonly smoked illicit substance in the world. It can be smoked alone in plant form (marijuana) but it is mainly smoked mixed with tobacco. The combined smoking of cannabis and tobacco is a common-place phenomenon in our society. However, its use is responsible for severe pulmonary consequences. The specific impact of smoking cannabis is difficult to assess precisely and to distinguish from the effect of tobacco. Marijuana smoke contains polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and carcinogens at higher concentration than tobacco smoke. Cellular, tissue, animal and human studies, and also epidemiological studies, show that marijuana smoke is a risk factor for lung cancer. Cannabis exposure doubles the risk of developing lung cancer. This should encourage clinicians to identify cannabis use and to offer patients support in quitting.

  11. Lung cancer risk associated with cancer in relatives.

    PubMed

    Shaw, G L; Falk, R T; Pickle, L W; Mason, T J; Buffler, P A

    1991-01-01

    Family history data from an incident case-control study of lung cancer conducted in the Texas Gulf Coast region between 1976 and 1980 were analyzed to evaluate the contribution of cancer in first-degree relatives to lung cancer risk. Odds ratios (OR) increased slightly as the number of relatives with any cancer increased (reaching 1.5 with 4 or more relatives with cancer). Risks were higher for tobacco-related cancers (OR = 1.5 for 2 or more relatives with these tumors) and greatest for first-degree relatives with lung cancer (OR = 2.8 for lung cancer in 2 or more relatives). For cases of squamous cell carcinoma and adenocarcinoma of the lung, risks with 3 or more relatives with any cancer were increased 2-fold (OR = 1.8 and 1.9 respectively), and a significantly elevated risk was found for having a first-degree relative with lung cancer for each histologic type (ORs from 1.7-2.1). Having a spouse with lung cancer increased lung cancer risk (OR = 2.5), and cases with lung cancer reported in a first-degree relative were diagnosed at an earlier age, as were case siblings with lung cancer.

  12. Response of human pancreatic cancer cell xenografts to tetraiodothyroacetic acid nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yalcin, Murat; Lin, Hung-Yun; Sudha, Thangirala; Bharali, Dhruba J; Meng, Ran; Tang, Heng-Yuan; Davis, Faith B; Stain, Steven C; Davis, Paul J; Mousa, Shaker A

    2013-06-01

    Tetraiodothyroacetic acid (tetrac) and its nanoparticle formulation (Tetrac NP) act at an integrin cell surface receptor to inhibit tumor cell proliferation and tumor-related angiogenesis. Human pancreatic cancer cell (PANC-1 and MPanc96) xenografts were established in nude mice, and the effects of tetrac versus Tetrac NP on tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis were determined. The in vitro effects of tetrac and Tetrac NP were also determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction or immunoblot on gene expression or gene products relevant to cell cycle arrest, apoptosis, or angiogenesis. Tetrac and Tetrac NP reduced both PANC-1 tumor mass by 45-55 % and PANC-1 tumor hemoglobin content, a marker of angiogenesis, by 50-60 % (*P < 0.05) in treated groups vs. controls by treatment day 15. Comparable results were obtained with tetrac and Tetrac NP in suppressing tumor growth and tumor angiogenesis in MPanc96 xenografts. In vitro studies showed that tetrac and Tetrac NP caused accumulation of pro-apoptotic protein BcLx-s. Tetrac NP was more effective than tetrac in increasing cellular abundance of mRNAs of pro-apoptotic p53 and p21 and anti-angiogenesis thrombospondin 1 protein in PANC-1 and MPanc96 cancer cell lines. Tetrac NP noticeably decreased expression of EGFR and of anti-apoptosis gene XIAP; tetrac did not affect EGFR and increased XIAP mRNA in both MPanc96 and PANC-1. In conclusion, tetrac or Tetrac NP effectively inhibited human pancreatic xenograft growth and tumor angiogenesis via a plasma membrane receptor that downstream modulated cellular abundance of proteins or mRNAs relevant to apoptosis and angiogenesis.

  13. Hemodynamics in vasculogenic mimicry and angiogenesis of inflammatory breast cancer xenograft.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kazuo; Kobayashi, Hisataka; Heike, Yuji; Kawamoto, Satomi; Brechbiel, Martin W; Kasumi, Fujio; Iwanaga, Toshihiko; Konishi, Fumio; Terada, Masaaki; Wakasugi, Hiro

    2002-01-15

    In the present study, we examined hemodynamics in vasculogenic mimicry (VM) and angiogenesis of inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) xenografts (WIBC-9), having previously reported on the unique histological features and molecular basis of these processes (K. Shirakawa et al., Cancer Res., 61: 445-451, 2001). Histologically, the WIBC-9 xenografts exhibited invasive ductal carcinoma with a hypervascular structure (angiogenesis) in the tumor margin and VM without endothelial cells, central necrosis, or fibrosis in the tumor center. Results of molecular analysis indicated that WIBC-9 had a vasculogenic phenotype, including expression of Flt-1 and Tie-2. Comparison of WIBC-9 with an established non-IBC xenograft (MC-5), using time-coursed dynamic micromagnetic resonance angiography analysis (with our newly developed intravascular macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent), electromicroscopy, and immunohistochemistry, demonstrated blood flow and a VM-angiogenesis junction in the central area of the WIBC-9 tumor. It has previously been considered impossible to prove a connection between VM and angiogenesis using angiography, because there are no intravascular macromolecular magnetic resonance imaging contrast agents that do not exhibit significant leakage through the vascular wall. In the present study, laser-captured microdissection was performed in regions of WIBC-9 tumors that exhibited VM without endothelial cells, central necrosis, or fibrosis, revealing expression of human-Flt-1 and human-Tie2 and the absence of human-CD31, human-endothelin B receptor, and human-thrombin receptor. These facts led us to hypothesize that the VM of WIBC-9 involves hemodynamics that serve to feed WIBC-9 cells, and this in turn suggests a connection between VM and angiogenesis. PMID:11809710

  14. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpressionmore » of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.« less

  15. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpression of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.

  16. Survivin Antisense Oligonucleotides Effectively Radiosensitize Colorectal Cancer Cells in Both Tissue Culture and Murine Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Roedel, Franz; Capalbo, Gianni; Weiss, Christian; Roedel, Claus

    2008-05-01

    Purpose: Survivin shows a radiation resistance factor in colorectal cancer. In the present study, we determined whether survivin messenger RNA levels in patients with rectal cancer predict tumor response after neoadjuvant radiochemotherapy and whether inhibition of survivin by the use of antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) enhances radiation responses. Methods and Materials: SW480 colorectal carcinoma cells were transfected with survivin ASO (LY2181308) and irradiated with doses ranging from 0-8 Gy. Survivin expression, cell-cycle distribution, {gamma}H2AX fluorescence, and induction of apoptosis were monitored by means of immunoblotting, flow cytometry, and caspase 3/7 activity. Clonogenic survival was determined by using a colony-forming assay. An SW480 xenograft model was used to investigate the effect of survivin attenuation and irradiation on tumor growth. Furthermore, survivin messenger RNA levels were studied in patient biopsy specimens by using Affymetrix microarray analysis. Results: In the translational study of 20 patients with rectal cancer, increased survivin levels were associated with significantly greater risk of local tumor recurrence (p = 0.009). Treatment of SW480 cells with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in an increased percentage of apoptotic cells, caspase 3/7 activity, fraction of cells in the G{sub 2}/M phase, and H2AX phosphorylation. Clonogenic survival decreased compared with control-treated cells. Furthermore, treatment of SW480 xenografts with survivin ASOs and irradiation resulted in a significant delay in tumor growth. Conclusion: Survivin appears to be a molecular biomarker in patients with rectal cancer. Furthermore, in vitro and in vivo data suggest a potential role of survivin as a molecular target to improve treatment response to radiotherapy in patients with rectal cancer.

  17. beta 1 integrin inhibition dramatically enhances radiotherapy efficacy in human breast cancer xenografts

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Catherine C.; Park, Catherine C.; Zhang, Hui J.; Yao, Evelyn S.; Park, Chong J.; Bissell, Mina J.

    2008-06-02

    {beta}1 integrin signaling has been shown to mediate cellular resistance to apoptosis after exposure to ionizing radiation (IR). Other signaling molecules that increase resistance include Akt, which promotes cell survival downstream of {beta}1 integrin signaling. We showed previously that {beta}1 integrin inhibitory antibodies, AIIB2, enhance apoptosis and decrease growth in human breast cancer cells in 3 dimensional laminin-rich extracellular matrix (3D lrECM) cultures and in vivo. Here we asked whether AIIB2 could synergize with IR to modify Akt-mediated IR resistance. We used 3D lrECM cultures to test the optimal combination of AIIB2 with IR treatment of two breast cancer cell lines, MCF-7 and HMT3522-T4-2, as well as T4-2 myr-Akt breast cancer colonies or HMT3522-S-1, which form normal organotypic structures in 3D lrECM. Colonies were assayed for apoptosis and {beta}1 integrin/Akt signaling pathways were evaluated using western blot. In addition, mice bearing MCF-7 xenografts were used to validate the findings in 3D lrECM. We report that AIIB2 increased apoptosis optimally post-IR by down regulating Akt in breast cancer colonies in 3D lrECM. In vivo, addition of AIIB2 after IR significantly enhanced tumor growth inhibition and apoptosis compared to either treatment alone. Remarkably, the degree of tumor growth inhibition using AIIB2 plus 2 Gy radiation was similar to that of 8 Gy alone. We showed previously that AIIB2 had no discernible toxicity in mice; here, its addition allowed for a significant reduction in the IR dose that was necessary to achieve comparable growth inhibition and apoptosis in breast cancer xenografts in vivo.

  18. Experimental investigation of the penetration of ultrasound nanobubbles in a gastric cancer xenograft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiaozhou; Wang, Luofu; Guo, Yanli; Tong, Haipeng; Li, Lang; Ding, Jun; Huang, Haiyun

    2013-08-01

    Nanobubbles as a type of ultrasound contrast agent have attracted much interest in recent years due to their many advantages, such as strong penetrating power and high stability. However, there is still insufficient morphological evidence concerning gas-filled nanobubbles in tumor tissue spaces and tumor angiogenesis. We used a gastric cancer xenograft as an example to study this question. Nanobubbles with a particle size of 435.2 ± 60.53 nm were prepared and compared with SonoVue® microbubbles in vitro and in vivo, and they exhibited a superior contrast imaging effect. After excluding the impact of the nanobubbles in blood vessels through saline flush, we used an ultrasound burst and frozen sectioning to investigate the distribution of nanobubbles in the gastric cancer xenografts and confirmed this by transmission electron microscopy. Preliminary results showed that the nanobubbles were able to pass through the gaps between the endothelial cells in the tumor vascular system to enter the tissue space. These findings could provide morphological evidence for extravascular ultrasound imaging of tumors and serve as a foundation for the application of nanobubbles in extravascular tumor-targeted ultrasonic diagnostics and therapy.

  19. Attitudes and Stereotypes in Lung Cancer versus Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sriram, N; Mills, Jennifer; Lang, Edward; Dickson, Holli K; Hamann, Heidi A; Nosek, Brian A; Schiller, Joan H

    2015-01-01

    Societal perceptions may factor into the high rates of nontreatment in patients with lung cancer. To determine whether bias exists toward lung cancer, a study using the Implicit Association Test method of inferring subconscious attitudes and stereotypes from participant reaction times to visual cues was initiated. Participants were primarily recruited from an online survey panel based on US census data. Explicit attitudes regarding lung and breast cancer were derived from participants' ratings (n = 1778) regarding what they thought patients experienced in terms of guilt, shame, and hope (descriptive statements) and from participants' opinions regarding whether patients ought to experience such feelings (normative statements). Participants' responses to descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer were compared with responses to statements about breast cancer. Analyses of responses revealed that the participants were more likely to agree with negative descriptive and normative statements about lung cancer than breast cancer (P<0.001). Furthermore, participants had significantly stronger implicit negative associations with lung cancer compared with breast cancer; mean response times in the lung cancer/negative conditions were significantly shorter than in the lung cancer/positive conditions (P<0.001). Patients, caregivers, healthcare providers, and members of the general public had comparable levels of negative implicit attitudes toward lung cancer. These results show that lung cancer was stigmatized by patients, caregivers, healthcare professionals, and the general public. Further research is needed to investigate whether implicit and explicit attitudes and stereotypes affect patient care. PMID:26698307

  20. Alpha-carotene inhibits metastasis in Lewis lung carcinoma in vitro, and suppresses lung metastasis and tumor growth in combination with taxol in tumor xenografted C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yi-Zhen; Yang, Chih-Min; Chen, Jen-Yin; Liao, Junn-Wang; Hu, Miao-Lin

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the anti-metastatic activity of α-carotene (AC) in Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) and in combination with taxol in LLC-xenografted C57BL/6 mice. Cell culture studies reveal that AC significantly inhibited invasion, migration and activities of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2, -9 and urokinase plasminogen activator but increased protein expression of tissue inhibitor of MMP (TIMP)-1, -2 and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1. These effects of AC are similar to those of β-carotene at the same concentration (2.5 μM). AC (2.5 μM) also significantly inhibited integrin β1-mediated phosphorylation of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) which then decreased the phosphorylation of MAPK family. Findings from the animal model reveal that AC treatment (5m g/kg) alone significantly decreased lung metastasis without affecting primary tumor growth, whereas taxol treatment (6 mg/kg) alone exhibited significant inhibition on both actions, as compared to tumor control group. AC treatment alone significantly decreased protein expression of integrin β1 but increased protein expression of TIMP-1 and PAI-1 without affecting protein expression of TIMP-2 and phosphorylation of FAK in lung tissues, whereas taxol treatment alone significantly increased protein expression of TIMP-1, PAI-1 and TIMP-2 but decreased protein expression of integrin β1 and phosphorylation of FAK. The combined treatment produced stronger actions on lung metastasis and lung tissues protein expression of TIMP-1, TIMP-2 and PAI-1. Overall, we demonstrate that AC effectively inhibits LLC metastasis and suppresses lung metastasis in combination with taxol in LLC-bearing mice, suggesting that AC could be used as an anti-metastatic agent or as an adjuvant for anti-cancer drugs.

  1. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201's cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  2. Small Molecular TRAIL Inducer ONC201 Induces Death in Lung Cancer Cells: A Preclinical Study

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Yuan; Zhou, Jihong; Li, Zhanhua; Jiang, Ying; Zhou, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) selectively targets cancer cells. The present preclinical study investigated the anti-cancer efficiency of ONC201, a first-in-class small molecule TRAIL inducer, in lung cancer cells. We showed that ONC201 was cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in both established (A549 and H460 lines) and primary human lung cancer cells. It was yet non-cytotoxic to normal lung epithelial cells. Further, ONC201 induced exogenous apoptosis activation in lung cancer cells, which was evidenced by TRAIL/death receptor-5 (DR5) induction and caspase-8 activation. The caspase-8 inhibitor or TRAIL/DR5 siRNA knockdown alleviated ONC201’s cytotoxicity against lung cancer cells. Molecularly, ONC201 in-activated Akt-S6K1 and Erk signalings in lung cancer cells, causing Foxo3a nuclear translocation. For the in vivo studies, intraperitoneal injection of ONC201 at well-tolerated doses significantly inhibited xenografted A549 tumor growth in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Further, ONC201 administration induced TRAIL/DR5 expression, yet inactivated Akt-S6K1 and Erk in tumor tissues. These results of the study demonstrates the potent anti-lung cancer activity by ONC201. PMID:27626799

  3. Lung cancer screening: subsequent evidences of national lung screening trial.

    PubMed

    Park, Young Sik

    2014-08-01

    The US National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6.7% decrease in all-cause mortality. The NLST is the only trial showing positive results in a high-risk population, such as in patients with old age and heavy ever smokers. Lung cancer screening using a low-dose chest computed tomography might be beneficial for the high-risk group. However, there may also be potential adverse outcomes in terms of over diagnosis, bias and cost-effectiveness. Until now, lung cancer screening remains controversial. In this review, we wish to discuss the evolution of lung cancer screening and summarize existing evidences and recommendations.

  4. Year-in-Review of Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    In the last several years, we have made slow but steady progress in understanding molecular biology of lung cancer. This review is focused on advances in understanding the biology of lung cancer that have led to proof of concept studies on new therapeutic approaches. The three selected topics include genetics, epigenetics and non-coding RNA. This new information represents progress in the integration of molecular mechanisms that to identify more effective ways to target lung cancer. PMID:23166546

  5. Review of radon and lung cancer risk

    SciTech Connect

    Samet, J.M.; Hornung, R.W. )

    1990-03-01

    Radon, a long-established cause of lung cancer in uranium and other underground miners, has recently emerged as a potentially important cause of lung cancer in the general population. The evidence for widespread exposure of the population to radon and the well-documented excess of lung cancer among underground miners exposed to radon decay products have raised concern that exposure to radon progeny might also be a cause of lung cancer in the general population. To date, epidemiological data on the lung cancer risk associated with environmental exposure to radon have been limited. Consequently, the lung cancer hazard posed by radon exposure in indoor air has been addressed primarily through risk estimation procedures. The quantitative risks of lung cancer have been estimated using exposure-response relations derived from the epidemiological investigations of uranium and other underground miners. We review five of the more informative studies of miners and recent risk projection models for excess lung cancer associated with radon. The principal models differ substantially in their underlying assumptions and consequently in the resulting risk projections. The resulting diversity illustrates the substantial uncertainty that remains concerning the most appropriate model of the temporal pattern of radon-related lung cancer. Animal experiments, further follow-up of the miner cohorts, and well-designed epidemiological studies of indoor exposure should reduce this uncertainty. 18 references.

  6. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India.

  7. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of ETV1, YK-4-279, Prevents Prostate Cancer Growth and Metastasis in a Mouse Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Rahim, Said; Minas, Tsion; Hong, Sung-Hyeok; Justvig, Sarah; Çelik, Haydar; Kont, Yasemin Saygideger; Han, Jenny; Kallarakal, Abraham T.; Kong, Yali; Rudek, Michelle A.; Brown, Milton L.; Kallakury, Bhaskar; Toretsky, Jeffrey A.; Üren, Aykut

    2014-01-01

    Background The erythroblastosis virus E26 transforming sequences (ETS) family of transcription factors consists of a highly conserved group of genes that play important roles in cellular proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Chromosomal translocations fusing ETS factors to promoters of androgen responsive genes have been found in prostate cancers, including the most clinically aggressive forms. ERG and ETV1 are the most commonly translocated ETS proteins. Over-expression of these proteins in prostate cancer cells results in a more invasive phenotype. Inhibition of ETS activity by small molecule inhibitors may provide a novel method for the treatment of prostate cancer. Methods and Findings We recently demonstrated that the small molecule YK-4-279 inhibits biological activity of ETV1 in fusion-positive prostate cancer cells leading to decreased motility and invasion in-vitro. Here, we present data from an in-vivo mouse xenograft model. SCID-beige mice were subcutaneously implanted with fusion-positive LNCaP-luc-M6 and fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors. Animals were treated with YK-4-279, and its effects on primary tumor growth and lung metastasis were evaluated. YK-4-279 treatment resulted in decreased growth of the primary tumor only in LNCaP-luc-M6 cohort. When primary tumors were grown to comparable sizes, YK-4-279 inhibited tumor metastasis to the lungs. Expression of ETV1 target genes MMP7, FKBP10 and GLYATL2 were reduced in YK-4-279 treated animals. ETS fusion-negative PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were unresponsive to the compound. Furthermore, YK-4-279 is a chiral molecule that exists as a racemic mixture of R and S enantiomers. We established that (S)-YK-4-279 is the active enantiomer in prostate cancer cells. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that YK-4-279 is a potent inhibitor of ETV1 and inhibits both the primary tumor growth and metastasis of fusion positive prostate cancer xenografts. Therefore, YK-4-279 or similar compounds may be

  8. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-06-04

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  9. [Advances in Lung Stem Cells and Lung Cancer Stem Cells].

    PubMed

    Yin, Huijing; Deng, Jiong

    2015-10-20

    Cancer stem cells (CSCs) are emerging as a hot topic for cancer research. Lung CSCs share many characteristics with normal lung stem cells (SCs), including self-renewal and multi-potency for differentiation. Many molecular markers expressed in various types of CSCs were also found in lung CSCs, such as CD133, CD44, aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) and ATP-binding cassette sub-family G member 2 (ABCG2). Similarly, proliferation and expansion of lung CSCs are regulated not only by signal transduction pathways functioning in normal lung SCs, such as Notch, Hedgehog and Wnt pathways, but also by those acting in tumor cells, such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI3K) pathways. As CSC plays an critical role in tumor recurrence, metastasis and drug-resistance, understanding the difference between lung CSCs and normal lung SCs, identifying and targeting CSC markers or related signaling pathways may increase the efficacy of therapy on lung cancer and improved survival of lung cancer patients.

  10. Inhibition of checkpoint kinase 1 sensitizes lung cancer brain metastases to radiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Heekyoung; Yoon, Su Jin; Jin, Juyoun; Choi, Seung Ho; Seol, Ho Jun; Lee, Jung-Il; and others

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. {yields} Radiosensitivity of cancer cells was enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor. {yields} Depletion of Chk1 in cancer cells showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation. {yields} Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity. -- Abstract: The most important therapeutic tool in brain metastasis is radiation therapy. However, resistance to radiation is a possible cause of recurrence or treatment failure. Recently, signal pathways about DNA damage checkpoints after irradiation have been noticed. We investigated the radiosensitivity can be enhanced with treatment of Chk1 inhibitor, AZD7762 in lung cancer cell lines and xenograft models of lung cancer brain metastasis. Clonogenic survival assays showed enhancement of radiosensitivity with AZD7762 after irradiation of various doses. AZD7762 increased ATR/ATM-mediated Chk1 phosphorylation and stabilized Cdc25A, suppressed cyclin A expression in lung cancer cell lines. In xenograft models of lung cancer (PC14PE6) brain metastasis, AZD7762 significantly prolonged the median survival time in response to radiation. Depletion of Chk1 using shRNA also showed an enhancement of sensitivity to radiation in PC14PE6 cells. The results of this study support that Chk1 can be a good target for enhancement of radiosensitivity.

  11. Systematic repurposing screening in xenograft models identifies approved drugs with novel anti-cancer activity.

    PubMed

    Roix, Jeffrey J; Harrison, S D; Rainbolt, Elizabeth A; Meshaw, Kathryn R; McMurry, Avery S; Cheung, Peter; Saha, Saurabh

    2014-01-01

    Approved drugs target approximately 400 different mechanisms of action, of which as few as 60 are currently used as anti-cancer therapies. Given that on average it takes 10-15 years for a new cancer therapeutic to be approved, and the recent success of drug repurposing for agents such as thalidomide, we hypothesized that effective, safe cancer treatments may be found by testing approved drugs in new therapeutic settings. Here, we report in-vivo testing of a broad compound collection in cancer xenograft models. Using 182 compounds that target 125 unique target mechanisms, we identified 3 drugs that displayed reproducible activity in combination with the chemotherapeutic temozolomide. Candidate drugs appear effective at dose equivalents that exceed current prescription levels, suggesting that additional pre-clinical efforts will be needed before these drugs can be tested for efficacy in clinical trials. In total, we suggest drug repurposing is a relatively resource-intensive method that can identify approved medicines with a narrow margin of anti-cancer activity.

  12. Aminomethylphosphonic acid inhibits growth and metastasis of human prostate cancer in an orthotopic xenograft mouse model

    PubMed Central

    Parajuli, Keshab Raj; Zhang, Qiuyang; Liu, Sen; You, Zongbing

    2016-01-01

    Aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) has been shown to inhibit prostate cancer cell growth in vitro. The purpose of the present study was to determine if AMPA could inhibit growth and metastasis of prostate cancer in vivo. Human prostate cancer PC-3-LacZ-luciferase cells were implanted into the ventral lateral lobes of the prostate in 39 athymic Nu/Nu nude male mice. Seven days later, mice were randomized into the control group (n = 14, treated intraperitoneally with phosphate buffered saline), low dose group (n = 10, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 400 mg/kg body weight/day), and high dose group (n = 15, treated intraperitoneally with AMPA at 800 mg/kg body weight/day). Tumor growth and metastasis were examined every 4-7 days by bioluminescence imaging of live mice. We found that AMPA treatment significantly inhibited growth and metastasis of orthotopic xenograft prostate tumors and prolonged the survival time of the mice. AMPA treatment decreased expression of BIRC2 and activated caspase 3, leading to increased apoptosis in the prostate tumors. AMPA treatment decreased expression of cyclin D1. AMPA treatment also reduced angiogenesis in the prostate tumors. Taken together, these results demonstrate that AMPA can inhibit prostate cancer growth and metastasis, suggesting that AMPA may be developed into a therapeutic agent for the treatment of prostate cancer. PMID:26840261

  13. Lung Cancer in Never Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ping

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer in never smokers (LCINS) has lately been recognized as a unique disease based on rapidly gained knowledge from genomic changes to treatment responses. The focus of this article is on current knowledge and challenges with regard to LCINS expanded from recent reviews highlighting five areas: (1) distribution of LCINS by temporal trends, geographic regions, and populations; (2) three well-recognized environmental risk factors; (3) other plausible environmental risk factors; (4) prior chronic lung diseases and infectious diseases as risk factors; and (5) lifestyles as risk or protective factors. This article will also bring attention to recently published literature in two pioneering areas: (1) histological characteristics, clinical features with emerging new effective therapies, and social and psychological stigma; and (2) searching for susceptibility genes using integrated genomic approaches. PMID:21500120

  14. Personalized therapy for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Andre L; Eng, Juliana

    2014-12-01

    The past decade has seen an enormous advancement in the therapy for lung cancer, predominantly seen in adenocarcinoma, ranging from the introduction of histology-based drugs to the discovery of targetable mutations. These events have led to a personalized therapeutic approach with the delivery of drugs that target specific oncogenic pathways active in a given tumor with the intent of acquiring the best response rate. The discovery of sensitizing mutation in the epidermal growth factor receptor gene as the basis for clinical response to tyrosine kinase inhibitors led to a systematic search for other molecular targets in lung cancer. Currently, there are several molecular alterations that can be targeted by experimental drugs. These new discoveries would not be possible without a parallel technological evolution in diagnostic molecular pathology. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is a technology that allows for the evaluation of multiple molecular alterations in the same sample using a small amount of tissue. Selective evaluation of targeted cancer genes, instead of whole-genome evaluation, is the approach that is best suited to enter clinical practice. This technology allows for the detection of most molecular alteration with a single test, thus saving tissue for future discoveries. The use of NGS is expected to increase and gain importance in clinical and experimental approaches, since it can be used as a diagnostic tool as well as for new discoveries. The technique may also help us elucidate the interplay of several genes and their alteration in the mechanism of drug response and resistance.

  15. Enhanced Quitline Intervention in Smoking Cessation for Patients With Non-Metastatic Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-09-28

    Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Tobacco Use Disorder

  16. Radiosensitizing Pancreatic Cancer Xenografts by an Implantable Micro-Oxygen Generator.

    PubMed

    Cao, Ning; Song, Seung Hyun; Maleki, Teimour; Shaffer, Michael; Stantz, Keith M; Cao, Minsong; Kao, Chinghai; Mendonca, Marc S; Ziaie, Babak; Ko, Song-Chu

    2016-04-01

    Over the past decades, little progress has been made to improve the extremely low survival rates in pancreatic cancer patients. Extreme hypoxia observed in pancreatic tumors contributes to the aggressive and metastatic characteristics of this tumor and can reduce the effectiveness of conventional radiation therapy and chemotherapy. In an attempt to reduce hypoxia-induced obstacles to effective radiation treatment, we used a novel device, the implantable micro-oxygen generator (IMOG), for in situ tumor oxygenation. After subcutaneous implantation of human pancreatic xenograft tumors in athymic rats, the IMOG was wirelessly powered by ultrasonic waves, producing 30 μA of direct current (at 2.5 V), which was then utilized to electrolyze water and produce oxygen within the tumor. Significant oxygen production by the IMOG was observed and corroborated using the NeoFox oxygen sensor dynamically. To test the radiosensitization effect of the newly generated oxygen, the human pancreatic xenograft tumors were subcutaneously implanted in nude mice with either a functional or inactivated IMOG device. The tumors in the mice were then exposed to ultrasonic power for 10 min, followed by a single fraction of 5 Gy radiation, and tumor growth was monitored thereafter. The 5 Gy irradiated tumors containing the functional IMOG exhibited tumor growth inhibition equivalent to that of 7 Gy irradiated tumors that did not contain an IMOG. Our study confirmed that an activated IMOG is able to produce sufficient oxygen to radiosensitize pancreatic tumors, enhancing response to single-dose radiation therapy. PMID:27002539

  17. What You Need to Know about Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Publications Reports What You Need To Know About™ Lung Cancer This booklet is about lung cancer. Learning about medical care for your cancer ... ePub This booklet covers: The anatomy of the lungs and basics about lung cancer Treatment for lung ...

  18. Diagnosis and Molecular Classification of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Parra-Cuentas, Edwin; Wistuba, Ignacio I

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is a complex disease composed of diverse histological and molecular types with clinical relevance. The advent of large-scale molecular profiling has been helpful to identify novel molecular targets that can be applied to the treatment of particular lung cancer patients and has helped to reshape the pathological classification of lung cancer. Novel directions include the immunotherapy revolution, which has opened the door for new opportunities for cancer therapy and is also redefining the classification of multiple tumors, including lung cancer. In the present chapter, we will review the main current basis of the pathological diagnosis and classification of lung cancer incorporating the histopathological and molecular dimensions of the disease. PMID:27535388

  19. Lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners

    SciTech Connect

    Gottlieb, L.S.; Husen, L.A.

    1982-04-01

    Lung cancer has been a rare disease among the Indians of the southwestern United States. However, the advent of uranium mining in the area has been associated with an increased incidence of lung cancer among Navajo uranium miners. This study centers on Navajo men with lung cancer who were admitted to the hospital from February 1965 to May 1979. Of a total of 17 patients with lung cancer, 16 were uranium miners, and one was a nonminer. The mean value of cumulative radon exposure for this group was 1139.5 working level months (WLMs). The predominant cancer type was the small cell undifferentiated category (62.5 percent). The low frequency of cigarette smoking in this group supports the view that radiation is the primary cause of lung cancer among uranium miners and that cigarette smoking acts as a promoting agent.

  20. KIT Signaling Promotes Growth of Colon Xenograft Tumors in Mice and is Upregulated in a Subset of Human Colon Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Evan C.; Karl, Taylor A.; Kalisky, Tomer; Gupta, Santosh K.; O’Brien, Catherine A.; Longacre, Teri A.; van de Rijn, Matt; Quake, Stephen R.; Clarke, Michael F.; Rothenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Background & Aims Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitors have advanced colon cancer treatment. We investigated the role of the RTK KIT in development of human colon cancer. Methods An array of 137 patient-derived colon tumors and their associated xenografts were analyzed by immunohistochemistry to measure levels of KIT and its ligand KITLG. KIT and/or KITLG was stably knocked down by expression of small hairpin RNAs from lentiviral vectors in DLD1, HT29, LS174T, and COLO320 colon cancer cell lines, and in UM-COLON#8 and POP77 xenografts; cells transduced with only vector were used as controls. Cells were analyzed by real-time quantitative reverse transcription PCR, single-cell gene expression analysis, flow cytometry, and immunohistochemical, immunoblot, and functional assays. Xenograft tumors were grown from control and KIT-knockdown DLD1 and UM-COLON#8 cells in immunocompromised mice and compared. Some mice were given the RTK inhibitor imatinib following injection of cancer cells; tumor growth was measured based on bioluminescence. We assessed tumorigenicity using limiting dilution analysis. Results KIT and KITLG were expressed heterogeneously by a subset of human colon tumors. Knockdown of KIT decreased proliferation of colon cancer cell lines and growth of xenograft tumors in mice, compared with control cells. KIT knockdown cells had increased expression of enterocyte markers, decreased expression of cycling genes, and, unexpectedly, increased expression of LGR5-associated genes. No activating mutations in KIT were detected in DLD1, POP77, or UM-COLON#8 cell lines. However, KITLG-knockdown DLD1 cells formed smaller xenograft tumors than control cells. Gene expression analysis of single CD44+ cells indicated that KIT may promote growth via KITLG autocrine and/or paracrine signaling. Imatinib inhibited growth of KIT+ colon cancer organoids in culture and growth of xenograft tumors in mice. Cancer cells with endogenous KIT expression were more tumorigenic in

  1. Chemoprevention studies within lung cancer screening programmes.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, G; Guerrieri-Gonzaga, A; Infante, M; Bonanni, B

    2015-01-01

    While aggressive tobacco control and help to stop smoking are essential weapons in the fight against lung cancer, screening with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in high-risk populations and chemoprevention may also contribute to reducing lung cancer deaths. Persons undergoing LDCT screening are an ideal population to be tested for agents potentially able to prevent the development of lung cancer by the regression of precancerous lesions, which are routinely monitored as part of the screening process. Peripheral subsolid nodules appear as particularly suitable targets, since many are adenocarcinoma precursors. A study on inhaled budesonide (a potential chemopreventive drug) for 1 year found that the mean size of non-solid lung nodules was significantly reduced over 5 years of follow-up, compared to inhaled placebo, in a population of high-risk individuals with indeterminate lung nodules not requiring immediate specific investigation for lung cancer and detected as part of a lung cancer screening program with LDCT. A new randomised placebo-controlled phase-II trial to test the ability of aspirin to induce the regression of non-solid and partially solid nodules detected by LDCT screening has been started. The effect of aspirin on a miRNA signature able to predict the presence of both cancer and precancerous lesions in high-risk asymptomatic individuals is also being monitored in the trial. This signature was previously shown to predict the presence of both lung cancer and non-solid lung nodules in asymptomatic individuals. PMID:26635901

  2. Transcriptomic alterations in human prostate cancer cell LNCaP tumor xenograft modulated by dietary phenethyl isothiocyanate

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Temporal growth of tumor xenografts in mice on a control diet was compared to mice supplemented daily with 3 µmol/g of the cancer preventive compound phenethyl isothiocyanate. Phenethyl isothiocyanate decreased the rate of tumor growth. The effects of phenethyl isothiocyanate on tumor growth were ex...

  3. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Using Brain Tumor Stem Cell Systems to Study Cancer.

    PubMed

    Chokshi, Chirayu; Dhillon, Manvir; McFarlane, Nicole; Venugopal, Chitra; Singh, Sheila K

    2016-01-01

    Patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models provide an excellent platform to understand cancer initiation and development in vivo. In the context of brain tumor initiating cells (BTICs), PDX models allow for characterization of tumor formation, growth, and recurrence, in a clinically relevant in vivo system. Here, we detail procedures to harvest, culture, characterize, and orthotopically inject human BTICs derived from patient samples.

  4. Classification and Pathology of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Min

    2016-07-01

    Advancement in the understanding of lung tumor biology enables continued refinement of lung cancer classification, reflected in the recently introduced 2015 World Health Organization classification of lung cancer. In small biopsy or cytology specimens, special emphasis is placed on separating adenocarcinomas from the other lung cancers to effectively select tumors for targeted molecular testing. In resection specimens, adenocarcinomas are further classified based on architectural pattern to delineate tissue types of prognostic significance. Neuroendocrine tumors are divided into typical carcinoid, atypical carcinoid, small cell carcinoma, and large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma based on a combination of features, especially tumor cell proliferation rate. PMID:27261908

  5. [Developing surgical options for lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Sihvo, Eero

    2016-01-01

    The selection of correct treatment for lung cancer is multidisciplinary collaboration and requires careful assessment of the extent of the tumor and the condition of the patient. In localized non-small cell lung cancer, mere surgery or surgery in combination with adjuvant therapies are the best options for curing the disease. The trend in modern surgery is mini-invasiveness and preservation of lung tissue. Accordingly, any unit conducting lung cancer operations should have access to all modern techniques in order to provide each patient with optimal, patient-tailored surgical therapy. PMID:27132298

  6. CXCR1 blockade selectively targets human breast cancer stem cells in vitro and in xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Ginestier, Christophe; Liu, Suling; Diebel, Mark E.; Korkaya, Hasan; Luo, Ming; Brown, Marty; Wicinski, Julien; Cabaud, Olivier; Charafe-Jauffret, Emmanuelle; Birnbaum, Daniel; Guan, Jun-Lin; Dontu, Gabriela; Wicha, Max S.

    2010-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that breast cancer and other solid tumors possess a rare population of cells capable of extensive self-renewal that contribute to metastasis and treatment resistance. We report here the development of a strategy to target these breast cancer stem cells (CSCs) through blockade of the IL-8 receptor CXCR1. CXCR1 blockade using either a CXCR1-specific blocking antibody or repertaxin, a small-molecule CXCR1 inhibitor, selectively depleted the CSC population in 2 human breast cancer cell lines in vitro. Furthermore, this was followed by the induction of massive apoptosis in the bulk tumor population via FASL/FAS signaling. The effects of CXCR1 blockade on CSC viability and on FASL production were mediated by the FAK/AKT/FOXO3A pathway. In addition, repertaxin was able to specifically target the CSC population in human breast cancer xenografts, retarding tumor growth and reducing metastasis. Our data therefore suggest that CXCR1 blockade may provide a novel means of targeting and eliminating breast CSCs. PMID:20051626

  7. Patient-derived xenograft models of breast cancer and their predictive power.

    PubMed

    Whittle, James R; Lewis, Michael T; Lindeman, Geoffrey J; Visvader, Jane E

    2015-02-10

    Despite advances in the treatment of patients with early and metastatic breast cancer, mortality remains high due to intrinsic or acquired resistance to therapy. Increased understanding of the genomic landscape through massively parallel sequencing has revealed somatic mutations common to specific subtypes of breast cancer, provided new prognostic and predictive markers, and highlighted potential therapeutic targets. Evaluating new targets using established cell lines is limited by the inexact correlation between responsiveness observed in cell lines versus that elicited in the patient. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) generated from fresh tumor specimens recapitulate the diversity of breast cancer and reflect histopathology, tumor behavior, and the metastatic properties of the original tumor. The high degree of genomic preservation evident across primary tumors and their matching PDXs over serial passaging validate them as important preclinical tools. Indeed, there is accumulating evidence that PDXs can recapitulate treatment responses of the parental tumor. The finding that tumor engraftment is an independent and poor prognostic indicator of patient outcome represents the first step towards personalized medicine. Here we review the utility of breast cancer PDX models to study the clonal evolution of tumors and to evaluate novel therapies and drug resistance.

  8. Gene Therapy for Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lara-Guerra, Humberto; Roth, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy was originally conceived to treat monogenic diseases. The replacement of a defective gene with a functional gene can theoretically cure the disease. In cancer, multiple genetic defects are present and the molecular profile changes during the course of the disease, making the replacement of all defective genes impossible. To overcome these difficulties, various gene therapy strategies have been adopted, including immune stimulation, transfer of suicide genes, inhibition of driver oncogenes, replacement of tumor-suppressor genes that could mediate apoptosis or anti-angiogenesis, and transfer of genes that enhance conventional treatments such as radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Some of these strategies have been tested successfully in non-small-cell lung cancer patients and the results of laboratory studies and clinical trials are reviewed herein. PMID:27481008

  9. Recent advances in lung cancer biology

    SciTech Connect

    Lechner, J.

    1995-12-31

    This paper provides an overview of carcinogenesis, especially as related to lung cancers. Various growth factors and their mutated forms as oncogenes are discussed with respect to gene location and their role in the oncogenic process. Finally the data is related to lung cancer induction in uranium miners and exposure to radon.

  10. Lung Cancer - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    MedlinePlus

    ... Arabic) سرطان الرئة - العربية Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Bosnian (Bosanski) Lung Cancer Karcinom pluća - Bosanski (Bosnian) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Lung Cancer 肺癌 - 简体中文 (Chinese - ...

  11. The future of patient-derived tumor xenografts in cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Sia, Daniela; Moeini, Agrin; Labgaa, Ismail; Villanueva, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, major technological advancements have led to a better understanding of the molecular drivers of human malignancies. Nonetheless, this progress only marginally impacted the cancer therapeutic approach, probably due to the limited ability of experimental models to predict efficacy in clinical trials. In an effort to offset this limitation, there has been an increasing interest in the development of patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models where human tumors are xenotransplanted into immunocompromised mice. Considering their high resemblance to human tumors and their stability, PDX models are becoming the preferred translational tools in preclinical studies. Nonetheless, several limitations hamper a wider use of PDX models and tarnish the concept that they might represent the missing piece in the personalized medicine puzzle.

  12. Indoor radon and lung cancer in China

    SciTech Connect

    Blot, W.J.; Xu, Z.Y.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Zhao, D.Z.; Stone, B.J.; Sun, J.; Jing, L.B.; Fraumeni, J.F. Jr. )

    1990-06-20

    Radon has long been known to contribute to risk of lung cancer, especially in undergound miners who are exposed to large amounts of the carcinogen. Recently, however, lower amounts of radon present in living areas have been suggested as an important cause of lung cancer. In an effort to clarify the relationship of low amounts of radon with lung cancer risk, we placed alpha-track radon detectors in the homes of 308 women with newly diagnosed lung cancer and 356 randomly selected female control subjects of similar age. Measurements were taken after 1 year. All study participants were part of the general population of Shenyang, People's Republic of China, an industrial city in the northeast part of the country that has one of the world's highest rates of lung cancer in women. The median time of residence in the homes was 24 years. The median household radon level was 2.3 pCi/L of air; 20% of the levels were greater than 4 pCi/L. Radon levels tended to be higher in single-story houses or on the first floor of multiple-story dwellings, and they were also higher in houses with increased levels of indoor air pollution from coal-burning stoves. However, the levels were not higher in homes of women who developed lung cancer than in homes of controls, nor did lung cancer risk increase with increasing radon level. No association between radon and lung cancer was observed regardless of cigarette-smoking status, except for a nonsignificant trend among heavy smokers. No positive associations of lung cancer cell type with radon were observed, except for a nonsignificant excess risk of small cell cancers among the more heavily exposed residents. Our data suggest that projections from surveys of miners exposed to high radon levels may have overestimated the overall risks of lung cancer associated with levels typically seen in homes in this Chinese city.

  13. Development and Evaluation of a Lung Cancer Screening Decision Aid.

    PubMed

    Hart, Katelyn; Tofthagen, Cindy; Wang, Hsiao-Lan

    2016-10-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer; however, it often is not diagnosed until the advanced stages. Early-stage lung cancer is curable, but screening tools are not usually implemented in practice because of a lack of provider awareness. A lung cancer screening decision aid may increase screening use and, ultimately, reduce lung cancer deaths.
. PMID:27668377

  14. The Anti-Proliferative Effect of Boron Neutron Capture Therapy in a Prostate Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Takai, Tomoaki; Ibuki, Naokazu; Hirano, Hajime; Nomi, Hayahito; Kawabata, Shinji; Kiyama, Satoshi; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Suzuki, Minoru; Kirihata, Mitsunori; Azuma, Haruhito

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a selective radiation treatment for tumors that preferentially accumulate drugs carrying the stable boron isotope, 10B. BNCT has been evaluated clinically as an alternative to conventional radiation therapy for the treatment of brain tumors, and more recently, recurrent advanced head and neck cancer. Here we investigated the effect of BNCT on prostate cancer (PCa) using an in vivo mouse xenograft model that we have developed. Materials and Methods Mice bearing the xenotransplanted androgen-independent human PCa cell line, PC3, were divided into four groups: Group 1: untreated controls; Group 2: Boronophenylalanine (BPA); Group 3: neutron; Group 4: BPA-mediated BNCT. We compared xenograft growth among these groups, and the body weight and any motility disturbance were recorded. Immunohistochemical (IHC) studies of the proliferation marker, Ki-67, and TUNEL staining were performed 9 weeks after treatment. Results The in vivo studies demonstrated that BPA-mediated BNCT significantly delayed tumor growth in comparison with the other groups, without any severe adverse events. There was a significant difference in the rate of freedom from gait abnormalities between the BPA-mediated BNCT group and the other groups. The IHC studies revealed that BNCT treatment significantly reduced the number of Ki-67-positive cells in comparison with the controls (mean±SD 6.9±1.5 vs 12.7±4.0, p<0.05), while there was no difference in the number of apoptotic cells, suggesting that BPA-mediated BNCT reduced PCa progression without affecting apoptosis at 9 weeks post-treatment. Conclusions This study has provided the first preclinical proof-of-principle data to indicate that BPA-mediated BNCT reduces the in vivo growth of PCa. Although further studies will be necessary, BNCT might be a novel potential treatment for PCa. PMID:26325195

  15. Growth hormone receptor antagonism suppresses tumour regrowth after radiotherapy in an endometrial cancer xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Evans, Angharad; Jamieson, Stephen M F; Liu, Dong-Xu; Wilson, William R; Perry, Jo K

    2016-08-28

    Human GH expression is associated with poor survival outcomes for endometrial cancer patients, enhanced oncogenicity of endometrial cancer cells and reduced sensitivity to ionising radiation in vitro, suggesting that GH is a potential target for anticancer therapy. However, whether GH receptor inhibition sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo has not been tested. In the current study, we evaluated whether the GH receptor antagonist, pegvisomant (Pfizer), sensitises to radiotherapy in vivo in an endometrial tumour xenograft model. Subcutaneous administration of pegvisomant (20 or 100 mg/kg/day, s.c.) reduced serum IGF1 levels by 23% and 68%, respectively, compared to vehicle treated controls. RL95-2 xenografts grown in immunodeficient NIH-III mice were treated with vehicle or pegvisomant (100 mg/kg/day), with or without fractionated gamma radiation (10 × 2.5 Gy over 5 days). When combined with radiation, pegvisomant significantly increased the median time tumours took to reach 3× the pre-radiation treatment volume (49 days versus 72 days; p = 0.001). Immunohistochemistry studies demonstrated that 100 mg/kg pegvisomant every second day was sufficient to abrogate MAP Kinase signalling throughout the tumour. In addition, treatment with pegvisomant increased hypoxic regions in irradiated tumours, as determined by immunohistochemical detection of pimonidazole adducts, and decreased the area of CD31 labelling in unirradiated tumours, suggesting an anti-vascular effect. Pegvisomant did not affect intratumoral staining for HIF1α, VEGF-A, CD11b, or phospho-EGFR. Our results suggest that blockade of the human GH receptor may improve the response of GH and/or IGF1-responsive endometrial tumours to radiation.

  16. Establishment of a patient-derived orthotopic Xenograft (PDOX) model of HER-2-positive cervical cancer expressing the clinical metastatic pattern.

    PubMed

    Hiroshima, Yukihiko; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, Nan; Maawy, Ali; Mii, Sumiyuki; Yamamoto, Mako; Uehara, Fuminari; Miwa, Shinji; Yano, Shuya; Murakami, Takashi; Momiyama, Masashi; Chishima, Takashi; Tanaka, Kuniya; Ichikawa, Yasushi; Bouvet, Michael; Murata, Takuya; Endo, Itaru; Hoffman, Robert M

    2015-01-01

    Squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix, highly prevalent in the developing world, is often metastatic and treatment resistant with no standard treatment protocol. Our laboratory pioneered the patient-derived orthotopic xenograft (PDOX) nude mouse model with the technique of surgical orthotopic implantation (SOI). Unlike subcutaneous transplant patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, PDOX models metastasize. Most importantly, the metastasis pattern correlates to the patient. In the present report, we describe the development of a PDOX model of HER-2-positive cervical cancer. Metastasis after SOI in nude mice included peritoneal dissemination, liver metastasis, lung metastasis as well as lymph node metastasis reflecting the metastatic pattern in the donor patient. Metastasis was detected in 4 of 6 nude mice with primary tumors. Primary tumors and metastases in the nude mice had histological structures similar to the original tumor and were stained by an anti-HER-2 antibody in the same pattern as the patient's cancer. The metastatic pattern, histology and HER-2 tumor expression of the patient were thus preserved in the PDOX model. In contrast, subcutaneous transplantation of the patient's cervical tumors resulted in primary growth but not metastasis.

  17. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-03-17

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Early diagnosis of lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saccomanno, Geno; Bechtel, Joel J.

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of death in the United States. Although the incidence of cigarette smoking is decreasing in the United States it appears to be increasing worldwide. The five-year survival rate has not improved in cases with advanced disease, but several articles have indicated that survival can be improved in cases diagnosed early by sputum cytology and chest x-ray. In cases diagnosed while the lesion is in the in-situ stage or measures less than 1 cm in diameter, surgical excision and/or radiation therapy improves survival; therefore, the early diagnosis of high-risk patients should be vigorously pursued. A recent study at a community hospital in Grand Junction, Colorado, presented 45 lung cancer cases diagnosed with positive sputum cytology and negative chest x-ray, and indicates that early diagnosis does improve survival. This study has been conducted during the past six years; 16 cases have survived three years and six cases show five-year survival.

  19. Study of Ponatinib in Patients With Lung Cancer Preselected Using Different Candidate Predictive Biomarkers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  20. Early Lung Cancer Diagnosis by Biosensors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuqian; Yang, Dongliang; Weng, Lixing; Wang, Lianhui

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer causes an extreme threat to human health, and the mortality rate due to lung cancer has not decreased during the last decade. Prognosis or early diagnosis could help reduce the mortality rate. If microRNA and tumor-associated antigens (TAAs), as well as the corresponding autoantibodies, can be detected prior to clinical diagnosis, such high sensitivity of biosensors makes the early diagnosis and prognosis of cancer realizable. This review provides an overview of tumor-associated biomarker identifying methods and the biosensor technology available today. Laboratorial researches utilizing biosensors for early lung cancer diagnosis will be highlighted. PMID:23892596

  1. Exosomal formulation enhances therapeutic response of celastrol against lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Aqil, Farrukh; Kausar, Hina; Agrawal, Ashish Kumar; Jeyabalan, Jeyaprakash; Kyakulaga, Al-Hassan; Munagala, Radha; Gupta, Ramesh

    2016-08-01

    Celastrol (CEL), a plant-derived triterpenoid, is a known inhibitor of Hsp90 and NF-κB activation pathways and has recently been suggested to be of therapeutic importance in various cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of celastrol-mediated effects in lung cancer are not systematically studied. Moreover, it suffers from poor bioavailability and off-site toxicity issues. This study aims to study the effect of celastrol loaded into exosomes against two non-small cell-lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cell lines and explore the molecular mechanisms to determine the proteins governing the cellular responses. We observed that celastrol inhibited the proliferation of A549 and H1299 NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner as indexed by MTT assay. Mechanistically, CEL pre-treatment of H1299 cells completely abrogated TNFα-induced NF-κB activation and upregulated the expression of ER-stress chaperones Grp 94, Grp78, and pPERK. These changes in ER-stress mediators were paralleled by an increase in apoptotic response as evidenced by higher annexin-V/PI positive cells evaluated by FACS and immunoblotting which showed upregulation of the ER stress specific pro-apoptotic transcription factor, GADD153/CHOP and alteration of Bax/Bcl2 levels. Exosomes loaded with CEL exhibited enhanced anti-tumor efficacy as compared to free CEL against lung cancer cell xenograft. CEL did not exhibit any gross or systemic toxicity in wild-type C57BL6 mice as determined by hematological and liver and kidney function test. Together, our data demonstrate the chemotherapeutic potential of CEL in lung cancer and that exosomal formulation enhances its efficacy and reduces dose related toxicity.

  2. Molecular characterization of patient-derived human pancreatic tumor xenograft models for preclinical and translational development of cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Mattie, Mike; Christensen, Ashley; Chang, Mi Sook; Yeh, William; Said, Suzanne; Shostak, Yuriy; Capo, Linnette; Verlinsky, Alla; An, Zili; Joseph, Ingrid; Zhang, Yi; Kumar-Ganesan, Sathish; Morrison, Karen; Stover, David; Challita-Eid, Pia

    2013-10-01

    Preclinical evaluation of novel cancer agents requires models that accurately reflect the biology and molecular characteristics of human tumors. Molecular profiles of eight pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma patient tumors were compared to corresponding passages of xenografts obtained by grafting tumor fragments into immunocompromised mice. Molecular characterization was performed by copy number analysis, gene expression and microRNA microarrays, mutation analysis, short tandem repeat (STR) profiling, and immunohistochemistry. Xenografts were found to be highly representative of their respective tumors, with a high degree of genetic stability observed by STR profiling and mutation analysis. Copy number variation (CNV) profiles of early and late xenograft passages were similar, with recurrent losses on chromosomes 1p, 3p, 4q, 6, 8p, 9, 10, 11q, 12p, 15q, 17, 18, 20p, and 21 and gains on 1q, 5p, 8q, 11q, 12q, 13q, 19q, and 20q. Pearson correlations of gene expression profiles of tumors and xenograft passages were above 0.88 for all models. Gene expression patterns between early and late passage xenografts were highly stable for each individual model. Changes observed in xenograft passages largely corresponded to human stromal compartment genes and inflammatory processes. While some differences exist between the primary tumors and corresponding xenografts, the molecular profiles remain stable after extensive passaging. Evidence for stability in molecular characteristics after several rounds of passaging lends confidence to clinical relevance and allows for expansion of models to generate the requisite number of animals required for cohorts used in drug screening and development studies.

  3. Potent anti-cancer effects of citrus peel flavonoids in human prostate xenograft tumors.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ching-Shu; Li, Shiming; Miyauchi, Yutaka; Suzawa, Michiko; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung

    2013-06-01

    Prostate cancer is one of the most prevalent malignancies and is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men. Fruit and vegetable consumption is a novel, non-toxic therapeutic approach that can be used to prevent and treat prostate cancer. Citrus peels and their extracts have been reported to have potent pharmacological activities and health benefits due to the abundance of flavonoids in citrus fruits, particularly in the peels. Our previous studies demonstrated that oral administration of Gold Lotion (GL), an extract of multiple varieties of citrus peels containing abundant flavonoids, including a large percentage of polymethoxyflavones (PMFs), effectively suppressed azoxymethane (AOM)-induced colonic tumorigenesis. However, the efficacy of GL against prostate cancer has not yet been investigated. Here, we explored the anti-tumor effects of GL using a human prostate tumor xenograft mouse model. Our data demonstrated that treatment with GL by both intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection and oral administration dramatically reduced both the weights (57%-100% inhibition) and volumes (78%-94% inhibition) of the tumors without any observed toxicity. These inhibitory effects were accompanied by mechanistic down-regulation of the protein levels of inflammatory enzymes (inducible nitric oxide synthase, iNOS and cyclooxygenase-2, COX-2), metastasis (matrix metallopeptidase-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9), angiogenesis (vascular endothelial growth factor, VEGF), and proliferative molecules, as well as by the induction of apoptosis in prostate tumors. Our findings suggest that GL is an effective anti-cancer agent that may potentially serve as a novel therapeutic option for prostate cancer treatment.

  4. Establishment and characterisation of patient-derived xenografts as paraclinical models for gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Young; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Hyunki; Sim, Moon Hee; Kim, Ka-Kyung; Lee, Gunho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; An, Ji Yeong; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Choong-Bai; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-01-01

    The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model is emerging as a promising translational platform to duplicate the characteristics of tumours. However, few studies have reported detailed histological and genomic analyses for model fidelity and for factors affecting successful model establishment of gastric cancer. Here, we generated PDX tumours surgically-derived from 62 gastric cancer patients. Fifteen PDX models were successfully established (24.2%, 15/62) and passaged to maintain tumours in immune-compromised mice. Diffuse type and low tumour cell percentage were negatively correlated with success rates (p = 0.005 and p = 0.025, respectively), while reducing ex vivo and overall procedure times were positively correlated with success rates (p = 0.003 and p = 0.01, respectively). The histology and genetic characteristics of PDX tumour models were stable over subsequent passages. Lymphoma transformation occurred in five cases (33.3%, 5/15), and all were in the NOG mouse, with none in the nude mouse. Together, the present study identified Lauren classification, tumour cell percentages, and ex vivo times along with overall procedure times, as key determinants for successful PDX engraftment. Furthermore, genetic and histological characteristics were highly consistent between primary and PDX tumours, which provide realistic paraclinical models, enabling personalised development of treatment options for gastric cancer. PMID:26926953

  5. Establishment and characterisation of patient-derived xenografts as paraclinical models for gastric cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Yoon Young; Lee, Jae Eun; Kim, Hyunki; Sim, Moon Hee; Kim, Ka-Kyung; Lee, Gunho; Kim, Hyoung-Il; An, Ji Yeong; Hyung, Woo Jin; Kim, Choong-Bai; Noh, Sung Hoon; Kim, Sangwoo; Cheong, Jae-Ho

    2016-03-01

    The patient-derived xenograft (PDX) model is emerging as a promising translational platform to duplicate the characteristics of tumours. However, few studies have reported detailed histological and genomic analyses for model fidelity and for factors affecting successful model establishment of gastric cancer. Here, we generated PDX tumours surgically-derived from 62 gastric cancer patients. Fifteen PDX models were successfully established (24.2%, 15/62) and passaged to maintain tumours in immune-compromised mice. Diffuse type and low tumour cell percentage were negatively correlated with success rates (p = 0.005 and p = 0.025, respectively), while reducing ex vivo and overall procedure times were positively correlated with success rates (p = 0.003 and p = 0.01, respectively). The histology and genetic characteristics of PDX tumour models were stable over subsequent passages. Lymphoma transformation occurred in five cases (33.3%, 5/15), and all were in the NOG mouse, with none in the nude mouse. Together, the present study identified Lauren classification, tumour cell percentages, and ex vivo times along with overall procedure times, as key determinants for successful PDX engraftment. Furthermore, genetic and histological characteristics were highly consistent between primary and PDX tumours, which provide realistic paraclinical models, enabling personalised development of treatment options for gastric cancer.

  6. Analysis of the Lipidome of Xenografts Using MALDI-IMS and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández, Roberto; Lage, Sergio; Abad-García, Beatriz; Barceló-Coblijn, Gwendolyn; Terés, Silvia; López, Daniel H.; Guardiola-Serrano, Francisca; Martín, M. Laura; Escribá, Pablo V.; Fernández, José A.

    2014-07-01

    Human tumor xenografts in immunodeficient mice are a very popular model to study the development of cancer and to test new drug candidates. Among the parameters analyzed are the variations in the lipid composition, as they are good indicators of changes in the cellular metabolism. Here, we present a study on the distribution of lipids in xenografts of NCI-H1975 human lung cancer cells, using MALDI imaging mass spectrometry and UHPLC-ESI-QTOF. The identification of lipids directly from the tissue by MALDI was aided by the comparison with identification using ESI ionization in lipid extracts from the same xenografts. Lipids belonging to PCs, PIs, SMs, DAG, TAG, PS, PA, and PG classes were identified and their distribution over the xenograft was determined. Three areas were identified in the xenograft, corresponding to cells in different metabolic stages and to a layer of adipose tissue that covers the xenograft.

  7. Development of Patient Derived Xenograft Models of Overt Spontaneous Breast Cancer Metastasis: A Cautionary Note

    PubMed Central

    Paez-Ribes, Marta; Man, Shan; Xu, Ping; Kerbel, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    Several approaches are being evaluated to improve the historically limited value of studying transplanted primary tumors derived by injection of cells from established cell lines for predicting subsequent cancer therapy outcomes in patients and clinical trials. These approaches include use of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs) of spontaneous tumors, or patient tumor tissue derived xenografts (PDXs). Almost all such therapy studies utilizing such models involve treatment of established primary tumors. An alternative approach we have developed involves transplanted human tumor xenografts derived from established cell lines to treat mice with overt visceral metastases after primary tumor resection. The rationale is to mimic the more challenging circumstance of treating patients with late stage metastatic disease. These metastatic models entail prior in vivo selection of heritable, phenotypically stable variants with increased aggressiveness for spontaneous metastasis; they were derived by orthotopic injection of tumor cells followed by primary tumor resection and serial selection of distant spontaneous metastases, from which variant cell lines having a more aggressive heritable metastatic phenotype were established. We attempted to adopt this strategy for breast cancer PDXs. We studied five breast cancer PDXs, with the emphasis on two, called HCI-001 and HCI-002, both derived from triple negative breast cancer patients. However significant technical obstacles were encountered. These include the inherent slow growth rates of PDXs, the rarity of overt spontaneous metastases (detected in only 3 of 144 mice), very high rates of tumor regrowths at the primary tumor resection site, the failure of the few human PDX metastases isolated to manifest a more aggressive metastatic phenotype upon re-transplantation into new hosts, and the formation of metastases which were derived from de novo mouse thymomas arising in aged SCID mice that we used for the experiments. We

  8. Genomic heterogeneity of multiple synchronous lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yu; Zhang, Jianjun; Li, Lin; Yin, Guangliang; Zhang, Jianhua; Zheng, Shan; Cheung, Hannah; Wu, Ning; Lu, Ning; Mao, Xizeng; Yang, Longhai; Zhang, Jiexin; Zhang, Li; Seth, Sahil; Chen, Huang; Song, Xingzhi; Liu, Kan; Xie, Yongqiang; Zhou, Lina; Zhao, Chuanduo; Han, Naijun; Chen, Wenting; Zhang, Susu; Chen, Longyun; Cai, Wenjun; Li, Lin; Shen, Miaozhong; Xu, Ningzhi; Cheng, Shujun; Yang, Huanming; Lee, J. Jack; Correa, Arlene; Fujimoto, Junya; Behrens, Carmen; Chow, Chi-Wan; William, William N.; Heymach, John V.; Hong, Waun Ki; Swisher, Stephen; Wistuba, Ignacio I.; Wang, Jun; Lin, Dongmei; Liu, Xiangyang; Futreal, P. Andrew; Gao, Yanning

    2016-01-01

    Multiple synchronous lung cancers (MSLCs) present a clinical dilemma as to whether individual tumours represent intrapulmonary metastases or independent tumours. In this study we analyse genomic profiles of 15 lung adenocarcinomas and one regional lymph node metastasis from 6 patients with MSLC. All 15 lung tumours demonstrate distinct genomic profiles, suggesting all are independent primary tumours, which are consistent with comprehensive histopathological assessment in 5 of the 6 patients. Lung tumours of the same individuals are no more similar to each other than are lung adenocarcinomas of different patients from TCGA cohort matched for tumour size and smoking status. Several known cancer-associated genes have different mutations in different tumours from the same patients. These findings suggest that in the context of identical constitutional genetic background and environmental exposure, different lung cancers in the same individual may have distinct genomic profiles and can be driven by distinct molecular events. PMID:27767028

  9. Cardiac glycosides display selective efficacy for STK11 mutant lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Nayoung; Yim, Hwa Young; He, Ningning; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Choi, Jin-Sung; Lee, Hye Suk; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Euna; Song, Mee; Jeon, Sang-Min; Kim, Woo-Young; Mills, Gordon B.; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Although STK11 (LKB1) mutation is a major mediator of lung cancer progression, targeted therapy has not been implemented due to STK11 mutations being loss-of-function. Here, we report that targeting the Na+/K+-ATPase (ATP1A1) is synthetic lethal with STK11 mutations in lung cancer. The cardiac glycosides (CGs) digoxin, digitoxin and ouabain, which directly inhibit ATP1A1 function, exhibited selective anticancer effects on STK11 mutant lung cancer cell lines. Restoring STK11 function reduced the efficacy of CGs. Clinically relevant doses of digoxin decreased the growth of STK11 mutant xenografts compared to wild type STK11 xenografts. Increased cellular stress was associated with the STK11-specific efficacy of CGs. Inhibiting ROS production attenuated the efficacy of CGs, and STK11-AMPK signaling was important in overcoming the stress induced by CGs. Taken together, these results show that STK11 mutation is a novel biomarker for responsiveness to CGs. Inhibition of ATP1A1 using CGs warrants exploration as a targeted therapy for STK11 mutant lung cancer. PMID:27431571

  10. Cardiac glycosides display selective efficacy for STK11 mutant lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Nayoung; Yim, Hwa Young; He, Ningning; Lee, Cheol-Jung; Kim, Ju Hyun; Choi, Jin-Sung; Lee, Hye Suk; Kim, Somin; Jeong, Euna; Song, Mee; Jeon, Sang-Min; Kim, Woo-Young; Mills, Gordon B; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yoon, Sukjoon

    2016-01-01

    Although STK11 (LKB1) mutation is a major mediator of lung cancer progression, targeted therapy has not been implemented due to STK11 mutations being loss-of-function. Here, we report that targeting the Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (ATP1A1) is synthetic lethal with STK11 mutations in lung cancer. The cardiac glycosides (CGs) digoxin, digitoxin and ouabain, which directly inhibit ATP1A1 function, exhibited selective anticancer effects on STK11 mutant lung cancer cell lines. Restoring STK11 function reduced the efficacy of CGs. Clinically relevant doses of digoxin decreased the growth of STK11 mutant xenografts compared to wild type STK11 xenografts. Increased cellular stress was associated with the STK11-specific efficacy of CGs. Inhibiting ROS production attenuated the efficacy of CGs, and STK11-AMPK signaling was important in overcoming the stress induced by CGs. Taken together, these results show that STK11 mutation is a novel biomarker for responsiveness to CGs. Inhibition of ATP1A1 using CGs warrants exploration as a targeted therapy for STK11 mutant lung cancer. PMID:27431571

  11. Dynamics of genomic clones in breast cancer patient xenografts at single cell resolution

    PubMed Central

    Eirew, Peter; Steif, Adi; Khattra, Jaswinder; Ha, Gavin; Yap, Damian; Farahani, Hossein; Gelmon, Karen; Chia, Stephen; Mar, Colin; Wan, Adrian; Laks, Emma; Biele, Justina; Shumansky, Karey; Rosner, Jamie; McPherson, Andrew; Nielsen, Cydney; Roth, Andrew J. L.; Lefebvre, Calvin; Bashashati, Ali; de Souza, Camila; Siu, Celia; Aniba, Radhouane; Brimhall, Jazmine; Oloumi, Arusha; Osako, Tomo; Bruna, Alejandra; Sandoval, Jose; Algara, Teresa; Greenwood, Wendy; Leung, Kaston; Cheng, Hongwei; Xue, Hui; Wang, Yuzhuo; Lin, Dong; Mungall, Andrew J.; Moore, Richard; Zhao, Yongjun; Lorette, Julie; Nguyen, Long; Huntsman, David; Eaves, Connie J.; Hansen, Carl; Marra, Marco A.; Caldas, Carlos; Shah, Sohrab P.; Aparicio, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Human cancers, including breast cancers, are comprised of clones differing in mutation content. Clones evolve dynamically in space and time following principles of Darwinian evolution1,2, underpinning important emergent features such as drug resistance and metastasis3–7. Human breast cancer xenoengraftment is used as a means of capturing and studying tumour biology, and breast tumour xenografts are generally assumed to be reasonable models of the originating tumours8–10. However the consequences and reproducibility of engraftment and propagation on the genomic clonal architecture of tumours has not been systematically examined at single cell resolution. Here we show by both deep genome and single cell sequencing methods, the clonal dynamics of initial engraftment and subsequent serial propagation of primary and metastatic human breast cancers in immunodeficient mice. In all 15 cases examined, clonal selection on engraftment was observed in both primary and metastatic breast tumours, varying in degree from extreme selective engraftment of minor (<5% of starting population) clones to moderate, polyclonal engraftment. Furthermore, ongoing clonal dynamics during serial passaging is a feature of tumours experiencing modest initial selection. Through single cell sequencing, we show that major mutation clusters estimated from tumour population sequencing relate predictably to the most abundant clonal genotypes, even in clonally complex and rapidly evolving cases. Finally, we show that similar clonal expansion patterns can emerge in independent grafts of the same starting tumour population, indicating that genomic aberrations can be reproducible determinants of evolutionary trajectories. Our results show that measurement of genomically defined clonal population dynamics will be highly informative for functional studies utilizing patient-derived breast cancer xenoengraftment. PMID:25470049

  12. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  13. Effect of melatonin on tumor growth and angiogenesis in xenograft model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Jardim-Perassi, Bruna Victorasso; Arbab, Ali S; Ferreira, Lívia Carvalho; Borin, Thaiz Ferraz; Varma, Nadimpalli R S; Iskander, A S M; Shankar, Adarsh; Ali, Meser M; de Campos Zuccari, Debora Aparecida Pires

    2014-01-01

    As neovascularization is essential for tumor growth and metastasis, controlling angiogenesis is a promising tactic in limiting cancer progression. Melatonin has been studied for their inhibitory properties on angiogenesis in cancer. We performed an in vivo study to evaluate the effects of melatonin treatment on angiogenesis in breast cancer. Cell viability was measured by MTT assay after melatonin treatment in triple-negative breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231). After, cells were implanted in athymic nude mice and treated with melatonin or vehicle daily, administered intraperitoneally 1 hour before turning the room light off. Volume of the tumors was measured weekly with a digital caliper and at the end of treatments animals underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with Technetium-99m tagged vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) C to detect in vivo angiogenesis. In addition, expression of pro-angiogenic/growth factors in the tumor extracts was evaluated by membrane antibody array and collected tumor tissues were analyzed with histochemical staining. Melatonin in vitro treatment (1 mM) decreased cell viability (p<0.05). The breast cancer xenografts nude mice treated with melatonin showed reduced tumor size and cell proliferation (Ki-67) compared to control animals after 21 days of treatment (p<0.05). Expression of VEGF receptor 2 decreased significantly in the treated animals compared to that of control when determined by immunohistochemistry (p<0.05) but the changes were not significant on SPECT (p>0.05) images. In addition, there was a decrease of micro-vessel density (Von Willebrand Factor) in melatonin treated mice (p<0.05). However, semiquantitative densitometry analysis of membrane array indicated increased expression of epidermal growth factor receptor and insulin-like growth factor 1 in treated tumors compared to vehicle treated tumors (p<0.05). In conclusion, melatonin treatment showed effectiveness in reducing tumor growth and cell

  14. Patient-derived xenograft models to improve targeted therapy in epithelial ovarian cancer treatment.

    PubMed

    Scott, Clare L; Becker, Marc A; Haluska, Paul; Samimi, Goli

    2013-12-04

    Despite increasing evidence that precision therapy targeted to the molecular drivers of a cancer has the potential to improve clinical outcomes, high-grade epithelial ovarian cancer (OC) patients are currently treated without consideration of molecular phenotype, and predictive biomarkers that could better inform treatment remain unknown. Delivery of precision therapy requires improved integration of laboratory-based models and cutting-edge clinical research, with pre-clinical models predicting patient subsets that will benefit from a particular targeted therapeutic. Patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are renewable tumor models engrafted in mice, generated from fresh human tumors without prior in vitro exposure. PDX models allow an invaluable assessment of tumor evolution and adaptive response to therapy. PDX models have been applied to pre-clinical drug testing and biomarker identification in a number of cancers including ovarian, pancreatic, breast, and prostate cancers. These models have been shown to be biologically stable and accurately reflect the patient tumor with regards to histopathology, gene expression, genetic mutations, and therapeutic response. However, pre-clinical analyses of molecularly annotated PDX models derived from high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) remain limited. In vivo response to conventional and/or targeted therapeutics has only been described for very small numbers of individual HG-SOC PDX in conjunction with sparse molecular annotation and patient outcome data. Recently, two consecutive panels of epithelial OC PDX correlate in vivo platinum response with molecular aberrations and source patient clinical outcomes. These studies underpin the value of PDX models to better direct chemotherapy and predict response to targeted therapy. Tumor heterogeneity, before and following treatment, as well as the importance of multiple molecular aberrations per individual tumor underscore some of the important issues addressed in PDX models.

  15. Efficacy and Hemotoxicity of Stealth Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Nanovectors on Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gautier, J; Allard-Vannier, E; Burlaud-Gaillard, J; Domenech, J; Chourpa, I

    2015-01-01

    In the field of oncology, research is now focused on the development of theranostic nanosystems that combine the functions of drug delivery and imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. In this context, we designed polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX), an antineoplastic agent. These DOX-loaded PEGylated SPIONs, or DLPS, should be useful for the delivery of DOX in vivo, as well as for magnetic drug targeting (MDT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential applications of DLPS in vivo as drug carrier systems for the reduction of xenograft breast tumors induced in nude mice. Prior to the animal model experiments, the main internalization pathways for the nanovectors in MDA-MB435 breast cancer cells were determined to be based on caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The time- and quantity-dependence of the nanoparticle uptake by the cells altered the in vitro cytotoxicity of the DLPS. The in vitro antiproliferative effect of the DLPS was dependent not only on DOX concentration, but also on the efficacy of nanoparticle internalization. Evaluation of the effect of DLPS treatment on xenograft tumors in nude mice showed that DLPS limited tumor growth in a manner comparable to that of free DOX under normal conditions of tumor growth. The application of an external magnetic field on tumors, i.e., MDT, did not improve the efficacy of the DLPS treatment. Nevertheless, the vectorization of DOX with DLPS appears to limit the hematologic side effects usually associated with DOX treatment.

  16. Efficacy and Hemotoxicity of Stealth Doxorubicin-Loaded Magnetic Nanovectors on Breast Cancer Xenografts.

    PubMed

    Gautier, J; Allard-Vannier, E; Burlaud-Gaillard, J; Domenech, J; Chourpa, I

    2015-01-01

    In the field of oncology, research is now focused on the development of theranostic nanosystems that combine the functions of drug delivery and imaging for diagnosis/monitoring. In this context, we designed polyethylene glycol (PEG)ylated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) for the delivery of doxorubicin (DOX), an antineoplastic agent. These DOX-loaded PEGylated SPIONs, or DLPS, should be useful for the delivery of DOX in vivo, as well as for magnetic drug targeting (MDT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The aim of this study was to evaluate the potential applications of DLPS in vivo as drug carrier systems for the reduction of xenograft breast tumors induced in nude mice. Prior to the animal model experiments, the main internalization pathways for the nanovectors in MDA-MB435 breast cancer cells were determined to be based on caveolae- and clathrin-mediated endocytosis. The time- and quantity-dependence of the nanoparticle uptake by the cells altered the in vitro cytotoxicity of the DLPS. The in vitro antiproliferative effect of the DLPS was dependent not only on DOX concentration, but also on the efficacy of nanoparticle internalization. Evaluation of the effect of DLPS treatment on xenograft tumors in nude mice showed that DLPS limited tumor growth in a manner comparable to that of free DOX under normal conditions of tumor growth. The application of an external magnetic field on tumors, i.e., MDT, did not improve the efficacy of the DLPS treatment. Nevertheless, the vectorization of DOX with DLPS appears to limit the hematologic side effects usually associated with DOX treatment. PMID:26301312

  17. Different fatty acid metabolism effects of (−)-Epigallocatechin-3-Gallate and C75 in Adenocarcinoma lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Fatty acid synthase (FASN) is overexpressed and hyperactivated in several human carcinomas, including lung cancer. We characterize and compare the anti-cancer effects of the FASN inhibitors C75 and (−)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) in a lung cancer model. Methods We evaluated in vitro the effects of C75 and EGCG on fatty acid metabolism (FASN and CPT enzymes), cellular proliferation, apoptosis and cell signaling (EGFR, ERK1/2, AKT and mTOR) in human A549 lung carcinoma cells. In vivo, we evaluated their anti-tumour activity and their effect on body weight in a mice model of human adenocarcinoma xenograft. Results C75 and EGCG had comparable effects in blocking FASN activity (96,9% and 89,3% of inhibition, respectively). In contrast, EGCG had either no significant effect in CPT activity, the rate-limiting enzyme of fatty acid β-oxidation, while C75 stimulated CPT up to 130%. Treating lung cancer cells with EGCG or C75 induced apoptosis and affected EGFR-signaling. While EGCG abolished p-EGFR, p-AKT, p-ERK1/2 and p-mTOR, C75 was less active in decreasing the levels of EGFR and p-AKT. In vivo, EGCG and C75 blocked the growth of lung cancer xenografts but C75 treatment, not EGCG, caused a marked animal weight loss. Conclusions In lung cancer, inhibition of FASN using EGCG can be achieved without parallel stimulation of fatty acid oxidation and this effect is related mainly to EGFR signaling pathway. EGCG reduce the growth of adenocarcinoma human lung cancer xenografts without inducing body weight loss. Taken together, EGCG may be a candidate for future pre-clinical development. PMID:22769244

  18. Residential Radon Appears to Prevent Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Bobby R.

    2011-01-01

    Residential radon has been found to be associated with lung cancer in epidemiological/ecological studies and the researchers have inappropriately concluded that residential radon causes lung cancer. Their conclusion relates to the linear-no-threshold (LNT) hypothesis-based, risk-assessment paradigm; however, the LNT hypothesis has been invalidated in numerous studies. It is shown in this paper that our hormetic relative risk (HRR) model is consistent with lung cancer data where detailed measurements of radon in each home were carried out. Based on the HRR model, low-level radon radioactive progeny is credited for activated natural protection (ANP) against lung cancer including smoking-related lung cancer. The proportion B(x) (benefit function) of ANP beneficiaries increases as the average radon level x increases to near the Environmental Protection Agency’s action level of 4 picocuries/L (approximately 150 Bq m−3). As the average level of radon increases to somewhat above the action level, ANP beneficiaries progressively decrease to zero (B(x) decreases to 0), facilitating the occurrence of smoking-related lung cancers as well as those related to other less important risk factors. Thus, residential radon does not appear to cause lung cancer but rather to protect, in an exposure-level-dependent manner, from its induction by other agents (e.g., cigarette-smoke-related carcinogens). PMID:22461755

  19. 15-Hydroxyprostaglandin Dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) and Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tai, Hsin-Hsiung; Tong, Min; Ding, Yunfei

    2007-01-01

    15-Hydroxyprostaglandin dehydrogenase (15-PGDH) catalyzes NAD+-linked oxidation of 15 (S)-hydroxyl group of prostaglandins and lipoxins and is the key enzyme responsible for the biological inactivation of these eicosanoids. The enzyme was found to be under-expressed as opposed to cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) being over-expressed in lung and other tumors. A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells were used as a model system to study the role of 15-PGDH in lung tumorigenesis. Up-regulation of COX-2 expression by pro-inflammatory cytokines in A549 cells was accompanied by a down-regulation of 15-PGDH expression. Over-expression of COX-2 but not COX-1 by adenoviral-mediated approach also attenuated 15-PGDH expression. Similarly, over-expression of 15-PGDH by the same strategy inhibited IL-1β-induced COX-2 expression. It appears that the expression of COX-2 and 15-PGDH is regulated reciprocally. Adenoviral-mediated transient over-expression of 15-PGDH in A549 cells resulted in apoptosis. Xenograft studies in nude mice also showed tumor suppression with cells transiently over-expressing 15-PGDH. However, cells stably over-expressing 15-PGDH generated tumors faster than those control cells. Examination of different clones of A549 cells stably expressing different levels of 15-PGDH indicated that the levels of 15-PGDH expression correlated positively with those of mesenchymal markers, and negatively with those of epithelial markers. It appears that the stable expression of 15-PGDH induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) which may account for the tumor promotion in xenograft studies. A number of anti-cancer agents, such as transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), glucocorticoids and some histone deacetylase inhibitors were found to induce 15-PGDH expression. These results suggest that tumor suppressive action of these agents may, in part, be related to their ability to induce 15-PGDH expression. PMID:17481556

  20. Maternal lung cancer and testicular cancer risk in the offspring.

    PubMed

    Kaijser, Magnus; Akre, Olof; Cnattingius, Sven; Ekbom, Anders

    2003-07-01

    It has been hypothesized that smoking during pregnancy could increase the offspring's risk for testicular cancer. This hypothesis is indirectly supported by both ecological studies and studies of cancer aggregations within families. However, results from analytical epidemiological studies are not consistent, possibly due to methodological difficulties. To further study the association between smoking during pregnancy and testicular cancer, we did a population-based cohort study on cancer risk among offspring of women diagnosed with lung cancer. Through the use of the Swedish Cancer Register and the Swedish Second-Generation Register, we identified 8,430 women who developed lung cancer between 1958 and 1997 and delivered sons between 1941 and 1979. Cancer cases among the male offspring were then identified through the Swedish Cancer Register. Standardized incidence ratios were computed, using 95% confidence intervals. We identified 12,592 male offspring of mothers with a subsequent diagnosis of lung cancer, and there were 40 cases of testicular cancer (standardized incidence ratio, 1.90; 95% confidence interval, 1.35-2.58). The association was independent of maternal lung cancer subtype, and the risk of testicular cancer increased stepwise with decreasing time interval between birth and maternal lung cancer diagnosis. Our results support the hypothesis that exposure to cigarette smoking in utero increases the risk of testicular cancer.

  1. Lung Cancer:Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Lung Cancer: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatments & Research Past Issues / Winter ... lung cancer are given intravenously or by mouth. Lung Cancer Research The large-scale National Lung Screening ...

  2. Effects of Tetrahydrocurcumin on Tumor Growth and Cellular Signaling in Cervical Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yoysungnoen, Bhornprom; Bhattarakosol, Parvapan; Changtam, Chatchawan; Patumraj, Suthiluk

    2016-01-01

    Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC) is a stable metabolite of curcumin (CUR) in physiological systems. The mechanism underlying the anticancer effect of THC is not completely understood. In the present study, we investigated the effects of THC on tumor growth and cellular signaling in cervical cancer xenografts in nude mice. Cervical cancer cells (CaSki) were subcutaneously injected in nude mice to establish tumors. One month after the injection, mice were orally administered vehicle or 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg of THC daily for 30 consecutive days. Relative tumor volume (RTV) was measured every 3-4 days. COX-2, EGFR, p-ERK1&2, p-AKT, and Ki-67 expressions were measured by immunohistochemistry whereas cell apoptosis was detected by TUNELS method. THC treatments at the doses of 100, 300, and 500 mg/kg statistically retarded the RTV by 70.40%, 76.41%, and 77.93%, respectively. The CaSki + vehicle group also showed significantly increased COX-2, EGFR, p-ERK1&2, and p-AKT; however they were attenuated by all treatments with THC. Ki-67 overexpression and a decreasing of cell apoptosis were found in CaSki + vehicle group, but these findings were reversed after the THC treatments. PMID:26881213

  3. Imaging Tumor Variation in Response to Photodynamic Therapy in Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Models

    SciTech Connect

    Samkoe, Kimberley S.; Chen, Alina; Rizvi, Imran; O'Hara, Julia A.; Hoopes, P. Jack; Pereira, Stephen P.; Hasan, Tayyaba; Pogue, Brian W.

    2010-01-15

    Purpose: A treatment monitoring study investigated the differential effects of orthotopic pancreatic cancer models in response to interstitial photodynamic therapy (PDT), and the validity of using magnetic resonance imaging as a surrogate measure of response was assessed. Methods and Materials: Different orthotopic pancreatic cancer xenograft models (AsPC-1 and Panc-1) were used to represent the range of pathophysiology observed in human beings. Identical dose escalation studies (10, 20, and 40J/cm) using interstitial verteporfin PDT were performed, and magnetic resonance imaging with T2-weighted and T1-weighted contrast were used to monitor the total tumor volume and the vascular perfusion volume, respectively. Results: There was a significant amount of necrosis in the slower-growing Panc-1 tumor using high light dose, although complete necrosis was not observed. Lower doses were required for the same level of tumor kill in the faster-growing AsPC-1 cell line. Conclusions: The tumor growth rate and vascular pattern of the tumor affect the optimal PDT treatment regimen, with faster-growing tumors being relatively easier to treat. This highlights the fact that therapy in human beings shows a heterogeneous range of outcomes, and suggests a need for careful individualized treatment outcomes assessment in clinical work.

  4. TCGA data and patient-derived orthotopic xenografts highlight pancreatic cancer-associated angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Gore, Jesse; Craven, Kelly E.; Wilson, Julie L.; Cote, Gregory A.; Cheng, Monica; Nguyen, Hai V.; Cramer, Harvey M.; Sherman, Stuart; Korc, Murray

    2015-01-01

    Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDACs) overexpress pro-angiogenic factors but are not viewed as vascular. Using data from The Cancer Genome Atlas we demonstrate that a subset of PDACs exhibits a strong pro-angiogenic signature that includes 37 genes, such as HDAC9, that are overexpressed in PDAC arising in KRC mice, which express mutated Kras and lack RB. Moreover, patient-derived orthotopic xenografts can exhibit tumor angiogenesis, whereas conditioned media (CM) from KRC-derived pancreatic cancer cells (PCCs) enhance endothelial cell (EC) growth and migration, and activate canonical TGF-β signaling and STAT3. Inhibition of the type I TGF-β receptor with SB505124 does not alter endothelial activation in vitro, but decreases pro-angiogenic gene expression and suppresses angiogenesis in vivo. Conversely, STAT3 silencing or JAK1–2 inhibition with ruxolitinib blocks CM-enhanced EC proliferation. STAT3 disruption also suppresses endothelial HDAC9 and blocks CM-induced HDAC9 expression, whereas HDAC9 re-expression restores CM-enhanced endothelial proliferation. Moreover, ruxolitinib blocks mitogenic EC/PCC cross-talk, and suppresses endothelial p-STAT3 and HDAC9, and PDAC progression and angiogenesis in vivo, while markedly prolonging survival of KRC mice. Thus, targeting JAK1–2 with ruxolitinib blocks a final pathway that is common to multiple pro-angiogenic factors, suppresses EC-mediated PCC proliferation, and may be useful in PDACs with a strong pro-angiogenic signature. PMID:25762644

  5. Evaluating patient-derived colorectal cancer xenografts as preclinical models by comparison with patient clinical data.

    PubMed

    Nunes, Manoel; Vrignaud, Patricia; Vacher, Sophie; Richon, Sophie; Lièvre, Astrid; Cacheux, Wulfran; Weiswald, Louis-Bastien; Massonnet, Gerald; Chateau-Joubert, Sophie; Nicolas, André; Dib, Colette; Zhang, Weidong; Watters, James; Bergstrom, Donald; Roman-Roman, Sergio; Bièche, Ivan; Dangles-Marie, Virginie

    2015-04-15

    Development of targeted therapeutics required translationally relevant preclinical models with well-characterized cancer genome alterations. Here, by studying 52 colorectal patient-derived tumor xenografts (PDX), we examined key molecular alterations of the IGF2-PI3K and ERBB-RAS pathways and response to cetuximab. PDX molecular data were compared with that published for patient colorectal tumors in The Cancer Genome Atlas. We demonstrated a significant pattern of mutual exclusivity of genomic abnormalities in the IGF2-PI3K and ERBB-RAS pathways. The genomic anomaly frequencies observed in microsatellite stable PDX reproduce those detected in nonhypermutated patient tumors. We found frequent IGF2 upregulation (16%), which was mutually exclusive with IRS2, PIK3CA, PTEN, and INPP4B alterations, supporting IGF2 as a potential drug target. In addition to maintaining the genomic and histologic diversity, correct preclinical models need to reproduce drug response observed in patients. Responses of PDXs to cetuximab recapitulate also clinical data in patients, with partial or complete response in 15% (8 of 52) of PDXs and response strictly restricted to KRAS wild-type models. The response rate reaches 53% (8 of 15) when KRAS, BRAF, and NRAS mutations are concomitantly excluded, proving a functional cross-validation of predictive biomarkers obtained retrospectively in patients. Collectively, these results show that, because of their clinical relevance, colorectal PDXs are appropriate tools to identify both new targets, like IGF2, and predictive biomarkers of response/resistance to targeted therapies.

  6. The Canadian Lung Cancer Conference 2016

    PubMed Central

    Melosky, B.; Ho, C.

    2016-01-01

    Each February, the Canadian Lung Cancer Conference brings together lung cancer researchers, clinicians, and care professionals who are united in their commitment to improve the care of patients with lung cancer. This year’s meeting, held 11–12 February, featured a resident education session, a welcome dinner, networking sessions, lectures, breakout sessions, debates, and a satellite symposium. Key themes from this year’s meeting included innovations across the care spectrum and results of recent clinical trials with targeted agents, immuno-oncology agents, and novel drug combinations.

  7. Immune checkpoint blockade in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Somasundaram, Aswin; Socinski, Mark A; Villaruz, Liza C

    2016-08-01

    Immunotherapy has revolutionized the therapeutic landscape of advanced lung cancer. The adaptive immune system has developed a sophisticated method of tumor growth control, but T-cell activation is regulated by various checkpoints. Blockade of the immune checkpoints with therapies targeting the PD-1 pathway, such as nivolumab and pembrolizumab, has been validated as a therapeutic approach in non-small cell lung cancer. Newer therapies and novel combinations are also being evaluated, and the use of biomarkers in conjunction with these drugs is an area of active investigation. This review summarizes the current evidence for the efficacy and safety of the above approaches in the treatment of lung cancer. PMID:27585231

  8. Retrospective Analysis of Lung Transplant Recipients Found to Have Unexpected Lung Cancer in Explanted Lungs.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Takahiro; Cypel, Marcelo; de Perrot, Marc; Pierre, Andrew; Waddell, Tom; Singer, Lianne; Roberts, Heidi; Keshavjee, Shaf; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Unexpected lung cancer is sometimes found in explanted lungs. The objective of this study was to review these patients and their outcomes to better understand and optimize management protocols for lung transplant candidates with pulmonary nodules. Retrospective analysis of pretransplant imaging and clinicopathologic characteristics of patients who were found to have lung cancer in their explanted lungs was performed. From January 2003 to December 2012, 13 of 853 lung transplant recipients were found to have unexpected lung cancer in their explanted lung (1.52%). Of them, 9 cases were for interstitial lung disease (2.8%; 9/321 recipients) and 4 cases were for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (1.57%; 4/255 recipients). The median period between computed tomographic scan and lung transplantation was 2.40 months (range: 0.5-19.2). On computed tomographic scan, only 3 cases were shown to possibly have a neoplasm by the radiologist. The staging of these lung cancers was as follows: 3 cases of IA, 1 case of IB, 5 cases of IIA, 1 case of IIIA, and 3 cases of IV. Of 13 cases, 9 died owing to cancer progression. On the contrary, only 1 stage I case with small cell lung cancer showed cancer recurrence. The median survival time was 339 days, and the 3-year survival rate was 11.0%. In conclusion, most of the patients with unexpected lung cancer showed poor prognosis except for the early-stage disease. The establishment of proper protocol for management of such nodules is important to improve the management of candidates who are found to have pulmonary nodules on imaging. PMID:26074103

  9. Exploring a structural protein-drug interactome for new therapeutics in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xiaodong; Wang, Fang; Li, Liwei; Bum-Erdene, Khuchtumur; Xu, David; Wang, Bo; Sinn, Anthony A; Pollok, Karen E; Sandusky, George E; Li, Lang; Turchi, John J; Jalal, Shadia I; Meroueh, Samy O

    2014-03-01

    The pharmacology of drugs is often defined by more than one protein target. This property can be exploited to use approved drugs to uncover new targets and signaling pathways in cancer. Towards enabling a rational approach to uncover new targets, we expand a structural protein-ligand interactome () by scoring the interaction among 1000 FDA-approved drugs docked to 2500 pockets on protein structures of the human genome. This afforded a drug-target network whose properties compared favorably with previous networks constructed using experimental data. Among drugs with the highest degree and betweenness two are cancer drugs and one is currently used for treatment of lung cancer. Comparison of predicted cancer and non-cancer targets reveals that the most cancer-specific compounds were also the most selective compounds. Analysis of compound flexibility, hydrophobicity, and size showed that the most selective compounds were low molecular weight fragment-like heterocycles. We use a previously-developed screening approach using the cancer drug erlotinib as a template to screen other approved drugs that mimic its properties. Among the top 12 ranking candidates, four are cancer drugs, two of them kinase inhibitors (like erlotinib). Cellular studies using non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells revealed that several drugs inhibited lung cancer cell proliferation. We mined patient records at the Regenstrief Medical Record System to explore the possible association of exposure to three of these drugs with occurrence of lung cancer. Preliminary in vivo studies using the non-small cell lung cancer (NCLSC) xenograft model showed that losartan- and astemizole-treated mice had tumors that weighed 50 (p < 0.01) and 15 (p < 0.01) percent less than the treated controls. These results set the stage for further exploration of these drugs and to uncover new drugs for lung cancer therapy. PMID:24402119

  10. Enhanced heme function and mitochondrial respiration promote the progression of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hooda, Jagmohan; Cadinu, Daniela; Alam, Md Maksudul; Shah, Ajit; Cao, Thai M; Sullivan, Laura A; Brekken, Rolf; Zhang, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality, and about 85% of the cases are non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Importantly, recent advance in cancer research suggests that altering cancer cell bioenergetics can provide an effective way to target such advanced cancer cells that have acquired mutations in multiple cellular regulators. This study aims to identify bioenergetic alterations in lung cancer cells by directly measuring and comparing key metabolic activities in a pair of cell lines representing normal and NSCLC cells developed from the same patient. We found that the rates of oxygen consumption and heme biosynthesis were intensified in NSCLC cells. Additionally, the NSCLC cells exhibited substantially increased levels in an array of proteins promoting heme synthesis, uptake and function. These proteins include the rate-limiting heme biosynthetic enzyme ALAS, transporter proteins HRG1 and HCP1 that are involved in heme uptake, and various types of oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins such as cytoglobin and cytochromes. Several types of human tumor xenografts also displayed increased levels of such proteins. Furthermore, we found that lowering heme biosynthesis and uptake, like lowering mitochondrial respiration, effectively reduced oxygen consumption, cancer cell proliferation, migration and colony formation. In contrast, lowering heme degradation does not have an effect on lung cancer cells. These results show that increased heme flux and function are a key feature of NSCLC cells. Further, increased generation and supply of heme and oxygen-utilizing hemoproteins in cancer cells will lead to intensified oxygen consumption and cellular energy production by mitochondrial respiration, which would fuel cancer cell proliferation and progression. The results show that inhibiting heme and respiratory function can effectively arrest the progression of lung cancer cells. Hence, understanding heme function can positively impact on research in lung cancer

  11. Lung and Upper Aerodigestive Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers, as well as new approa | Conducts and supports research on the prevention and early detection of lung and head and neck cancers.

  12. Lung cancer screening guidelines: common ground and differences

    PubMed Central

    Gulati, Swati

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for almost one-third of all cancer related deaths. Lung cancer risk persists even after smoking cessation and so many lung cancers now are diagnosed in former smokers. Five-year survival of lung cancer has marginally improved over decades and significantly lags behind that of colon, breast and prostate cancer. Over the past one decade, lung cancer screening trials have shown promising results. Results from National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST), have shown a significant 20% reduction in mortality with annual low dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening. Based on these results, annual LDCT testing has been recommended for lung cancer screening in high risk population. However, development and acceptance of lung cancer screening as a public health policy is still in the nascent stages. Major concerns relate to risk of radiation, overdiagnosis bias, proportion of false positives and cost benefit analysis. This article reviews the literature pertaining to lung cancer screening guidelines and above mentioned concerns. PMID:25806292

  13. Management of Lung Cancer in the Elderly.

    PubMed

    Rao, Archana; Sharma, Namita; Gajra, Ajeet

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-associated mortality in the USA. The median age at diagnosis of lung cancer is 70 years, and thus, about one-half of patients with lung cancer fall into the elderly subgroup. There is dearth of high level of evidence regarding the management of lung cancer in the elderly in the three broad stages of the disease including early-stage, locally advanced, and metastatic disease. A major reason for the lack of evidence is the underrepresentation of elderly in prospective randomized clinical trials. Due to the typical decline in physical and physiologic function associated with aging, most elderly do not meet the stringent eligibility criteria set forth in age-unselected clinical trials. In addition to performance status, ideally, comorbidity, cognitive, and psychological function, polypharmacy, social support, and patient preferences should be taken into account before applying prevailing treatment paradigms often derived in younger, healthier patients to the care of the elderly patient with lung cancer. The purpose of this chapter was to review the existing evidence of management of early-stage, locally advanced disease, and metastatic lung cancer in the elderly. PMID:27535398

  14. Biodistribution of charged F(ab')2 photoimmunoconjugates in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer.

    PubMed

    Duska, L R; Hamblin, M R; Bamberg, M P; Hasan, T

    1997-01-01

    The effect of charge modification of photoimmunoconjugates (PICs) on their biodistribution in a xenograft model of ovarian cancer was investigated. Chlorin(e6)c(e6) was attached site specifically to the F(ab')2 fragment of the murine monoclonal antibody OC125, directed against human ovarian cancer cells, via poly-1-lysine linkers carrying cationic or anionic charges. Preservation of immunoreactivity was checked by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PICs were radiolabelled with 125I and compared with non-specific rabbit IgG PICs after intraperitoneal (i.p.) injection into nude mice. Samples were taken from normal organs and tumour at 3 h and 24 h. Tumour to normal 125I ratios showed that the cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC had the highest tumour selectivity. Ratios for c(e6) were uniformly higher than for 125I, indicating that c(e6) became separated from 125I. OC125F(ab')2 gave highest tissue values of 125I, followed by cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC; other species were much lower. The amounts of c(e6) delivered per gram of tumour were much higher for cationic OC125F(ab')2 PIC than for other species. The results indicate that cationic charge stimulates the endocytosis and lysosomal degradation of the OC125F(ab')2-pl-c(e6) that has bound to the i.p. tumour. Positively charged PICs may have applications in the i.p. photoimmunotherapy of minimal residual ovarian cancer. PMID:9062404

  15. Differential antitumor activity of aflibercept and bevacizumab in patient-derived xenograft models of colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Chiron, Marielle; Bagley, Rebecca G; Pollard, Jack; Mankoo, Parminder K; Henry, Christophe; Vincent, Loïc; Geslin, Catherine; Baltes, Nina; Bergstrom, Donald A

    2014-06-01

    The recombinant fusion protein aflibercept (ziv-aflibercept in the United States) binds VEGF-A, VEGF-B, and placental growth factor (PlGF). The monoclonal antibody bevacizumab binds VEGF-A. Recent studies hypothesized that dual targeting of VEGF/PlGF is more beneficial than targeting either ligand. We compared activity of aflibercept versus bevacizumab in 48 patient-derived xenograft (PDX) colorectal cancer models. Nude mice engrafted subcutaneously with PDX colorectal cancer tumors received biweekly aflibercept, bevacizumab, or vehicle injections. Differential activity between aflibercept and bevacizumab, determined by mouse (m), human (h), VEGF-A, and PlGF levels in untreated tumors, was measured. Aflibercept induced complete tumor stasis in 31 of 48 models and bevacizumab in 2 of 48. Based on statistical analysis, aflibercept was more active than bevacizumab in 39 of 48 models; in 9 of 39 of these models, bevacizumab was considered inactive. In 9 of 48 remaining models, aflibercept and bevacizumab had similar activity. Tumor levels of hVEGF-A (range 776-56,039 pg/mg total protein) were ∼16- to 1,777-fold greater than mVEGF-A (range 8-159 pg/mg total protein). Tumor levels of mPlGF (range 104-1,837 pg/mg total protein) were higher than hPlGF (range 0-543 pg/mg total protein) in 47 of 48 models. Tumor cells were the major source of VEGF; PlGF was primarily produced by tumor stroma. Because tumor levels of hVEGF-A were far greater than mVEGF-A, bevacizumab's inability to bind mVEGF-A is unlikely to explain higher and more consistent aflibercept activity. Neutralizing PlGF and VEGFR-1 activation may be a factor and should be investigated in future studies. In these colorectal cancer PDX models, aflibercept demonstrated greater antitumor activity than bevacizumab.

  16. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent

    PubMed Central

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M.; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  17. Lung cancer in the Indian subcontinent.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Vanita; Pinninti, Rakesh; Patil, Vijay M; Joshi, Amit; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Smoking tobacco, both cigarettes and beedis, is the principal risk factor for causation of lung cancer in Indian men; however, among Indian women, the association with smoking is not strong, suggesting that there could be other risk factors besides smoking. Despite numerous advances in recent years in terms of diagnostic methods, molecular changes, and therapeutic interventions, the outcomes of the lung cancer patients remain poor; hence, a better understanding of the risk factors may impact the preventive measures to be implemented at the community level. There is a lack of comprehensive data on lung cancer in India. In this review, we attempt to collate the available data on lung cancer from India. PMID:27606290

  18. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression.

  19. Cetuximab intensifies the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells in a nude mouse colorectal cancer xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shanshan; Li, Xuechun; Chen, Rongming; Yin, Mingang; Zheng, Qiuhong

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells, discovered ~40 years ago, are believed to be the most effective cytotoxic lymphocytes to counteract cancer; however, adoptive NK cell therapy in vivo has encountered certain limitations, including a lack of specificity. The drug cetuximab can mediate antibody dependent cell mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity through NK cells in vivo, and has been approved for the first-line treatment of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-positive metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC). However, the ADCC activity of adoptive NK cells, induced by cetuximab in a nude mouse CRC xenograft model, has not been previously reported. The aim of the present study was to explore the ADCC activity of cetuximab combined with adoptive NK cells in CRC xenograft models with various EGFR expressions. The nude mouse xenograft models were established by subcutaneously injecting LOVO or SW620 cells. The mice were then randomly divided into 6 groups: Phosphate-buffered saline, cetuximab, human immunoglobulin G (hIgG), NK cells, hIgG plus NK cells and cetuximab plus NK cells. The ADCC antitumor activity was evaluated in these CRC models. The results indicated that the cetuximab plus NK cells group showed the greatest tumor inhibition effect compared with the NK cells group in LOVO xenograft tumor models with positive EGFR expression. However, the combination of cetuximab and NK cells did not show a stronger tumor inhibitory effect against the SW620 xenograft tumor models compared with the efficiency of NK cells. In conclusion, cetuximab could intensify the ADCC antitumor activity of adoptive NK cells towards CRC with an increased EGFR expression. The combination of cetuximab and NK cells may be a potential immunotherapy for metastatic CRC patients with positive EGFR expression. PMID:27602116

  20. Spheroid culture of LuCaP 136 patient-derived xenograft enables versatile preclinical models of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Valta, Maija P; Zhao, Hongjuan; Saar, Matthias; Tuomela, Johanna; Nolley, Rosalie; Linxweiler, Johannes; Sandholm, Jouko; Lehtimäki, Jaakko; Härkönen, Pirkko; Coleman, Ilsa; Nelson, Peter S; Corey, Eva; Peehl, Donna M

    2016-04-01

    LuCaP serially transplantable patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) are valuable preclinical models of locally advanced or metastatic prostate cancer. Using spheroid culture methodology, we recently established cell lines from several LuCaP PDXs. Here, we characterized in depth the features of xenografts derived from LuCaP 136 spheroid cultures and found faithful retention of the phenotype of the original PDX. In vitro culture enabled luciferase transfection into LuCaP 136 spheroids, facilitating in vivo imaging. We showed that LuCaP 136 spheroids formed intratibial, orthotopic, and subcutaneous tumors when re-introduced into mice. Intratibial tumors responded to castration and were highly osteosclerotic. LuCaP 136 is a realistic in vitro-in vivo preclinical model of a subtype of bone metastatic prostate cancer.

  1. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects.

    PubMed

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  2. Immunotherapy for lung cancer: advances and prospects

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Wang, Liping; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer as well as the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. To date, surgery is the first choice treatment, but most clinically diagnosed cases are inoperable. While chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy are the next considered options for such cases, these treatment modalities have adverse effects and are sometimes lethal to patients. Thus, new effective strategies with minimal side effects are urgently needed. Cancer immunotherapy provides either active or passive immunity to target tumors. Multiple immunotherapy agents have been proposed and tested for potential therapeutic benefit against lung cancer, and some pose fewer side effects as compared to conventional chemotherapy and radiotherapy. In this article, we discuss studies focusing on interactions between lung cancer and the immune system, and we place an emphasis on outcome evidence in order to create a knowledge base well-grounded in clinical reality. Overall, this review highlights the need for new lung cancer treatment options, with much ground to be paved for future advances in the field. We believe that immunotherapy agents alone or with other forms of treatment can be recognized as next modality of lung cancer treatment. PMID:27168951

  3. Tobacco smoke carcinogens and lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hecht, S S

    1999-07-21

    The complexity of tobacco smoke leads to some confusion about the mechanisms by which it causes lung cancer. Among the multiple components of tobacco smoke, 20 carcinogens convincingly cause lung tumors in laboratory animals or humans and are, therefore, likely to be involved in lung cancer induction. Of these, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and the tobacco-specific nitrosamine 4-(methylnitrosamino)-1-(3-pyridyl)-1-butanone are likely to play major roles. This review focuses on carcinogens in tobacco smoke as a means of simplifying and clarifying the relevant information that provides a mechanistic framework linking nicotine addiction with lung cancer through exposure to such compounds. Included is a discussion of the mechanisms by which tobacco smoke carcinogens interact with DNA and cause genetic changes--mechanisms that are reasonably well understood--and the less well defined relationship between exposure to specific tobacco smoke carcinogens and mutations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Molecular epidemiologic studies of gene-carcinogen interactions and lung cancer--an approach that has not yet reached its full potential--are also discussed, as are inhalation studies of tobacco smoke in laboratory animals and the potential role of free radicals and oxidative damage in tobacco-associated carcinogenesis. By focusing in this review on several important carcinogens in tobacco smoke, the complexities in understanding tobacco-induced cancer can be reduced, and new approaches for lung cancer prevention can be envisioned. PMID:10413421

  4. Lung Cancer Screening with Low Dose CT

    PubMed Central

    Caroline, Chiles

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The announcement of the results of the NLST, showing a 20% reduction in lung-cancer specific mortality with LDCT screening in a high risk population, marked a turning point in lung cancer screening. This was the first time that a randomized controlled trial had shown a mortality reduction with an imaging modality aimed at early detection of lung cancer. Current guidelines endorse LDCT screening for smokers and former smokers ages 55 to 74, with at least a 30 pack year smoking history. Adherence to published algorithms for nodule follow-up is strongly encouraged. Future directions for screening research include risk stratification for selection of the screening population, and improvements in the diagnostic follow-up for indeterminate pulmonary nodules. As with screening for other malignancies, screening for lung cancer with LDCT has revealed that there are indolent lung cancers which may not be fatal. More research is necessary if we are to maximize the risk-benefit ratio in lung cancer screening. PMID:24267709

  5. Lung cancer screening: promise and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Berg, Christine D; Aberle, Denise R; Wood, Douglas E

    2012-01-01

    The results of the National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) have provided the medical community and American public with considerable optimism about the potential to reduce lung cancer mortality with imaging-based screening. Designed as a randomized trial, the NLST has provided the first evidence of screening benefit by showing a 20% reduction in lung cancer mortality and a 6.7% reduction in all-cause mortality with low dose helical computed tomography (LDCT) screening relative to chest X-ray. The major harms of LDCT screening include the potential for radiation-induced carcinogenesis; high false-positivity rates in individuals without lung cancer, and overdiagnosis. Following the results of the NLST, the National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) published the first of multiple lung cancer screening guidelines under development by major medical organizations. These recommendations amalgamated screening cohorts, practices, interpretations, and diagnostic follow-up based on the NLST and other published studies to provide guidance for the implementation of LDCT screening. There are major areas of opportunity to optimize implementation. These include standardizing practices in the screening setting, optimizing risk profiles for screening and for managing diagnostic evaluation in individuals with indeterminate nodules, developing interdisciplinary screening programs in conjunction with smoking cessation, and approaching all stakeholders systematically to ensure the broadest education and dissemination of screening benefits relative to risks. The incorporation of validated biomarkers of risk and preclinical lung cancer can substantially enhance the effectiveness screening programs. PMID:24451779

  6. Human Lung Cancer Cells Grown on Acellular Rat Lung Matrix Create Perfusable Tumor Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Dhruva K.; Thrall, Michael J.; Baird, Brandi N.; Ott, Harald C.; Blackmon, Shanda H.; Kurie, Jonathan M.; Kim, Min P.

    2015-01-01

    Background Extracellular matrix allows lung cancer to form its shape and grow. Recent studies on organ reengineering for orthotopic transplantation have provided a new avenue for isolating purified native matrix to use for growing cells. Whether human lung cancer cells grown in a decellularized rat lung matrix would create perfusable human lung cancer nodules was tested. Methods Rat lungs were harvested and native cells were removed using sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton X-100 in a decellularization chamber to create a decellularized rat lung matrix. Human A549, H460, or H1299 lung cancer cells were placed into the decellularized rat lung matrix and grown in a customized bioreactor with perfusion of oxygenated media for 7 to 14 days. Results Decellularized rat lung matrix showed preservation of matrix architecture devoid of all rat cells. All three human lung cancer cell lines grown in the bioreactor developed tumor nodules with intact vasculature. Moreover, the lung cancer cells developed a pattern of growth similar to the original human lung cancer. Conclusions Overall, this study shows that human lung cancer cells form perfusable tumor nodules in a customized bioreactor on a decellularized rat lung matrix created by a customized decellularization chamber. The lung cancer cells grown in the matrix had features similar to the original human lung cancer. This ex vivo model can be used potentially to gain a deeper understanding of the biologic processes involved in human lung cancer. PMID:22385822

  7. Growth of LAPC4 prostate cancer xenograft tumor is insensitive to 5α-reductase inhibitor dutasteride.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Raquel Ramos; Masoodi, Khalid Z; Pascal, Laura E; Nelson, Joel B; Wang, Zhou

    2014-01-01

    Intermittent androgen deprivation therapy (IADT) allows prostate cancer patients a break from the side-effects of continuous androgen deprivation therapy (ADT). Although clinical studies suggest that IADT can significantly improve patient quality of life over ADT, it has not been demonstrated to improve patient survival. Recently, increased survival has been demonstrated when 5α-reductase inhibitors have been used during the off-cycle of IADT in animal xenograft tumor models LNCaP and LuCaP35. In the current study, the sensitivity of LAPC4 xenograft tumor regrowth to the 5ARI dutasteride was determined. Tumor regrowth and gene expression changes in LAPC4 tumors were compared to the previously determined response of LNCaP and LuCaP35 xenograft tumors to 5ARI treatment during the off-cycle of IADT, LAPC4, LNCaP and LuCaP35 tumors were sensitive to androgen manipulation. However, in contrast to LNCaP and LuCaP35, dutasteride treatment during testosterone-stimulated prostate regrowth did not affect tumor regrowth or the expression of androgen responsive genes. Tumor response to dutasteride during the off-cycle of IADT is variable in xenograft prostate tumor models. Future studies will be required to elucidate the mechanisms contributing to the dutasteride resistance observed in the LAPC4 model during the off-cycle. PMID:25374909

  8. Lung cancer screening overdiagnosis: reports of overdiagnosis in screening for lung cancer are grossly exaggerated.

    PubMed

    Mortani Barbosa, Eduardo J

    2015-08-01

    The National Lung Cancer Screening Trial (NLST) demonstrated a mortality reduction benefit associated with low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) screening for lung cancer. There has been considerable debate regarding the benefits and harms of LDCT lung cancer screening, including the challenges related to its practical implementation. One of the controversies regards overdiagnosis, which conceptually denotes diagnosing a cancer that, either because of its indolent, low-aggressiveness biologic behavior or because of limited life expectancy, is unlikely to result in significant morbidity during the patient's remainder lifetime. In theory, diagnosing and treating these cancers offer no measurable benefit while incurring costs and risks. Therefore, if a screening test detects a substantial number of overdiagnosed cancers, it is less likely to be effective. It has been argued that LDCT screening for lung cancer results in an unacceptably high rate of overdiagnosis. This article aims to defend the opposite stance. Overdiagnosis does exist and to a certain extent is inherent to any cancer-screening test. Nonetheless, the concept is less dualistic and more nuanced than it has been suggested. Furthermore, the average estimates of overdiagnosis in LDCT lung cancer screening based on the totality of published data are likely much lower than the highest published estimates, if a careful definition of a positive screening test reflecting our current understanding of lung cancer biology is utilized. This article presents evidence on why reports of overdiagnosis in lung cancer screening have been exaggerated.

  9. Patient-derived bladder cancer xenografts in the preclinical development of novel targeted therapies.

    PubMed

    Jäger, Wolfgang; Xue, Hui; Hayashi, Tetsutaro; Janssen, Claudia; Awrey, Shannon; Wyatt, Alexander W; Anderson, Shawn; Moskalev, Igor; Haegert, Anne; Alshalalfa, Mohammed; Erho, Nicholas; Davicioni, Elai; Fazli, Ladan; Li, Estelle; Collins, Colin; Wang, Yuzhuo; Black, Peter C

    2015-08-28

    Optimal animal models of muscle invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) are necessary to overcome the current lack of novel targeted therapies for this malignancy. Here we report on the establishment and characterization of patient-derived primary xenografts (PDX). Patient tumors were grafted under the renal capsule of mice and subsequently transplanted over multiple generations. Patient tumor and PDX were processed for analysis of copy number variations by aCGH, gene expression by microarray, and expression of target pathways by immunohistochemistry (IHC). One PDX harbouring an FGFR3 mutation was treated with an inhibitory monoclonal antibody targeting FGFR3. Five PDX were successfully established. Tumor doubling time ranged from 5 to 11 days. Array CGH revealed shared chromosomal aberrations in the patient tumors and PDX. Gene expression microarray and IHC confirmed that PDXs maintain similar patterns to the parental tumors. Tumor growth in the PDX with an FGFR3 mutation was inhibited by the FGFR3 inhibitor. PDXs recapitulate the tumor biology of the patients' primary tumors from which they are derived. Investigations related to tumor biology and drug testing in these models are therefore more likely to be relevant to the disease state in patients. They represent a valuable tool for developing precision therapy in MIBC.

  10. Collagen density and alignment in responsive and resistant trastuzumab-treated breast cancer xenografts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Alex J.; Cook, Rebecca S.; Lee, Jae H.; Arteaga, Carlos L.; Skala, Melissa C.

    2015-02-01

    Tumor collagen characteristics influence tumor malignancy, invasion, and metastasis. This study investigates the effects of trastuzumab (Tz) on the collagen of Tz-responsive (BT474) and Tz-resistant (HR6) breast cancer xenografts. Collagen content was assessed by in vivo second harmonic generation (SHG) imaging and histological trichrome staining of tumor sections. Collagen SHG imaging of control BT474 and HR6 tumors demonstrated increased collagen density after 14 days of treatment (p<0.05). Trichrome staining revealed decreased collagen in Tz-treated BT474 and HR6 tumors at 2, 5, and 14 days of treatment, suggesting that Tz affects the tumor microenvironment independent of epithelial cell response. Additionally, collagen alignment analysis revealed significantly less aligned collagen in the Tz-treated BT474 tumors at day 14 compared with control BT474 tumors. There was no correlation between SHG endpoints (collagen density and alignment) and trichrome staining (p>0.05), consistent with the physically distinctive nature of these measurements. There was also no correlation between tumor size and collagen endpoints (p>0.05). These results identify changes within the collagen compartment of the tumor microenvironment following Tz treatment, which are independent from the tumor cell response to Tz, and demonstrate that intravital collagen SHG imaging is capable of measuring dynamic changes in tumor microenvironment following treatment that complements trichrome staining.

  11. Inhibition of erythropoietin signalling destroys xenografts of ovarian and uterine cancers in nude mice

    PubMed Central

    Yasuda, Y; Musha, T; Tanaka, H; Fujita, Y; Fujita, H; Utsumi, H; Matsuo, T; Masuda, S; Nagao, M; Sasaki, R; Nakamura, Y

    2001-01-01

    We have recently shown that malignant tumours from the ovary and uterus expressed erythropoietin (Epo) and its receptor (EpoR), and that deprivation of Epo signal in tumour blocks induced death of malignant cells and capillary endothelial cells in vitro (Yasuda et al, submitted). These in vitro results prompted us to examine the effect of Epo-signal withdrawal on tumours in vivo. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated the expression of mRNAs for Epo and EpoR in the transplants of uterine and ovarian tumours in nude mice. Then we injected locally anti-Epo antibody or soluble form of EpoR into the transplants. At 12 h, 1, 7 or 14 days after the injection, all transplants were resected and examined macro- and microscopically. Tumour size was reduced in Epo signal-deprived transplants. Immunohistochemical examinations revealed destruction of Epo-responding malignant and capillary endothelial cells through apoptotic death. The degree of tumour regression correlated well with the dose and frequency of the injections. Control xenografts with saline injection or needle insertion showed well-developed tumour masses. This Epo response pathway will have profound implications for our understanding of the development and progression of malignant tumours and for the use of Epo-signal deprivation as an effective therapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11259101

  12. Reversing Cancer Multidrug Resistance in Xenograft Models via Orchestrating Multiple Actions of Functional Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Yang, Debin; Wang, Tingfang; Su, Zhigui; Xue, Lingjing; Mo, Ran; Zhang, Can

    2016-08-31

    A multistimuli responsive drug delivery system (DDS) based on sulfhydryl and amino-cofunctionalized mesoporous silica nanoparticles (SH/NH2-MSNs) has been developed, in which the multifunctional hyaluronic acid (HA) derivatives were grafted onto the SH/NH2-MSNs by disulfide bonds for targeting delivery, controlling drug release and reversing multidrug resistance (MDR). The doxorubicin (Dox) loaded multifunctional HA derivatives modified mesoporous silica nanoparticles (Dox/HHS-MSNs) were enzyme and redox sensitive, which could respond to the intracellular stimuli of hyaluronidase (HAase) and glutathione (GSH) successively and prevent drug leakage before reaching the tumor tissues. The cellular uptake experiments showed that Dox/HHS-MSNs were vulnerable to be endocytosed into the Dox-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma (MCF-7/ADR) cells, efficiently realized the endolysosomal escape and remained in the cytoplasm. Because of orchestrating multiple actions above including active targeting, endolysosomal escape and efficient multilevel drug release, Dox/HHS-MSNs could induce the strongest apoptosis and cytotoxicity of MCF-7/ADR cells. Furthermore, a series of in vivo studies on MCF-7/ADR tumor-bearing xenograft mouse models demonstrated that Dox/HHS-MSNs possessed the enhanced tumor-targeting capacity and the best therapeutic efficacy to reverse cancer MDR. PMID:27420116

  13. Development and Characterization of Bladder Cancer Patient-Derived Xenografts for Molecularly Guided Targeted Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Tzu-yin; Davis, Ryan R.; Keck, James; Ghosh, Paramita M.; Gill, Parkash; Airhart, Susan; Bult, Carol; Gandara, David R.; Liu, Edison; de Vere White, Ralph W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The overarching goal of this project is to establish a patient-derived bladder cancer xenograft (PDX) platform, annotated with deep sequencing and patient clinical information, to accelerate the development of new treatment options for bladder cancer patients. Herein, we describe the creation, initial characterization and use of the platform for this purpose. Methods and Findings Twenty-two PDXs with annotated clinical information were established from uncultured unselected clinical bladder cancer specimens in immunodeficient NSG mice. The morphological fidelity was maintained in PDXs. Whole exome sequencing revealed that PDXs and parental patient cancers shared 92–97% of genetic aberrations, including multiple druggable targets. For drug repurposing, an EGFR/HER2 dual inhibitor lapatinib was effective in PDX BL0440 (progression-free survival or PFS of 25.4 days versus 18.4 days in the control, p = 0.007), but not in PDX BL0269 (12 days versus 13 days in the control, p = 0.16) although both expressed HER2. To screen for the most effective MTT, we evaluated three drugs (lapatinib, ponatinib, and BEZ235) matched with aberrations in PDX BL0269; but only a PIK3CA inhibitor BEZ235 was effective (p<0.0001). To study the mechanisms of secondary resistance, a fibroblast growth factor receptor 3 inhibitor BGJ398 prolonged PFS of PDX BL0293 from 9.5 days of the control to 18.5 days (p<0.0001), and serial biopsies revealed that the MAPK/ERK and PIK3CA-AKT pathways were activated upon resistance. Inhibition of these pathways significantly prolonged PFS from 12 day of the control to 22 days (p = 0.001). To screen for effective chemotherapeutic drugs, four of the first six PDXs were sensitive to the cisplatin/gemcitabine combination, and chemoresistance to one drug could be overcome by the other drug. Conclusion The PDX models described here show good correlation with the patient at the genomic level and known patient response to treatment. This supports further

  14. Role of STAT3 in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Dutta, Pranabananda; Sabri, Nafiseh; Li, Jinghong; Li, Willis X

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer remains a challenging disease. It is responsible for the high cancer mortality rates in the US and worldwide. Elucidation of the molecular mechanisms operative in lung cancer is an important first step in developing effective therapies. Accumulating evidence over the last 2 decades suggests a critical role for Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 (STAT3) as a point of convergence for various signaling pathways that are dysregulated in the disease. In this review, we discuss possible molecular mechanisms involving STAT3 in lung tumorigenesis based on recent literature. We consider possible roles of STAT3 in cancer cell proliferation and survival, in the tumor immune environment, and in epigenetic regulation and interaction of STAT3 with other transcription factors. We also discuss the potential role of STAT3 in tumor suppression, which complicates strategies of targeting STAT3 in cancer therapy. PMID:26413424

  15. ING5 inhibits cancer aggressiveness via preventing EMT and is a potential prognostic biomarker for lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Zhang, Xutao; Meng, Jin; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xinli; Liu, Yanxia; Wang, Yukun; Li, Yuhua; Sun, Yang; Wang, Zhipeng; Mei, Qibing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-06-30

    The proteins of the Inhibitor of Growth (ING) candidate tumor suppressor family are involved in multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and chromatin remodeling. ING5 is the new member of the family whose actual role in tumor suppression is not known. Here we show that ING5 overexpression in lung cancer A549 cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasiveness, while ING5 knockdown in lung cancer H1299 cells promoted cell aggressiveness. ING5 overexpression also abrogated tumor growth and invasive abilities of lung cancer cells in mouse xenograft models. Further study showed that ING5 overexpression inhibited EMT indicated by increase of E-cadherin and decrease of N-cadherin, Snail and slug at mRNA and protein levels, which was accompanied with morphological changes. cDNA microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR validation revealed that ING5 significantly downregulated expression of EMT (epithelial to mesenchymal transition)-inducing genes including CEACAM6, BMP2 and CDH11. Clinical study by tissue microarray showed that nuclear ING5 negatively correlated with clinical stages and lymph node metastasis of lung cancer. Furthermore, high level of nuclear ING5 was associated with a better prognosis. Taken together, these findings uncover an important role for ING5 as a potent tumor suppressor in lung cancer growth and metastasis.

  16. ING5 inhibits cancer aggressiveness via preventing EMT and is a potential prognostic biomarker for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong; Liu, Xinli; Liu, Yanxia; Wang, Yukun; Li, Yuhua; Sun, Yang; Wang, Zhipeng; Mei, Qibing; Zhang, Tao

    2015-01-01

    The proteins of the Inhibitor of Growth (ING) candidate tumor suppressor family are involved in multiple cellular functions such as cell cycle regulation, apoptosis, and chromatin remodeling. ING5 is the new member of the family whose actual role in tumor suppression is not known. Here we show that ING5 overexpression in lung cancer A549 cells inhibited cell proliferation and invasiveness, while ING5 knockdown in lung cancer H1299 cells promoted cell aggressiveness. ING5 overexpression also abrogated tumor growth and invasive abilities of lung cancer cells in mouse xenograft models. Further study showed that ING5 overexpression inhibited EMT indicated by increase of E-cadherin and decrease of N-cadherin, Snail and slug at mRNA and protein levels, which was accompanied with morphological changes. cDNA microarray and subsequent qRT-PCR validation revealed that ING5 significantly downregulated expression of EMT (epithelial to mesenchymal transition)-inducing genes including CEACAM6, BMP2 and CDH11. Clinical study by tissue microarray showed that nuclear ING5 negatively correlated with clinical stages and lymph node metastasis of lung cancer. Furthermore, high level of nuclear ING5 was associated with a better prognosis. Taken together, these findings uncover an important role for ING5 as a potent tumor suppressor in lung cancer growth and metastasis. PMID:25938545

  17. Cancer genes in lung cancer: racial disparities: are there any?

    PubMed

    El-Telbany, Ahmed; Ma, Patrick C

    2012-07-01

    Cancer is now known as a disease of genomic alterations. Mutational analysis and genomics profiling in recent years have advanced the field of lung cancer genetics/genomics significantly. It is becoming more accepted now that the identification of genomic alterations in lung cancer can impact therapeutics, especially when the alterations represent "oncogenic drivers" in the processes of tumorigenesis and progression. In this review, we will highlight the key driver oncogenic gene mutations and fusions identified in lung cancer. The review will summarize and report the available demographic and clinicopathological data as well as molecular details behind various lung cancer gene alterations in the context of race. We hope to shed some light into the disparities in the incidence of various genetic mutations among lung cancer patients of different racial backgrounds. As molecularly targeted therapy continues to advance in lung cancer, racial differences in specific genetic/genomic alterations can have an important impact in the choices of therapeutics and in our understanding of the drug sensitivity/resistance profile. The most relevant genes in lung cancer described in this review include the following: EGFR, KRAS, MET, LKB1, BRAF, PIK3CA, ALK, RET, and ROS1. Commonly identified genetic/genomic alterations such as missense or nonsense mutations, small insertions or deletions, alternative splicing, and chromosomal fusion rearrangements were discussed. Relevance in current targeted therapeutic drugs was mentioned when appropriate. We also highlighted various targeted therapeutics that are currently under clinical development, such as the MET inhibitors and antibodies. With the advent of next-generation sequencing, the landscape of genomic alterations in lung cancer is expected to be much transformed and detailed in upcoming years. These genomic landscape differences in the context of racial disparities should be emphasized both in tumorigenesis and in drug sensitivity

  18. Isolation and characterization of renal cancer stem cells from patient-derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Michel, Julien Giron; Chiabotto, Giulia; Lecoz, Vincent; Romei, Cristina; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito; Angevin, Eric; Gad, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Messai, Yosra; Kieda, Claudine; Clay, Denis; Sabatini, Federica; Escudier, Bernard; Camussi, Giovanni; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-01-01

    As rapidly developing patient-derived xenografts (PDX) could represent potential sources of cancer stem cells (CSC), we selected and characterized non-cultured PDX cell suspensions from four different renal carcinomas (RCC). Only the cell suspensions from the serial xenografts (PDX-1 and PDX-2) of an undifferentiated RCC (RCC-41) adapted to the selective CSC medium. The cell suspension derived from the original tumor specimen (RCC-41-P-0) did not adapt to the selective medium and strongly expressed CSC-like markers (CD133 and CD105) together with the non-CSC tumor marker E-cadherin. In comparison, PDX-1 and PDX-2 cells exhibited evolution in their phenotype since PDX-1 cells were CD133high/CD105-/Ecadlow and PDX-2 cells were CD133low/CD105-/Ecad-. Both PDX subsets expressed additional stem cell markers (CD146/CD29/OCT4/NANOG/Nestin) but still contained non-CSC tumor cells. Therefore, using different cell sorting strategies, we characterized 3 different putative CSC subsets (RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+, RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133-/EpCAMlow and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+/EpCAMbright). In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed that RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133− over-expressed the pluripotency gene ERBB4, while RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ over-expressed several tumor suppressor genes. These three CSC subsets displayed ALDH activity, formed serial spheroids and developed serial tumors in SCID mice, although RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ displayed less efficiently the above CSC properties. RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ tumors showed vessels of human origin with CSC displaying peri-vascular distribution. By contrast, RCC-41-PDX-2 originated tumors exhibiting only vessels of mouse origin without CSC peri-vascular distribution. Altogether, our results indicate that PDX murine microenvironment promotes a continuous redesign of CSC phenotype, unmasking CSC subsets potentially present in a single RCC or generating ex novo different CSC-like subsets. PMID:26551931

  19. Isolation and characterization of renal cancer stem cells from patient-derived xenografts.

    PubMed

    Hasmim, Meriem; Bruno, Stefania; Azzi, Sandy; Gallerne, Cindy; Michel, Julien Giron; Chiabotto, Giulia; Lecoz, Vincent; Romei, Cristina; Spaggiari, Grazia Maria; Pezzolo, Annalisa; Pistoia, Vito; Angevin, Eric; Gad, Sophie; Ferlicot, Sophie; Messai, Yosra; Kieda, Claudine; Clay, Denis; Sabatini, Federica; Escudier, Bernard; Camussi, Giovanni; Eid, Pierre; Azzarone, Bruno; Chouaib, Salem

    2016-03-29

    As rapidly developing patient-derived xenografts (PDX) could represent potential sources of cancer stem cells (CSC), we selected and characterized non-cultured PDX cell suspensions from four different renal carcinomas (RCC). Only the cell suspensions from the serial xenografts (PDX-1 and PDX-2) of an undifferentiated RCC (RCC-41) adapted to the selective CSC medium. The cell suspension derived from the original tumor specimen (RCC-41-P-0) did not adapt to the selective medium and strongly expressed CSC-like markers (CD133 and CD105) together with the non-CSC tumor marker E-cadherin. In comparison, PDX-1 and PDX-2 cells exhibited evolution in their phenotype since PDX-1 cells were CD133high/CD105-/Ecadlow and PDX-2 cells were CD133low/CD105-/Ecad-. Both PDX subsets expressed additional stem cell markers (CD146/CD29/OCT4/NANOG/Nestin) but still contained non-CSC tumor cells. Therefore, using different cell sorting strategies, we characterized 3 different putative CSC subsets (RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+, RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133-/EpCAMlow and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+/EpCAMbright). In addition, transcriptomic analysis showed that RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133- over-expressed the pluripotency gene ERBB4, while RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ over-expressed several tumor suppressor genes. These three CSC subsets displayed ALDH activity, formed serial spheroids and developed serial tumors in SCID mice, although RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ and RCC-41-PDX-2/CD133+ displayed less efficiently the above CSC properties. RCC-41-PDX-1/CD132+ tumors showed vessels of human origin with CSC displaying peri-vascular distribution. By contrast, RCC-41-PDX-2 originated tumors exhibiting only vessels of mouse origin without CSC peri-vascular distribution.Altogether, our results indicate that PDX murine microenvironment promotes a continuous redesign of CSC phenotype, unmasking CSC subsets potentially present in a single RCC or generating ex novo different CSC-like subsets.

  20. High-resolution MRI analysis of breast cancer xenograft on the chick chorioallantoic membrane.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Zhi; Syrovets, Tatiana; Genze, Felicitas; Abaei, Alireza; Ma, Genshan; Simmet, Thomas; Rasche, Volker

    2015-04-01

    The chick chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) model has been successfully used to study angiogenesis, cancer progression and its pharmacological treatment, tumor pharmacokinetics, and properties of novel nanomaterials. MRI is an attractive technique for non-invasive and longitudinal monitoring of physiological processes and tumor growth. This study proposes an age-adapted cooling regime for immobilization of the chick embryo, enabling high-resolution MRI of the embryo and the CAM tumor xenograft. 64 chick embryos were enrolled in this study. The novel immobilization and imaging protocol was optimized in 29 embryos. From d7 to d18 immobilization of the embryo up to 90 min was achieved by cooling at 4 °C pre-imaging, with cooling times adapted to age. Its application to tumor growth monitoring was evaluated in 15 embryos after xenotransplantation of human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells on CAM. Tumor volumes were monitored from d4 to d9 after grafting (d11 to d16 after incubation) applying a T2 -weighted multislice RARE sequence. At d9 after grafting, the tumors were collected and compared with the MRI-derived data by histology and weight measurements. Additional imaging methods comprising DWI, T2 mapping, and the bio-distribution of contrast agents were tested at d9 after grafting in 20 further embryos. With the adaptive cooling regime, motion artifacts could be completely avoided for up to 90 min scan time, enabling high-resolution in ovo imaging. Excellent anatomical details could be obtained in the embryo and tumors. Tumor volumes could be quantified over time. The results prove the feasibility of high-resolution MRI for longitudinal tumor and organ growth monitoring. The suggested method is promising for future applications such as testing tailored and/or targeted treatment strategies, longitudinal monitoring of tumor development, analysis of therapeutic efficacies of drugs, or assessment of tumor pharmacokinetics. The method provides an alternative to animal

  1. Monitoring longitudinal changes in irradiated head and neck cancer xenografts using diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishwanath, Karthik; Jiang, Shudong; Gunn, Jason R.; Marra, Kayla; Andreozzi, Jacqueline M.; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-02-01

    Radiation therapy is often used as the preferred clinical treatment for control of localized head and neck cancer. However, during the course of treatment (6-8 weeks), feedback about functional and/or physiological changes within impacted tissue are not obtained, given the onerous financial and/or logistical burdens of scheduling MRI, PET or CT scans. Diffuse optical sensing is well suited to address this problem since the instrumentation can be made low-cost and portable while still being able to non-invasively provide information about vascular oxygenation in vivo. Here we report results from studies that employed an optical fiber-based portable diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) system to longitudinally monitor changes in tumor vasculature within two head and neck cancer cell lines (SCC-15 and FaDu) xenografted in the flanks of nude mice, in two separate experiments. Once the tumor volumes were 100mm3, 67% of animals received localized (electron beam) radiation therapy in five fractions (8Gy/day, for 5 days) while 33% of the animals served as controls. DRS measurements were obtained from each animal on each day of treatment and then for two weeks post-treatment. Reflectance spectra were parametrized to extract total hemoglobin concentration and blood oxygen-saturation and the resulting time-trends of optical parameters appear to be dissimilar for the two cell-lines. These findings are also compared to previous animal experiments (using the FaDu line) that were irradiated using a photon beam radiotherapy protocol. These results and implications for the use of fiber-based DRS measurements made at local (irradiated) tumor site as a basis for identifying early radiotherapy-response are presented and discussed.

  2. Hwanggeumchal sorghum Induces Cell Cycle Arrest, and Suppresses Tumor Growth and Metastasis through Jak2/STAT Pathways in Breast Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Eun Joung; Joung, Youn Hee; Hong, Dae Young; Park, Eui U.; Park, Seung Hwa; Choi, Soo Keun; Moon, Eon-Soo; Cho, Byung Wook; Park, Kyung Do; Lee, Hak Kyo; Kim, Myong-Jo; Park, Dong-Sik; Yang, Young Mok

    2012-01-01

    Background Cancer is one of the highly virulent diseases known to humankind with a high mortality rate. Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women worldwide. Sorghum is a principal cereal food in many parts of the world, and is critical in folk medicine of Asia and Africa. In the present study, we analyzed the effects of HSE in metastatic breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings Preliminary studies conducted on MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 xenograft models showed tumor growth suppression by HSE. Western blotting studies conducted both in vivo and in vitro to check the effect of HSE in Jak/STAT pathways. Anti-metastatic effects of HSE were confirmed using both MDA-MB 231 and MCF-7 metastatic animal models. These studies showed that HSE can modulate Jak/STAT pathways, and it hindered the STAT5b/IGF-1R and STAT3/VEGF pathways not only by down-regulating the expression of these signal molecules and but also by preventing their phosphorylation. The expression of angiogenic factors like VEGF, VEGF-R2 and cell cycle regulators like cyclin D, cyclin E, and pRb were found down-regulated by HSE. In addition, it also targets Brk, p53, and HIF-1α for anti-cancer effects. HSE induced G1 phase arrest and migration inhibition in MDA-MB 231 cells. The metastasis of breast cancer to the lungs also found blocked by HSE in the metastatic animal model. Conclusions/Significance Usage of HS as a dietary supplement is an inexpensive natural cancer therapy, without any side effects. We strongly recommend the use of HS as an edible therapeutic agent as it possesses tumor suppression, migration inhibition, and anti-metastatic effects on breast cancer. PMID:22792362

  3. Sirolimus and Auranofin in Treating Patients With Advanced or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer or Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-25

    Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Activin type IB receptor signaling in prostate cancer cells promotes lymph node metastasis in a xenograft model

    SciTech Connect

    Nomura, Masatoshi; Tanaka, Kimitaka; Wang, Lixiang; Goto, Yutaka; Mukasa, Chizu; Ashida, Kenji; Takayanagi, Ryoichi

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling induces Snail and S100A4 expressions in prostate cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The prostate cancer cell lines expressing an active form of ActRIB were established. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ActRIB signaling promotes EMT and lymph node metastasis in xenograft model. -- Abstract: Activin, a member of the transforming growth factor-{beta} family, has been known to be a growth and differentiating factor. Despite its pluripotent effects, the roles of activin signaling in prostate cancer pathogenesis are still unclear. In this study, we established several cell lines that express a constitutive active form of activin type IB receptor (ActRIBCA) in human prostate cancer cells, ALVA41 (ALVA-ActRIBCA). There was no apparent change in the proliferation of ALVA-ActRIBCA cells in vitro; however, their migratory ability was significantly enhanced. In a xenograft model, histological analysis revealed that the expression of Snail, a cell-adhesion-suppressing transcription factor, was dramatically increased in ALVA-ActRIBCA tumors, indicating epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT). Finally, mice bearing ALVA-ActRIBCA cells developed multiple lymph node metastases. In this study, we demonstrated that ActRIBCA signaling can promote cell migration in prostate cancer cells via a network of signaling molecules that work together to trigger the process of EMT, and thereby aid in the aggressiveness and progression of prostate cancers.

  5. CD43 in the nucleus and cytoplasm of lung cancer is a potential therapeutic target.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiangwei; Cash, Steven E; Andersen, Jeremiah J; Kennedy, Colin R; Oldenburg, Darby G; Zander, Valerie B; Foley, Greta R; Simon Shelley, Carl

    2013-04-15

    CD43 is a transmembrane sialoglycoprotein. Normally the molecule is only produced by white blood cells where it regulates functions such as intercellular adhesion, intracellular signaling, apoptosis, migration and proliferation. Two CD43 antibodies were used to interrogate 66 cases of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and 24 cases of small cell lung cancer (SCLC). In addition, we engineered the CD43-positive lung cancer cell line A549 to stably express either non-targeted or CD43-targeted small-interfering RNA (siRNA). These lines were then subjected to in vitro assays of apoptosis, natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity, intercellular adhesion and transendothelial migration. A xenograft mouse model evaluated the ability of the lines to grow primary tumors in vivo. CD43 was found to be expressed in the majority of both SCLC and NSCLC. Inclusive of CD43-negative tumors, differential patterns of nuclear and cytoplasmic expression of CD43 define four molecular subcategories of lung cancer. Targeting CD43 in A549 lung cancer cells, increased homotypic adhesion, decreased heterotypic adhesion and transendothelial migration, increased susceptibility to apoptosis and increased vulnerability to lysis by NK cells. Furthermore, targeting inhibited the growth of primary tumors in nude mice.

  6. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  7. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kanaji, Nobuhiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kita, Nobuyuki; Bandoh, Shuji; Tadokoro, Akira; Ishii, Tomoya; Dobashi, Hiroaki; Matsunaga, Takuya

    2014-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes are signs or symptoms that occur as a result of organ or tissue damage at locations remote from the site of the primary tumor or metastases. Paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer can impair various organ functions and include neurologic, endocrine, dermatologic, rheumatologic, hematologic, and ophthalmological syndromes, as well as glomerulopathy and coagulopathy (Trousseau’s syndrome). The histological type of lung cancer is generally dependent on the associated syndrome, the two most common of which are humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy in squamous cell carcinoma and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion in small cell lung cancer. The symptoms often precede the diagnosis of the associated lung cancer, especially when the symptoms are neurologic or dermatologic. The proposed mechanisms of paraneoplastic processes include the aberrant release of humoral mediators, such as hormones and hormone-like peptides, cytokines, and antibodies. Treating the underlying cancer is generally the most effective therapy for paraneoplastic syndromes, and treatment soon after symptom onset appears to offer the best potential for symptom improvement. In this article, we review the diagnosis, potential mechanisms, and treatments of a wide variety of paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung cancer. PMID:25114839

  8. Ultrasound-mediated destruction of paclitaxel and oxygen loaded lipid microbubbles for combination therapy in ovarian cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Chang, Shufang; Sun, Jiangchuan; Zhu, Shenyin; Yin, Minyue; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X

    2015-05-28

    We have synthesized multifunctional oxygen and paclitaxel loaded microbubbles (OPLMBs) for ultrasound mediated delivery of combination therapy in an ovarian cancer xenograft model. In comparison with other therapeutic options, intravenous injection of OPLMBs followed by ultrasound mediation yielded a superior therapeutic outcome. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and the reduced VEGF expression after treatment. Western Blot tests further confirmed the decreased expressions of HIF-1α and P-gp. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediation of OPLMBs may provide a promising drug delivery strategy for the combination treatment of ovarian cancer.

  9. Lung cancer screening: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Veronesi, Giulia

    2015-05-01

    European studies have contributed significantly to the understanding of lung cancer screening. Smoking within screening, quality of life, nodule management, minimally invasive treatments, cancer prevention programs, and risk models have been extensively investigated by European groups. Mortality data from European screening studies have not been encouraging so far, but long-term results of the NELSON study are eagerly awaited. Investigations on molecular markers of lung cancer are ongoing in Europe; preliminary results suggest they may become an important screening tool in the future.

  10. Molecular understanding of lung cancers-A review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Chinnappan Ravinder; Kathiresan, Kandasamy

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is considered to be the most common cancer in the world. The purpose of this paper is to review scientific evidence, particularly epidemiologic evidence of overall lung cancer burden in the world. And molecular understanding of lung cancer at various levels by dominant and suppressor oncogenes. PMID:25183110

  11. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  12. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  13. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  14. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  15. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  16. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  17. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  18. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  19. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  20. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  1. 28 CFR 79.54 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.54... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  2. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  3. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  4. 28 CFR 79.64 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.64... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... claimant. A conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by...

  5. 28 CFR 79.45 - Proof of primary lung cancer.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Proof of primary lung cancer. 79.45... cancer. (a) In determining whether a claimant developed primary lung cancer following pertinent... conclusion that a claimant developed primary lung cancer must be supported by medical documentation. To...

  6. The noncoding RNA MALAT1 is a critical regulator of the metastasis phenotype of lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gutschner, Tony; Hämmerle, Monika; Eissmann, Moritz; Hsu, Jeff; Kim, Youngsoo; Hung, Gene; Revenko, Alexey; Arun, Gayatri; Stentrup, Marion; Gross, Matthias; Zörnig, Martin; MacLeod, A Robert; Spector, David L; Diederichs, Sven

    2013-02-01

    The long noncoding RNA MALAT1 (metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1), also known as MALAT-1 or NEAT2 (nuclear-enriched abundant transcript 2), is a highly conserved nuclear noncoding RNA (ncRNA) and a predictive marker for metastasis development in lung cancer. To uncover its functional importance, we developed a MALAT1 knockout model in human lung tumor cells by genomically integrating RNA destabilizing elements using zinc finger nucleases. The achieved 1,000-fold MALAT1 silencing provides a unique loss-of-function model. Proposed mechanisms of action include regulation of splicing or gene expression. In lung cancer, MALAT1 does not alter alternative splicing but actively regulates gene expression including a set of metastasis-associated genes. Consequently, MALAT1-deficient cells are impaired in migration and form fewer tumor nodules in a mouse xenograft. Antisense oligonucleotides (ASO) blocking MALAT1 prevent metastasis formation after tumor implantation. Thus, targeting MALAT1 with ASOs provides a potential therapeutic approach to prevent lung cancer metastasis with this ncRNA serving as both predictive marker and therapeutic target. Finally, regulating gene expression, but not alternative splicing, is the critical function of MALAT1 in lung cancer metastasis. In summary, 10 years after the discovery of the lncRNA MALAT1 as a biomarker for lung cancer metastasis, our loss-of-function model unravels the active function of MALAT1 as a regulator of gene expression governing hallmarks of lung cancer metastasis.

  7. Pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound therapy enhances targeted delivery of cetuximab to colon cancer xenograft model in mice.

    PubMed

    Park, Min Jung; Kim, Young-Sun; Yang, Jehoon; Sun, Woo Chul; Park, Hajan; Chae, Sun Young; Namgung, Mi-Sun; Choi, Kyu-Sil

    2013-02-01

    Our aim was to evaluate whether pulsed high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy enhances the effect of an epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted chemotherapeutic drug, cetuximab, in treating human colon cancer xenografts in a mouse model. Balb/c nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of HT-29 cells were randomly categorized into control (n = 9), pulsed HIFU alone (n = 10), cetuximab monotherapy (n = 8) or combined pulsed HIFU and cetuximab therapy (n = 9) group. Cetuximab, pulsed HIFU therapy, or both were administered three times per week starting from day 8 after tumor cell injection. Based on tumor growth curves up to 34 days, the combination therapy group showed more suppressed tumor growth than all other groups (p < 0.05). The final relative tumor volumes were 5.4 ± 2.1, 5.2 ± 1.3, 4.8 ± 1.8, and 3.1 ± 0.9 for control, pulsed HIFU alone, cetuximab monotherapy, and combination therapy groups, respectively. In conclusion, pulsed HIFU therapy appears to enhance the anti-tumor effect of epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted cetuximab on human colon cancer xenograft models in mice. PMID:23219035

  8. Antitumor effect of Deoxypodophyllotoxin on human breast cancer xenograft transplanted in BALB/c nude mice model.

    PubMed

    Khaled, Meyada; Belaaloui, Ghania; Jiang, Zhen-Zhou; Zhu, Xiong; Zhang, Lu-Yong

    2016-10-01

    Recently, biologically active compounds isolated from plants used in herbal medicine have been the center of interest. Deoxypodophyllotoxin (DPT), structurally closely related to the lignan podophyllotoxin, was found to be a potent antitumor and antiproliferative agent, in several tumor cells, in vitro. However, DPT has not been used clinically yet because of the lack of in vivo studies. This study is the first report demonstrating the antitumor effect of DPT on MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer xenografts in nude mice. DPT, significantly, inhibited the growth of MDA-MB-231 xenograft in BALB/c nude mice. The T/C value (the value of the relative tumor volume of treatment group compared to the control group) of groups treated with 5, 10, and 20 mg/kg of intravenous DPT-HP-β-CD was 42.87%, 34.04% and 9.63%, respectively, suggesting the positive antitumor activity of DPT. In addition, the antitumor effect of DPT-HP-β-CD (20 mg/kg) in human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 xenograft was more effective than etoposide (VP-16) (20 mg/kg) and docetaxel (20 mg/kg). These findings suggest that this drug is a promising chemotherapy candidate against human breast carcinoma. PMID:27578026

  9. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-26

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. A Walnut-Enriched Diet Reduces the Growth of LNCaP Human Prostate Cancer Xenografts in Nude Mice

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Dun-Xian; Manchester, Lucien C.; Korkmaz, Ahmet; Fuentes-Broto, Lorena; Hardman, W. Elaine; Rosales-Corral, Sergio A.; Qi, Wenbo

    2013-01-01

    It was investigated whether a standard mouse diet (AIN-76A) supplemented with walnuts reduced the establishment and growth of LNCaP human prostate cancer cells in nude (nu/nu) mice. The walnut-enriched diet reduced the number of tumors and the growth of the LNCaP xenografts; 3 of 16 (18.7%) of the walnut-fed mice developed tumors; conversely, 14 of 32 mice (44.0%) of the control diet-fed animals developed tumors. Similarly, the xenografts in the walnut-fed animals grew more slowly than those in the control diet mice. The final average tumor size in the walnut-diet animals was roughly one-fourth the average size of the prostate tumors in the mice that ate the control diet. PMID:23758186

  11. Intermediate endpoint biomarkers for lung cancer chemoprevention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacAulay, Calum E.; Lam, Stephen; Klein-Parker, Helga; Gazdar, Adi; Guillaud, Martial; Payne, Peter W.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Dawe, Chris; Band, Pierre; Palcic, Branko

    1998-04-01

    Given the demographics of current and ex-smoking populations in North America, lung cancer will be a major problem in the foreseeable future. Early detection and treatment of lung cancer holds great promise for the management of this disease. Unlike cervical cancer, the physical, complete removal/destruction of all dysplastic lesions in the bronchial tree is not possible; however, treatment of the lesions using a chemopreventive agent is. Intermediate biomarkers have been used to screen promising chemopreventive agents for larger population studies. We have examined the natural history of lung cancer development by following a group of subjects at high risk of developing lung cancer using fluorescence endoscopy to identify the areas of abnormality for biopsy. Approximately 900 biopsies have been collected in this fashion and graded by at least two experienced, expert pathologists. Using an interactive version of the Cyto-Savant (Oncometrics Imaging Corp.), cytometric and tissue architectural data were collected from these biopsies. Using only the data from the normal and invasive cancer biopsies, quantitative morphometric and architectural indices were generated and calculated for all the collected biopsies. These indices were compared with Loss of Heterozygosity (LOH) of ten sites commonly associated with cancer. These results and the application of these quantitative measures to two small chemoprevention studies will be reported.

  12. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-11

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  13. Results of Lung Cancer Surgery for Octogenarians

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Haruaki; Ichinose, Junji; Nagayama, Kazuhiro; Nitadori, Junichi; Anraku, Masaki; Nakajima, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Growing number of elderly lung cancer patients reflecting a lengthening life span has become a serious problem. Purpose of this study was to elucidate the short and long-term outcome of the surgery for octogenarians, and to evaluate the role of lung cancer surgery for this high age group. Methods: The patients with lung cancer aged 80 years or more who underwent the surgery at our institute from January 1998 through December 2012 were retrospectively analyzed by chart review, and the operative mortality, morbidity and the long-term survival were assessed. Results: Out of a total of 1107 patients with primary lung cancer who received surgery during the study period, 94 were octogenarians (8.5%). Sixty-nine patients (73.4%) had preoperative co-morbidity including hypertension in 50 (53.2%), coincidence of other malignancy in 35 (37.2%), anti-coagulant therapy in 29 (30.9%). Twenty-six patients (27.7%) had major or minor postoperative morbidity, and one (1.1%) died due to bronchopleural fistula. Overall-5-year survival rate was 57.5%. Univariative and multivariative analysis using Cox proportional hazard model revealed that male gender and non-adenocarcinoma histology were significant risk factors for poor prognosis. Conclusion: Gender and histology should be taken into account in preoperative evaluation of indication for lung cancer in octogenarians. PMID:25740447

  14. BAP1 suppresses lung cancer progression and is inhibited by miR-31

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xueliang; Liao, Zhicong; Zhou, Yong; Liu, Yanqing; Wang, Yanbo; Hong, Yeting; Zhou, Xinyan; Yan, Xin; Yu, Min; Ma, Miao; Zhang, Weijie; Guo, Baoliang; Zhang, Jianguo; Zen, Ke; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Qipeng; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    BRCA1-associated protein-1 (BAP1) is an important nuclear-localized deubiquitinating enzyme that serves as a tumor suppressor in lung cancer; however, its function and its regulation are largely unknown. In this study, we found that BAP1 protein levels were dramatically diminished in lung cancer tissues while its mRNA levels did not differ significantly, suggesting that a post-transcriptional mechanism was involved in BAP1 regulation. Because microRNAs (miRNAs) are powerful post-transcriptional regulators of gene expression, we used bioinformatic analyses to search for miRNAs that could potentially bind BAP1. We predicted and experimentally validated miR-31 as a direct regulator of BAP1. Moreover, we showed that miR-31 promoted proliferation and suppressed apoptosis in lung cancer cells and accelerated the development of tumor growth in xenograft mice by inhibiting BAP1. Taken together, this study highlights an important role for miR-31 in the suppression of BAP1 in lung cancer cells and may provide insights into the molecular mechanisms of lung carcinogenesis. PMID:26885612

  15. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer-the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide-biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes' squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  16. Biomarkers and transcriptome profiling of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Yu, Sung-Liang; Li, Ker-Chau; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2012-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. High-throughput technologies such as microarrays provide an opportunity to explore biomarkers for cancer prevention, prognosis and treatment guidance. Recent studies have revealed many biomarkers with the potential for clinical application. However, major limitations still exist. Although useful data on cancer genomics has accumulated rapidly, there has also been a simultaneous tendency for amplification of the complex relationships among the enormous number of variables that need to be considered. Disentangling these complex gene-gene interactions requires new approaches to data analysis to reveal information that has been obscured by traditional methods. Here, we review the current findings on biomarker identification in lung cancer, address their limitations and discuss some future directions for improvements in this area of research.

  17. Identification of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in the reactive stroma of a prostate cancer xenograft by side population analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Santamaria-Martinez, Albert; Barquinero, Jordi; Barbosa-Desongles, Anna; Hurtado, Antoni; Pinos, Tomas; Seoane, Joan; Poupon, Marie-France; Morote, Joan; Reventos, Jaume; Munell, Francina

    2009-10-15

    Cancer stem cells are a distinct cellular population that is believed to be responsible for tumor initiation and maintenance. Recent data suggest that solid tumors also contain another type of stem cells, the mesenchymal stem cells or multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs), which contribute to the formation of tumor-associated stroma. The Hoechst 33342 efflux assay has proved useful to identify a rare cellular fraction, named Side Population (SP), enriched in cells with stem-like properties. Using this assay, we identified SP cells in a prostate cancer xenograft containing human prostate cancer cells and mouse stromal cells. The SP isolation, subculture and sequential sorting allowed the generation of single-cell-derived clones of murine origin that were recognized as MSC by their morphology, plastic adherence, proliferative potential, adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation ability and immunophenotype (CD45{sup -}, CD81{sup +} and Sca-1{sup +}). We also demonstrated that SP clonal cells secrete transforming growth factor {beta}1 (TGF-{beta}1) and that their inhibition reduces proliferation and accelerates differentiation. These results reveal the existence of SP cells in the stroma of a cancer xenograft, and provide evidence supporting their MSC nature and the role of TGF-{beta}1 in maintaining their proliferation and undifferentiated status. Our data also reveal the usefulness of the SP assay to identify and isolate MSC cells from carcinomas.

  18. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed.

  19. Nanomedicine for Treatment of Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Sajid

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the second most common cancer and the primary cause of cancer-related death in both men and women in the United States and rest of the world. Due to diagnosis at an advanced stage, it is associated with a high mortality in a majority of patients. In recent years, enormous advances have occurred in the development and application of nanotechnology in the detection, diagnosis, and therapy of cancer. This progress has led to the development of the emerging field of "cancer nanomedicine." Nanoparticle-based therapeutic systems have gained immense popularity due to their bioavailability, in vivo stability, intestinal absorption, solubility, sustained and targeted delivery, and therapeutic effectiveness of several anticancer agents. Currently, a plethora of nanocarrier formulations are utilized including lipid-based, polymeric and branched polymeric, metal-based, magnetic, and mesoporous silica. In lung cancer, nanoparticle-based therapeutics is paving the way in the diagnosis, imaging, screening, and treatment of primary and metastatic tumors. The application and expansion of novel nanocarriers for drug delivery is an exciting and challenging research filed, in particular for the delivery of emerging cancer therapies. Some of the current progress and challenges in nanoparticle-based drug delivery systems for lung cancer treatment are discussed. PMID:26703803

  20. Contemplating Genetic Feedback Regarding Lung Cancer Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Shepperd, James A.; Novell, Corinne A.; O'Neill, Suzanne C.; Docherty, Sharron L.; Sanderson, Saskia C.; McBride, Colleen M.; Lipkus, Isaac M.

    2013-01-01

    Background and Purpose We examined three theoretical models (self-enhancement theory, consistency theory, and combined model) for understanding how expectations and test result favorability influence smokers' desire for a retest following hypothetical genetic test results. Method College smokers (N = 128) read a brochure describing a biomarker for lung cancer (the GSTM1 gene) then reported whether they thought they had the gene (indicating lower lung cancer risk) or were missing the gene (indicating higher lung cancer risk). Participants then reported whether they would get retested if they received favorable GSTM1 results versus unfavorable GSTM1 results. Results Participants were most likely to want a retest, suggesting rejection of the results, if they expected favorable news yet received unfavorable news. Conclusion The findings supported the combined model such that smokers expressed greatest interest in a retest when they imagined genetic risk feedback that challenges both enhancement and consistency motives. PMID:24222509

  1. Smoking cessation and lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Tønnesen, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Smoking behavior may have a substantial influence on the overall effect of lung cancer screening. Non-randomized studies of smoking behavior during screening have indicated that computer tomography (CT) screening induces smoking cessation. Randomized studies have further elaborated that this effect has to do with participation in screening alone and not dependent on the CT scan. Participants in both CT and control arm in randomized screening trials had higher smoking abstinence rate compared to that of the general population. A positive screening test seems to further promote smoking cessation and decrease smoking relapse rate. Also low smoking dependency and high motivation to quit smoking at baseline predicted smoking abstinence in screening trials. Lung cancer screening therefore seems to be a teachable moment for smoking cessation. Targeted smoking cessation counselling should be an integrated part of future lung cancer screening trials. PMID:27195275

  2. Smoking cessation and lung cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Tønnesen, Philip; Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-04-01

    Smoking behavior may have a substantial influence on the overall effect of lung cancer screening. Non-randomized studies of smoking behavior during screening have indicated that computer tomography (CT) screening induces smoking cessation. Randomized studies have further elaborated that this effect has to do with participation in screening alone and not dependent on the CT scan. Participants in both CT and control arm in randomized screening trials had higher smoking abstinence rate compared to that of the general population. A positive screening test seems to further promote smoking cessation and decrease smoking relapse rate. Also low smoking dependency and high motivation to quit smoking at baseline predicted smoking abstinence in screening trials. Lung cancer screening therefore seems to be a teachable moment for smoking cessation. Targeted smoking cessation counselling should be an integrated part of future lung cancer screening trials. PMID:27195275

  3. Antiangiogenic therapy using endostatin increases the number of ALDH+ lung cancer stem cells by generating intratumor hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yang; Wang, Yu-yi; Wang, Yi-qin; Wang, Xia; Liu, Yan-Yang; Wang, Jian-Tao; Du, Chi; Wang, Li; Li, Mei; Luo, Feng; Jiang, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Antiangiogenic therapy is becoming a promising option for cancer treatment. However, many investigations have recently indicated that these therapies may have limited efficacy, and the cancers in most patients eventually develop resistance to these therapies. There is considerable recently acquired evidence for an association of such resistance with cancer stem-like cells (CSLCs). Here, we used xenograft tumor murine models to further suggest that antiangiogenic agents actually increase the invasive and metastatic properties of lung cancer cells. In our experiments with murine lung cancer xenografts, we found that the antiangiogenic agent endostatin increased the population of ALDH+ cells, and did so by generating intratumoral hypoxia in the xenografts. We further showed endostatin to cause an increase in the CSLC population by accelerating the generation of tumor hypoxia and by recruiting TAMs, MDSCs and Treg cells, which are inflammatory and immunosuppressive cells and which can secrete cytokines and growth factors such as IL-6, EGF, and TGF-β into the tumor microenvironment. All these factors are related with increased CSLC population in tumors. These results imply that improving the clinical efficacy of antiangiogenic treatments will require the concurrent use of CSLC-targeting agents. PMID:27703219

  4. Treatment Option Overview (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  5. Treatment Options by Stage (Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  6. Stages of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... lung cancer include a cough that doesn't go away and shortness of breath. Sometimes lung cancer ... discomfort or pain. A cough that doesn’t go away or gets worse over time. Trouble breathing. ...

  7. Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That

    MedlinePlus

    ... https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159289.html Better Lung Cancer Survival? There's an App for That Study ... HealthDay News) -- A new smartphone app may help lung cancer patients live longer and better by monitoring ...

  8. General Information about Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... most patients with non-small cell lung cancer, current treatments do not cure the cancer. If lung ... professional versions have detailed information written in technical language. The patient versions are written in easy-to- ...

  9. New genes linked to lung cancer susceptibility in Asian women

    Cancer.gov

    An international group of scientists has identified three genes that predispose Asian women who have never smoked to lung cancer. The discovery of specific genetic variations, which have not previously been associated with lung cancer risk in other popul

  10. Fluorescence imaging of early lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum E.; Le Riche, Jean C.; Ikeda, Norihiko; Palcic, Branko

    1995-01-01

    The performance of a fluorescence imaging device was compared with conventional white-light bronchoscopy in 100 patients with lung cancer, 46 patients with resected State I nonsmall cell lung cancer, 10 patients with head and neck cancer, and 67 volunteers who had smoked at least one pack of cigarettes per day for twenty-five years or more. Using differences in tissue autofluorescence between premalignant, malignant and normal tissues, fluorescence bronchoscopy was found to detect more than twice as many moderate-severe dysplasia and carcinoma in situ sites than conventional white-light bronchoscopy. The use of fluorescence imaging to detect small peripheral lung nodules was investigated in a micro metastatic lung model of mice implanted with Lewis lung tumor cells. Fluorescence imaging was found to be able to detect small malignant lung lesions. The use of (delta) -aminolevulinic acid (ALA) to enhance fluorescence detection of CIS was investigated in a patient after oral administration of 60 mg/kg of ALA four hours prior to bronchoscopy, although ALA enhanced the tumor's visibility, multiple sites of false positive fluorescence were observed in areas of inflammation or metaplasia.

  11. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  12. Small RNA combination therapy for lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Wen; Dahlman, James E.; Tammela, Tuomas; Khan, Omar F.; Sood, Sabina; Dave, Apeksha; Cai, Wenxin; Chirino, Leilani M.; Yang, Gillian R.; Bronson, Roderick; Crowley, Denise G.; Sahay, Gaurav; Schroeder, Avi; Langer, Robert; Anderson, Daniel G.; Jacks, Tyler

    2014-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and siRNAs have enormous potential as cancer therapeutics, but their effective delivery to most solid tumors has been difficult. Here, we show that a new lung-targeting nanoparticle is capable of delivering miRNA mimics and siRNAs to lung adenocarcinoma cells in vitro and to tumors in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung cancer based on activation of oncogenic Kirsten rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (Kras) and loss of p53 function. Therapeutic delivery of miR-34a, a p53-regulated tumor suppressor miRNA, restored miR-34a levels in lung tumors, specifically down-regulated miR-34a target genes, and slowed tumor growth. The delivery of siRNAs targeting Kras reduced Kras gene expression and MAPK signaling, increased apoptosis, and inhibited tumor growth. The combination of miR-34a and siRNA targeting Kras improved therapeutic responses over those observed with either small RNA alone, leading to tumor regression. Furthermore, nanoparticle-mediated small RNA delivery plus conventional, cisplatin-based chemotherapy prolonged survival in this model compared with chemotherapy alone. These findings demonstrate that RNA combination therapy is possible in an autochthonous model of lung cancer and provide preclinical support for the use of small RNA therapies in patients who have cancer. PMID:25114235

  13. The lung cancer nurse role in the management of paraneoplastic syndromes in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) associated with lung cancer are well recognised, are often complex to diagnose, and have minimal evidence to promote nursing and medical management. This paper aims to help guide lung cancer nurses to identify the most common and rarer PNS together with basic clinical management advice to help develop nursing assessments and interventions. The issues regarding the pathway of care at diagnosis together with palliative and supportive care requirements will be addressed and will aim to promote best practice in patients diagnosed with PNS and lung cancer. PMID:27413699

  14. Variation in lung cancer resources and workload: results from the first national lung cancer organisational audit.

    PubMed

    Cusworth, K; O'Dowd, E; Hubbard, R; Beckett, P; Peake, M D; Woolhouse, I

    2015-10-01

    We report the findings of the first national lung cancer organisational audit. The results demonstrate marked variation in service provision and workload of some lung cancer specialists. For example, over half of the clinical nurse specialists report case volumes over recommended numbers. Some trusts have no access to key treatments such as video assisted thoracoscopy (VAT) lobectomy and stereotactic radiotherapy. Multivariate regression analysis demonstrated an association between higher surgical resection rates and the on-site availability of advanced staging and therapeutic modalities, for example, PET scan and VAT lobectomy. We conclude by making a number of recommendations to address the variation in lung cancer care. PMID:26043732

  15. Endostatin enhances antitumor effect of tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell therapy in mouse xenograft model of lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jing; Liu, Xiaolin; Xie, Qi; Chen, Guoling; Li, Xingyu; Jia, Yanrui; Yin, Beibei; Qu, Xun; Li, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate the antitumor effect of endostatin combined with tumor antigen-pulsed dendritic cell (DC)-T cell therapy on lung cancer. Methods Transplanted Lewis lung cancer (LLC) models of C57BL/6 mice were established by subcutaneous injection of LLC cells in left extremity axillary. Tumor antigen-pulsed DC-T cells from spleen cells and bone of mice were cultured in vitro. Tumor-bearing mice were randomly divided into three groups, including DC-T+endostatin group, DC-T group, and phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) control group. Microvessel density (MVD) of tumor tissue in tumor-bearing mice was determined by immunohistochemistry (IHC). The expressions of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) were determined by Western blotting and IHC staining. The proportions of CD8+ T cells, mature dendritic cells (mDC), tumor-associated macrophages [TAM (M1/M2)], and myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were determined by flow cytometry. The expressions of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-10, IL-17, transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in suspended cells of tumor tissue were detected by enzyme-linked immune sorbent assay (ELISA). Results DC-T cells combined with endostatin remarkably suppressed tumor growth. MVD of mice in DC-T+endostatin group was significantly lower than that of the control group and DC-T monotherapy group. The expressions of VEGF, IL-6 and IL-17 in tumors were markedly decreased, but IFN-γ and HIF-1α increased after treating with DC-T cells combined with endostatin, compared to control group and DC-T group. In the DC-T+endostatin group, the proportions of MDSC and TAM (M2 type) were significantly decreased, mDC and TAM (M1 type) were up-regulated, and CD8+ T cells were recruited to infiltrate tumors, in contrast to PBS control and DC-T monotherapy. DC-T cells combined with endostatin potently reduced the expressions of IL-6, IL-10, TGF-β and

  16. [Lung cancer, smoking and genetic modifications].

    PubMed

    Popescu, Iulian

    2008-01-01

    Lung cancer represents a heterogeneity entity consisting of different histopathologic, clinic and therapeutic subtypes. Smoking is the most well-known risk factor, but the mechanisms of occurrence of lung cancer are not completely understood yet. The effects of smoking are related to the young age of beginning of smoking, the daily dose and the length of smoking, but they also depend of the individual heredity due to the gene polymorphism. Smoking induces several deleterious mechanisms: inactivation of tumor-suppressor genes, activation of proto-oncogenes, increase in telomerase's activity.

  17. MicroRNA-224 promotes tumor progression in nonsmall cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Ri; Meng, Wei; Sun, Hui-Lung; Kim, Taewan; Ye, Zhenqing; Fassan, Matteo; Jeon, Young-Jun; Li, Bin; Vicentini, Caterina; Peng, Yong; Lee, Tae Jin; Luo, Zhenghua; Liu, Lan; Xu, Dongyuan; Tili, Esmerina; Jin, Victor; Middleton, Justin; Chakravarti, Arnab; Lautenschlaeger, Tim; Croce, Carlo M.

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide. Despite advancements and improvements in surgical and medical treatments, the survival rate of lung cancer patients remains frustratingly poor. Local control for early-stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) has dramatically improved over the last decades for both operable and inoperable patients. However, the molecular mechanisms of NSCLC invasion leading to regional and distant disease spread remain poorly understood. Here, we identify microRNA-224 (miR-224) to be significantly up-regulated in NSCLC tissues, particularly in resected NSCLC metastasis. Increased miR-224 expression promotes cell migration, invasion, and proliferation by directly targeting the tumor suppressors TNFα-induced protein 1 (TNFAIP1) and SMAD4. In concordance with in vitro studies, mouse xenograft studies validated that miR-224 functions as a potent oncogenic miRNA in NSCLC in vivo. Moreover, we found promoter hypomethylation and activated ERK signaling to be involved in the regulation of miR-224 expression in NSCLC. Up-regulated miR-224, thus, facilitates tumor progression by shifting the equilibrium of the partially antagonist functions of SMAD4 and TNFAIP1 toward enhanced invasion and growth in NSCLC. Our findings indicate that targeting miR-224 could be effective in the treatment of certain lung cancer patients. PMID:26187928

  18. Circulating tumor cells in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Young, Rachel; Pailler, Emma; Billiot, Fanny; Drusch, Françoise; Barthelemy, Amélie; Oulhen, Marianne; Besse, Benjamin; Soria, Jean-Charles; Farace, Françoise; Vielh, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as potential biomarkers in several cancers such as colon, prostate, and breast carcinomas, with a correlation between CTC number and patient prognosis being established by independent research groups. The detection and enumeration of CTCs, however, is still a developing field, with no universal method of detection suitable for all types of cancer. CTC detection in lung cancer in particular has proven difficult to perform, as CTCs in this type of cancer often present with nonepithelial characteristics. Moreover, as many detection methods rely on the use of epithelial markers to identify CTCs, the loss of these markers during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition in certain metastatic cancers can render these methods ineffective. The development of personalized medicine has led to an increase in the advancement of molecular characterization of CTCs. The application of techniques such as FISH and RT-PCR to detect EGFR, HER2, and KRAS abnormalities in lung, breast, and colon cancer, for example, could be used to characterize CTCs in real time. The use of CTCs as a 'liquid biopsy' is therefore an exciting possibility providing information on patient prognosis and treatment efficacy. This review summarizes the state of CTC detection today, with particular emphasis on lung cancer, and discusses the future applications of CTCs in helping the clinician to develop new strategies in patient treatment. PMID:23207444

  19. Effect of dietary selenium and cancer cell xenograft on peripheral T and B lymphocytes in adult nude mice.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Hsing; Holmstrom, Alexandra; Li, Xiangdong; Wu, Ryan T Y; Zeng, Huawei; Xiao, Zhengguo

    2012-05-01

    Selenium (Se) is known to regulate tumorigenesis and immunity at the nutritional and supranutritional levels. Because the immune system provides critical defenses against cancer and the athymic, immune-deficient NU/J nude mice are known to gradually develop CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells, we investigated whether B and T cell maturation could be modulated by dietary Se and by tumorigenesis in nude mice. Fifteen homozygous nude mice were fed a Se-deficient, Torula yeast basal diet alone (Se-) or supplemented with 0.15 (Se+) or 1.0 (Se++) mg Se/kg (as Na(2)SeO(4)) for 6 months, followed by a 7-week time course of PC-3 prostate cancer cell xenograft (2 × 10(6) cells/site, 2 sites/mouse). Here, we show that peripheral B cell levels decreased in nude mice fed the Se -  or Se++ diet and the CD4(+) T cell levels increased in mice fed the Se++ diet. During the PC-3 cell tumorigenesis, dietary Se status did not affect peripheral CD4(+) or CD8(+) T cells in nude mice whereas mice fed with the Se++ diet appeared to exhibit greater peripheral CD25(+)CD4(+) T cells on day 9. Dietary Se status did not affect spleen weight in nude mice 7 weeks after the xenograft. Spleen weight was associated with frequency of peripheral CD4(+), but not CD8(+) T cells. Taken together, dietary Se at the nutritional and supranutritional levels regulates peripheral B and T cells in adult nude mice before and after xenograft with PC-3 prostate cancer cells.

  20. TSU-68 (SU6668) inhibits local tumor growth and liver metastasis of human colon cancer xenografts via anti-angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Yorozuya, Kyoko; Kubota, Tetsuro; Watanabe, Masahiko; Hasegawa, Hirotoshi; Ozawa, Soji; Kitajima, Masaki; Chikahisa, Lumi Muramatsu; Yamada, Yuji

    2005-09-01

    A number of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs) are involved in angiogenesis. TSU-68 (SU-6668) was developed as an inhibitor of RTKs involved in VEGF, bFGF and PDGF signaling, which then inhibits endothelial cell proliferation. We investigated the antitumor effects of TSU-68 against human colon cancer xenografts in male SCID mice and its anti-angiogenic activity using a dorsal air-sac (DAS) assay. TSU-68 was administered orally at a dose of 200 mg/kg twice daily. Mice bearing human colon carcinoma, HT-29, or WiDr xenografts were treated for 16 days. To determine the effect on hepatic metastasis, cell suspensions of HT-29 or WAV-I were injected into the spleen of mice on day 0, and mice treated for 28 days starting from day 1. For the DAS assay, HT-29, WiDr or WAV-I cells suspended in PBS at 2 x 10(7) cells/Millipore chamber were implanted subcutaneously into SCID mice, which were then treated from day 0 to 5, On day 6, the anti-angiogenic effects were assessed. Results indicated that TSU-68 significantly inhibited the growth of subcutaneous tumors. In the hepatic metastasis model, liver weights of the TSU-68-treated group were significantly reduced, compared to those of control mice. In the DAS assay, the angiogenic indices of the treated groups were significantly decreased for HT-29, WiDr and WAV-I tumors, with T/C ratios of 13.4, 50 and 35.3%, respectively. As TSU-68 significantly inhibited tumor growth and liver metastasis formation of human colon cancer xenografts, probably through anti-angiogenic activity, this agent may be useful for the treatment of colon cancer.

  1. The relationship between COPD and lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Durham, A.L.; Adcock, I.M.

    2015-01-01

    Both COPD and lung cancer are major worldwide health concerns owing to cigarette smoking, and represent a huge, worldwide, preventable disease burden. Whilst the majority of smokers will not develop either COPD or lung cancer, they are closely related diseases, occurring as co-morbidities at a higher rate than if they were independently triggered by smoking. Lung cancer and COPD may be different aspects of the same disease, with the same underlying predispositions, whether this is an underlying genetic predisposition, telomere shortening, mitochondrial dysfunction or premature aging. In the majority of smokers, the burden of smoking may be dealt with by the body’s defense mechanisms: anti-oxidants such as superoxide dismutases, anti-proteases and DNA repair mechanisms. However, in the case of both diseases these fail, leading to cancer if mutations occur or COPD if damage to the cell and proteins becomes too great. Alternatively COPD could be a driving factor in lung cancer, by increasing oxidative stress and the resulting DNA damage, chronic exposure to pro-inflammatory cytokines, repression of the DNA repair mechanisms and increased cellular proliferation. Understanding the mechanisms that drive these processes in primary cells from patients with these diseases along with better disease models is essential for the development of new treatments. PMID:26363803

  2. Lung Cancer Gene Signatures and Clinical Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Kuner, Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Microarrays have been used for more than two decades in preclinical research. The tumor transcriptional profiles were analyzed to select cancer-associated genes for in-deep functional characterization, to stratify tumor subgroups according to the histopathology or diverse clinical courses, and to assess biological and cellular functions behind these gene sets. In lung cancer—the main type of cancer causing mortality worldwide—biomarker research focuses on different objectives: the early diagnosis of curable tumor diseases, the stratification of patients with prognostic unfavorable operable tumors to assess the need for further therapy regimens, or the selection of patients for the most efficient therapies at early and late stages. In non-small cell lung cancer, gene and miRNA signatures are valuable to differentiate between the two main subtypes’ squamous and non-squamous tumors, a discrimination which has further implications for therapeutic schemes. Further subclassification within adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma has been done to correlate histopathological phenotype with disease outcome. Those tumor subgroups were assigned by diverse transcriptional patterns including potential biomarkers and therapy targets for future diagnostic and clinical applications. In lung cancer, none of these signatures have entered clinical routine for testing so far. In this review, the status quo of lung cancer gene signatures in preclinical and clinical research will be presented in the context of future clinical perspectives.

  3. Transthyretin as a potential biomarker for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection

    PubMed Central

    DING, HONGMEI; LIU, JIANHUA; XUE, RONG; ZHAO, PENG; QIN, YI; ZHENG, FANG; SUN, XUGUO

    2014-01-01

    Satisfactory biomarkers for screening and early diagnosis of lung cancer remain scarce and require further investigation. The aim of the present study was to examine the changes of the biochemical and protein composition in the serum and pleural effusion from lung cancer and lung infection (bacterial pneumonia) patients. A total of 92 patients with lung cancer, 38 with bacterial pneumonia and 42 healthy controls were enrolled in the study. The serum levels of cholesterol, apolipoprotein A and transthyretin (TTR) in the lung cancer patients were higher than that of the lung infection patients (P<0.05). The levels of TTR were higher, whereas the activity of adenosine deaminase (ADA) was lower in the pleural effusion from the lung cancer patients compared to the lung infection patients (P<0.05). Furthermore, the pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios in the lung cancer patients were higher, whereas the ratios of ADA were lower (P<0.05). By matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis, four major peaks corresponding to native TTR, Sul-TTR, Cys-TTR and Cysgly-TTR were observed in the serum of the lung cancer and lung infection patients. A significant increase was found in the proportion of Cysgly-TTR in the pleural effusion from the patients with lung cancer. The data indicated that a combination of pleural effusion/serum TTR ratios and modified TTR may be beneficial for the differential diagnosis between lung cancer and lung infection. PMID:25054025

  4. Targeting Lung Cancer Stem Cells with Antipsychological Drug Thioridazine

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Haiying; Huang, Dongning; Qin, Li; Zheng, Zhiyong; Hua, Li; Wang, Guodong; Huang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer stem cells are a subpopulation of cells critical for lung cancer progression, metastasis, and drug resistance. Thioridazine, a classical neurological drug, has been reported with anticancer ability. However, whether thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells has never been studied. In our current work, we used different dosage of thioridazine to test its effect on lung cancer stem cells sphere formation. The response of lung cancer stem cells to chemotherapy drug with thioridazine treatment was measured. The cell cycle distribution of lung cancer stem cells after thioridazine treatment was detected. The in vivo inhibitory effect of thioridazine was also measured. We found that thioridazine could dramatically inhibit sphere formation of lung cancer stem cells. It sensitized the LCSCs to chemotherapeutic drugs 5-FU and cisplatin. Thioridazine altered the cell cycle distribution of LCSCs and decreased the proportion of G0 phase cells in lung cancer stem cells. Thioridazine inhibited lung cancer stem cells initiated tumors growth in vivo. This study showed that thioridazine could inhibit lung cancer stem cells in vitro and in vivo. It provides a potential drug for lung cancer therapy through targeting lung cancer stem cells. PMID:27556038

  5. S0536: Cetuximab, Paclitaxel, Carboplatin, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-11

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  6. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-08

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  8. The in vivo performance of ferrocenyl tamoxifen lipid nanocapsules in xenografted triple negative breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lainé, Anne-Laure; Adriaenssens, Eric; Vessières, Anne; Jaouen, Gérard; Corbet, Cyril; Desruelles, Emilie; Pigeon, Pascal; Toillon, Robert-Alain; Passirani, Catherine

    2013-09-01

    Triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) represent the most aggressive form of breast cancers and their treatment are challenging due to the tumor heterogeneity. The high death rate and the limited systemic treatment options for TNBC necessitate the search for alternative chemotherapeutics. We previously found that FcOHTAM, an organometallic derivative of hydroxytamoxifen, showed in vitro a strong antiproliferative effect on various breast cancer cell lines, including MDA-MB-231 cells, the archetype of TNBC. In this study, we developed stealth FcOHTAM loaded lipid nanocapsules (LNCs) to further evaluate this novel drug on a TNBC xenografted model. Cell cycle analysis of MDA-MB-231 cells confirmed the preservation of the drug activity through LNCs causing a cycle arrest in phase S after 48 h exposure at the IC50 concentration (2 μm). Two intraperitoneal injections of FcOHTAM loaded LNCs (20 mg/kg) administered to luciferase-transfected MDA-MB-231 tumors bearing mice led to a marked delay in tumor growth. As a consequence, a significantly lower tumor volume was obtained at the end of the experiment with a difference of 36% at day 38 compared to the untreated group. These results represent the first evidence of an in vivo effect of FcOHTAM and ferrocenyl derivatives in general on xenografted breast tumors. PMID:23777919

  9. Therapeutic Effects of Microbubbles Added to Combined High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound and Chemotherapy in a Pancreatic Cancer Xenograft Model

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Mi Hye; Kim, Hae Ri; Kim, Bo Ram; Park, Eun-Joo; Kim, Hoe Suk; Han, Joon Koo; Choi, Byung Ihn

    2016-01-01

    Objective To investigate whether high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of chemotherapy. Materials and Methods A pancreatic cancer xenograft model was established using BALB/c nude mice and luciferase-expressing human pancreatic cancer cells. Mice were randomly assigned to five groups according to treatment: control (n = 10), gemcitabine alone (GEM; n = 12), HIFU with microbubbles (HIFU + MB, n = 11), combined HIFU and gemcitabine (HIGEM; n = 12), and HIGEM + MB (n = 13). After three weekly treatments, apoptosis rates were evaluated using the terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling assay in two mice per group. Tumor volume and bioluminescence were monitored using high-resolution 3D ultrasound imaging and in vivo bioluminescence imaging for eight weeks in the remaining mice. Results The HIGEM + MB group showed significantly higher apoptosis rates than the other groups (p < 0.05) and exhibited the slowest tumor growth. From week 5, the tumor-volume-ratio relative to the baseline tumor volume was significantly lower in the HIGEM + MB group than in the control, GEM, and HIFU + MB groups (p < 0.05). Despite visible distinction, the HIGEM and HIGEM + MB groups showed no significant differences. Conclusion High-intensity focused ultrasound combined with microbubbles enhances the therapeutic effects of gemcitabine chemotherapy in a pancreatic cancer xenograft model. PMID:27587968

  10. Respiratory tract cancers: lung and mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Crosignani, Paolo; Piffer, Silvano

    2004-01-01

    The trend analysis of lung cancer in the database of the Italian Network of Cancer Registries (pool AIRT), showed, among males (52,267 incident cases and 46, 726 deaths included in the study) a statistically significant decrease of incidence and mortality in the period 1986-1997; incidence rates decreased by about 1.4%/year and mortality rates by about 1.6%/year. Among females, lung cancer trends are rather different from that of males, according to diverging trends in tobacco smoking exposures; in fact, both incidence (+1.2%/year) and mortality (+0.9%/year) are increasing. Incidence of mesothelioma (1594 cases), showed for the period 1986-1997, a statistically significant increase among both males and females; standardised rates increased, more than 4% every year. As regards to deaths due to pleural malignant cancers (1393 among males and 664 among females) their trend was stable in the analysed period.

  11. Pazopanib diminishes non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) growth and metastases in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Honglin; Yang, Fan; Shen, Wang; Wang, Yuli; Li, Xuebing; You, Jiacong; Zhou, Qinghua

    2015-01-01

    Background Anti-angiogenesis has been demonstrated to have a critical role in lung cancer pathogenesis. Here, we characterized the effect of the small-molecule angiogenesis inhibitor pazopanib on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Methods NSCLC cells were tested for viability and migration after incubation with varying concentrations of pazopanib. Further, the phosphorylation status of extracellular signal-regulated kinase, protein kinase B, and MEK were assessed in vitro. For in vivo testing, mice grafted with NSCLC cell lines L9981 and A549 were treated orally with pazopanib. Results Pazopanib inhibits signaling pathways in tumor cells, thus blocking NSCLC cell growth and migration in vitro and inducing tumor cell arrest at G0/G1 phase. We show that pazopanib could inhibit tumor cell growth, decrease metastases, and prolong survival in two mouse xenograft models of human NSCLC. Conclusion These preclinical studies of pazopanib show the possibility of clinical application and, ultimately, improvement in patient outcome. PMID:26273349

  12. Regulation of nonsmall-cell lung cancer stem cell like cells by neurotransmitters and opioid peptides.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Jheelam; Papu John, Arokya M S; Schuller, Hildegard M

    2015-12-15

    Nonsmall-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading type of lung cancer and has a poor prognosis. We have shown that chronic stress promoted NSCLC xenografts in mice via stress neurotransmitter-activated cAMP signaling downstream of beta-adrenergic receptors and incidental beta-blocker therapy was reported to improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients. These findings suggest that psychological stress promotes NSCLC whereas pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP may inhibit NSCLC. Cancer stem cells are thought to drive the development, progression and resistance to therapy of NSCLC. However, their potential regulation by stress neurotransmitters has not been investigated. In the current study, epinephrine increased the number of cancer stem cell like cells (CSCs) from three NSCLC cell lines in spheroid formation assays while enhancing intracellular cAMP and the stem cell markers sonic hedgehog (SHH), aldehyde dehydrogenase-1 (ALDH-1) and Gli1, effects reversed by GABA or dynorphin B via Gαi -mediated inhibition of cAMP formation. The growth of NSCLC xenografts in a mouse model of stress reduction was significantly reduced as compared with mice maintained under standard conditions. Stress reduction reduced serum levels of corticosterone, norepinephrine and epinephrine while the inhibitory neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and opioid peptides increased. Stress reduction significantly reduced cAMP, VEGF, p-ERK, p-AKT, p-CREB, p-SRc, SHH, ALDH-1 and Gli1 in xenograft tissues whereas cleaved caspase-3 and p53 were induced. We conclude that stress neurotransmitters activate CSCs in NSCLC via multiple cAMP-mediated pathways and that pharmacologically or psychologically induced decreases in cAMP signaling may improve clinical outcomes in NSCLC patients.

  13. Pyruvate carboxylase is critical for non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Katherine; Fox, Matthew P; Bousamra, Michael; Slone, Stephen P; Higashi, Richard M; Miller, Donald M; Wang, Yali; Yan, Jun; Yuneva, Mariia O; Deshpande, Rahul; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic biosynthesis requires precursors supplied by the Krebs cycle, which in turn requires anaplerosis to replenish precursor intermediates. The major anaplerotic sources are pyruvate and glutamine, which require the activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1), respectively. Due to their rapid proliferation, cancer cells have increased anabolic and energy demands; however, different cancer cell types exhibit differential requirements for PC- and GLS-mediated pathways for anaplerosis and cell proliferation. Here, we infused patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with uniformly 13C-labeled glucose before tissue resection and determined that the cancerous tissues in these patients had enhanced PC activity. Freshly resected paired lung tissue slices cultured in 13C6-glucose or 13C5,15N2-glutamine tracers confirmed selective activation of PC over GLS in NSCLC. Compared with noncancerous tissues, PC expression was greatly enhanced in cancerous tissues, whereas GLS1 expression showed no trend. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of paired lung tissues showed PC overexpression in cancer cells rather than in stromal cells of tumor tissues. PC knockdown induced multinucleation, decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in human NSCLC cells, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Growth inhibition was accompanied by perturbed Krebs cycle activity, inhibition of lipid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and altered glutathione homeostasis. These findings indicate that PC-mediated anaplerosis in early-stage NSCLC is required for tumor survival and proliferation. PMID:25607840

  14. Pyruvate carboxylase is critical for non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sellers, Katherine; Fox, Matthew P; Bousamra, Michael; Slone, Stephen P; Higashi, Richard M; Miller, Donald M; Wang, Yali; Yan, Jun; Yuneva, Mariia O; Deshpande, Rahul; Lane, Andrew N; Fan, Teresa W-M

    2015-02-01

    Anabolic biosynthesis requires precursors supplied by the Krebs cycle, which in turn requires anaplerosis to replenish precursor intermediates. The major anaplerotic sources are pyruvate and glutamine, which require the activity of pyruvate carboxylase (PC) and glutaminase 1 (GLS1), respectively. Due to their rapid proliferation, cancer cells have increased anabolic and energy demands; however, different cancer cell types exhibit differential requirements for PC- and GLS-mediated pathways for anaplerosis and cell proliferation. Here, we infused patients with early-stage non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with uniformly 13C-labeled glucose before tissue resection and determined that the cancerous tissues in these patients had enhanced PC activity. Freshly resected paired lung tissue slices cultured in 13C6-glucose or 13C5,15N2-glutamine tracers confirmed selective activation of PC over GLS in NSCLC. Compared with noncancerous tissues, PC expression was greatly enhanced in cancerous tissues, whereas GLS1 expression showed no trend. Moreover, immunohistochemical analysis of paired lung tissues showed PC overexpression in cancer cells rather than in stromal cells of tumor tissues. PC knockdown induced multinucleation, decreased cell proliferation and colony formation in human NSCLC cells, and reduced tumor growth in a mouse xenograft model. Growth inhibition was accompanied by perturbed Krebs cycle activity, inhibition of lipid and nucleotide biosynthesis, and altered glutathione homeostasis. These findings indicate that PC-mediated anaplerosis in early-stage NSCLC is required for tumor survival and proliferation.

  15. The European initiative for quality management in lung cancer care.

    PubMed

    Blum, Torsten G; Rich, Anna; Baldwin, David; Beckett, Paul; De Ruysscher, Dirk; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Gaga, Mina; Gamarra, Fernando; Grigoriu, Bogdan; Hansen, Niels C G; Hubbard, Richard; Huber, Rudolf Maria; Jakobsen, Erik; Jovanovic, Dragana; Konsoulova, Assia; Kollmeier, Jens; Massard, Gilbert; McPhelim, John; Meert, Anne-Pascale; Milroy, Robert; Paesmans, Marianne; Peake, Mick; Putora, Paul-Martin; Scherpereel, Arnaud; Schönfeld, Nicolas; Sitter, Helmut; Skaug, Knut; Spiro, Stephen; Strand, Trond-Eirik; Taright, Samya; Thomas, Michael; van Schil, Paul E; Vansteenkiste, Johan F; Wiewrodt, Rainer; Sculier, Jean-Paul

    2014-05-01

    Lung cancer is the commonest cause of cancer-related death worldwide and poses a significant respiratory disease burden. Little is known about the provision of lung cancer care across Europe. The overall aim of the Task Force was to investigate current practice in lung cancer care across Europe. The Task Force undertook four projects: 1) a narrative literature search on quality management of lung cancer; 2) a survey of national and local infrastructure for lung cancer care in Europe; 3) a benchmarking project on the quality of (inter)national lung cancer guidelines in Europe; and 4) a feasibility study of prospective data collection in a pan-European setting. There is little peer-reviewed literature on quality management in lung cancer care. The survey revealed important differences in the infrastructure of lung cancer care in Europe. The European guidelines that were assessed displayed wide variation in content and scope, as well as methodological quality but at the same time there was relevant duplication. The feasibility study demonstrated that it is, in principle, feasible to collect prospective demographic and clinical data on patients with lung cancer. Legal obligations vary among countries. The European Initiative for Quality Management in Lung Cancer Care has provided the first comprehensive snapshot of lung cancer care in Europe.

  16. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer. PMID:25864755

  17. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc.

  18. The wind god promotes lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Frisch, Steven M; Schaller, Michael D

    2014-05-12

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Li and colleagues demonstrate that the hematopoietic transcription factor Aiolos (named after the Wind God of Greek mythology) confers anoikis resistance in lung tumor cells through repression of cell adhesion-related genes including the mechanosensor p66Shc. PMID:24823631

  19. Gene variant linked to lung cancer risk

    Cancer.gov

    A variation of the gene NFKB1, called rs4648127, is associated with an estimated 44 percent reduction in lung cancer risk. When this information, derived from samples obtained as part of a large NCI-sponsored prevention clinical trial, was compared with d

  20. Daurinol Enhances the Efficacy of Radiotherapy in Lung Cancer via Suppression of Aurora Kinase A/B Expression.

    PubMed

    Woo, Jong Kyu; Kang, Ju-Hee; Shin, DongYun; Park, Seong-Hyeok; Kang, Kyungsu; Nho, Chu Won; Seong, Je Kyung; Lee, Sang-Jin; Oh, Seung Hyun

    2015-07-01

    The aurora kinases constitute one family of serine/threonine kinases whose activity is essential for mitotic progression. The aurora kinases are frequently upregulated in human cancers and are associated with sensitivity to chemotherapy in certain ones. In the present study, we investigated whether aurora kinases could be a target to overcome radioresistance or enhance the radiosensitivity of lung cancer. For that purpose, we determined the therapeutic potential of daurinol, an investigational topoisomerase inhibitor, alone and in combination with radiation, by observing its effect on aurora kinases. Daurinol decreased cell viability and proliferation in human colon and lung cancer cells. Gene expression in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells was evaluated using RNA microarray. The mRNA expression of 18 genes involved in the mitotic spindle check point, including aurora kinase A (AURKA) and aurora kinase B (AURKB), was decreased in daurinol-treated human colon cancer cells as compared with vehicle-treated cells. As expected, radiation increased expression levels of AURKA and AURKB. This increase was effectively attenuated by siRNAs against AURKA and AURKB, which suppressed cell growth and increased apoptosis under radiation. Furthermore, the expression of AURKA and AURKB was suppressed by daurinol in the presence or absence of radiation in colon and lung cancer cells. Daurinol alone or in combination with radiation decreased lung cancer growth in xenograft mouse models. Our data clearly confirm the antitumor and radiosensitizing activity of daurinol in human lung cancer cells through the inhibition of AURKA and AURKB. PMID:25882311

  1. Lung cancer in HIV-infected patients

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, R; Lebrón, J; Guerrero-León, M; Del Arco, A; Colmenero, J; Márquez, M; Santos, J

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Several studies have shown that HIV patients are at higher risk of lung cancer. Our aim is to analyse the prevalence and features of lung cancer in HIV-infected patients. Methods The clinical charts of 4,721 HIV-infected patients seen in three hospitals of southeast Spain (study period 1992–2012) were reviewed, and all patients with a lung cancer were analysed. Results There were 61 lung cancers, giving a prevalence of 1.2%. There was a predominance of men (82.0%), and smokers (96.6%; mean pack-years 35.2), with a median age of 48.0 (41.7–52.9) years, and their distribution according to risk group for HIV was: intravenous drug use 58.3%, homosexual 20.0%, and heterosexual 16.7%. Thirty-four (56.7%) patients were Aids cases, and 29 (47.5%) had prior pulmonar events: tuberculosis 16, bacterial pneumonia 9, and P. jiroveci pneumonia 4. The median nadir CD4 count was 149/mm3 (42–232), the median CD4 count at the time of diagnosis of the lung cancer was 237/mm3 (85–397), and 66.1%<350/mm3. 66.7% were on ART, and 70% of them had undetectable HIV viral load. The most common histological types of lung cancer were adenocarcinoma and epidermoid, with 24 (40.0%) and 23 (38.3%) cases, respectively. There were 49 (80.3%) cases with advanced stages (III and IV) at diagnosis. The distribution of treatments was: only palliative 23 (39.7%), chemotherapy 14 (24.1%), surgery and chemotherapy 8 (13.8%), radiotherapy 7 (12.1%), surgery 4 (6.9%), and other combined treatments 2 (3.4%). Forty-six (76.7%) patients died, with a median survival time of 3 months. The Kaplan-Meier survival rate at 6 months was 42.7% (at 12 months 28.5%). Conclusions The prevalence of lung cancer in this cohort of HIV-patients is high. People affected are mainly men, smokers, with transmission of HIV by intravenous drug use, and around half of them with prior opportunistic pulmonary events. Most patients had low nadir CD4 count, and were immunosuppressed at the time of diagnosis. Adenocarcinoma

  2. Vaccine Therapy in Treating Patients With Colon, Pancreatic, or Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-04-27

    Recurrent Colon Cancer; Extensive Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Rectal Cancer; Limited Stage Small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Pancreatic Cancer; Recurrent Rectal Cancer; Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage I Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IVB Pancreatic Cancer; Stage II Pancreatic Cancer; Stage III Colon Cancer; Stage IVA Pancreatic Cancer

  3. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  4. Opposite Effects of M1 and M2 Macrophage Subtypes on Lung Cancer Progression

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Ang; Hsiao, Yi-Jing; Chen, Hsuan-Yu; Chen, Huei-Wen; Ho, Chao-Chi; Chen, Yu-Yun; Liu, Yi-Chia; Hong, Tsai-Hsia; Yu, Sung-Liang; Chen, Jeremy J.W.; Yang, Pan-Chyr

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages in a tumor microenvironment have been characterized as M1- and M2-polarized subtypes. Here, we discovered the different macrophages’ impacts on lung cancer cell A549. The M2a/M2c subtypes promoted A549 invasion and xenograft tumor growth. The M1 subtype suppressed angiogenesis. M1 enhanced the sensitivity of A549 to cisplatin and decreased the tube formation activity and cell viability of A549 cells by inducing apoptosis and senescence. Different macrophage subtypes regulated genes involved in the immune response, cytoskeletal remodeling, coagulation, cell adhesion, and apoptosis pathways in A549 cells, which was a pattern that correlated with the altered behaviors of the A549 cells. Furthermore, we found that the identified M1/M2 gene signatures were significantly correlated with the extended overall survival of lung cancer patients. These results suggest that M1/M2 gene expression signature may be used as a prognostic indicator for lung cancer patients, and M1/M2 polarization may be a target of investigation of immune-modulating therapies for lung cancer in the future. PMID:26399191

  5. Appropriateness of Using Patient-Derived Xenograft Models for Pharmacologic Evaluation of Novel Therapies for Esophageal/Gastro-Esophageal Junction Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dodbiba, Lorin; Teichman, Jennifer; Fleet, Andrew; Thai, Henry; Starmans, Maud H. W.; Navab, Roya; Chen, Zhuo; Girgis, Hala; Eng, Lawson; Espin-Garcia, Osvaldo; Shen, Xiaowei; Bandarchi, Bizhan; Schwock, Joerg; Tsao, Ming-Sound; El-Zimaity, Hala; Der, Sandy D.; Xu, Wei; Bristow, Robert G.; Darling, Gail E.; Boutros, Paul C.

    2015-01-01

    The high morbidity and mortality of patients with esophageal (E) and gastro-esophageal junction (GEJ) cancers, warrants new pre-clinical models for drug testing. The utility of primary tumor xenografts (PTXGs) as pre-clinical models was assessed. Clinicopathological, immunohistochemical markers (p53, p16, Ki-67, Her-2/neu and EGFR), and global mRNA abundance profiles were evaluated to determine selection biases of samples implanted or engrafted, compared with the underlying population. Nine primary E/GEJ adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were further characterized for the spectrum and stability of gene/protein expression over passages. Seven primary esophageal adenocarcinoma xenograft lines were treated with individual or combination chemotherapy. Tumors that were implanted (n=55) in NOD/SCID mice had features suggestive of more aggressive biology than tumors that were never implanted (n=32). Of those implanted, 21/55 engrafted; engraftment was associated with poorly differentiated tumors (p=0.04) and older patients (p=0.01). Expression of immunohistochemical markers were similar between patient sample and corresponding xenograft. mRNA differences observed between patient tumors and first passage xenografts were largely due to loss of human stroma in xenografts. mRNA patterns of early vs late passage xenografts and of small vs large tumors of the same passage were similar. Complete resistance was present in 2/7 xenografts while the remaining tumors showed varying degrees of sensitivity, that remained constant across passages. Because of their ability to recapitulate primary tumor characteristics during engraftment and across serial passaging, PTXGs can be useful clinical systems for assessment of drug sensitivity of human E/GEJ cancers. PMID:25826681

  6. Eczema as the first manifestation of a lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Meng, Xiangjiao; Wang, Renben; Huang, Zhaoqin; Yu, Jinming

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer combined with eczema is a rare disease. We report a case of 58-year-old man with eczema as the first manifestation of a lung cancer. Skin examination revealed diffuse erythema, dander, itchy rash, and scratch. Chest contrast-enhanced computed tomography showed a heterogeneously enhanced irregular mass in the right lung. Punch biopsy of the tumor confirms squamous cell lung cancer. Eczema vanished nearly completely after one cycle of chemotherapy.

  7. Role of acetylcholinesterase in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Hui-Jun; Wu, Ren-Pei; Liu, Jing-Jing; Zhang, Ling-Juan; Li, Zhao-Shen

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) plays a key role in catalytic hydrolysis of cholinergic neurotransmitters. Intensive research has proven the involvement of this protein in novel functions, such as cell adhesion, differentiation, and proliferation. In addition, several recent studies have indicated that acetylcholinesterase is potentially a marker and regulator of apoptosis. Importantly, AChE is also a promising tumor suppressor. In this review, we briefly summarize the involvement of AChE in apoptosis and cancer, focusing on the role of AChE in lung cancer, as well as the therapeutic consideration of AChE for cancer therapy. PMID:26273392

  8. Pharmacokinetics and tissue distribution of inositol hexaphosphate in C.B17 SCID mice bearing human breast cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Eiseman, Julie; Lan, Jing; Guo, Jianxia; Joseph, Erin; Vucenik, Ivana

    2011-10-01

    Inositol hexaphosphate (IP(6)) is effective in preclinical cancer prevention and chemotherapy. In addition to cancer, IP(6) has many other beneficial effects for human health, such as reduction in risk of developing cardiovascular disease and diabetes and inhibition of kidney stone formation. Studies presented here describe the pharmacokinetics, tissue distribution, and metabolism of IP(6) following intravenous (IV) or per os (PO) administration to mice. SCID mice bearing MDA-MB-231 xenografts were treated with 20 mg/kg IP(6) (3 μCi per mouse [(14)C]-uniformly ring-labeled IP(6)) and euthanized at various times after IP(6) treatment. Plasma and tissues were analyzed for [(14)C]-IP(6) and metabolites by high-performance liquid chromatography with radioactivity detection. Following IV administration of IP(6), plasma IP(6) concentrations peaked at 5 minutes and were detectable until 45 minutes. Liver IP(6) concentrations were more than 10-fold higher than plasma concentrations, whereas other normal tissue concentrations were similar to plasma. Only inositol was detected in xenografts. After PO administration, IP(6) was detected in liver; but only inositol was detectable in other tissues. After both IV and PO administration, exogenous IP(6) was rapidly dephosphorylated to inositol; however, alterations in endogenous IPs were not examined.

  9. Correlation between tumor engraftment in patient-derived xenograft models and clinical outcomes in colorectal cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Oh, Bo Young; Lee, Woo Yong; Jung, Sungwon; Hong, Hye Kyung; Nam, Do-Hyun; Park, Yoon Ah; Huh, Jung Wook; Yun, Seong Hyeon; Kim, Hee Cheol; Chun, Ho-Kyung; Cho, Yong Beom

    2015-06-30

    Despite numerous studies involving patient-derived xenograft (PDX) models, few studies have investigated the relationship between the ability of the tumor to engraft (tumorigenicity) and the clinical features of colorectal cancer (CRC). The aim of this study was to determine whether tumorigenicity correlates with clinical outcomes of CRC patients. We included 241 CRC patients who underwent radical surgery from 2010 to 2013. PDX models were established by implanting tumor fragments obtained from these patients into the subcutaneous layer of immunodeficient mice. Xenografts were successfully established from 62.2%. Successful engraftment was associated with advanced stage (p < 0.001) and moderate/poor differentiation (p = 0.029). Three-year disease-free survival (DFS) rates were lower for patients with tumorigenicity (p = 0.011). In stage III patients, tumorigenicity was an independent predictor of poor DFS (p = 0.034). In addition, mutation of TP53 was most frequently detected in stage III patients with tumorigenicity. Two models of stage IV disease without KRAS mutations showed high sensitivity to EGFR-targeted agents, while none of the models with KRAS mutations showed high sensitivity. In conclusion, PDX models may provide an effective preclinical tool for predicting cancer progression and could be used to further genomic and pharmacologic research on personalized treatments.

  10. Deaths in Canada from lung cancer due to involuntary smoking.

    PubMed Central

    Wigle, D T; Collishaw, N E; Kirkbride, J; Mao, Y

    1987-01-01

    Recently published evidence indicates that involuntary smoking causes an increased risk of lung cancer among nonsmokers. Information was compiled on the proportion of people who had never smoked among victims of lung cancer, the risk of lung cancer for nonsmokers married to smokers and the prevalence of such exposure. On the basis of these data we estimate that 50 to 60 of the deaths from lung cancer in Canada in 1985 among people who had never smoked were caused by spousal smoking; about 90% occurred in women. The total number of deaths from lung cancer attributable to exposure to tobacco smoke from spouses and other sources (mainly the workplace) was derived by applying estimated age- and sex-specific rates of death from lung cancer attributable to such exposure to the population of Canadians who have never smoked; about 330 deaths from lung cancer annually are attributable to such exposure. PMID:3567810

  11. Breath sensors for lung cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Adiguzel, Yekbun; Kulah, Haluk

    2015-03-15

    The scope of the applications of breath sensors is abundant in disease diagnosis. Lung cancer diagnosis is a well-fitting health-related application of this technology, which is of utmost importance in the health sector, because lung cancer has the highest death rate among all cancer types, and it brings a high yearly global burden. The aim of this review is first to provide a rational basis for the development of breath sensors for lung cancer diagnostics from a historical perspective, which will facilitate the transfer of the idea into the rapidly evolving sensors field. Following examples with diagnostic applications include colorimetric, composite, carbon nanotube, gold nanoparticle-based, and surface acoustic wave sensor arrays. These select sensor applications are widened by the state-of-the-art developments in the sensors field. Coping with sampling sourced artifacts and cancer staging are among the debated topics, along with the other concerns like proteomics approaches and biomimetic media utilization, feature selection for data classification, and commercialization.

  12. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  13. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored.

  14. Targeting angiogenesis in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stratigos, Michalis; Matikas, Alexios; Voutsina, Alexandra; Mavroudis, Dimitrios; Georgoulias, Vassilis

    2016-08-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive and lethal malignancy. Despite high initial response rates to systemic chemotherapy, the disease eventually relapses; further treatment only modestly improves outcomes and overall survival (OS) for patients with extensive stage disease is less than one year. Little progress has been made during the past decades, with no new drugs approved. Consequently, the development of novel strategies is an unmet need. The inhibition of angiogenesis, a defining characteristic of cancer, has demonstrated modest efficacy in several human malignancies, including non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). However, results from clinical trials in SCLC have been disappointing, and no anti-angiogenic agent has received regulatory approval due to lack of clinical efficacy. The elucidation of underlying mechanisms responsible for tumor resistance to angiogenic therapy and the simultaneous blockade of multiple elements that play a role in angiogenesis need to be further explored. PMID:27652203

  15. GZD856, a novel potent PDGFRα/β inhibitor, suppresses the growth and migration of lung cancer cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhang; Ren, Xiaomei; Lu, Xiaoyun; Wang, Deping; Hu, Xianjing; Zheng, Yi; Song, Liyan; Pang, Hongwen; Yu, Rongmin; Ding, Ke

    2016-05-28

    Platelet-derived growth factor receptors (PDGFRα/β) play critical roles in the autocrine-stimulated growth and recruitment of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) of human lung cancer cells. We have identified GZD856 as a new PDGFR inhibitor that potently inhibits PDGFRα/β kinase activity and blocks this signaling pathway in lung cancer cells both in vitro and in vivo. GZD856 strongly suppresses the proliferation of PDGFRα-amplified H1703 (PDGFRβ(-)) human lung cancer cells and demonstrates significant in vivo antitumor efficacy in a xenograft mouse model. Although GZD856 displays only limited in vitro antiproliferative efficiency against PDGFRα(-)/PDGFRβ(+) A549 lung cancer cells, it efficiently inhibits the in vivo growth and metastasis of A549 cancer cells in xenograft and orthotopic models, respectively. The promising in vivo antitumor activity of GZD856 in A549 models may result from its suppression of PDGFR-related microenvironment factors, such as recruitment of CAFs and collagen content in stromal cells. GZD856 may be considered as a promising new candidate for anti-lung cancer drug development.

  16. Cutaneous manifestations of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Owen, Cindy England

    2016-06-01

    Skin findings can serve as a clue to internal disease. In this article, cutaneous manifestations of underlying lung malignancy are reviewed. Paraneoplastic dermatoses are rare, but when recognized early, can lead to early diagnosis of an underlying neoplasm. Malignancy-associated dermatoses comprise a broad group of hyperproliferative and inflammatory disorders, disorders caused by tumor production of hormonal or metabolic factors, autoimmune connective tissue diseases, among others. In this review, paraneoplastic syndromes associated with lung malignancy are discussed, including ectopic ACTH syndrome, bronchial carcinoid variant syndrome, secondary hypertrophic osteoarthropathy/digital clubbing, erythema gyratum repens, malignant acanthosis nigricans, sign of Leser-Trélat, tripe palms, hypertrichosis lanuginosa, acrokeratosis paraneoplastica, and dermatomyositis. PMID:27178690

  17. Disseminated lung cancer presenting as a rectal mass.

    PubMed

    Noergaard, Mia M; Stamp, Inger M H; Bodtger, Uffe

    2016-01-01

    Primary lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths globally, and approximately 50% had metastatic disease at the time of diagnosis. A rectal mass and unintended weight loss are common manifestations of rectal cancer. Our case presented with a rectal mass, but workup revealed a metastatic lesion from lung cancer. Lung cancer metastases to the lower gastrointestinal tract imply reduced survival compared with the already poor mean survival of stage IV lung cancer. Despite relevant therapy, the patient died 5 months after referral. PMID:27683028

  18. Sensitivity to CPT-11 of xenografted human colorectal cancers as a function of microsatellite instability and p53 status

    PubMed Central

    Bras-Gonçalves, R A; Rosty, C; Laurent-Puig, P; Soulié, P; Dutrillaux, B; Poupon, M-F

    2000-01-01

    Biological parameters influencing the response of human colorectal cancers (CRCs) to CPT-11, a topoisomerase 1 (top1) inhibitor, were investigated using a panel of nine CRCs xenografted into nude mice. CRC xenografts differed in their p53 status (wt or mut) and in their microsatellite instability phenotype (MSI+when altered). Five CRC xenografts were established from clinical samples. All five had a functional p53, two were MSI+and three were MSI–. Tumour-bearing nude mice were treated intraperitonealy (i.p.) with CPT-11. At 10 mg kg–1of CPT-11, four injections at 4-day intervals, four of the five xenografts responded to CPT-11 (growth delay of up to 10 days); the non-responder tumour was MSI−. At 40 mg kg−1of CPT-11, six injections at 4-day intervals, the five CRCs displayed variable but marked responses with complete regressions. In order to assess the role of p53 status in CPT-11 response, four CRC lines were used. HT29 cell line was MSI−/ Ala273-mutp53, its subclone HT29A3 being transfected by wtp53. LoVo cell line was MSI+/ wtp53, its subclone X17LoVo dominantly expressed Ala273-mutp53 after transfection. LoVo tumours (MSI+/ mutp53) were more sensitive than X17LoVo (MSI+/ mutp53. HT 29 tumours (MSI−Imutp53), were refractory to CPT-11 while HT29A3 tumours (MSI−/ wtp53) were sensitive, showing that wtp53 improves the drug-response in these MSI−tumours. Levels of mRNA expression of top1, fasR, TP53 and mdr1 were semi-quantified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. None of these parameters correlated with CPT-11 response. Taken together, these observations indicate that MSI and p53 alterations could be associated with different CPT-11 sensitivities; MSI phenotype moderately influences the CPT-11 sensitivity, MSI+being more sensitive than MSI−CRC freshly obtained from patients, mutp53 status being associated with a poor response to CPT-11. © 2000 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10732766

  19. [Minimally Invasive Open Surgery for Lung Cancer].

    PubMed

    Nakagawa, Kazuo; Watanabe, Shunichi

    2016-07-01

    Significant efforts have been made to reduce the invasiveness of surgical procedures by surgeons for a long time. Surgeons always keep it in mind that the basic principle performing less invasive surgical procedures for malignant tumors is to decrease the invasiveness for patients without compromising oncological curability and surgical safety. Video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS) has been used increasingly as a minimally invasive approach to lung cancer surgery. Whereas, whether VATS lobectomy is a less invasive procedure and has equivalent or better clinical effect compared with open lobectomy for patients with lung cancer remains controversial because of the absence of randomized prospective studies. The degree of difficulty for anatomical lung resection depends on the degree of the fissure development, mobility of hilar lymph nodes, and the degree of pleural adhesions. During pulmonary surgery, thoracic surgeons always have to deal with not only these difficulties but other unexpected events such as intraoperative bleeding. Recently, we perform pulmonary resection for lung cancer with minimally invasive open surgery (MIOS) approach. In this article, we introduce the surgical procedure of MIOS and demonstrate short-term results. Off course, the efficacy of MIOS needs to be further evaluated with long-term results. PMID:27440030

  20. The Utility of Exercise Testing in Patients with Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ha, Duc; Mazzone, Peter J; Ries, Andrew L; Malhotra, Atul; Fuster, Mark

    2016-09-01

    The harm associated with lung cancer treatment include perioperative morbidity and mortality and therapy-induced toxicities in various organs, including the heart and lungs. Optimal treatment therefore entails a need for risk assessment to weigh the probabilities of benefits versus harm. Exercise testing offers an opportunity to evaluate a patient's physical fitness/exercise capacity objectively. In lung cancer, it is most often used to risk-stratify patients undergoing evaluation for lung cancer resection. In recent years, its use outside this context has been described, including in nonsurgical candidates and lung cancer survivors. In this article we review the physiology of exercise testing and lung cancer. Then, we assess the utility of exercise testing in patients with lung cancer in four contexts (preoperative evaluation for lung cancer resection, after lung cancer resection, lung cancer prognosis, and assessment of efficiency of exercise training programs) after systematically identifying original studies involving the most common forms of exercise tests in this patient population: laboratory cardiopulmonary exercise testing and simple field testing with the 6-minute walk test, shuttle walk test, and/or stair-climbing test. Lastly, we propose a conceptual framework for risk assessment of patients with lung cancer who are being considered for therapy and identify areas for further studies in this patient population. PMID:27156441

  1. Smad6 determines BMP-regulated invasive behaviour of breast cancer cells in a zebrafish xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    de Boeck, Miriam; Cui, Chao; Mulder, Aat A; Jost, Carolina R; Ikeno, Souichi; ten Dijke, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) family is known to play critical roles in cancer progression. While the dual role of TGF-β is well described, the function of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is unclear. In this study, we established the involvement of Smad6, a BMP-specific inhibitory Smad, in breast cancer cell invasion. We show that stable overexpression of Smad6 in breast cancer MCF10A M2 cells inhibits BMP signalling, thereby mitigating BMP6-induced suppression of mesenchymal marker expression. Using a zebrafish xenograft model, we demonstrate that overexpression of Smad6 potentiates invasion of MCF10A M2 cells and enhances the aggressiveness of breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells in vivo, whereas a reversed phenotype is observed after Smad6 knockdown. Interestingly, BMP6 pre-treatment of MDA-MB-231 cells induced cluster formation at the invasive site in the zebrafish. BMP6 also stimulated cluster formation of MDA-MB-231 cells co-cultured on Human Microvascular Endothelial Cells (HMEC)-1 in vitro. Electron microscopy illustrated an induction of cell-cell contact by BMP6. The clinical relevance of our findings is highlighted by a correlation of high Smad6 expression with poor distant metastasis free survival in ER-negative cancer patients. Collectively, our data strongly indicates the involvement of Smad6 and BMP signalling in breast cancer cell invasion in vivo. PMID:27113436

  2. Radiation Therapy for Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... whether surgery will be helpful for you EXTERNAL BEAM RADIATION THER APY External beam radiation therapy is the safe delivery of high- ... your cancer. A linear accelerator focuses the radiation beam to a precise location in your body for ...

  3. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Templeton, Amanda K; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama; Ramesh, Rajagopal

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called "cancer stem cells" (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  4. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  5. TLR9 agonist acts by different mechanisms synergizing with bevacizumab in sensitive and cetuximab-resistant colon cancer xenografts.

    PubMed

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Caputo, Rosa; Garofalo, Sonia; Bianco, Roberto; Rosa, Roberta; Merola, Gerardina; Gelardi, Teresa; Racioppi, Luigi; Fontanini, Gabriella; De Placido, Sabino; Kandimalla, Ekambar R; Agrawal, Sudhir; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2007-07-24

    Synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), a class of agents that induce specific immune response, exhibit antitumor activity and are currently being investigated in cancer patients. Intriguingly, their mechanisms of action on tumor growth and angiogenesis are still incompletely understood. We recently discovered that a synthetic agonist of TLR9, immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO), acts by impairing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and potently synergizes with anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab in GEO human colon cancer xenografts, whereas it is ineffective in VEGF-overexpressing cetuximab-resistant GEO cetuximab-resistant (GEO-CR) tumors. VEGF is activated by EGFR, and its overexpression causes resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Therefore, we used IMO and the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab as tools to study IMO's role on EGFR and angiogenesis and to explore its therapeutic potential in GEO, LS174T, and GEO-CR cancer xenografts. We found that IMO enhances the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of cetuximab, that bevacizumab has no ADCC, and IMO is unable to enhance it. Nevertheless, the IMO-plus-bevacizumab combination synergistically inhibits the growth of GEO and LS174T as well as of GEO-CR tumors, preceded by inhibition of signaling protein expression, microvessel formation, and human, but not murine, VEGF secretion. Moreover, IMO inhibited the growth, adhesion, migration, and capillary formation of VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells. The antitumor activity was irrespective of the TLR9 expression on tumor cells. These studies demonstrate that synthetic agonists of TLR9 interfere with growth and angiogenesis also by EGFR- and ADCC-independent mechanisms affecting endothelial cell functions and provide a strong rationale to combine IMO with bevacizumab and EGFR inhibitory drugs in colon cancer patients.

  6. TLR9 agonist acts by different mechanisms synergizing with bevacizumab in sensitive and cetuximab-resistant colon cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Damiano, Vincenzo; Caputo, Rosa; Garofalo, Sonia; Bianco, Roberto; Rosa, Roberta; Merola, Gerardina; Gelardi, Teresa; Racioppi, Luigi; Fontanini, Gabriella; De Placido, Sabino; Kandimalla, Ekambar R.; Agrawal, Sudhir; Ciardiello, Fortunato; Tortora, Giampaolo

    2007-01-01

    Synthetic agonists of Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), a class of agents that induce specific immune response, exhibit antitumor activity and are currently being investigated in cancer patients. Intriguingly, their mechanisms of action on tumor growth and angiogenesis are still incompletely understood. We recently discovered that a synthetic agonist of TLR9, immune modulatory oligonucleotide (IMO), acts by impairing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling and potently synergizes with anti-EGFR antibody cetuximab in GEO human colon cancer xenografts, whereas it is ineffective in VEGF-overexpressing cetuximab-resistant GEO cetuximab-resistant (GEO-CR) tumors. VEGF is activated by EGFR, and its overexpression causes resistance to EGFR inhibitors. Therefore, we used IMO and the anti-VEGF antibody bevacizumab as tools to study IMO's role on EGFR and angiogenesis and to explore its therapeutic potential in GEO, LS174T, and GEO-CR cancer xenografts. We found that IMO enhances the antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) activity of cetuximab, that bevacizumab has no ADCC, and IMO is unable to enhance it. Nevertheless, the IMO-plus-bevacizumab combination synergistically inhibits the growth of GEO and LS174T as well as of GEO-CR tumors, preceded by inhibition of signaling protein expression, microvessel formation, and human, but not murine, VEGF secretion. Moreover, IMO inhibited the growth, adhesion, migration, and capillary formation of VEGF-stimulated endothelial cells. The antitumor activity was irrespective of the TLR9 expression on tumor cells. These studies demonstrate that synthetic agonists of TLR9 interfere with growth and angiogenesis also by EGFR- and ADCC-independent mechanisms affecting endothelial cell functions and provide a strong rationale to combine IMO with bevacizumab and EGFR inhibitory drugs in colon cancer patients. PMID:17636117

  7. Smog May Shorten Lives of Lung Cancer Patients

    MedlinePlus

    ... 5, 2016 FRIDAY, Aug. 5, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Air pollution may shorten the lives of lung cancer patients, ... the International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies air pollution as a cancer-causing agent. "This study, along ...

  8. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Li Rita; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Chang, Shen-Chih; Lazarus, Philip; Teare, M. Dawn; Woll, Penella J.; Orlow, Irene; Cox, Brian; Brhane, Yonathan; Liu, Geoffrey; Hung, Rayjean J.

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled using random effects models. Subgroup analyses were done for sex, histology and tobacco smoking status. The shapes of dose-response associations were examined using restricted cubic spline regression. The overall pooled OR for habitual versus nonhabitual or never users was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.66–1.38). Compared to nonhabitual or never users, the summary OR was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63–1.24) for individuals who smoked 1 or more joint-equivalents of cannabis per day and 0.94 (95%CI: 0.67–1.32) for those consumed at least 10 joint-years. For adenocarcinoma cases the ORs were 1.73 (95%CI: 0.75–4.00) and 1.74 (95%CI: 0.85–3.55), respectively. However, no association was found for the squamous cell carcinoma based on small numbers. Weak associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were observed in never tobacco smokers. Spline modeling indicated a weak positive monotonic association between cumulative cannabis use and lung cancer, but precision was low at high exposure levels. Results from our pooled analyses provide little evidence for an increased risk of lung cancer among habitual or long-term cannabis smokers, although the possibility of potential adverse effect for heavy consumption cannot be excluded. PMID:24947688

  9. Cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk: Pooled analysis in the International Lung Cancer Consortium.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li Rita; Morgenstern, Hal; Greenland, Sander; Chang, Shen-Chih; Lazarus, Philip; Teare, M Dawn; Woll, Penella J; Orlow, Irene; Cox, Brian; Brhane, Yonathan; Liu, Geoffrey; Hung, Rayjean J

    2015-02-15

    To investigate the association between cannabis smoking and lung cancer risk, data on 2,159 lung cancer cases and 2,985 controls were pooled from 6 case-control studies in the US, Canada, UK, and New Zealand within the International Lung Cancer Consortium. Study-specific associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were estimated using unconditional logistic regression adjusting for sociodemographic factors, tobacco smoking status and pack-years; odds-ratio estimates were pooled using random effects models. Subgroup analyses were done for sex, histology and tobacco smoking status. The shapes of dose-response associations were examined using restricted cubic spline regression. The overall pooled OR for habitual versus nonhabitual or never users was 0.96 (95% CI: 0.66-1.38). Compared to nonhabitual or never users, the summary OR was 0.88 (95%CI: 0.63-1.24) for individuals who smoked 1 or more joint-equivalents of cannabis per day and 0.94 (95%CI: 0.67-1.32) for those consumed at least 10 joint-years. For adenocarcinoma cases the ORs were 1.73 (95%CI: 0.75-4.00) and 1.74 (95%CI: 0.85-3.55), respectively. However, no association was found for the squamous cell carcinoma based on small numbers. Weak associations between cannabis smoking and lung cancer were observed in never tobacco smokers. Spline modeling indicated a weak positive monotonic association between cumulative cannabis use and lung cancer, but precision was low at high exposure levels. Results from our pooled analyses provide little evidence for an increased risk of lung cancer among habitual or long-term cannabis smokers, although the possibility of potential adverse effect for heavy consumption cannot be excluded.

  10. Curcumin and lung cancer--a review.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Hiren J; Patel, Vipul; Sadikot, Ruxana T

    2014-12-01

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane) is the most important component of the spice turmeric and is derived from the rhizome of the East Indian plant Curcuma longa. Curcumin has been used extensively in Ayurvedic medicine for centuries, as it is nontoxic and has a variety of therapeutic properties including antioxidant, analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and antiseptic activities. Recently, curcumin has been widely studied for its anticancer properties via its effects on a variety of biological pathways involved in apoptosis, tumor proliferation, chemo- and radiotherapy sensitization, tumor invasion, and metastases. Curcumin can be an effective adjunct in treating solid organ tumors due to its properties of regulating oncogenes like p53, egr-1, c-myc, bcl-XL, etc.; transcription factors like NF-kB, STAT-3, and AP-1; protein kinases like MAPK; and enzymes like COX and LOX. Lung cancer is the most common malignancy worldwide and a leading cause of cancer-related deaths. Seventy-five percent of lung cancer presents at an advanced stage where the existing treatment is not very effective and may result in tremendous patient morbidity. As a result, there is a significant interest in developing adjunctive chemotherapies to augment currently available treatment protocols, which may allow decreased side effects and toxicity without compromising therapeutic efficacy. Curcumin is one such potential candidate, and this review presents an overview of the current in vitro and in vivo studies of curcumin in lung cancer.

  11. Palliative care in patients with lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Farbicka, Paulina

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer accounts for 12% of all cancers and has the highest annual rate of mortality in men and women. The overall aim is cure or prolongation of life without evidence of disease. Almost 60% of patients at the moment of diagnosis are not eligible for radical treatment. Therefore soothing and supportive treatment is the only treatment of choice. Patients with lung cancer who have symptoms of dyspnea, chronic cough, severe pain, exhaustion and cachexia syndrome, fear and depression and significantly reduced physical and intellectual activities are qualified for inpatient or home palliative care. Knowledge about various methods used in palliative treatment allows one to alleviate symptoms that occur in an advanced stage of disease with an expected short survival period. Methods of oncological treatment that are often used in patients with advanced lung cancer include radiotherapy and chemotherapy. Drawing attention to the earlier implementation of palliative care is an objective of research carried out during recent years. Advances in surgical and conservative treatment of these patients have contributed to better outcomes and longer survival time. PMID:24596508

  12. Testing lung cancer drugs and therapies in mice

    Cancer.gov

    National Cancer Institute (NCI) investigators have designed a genetically engineered mouse for use in the study of human lung squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). SCC is a type of non-small cell lung carcinoma, one of the most common types of lung cancer, with

  13. Lung cancer: Current status and prospects for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Mountain, C.F.; Carr, D.T.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains 32 papers. Some of the titles are: Activation of cellular ras genes in human neoplasms; The valve of definitive radiation therapy of unresectable squamous cell carcinoma, large cell carcinoma, and adenocarcinoma of the lung; Current concepts of chemotherapy and radiotherapy for small cell lung cancer, and Current status of immunotherapy for lung cancer.

  14. Opposite angiogenic outcome of curcumin against ischemia and Lewis lung cancer models: in silico, in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shengjun; Xu, Yan; Li, Xin; Tie, Lu; Pan, Yan; Li, Xuejun

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the angiogenic effects of curcumin on an ischemia and lung cancer model. To induce ischemia combined with lung cancer models, unilateral femoral arteries of C57BL/6 mice were disconnected on one side of the mouse and Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) cells were xenografted on the opposite side. Angiogenic effects and underlying mechanisms associated with curcumin were investigated. Molecular target(s), signaling cascades and binding affinities were detected by Western blot, two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE), computer simulations and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) techniques. Curcumin promoted post-ischemic blood recirculation and suppressed lung cancer progression in inbred C57BL/6 mice via regulation of the HIF1α/mTOR/VEGF/VEGFR cascade oppositely. Inflammatory stimulation induced by neutrophil elastase (NE) promoted angiogenesis in lung cancer tissues, but these changes were reversed by curcumin through directly reducing NE secretion and stimulating α1-antitrypsin (α1-AT) and insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS-1) production. Meanwhile, curcumin dose-dependently influenced endothelial cells (EC) tube formation and chicken embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) neovascularization. Curcumin had opposite effects on blood vessel regeneration under physiological and pathological angiogenesis, which was effected through negative or positive regulation of the HIF1α/mTOR/VEGF/VEGFR cascade. Curcumin had the promise as a new treatment modality for both ischemic conditions and lung cancer simultaneously in the clinic.

  15. TOPK promotes lung cancer resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors by phosphorylating and activating c-Jun

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tao; Wang, Ting; Niu, Mengjie; Zhang, Shengli; Jia, Lintao; Li, Shengqing

    2016-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) targeting the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) have shown promising clinical efficacy in non-squamous non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC); however, resistance is frequently observed in malignant cells, operating through a mechanism that remains largely unknown. The present study shows that T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) is upregulated in NSCLC and excessively activated in TKI-refractory cells. TOPK dictates the responsiveness of lung cancers to the EGFR-targeted TKI gefitinib through the transcription factor AP-1 component c-Jun. TOPK binds directly to and phosphorylates c-Jun, which consequently activates the transcription of AP-1 target genes, including CCND1 and CDC2. TOPK silencing sensitizes EGFR-TKI-resistant lung cancer cells to gefitinib and increases gefitinib efficacy in preclinical lung adenocarcinoma xenograft models. These findings represent a novel mechanism of lung cancer resistance to TKIs and suggest that TOPK may have value both as a predictive biomarker and as a therapeutic target: TOPK-targeted therapy may synergize with EGFR-targeted therapy in lung cancers. PMID:26745678

  16. Oral administration of penta-O-galloyl-β-D-glucose suppresses triple-negative breast cancer xenograft growth and metastasis in strong association with JAK1-STAT3 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyo-Jeong; Seo, Nam-Jun; Jeong, Soo-Jin; Park, Yongjin; Jung, Deok-Beom; Koh, Wonil; Lee, Hyo-Jung; Lee, Eun-Ok; Ahn, Kwang Seok; Ahn, Kyoo Seok; Lü, Junxuan; Kim, Sung-Hoon

    2011-06-01

    There is an urgent clinical need for chemotherapeutic and chemopreventive drugs for triple-negative breast cancer (TNBCa). Extending on our recent work, we hypothesize that the herbal compound 1,2,3,4,6-penta-O-galloyl-beta-D-glucose (PGG) can inhibit the growth and metastasis of TNBCa xenograft and target Janus-activated kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) 3-signaling axis. Daily oral gavage of 10 mg PGG/kg body wt decreased MDA-MB-231 xenograft weight by 49.3% (P < 0.01) at 40 days postinoculation, whereas weekly intraperitoneal injections of Taxol at the same dosage resulted in a 21.4% reduction (P > 0.1). PGG treatment also decreased the incidence of lung metastasis. Immunohistochemical staining detected decreased Ki-67 (proliferation) index and increased terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase deoxyuridine triphosphate nick end labeling (apoptosis) index in PGG-treated and Taxol-treated xenografts. However, the CD34 (angiogenesis) index was decreased only in PGG-treated xenografts along with decreased phospho-STAT3. In cell culture of MDA-MB-231 cells, PGG decreased pSTAT3 and its downstream target proteins, decreased its upstream kinase pJAK1 and induced the expression of SHP1, a JAK1 upstream tyrosine phosphatase, within as early as 1 h of exposure. The phosphatase inhibitor pervanadate reversed the PGG-induced downregulation of pSTAT3 and caspase activation. Orally administered PGG can inhibit TNBCa growth and metastasis, probably through anti-angiogenesis, antiproliferation and apoptosis induction. Mechanistically, PGG-induced inhibition of JAK1-STAT3 axis may contribute to the observed in vivo efficacy and the effects on the cellular processes.

  17. Silicosis and lung cancer among Chinese granite workers.

    PubMed

    Chia, S E; Chia, K S; Phoon, W H; Lee, H P

    1991-06-01

    Of the 184 cases of silicosis registered between 1 January 1970 and 31 December 1984 in Singapore, all the relevant information was available for 159, which were linked to the population-based National Cancer Register for lung cancer. Nine cases of lung cancer were found. The standardized incidence ratio (SIR) was computed with the age- and calendar-specific incidence of lung cancer rates of Chinese males in Singapore as a basis. Excess risk of lung cancer was found (SIR 2.01, 95% confidence interval 0.92-3.81). Adjustment for smoking showed that it alone could not account for the excess lung cancer risk. There was an increasing, but not significant, trend with increasing severity of silicosis and exposure duration. The results suggest that the severity of silicosis and possibly exposure to free silica may have contributed to the excess of lung cancer among the cases of silicosis studied.

  18. DIETARY AGENTS FOR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT OF LUNG CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naghma; Mukhtar, Hasan

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is a prominent cause of cancer-associated mortality worldwide. The main reason for high mortality due to lung cancer is attributable to the fact that the diagnosis is generally made when it has spread beyond a curable stage and cannot be treated surgically or with radiation therapy. Therefore, new approaches like dietary modifications could be extremely useful in reducing lung cancer incidences. Several fruits and vegetables offer a variety of bioactive compounds to afford protection against several diseases, including lung cancer. A number of research studies involving dietary agents provide strong evidence for their role in the prevention and treatment of lung cancer, and have identified their molecular mechanisms of action and potential targets. In this review article, we summarize data from in-vitro and in-vivo studies and where available, in clinical trials, on the effects of some of the most promising dietary agents against lung cancer. PMID:25644088

  19. Prevention and management of lung cancer in China.

    PubMed

    Hong, Qun-Ying; Wu, Guo-Ming; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Hu, Cheng-Ping; Zhou, Jian-Ying; Chen, Liang-An; Li, Wei-Min; Li, Shi-Yue; Wang, Kai; Wang, Qi; Zhang, Xiao-Ju; Li, Jing; Gong, Xin; Bai, Chun-Xue

    2015-09-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide. In China, the incidence of lung cancer has grown rapidly, resulting in a large social and economic burden. Several researchers have devoted their studies to lung cancer and have demonstrated that there are many risk factors for lung cancer in China, including tobacco use, environmental pollution, food, genetics, and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, the lung cancer incidence is still growing rapidly in China, and there is an even higher incidence among the younger generation. One explanation may be the triple-neglect situation, in which medical policies that neglect prevention, diagnosis, and supportive care have increased patients' mortality and reduced their quality of life. Therefore, it is necessary to enhance the efficiency of prevention and early diagnosis not only by focusing more attention on treatment but also by drawing more attention to supportive care for patients with lung cancer.

  20. Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Metastatic Breast Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Prostate Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-17

    Male Breast Carcinoma; Prostate Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Prostate Carcinoma; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Prostate Cancer

  1. Human cancer xenografts in outbred nude mice can be confounded by polymorphisms in a modifier of tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Zeineldin, Maged; Jensen, Derek; Paranjape, Smita R; Parelkar, Nikhil K; Jokar, Iman; Vielhauer, George A; Neufeld, Kristi L

    2014-08-01

    Tumorigenicity studies often employ outbred nude mice, in the absence of direct evidence that this mixed genetic background will negatively affect experimental outcome. Here we show that outbred nude mice carry two different alleles of Pla2g2a, a genetic modifier of intestinal tumorigenesis in mice. Here, we identify previous unreported linked polymorphisms in the promoter, noncoding and coding sequences of Pla2g2a and show that outbred nude mice from different commercial providers are heterogeneous for this polymorphic Pla2g2a allele. This heterogeneity even extends to mice obtained from a single commercial provider, which display mixed Pla2g2a genotypes. Notably, we demonstrated that the polymorphic Pla2g2a allele affects orthotopic xenograft establishment of human colon cancer cells in outbred nude mice. This finding establishes a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing intestinal tumorigenesis. Using in vitro reporter assays and pharmacological inhibitors, we show promoter polymorphisms and nonsense-mediated RNA decay (NMD) as underlying mechanisms that lead to low Pla2g2a mRNA levels in tumor-sensitive mice. Together, this study provides mechanistic insight regarding Pla2g2a polymorphisms and demonstrates a non-cell-autonomous role for Pla2g2a in suppressing tumors. Moreover, our direct demonstration that mixed genetic backgrounds of outbred nude mice can significantly affect baseline tumorigenicity cautions against future use of outbred mice for tumor xenograft studies.

  2. Molecular correlates of platinum response in human high-grade serous ovarian cancer patient-derived xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Topp, M; Hartley, L; Cook, M; Heong, V; Boehm, E; McShane, L; Pyman, J; McNally, O; Ananda, S; Harrell, M; Etemadmoghadam, D; Galletta, L; Alsop, K; Mitchell, G; Fox, SB; Kerr, JB; Hutt, KJ; Kaufmann, SH; Swisher, EM; Bowtell, DD; Wakefield, M; Scott, CL

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Improvement in the ability to target underlying drivers and vulnerabilities of high-grade serous ovarian cancer (HG-SOC) requires the development of molecularly annotated pre-clinical models reflective of clinical responses. Methods We generated patient-derived xenografts (PDXs) from consecutive, chemotherapy-naïve, human HG-SOC by transplanting fresh human HG-SOC fragments into subcutaneous and intra-ovarian bursal sites of NOD/SCID IL2Rγnull recipient mice, completed molecular annotation and assessed platinum sensitivity. Results The success rate of xenografting was 83%. Of ten HG-SOC PDXs, all contained mutations in TP53, two were mutated for BRCA1, three for BRCA2, and in two, BRCA1 was methylated. In vivo cisplatin response, determined as platinum sensitive (progression-free interval ≥100 d, n=4), resistant (progression-free interval <100 d, n=3) or refractory (n=3), was largely consistent with patient outcome. Three of four platinum sensitive HG-SOC PDXs contained DNA repair gene mutations, and the fourth was methylated for BRCA1. In contrast, all three platinum refractory PDXs overexpressed dominant oncogenes (CCNE1, LIN28B and/or BCL2). Conclusions Because PDX platinum response reflected clinical outcome, these annotated PDXs will provide a unique model system for preclinical testing of novel therapies for HG-SOC. PMID:24560445

  3. Exploring targeted pulmonary delivery for treatment of lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Goel, Amit; Baboota, Sanjula; Sahni, Jasjeet K; Ali, Javed

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer is the most malignant cancer today. The treatment of lung cancer continues to be a challenge for oncologists. The direct delivery of chemotherapeutic agents to the lungs could represent a novel therapeutic approach for patients with pulmonary metastases. The large alveolar surface area, the low thickness of the epithelial barrier, and an extensive vascularization make the pulmonary route an ideal route for administration of oncolytics. This paper reviews the research performed over the last and current decades on the delivery of various oncolytics for pulmonary delivery for the treatment of lung cancer. Inhaled drug delivery devices in cancer therapy are also discussed in the present manuscript. PMID:23799201

  4. Genetic Testing for Lung Cancer Risk

    PubMed Central

    Marcy, Theodore W; Stefanek, Michael; Thompson, Kimberly M

    2002-01-01

    Advances in genetics have increased our ability to assess an individual's genetic risk for disease. There is a hypothesis that genetic test results will motivate high-risk individuals to reduce harmful exposures, to increase their surveillance for disease, or to seek preventive treatments. However, genetic testing for genes associated with an increased risk of lung cancer would not change physicians' recommendations regarding smoking cessation. Limited studies suggest that test results that demonstrate an increased risk of lung cancer do not improve smoking cessation success. These test results may even distort an individual's risk perceptions. Before recommending genetic testing to assess risk for disease, physicians need to consider whether knowledge about genetic susceptibility will alter patient management. PMID:12472931

  5. Residential radon exposure and lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Neuberger, J.S.

    1994-12-31

    Epidemiological studies of underground uranium and hard-rock miners, as well as animal experiments, indicate that the decay products of radon gas are a contributory cause of lung cancer. While one might expect that residential radon (progeny) exposure might be linked to an increase in lung cancer rates, sufficient evidence from residential studies is required to support this assumption. To date this evidence has not been definitive enough. There are differences in age, sex, dust exposure, and smoking between groups exposed in mines and in homes. A number of published studies have addressed this question; a number of studies are under way. The composite results from these studies may be useful in reducing the uncertainty. This paper summarizes and critiques results and discusses several methodological issues related to the studies.

  6. Spectral characteristic analysis of lung cancer serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiao Zhou; Jin, Huiqiang; Liu, Huasheng; Ding, Jianhua; Lin, Junxiu

    2001-10-01

    Spectral changes of lung cancer serum in the process of tumor evolution were investigated in this study. We kept close watch on the tumor progression of a group of patients, and measured their serum spectra using 488.0nm and 514.5nm excitation of an Ar-ion laser once a week. There was no apparent change observed in fluorescence spectrum in different period. However, the relative intensity of three Raman peaks (mode A, B and C) decreased every week later. For quantitative analysis of such changes, a parameter Ir (relative intensity of C Raman peak) was introduced and Ir-value was calculated. Calculation showed that Ir-value was degressive with tumor evolution, but (beta) (Ir5145 /Ir4880) varied irregularly. To the end, no Raman peak was observed. We assumed that three Raman peaks were derived from beta carotene. It indicated that the content of beta carotene decreased with the aggravation of lung cancer.

  7. Lung Cancer Ablation: Technologies and Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Alexander, Erica S.; Dupuy, Damian E.

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of lung cancers in 2012 is estimated to reach 226,160 new cases, with only a third of patients suitable surgical candidates. Tumor ablation has emerged as an important and efficacious treatment option for nonsurgical lung cancer patients. This localized minimally invasive therapy is best suited for small oligonodular lesions or favorably located metastatic tumors. Radiofrequency ablation has been in use for over a decade, and newer modalities including microwave ablation, cryoablation, and irreversible electroporation have emerged as additional treatment options for patients. Ablation therapies can offer patients and clinicians a repeatable and effective therapy for palliation and, in some cases, cure of thoracic malignancies. This article discusses the available technologies and techniques available for tumor ablation of thoracic malignancies including patient selection, basic aspects of procedure technique, imaging follow-up, treatment outcomes, and comparisons between various therapies. PMID:24436530

  8. Lung cancer-a fractal viewpoint.

    PubMed

    Lennon, Frances E; Cianci, Gianguido C; Cipriani, Nicole A; Hensing, Thomas A; Zhang, Hannah J; Chen, Chin-Tu; Murgu, Septimiu D; Vokes, Everett E; Vannier, Michael W; Salgia, Ravi

    2015-11-01

    Fractals are mathematical constructs that show self-similarity over a range of scales and non-integer (fractal) dimensions. Owing to these properties, fractal geometry can be used to efficiently estimate the geometrical complexity, and the irregularity of shapes and patterns observed in lung tumour growth (over space or time), whereas the use of traditional Euclidean geometry in such calculations is more challenging. The application of fractal analysis in biomedical imaging and time series has shown considerable promise for measuring processes as varied as heart and respiratory rates, neuronal cell characterization, and vascular development. Despite the advantages of fractal mathematics and numerous studies demonstrating its applicability to lung cancer research, many researchers and clinicians remain unaware of its potential. Therefore, this Review aims to introduce the fundamental basis of fractals and to illustrate how analysis of fractal dimension (FD) and associated measurements, such as lacunarity (texture) can be performed. We describe the fractal nature of the lung and explain why this organ is particularly suited to fractal analysis. Studies that have used fractal analyses to quantify changes in nuclear and chromatin FD in primary and metastatic tumour cells, and clinical imaging studies that correlated changes in the FD of tumours on CT and/or PET images with tumour growth and treatment responses are reviewed. Moreover, the potential use of these techniques in the diagnosis and therapeutic management of lung cancer are discussed.

  9. [Lung Cancer as an Occupational Disease].

    PubMed

    Baur, X; Woitowitz, H-J

    2016-08-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most frequently encountered cancer types. According to the latest WHO data, about 10 % of this disease are due to occupational exposure to cancerogens. Asbestos is still the number one carcinogen. Further frequent causes include quarz and ionizing radiation (uranium mining). Probable causes of the disease can be identified only with the help of detailed occupational history taken by a medical specialist and qualified exposure assessment. Without clarifying the cause of the disease, there is neither a correct insurance procedure nor compensation for the victim, and furthermore, required preventive measures cannot be initiated. PMID:27512930

  10. Discovery – Lung Cancer Screening Saves Lives: The NLST

    Cancer.gov

    NCI funded the National Lung Screening Trial, an eight-year study that used new technology to detect small, aggressive tumors early enough to surgically remove them. This approach reduced lung cancer deaths among participants by 20 percent.

  11. Tumor-suppressive miR-218-5p inhibits cancer cell proliferation and migration via EGFR in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Zhicong; Fu, Zheng; Hong, Yeting; Zhou, Yong; Zhang, Chen-Yu; Chen, Xi

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death worldwide, and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) accounts for approximately 80% of lung cancer cases. Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have been consistently demonstrated to be involved in NSCLC and to act as either tumor oncogenes or tumor suppressors. In this study, we identified a specific binding site for miR-218-5p in the 3′-untranslated region of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). We further experimentally validated miR-218-5p as a direct regulator of EGFR. We also identified an inverse correlation between miR-218-5p and EGFR protein levels in NSCLC tissue samples. Moreover, we demonstrated that miR-218-5p plays a critical role in suppressing the proliferation and migration of lung cancer cells probably by binding to EGFR. Finally, we examined the function of miR-218-5p in vivo and revealed that miR-218-5p exerts an anti-tumor effect by negatively regulating EGFR in a xenograft mouse model. Taken together, the results of this study highlight an important role for miR-218-5p in the regulation of EGFR in NSCLC and may open new avenues for future lung cancer therapies. PMID:27057632

  12. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-11-13

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  13. Celecoxib enhanced the cytotoxic effect of cisplatin in chemo-resistant gastric cancer xenograft mouse models through a cyclooxygenase-2-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong-Bin; Shen, Fu-Ming; Lv, Qian-Zhou

    2016-04-01

    Our previous study suggested that co-administration of celecoxib increased chemo-sensitivity of multidrug-resistant human gastric cancer SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin (DDP) in vitro. The present study was designed to investigate whether celecoxib had the similar activities in vivo. SGC-7901/DDP and SGC-7901 xenograft mouse models were established. At the end of the experiment, cisplatin treatment alone significantly inhibited tumor growth in SGC-7901 xenograft, as compared with that in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, suggesting that it maintained cisplatin sensitivity. When cisplatin and celecoxib were co-administrated, their antitumor activities were augmented in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft. The levels of Ki67 and PCNA after combination therapy were significantly decreased in SGC-7901/DDP xenograft, as compared with those of cisplatin treatment alone. Moreover, examining the apoptotic index by TUNEL assay showed similar results. Further studies demonstrated the inhibitory effect of celecoxib on cyclooxygenase-2 and P-glycoprotein expression was the possible reason to increase sensitivity of SGC-7901/DDP cells to cisplatin in vivo. However, the ratio of thromboxane B2 and prostaglandin F1α was elevated after celecoxib treatment in mice. This has been proposed to increase the risk of thrombogenesis. Further studies are required to evaluate the efficacy and safety of celecoxib for reducing chemo-resistance in gastric cancer. PMID:26879869

  14. Therapeutic Delivery of miR-200c Enhances Radiosensitivity in Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Maria Angelica; Valdecanas, David; Zhang, Xiaochun; Zhan, Yanai; Bhardwaj, Vikas; Calin, George A; Komaki, Ritsuko; Giri, Dipak K; Quini, Caio C; Wolfe, Tatiana; Peltier, Heidi J; Bader, Andreas G; Heymach, John V; Meyn, Raymond E; Welsh, James W

    2014-01-01

    The microRNA (miR)-200s and their negative regulator ZEB1 have been extensively studied in the context of the epithelial–mesenchymal transition. Loss of miR-200s has been shown to enhance cancer aggressiveness and metastasis, whereas replacement of miR-200 miRNAs has been shown to inhibit cell growth in several types of tumors, including lung cancer. Here, we reveal a novel function of miR-200c, a member of the miR-200 family, in regulating intracellular reactive oxygen species signaling and explore a potential application for its use in combination with therapies known to increase oxidative stress such as radiation. We found that miR-200c overexpression increased cellular radiosensitivity by direct regulation of the oxidative stress response genes PRDX2, GAPB/Nrf2, and SESN1 in ways that inhibits DNA double-strand breaks repair, increase levels of reactive oxygen species, and upregulate p21. We used a lung cancer xenograft model to further demonstrate the therapeutic potential of systemic delivery of miR-200c to enhance radiosensitivity in lung cancer. Our findings suggest that the antitumor effects of miR-200c result partially from its regulation of the oxidative stress response; they further suggest that miR-200c, in combination with radiation, could represent a therapeutic strategy in the future. PMID:24791940

  15. Hyperspectral imaging of skin and lung cancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdeva, Larisa A.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Alonova, Marina V.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Artemyev, Dmitry N.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2016-04-01

    The problem of cancer control requires design of new approaches for instrumental diagnostics, as the accuracy of cancer detection on the first step of diagnostics in clinics is slightly more than 50%. In this study, we present a method of visualization and diagnostics of skin and lung tumours based on registration and processing of tissues hyperspectral images. In a series of experiments registration of hyperspectral images of skin and lung tissue samples is carried out. Melanoma, basal cell carcinoma, nevi and benign tumours are studied in skin ex vivo and in vivo experiments; adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas are studied in ex vivo lung experiments. In a series of experiments the typical features of diffuse reflection spectra for pathological and normal tissues were found. Changes in tissues morphology during the tumour growth lead to the changes of blood and pigments concentration, such as melanin in skin. That is why tumours and normal tissues maybe differentiated with information about spectral response in 500-600 nm and 600 - 670 nm areas. Thus, hyperspectral imaging in the visible region may be a useful tool for cancer detection as it helps to estimate spectral properties of tissues and determine malignant regions for precise resection of tumours.

  16. Dietary factors in lung cancer prognosis.

    PubMed

    Goodman, M T; Kolonel, L N; Wilkens, L R; Yoshizawa, C N; Le Marchand, L; Hankin, J H

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis-generating analysis of the role of diet on survival was conducted among a sample of 463 men and 212 women with histologically-confirmed lung cancer. Interview information was obtained from two population-based case-control studies of lung cancer conducted on the Island of Oahu, Hawaii, between 1979 and 1985. The interview consisted of a quantitative dietary history to assess the usual intake of foods 1 year prior to diagnosis, a complete tobacco history, and other demographic and lifestyle information. Records from the Hawaii Tumor Registry were reviewed for data on stage, histology, and follow-up status of these patients. A food group analysis showed a significant reduction in the risk of death with increasing consumption of all vegetables combined among women (P for trend = 0.03), but not among men. The covariate-adjusted median survival times for women from the highest to the lowest quartiles of vegetable intake were 33, 21, 15, and 18 months, respectively. The results also suggested an association of fruit intake and survival among women (P for trend = 0.02), although a similar effect was not found among men. Increased consumption of certain foods, such as tomatoes and oranges among men, and broccoli and, perhaps, tomatoes among women, appeared to improve survival. This exploratory analysis provides mixed indications that certain components of vegetables and fruits may prolong survival in lung cancer patients. PMID:1591072

  17. The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: low-dose helical computed tomography (CT) and standard chest X-ray. Both chest X-rays and low-dose helical CT scans have been used to find lung cancer early, but the effects of these screening techniques on lung cancer mortality rates had not been determined. NLST enrolled 53,454 current or former heavy smokers from 33 sites and coordinating centers across the United States. | The National Lung Screening Trial (NLST) compared two ways of detecting lung cancer: participants who received low-dose helical CT scans had a 20% lower risk of dying from lung cancer than participants who received standard chest X-rays.

  18. Death Concerns among Individuals Newly Diagnosed with Lung Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lehto, Rebecca; Therrien, Barbara

    2010-01-01

    Confronting the reality of death is an important challenge for individuals facing life-threatening illness such as lung cancer, the leading cause of cancer death. Few studies, however, document the nature of death-related concerns in individuals newly diagnosed with lung cancer. The aims of this exploratory study were to examine unsolicited…

  19. Basal Tumor Cell Isolation and Patient-Derived Xenograft Engraftment Identify High-Risk Clinical Bladder Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Skowron, K. B.; Pitroda, S. P.; Namm, J. P.; Balogun, O.; Beckett, M. A.; Zenner, M. L.; Fayanju, O.; Huang, X.; Fernandez, C.; Zheng, W.; Qiao, G.; Chin, R.; Kron, S. J.; Khodarev, N. N.; Posner, M. C.; Steinberg, G. D.; Weichselbaum, R. R.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies to identify tumors at highest risk for treatment failure are currently under investigation for patients with bladder cancer. We demonstrate that flow cytometric detection of poorly differentiated basal tumor cells (BTCs), as defined by the co-expression of CD90, CD44 and CD49f, directly from patients with early stage tumors (T1-T2 and N0) and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) engraftment in locally advanced tumors (T3-T4 or N+) predict poor prognosis in patients with bladder cancer. Comparative transcriptomic analysis of bladder tumor cells isolated from PDXs indicates unique patterns of gene expression during bladder tumor cell differentiation. We found cell division cycle 25C (CDC25C) overexpression in poorly differentiated BTCs and determined that CDC25C expression predicts adverse survival independent of standard clinical and pathologic features in bladder cancer patients. Taken together, our findings support the utility of BTCs and bladder cancer PDX models in the discovery of novel molecular targets and predictive biomarkers for personalizing oncology care for patients. PMID:27775025

  20. The impact of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on breast cancer metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ampuja, M; Alarmo, E L; Owens, P; Havunen, R; Gorska, A E; Moses, H L; Kallioniemi, A

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is a key regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. In breast cancer cells, BMP4 has been shown to reduce proliferation in vitro and interestingly, in some cases, also to induce migration and invasion. Here we investigated whether BMP4 influences breast cancer metastasis formation by using a xenograft mouse model. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were injected intracardially into mice and metastasis formation was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Mice treated with BMP4 developed metastases slightly earlier as compared to control animals but the overall number of metastases was similar in both groups (13 in the BMP4 group vs. 12 in controls). In BMP4-treated mice, bone metastases were more common (10 vs. 7) but adrenal gland metastases were less frequent (1 vs. 5) than in controls. Immunostaining revealed no differences in signaling activation, proliferation rate, blood vessel formation, EMT markers or the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts between the treatment groups. In conclusion, BMP4 caused a trend towards accelerated metastasis formation, especially in bone. More work is needed to uncover the long-term effects of BMP4 and the clinical relevance of these findings.

  1. Ultrasound-Mediated Destruction of LHRHa Targeted and Paclitaxel Loaded Lipid Microbubbles for the Treatment of Intraperitoneal Ovarian Cancer Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Shufang; Liu, Hongxia; Zhu, Yi; Wang, Zhigang; Xu, Ronald X.

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasound-targeted microbubble destruction (UTMD) is a promising technique to facilitate the delivery of chemotherapy in cancer treatment. However, the process typically uses non-specific microbubbles, leading to low tumor-to-normal tissue uptake ratio and adverse side effects. In this study, we synthesized the LHRH receptor targeted and paclitaxel (PTX) loaded lipid microbubbles (TPLMBs) for tumor-specific binding and enhanced therapeutic effect at the tumor site. An ovarian cancer xenograft model was established by injecting A2780/DDP cells intraperitoneally in BALB/c nude mice. Microscopic imaging of tumor sections after intraperitoneal injection of TPLMBs showed effective binding of the microbubbles with cancer cells. Ultrasound mediated destruction of the intraperitoneally injected TPLMBs yielded a superior therapeutic outcome in comparison with other treatment options. Immunohistochemical analyses of the dissected tumor tissue further confirmed the increased tumor apoptosis and reduced angiogenesis. Our experiment suggests that ultrasound mediated intraperitoneal administration of the targeted drug-loaded microbubbles may be a useful method for the treatment of ovarian cancer. PMID:24237050

  2. The impact of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on breast cancer metastasis in a mouse xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Ampuja, M; Alarmo, E L; Owens, P; Havunen, R; Gorska, A E; Moses, H L; Kallioniemi, A

    2016-06-01

    Bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) is a key regulator of cell proliferation and differentiation. In breast cancer cells, BMP4 has been shown to reduce proliferation in vitro and interestingly, in some cases, also to induce migration and invasion. Here we investigated whether BMP4 influences breast cancer metastasis formation by using a xenograft mouse model. MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells were injected intracardially into mice and metastasis formation was monitored using bioluminescence imaging. Mice treated with BMP4 developed metastases slightly earlier as compared to control animals but the overall number of metastases was similar in both groups (13 in the BMP4 group vs. 12 in controls). In BMP4-treated mice, bone metastases were more common (10 vs. 7) but adrenal gland metastases were less frequent (1 vs. 5) than in controls. Immunostaining revealed no differences in signaling activation, proliferation rate, blood vessel formation, EMT markers or the number of cancer-associated fibroblasts between the treatment groups. In conclusion, BMP4 caused a trend towards accelerated metastasis formation, especially in bone. More work is needed to uncover the long-term effects of BMP4 and the clinical relevance of these findings. PMID:26970275

  3. 1st ESMO Consensus Conference in lung cancer; Lugano 2010: small-cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Stahel, R; Thatcher, N; Früh, M; Le Péchoux, C; Postmus, P E; Sorensen, J B; Felip, E

    2011-09-01

    The 1st ESMO Consensus Conference on lung cancer was held in Lugano, Switzerland on 21st and 22nd May 2010 with the participation of a multidisciplinary panel of leading professionals in pathology and molecular diagnostics and medical, surgical and radiation oncology. Before the conference, the expert panel prepared clinically relevant questions concerning five areas as follows: early and locally advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), first-line metastatic NSCLC, second-/third-line NSCLC, NSCLC pathology and molecular testing, and small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) to be addressed through discussion at the Consensus Conference. All relevant scientific literature for each question was reviewed in advance. During the Consensus Conference, the panel developed recommendations for each specific question. The consensus agreement in SCLC is reported in this article. The recommendations detailed here are based on an expert consensus after careful review of published data. All participants have approved this final update.

  4. Nutrition habits, physical activity, and lung cancer: an authoritative review.

    PubMed

    Koutsokera, Alexandra; Kiagia, Maria; Saif, Muhammad W; Souliotis, Kyriakos; Syrigos, Kostas N

    2013-07-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death worldwide. Because of high incidence rates and low survival rates, it is important to study the risk factors that may help prevent the disease from developing. It has been well established that cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for lung cancer. Nonetheless it is likely that there are other modifiable risk factors that would assist in the prevention of lung cancer. Research on factors such as nutrition and physical activity and their influence on lung cancer has been carried out for nearly 3 decades. A systematic review in the MEDLINE database of published studies was conducted, focusing on systematic reviews, meta-analyses, and large prospective studies. The association between physical activity and lung cancer has been conflicting. Among the researched studies, 10 showed an inverse association, whereas 11 reported no association. A meta-analysis that was conducted from 1996 to October 2003 showed that leisure physical activity (LPA) prevents lung cancer. Data from 11 cohort and case-control studies showed an inverse relationship between fruit and vegetable consumption and lung cancer. Evidence from case-control studies suggests a positive association between meat intake and risk of lung cancer, although several more recent studies have presented doubts about these findings. The possible association of physical activity, nutrition, and the risk of lung cancer development remains controversial. Further prospective studies should be conducted to determine the potential influence of these 2 risk factors.

  5. Epidemiology of Lung Cancer in Korea: Recent Trends

    PubMed Central

    Park, Ji Young

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer causes the most cancer deaths in Korea. Although the smoking rate has begun to decrease, the prevalence of lung cancer is still increasing. We reviewed the national lung cancer registry data and the data published about lung cancer in Korea. In 2012, the crude incidence rate of lung cancer was 43.9 per 100,000. The age-standardized mortality rate of lung cancer was 19.8 per 100,000. The 5-year relative survival rate for lung cancer was 11.3% from 1993 to 1995 and increased to 21.9% in the period from 2008 to 2012. Lung cancer occurring in never-smokers was estimated to increase in Korea. Adenocarcinoma is steadily increasing in both women and men and has replaced squamous cell carcinoma as the most common type of lung cancer in Korea. In patients with adenocarcinoma, the frequency of EGFR mutations was 43% (range, 20%–56%), while that of the EMK4-ALK gene was less than 5%. PMID:27064578

  6. Unbiased Selection of Peptide-Peptoid Hybrids Specific for Lung Cancer Compared to Normal Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Matharage, Jaya M; Minna, John D; Brekken, Rolf A; Udugamasooriya, D Gomika

    2015-12-18

    To develop widely applicable diagnostic and potentially therapeutic approaches overcoming protein heterogeneity in human cancer, we have developed a technology to unbiasedly select high specificity compound(s) that bind any biomolecule (e.g., proteins, lipids, carbohydrates) presented on the cancer cell surface but not on normal cells. We utilized a peptidomimetic based on-bead two-color (OBTC) combinatorial cell screen that can detect differences between two cell surfaces at high accuracy by looking for beads (where each bead in the library had one peptide-peptoid hybrid on the surface) that only bound cancer but not normal cells. We screened a library of 393 216 compounds targeting HCC4017 lung adenocarcinoma cells (labeled in red) in the presence of HBEC30KT normal bronchial epithelial cells (labeled in green) derived from the same tissue of the same patient. This screen identified a peptide-peptoid hybrid called PPS1 which displayed high specific binding for HCC4017 cancer cells over HBEC30KT cells. Specificity was validated through on-bead, ELISA-like and magnetic bead pulldown studies, while a scrambled version of PPS1 did not show any binding. Of interest, the simple dimeric version (PPS1D1) displayed cytotoxic activity on HCC4017 cells, but not on normal HBEC30KT cells. PPS1D1 also strongly accumulated in HCC4017 lung cancer xenografts in mice over control constructs. We conclude that such combinatorial screens using tumor and normal cells from the same patient have significant potential to develop new reagents for cancer biology, diagnosis, and potentially therapy.

  7. Lung cancer in chromate-exposed aerospace workers.

    PubMed

    Alexander, B H; Checkoway, H; Wechsler, L; Heyer, N J; Muhm, J M; O'Keeffe, T P

    1996-12-01

    A retrospective cohort study evaluated the risk of lung cancer in aerospace workers with minimum of 6 months' employment in jobs with chromium [VI] exposure (n = 2429). Standardized incidence ratios (SIR) estimated the risk of lung cancer by duration of employment in chromate-exposure jobs and cumulative exposure based on industrial hygiene and work-history data. The overall SIR for lung cancer was 0.8 (observed [Obs] = 15). Lung cancer risk was inversely related to estimates of cumulative chromate exposure and duration of employment as a painter. Although based on few cases, an elevated lung cancer risk was found in subjects who had worked for 5 or more years as a chrome plater or surface processor tank tender (Obs = 2, SIR = 1.9) and sander/masker or polisher (Obs = 3, SIR = 2.7). A clear association was not observed between chromate exposure and the risk of lung cancer in this population of workers.

  8. CELLULAR AND MOLECULAR IMMUNOLOGY OF LUNG CANCER: THERAPEUTIC IMPLICATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Austin Huy; Berim, Ilya G; Agrawal, Devendra K

    2015-01-01

    Though incidence is declining, the prognosis of lung cancer remains poor. This is likely due to lack of early detection and only recent developments in selective cancer therapies. Key immune cells involved in the pathogenesis of lung cancer include CD4+ T-lymphocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells, and natural killer cells. The growing understanding of these cells indicates a highly complex and intertwined network of their involvement in each stage of lung cancer. Immune cell types and numbers affect prognosis and could offer an opportunity for clinical therapeutic applications. However, an incomplete understanding of immune cell involvement and the underlying processes in lung cancer still remain. More investigation focusing on the role of the immune cells will further the understanding of lung carcinogenesis and develop novel therapeutic approaches for the treatment and management of patients with more specialized and selective lung cancer. PMID:25351434

  9. Perspectives of African Americans on Lung Cancer: A Qualitative Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Laura Tesler; Browning, Emily; Gagne, Joshua; Emmons, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Background. Disparities in incidence and mortality for lung cancer in African Americans are well documented; however, the extent to which disparities reflect differences in patient perceptions of tobacco and lung cancer treatment is unclear. The objective of this study was to explore African Americans’ knowledge of lung cancer, perceived risk, interest in smoking cessation, attitudes toward lung cancer treatment, and lung cancer diagnosis and treatment experiences. Patients and Methods. The cohort comprised 32 African-American current and former smokers without a cancer diagnosis who participated in focus groups and 10 African Americans with lung cancer who participated in in-depth interviews. Transcripts were analyzed using a modified grounded theory approach. Results. Participants without a cancer diagnosis were aware of the link between smoking and lung cancer, the common symptoms of the disease, and its poor prognosis. They desired specific, personalized smoking-cessation information. If diagnosed, the majority reported, they would seek medical care. Most believed that insurance and socioeconomic factors were more likely to affect treatment access than racial discrimination. Participants with a cancer diagnosis were also aware of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. They felt their treatment plans were appropriate and trusted their physicians. Most did not believe that race affected their care. Conclusion. This qualitative study suggests that African-American smokers are aware of the relationship between smoking and lung cancer and are interested in smoking-cessation treatment. These data also indicate that lung cancer disparities are unlikely to be associated with differential willingness to receive care but that African Americans may perceive financial and insurance barriers to lung cancer treatment. PMID:25795634

  10. Sodium Selenite Radiosensitizes Hormone-Refractory Prostate Cancer Xenograft Tumors but Not Intestinal Crypt Cells In Vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tian Junqiang; Ning Shouchen; Knox, Susan J.

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: We have previously shown that sodium selenite (SSE) increases radiation-induced cell killing of human prostate carcinoma cells in vitro. In this study we further evaluated the in vivo radiosensitizing effect of SSE in prostate cancer xenograft tumors and normal radiosensitive intestinal crypt cells. Methods and Materials: Immunodeficient (SCID) mice with hormone-independent LAPC-4 (HI-LAPC-4) and PC-3 xenograft tumors (approximately 200 mm{sup 3}) were divided into four groups: control (untreated), radiation therapy (XRT, local irradiation), SSE (2 mg/kg, intraperitoneally, 3 times/week), and XRT plus SSE. The XRT was given at the beginning of the regimen as a single dose of 5 Gy for HI-LAPC-4 tumors and a single dose of 7 Gy followed by a fractional dose of 3 Gy/d for 5 days for PC-3 tumors. The tumor volume was measured 3 times per week. The radiosensitizing effect of SSE on normal intestinal epithelial cells was assessed by use of a crypt cell microcolony assay. Results: In the efficacy study, SSE alone significantly inhibited the tumor growth in HI-LAPC-4 tumors but not PC-3 tumors. Sodium selenite significantly enhanced the XRT-induced tumor growth inhibition in both HI-LAPC-4 and PC-3 tumors. In the toxicity study, SSE did not affect the intestinal crypt cell survival either alone or in combination with XRT. Conclusions: Sodium selenite significantly enhances the effect of radiation on well-established hormone-independent prostate tumors and does not sensitize the intestinal epithelial cells to radiation. These results suggest that SSE may increase the therapeutic index of XRT for the treatment of prostate cancer.

  11. Lung cancer screening in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Jessica; Marín, Marta; Sánchez-Salcedo, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are two intimately related diseases, with great impact on public health. Annual screening using low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) of the chest significantly reduces mortality due to lung cancer, and several scientific societies now recommend this technique. COPD, defined by the presence of airflow obstruction [forced expiratory volume and forced vital capacity (FVC) ratio less than 0.70], and their clinical phenotypes, namely emphysema and chronic bronchitis, have been associated with increased lung cancer risk. Several epidemiological studies, including lung cancer screening trials, have found a 2- to 4-fold increase in lung cancer risk in patients with COPD when compared to individuals without airflow obstruction. Part of the risk attributed to airflow obstruction appears to be derived from the presence of radiographic emphysema. The latter has proven to be an important lung cancer risk factor in smokers without airflow obstruction and even in never smokers. This evidence supports the idea of including patients with COPD and/or emphysema in lung cancer screening programs. There is evidence that lung cancer screening in this population is effective and can potentially reduce mortality. Specific lung cancer risk scores have been developed for patients with COPD [COPD lung cancer screening score (LUCSS) and COPD-LUCSS-diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide (DLCO)] to identify those at high risk. A multidisciplinary approach for an adequate patient selection, especially of patients with severe disease, is key to maximize benefits and reduce harms from lung cancer screening in this population. Patients with COPD included in lung cancer screening programs could also benefit from other interventions, such as smoking cessation and adequate treatment. PMID:27195278

  12. Diagnosis of Jejunal Metastases from Lung Cancer Using Capsule Endoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Leduc, Charlotte; Prim, Nathalie; Mennecier, Bertrand; Delvaux, Michel; Gangi, Afshin; Quoix, Elisabeth

    2016-01-01

    Gastrointestinal metastases from lung cancer are rare and usually asymptomatic. We report a case of small bowel metastases from primary lung cancer revealed by abdominal pain and severe recurrent anaemia. The diagnosis was obtained with capsule endoscopy. This non-invasive procedure thus represents a valuable method contributing to a rapid and detailed diagnosis while reducing underdiagnosis, and it should thus be considered for lung cancer patients complaining of abdominal symptoms, which may indeed be related to gastrointestinal metastases. PMID:27790115

  13. Lung cancer molecular epidemiology in China: recent trends

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Lung cancer is both the most common diagnosed cancer and the leading cause of cancer related deaths in China. During the past three decades, the incidence and mortality of lung cancer in China are increasing rapidly. According to data from National Central Cancer Registry (NCCR) in 2010, the crude incidence of lung cancer in China was 46.08 per 100,000 population (61.86 per 100,000 men and 29.54 per 100,000 women), with an estimated over 600,000 new diagnosed lung cancer patients (416,333 males and 189,613 females). Meanwhile, the crude mortality of lung cancer in China was 37.00 per 100,000 population (50.04 per 100,000 men and 23.33 per 100,000 women). Consistent with the change in developed countries, adenocarcinoma has become the most predominant histological subtype of lung cancer in China. For the majority advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients, especially patients with adenocarcinoma, targeted therapy became increasing important in the treatment. Chinese researcher have done a lot work in terms of lung cancer molecular epidemiology, therefore, in this review, we further summarized the epidemiology of driver genes in NSCLC, hoping to help clinicians to better screen certain driver genes in China for treatment decisions. PMID:25806311

  14. A case of three synchronous primary lung cancers within the same lung lobe

    PubMed Central

    Misiak, Piotr; Brocki, Marian

    2016-01-01

    We present the case of a 74-year-old patient with three synchronous primary lung cancers within the same lung lobe. Computed tomography and positron emission tomography investigations revealed two suspicious nodular lesions in the upper lobe of the left lung. Fine-needle aspiration biopsy confirmed that one of the lesions was non-small cell lung cancer. The patient was qualified for surgical treatment, and left upper lobectomy plus lymphadenectomy was performed. Histopathological examination confirmed the presence of three primary cancers in the left lung: keratinizing squamous cell carcinoma, neuroendocrine carcinoma, and acinar adenocarcinoma, localized within the same lung lobe. The patient was classified as having stage T3N1M0 lung cancer (stage IIIA) according to the latest, 7th edition of the TNM classification. PMID:27516792

  15. QUANTITATIVE CT ANALYSIS, AIRFLOW OBSTRUCTION AND LUNG CANCER IN THE PITTSBURGH LUNG SCREENING STUDY

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David O; Leader, Joseph K; Fuhrman, Carl R; Reilly, John J; Sciurba, Frank C.; Weissfeld, Joel L

    2011-01-01

    Background To study the relationship between emphysema, airflow obstruction and lung cancer in a high risk population we performed quantitative analysis of screening computed tomography (CT) scans. Methods Subjects completed questionnaires, spirometry and low-dose helical chest CT. Analyses compared cases and controls according to automated quantitative analysis of lung parenchyma and airways measures. Results Our case-control study of 117 matched pairs of lung cancer cases and controls did not reveal any airway or lung parenchymal findings on quantitative analysis of screening CT scans that were associated with increased lung cancer risk. Airway measures including wall area %, lumen perimeter, lumen area and average wall HU, and parenchymal measures including lung fraction < −910 Hounsfield Units (HU), were not statistically different between cases and controls. Conclusions The relationship between visual assessment of emphysema and increased lung cancer risk could not be verified by quantitative analysis of low-dose screening CT scans in a high risk tobacco exposed population. PMID:21610523

  16. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  17. RAD1901: a novel, orally bioavailable selective estrogen receptor degrader that demonstrates antitumor activity in breast cancer xenograft models

    PubMed Central

    Shomali, Maysoun; Paquin, Dotty; Lyttle, C. Richard; Hattersley, Gary

    2015-01-01

    Agents that inhibit estrogen production, such as aromatase inhibitors or those that directly block estrogen receptor (ER) activity, such as selective estrogen receptor modulators and selective estrogen receptor degraders, are routinely used in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancers. However, although initial treatment with these agents is often successful, many women eventually relapse with drug-resistant breast cancers. To overcome some of the challenges associated with current endocrine therapies and to combat the development of resistance, there is a need for more durable and more effective ER-targeted therapies. Here we describe and characterize a novel, orally bioavailable small-molecule selective estrogen receptor degrader, RAD1901, and evaluate its therapeutic potential for the treatment of breast cancer. RAD1901 selectively binds to and degrades the ER and is a potent antagonist of ER-positive breast cancer cell proliferation. Importantly, RAD1901 produced a robust and profound inhibition of tumor growth in MCF-7 xenograft models. In an intracranial MCF-7 model, RAD1901-treated animals survived longer than those treated with either control or fulvestrant, suggesting the potential benefit of RAD1901 in the treatment of ER-positive breast cancer that has metastasized to the brain. Finally, RAD1901 preserved ovariectomy-induced bone loss and prevented the uterotropic effects of E2, suggesting that it may act selectively as an agonist in bone but as an antagonist in breast and uterine tissues. RAD1901 is currently under clinical study in postmenopausal women with ER-positive advanced breast cancer. PMID:26164151

  18. Association of Radiographic Emphysema and Airflow Obstruction with Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, David O.; Weissfeld, Joel L.; Balkan, Arzu; Schragin, Jeffrey G.; Fuhrman, Carl R.; Fisher, Stephen N.; Wilson, Jonathan; Leader, Joseph K.; Siegfried, Jill M.; Shapiro, Steven D.; Sciurba, Frank C.

    2008-01-01

    Rationale: To study the relationship between emphysema and/or airflow obstruction and lung cancer in a high-risk population. Objective: We studied lung cancer related to radiographic emphysema and spirometric airflow obstruction in tobacco-exposed persons who were screened for lung cancer using chest computed tomography (CT). Methods: Subjects completed questionnaires, spirometry, and low-dose helical chest CT. CT scans were scored for emphysema based on National Emphysema Treatment Trial criteria. Multiple logistic regressions estimated the independent associations between various factors, including radiographic emphysema and airflow obstruction, and subsequent lung cancer diagnosis. Measurements and Main Results: Among 3,638 subjects, 57.5, 18.8, 14.6, and 9.1% had no, trace, mild, and moderate–severe emphysema, and 57.3, 13.6, 22.8, and 6.4% had no, mild (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease [GOLD] I), moderate (GOLD II), and severe (GOLD III–IV) airflow obstruction. Of 3,638 subjects, 99 (2.7%) received a lung cancer diagnosis. Adjusting for sex, age, years of cigarette smoking, and number of cigarettes smoked daily, logistic regression showed the expected lung cancer association with the presence of airflow obstruction (GOLD I–IV, odds ratio [OR], 2.09; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.33–3.27). A second logistic regression showed lung cancer related to emphysema (OR, 3.56; 95% CI, 2.21–5.73). After additional adjustments for GOLD class, emphysema remained a strong and statistically significant factor related to lung cancer (OR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.91–5.15). Conclusions: Emphysema on CT scan and airflow obstruction on spirometry are related to lung cancer in a high-risk population. Emphysema is independently related to lung cancer. Both radiographic emphysema and airflow obstruction should be considered when assessing lung cancer risk. PMID:18565949

  19. Lung scintigraphy in differential diagnosis of peripheral lung cancer and community-acquired pneumonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivonogov, Nikolay G.; Efimova, Nataliya Y.; Zavadovsky, Konstantin W.; Lishmanov, Yuri B.

    2016-08-01

    Ventilation/perfusion lung scintigraphy was performed in 39 patients with verified diagnosis of community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) and in 14 patients with peripheral lung cancer. Ventilation/perfusion ratio, apical-basal gradients of ventilation (U/L(V)) and lung perfusion (U/L(P)), and alveolar capillary permeability of radionuclide aerosol were determined based on scintigraphy data. The study demonstrated that main signs of CAP were increases in ventilation/perfusion ratio, perfusion and ventilation gradient on a side of the diseased lung, and two-side increase in alveolar capillary permeability rate for radionuclide aerosol. Unlike this, scintigraphic signs of peripheral lung cancer comprise an increase in ventilation/perfusion ratio over 1.0 on a side of the diseased lung with its simultaneous decrease on a contralateral side, normal values of perfusion and ventilation gradients of both lungs, and delayed alveolar capillary clearance in the diseased lung compared with the intact lung.

  20. Multiphoton microscopy as a diagnostic imaging modality for lung cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlova, Ina; Hume, Kelly R.; Yazinski, Stephanie A.; Peters, Rachel M.; Weiss, Robert S.; Webb, Watt W.

    2010-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading killer among all cancers for both men and women in the US, and is associated with one of the lowest 5-year survival rates. Current diagnostic techniques, such as histopathological assessment of tissue obtained by computed tomography guided biopsies, have limited accuracy, especially for small lesions. Early diagnosis of lung cancer can be improved by introducing a real-time, optical guidance method based on the in vivo application of multiphoton microscopy (MPM). In particular, we hypothesize that MPM imaging of living lung tissue based on twophoton excited intrinsic fluorescence and second harmonic generation can provide sufficient morphologic and spectroscopic information to distinguish between normal and diseased lung tissue. Here, we used an experimental approach based on MPM with multichannel fluorescence detection for initial discovery that MPM spectral imaging could differentiate between normal and neoplastic lung in ex vivo samples from a murine model of lung cancer. Current results indicate that MPM imaging can directly distinguish normal and neoplastic lung tissues based on their distinct morphologies and fluorescence emission properties in non-processed lung tissue. Moreover, we found initial indication that MPM imaging differentiates between normal alveolar tissue, inflammatory foci, and lung neoplasms. Our long-term goal is to apply results from ex vivo lung specimens to aid in the development of multiphoton endoscopy for in vivo imaging of lung abnormalities in various animal models, and ultimately for the diagnosis of human lung cancer.

  1. Androgen Regulated Genes in Human Prostate Xenografts in Mice: Relation to BPH and Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Love, Harold D.; Booton, S. Erin; Boone, Braden E.; Breyer, Joan P.; Koyama, Tatsuki; Revelo, Monica P.; Shappell, Scott B.; Smith, Jeffrey R.; Hayward, Simon W.

    2009-01-01

    Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate carcinoma (CaP) are linked to aging and the presence of androgens, suggesting that androgen regulated genes play a major role in these common diseases. Androgen regulation of prostate growth and development depends on the presence of intact epithelial-stromal interactions. Further, the prostatic stroma is implicated in BPH. This suggests that epithelial cell lines are inadequate to identify androgen regulated genes that could contribute to BPH and CaP and which could serve as potential clinical biomarkers. In this study, we used a human prostate xenograft model to define a profile of genes regulated in vivo by androgens, with an emphasis on identifying candidate biomarkers. Benign transition zone (TZ) human prostate tissue from radical prostatectomies was grafted to the sub-renal capsule site of intact or castrated male immunodeficient mice, followed by the removal or addition of androgens, respectively. Microarray analysis of RNA from these tissues was used to identify genes that were; 1) highly expressed in prostate, 2) had significant expression changes in response to androgens, and, 3) encode extracellular proteins. A total of 95 genes meeting these criteria were selected for analysis and validation of expression in patient prostate tissues using quantitative real-time PCR. Expression levels of these genes were measured in pooled RNAs from human prostate tissues with varying severity of BPH pathologic changes and CaP of varying Gleason score. A number of androgen regulated genes were identified. Additionally, a subset of these genes were over-expressed in RNA from clinical BPH tissues, and the levels of many were found to correlate with disease status. Our results demonstrate the feasibility, and some of the problems, of using a mouse xenograft model to characterize the androgen regulated expression profiles of intact human prostate tissues. PMID:20027305

  2. Isolation of Pancreatic Cancer Cells from a Patient-Derived Xenograft Model Allows for Practical Expansion and Preserved Heterogeneity in Culture.

    PubMed

    Pham, Kien; Delitto, Daniel; Knowlton, Andrea E; Hartlage, Emily R; Madhavan, Ricky; Gonzalo, David H; Thomas, Ryan M; Behrns, Kevin E; George, Thomas J; Hughes, Steven J; Wallet, Shannon M; Liu, Chen; Trevino, Jose G

    2016-06-01

    Commercially available, highly passaged pancreatic cancer (PC) cell lines are of limited translational value. Attempts to overcome this limitation have primarily consisted of cancer cell isolation and culture directly from human PC specimens. However, these techniques are associated with exceedingly low success rates. Here, we demonstrate a highly reproducible culture of primary PC cell lines (PPCLs) from patient-derived xenografts, which preserve, in part, the intratumoral heterogeneity known to exist in PC. PPCL expansion from patient-derived xenografts was successful in 100% of attempts (5 of 5). Phenotypic analysis was evaluated with flow cytometry, immunofluorescence microscopy, and short tandem repeat profiling. Importantly, tumorigenicity of PPCLs expanded from patient-derived xenografts was assessed by subcutaneous injection into nonobese diabeteic.Cg-Prkdc(scid)Il2rg(tm1Wjl)/SzJ mice. Morphologically, subcutaneous injection of all PPCLs into mice yielded tumors with similar characteristics to the parent xenograft. PPCLs uniformly expressed class I human leukocyte antigen, epithelial cell adhesion molecule, and cytokeratin-19. Heterogeneity within each PPCL persisted in culture for the frequency of cells expressing the cancer stem cell markers CD44, CD133, and c-Met and the immunologic markers human leukocyte antigen class II and programmed death ligand 1. This work therefore presents a reliable method for the rapid expansion of primary human PC cells and, thereby, provides a platform for translational investigation and, importantly, potential personalized therapeutic approaches.

  3. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model

    PubMed Central

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient’s medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model. PMID:27556456

  4. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  5. Antitumor activity of [Pt(O,O'-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] in mouse xenograft model of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Muscella, A; Vetrugno, C; Migoni, D; Biagioni, F; Fanizzi, F P; Fornai, F; De Pascali, S A; Marsigliante, S

    2014-01-01

    The higher and selective cytotoxicity of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] toward cancer cell in both immortalized cell lines and in breast cancer cells in primary cultures, stimulated a pre-clinical study so as to evaluate its therapeutic potential in vivo. The efficacy of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was assessed using a xenograft model of breast cancer developed by injection of MCF-7 cells in the flank of BALB/c nude mice. Treatment of solid tumor-bearing mice with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] induced up to 50% reduction of tumor mass compared with an average 10% inhibition recorded in cisplatin-treated animals. Thus, chemotherapy with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] was much more effective than cisplatin. We also demonstrated enhanced in vivo pharmacokinetics, biodistribution and tolerability of [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] when compared with cisplatin administered in Wistar rats. Pharmacokinetics studies with [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] revealed prolonged Pt persistence in systemic blood circulation and decreased nefrotoxicity and hepatotoxicity, major target sites of cisplatin toxicity. Overall, [Pt(O,O′-acac)(γ-acac)(DMS)] turned out to be extremely promising in terms of greater in vivo anticancer activity, reduced nephrotoxicity and acute toxicity compared with cisplatin. PMID:24457958

  6. Development of a Patient-Derived Xenograft (PDX) of Breast Cancer Bone Metastasis in a Zebrafish Model.

    PubMed

    Mercatali, Laura; La Manna, Federico; Groenewoud, Arwin; Casadei, Roberto; Recine, Federica; Miserocchi, Giacomo; Pieri, Federica; Liverani, Chiara; Bongiovanni, Alberto; Spadazzi, Chiara; de Vita, Alessandro; van der Pluijm, Gabri; Giorgini, Andrea; Biagini, Roberto; Amadori, Dino; Ibrahim, Toni; Snaar-Jagalska, Ewa

    2016-08-22

    Bone metastasis is a complex process that needs to be better understood in order to help clinicians prevent and treat it. Xenografts using patient-derived material (PDX) rather than cancer cell lines are a novel approach that guarantees more clinically realistic results. A primary culture of bone metastasis derived from a 67-year-old patient with breast cancer was cultured and then injected into zebrafish (ZF) embryos to study its metastatic potential. In vivo behavior and results of gene expression analyses of the primary culture were compared with those of cancer cell lines with different metastatic potential (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231). The MCF7 cell line, which has the same hormonal receptor status as the bone metastasis primary culture, did not survive in the in vivo model. Conversely, MDA-MB-231 disseminated and colonized different parts of the ZF, including caudal hematopoietic tissues (CHT), revealing a migratory phenotype. Primary culture cells disseminated and in later stages extravasated from the vessels, engrafting into ZF tissues and reaching the CHT. Primary cell behavior reflected the clinical course of the patient's medical history. Our results underline the potential for using PDX models in bone metastasis research and outline new methods for the clinical application of this in vivo model.

  7. Asymmetric synthesis and evaluation of a hydroxyphenylamide voltage-gated sodium channel blocker in human prostate cancer xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Gary C.; Kong, Yali; Paige, Mikell; Li, Zhang; Merrick, Ellen C.; Hansen, Todd; Suy, Simeng; Wang, Kan; Dakshanamurthy, Sivanesan; Cordova, Antoinette; McManus, Owen B.; Williams, Brande S.; Chruszcz, Maksymilian; Minor, Wladek; Patel, Manoj K.; Brown, Milton L.

    2013-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels are known to be expressed in neurons and other excitable cells. Recently, voltage-gated sodium channels have been found to be expressed in human prostate cancer cells. α-Hydroxy-α-phenylamides are a new class of small molecules that have demonstrated potent inhibition of voltage-gated sodium channels. The hydroxyamide motif, an isostere of a hydantoin ring, provides an active scaffold from which several potent racemic sodium channel blockers have been derived. With little known about chiral preferences, the development of chiral syntheses to obtain each pure enantiomer for evaluation as sodium channel blockers is important. Using Seebach and Frater's chiral template, cyclocondensation of (R)-3-chloromandelic acid with pivaldehyde furnished both the cis- and trans-2,5-disubsituted dioxolanones. Using this chiral template, we synthesized both enantiomers of 2-(3-chlorophenyl)-2-hydroxynonanamide, and evaluated their ability to functionally inhibit hNav isoforms, human prostate cancer cells and xenograft. Enantiomers of lead demonstrated significant ability to reduce prostate cancer in vivo. PMID:22364743

  8. 5-Fluorouracil + cisplatin + mitomycin C is a relatively most effective combination against xenograft lines of human colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Kawabata, K; Nio, Y; Imamura, M

    1997-09-01

    5-Fluorouracil (5-FU) has been an accepted effective against colorectal cancer, but combination regimens resulted in a lesser effect than 5-FU alone. The present study was designed to evaluate the efficiency of various combination chemotherapies, including 5-FU, on human colorectal cancer xenograft lines (CC-KK and RC-TK), which had been passed by transplantation in nude mice. Eight anticancer agents [5-FU, mitomycin C (MMC), adriamycin (ADR), 4'-epirubicin (EPIR), carboquone (CQ), cisplatin, carboplatin and etoposide (VP-16)] and their combinations were evaluated at 2-4 times the clinical dose. When the agents were administered singly, 5-FU, EPIR and CQ were effective against CC-KK, and 5-FU, MMC, EPIR, ADR, CQ and carboplatin were effective against RC-TK. Of the two-agent combinations including 5-FU, cisplatin + 5-FU was the most effective against both CC-KK and RC-TK. However, of the three-agent combinations, only cisplatin + 5-FU + MMC was more effective against both lines than cisplatin + 5-FU. These results suggest that cisplatin + 5-FU + MMC may be the most useful regimen against colorectal cancers in clinical application.

  9. Radiation-induced heart disease in lung cancer radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Xin; Feng, Yuanming; Yang, Chengwen; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ping; Deng, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Radiation-induced heart disease (RIHD), which affects the patients’ prognosis with both acute and late side effects, has been published extensively in the radiotherapy of breast cancer, lymphoma and other benign diseases. Studies on RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy, however, are less extensive and clear even though the patients with lung cancer are delivered with higher doses to the heart during radiation treatment. Methods: In this article, after extensive literature search and analysis, we reviewed the current evidence on RIHD in lung cancer patients after their radiation treatments and investigated the potential risk factors for RIHD as compared to other types of cancers. Result: Cardiac toxicity has been found highly relevant in lung cancer radiotherapy. So far, the crude incidence of cardiac complications in the lung cancer patients after radiotherapy has been up to 33%. Conclusion: The dose to the heart, the lobar location of tumor, the treatment modality, the history of heart and pulmonary disease and smoking were considered as potential risk factors for RIHD in lung cancer radiotherapy. As treatment techniques improve over the time with better prognosis for lung cancer survivors, an improved prediction model can be established to further reduce the cardiac toxicity in lung cancer radiotherapy. PMID:27741117

  10. Transcriptional coactivator CBP upregulates hTERT expression and tumor growth and predicts poor prognosis in human lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Meng; Wu, Taihua; Yu, Zhenlong; Wang, Jingshu; Chen, Wangbing; Shi, Dingbo; Yu, Wendan; Xiao, Yao; Yi, Canhui; Tang, Zhipeng; Xu, Tingting; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Du, Guangwei; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-01-01

    Upregulated expression and activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a hallmarker of lung tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the aberrant hTERT activity in lung cancer cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we found the transcriptional co-activator CBP as a new hTERT promoter-binding protein that regulated hTERT expression and tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma cells using a biotin-streptavidin-bead pulldown technique. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay verified the immortalized cell and tumor cell-specific binding of CBP on hTERT promoter. Overexpression of exogenous CBP upregulated the expression of the hTERT promoter-driven luciferase and endogenous hTERT protein in lung cancer cells. Conversely, inhibition of CBP by CBP-specific siRNA or its chemical inhibitor repressed the expression of hTERT promoter-driven luciferase and endogenous hTERT protein as well as telomerase activity. Moreover, inhibition of CBP expression or activity also significantly reduced the proliferation of lung cancer cells in vitro and tumor growth in an xenograft mouse model in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays of lung cancers revealed a positive correlation between CBP and hTERT. Importantly, the patients with high CBP and hTERT expression had a significantly shorter overall survival. Furthermore, CBP was found to interact with and acetylate transactivator Sp1 in lung cancer cells. Inhibition of CBP by CBP-specific siRNA or its chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited Sp1 acetylation and its binding to the hTERT promoter. Collectively, our results indicate that CBP contributes to the upregulation of hTERT expression and tumor growth, and overexpression of CBP predicts poor prognosis in human lung cancers. PMID:25294805

  11. Transcriptional coactivator CBP upregulates hTERT expression and tumor growth and predicts poor prognosis in human lung cancers.

    PubMed

    Guo, Wei; Lu, Jianjun; Dai, Meng; Wu, Taihua; Yu, Zhenlong; Wang, Jingshu; Chen, Wangbing; Shi, Dingbo; Yu, Wendan; Xiao, Yao; Yi, Canhui; Tang, Zhipeng; Xu, Tingting; Xiao, Xiangsheng; Yuan, Yuhui; Liu, Quentin; Du, Guangwei; Deng, Wuguo

    2014-10-15

    Upregulated expression and activation of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) is a hallmarker of lung tumorigenesis. However, the mechanism underlying the aberrant hTERT activity in lung cancer cells remains poorly understood. In this study, we found the transcriptional co-activator CBP as a new hTERT promoter-binding protein that regulated hTERT expression and tumor growth in lung adenocarcinoma cells using a biotin-streptavidin-bead pulldown technique. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay verified the immortalized cell and tumor cell-specific binding of CBP on hTERT promoter. Overexpression of exogenous CBP upregulated the expression of the hTERT promoter-driven luciferase and endogenous hTERT protein in lung cancer cells. Conversely, inhibition of CBP by CBP-specific siRNA or its chemical inhibitor repressed the expression of hTERT promoter-driven luciferase and endogenous hTERT protein as well as telomerase activity. Moreover, inhibition of CBP expression or activity also significantly reduced the proliferation of lung cancer cells in vitro and tumor growth in an xenograft mouse model in vivo. Immunohistochemical analysis of tissue microarrays of lung cancers revealed a positive correlation between CBP and hTERT. Importantly, the patients with high CBP and hTERT expression had a significantly shorter overall survival. Furthermore, CBP was found to interact with and acetylate transactivator Sp1 in lung cancer cells. Inhibition of CBP by CBP-specific siRNA or its chemical inhibitor significantly inhibited Sp1 acetylation and its binding to the hTERT promoter. Collectively, our results indicate that CBP contributes to the upregulation of hTERT expression and tumor growth, and overexpression of CBP predicts poor prognosis in human lung cancers.

  12. Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late To Quit | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Lung Cancer Smoking and Lung Cancer: It's Never Too Late to Quit Past ... Table of Contents Because most people who get lung cancer were smokers, you may feel that doctors ...

  13. MDT lung cancer care: input from the Surgical Oncologist.

    PubMed

    Kidane, Biniam; Toyooka, Shinichi; Yasufuku, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    Although there have been many advancements in the multidisciplinary management of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), surgery remains the primary modality of choice for resectable lung cancer when the patient is able to tolerate lung resection physiologically. There have been recent advances in surgical diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Increasing use of low-dose computed tomography (CT) screening for lung cancer has resulted in increased detection of small peripheral nodules or semi-solid ground glass opacities. Here, we review different modalities of localization techniques that have been used to aid surgical excisional biopsy when needle biopsy has failed to provide tissue diagnosis. We also report on the current debates regarding the use of sublobar resections for Stage I NSCLC as well as the surgical management of locally advanced NSCLC. Finally, we discuss the complex surgical management of T4 NSCLC lung cancers.

  14. Repurposing of bisphosphonates for the prevention and therapy of nonsmall cell lung and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stachnik, Agnes; Yuen, Tony; Iqbal, Jameel; Sgobba, Miriam; Gupta, Yogesh; Lu, Ping; Colaianni, Graziana; Ji, Yaoting; Zhu, Ling-Ling; Kim, Se-Min; Li, Jianhua; Liu, Peng; Izadmehr, Sudeh; Sangodkar, Jaya; Scherer, Thomas; Mujtaba, Shiraz; Galsky, Matthew; Gomez, Jorge; Epstein, Solomon; Buettner, Christoph; Bian, Zhuan; Zallone, Alberta; Aggarwal, Aneel K; Haider, Shozeb; New, Maria I; Sun, Li; Narla, Goutham; Zaidi, Mone

    2014-12-16

    A variety of human cancers, including nonsmall cell lung (NSCLC), breast, and colon cancers, are driven by the human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) family of receptor tyrosine kinases. Having shown that bisphosphonates, a class of drugs used widely for the therapy of osteoporosis and metastatic bone disease, reduce cancer cell viability by targeting HER1, we explored their potential utility in the prevention and therapy of HER-driven cancers. We show that bisphosphonates inhibit colony formation by HER1(ΔE746-A750)-driven HCC827 NSCLCs and HER1(wt)-expressing MB231 triple negative breast cancers, but not by HER(low)-SW620 colon cancers. In parallel, oral gavage with bisphosphonates of mice xenografted with HCC827 or MB231 cells led to a significant reduction in tumor volume in both treatment and prevention protocols. This result was not seen with mice harboring HER(low) SW620 xenografts. We next explored whether bisphosphonates can serve as adjunctive therapies to tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), namely gefitinib and erlotinib, and whether the drugs can target TKI-resistant NSCLCs. In silico docking, together with molecular dynamics and anisotropic network modeling, showed that bisphosphonates bind to TKIs within the HER1 kinase domain. As predicted from this combinatorial binding, bisphosphonates enhanced the effects of TKIs in reducing cell viability and driving tumor regression in mice. Impressively, the drugs also overcame erlotinib resistance acquired through the gatekeeper mutation T790M, thus offering an option for TKI-resistant NSCLCs. We suggest that bisphosphonates can potentially be repurposed for the prevention and adjunctive therapy of HER1-driven cancers.

  15. Implementation and organization of lung cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Haseem

    2016-01-01

    CT screening for lung cancer is now being implemented in the US and China on a widespread national scale but not in Europe so far. The review gives a status for the implementation process and the hurdles to overcome in the future. It also describes the guidelines and requirements for the structure and components of high quality CT screening programs. These are essential in order to achieve a successful program with the fewest possible harms and a possible mortality benefit like that documented in the American National Lung Screening Trial (NLST). In addition the importance of continued research in CT screening methods is described and discussed with focus on the great potential to further improve this method in the future for the benefit of patients and society. PMID:27195270

  16. Urothelial bladder cancer with cavitary lung metastases.

    PubMed

    Kurian, Anil; Lee, Jason; Born, Abraham

    2011-01-01

    Transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) of the bladder tends to remain superficial; however, in 5% to 20% of cases, it progresses to muscle invasion and, more rarely, can metastasize. TCC of the bladder primarily spreads via regional lymphatics. The most common sites of distant metastases of TCC are the liver, lung, mediastinum and bone. Longterm survival of patients with metastatic bladder cancer is rare. Patterns of pulmonary metastasis include multiple nodules, a solitary mass or interstitial micronodule. When multiple nodules are present, they are round and well-circumscribed, without calcification or cavitation. An unusual case of rapidly metastatic TCC to the lung causing large cavitary masses and nodules is presented. Imaging performed after the patient began chemotherapy revealed widespread necrosis of the metastatic cavitary masses causing moderate volume hemoptysis. PMID:21766082

  17. Kinome RNAi Screens Reveal Synergistic Targeting of MTOR and FGFR1 Pathways for Treatment of Lung Cancer and HNSCC.

    PubMed

    Singleton, Katherine R; Hinz, Trista K; Kleczko, Emily K; Marek, Lindsay A; Kwak, Jeff; Harp, Taylor; Kim, Jihye; Tan, Aik Choon; Heasley, Lynn E

    2015-10-15

    The FGFR1 is a therapeutic target under investigation in multiple solid tumors and clinical trials of selective tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKI) are underway. Treatment with a single TKI represents a logical step toward personalized cancer therapy, but intrinsic and acquired resistance mechanisms limit their long-term benefit. In this study, we deployed RNAi-based functional genomic screens to identify protein kinases controlling the intrinsic sensitivity of FGFR1-dependent lung cancer and head and neck squamous cell cancer (HNSCC) cells to ponatinib, a multikinase FGFR-active inhibitor. We identified and validated a synthetic lethal interaction between MTOR and ponatinib in non-small cell lung carcinoma cells. In addition, treatment with MTOR-targeting shRNAs and pharmacologic inhibitors revealed that MTOR is an essential protein kinase in other FGFR1-expressing cancer cells. The combination of FGFR inhibitors and MTOR or AKT inhibitors resulted in synergistic growth suppression in vitro. Notably, tumor xenografts generated from FGFR1-dependent lung cancer cells exhibited only modest sensitivity to monotherapy with the FGFR-specific TKI, AZD4547, but when combined with the MTOR inhibitor, AZD2014, significantly attenuated tumor growth and prolonged survival. Our findings support the existence of a signaling network wherein FGFR1-driven ERK and activated MTOR/AKT represent distinct arms required to induce full transformation. Furthermore, they suggest that clinical efficacy of treatments for FGFR1-driven lung cancers and HNSCC may be achieved by combining MTOR inhibitors and FGFR-specific TKIs. PMID:26359452

  18. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer. PMID:27509656

  19. [THE ROLE OF ESTROGENS IN THE CARCINOGENESIS OF LUNG CANCER].

    PubMed

    Uchikova, E; Uchikov, A; Dimitrakova, E; Uchikov, P

    2016-01-01

    Morbidity and mortality from lung cancer has dramatically increased in women as compared to men over the past few years. Historically, smoking has been considered the major risk factor for lung cancer regardless of gender. Several recent lines of evidence implicate gender differences in the observed differences in prevalence and histologic type which cannot be explained based on the carcinogenic action of nicotine. Several recent studies underscore the importance of reproductive and hormonal factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer Lung cancer morbidity and mortality in Bulgaria was 16.2/100000 women and 14.6/ 100000 women, resp. Lung cancer morbidity in Europe was 39/100000 women. Lung cancer is extremely sensitive to estrogens. The latter act directly or as effect modifiers for the relationship between smoking and lung cancer. Further research examining the relationship between serum estrogen levels and the estrogen receptor expression in normal and tumor lung tissue samples can help elucidate the importance of reproductive and hormonal (exogenous and endogenous) factors in the carcinogenesis of lung cancer.

  20. Oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development and its activation of the MAPK–ERK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, C; Fan, S; Owonikoko, T K; Khuri, F R; Sun, S-Y; Li, R

    2011-01-01

    Cancer progression involves multiple complex and interdependent steps, including progressive proliferation, angiogenesis and metastases. The complexity of these processes requires a comprehensive elucidation of the integrated signaling networks for better understanding. EAPII interacts with multiple cancer-related proteins, but its biological significance in cancer development remains unknown. In this report we identified the elevated level of EAPII protein in non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) patients and NSCLC cell lines in culture. The oncogenic role of EAPII in lung cancer development was demonstrated using NSCLC cells with genetic manipulations that influence EAPII expression: EAPII overexpression increases proliferation of NSCLC cells with an accelerated transition of cell cycle and facilitates xenograft tumor growth in vivo; EAPII knockdown results in apoptosis of NSCLC cells and reduces xenograft tumor formation. To further explore the mechanism of EAPII's oncogenic role in lung cancer development and to elucidate the potential signaling pathway(s) that EAPII may impact, we employed antibody array to investigate the alternation of the major signaling pathways in NSCLC cells with altered EAPII level. We found that EAPII overexpression significantly activated Raf1 and ERK1/2, but not c-Jun N-terminal kinase and p38 pathways. Consistently, the protein and mRNA levels of MYC and cyclin D1, which are targets of the mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MAPK–ERK) pathway, are significantly increased by EAPII overexpression. Taken together, we demonstrated that EAPII is an oncogenic factor and the activation of MAPK–ERK signaling pathway by EAPII may contribute to lung cancer development. PMID:21478903

  1. Interpretation of lung cancer study outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Abbate, Marida; Bidoli, Paolo; Pelizzoni, Davide; Canova, Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in developed countries. However, in the last few years we observed an important acceleration in drug development due to oncogenic driver tumors discovery. Sharing and putting together preclinical data from benchmark and data from clinical research is the scientific paradigm that allows real breakthrough in clinical practice in this field, but only a few targeted agents are worthy and practice changing. The clinical research and proper use of statistical methodology are the pillars to continue to achieve important goals like improvement of overall survival. A good medical oncologist should be able to critically read a scientific paper and move from the observed outcomes into clinical perspective. Despite clinical improvements, sometimes the union of promising targeted agents and optimistic expectations misrepresent the reality and the value of clinical research. In this article, we try to analyze the meaning of statistical assumptions from clinical trials, especially in lung cancer, through a critical review of the concept of value-based medicine. We also attempt to give the reader some practical tools to weigh scientific value of literature reports. PMID:26716052

  2. Lung cancer biology: a genetic and genomic perspective.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Céspedes, M

    2009-05-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of death due to cancer in most western countries and, as tobacco consumption is not significantly decreasing worldwide, will remain so in the coming decades. Thus, in addition to preventing uptake and encouraging cessation of the smoking habit, it is important to invest in understanding the biology of this type of cancer. Of particular interest are the recent efforts directed towards characterising the entire set of gene alterations in lung cancer. The present review describes the catalogue of known genetic alterations in lung cancer, their biological role and their use in clinical management.

  3. Occupational Lung Cancer Surveillance in South Korea, 2006-2009

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hwan-Cheol; Ryu, Jeong-Seon; Won, Jong Uk; Moon, Jai Dong; Kim, Young-Chul; Koh, Sang Baek; Yong, Suk Joong; Kim, Soo Geun; Park, Jae Yong; Kim, Inah; Kim, Jung Il; Kim, Jung Won; Lee, Eui-cheol; Kim, Hyoung-Ryoul; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Dong Mug; Hong, Yun-Chul

    2010-01-01

    Objectives The lung cancer mortality in Korea has increased remarkably during the last 20 years, and has been the first leading cause of cancer-related deaths since 2000. The aim of the current study was to examine the time trends of occupational lung cancer and carcinogens exposure during the period 2006-2009 in South Korea, by assessing the proportion of occupational burden. Methods We defined occupational lung cancer for surveillance, and developed a reporting protocol and reporting website for the surveillance of occupational lung cancer. The study patients were chosen from 9 participating university hospitals in the following 7 areas: Seoul, Incheon, Wonju, Daejeon, Daegu, Busan, and Gwangju. Results The combined proportion of definite and probable occupational lung cancer among all lung cancers investigated in this study was 10.0%, 8.6%, 10.7%, and 15.8% in the years 2006 to 2009, respectively, with an average of 11.7% over the four-year study period. The main carcinogens were asbestos, crystalline silica, radon, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), diesel exhaust particles, chromium, and nickel. Conclusion We estimated that about 11.7% of the incident lung cancer was preventable. This reveals the potential to considerably reduce lung cancer by intervention in occupational fields. PMID:22953173

  4. Targeting lung cancer through inhibition of checkpoint kinases

    PubMed Central

    Syljuåsen, Randi G.; Hasvold, Grete; Hauge, Sissel; Helland, Åslaug

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitors of checkpoint kinases ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are currently being tested in preclinical and clinical trials. Here, we review the basic principles behind the use of such inhibitors as anticancer agents, and particularly discuss their potential for treatment of lung cancer. As lung cancer is one of the most deadly cancers, new treatment strategies are highly needed. We discuss how checkpoint kinase inhibition in principle can lead to selective killing of lung cancer cells while sparing the surrounding normal tissues. Several features of lung cancer may potentially be exploited for targeting through inhibition of checkpoint kinases, including mutated p53, low ERCC1 levels, amplified Myc, tumor hypoxia and presence of lung cancer stem cells. Synergistic effects have also been reported between inhibitors of ATR/Chk1/Wee1 and conventional lung cancer treatments, such as gemcitabine, cisplatin, or radiation. Altogether, inhibitors of ATR, Chk1, and Wee1 are emerging as new cancer treatment agents, likely to be useful in lung cancer treatment. However, as lung tumors are very diverse, the inhibitors are unlikely to be effective in all patients, and more work is needed to determine how such inhibitors can be utilized in the most optimal ways. PMID:25774168

  5. Trends of lung cancer mortality in Mexico.

    PubMed

    Lazcano Ponce, E C; Tovar Guzman, V; Meneses Gonzalez, F; Rascon Pacheco, R A; Hernandez Avila, M

    1997-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is one of the most important public health problems in the world; 1,035,000 annual deaths are estimated each year and more than 80% of these are attributed to tobacco. The trend of lung cancer mortality in Mexico City from 1979 - 1993 was determined, as was the rate ratio of lung cancer mortality in 31 states in Mexico, taking Mexico City as a reference by means of a Poisson model. A strong linear regression model was used to evaluate the rate, where the dependent variable was LC mortality rate and the independent variable the year observed. In 15 years, 73,807 deaths from LC were reported, with an increase in mortality from 5.01 - 7.25 per 100,000 inhabitants. Mortality increases significantly after 60 years of age (B not equal to 0), p<.05) in men and in women. Mortality from LC was 70% in men, and more than 60% of deaths were reported after 65 years of age. Mortality risk is higher in the northern states of the country (e.g., Sonora, RR=2.40) than in the southern region (e.g., Oaxaca RR=0.40). In Mexico, almost 10,000 deaths by LC are estimated for the year 2010. Therefore, changes in lifestyle should be encouraged in order to decrease the smoking habit. The governmental tax on cigarettes should be increased, smoking restricted in squares and public spaces, and the risks should be announced on cigarette packages, among other measures. With respect to other emergent risk factors, the sources of industrial pollution and toxic emissions should be regulated.

  6. Esterase-activatable β-lapachone prodrug micelles for NQO1-targeted lung cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Xinpeng; Huang, Xiumei; Moore, Zachary; Huang, Gang; Kilgore, Jessica A.; Wang, Yiguang; Hammer, Suntrea; Williams, Noelle S.; Boothman, David A.; Gao, Jinming

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most lethal forms of cancer and current chemotherapeutic strategies lack broad specificity and efficacy. Recently, β-lapachone (β-lap) was shown to be highly efficacious in killing non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells regardless of their p53, cell cycle and caspase status. Pre-clinical and clinical use of β-lap (clinical form, ARQ501 or 761) is hampered by poor pharmacokinetics and toxicity due to hemolytic anemia. Here, we report the development and preclinical evaluation of β-lap prodrug nanotherapeutics consisting of diester derivatives of β-lap encapsulated in biocompatible and biodegradable poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(d,l-lactic acid) (PEG-b-PLA) micelles. Compared to the parent drug, diester derivatives of β-lap showed higher drug loading densities inside PEG-b-PLA micelles. After esterase treatment, micelle-delivered β-lap-dC3 and -dC6 prodrugs were converted to β-lap. Cytotoxicity assays using A549 and H596 lung cancer cells showed that both micelle formulations maintained NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1)-dependent cytotoxicity. However, antitumor efficacy study of β-lap-dC3 micelles against orthotopic A549 NSCLC xenograft-bearing mice showed significantly greater long-term survival over β-lap-dC6 micelles or β-lap-HPβCD complexes. Improved therapeutic efficacy of β-lap-dC3 micelles correlated with higher area under the concentration-time curves of β-lap in tumors, and enhanced pharmacodynamic endpoints (e.g., PARP1 hyperactivation, γH2AX, and ATP depletion). β-Lap-dC3 prodrug micelles provide a promising strategy for NQO1-targeted therapy of lung cancer with improved safety and antitumor efficacy. PMID:25542645

  7. Doxycycline reverses epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition and suppresses the proliferation and metastasis of lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan-rong; Liu, Hui-juan; Zhao, Dong; Chen, Shuang; Xiao, Ting; Meng, Jing; Jing, Xue-shuang; Wang, Jing; Sun, Bo; Dai, Ting-ting; Yang, Cheng; Sun, Tao; Zhou, Hong-gang

    2015-01-01

    The gelatinase inhibitor doxycycline is the prototypical antitumor antibiotic. We investigated the effects of doxycycline on the migration, invasion, and metastasis of human lung cancer cell lines and in a mouse model. We also measured the effect of doxycycline on the transcription of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) markers, and used immunohistochemistry to determine whether EMT reversal was associated with doxycycline inhibition. Doxycycline dose-dependently inhibited proliferation, migration, and invasion of NCI-H446 human small cell lung cancer cells. It also suppressed tumor growth from NCI-H446 and A549 lung cancer cell xenografts without altering body weight, inhibited Lewis lung carcinoma cell migration, and prolonged survival. The activities of the transcription factors Twist1/2, SNAI1/2, AP1, NF-κB, and Stat3 were suppressed by doxycycline, which reversed EMT and inhibited signal transduction, thereby suppressing tumor growth and metastasis. Our data demonstrate functional targeting of transcription factors by doxycycline to reverse EMT and suppress tumor proliferation and metastasis. Thus, doxycycline selectively targets malignant tumors and reduces its metastatic potential with less cytotoxicity in lung cancer patients. PMID:26512779

  8. Mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene identify a novel therapeutic target in squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Ramos, Alex H; Xu, Chunxiao; Dutt, Amit; Zhou, Wenjun; Brace, Lear E; Woods, Brittany A; Lin, Wenchu; Zhang, Jianming; Deng, Xianming; Lim, Sang Min; Heynck, Stefanie; Peifer, Martin; Simard, Jeffrey R; Lawrence, Michael S; Onofrio, Robert C; Salvesen, Helga B; Seidel, Danila; Zander, Thomas; Heuckmann, Johannes M; Soltermann, Alex; Moch, Holger; Koker, Mirjam; Leenders, Frauke; Gabler, Franziska; Querings, Silvia; Ansén, Sascha; Brambilla, Elisabeth; Brambilla, Christian; Lorimier, Philippe; Brustugun, Odd Terje; Helland, Åslaug; Petersen, Iver; Clement, Joachim H; Groen, Harry; Timens, Wim; Sietsma, Hannie; Stoelben, Erich; Wolf, Jürgen; Beer, David G; Tsao, Ming Sound; Hanna, Megan; Hatton, Charles; Eck, Michael J; Janne, Pasi A; Johnson, Bruce E; Winckler, Wendy; Greulich, Heidi; Bass, Adam J; Cho, Jeonghee; Rauh, Daniel; Gray, Nathanael S; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Haura, Eric B; Thomas, Roman K; Meyerson, Matthew

    2011-01-01

    While genomically targeted therapies have improved outcomes for patients with lung adenocarcinoma, little is known about the genomic alterations which drive squamous cell lung cancer. Sanger sequencing of the tyrosine kinome identified mutations in the DDR2 kinase gene in 3.8% of squamous cell lung cancers and cell lines. Squamous lung cancer cell lines harboring DDR2 mutations were selectively killed by knock-down of DDR2 by RNAi or by treatment with the multi-targeted kinase inhibitor dasatinib. Tumors established from a DDR2 mutant cell line were sensitive to dasatinib in xenograft models. Expression of mutated DDR2 led to cellular transformation which was blocked by dasatinib. A squamous cell lung cancer patient with a response to dasatinib and erlotinib treatment harbored a DDR2 kinase domain mutation. These data suggest that gain-of-function mutations in DDR2 are important oncogenic events and are amenable to therapy with dasatinib. As dasatinib is already approved for use, these findings could be rapidly translated into clinical trials. PMID:22328973

  9. Estrogen Plus Progestin and Lung Cancer in Postmenopausal Women

    PubMed Central

    Chlebowski, Rowan T.; Schwartz, Ann G.; Wakelee, Heather; Anderson, Garnet L.; Stefanick, Marcia L.; Manson, JoAnn E.; Rodabough, Rebecca J.; Chien, Jason W.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Gass, Margery; Kotchen, Jane Morley; Johnson, Karen C.; O’Sullivan, Mary Jo; Ockene, Judith K.; Chen, Chu; Hubbell, F. Allan

    2010-01-01

    Background In the post intervention period of the Women’s Health Initiative (WHI) clinical trial, estrogen plus progestin increased total cancer incidence and an adverse influence on lung cancer mortality was suggested. Methods We conducted post hoc analyses over the full follow-up period of the WHI randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trial evaluating daily conjugated equine estrogen (CEE, 0.625 mg) plus medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA, 2.5 mg) influence on lung cancer incidence and mortality in 16,608 postmenopausal women. Findings After 5.6 years intervention and 2.4 years additional follow-up (mean), there were 109 lung cancers in the hormone group and 85 in the placebo group (hazard ratio (HR) 1.23, 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.92, 1.63, P=0.16). While the difference was not statistically significant, for non-small cell lung cancer a possible divergence emerged over time, with more diagnoses in the CEE plus MPA group (96 vs 72 cases, respectively, HR 1.28, 95% CI 0.94, 1.73, P=0.12) and these cancers were more commonly poorly differentiated and more commonly had distant metastasis. Deaths from lung cancer were significantly increased in the CEE plus MPA group (73 vs 40 deaths, respectively, HR 1.71, 95% CI 1.16, 2.52, P=0.01) as were deaths from non-small cell lung cancer (62 vs 31 deaths, respectively, HR 1.87, 95% CI 1.22, 2.88, P=0.004). Small cell lung cancer incidence and mortality was comparable between randomization groups. Interpretation Use of estrogen plus progestin did not increase lung cancer incidence but significantly increased deaths from lung cancer. The effect may primarily be through influence on non-small cell lung cancer outcome. PMID:19767090

  10. Selective expression of transthyretin in subtypes of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Hao, Shuai; Sun, Suozhu; Xiao, Xueyuan; He, Dacheng; Liu, Liyun

    2016-06-01

    Transthyretin (TTR) is expressed primarily in liver, choroid plexus of brain and pancreatic islet A and B cells. It is also synthesized in some endocrine tumors. In the present study, the protein expression of TTR in lung cancer tissues and cell lines was investigated by western blot. The mRNA expression of TTR in 24 pairs of frozen lung cancer tissues was examined by RT-PCR. The specific expression and cellular distribution of TTR were also evaluated in 104 paraffin-embedded lung cancer samples and 3 normal lung tissues by immunohistochemistry. Similarly, the subcellular localization and expression of TTR were further analyzed in lung cancer cell lines. With the exception of mucinous adenocarcinoma, the expression of TTR protein was observed in all tested subtypes of lung carcinoma. Adenocarcinoma displayed the highest positive expression rate of TTR, accounting for 84.4 %, and the positive expression rate of TTR was up to 85.7 % at stages III and IV. The secretory bubbles with strong TTR staining were observed in luminal cells of lung cancer. Furthermore, the localization of TTR in the cytoplasm of lung cancer cells and the secretion of TTR into extracellular milieu were also confirmed. Taken together, TTR is selectively synthesized in lung cancer cells and can be secreted extracellularly. PMID:26943652

  11. Mango polyphenolics suppressed tumor growth in breast cancer xenografts in mice: role of the PI3K/AKT pathway and associated microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Nivedita; Kim, Hyemee; Krenek, Kimberly; Talcott, Stephen T; Mertens-Talcott, Susanne U

    2015-08-01

    The cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory properties of mango polyphenolics including gallic acid and gallotannins have been demonstrated in numerous types of cancers. We hypothesized that the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT pathway and the expression of related miRNAs are involved in the chemotherapeutic activities of mango polyphenolics in a mouse xenograft model for breast cancer. The objectives of this research were to determine the tumor-cytotoxic activities of mango polyphenolics and the underlying molecular mechanisms involving posttranscriptional targets in BT474 breast cancer cells and xenografts in mice. In vitro findings showed cytotoxic effects of mango polyphenolics in BT474 breast cancer cells within a concentration range of 2.5 to 20 mg/L gallic acid equivalents. Mango polyphenolics suppressed the expression of PI3K, AKT, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) mRNA, and pAKT, AKT, pPI3K (p85), VEGF and nuclear factor-kappa B protein levels. The involvement of miR-126 was verified by using antagomiR for miR-126, where mango reversed the effect of the antagomiR of miR-126. In vivo, the intake of mango polyphenolics decreased the tumor volume by 73% in BT474 xenograft-bearing mice compared with the control group. In addition, mango reduced the expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (p65), pAKT, pPI3K, mammalian target of rapamycin, hypoxia inducible factor-1α, and VEGF protein in athymic nude mice. A screening for miRNA expression changes confirmed that mango polyphenolics modulated the expression of cancer-associated miRNAs including miR-126 in the xenografted tumors. In summary, mango polyphenolics have a chemotherapeutic potential against breast cancer that at least in part is mediated through the PI3K/AKT pathway and miR-126.

  12. Ultrasound-enhanced drug delivery in prostate cancer xenografts by nanoparticles stabilizing microbubbles.

    PubMed

    Eggen, Siv; Fagerland, Stein-Martin; Mørch, Ýrr; Hansen, Rune; Søvik, Kishia; Berg, Sigrid; Furu, Håkon; Bøhn, Audun Dybvik; Lilledahl, Magnus B; Angelsen, Anders; Angelsen, Bjørn; de Lange Davies, Catharina

    2014-08-10

    The delivery of nanoparticles to solid tumors is often ineffective due to the lack of specificity towards tumor tissue, limited transportation of the nanoparticles across the vascular wall and poor penetration through the extracellular matrix of the tumor. Ultrasound is a promising tool that can potentially improve several of the transportation steps, and the interaction between sound waves and microbubbles generates biological effects that can be beneficial for the successful delivery of nanocarriers and their contents. In this study, a novel platform consisting of nanoparticle-stabilized microbubbles has been investigated for its potential for ultrasound-enhanced delivery to tumor xenografts. Confocal laser scanning microscopy was used to study the supply of nanoparticles from the vasculature and to evaluate the effect of different ultrasound parameters at a microscopic level. The results demonstrated that although the delivery is heterogeneous within tumors, there is a significant improvement in the delivery and the microscopic distribution of both nanoparticles and a released model drug when the nanoparticles are combined with microbubbles and ultrasound. The mechanisms that underlie the improved delivery are discussed.

  13. Growth suppression of MCF-7 cancer cell-derived xenografts in nude mice by caveolin-1

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Ping; Wang Xiaohui; Li Fei; Qi Baoju; Zhu Hua; Liu Shuang; Cui Yeqing; Chen Jianwen

    2008-11-07

    Caveolin-1 is an essential structural constituent of caveolae membrane domains that has been implicated in mitogenic signaling and oncogenesis. However, the exact functional role of caveolin-1 still remains controversial. In this report, utilizing MCF-7 human breast adenocarcinoma cells stably transfected with caveolin-1 (MCF-7/cav-1 cells), we demonstrate that caveolin-1 expression dramatically inhibits invasion and migration of these cells. Importantly, in vivo experiments employing xenograft tumor models demonstrated that expression of caveolin-1 results in significant growth inhibition of breast tumors. Moreover, a dramatic delay in tumor progression was observed in MCF-7/cav-1 cells as compared with MCF-7 cells. Histological analysis of tumor sections demonstrated a marked decrease in the percentage of proliferating tumor cells (Ki-67 assay) along with an increase in apoptotic tumor cells (TUNEL assay) in MCF-7/cav-1-treated animals. Our current findings provide for the first time in vivo evidence that caveolin-1 can indeed function as a tumor suppressor in human breast adenocarcinoma derived from MCF-7 cells rather than as a tumor promoter.

  14. Effect of amitriptylin on the growth-kinetics of 2 human cancer xenograft lines in nude-mice.

    PubMed

    Bassukas, I

    1994-04-01

    With respect to the controversial discussion of the effect of antidepressants on the development of cancer in the literature, elicited by a recent report on growth stimulating effects of antidepressants (Brandes et al, Cancer Res 52: 3796, 1992), the effect of daily doses of amitriptylin (80 mg/m2 body surface, intraperitoneally) on the macroscopic growth of two human tumor xenograft lines in nude mice was studied (a malignant. melanoma, FO-1 and a renal cell adenocarcinoma, RCC). The application of the Gompertzian difference equation to compare the growth patterns of treated and untreated tumors shows that amitriptylin does modify the growth characteristics of both lines (p<0.05). however, in opposite directions: The growth of the melanoma FO-1 is stimulated whereas that of the RCC is inhibited. The growth pattern analysis further indicates, that this difference mainly consists of the differential effect of amitriptylin on the growth retarding processes of the tumors: amitriptylin inhibits the initial intrinsic growth rate of both tumor lines, however, only in the case of the FO-1 does it inhibit simultaneously also the growth retarding process and, thus, it ultimately stimulates its growth. On the contrary the near exponential growth of the RCC is not affected by amitriptylin. However, it cannot be excluded that at least some of the tumor growth modifying effects of the present treatment may be attributed to the potentiation of the animal weight loss by amitriptylin in the tumor-bearing animals (p<0.05).

  15. Lung Cancer Assistant: a hybrid clinical decision support application for lung cancer care

    PubMed Central

    Sesen, M. Berkan; Peake, Michael D.; Banares-Alcantara, Rene; Tse, Donald; Kadir, Timor; Stanley, Roz; Gleeson, Fergus; Brady, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Multidisciplinary team (MDT) meetings are becoming the model of care for cancer patients worldwide. While MDTs have improved the quality of cancer care, the meetings impose substantial time pressure on the members, who generally attend several such MDTs. We describe Lung Cancer Assistant (LCA), a clinical decision support (CDS) prototype designed to assist the experts in the treatment selection decisions in the lung cancer MDTs. A novel feature of LCA is its ability to provide rule-based and probabilistic decision support within a single platform. The guideline-based CDS is based on clinical guideline rules, while the probabilistic CDS is based on a Bayesian network trained on the English Lung Cancer Audit Database (LUCADA). We assess rule-based and probabilistic recommendations based on their concordances with the treatments recorded in LUCADA. Our results reveal that the guideline rule-based recommendations perform well in simulating the recorded treatments with exact and partial concordance rates of 0.57 and 0.79, respectively. On the other hand, the exact and partial concordance rates achieved with probabilistic results are relatively poorer with 0.27 and 0.76. However, probabilistic decision support fulfils a complementary role in providing accurate survival estimations. Compared to recorded treatments, both CDS approaches promote higher resection rates and multimodality treatments. PMID:24990290

  16. Semaphorins and their receptors in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Potiron, Vincent A.; Roche, Joëlle; Drabkin, Harry A.

    2009-01-01

    Semaphorins are a large family of secreted, transmembrane and GPI-linked proteins initially characterized in the development of the nervous system and axonal guidance. Semaphorins are expressed in many tissues where they regulate normal development, organ morphogenesis, immunity and angiogenesis. They affect the cytoskeleton, actin filament organization, microtubules and cell adhesion. Semaphorin signaling is transduced by plexins, which in the case of most class-3 semaphorins requires high affinity neuropilin receptors. The neuropilins also function as receptors for VEGF and other growth factors, and their expression is often abnormal in tumors. In cancer, semaphorins have both tumor suppressor and tumor promoting functions. We review here the current status of semaphorins and their receptors in tumor development with a focus on lung cancer. PMID:18625544

  17. Lung cancer in Japanese chromate workers.

    PubMed Central

    Ohsaki, Y; Abe, S; Kimura, K; Tsuneta, Y; Mikami, H; Murao, M

    1978-01-01

    We have treated ten patients with lung cancer among workers in a chromate factory between 1972 and 1976. Four further cases were also found through death certificates and medical records. Most were smokers and all were men. The average duration of exposure to chromate was 24 years (range 10 to 36). The cell type in our ten patients was squamous in seven and small anaplastic type in three. Th