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Sample records for lung cells exposed

  1. Increased Myeloid Cell Production and Lung Bacterial Clearance in Mice Exposed to Cigarette Smoke.

    PubMed

    Basilico, Paola; Cremona, Tiziana P; Oevermann, Anna; Piersigilli, Alessandra; Benarafa, Charaf

    2016-03-01

    Pneumonia is a leading cause of hospitalization in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although most patients with COPD are smokers, the effects of cigarette smoke exposure on clearance of lung bacterial pathogens and on immune and inflammatory responses are incompletely defined. Here, clearance of Streptococcus pneumoniae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa and associated immune responses were examined in mice exposed to cigarette smoke or after smoking cessation. Mice exposed to cigarette smoke for 6 weeks or 4 months demonstrated decreased lung bacterial burden compared with air-exposed mice when infected 16 to 24 hours after exposure. When infection was performed after smoke cessation, bacterial clearance kinetics of mice previously exposed to smoke reversed to levels comparable to those of control mice, suggesting that the observed defects were not dependent on adaptive immunological memory to bacterial determinants found in smoke. Comparing cytokine levels and myeloid cell production before infection in mice exposed to cigarette smoke with mice never exposed or after smoke cessation revealed that reduced bacterial burden was most strongly associated with higher levels of IL-1β and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor in the lungs and with increased neutrophil reserve and monocyte turnover in the bone marrow. Using Serpinb1a-deficient mice with reduced neutrophil numbers and treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor showed that increased neutrophil numbers contribute only in part to the effect of smoke on infection. Our findings indicate that cigarette smoke induces a temporary and reversible increase in clearance of lung pathogens, which correlates with local inflammation and increased myeloid cell output from the bone marrow.

  2. Enhanced histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs exposed to sulfuric acid aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Fujimaki, Hidekazu ); Katayama, Noboru; Wakamori, Kazuo )

    1992-06-01

    To clarify the relationship between air pollution and mast cell response, the effects of sulfuric acid aerosols on histamine release from lung mast cells of guinea pigs were investigated. Guinea pigs were exposed to 0.3, 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} sulfuric acid (H{sub 2}SO{sub 4}) aerosols or 4 ppm nitrogen dioxide (NO{sub 2}) for 2 and 4 weeks. After the exposure, lung mast cell suspensions were isolated by collagenase treatment and antigen- or A23187-induced histamine release was measured. Antigen-induced histamine release from mast cells was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 and 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 2 weeks, but exposure to H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} for 4 weeks did not show the enhancement of antigen-induced histamine release. A23187-induced histamine release was significantly enhanced by the exposure to 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}SO{sub 4} or 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks, but suppression of histamine release from lung mast cells stimulated with A23187 was observed by the exposure to 3.2 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} for 4 weeks. The exposure to 0.3 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} showed no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. The combination of 1.0 mg/m{sup 3} H{sub 2}So{sub 4} with 4 ppm NO{sub 2} for 2 weeks resulted in no changes in antigen- and A23187-induced histamine release. These results suggested that functional properties of lung mast cells may be altered by a low concentration of H{sub 2}So{sub 4} aerosol exposure.

  3. Global gene expression profiling in human lung cells exposed to cobalt

    PubMed Central

    Malard, Veronique; Berenguer, Frederic; Prat, Odette; Ruat, Sylvie; Steinmetz, Gerard; Quemeneur, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Background It has been estimated that more than 1 million workers in the United States are exposed to cobalt. Occupational exposure to 59 Co occurs mainly via inhalation and leads to various lung diseases. Cobalt is classified by the IARC as a possible human carcinogen (group 2B). Although there is evidence for in vivo and in vitro toxicity, the mechanisms of cobalt-induced lung toxicity are not fully known. The purpose of this work was to identify potential signatures of acute cobalt exposure using a toxicogenomic approach. Data analysis focused on some cellular processes and protein targets that are thought to be relevant for carcinogenesis, transport and biomarker research. Results A time course transcriptome analysis was performed on A549 human pulmonary cells, leading to the identification of 85 genes which are repressed or induced in response to soluble 59 Co. A group of 29 of these genes, representing the main biological functions, was assessed by quantitative RT-PCR. The expression profiles of six of them were then tested by quantitative RT-PCR in a time-dependent manner and three modulations were confirmed by Western blotting. The 85 modulated genes include potential cobalt carriers (FBXL2, ZNT1, SLC12A5), tumor suppressors or transcription factors (MAZ, DLG1, MYC, AXL) and genes linked to the stress response (UBC, HSPCB, BNIP3L). We also identified nine genes coding for secreted proteins as candidates for biomarker research. Of those, TIMP2 was found to be down-regulated and this modulation was confirmed, in a dose-dependent manner, at protein level in the supernatant of exposed cells. Conclusion Most of these genes have never been described as related to cobalt stress and provide original hypotheses for further study of the effects of this metal ion on human lung epithelial cells. A putative biomarker of cobalt toxicity was identified. PMID:17553155

  4. Cell cycle synchronization reveals greater G2/M-phase accumulation of lung epithelial cells exposed to titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Medina-Reyes, Estefany I; Bucio-López, Laura; Freyre-Fonseca, Verónica; Sánchez-Pérez, Yesennia; García-Cuéllar, Claudia M; Morales-Bárcenas, Rocío; Pedraza-Chaverri, José; Chirino, Yolanda I

    2015-03-01

    Titanium dioxide has been classified in the 2B group as a possible human carcinogen by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, and amid concerns of its exposure, cell cycle alterations are an important one. However, several studies show inconclusive effects, mainly because it is difficult to compare cell cycle effects caused by TiO2 nanoparticle (NP) exposure between different shapes and sizes of NP, cell culture types, and time of exposure. In addition, cell cycle is frequently analyzed without cell cycle synchronization, which may also mask some effects. We hypothesized that synchronization after TiO2 NP exposure could reveal dissimilar cell cycle progression when compared with unsynchronized cell population. To test our hypothesis, we exposed lung epithelial cells to 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NPs for 7 days and one population was synchronized by serum starvation and inhibition of ribonucleotide reductase using hydroxyurea. Another cell population was exposed to TiO2 NPs under the same experimental conditions, but after treatments, cell cycle was analyzed without synchronization. Our results showed that TiO2 NP-exposed cells without synchronization had no changes in cell cycle distribution; however, cell population synchronized after 1 and 10 μg/cm(2) TiO2 NP treatment showed a 1.5-fold and 1.66-fold increase, respectively, in proliferation. Synchronized cells also reveal a faster capability of TiO2 NP-exposed cells to increase cell population in the G2/M phase in the following 9 h after synchronization. We conclude that synchronization discloses a greater percentage of cells in the G2/M phase and higher proliferation than TiO2 NP-synchronized cells.

  5. Quantification of DNA adducts formed in liver, lungs, and isolated lung cells of rats and mice exposed to (14)C-styrene by nose-only inhalation.

    PubMed

    Boogaard, P J; de Kloe, K P; Wong, B A; Sumner, S C; Watson, W P; van Sittert, N J

    2000-10-01

    Bronchiolo-alveolar tumors were observed in mice exposed chronically to 160 ppm styrene, whereas no tumors were seen in rats up to concentrations of 1000 ppm. Clara cells, which are predominant in the bronchiolo-alveolar region in mouse lungs but less numerous in rat and human lung, contain various cytochrome P450s, which may oxidize styrene to the rodent carcinogen styrene-7,8-oxide (SO) and other reactive metabolites. Reactive metabolites may form specific DNA adducts and induce the tumors observed in mice. To determine DNA adducts in specific tissues and cell types, rats and mice were exposed to 160 ppm [ring-U-(14)C]styrene by nose-only inhalation for 6 h in a recirculating exposure system. Liver and lungs were isolated 0 and 42 h after exposure. Fractions enriched in Type II cells and Clara cells were isolated from rat and mouse lung, respectively. DNA adduct profiles differed quantitatively and qualitatively in liver, total lung, and enriched lung cell fractions. At 0 and 42 h after exposure, the two isomeric N:7-guanine adducts of SO (measured together, HPEG) were present in liver at 3.0 +/- 0.2 and 1.9 +/- 0.3 (rat) and 1.2 +/- 0.2 and 3.2 +/- 0.5 (mouse) per 10(8) bases. Several other, unidentified adducts were present at two to three times higher concentrations in mouse, but not in rat liver. In both rat and mouse lung, HPEG was the major adduct at approximately 1 per 10(8) bases at 0 h, and these levels halved at 42 h. In both rat Type II and non-Type II cells, HPEG was the major adduct and was about three times higher in Type II cells than in total lung. For mice, DNA adduct levels in Clara cells and non-Clara cells were similar to total lung. The hepatic covalent binding index (CBI) at 0 and 42 h was 0.19 +/- 0.06 and 0.14 +/- 0.03 (rat) and 0. 25 +/- 0.11 and 0.44 +/- 0.23 (mouse), respectively. The pulmonary CBIs, based on tissues combined for 0 and 42 h, were 0.17 +/- 0.04 (rat) and 0.24 +/- 0.04 (mouse). Compared with CBIs for other genotoxicants

  6. p16INK4A inactivation mechanisms in non-small-cell lung cancer patients occupationally exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Andujar, Pascal; Wang, Jinhui; Descatha, Alexis; Galateau-Sallé, Françoise; Abd-Alsamad, Issam; Billon-Galland, Marie-Annick; Blons, Hélène; Clin, Bénédicte; Danel, Claire; Housset, Bruno; Laurent-Puig, Pierre; Le Pimpec-Barthes, Françoise; Letourneux, Marc; Monnet, Isabelle; Régnard, Jean-François; Renier, Annie; Zucman-Rossi, Jessica; Pairon, Jean-Claude; Jaurand, Marie-Claude

    2010-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that asbestos fibers constitute the major occupational risk factor and that asbestos acts synergistically with tobacco smoking to induce lung cancer. Although some somatic gene alterations in lung cancer have been linked to tobacco smoke, few data are available on the role of asbestos fibers. P16/CDKN2A is an important tumor suppressor gene that is frequently altered in lung cancer via promoter 5'-CpG island hypermethylation and homozygous deletion, and rarely via point mutation. Many studies suggest that tobacco smoking produces P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in lung cancer, but the status of this gene in relation to asbestos exposure has yet to be determined. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanism of P16/CDKN2A alterations in lung cancer in asbestos-exposed patients. P16/CDKN2A gene status was studied in 75 human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cases with well-defined smoking habits, and detailed assessment of asbestos exposure, based on occupational questionnaire and determination of asbestos bodies in lung tissue. The results of this study confirm published data on the effect of tobacco smoke on P16/CDKN2A gene alterations, characterized by significantly higher P16/CDKN2A promoter hypermethylation in heavy smokers (more than 40 pack-years (P-Y)) than in smokers of less than 40 P-Y. These results also demonstrate a higher incidence of loss of heterozygosity and homozygous deletion in asbestos-exposed cases, after adjustment for age and cumulative tobacco consumption, than in unexposed cases (P=0.0062). This study suggests that P16/CDKN2A gene inactivation in asbestos-exposed NSCLC cases mainly occurs via deletion, a feature also found in malignant mesothelioma, a tumor independent of tobacco smoking but associated with asbestos exposure, suggesting a possible relationship with an effect of asbestos fibers.

  7. Gene expression profile of human lung epithelial cells chronically exposed to single-walled carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Dongquan; Stueckle, Todd A.; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Rojanasakul, Yon; Lu, Yongju; Wang, Liying

    2015-01-01

    A rapid increase in utility of engineered nanomaterials, including carbon nanotubes (CNTs), has raised a concern over their safety. Based on recent evidence from animal studies, pulmonary exposure of CNTs may lead to nanoparticle accumulation in the deep lung without effective clearance which could interact with local lung cells for a long period of time. Physicochemical similarities of CNTs to asbestos fibers may contribute to their asbestos-like carcinogenic potential after long-term exposure, which has not been well addressed. More studies are needed to identify and predict the carcinogenic potential and mechanisms for promoting their safe use. Our previous study reported a long-term in vitro exposure model for CNT carcinogenicity and showed that 6-month sub-chronic exposure of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) causes malignant transformation of human lung epithelial cells. In addition, the transformed cells induced tumor formation in mice and exhibited an apoptosis resistant phenotype, a key characteristic of cancer cells. Although the potential role of p53 in the transformation process was identified, the underlying mechanisms of oncogenesis remain largely undefined. Here, we further examined the gene expression profile by using genome microarrays to profile molecular mechanisms of SWCNT oncogenesis. Based on differentially expressed genes, possible mechanisms of SWCNT-associated apoptosis resistance and oncogenesis were identified, which included activation of pAkt/p53/Bcl-2 signaling axis, increased gene expression of Ras family for cell cycle control, Dsh-mediated Notch 1, and downregulation of apoptotic genes BAX and Noxa. Activated immune responses were among the major changes of biological function. Our findings shed light on potential molecular mechanisms and signaling pathways involved in SWCNT oncogenic potential.

  8. Induction of Cell Death through Alteration of Oxidants and Antioxidants in Lung Epithelial Cells Exposed to High Energy Protons*

    PubMed Central

    Baluchamy, Sudhakar; Ravichandran, Prabakaran; Periyakaruppan, Adaikkappan; Ramesh, Vani; Hall, Joseph C.; Zhang, Ye; Jejelowo, Olufisayo; Gridley, Daila S.; Wu, Honglu; Ramesh, Govindarajan T.

    2010-01-01

    Radiation affects several cellular and molecular processes, including double strand breakage and modifications of sugar moieties and bases. In outer space, protons are the primary radiation source that poses a range of potential health risks to astronauts. On the other hand, the use of proton irradiation for tumor radiation therapy is increasing, as it largely spares healthy tissues while killing tumor tissues. Although radiation-related research has been conducted extensively, the molecular toxicology and cellular mechanisms affected by proton irradiation remain poorly understood. Therefore, in this study, we irradiated rat lung epithelial cells with different doses of protons and investigated their effects on cell proliferation and death. Our data show an inhibition of cell proliferation in proton-irradiated cells with a significant dose-dependent activation and repression of reactive oxygen species and antioxidants glutathione and superoxide dismutase, respectively, compared with control cells. In addition, the activities of apoptosis-related genes such as caspase-3 and -8 were induced in a dose-dependent manner with corresponding increased levels of DNA fragmentation in proton-irradiated cells compared with control cells. Together, our results show that proton irradiation alters oxidant and antioxidant levels in cells to activate the apoptotic pathway for cell death. PMID:20538614

  9. Lung cancer - small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - small cell; Small cell lung cancer; SCLC ... About 15% of all lung cancer cases are SCLC. Small cell lung cancer is slightly more common in men than women. Almost all cases of SCLC are ...

  10. Lung tumorigenic response of strain A mice exposed to hypoxic cell sensitizers alone and in combination with gamma-radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Mian, T.A.; Theiss, J.C.; Grdina, D.J.

    1983-01-01

    The influence of metronidazole, misonidazole, and desmethylmisonidazole on the induction of lung adenomas in the strain A mouse was examined. Two dose levels of the hypoxic cell sensitizers, 0.2 and 0.6 mg/g, were used either alone or in combination with 900 rads of gamma-radiation in a fractionated dose schedule of twice a week for 3 weeks. In the groups of mice which received hypoxic cell sensitizers only, the prevalence and the mean number of lung tumors per mouse were somewhat increased (p less than 0.10) in the group receiving the higher dose (0.6 mg/g) of misonidazole but was not significantly different from results for the control animals in the other two sensitizer groups. The combination of hypoxic cell sensitizer and radiation did not show any significant enhancement of lung tumor response when compared with the group which received radiation only. The dose of radiation used in this study significantly enhanced lung tumor formation in mice when compared with that in the control group. Thus, under the experimental exposure conditions used in this investigation, which were somewhat similar to the exposure conditions occurring in clinical treatment, each of the hypoxic cell sensitizers tested failed to sensitize significantly the mice to the carcinogenic effects of gamma-radiation.

  11. Gene Expression Changes in Human Lung Cells Exposed to Arsenic, Chromium, Nickel or Vanadium Indicate the First Steps in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Clancy, Hailey A.; Sun, Hong; Passantino, Lisa; Kluz, Thomas; Muñoz, Alexandra; Zavadil, Jiri; Costa, Max

    2013-01-01

    The complex process of carcinogenesis begins with transformation of a single cell to favor aberrant traits such as loss of contact inhibition and unregulated proliferation – features found in every cancer. Despite cancer’s widespread prevalence, the early events that initiate cancer remain elusive, and without knowledge of these events cancer prevention is difficult. Here we show that exposure to As, Cr, Ni, or Vanadium (V) promotes changes in gene expression that occur in conjunction with aberrant growth. We exposed immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells to one of four metals/metalloid for four to eight weeks and selected transformed clonal populations based upon anchorage independent growth of single cells in soft agar. We detected a metal-specific footprint of cancer-related gene expression that was consistent across multiple transformed clones. These gene expression changes persisted in the absence of the progenitor metal for numerous cell divisions. Our results show that even a brief exposure to a carcinogenic metal may cause many changes in gene expression in the exposed cells, and that from these many changes, the specific change(s) that each metal causes that initiate cancer likely arise. PMID:22714537

  12. Toxicity of copper oxide nanoparticles in lung epithelial cells exposed at the air-liquid interface compared with in vivo assessment

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Xuefang; Park, Jae Hong; Peters, Thomas M.; Thorne, Peter S.

    2015-01-01

    The toxicity of spark-generated copper oxide nanoparticles (CuONPs) was evaluated in human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC) and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549 cells) using an in vitro air-liquid interface (ALI) exposure system. Dose-response results were compared to in vivo inhalation and instillation studies of CuONP. Cells were exposed to particle-free clean air (controls) or spark-generated CuONPs. The number median diameter, geometric standard deviation and total number concentration of CuONPs were 9.2 nm, 1.48 and 2.27×107 particles/cm3, respectively. Outcome measures included cell viability, cytotoxicity, oxidative stress and proinflammatory chemokine production. Exposure to clean air (2 or 4 hr) did not induce toxicity in HBEC or A549 cells. Compared with controls, CuONP exposures significantly reduced cell viability, increased lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release and elevated levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and IL-8 in a dose-dependent manner. A549 cells were significantly more susceptible to CuONP effects than HBEC. Antioxidant treatment reduced CuONP-induced cytotoxicity. When dose was expressed per area of exposed epithelium there was good agreement of toxicity measures with murine in vivo studies. This demonstrates that in vitro ALI studies can provide meaningful data on nanotoxicity of metal oxides. PMID:25575782

  13. Generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species and its effects on DNA damage in lung cancer cells exposed to atmospheric pressure helium/oxygen plasma jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Tae Hun; Joh, Hea Min; Kim, Sun Ja; Choi, Ji Ye; Kang, Tae-Hong

    2016-09-01

    We investigated the effects of the operating parameters on the generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in the gas and liquid phases exposed to atmospheric pressure a pulsed-dc helium plasma jets. The densities of reactive species including OH radicals were obtained at the plasma-liquid surface and inside the plasma-treated liquids using ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and chemical probe method. And the nitrite concentration was detected by Griess assay. The data are very suggestive that there is a strong correlation among the production of RONS in the plasmas and liquids. Exposure of plasma to cancer cells increases the cellular levels of RONS, which has been linked to apoptosis and the damage of cellular proteins, and may also indirectly cause structural damage to DNA. To identify the correlation between the production of RONS in cells and plasmas, various assay analyses were performed on plasma treated human lung cancer cells (A549) cells. In addition, the effect of additive oxygen gas on the plasma-induced oxidative stress in cancer cells was investigated. It was observed that DNA damage was significantly increased with helium/oxygen plasma compared to with pure helium plasma.

  14. Higher AgNOR Expression in Metaplastic and Dysplastic Airway Epithelial Cells Predicts the Risk of Developing Lung Cancer in Women Chronically Exposed to Biomass Smoke.

    PubMed

    Mondal, Nandan Kumar; Roychoudhury, Sanghita; Ray, Manas Ranjan

    2015-01-01

    We evaluated AgNOR expression in airway epithelial cells (AECs) as a risk factor of lung carcinogenesis in 228 nonsmoking women exposed to biomass fuel (BMF). A total of 185 age-matched women who cooked with cleaner fuel (liquefied petroleum gas [LPG]) were enrolled as study controls. Compared with controls, Papanicolaou-stained sputum samples showed 4 and 8 times higher prevalence of metaplasia and dysplasia, respectively, in AECs of BMF users. AgNOR staining showed significantly larger numbers of dots and larger size and percentage of AgNOR-occupied nuclear area in normal AECs of BMF users than in controls. Interestingly, AgNOR parameters increased dramatically when the cells were transformed from normalcy to metaplasia and dysplasia. Compared with LPG users, BMF users showed a marked rise in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and a depletion of superoxide dismutase (SOD), indicating oxidative stress. Indoor air of BMF-using households had 2-5 times more particulate pollutants (PM10 and PM2.5), 73% more nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and 4 times more particulate-laden benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P], but no difference in sulfur dioxide was observed. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) study estimated a 6-fold rise in benzene metabolite trans, trans-muconic acid (t,t-MA) in urine of BMF users. After controlling confounding factors using multivariate logistic regression, positive associations were observed between cellular changes, AgNOR parameters, and PM10, PM2.5, NO2, B(a)P, and t,t-MA levels, especially the concentration of B(a)P. In conclusion, cumulative exposure to biomass smoke causes oxidative stress and enhances AgNOR expression in precancerous metaplastic and dysplastic AECs and appears to be a risk factor for developing lung cancer.

  15. Inhibition of the formation of benzo[a]pyrene adducts to DNA in A549 lung cells exposed to mixtures of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    PubMed

    Genies, Camille; Jullien, Amandine; Lefebvre, Emmanuel; Revol, Morgane; Maitre, Anne; Douki, Thierry

    2016-09-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are ubiquitous pollutants, which exhibit carcinogenic properties especially in lungs. In the present work, we studied the effect of mixtures of 12 PAHs on the A549 alveolar cells. We first assess the ability of each PAH at inducing gene expression of phase I metabolization enzymes and at generating DNA adducts. A good correlation was found between these two endpoints. We then exposed cells to either binary mixtures of the highly genotoxic benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) with each PAH or complex mixtures of all studied PAHs mimicking by real emissions including combustion of wood, cigarette smoke, and atmospheres of garage, silicon factory and urban environments. Compared to pure B[a]P, both types of mixtures led to reduced CYP450 activity measured by the EROD test. A similar trend was observed for the formation of DNA adducts. Surprisingly, the complex mixtures were more potent than B[a]P used at the same concentration for the induction of genes coding for CYP. Our results stress the lack of additivity of the genotoxic properties of PAH in mixtures. Interestingly, an opposite synergy in the formation of B[a]P adducts were observed previously in hepatocytes. Our data also show that measurement of the metabolic activity rather than quantification of gene expression reflects the actual bioactivation of PAHs into DNA damaging species.

  16. Reduction in (pro-)inflammatory responses of lung cells exposed in vitro to diesel exhaust treated with a non-catalyzed diesel particle filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steiner, Sandro; Czerwinski, Jan; Comte, Pierre; Müller, Loretta L.; Heeb, Norbert V.; Mayer, Andreas; Petri-Fink, Alke; Rothen-Rutishauser, Barbara

    2013-12-01

    Increasingly stringent regulation of particulate matter emissions from diesel vehicles has led to the widespread use of diesel particle filters (DPFs), the effect of which on exhaust toxicity is so far poorly understood. We exposed a cellular model of the human respiratory epithelium at the air-liquid interface to non-catalyzed wall-flow DPF-filtered diesel exhaust and compared the resulting biological responses to the ones observed upon exposure to unfiltered exhaust. Filtered diesel exhaust acted highly oxidative, even though to a lesser extent than unfiltered exhaust (quantification of total reduced glutathione), and both exhaust types triggered comparable responses to oxidative stress (measurement of heme-oxygenase 1 (HMOX1) and superoxide-dismutase (SOD1) gene expression). Further, diesel exhaust filtration significantly reduced pro-inflammatory responses (measurement of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) gene expression and quantification of the secretion of their gene products TNF-α and IL-8). Because inflammatory processes are central to the onset of adverse respiratory health effects caused by diesel exhaust inhalation, our results imply that DPFs may make a valuable contribution to the detoxification of diesel vehicle emissions. The induction of significant oxidative stress by filtered diesel exhaust however, also implies that the non-particulate exhaust components also need to be considered for lung cell risk assessment.

  17. Investigation by microarray analysis of effects of cigarette design characteristics on gene expression in human lung mucoepidermoid cancer cells NCI-H292 exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Takashi; Sakaguchi, Chikako; Fukano, Yasuo

    2015-02-01

    The effects of tobacco leaf types and the presence or absence of charcoal in the cigarette filters on gene expression were investigated using cigarette prototypes made of either flue-cured (FC) leaf or burley (BLY) leaf and Kentucky Reference 2R4F as a representative blend cigarette with cellulose acetate filters or charcoal filters. NCI-H292, human lung mucoepidermoid carcinoma cell line, was exposed to the total particulate matter (TPM) and gas/vapor phase (GVP) from each prototype for 8h and then the changes in gene expression from microarray data were analyzed. A number of genes associated with oxidative stress, inflammation, DNA damage and xenobiotic response were modified by the two fractions, TPM and GVP, from the three prototypes with cellulose acetate filters. Both TPM and GVP fractions strongly enhanced the gene expression of HMOX1, which is encoding the limiting enzyme in heme degradation and a key regulator of oxidative stress and inflammatory process. Comparing the effects of TPM and GVP fraction, TPM strongly activated Nrf2 pathway-mediated anti-oxidative stress reaction, whereas GVP caused notable DNA damage response. In comparison of FC and BLY, TPM from FC more strongly induced the expression of histone family proteins than that from BLY. GVP from FC markedly induced gene expression associated with HSP70-mediated inflammation relative to that from BLY. Charcoal included in the filter strongly reduced the effects of GVP from each cigarette on gene expression. However, charcoal did not modified the effects of TPM. As a whole, charcoal is a useful material for reducing the biological effects of GVP.

  18. Asbestos content in lungs of occupationally and nonoccupationally exposed individuals

    SciTech Connect

    Dodson, R.F.; Greenberg, S.D.; Williams, M.G. Jr.; Corn, C.J.; O'Sullivan, M.F.; Hurst, G.A.

    1984-07-06

    Previous reports have indicated that a majority of the population has asbestos bodies within their lungs. These studies generally have been carried out using cohorts from urban environments. The present study compares the asbestos body levels from three unique cohorts: (1) a nonoccupationally exposed group from a large urban environment having a relatively low asbestos content, (2) patients with lung cancer from a nonurban setting, and (3) amosite asbestos workers, who worked and lived in a rural setting. The number of asbestos bodies in both the urban nonoccupationally exposed group and the patients with lung cancer was generally found to be low or below limits of detectability, with the exceptions being those persons in whom an occupational exposure was eventually found. The ferruginous body content of the occupationally exposed group varied considerably between individuals as well as between sites within the same individual.

  19. Lung cancer in rats exposed to fibrogenic dusts

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.M.; Wilson, J.S.; Tillery, M.I.; Smith, D.M.

    1984-01-01

    Fischer-344 rats were exposed to quartz dusts and to quartz-bearing oil shale dusts in long-term inhalation studies. Aerosol concentrations of 12 mg/m/sup 3/ and 152-176 mg/m/sup 3/ for quartz and shale dusts, respectively, were used in exposure regimens lasting up to two years. Pulmonary fibrosis was observed in most animals surviving beyond 400 days. Adenocarcinomas and epidermoid carcinomas of the lung were observed in animals from all exposure groups, including those exposed to quartz alone. The pulmonary tumors were a late effect, with the earliest lung tumor being observed after 651 days. 13 references, 10 figures, 4 tables.

  20. Lung cancer - non-small cell

    MedlinePlus

    Cancer - lung - non-small cell; Non-small cell lung cancer; NSCLC; Adenocarcinoma - lung; Squamous cell carcinoma - lung ... Smoking causes most cases (around 90%) of lung cancer. The risk depends on the number of cigarettes ...

  1. Induction of Rad51 protein levels by p38 MAPK decreases cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in benzo[a]pyrene-exposed human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.-M.; Wang, L.-H.; Hong, J.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-08-01

    Rad51 is an essential component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. Abnormal expression of Rad51 has been reported in various carcinomas. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen found in the environment, induces cancer in multiple organs. B[a]P has been shown to activate the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in mammalian cells. The prime purpose of this study was to determine how B[a]P activates the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, and how this then regulates Rad51 expression in human cancer cells. Exposure of human lung cancer cells with B[a]P increased Rad51 protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. B[a]P also induced Rad51 mRNA and protein synthesis. Blockage of p38 MAPK activation by SB202190 or small interfering RNA (si-p38) decreased B[a]P-elicited Rad51 protein levels by increasing Rad51 protein instability, but did not affect Rad51 mRNA transcription. Furthermore, enhancement of p38 MAPK signaling by constitutively active MKK6 (MKK6E) increased Rad51 protein levels and protein stability. Moreover, B[a]P-induced cytotoxicity and mutagenicity were significantly increased in cells depleted of endogenous Rad51. Taken together, these results indicate that Rad51 protein provides a critical role in inhibiting the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of B[a]P in B[a]P-treated human lung cancer cells. Furthermore, the work points to an unexpected role of p38 MAPK signaling in the control of Rad51 protein stability in response to B[a]P exposure.

  2. Localization of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) in the lungs of silica-exposed mice.

    PubMed Central

    Nario, R C; Hubbard, A K

    1997-01-01

    Intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) is expressed on a variety of cells including endothelial cells, alveolar epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages. Endothelial/epithelial cell ICAM-1 participates in the migration of leukocytes out of the blood in response to pulmonary inflammation, whereas alveolar macrophage ICAM-1 may represent cell activation. Our previous studies have shown that there is increased expression of ICAM-1 in lung tissue during acute inflammation following intratracheal injection with silica particles (2 mg/mouse). This increased expression was shown to play a role, in part, in the migration of neutrophils from the circulation into the tissue parenchyma. The aim of the current work is to localize expression of ICAM-1 during acute inflammation in lungs of mice exposed to either silica or the nuisance dust, titanium dioxide. In silica-exposed mice, a significant increase in ICAM-1 was detected on day-1 and localized by immunohistochemistry to aggregates of pulmonary macrophages and to type II epithelial cells. Areas of the lung with increased ICAM-1 expression also showed increased tumor necrosis factor alpha expression. Immunocytochemical staining of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells demonstrated increased ICAM-1 expression associated with alveolar macrophages 3, 5, and 7 days following silica exposure. Finally, soluble ICAM-1 levels in the BAL fluid were significantly increased in mice exposed to silica on the same days. Titanium dioxide exposure elicited a minimal increase in expression of ICAM-1 in the lungs. These data demonstrate that exposure to the toxic particle silica specifically increases ICAM-1 expression localized to pulmonary macrophages and type II epithelial cells. Images Figure 2. B Figure 2. A Figure 2. D Figure 2. C Figure 3. A Figure 3. B Figure 5. B Figure 5. A Figure 5. C PMID:9400721

  3. The protective effect of Nigella sativa on lung injury of sulfur mustard-exposed Guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hossein, Boskabady Mohammad; Nasim, Vahedi; Sediqa, Amery

    2008-05-01

    The lung is one of the most exposable organs to chemical warfare agents such as sulfur mustard (SM) gas. Airway hyperresponsiveness and lung inflammation are reported in chemical warfare victims. There is no definite treatment for respiratory disorders induced by SM exposure. However, the protective effect of Nigella sativa on inflammatory process was shown. In the present study, the protective effect of Nigella sativa on tracheal responsiveness and lung inflammation of SM exposed guinea pigs was examined. Guinea pigs were exposed to diluent's solution (ethanol, control group), 100 mg/m(3) inhaled sulfur mustard (SME group), and SME treated with Nigella sativa, 0.08 g daily (SME+N), n = 6 for each group. Tracheal responsiveness (TR) to methacholine, total white blood cell (WBC) count of lung lavage, and differential WBC were done 14 days post exposure. The weigh of animal were measured at the beginning, middle (day 7), and the end (day 14) of the study. The TR of SM-exposed guinea pigs was significantly (P < .001) and WBC nonsignificantly higher than those of controls. In SME guinea pigs, there was a weight loss but in the case of SME+N guinea pigs, no obvious weight change thought the study was seen. The eosinophl, monocyte, and lympocytes in SME animals were significantly changed compared to control group (P < .001 for all cases). Monocyte, lymphocyte, and neutrophil number were decreased in SME+N group compared to SME animals, which was significant only for neutrophil (P < .05). These results showed a preventive effect of Nigella sativa on TR of SM-exposed guinea pigs.

  4. Arginases I and II in lungs of ovalbumin-sensitized mice exposed to ovalbumin: Sources and consequences

    SciTech Connect

    Kenyon, Nicholas J.; Bratt, Jennifer M.; Linderholm, Angela L.; Last, Michael S.; Last, Jerold A.

    2008-08-01

    Arginase gene expression in the lung has been linked to asthma both in clinical studies of human patients and in the well-studied mouse model of ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation. Arginase is thought to regulate NO levels in the lung by its ability to divert arginine, the substrate for nitric oxide synthases that produce citrulline and NO, into an alternative metabolic pathway producing ornithine and urea. In the present study arginase I and arginase II concentrations were measured in isolated microdissected airway preparations from sensitized Balb/c mice exposed to ovalbumin aerosol. We found that arginase II was constitutively expressed in the airways of normal mice, whereas arginase I was undetectable in normal airways, while its expression was increased in airways of mice exposed to ovalbumin. The expression of arginase I strongly correlated with the presence of lung inflammation, as quantified by differential cell counts in lung lavage, suggesting that most, or all, of the arginase I in lungs of mice exposed to ovalbumin is present in the inflammatory cells rather than in the airway epithelium. There was also a significant correlation between increased expression of arginase I in the isolated airways and decreased lung compliance. On the other hand, while we found arginase II expression to also be significantly increased in airways from mice exposed to ovalbumin as compared with normal airways, the relative increase was much less than that observed for arginase I, suggesting that there was a smaller contribution of inflammatory cells to the arginase II content of the airways in mice exposed to ovalbumin. There was no apparent correlation between the content of arginase in isolated airways and exhaled NO concentration in the expired air from mice exposed to ovalbumin. However, there was a correlation between exhaled NO concentration from mice exposed to ovalbumin and the lymphocyte content of the lung lavage. The concentration of arginine found in isolated

  5. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    SciTech Connect

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Gonzalez-De Alba, Cesar; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2015-09-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero has been associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms or diseases in the adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that the exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero in children was associated with impairment in the lung function and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammation response to the metalloid. Therefore, we designed this cross-sectional study in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their arsenic urinary levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the soluble receptor for advanced glycation end products' (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsonic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. Arsenic-induced alterations in inflammatory biomarkers may contribute to the development of restrictive lung diseases. - Highlights: • First study in children evaluating lung inflammatory biomarkers and As levels

  6. Potential targets for lung squamous cell carcinoma

    Cancer.gov

    Researchers have identified potential therapeutic targets in lung squamous cell carcinoma, the second most common form of lung cancer. The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) Research Network study comprehensively characterized the lung squamous cell carcinoma gen

  7. Sister chromatid exchange analysis in lung and peripheral blood lymphocytes of mice exposed to methyl isocyanate by inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Kligerman, A.D.; Campbell, J.A.; Erexson, G.L.; Allen, J.W.; Shelby, M.D.

    1987-01-01

    Mice were exposed to 1, 3, or 6 ppm methyl isocyanate (MIC) for 6 hr/day for four consecutive days. Lung cells and peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) were removed and cultured for analysis of sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and cell cycle kinetics. MIC caused a small but significant increase in SCE frequency of cultured lung cells from mice exposed to 1, 3, or 6 ppm MIC. MIC did not significantly increase SCE levels in PBLs of mice exposed to concentrations as high as 6 ppm. In cultured PBLs, MIC had a stimulatory effect on cell cycling rates as measured by the replicative index, and it caused a significant reduction in mononuclear leucocyte counts and the mitotic indices.

  8. Comparisons of IL-8, ROS and p53 responses in human lung epithelial cells exposed to two extracts of PM2.5 collected from an e-waste recycling area, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Fangxing; Jin, Shiwei; Xu, Ying; Lu, Yuanan

    2011-04-01

    To identify the different effects of organic-soluble and water-soluble pollutants adsorbed on PM2.5 (PM: particulate matter) released from e-waste (electrical/electronic waste) on inflammatory response, oxidative stress and DNA damage, interleukin-8 (IL-8), reactive oxygen species (ROS) and p53 protein levels were determined and compared in human lung epithelial A549 cells exposed to extracts of PM2.5 collected from two sampling sites in an e-waste recycling area in China. It is found that both extracts induced increases of IL-8 release, ROS production and p53 protein expression. The differences between the organic-soluble and water-soluble extracts were determined as of significance for ROS production (p < 0.05) and p53 protein expression (p < 0.01). The ROS production and p53 protein expression induced by the organic-soluble extracts were found to be greater than those induced by the water-soluble extracts, for both sampling sites. The results indicated that PM2.5 collected from the e-waste recycling areas could lead to inflammatory response, oxidative stress and DNA damage, and the organic-soluble extracts had higher potential to induce such adverse effects on human health.

  9. Lung inflammation biomarkers and lung function in children chronically exposed to arsenic

    PubMed Central

    Olivas-Calderón, Edgar; Recio-Vega, Rogelio; Gandolfi, A. Jay; Lantz, R. Clark; González-Cortes, Tania; Alba, Cesar Gonzalez-De; Froines, John R.; Espinosa-Fematt, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    Evidence suggests that exposure to arsenic in drinking water during early childhood or in utero is associated with an increase in respiratory symptoms and diseases in adulthood, however only a few studies have been carried out during those sensitive windows of exposure. Recently our group demonstrated that exposure to arsenic during early childhood or in utero was associated with impairment in the lung function in children and suggested that this adverse effect could be due to a chronic inflammatory response to the metalloid. Therefore, a cross-sectional study was designed in a cohort of children associating lung inflammatory biomarkers and lung function with urinary As levels. A total of 275 healthy children were partitioned into four study groups according with their As levels. Inflammation biomarkers were measured in sputum by ELISA and the lung function was evaluated by spirometry. Fifty eight percent of the studied children were found to have a restrictive spirometric pattern. In the two highest exposed groups, the Soluble Receptor for Advanced Glycation Endproducts (sRAGE) sputum level was significantly lower and Matrix Metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) concentration was higher. When the biomarkers were correlated to the urinary arsenic species, negative associations were found between dimethylarsinic (DMA), monomethylarsenic percentage (%MMA) and dimethylarsinic percentage (%DMA) with sRAGE and positive associations between %DMA with MMP-9 and with the MMP-9/Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase (TIMP-1) ratio. In conclusion, chronic arsenic exposure of children negatively correlates with sRAGE, and positively correlated with MMP-9 and MMP-9/TIMP-1 levels, and increases the frequency of an abnormal spirometric pattern. PMID:26048584

  10. Gene expression in the lung of p53 mutant mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Cartiglia, Cristina; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Bagnasco, Maria; Merello, Andrea; You, Ming; Lubet, Ronald A; De Flora, Silvio

    2004-12-01

    We showed previously that p53 mutations play a role in cigarette smoke-related carcinogenesis not only in humans but also in A/J mice. In fact, (UL53-3 x A/J)F(1) mice, carrying a dominant-negative germ-line p53 mutation, responded to exposure to environmental cigarette smoke more efficiently than their wild-type (wt) littermate controls in terms of molecular alterations, cytogenetic damage, and lung tumor yield. To clarify the mechanisms involved, we analyzed by cDNA array the expression of 1,185 cancer-related genes in the lung of the same mice. Neither environmental cigarette smoke nor the p53 status affected the expression of the p53 gene, but the p53 mutation strikingly increased the basal levels of p53 nuclear protein in the lung. Environmental cigarette smoke increased p53 protein levels in wt mice only. The p53 mutation enhanced the expression of positive cell cycle regulators in sham-exposed mice, which suggests a physiologic protective role of p53. In environmental cigarette smoke-exposed mice, the p53 mutation resulted in a lack of induction of proapoptotic genes and in overexpression of genes involved in cell proliferation, signal transduction, angiogenesis, inflammation, and immune response. Mutant mice and wt mice reacted to environmental cigarette smoke in a similar manner regarding genes involved in metabolism of xenobiotics, multidrug resistance, and protein repair. Irrespective of the p53 status, environmental cigarette smoke poorly affected the expression of oncogenes, tumor suppressor genes, and DNA repair genes. Taken together, these findings may explain the increased susceptibility of p53 mutant mice to smoke-related alterations of intermediate biomarkers and lung carcinogenesis.

  11. Elastolytic activity in the lungs of rats exposed to cadmium aerosolization

    SciTech Connect

    Padmanabhan, R.V.; Gudapaty, S.R.; Liener, I.E.; Hoidal, J.R.

    1982-10-01

    Rats were exposed for 1 hr per day for up to 35 days to an aerosol of 0.1% cadmium chloride. At periodic intervals, animals were sacrificed and their lungs lavaged. The lung lavage fluid was examined for polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMN) and alveolar macrophages (AM). A portion of the cells of the lavage fluid was lysed, and the remainder of the cells were cultured. The lavage fluids, cell lysates, and conditioned media were assayed for elastolytic activity in the presence and absence of a peptide chloromethyl ketone and EDTA. Exposure to cadmium evoked a biphasic cellular response characterized by an initial influx (1-3 days) of PMN followed by a gradual increase in AM. This biphasic cellular response was accompanied by a shift in the type of elastolytic activity which was present in the lung lavage and its cellular components. The initial PMN phase was accompanied by the enhanced production of an elastase inhibited only by the peptide chloromethyl ketone, while the subsequent AM phase was associated with an elastase activity which was inhibited only by EDTA. The possible implication of these results with respect to the pathogenesis of emphysema is considered.

  12. Respiratory symptoms and lung function in oil mist-exposed workers

    SciTech Connect

    Jarvholm, B.; Bake, B.; Lavenius, B.; Thiringer, G.; Vokmann, R.

    1982-06-01

    The prevalence of respiratory symptoms was registered and ventilatory function was determined in 164 men exposed to oil mist. The average exposure time was 16.2 years. One hundred fifty-nine office workers served as controls. The exposed men reported more respiratory symptoms: 14% of the exposed nonsmokers v. 2% of the nonsmoking controls having cough at least three months a year. There were non significant differences between spirometric measurements and chest roentgenograms of the men exposed to oil mist and those of the office workers. The lung function of 25 nonsmoking exposed men was further examined with other lung function tests. The mean values for closing volume, slope of the alveolar plateau, total lung capacity, residual volume, elastic recoil at various lung volumes, and diffusion capacity did not differ significantly.

  13. WE-FG-BRB-04: RBEs for Human Lung Cancer Cells Exposed to Protons and Heavier Ions: Implications for Clinical Use of Charged Particles in Cancer Therapy.

    PubMed

    Held, K

    2016-06-01

    The physical pattern of energy deposition and the enhanced relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of protons and carbon ions compared to photons offer unique and not fully understood or exploited opportunities to improve the efficacy of radiation therapy. Variations in RBE within a pristine or spread out Bragg peak and between particle types may be exploited to enhance cell killing in target regions without a corresponding increase in damage to normal tissue structures. In addition, the decreased sensitivity of hypoxic tumors to photon-based therapies may be partially overcome through the use of more densely ionizing radiations. These and other differences between particle and photon beams may be used to generate biologically optimized treatments that reduce normal tissue complications. In this symposium, speakers will examine the impact of the RBE of charged particles on measurable biological endpoints, treatment plan optimization, and the prediction or retrospective assessment of treatment outcomes. In particular, an AAPM task group was formed to critically examine the evidence for a spatially-variant RBE in proton therapy. Current knowledge of proton RBE variation with respect to dose, biological endpoint, and physics parameters will be reviewed. Further, the clinical relevance of these variations will be discussed. Recent work focused on improving simulations of radiation physics and biological response in proton and carbon ion therapy will also be presented. Finally, relevant biology research and areas of research needs will be highlighted, including the dependence of RBE on genetic factors including status of DNA repair pathways, the sensitivity of cancer stem-like cells to charged particles, the role of charged particles in hypoxic tumors, and the importance of fractionation effects. In addition to the physical advantages of protons and more massive ions over photons, the future application of biologically optimized treatment plans and their potential to

  14. Altered lipid synthesis in type II pneumonocytes exposed to lung surfactant.

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, N R; Tesan, M; Tyler, N E; Bleasdale, J E

    1986-01-01

    When type II pneumonocytes were exposed to purified lung surfactant that contained 1-palmitoyl-2-[3H]palmitoyl-glycero-3-phosphocholine, radiolabelled surfactant was apparently taken up by the cells since it could not be removed by either repeated washing or exchange with non-radiolabelled surfactant, but was released when the cells were lysed. After 4 h of exposure to [3H]surfactant, more than half of the 3H within cells remained in disaturated phosphatidylcholine. Incorporation of [3H]choline, [14C]palmitate and [14C]acetate into glycerophospholipids was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this inhibition, like surfactant uptake, was half-maximal when the extracellular concentration of surfactant was approx. 0.1 mumol of lipid P/ml. Inhibition of incorporation of radiolabelled precursors by surfactant occurred rapidly and reversibly and was not due solely to dilution of the specific radioactivity of intracellular precursors. Activity of dihydroxyacetone-phosphate acyltransferase, but not glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase, was decreased in type II cells exposed to surfactant and this was reflected by a decrease in the 14C/3H ratio of total lipids synthesized when cells incubated with [U-14C]glycerol and [2-3H]glycerol were exposed to surfactant. Phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylglycerol and cholesterol, either individually or mixed in the molar ratio found in surfactant, did not mimic purified surfactant in the inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis. In contrast, an apoprotein fraction isolated from surfactant inhibited greatly the incorporation of [3H]choline into lipids and this inhibitory activity was labile to heat and to trypsin. It is concluded that the apparent uptake of surfactant by type II cells in vitro is accompanied by an inhibition of glycerophospholipid synthesis via a mechanism that involves a surfactant apoprotein. Images Fig. 4. PMID:3827860

  15. Stem Cells in the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoming; Driskell, Ryan R.; Engelhardt, John F.

    2007-01-01

    The lung is composed of two major anatomically distinct regions—the conducting airways and gas-exchanging airspaces. From a cell biology standpoint, the conducting airways can be further divided into two major compartments, the tracheobronchial and bronchiolar airways, while the alveolar regions of the lung make up the gas-exchanging airspaces. Each of these regions consists of distinct epithelial cell types with unique cellular physiologies and stem cell compartments. This chapter focuses on model systems with which to study stem cells in the adult tracheobronchial airways, also referred to as the proximal airway of the lung. Important in such models is an appreciation for the diversity of stem cell niches in the conducting airways that provide localized environmental signals to both maintain and mobilize stem cells in the setting of airway injury and normal cellular turnover. Because cellular turnover in airways is relatively slow, methods for analysis of stem cells in vivo have required prior injury to the lung. In contrast, ex vivo and in vitro models for analysis of airway stem cells have used genetic markers to track lineage relationships together with reconstitution systems that mimic airway biology. Over the past decades, several widely acceptable methods have been developed and used in the characterization of adult airway stem/ progenitor cells. These include localization of label-retaining cells (LRCs), retroviral tagging of epithelial cells seeded into xenografts, air–liquid interface cultures to track clonal proliferative potential, and multiple transgenic mouse models. This chapter reviews the biologic context and use of these models while providing detailed methods for several of the more broadly useful models for studying adult airway stem/progenitor cell types. PMID:17141060

  16. Apoptosis and Bax expression are increased by coal dust in the polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-exposed lung

    SciTech Connect

    Ghanem, M.M.; Battelli, L.A.; Mercer, R.R.; Scabilloni, J.F.; Kashon, M.L.; Ma, J.Y.C.; Nath, J.; Hubbs, A.F.

    2006-09-15

    Miners inhaling respirable coal dust (CD) frequently develop coal workers' pneumoconiosis. Many coal miners are also exposed to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) components of diesel engine exhaust and cigarette smoke, which may contribute to lung disease in these workers. Recently, apoptosis was reported to play a critical role in the development of another pneumoconiosis of miners, silicosis. In addition, CID was reported to suppress cytochrome P450 1A1 (CYP1A1) induction by PAHs. We exposed rats intratracheally to 0.0, 2.5, 10.0, 20.0, or 40.0 mg/rat CD and, 11 days later, to intraperitoneal P-naphthoflavone (BNF), a PAH. In another group of rats exposed to CD and BNF, caspase activity was inhibited by injection of the pan-caspase inhibitor Q-VD-OPH (quinoline-Val-Asp (OMe)-CH{sub 2}-OPH). In rats exposed to BNF, CD exposure increased alveolar expression of the proapoptotic mediator Bax but decreased CYP1A1 induction relative to BNF exposure alone. Pan-caspase inhibition decreased CD-associated Bax expression and apoptosis but did not restore CYP1A1 activity. Further, CD-induced lung inflammation and alveolar epithelial cell hypertrophy and hyperplasia were not suppressed by caspase inhibition. It is concluded that combined BNF and CD exposure increased Bax expression and apoptosis in the lung, but Bax and apoptosis were not the major determinants of early lung injury in this model.

  17. Modeling lung cancer risks in laboratory dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Park, J.F.; Buschbom, R.L.

    1990-06-01

    These analyses are based on data from a lifespan study of beagle dogs exposed to inhaled plutonium being conducted at Pacific Northwest Laboratory. An important goal of this study is to increase understanding of health risk resulting from this exposure, with particular attention to lung cancer risks. Data on humans exposed to plutonium are inadequate for achieving this goal.

  18. The Therapeutic Potential of Differentiated Lung Cells from Embryonic Stem Cells in Lung Diseases.

    PubMed

    Mokhber Dezfouli, Mohammad Reza; Chaleshtori, Sirous Sadeghian; Dehghan, Mohammad Mehdi; Tavanaeimanesh, Hamid; Baharvand, Hossein; Tahamtani, Yaser

    2017-01-01

    Lung diseases cause great morbidity and mortality. The choice of effective medical treatment is limited and the number of lung diseases are difficult to treat with current treatments. The embryonic stem cells (ESCs) have the potential to differentiate into cell types of all three germinal layers, including lung epithelial cells. So they can be a potential source for new cell therapies for hereditary or acquired diseases of the airways and lungs. One method for treatment of lung diseases is cell therapy and the use of ESCs that can replace the damaged epithelial and endothelial cells. Progress using ESCs has developed slowly for lung regeneration because differentiation of lung cells from ESCs is more difficult as compared to differentiation of other cells. The review studies the therapeutic effects of differentiated lung cells from embryonic stem cells in lung diseases. There are few studies of differentiation of ESCs into a lineage of respiratory and then investigation of this cell in experimental model of lung diseases.

  19. Cardiovascular biomarkers predict susceptibility to lung injury in World Trade Center dust-exposed firefighters.

    PubMed

    Weiden, Michael D; Naveed, Bushra; Kwon, Sophia; Cho, Soo Jung; Comfort, Ashley L; Prezant, David J; Rom, William N; Nolan, Anna

    2013-05-01

    Pulmonary vascular loss is an early feature of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Biomarkers of inflammation and of metabolic syndrome predict loss of lung function in World Trade Center (WTC) lung injury (LI). We investigated if other cardiovascular disease (CVD) biomarkers also predicted WTC-LI. This nested case-cohort study used 801 never-smoker, WTC-exposed firefighters with normal pre-9/11 lung function presenting for subspecialty pulmonary evaluation (SPE) before March 2008. A representative subcohort of 124 out of 801 subjects with serum drawn within 6 months of 9/11 defined CVD biomarker distribution. Post-9/11 forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) at defined cases were as follows: susceptible WTC-LI cases with FEV1 ≤77% predicted (66 out of 801) and resistant WTC-LI cases with FEV1 ≥107% predicted (68 out of 801). All models were adjusted for WTC exposure intensity, body mass index at SPE, age on 9/11 and pre-9/11 FEV1. Susceptible WTC-LI cases had higher levels of apolipoprotein-AII, C-reactive protein and macrophage inflammatory protein-4 with significant relative risks (RRs) of 3.85, 3.93 and 0.26, respectively, with an area under the curve (AUC) of 0.858. Resistant WTC-LI cases had significantly higher soluble vascular cell adhesion molecule and lower myeloperoxidase, with RRs of 2.24 and 2.89, respectively (AUC 0.830). Biomarkers of CVD in serum 6 months post-9/11 predicted either susceptibility or resistance to WTC-LI. These biomarkers may define pathways either producing or protecting subjects from pulmonary vascular disease and associated loss of lung function after an irritant exposure.

  20. Peribronchiolar fibrosis in lungs of cats chronically exposed to diesel exhaust

    SciTech Connect

    Hyde, D.M.; Plopper, C.G.; Weir, A.J.; Murnane, R.D.; Warren, D.L.; Last, J.A.; Pepelko, W.E.

    1985-02-01

    This study reports the quantitative changes in the pulmonary proximal acinar region following chronic exposure to diesel exhaust and following an additional 6 months in clean air. Cats (13 months of age) from a minimum disease colony were exposed to clean air (eight cats for 27 months and nine cats for 33 months), diesel exhaust for 8 hours/day, 7 days/week (nine cats for 27 months), or diesel exhaust for 27 months followed by 6 months in clean air (10 cats). Morphologic and morphometric evaluation using light microscopy and scanning and transmission electron microscopy revealed two major exposure-related lesions in proximal acinar regions of lungs of cats: peribronchiolar fibrosis associated with significant increases in lymphocytes, fibroblasts, and interstitial macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions and bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia associated with the presence of ciliated and basal cells and alveolar macrophages containing diesel particulate-like inclusions. Peribronchiolar fibrosis was greater at the end of the 6 months in clean air following exposure, whereas the bronchiolar epithelial metaplasia was most severe at the end of exposure. Following an additional 6 months in clean air the epithelium more closely resembled the control epithelial cell population. The labeling index of terminal bronchiolar epithelium was significantly increased at the end of exposure but was not significantly different from controls or exposed cats following an additional 6 months in clean air. The ultrastructural appearance of epithelial cells remained relatively unchanged following diesel exhaust exposure with the exception of diesel particulate-like inclusions.

  1. Mechanobiology in Lung Epithelial Cells: Measurements, Perturbations, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra; Navajas, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial cells of the lung are located at the interface between the environment and the organism and serve many important functions including barrier protection, fluid balance, clearance of particulate, initiation of immune responses, mucus and surfactant production, and repair following injury. Because of the complex structure of the lung and its cyclic deformation during the respiratory cycle, epithelial cells are exposed to continuously varying levels of mechanical stresses. While normal lung function is maintained under these conditions, changes in mechanical stresses can have profound effects on the function of epithelial cells and therefore the function of the organ. In this review, we will describe the types of stresses and strains in the lungs, how these are transmitted, and how these may vary in human disease or animal models. Many approaches have been developed to better understand how cells sense and respond to mechanical stresses, and we will discuss these approaches and how they have been used to study lung epithelial cells in culture. Understanding how cells sense and respond to changes in mechanical stresses will contribute to our understanding of the role of lung epithelial cells during normal function and development and how their function may change in diseases such as acute lung injury, asthma, emphysema, and fibrosis. PMID:23728969

  2. Evidence for Human Lung Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kajstura, Jan; Rota, Marcello; Hall, Sean R.; Hosoda, Toru; D’Amario, Domenico; Sanada, Fumihiro; Zheng, Hanqiao; Ogórek, Barbara; Rondon-Clavo, Carlos; Ferreira-Martins, João; Matsuda, Alex; Arranto, Christian; Goichberg, Polina; Giordano, Giovanna; Haley, Kathleen J.; Bardelli, Silvana; Rayatzadeh, Hussein; Liu, Xiaoli; Quaini, Federico; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa; Perrella, Mark A.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Anversa, Piero

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND Although progenitor cells have been described in distinct anatomical regions of the lung, description of resident stem cells has remained elusive. METHODS Surgical lung-tissue specimens were studied in situ to identify and characterize human lung stem cells. We defined their phenotype and functional properties in vitro and in vivo. RESULTS Human lungs contain undifferentiated human lung stem cells nested in niches in the distal airways. These cells are self-renewing, clonogenic, and multipotent in vitro. After injection into damaged mouse lung in vivo, human lung stem cells form human bronchioles, alveoli, and pulmonary vessels integrated structurally and functionally with the damaged organ. The formation of a chimeric lung was confirmed by detection of human transcripts for epithelial and vascular genes. In addition, the self-renewal and long-term proliferation of human lung stem cells was shown in serial-transplantation assays. CONCLUSIONS Human lungs contain identifiable stem cells. In animal models, these cells participate in tissue homeostasis and regeneration. They have the undemonstrated potential to promote tissue restoration in patients with lung disease. (Funded by the National Institutes of Health.) PMID:21561345

  3. Ozone exposed epithelial cells modify cocultured natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Loretta; Brighton, Luisa E.

    2013-01-01

    Ozone (O3) causes significant adverse health effects worldwide. Nasal epithelial cells (NECs) are among the first sites within the respiratory system to be exposed to inhaled air pollutants. They recruit, activate, and interact with immune cells via soluble mediators and direct cell-cell contacts. Based on our recent observation demonstrating the presence of natural killer (NK) cells in nasal lavages, the goal of this study was to establish a coculture model of NECs and NK cells and examine how exposure to O3 modifies this interaction. Flow cytometry analysis was used to assess immunophenotypes of NK cells cocultured with either air- or O3-exposed NECs. Our data show that coculturing NK cells with O3-exposed NECs decreased intracellular interferon-γ (IFN-γ), enhanced, albeit not statistically significant, IL-4, and increased CD16 expression on NK cells compared with air controls. Additionally, the cytotoxicity potential of NK cells was reduced after coculturing with O3-exposed NECs. To determine whether soluble mediators released by O3-exposed NECs caused this shift, apical and basolateral supernatants of air- and O3-exposed NECs were used to stimulate NK cells. While the conditioned media of O3-exposed NECs alone did not reduce intracellular IFN-γ, O3 enhanced the expression of NK cell ligands ULBP3 and MICA/B on NECs. Blocking ULBP3 and MICA/B reversed the effects of O3-exposed NECs on IFN-γ production in NK cells. Taken together, these data showed that interactions between NECs and NK cells in the context of O3 exposure changes NK cell activity via direct cell-cell interactions and is dependent on ULBP3/MICA/B expressed on NECs. PMID:23241529

  4. Gene expression profile of oxidative stress and antioxidant defense in lung tissue of patients exposed to sulfur mustard.

    PubMed

    Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Ghanei, Mostafa; Qazvini, Ali; Vahedi, Ensieh; Panahi, Yunes

    2016-04-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a potent alkylating agent that targets several organs, especially lung tissue. Although pathological effects of SM on mustard lung have been widely considered, molecular and cellular mechanisms for these pathologies are poorly understood. We investigated changes in expression of genes related to oxidative stress (OS) and antioxidant defense caused by SM in lung tissue of patients. We performed gene expression profiling of OS and antioxidant defense in lung tissue samples from healthy controls (n=5) and SM-exposed patients (n=6). Changes in gene expression were measured using a 96-well RT(2) Profiler ™PCR Array: Human Oxidative Stress and Antioxidant Defense, which arrayed 84 genes functionally involved in cellular OS response. 47 (55.95%) genes were found to be significantly upregulated in patients with mustard lung compared with controls (p<0.05), whereas 7 (8.33%) genes were significantly downregulated (p<0.05). Among the most upregulated genes were OS responsive-1 (OXSR1), forkhead box M1 (FOXM1), and glutathione peroxidase-2 (GPX2), while metallothionein-3 (MT3) and glutathione reductase (GSR) were the most downregulated genes. Expression of hypoxia-induced genes (CYGB and MB), antioxidants and reactive oxygen species (ROS)-producing genes were significantly altered, suggesting an increased oxidative damage in mustard lungs. Mustard lungs were characterized by hypoxia, massive production of ROS, OS, disruption of epithelial cells, surfactant dysfunction, as well as increased risk of lung cancer and pulmonary fibrosis. Oxidative stress induced by ROS is the major mechanism for direct effect of SM exposure on respiratory system. Antioxidant treatment may improve the main features of mustard lungs.

  5. Differential responses in the lungs of newborn mouse pups exposed to 85% or >95% oxygen.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D; Welty, Stephen E

    2009-01-01

    Premature infants often develop serious clinical complications associated with respiratory failure and hyperoxic lung injury that includes lung inflammation and alterations in lung development. The goal of these studies is to test the hypothesis that there are differences in the course of lung injury in newborn mice exposed to 85% or >95% oxygen that provide models to address the differential effects of oxidation and inflammation. Our results indicate differences between the 85% and >95% O2 exposure groups by day 14 in weight gain and lung alveolarization. Inflammation, assessed by neutrophil counts, was observed in both hyperoxia groups by day 3 but was dramatically greater in the >95% O2-exposed groups by day 14 and associated with greater developmental deficits. Cytoplasmic phospholipase A2, cyclooxygenase-2, and 5-lipoxygenase levels were elevated but no patterns of differences were observed between exposure groups. Prostaglandins D2, E2, and F2alpha were increased in the tissues from mouse pups exposed to >95% O2 at 7 d indicating a differential expression of cyclooxygenase-2 products. Our data indicate that there are differences in the models of 85% or >95% O2 exposure and these differences may provide mechanistic insights into hyperoxic lung injury in an immature system.

  6. Lung stem cell update: promise and controversy.

    PubMed

    Neuringer, I P; Randell, S H

    2006-03-01

    Currently, there is great enthusiasm about potential stem cell therapies for intractable diseases. We previously reviewed the topic of stem cells in lung injury and repair, including the role of endogenous, tissue (somatic) stem cells and the contribution of circulating cells to the lung parenchyma. Our purpose here is to provide a concise update in this fast-moving field. New information and ongoing debate focus attention on basic issues in lung stem cell biology and highlight the need for additional studies to establish the feasibility of cell therapies to prevent or treat lung diseases.

  7. Cancer Stem Cells in Lung Tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Kratz, Johannes R.; Yagui-Beltrán, Adam; Jablons, David M.

    2011-01-01

    Although stem cells were discovered more than 50 years ago, we have only recently begun to understand their potential importance in cancer biology. Recent advances in our ability to describe, isolate, and study lung stem cell populations has led to a growing recognition of the central importance cells with stem cell-like properties may have in lung tumorigenesis. This article reviews the major studies supporting the existence and importance of cancer stem cells in lung tumorigenesis. Continued research in the field of lung cancer stem cell biology is vital, as ongoing efforts promise to yield new prognostic and therapeutic targets. PMID:20493987

  8. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    PubMed

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-04-23

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients.

  9. Lung function in asbestos-exposed workers, a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background A continuing controversy exists about whether, asbestos exposure is associated with significant lung function impairments when major radiological abnormalities are lacking. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis in order to assess whether asbestos exposure is related to impairment of lung function parameters independently of the radiological findings. Methods MEDLINE was searched from its inception up to April 2010. We included studies that assessed lung function parameters in asbestos exposed workers and stratified subjects according to radiological findings. Estimates of VC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC with their dispersion measures were extracted and pooled. Results Our meta-analysis with data from 9,921 workers exposed to asbestos demonstrates a statistically significant reduction in VC, FEV1 and FEV1/VC, even in those workers without radiological changes. Less severe lung function impairments are detected if the diagnoses are based on (high resolution) computed tomography rather than the less sensitive X-ray images. The degree of lung function impairment was partly related to the proportion of smokers included in the studies. Conclusions Asbestos exposure is related to restrictive and obstructive lung function impairment. Even in the absence of radiological evidence of parenchymal or pleural diseases there is a trend for functional impairment. PMID:21791077

  10. Lung cancer stem cells: An epigenetic perspective.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Samriddhi; Khan, Sajid; Sinha, Sonam; Meeran, Syed Musthapa

    2017-02-05

    Lung cancer remains the major cause of human mortality among all the cancer types despite the colossal amount of efforts to prevent the cancer onset and to provide the appropriate cure. Recent reports have identified that important contributors of lung cancer-related mortality are the drug resistance and aggressive tumor relapse, the characteristics contributed by the presence of lung cancer stem cells (CSCs). The identification of lung CSCs is inherently complex due to the quiescent nature of lung epithelium, which makes the distinction between the normal lung epithelium and lung CSCs difficult. Recently, multiple researches have helped in the identification of lung CSCs based on the presence or absence of certain specific types of stem cell markers. Maintenance of lung CSCs is chiefly mediated through the epigenetic modifications of their genome. In this review, we will discuss about the origin of lung CSCs and the role of epigenetic modifications in their maintenance. We will also discuss in brief the major lung CSC markers and the therapeutic approaches to selectively target this population of cells.

  11. Lung function status of workers exposed to wood dust in timber markets in Calabar, Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Okwari, O O; Antai, A B; Owu, D U; Peters, E J; Osim, E E

    2005-06-01

    The effect of chronic exposure to dust from local woods such as ebony, achi, and iroko on lung function of timber market workers in Calabar - Nigeria, was studied. Forced vital capacity (FVC), Forced Expiratory Volume in one second, (FEV1), Forced Expiratory Volume as a percentage of forced vital capacity (FEV1 %), and Peak Expiratory Flow Rate (PEFR) were measured in 221 workers (aged 20-25 years) exposed to wood dust to assess their lung function and compared with 200 age- and sex- matched control subjects who were not exposed to any known air pollutant. The concentration of respirable dust was significantly higher in the test (P<0.001) than in control site. The mean values of FVC, FEV1, FEV1% and PEFR of the timber workers were significantly lower (P<0.01) than in control subjects. Respiratory symptoms such as cough, chest pain and nasal irritation had higher prevalence in the test group than in the control group. Non-respiratory symptoms (skin and eye irritation) were prevalent in the test group but not found in the control group. Workers exposed to wood dust had restrictive pattern of ventilatory function impairment. The lung function indices of the timber workers decreased with their length of service. Chronic exposure to wood dust impairs lung function.

  12. Influence of vitamin E on polyamine metabolism in ozone-exposed rat lungs

    SciTech Connect

    Elsayed, N.M.

    1987-06-01

    The influence of vitamin E (E) on lung polyamine metabolism of rats exposed to ozone (O/sub 3/) was examined. Rats fed diets either E-deficient or supplemented with 1000 IU E/kg were exposed to 0.5 +/- 0.05 ppm O/sub 3/ or filtered room air continuously for 5 days. They were then sacrificed and their lungs were analyzed for biochemical changes. Lung E content was strongly associated with the dietary level, and increased (36%, P less than 0.05) after O/sub 3/ exposure only in E-supplemented rats. Lung polyamine metabolism was not affected in the air-control rats by E level, but increased after O/sub 3/ exposure in both dietary groups. The activities of ornithine decarboxylase and S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase were elevated above air controls. However, the increases were significant only for E-deficient rats when compared to E-supplemented rats. After O/sub 3/ exposure, putrescine increased significantly in both dietary groups; spermidine increased but was significantly higher only in the E-deficient group; and spermine remained unchanged in both dietary groups. Elevated E content of supplemented rat lungs after O/sub 3/ exposure may represent its mobilization under oxidant stress. Increased polyamine metabolism of E-deficient rats suggests either a greater sensitivity to injury by O/sub 3/ or a possible antioxidant function for polyamines compensating for E deficiency.

  13. The effect of vitamin E on lung pathology in sulfur mustard-exposed guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Gholamnezhad, Zahra; Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Amery, Sediqa; Vahedi, Nassim; Tabatabaei, Abass; Boskabady, Morteza; Shahriary, Alireza

    2016-12-01

    Pulmonary complications of exposure to sulfur mustard (SM) gas range from no effect or mild symptoms to severe bronchial stenosis. In the present study, the protective effect of vitamin E on the lung inflammation of SM-exposed guinea pigs was examined. Guinea pigs (n = 5 for each group) were exposed to ethanol (control group), 40 mg/m(3) inhaled SM (SME group), SME treated with vitamin E (SME + E), SME treated with dexamethasone (SME + D), and SME treated with both treatments (SME + E + D). Pathological evaluation of the lung was done 14 days postexposure. The epithelial desquamation of trachea and other pathologic changes in the lung of the SME group were significantly higher than those in the control group. Furthermore, the pathological changes of trachea and lung in the SME + E and SME + E + D groups were significantly improved compared with those of SME group. In addition, the pathological changes of trachea and lung of SME + E and SME + E + D animals were significantly less than those of SME + D group.

  14. Transcriptomics analysis of lungs and peripheral blood of crystalline silica-exposed rats.

    PubMed

    Sellamuthu, Rajendran; Umbright, Christina; Roberts, Jenny R; Chapman, Rebecca; Young, Shih-Houng; Richardson, Diana; Cumpston, Jared; McKinney, Walter; Chen, Bean T; Frazer, David; Li, Shengqiao; Kashon, Michael; Joseph, Pius

    2012-08-01

    Minimally invasive approaches to detect/predict target organ toxicity have significant practical applications in occupational toxicology. The potential application of peripheral blood transcriptomics as a practical approach to study the mechanisms of silica-induced pulmonary toxicity was investigated. Rats were exposed by inhalation to crystalline silica (15 mg/m(3), 6 h/day, 5 days) and pulmonary toxicity and global gene expression profiles of lungs and peripheral blood were determined at 32 weeks following termination of exposure. A significant elevation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid lactate dehydrogenase activity and moderate histological changes in the lungs, including type II pneumocyte hyperplasia and fibrosis, indicated pulmonary toxicity in the rats. Similarly, significant infiltration of neutrophils and elevated monocyte chemotactic protein-1 levels in the lungs showed pulmonary inflammation in the rats. Microarray analysis of global gene expression profiles identified significant differential expression [>1.5-fold change and false discovery rate (FDR) p < 0.01] of 520 and 537 genes, respectively, in the lungs and blood of the exposed rats. Bioinformatics analysis of the differentially expressed genes demonstrated significant similarity in the biological processes, molecular networks, and canonical pathways enriched by silica exposure in the lungs and blood of the rats. Several genes involved in functions relevant to silica-induced pulmonary toxicity such as inflammation, respiratory diseases, cancer, cellular movement, fibrosis, etc, were found significantly differentially expressed in the lungs and blood of the silica-exposed rats. The results of this study suggested the potential application of peripheral blood gene expression profiling as a toxicologically relevant and minimally invasive surrogate approach to study the mechanisms underlying silica-induced pulmonary toxicity.

  15. Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronical epithelial cells exposed to zinc

    EPA Science Inventory

    Determining adaptive and adverse oxidative stress responses in human bronchial epithelial cells exposed to zincJenna M. Currier1,2, Wan-Yun Cheng1, Rory Conolly1, Brian N. Chorley1Zinc is a ubiquitous contaminant of ambient air that presents an oxidant challenge to the human lung...

  16. [Early recognition of lung cancer in workers occupationally exposed to asbestos].

    PubMed

    Hofmann-Preiß, K; Rehbock, B

    2016-09-01

    Despite the fact that working with asbestos and placing it on the market have been banned in Germany since 1993 according to the Ordinance on Hazardous Substances, asbestos-related diseases of the lungs and pleura are still the leading cause of death in occupational diseases. The maximum industrial usage of asbestos was reached in former West Germany in the late 1970s and in former East Germany the late 1980s. Occupational diseases, mainly mesotheliomas and lung cancer emerging now are thus caused by asbestos exposure which occurred 30-40 years earlier. It is known that the combination of smoking and asbestos exposure results in a superadditive increase in the risk to develop lung cancer. No suitable screening methods for early detection of malignant mesothelioma are currently available and the therapeutic options are still very limited; however, the national lung screening trial (NLST) has shown for the first time that by employing low-dose computed tomography (LDCT) in heavy smokers, lung cancer mortality can be significantly reduced. According to current knowledge the resulting survival benefits far outweigh the potential risks involved in the diagnostic work-up of suspicious lesions. These results in association with the recommendations of international medical societies and organizations were pivotal as the German statutory accident insurance (DGUV) decided to provide LDCT as a special occupational medical examination for workers previously exposed to asbestos and with a particularly high risk for developing lung cancer.

  17. Hot beta particles in the lung: Results from dogs exposed to fission product radionuclides

    SciTech Connect

    Hahn, F.F.; Griffith, W.C.; Hobbs, C.H.

    1995-12-01

    The Chernobyl nuclear reactor accident resulted in the release of uranium dioxide fuel and fission product radionuclides into the environment with the fallout of respirable, highly radioactive particles that have been termed {open_quotes}hot beta particles.{close_quotes} There is concern that these hot beta particles (containing an average of 150-20,000 Bq/particle), when inhaled and deposited in the lung, may present an extraordinary hazard for the induction of lung cancer. We reviewed data from a group of studies in dogs exposed to different quantities of beta-emitting radionuclides with varied physical half-lives to determine if those that inhaled hot beta particles were at unusual risk for lung cancer. This analysis indicates that the average dose to the lung is adequate to predict biologic effects of lung cancer for inhaled beta-emitting radionuclides in the range of 5-50 Gy to the lung and with particle activities in the range of 0.10-50 Bq/particle.

  18. Pulmonary Rehabilitation in Improving Lung Function in Patients With Locally Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Undergoing Chemoradiation

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-05

    Cachexia; Fatigue; Pulmonary Complications; Radiation Toxicity; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Global Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues of Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.; Meyers, Valerie E.; Zhang, Ye

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% respirable very fine dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust. Animals were euthanized at 1 day and 13 weeks after the last inhalation exposure. After being lavaged, lung tissue from each animal was collected and total RNA was isolated. Four samples of each dose group were analyzed using Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray to profile global gene expression of 44K transcripts. After background subtraction, normalization, and log transformation, t tests were used to compare the mean expression levels of each exposed group to the control group. Correction for multiple testing was made using the method of Benjamini, Krieger, and Yekuteli (1) to control the false discovery rate. Genes with significant changes of at least 1.75 fold were identified as genes of interest. Both low and high doses of lunar dust caused dramatic, dose-dependent global gene expression changes in the lung tissues. However, the responses of lung tissue to low dose lunar dust are distinguished from those of high doses, especially those associated with 61mg/m3 dust exposure. The data were further integrated into the Ingenuity system to analyze the gene ontology (GO), pathway distribution and putative upstream regulators and gene targets. Multiple pathways, functions, and upstream regulators have been identified in response to lunar dust induced damage in the lung tissue.

  20. Lung cancer mortality among nonsmoking uranium miners exposed to radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Roscoe, R.J.; Steenland, K.; Halperin, W.E.; Beaumont, J.J.; Waxweiler, R.J.

    1989-08-04

    Radon daughters, both in the workplace and in the household, are a continuing cause for concern because of the well-documented association between exposure to radon daughters and lung cancer. To estimate the risk of lung cancer mortality among nonsmokers exposed to varying levels of radon daughters, 516 white men who never smoked cigarettes, pipes, or cigars were selected from the US Public Health Service cohort of Colorado Plateau uranium miners and followed up from 1950 through 1984. Age-specific mortality rates for nonsmokers from a study of US veterans were used for comparison. Fourteen deaths from lung cancer were observed among the nonsmoking miners, while 1.1 deaths were expected, yielding a standardized mortality ratio of 12.7 with 95% confidence limits of 8.0 and 20.1. These results confirm that exposure to radon daughters in the absence of cigarette smoking is a potent carcinogen that should be strictly controlled.

  1. Adult stem cells underlying lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xian, Wa; McKeon, Frank

    2012-03-01

    Despite the massive toll in human suffering imparted by degenerative lung disease, including COPD, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and ARDS, the scientific community has been surprisingly agnostic regarding the potential of lung tissue, and in particular the alveoli, to regenerate. However, there is circumstantial evidence in humans and direct evidence in mice that ARDS triggers robust regeneration of lung tissue rather than irreversible fibrosis. The stem cells responsible for this remarkable regenerative process has garnered tremendous attention, most recently yielding a defined set of cloned human airway stem cells marked by p63 expression but with distinct commitment to differentiated cell types typical of the upper or lower airways, the latter of which include alveoli-like structures in vitro and in vivo. These recent advances in lung regeneration and distal airway stem cells and the potential of associated soluble factors in regeneration must be harnessed for therapeutic options in chronic lung disease.

  2. Stem cell factor improves lung recovery in rats following neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Miranda, Luis F.; Rodrigues, Claudia O.; Ramachandran, Shalini; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Klim, Jammie; Hehre, Dorothy; McNiece, Ian; Hare, Joshua M.; Suguihara, Cleide Y.; Young, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Stem cell factor (SCF) and its receptor, c-kit, are modulators of angiogenesis. Neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury (HILI) is characterized by disordered angiogenesis. The objective of this study was to determine whether exogenous SCF improves recovery from neonatal HILI by improving angiogenesis. METHODS Newborn rats assigned to normoxia (RA: 20.9% O2) or hyperoxia (90% O2) from postnatal day (P) 2 to 15, received daily injections of SCF 100 µg/kg or placebo (PL) from P15 to P21. Lung morphometry was performed at P28. Capillary tube formation in SCF-treated hyperoxia-exposed pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (HPMECs) was determined by Matrigel assay. RESULTS As compared with RA, hyperoxic-PL pups had decrease in alveolarization and in lung vascular density, and this was associated with increased right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling. In contrast, SCF-treated hyperoxic pups had increased angiogenesis, improved alveolarization, and attenuation of pulmonary hypertension as evidenced by decreased RVSP, right ventricular hypertrophy, and vascular remodeling. Moreover, in an in vitro model, SCF increased capillary tube formation in hyperoxia-exposed HPMECs. CONCLUSION Exogenous SCF restores alveolar and vascular structure in neonatal rats with HILI by promoting neoangiogenesis. These findings suggest a new strategy to treat lung diseases characterized by dysangiogenesis. PMID:24153399

  3. Cytokine and Chemokine Responses of Lung Exposed to Surrogate Viral and Bacterial Infections

    PubMed Central

    Liberati, Teresa A; Trammell, Rita A; Randle, Michelle; Barrett, Sarah; Toth, Linda A

    2013-01-01

    The use of in vitro models of complex in vivo systems has yielded many insights into the molecular mechanisms that underlie normal and pathologic physiology. However although the reduced complexity of these models is advantageous with regard to some research questions, the simplification may obscure or eliminate key influences that occur in vivo. We sought to examine this possibility with regard to the lung's response to infection, which may be inherent to resident lung cells or related to the systemic response to pulmonary infection. We used the inbred mouse strains C57BL/6J, DBA/2J, and B6.129S2-IL6tm1Kopf, which differ in their response to inflammatory and infectious challenges, to assess in vivo responses of lung to surrogate viral and bacterial infection and compared these with responses of cultured lung slices and human A549 cells. Pulmonary cytokine concentrations were measured both after in vivo inoculation of mice and in vitro exposure of lung slices and A549 cells to surrogate viral and bacterial infections. The data indicate similarities and differences in early lung responses to in vivo compared with in vitro exposure to these inflammatory substances. Therefore, resident cells in the lung appear to respond to some challenges in a strain-independent manner, whereas some stimuli may elicit recruitment of peripheral inflammatory cells that generate the subsequent response in a genotype-related manner. These results add to the body of information pointing to host genotype as a crucial factor in mediating the severity of microbial infections and demonstrate that some of these effects may not be apparent in vitro. PMID:23582418

  4. The effect of vitamin E on tracheal responsiveness and lung inflammation in sulfur mustard exposed guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Boskabady, Mohammad Hossein; Amery, Sediqa; Vahedi, Nassim; Khakzad, Mohammad Reza

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary complications of sulfur mustard (SM) range from mild respiratory symptoms to even severe bronchial stenosis. In the present study, the protective effect of vitamin E on tracheal responsiveness (TR) and lung inflammation of SM-exposed guinea pigs were examined. Guinea pigs were exposed to ethanol (control group), 40 mg/m(3) inhaled SM and ethanol vehicle (sulfur mustard exposed (SME) group), SME treated with vitamin E (SME + E), SME with dexamethasone (SME + D) and both drugs (SME + E + D), (n = 8 for each group). TR to methacholine, total and differential white blood cell (WBC) count of lung lavage and serum cytokines were evaluated 14 days post-exposure. TR, WBC, interleukin 4 (IL-4), interferon gamma (INF-γ), eosinophil, and monocyte levels in SME guinea pigs were significantly higher, but lymphocyte was lower than those of controls (P < 0.05 to P < 0.001). TR, IL-4, and eosinophil levels in SME + E, SME + D and SME + E + D, INF-γ in SME + E and SME + E + D and WBC in SME + E were significantly decreased compared to that of the SME group (P < 0.01 to P < 0.001). In addition, the TR of SME + D + E was significantly higher than that of SME + E (P < 0.01) and SME + D (P < 0.05) groups. The results showed a preventive effect of vitamin E, dexamethasone and their combination on TR and lung inflammation in SME guinea pigs.

  5. Lung proliferative and clearance responses to inhaled para-aramid RFP in exposed hamsters and rats: comparisons with chrysotile asbestos fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Warheit, D B; Snajdr, S I; Hartsky, M A; Frame, S R

    1997-01-01

    This study compared pulmonary effects of para-aramid respirable-sized, fiber-shaped particles (RFP) (p-aramid fibrils) and chrysotile asbestos fiber exposures in rats. Additional p-aramid inhalation studies were conducted in hamsters to compare species responses. The hamster results are preliminary. The parameters studied were clearance/biopersistence of inhaled p-aramid RFP or size-separated asbestos fibers as well as pulmonary cell proliferation and inflammation indices after 2-week inhalation exposures. Rats were exposed nose only to chrysotile asbestos fibers at concentrations of 459 and 782 fibers/ml or to p-aramid RFP at 419 or 772 fibrils/ml. Hamsters were exposed whole body to p-aramid RFP at concentrations of 358 and 659 fibrils/ml. Subsequently, animals were assessed immediately (time 0) as well as 5 days (10 days for hamsters), 1, 3, 6, and 12 months postexposure. Lung burdens for the p-aramid-exposed rats were 4.8 x 10(7) and 7.6 x 10(7) fibrils/lung, with similar numbers of chrysotile fibers > 5 microns recovered from the lungs of asbestos-exposed rats. In comparison, 1.4 x 10(6) fibrils/lung were recovered in the high-dose hamster group. Biopersistence studies in p-aramid-exposed rats and hamsters demonstrated an initial increase (relative to time 0) in retained p-aramid fibrils during the first month postexposure, which indicated breakage or shortening of inhaled fibrils. This result was associated with a progressive reduction, and increased residence time in the lung, in the mean lengths of the fibrils, which signified biodegradability of inhaled p-aramid fibrils in both species. In contrast, clearance of short chrysotile asbestos fibers was rapid, but clearance of the long chrysotile fibers was slow or insignificant, as evidenced by a progressive increase over time in the mean lengths of fibers recovered from the lungs of exposed rats. Two-week, high-dose exposures to p-aramid in both rats and hamsters produced transient increases in pulmonary

  6. Chronic cadmium exposure in vitro induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Tokar, Erik J.; Xu, Yuanyuan; Orihuela, Ruben; Ngalame, Ntube N. Olive; Waalkes, Michael P.

    2013-12-01

    Cadmium is a known human lung carcinogen. Here, we attempt to develop an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung carcinogenesis by chronically exposing the peripheral lung epithelia cell line, HPL-1D, to a low level of cadmium. Cells were chronically exposed to 5 μM cadmium, a noncytotoxic level, and monitored for acquired cancer characteristics. By 20 weeks of continuous cadmium exposure, these chronic cadmium treated lung (CCT-LC) cells showed marked increases in secreted MMP-2 activity (3.5-fold), invasion (3.4-fold), and colony formation in soft agar (2-fold). CCT-LC cells were hyperproliferative, grew well in serum-free media, and overexpressed cyclin D1. The CCT-LC cells also showed decreased expression of the tumor suppressor genes p16 and SLC38A3 at the protein levels. Also consistent with an acquired cancer cell phenotype, CCT-LC cells showed increased expression of the oncoproteins K-RAS and N-RAS as well as the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition marker protein Vimentin. Metallothionein (MT) expression is increased by cadmium, and is typically overexpressed in human lung cancers. The major MT isoforms, MT-1A and MT-2A were elevated in CCT-LC cells. Oxidant adaptive response genes HO-1 and HIF-1A were also activated in CCT-LC cells. Expression of the metal transport genes ZNT-1, ZNT-5, and ZIP-8 increased in CCT-LC cells culminating in reduced cadmium accumulation, suggesting adaptation to the metal. Overall, these data suggest that exposure of human lung epithelial cells to cadmium causes acquisition of cancer cell characteristics. Furthermore, transformation occurs despite the cell's ability to adapt to chronic cadmium exposure. - Highlights: • Chronic cadmium exposure induces cancer cell characteristics in human lung cells. • This provides an in vitro model of cadmium-induced human lung cell transformation. • This occurred with general and lung specific changes typical for cancer cells. • These findings add insight to the relationship

  7. Comparison of lung alveolar and tissue cells in silica-induced inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sjöstrand, M; Absher, P M; Hemenway, D R; Trombley, L; Baldor, L C

    1991-01-01

    The silicon dioxide mineral, cristobalite (CRS) induces inflammation involving both alveolar cells and connective tissue compartments. In this study, we compared lung cells recovered by whole lung lavage and by digestion of lung tissue from rats at varying times after 8 days of exposure to aerosolized CRS. Control and exposed rats were examined between 2 and 36 wk after exposure. Lavaged cells were obtained by bronchoalveolar lavage with phosphate-buffered saline. Lung wall cells were prepared via collagenase digestion of lung tissue slices. Cells from lavage and lung wall were separated by Percoll density centrifugation. The three upper fractions, containing mostly macrophages, were cultured, and the conditioned medium was assayed for effect on lung fibroblast growth and for activity of the lysosomal enzyme, N-acetyl-beta-D-glucosaminidase. Results demonstrated that the cells separated from the lung walls exhibited different reaction patterns compared with those cells recovered by lavage. The lung wall cells exhibited a progressive increase in the number of macrophages and lymphocytes compared with a steady state in cells of the lung lavage. This increase in macrophages apparently was due to low density cells, which showed features of silica exposure. Secretion of a fibroblast-stimulating factor was consistently high by lung wall macrophages, whereas lung lavage macrophages showed inconsistent variations. The secretion of NAG was increased in lung lavage macrophages, but decreased at most observation times in lung wall macrophages. No differences were found among cells in the different density fractions regarding fibroblast stimulation and enzyme secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  8. Blood and lung microRNAs as biomarkers of pulmonary tumorigenesis in cigarette smoke-exposed mice.

    PubMed

    Izzotti, Alberto; Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Pulliero, Alessandra; Geretto, Marta; Micale, Rosanna T; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Miller, Mark Steven; Steele, Vernon E; De Flora, Silvio

    2016-12-20

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is known to dysregulate microRNA expression profiles in the lungs of mice, rats, and humans, thereby modulating several pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis and other CS-related diseases. We designed a study aimed at evaluating (a) the expression of 1135 microRNAs in the lung of Swiss H mice exposed to mainstream CS during the first 4 months of life and thereafter kept in filtered air for an additional 3.5 months, (b) the relationship between lung microRNA profiles and histopathological alterations in the lung, (c) intergender differences in microRNA expression, and (d) the comparison with microRNA profiles in blood serum. CS caused multiple histopathological alterations in the lung, which were almost absent in sham-exposed mice. An extensive microRNA dysregulation was detected in the lung of CS-exposed mice. Modulation of microRNA profiles was specifically related to the histopathological picture, no effect being detected in lung fragments with non-neoplastic lung diseases (emphysema or alveolar epithelial hyperplasia), whereas a close association occurred with the presence and multiplicity of preneoplastic lesions (microadenomas) and benign lung tumors (adenomas). Three microRNAs regulating estrogen and HER2-dependent mechanisms were modulated in the lung of adenoma-bearing female mice. Blood microRNAs were also modulated in mice affected by early neoplastic lesions. However, there was a poor association between lung microRNAs and circulating microRNAs, which can be ascribed to an impaired release of mature microRNAs from the damaged lung. Studies in progress are evaluating the feasibility of analyzing blood microRNAs as a molecular tool for lung cancer secondary prevention.

  9. Blood and lung microRNAs as biomarkers of pulmonary tumorigenesis in cigarette smoke-exposed mice

    PubMed Central

    Izzotti, Alberto; Balansky, Roumen; Ganchev, Gancho; Iltcheva, Marietta; Longobardi, Mariagrazia; Pulliero, Alessandra; Geretto, Marta; Micale, Rosanna T.; La Maestra, Sebastiano; Miller, Mark Steven; Steele, Vernon E.; De Flora, Silvio

    2016-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) is known to dysregulate microRNA expression profiles in the lungs of mice, rats, and humans, thereby modulating several pathways involved in lung carcinogenesis and other CS-related diseases. We designed a study aimed at evaluating (a) the expression of 1135 microRNAs in the lung of Swiss H mice exposed to mainstream CS during the first 4 months of life and thereafter kept in filtered air for an additional 3.5 months, (b) the relationship between lung microRNA profiles and histopathological alterations in the lung, (c) intergender differences in microRNA expression, and (d) the comparison with microRNA profiles in blood serum. CS caused multiple histopathological alterations in the lung, which were almost absent in sham-exposed mice. An extensive microRNA dysregulation was detected in the lung of CS-exposed mice. Modulation of microRNA profiles was specifically related to the histopathological picture, no effect being detected in lung fragments with non-neoplastic lung diseases (emphysema or alveolar epithelial hyperplasia), whereas a close association occurred with the presence and multiplicity of preneoplastic lesions (microadenomas) and benign lung tumors (adenomas). Three microRNAs regulating estrogen and HER2-dependent mechanisms were modulated in the lung of adenoma-bearing female mice. Blood microRNAs were also modulated in mice affected by early neoplastic lesions. However, there was a poor association between lung microRNAs and circulating microRNAs, which can be ascribed to an impaired release of mature microRNAs from the damaged lung. Studies in progress are evaluating the feasibility of analyzing blood microRNAs as a molecular tool for lung cancer secondary prevention. PMID:27713172

  10. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; ...

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations ofmore » adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.« less

  11. ALTERNATE PATHWAY TO LUNG CANCER INDICATED BY KRAS AND P53 MUTATIONS IN NONSMOKERS EXPOSED TO INDOOR SMOKY COAL EMISSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Alternate Pathway to Lung Cancer Indicated by KRAS and P53 Mutations in Nonsmokers Exposed to Indoor Smoky Coal Emissions

    Use of smoky coal in unvented homes in Xuan Wei County, Yunnan Province, China, is
    associated with lung cancer among nonsmoking females. Such wome...

  12. Lung cancer in Swedish iron miners exposed to low doses of radon daughters

    SciTech Connect

    Radford, E.P.; Renard, K.G.

    1984-06-07

    In a retrospective study, we investigated lung-cancer mortality from 1951 to 1976 in 1415 Swedish iron miners exposed to short-lived radioactive daughters of radon gas at concentrations leading to annual doses close to the currently accepted occupational limit. Fifty deaths from lung cancer were observed, as compared with 12.8 expected; expected rates were determined by a smoking-specific analysis based on data from a random sample of the Swedish male population. Among nonsmokers 18 deaths were observed, as compared with 1.8 expected; among current smokers and recent exsmokers 32 deaths were observed and 11.0 were expected. The effects of smoking and exposure to alpha radiation from radon daughters were nearly additive. Comparison of lung-cancer risk coefficients from this study and from other cohort studies of underground miners showed good agreement. Exposure to radon daughters is a major medical problem is underground metal mining, but our results also indicate that exposure to radon daughters at home accounts for an appreciable number of cases of lung cancer in the general population.

  13. Exposure, lung function, and symptoms in car painters exposed to hexamethylendiisocyanate and biuret modified hexamethylendiisocyanate

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandersson, R.; Hedenstierna, G.; Plato, N.; Kolmodin-Hedman, B.

    1987-11-01

    Individuals who paint cars often complain to doctors about respiratory problems. Car painters are exposed to isocyanates, especially hexamethylendiisocyanate (HDI), and biuret modified HDI (HDI-BT). The mean exposure to HDI-BT was 115 micrograms/m3 in the air (range 10-385 micrograms/m3), which exceeds the time-weighted Swedish threshold level of 90 micrograms/m3. Exposure to HDI was about 1.0 microgram/m3 with brief peaks. This study investigated the effect of HDI and HDI-BT on lung function and included two control groups: (1) car platers, exposed to the same solvents and grinding dust as car painters, but not to isocyanates, and (2) car mechanics (controls), not exposed to the mentioned agents. Car painters and car platers were compared to car mechanics on Monday before work. Acute effects of car painting were tested by comparing the lung function values on Monday morning with those on Friday afternoon. Pulmonary function was evaluated by means of spirometry and a single breath nitrogen washout. Spirometry in painters and platers did not differ from that in controls, i.e., car mechanics. Closing volume in relation to vital capacity (CV%) was increased in car painters, suggestive of a small airways disease on Monday before work and tended to increase during a work week. Car platers did not differ from controls.

  14. Identification of differentially expressed genes in lung tissues of nickel-exposed rats using suppression subtractive hybridization.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Jun; Fan, Yingying; Liu, Lihong; Li, Mengjie; Zhou, Yang; Shao, Zhihua; Shi, Hongjun; Wang, Ying

    2011-11-01

    Occupational exposure to nickel compound, such as nickel refining, electroplating, and in conjunction with other metals, is harmful to the health, causing respiratory distress, and lung and nasal cancer. In this work, the different gene expression patterns of lung tissues from nickel-exposed rats and controls were investigated. The suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method was used to generate two subtracted cDNA libraries with gene transcripts differentially expressed after nickel inducing. Dot-blot hybridizations were used to confirm differential ratios of expression of obtained SSH clones. Out of 768 unique SSH clones, which were chosen randomly from the two subtraction libraries (384 of each), 319 could be verified as differentially expressed. According to blast screening and functional annotation, 28% genes in nickel-induced cDNA library were related to cell differentiation, whereas 21% in driver library were related to oxygen transport. Two novel expressed sequence tags (ESTs; NCBI Accession No. FC809414 and No. FC809411) in nickel-induced cDNA library were obtained. The genes detected in the present study are probably important genes associated with nickel-induced lung cancer.

  15. Gene Expression Profiling of Lung Tissue of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Feiveson, Alan H.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Kidane, Yared H.; Ploutz-Snyder Robert; Yeshitla, Samrawit; Zalesak, Selina M.; Scully, Robert R.; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in the lung tissue of rats exposed to lunar dust particles. Multiple pathways and transcription factors were identified using the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool, showing the potential networks of these signaling regulations involved in lunar dust-induced prolonged proflammatory response and toxicity. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explores the molecular mechanisms of lunar dust induced toxicity. This work contributes not only to the risk assessment for future space exploration, but also to the understanding of the dust-induced toxicity to humans on earth.

  16. Is it useful to combine sputum cytology and low-dose spiral computed tomography for early detection of lung cancer in formerly asbestos-exposed power industry workers?

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Low-dose spiral computed tomography (LDSCT) in comparison to conventional chest X-ray proved to be a highly sensitive method of diagnosing early stage lung cancer. However, centrally located early stage lung tumours remain a diagnostic challenge. We determined the practicability and efficacy of early detection of lung cancer when combining LDSCT and sputum cytology. Methods Of a cohort of 4446 formerly asbestos exposed power industry workers, we examined a subgroup of 187 (4.2%) high risk participants for lung cancer at least once with both LDSCT and sputum cytology. After the examination period the participants were followed-up for more than three years. Results The examinations resulted in the diagnosis of lung cancer in 12 participants (6.4%). Six were in clinical stage I. We found 10 non-small cell lung carcinomas and one small cell lung carcinoma. Sputum specimens showed suspicious pathological findings in seven cases and in 11 cases the results of LDSCT indicated malignancies. The overall sensitivity and specificity of sputum cytology was 58.0% and 98% with positive (PPV) and negative (NPV) predictive values of 70% and 97%. For LDSCT we calculated the sensitivity and specificity of 92% and 97%. The PPV and NPV were 65% and 99% respectively. Conclusions Our results confirmed that in surveillance programmes a combination of sputum cytology and LDSCT is well feasible and accepted by the participants. Sputum examination alone is not effective enough for the detection of lung cancer, especially at early stage. Even in well- defined risk groups highly exposed to asbestos, we cannot recommend the use of combined LDSCT and sputum cytology examinations as long as no survival benefit has been proved for the combination of both methods. For ensuring low rates of false-positive and false-negative results, programme planners must closely cooperate with experienced medical practitioners and pathologists in a well-functioning interdisciplinary network. PMID

  17. Genomic analysis of human lung fibroblasts exposed to vanadium pentoxide to identify candidate genes for occupational bronchitis

    PubMed Central

    Ingram, Jennifer L; Antao-Menezes, Aurita; Turpin, Elizabeth A; Wallace, Duncan G; Mangum, James B; Pluta, Linda J; Thomas, Russell S; Bonner, James C

    2007-01-01

    Background Exposure to vanadium pentoxide (V2O5) is a cause of occupational bronchitis. We evaluated gene expression profiles in cultured human lung fibroblasts exposed to V2O5 in vitro in order to identify candidate genes that could play a role in inflammation, fibrosis, and repair during the pathogenesis of V2O5-induced bronchitis. Methods Normal human lung fibroblasts were exposed to V2O5 in a time course experiment. Gene expression was measured at various time points over a 24 hr period using the Affymetrix Human Genome U133A 2.0 Array. Selected genes that were significantly changed in the microarray experiment were validated by RT-PCR. Results V2O5 altered more than 1,400 genes, of which ~300 were induced while >1,100 genes were suppressed. Gene ontology categories (GO) categories unique to induced genes included inflammatory response and immune response, while GO catogories unique to suppressed genes included ubiquitin cycle and cell cycle. A dozen genes were validated by RT-PCR, including growth factors (HBEGF, VEGF, CTGF), chemokines (IL8, CXCL9, CXCL10), oxidative stress response genes (SOD2, PIPOX, OXR1), and DNA-binding proteins (GAS1, STAT1). Conclusion Our study identified a variety of genes that could play pivotal roles in inflammation, fibrosis and repair during V2O5-induced bronchitis. The induction of genes that mediate inflammation and immune responses, as well as suppression of genes involved in growth arrest appear to be important to the lung fibrotic reaction to V2O5. PMID:17459161

  18. Gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Casella, Giovanni; Bella, Camillo Di; Cambareri, Antonino Roberto; Buda, Carmelo Antonio; Corti, Gianluigi; Magri, Filippo; Crippa, Stefano; Baldini, Vittorio

    2006-01-01

    Metastatic tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are rare. We describe a case of gastric metastasis due to primary lung cancer, revealed by an upper gastrointestinal endoscopy (UGIE). Haematogenous metastases to the stomach are a rare event. To our knowledge, only 55 cases have been described in the international literature. In these patients, the prognosis is very poor. We report herein a case of gastric metastasis by lung small cell carcinoma, with a review of the literature about this rare entity. PMID:16810769

  19. Stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and lung diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J; Bertoncello, Ivan; Borok, Zea; Kim, Carla; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela; Reynolds, Susan; Rojas, Mauricio; Stripp, Barry; Warburton, David; Prockop, Darwin J

    2011-06-01

    The University of Vermont College of Medicine and the Vermont Lung Center, with support of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI), the Alpha-1 Foundation, the American Thoracic Society, the Emory Center for Respiratory Health,the Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) Treatment Alliance,and the Pulmonary Fibrosis Foundation, convened a workshop,‘‘Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases,’’ held July 26-29, 2009 at the University of Vermont,to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy approaches for lung diseases. These are rapidly expanding areas of study that provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of the mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, discuss and debate current controversies, and identify future research directions and opportunities for both basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases.

  20. Gene Expression Profiling in Lung Tissues from Rat Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Zalesak, Selina M.; Kidane, Yared H.; Feiveson, Alan H.; Ploutz-Snyder, Robert; Scully, Robert R.; Williams, Kyle; Wu, Honglu; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine dust (< 3 micron), that is respirable. The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to analyze the dynamics of global gene expression changes in lung tissues from rats exposed to lunar dust particles. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 mg/m(exp 3) of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized 1 day, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The total RNAs were isolated from lung tissues after being lavaged. The Agilent Rat GE v3 microarray was used to profile global gene expression (44K). The genes with significant expression changes are identified and the gene expression data were further analyzed using various statistical tools.

  1. Lung cancer and mesothelioma risk assessment for a population environmentally exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Bourgault, Marie-Hélène; Gagné, Michelle; Valcke, Mathieu

    2014-03-01

    Asbestos-related cancer risk is usually a concern restricted to occupational settings. However, recent published data on asbestos environmental concentrations in Thetford Mines, a mining city in Quebec, Canada, provided an opportunity to undertake a prospective cancer risk assessment in the general population exposed to these concentrations. Using an updated Berman and Crump dose-response model for asbestos exposure, we selected population-specific potency factors for lung cancer and mesothelioma. These factors were evaluated on the basis of population-specific cancer data attributed to the studied area's past environmental levels of asbestos. We also used more recent population-specific mortality data along with the validated potency factors to generate corresponding inhalation unit risks. These unit risks were then combined with recent environmental measurements made in the mining town to calculate estimated lifetime risk of asbestos-induced lung cancer and mesothelioma. Depending on the chosen potency factors, the lifetime mortality risks varied between 0.7 and 2.6 per 100,000 for lung cancer and between 0.7 and 2.3 per 100,000 for mesothelioma. In conclusion, the estimated lifetime cancer risk for both cancers combined is close to Health Canada's threshold for "negligible" lifetime cancer risks. However, the risks estimated are subject to several uncertainties and should be confirmed by future mortality rates attributed to present day asbestos exposure.

  2. Analysis of non-thermal plasma-induced cell injury in human lung cancer cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurita, Hirofumi; Sano, Kaori; Wada, Motoi; Mizuno, Kazue; Ono, Ryo; Yasuda, Hachiro; Takashima, Kazunori; Mizuno, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Recent progress of biomedical application of atmospheric pressure plasma shows that the biological effects are mainly due to reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) in liquid produced by the plasma exposure. To elucidate the cellular responses induced by exposure to the plasma, we focused on identification and quantification of reactive chemical species in plasma-exposed cell culture medium, and cell injury in mammalian cells after treatment of the plasma-exposed medium. In this study, we examined human lung cancer cell lines. The contribution of H2O2 to the cellular responses was considered. Here, an atmospheric pressure plasma jet (APPJ) sustained by a pulsed power supply in argon was used. After APPJ exposure to cell culture medium, RONS detection in liquid was conducted. It showed that OH radical, ONOO-, NO2-, NO3-, and H2O2 were produced in the plasma-exposed medium. Cellular responses of human lung cancer cell lines to the plasma-exposed medium in a concentration-dependence manner were also studied. It showed that the plasma-exposed medium and the H2O2 treatment gave similar reduction in viability and induction of apoptosis. This work was partly supported by MEXT KAKENHI Grant Number 24108005 and JSPS KAKENHI Grant Number 26390096.

  3. Maternal docosahexaenoic acid supplementation decreases lung inflammation in hyperoxia-exposed newborn mice.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Lynette K; Valentine, Christina J; Pennell, Michael; Velten, Markus; Britt, Rodney D; Dingess, Kelly; Zhao, Xuilan; Welty, Stephen E; Tipple, Trent E

    2011-02-01

    DHA is a long-chain fatty acid that has potent antiinflammatory properties. Whereas maternal DHA dietary supplementation has been shown to improve cognitive development in infants fed DHA-supplemented milk, the antiinflammatory effects of maternal DHA supplementation on the developing fetus and neonate have not been extensively explored. Pregnant C3H/HeN dams were fed purified control or DHA-supplemented diets (~0.25% of total fat) at embryonic d 16 and consumed these diets throughout the study. At birth, the nursing mouse pups were placed in room air (RA; 21% O(2)) or >95% O(2) (hyperoxia) for up to 7 d. These studies tested the hypothesis that maternal DHA supplementation would decrease inflammation and improve alveolarization in the lungs of newborn mouse pups exposed to hyperoxia. Survival, inflammatory responses, and lung growth were compared among control diet/RA, DHA/RA, control/O(2), and DHA/O(2) pups. There were fewer neutrophils and macrophages in lung tissues from pups nursed by DHA-supplemented dams than in those nursed by dams fed the control diet at 7 d of hyperoxia exposure (P < 0.015). Although differences due to hyperoxia exposure were observed, maternal diet did not affect keratinocyte-derived chemokine, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, IL-1β, or TNFα mRNA levels in pup tissues. Hyperoxia also induced NF-κB activity, but maternal diet did not affect NF-κB or PPARγ activities. In mice, DHA supplementation decreases leukocyte infiltration in the offspring exposed to hyperoxia, suggesting a potential role for DHA supplementation as a therapy to reduce inflammation in preterm infants.

  4. Bone Marrow-Derived c-kit+ Cells Attenuate Neonatal Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Shalini; Suguihara, Cleide; Drummond, Shelley; Chatzistergos, Konstantinos; Klim, Jammie; Torres, Eneida; Huang, Jian; Hehre, Dorothy; Rodrigues, Claudia O.; McNiece, Ian K.; Hare, Joshua M.; Young, Karen C.

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that bone marrow (BM)-derived stem cells have therapeutic efficacy in neonatal hyperoxia-induced lung injury (HILI). c-kit, a tyrosine kinase receptor that regulates angiogenesis, is expressed on several populations of BM-derived cells. Preterm infants exposed to hyperoxia have decreased lung angiogenesis. Here we tested the hypothesis that administration of BM-derived c-kit+ cells would improve angiogenesis in neonatal rats with HILI. To determine whether intratracheal (IT) administration of BM-derived c-kit+ cells attenuates neonatal HILI, rat pups exposed to either normobaric normoxia (21% O2) or hyperoxia (90% O2) from postnatal day (P) 2 to P15 were randomly assigned to receive either IT BM-derived green fluorescent protein (GFP)+ c-kit− cells (PL) or BM-derived GFP+ c-kit+ cells on P8. The effect of cell therapy on lung angiogenesis, alveolarization, pulmonary hypertension, vascular remodeling, cell proliferation, and apoptosis was determined at P15. Cell engraftment was determined by GFP immunostaining. Compared to PL, the IT administration of BM-derived c-kit+ cells to neonatal rodents with HILI improved alveolarization as evidenced by increased lung septation and decreased mean linear intercept. This was accompanied by an increase in lung vascular density, a decrease in lung apoptosis, and an increase in the secretion of proangiogenic factors. There was no difference in pulmonary vascular remodeling or the degree of pulmonary hypertension. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that 1% of total lung cells were GFP+ cells. IT administration of BM-derived c-kit+ cells improves lung alveolarization and angiogenesis in neonatal HILI, and this may be secondary to an improvement in the lung angiogenic milieu. PMID:23759597

  5. 7-Alkylguanine adduct levels in urine, lungs and liver of mice exposed to styrene by inhalation

    SciTech Connect

    Vodicka, Pavel Erik . E-mail: pvodicka@biomed.cas.cz; Linhart, Igor; Novak, Jan; Koskinen, Mikko; Vodickova, Ludmila; Hemminki, Kari

    2006-01-15

    This study describes urinary excretion of two nucleobase adducts derived from styrene 7,8-oxide (SO), i.e., 7-(2-hydroxy-1-phenylethyl)guanine (N7{alpha}G) and 7-(2-hydroxy-2-phenylethyl)guanine (N7{beta}G), as well as a formation of N7-SO-guanine adducts in lungs and liver of two month old male NMRI mice exposed to styrene by inhalation in a 3-week subacute study. Strikingly higher excretion of both isomeric nucleobase adducts in the first day of exposure was recorded, while the daily excretion of nucleobase adducts in following time intervals reached the steady-state level at 4.32 + 1.14 and 6.91 + 1.17 pmol/animal for lower and higher styrene exposure, respectively. {beta}-SO-guanine DNA adducts in lungs increased with exposure in a linear way (F = 13.7 for linearity and 0.17 for non-linearity, respectively), reaching at the 21st day the level of 23.0 adducts/10{sup 8} normal nucleotides, i.e., 0.74 fmol/{mu}g DNA of 7-alkylguanine DNA adducts for the concentration of 1500 mg/m{sup 3}, while no 7-SO-guanine DNA adducts were detected in the liver after 21 days of inhalation exposure to both of styrene concentrations. A comparison of 7-alkylguanines excreted in urine with 7-SO-guanines in lungs (after correction for depurination and for missing {alpha}-isomers) revealed that persisting 7-SO-guanine DNA adducts in lungs account for about 0.5% of the total alkylation at N7 of guanine. The total styrene-specific 7-guanine alkylation accounts for about 1.0 x 10{sup -5}% of the total styrene uptake, while N1-adenine alkylation contributes to this percentage only negligibly.

  6. Models for comparing lung-cancer risks in radon- and plutonium-exposed experimental animals

    SciTech Connect

    Gilbert, E.S.; Cross, F.T.; Sanders, C.L.; Dagle, G.E.

    1990-10-01

    Epidemiologic studies of radon-exposed underground miners have provided the primary basis for estimating human lung-cancer risks resulting from radon exposure. These studies are sometimes used to estimate lung-cancer risks resulting from exposure to other alpha- emitters as well. The latter use, often referred to as the dosimetric approach, is based on the assumption that a specified dose to the lung produces the same lung-tumor risk regardless of the substance producing the dose. At Pacific Northwest Laboratory, experiments have been conducted in which laboratory rodents have been given inhalation exposures to radon and to plutonium ({sup 239}PuO{sub 2}). These experiments offer a unique opportunity to compare risks, and thus to investigate the validity of the dosimetric approach. This comparison is made most effectively by modeling the age-specific risk as a function of dose in a way that is comparable to analyses of human data. Such modeling requires assumptions about whether tumors are the cause of death or whether they are found incidental to death from other causes. Results based on the assumption that tumors are fatal indicate that the radon and plutonium dose-response curves differ, with a linear function providing a good description of the radon data, and a pure quadratic function providing a good description of the plutonium data. However, results based on the assumption that tumors are incidental to death indicate that the dose-response curves for the two exposures are very similar, and thus support the dosimetric approach. 14 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Mechanisms of clearance of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae from cigarette smoke-exposed mouse lungs.

    PubMed

    Gaschler, G J; Zavitz, C C J; Bauer, C M T; Stämpfli, M R

    2010-11-01

    Inflammation is prevalent in all stages of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, and, furthermore, individuals undergo periods of exacerbation, during which pulmonary inflammation increases, often a result of bacterial infection. The present study investigates the in vivo consequences of cigarette smoke exposure on bacterial challenge with nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). BALB/c and C57 black 6 (C57BL/6) mice were exposed to cigarette smoke once or twice daily for a total period of 8 weeks. Exacerbated inflammation was observed in cigarette smoke-exposed compared to room-air-exposed mice following challenge with live or heat-inactivated NTHi. Accelerated clearance of live NTHi from cigarette smoke-exposed mice was independent of the establishment of chronic inflammation or direct toxic effects of cigarette smoke components on bacteria. Mechanistically, a cell-free factor in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contributed to accelerated clearance following passive transfer to naive mice. Further investigation demonstrated increased titres of immunoglobulin A in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, but not the blood, of cigarette smoke-exposed mice, including increased titres of NTHi-specific immunoglobulin A, whereas heavy chain joining element (J(H))(-/-) B-cell-deficient cigarette smoke-exposed mice did not demonstrate decreased bacterial burden following challenge. The present results demonstrate that cigarette smoke exposure results in exacerbated inflammation following challenge with NTHi, as well as increased titres of antibodies that contribute to bacterial clearance.

  8. Mast cells promote melanoma colonization of lungs.

    PubMed

    Öhrvik, Helena; Grujic, Mirjana; Waern, Ida; Gustafson, Ann-Marie; Ernst, Nancy; Roers, Axel; Hartmann, Karin; Pejler, Gunnar

    2016-10-18

    Mast cells have been implicated in malignant processes, mainly through clinical correlative studies and by experiments performed using animals lacking mast cells due to defective c-kit signaling. However, mast cell-deficient mouse models based on c-kit defects have recently been questioned for their relevance. Here we addressed the effect of mast cells in a tumor setting by using transgenic Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice, in which the deficiency of mast cells is independent of c-kit defects. Melanoma cells (B16.F10) were administered either subcutaneously or intravenously into Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice or Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ littermate controls, followed by the assessment of formed tumors. In the subcutaneous model, mast cells were abundant in the tumor stroma of control mice but were absent in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ mice. However, the absence of mast cells did not affect tumor size. In contrast, after intravenous administration of B16.F10 cells, melanoma colonization of the lungs was markedly reduced in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals. Decreased melanoma colonization of the lungs in Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ animals was accompanied by increased inflammatory cell recruitment into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, suggesting that mast cells suppress inflammation in this setting. Further, qPCR analysis revealed significant alterations in the expression of Twist and E-cadherin in lungs of Mcpt5-Cre+ R-DTA+ vs. control Mcpt5-Cre- R-DTA+ animals, suggesting an impact of mast cells on epithelial-mesenchymal transition. In conclusion, this study reveals that mast cells promote melanoma colonization of the lung.

  9. CD11b(+) Mononuclear Cells Mitigate Hyperoxia-Induced Lung Injury in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Eldredge, Laurie C; Treuting, Piper M; Manicone, Anne M; Ziegler, Steven F; Parks, William C; McGuire, John K

    2016-02-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common consequence of life-saving interventions for infants born with immature lungs. Resident tissue myeloid cells regulate lung pathology, but their role in BPD is poorly understood. To determine the role of lung interstitial myeloid cells in neonatal responses to lung injury, we exposed newborn mice to hyperoxia, a neonatal mouse lung injury model with features of human BPD. In newborn mice raised in normoxia, we identified a CD45(+) F4/80(+) CD11b(+), Ly6G(lo-int) CD71(+) population of cells in lungs of neonatal mice present in significantly greater percentages than in adult mice. In response to hyperoxia, surface marker and gene expression in whole lung macrophages/monocytes was biased to an alternatively activated phenotype. Partial depletion of these CD11b(+) mononuclear cells using CD11b-diphtheria toxin (DT) receptor transgenic mice resulted in 60% mortality by 40 hours of hyperoxia exposure with more severe lung injury, perivascular edema, and alveolar hemorrhage compared with DT-treated CD11b-DT receptor-negative controls, which displayed no mortality. These results identify an antiinflammatory population of CD11b(+) mononuclear cells that are protective in hyperoxia-induced neonatal lung injury in mice, and suggest that enhancing their beneficial functions may be a treatment strategy in infants at risk for BPD.

  10. Glutathione reductase targeted to type II cells does not protect mice from hyperoxic lung injury.

    PubMed

    Heyob, Kathryn M; Rogers, Lynette K; Welty, Stephen E

    2008-12-01

    Exposure of the lung epithelium to reactive oxygen species without adequate antioxidant defenses leads to airway inflammation, and may contribute to lung injury. Glutathione peroxidase catalyzes the reduction of peroxides by oxidation of glutathione (GSH) to glutathione disulfide (GSSG), which can in turn be reduced by glutathione reductase (GR). Increased levels of GSSG have been shown to correlate negatively with outcome after oxidant exposure, and increased GR activity has been protective against hyperoxia in lung epithelial cells in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that increased GR expression targeted to type II alveolar epithelial cells would improve outcome in hyperoxia-induced lung injury. Human GR with a mitochondrial targeting sequence was targeted to mouse type II cells using the SPC promoter. Two transgenic lines were identified, with Line 2 having higher lung GR activities than Line 1. Both transgenic lines had lower lung GSSG levels and higher GSH/GSSG ratios than wild-type. Six-week-old wild-type and transgenic mice were exposed to greater than 95% O2 or room air (RA) for 84 hours. After exposure, Line 2 mice had higher right lung/body weight ratios and lavage protein concentrations than wild-type mice, and both lines 1 and 2 had lower GSSG levels than wild-type mice. These findings suggest that GSSG accumulation in the lung may not play a significant role in the development of hyperoxic lung injury, or that compensatory responses to unregulated GR expression render animals more susceptible to hyperoxic lung injury.

  11. Genomic instability in quartz dust exposed rat lungs: Is inflammation responsible?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, C.; Knaapen, A. M.; Cakmak Demircigil, G.; Coskun, Erdem; van Schooten, F. J.; Borm, P. J. A.; Schins, R. P. F.

    2009-02-01

    Exposure to quartz dusts has been associated with lung cancer and fibrosis. Although the responsible mechanisms are not completely understood, progressive inflammation with associated induction of persistent oxidative stress has been discussed as a key event for these diseases. Previously we have evaluated the kinetics of pulmonary inflammation in the rat model following a single intratracheal instillation of 2mg DQ12 quartz, either in its native form or upon its surface modification with polyvinylpyridine-N-oxide or aluminium lactate. This model has been applied now to evaluate the role of inflammation in the kinetics of induction of DNA damage and response at 3, 7, 28, and 90 days after treatment. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts and differentials as well as BAL fluid myeloperoxidase activity were used as markers of inflammation. Whole lung homogenate was investigated to determine the induction of the oxidative and pre-mutagenic DNA lesion 8-hydroxy-2-deoxy-guanosine (8-OHdG) by HPLC/ECD, while mRNA and protein expression of oxidative stress and DNA damage response genes including hemeoxygenase-1 (HO-1) and apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease (APE/Ref-1) were evaluated using Western blotting and real time PCR. Isolated lung epithelial cells from the treated rats were used for DNA strand breakage analysis using the alkaline comet assay as well as for micronucleus scoring in May-Gruenwald-Giemsa stained cytospin preparations. In the rats that were treated with quartz, no increased 8-OHdG levels were observed, despite the presence of a marked and persistent inflammation. However, DNA strand breakage in the lung epithelial cells of the quartz treated rats was significantly enhanced at 3 days, but not at 28 days. Moreover, significantly enhanced micronucleus frequencies were observed for all four time points investigated. In the animals that were treated with the PVNO modified quartz, micronuclei scores did not differ from controls, while in those treated with

  12. Gene expression profiling in the lung and liver of PFOA-exposed mouse fetuses.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Mitchell B; Thibodeaux, Julie R; Wood, Carmen R; Zehr, Robert D; Schmid, Judith E; Lau, Christopher

    2007-09-24

    Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) is a stable perfluoroalkyl acid used to synthesize fluoropolymers during the manufacture of a wide variety of products. Concerns have been raised over the potential health effects of PFOA because it is persistent in the environment and can be detected in blood and other tissues of many animal species, including humans. PFOA has also been shown to induce growth deficits and mortality in murine neonates. To better understand the mechanism of PFOA induced developmental toxicity, lung and liver gene expression profiling was conducted in PFOA-exposed full-term mouse fetuses. Thirty timed-pregnant CD-1 mice were orally dosed from gestation days 1-17 with either 0, 1, 3, 5, or 10mg/(kgday) PFOA in water. At term, fetal lung and liver were collected, total RNA prepared, and samples pooled from three fetuses per litter. Five biological replicates consisting of individual litter samples were then evaluated for each treatment group using Affymetrix mouse 430_2 microarrays. The expression of genes related to fatty acid catabolism was altered in both the fetal liver and lung. In the fetal liver, the effects of PFOA were robust and also included genes associated with lipid transport, ketogenesis, glucose metabolism, lipoprotein metabolism, cholesterol biosynthesis, steroid metabolism, bile acid biosynthesis, phospholipid metabolism, retinol metabolism, proteosome activation, and inflammation. These changes are consistent with transactivation of PPARalpha, although, with regard to bile acid biosynthesis and glucose metabolism, non-PPARalpha related effects were suggested as well. Additional studies will be needed to more thoroughly address the role of PPARalpha, and other nuclear receptors, in PFOA mediated developmental toxicity.

  13. Treatment options for small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Todd; Gillenwater, Heidi H

    2004-07-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer-related death in the United States. Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) comprises 15% to 25% of all lung cancers. The leading cause of lung cancer remains smoking, and rates of smoking continue to rise in women, whereas rates in other subgroups have slowed. In this article we review recent advances in the treatment of limited-stage as well as extensive-stage small cell lung cancer. In limited-stage disease, the best survival results are observed when patients are treated with twice-daily thoracic radiotherapy given concurrently with chemotherapy. Patients who have been successful in smoking cessation during therapy for limited-stage disease may have a survival benefit over those who are unable to quit smoking during treatment. In extensive-stage disease, the most significant trial is one comparing irinotecan plus cisplatin and etoposide plus cisplatin, showing a survival advantage for the irinotecan arm. This trial may change the standard of care for patients with extensive-stage disease. A similar ongoing trial in the United States is attempting to confirm these results.

  14. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates.

    PubMed

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-07-10

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects.

  15. Differential protein folding and chemical changes in lung tissues exposed to asbestos or particulates

    PubMed Central

    Pascolo, Lorella; Borelli, Violetta; Canzonieri, Vincenzo; Gianoncelli, Alessandra; Birarda, Giovanni; Bedolla, Diana E.; Salomé, Murielle; Vaccari, Lisa; Calligaro, Carla; Cotte, Marine; Hesse, Bernhard; Luisi, Fernando; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Melato, Mauro; Rizzardi, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Environmental and occupational inhalants may induce a large number of pulmonary diseases, with asbestos exposure being the most risky. The mechanisms are clearly related to chemical composition and physical and surface properties of materials. A combination of X-ray fluorescence (μXRF) and Fourier Transform InfraRed (μFTIR) microscopy was used to chemically characterize and compare asbestos bodies versus environmental particulates (anthracosis) in lung tissues from asbestos exposed and control patients. μXRF analyses revealed heterogeneously aggregated particles in the anthracotic structures, containing mainly Si, K, Al and Fe. Both asbestos and particulates alter lung iron homeostasis, with a more marked effect in asbestos exposure. μFTIR analyses revealed abundant proteins on asbestos bodies but not on anthracotic particles. Most importantly, the analyses demonstrated that the asbestos coating proteins contain high levels of β-sheet structures. The occurrence of conformational changes in the proteic component of the asbestos coating provides new insights into long-term asbestos effects. PMID:26159651

  16. Combination Chemotherapy, Radiation Therapy, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Newly Diagnosed Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-11-01

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  17. Airway hyperresponsiveness, prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, and lung function in workers exposed to irritants.

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, A M; Pal, T M; Boleij, J S; Schouten, J P; Rijcken, B

    1994-01-01

    The association between occupational exposure to airway irritants and the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of lung function, and whether these associations were modified by airway hyperresponsiveness, smoking, and a history of allergy were studied in 668 workers from synthetic fibre plants. Respiratory symptoms were recorded with a self administered Dutch version of the British Medical Research Council questionnaire, with additional questions on allergy. Airway responsiveness was measured by a 30 second tidal breathing histamine challenge test. On the basis of job titles and working department, the current state of exposure of all workers was characterised as (1) no exposure, reference group; (2) white collar workers; (3) SO2 HCl, SO4(2); (4) polyester vapour; (5) oil mist and vapour; (6) polyamide and polyester vapour; (7) multiple exposure. Workers exposed to airway irritants were not simultaneously exposed to airborne dust. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at < or = 32 mg/ml histamine, was present in 23% of the subjects. The association between exposure groups and prevalence of symptoms was estimated by means of multiple logistic regression; the association with level of lung function (forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1, maximum mid-expiratory flow rate (MMEF)) was estimated by means of multiple linear regression. Both methods allow simultaneous adjustment for potential confounding factors. The exposure groups were associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms. Lower prevalence of symptoms was found for workers exposed to SO2, HCl, and SO4(2-), most likely due to pre-employment selection procedures. Current smoking, AHR, and a history of allergy were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, independent of each other, and independent of irritant exposure. The association between exposure and prevalence of

  18. Airway hyperresponsiveness, prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, and lung function in workers exposed to irritants.

    PubMed

    Kremer, A M; Pal, T M; Boleij, J S; Schouten, J P; Rijcken, B

    1994-01-01

    The association between occupational exposure to airway irritants and the prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms and level of lung function, and whether these associations were modified by airway hyperresponsiveness, smoking, and a history of allergy were studied in 668 workers from synthetic fibre plants. Respiratory symptoms were recorded with a self administered Dutch version of the British Medical Research Council questionnaire, with additional questions on allergy. Airway responsiveness was measured by a 30 second tidal breathing histamine challenge test. On the basis of job titles and working department, the current state of exposure of all workers was characterised as (1) no exposure, reference group; (2) white collar workers; (3) SO2 HCl, SO4(2); (4) polyester vapour; (5) oil mist and vapour; (6) polyamide and polyester vapour; (7) multiple exposure. Workers exposed to airway irritants were not simultaneously exposed to airborne dust. Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), defined as a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) at < or = 32 mg/ml histamine, was present in 23% of the subjects. The association between exposure groups and prevalence of symptoms was estimated by means of multiple logistic regression; the association with level of lung function (forced vital capacity (FVC), FEV1, maximum mid-expiratory flow rate (MMEF)) was estimated by means of multiple linear regression. Both methods allow simultaneous adjustment for potential confounding factors. The exposure groups were associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms. Lower prevalence of symptoms was found for workers exposed to SO2, HCl, and SO4(2-), most likely due to pre-employment selection procedures. Current smoking, AHR, and a history of allergy were significantly associated with a higher prevalence of chronic respiratory symptoms, independent of each other, and independent of irritant exposure. The association between exposure and prevalence of

  19. Quantification of DNA adducts in lungs, liver and brain of rats exposed to acetaldehyde.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Camila C M; Batista, Guilherme L; Freitas, Florêncio P; Lopes, Fernando S; Sanchez, Angélica B; Gutz, Ivano G R; Di Mascio, Paolo; Medeiros, Marisa H G

    2014-10-01

    Air pollution is a major risk for human health. Acetaldehyde is an environmental pollutant present in tobacco smoke, vehicle exhaust and several food products. Formation of DNA adducts has been regarded as a critical factor in the mechanisms of acetaldehyde mutagenicity and carcinogenesis. Acetaldehyde reacts with 2'-deoxyguanosine in DNA to primarily form N(2)-ethylidene-2'-deoxyguanosine (N(2)-ethylidene-dGuo). The subsequent reaction of N(2)-ethylidene-dGuo with another molecule of acetaldehyde gives rise to 1,N(2)-propano-2´-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-propanodGuo). In this study, on-line reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) separation with tandem mass spectrometry detection was utilized for the accurate quantification of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo and 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-edGuo) in tissues of rats exposed to 12 ppb, 33 ppb and 96 ppb acetaldehyde in atmospheric air for 50 days. A significant increase in the levels of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo was observed in lung tissues of rats exposed to 12 ppb (7.8/10(8) dGuo); 33 ppb (8.9/10(8) dGuo) and 96 ppb (11.6/10(8) dGuo) compared to controls (4.2/10(8) dGuo). For comparative purposes, the levels of 1,N(2)-etheno-2'-deoxyguanosine (1,N(2)-edGuo), which is produced from a,b-unsaturated aldehydes formed during the lipid peroxidation process were also measured. Elevated levels of 1,N(2)-edGuo were observed only in lung tissues of animals exposed to 96 ppb acetaldehyde. 1,N(2)-propanodGuo also differed quantitatively in liver but not in brain. The monitoring of 1,N(2)-propanodGuo levels in tissues provides important information on acetaldehyde genotoxicity and may contribute to the elucidation of the mechanisms associated with acetaldehyde exposure and cancer risk. Supported byFAPESP:2011/10048-5, CAPES, INCT Redoxoma:573530/2008-4,NAP Redoxoma: 2011.1.9352.1.8, CEPID Redoxoma:2013/07937-8.

  20. Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in Lung Biology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Allison N; Goodwin, Meagan; Kim, Carla F; Weiss, Daniel J

    2012-01-01

    A number of novel approaches for repair and regeneration of injured lung have developed over the past several years. These include a better understanding of endogenous stem and progenitor cells in the lung that can function in reparative capacity as well as extensive exploration of the potential efficacy of administering exogenous stem or progenitor cells to function in lung repair. Recent advances in ex vivo lung engineering have also been increasingly applied to the lung. The current status of these approaches as well as initial clinical trials of cell therapies for lung diseases are reviewed below. PMID:22395528

  1. CHANGES IN HEART RATE VARIABILITY AND LUNG FUNCTION OBSERVED IN NC PATROL TROOPERS EXPOSED TO PM AND AIR TOXICS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in Heart Rate Variability and Lung Function in NC Patrol Troopers exposed to PM and Air Toxics

    Michael Riediker1, Wayne E Cascio1, Robert B Devlin2, Thomas Griggs1&4, Margaret Herbst1, Ronald W Williams3, Steve P McCorquodale4, Philip A Bromberg1
    1) University o...

  2. Risk assessment of lung cancer and asbestosis in workers exposed to asbestos fibers in brake shoe factory in Iran.

    PubMed

    Azari, Mansour R; Nasermoaddeli, Ali; Movahadi, Mohammad; Mehrabi, Yadollah; Hatami, Hossein; Soori, Hamid; Moshfegh, Elaheh; Ramazni, Behnam

    2010-01-01

    Chrysotile asbestos fiber, imported from Russia, is used mainly for manufacturing purposes in Iran and related risks in the form of asbestosis and cancer were studied. Occupational exposure of all male workers (61 persons) to asbestos in a brake shoe factory was monitored. Cumulative exposures were determined through multiplication of typical exposure and work history. Risk assessment of exposed workers was estimated by risk criteria recommended by the American Environmental Protection Agency. Measurement of lung function parameters such as forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV(1)), forced volume capacity (FVC) and FEV(1)/FVC of exposed workers were obtained. Unadjusted correlation and adjusted correlation analysis for support of the association between cumulative exposure (fiber/ml-yr) and lung function parameters were used. Exposure of majority of exposed group was far greater than the occupational exposure limits (0.1 fiber/ml) in the range of 0.06-8.06 fiber/ml. Cumulative exposures in the range of 0.02 to 110.77 fiber/ml-yr were obtained. According to the risk criteria stated by ATSDR, risk assessment of workers in term of fibrotic changes was predicted for at least 24.6 percent of the exposed subjects. Again, according to the lung cancer risk criteria stated by EPA, 59 percent of workers will have excess risk. Negative correlation between lung function parameters (FEV(1), FEV(1)/FVC) and cumulative exposures adjusted for age and BMI were significant (p<0.05).

  3. Tumor necrosis factor alpha gene expression in human monocytic THP-1 cells exposed to beryllium.

    PubMed

    Galbraith, G M; Pandey, J P; Schmidt, M G; Arnaud, P; Goust, J M

    1996-01-01

    Chronic beryllium disease, which results from occupational exposure to particulate beryllium, is characterized by the development of lung granulomas and progressive pulmonary fibrosis. Increased production of proinflammatory cytokines (e.g., tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta) by pulmonary alveolar macrophages occurs in many chronic fibrotic lung diseases and is thought to contribute to the disease process. The purpose of the present study was to investigate cytokine production by human monocytic cells exposed to beryllium in vitro. The results indicated that such cells respond to beryllium ions in the presence of fluoride by accumulation of messenger ribonucleic acid for both tumor necrosis factor alpha and interleukin-1 beta. These findings suggest that inhaled beryllium may directly stimulate the production of these cytokines by alveolar macrophages in vitro.

  4. Asbestosis and small cell lung cancer in a clutch refabricator

    PubMed Central

    Levin, J. L.; O'Sullivan, M. F.; Corn, C. J.; Williams, M. G.; Dodson, R. F.

    1999-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To present a case of asbestosis and small cell lung cancer caused by asbestos in a clutch refabricator. METHODS: Exposed surfaces of used clutches similar to those refabricated in the worker's workplace were rinsed, and the filtrate analysed by analytical transmission electron microscopy. Tissue samples were also analysed by this technique. RESULTS: Numerous chrysotile fibres of respirable dimensions and sufficient length to form ferruginous bodies (FBs) were detected from rinsed filtrates of the clutch. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid contained many FBs, characteristic of asbestos bodies. Necropsy lung tissue showed grade 4 asbestosis and a small cell carcinoma in the right pulmonary hilum. Tissue analysis by light and analytical electron microscopy showed tissue burdens of coated and uncoated asbestos fibres greatly exceeding reported environmental concentrations (3810 FBs/g dry weight and 2,080,000 structures > or = 0.5 micron/g dry weight respectively). 72% Of the cores were identified as chrysotile. CONCLUSIONS: Clutch refabrication may lead to exposure to asbestos of sufficient magnitude to cause asbestosis and lung cancer.   PMID:10615292

  5. Toxicity of Lunar Dust in Lungs Assessed by Examining Biomarkers in Exposed Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.; Young, S. H.; Quan, C. L.; Khan-Mayberry, N.; Taylor, L. A.

    2009-01-01

    NASA plans to build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of soil, of which the finest portion is highly reactive dust. NASA has invited NIOSH to collaboratively investigate the toxicity of lunar dust. Dust samples of respirable sizes were aerodynamically isolated from two lunar soil samples of different maturities (cosmic exposure ages) collected during the Apollo 16 mission. The lunar dust samples, titanium dioxide, or quartz, suspended in normal saline or in Survanta (a bovine lung surfactant), were given to groups of 5 mice (C-57 male) by intrapharyngeal aspiration at 1, 0.3, or 0.1 mg/mouse. The mice were euthanized 7 or 30 days later, and their lungs were lavaged to assess the toxicity biomarkers in bronchioalveolar lavage fluids. The acellular fractions were assayed for total proteins, lactate dehydrogenase activities, and cytokines; the cellular portions were assessed for total cell counts and cell differentials. Results from the high-dose groups showed that lunar dust, suspended in saline, was more toxic than TiO 2, but less toxic than quartz. Lunar dust particles aggregate and settle out rapidly in water or saline, but not in Survanta. Lunar dust suspended in Survanta manifested greater toxicity than lunar dust in saline. The increase in toxicity presumably was due to that Survanta gave a better particle dispersion in the lungs. The two lunar dust samples showed similar toxicity. The overall results showed that lunar dust is more toxic than TiO 2 but less toxic than quartz.

  6. Veliparib With or Without Radiation Therapy, Carboplatin, and Paclitaxel in Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-03

    Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma, Mixed Subtype; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Thomas H.; Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper discusses the characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings will be presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  8. Optical performance of exposed solar cell covers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hichwa, Bryant P.; Selee, Steven R.; Dodds, Jerry; Long, Greg S.

    1991-01-01

    The characterization results of samples flown on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) are discussed. These samples included both coated and uncoated fused silica and ceria glass substrates used in the manufacture of solar cell covers. The coatings comprised a single-layer magnesium fluoride antireflection coating and an all-dielectric high-reflector multilayer coating centered at 350 nm. Samples were mounted on both the leading and trailing surfaces of the LDEF for exposure to the environment of space. The optical properties of the coatings will be compared to control samples which were stored on the ground during the LDEF Mission. Results of Auger Electron Spectroscopy and Rutherford Backscatter Spectroscopy measurements made on several of the coatings are presented to explain the effects of space on the chemical composition of the coatings.

  9. Low-Dose Acetylsalicylic Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  10. Radiation Therapy, Chemotherapy, and Soy Isoflavones in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-28

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  11. Lung cancer risk in workers exposed to poly(vinyl chloride) dust: a nested case-referent study

    PubMed Central

    Mastrangelo, G; Fedeli, U; Fadda, E; Milan, G; Turato, A; Pavanello, S

    2003-01-01

    Background: There have been few investigations of an association between poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC) dust exposure and an increase in lung cancer incidence, and their conclusions have been inconsistent. Aims: To determine whether PVC and/or vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) is the associated risk factor(s), by means of a nested case-referent study, in order to estimate lung cancer risk, avoiding selection, information, or confounding biases. Methods: Thirty eight cases of histologically verified lung cancer and 224 control subjects without a history of cancer were selected from an Italian cohort of 1658 vinyl chloride workers. Information sources included clinical records (diagnosis, smoking habits) and plant records (occupational history). The risk of lung cancer was estimated by odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI), calculated using logistic regression models. Results: In PVC baggers exposed to high levels of respirable PVC particles in the workplace, the lung cancer OR increases by 20% for each extra year of work (OR = 1.2003; 95% CI 1.0772 to 1.3469; p = 0.0010), when the influence of age and smoking habits is controlled. No relation was found between lung cancer and cumulative VCM exposure. Conclusion: This nested case-control study showed, in the VCM/PVC industry, an increased risk of lung cancer associated with exposure to PVC dust; previous cohort studies failed to recognise such excess, probably because they used VCM exposure as the risk indicator. PMID:12771394

  12. [Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Pourel, N

    2016-10-01

    Radiotherapy for small cell lung carcinoma has known significant improvements over the past 10 years especially through routine use of PET-CT in the initial work-up and contouring before treatment. Prophylactic cranial irradiation remains a standard of care for locally advanced disease and is a subject of controversy for metastatic disease. A new indication for thoracic radiotherapy may soon arise for metastatic disease, still confirmation studies are ongoing.

  13. Lung dendritic cells at the innate-adaptive immune interface

    PubMed Central

    Condon, Tracy Voss; Sawyer, Richard T.; Fenton, Matthew J.; Riches, David W. H.

    2011-01-01

    This review updates the basic biology of lung DCs and their functions. Lung DCs have taken center stage as cellular therapeutic targets in new vaccine strategies for the treatment of diverse human disorders, including asthma, allergic lung inflammation, lung cancer, and infectious lung disease. The anatomical distribution of lung DCs, as well as the division of labor between their subsets, aids their ability to recognize and endocytose foreign substances and to process antigens. DCs can induce tolerance in or activate naïve T cells, making lung DCs well-suited to their role as lung sentinels. Lung DCs serve as a functional signaling/sensing unit to maintain lung homeostasis and orchestrate host responses to benign and harmful foreign substances. PMID:21807741

  14. Treatment of lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Pusceddu, Sara; Proto, Claudia; Macerelli, Marianna; Signorelli, Diego; Vitali, Milena; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gallucci, Rosaria; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Platania, Marco; Buzzoni, Roberto; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2016-06-01

    Lung large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (L-LCNEC) is a rare, aggressive, and difficult-to-treat tumor. It is classified as a neuroendocrine subtype of large cell lung carcinoma (LCLC) belonging to the non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) group, but it is also included in the neuroendocrine tumor (NET) group. Most of the available data related to its treatment derive from retrospective analyses or small case series. For patients with L-LCNEC, prognosis is generally very poor. In early stages (I-II-III), surgery is recommended but does not seem to be sufficient. Platinum-based adjuvant chemotherapy may be useful while the role of neoadjuvant chemotherapy is still not well defined. In patients with advanced L-LCNEC, the chemotherapy regimens used in SCLC still remain the standard of treatment, but results are not satisfactory. Due to their peculiar clinical and biological features and the lack of literature data, there is an emerging need for a consensus on the best treatment strategy for L-LCNEC and for the identification of new therapeutic options. In this review, we will discuss the key aspects of L-LCNEC management with the aim to clarify the most controversial issues.

  15. Bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Krause, Diane S

    2008-08-15

    Bone marrow-derived cells can take on the phenotype of epithelial cells and express epithelial-specific genes in multiple organs. Here, we focus on recent data on the appearance of marrow-derived epithelial cells in the adult lung. These findings have garnered significant skepticism because in most cases marrow-derived epithelial cells are very rare, the marrow cell of origin is not known, the techniques for detection have needed improvement, and there seem to be multiple mechanisms by which this occurs. Recent studies have focused on these concerns. Once these important concerns are addressed, further studies on the function(s) of these cells will need to be performed to determine whether this engraftment has any clinical significance-either beneficial or detrimental.

  16. Lung radiology and pulmonary function of children chronically exposed to air pollution.

    PubMed

    Calderón-Garcidueñas, Lilian; Mora-Tiscareño, Antonieta; Fordham, Lynn A; Chung, Charles J; Valencia-Salazar, Gildardo; Flores-Gómez, Silvia; Solt, Anna C; Gomez-del Campo, Alberto; Jardón-Torres, Ricardo; Henríquez-Roldán, Carlos; Hazucha, Milan J; Reed, William

    2006-09-01

    We analyzed the chest radiographs (CXRs) of 249 clinically healthy children, 230 from southwest Mexico City and 19 from Tlaxcala. In contrast to children from Tlaxcala, children from southwest Mexico City were chronically exposed to ozone levels exceeding the U.S. National Ambient Air Quality Standards for an average of 4.7 hr/day and to concentrations of particulate matter (PM) with aerodynamic diameters lung function tests based on predicted values. These findings are consistent with bronchiolar, peribronchiolar, and/or alveolar duct inflammation, possibly caused by ozone, PM, and lipopolysaccharide exposure. The epidemiologic implications of these findings are important for children residing in polluted environments, because bronchiolar disease could lead to chronic pulmonary disease later in life.

  17. Effect of amygdalin on the proliferation of hyperoxia-exposed type II alveolar epithelial cells isolated from premature rat.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huaping; Chang, Liwen; Li, Wenbin; Liu, Hanchu

    2004-01-01

    The pathogenesis of hyperoxia lung injury and the mechanism of amygdalin on type 2 alveolar epithelial cells (AEC2) isolated from premature rat lungs in vitro were investigated. AEC2 were obtained by primary culture from 20-days fetal rat lung and hyperoxia-exposed cell model was established. Cell proliferating viability was examined by MTT assay after treatment of amygdalin at various concentrations. DNA content and the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) protein expression of AEC2 were measured by using flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry respectively after 24 h of hyperoxia exposure or amygdalin treatment. The results showed that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation and decreased PCNA protein expression in A-EC2 of premature rat in vitro. Amygdalin at the concentration range of 50-200 micromol/L stimulated the proliferation of AEC2 in a dose-dependent manner, however, 400 micromol/L amygdalin inhibited the proliferation of AEC2. Amygdalin at the concentration of 200 micromol/L played its best role in facilitating proliferation of AEC2s in vitro and could partially ameliorated the changes of proliferation in hyperoxia exposed AEC2 of premature rat. It has been suggested that hyperoxia inhibited the proliferation of AEC2s of premature rat, which may contribute to hyperoxia lung injury. Amygdalin may play partial protective role in hyperoxia-induced lung injury.

  18. Gallium-67 uptake in the lung of asbestos exposed sheep: early association with enhanced macrophage-derived fibronectin accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Begin, R.; Bisson, G.; Lambert, R.; Cote, Y.; Fabi, D.; Martel, M.; Lamoureux, G.; Rola-Pleszczynski, M.; Boctor, M.; Dalle, D.

    1986-04-01

    To evaluate the time course and mechanisms of enhanced /sup 67/Ga lung uptake in asbestosis, we exposed two groups of sheep every 2 wk to either 100 ml saline (controls) or 100 mg UICC chrysotile fibers in 100 ml saline. The sheep were evaluated periodically by pulmonary function tests (PFT), thoracic radiograph (TR), /sup 67/Ga lung scan, bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), and transbronchial lung biopsy (TLB). By month 24 of the study, 9/15 exposed sheep had developed the initial alveolitis and had significant changes in PFT, TR, and TLB. The other six exposed sheep differed from controls only by a 75% increase in BAL fibronectin until month 30, where significant changes in albumin occurred and /sup 67/Ga scan score increased. The nine sheep with alveolitis had significant sustained increases in /sup 67/Ga scan and BAL levels from month 6, associated with a 150% increase in BAL fibronectin and other parameters of disease activity changed from month 18 to 30. We concluded that in the sheep model of asbestosis, significant changes in /sup 67/Ga scan, /sup 67/Ga BAL counts, and excessive elevation of BAL fibronectin preceded other parameters of disease activity. The data suggest that excessively activated macrophages are primarily responsible for the early /sup 67/Ga lung uptake.

  19. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Akram, Khondoker M; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A; Forsyth, Nicholas R

    2016-01-19

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases.

  20. Lung Regeneration: Endogenous and Exogenous Stem Cell Mediated Therapeutic Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Akram, Khondoker M.; Patel, Neil; Spiteri, Monica A.; Forsyth, Nicholas R.

    2016-01-01

    The tissue turnover of unperturbed adult lung is remarkably slow. However, after injury or insult, a specialised group of facultative lung progenitors become activated to replenish damaged tissue through a reparative process called regeneration. Disruption in this process results in healing by fibrosis causing aberrant lung remodelling and organ dysfunction. Post-insult failure of regeneration leads to various incurable lung diseases including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Therefore, identification of true endogenous lung progenitors/stem cells, and their regenerative pathway are crucial for next-generation therapeutic development. Recent studies provide exciting and novel insights into postnatal lung development and post-injury lung regeneration by native lung progenitors. Furthermore, exogenous application of bone marrow stem cells, embryonic stem cells and inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) show evidences of their regenerative capacity in the repair of injured and diseased lungs. With the advent of modern tissue engineering techniques, whole lung regeneration in the lab using de-cellularised tissue scaffold and stem cells is now becoming reality. In this review, we will highlight the advancement of our understanding in lung regeneration and development of stem cell mediated therapeutic strategies in combating incurable lung diseases. PMID:26797607

  1. Preconditioning allows engraftment of mouse and human embryonic lung cells, enabling lung repair in mice.

    PubMed

    Rosen, Chava; Shezen, Elias; Aronovich, Anna; Klionsky, Yael Zlotnikov; Yaakov, Yasmin; Assayag, Miri; Biton, Inbal Eti; Tal, Orna; Shakhar, Guy; Ben-Hur, Herzel; Shneider, David; Vaknin, Zvi; Sadan, Oscar; Evron, Shmuel; Freud, Enrique; Shoseyov, David; Wilschanski, Michael; Berkman, Neville; Fibbe, Willem E; Hagin, David; Hillel-Karniel, Carmit; Krentsis, Irit Milman; Bachar-Lustig, Esther; Reisner, Yair

    2015-08-01

    Repair of injured lungs represents a longstanding therapeutic challenge. We show that human and mouse embryonic lung tissue from the canalicular stage of development (20-22 weeks of gestation for humans, and embryonic day 15-16 (E15-E16) for mouse) are enriched with progenitors residing in distinct niches. On the basis of the marked analogy to progenitor niches in bone marrow (BM), we attempted strategies similar to BM transplantation, employing sublethal radiation to vacate lung progenitor niches and to reduce stem cell competition. Intravenous infusion of a single cell suspension of canalicular lung tissue from GFP-marked mice or human fetal donors into naphthalene-injured and irradiated syngeneic or SCID mice, respectively, induced marked long-term lung chimerism. Donor type structures or 'patches' contained epithelial, mesenchymal and endothelial cells. Transplantation of differentially labeled E16 mouse lung cells indicated that these patches were probably of clonal origin from the donor. Recipients of the single cell suspension transplant exhibited marked improvement in lung compliance and tissue damping reflecting the energy dissipation in the lung tissues. Our study provides proof of concept for lung reconstitution by canalicular-stage human lung cells after preconditioning of the pulmonary niche.

  2. Mast Cells in Lung Homeostasis: Beyond Type I Hypersensitivity.

    PubMed

    Campillo-Navarro, Marcia; Chávez-Blanco, Alma D; Wong-Baeza, Isabel; Serafín-López, Jeanet; Flores-Mejía, Raúl; Estrada-Parra, Sergio; Estrada-García, Iris; Chacón-Salinas, Rommel

    2014-06-01

    Lungs are indispensable organs for the respiratory process, and maintaining their homeostasis is essential for human health and survival. However, during the lifetime of an individual, the lungs suffer countless insults that put at risk their delicate organization and function. Many cells of the immune system participate to maintain this equilibrium and to keep functional lungs. Among these cells, mast cells have recently attracted attention because of their ability to rapidly secrete many chemical and biological mediators that modulate different processes like inflammation, angiogenesis, cell proliferation, etc. In this review, we focus on recent advances in the understanding of the role that mast cells play in lung protection during infections, and of the relation of mast cell responses to type I hypersensitivity-associated pathologies. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of mast cells during wound healing in the lung and its association with lung cancer, and how mast cells could be exploited as therapeutic targets in some diseases.

  3. Human embryonic stem cells and lung regeneration.

    PubMed

    Varanou, A; Page, C P; Minger, S L

    2008-10-01

    Human embryonic stem cells are pluripotent cells derived from the inner cell mass of preimplantation stage embryos. Their unique potential to give rise to all differentiated cell types has generated great interest in stem cell research and the potential that it may have in developmental biology, medicine and pharmacology. The main focus of stem cell research has been on cell therapy for pathological conditions with no current methods of treatment, such as neurodegenerative diseases, cardiac pathology, retinal dysfunction and lung and liver disease. The overall aim is to develop methods of application either of pure cell populations or of whole tissue parts to the diseased organ under investigation. In the field of pulmonary research, studies using human embryonic stem cells have succeeded in generating enriched cultures of type II pneumocytes in vitro. On account of their potential of indefinite proliferation in vitro, embryonic stem cells could be a source of an unlimited supply of cells available for transplantation and for use in gene therapy. Uncovering the ability to generate such cell types will expand our understanding of biological processes to such a degree that disease understanding and management could change dramatically.

  4. Biological therapies in nonsmall cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Zugazagoitia, Jon; Molina-Pinelo, Sonia; Lopez-Rios, Fernando; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2017-03-01

    Biological therapies have improved survival outcomes of advanced-stage nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Genotype-directed therapies have changed treatment paradigms of patients with EGFR-mutant and ALK/ROS1-rearranged lung adenocarcinomas, and the list of druggable targets with demonstrated clinical actionability (BRAF, MET, RET, NTRK1 and HER2) continues to expand. Furthermore, we have incrementally understood the mechanisms of cancer immune evasion and foresee ways to effectively circumvent them, particularly at the immune checkpoint level. Drugs targeting the tumour immune-evasive PD-1 pathway have demonstrated remarkable treatment benefits in this disease, with a non-negligible fraction of patients potentially receiving long-term survival benefits. Herein, we briefly discuss the role of various medical disciplines in the management of advanced-stage NSCLC and review the most relevant biological therapies for this disease, with particular emphasis in genotype-directed therapies and immune checkpoint inhibitors.

  5. In vitro cultured lung cancer cells are not suitable for animal-based breath biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Schallschmidt, Kristin; Becker, Roland; Zwaka, Hanna; Menzel, Randolf; Johnen, Dorothea; Fischer-Tenhagen, Carola; Rolff, Jana; Nehls, Irene

    2015-02-10

    In vitro cultured lung cancer cell lines were investigated regarding the possible identification of volatile organic compounds as potential biomarkers. Gas samples from the headspace of pure culture medium and from the cultures of human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines A549 and Lu7466 were exposed to polypropylene fleece in order to absorb odour components. Sniffer dogs were trained with loaded fleeces of both cell lines, and honey bees were trained with fleeces exposed to A549. Afterwards, their ability to distinguish between cell-free culture medium odour and lung cancer cell odour was tested. Neither bees nor dogs were able to discriminate between odours from the cancer cell cultures and the pure culture medium. Solid phase micro extraction followed by gas chromatography with mass selective detection produced profiles of volatiles from the headspace offered to the animals. The profiles from the cell lines were largely similar; distinct differences were based on the decrease of volatile culture medium components due to the cells' metabolic activity. In summary, cultured lung cancer cell lines do not produce any biomarkers recognizable by animals or gas chromatographic analysis.

  6. Persistent Expression Changes of Fibrosis-Related Genes in the Lung Tissues of Rats Exposed to Lunar Dust Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Ye; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully, Robert R.; Yeshitla, Samrawit A.; Wu, Honglu; Meyers, Valerie; James, John T.

    2014-01-01

    The Moon's surface is covered by a layer of fine, potential reactive dust. Lunar dust contain about 1-2% of very fine respirable dust (less than 3 micrometers). The habitable area of any lunar landing vehicle and outpost would inevitably be contaminated with lunar dust that could pose a health risk. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the toxicity of Apollo moon dust in rodents to assess the health risk of dust exposures to humans. One of the particular interests in the study is to evaluate dust-induced changes of the expression of fibrosis-related genes, and to identify specific signaling pathways involved in lunar dustinduced toxicity. F344 rats were exposed for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk) in nose-only inhalation chambers to concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 21, and 61 milligrams per cubic meters of lunar dust. Five rats per group were euthanized at 1 day, 1 week, 1 month, and 3 months after the last inhalation exposure. The bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was collected by lavaging with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). A zymosan-induced luminolbased chemiluminescence assay was used to assess the activity of BAL cells. The lavaged lung tissue was snap frozen in LN2 and total RNA was isolated using the Qigen RNeasy kit. The expression of 84 fibrosisrelated genes were analyzed using the RT2 Profiler PCR Array technique. The expression of 18 genes of interest were further measured using real-time PCR technique in all the samples. 10 out of 18 genes of interest showed persistently significant expression changes in the local lung tissue exposed to lunar dust, indicating a prolonged proinflammatory response. The expressions of several of these genes were dose- and time-dependent and were significantly correlated with other pathological parameters. The potential signaling pathways and upstream regulators were further analyzed using IPA pathway analysis tool based on the gene expression data. The data presented in this study, for the first time, explore the

  7. Expression of pleiotrophin in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, H Q; Wang, J

    2015-01-01

    Pleiotrophin (PTN) is a kind of heparin binding growth factor closely related to tumor progression. This study aimed to discuss the significance of the expression of PTN in benign and malignant lung cancer tissues, especially small cell lung cancer. Lung cancer samples were collected for study and lung tissue samples with benign lesions were taken as controls. The expression of PTN was detected using tissue chip combined with the immunohistochemical method, and the differences of small cell lung cancer with non-small cell lung cancer and benign lesion tissue were compared. It was found that PTN expression was mainly located in the cytoplasm and membrane of cells; PTN expression in the lung cancer group was higher than that in the control group (p < 0.01), and PTN expression in the small cell cancer group was higher than that in the squamous carcinoma group and glandular cancer group (p < 0.05). In addition, PTN expression quantity in patients with lung cancer were in close correlation with TNM staging, pathological type and tumor differentiation degree (p < 0.05). PTN was found to express abnormally high in lung cancer, especially small cell lung cancer tissue. PTN is most likely to be a new tumor marker for diagnosis and prognosis of lung cancer.

  8. Metabolomics in Lung Inflammation: A High Resolution 1H NMR Study of Mice Exposed to Silica Dust

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jian Zhi; Rommereim, Donald N.; Minard, Kevin R.; Woodstock, Angie; Harrer, Bruce J.; Wind, Robert A.; Phipps, Richard P.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2010-01-01

    Here we report the first 1H NMR metabolomics studies on excised lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) from mice exposed to crystalline silica. High resolution 1H NMR metabolic profiling on intact excised lungs was performed using slow magic angle sample spinning (slow-MAS) 1H PASS (phase altered spinning sidebands) at a sample spinning rate of 80 Hz. Metabolic profiling on BALF was completed using fast magic angle spinning at 2kHz. Major findings are that the relative concentrations of choline, phosphocholine (PC) and glycerophosphocholine(GPC) were statistically significantly increased in silica-exposed mice compared to sham controls, indicating an altered membrane choline phospholipids metabolism (MCPM). The relative concentrations of glycogen/glucose, lactate and creatine were also statistically significantly increased in mice exposed to silica dust, suggesting that cellular energy pathways were affected by silica dust. Elevated levels of glycine, lysine, glutamate, proline and 4-hydroxyproline were also increased in exposed mice, suggesting the activation of a collagen pathway. Furthermore, metabolic profiles in mice exposed to silica dust were found to be spatially heterogeneous, in consistent with regional inflammation revealed by in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). PMID:20020862

  9. Stem cell conditioned medium improves acute lung injury in mice: in vivo evidence for stem cell paracrine action

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Lavinia; Byrne, Roisin N.; van Haaften, Tim; Vadivel, Arul; Alphonse, Rajesh S.; Rey-Parra, Gloria J.; Weissmann, Gaia; Hall, Adam; Eaton, Farah

    2012-01-01

    Mortality and morbidity of acute lung injury and acute respiratory distress syndrome remain high because of the lack of pharmacological therapies to prevent injury or promote repair. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) prevent lung injury in various experimental models, despite a low proportion of donor-derived cell engraftment, suggesting that MSCs exert their beneficial effects via paracrine mechanisms. We hypothesized that soluble factors secreted by MSCs promote the resolution of lung injury in part by modulating alveolar macrophage (AM) function. We tested the therapeutic effect of MSC-derived conditioned medium (CdM) compared with whole MSCs, lung fibroblasts, and fibroblast-CdM. Intratracheal MSCs and MSC-CdM significantly attenuated lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung neutrophil influx, lung edema, and lung injury as assessed by an established lung injury score. MSC-CdM increased arginase-1 activity and Ym1 expression in LPS-exposed AMs. In vivo, AMs from LPS-MSC and LPS-MSC CdM lungs had enhanced expression of Ym1 and decreased expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase compared with untreated LPS mice. This suggests that MSC-CdM promotes alternative macrophage activation to an M2 “healer” phenotype. Comparative multiplex analysis of MSC- and fibroblast-CdM demonstrated that MSC-CdM contained several factors that may confer therapeutic benefit, including insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). Recombinant IGF-I partially reproduced the lung protective effect of MSC-CdM. In summary, MSCs act through a paracrine activity. MSC-CdM promotes the resolution of LPS-induced lung injury by attenuating lung inflammation and promoting a wound healing/anti-inflammatory M2 macrophage phenotype in part via IGF-I. PMID:23023971

  10. Genetically Modified T Cells in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer or Mesothelioma

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-04

    Advanced Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; HLA-A*0201 Positive Cells Present; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Pleural Malignant Mesothelioma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage III Pleural Mesothelioma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Pleural Mesothelioma

  11. Potassium ion fluxes in corneal epithelial cells exposed to UVB

    PubMed Central

    Ubels, John L.; Van Dyken, Rachel E.; Louters, Julienne R.; Schotanus, Mark P.; Haarsma, Loren D.

    2011-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the efflux of K+ from human corneal limbal epithelial cells (HCLE) exposed to ambient levels of UVB, which is known to cause apoptosis, and to examine the effect of K+ channel blockers on loss of potassium induced by UVB. HCLE cells were exposed to 100–200 mJ/cm2 UVB, followed by incubation in culture media with 5.5 – 100 mM K+, BDS-1, Ba2+ or ouabain. To measure intracellular cations, cells were washed in 280 mM sucrose and lysed in DI water. K+ and Na+ levels in lysates were measured by ion chromatography. HCLE cells showed maximal loss of [K+]i 10 minutes after exposure to UVB and 5.5 mM K+ media, with recovery of normal K+ levels after 90 minutes. Treatment with 1 µM BDS-1 following UVB exposure reduced the loss of [K+]i retained by HCLE cells. Exposure to 0.1–5 mM Ba2+ inhibited UVB-induced K+ loss in a time and dose dependent manner. These results confirm that blocking K+ channels in HCLE cells exposed to UVB prevents efflux of K+, confirming that UVB activates K+ channels in these cells. Electrophysiology data shows that K+ channels remain highly active at least 90 minutes after UVB exposure. HCLE cells exposed to UVB and incubated 0.01–1µM ouabain did not recover from UVB-induced K+ loss. These data suggest that the Na/K pump may act to restore [K+]i to control levels in HCLE cells following UVB exposure and that the pump is not damaged by exposure to UVB. Incubation of HCLE cells exposed to UVB in medium with 25–100mM K+ media prevented K+ efflux at extracellular concentrations as low as 25mM (the concentration in tear fluid), maintaining control levels of [K+]i. In all experiments inward fluxes and intracelluar Na+ levels mirrored K+ changes, albeit at the expected lower concentrations. The prevention of UVB-induced K+i loss by 25 mM K+o is consistent with the possible contribution of the relatively high K+ concentration in tears to protection of the corneal epithelium from ambient UVB. PMID:21377460

  12. MDSC and TGFβ Are Required for Facilitation of Tumor Growth in the Lungs of Mice Exposed to Carbon Nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Shvedova, Anna A; Kisin, Elena R; Yanamala, Naveena; Tkach, Alexey V; Gutkin, Dmitriy W; Star, Alexander; Shurin, Galina V; Kagan, Valerian E; Shurin, Michael R

    2015-04-15

    During the last decades, changes have been observed in the frequency of different histologic subtypes of lung cancer, one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality, with a declining proportion of squamous cell carcinomas and an increasing proportion of adenocarcinomas, particularly in developed countries. This suggests the emergence of new etiologic factors and mechanisms, including those defining the lung microenvironment, promoting tumor growth. Assuming that the lung is the main portal of entry for broadly used nanomaterials and their established proinflammatory propensities, we hypothesized that nanomaterials may contribute to changes facilitating tumor growth. Here, we report that an acute exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) induces recruitment and accumulation of lung-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and MDSC-derived production of TGFβ, resulting in upregulated tumor burden in the lung. The production of TGFβ by MDSC requires their interaction with both SWCNT and tumor cells. We conclude that pulmonary exposure to SWCNT favors the formation of a niche that supports ingrowth of lung carcinoma in vivo via activation of TGFβ production by SWCNT-attracted and -presensitized MDSC.

  13. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: Structural and biochemical aspects.

    PubMed

    Sabanero, Myrna; Azorín-Vega, Juan Carlos; Flores-Villavicencio, Lérida Liss; Castruita-Dominguez, J Pedro; Vallejo, Miguel Angel; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Cordova-Fraga, Teodoro; Sosa-Aquino, Modesto

    2016-02-01

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv/year) and subsequently exposure to high doses produces greater effects in people. It has been reported that people who have been exposed to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv/year) and subsequently are exposed to high doses, have greater effects. However, at a molecular and biochemical level, it is an unknown alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa ATCC CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/90 s). Our research considers multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin microfilaments), nuclei (DAPI), and genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation show structural alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin microfilaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200 μM H2O2/1h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between various line cells. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation.

  14. From the Field to the Laboratory: Air Pollutant-Induced Genomic Effects in Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vizuete, William; Sexton, Kenneth G.; Nguyen, Hang; Smeester, Lisa; Aagaard, Kjersti Marie; Shope, Cynthia; Lefer, Barry; Flynn, James H.; Alvarez, Sergio; Erickson, Mathew H.; Fry, Rebecca C.

    2015-01-01

    Current in vitro studies do not typically assess cellular impacts in relation to real-world atmospheric mixtures of gases. In this study, we set out to examine the feasibility of measuring biological responses at the level of gene expression in human lung cells upon direct exposures to air in the field. This study describes the successful deployment of lung cells in the heavily industrialized Houston Ship Channel. By examining messenger RNA (mRNA) levels from exposed lung cells, we identified changes in genes that play a role as inflammatory responders in the cell. The results show anticipated responses from negative and positive controls, confirming the integrity of the experimental protocol and the successful deployment of the in vitro instrument. Furthermore, exposures to ambient conditions displayed robust changes in gene expression. These results demonstrate a methodology that can produce gas-phase toxicity data in the field. PMID:26917966

  15. B cells play key roles in th2-type airway immune responses in mice exposed to natural airborne allergens.

    PubMed

    Drake, Li Yin; Iijima, Koji; Hara, Kenichiro; Kobayashi, Takao; Kephart, Gail M; Kita, Hirohito

    2015-01-01

    Humans are frequently exposed to various airborne allergens. In addition to producing antibodies, B cells participate in immune responses via various mechanisms. The roles of B cells in allergic airway inflammation and asthma have been controversial. We examined the functional importance of B cells in a mouse model of asthma, in which mice were exposed repeatedly to common airborne allergens. Naïve wild-type BALB/c mice or B cell-deficient JH-/- mice were exposed intranasally to a cocktail of allergen extracts, including Alternaria, Aspergillus, and house dust mite, every other day for two weeks. Ovalbumin was included in the cocktail to monitor the T cell immune response. Airway inflammation, lung pathology, and airway reactivity were analyzed. The airway exposure of naïve wild type mice to airborne allergens induced robust eosinophilic airway inflammation, increased the levels of Th2 cytokines and chemokines in the lung, and increased the reactivity to inhaled methacholine. These pathological changes and immune responses were attenuated in B cell-deficient JH-/- mice. The allergen-induced expansion of CD4+ T cells was impaired in the lungs and draining lymph nodes of JH-/- mice. Furthermore, lymphocytes from JH-/- mice failed to produce Th2 cytokines in response to ovalbumin re-stimulation in vitro. Our results suggest that B cells are required for the optimal development of Th2-type immune responses and airway inflammation when exposed to common airborne allergens. The therapeutic targeting of B cells may be beneficial to treat asthma in certain patients.

  16. Nedaplatin sensitization of cisplatin-resistant human non-small cell lung cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUAN; ZHU, XIAOLI; HUANG, JING; CHEN, PINGSHENG; HAN, SHUHUA; YAN, XING

    2016-01-01

    Cisplatin (DDP) has been one of the most widely used chemotherapy drugs for advanced non-small cell lung cancer. However, the increase in the number of DDP-resistant cancer cells has become a major impediment in the clinical management of cancer. In the present study, for the first time, the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay was used to demonstrate that nedaplatin (NDP) could have a stronger inhibitory effect than DDP alone in DDP-resistant A549 (A549DDP) cells and that it could attenuate the resistance of these cells. Additionally, flow cytometry analysis showed that the apoptosis rate of these resistant cells when exposed to NDP was markedly increased and the number of cells in the G2 stage of the cell cycle was significantly increased. Furthermore, western blot analysis indicated that NDP decreased the protein expression of P-glycoprotein, tumor protein p53 and B-cell lymphoma 2, and increased the expression of Bcl-2-associated X protein, all of which could possibly improve the NDP intracellular drug concentration and promote cell apoptosis. These observations suggested that NDP could have higher efficacy in DDP-resistant lung cancer cells, and further studies applying more detailed analyses are warranted to elucidate the mechanism(s) behind this effect. PMID:27073518

  17. Serum copper concentration as an index of lung injury in rats exposed to hemithorax irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, W.F.; Molteni, A.; Fitzsimons, E.J.; Hinz, J.

    1988-06-01

    Serum copper concentration was evaluated as an index of lung injury (monitored by lung prostacyclin production) with respect to the effects of time, dose, dose fractionation, and penicillamine dose modification in rats irradiated to the right hemithorax. Both lung PGI2 production and serum Cu concentration increased with increasing /sup 60/Co gamma-ray dose in animals sacrificed 2 or 6 months postirradiation, and the highest values for both responses were observed at the latter autopsy time. At 2 months postirradiation, the elevations in lung PGI2 production and serum Cu concentration also were spared similarly when total radiation doses were delivered in five equal daily fractions as compared to single doses. Finally, the ability of D-penicillamine to ameliorate the radiation-induced hyperproduction of PGI2 by rat lung was accompanied by an attenuation of the dose-dependent increase in serum Cu concentration at 2 months postirradiation in the drug-treated rats. In contrast, serum iron concentration was independent of time, dose, and penicillamine. At 2 months after irradiation, there also was a dose-dependent increase in lung hydroxyproline (collagen) content, the magnitude of which correlated closely with serum copper concentration in individual animals. Thus serum copper concentration is an accurate and minimally invasive index of lung injury in rats irradiated to the hemithorax and can predict lung hydroxyproline (collagen) content in individual irradiated rats.

  18. Pleural mesothelial cells in pleural and lung diseases

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Veena B.

    2015-01-01

    During development, the mesoderm maintains a complex relationship with the developing endoderm giving rise to the mature lung. Pleural mesothelial cells (PMCs) derived from the mesoderm play a key role during the development of the lung. The pleural mesothelium differentiates to give rise to the endothelium and smooth muscle cells via epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). An aberrant recapitulation of such developmental pathways can play an important role in the pathogenesis of disease processes such as idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The PMC is the central component of the immune responses of the pleura. When exposed to noxious stimuli, it demonstrates innate immune responses such as Toll-like receptor (TLR) recognition of pathogen associated molecular patterns as well as causes the release of several cytokines to activate adaptive immune responses. Development of pleural effusions occurs due to an imbalance in the dynamic interaction between junctional proteins, n-cadherin and β-catenin, and phosphorylation of adherens junctions between PMCs, which is caused in part by vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) released by PMCs. PMCs play an important role in defense mechanisms against bacterial and mycobacterial pleural infections, and in pathogenesis of malignant pleural effusion, asbestos related pleural disease and malignant pleural mesothelioma. PMCs also play a key role in the resolution of inflammation, which can occur with or without fibrosis. Fibrosis occurs as a result of disordered fibrin turnover and due to the effects of cytokines such as transforming growth factor-β, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), and basic fibroblast growth factor; which are released by PMCs. Recent studies have demonstrated a role for PMCs in the pathogenesis of IPF suggesting their potential as a cellular biomarker of disease activity and as a possible therapeutic target. Pleural-based therapies targeting PMCs for treatment of IPF and other lung diseases need

  19. Regulation of cytochrome P4501A1 expression by hyperoxia in human lung cell lines: Implications for hyperoxic lung injury

    SciTech Connect

    Bhakta, Kushal Y. Jiang, Weiwu; Couroucli, Xanthi I.; Fazili, Inayat S.; Muthiah, Kathirvel; Moorthy, Bhagavatula

    2008-12-01

    Supplemental oxygen, used to treat pulmonary insufficiency in newborns, contributes to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD). Cytochrome P4501A enzymes are induced by hyperoxia in animal models, but their role in human systems is unknown. Here we investigated the molecular mechanisms of induction of CYP1A1 by hyperoxia in human lung cell lines. Three human lung cell lines were exposed to hyperoxia (95% O2) for 0-72 h, and CYP1A1 activities, apoprotein contents, and mRNA levels were determined. Hyperoxia significantly induced CYP1A1 activity and protein contents (2-4 fold), and mRNA levels (30-40 fold) over control in each cell line. Transfection of a CYP1A1 promoter/luciferase reporter construct, followed by hyperoxia (4-72 h), showed marked (2-6 fold) induction of luciferase expression. EMSA and siRNA experiments strongly suggest that the Ah receptor (AHR) is involved in the hyperoxic induction of CYP1A1. MTT reduction assays showed attenuation of cell injury with the CYP1A1 inducer beta-naphthoflavone (BNF). Our results strongly suggest that hyperoxia transcriptionally activates CYP1A1 expression in human lung cell lines by AHR-dependent mechanisms, and that CYP1A1 induction is associated with decreased toxicity. This novel finding of induction of CYP1A1 in the absence of exogenous AHR ligands could lead to novel interventions in the treatment of BPD.

  20. Lung function, biological monitoring, and biological effect monitoring of gemstone cutters exposed to beryls

    PubMed Central

    Wegner, R.; Heinrich-Ramm, R.; Nowak, D.; Olma, K.; Poschadel, B.; Szadkowski, D.

    2000-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—Gemstone cutters are potentially exposed to various carcinogenic and fibrogenic metals such as chromium, nickel, aluminium, and beryllium, as well as to lead. Increased beryllium concentrations had been reported in the air of workplaces of beryl cutters in Idar-Oberstein, Germany. The aim of the survey was to study the excretion of beryllium in cutters and grinders with occupational exposure to beryls—for example, aquamarines and emeralds—to examine the prevalence of beryllium sensitisation with the beryllium lymphocyte transformation test (BeLT), to examine the prevalence of lung disease induced by beryllium, to describe the internal load of the respective metals relative to work process, and to screen for genotoxic effects in this particular profession.
METHODS—In a cross sectional investigation, 57 out of 100 gemstone cutters working in 12 factories in Idar-Oberstein with occupational exposure to beryls underwent medical examinations, a chest radiograph, lung function testing (spirometry, airway resistance with the interrupter technique), and biological monitoring, including measurements of aluminium, chromium, and nickel in urine as well as lead in blood. Beryllium in urine was measured with a newly developed direct electrothermal atomic absorption spectroscopy technique with a measurement limit of 0.06 µg/l. Also, cytogenetic tests (rates of micronuclei and sister chromatid exchange), and a BeLT were performed. Airborne concentrations of beryllium were measured in three factories. As no adequate local control group was available, the cutters were categorised into those with an exposure to beryls of >4 hours/week (group A) and ⩽4 hours/week (group B).
RESULTS—Clinical, radiological, or spirometric abnormalities indicating pneumoconiosis were detected in none of the gemstone cutters. Metal concentrations in biological material were far below the respective biological limit values, and beryllium in urine was only measurable in

  1. Mast cells modulate acute ozone-induced inflammation of the murine lung

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeberger, S.R.; Seiden, J.E.; Levitt, R.C.; Zhang, L.Y. )

    1993-11-01

    We hypothesized that mast cells modulate lung inflammation that develops after acute ozone (O3) exposure. Two tests were done: (1) genetically mast-cell-deficient (WBB6F1-W/Wv, WCB6F1-SI/SId) and bone-marrow-transplanted W/Wv mice were exposed to O3 or filtered air, and the inflammatory responses were compared with those of mast-cell-sufficient congenic mice (WBB6F1-(+)/+, WCB6F1-(+)/+); (2) genetically O3-susceptible C57BL/6J mice were treated pharmacologically with putative mast-cell modulators or vehicle, and the O3-induced inflammatory responses were compared. Mice were exposed to 1.75 ppm O3 or air for 3 h, and lung inflammation was assessed by bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) 6 and 24 h after exposure. Relative to O3-exposed W/Wv and SI/SId mice, the mean numbers of lavageable polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) and total BAL protein concentration (a marker of permeability) were significantly greater in the respective O3-exposed normal congenic +/+ mice (p < 0.05). Mast cells were reconstituted in W/Wv mice by transplantation of bone marrow cells from congenic +/+ mice, and O3-induced lung inflammation was assessed in the mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice. After O3 exposure, the changes in lavageable PMNs and total protein of mast-cell-replete W/Wv mice were not different from age-matched normal +/+ control mice, and they were significantly greater than those of sham-transplanted W/Wv mice (p < 0.05). Genetically susceptible C57BL/6J mice were pretreated with a mast-cell stabilizer (nedocromil sodium), secretagogue (compound 48/80), or vehicle, and the mice were exposed to O3.

  2. Gefitinib in Treating Patients With Stage IB, II, or IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer That Was Completely Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-12-19

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  3. Docetaxel, Cisplatin, Pegfilgrastim, and Erlotinib Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage IIIB or Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-17

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Bronchoalveolar Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  4. Metabolic Changes Precede the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in the Monocrotaline Exposed Rat Lung

    PubMed Central

    Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary L.; Kinchen, Jason M.; Mohney, Robert P.; Maltepe, Emin; Desai, Ankit A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.; Garcia, Joe G. N.; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for metabolic profiling to evaluate the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, a detailed analysis of the metabolic changes in lungs at the early stage of PH, characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure but prior to the development of right ventricle hypertrophy and failure, is lacking in a preclinical animal model of PH. Thus, we undertook a study using rats 14 days after exposure to monocrotaline (MCT), to determine whether we could identify early stage metabolic changes prior to the manifestation of developed PH. We observed changes in multiple pathways associated with the development of PH, including activated glycolysis, increased markers of proliferation, disruptions in carnitine homeostasis, increased inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers, and a reduction in glutathione biosynthesis. Further, our global metabolic profile data compare favorably with prior work carried out in humans with PH. We conclude that despite the MCT-model not recapitulating all the structural changes associated with humans with advanced PH, including endothelial cell proliferation and the formation of plexiform lesions, it is very similar at a metabolic level. Thus, we suggest that despite its limitations it can still serve as a useful preclinical model for the study of PH. PMID:26937637

  5. Metabolic Changes Precede the Development of Pulmonary Hypertension in the Monocrotaline Exposed Rat Lung.

    PubMed

    Rafikova, Olga; Meadows, Mary L; Kinchen, Jason M; Mohney, Robert P; Maltepe, Emin; Desai, Ankit A; Yuan, Jason X-J; Garcia, Joe G N; Fineman, Jeffrey R; Rafikov, Ruslan; Black, Stephen M

    2016-01-01

    There is increasing interest in the potential for metabolic profiling to evaluate the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH). However, a detailed analysis of the metabolic changes in lungs at the early stage of PH, characterized by increased pulmonary artery pressure but prior to the development of right ventricle hypertrophy and failure, is lacking in a preclinical animal model of PH. Thus, we undertook a study using rats 14 days after exposure to monocrotaline (MCT), to determine whether we could identify early stage metabolic changes prior to the manifestation of developed PH. We observed changes in multiple pathways associated with the development of PH, including activated glycolysis, increased markers of proliferation, disruptions in carnitine homeostasis, increased inflammatory and fibrosis biomarkers, and a reduction in glutathione biosynthesis. Further, our global metabolic profile data compare favorably with prior work carried out in humans with PH. We conclude that despite the MCT-model not recapitulating all the structural changes associated with humans with advanced PH, including endothelial cell proliferation and the formation of plexiform lesions, it is very similar at a metabolic level. Thus, we suggest that despite its limitations it can still serve as a useful preclinical model for the study of PH.

  6. Delivering nanoparticles to lungs while avoiding liver and spleen through adsorption on red blood cells.

    PubMed

    Anselmo, Aaron C; Gupta, Vivek; Zern, Blaine J; Pan, Daniel; Zakrewsky, Michael; Muzykantov, Vladimir; Mitragotri, Samir

    2013-12-23

    Nanoparticulate drug delivery systems are one of the most widely investigated approaches for developing novel therapies for a variety of diseases. However, rapid clearance and poor targeting limit their clinical utility. Here, we describe an approach to harness the flexibility, circulation, and vascular mobility of red blood cells (RBCs) to simultaneously overcome these limitations (cellular hitchhiking). A noncovalent attachment of nanoparticles to RBCs simultaneously increases their level in blood over a 24 h period and allows transient accumulation in the lungs, while reducing their uptake by liver and spleen. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles exhibited ∼3-fold increase in blood persistence and ∼7-fold higher accumulation in lungs. RBC-adsorbed nanoparticles improved lung/liver and lung/spleen nanoparticle accumulation by over 15-fold and 10-fold, respectively. Accumulation in lungs is attributed to mechanical transfer of particles from the RBC surface to lung endothelium. Independent tracing of both nanoparticles and RBCs in vivo confirmed that RBCs themselves do not accumulate in lungs. Attachment of anti-ICAM-1 antibody to the exposed surface of NPs that were attached to RBCs led to further increase in lung targeting and retention over 24 h. Cellular hitchhiking onto RBCs provides a new platform for improving the blood pharmacokinetics and vascular delivery of nanoparticles while simultaneously avoiding uptake by liver and spleen, thus opening the door for new applications.

  7. Gold nanoparticles trigger apoptosis and necrosis in lung cancer cells with low intracellular glutathione

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Gu, Xiaohu; Zhang, Ke; Ding, Yi; Wei, Xinbing; Zhang, Xiumei; Zhao, Yunxue

    2013-08-01

    Previously 13 nm gold nanoparticles (GNPs) have been shown to display cytotoxicity to lung cancer cells when l-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) was used to decrease the expression of intracellular glutathione (GSH). In this study, we investigated how the GNPs induced cell death at the molecular level. Dual staining with fluorescent annexin V, and propidium iodide was used to discriminate apoptotic and necrotic cell death. We found that GNPs induced apoptosis and necrosis in lung cancer cells with low level of intracellular GSH. The disruption of F-actin and phosphorylation of H2AX induced by GNPs were both associated with apoptosis. The ER stress was caused, mitochondrial membrane potential was disrupted, intracellular calcium was elevated and intracellular caspase-3 was activated by GNPs in lung cancer cells with low intracellular GSH, while cell death could not be prevented by the pan-caspase inhibitor N-benzyloxycarbonyl-Val-Ala-Asp-fluoromethylketone. The cells were further examined for caspase-independent death. After GNPs and BSO exposure, apoptosis inducing factor, endonuclease G, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase translocated into the nuclei of apoptotic cells. Receptor-interacting protein 1 kinase inhibitor necrostatin-1 significantly decreased the PI positive cells that were induced by GNPs and BSO. Taken together, our results suggest that multiple modes of cell death are concurrently induced in GNPs-exposed lung cancer cells with low intracellular GSH, including apoptosis and necrosis. These results have important implications for GNPs in anticancer applications.

  8. ABLATION OF LUNG EPITHELIAL CELLS DEREGULATES FGF-10 EXPRESSION AND IMPAIRS LUNG BRANCHING MORPHOGENESIS

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Namjin; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Pauling, Michelle Haynes; Lorizio, Walter; Vu, Thiennu H.

    2010-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are essential for tissue patterning during organogenesis. Distal lung epithelium and its adjacent mesenchyme comprise the epithelial-mesenchymal signaling unit that regulates lung branching morphogenesis. Tissue recombination experiments have demonstrated the importance of mesenchymal signals in inducing lung epithelial differentiation and branching, but the role of the epithelium in regulating mesenchymal signals has not been well characterized. Using transgenic mice, we ablated distal lung epithelial cells during lung development by inducing the expression of a constitutively active proapoptotic Bax protein under the surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter. We found that epithelial cell ablation results in impaired lung branching morphogenesis, which progresses to emphysematous airspaces in the adults. Mesenchymal expression of fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf-10), whose strict spatial and temporal expression is critical for proper lung branching morphogenesis, is disrupted and loses its localized pattern. Interestingly, the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh), an epithelial gene known to modulate Fgf-10 expression, is unchanged, indicating the existence of other distal epithelial signals that regulate mesenchymal Fgf-10 expression. We propose that distal SP-C expressing lung epithelial cells provide essential signals for the downregulation of Fgf-10 expression in the distal mesenchyme during lung development. PMID:19115389

  9. Ablation of lung epithelial cells deregulates FGF-10 expression and impairs lung branching morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Namjin; Yamamoto, Hiroaki; Pauling, Michelle Haynes; Lorizio, Walter; Vu, Thiennu H

    2009-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are essential for tissue patterning during organogenesis. Distal lung epithelium and its adjacent mesenchyme comprise the epithelial-mesenchymal signaling unit that regulates lung branching morphogenesis. Tissue recombination experiments have demonstrated the importance of mesenchymal signals in inducing lung epithelial differentiation and branching, but the role of the epithelium in regulating mesenchymal signals has not been well characterized. Using transgenic mice, we ablated distal lung epithelial cells during lung development by inducing the expression of a constitutively active proapoptotic Bax protein under the surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter. We found that epithelial cell ablation results in impaired lung branching morphogenesis, which progresses to emphysematous airspaces in the adults. Mesenchymal expression of fibroblast growth factor 10 (Fgf-10), whose strict spatial and temporal expression is critical for proper lung branching morphogenesis, is disrupted and loses its localized pattern. Interestingly, the expression of sonic hedgehog (Shh), an epithelial gene known to modulate Fgf-10 expression, is unchanged, indicating the existence of other distal epithelial signals that regulate mesenchymal Fgf-10expression. We propose that distal SP-C expressing lung epithelial cells provide essential signals for the downregulation of Fgf-10 expression in the distal mesenchyme during lung development. 292:123-130, 2009. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Harnessing the potential of lung stem cells for regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    McQualter, Jonathan L; Anthony, Desiree; Bozinovski, Steven; Prêle, Cecilia M; Laurent, Geoffrey J

    2014-11-01

    In response to recurrent exposure to environmental insults such as allergens, pollution, irritants, smoke and viral/bacterial infection, the epithelium of the lung is continually damaged. Homeostasis of the lung requires a balance between immune regulation and promotion of tissue regeneration, which requires the co-ordinated proliferation and differentiation of stem and progenitor cells. In this review we reflect on the current understanding of lung epithelial stem and progenitor cells and advocate a model hierarchy in which self-renewing multipotent lung epithelial stem cells give rise to lineage restricted progenitor cells that repopulate airway and alveolar epithelial cell lineages during homeostasis and repair. We also discuss the role of mesenchymal progenitor cells in maintaining the structural integrity of the lung and propose a model in which mesenchymal cells act as the quintessential architects of lung regeneration by providing molecular signals, such as FGF-10, to regulate the fate and specificity of epithelial stem and progenitor cells. Moreover, we discuss the current status and future prospects for translating lung stem cell therapies to the clinic to replace, repair, or regenerate diseased lung tissue. This article is part of a directed issue entitled: Regenerative Medicine: the challenge of translation.

  11. Lung endothelial cells strengthen, but brain endothelial cells weaken barrier properties of a human alveolar epithelium cell culture model.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Winfried; Samwer, Fabian; Kunzmann, Steffen; Muellenbach, Ralf M; Wirth, Michael; Speer, Christian P; Roewer, Norbert; Förster, Carola Y

    2012-11-01

    The blood-air barrier in the lung consists of the alveolar epithelium, the underlying capillary endothelium, their basement membranes and the interstitial space between the cell layers. Little is known about the interactions between the alveolar and the blood compartment. The aim of the present study was to gain first insights into the possible interplay between these two neighbored cell layers. We established an in vitro Transwell model of the alveolar epithelium based on human cell line H441 and investigated the influence of conditioned medium obtained from human lung endothelial cell line HPMEC-ST1.6R on the barrier properties of the H441 layers. As control for tissue specificity H441 layers were exposed to conditioned medium from human brain endothelial cell line hCMEC/D3. Addition of dexamethasone was necessary to obtain stable H441 cell layers. Moreover, dexamethasone increased expression of cell type I markers (caveolin-1, RAGE) and cell type II marker SP-B, whereas decreased the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) in a concentration dependent manner. Soluble factors obtained from the lung endothelial cell line increased the barrier significantly proven by TEER values and fluorescein permeability on the functional level and by the differential expression of tight junctional proteins on the molecular level. In contrast to this, soluble factors derived from brain endothelial cells weakened the barrier significantly. In conclusion, soluble factors from lung endothelial cells can strengthen the alveolar epithelium barrier in vitro, which suggests communication between endothelial and epithelial cells regulating the integrity of the blood-air barrier.

  12. [Advances of molecular targeted therapy in squamous cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Ma, Li; Zhang, Shucai

    2013-12-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is one of the most prevalent subtypes of lung cancer worldwide, about 400,000 persons die from squamous-cell lung cancer around the world, and its pathogenesis is closely linked with tobacco exposure. Unfortunately, squamous-cell lung cancer patients do not benefit from major advances in the development of targeted therapeutics such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) inhibitors or anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) inhibitors that show exquisite activity in lung adenocarcinomas with EGFR mutations or echinoderm microtubule associated protein like-4 (EML4)-ALK fusions, respectively. Major efforts have been launched to characterize the genomes of squamous-cell lung cancers. Among the new results emanating from these efforts are amplifications of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene, the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) gene mutation as potential novel targets for the treatment of SQCLCs. Researchers find that there are many specific molecular targeted genes in the genome of squamous-cell lung cancer patients. These changes play a vital role in cell cycle regulation, oxidative stress, cell apoptosis, squamous epithelium differentiation, may be the candidate targeted moleculars in SQCLCs. Here, we provide a review on these discoveries and their implications for clinical trials in squamous-cell lung cancer assessing the value of novel therapeutics addressing these targets.

  13. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Stuart C; Metcalf, Robert L; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P E; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J C; Seftor, Richard E B; Seftor, Elisabeth A; Rothwell, Dominic G; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L; Blackhall, Fiona H; Dive, Caroline

    2016-11-09

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form 'endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (P<0.025). VM vessels are also observed in 9/10 CTC patient-derived explants (CDX), where molecular analysis of fractionated VE-cadherin-positive cells uncovered copy-number alterations and mutated TP53, confirming human tumour origin. VE-cadherin is required for VM in NCI-H446 SCLC xenografts, where VM decreases tumour latency and, despite increased cisplatin intra-tumour delivery, decreases cisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Vasculogenic mimicry in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Stuart C.; Metcalf, Robert L.; Trapani, Francesca; Mohan, Sumitra; Antonello, Jenny; Abbott, Benjamin; Leong, Hui Sun; Chester, Christopher P. E.; Simms, Nicole; Polanski, Radoslaw; Nonaka, Daisuke; Priest, Lynsey; Fusi, Alberto; Carlsson, Fredrika; Carlsson, Anders; Hendrix, Mary J. C.; Seftor, Richard E. B.; Seftor, Elisabeth A.; Rothwell, Dominic G.; Hughes, Andrew; Hicks, James; Miller, Crispin; Kuhn, Peter; Brady, Ged; Simpson, Kathryn L.; Blackhall, Fiona H.; Dive, Caroline

    2016-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is characterized by prevalent circulating tumour cells (CTCs), early metastasis and poor prognosis. We show that SCLC patients (37/38) have rare CTC subpopulations co-expressing vascular endothelial-cadherin (VE-cadherin) and cytokeratins consistent with vasculogenic mimicry (VM), a process whereby tumour cells form ‘endothelial-like' vessels. Single-cell genomic analysis reveals characteristic SCLC genomic changes in both VE-cadherin-positive and -negative CTCs. Higher levels of VM are associated with worse overall survival in 41 limited-stage patients' biopsies (P<0.025). VM vessels are also observed in 9/10 CTC patient-derived explants (CDX), where molecular analysis of fractionated VE-cadherin-positive cells uncovered copy-number alterations and mutated TP53, confirming human tumour origin. VE-cadherin is required for VM in NCI-H446 SCLC xenografts, where VM decreases tumour latency and, despite increased cisplatin intra-tumour delivery, decreases cisplatin efficacy. The functional significance of VM in SCLC suggests VM regulation may provide new targets for therapeutic intervention. PMID:27827359

  15. S0819: Carboplatin and Paclitaxel With or Without Bevacizumab and/or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-16

    Recurrent Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Lung Adenocarcinoma; Recurrent Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  16. Comparative genomic hybridization study of arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed urinary transitional cell carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, L.-I; Chiu, Allen W.; Pu, Y.-S.; Wang, Y.-H.; Huan, Steven K.; Hsiao, C.-H.; Hsieh, F.-I; Chen, C.-J.

    2008-03-01

    To compare the differences in DNA aberrations between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed transitional cell carcinoma (TCC), we analyzed 19 arsenic-exposed and 29 non-arsenic-exposed urinary TCCs from Chi-Mei Hospital using comparative genomic hybridization. DNA aberrations were detected in 42 TCCs including 19 arsenic-exposed and 23 non-arsenic-exposed TCCs. Arsenic-exposed TCCs had more changes than unexposed TCCs (mean {+-} SD, 6.6 {+-} 2.9 vs. 2.9 {+-} 2.2). Arsenic exposure was significantly associated with the number of DNA aberrations after adjustment for tumor stage, tumor grade and cigarette smoking in multiple regression analysis. The most frequent DNA gains, which were strikingly different between arsenic-exposed and non-arsenic-exposed TCCs, included those at 1p, 4p, 4q and 8q. A much higher frequency of DNA losses in arsenic-exposed TCCs compared with non-arsenic-exposed TCCs was observed in 10q, 11p and 17p. Chromosomal loss in 17p13 was associated not only with arsenic exposure, but also with tumor stage and grade. The p53 immunohistochemistry staining showed that chromosome 17p13 loss was associated with either p53 no expression (25%) or p53 overexpression (75%). The findings suggest that long-term arsenic exposure may increase the chromosome abnormality in TCC, and 17p loss plays an important role in arsenic-induced urinary carcinogenesis.

  17. Metabolite signatures in hydrophilic extracts of mouse lungs exposed to cigarette smoke revealed by 1H NMR metabolomics investigation

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Xuan; Feng, Ju; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M.; Waters, Katrina M.; Tilton, Susan C.; Pounds, Joel G.; Corley, Richard A.; Liu, Maili; Hu, Mary Y.

    2015-05-12

    Herein, 1H-NMR metabolomics are carried out to evaluate the changes of metabolites in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. It is found that the concentrations of adenosine derivatives (i.e. ATP, ADP and AMP), inosine and uridine are significantly fluctuated in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke compared with those of controls regardless the mouse is obese or regular weight. The decreased ATP, ADP, AMP and elevated inosine predict that the deaminases in charge of adenosine derivatives to inosine derivatives conversion are altered in lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke. Transcriptional analysis reveals that the concentrations of adenosine monophosphate deaminase and adenosine deaminase are different in the lungs of mice exposed to cigarette smoke, confirming the prediction from metabolomics studies. We also found, for the first time, that the ratio of glycerophosphocholine (GPC) to phosphocholine (PC) is significantly increased in the lungs of obese mice compared with regular weight mice. The ratio of GPC/PC is further elevated in the lungs of obese group by cigarette smoke exposure. Since GPC/PC ratio is a known biomarker for cancer, these results may suggest that obese group is more susceptible to lung cancer when exposed to cigarette smoke.

  18. 4-Methoxyestradiol-induced oxidative injuries in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng Yahsin; Chang, Louis W.; Cheng Lichuan; Tsai, M.-H.; Lin Pinpin . E-mail: pplin@nhri.org.tw

    2007-05-01

    Epidemiological studies indicated that people exposed to dioxins were prone to the development of lung diseases including lung cancer. Animal studies demonstrated that 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) increased liver tumors and promoted lung metaplasia in females. Metabolic changes in 17{beta}-estradiol (E{sub 2}) resulted from an interaction between TCDD and E{sub 2} could be associated with gender difference. Previously, we reported that methoxylestradiols (MeOE{sub 2}), especially 4-MeOE{sub 2}, accumulated in human lung cells (BEAS-2B) co-treated with TCDD and E{sub 2}. In the present study, we demonstrate unique accumulation of 4-MeOE{sub 2}, as a result of TCDD/E{sub 2} interaction and revealed its bioactivity in human lung epithelial cell line (H1355). 4-Methoxyestradiol treatment significantly decreased cell growth and increased mitotic index. Elevation of ROS and SOD activity, with a concomitant decrease in the intracellular GSH/GSSG ratio, was also detected in 4-MeOE{sub 2}-treated cells. Quantitative comet assay showed increased oxidative DNA damage in the 4-MeOE{sub 2}-treated H1355 cells, which could be significantly reduced by the anti-oxidant N-acetylcysteine (NAC). However, inhibition of cell growth and increase in mitotic arrest induced by 4-MeOE{sub 2} were unaffected by NAC. We concluded that 4-MeOE{sub 2} accumulation resulting from TCDD and E{sub 2} interaction would contribute to the higher vulnerability on lung pathogenesis in females when exposed to TCDD.

  19. Reduced Fhit protein expression and loss of heterozygosity at FHIT gene in tumours from smoking and asbestos-exposed lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Pylkkanen, Lea; Wolff, Henrik; Stjernvall, Tuula; Tuominen, Paivi; Sioris, Thanos; Karjalainen, Antti; Anttila, Sisko; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti

    2002-02-01

    The FHIT gene, at 3p14.2, has been suggested to form a molecular target to damage induced by human lung carcinogens. We examined aberrant expression of the Fhit protein and allele loss at the FHIT gene in a series of lung cancer cases, mainly of non-small cell carcinoma (NSCLC) histology. We had detailed data on tobacco smoke exposure and occupational asbestos exposure available for the cases. The principal aim of the present study was to investigate whether absent or reduced Fhit expression or FHIT allele loss was associated with exposure to these pulmonary carcinogens. We detected reduced Fhit expression in 62% (33/53) of the cases analysed. Prevalence of allele loss at the FHIT locus was 22% (20/89). Reduced protein expression was common both in the asbestos-exposed (67%) and non-exposed cases (59%); [odds ratio (OR) 1.4, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.4-4.9]. LOH frequencies differed somewhat between the two groups and were 25% vs. 16%, respectively (OR 1.8; 95% CI 0.5-5.9). Absent or reduced expression was common in smokers, with no significant difference found between current smokers and non-smokers (mainly former smokers) (OR 1.4, 95% CI 0.5-4.5). NSCLCs with squamous cell histology exhibited both aberrant expression (OR 3.1, 95% CI 0.9-10.3) and allele loss (OR 3.3, 95% CI 0.9-12.7) more frequently than adenocarcinoma. Finally, we found that FHIT allele loss was increased in stage II or more advanced disease (OR 2.5, 95% CI 0.9-7.4), and in poorly differentiated tumours (grade 3, OR 2.6, 95% CI 0.8-8.1). In conclusion, our present data support significance of FHIT inactivation in development of lung cancer.

  20. Obstructive Jaundice from Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Lung.

    PubMed

    Seth, Abhishek; Palmer, Thomas R; Campbell, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Obstructive jaundice from metastatic lung cancer is extremely rare. Most reported cases have had small cell cancer of lung or adenocarcinoma of lung as primary malignancy metastasizing to the biliary system. We report the case of a patient presenting with symptoms of obstructive jaundice found to have metastatic involvement of hepatobiliary system from squamous cell cancer (SCC) of lung. ERCP (endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography) with biliary stenting is the procedure of choice in such patients. Our case is made unique by the fact that technical difficulties made it difficult for the anesthesiologists to intubate the patient for an ERCP. As a result percutaneous transhepatic cholangiogram (PTC) with internal-external biliary drainage was performed.

  1. Diverse profiles of ricin-cell interactions in the lung following intranasal exposure to ricin.

    PubMed

    Sapoznikov, Anita; Falach, Reut; Mazor, Ohad; Alcalay, Ron; Gal, Yoav; Seliger, Nehama; Sabo, Tamar; Kronman, Chanoch

    2015-11-17

    Ricin, a plant-derived exotoxin, inhibits protein synthesis by ribosomal inactivation. Due to its wide availability and ease of preparation, ricin is considered a biothreat, foremost by respiratory exposure. We examined the in vivo interactions between ricin and cells of the lungs in mice intranasally exposed to the toxin and revealed multi-phasic cell-type-dependent binding profiles. While macrophages (MΦs) and dendritic cells (DCs) displayed biphasic binding to ricin, monophasic binding patterns were observed for other cell types; epithelial cells displayed early binding, while B cells and endothelial cells bound toxin late after intoxication. Neutrophils, which were massively recruited to the intoxicated lung, were refractive to toxin binding. Although epithelial cells bound ricin as early as MΦs and DCs, their rates of elimination differed considerably; a reduction in epithelial cell counts occurred late after intoxication and was restricted to alveolar type II cells only. The differential binding and cell-elimination patterns observed may stem from dissimilar accessibility of the toxin to different cells in the lung and may also reflect unequal interactions of the toxin with different cell-surface receptors. The multifaceted interactions observed in this study between ricin and the various cells of the target organ should be considered in the future development of efficient post-exposure countermeasures against ricin intoxication.

  2. The common anesthetic, sevoflurane, induces apoptosis in A549 lung alveolar epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Gui-Hua; Zhang, Juan; Liao, Da-Qing; Li, Zhuo; Yang, Jing; Luo, Nan-Fu; Gu, Yan

    2014-01-01

    Lung alveolar epithelial cells are the first barrier exposed to volatile anesthetics, such as sevoflurane, prior to reaching the targeted neuronal cells. Previously, the effects of volatile anesthetics on lung surfactant were studied primarily with physicochemical models and there has been little experimental data from cell cultures. Therefore it was investigated whether sevoflurane induces apoptosis of A549 lung epithelial cells. A549 cells were exposed to sevoflurane via a calibrated vaporizer with a 2 l/min flow in a gas‑tight chamber at 37˚C. The concentration of sevoflurane in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium was detected with gas chromatography. Untreated cells and cells treated with 2 µM daunorubicin hydrochloride (DRB) were used as negative and positive controls, respectively. Apoptosis factors, including the level of ATP, apoptotic‑bodies by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase‑mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay, DNA damage and the level of caspase 3/7 were analyzed. Cells treated with sevoflurane showed a significant reduction in ATP compared with untreated cells. Effects in the DRB group were greater than in the sevoflurane group. The difference of TUNEL staining between the sevoflurane and untreated groups was statistically significant. DNA degradation was observed in the sevoflurane and DRB groups, however this was not observed in the untreated group. The sevoflurane and DRB groups induced increased caspase 3/7 activation compared with untreated cells. These results suggest that sevoflurane induces apoptosis in A549 cells. In conclusion, 5% sevoflurane induced apoptosis of A549 lung alveolar epithelial cells, which resulted in decreased cell viability, increased apoptotic bodies, impaired DNA integrality and increased levels of caspase 3/7.

  3. Lymphocyte infiltration and increased macrophage phagocytosis in the lungs of HNO sub 3 -exposed humans

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, S.; Roger, L.J.; Devlin, R.B.; Koren, H.S. )

    1991-03-11

    Nitric acid is a common air pollutant possibly associated with airway inflammation. Therefore the authors have exposed healthy, non-smoking volunteers, 18-35 yr of age, once to HNO{sub 3} and once to filtered air for 2 hr with 100 min of moderate exercise. Eighteen hr after exposure bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and the cells and fluid were analyzed for indicators of inflammation. Compared to air, the number of lymphocytes in lavage fluid was increased after HNO{sub 3}; macrophage and PMN counts were unchanged. In a phagocytosis assay, the number of macrophages ingesting unopsinized C. albicans increased from 12% (air to 33%) (HNO{sub 3}); the number ingesting opsonized yeast increased from 58% to 78%. Lavage fluid protein concentration was increased. These preliminary data suggest that HNO{sub 3} exposure results in permeability changes accompanied by lymphocyte infiltration and stimulation of macrophage phagocytosis in the lower airways. The lack of LDH and PMN increases in the lavage, under the conditions tested, suggests that this pollutant does not cause tissue damage in the airways as previously reported with O{sub 3}.

  4. CDDO-Me protects normal lung and breast epithelial cells but not cancer cells from radiation.

    PubMed

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E; Shay, Jerry W

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients.

  5. CDDO-Me Protects Normal Lung and Breast Epithelial Cells but Not Cancer Cells from Radiation

    PubMed Central

    El-Ashmawy, Mariam; Delgado, Oliver; Cardentey, Agnelio; Wright, Woodring E.; Shay, Jerry W.

    2014-01-01

    Although radiation therapy is commonly used for treatment for many human diseases including cancer, ionizing radiation produces reactive oxygen species that can damage both cancer and healthy cells. Synthetic triterpenoids, including CDDO-Me, act as anti-inflammatory and antioxidant modulators primarily by inducing the transcription factor Nrf2 to activate downstream genes containing antioxidant response elements (AREs). In the present series of experiments, we determined if CDDO-Me can be used as a radioprotector in normal non-cancerous human lung and breast epithelial cells, in comparison to lung and breast cancer cell lines. A panel of normal non-cancerous, partially cancer progressed, and cancer cell lines from both lung and breast tissue was exposed to gamma radiation with and without pre-treatment with CDDO-Me. CDDO-Me was an effective radioprotector when given ∼18 hours before radiation in epithelial cells (average dose modifying factor (DMF) = 1.3), and Nrf2 function was necessary for CDDO-Me to exert these radioprotective effects. CDDO-Me did not protect cancer lines tested from radiation-induced cytotoxicity, nor did it protect experimentally transformed human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) with progressive oncogenic manipulations. CDDO-Me also protected human lymphocytes against radiation-induced DNA damage. A therapeutic window exists in which CDDO-Me protects normal cells from radiation by activating the Nrf2 pathway, but does not protect experimentally transformed or cancer cell lines. This suggests that use of this oral available, non-toxic class of drug can protect non-cancerous healthy cells during radiotherapy, resulting in better outcomes and less toxicity for patients. PMID:25536195

  6. Intracellular signals of lung cancer cells as possible therapeutic targets

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Kiyomichi; Kumano, Keiki; Ueno, Hiroo

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, several molecularly targeted therapies have been developed as part of lung cancer treatment; they have produced dramatically good results. However, among the many oncogenes that have been identified to be involved in the development of lung cancers, a number of oncogenes are not covered by these advanced therapies. For the treatment of lung cancers, which is a group of heterogeneous diseases, persistent effort in developing individual therapies based on the respective causal genes is important. In addition, for the development of a novel therapy, identification of the lung epithelial stem cells and the origin cells of lung cancer, and understanding about candidate cancer stem cells in lung cancer tissues, their intracellular signaling pathways, and the mechanism of dysregulation of the pathways in cancer cells are extremely important. However, the development of drug resistance by cancer cells, despite the use of molecularly targeted drugs for the causal genes, thus obstructing treatment, is a well-known phenomenon. In this article, we discuss major causal genes of lung cancers and intracellular signaling pathways involving those genes, and review studies on origin and stem cells of lung cancers, as well as the possibility of developing molecularly targeted therapies based on these studies. PMID:25707772

  7. Deguelin Induces the Apoptosis of Lung Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells through Regulating the Expression of Galectin-1

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Bing; Zhao, Dejian; Yao, Yinan; Bao, Zhang; Lu, Guohua; Zhou, Jianying

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality around the world. Despite advances in the targeted therapy, patients with lung squamous cell carcinoma(SCC) still benefit few from it, and the search for potential effective therapies is imperative. Here, we demonstrated that deguelin induced significant apoptosis of lung SCC cells in vitro. Importantly, we found deguelin down-regulated the expression of galectin-1, which was involved in a wide range of tumorous physiologic process. Thus, we both over-expressed and down-regulated galectin-1 to perform its role in deguelin-induced apoptosis. We found that increased galectin-1 attenuated apoptosis of SCC cells exposed to deguelin, while galectin-1 knockdown sensitized lung cancer cells to deguelin treatment. Additionally, we observed that down-regulation of galectin-1 resulted in suppression of Ras/Raf/ERK pathway which was involved in deguelin-induced cell apoptosis. We also found that deguelin had a significant anti-tumor ability with decline of galectin-1 in vivo. In conclusion, these findings confirm that deguelin may act as a new chemo-preventive agent through inducing apoptosis of lung SCC cells in a galectin-1 dependent manner. PMID:27313498

  8. A Histological Assessment of Lung Injury in Rats Exposed to Inhaled Sulfur Mustard across Dose and Time

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    inflammatory exudate, alveolar (luminal) edema and flooding, and alveolar interstitial edema and inflammation were seen. From third week to 6 months post...histiocytosis with a mixed inflammatory exudate, alveolar (luminal) edema and flooding, and alveolar interstitial edema and inflammation were seen. Acute...lumen. In the lung, perivascular (and peribronchiolar) edema with minimal neutrophilic inflammation was observed. Varying in severity and cell type

  9. DNA adduct formation in precision-cut rat liver and lung slices exposed to benzo[a]pyrene.

    PubMed

    Harrigan, Jeanine A; Vezina, Chad M; McGarrigle, Barbara P; Ersing, Noreen; Box, Harold C; Maccubbin, Alexander E; Olson, James R

    2004-02-01

    Chemical-DNA adducts provide an integrated measure of exposure, absorption, bioactivation, detoxification, and DNA repair following exposure to a genotoxic agent. Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a prototypical polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH), can be bioactivated by cytochrome P-450s (CYPs) and epoxide hydrolase to genotoxic metabolites which form covalent adducts with DNA. In this study, we utilized precision-cut rat liver and lung slices exposed to BaP to investigate tissue-specific differences in chemical absorption and formation of DNA adducts. To investigate the contribution of bioactivating CYPs (such as CYP1A1 and CYP1B1) on the formation of BaP-DNA adducts, animals were also pretreated in vivo with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD, dioxin) prior to in vitro incubation of tissue slices with BaP. Furthermore, the tissue distribution of BaP and BaP-DNA adduct levels from in vivo studies were compared with those from the in vitro tissue slice experiments. The results indicate a time- and concentration-dependent increase in tissue-associated BaP following exposure of rat liver and lung tissue slices to BaP in vitro, with generally higher levels of BaP retained in lung tissue. Furthermore, rat liver and lung slices metabolized BaP to reactive intermediates that formed covalent adducts with DNA. Total BaP-DNA adducts increased with concentration and incubation time. Adduct levels (fmol adduct/microg DNA) in lung slices were greater than liver at all doses. Liver slices contained one major and two minor adducts, while lung slices contained two major and 3 minor adducts. The tissue-specific qualitative profile of these adducts in tissue slices was similar to that observed from in vivo studies, further validating the use of this model. Pretreatment of animals with TCDD prior to in vitro incubation with BaP potentiated the levels of DNA adduct formation. TCDD pretreatment altered the adduct distribution in lung but not in liver slices. Together, the results

  10. Lung regeneration: mechanisms, applications and emerging stem cell populations

    PubMed Central

    Kotton, Darrell N; Morrisey, Edward E

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that the respiratory system has an extensive ability to respond to injury and regenerate lost or damaged cells. The unperturbed adult lung is remarkably quiescent, but after insult or injury progenitor populations can be activated or remaining cells can re-enter the cell cycle. Techniques including cell-lineage tracing and transcriptome analysis have provided novel and exciting insights into how the lungs and trachea regenerate in response to injury and have allowed the identification of pathways important in lung development and regeneration. These studies are now informing approaches for modulating the pathways that may promote endogenous regeneration as well as the generation of exogenous lung cell lineages from pluripotent stem cells. The emerging advances, highlighted in this Review, are providing new techniques and assays for basic mechanistic studies as well as generating new model systems for human disease and strategies for cell replacement. PMID:25100528

  11. The efficiency of photovoltaic cells exposed to pulsed laser light

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowe, R. A.; Landis, G. A.; Jenkins, P.

    1993-01-01

    Future space missions may use laser power beaming systems with a free electron laser (FEL) to transmit light to a photovoltaic array receiver. To investigate the efficiency of solar cells with pulsed laser light, several types of GaAs, Si, CuInSe2, and GaSb cells were tested with the simulated pulse format of the induction and radio frequency (RF) FEL. The induction pulse format was simulated with an 800-watt average power copper vapor laser and the RF format with a frequency-doubled mode-locked Nd:YAG laser. Averaged current vs bias voltage measurements for each cell were taken at various optical power levels and the efficiency measured at the maximum power point. Experimental results show that the conversion efficiency for the cells tested is highly dependent on cell minority carrier lifetime, the width and frequency of the pulses, load impedance, and the average incident power. Three main effects were found to decrease the efficiency of solar cells exposed to simulated FEL illumination: cell series resistance, LC 'ringing', and output inductance. Improvements in efficiency were achieved by modifying the frequency response of the cell to match the spectral energy content of the laser pulse with external passive components.

  12. Chromosome aberrations in ataxia telangiectasia cells exposed to heavy ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawata, T.; Cucinotta, F.; George, K.; Wu, H.; Shigematsu, N.; Furusawa, Y.; Uno, T.; Isobe, K.; Ito, H.

    Understanding of biological effects of heavy ions is important to assess healt h risk in space. One of the most important issues may be to take into account individual susceptibility. Ataxia telangiectasia (A-T) cells are known to exhibit abnormal responses to radiations but the mechanism of hyper radiosensitivity of A-T still remains unknown. We report chromosome aberrations in normal human fibroblasts and AT fibroblasts exposed to low- and high-LET radiations. A chemical-induced premature chromosome condensation (PCC) technique combined with chromosome- painting technique was applied to score chromosome aberrations in G2/M-phase cells. Following gamma irradiation, GM02052 cells were approximately 5 times more sensitive to g-rays than AG1522 cells. GM02052 cells had a much higher frequency of deletions and misrejoining than AG1522 cells. When the frequency of complex type aberrations was compared, GM02052 cells showed more than 10 times higher frequency than AG1522 cells. The results will be compared with those obtained from high-LET irradiations.

  13. Methoxyamine, Pemetrexed Disodium, Cisplatin, and Radiation Therapy in Treating Patients With Stage IIIA-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-03-06

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Stage IIIA Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIB Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IV Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  14. Oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung of rat chronically exposed to nicotine alone or associated to ethanol.

    PubMed

    Dhouib, H; Jallouli, M; Draief, M; Bouraoui, S; El-Fazâa, S

    2015-12-01

    Smoking is the most important preventable risk factor of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and lung cancer. This study was designed to investigate oxidative damage and histopathological changes in lung tissue of rats chronically exposed to nicotine alone or supplemented with ethanol. Twenty-four male Wistar rats divided into three groups were used for the study. The nicotine group received nicotine (2.5mg/kg/day); the nicotine-ethanol group was given simultaneously same dose of nicotine plus ethanol (0.2g/kg/day), while the control group was administered only normal saline (1 ml/kg/day). The treatment was administered by subcutaneous injection once daily for a period of 18 weeks. Chronic nicotine administration alone or combined to ethanol caused a significant increase in malondialdehyde (MDA) level, superoxide dismutase (SOD) activity and catalase (CAT) activity in lung tissue compared to control rats suggesting an oxidative damage. However, these increases were mostly prominent in nicotine group. The histopathological examination of lung tissue of rats in both treated groups revealed many alterations in the pulmonary structures such as emphysema change (disappearance of the alveolar septa, increased irregularity and size of air sacs) and marked lymphocytic infiltration in perivascular and interstitial areas. However, the changes characterized in the nicotine group (pulmonary congestion, hemorrhage into alveoli and interstitial areas, edema) were more drastic than those observed in the nicotine-ethanol group, and they can be attributed to a significant degree of capillary endothelial permeability and microvascular leak. Conversely, the ethanol supplementation caused an appearance of fatty change and fibrosis in pulmonary tissue essentially due to a metabolism of ethanol. Finally, the lung damage illustrated in nicotine group was more severe than that observed in the nicotine-ethanol group. We conclude that the combined administration of nicotine and ethanol

  15. Role of mesenchymal cell death in lung remodeling after injury.

    PubMed Central

    Polunovsky, V A; Chen, B; Henke, C; Snover, D; Wendt, C; Ingbar, D H; Bitterman, P B

    1993-01-01

    Repair after acute lung injury requires elimination of granulation tissue from the alveolar airspace. We hypothesized that during lung repair, signals capable of inducing the death of the two principal cellular elements of granulation tissue, fibroblasts and endothelial cells, would be present at the air-lung interface. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid obtained from patients during lung repair induced both fibroblast and endothelial cell death, while fluid obtained at the time of injury or from patient controls did not. The mode of cell death for endothelial cells was apoptosis. Fibroblast death, while morphologically distinct from necrosis, also differed from typical apoptosis. Only proliferating cells were susceptible to the bioactivities in lavage fluid, which were trypsin sensitive and lipid insoluble. Histological examination of lung tissue from patients after lung injury revealed evidence of apoptotic cells within airspace granulation tissue. Our results suggest that cell death induced by peptide(s) present at the air-lung interface may participate in the remodeling process that accompanies tissue repair after injury. Images PMID:8326006

  16. Novel therapies in small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Induru, Raghava; Jalal, Shadia I.

    2015-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine tumor of the lung with a tendency to metastasize widely early in the course of the disease. The VA staging system classifies the disease into limited stage (LS) which is confined to one hemithorax and can be included into one radiation field or extensive stage (ES) which extends beyond one hemithorax. Current standard of care is concurrent chemoradiation for LS disease and chemotherapy alone for ES disease. Only a quarter of patients with LS disease will be cured with current standard treatments and majority of the patients ultimately succumb to their disease. A very complex genetic landscape of SCLC accounts for its resistance to conventional therapy and a high recurrence rate, however, at the same time this complexity can form the basis for effective targeted therapy for the disease. In recent years, several different therapeutic strategies and targeted agents have been under investigation for their potential role in SCLC. Several of them including EGFR TKIs, BCR-ABL TKIs, mTOR inhibitors, and VEGF inhibitors have been unsuccessful in showing a survival advantage in this disease. Several others including DNA repair inhibitors, cellular developmental pathway inhibitors, antibody drug conjugates (ADCs), as well as immune therapy with vaccines, immunomodulators, and immune checkpoint inhibitors are being tested. So far, none of these agents are approved for use in SCLC and the majority are in phase I/II clinical trials, with immune checkpoint inhibitors being the most promising therapeutic strategy. In this article, we will discuss these novel therapeutic agents and currently available data in SCLC. PMID:26629422

  17. ANTIOXIDANT SUPPLEMENTATION AND LUNG FUNCTIONS AMONG ASTHMATIC CHILDREN EXPOSED TO HIGH LEVELS OF AIR POLLUTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract

    Air pollutant exposure has been related to adverse respiratory effects, in particular, in asthmatics. This effect could be the consequence of the oxidative stress caused by air pollutants on the lung. Antioxidant vitamins are free- radical scavengers, and could ha...

  18. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared (NIR) ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of-cavity pulse- stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two-photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two- photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond layers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  19. Cloning assay thresholds on cells exposed to ultrafast laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Fischer, Peter; Becker, Thomas P.; Oehring, Hartmut; Halbhuber, Karl-Juergen

    1999-06-01

    The influence of the peak power, laser wavelength and the pulse duration of near infrared ultrashort laser pulses on the reproduction behavior of Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells has been studied. In particular, we determined the cloning efficiency of single cell pairs after exposure to ultrashort laser pulses with an intensity in the range of GW/cm2 and TW/cm2. A total of more than 3500 non- labeled cells were exposed to a highly focused scanning beam of a multiphoton laser microscope with 60 microsecond(s) pixel dwell time per scan. The beam was provided by a tunable argon ion laser pumped mode-locked 76 MHz Titanium:Sapphire laser as well as by a compact solid-state laser based system (Vitesse) at a fixed wavelength of 800 nm. Pulse duration (tau) was varied in the range of 100 fs to 4 ps by out-of- cavity pulse-stretching units consisting of SF14 prisms and blazed gratings. Within an optical (laser power) window CHO cells could be scanned for hours without severe impact on reproduction behavior, morphology and vitality. Ultrastructural studies reveal that mitochondria are the major targets of intense destructive laser pulses. Above certain laser power P thresholds, CHO cells started to delay or failed to undergo cell division and, in part, to develop uncontrolled cell growth (giant cell formation). The damage followed a P2/(tau) relation which is typical for a two- photon excitation process. Therefore, cell damage was found to be more pronounced at shorter pulses. Due to the same P2/(tau) relation for the efficiency of fluorescence excitation, two-photon microscopy of living cells does not require extremely short femtosecond laser pulses nor pulse compression units. Picosecond as well as femtosecond lasers can be used as efficient light sources in safe two photon fluorescence microscopy. Only in three photon fluorescence microscopy, femtosecond laser pulses are advantageous over picosecond pulses.

  20. Serine Proteases Enhance Immunogenic Antigen Presentation on Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Peters, Haley L; Tripathi, Satyendra C; Kerros, Celine; Katayama, Hiroyuki; Garber, Haven R; St John, Lisa S; Federico, Lorenzo; Meraz, Ismail M; Roth, Jack A; Sepesi, Boris; Majidi, Mourad; Ruisaard, Kathryn; Clise-Dwyer, Karen; Roszik, Jason; Gibbons, Don L; Heymach, John V; Swisher, Stephen G; Bernatchez, Chantale; Alatrash, Gheath; Hanash, Samir; Molldrem, Jeffrey J

    2017-03-02

    Immunotherapies targeting immune checkpoints have proven efficacious in reducing the burden of lung cancer in patients; however, the antigenic targets of these reinvigorated T cells remain poorly defined. Lung cancer tumors contain tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and neutrophils, which release the serine proteases neutrophil elastase (NE) and proteinase 3 (P3) into the tumor microenvironment. NE and P3 shape the antitumor adaptive immune response in breast cancer and melanoma. In this report, we demonstrate that lung cancer cells cross-presented the tumor-associated antigen PR1, derived from NE and P3. Additionally, NE and P3 enhanced the expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I molecules on lung cancer cells and induced unique, endogenous peptides in the immunopeptidome, as detected with mass spectrometry sequencing. Lung cancer patient tissues with high intratumoral TAMs were enriched for MHC class I genes and T-cell markers, and patients with high TAM and cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) infiltration had improved overall survival. We confirmed the immunogenicity of unique, endogenous peptides with cytotoxicity assays against lung cancer cell lines, using CTLs from healthy donors that had been expanded against select peptides. Finally, CTLs specific for serine proteases-induced endogenous peptides were detected in lung cancer patients using peptide/HLA-A2 tetramers and were elevated in tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes. Thus, serine proteases in the tumor microenvironment of lung cancers promote the presentation of HLA class I immunogenic peptides that are expressed by lung cancer cells, thereby increasing the antigen repertoire that can be targeted in lung cancer. Cancer Immunol Res; 5(4); 1-11. ©2017 AACR.

  1. Time-dependent changes of markers associated with inflammation in the lungs of humans exposed to ambient levels of ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Koren, H.S.; Devlin, R.B.; Becker, S.; Perez, R.; McDonnell, W.F.

    1991-01-01

    Acute exposure of humans to 0.4 ppm ozone results in reversible respiratory function decrements, and cellular and biochemical changes leading to the production of substances which can mediate inflammation and acute lung injury. The purpose of the study was to determine whether inflammatory changes occur relatively rapidly (within 1h) following exposure to ozone, or if the cascade of events which are initiated by ozone and lead to inflammation, take some time to develop. The authors exposed 10 healthy volunteers twice: once to filtered air and once to 0.4 ppm ozone. Each exposure lasted for 2h at an exercise level of 60 1/min, and bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 1h following exposure. The data from the study were exposed to 03 under identical conditions except that bronchoalveolar lavage was performed 18h following exposure. The results of the present study demonstrate that 03 is capable of inducing rapid cellular and biochemical changes in the lung. These changes were detectable as early as 1h following a 2h exposure of humans to ozone. The profiles of these changes were different at 1h and 18h following ozone exposures. Bronchoalveolar lavage fluid had levels of neutrophils, IL-6, and prostaglandin E2 that were higher at 1h than at 18h post exposure.

  2. Mineral particles in the lungs of subjects resident in the Rome area and not occupationally exposed to mineral dust

    SciTech Connect

    Paoletti, L.; Batisti, D.; Caiazza, S.; Petrelli, M.G.; Taggi, F.; De Zorzi, L.; Dina, M.A.; Donelli, G.

    1987-10-01

    We studied the inorganic particulate contained in the lung parenchyma of 10 subjects (5 males and 5 females) residing in an urban area and not occupationally exposed to dusts. A total of 17 mineral types were identified, along with 16 metal elements in the form of oxides and sulfides. Approximately 70% of the minerals were made up of phyllosilicates, in particular clay, mica, and talc; three metal elements, Fe, Al, and Ti, accounted for more than 75% of the recovered oxide particles. The mean concentration of the observed inorganic particles was approximately 1.8 X 10(5) pp/mg dry tissue. No significant differences were observed in terms of total particulate concentration in the various areas of the lungs and between the right and left lung. Instead we observed a larger concentration of fibrous particles in the upper lobes. The analysis of the data made it possible to determine the presence of a high degree of correlation between the concentrations of silicates and the concentrations of metal oxides and sulfides, implying the existence of a ubiquitous environmental source of these mineral particles. The frequent observation of tremolite fibers is remarkable. This finding, confirmed elsewhere, indicates that the magnitude of the sources of these fibers in the environment, constituted by contaminated talc dusts, has been underestimated until today.

  3. Histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma in non-small cell lung carcinoma tumors

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Morales, José Manuel; Cano-García, Fernando

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is the principal cause of cancer-related death worldwide. The use of targeted therapies, especially tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), in specific groups of patients has dramatically improved the prognosis of this disease, although inevitably some patients will develop resistance to these drugs during active treatment. The most common cancer-associated acquired mutation is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) Thr790Met (T790M) mutation. During active treatment with targeted therapies, histopathological transformation to small-cell lung carcinoma (SCLC) can occur in 3–15% of patients with non-small-cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) tumors. By definition, SCLC is a high-grade tumor with specific histological and genetic characteristics. In the majority of cases, a good-quality hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) stain is enough to establish a diagnosis. Immunohistochemistry (IHC) is used to confirm the diagnosis and exclude other neoplasia such as sarcomatoid carcinomas, large-cell carcinoma, basaloid squamous-cell carcinoma, chronic inflammation, malignant melanoma, metastatic carcinoma, sarcoma, and lymphoma. A loss of the tumor-suppressor protein retinoblastoma 1 (RB1) is found in 100% of human SCLC tumors; therefore, it has an essential role in tumorigenesis and tumor development. Other genetic pathways probably involved in the histopathological transformation include neurogenic locus notch homolog (NOTCH) and achaete-scute homolog 1 (ASCL1). Histological transformation to SCLC can be suspected in NSCLC patients who clinically deteriorate during active treatment. Biopsy of any new lesion in this clinical setting is highly recommended to rule out a SCLC transformation. New studies are trying to assess this histological transformation by noninvasive measures such as measuring the concentration of serum neuron-specific enolase. PMID:27652204

  4. Isolation, cultivation and identification of human lung adenocarcinoma stem cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, DE-GENG; JIANG, AI-GUI; LU, HUI-YU; ZHANG, LI-XIN; GAO, XIAO-YAN

    2015-01-01

    Recently, an increasing number of studies have demonstrated that lung cancer is a stem cell disease. However, ideal cell surface markers for isolating stem cells in lung cancer are yet to be identified. In the present study, a cell population with a cluster of differentiation (CD)133+ phenotype was successfully isolated from a single cell suspension of lung adenocarcinoma tissue using magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and enriched in a serum-free culture. In comparison to CD133− cells, the CD133+ cells exhibited an enhanced capacity for self-renewal and differentiation, and a greater potential for in vivo tumor formation, in non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficient (NOD/SCID) mice. Tumors could be induced in NOD/SCID mice by the transplantation of 102 stem-like cells per mouse. The results of the present study demonstrated that CD133 may serve as a specific cell surface marker for lung adenocarcinoma stem cells, and that MACS combined with serum-free culture is an effective method for isolating and enriching lung cancer stem cells. PMID:25435932

  5. Synthesis of protein in intestinal cells exposed to cholera toxin

    SciTech Connect

    Peterson, J.W.; Berg, W.D. Jr.; Coppenhaver, D.H.

    1987-11-01

    The mechanism by which cyclic adenosine monophosphate (AMP), formed by intestinal epithelial cells in response to cholera toxin, ultimately results in alterations in water and electrolyte transport is poorly understood. Several studies have indicated that inhibitors of transcription or translation block much of the transport of ions and water in the intestine and edema formation in tissue elicited by cholera toxin. Data presented in this study confirmed the inhibitory effects of cycloheximide on cholera toxin-induced fluid accumulation in the rabbit intestinal loop model. Neither cycloheximide nor actinomycin D altered the amount of cyclic AMP that accumulated in intestinal cells and Chinese hamster ovary cells exposed to cholera toxin. An increase in (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporation was readily demonstrable in intestinal epithelial cells from rabbits challenged with Vibrio cholerae. Similarly, intestinal epithelial cells incubated with cholera toxin for 4 hr synthesized substantially more protein than controls as determined by relative incorporation of (/sup 35/S) methionine. Most of the new protein synthesized in response to cholera toxin was membrane associated and of high molecular weight. The possible significance of the toxin-induced protein relative to cholera pathogenesis was discussed.

  6. Lung cancer stem cells and implications for future therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jing; Li, Ze-hong; White, James; Zhang, Lin-bo

    2014-07-01

    Lung cancer is the most dreaded of all cancers because of the higher mortality rates associated with it worldwide. The various subtypes of lung cancer respond differently to a particular treatment regime, which makes the therapeutic interventions all the more complicated. The concept of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is based primarily on the clinical and experimental observations that indicate the existence of a subpopulation of cells with the capacity to self-renew and differentiate as well as show increased resistance to radiation and chemotherapy. They are considered as the factors responsible for the cases of tumor relapse. The CSCs may have significant role in the development of lung tumorigenesis based on the identification of the CSCs which respond during injury. The properties of multi-potency and self-renewal are shared in common by the lung CSCs with the normal pluripotent stem cells which can be isolated using the similar markers. This review deals with the origin and characteristics of the lung cancer stem cells. The role of different markers used to isolate lung CSCs like CD44, ALDH (aldehyde dehydrogenase), CD133 and ABCG2 (ATP binding cassette sub family G member 2) have been discussed in detail. Analysis of the developmental signaling pathways such as Wnt/β-catenin, Notch, hedgehog in the regulation and maintenance of the lung CSCs have been done. Finally, before targeting the lung CSC biomarkers for potential therapeutics, challenges faced in lung cancer stem cell research need to be taken into account. With the accepted notion that the CSCs are to blame for cancer relapse and drug resistance, targeting them can be an important aspect of lung cancer therapy in the future.

  7. Modeling Lung Carcinogenesis in Radon-Exposed Miner Cohorts: Accounting for Missing Information on Smoking.

    PubMed

    van Dillen, Teun; Dekkers, Fieke; Bijwaard, Harmen; Brüske, Irene; Wichmann, H-Erich; Kreuzer, Michaela; Grosche, Bernd

    2016-05-01

    Epidemiological miner cohort data used to estimate lung cancer risks related to occupational radon exposure often lack cohort-wide information on exposure to tobacco smoke, a potential confounder and important effect modifier. We have developed a method to project data on smoking habits from a case-control study onto an entire cohort by means of a Monte Carlo resampling technique. As a proof of principle, this method is tested on a subcohort of 35,084 former uranium miners employed at the WISMUT company (Germany), with 461 lung cancer deaths in the follow-up period 1955-1998. After applying the proposed imputation technique, a biologically-based carcinogenesis model is employed to analyze the cohort's lung cancer mortality data. A sensitivity analysis based on a set of 200 independent projections with subsequent model analyses yields narrow distributions of the free model parameters, indicating that parameter values are relatively stable and independent of individual projections. This technique thus offers a possibility to account for unknown smoking habits, enabling us to unravel risks related to radon, to smoking, and to the combination of both.

  8. Mast cells in airway diseases and interstitial lung disease.

    PubMed

    Cruse, Glenn; Bradding, Peter

    2016-05-05

    Mast cells are major effector cells of inflammation and there is strong evidence that mast cells play a significant role in asthma pathophysiology. There is also a growing body of evidence that mast cells contribute to other inflammatory and fibrotic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. This review discusses the role that mast cells play in airway diseases and highlights how mast cell microlocalisation within specific lung compartments and their cellular interactions are likely to be critical for their effector function in disease.

  9. Chronic Exposure to Particulate Chromate Induces Premature Centrosome Separation and Centriole Disengagement in Human Lung Cells

    PubMed Central

    Martino, Julieta; Holmes, Amie L.; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S.; Wise, John Pierce

    2015-01-01

    Particulate hexavalent chromium (Cr(VI)) is a well-established human lung carcinogen. Lung tumors are characterized by structural and numerical chromosome instability. Centrosome amplification is a phenotype commonly found in solid tumors, including lung tumors, which strongly correlates with chromosome instability. Human lung cells exposed to Cr(VI) exhibit centrosome amplification but the underlying phenotypes and mechanisms remain unknown. In this study, we further characterize the phenotypes of Cr(VI)-induced centrosome abnormalities. We show that Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification correlates with numerical chromosome instability. We also show chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) induces centrosomes with supernumerary centrioles and acentriolar centrosomes in human lung cells. Moreover, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) affects the timing of important centriolar events. Specifically, chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) causes premature centriole disengagement in S and G2 phase cells. It also induces premature centrosome separation in interphase. Altogether, our data suggest that chronic exposure to particulate Cr(VI) targets the protein linkers that hold centrioles together. These centriolar linkers are important for key events of the centrosome cycle and their premature disruption might underlie Cr(VI)-induced centrosome amplification. PMID:26293554

  10. Mechanical stretch-induced serotonin release from pulmonary neuroendocrine cells: implications for lung development.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Copland, Ian; Post, Martin; Yeger, Herman; Cutz, Ernest

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) produce amine (serotonin, 5-HT) and peptides (e.g., bombesin, calcitonin) with growth factor-like properties and are thought to play an important role in lung development. Because physical forces are essential for lung growth and development, we investigated the effects of mechanical strain on 5-HT release in PNEC freshly isolated from rabbit fetal lung and in the PNEC-related tumor H727 cell line. Cultures exposed to sinusoidal cyclic stretch showed a significant 5-HT release inhibitable with gadolinium chloride (10 nM), a blocker of mechanosensitive channels. In contrast to hypoxia (Po2 approximately 20 mmHg), stretch-induced 5-HT release was not affected by Ca2+-free medium or nifedipine (50 microM), excluding the exocytic pathway. In H727 cells, stretch failed to release calcitonin, a peptide stored within dense core vesicles (DCV), whereas hypoxia caused massive calcitonin release. 5-HT released by mechanical stretch is derived predominantly from the cytoplasmic pool, because it is rapid ( approximately 5 min) and is releasable from early (20 days of gestation) fetal PNEC containing few DCV. Both mechanical stretch and hypoxia upregulated expression of tryptophan hydroxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme of 5-HT synthesis. We conclude that mechanical strain is an important physiological stimulus for the release of 5-HT from PNEC via mechanosensitive channels with potential effects on lung development and resorption of lung fluid at the time of birth.

  11. Effect of Local Tidal Lung Strain on Inflammation in Normal and Lipopolysaccharide-Exposed Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Wellman, Tyler J.; Winkler, Tilo; Costa, Eduardo L.V.; Musch, Guido; Harris, R. Scott; Zheng, Hui; Venegas, Jose G.; Vidal Melo, Marcos F.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Regional tidal lung strain may trigger local inflammation during mechanical ventilation, particularly when additional inflammatory stimuli are present. However, it is unclear whether inflammation develops proportionally to tidal strain or only above a threshold. We aimed to: (1) assess the relationship between regional tidal strain and local inflammation in vivo during the early stages of lung injury in lungs with regional aeration heterogeneity comparable to that of humans; and (2) determine how this strain-inflammation relationship is affected by endotoxemia. Design Interventional animal study. Setting Experimental laboratory and positron emission tomography (PET) facility. Subjects Eighteen 2–4-month-old sheep. Interventions Three groups of sheep (n=6) were mechanically ventilated to the same plateau pressure (30–32 cmH2O) with High-Strain (VT=18.2±6.5 ml/kg, PEEP=0), High-Strain plus intravenous lipopolysaccharide (LPS) (VT=18.4±4.2 ml/kg, PEEP=0), or Low-Strain plus LPS (VT=8.1±0.2 ml/kg, PEEP=17±3 cmH2O). At baseline, we acquired respiratory-gated PET scans of inhaled 13NN to measure tidal strain from end-expiratory and end-inspiratory images in six regions of interest (ROIs). After 3 hours of mechanical ventilation, dynamic [18F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose (18F-FDG) scans were acquired to quantify metabolic activation, indicating local neutrophilic inflammation, in the same ROIs. Measurements and Main Results Baseline regional tidal strain had a significant effect on 18F-FDG net uptake rate Ki in High-Strain LPS (p=0.036) and on phosphorylation rate k3 in High-Strain (p=0.027) and High-Strain LPS (p=0.004). LPS exposure increased the k3-tidal strain slope 3-fold (p=0.009), without significant lung edema. The Low-Strain LPS group showed lower baseline regional tidal strain (0.33±0.17) than High-Strain (1.21±0.62; p<0.001) or High-Strain LPS (1.26±0.44; p<0.001), and lower k3 (p<0.001) and Ki (p<0.05) than High-Strain LPS. Conclusions Local

  12. Mesenchymal stem cell therapy in lung disorders: pathogenesis of lung diseases and mechanism of action of mesenchymal stem cell.

    PubMed

    Inamdar, Ajinkya C; Inamdar, Arati A

    2013-10-01

    Lung disorders such as asthma, acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD), and interstitial lung disease (ILD) show a few common threads of pathogenic mechanisms: inflammation, aberrant immune activity, infection, and fibrosis. Currently no modes of effective treatment are available for ILD or emphysema. Being anti-inflammatory, immunomodulatory, and regenerative in nature, the administration of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) has shown the capacity to control immune dysfunction and inflammation in the lung. The intravenous infusion of MSCs, the common mode of delivery, is followed by their entrapment in lung vasculature before MSCs reach to other organ systems thus indicating the feasible and promising approach of MSCs therapy for lung diseases. In this review, we discuss the mechanistic basis for MSCs therapy for asthma, ARDS, COPD, and ILD.

  13. Polyamines and polyamine biosynthesis in cells exposed to hyperthermia

    SciTech Connect

    Gerner, E.W.; Stickney, D.G.; Herman, T.S.; Fuller, D.J.

    1983-02-01

    The issue of how polyamines act to sensitize cultured cells to the lethal effects of hyperthermia was investigated using Chinese hamster cells which were induced to express thermotolerance. Intracellular levels of these naturally occurring polycations were manipulated in certain situations by treating whole cells with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone), an inhibitor of the S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylases. Exogenous spermine as low as 100 ..mu..M in the culture media dramatically sensitized cells expressing thermotolerance to the lethal effects of subsequent 42/sup 0/C exposures. When thermotolerance was differentially induced in cultures exposed to 42.4/sup 0/C by varying the rate of heating from 37 to 42.4/sup 0/C, the most resistant cells and the highest levels of intracellular spermidine and spermine. This finding was explainable in part by the observation that the putrescine-dependent S-adenosyl-L-methionine decarboxylase activity was minimally affected in cells expressng the greatest degree of thermotolerance. When this enzyme activity was inhibited by drug, lowered intracellular polyamine levels did not correspond with subsequent survival responses to heat. Interestingly, cultures treated with methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) 24 hr previous to heat exposure showed a reduced capacity to express rate of heating-induced thermotolerance. Together, these results demonstrate that the polyamines, especially spermidine and spermine, enhance hyperthermia-induced cell killing by some mechanism involving the plasma membrane. Further, our data suggest that methylglyoxal bis-(guanylhydrazone) can act to affect thermal responses by a mechanism(s) other than modification of intracellular polyamine levels.

  14. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Philip, Kemly; Acero, Luis F; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Molina, Jose G; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Bunge, Isabelle; Volcik, Kelly A; Le, Thanh-Thuy T; Johnston, Richard A; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K; Blackburn, Michael R

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, fibroproliferative disease. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can develop secondary to IPF and increase mortality. Alternatively, activated macrophages (AAMs) contribute to the pathogenesis of both IPF and PH. Here we hypothesized that adenosine signaling through the ADORA2B on AAMs impacts the progression of these disorders and that conditional deletion of ADORA2B on myeloid cells would have a beneficial effect in a model of these diseases. Conditional knockout mice lacking ADORA2B on myeloid cells (Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre)) were exposed to the fibrotic agent bleomycin (BLM; 0.035 U/g body weight, i.p.). At 14, 17, 21, 25, or 33 d after exposure, SpO2, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histologic analyses were performed. On day 33, lung function and cardiovascular analyses were determined. Markers for AAM and mediators of fibrosis and PH were assessed. Adora2B(f/f)-LysM(Cre) mice presented with attenuated fibrosis, improved lung function, and no evidence of PH compared with control mice exposed to BLM. These findings were accompanied by reduced expression of CD206 and arginase-1, markers for AAMs. A 10-fold reduction in IL-6 and a 5-fold decrease in hyaluronan, both linked to lung fibrosis and PH, were also observed. These data suggest that activation of the ADORA2B on macrophages plays an active role in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and PH.

  15. Chronic obstructive lung diseases and risk of non-small cell lung cancer in women

    PubMed Central

    Schwartz, Ann G.; Cote, Michele L.; Wenzlaff, Angela S.; Van Dyke, Alison; Chen, Wei; Ruckdeschel, John C.; Gadgeel, Shirish; Soubani, Ayman O.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The link between lung cancer and chronic obstructive lung diseases (COPD) has not been well studied in women even though lung cancer and COPD account for significant and growing morbidity and mortality among women. Methods We evaluated the relationship between COPD and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in a population-based case-control study of women and constructed a time course of chronic lung diseases in relation to onset of lung cancer. Five hundred sixty-two women aged 18–74, diagnosed with NSCLC and 564 population-based controls matched on race and age participated. Multivariable unconditional logistic regression models were used to estimate risk associated with a history of COPD, chronic bronchitis or emphysema. Results Lung cancer risk increased significantly for white women with a history of COPD (OR=1.85; 95% CI 1.21–2.81), but this was not seen in African American women. Risk associated with a history of chronic bronchitis was strongest when diagnosed at age 25 or earlier (OR=2.35, 95% CI 1.17–4.72); emphysema diagnosed within nine years of lung cancer was also associated with substantial risk (OR=6.36, 95% CI 2.36–17.13). Race, pack-years of smoking, exposure to environmental tobacco smoke as an adult, childhood asthma and exposure to asbestos were associated with a history of COPD among lung cancer cases. Conclusions In women, COPD is associated with risk of lung cancer differentially by race. Untangling whether COPD is in the causal pathway or simply shares risk factors will require future studies to focus on specific COPD features while exploring underlying genetic susceptibility to these diseases. PMID:19190518

  16. Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Stage IB-IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Has Been or Will Be Removed by Surgery (The ALCHEMIST Screening Trial)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-12

    Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Stage IB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma

  17. Histopathologic, morphometric, and physiologic investigation of lungs of dogs exposed to uranium-ore dust

    SciTech Connect

    Cross, F.T.; Filipy, R.E.; Loscutoff, S.M.; Mihalko, P.J.; Palmer, R.F.; Busch, R.H.

    1981-01-01

    The most consistent pulmonary-function change attributed to carnotite uranium-ore-dust exposure (at 15 mg/m/sup 3/, for 4 h/day, 5 days/week) is an increased slope of the single-breath N/sub 2/ washout curve, suggesting an uneven distribution of ventilation. This change was observed in dogs exposed for less than 1 year and continued through 4 years of exposure. Measurements of pulmonary resistance, after 27, 40 and 47 months exposure, showed slight age-related changes and increasing differences between control and exposed animals with duration of exposure. These two changes are suggestive of a bronchitic response, similar to the industrial bronchitis of mine workers. The most notable pulmonary lesions observed in dogs exposed for up to 4 years are: vesicular emphysema, peribronchiolitis and focal pneumoconiosis. Lesions of the major airways and upper respiratory tract, when present, were minimal in severity. Pulmonary vesicular emphysema was present in all but one of the examined dogs. The emphysema was dose-related, in that it was present only to a slight degree in dogs exposed for less than 3 years and, thereafter, increased in severity. Morphometric measurement data confirmed the value of the histopathologic grading system for the degree of emphysema. These data correlated best with the dynamic pulmonary compliance measurements.

  18. Aryl hydrocarbon receptor protects lung adenocarcinoma cells against cigarette sidestream smoke particulates-induced oxidative stress

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Ya-Hsin; Huang, Su-Chin; Lin, Chun-Ju; Cheng, Li-Chuan; Li, Lih-Ann

    2012-03-15

    Environmental cigarette smoke has been suggested to promote lung adenocarcinoma progression through aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-signaled metabolism. However, whether AhR facilitates metabolic activation or detoxification in exposed adenocarcinoma cells remains ambiguous. To address this question, we have modified the expression level of AhR in two human lung adenocarcinoma cell lines and examined their response to an extract of cigarette sidestream smoke particulates (CSSP). We found that overexpression of AhR in the CL1-5 cell line reduced CSSP-induced ROS production and oxidative DNA damage, whereas knockdown of AhR expression increased ROS level in CSSP-exposed H1355 cells. Oxidative stress sensor Nrf2 and its target gene NQO1 were insensitive to AhR expression level and CSSP treatment in human lung adenocarcinoma cells. In contrast, induction of AhR expression concurrently increased mRNA expression of xenobiotic-metabolizing genes CYP1B1, UGT1A8, and UGT1A10 in a ligand-independent manner. It appeared that AhR accelerated xenobiotic clearing and diminished associated oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of a set of phase I and II metabolizing genes. However, the AhR-signaled protection could not shield cells from constant oxidative stress. Prolonged exposure to high concentrations of CSSP induced G0/G1 cell cycle arrest via the p53–p21–Rb1 signaling pathway. Despite no effect on DNA repair rate, AhR facilitated the recovery of cells from growth arrest when CSSP exposure ended. AhR-overexpressing lung adenocarcinoma cells exhibited an increased anchorage-dependent and independent proliferation when recovery from exposure. In summary, our data demonstrated that AhR protected lung adenocarcinoma cells against CSSP-induced oxidative stress and promoted post-exposure clonogenicity. -- Highlights: ► AhR expression level influences cigarette sidestream smoke-induced ROS production. ► AhR reduces oxidative stress by coordinate regulation of

  19. Effects on symptoms and lung function in humans experimentally exposed to diesel exhaust.

    PubMed Central

    Rudell, B; Ledin, M C; Hammarström, U; Stjernberg, N; Lundbäck, B; Sandström, T

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Diesel exhaust is a common air pollutant made up of several gases, hydrocarbons, and particles. An experimental study was carried out which was designed to evaluate if a particle trap on the tail pipe of an idling diesel engine would reduce effects on symptoms and lung function caused by the diesel exhaust, compared with exposure to unfiltered exhaust. METHODS: Twelve healthy non-smoking volunteers (aged 20-37) were investigated in an exposure chamber for one hour during light work on a bicycle ergometer at 75 W. Each subject underwent three separate double blind exposures in a randomised sequence: to air and to diesel exhaust with the particle trap at the tail pipe and to unfiltered diesel exhaust. Symptoms were recorded according to the Borg scale before, every 10 minutes during, and 30 minutes after the exposure. Lung function was measured with a computerised whole body plethysmograph. RESULTS: The ceramic wall flow particle trap reduced the number of particles by 46%, whereas other compounds were relatively constant. It was shown that the most prominent symptoms during exposure to diesel exhaust were irritation of the eyes and nose and an unpleasant smell increasing during exposure. Both airway resistance (R(aw)) and specific airway resistance (SR(aw)) increased significantly during the exposures to diesel exhaust. Despite the 46% reduction in particle numbers by the trap effects on symptoms and lung function were not significantly attenuated. CONCLUSION: Exposure to diesel exhaust caused symptoms and bronchoconstriction which were not significantly reduced by a particle trap. PMID:8943829

  20. Chemotherapy and Radiation Therapy With or Without Metformin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With Stage III Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-20

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Large Cell Lung Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Squamous Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  1. Modifiers of exposure--response estimates for lung cancer among miners exposed to radon progeny

    SciTech Connect

    Hornung, R.W.; Deddens, J.; Roscoe, R.

    1995-03-01

    The association between lung cancer and exposure to radon decay products has been well established. Despite agreement on this point, there is still some degree of uncertainty regarding characteristics of the exposure-response relationship. The use of studies of underground miners to estimate lung cancer risks due to residential radon exposure depends upon a better understanding of factors potentially modifying the exposure-response relationship. Given the diversity in study populations regarding smoking status, mining conditions, risk analysis methodology, and referent populations, the risk estimates across studies are quite similar. However, several factors partially contributing to differences in risk estimates are modified by attained age, time since last exposure, exposure rate, and cigarette smoking patterns. There is growing agreement across studies that relative risk decreases with attained age and time since last exposure. Several studies have also found an inverse exposure-rate effect, i.e., low exposure rates for protracted duration of exposure are more hazardous than equivalent cumulative exposures received at higher rates for shorter periods of time. Additionally, the interaction between radon exposure and cigarette smoking appears to be intermediate between additive and multiplicative in a growing number of studies. Quantitative estimates of these modifying factors are given using a new analysis of data from the latest update of the Colorado Plateau uranium miners cohort. 24 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  2. Enhanced Deposition by Electrostatic Field-Assistance Aggravating Diesel Exhaust Aerosol Toxicity for Human Lung Cells.

    PubMed

    Stoehr, Linda C; Madl, Pierre; Boyles, Matthew S P; Zauner, Roland; Wimmer, Monika; Wiegand, Harald; Andosch, Ancuela; Kasper, Gerhard; Pesch, Markus; Lütz-Meindl, Ursula; Himly, Martin; Duschl, Albert

    2015-07-21

    Air pollution is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, but conventional air quality monitoring gives no information about biological consequences. Exposing human lung cells at the air-liquid interface (ALI) to ambient aerosol could help identify acute biological responses. This study investigated electrode-assisted deposition of diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) on human lung epithelial cells (A549) in a prototype exposure chamber. A549 cells were exposed to DEA at the ALI and under submerged conditions in different electrostatic fields (EFs) and were assessed for cell viability, membrane integrity, and IL-8 secretion. Qualitative differences of the DEA and its deposition under different EFs were characterized using scanning mobility particle sizer (SMPS) measurements, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS). Upon exposure to DEA only, cell viability decreased and membrane impairment increased for cells at the ALI; submerged cells were unaffected. These responses were enhanced upon application of an EF, as was DEA deposition. No adverse effects were observed for filtered DEA or air only, confirming particle-induced responses. The prototype exposure chamber proved suitable for testing DEA-induced biological responses of cells at the ALI using electrode-assisted deposition and may be useful for analysis of other air pollutants.

  3. Glucocorticoids decrease Treg cell numbers in lungs of allergic mice.

    PubMed

    Olsen, P C; Kitoko, J Z; Ferreira, T P; de-Azevedo, C T; Arantes, A C; Martins, Μ A

    2015-01-15

    Glucocorticoids have been the hallmark anti-inflammatory drug used to treat asthma. It has been shown that glucocorticoids ameliorate asthma by increasing numbers and activity of Tregs, in contrast recent data show that glucocorticoid might have an opposite effect on Treg cells from normal mice. Since Tregs are target cells that act on the resolution of asthma, the aim of this study was to elucidate the effect of glucocorticoid treatment on lung Tregs in mouse models of asthma. Allergen challenged mice were treated with either oral dexamethasone or nebulized budesonide. Broncoalveolar lavage and airway hyperresponsiveness were evaluated after allergenic challenge. Lung, thymic and lymph node cells were phenotyped on Treg through flow cytometry. Lung cytokine secretion was detected by ELISA. Although dexamethasone inhibited airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness, improving resolution, we have found that both dexamethasone and budesonide induce a reduction of Treg numbers on lungs and lymphoid organs of allergen challenged mice. The reduction of lung Treg levels was independent of mice strain or type of allergen challenge. Our study also indicates that both glucocorticoids do not increase Treg activity through production of IL-10. Glucocorticoid systemic or localized treatment induced thymic atrophy. Taken together, our results demonstrate that glucocorticoids decrease Treg numbers and activity in different asthma mouse models, probably by reducing thymic production of T cells. Therefore, it is possible that glucocorticoids do not have beneficial effects on lung populations of Treg cells from asthmatic patients.

  4. Cell Cycle Related Differentiation of Bone Marrow Cells into Lung Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Dooner, Mark; Aliotta, Jason M.; Pimental, Jeffrey; Dooner, Gerri J.; Abedi, Mehrdad; Colvin, Gerald; Liu, Qin; Weier, Heinz-Ulli; Dooner, Mark S.; Quesenberry, Peter J.

    2007-12-31

    Green-fluorescent protein (GFP) labeled marrow cells transplanted into lethally irradiated mice can be detected in the lungs of transplanted mice and have been shown to express lung specific proteins while lacking the expression of hematopoietic markers. We have studied marrow cells induced to transit cell cycle by exposure to IL-3, IL-6, IL-11 and steel factor at different times of culture corresponding to different phases of cell cycle. We have found that marrow cells at the G1/S interface have a 3-fold increase in cells which assume a lung phenotype and that this increase is no longer seen in late S/G2. These cells have been characterized as GFP{sup +} CD45{sup -} and GFP{sup +} cytokeratin{sup +}. Thus marrow cells with the capacity to convert into cells with a lung phenotype after transplantation show a reversible increase with cytokine induced cell cycle transit. Previous studies have shown the phenotype of bone marrow stem cells fluctuates reversibly as these cells traverse cell cycle, leading to a continuum model of stem cell regulation. The present studies indicate that marrow stem cell production of nonhematopoietic cells also fluctuates on a continuum.

  5. KLF4 regulates adult lung tumor-initiating cells and represses K-Ras-mediated lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Chen, X; Zhang, W; Liu, J; Avdiushko, R; Napier, D L; Liu, A X; Neltner, J M; Wang, C; Cohen, D; Liu, C

    2016-02-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in both men and women worldwide. To identify novel factors that contribute to lung cancer pathogenesis, we analyzed a lung cancer database from The Cancer Genome Atlas and found that Krüppel-like Factor 4 (KLF4) expression is significantly lower in patients' lung cancer tissue than in normal lung tissue. In addition, we identified seven missense mutations in the KLF4 gene. KLF4 is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation and differentiation as well as the self-renewal of stem cells. To understand the role of KLF4 in the lung, we generated a tamoxifen-induced Klf4 knockout mouse model. We found that KLF4 inhibits lung cancer cell growth and that depletion of Klf4 altered the differentiation pattern in the developing lung. To understand how KLF4 functions during lung tumorigenesis, we generated the K-ras(LSL-G12D/+);Klf4(fl/fl) mouse model, and we used adenovirus-expressed Cre to induce K-ras activation and Klf4 depletion in the lung. Although Klf4 deletion alone or K-ras mutation alone can trigger lung tumor formation, Klf4 deletion combined with K-ras mutation significantly enhanced lung tumor formation. We also found that Klf4 deletion in conjunction with K-ras activation caused lung inflammation. To understand the mechanism whereby KLF4 is regulated during lung tumorigenesis, we analyzed KLF4 promoter methylation and the profiles of epigenetic factors. We found that Class I histone deacetylases (HDACs) are overexpressed in lung cancer and that HDAC inhibitors induced expression of KLF4 and inhibited proliferation of lung cancer cells, suggesting that KLF4 is probably repressed by histone acetylation and that HDACs are valuable drug targets for lung cancer treatment.

  6. Interactions of ozone and antineoplastic drugs on rat lung fibroblasts and Walker rat carcinoma cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wenzel, D.G.; Morgan, D.L.

    1983-05-01

    Cultured rat lung fibroblasts (F-cells) and Walker rat carcinoma cells (WRC-cells) labeled with /sup 51/Cr were exposed to the following antitumor drugs alone or with O/sub 3/: carmustine (BCNU), doxorubicin (Dox), cisplatin (CPt), mitomycin C (Mit C) or vitamin K/sub 3/ (Vit K). Release of /sup 51/Cr (cell injury) was greater for F-cells than WRC-cells with any single treatment. Pretreatment with any drug (400 microM), except for Vit K with WRC-cells, did not significantly increase O/sub 3/-induced loss of /sup 51/Cr. Co-exposure of F-cells to drugs and O/sub 3/ resulted in a marked potentiation of O/sub 3/-induced injury with Vit K, and an inhibition with Dox.

  7. TRIM72 modulates caveolar endocytosis in repair of lung cells.

    PubMed

    Nagre, Nagaraja; Wang, Shaohua; Kellett, Thomas; Kanagasabai, Ragu; Deng, Jing; Nishi, Miyuki; Shilo, Konstantin; Oeckler, Richard A; Yalowich, Jack C; Takeshima, Hiroshi; Christman, John; Hubmayr, Rolf D; Zhao, Xiaoli

    2016-03-01

    Alveolar epithelial and endothelial cell injury is a major feature of the acute respiratory distress syndrome, in particular when in conjunction with ventilation therapies. Previously we showed [Kim SC, Kellett T, Wang S, Nishi M, Nagre N, Zhou B, Flodby P, Shilo K, Ghadiali SN, Takeshima H, Hubmayr RD, Zhao X. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 307: L449-L459, 2014.] that tripartite motif protein 72 (TRIM72) is essential for amending alveolar epithelial cell injury. Here, we posit that TRIM72 improves cellular integrity through its interaction with caveolin 1 (Cav1). Our data show that, in primary type I alveolar epithelial cells, lack of TRIM72 led to significant reduction of Cav1 at the plasma membrane, accompanied by marked attenuation of caveolar endocytosis. Meanwhile, lentivirus-mediated overexpression of TRIM72 selectively increases caveolar endocytosis in rat lung epithelial cells, suggesting a functional association between these two. Further coimmunoprecipitation assays show that deletion of either functional domain of TRIM72, i.e., RING, B-box, coiled-coil, or PRY-SPRY, abolishes the physical interaction between TRIM72 and Cav1, suggesting that all theoretical domains of TRIM72 are required to forge a strong interaction between these two molecules. Moreover, in vivo studies showed that injurious ventilation-induced lung cell death was significantly increased in knockout (KO) TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) lungs compared with wild-type controls and was particularly pronounced in double KO mutants. Apoptosis was accompanied by accentuation of gross lung injury manifestations in the TRIM72(KO) and Cav1(KO) mice. Our data show that TRIM72 directly and indirectly modulates caveolar endocytosis, an essential process involved in repair of lung epithelial cells through removal of plasma membrane wounds. Given TRIM72's role in endomembrane trafficking and cell repair, we consider this molecule an attractive therapeutic target for patients with injured lungs.

  8. Antiviral B cell and T cell immunity in the lungs.

    PubMed

    Chiu, Christopher; Openshaw, Peter J

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory viruses are frequent causes of repeated common colds, bronchitis and pneumonia, which often occur unpredictably as epidemics and pandemics. Despite those decimating effects on health and decades of intensive research, treatments remain largely supportive. The only commonly available vaccines are against influenza virus, and even these need improvement. The lung shares some features with other mucosal sites, but preservation of its especially delicate anatomical structures necessitates a fine balance of pro- and anti-inflammatory responses; well-timed, appropriately placed and tightly regulated T cell and B cell responses are essential for protection from infection and limitation of symptoms, whereas poorly regulated inflammation contributes to tissue damage and disease. Recent advances in understanding adaptive immunity should facilitate vaccine development and reduce the global effect of respiratory viruses.

  9. Cancer stem cells: progress and challenges in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Amanda K.; Miyamoto, Shinya; Babu, Anish; Munshi, Anupama

    2014-01-01

    The identification of a subpopulation of tumor cells with stem cell-like characteristics first in hematological malignancies and later in solid tumors has emerged into a novel field of cancer research. It has been proposed that this aberrant population of cells now called “cancer stem cells” (CSCs) drives tumor initiation, progression, metastasis, recurrence, and drug resistance. CSCs have been shown to have the capacity of self-renewal and multipotency. Adopting strategies from the field of stem cell research has aided in identification, localization, and targeting of CSCs in many tumors. Despite the huge progress in other solid tumors such as brain, breast, and colon cancers no substantial advancements have been made in lung cancer. This is most likely due to the current rudimentary understanding of lung stem cell hierarchy and heterogeneous nature of lung disease. In this review, we will discuss the most recent findings related to identification of normal lung stem cells and CSCs, pathways involved in regulating the development of CSCs, and the importance of the stem cell niche in development and maintenance of CSCs. Additionally, we will examine the development and feasibility of novel CSC-targeted therapeutic strategies aimed at eradicating lung CSCs. PMID:27358855

  10. Genetic and molecular coordinates of neuroendocrine lung tumors, with emphasis on small-cell lung carcinomas.

    PubMed Central

    Koutsami, Marilena K.; Doussis-Anagnostopoulou, Ipatia; Papavassiliou, Athanasios G.; Gorgoulis, Vassilis G.

    2002-01-01

    The aim of this review is to present the advances in our understanding of the progression of tumorigenesis in neuroendocrine lung tumors. Current information on established and putative diagnostic and prognostic markers of neuroendocrine tumors are evaluated, with a special reference to small-cell lung carcinoma, due to its higher incidence and aggressive behavior. The genetic and molecular changes that accompany these neoplasms are highlighted, and factors that influence cell-cycle progression, apoptosis, drug resistance, and escape from immune surveillance are critically assessed. PMID:12435853

  11. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Karmouty-Quintana, Harry; Philip, Kemly; Acero, Luis F.; Chen, Ning-Yuan; Weng, Tingting; Molina, Jose G.; Luo, Fayong; Davies, Jonathan; Le, Ngoc-Bao; Bunge, Isabelle; Volcik, Kelly A.; Le, Thanh-Thuy T.; Johnston, Richard A.; Xia, Yang; Eltzschig, Holger K.; Blackburn, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is a lethal, fibroproliferative disease. Pulmonary hypertension (PH) can develop secondary to IPF and increase mortality. Alternatively, activated macrophages (AAMs) contribute to the pathogenesis of both IPF and PH. Here we hypothesized that adenosine signaling through the ADORA2B on AAMs impacts the progression of these disorders and that conditional deletion of ADORA2B on myeloid cells would have a beneficial effect in a model of these diseases. Conditional knockout mice lacking ADORA2B on myeloid cells (Adora2Bf/f-LysMCre) were exposed to the fibrotic agent bleomycin (BLM; 0.035 U/g body weight, i.p.). At 14, 17, 21, 25, or 33 d after exposure, SpO2, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and histologic analyses were performed. On day 33, lung function and cardiovascular analyses were determined. Markers for AAM and mediators of fibrosis and PH were assessed. Adora2Bf/f-LysMCre mice presented with attenuated fibrosis, improved lung function, and no evidence of PH compared with control mice exposed to BLM. These findings were accompanied by reduced expression of CD206 and arginase-1, markers for AAMs. A 10-fold reduction in IL-6 and a 5-fold decrease in hyaluronan, both linked to lung fibrosis and PH, were also observed. These data suggest that activation of the ADORA2B on macrophages plays an active role in the pathogenesis of lung fibrosis and PH.—Karmouty-Quintana, H., Philip, K., Acero, L. F., Chen, N.-Y., Weng, T., Molina, J. G., Luo, F., Davies, J., Le, N.-B., Bunge, I., Volcik, K. A., Le, T.-T. T., Johnston, R. A., Xia, Y., Eltzschig, H. K., Blackburn, M. R. Deletion of ADORA2B from myeloid cells dampens lung fibrosis and pulmonary hypertension. PMID:25318478

  12. Bystander suppression of allergic airway inflammation by lung resident memory CD8+ T cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marsland, Benjamin J.; Harris, Nicola L.; Camberis, Mali; Kopf, Manfred; Hook, Sarah M.; Le Gros, Graham

    2004-04-01

    CD8+ memory T cells have recently been recognized as playing a key role in natural immunity against unrelated viral infections, a phenomenon referred to as "heterologous antiviral immunity." We now provide data that the cellular immunological interactions that underlie such heterologous immunity can play an equally important role in regulating T helper 2 immune responses and protecting mucosal surfaces from allergen-induced inflammation. Our data show that CD8+ T cells, either retained in the lung after infection with influenza virus, or adoptively transferred via the intranasal route can suppress allergic airway inflammation. The suppression is mediated by IFN-, which acts to reduce the activation level, T helper 2 cytokine production, airways hyperresponsiveness, and migration of allergen-specific CD4+ T cells into the lung, whereas the systemic and draining lymph node responses remain unchanged. Of note, adoptive transfer of previously activated transgenic CD8+ T cells conferred protection against allergic airway inflammation, even in the absence of specific-antigen. Airway resident CD8+ T cells produced IFN- when directly exposed to conditioned media from activated dendritic cells or the proinflammatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-18. Taken together these data indicate that effector/memory CD8+ T cells present in the airways produce IFN- after inflammatory stimuli, independent of specific-antigen, and as a consequence play a key role in modifying the degree and frequency of allergic responses in the lung.

  13. Role of ATM in bystander signaling between human monocytes and lung adenocarcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Somnath; Ghosh, Anu; Krishna, Malini

    2015-12-01

    The response of a cell or tissue to ionizing radiation is mediated by direct damage to cellular components and indirect damage mediated by radiolysis of water. Radiation affects both irradiated cells and the surrounding cells and tissues. The radiation-induced bystander effect is defined by the presence of biological effects in cells that were not themselves in the field of irradiation. To establish the contribution of the bystander effect in the survival of the neighboring cells, lung carcinoma A549 cells were exposed to gamma-irradiation, 2Gy. The medium from the irradiated cells was transferred to non-irradiated A549 cells. Irradiated A549 cells as well as non-irradiated A549 cells cultured in the presence of medium from irradiated cells showed decrease in survival and increase in γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci, indicating a bystander effect. Bystander signaling was also observed between different cell types. Phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA)-stimulated and gamma-irradiated U937 (human monocyte) cells induced a bystander response in non-irradiated A549 (lung carcinoma) cells as shown by decreased survival and increased γ-H2AX and p-ATM foci. Non-stimulated and/or irradiated U937 cells did not induce such effects in non-irradiated A549 cells. Since ATM protein was activated in irradiated cells as well as bystander cells, it was of interest to understand its role in bystander effect. Suppression of ATM with siRNA in A549 cells completely inhibited bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. On the other hand suppression of ATM with siRNA in PMA stimulated U937 cells caused only a partial inhibition of bystander effect in bystander A549 cells. These results indicate that apart from ATM, some additional factor may be involved in bystander effect between different cell types.

  14. Toxicity of Lunar Dust in Lungs Assessed by Examining Biomarkers in Exposed Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lam, C.-W.; James, J. T.; Zeidler-Erdely, P. C.; Castranova, V.; Young, S. H.; Quan, C. L.; Khan-Mayberry, N.; Taylor, L. A.

    2010-01-01

    NASA is contemplating to build an outpost on the Moon for prolonged human habitation and research. The lunar surface is covered by a layer of soil, of which the finest portion is highly reactive dust. Dust samples of respirable sizes were aerodynamically isolated from two lunar soil samples of different maturities (cosmic exposure ages) collected during the Apollo 16 mission. The lunar dust samples, TiO2, or quartz, suspended in normal saline were given to groups of 5 C57 male mice by intrapharyngeal aspiration at 0. 1, 0.3, or 1.0 mg/mouse. Because lunar dust aggregates rapidly in aqueous media, some tests were conducted with dusts suspended in Survanta/saline (1:1). The mice were euthanized 7 or 30 days later, and their lungs were lavaged to assess the presence of toxicity biomarkers in bronchioalveolar lavage fluids. The overall results showed that the two lunar dust samples were similar in toxicity, they were more toxic than T102 , but less toxic than quartz. This preliminary study is a part of the large study to obtain data for setting exposure limits for astronauts living on the Moon

  15. Noise Removal with Maintained Spatial Resolution in Raman Images of Cells Exposed to Submicron Polystyrene Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ahlinder, Linnea; Wiklund Lindström, Susanne; Lejon, Christian; Geladi, Paul; Österlund, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The biodistribution of 300 nm polystyrene particles in A549 lung epithelial cells has been studied with confocal Raman spectroscopy. This is a label-free method in which particles and cells can be imaged without using dyes or fluorescent labels. The main drawback with Raman imaging is the comparatively low spatial resolution, which is aggravated in heterogeneous systems such as biological samples, which in addition often require long measurement times because of their weak Raman signal. Long measurement times may however induce laser-induced damage. In this study we use a super-resolution algorithm with Tikhonov regularization, intended to improve the image quality without demanding an increased number of collected pixels. Images of cells exposed to polystyrene particles have been acquired with two different step lengths, i.e., the distance between pixels, and compared to each other and to corresponding images treated with the super-resolution algorithm. It is shown that the resolution after application of super-resolution algorithms is not significantly improved compared to the theoretical limit for optical microscopy. However, to reduce noise and artefacts in the hyperspectral Raman images while maintaining the spatial resolution, we show that it is advantageous to use short mapping step lengths and super-resolution algorithms with appropriate regularization. The proposed methodology should be generally applicable for Raman imaging of biological samples and other photo-sensitive samples.

  16. Curcumin inhibits B[a]PDE-induced procarcinogenic signals in lung cancer cells, and curbs B[a]P-induced mutagenesis and lung carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Puliyappadamba, Vineshkumar T; Thulasidasan, Arun Kumar T; Vijayakurup, Vinod; Antony, Jayesh; Bava, Smitha V; Anwar, Shabna; Sundaram, Sankar; Anto, Ruby John

    2015-01-01

    Benzo[a]pyrene is a procarcinogen present in environment and cigarette smoke, which could be bio-transformed in vivo to B[a]PDE, a potent carcinogen known to form DNA adducts and induce mutations. We observed that curcumin, a known chemopreventive, could significantly inhibit the survival of lung cancer cells exposed to B[a]PDE. It also downregulates B[a]PDE-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB as assessed by Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay (EMSA) and NF-κB-dependent reporter gene assay. Ames assay demonstrated its ability to revert the mutagenic property of benzo[a]pyrene. These observations prompted us to evaluate the efficacy of curcumin in preventing B[a]P-induced lung carcinogenesis in vivo and to explore the molecular mechanism associated with it. The average number of tumor nodules present in the lungs of the Swiss albino mice, which received benzo[a]pyrene, was significantly high compared to that received curcumin as 2% diet along with B[a]P. Curcumin treatment significantly reverted histopathological deviations in the lung tissues due to benzo[a]pyrene ingestion. Moreover, curcumin diet reduced benzo[a]pyrene-induced activation of NF-κB and MAPK signaling and Cox-2 transcription in lung tissues of mice. Taken together, this study illustrates multifaceted efficacy of curcumin in preventing lung cancer.

  17. ABCG2pos lung mesenchymal stem cells are a novel pericyte subpopulation that contributes to fibrotic remodeling.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Shennea; Baskir, Rubin S; Gaskill, Christa; Menon, Swapna; Carrier, Erica J; Williams, Janice; Talati, Megha; Helm, Karen; Alford, Catherine E; Kropski, Jonathan A; Loyd, James; Wheeler, Lisa; Johnson, Joyce; Austin, Eric; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Meyrick, Barbara; West, James D; Klemm, Dwight J; Majka, Susan M

    2014-10-15

    Genesis of myofibroblasts is obligatory for the development of pathology in many adult lung diseases. Adult lung tissue contains a population of perivascular ABCG2(pos) mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) that are precursors of myofibroblasts and distinct from NG2 pericytes. We hypothesized that these MSC participate in deleterious remodeling associated with pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and associated hypertension (PH). To test this hypothesis, resident lung MSC were quantified in lung samples from control subjects and PF patients. ABCG2(pos) cell numbers were decreased in human PF and interstitial lung disease compared with control samples. Genetic labeling of lung MSC in mice enabled determination of terminal lineage and localization of ABCG2 cells following intratracheal administration of bleomycin to elicit fibrotic lung injury. Fourteen days following bleomycin injury enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-labeled lung MSC-derived cells were increased in number and localized to interstitial areas of fibrotic and microvessel remodeling. Finally, gene expression analysis was evaluated to define the response of MSC to bleomycin injury in vivo using ABCG2(pos) MSC isolated during the inflammatory phase postinjury and in vitro bleomycin or transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)-treated cells. MSC responded to bleomycin treatment in vivo with a profibrotic gene program that was not recapitulated in vitro with bleomycin treatment. However, TGF-β1 treatment induced the appearance of a profibrotic myofibroblast phenotype in vitro. Additionally, when exposed to the profibrotic stimulus, TGF-β1, ABCG2, and NG2 pericytes demonstrated distinct responses. Our data highlight ABCG2(pos) lung MSC as a novel cell population that contributes to detrimental myofibroblast-mediated remodeling during PF.

  18. CT findings of small cell lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dongjun; Rho, Ji Young; Kang, Seunghun; Yoo, Koun Joy; Choi, Hye Jeong

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The purpose of this study was to clarify the recognizable computed tomography (CT) features of small cell lung carcinoma (SCLC). Contrast enhanced CT scans were reviewed retrospectively for mass location, mediastinal extension, and other concomitant findings in 142 patients with pathologically proven SCLC. SCLC was classified into hilar mass only (type I), hilar mass with ipsilateral mediastinal extension (type II), hilar mass with bilateral mediastinal extension (type III), and peripheral mass (type IV). When mediastinal lymphadenopathy (m-LAP) was indistinguishable from a hilar mass, we defined it as a mediastinal conglomerate mass (m-CM). Type IIa or IIIa had ipsilateral or bilateral m-LAP and type IIb, IIIb or IIIc had ipsilateral or bilateral m-CM. Type I (n = 8, 5.6%), type II (n = 58, 40.8%), type III (n = 55, 38.8%), and type IV (n = 21, 14.8%) were manifested. The combination of a hilar mass and m-CM was found in 68 patients (47.9%). Type IV masses showed lobulation in 11, microlobulation in 4, both lobulated and irregular margins in 4, and spiculation in 2. A total of 120 patients (84.5%) had a bronchial stenosis/obstruction; single (n = 52) and 2 or more (n = 68). Ninety-five patients (67.0%) had vascular invasion including main/lobar pulmonary artery and superior vena cava, and 55 (38.7%) had pleural effusion and/or pleural nodules. Concomitant parenchymal findings (n = 92, 64.8%) were noted: contiguous consolidation/nodule (n = 45), hematogeneous spread (n = 32), lymphangitic spread (n = 21), obstructive pneumonia (n = 22), and obstructive atelectasis (n = 14). In conclusion, the recognizable CT features of SCLC were a hilar mass with m-CM. Most of the hilar masses showed 2 or more bronchial stenoses/obstructions. Most cases of peripheral SCLC manifested as a lobulated mass rather than a spiculated mass. Vascular invasion and concomitant parenchymal findings were observed commonly. PMID:27893684

  19. Inappropriate antidiuretic hormone secretion due to squamous cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Kotoulas, Christophoros; Panagiotou, Ioannis; Tsipas, Panteleimon; Koutoulakis, Emmanouil

    2015-06-01

    The syndrome of inappropriate secretion of antidiuretic hormone is a disorder of impaired water excretion caused by the inability to suppress secretion of antidiuretic hormone. It has been commonly associated with small cell carcinoma. The association of this syndrome with squamous cell lung carcinoma has rarely been reported, with only 4 cases over the past two decades in the English literature. We describe the case of a 75-year-old Caucasian male who developed the syndrome after a right pneumonectomy for down-staged squamous cell lung cancer previously treated with neoadjuvant platinum-based chemotherapy and radiotherapy.

  20. Free lung cell phagocytosis and the effect of cigarette smoke exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Fogelmark, B.; Rylander, R.; Sjoestrand, M.; Reininghaus, W.

    1980-06-01

    We report on a technique for studying phagocytosis in free lung cells with the use of fungal spores. Free lung cells were obtained from a bronchial lavage. They were incubated with fungal spores and the engulfment of these spores was studied at various time intervals and under different conditions. The phagocytosis process was found to occur from relatively stationary macrophages within the first hours after incubation. The number of engulfed spores was proportional to their number in the solution. Addition of serum or surfactant to the medium increased the phagocytosis rate. In hamsters and rats exposed to tobacco smoke under in vivo conditions, a dose-related increase in phagocytosis rate could be demonstrated.

  1. Stages of Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or workplace. Imaging tests such as CT scans . Atomic bomb radiation. Being exposed to asbestos , chromium, nickel, ... used to place a stent in a body structure to keep the structure open. An endoscopic stent ...

  2. Treatment Option Overview (Small Cell Lung Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... or workplace. Imaging tests such as CT scans . Atomic bomb radiation. Being exposed to asbestos , chromium, nickel, ... used to place a stent in a body structure to keep the structure open. An endoscopic stent ...

  3. General Information about Small Cell Lung Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or workplace. Imaging tests such as CT scans . Atomic bomb radiation. Being exposed to asbestos , chromium, nickel, ... used to place a stent in a body structure to keep the structure open. An endoscopic stent ...

  4. Effect of Adjuvant Magnetic Fields in Radiotherapy on Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cells In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Jianguo; Sheng, Huaying; Zhu, Chihong; Jiang, Hao; Ma, Shenglin

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To explore sensitization and possible mechanisms of adjuvant magnetic fields (MFs) in radiotherapy (RT) of non-small-cell lung cancer. Methods. Human A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells were treated with MF, RT, and combined MF-RT. Colony-forming efficiency was calculated, cell cycle and apoptosis were measured, and changes in cell cycle- and apoptosis-related gene expression were measured by microarray. Results. A 0.5 T, 8 Hz stationary MF showed a duration-dependent inhibitory effect lasting for 1–4 hours. The MF-treated groups had significantly greater cell inhibition than did controls (P < 0.05). Surviving fractions and growth curves derived from colony-forming assay showed that the MF-only, RT-only, and MF-RT groups had inhibited cell growth; the MF-RT group showed a synergetic effect. Microarray of A549 cells exposed for 1 hour to MF showed that 19 cell cycle- and apoptosis-related genes had 2-fold upregulation and 40 genes had 2-fold downregulation. MF significantly arrested cells in G2 and M phases, apparently sensitizing the cells to RT. Conclusions. MF may inhibit A549 cells and can increase their sensitivity to RT, possibly by affecting cell cycle- and apoptosis-related signaling pathways. PMID:24224175

  5. Sirolimus and Gold Sodium Thiomalate in Treating Patients With Advanced Squamous Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2012-12-13

    Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Unspecified Adult Solid Tumor, Protocol Specific

  6. Lung Deposition and Clearance of Inhaled Vanadium Pentoxide in Chronically Exposed F344 Rats and B6C3F1 Mice

    SciTech Connect

    Dill, Jeffrey A.; Lee, Kyeonghee M.; Mellinger, Kathleen H.; Bates, Derrick J.; Burka, Leo T.; Roycroft, Joseph H.

    2004-01-01

    Female F344 rats and B6C3F1 mice were exposed to vanadium pentoxide (V{sub 2}O{sub 5}) at concentrations of 0, 0.5, 1, or 2 mg/m{sup 3} (rats) and 0, 1, 2, or 4 mg/m{sup 3} (mice) for 6 h/day, 5 days/week (for up to 18 months), by whole-body inhalation. Lung weights and lung burdens of vanadium were determined for exposed animals after 1, 5, and 12 days and after 1, 2, 6, 12, and 18 months of V{sub 2}O{sub 5} exposure. Blood vanadium concentrations were determined at 1, 2, 6, 12, and 18 months for all animals including controls. A model that assumed a first-order deposition rate and a first-order elimination rate for vanadium was employed to fit the lung burden data. Comparisons between exposed groups indicated a progressive increase in lung weight with exposure concentration and time on exposure for both species. The vanadium lung burdens appeared to reach steady state in the lowest exposure groups (0.5 and 1 mg/m{sup 3} for rats and mice, respectively) but showed a decline in the higher exposure groups. This deposition pattern was similar between rats and mice but the maximum lung burdens were observed at different times (1 or 2 months in mice vs. 6 months in rats). The vanadium deposition rate decreased faster in mice, while the elimination half-lives of vanadium lung burdens were about six- to nine-fold shorter in mice than in rats at 1 and 2 mg/m{sup 3}. Thus, the retention of vanadium in the lungs at 18 months was lower in mice ({approx}2% retained) compared with rats (13-15% retained) at the common exposure concentrations of 1 and 2 mg/m{sup 3}. The lung burden data were approximately proportional to the exposure concentration in both species, likely due to concomitant decreases in deposition and elimination to a similar extent with increasing exposure. The area under the lung burden versus time curves and the area under the blood concentration (control-normalized) versus time curves were also proportional to exposure concentration. The progression of

  7. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary Lung squamous cell carcinoma (lung SqCC) is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in lung SqCC have not been comprehensively characterized and no molecularly targeted agents have been developed specifically for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA), we profiled 178 lung SqCCs to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. Lung SqCC is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumor. We found statistically recurrent mutations in 18 genes in including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations were seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2/KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, PI3K/AKT in 47%, and CDKN2A/RB1 in 72% of tumors. We identified a potential therapeutic target in the majority of tumors, offering new avenues of investigation for lung SqCC treatment. PMID:22960745

  8. Lack of effects on key cellular parameters of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT static magnetic field.

    PubMed

    Romeo, Stefania; Sannino, Anna; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria; Massa, Rita; d'Angelo, Raffaele; Zeni, Olga

    2016-01-14

    The last decades have seen increased interest toward possible adverse effects arising from exposure to intense static magnetic fields. This concern is mainly due to the wider and wider applications of such fields in industry and clinical practice; among them, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facilities are the main sources of exposure to static magnetic fields for both general public (patients) and workers. In recent investigations, exposures to static magnetic fields have been demonstrated to elicit, in different cell models, both permanent and transient modifications in cellular endpoints critical for the carcinogenesis process. The World Health Organization has therefore recommended in vitro investigations as important research need, to be carried out under strictly controlled exposure conditions. Here we report on the absence of effects on cell viability, reactive oxygen species levels and DNA integrity in MRC-5 human foetal lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT magnetic induction level, under different exposure regimens. Exposures have been performed by using an experimental apparatus designed and realized for operating with the static magnetic field generated by permanent magnets, and confined in a magnetic circuit, to allow cell cultures exposure in absence of confounding factors like heating or electric field components.

  9. Lack of effects on key cellular parameters of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT static magnetic field

    PubMed Central

    Romeo, Stefania; Sannino, Anna; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria; Massa, Rita; d’Angelo, Raffaele; Zeni, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen increased interest toward possible adverse effects arising from exposure to intense static magnetic fields. This concern is mainly due to the wider and wider applications of such fields in industry and clinical practice; among them, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facilities are the main sources of exposure to static magnetic fields for both general public (patients) and workers. In recent investigations, exposures to static magnetic fields have been demonstrated to elicit, in different cell models, both permanent and transient modifications in cellular endpoints critical for the carcinogenesis process. The World Health Organization has therefore recommended in vitro investigations as important research need, to be carried out under strictly controlled exposure conditions. Here we report on the absence of effects on cell viability, reactive oxygen species levels and DNA integrity in MRC-5 human foetal lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT magnetic induction level, under different exposure regimens. Exposures have been performed by using an experimental apparatus designed and realized for operating with the static magnetic field generated by permanent magnets, and confined in a magnetic circuit, to allow cell cultures exposure in absence of confounding factors like heating or electric field components. PMID:26762783

  10. Lack of effects on key cellular parameters of MRC-5 human lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT static magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romeo, Stefania; Sannino, Anna; Scarfì, Maria Rosaria; Massa, Rita; D’Angelo, Raffaele; Zeni, Olga

    2016-01-01

    The last decades have seen increased interest toward possible adverse effects arising from exposure to intense static magnetic fields. This concern is mainly due to the wider and wider applications of such fields in industry and clinical practice; among them, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) facilities are the main sources of exposure to static magnetic fields for both general public (patients) and workers. In recent investigations, exposures to static magnetic fields have been demonstrated to elicit, in different cell models, both permanent and transient modifications in cellular endpoints critical for the carcinogenesis process. The World Health Organization has therefore recommended in vitro investigations as important research need, to be carried out under strictly controlled exposure conditions. Here we report on the absence of effects on cell viability, reactive oxygen species levels and DNA integrity in MRC-5 human foetal lung fibroblasts exposed to 370 mT magnetic induction level, under different exposure regimens. Exposures have been performed by using an experimental apparatus designed and realized for operating with the static magnetic field generated by permanent magnets, and confined in a magnetic circuit, to allow cell cultures exposure in absence of confounding factors like heating or electric field components.

  11. Lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Aisner, J.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 13 chapters. Some of the chapter titles are: The Pathology of Lung Cancer; Radiotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Cancer of the Lung; Chemotherapy for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; Immunotherapy in the Management of Lung Cancer; Preoperative Staging and Surgery for Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer; and Prognostic Factors in Lung Cancer.

  12. Lung carcinogenesis from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and contribution of signal transducers and lung stem cells in the inflammatory microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Sekine, Yasuo; Hata, Atsushi; Koh, Eitetsu; Hiroshima, Kenzo

    2014-07-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer are closely related. The annual incidence of lung cancer arising from COPD has been reported to be 0.8-1.7 %. Treatment of lung cancer from COPD is very difficult due to low cardiopulmonary function, rapid tumor growth, and resistance to molecularly targeted therapies. Chronic inflammation caused by toxic gases can induce COPD and lung cancer. Carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment occurs during cycles of tissue injury and repair. Cellular damage can induce induction of necrotic cell death and loss of tissue integrity. Quiescent normal stem cells or differentiated progenitor cells are introduced to repair injured tissues. However, inflammatory mediators may promote the growth of bronchioalveolar stem cells, and activation of NF-κB and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) play crucial roles in the development of lung cancer from COPD. Many of the protumorgenic effects of NF-κB and STAT3 activation in immune cells are mediated through paracrine signaling. NF-κB and STAT3 also contribute to epithelial-mesenchymal transition. To improve lung cancer treatment outcomes, lung cancer from COPD must be overcome. In this article, we review the characteristics of lung cancer from COPD and the mechanisms of carcinogenesis in the inflammatory microenvironment. We also propose the necessity of identifying the mechanisms underlying progression of COPD to lung cancer, and comment on the clinical implications with respect to lung cancer prevention, screening, and therapy.

  13. Hedgehog Pathway Inhibition Radiosensitizes Non-Small Cell Lung Cancers

    SciTech Connect

    Zeng, Jing; Aziz, Khaled; Chettiar, Sivarajan T.; Aftab, Blake T.; Armour, Michael; Gajula, Rajendra; Gandhi, Nishant; Salih, Tarek; Herman, Joseph M.; Wong, John; Rudin, Charles M.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Hales, Russell K.

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Despite improvements in chemoradiation, local control remains a major clinical problem in locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer. The Hedgehog pathway has been implicated in tumor recurrence by promoting survival of tumorigenic precursors and through effects on tumor-associated stroma. Whether Hedgehog inhibition can affect radiation efficacy in vivo has not been reported. Methods and Materials: We evaluated the effects of a targeted Hedgehog inhibitor (HhAntag) and radiation on clonogenic survival of human non-small cell lung cancer lines in vitro. Using an A549 cell line xenograft model, we examined tumor growth, proliferation, apoptosis, and gene expression changes after concomitant HhAntag and radiation. In a transgenic mouse model of Kras{sup G12D}-induced and Twist1-induced lung adenocarcinoma, we assessed tumor response to radiation and HhAntag by serial micro-computed tomography (CT) scanning. Results: In 4 human lung cancer lines in vitro, HhAntag showed little or no effect on radiosensitivity. By contrast, in both the human tumor xenograft and murine inducible transgenic models, HhAntag enhanced radiation efficacy and delayed tumor growth. By use of the human xenograft model to differentiate tumor and stromal effects, mouse stromal cells, but not human tumor cells, showed significant and consistent downregulation of Hedgehog pathway gene expression. This was associated with increased tumor cell apoptosis. Conclusions: Targeted Hedgehog pathway inhibition can increase in vivo radiation efficacy in lung cancer preclinical models. This effect is associated with pathway suppression in tumor-associated stroma. These data support clinical testing of Hedgehog inhibitors as a component of multimodality therapy for locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer.

  14. Codon 12 Ki-ras mutation in non-small-cell lung cancer: comparative evaluation in tumoural and non-tumoural lung.

    PubMed Central

    Urban, T.; Ricci, S.; Lacave, R.; Antoine, M.; Kambouchner, M.; Capron, F.; Bernaudin, J. F.

    1996-01-01

    Ki-ras activation by point mutation on codon 12 has been reported in non-small-cell lung carcinomas and in various models of experimental lung tumours induced by chemical carcinogens. The cellular targets for carcinogenic compounds of tobacco smoke are usually considered to be the cells of the bronchial mucosa or alveolar epithelium. However, little is known about preneoplastic events in bronchopulmonary carcinogenesis. The hypothesis of the presence of widespread target cells containing Ki-ras mutation was investigated by evaluating concurrent neoplastic and non-neoplastic bronchial and alveolar samples from 51 patients with non-small-cell lung carcinomas. The polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) method used can detect one cell with a mutation on codon 12 among 10(2) normal cells. In tumour samples, a mutation was detected in 20% of adenocarcinomas, but in none of the adenosquamous or squamous cell carcinomas. No mutation was detected in the non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal samples. When using an enriched PCR-RFLP method detecting one mutated allele among 10(3) normal alleles a mutation was detected in 23% of adenocarcinomas. In conclusion, Ki-ras activation by mutation on codon 12 was not observed in non-neoplastic bronchial or parenchymal tissues in patients with bronchopulmonary cancers and does not appear to be a genetic event present in non-malignant epithelial target cells exposed to tobacco smoke. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:8855973

  15. Responses of well-differentiated nasal epithelial cells exposed to particles: Role of the epithelium in airway inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Auger, Floriane; Gendron, Marie-Claude; Chamot, Christophe; Marano, Francelyne; Dazy, Anne-Catherine . E-mail: dazy@paris7.jussieu.fr

    2006-09-15

    Numerous epidemiological studies support the contention that ambient air pollution particles can adversely affect human health. To explain the acute inflammatory process in airways exposed to particles, a number of in vitro studies have been performed on cells grown submerged on plastic and poorly differentiated, and on cell lines, the physiology of which is somewhat different from that of well-differentiated cells. In order to obtain results using a model system in which epithelial cells are similar to those of the human airway in vivo, apical membranes of well-differentiated human nasal epithelial (HNE) cells cultured in an air-liquid interface (ALI) were exposed for 24 h to diesel exhaust particles (DEP) and Paris urban air particles (PM{sub 2.5}). DEP and PM{sub 2.5} (10-80 {mu}g/cm{sup 2}) stimulated both IL-8 and amphiregulin (ligand of EGFR) secretion exclusively towards the basal compartment. In contrast, there was no IL-1{beta} secretion and only weak non-reproducible secretion of TNF-{alpha}. IL-6 and GM-CSF were consistently stimulated towards the apical compartment and only when cells were exposed to PM{sub 2.5}. ICAM-1 protein expression on cell surfaces remained low after particle exposure, although it increased after TNF-{alpha} treatment. Internalization of particles, which is believed to initiate oxidative stress and proinflammatory cytokine expression, was restricted to small nanoparticles ({<=} 40 nm). Production of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was detected, and DEP were more efficient than PM{sub 2.5}. Collectively, our results suggest that airway epithelial cells exposed to particles augment the local inflammatory response in the lung but cannot alone initiate a systemic inflammatory response.

  16. MUTATION SPECTRA OF SMOKY COAL COMBUSTION EMMISSIONS IN SALMONELLA REFLECTS THE TP53 AND KRAS MUTATIONS IN LUNG TUMORS FROM SMOKY COAL EXPOSED INDIVIDUALS

    EPA Science Inventory


    Mutation Spectra of Smoky Coal Combustion Emissions in Salmonella Reflect the TP53
    and KRAS Mutations in Lung Tumors from Smoky Coal-Exposed Individuals

    Abstract
    Nonsmoking women in Xuan Wei County, Yunnan Province, China who use smoky coal for cooking and h...

  17. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mitchell D; Vaughan, Joshua M; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12-13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6-11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  18. Impact of acute exposure to WTC dust on ciliated and goblet cells in lungs of rats

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Mitchell D.; Vaughan, Joshua M.; Garrett, Brittany; Prophete, Colette; Horton, Lori; Sisco, Maureen; Ghio, Andrew; Zelikoff, Judith; Lung-chi, Chen

    2015-01-01

    Clinical studies and the World Trade Center (WTC) Health Registry have revealed increases in the incidence of chronic (non-cancer) lung disorders among first responders (FR) who were at Ground Zero during the initial 72 h after the collapse. Our previous analyses of rats exposed to building-derived WTC dusts using exposure scenarios/levels that mimicked FR mouth-breathing showed that a single WTC dust exposure led to changes in expression of genes whose products could be involved in the lung ailments, but few other significant pathologies. We concluded that rather than acting as direct inducers of many of the FR health effects, it was more likely inhaled WTC dusts instead may have impacted on toxicities induced by other rescue-related co-pollutants present in Ground Zero air. To allow for such effects to occur, we hypothesized that the alkaline WTC dusts induced damage to the normal ability of the lungs to clear inhaled particles. To validate this, rats were exposed on two consecutive days (2 h/d, by intratracheal inhalation) to WTC dust (collected 12–13 September 2001) and examined over a 1-yr period thereafter for changes in the presence of ciliated cells in the airways and hyperplastic goblet cells in the lungs. WTC dust levels in the lungs were assessed in parallel to verify that any changes in levels of these cells corresponded with decreases in host ability to clear the particles themselves. Image analyses of the rat lungs revealed a significant decrease in ciliated cells and increase in hyperplastic goblet cells due to the single series of WTC dust exposures. The study also showed there was only a nominal non-significant decrease (6–11%) in WTC dust burden over a 1-yr period after the final exposure. These results provide support for our current hypothesis that exposure to WTC dusts caused changes in airway morphology/cell composition; such changes could, in turn, have led to potential alterations in the clearance/toxicities of other pollutants inhaled

  19. Comprehensive genomic characterization of squamous cell lung cancers.

    PubMed

    2012-09-27

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma is a common type of lung cancer, causing approximately 400,000 deaths per year worldwide. Genomic alterations in squamous cell lung cancers have not been comprehensively characterized, and no molecularly targeted agents have been specifically developed for its treatment. As part of The Cancer Genome Atlas, here we profile 178 lung squamous cell carcinomas to provide a comprehensive landscape of genomic and epigenomic alterations. We show that the tumour type is characterized by complex genomic alterations, with a mean of 360 exonic mutations, 165 genomic rearrangements, and 323 segments of copy number alteration per tumour. We find statistically recurrent mutations in 11 genes, including mutation of TP53 in nearly all specimens. Previously unreported loss-of-function mutations are seen in the HLA-A class I major histocompatibility gene. Significantly altered pathways included NFE2L2 and KEAP1 in 34%, squamous differentiation genes in 44%, phosphatidylinositol-3-OH kinase pathway genes in 47%, and CDKN2A and RB1 in 72% of tumours. We identified a potential therapeutic target in most tumours, offering new avenues of investigation for the treatment of squamous cell lung cancers.

  20. 'Dancing eyes, dancing feet syndrome' in small cell lung carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Chandramohan; Acharya, Mihir; Kumawat, Bansi Lal; Kochar, Abhishek

    2014-04-23

    A 60-year-old man presented with a 25-day history of acute onset instability of gait, tremulousness of limbs and involuntary eye movements. Examination revealed presence of opsoclonus, myoclonus and ataxia, without any loss of motor power in the limbs. Prompt investigations were directed towards identifying an underlying malignancy which is often associated with this type of clinical scenario. CT of the brain was normal and cerebrospinal fluid examination showed lymphocytic pleocytosis. A cavitatory lesion was found in the right lung base on the high-resolution CT of the chest and histopathological examination of this lung mass showed small cell lung carcinoma. The patient was managed symptomatically with levetiracetam and baclofen and referred to oncology department for resection of the lung mass.

  1. Survivorship Care Planning in Patients With Colorectal or Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-12-16

    Stage I Colon Cancer; Stage I Rectal Cancer; Stage IA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIC Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Colon Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Colon Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Rectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Colon Cancer; Stage IIIC Rectal Cancer

  2. Role of plasmacytoid dendritic cells in lung-associated inflammation.

    PubMed

    Sorrentino, Rosalinda; Morello, Silvana; Pinto, Aldo

    2010-06-01

    Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells (pDCs) are important immune orchestrators. One of the most important features of pDCs is the high production of IFN type I that can promote the polarization of T cells towards a Th1 phenotype. Recent evidence has highlighted the relevance of pDCs in therapy for asthma, lung infections and cancer. However, it is to note that pDCs can also participate in suppressive networks via the recruitment of T regulatory cells. Further studies are needed to understand pDCs activity in the lung, not only to elucidate pathological mechanisms, but also to lead towards new therapeutic approaches for lung inflammatory-based diseases. The article also outlines recent patents on plasmacytoid DCs.

  3. Endotoxin suppresses surfactant synthesis in cultured rat lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Li, J.J.; Sanders, R.L.; McAdam, K.P.; Gelfand, J.A.; Burke, J.F.

    1989-02-01

    Pulmonary complications secondary to postburn sepsis are a major cause of death in burned patients. Using an in vitro organotypic culture system, we examined the effect of E. coli endotoxin (LPS) on lung cell surfactant synthesis. Our results showed that E. coli endotoxin (1.0, 2.5, 10 micrograms LPS/ml) was capable of suppressing the incorporation of /sup 3/H-choline into de novo synthesized surfactant, lamellar bodies (LB), and common myelin figures (CMF) at 50%, 68%, and 64%, respectively. In a similar study, we were able to show that LPS also inhibited /sup 3/H-palmitate incorporation by cultured lung cells. LPS-induced suppression of surfactant synthesis was reversed by hydrocortisone. Our results suggest that LPS may play a significant role in reducing surfactant synthesis by rat lung cells, and thus contribute to the pathogenesis of sepsis-related respiratory distress syndrome (RDS) in burn injury.

  4. Carbon nanotubes induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells through FLICE-inhibitory protein.

    PubMed

    Pongrakhananon, Varisa; Luanpitpong, Sudjit; Stueckle, Todd A; Wang, Liying; Nimmannit, Ubonthip; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2015-02-01

    Chronic exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) has been reported to induce apoptosis resistance of human lung epithelial cells. As resistance to apoptosis is a foundation of neoplastic transformation and cancer development, we evaluated the apoptosis resistance characteristic of the exposed lung cells to understand the pathogenesis mechanism. Passage control and SWCNT-transformed human lung epithelial cells were treated with known inducers of apoptosis via the intrinsic (antimycin A and CDDP) or extrinsic (FasL and TNF-α) pathway and analyzed for apoptosis by DNA fragmentation, annexin-V expression, and caspase activation assays. Whole-genome microarray was performed to aid the analysis of apoptotic gene signaling network. The SWCNT-transformed cells exhibited defective death receptor pathway in association with cellular FLICE-inhibitory protein (c-FLIP) overexpression. Knockdown or chemical inhibition of c-FLIP abrogated the apoptosis resistance of SWCNT-transformed cells. Whole-genome expression signature analysis confirmed these findings. This study is the first to demonstrate carbon nanotube-induced defective death receptor pathway and the role of c-FLIP in the process.

  5. Characterization of the oxidant generation by inflammatory cells lavaged from rat lungs following acute exposure to ozone

    SciTech Connect

    Esterline, R.L.; Bassett, D.J.; Trush, M.A.

    1989-06-15

    Following exposure to 2 ppm ozone for 4 hr, two distinct effects on rat lung inflammatory cell oxidant generation were observed. TPA- and opsonized zymosan-stimulated superoxide production by the inflammatory cell population was found to be maximally inhibited 24 hr following ozone exposure. In contrast, luminol-amplified chemiluminescence increased 24 hr following ozone exposure, coinciding with an increase in the percentage of neutrophils and myeloperoxidase in the inflammatory cell population. Supporting the involvement of myeloperoxidase in the enhanced oxidant-generating status of these cells, the luminol-amplified chemiluminescence was found to be azide-, but not superoxide dismutase-inhibitable. Additionally, this cell population was found to generate taurine chloramines, a myeloperoxidase-dependent function which was absent prior to the ozone exposure and also demonstrated enhanced activation of benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol to its light-emitting dioxetane intermediate. Addition of myeloperoxidase to control alveolar macrophages resulted in enhanced luminol-amplified chemiluminescence, taurine chloramine generation, and enhanced chemiluminescence from benzo(a)pyrene-7,8-dihydrodiol demonstrating that, in the presence of myeloperoxidase, alveolar macrophages are capable of supporting myeloperoxidase-dependent reactions. The possibility of such an interaction occurring in vivo is suggested by the detection of myeloperoxidase activity in the cell-free lavagates of ozone-exposed rats. These studies suggest that neutrophils recruited to ozone-exposed lungs alter the oxidant-generating capabilities in the lung which could further contribute to lung injury or to the metabolism of inhaled xenobiotics.

  6. Image-Guided Hypofractionated Radiation Therapy With Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy Boost and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer That Cannot Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-07

    Adenocarcinoma of the Lung; Adenosquamous Cell Lung Cancer; Large Cell Lung Cancer; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Squamous Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  7. Therapeutic Potential of Lung Epithelial Progenitor Cells Derived from Embryonic and Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wetsel, Rick A.; Wang, Dachun; Calame, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells derived from preimplantation blastocysts and induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells generated from somatic cell sources are pluripotent and capable of indefinite expansion in vitro. They provide a possible unlimited source of cells that could be differentiated into lung progenitor cells for potential clinical use in pulmonary regenerative medicine. Because of inherent difficulties in deriving endodermal cells from undifferentiated cell cultures, applications using lung epithelial cells derived from ES and iPS cells have lagged behind similar efforts devoted to other tissues, such as the heart and spinal cord. However, during the past several years, significant advances in culture, differentiation, and purification protocols, as well as in bioengineering methodologies, have fueled enthusiasm for the development of stem cell–based lung therapeutics. This article provides an overview of recent research achievements and discusses future technical challenges that must be met before the promise of stem cell applications for lung disease can be realized. PMID:21226612

  8. Airway symptoms and lung function in pipelayers exposed to thermal degradation products from MDI-based polyurethane.

    PubMed Central

    Jakobsson, K; Kronholm-Diab, K; Rylander, L; Hagmar, L

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To study the prevalence of symptoms from the eyes and the upper and lower respiratory tract, lung function, and immunological sensitisation towards isocyanates in pipelayers exposed to thermal degradation products from methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI)-based polyurethane (PUR). MATERIAL AND METHODS: 50 presently active and 113 formerly active pipelayers were examined. Also, 65 unexposed workers were investigated for comparison. The one year prevalence of symptoms and smoking history (questionnaire data), lung function (vital capacity (VC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1), and atopy (positive skin prick tests towards standard allergens) were assessed among pipelayers and controls. For the pipelayers, the presence of work related symptoms and estimates of isocyanate and welding exposure were obtained from an interview. Skin prick tests towards specific isocyanate antigens and determinations of IgE-MDI and IgG-MDI in serum were also performed. RESULTS: The prevalence of episodes (more than once a month) of irritative eye symptoms, congestion of the nose, and soreness or dryness in the throat was much higher among the PUR pipelayers than among the controls. Most of the pipelayers with symptoms reported that these had started and occurred in relation to the PUR welding tasks. Presently active pipelayers with recent high PUR exposure showed a significant reduction of FEV1 compared with the controls. The estimated reduction, adjusted for smoking, was -0.3 l (P = 0.04). There was no confounding effect of ordinary welding. None of the pipelayers showed positive skin prick reactions against the specific isocyanate antigens used, or positive IgE-MDI, and only two had increased IgG-MDI. CONCLUSIONS: The findings indicate that exposure to thermal degradation products from MDI-based polyurethane has adverse effects on the mucous membranes and airways. PMID:9470895

  9. Cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of hexavalent chromium in human and North Atlantic right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) lung cells.

    PubMed

    Li Chen, Tânia; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Shaffiey, Fariba; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Kraus, Scott; Wise, John Pierce

    2009-11-01

    Humans and cetaceans are exposed to a wide range of contaminants. In this study, we compared the cytotoxic and genotoxic effects of a metal pollutant, hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)], which has been shown to cause damage in lung cells from both humans and North Atlantic right whales. Our results show that Cr induces increased cell death and chromosome damage in lung cells from both species with increasing intracellular Cr ion levels. Soluble Cr(VI) induced less of a cytotoxic and genotoxic effect based on administered dose in right whale (Eubalaena glacialis) cells than in human (Homo sapiens) cells. Whereas, particulate Cr(VI) induced a similar cytotoxic effect but less of a genotoxic effect based on administered dose in right whale cells than in human cells. Differences in chromium ion uptake explained soluble chromate-induced cell death but not all of the soluble chromate-induced chromosome damage. Uptake differences of lead ions could explain the differences in particulate chromate-induced toxicity. The data show that both forms of Cr(VI) are less genotoxic to right whale than human lung cells, and that soluble Cr(VI) induces a similar cytotoxic effect in both right whale and human cells, while particulate Cr(VI) is more cytotoxic to right whale lung cells.

  10. Soluble extracellular Klotho decreases sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Blake, David J; Reese, Caitlyn M; Garcia, Mario; Dahlmann, Elizabeth A; Dean, Alexander

    2015-10-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is currently the third leading cause of death in the US and is associated with an abnormal inflammatory response to cigarette smoke (CS). Exposure to CS induces oxidative stress and can result in cellular senescence in the lung. Cellular senescence can then lead to decreased proliferation of epithelial cells, the destruction of alveolar structure and pulmonary emphysema. The anti-aging gene, klotho, encodes a membrane bound protein that has been shown to be a key regulator of oxidative stress and cellular senescence. In this study the role of Klotho (KL) with regard to oxidative stress and cellular senescence was investigated in human pulmonary epithelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke. Individual clones that stably overexpress Klotho were generated through retroviral transfection and geneticin selection. Klotho overexpression was confirmed through RT-qPCR, Western blotting and ELISA. Compared to control cells, constitutive Klotho overexpression resulted in decreased sensitivity to cigarette smoke induced cell death in vitro via a reduction of reactive oxygen species and a decrease in the expression of p21. Our results suggest that increasing Klotho level in pulmonary epithelial cells may be a promising strategy to reduce cellular senescence and mitigate the risk for the development of COPD.

  11. Primary B-cell malignant lymphoma of the lung.

    PubMed

    Canver, C C

    1993-10-01

    A 52-year-old asymptomatic man was evaluated for two right lung lesions discovered on a chest roentgenogram during a routine physical examination. A computed tomographic scan revealed the absence of mediastinal nodal involvement. Guided-needle aspiration cytology was inconclusive. A subsequent right thoracotomy was necessary to perform biopsy of these masses, which proved to be B-cell malignant lymphomas of the lung. This case represents a rare example of a primary low-grade B-cell pulmonary lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue, with its distinct clinicopathologic features.

  12. Discrimination and quantification of autofluorescence spectra of human lung cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmani, Mahya; Khani, Mohammad Mehdi; Khazaei Koohpar, Zeinab; Molik, Paria

    2016-10-01

    To study laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy of the human lung cell line, we evaluated the native fluorescence properties of cancer QU-DB and normal MRC-5 human lung cells during continuous exposure to 405 nm laser light. Two emission bands centered at ~470 nm and ~560 nm were observed. These peaks are most likely attributable to mitochondrial fluorescent reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide and riboflavin fluorophores, respectively. This article highlights lung cell autofluorescence characterization and signal discrimination by collective investigation of different spectral features. The absolute intensity, the spectral shape factor or redox ratio, the full width of half-maximum and the full width of quarter maximum was evaluated. Moreover, the intensity ratio, the area under the peak and the area ratio as a contrast factor for normal and cancerous cells were also calculated. Among all these features it seems that the contrast factor precisely and significantly discriminates the spectral differences of normal and cancerous lung cells. On the other hand, the relative quantum yield for both cell types were found by comparing the quantum yield of an unknown compound with known fluorescein sodium as a reference solution.

  13. Expression of functionally relevant cell surface markers in dibutyltin-exposed human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Odman-Ghazi, Sabah O; Hatcher, Frank; Whalen, Margaret M

    2003-07-25

    Butyltin (BT) compounds are known for their worldwide contamination. Dibutyltin (DBT) is used as a stabilizer in plastic products, and as a deworming agent in poultry. Poultry products have been shown to contain measurable levels of DBT. Drinking water has also been reported to contain BTs due to leaching from PVC pipes. We, and others, have found measurable levels of DBT in human blood. BTs appear to increase the risk of cancer and other viral infections in exposed individuals. In previous studies we have shown that the tumor killing function of natural killer (NK) lymphocytes was greatly diminished after as little as a 1 h exposure to DBT and the inhibition continued even after removal of the compound. We also showed that there was a significant decrease in NK cell lysis of K562 target cells after an exposure to 1.5 microM DBT for 24 h. This 24 h exposure also decreased the ability of NK cells to bind to tumor cells. Loss of binding function was not seen when NK cells were exposed to 5-10 microM DBT for 1 h. However, NK cells exposed to 5 microM DBT for 1 h and then incubated in DBT-free media for 24, 48, or 96 h, showed a significant loss of tumor-binding function within 24 h. The effects of DBT exposure on seven cell surface molecules that are involved in NK-cell interactions with target cells were investigated. The results indicated that the exposure of NK cells to 1.5 microM DBT for 24 h decreased the expression of CD2, CD11a, CD16, CD11c. There was no decrease in expression of any of the markers studied when NK cells were exposed to 5 microM DBT for 1 h, consistent with the fact that a 1-h exposure had no effect on the ability of NK cells to bind tumor cells. However, when NK cells were exposed to 5 microM DBT for 1 h followed by 24, 48 or 96 h incubations in DBT-free media there was decreased expression of several of the cells surface molecules with the most dramatic decreases being in CD16 and CD56.

  14. RB loss in resistant EGFR mutant lung adenocarcinomas that transform to small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Niederst, Matthew J.; Sequist, Lecia V.; Poirier, John T.; Mermel, Craig H.; Lockerman, Elizabeth L.; Garcia, Angel R.; Katayama, Ryohei; Costa, Carlotta; Ross, Kenneth N.; Moran, Teresa; Howe, Emily; Fulton, Linnea E.; Mulvey, Hillary E.; Bernardo, Lindsay A.; Mohamoud, Farhiya; Miyoshi, Norikatsu; VanderLaan, Paul A.; Costa, Daniel B.; Jänne, Pasi A.; Borger, Darrell R.; Ramaswamy, Sridhar; Shioda, Toshi; Iafrate, Anthony J.; Getz, Gad; Rudin, Charles M.; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Engelman, Jeffrey A.

    2015-01-01

    Tyrosine kinase inhibitors are effective treatments for non-small-cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutations. However, relapse typically occurs after an average of 1 year of continuous treatment. A fundamental histological transformation from NSCLC to small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) is observed in a subset of the resistant cancers, but the molecular changes associated with this transformation remain unknown. Analysis of tumour samples and cell lines derived from resistant EGFR mutant patients revealed that Retinoblastoma (RB) is lost in 100% of these SCLC transformed cases, but rarely in those that remain NSCLC. Further, increased neuroendocrine marker and decreased EGFR expression as well as greater sensitivity to BCL2 family inhibition are observed in resistant SCLC transformed cancers compared with resistant NSCLCs. Together, these findings suggest that this subset of resistant cancers ultimately adopt many of the molecular and phenotypic characteristics of classical SCLC. PMID:25758528

  15. Halomethane-induced cytotoxicity and cell proliferation in human lung MRC-5 fibroblasts and NL20-TA epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nájera-Martínez, Minerva; García-Latorre, Ethel A; Reyes-Maldonado, Elba; Domínguez-López, M Lilia; Vega-López, Armando

    2012-09-01

    Halomethanes (HMs) can be formed during the chlorination process to obtain drinking water. In liver cells, HMs had been shown to be mutagenic and carcinogenic; however, their bioactivation by CYP 2E1 and GSTT1 is required. Although inhalation is the most common pathway of exposure, reports on the toxic effects induced by HMs in human lung are contradictory. The aim of this study was therefore to evaluate in vitro cytotoxicity and cell proliferation induced by CH(2)Cl(2), CHCl(3) and BrCHCl(2) in human lung NL20-TA epithelial cells and MRC-5 fibroblasts, and their relationship with CYP 2E1 and GSTT1 activity. High concentrations of these HMs induced cytotoxicity, particularly in cells treated with BrCHCl(2). Low concentrations of BrCHCl(2) stimulated hyperproliferation of fibroblasts, the most probable consequence of which is regenerative proliferation related to collagen induction. Fibroblasts exposed to BrCHCl(2) exhibited low levels of CYP 2E1 activity suggesting that released bromine is able to alter this activity by affecting the active site or auto regulating the activity itself. GSTT1 was up to ten times more active than CYP 2E1 in both cell lines, indicating that potential lung damage is due to formation of pro-carcinogens such as formaldehyde.

  16. Decreased lung carcinoma cell density on select polymer nanometer surface features for lung replacement therapies.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lijuan; Chun, Young Wook; Webster, Thomas J

    2010-05-13

    Poly(lactic-co-glycolic) acid (PLGA) has been widely used as a biomaterial in regenerative medicine because of its biocompatibility and biodegradability properties. Previous studies have shown that cells (such as bladder smooth muscle cells, chondrocytes, and osteoblasts) respond differently to nanostructured PLGA surfaces compared with nanosmooth surfaces. The purpose of the present in vitro research was to prepare PLGA films with various nanometer surface features and determine whether lung cancer epithelial cells respond differently to such topographies. To create nanosurface features on PLGA, different sized (190 nm, 300 nm, 400 nm, and 530 nm diameter) polystyrene beads were used to cast polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) molds which were used as templates to create nanofeatured PLGA films. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) images and root mean square roughness (RMS) values indicated that the intended spherical surface nanotopographies on PLGA with RMS values of 2.23, 5.03, 5.42, and 36.90 nm were formed by employing 190, 300, 400, and 530 nm beads. A solution evaporation method was also utilized to modify PLGA surface features by using 8 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 0.62 nm) and 4 wt% (to obtain an AFM RMS value of 2.23 nm) PLGA in chloroform solutions. Most importantly, lung cancer epithelial cells adhered less on the PLGA surfaces with RMS values of 0.62, 2.23, and 5.42 nm after four hours of culture compared with any other PLGA surface created here. After three days, PLGA surfaces with an RMS value of 0.62 nm had much lower cell density than any other sample. In this manner, PLGA with specific nanometer surface features may inhibit lung cancer cell density which may provide an important biomaterial for the treatment of lung cancer (from drug delivery to regenerative medicine).

  17. Emerging challenges of advanced squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yi-Chen; Zhou, Qing

    2016-01-01

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SQCLC) is an aggressive type of lung cancer and most are diagnosed at advanced stage. Patients with advanced SQCLC tend to be older, current or former smoker, with central type tumour located near large blood vessels and seldom with druggable genetic alternations. Consequently, progress of targeted therapy and antivascular agents available in lung adenocarcinoma could not be duplicated in this subset of patients. The treatment paradigms have long been dominant by cytotoxic agents and posed many therapeutic challenges. Until recent years, immune checkpoint inhibitors, other monoclonal antibodies and afatinib have been approved for treatment of advanced SQCLC, presenting a novel treatment landscape and initiating the era of precision medicine in this subset of patients. This review will summarise the recent treatment progresses in advanced SQCLC with a focus on checkpoint inhibitors of programmed cell death-1 receptor or its ligand, and discuss the emerging challenges in this new era. PMID:28255454

  18. Identification of different subsets of lung cells using Raman microspectroscopy and whole cell nucleus isolation.

    PubMed

    Pijanka, Jacek K; Stone, Nicholas; Rutter, Abigail V; Forsyth, Nicholas; Sockalingum, Ganesh D; Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep

    2013-09-07

    Raman spectroscopy has been widely used to study its possible clinical application in cancer diagnosis. However, in order to make it into clinical practice, it is important that this technique is able not only to identify cancer cells from their normal counterparts, but also from the array of cells present in human tissues. To this purpose, we used Raman spectroscopy to assess whether this technique was able to differentiate not only between lung cancer cells and lung epithelial cells but also from lung fibroblasts. Furthermore, we studied whether the differences were due to cell lineage (epithelial versus fibroblast) or to different proliferative characteristics of cells, and where in the cell compartment these differences might reside. To answer these questions we studied cell cytoplasm, cell nucleus and isolated whole cell nuclei. Our data suggests that Raman spectroscopy can differentiate between lung cancer, lung epithelial cells and lung fibroblasts. More important, it can also differentiate between 2 cells from the same lineage (fibroblast) but with one of them rendered immortal and with an increased proliferative activity. Finally, it seems that the main spectral differences reside in the cell nucleus and that the study of isolated nuclei strengthens the differences between cells.

  19. Inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs exposed to purified toxins from building isolated Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx and P. chrysogenum Thom.

    PubMed

    Rand, Thomas G; Giles, S; Flemming, J; Miller, J David; Puniani, Eva

    2005-09-01

    In vitro and in vivo studies have shown that building-associated Penicillium spores and spore extracts can induce significant inflammatory responses in lung cells and animal models of lung disease. However, because spores and spore extracts comprise mixtures of bioactive constituents often including toxins, it is impossible to resolve which constituent mediates inflammatory responses. This study examined dose-response (0.5 nM, 2.5 nM, 5.0 nM, 12.5 nM/g body weight (BW) animal) and time-course (3, 6, 24 and 48 h post instillation (PI)) relationships associated with inflammatory and cytotoxic responses in mouse lungs intratracheally instilled with pure brevianamide A, mycophenolic acid, and roquefortine C. High doses (5.0 nM and/or 12.5 nM/g BW animal) of brevianamide A and mycophenolic acid, the dominant metabolites of P. brevicompactum, and roquefortine C, the dominant metabolite of P. chrysogenum, induced significant inflammatory responses within 6 h PI, expressed as differentially elevated macrophage, neutrophil, MIP-2, TNF, and IL-6 concentrations in the bronchioalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of intratracheally exposed mice. Macrophage and neutrophil numbers were maximal at 24 h PI; responses of the other inflammatory markers were maximal at 6 h PI. Except for macrophage numbers in mycophenolic acid-treatment animals, cells exhibited significant dose-dependent-like responses; for the chemo-/cytokine markers, dose dependency was lacking except for MIP-2 concentration in brevianamide A-treatment animals. It was also found that brevianamide A induced cytotoxicity expressed as significantly increased LDH concentration in mouse BALF, at concentrations of 12.5 nM/g BW animal and at 6 and 24 h PI. Albumin concentrations, measured as a nonspecific marker of vascular leakage, were significantly elevated in the BALF of mice treated with 12.5 nM/g nM brevianamide A/animal from 6 to 24 h PI and in > or =5.0 nM/g mycophenolic acid-treated animals at 6 to 24 h PI. These results

  20. Fibrogenic Lung Injury Induces Non-Cell-Autonomous Fibroblast Invasion.

    PubMed

    Ahluwalia, Neil; Grasberger, Paula E; Mugo, Brian M; Feghali-Bostwick, Carol; Pardo, Annie; Selman, Moisés; Lagares, David; Tager, Andrew M

    2016-06-01

    Pathologic accumulation of fibroblasts in pulmonary fibrosis appears to depend on their invasion through basement membranes and extracellular matrices. Fibroblasts from the fibrotic lungs of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) have been demonstrated to acquire a phenotype characterized by increased cell-autonomous invasion. Here, we investigated whether fibroblast invasion is further stimulated by soluble mediators induced by lung injury. We found that bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from bleomycin-challenged mice or patients with IPF contain mediators that dramatically increase the matrix invasion of primary lung fibroblasts. Further characterization of this non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion suggested that the mediators driving this process are produced locally after lung injury and are preferentially produced by fibrogenic (e.g., bleomycin-induced) rather than nonfibrogenic (e.g., LPS-induced) lung injury. Comparison of invasion and migration induced by a series of fibroblast-active mediators indicated that these two forms of fibroblast movement are directed by distinct sets of stimuli. Finally, knockdown of multiple different membrane receptors, including platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β, lysophosphatidic acid 1, epidermal growth factor receptor, and fibroblast growth factor receptor 2, mitigated the non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion induced by bronchoalveolar lavage from bleomycin-injured mice, suggesting that multiple different mediators drive fibroblast invasion in pulmonary fibrosis. The magnitude of this mediator-driven fibroblast invasion suggests that its inhibition could be a novel therapeutic strategy for pulmonary fibrosis. Further elaboration of the molecular mechanisms that drive non-cell-autonomous fibroblast invasion consequently may provide a rich set of novel drug targets for the treatment of IPF and other fibrotic lung diseases.

  1. Exposure of Human Lung Cells to Tobacco Smoke Condensate Inhibits the Nucleotide Excision Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Holcomb, Nathaniel; Goswami, Mamta; Han, Sung Gu; Clark, Samuel; Orren, David K.; Gairola, C. Gary; Mellon, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to tobacco smoke is the number one risk factor for lung cancer. Although the DNA damaging properties of tobacco smoke have been well documented, relatively few studies have examined its effect on DNA repair pathways. This is especially true for the nucleotide excision repair (NER) pathway which recognizes and removes many structurally diverse DNA lesions, including those introduced by chemical carcinogens present in tobacco smoke. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of tobacco smoke on NER in human lung cells. We studied the effect of cigarette smoke condensate (CSC), a surrogate for tobacco smoke, on the NER pathway in two different human lung cell lines; IMR-90 lung fibroblasts and BEAS-2B bronchial epithelial cells. To measure NER, we employed a slot-blot assay to quantify the introduction and removal of UV light-induced 6–4 photoproducts and cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers. We find a dose-dependent inhibition of 6–4 photoproduct repair in both cell lines treated with CSC. Additionally, the impact of CSC on the abundance of various NER proteins and their respective RNAs was investigated. The abundance of XPC protein, which is required for functional NER, is significantly reduced by treatment with CSC while the abundance of XPA protein, also required for NER, is unaffected. Both XPC and XPA RNA levels are modestly reduced by CSC treatment. Finally, treatment of cells with MG-132 abrogates the reduction in the abundance of XPC protein produced by treatment with CSC, suggesting that CSC enhances proteasome-dependent turnover of the protein that is mediated by ubiquitination. Together, these findings indicate that tobacco smoke can inhibit the same DNA repair pathway that is also essential for the removal of some of the carcinogenic DNA damage introduced by smoke itself, increasing the DNA damage burden of cells exposed to tobacco smoke. PMID:27391141

  2. Maresin 1 Maintains the Permeability of Lung Epithelial Cells In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lin; Liu, Hong; Wang, Yaxin; Xia, Haifa; Gong, Jie; Li, Bo; Yao, Shanglong; Shang, You

    2016-12-01

    Previous reports showed that Maresin 1 (MaR1) possessed organ protection effects and could attenuate acute lung injury. Here, we aim to figure out whether MaR1 can maintain the permeability of lung epithelial cells by regulating the expression of tight junction protein during lung injury. Monolayer of murine lung epithelial cells was stimulated by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) with or without MaR1 and the permeability was evaluated. The expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1 in lung epithelial cells was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining and western blotting. MaR1 was given to the mice after LPS induced acute lung injury. The permeability of lung was assessed by Evans Blue extravasation, lung wet/dry ratio and protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Lung injury score was also evaluated. The expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1 in the lung was analyzed by immunofluorescence staining. Results showed that MaR1 maintained the permeability of lung epithelial cells and upregulated the expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1 after LPS stimulation. In acute lung injury mice, MaR1 upregulated the expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1, decreased lung permeability, and reduced lung injury. In summary, this study suggests that MaR1 can maintain the permeability of lung epithelial cells by upregulating the expression of Claudin-1 and ZO-1 in acute lung injury.

  3. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells function as airway sensors to control lung immune response

    PubMed Central

    Branchfield, Kelsey; Nantie, Leah; Verheyden, Jamie M.; Sui, Pengfei; Wienhold, Mark D.; Sun, Xin

    2016-01-01

    The lung is constantly exposed to environmental atmospheric cues. How it senses and responds to these cues is poorly defined. Here, we show that Roundabout receptor (Robo) genes are expressed in pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNECs), a rare, innervated epithelial population. Robo inactivation in mouse lung results in an inability of PNECs to cluster into sensory organoids and triggers increased neuropeptide production upon exposure to air. Excess neuropeptides lead to an increase in immune infiltrates, which in turn remodel the matrix and irreversibly simplify the alveoli. We demonstrate in vivo that PNECs act as precise airway sensors that elicit immune responses via neuropeptides. These findings suggest that the PNEC and neuropeptide abnormalities documented in a wide array of pulmonary diseases may profoundly affect symptoms and progression. PMID:26743624

  4. Temporal Lung Tumor Volume Changes in Small-Cell Lung Cancer Patients Undergoing Chemoradiotherapy

    SciTech Connect

    Yee, Don; Rathee, Satyapal; Robinson, Don; Murray, Brad

    2011-05-01

    Purpose: Small-cell lung cancer is considered to be relatively chemosensitive and radiosensitive. Small-cell tumor volume changes during concurrent chemoradiotherapy have not been quantified. The purpose of this work is to quantify small-cell lung tumor volume variations in limited-stage patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Eligible patients had pathologically confirmed limited-stage small-cell lung cancer, underwent concurrent chemoradiotherapy, and signed study-specific consent forms. Patients underwent serial chest computed tomography (CT) scans on a CT simulator with images acquired at the same phase of patients' respiratory cycle. Computed tomography scans were obtained at the time of planning CT scan and 3 times a week during radiotherapy (RT). Gross tumor volumes (GTVs) were contoured on each CT scan. Gross tumor volumes defined on each CT scan were analyzed for volume changes relative to pre-RT scans. Results: We obtained 104 CT scans (median, 11.5 scans per patient). The median tumor dose was 50 Gy. The median pre-RT GTV was 98.9 cm{sup 3} (range, 57.8-412.4 cm{sup 3}). The median GTV at the final serial CT scan was 10.0 cm{sup 3} (range, 4.2-81.6 cm{sup 3}). The mean GTV relative to pre-RT volume at the end of each RT week was 53.0% for Week 1, 29.8% for Week 2, 22.9% for Week 3, 19.5% for Week 4, and 12.4% for Week 5. Conclusions: Dramatic shrinkage of small-cell lung tumors occurred in patients undergoing chemoradiotherapy in this trial. Most of the observed GTV shrinkage occurred during the first week of RT.

  5. Proteomics of lung cell biology and pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Levine, Stewart J

    2007-10-01

    Proteomics has the goal of defining the complete protein complement of biological systems, which can then be analyzed in a comparative fashion to generate informative data regarding protein expression and function. Proteomic analyses can also facilitate the discovery of biomarkers that can be used to diagnose and monitor disease severity, activity and therapeutic response, as well as to identify new targets for drug development. A major challenge for proteomics, however, has been detecting low-abundance proteins in complex biological fluids. This review summarizes how proteomic analyses have advanced lung cell biology and facilitated the identification of new mechanisms of disease pathogenesis in respiratory disorders, such as asthma, cystic fibrosis, lung cancer, acute lung injury and sarcoidosis. The impact of nanotechnology and microfluidics, as well as studies of post-translational modifications and protein-protein interactions (the interactome), are considered. Furthermore, the application of systems-biology approaches to organize and analyze data regarding the lung proteome, interactome, genome, transcriptome, metabolome, glycome and small RNAome (regulatory RNAs), should facilitate future conceptual advances regarding lung cell biology, disease pathogenesis, biomarker discovery and drug development.

  6. Diversity of Epithelial Stem Cell Types in Adult Lung

    PubMed Central

    Li, Feng; He, Jinxi; Wei, Jun; Cho, William C.; Liu, Xiaoming

    2015-01-01

    Lung is a complex organ lined with epithelial cells. In order to maintain its homeostasis and normal functions following injuries caused by varied extraneous and intraneous insults, such as inhaled environmental pollutants and overwhelming inflammatory responses, the respiratory epithelium normally undergoes regenerations by the proliferation and differentiation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells that resided in distinct niches along the airway tree. The importance of local epithelial stem cell niches in the specification of lung stem/progenitor cells has been recently identified. Studies using cell differentiating and lineage tracing assays, in vitro and/or ex vivo models, and genetically engineered mice have suggested that these local epithelial stem/progenitor cells within spatially distinct regions along the pulmonary tree contribute to the injury repair of epithelium adjacent to their respective niches. This paper reviews recent findings in the identification and isolation of region-specific epithelial stem/progenitor cells and local niches along the airway tree and the potential link of epithelial stem cells for the development of lung cancer. PMID:25810726

  7. Radiosensitization of non-small cell lung cancer by kaempferol.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wei-Ting; Tsai, Yuan-Chung; Wu, His-Chin; Ho, Yung-Jen; Chen, Yueh-Sheng; Yao, Chen-Han; Yao, Chun-Hsu

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine whether kaempferol has a radiosensitization potential for lung cancer in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro radio-sensitization activity of kaempferol was elucidated in A-549 lung cancer cells by using an MTT (3-(4 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-25-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide) assay, cell cycle analysis and clonogenic assay. The in vivo activity was evaluated in the BALB/c nude mouse xenograft model of A-549 cells by hematoxylin and eosin staining and immunohistochemistry, and the tumor volume was recorded. Protein levels of the apoptotic pathway were detected by western blot analysis. Treatment with kaempferol inhibited the growth of A-549 cells through activation of apoptotic pathway. However, the same doses did not affect HFL1 normal lung cell growth. Kaempferol induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and the enhancement of radiation-induced death and clonogenic survival inhibition. The in vivo data showed that kaempferol increased tumor cell apoptosis and killing of radiation. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that kaempferol increased tumor cell killing by radiation in vitro and in vivo through inhibition of the AKT/PI3K and ERK pathways and activation of the mitochondria apoptosis pathway. The results of the present study provided solid evidence that kaempferol is a safe and potential radiosensitizer.

  8. Impaired NK Cell Activation and Chemotaxis toward Dendritic Cells Exposed to Complement-Opsonized HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Ellegård, Rada; Crisci, Elisa; Andersson, Jonas; Shankar, Esaki M; Nyström, Sofia; Hinkula, Jorma; Larsson, Marie

    2015-08-15

    Mucosa resident dendritic cells (DCs) may represent one of the first immune cells that HIV-1 encounters during sexual transmission. The virions in body fluids can be opsonized with complement factors because of HIV-mediated triggering of the complement cascade, and this appears to influence numerous aspects of the immune defense targeting the virus. One key attribute of host defense is the ability to attract immune cells to the site of infection. In this study, we investigated whether the opsonization of HIV with complement (C-HIV) or a mixture of complement and Abs (CI-HIV) affected the cytokine and chemokine responses generated by DCs, as well as their ability to attract other immune cells. We found that the expression levels of CXCL8, CXCL10, CCL3, and CCL17 were lowered after exposure to either C-HIV or CI-HIV relative to free HIV (F-HIV). DCs exposed to F-HIV induced higher cell migration, consisting mainly of NK cells, compared with opsonized virus, and the chemotaxis of NK cells was dependent on CCL3 and CXCL10. NK cell exposure to supernatants derived from HIV-exposed DCs showed that F-HIV induced phenotypic activation (e.g., increased levels of TIM3, CD69, and CD25) and effector function (e.g., production of IFNγ and killing of target cells) in NK cells, whereas C-HIV and CI-HIV did not. The impairment of NK cell recruitment by DCs exposed to complement-opsonized HIV and the lack of NK activation may contribute to the failure of innate immune responses to control HIV at the site of initial mucosa infection.

  9. Substrate Stiffness Regulates Filopodial Activities in Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liou, Yu-Ren; Torng, Wen; Kao, Yu-Chiu; Sung, Kung-Bin; Lee, Chau-Hwang; Kuo, Po-Ling

    2014-01-01

    Microenvironment stiffening plays a crucial role in tumorigenesis. While filopodia are generally thought to be one of the cellular mechanosensors for probing environmental stiffness, the effects of environmental stiffness on filopodial activities of cancer cells remain unclear. In this work, we investigated the filopodial activities of human lung adenocarcinoma cells CL1-5 cultured on substrates of tunable stiffness using a novel platform. The platform consists of an optical system called structured illumination nano-profilometry, which allows time-lapsed visualization of filopodial activities without fluorescence labeling. The culturing substrates were composed of polyvinyl chloride mixed with an environmentally friendly plasticizer to yield Young's modulus ranging from 20 to 60 kPa. Cell viability studies showed that the viability of cells cultured on the substrates was similar to those cultured on commonly used elastomers such as polydimethylsiloxane. Time-lapsed live cell images were acquired and the filopodial activities in response to substrates with varying degrees of stiffness were analyzed. Statistical analyses revealed that lung cancer cells cultured on softer substrates appeared to have longer filopodia, higher filopodial densities with respect to the cellular perimeter, and slower filopodial retraction rates. Nonetheless, the temporal analysis of filopodial activities revealed that whether a filopodium decides to extend or retract is purely a stochastic process without dependency on substrate stiffness. The discrepancy of the filopodial activities between lung cancer cells cultured on substrates with different degrees of stiffness vanished when the myosin II activities were inhibited by treating the cells with blebbistatin, which suggests that the filopodial activities are closely modulated by the adhesion strength of the cells. Our data quantitatively relate filopodial activities of lung cancer cells with environmental stiffness and should shed light

  10. Antisense bcl-2 treatment increases programmed cell death in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koty, P P; Zhang, H; Levitt, M L

    1999-02-01

    Programmed cell death (PCD) is a genetically regulated pathway that is altered in many cancers. This process is, in part, regulated by the ratio of PCD inducers (Bax) or inhibitors (Bcl-2). An abnormally high ratio of Bcl-2 to Bax prevents PCD, thus contributing to resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, many of which are capable of inducing PCD. Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells demonstrate resistance to these PCD-inducing agents. If Bcl-2 prevents NSCLC cells from entering the PCD pathway, then reducing the amount of endogenous Bcl-2 product may allow these cells to spontaneously enter the PCD pathway. Our purpose was to determine the effects of bcl-2 antisense treatment on the levels of programmed cell death in NSCLC cells. First, we determined whether bcl-2 and bax mRNA were expressed in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines: NCI-H226 (squamous), NCI-H358 (adenocarcinoma), and NCI-H596 (adenosquamous). Cells were then exposed to synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment, after which programmed cell death was determined, as evidenced by DNA fragmentation. Bcl-2 protein expression was detected immunohistochemically. All three NSCLC cell lines expressed both bcl-2 and bax mRNA and had functional PCD pathways. Synthetic antisense bcl-2 oligonucleotide treatment resulted in decreased Bcl-2 levels, reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell viability, and increased levels of spontaneous PCD. This represents the first evidence that decreasing Bcl-2 in three morphologically distinct NSCLC cell lines allows the cells to spontaneously enter a PCD pathway. It also indicates the potential therapeutic use of antisense bcl-2 in the treatment of NSCLC.

  11. Nonhematopoietic cells are the primary source of bone marrow-derived lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Kassmer, Susannah H; Bruscia, Emanuela M; Zhang, Ping-Xia; Krause, Diane S

    2012-03-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that bone marrow (BM)-derived cells differentiate into nonhematopoietic cells of multiple tissues. To date, it remains unknown which population(s) of BM cells are primarily responsible for this engraftment. To test the hypothesis that nonhematopoietic stem cells in the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells, either wild-type hematopoietic or nonhematopoietic BM cells were transplanted into irradiated surfactant-protein-C (SPC)-null mice. Donor-derived, SPC-positive type 2 pneumocytes were predominantly detected in the lungs of mice receiving purified nonhematopoietic cells and were absent from mice receiving purified hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We conclude that cells contained in the nonhematopoietic fraction of the BM are the primary source of marrow-derived lung epithelial cells. These nonhematopoietic cells may represent a primitive stem cell population residing in adult BM.

  12. Loss of lysophosphatidic acid receptor-3 enhances cell migration in rat lung tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Mai; Okabe, Kyoko; Yamawaki, Yasuna; Teranishi, Miki; Honoki, Kanya; Mori, Toshio; Fukushima, Nobuyuki; Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi

    2011-02-18

    Research highlights: {yields} Loss of the Lpar3 expression due to aberrant DNA methylation occurred in rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 inhibited cell migration of rat lung tumor cells. {yields} The Lpar3 may act as a negative regulator of rat lung tumor cells. -- Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) indicates several biological effects, such as cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. LPA interacts with G protein-coupled transmembrane LPA receptors. In our previous report, we detected that loss of the LPA receptor-1 (Lpar1) expression is due to its aberrant DNA methylation in rat tumor cell lines. In this study, to assess an involvement of the other LPA receptor, Lpar3, in the pathogenesis of rat lung tumor cells, we measured the expression levels of the Lpar3 gene and its DNA methylation status by reverse transcription (RT)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and bisulfite sequencing analyses, respectively. RLCNR lung adenocarcinoma cells showed reduced expression of the Lpar3, compared with normal lung tissues. In the 5' upstream region of the Lpar3, normal lung tissues were unmethylated. By contrast, RLCNR cells were highly methylated, correlating with reduced expressions of the Lpar3. Based on these results, we generated the Lpar3-expressing RLCNR-a3 cells and measured the cell migration ability. Interestingly, the cell migration of RLCNR-a3 cells was significantly lower than that of RLCNR cells. This study suggests that loss of the Lpar3 due to aberrant DNA methylation may be involved in the progression of rat lung tumor cells.

  13. From Here to There, Progenitor Cells and Stem Cells Are Everywhere in Lung Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Heise, Rebecca L.; Link, Patrick A.; Farkas, Laszlo

    2016-01-01

    The field of stem cell biology, cell therapy, and regenerative medicine has expanded almost exponentially, in the last decade. Clinical trials are evaluating the potential therapeutic use of stem cells in many adult and pediatric lung diseases with vascular component, such as bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD), chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), or pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Extensive research activity is exploring the lung resident and circulating progenitor cells and their contribution to vascular complications of chronic lung diseases, and researchers hope to use resident or circulating stem/progenitor cells to treat chronic lung diseases and their vascular complications. It is becoming more and more clear that progress in mechanobiology will help to understand the various influences of physical forces and extracellular matrix composition on the phenotype and features of the progenitor cells and stem cells. The current review provides an overview of current concepts in the field. PMID:27583245

  14. Characterization of murine lung dendritic cells: similarities to Langerhans cells and thymic dendritic cells

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) are potent accessory cells (AC) for the initiation of primary immune responses. Although murine lymphoid DC and Langerhans cells have been extensively characterized, DC from murine lung have been incompletely described. We isolated cells from enzyme-digested murine lungs and bronchoalveolar lavages that were potent stimulators of a primary mixed lymphocyte response (MLR). The AC had a low buoyant density, were loosely adherent and nonphagocytic. AC function was unaffected by depletion of cells expressing the splenic DC marker, 33D1. In addition, antibody and complement depletion of cells bearing the macrophage marker F4/80, or removal of phagocytic cells with silica also failed to decrease AC activity. In contrast, AC function was decreased by depletion of cells expressing the markers J11d and the low affinity interleukin 2 receptor (IL-2R), both present on thymic and skin DC. AC function was approximately equal in FcR+ and FcR- subpopulations, indicating there was heterogeneity within the AC population. Consistent with the functional data, a combined two-color immunofluorescence and latex bead uptake technique revealed that lung cells high in AC activity were enriched in brightly Ia+ dendritic- shaped cells that (a) were nonphagocytic, (b) lacked specific T and B lymphocyte markers and the macrophage marker F4/80, but (c) frequently expressed C3biR, low affinity IL-2R, FcRII, and the markers NLDC-145 and J11d. Taken together, the functional and phenotypic data suggest the lung cells that stimulate resting T cells in an MLR and that might be important in local pulmonary immune responses are DC that bear functional and phenotypic similarity to other tissues DC, such as Langerhans cells and thymic DC. PMID:2162904

  15. Cytotoxicity of Nigella sativa seed oil and extract against human lung cancer cell line.

    PubMed

    Al-Sheddi, Ebtesam Saad; Farshori, Nida Nayyar; Al-Oqail, Mai Mohammad; Musarrat, Javed; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz Ali; Siddiqui, Maqsood Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    Nigella sativa (N sativa), commonly known as black seed, has been used in traditional medicine to treat many diseases. The antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and antibacterial activities of N sativa extracts are well known. Therefore, the present study was designed to investigate the anticancer activity of seed extract (NSE) and seed oil (NSO) of N sativa against a human lung cancer cell line. Cells were exposed to 0.01 to 1 mg/ml of NSE and NSO for 24 h, then percent cell viability was assessed by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2, 5-biphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) and neutral red uptake (NRU) assays, and cellular morphology by phase contrast inverted microscopy. The results showed NSE and NSO significantly reduce the cell viability and alter the cellular morphology of A-549 cells in a concentration dependent manner. The percent cell viability was recorded as 75%, 50%, and 26% at 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/ml of NSE by MTT assay and 73%, 48%, and 23% at 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/ml of NSE by NRU assay. Exposure to NSO concentrations of 0.1 mg/ml and above for 24 h was also found to be cytotoxic. The decrease in cell viability at 0.1, 0.25, 0.5, and 1 mg/ml of NSO was recorded to be 89%, 52%, 41%, and 13% by MTT assay and 85%, 52%, 38%, and 11% by NRU assay, respectively. A-549 cells exposed to 0.25, 0.5 and 1 mg/ml of NSE and NSO lost their typical morphology and appeared smaller in size. The data revealed that the treatment of seed extract (NSE) and seed oil (NSO) of Nigella sativa significantly reduce viability of human lung cancer cells.

  16. Circumvention of drug resistance in human non-small cell lung cancer in vitro by verapamil.

    PubMed

    Merry, S; Courtney, E R; Fetherston, C A; Kaye, S B; Freshney, R I

    1987-10-01

    The sensitivity of 7 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines to each of 7 cytotoxic drugs was determined. None of the cell lines used in these experiments had been previously exposed to cytotoxic drugs in vitro. A pattern of cross-resistance (P less than 0.05) between the drugs adriamycin (ADR), vincristine (VC) and etoposide (VP16) was noted similar to that seen in other models. The calcium antagonist verapamil (6.6 microM) was shown to increase sensitivity (up to 29-fold) to ADR, VC or VP16 in 5 cell lines. For 2 of the cell lines (A549 and WIL) 2.2 microM verapamil increased VP16 cytotoxicity (up to 4-fold). Drug accumulation studies in 2 cell lines (A549 and SK-MES-1) showed that 6.6 microM verapamil increased intracellular levels of VC up to 4-fold with the greatest increase seen in the cell line (SK-MES-1) for which verapamil produced the greatest increase in cytotoxicity (10-fold). For ADR and VP16 increases in drug accumulation were smaller (up to 1.6-fold). Our data support a potential clinical role for verapamil in overcoming cytotoxic drug resistance in human lung cancer.

  17. Circumvention of drug resistance in human non-small cell lung cancer in vitro by verapamil.

    PubMed Central

    Merry, S.; Courtney, E. R.; Fetherston, C. A.; Kaye, S. B.; Freshney, R. I.

    1987-01-01

    The sensitivity of 7 human non-small cell lung cancer cell lines to each of 7 cytotoxic drugs was determined. None of the cell lines used in these experiments had been previously exposed to cytotoxic drugs in vitro. A pattern of cross-resistance (P less than 0.05) between the drugs adriamycin (ADR), vincristine (VC) and etoposide (VP16) was noted similar to that seen in other models. The calcium antagonist verapamil (6.6 microM) was shown to increase sensitivity (up to 29-fold) to ADR, VC or VP16 in 5 cell lines. For 2 of the cell lines (A549 and WIL) 2.2 microM verapamil increased VP16 cytotoxicity (up to 4-fold). Drug accumulation studies in 2 cell lines (A549 and SK-MES-1) showed that 6.6 microM verapamil increased intracellular levels of VC up to 4-fold with the greatest increase seen in the cell line (SK-MES-1) for which verapamil produced the greatest increase in cytotoxicity (10-fold). For ADR and VP16 increases in drug accumulation were smaller (up to 1.6-fold). Our data support a potential clinical role for verapamil in overcoming cytotoxic drug resistance in human lung cancer. PMID:2825748

  18. PLAGL2 translocation and SP-C promoter activity-A cellular response of lung cells to hypoxia

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Yuhong; Yang, Meng-Chun; Weissler, Jonathan C.; Yang, Yih-Sheng . E-mail: Yih-Sheng.Yang@UTSouthwestern.edu

    2007-08-31

    Cobalt is a transition metal which can substitute for iron in the oxygen-sensitive protein and mimic hypoxia. Cobalt was known to be associated with the development of lung disease. In this study, when lung cells were exposed to hypoxia-induced by CoCl{sub 2} at a sub-lethal concentration (100 {mu}M), their thyroid transcription factor-1 (TTF-1) expression was greatly reduced. Under this condition, SP-B promoter activity was down-regulated, but SP-C promoter remained active. Therefore, we hypothesized that other factor(s) besides TTF-1 might contribute to the modulation of SP-C promoter in hypoxic lung cells. Pleomorphic adenoma gene like-2 (PLAGL2), a previously identified TTF-1-independent activator of the SP-C promoter, was not down-regulated, nor increased, within those cells. Its cellular location was redistributed from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and quantitative RT-PCR analyses demonstrated that nuclear PLAGL2 occupied and transactivated the endogenous SP-C promoter in lung cells. Thereby, through relocating and accumulating of PLAGL2 inside the nucleus, PLAGL2 interacted with its target genes for various cellular functions. These results further suggest that PLAGL2 is an oxidative stress responding regulator in lung cells.

  19. Discovery of 2'-hydroxychalcones as autophagy inducer in A549 lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fang-Wu; Wang, Sheng-Qing; Zhao, Bao-Xiang; Miao, Jun-Ying

    2014-05-21

    A series of 2'-hydroxychalcone derivatives was synthesized and the effects of all the compounds on growth of A549 lung cancer cell were investigated. The results showed that all compounds had inhibitory effects on the growth of A549 lung cancer cells and compound possessed the highest growth inhibitory effect and induced autophagy of A549 lung cancer cells.

  20. Spontaneous Tumor Lysis Syndrome in Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saladi, Swetha; Patolia, Setu; Stoeckel, David

    2017-01-01

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a life-threatening oncologic complication caused by the lysis of a vast number of malignant cells resulting in metabolic derangements and organ dysfunction. TLS can occur spontaneously before initiation of any therapies often referred to as spontaneous tumor lysis syndrome (STLS), or shortly after the induction of chemotherapy, radiotherapy, or cytolytic antibody therapy. TLS is vastly seen in patients with hematological malignancies with high rapid cell turnover rates such as Burkitt lymphoma, acute myelogenous leukemia, and acute lymphocytic leukemia, and is rarely observed in solid tumors. However, TLS can occur in solid tumors, and there are multiple reports in the literature on the occurrence of TLS in various solid tumors. In this article, we report a case of STLS in small cell lung cancer followed by a brief review of the occurrence of TLS and STLS in small cell lung cancer. PMID:28344911

  1. Pneumopericardium as a non-small-cell lung carcinoma complication

    PubMed Central

    Kubisa, Anna; Dec, Paweł; Szewczak-Głodek, Małgorzata; Kochanowski, Leszek; Kubisa, Bartosz; Feledyk, Grzegorz; Czarnecka, Michalina; Wójcik, Janusz; Grodzki, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Below we present a case of a young man with symptoms of progressive weakness, fever, cough, rapid decrease in body weight and the presence of a tumor in the left axillary region. The chest radiography and echocardiography revealed gas bubbles in the pericardium. The more detailed diagnostics and computed tomography of the chest showed an infiltration of the left lung cavity and a fistula among the bronchus, pleural and pericardial cavities. Further diagnostics demonstrated that the pneumopericardium (diagnosed by means of chest radiograph and echocardiography) was a complication of a primary non-small-cell lung carcinoma. PMID:27785143

  2. Lymphangioleiomyomatosis Biomarkers Linked to Lung Metastatic Potential and Cell Stemness

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz de Garibay, Gorka; Herranz, Carmen; Llorente, Alicia; Boni, Jacopo; Serra-Musach, Jordi; Mateo, Francesca; Aguilar, Helena; Gómez-Baldó, Laia; Petit, Anna; Vidal, August; Climent, Fina; Hernández-Losa, Javier; Cordero, Álex; González-Suárez, Eva; Sánchez-Mut, José Vicente; Esteller, Manel; Llatjós, Roger; Varela, Mar; López, José Ignacio; García, Nadia; Extremera, Ana I.; Gumà, Anna; Ortega, Raúl; Plà, María Jesús; Fernández, Adela; Pernas, Sònia; Falo, Catalina; Morilla, Idoia; Campos, Miriam; Gil, Miguel; Román, Antonio; Molina-Molina, María; Ussetti, Piedad; Laporta, Rosalía; Valenzuela, Claudia; Ancochea, Julio; Xaubet, Antoni; Casanova, Álvaro; Pujana, Miguel Angel

    2015-01-01

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a rare lung-metastasizing neoplasm caused by the proliferation of smooth muscle-like cells that commonly carry loss-of-function mutations in either the tuberous sclerosis complex 1 or 2 (TSC1 or TSC2) genes. While allosteric inhibition of the mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) has shown substantial clinical benefit, complementary therapies are required to improve response and/or to treat specific patients. However, there is a lack of LAM biomarkers that could potentially be used to monitor the disease and to develop other targeted therapies. We hypothesized that the mediators of cancer metastasis to lung, particularly in breast cancer, also play a relevant role in LAM. Analyses across independent breast cancer datasets revealed associations between low TSC1/2 expression, altered mTOR complex 1 (mTORC1) pathway signaling, and metastasis to lung. Subsequently, immunohistochemical analyses of 23 LAM lesions revealed positivity in all cases for the lung metastasis mediators fascin 1 (FSCN1) and inhibitor of DNA binding 1 (ID1). Moreover, assessment of breast cancer stem or luminal progenitor cell biomarkers showed positivity in most LAM tissue for the aldehyde dehydrogenase 1 (ALDH1), integrin-ß3 (ITGB3/CD61), and/or the sex-determining region Y-box 9 (SOX9) proteins. The immunohistochemical analyses also provided evidence of heterogeneity between and within LAM cases. The analysis of Tsc2-deficient cells revealed relative over-expression of FSCN1 and ID1; however, Tsc2-deficient cells did not show higher sensitivity to ID1-based cancer inhibitors. Collectively, the results of this study reveal novel LAM biomarkers linked to breast cancer metastasis to lung and to cell stemness, which in turn might guide the assessment of additional or complementary therapeutic opportunities for LAM. PMID:26167915

  3. Biliary epithelium and liver B cells exposed to bacteria activate intrahepatic MAIT cells through MR1

    PubMed Central

    Jeffery, Hannah C.; van Wilgenburg, Bonnie; Kurioka, Ayako; Parekh, Krishan; Stirling, Kathryn; Roberts, Sheree; Dutton, Emma E.; Hunter, Stuart; Geh, Daniel; Braitch, Manjit K.; Rajanayagam, Jeremy; Iqbal, Tariq; Pinkney, Thomas; Brown, Rachel; Withers, David R.; Adams, David H.; Klenerman, Paul; Oo, Ye H.

    2016-01-01

    Background & Aims Mucosal-Associated Invariant T (MAIT) cells are innate-like T cells characterised by the invariant TCR-chain, Vα7.2-Jα33, and are restricted by MR1, which presents bacterial vitamin B metabolites. They are important for antibacterial immunity at mucosal sites; however, detailed characteristics of liver-infiltrating MAIT (LI-MAIT) and their role in biliary immune surveillance remain unexplored. Methods The phenotype and intrahepatic localisation of human LI-MAIT cells was examined in diseased and normal livers. MAIT cell activation in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, biliary epithelial cells (BEC) and liver B cells was assessed with/without anti-MR1. Results Intrahepatic MAIT cells predominantly localised to bile ducts in the portal tracts. Consistent with this distribution, they expressed biliary tropic chemokine receptors CCR6, CXCR6, and integrin αEβ7. LI-MAIT cells were also present in the hepatic sinusoids and possessed tissue-homing chemokine receptor CXCR3 and integrins LFA-1 and VLA-4, suggesting their recruitment via hepatic sinusoids. LI-MAIT cells were enriched in the parenchyma of acute liver failure livers compared to chronic diseased livers. LI-MAIT cells had an activated, effector memory phenotype, expressed α4β7 and receptors for IL-12, IL-18, and IL-23. Importantly, in response to E. coli-exposed macrophages, liver B cells and BEC, MAIT cells upregulated IFN-γ and CD40 Ligand and degranulated in an MR1-dependent, cytokine-independent manner. In addition, diseased liver MAIT cells expressed T-bet and RORγt and the cytokines IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-17. Conclusions Our findings provide the first evidence of an immune surveillance effector response for MAIT cells towards BEC in human liver; thus they could be manipulated for treatment of biliary disease in the future. PMID:26743076

  4. Reduced cell viability and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma and mesothelioma cells exposed to cidofovir.

    PubMed

    Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Nuvoli, Barbara; Galati, Rossella; Benedetti, Serena

    2017-02-20

    Besides its well-recognized antiviral activity, Cidofovir (CDV) has been shown to exert anticancer properties both within in vitro and in vivo models. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of CDV on still unexplored cultured cancer cells from human mesothelioma as well as breast, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Overall, a dose- and time-dependent inhibition of cell viability was observed after CDV exposure. To clarify the mechanisms underlying CDV action, apoptotic cell death was investigated in two infected cell lines [Ist-Mes1 and Ist-Mes2 mesothelioma cells (SV40+)] and in two uninfected cell lines (NCI-H2425 mesothelioma cells and FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells), which resulted the most sensitive to CDV treatment. Reduced expression of procaspase-3 and increased expression of PARP p85 fragment were observed in both infected and uninfected mesothelioma cells, indicating apoptosis induction by CDV in a virus-independent manner. Similarly, the increase of the pro-apoptotic proteins p53, cytochrome c and caspase-3, the decrease of the survival protein Bcl-x, and the increment of Bax/Bcl-2 ratio revealed the occurrence of apoptosis in CDV-treated FTC-133. The presence of nuclear DNA fragmentation confirmed apoptotic cell death by CDV. Overall, our findings warrant further investigations to explore the therapeutic potential of CDV for human mesothelioma and follicular thyroid carcinoma.

  5. Effect of angiopoietin-like protein 4 on rat pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells exposed to LPS

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YUXI; CHEN, HAILONG; LI, HAILONG; ZHANG, JINGWEN; GAO, YANYAN

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) possess highly proliferative and angiogenic capacities and are localized at the critical interface between the blood and microvessel wall; they are the primary targets of inflammatory cytokines during lung inflammation. Angiopoietin-like protein 4 (Angptl4) is a circulating protein that has recently been implicated in the regulation of angiogenesis and metastasis. This study aimed to investigate the effect of Angptl4 on rat PMVECs (RPMVECs) exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). The cell culture was stimulated with LPS. Total Angptl4 cDNA was obtained from Source BioScience. The PCR product was cloned into the pcDNA3.1-eGFP or the pcDNA3.1-eGFP-Angptl4 vector, which were then transfected into the RPMVECs using SuperFect transfection reagent. The Angptl4 mRNA levels, protein levels and cell morphology of the RPMVECs in the experimental groups were detected using real time-PCR, western blot analysis, MTT assay, ELISA and confocal microscopy methods, respectively. The Angptl4 expression vector, pcDNA3.1-eGFP-Angptl4, was successfully constructed. The Angptl4 mRNA level in the LPS-pcDNA3.1-eGFP-transfected group (blank control) was slightly increased and was significantly higher in the experimental group compared with the empty vector and blank control group with significant differences. Pro-apoptotic caspase-8, -9 and Bax protein were inhibited, while p-AKT/AKT and p-MEK1/2 protein expression was also decreased. The rosiglitazone group had significantly decreased levels of the inflammatory cytokine, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α (P<0.01). The overexpression of Angptl4 inhibited the LPS-induced increase in the permeability of the RPMVECs, which was associated with the depolymerization of central F-actin in the RPMVECs. In conclusion, our study demonstrates that the overexpression of Angptl4 exerts protective, anti-inflammatory and anti-angiogenic effects. It represents a novel therapeutic target gene for the treatment

  6. Evaluation of oxidative response and tissular damage in rat lungs exposed to silica-coated gold nanoparticles under static magnetic fields

    PubMed Central

    Ferchichi, Soumaya; Trabelsi, Hamdi; Azzouz, Inès; Hanini, Amel; Rejeb, Ahmed; Tebourbi, Olfa; Sakly, Mohsen; Abdelmelek, Hafedh

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of our study was the evaluation of toxicological effects of silica-coated gold nanoparticles (GNPs) and static magnetic fields (SMFs; 128 mT) exposure in rat lungs. Animals received a single injection of GNPs (1,100 µg/kg, 100 nm, intraperitoneally) and were exposed to SMFs, over 14 days (1 h/day). Results showed that GNPs treatment induced a hyperplasia of bronchus-associated lymphoid tissue. Fluorescence microscopy images showed that red fluorescence signal was detected in rat lungs after 2 weeks from the single injection of GNPs. Oxidative response study showed that GNPs exposure increased malondialdehyde level and decreased CuZn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in rat lungs. Furthermore, the histopathological study showed that combined effects of GNPs and SMFs led to more tissular damages in rat lungs in comparison with GNPs-treated rats. Interestingly, intensity of red fluorescence signal was enhanced after exposure to SMFs indicating a higher accumulation of GNPs in rat lungs under magnetic environment. Moreover, rats coexposed to GNPs and SMFs showed an increased malondialdehyde level, a fall of CuZn-superoxide dismutase, catalase, and glutathione peroxidase activities in comparison with GNPs-treated group. Hence, SMFs exposure increased the accumulation of GNPs in rat lungs and led to more toxic effects of these nanocomplexes. PMID:27354800

  7. Genetic Alterations in K-ras and p53 Cancer Genes in Lung Neoplasms From B6C3F1 Mice Exposed to Cumene

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Hue-Hua L.; Ton, Thai-Vu. T.; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P.; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C.; Lahousse, Stephanie A.

    2009-01-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the controls. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87 % cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56 % cumene-induced neoplasms and mutations were detected in 52 % neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutation and one of 7 (14 %) K-ras mutation was detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13 %) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12 %). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene. PMID:18648094

  8. Genetic alterations in K-ras and p53 cancer genes in lung neoplasms from B6C3F1 mice exposed to cumene.

    PubMed

    Hong, Hue-Hua L; Ton, Thai-Vu T; Kim, Yongbaek; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Clayton, Natasha P; Chan, Po-Chuen; Sills, Robert C; Lahousse, Stephanie A

    2008-07-01

    The incidences of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in cumene-treated B6C3F1 mice were significantly greater than those of the control animals. We evaluated these lung neoplasms for point mutations in the K-ras and p53 genes that are often mutated in humans. K-ras and p53 mutations were detected by cycle sequencing of PCR-amplified DNA isolated from paraffin-embedded neoplasms. K-ras mutations were detected in 87% of cumene-induced lung neoplasms, and the predominant mutations were exon 1 codon 12 G to T transversions and exon 2 codon 61 A to G transitions. P53 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry in 56% of cumene-induced neoplasms, and mutations were detected in 52% of neoplasms. The predominant mutations were exon 5, codon 155 G to A transitions, and codon 133 C to T transitions. No p53 mutations and one of seven (14%) K-ras mutations were detected in spontaneous neoplasms. Cumene-induced lung carcinomas showed loss of heterozygosity (LOH) on chromosome 4 near the p16 gene (13%) and on chromosome 6 near the K-ras gene (12%). No LOH was observed in spontaneous carcinomas or normal lung tissues examined. The pattern of mutations identified in the lung tumors suggests that DNA damage and genomic instability may be contributing factors to the mutation profile and development of lung cancer in mice exposed to cumene.

  9. Airway Epithelial Cell Cilia and Obstructive Lung Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yaghi, Asma; Dolovich, Myrna B.

    2016-01-01

    Airway epithelium is the first line of defense against exposure of the airway and lung to various inflammatory stimuli. Ciliary beating of airway epithelial cells constitutes an important part of the mucociliary transport apparatus. To be effective in transporting secretions out of the lung, the mucociliary transport apparatus must exhibit a cohesive beating of all ciliated epithelial cells that line the upper and lower respiratory tract. Cilia function can be modulated by exposures to endogenous and exogenous factors and by the viscosity of the mucus lining the epithelium. Cilia function is impaired in lung diseases such as COPD and asthma, and pharmacologic agents can modulate cilia function and mucus viscosity. Cilia beating is reduced in COPD, however, more research is needed to determine the structural-functional regulation of ciliary beating via all signaling pathways and how this might relate to the initiation or progression of obstructive lung diseases. Additionally, genotypes and how these can influence phenotypes and epithelial cell cilia function and structure should be taken into consideration in future investigations. PMID:27845721

  10. Multiple mutations of lung squamous cell carcinoma shared common mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhaoyan; Gu, Biao; Shi, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) is a subtype of non-small cell lung cancers which is the cause of 80% of all lung cancer deaths. The genes that highly mutated in patients with LUSC and their roles played in the tumorigenesis remains unknown. Data of patients with Lung squamous cell carcinoma (LUSC) were retrieved from The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA). Differentially expressed genes were identified between control and cancer samples. Patients and controls can be separated by mRNA expression level showing that the between-group variance and totally 1265 genes were differentially expressed between controls and patients. Top genes whose mutations highly occurred in patients with LUSC were identified, most of these genes were shown to be related with tumorigenesis in previous studies. All of the genes mostly mutated were independently correlated with expression levels of all genes. These mutations did not show the trend of co-occurrence. However, the influenced gene of these mutations had overlaps. After studying the intersection of these genes, a group of shared genes were identified. The shared pathways enriched which played critical role in LUSC were identified based on these shared genes. Different mutations had contribution to the progression of LUSC. Though these genes involved different specific mechanisms, most of them may share a common mechanism which is critical for LUSC. The results may suggest a neglected mechanism and also indicate a potential target for therapies. PMID:27835590

  11. Primary Tumor and MEF Cell Isolation to Study Lung Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengli; Maziveyi, Mazvita; Alahari, Suresh K

    2015-05-20

    In breast tumorigenesis, the metastatic stage of the disease poses the greatest threat to the affected individual. Normal breast cells with altered genotypes now possess the ability to invade and survive in other tissues. In this protocol, mouse mammary tumors are removed and primary cells are prepared from tumors. The cells isolated from this procedure are then available for gene profiling experiments. For successful metastasis, these cells must be able to intravasate, survive in circulation, extravasate to distant organs, and survive in that new organ system. The lungs are the typical target of breast cancer metastasis. A set of genes have been discovered that mediates the selectivity of metastasis to the lung. Here we describe a method of studying lung metastasis from a genetically engineered mouse model.. Furthermore, another protocol for analyzing mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) from the mouse embryo is included. MEF cells from the same animal type provide a clue of non-cancer cell gene expression. Together, these techniques are useful in studying mouse mammary tumorigenesis, its associated signaling mechanisms and pathways of the abnormalities in embryos.

  12. Lung B cells promote early pathogen dissemination and hasten death from inhalation anthrax.

    PubMed

    Rayamajhi, M; Delgado, C; Condon, T V; Riches, D W; Lenz, L L

    2012-07-01

    Sampling of mucosal antigens regulates immune responses but may also promote dissemination of mucosal pathogens. Lung dendritic cells (LDCs) capture antigens and traffic them to lung-draining lymph nodes (LDLNs) dependent on the chemokine receptor CCR7 (chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 7). LDCs also capture lung pathogens such as Bacillus anthracis (BA). However, we show here that the initial traffic of BA spores from lungs to LDLNs is largely independent of LDCs and CCR7, occurring instead in association with B cells. BA spores rapidly bound B cells in lungs and cultured mouse and human B cells. Binding was independent of the B-cell receptor (BCR). B cells instilled in the lungs trafficked to LDLNs and BA spore traffic to LDLNs was impaired by B-cell deficiency. Depletion of B cells also delayed death of mice receiving a lethal BA infection. These results suggest that mucosal B cells traffic BA, and possibly other antigens, from lungs to LDLNs.

  13. SAMHD1 is down regulated in lung cancer by methylation and inhibits tumor cell proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jia-lei; Lu, Fan-zhen; Shen, Xiao-Yong; Wu, Yun; Zhao, Li-ting

    2014-12-12

    Highlights: • SAMHD1 expression level is down regulated in lung adenocarcinoma. • The promoter of SAMHD1 is methylated in lung adenocarcinoma. • Over expression of SAMHD1 inhibits the proliferation of lung cancer cells. - Abstract: The function of dNTP hydrolase SAMHD1 as a viral restriction factor to inhibit the replication of several viruses in human immune cells was well established. However, its regulation and function in lung cancer have been elusive. Here, we report that SAMHD1 is down regulated both on protein and mRNA levels in lung adenocarcinoma compared to adjacent normal tissue. We also found that SAMHD1 promoter is highly methylated in lung adenocarcinoma, which may inhibit its gene expression. Furthermore, over expression of the SAMHD1 reduces dNTP level and inhibits the proliferation of lung tumor cells. These results reveal the regulation and function of SAMHD1 in lung cancer, which is important for the proliferation of lung tumor cells.

  14. Altered surfactant homeostasis and alveolar epithelial cell stress in amiodarone-induced lung fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Mahavadi, Poornima; Henneke, Ingrid; Ruppert, Clemens; Knudsen, Lars; Venkatesan, Shalini; Liebisch, Gerhard; Chambers, Rachel C; Ochs, Matthias; Schmitz, Gerd; Vancheri, Carlo; Seeger, Werner; Korfei, Martina; Guenther, Andreas

    2014-11-01

    Amiodarone (AD) is a highly efficient antiarrhythmic drug with potentially serious side effects. Severe pulmonary toxicity is reported in patients receiving AD even at low doses and may cause interstitial pneumonia as well as lung fibrosis. Apoptosis of alveolar epithelial type II cells (AECII) has been suggested to play an important role in this disease. In the current study, we aimed to establish a murine model of AD-induced lung fibrosis and analyze surfactant homeostasis, lysosomal, and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress in this model. AD/vehicle was instilled intratracheally into C57BL/6 mice, which were sacrificed on days 7, 14, 21, and 28. Extent of lung fibrosis development was assessed by trichrome staining and hydroxyproline measurement. Cytotoxicity was assessed by lactate dehydrogenase assay. Phospholipids (PLs) were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Surfactant proteins (SP) and markers for apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress were studied by Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. AECII morphology was evaluated by electron microscopy. Extensive lung fibrosis and AECII hyperplasia were observed in AD-treated mice already at day 7. Surfactant PL and SP accumulated in AECII over time. In parallel, induction of apoptosis, lysosomal, and ER stress was encountered in AECII of mice lungs and in MLE12 cells treated with AD. In vitro, siRNA-mediated knockdown of cathepsin D did not alter the AD-induced apoptotic response. Our data suggest that mice exposed to intratracheal AD develop severe pulmonary fibrosis, exhibit extensive surfactant alterations and cellular stress, but AD-induced AECII apoptosis is not mediated primarily via cathepsin D.

  15. Detection of programmed cell death in cells exposed to genotoxic agents using a caspase activation assay.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Madhu; Santra, Madhumita; Koty, Patrick P

    2014-01-01

    Many toxins that individuals are exposed to cause DNA damage. Cells that have sustained DNA damage may attempt to repair the damage prior to replication. However, if a cell has sustained serious damage it cannot repair, it will commit suicide through a genetically regulated programmed cell death (PCD) pathway. Crucial to the ultimate execution of PCD is a family of cysteine proteases called caspases. Activation of these enzymes occurs late enough in the PCD pathway that a cell can no longer avoid cell death, but still earlier than PCD-associated morphological changes or DNA fragmentation. This protocol details a method for using fluorochrome-conjugated caspase inhibitors for the detection of activated caspases in intact cells. The analysis and documentation is performed using fluorescence microscopy.

  16. Candidate dietary phytochemicals modulate expression of phase II enzymes GSTP1 and NQO1 in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Tan, Xiang-Lin; Shi, Miao; Tang, Hui; Han, Weiguo; Spivack, Simon D

    2010-08-01

    Many phytochemicals possess cancer-preventive properties, some putatively through phase II metabolism-mediated mutagen/oxidant quenching. We applied human lung cells in vitro to investigate the effects of several candidate phytopreventive agents, including green tea extracts (GTE), broccoli sprout extracts (BSE), epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), sulforaphane (SFN), phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), and benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC), on inducing phase II enzymes glutathione S-transferase P1 (GSTP1) and NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) at mRNA and protein levels. Primary normal human bronchial epithelial cells (NHBE), immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBEC), and lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were exposed to diet-achievable levels of GTE and BSE (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 mg/L), or individual index components EGCG, SFN, PEITC, BITC (0.5, 1.0, 2.0 micromol/L) for 24 h, 48 h, and 6 d, respectively. mRNA assays employed RNA-specific quantitative RT-PCR and protein assays employed Western blotting. We found that in NHBE cells, while GSTP1 mRNA levels were slightly but significantly increased after exposure to GTE or BSE, NQO1 mRNA increased to 2- to 4-fold that of control when exposed to GTE, BSE, or SFN. Effects on NQO1 mRNA expression in HBEC cells were similar. NQO1 protein expression increased up to 11.8-fold in SFN-treated NHBE cells. Both GSTP1 and NQO1 protein expression in A549 cells were constitutively high but not induced under any condition. Our results suggest that NQO1 is more responsive to the studied chemopreventive agents than GSTP1 in human lung cells and there is discordance between single agent and complex mixture effects. We conclude that modulation of lung cell phase II metabolism by chemopreventive agents requires cell- and agent-specific discovery and testing.

  17. PET-Adjusted Intensity Modulated Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    Metastatic Malignant Neoplasm in the Brain; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIA Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIB Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  18. Palliative Care Intervention in Improving Symptom Control and Quality of Life in Patients With Stage II-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer and Their Family Caregivers

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-13

    Caregiver; Psychological Impact of Cancer and Its Treatment; Recurrent Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

  19. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories

    SciTech Connect

    Oleru, U.G.; Elegbeleye, O.O.; Enu, C.C.; Olumide, Y.M.

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m/sup 3/ and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  20. Pulmonary function and symptoms of Nigerian workers exposed to Carbon black in dry cell battery and tire factories.

    PubMed

    Oleru, U G; Elegbeleye, O O; Enu, C C; Olumide, Y M

    1983-02-01

    The pulmonary function and symptoms of 125 workers exposed to carbon black in dry cell battery and tire manufacturing plants were investigated. There was no significant difference in the pulmonary function of the subjects in the two plants. There was good agreement in the symptoms reported in the two different factories: cough with phlegm production, tiredness, chest pain, catarrh, headache, and skin irritation. The symptoms also corroborate those reported in the few studies on the pulmonary effects of carbon black. The suspended particulate levels in the dry cell battery plant ranged from 25 to 34 mg/m3 and the subjects with the highest probable exposure level had the most impaired pulmonary function. The pulmonary function of the exposed subjects was significantly lower than that of a control, nonindustrially exposed population. The drop in the lung function from the expected value per year of age was relatively constant for all the study subgroups but the drop per year of duration of employment was more severe in the earlier years of employment. This study has underscored the need for occupational health regulations in the industries of developing countries.

  1. Differential effects of single-walled carbon nanotubes on cell viability of human lung and pharynx carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Hitoshi, Kotaro; Katoh, Miki; Suzuki, Tomoko; Ando, Yoshinori; Nadai, Masayuki

    2011-06-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) are attracting significant attention as a novel material for future innovations. Many in vitro studies have assessed the cytotoxicity of CNTs, but the effects of CNTs differ depending on the cell lines and the synthetic method adopted for fabricating CNTs. In the present study, the differential effects of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) on the cell viability of A549 cells from human lung carcinomas and FaDu cells from human head and neck carcinomas were investigated. The SWCNTs used in the present study were synthesized with nickel and yttrium (SO-SWCNTs), and iron (FH-P-SWCNTs) as catalysts. Cell viability was evaluated on the basis of cell-membrane biomass, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) content, and intracellular metabolic capacity. After 24-hr exposure of A549 and FaDu cells to 1.0 mg/ml SO-SWCNTs, the cell-membrane biomass of A549 cells decreased to 43% as compared to the control cells, whereas that of FaDu cells remained over 90%. After 24-hr exposure of A549 and FaDu cells to 1.0 mg/ml SO-SWCNT, the intracellular metabolic capacity decreased to 24% and 37%, respectively, and the ATP content decreased to 40% and 54%, respectively. SWCNTs had a greater impact on the viability values of A549 cells than on those of FaDu cells. In addition, cells exposed to FH-P-SWCNTs exhibited a higher viability than those exposed to SO-SWCNTs. Caspase 3/7 activity was not increased at maximum concentration of 1.0 mg/ml SO-SWCNTs. It was surmised that sensitivity to SWCNTs differs among the 2 cell lines; additionally, SWCNT characteristics may produce different effects on these cell lines.

  2. The Effects of Eucheuma cottonii on Signaling Pathway Inducing Mucin Synthesis in Rat Lungs Chronically Exposed to Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Coal Dust

    PubMed Central

    Kania, Nia; Mayangsari, Elly; Tony, Frans; Wahyuni, Endang Sri; Widodo, M. Aris

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of Eucheuma cottonii (EC) in oxidative stress and the signaling for mucin synthesis in rat lungs chronically exposed to coal dust. Coal dust with concomitant oral administration of ethanolic extract of EC at doses of 150 (EC150) or 300 mg/kg BW (EC300) compared to exposed to PM10 coal dust at doses of 6.25 (CD6.25), 12.5 (CD12.5), or 25 mg/m3 (CD25) (an hour daily for 6 months) and nonexposure group (control). The malondialdehyde (MDA), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)-α, epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and MUC5AC levels were determined in the lung. The administration of EC300 significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the MDA levels in groups exposed to all doses of coal dust compared to the respective coal dust-exposed nonsupplemented groups. Although not statistically significant,EC reduced the EGF levels and EGFR expressions in CD12.5 and CD25 groups and decreased the TGF-α, level and MUC5AC expression in CD25 group compared to the respective coal dust-exposed nonsupplemented groups. EC was able to decrease oxidative stress and was also able to decrease signaling for mucin synthesis, at least a part, via reducing the ligand in chronic coal dust exposure. PMID:24228027

  3. The Effects of Eucheuma cottonii on Signaling Pathway Inducing Mucin Synthesis in Rat Lungs Chronically Exposed to Particulate Matter 10 (PM10) Coal Dust.

    PubMed

    Kania, Nia; Mayangsari, Elly; Setiawan, Bambang; Nugrahenny, Dian; Tony, Frans; Wahyuni, Endang Sri; Widodo, M Aris

    2013-01-01

    This study was aimed at investigating the effects of Eucheuma cottonii (EC) in oxidative stress and the signaling for mucin synthesis in rat lungs chronically exposed to coal dust. Coal dust with concomitant oral administration of ethanolic extract of EC at doses of 150 (EC150) or 300 mg/kg BW (EC300) compared to exposed to PM10 coal dust at doses of 6.25 (CD6.25), 12.5 (CD12.5), or 25 mg/m(3) (CD25) (an hour daily for 6 months) and nonexposure group (control). The malondialdehyde (MDA), epidermal growth factor (EGF), transforming growth factor (TGF)- α , epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), and MUC5AC levels were determined in the lung. The administration of EC300 significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the MDA levels in groups exposed to all doses of coal dust compared to the respective coal dust-exposed nonsupplemented groups. Although not statistically significant,EC reduced the EGF levels and EGFR expressions in CD12.5 and CD25 groups and decreased the TGF- α , level and MUC5AC expression in CD25 group compared to the respective coal dust-exposed nonsupplemented groups. EC was able to decrease oxidative stress and was also able to decrease signaling for mucin synthesis, at least a part, via reducing the ligand in chronic coal dust exposure.

  4. Risk of Lung Cancer in Workers Exposed to Benzidine and/or Beta-Naphthylamine: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Kurumatani, Norio

    2016-09-05

    Benzidine (BZ) and beta-naphthylamine (BNA) have been classified as definite human carcinogens for bladder cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to BZ and/or BNA and lung cancer has been inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the risk for lung cancer among workers exposed to BZ/BNA. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that had reported occupational BZ/BNA exposure and the outcome of interest (lung cancer death and/or incidence). Meta-analyses were performed using random effects models to combine standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) or standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We identified 23 retrospective cohort studies including 1745 cases of lung cancer; only one study reported smoking-adjusted lung cancer risk. A significantly increased lung cancer risk (pooled SMR/SIR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14-1.43) was observed by combining all studies, with significant heterogeneity among studies (I(2) = 64.1%, P < 0.001). Effect estimates were higher for studies with direct BZ/BNA exposure (ie, dyestuff and manufacturing industries) (pooled SMR/SIR 1.58; 95% CI, 1.31-1.89), and studies that identified BZ/BNA-associated bladder cancer with SMR/SIR ≥4.7 (pooled SMR/SIR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.35-2.09). Effect estimates were similar for studies with and without concomitant occupational exposure to chromium, asbestos, arsenic, or bis(chloromethyl) ether. The cumulative meta-analysis showed that the evidence of association between occupational BZ/BNA exposure and lung cancer has been stable since 1995. Although the results of this meta-analysis have the potential for confounding by smoking and heterogeneity, our findings suggest that a finding of lung cancer following occupational BZ/BNA exposure should be considered to be a potential occupational disease.

  5. Alpha-particle-induced p53 protein expression in a rat lung epithelial cell strain.

    PubMed

    Hickman, A W; Jaramillo, R J; Lechner, J F; Johnson, N F

    1994-11-15

    Other investigators have shown that both sparsely ionizing and UV radiation cause cell cycle arrest that is associated with increased expression of wild-type p53 protein. The effect of exposure to alpha-particles from 238Pu on the induction of the p53 protein has now been examined in cultured lung epithelial cells derived from male F344 rats. The number of cells having increased levels of p53 protein was determined by flow cytometry after the cells had been stained with a monoclonal antibody to p53. alpha-Particle irradiation caused a dose-dependent increase in p53 protein levels detectable at doses as low as 0.6 cGy, with no evidence of a threshold. An increase in p53 protein also occurred in X-irradiated cells. However, no increase was seen in cells exposed to less than 10 cGy of X-rays, indicating the existence of a relatively higher DNA damage threshold for sparsely ionizing radiation. In addition, more cells exposed to low doses of alpha radiation had increased p53 protein levels than would be predicted based on the number of nuclei expected to be traversed by an alpha-particle, suggesting that alpha-particles cause genetic damage by mechanisms in addition to direct interactions with DNA.

  6. Oxidative stress and apoptosis induction in human thyroid carcinoma cells exposed to the essential oil from Pistacia lentiscus aerial parts

    PubMed Central

    Catalani, Simona; Palma, Francesco; Battistelli, Serafina; Benedetti, Serena

    2017-01-01

    Background Essential oils from the aerial parts (leaves, twigs and berries) of Pistacia lentiscus (PLEO) have been well characterized for their antibacterial and anti-inflammatory properties; however, poor information exists on their potential anticancer activity. Methods Increasing concentrations of PLEO (0.01–0.1% v/v, 80–800 μg/ml) were administered to a wide variety of cultured cancer cells from breast, cervix, colon, liver, lung, prostate, and thyroid carcinomas. Fibroblasts were also included as healthy control cells. Cell viability was monitored by WST-8 assay up to 72 hours after PLEO administration. The intracellular formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), the induction of apoptosis, and the enhancement of chemotherapeutic drug cytotoxicity by PLEO were further investigated in the most responsive cancer cell line. Results A dose-dependent reduction of tumor cell viability was observed upon PLEO exposure; while no cytotoxic effect was revealed in healthy fibroblasts. FTC-133 thyroid cancer cells were found to be the most sensitive cells to PLEO treatment; accordingly, an intracellular accumulation of ROS and an activation of both the extrinsic and intrinsic apoptotic pathways were evidenced in FTC-133 cells after PLEO administration. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of the antineoplastic drugs cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil and etoposide was enhanced in PLEO-exposed FTC-133 cells. Conclusion Taking into account its mode of action, PLEO might be considered as a promising source of natural antitumor agents which might have therapeutic potential in integrated oncology. PMID:28196126

  7. Cytoplasmic myosin exposed apoptotic cells appear with caspase-3 activation and enhance CLL cell viability

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Xiaoxuan; Zhang, Lu; Magli, Amanda R.; Catera, Rosa; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Griffin, Daniel O.; Rothstein, Thomas L.; Barrientos, Jacqueline; Kolitz, Jonathan E.; Allen, Steven L.; Rai, Kanti R.; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Chu, Charles C.

    2015-01-01

    The degree of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) binding to myosin exposed apoptotic cells (MEACs) correlates with worse patient outcomes, suggesting a link to disease activity. Therefore, we studied MEAC formation and the effects of MEAC binding on CLL cells. In cell line studies, both intrinsic (spontaneous or camptothecin-induced) and extrinsic (FasL- or anti-Fas-induced) apoptosis created a high percent of MEACs over time in a process associated with caspase-3 activation, leading to cytoplasmic myosin cleavage and trafficking to cell membranes. The involvement of common apoptosis pathways suggests that most cells can produce MEACs and indeed CLL cells themselves form MEACs. Consistent with the idea that MEAC formation may be a signal to remove dying cells, we found that natural IgM antibodies bind to MEACs. Functionally, co-culture of MEACs with CLL cells, regardless of immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region gene mutation status, improved leukemic cell viability. Based on inhibitor studies, this improved viability involved BCR signaling molecules. These results support the hypothesis that stimulation of CLL cells with antigen, such as those on MEACs, promotes CLL cell viability, which in turn could lead to progression to worse disease. PMID:26220042

  8. Rewiring of human lung cell lineage and mitotic networks in lung adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Il-Jin; Quigley, David; To, Minh D.; Pham, Patrick; Lin, Kevin; Jo, Brian; Jen, Kuang-Yu; Raz, Dan; Kim, Jae; Mao, Jian-Hua; Jablons, David; Balmain, Allan

    2015-01-01

    Analysis of gene expression patterns in normal tissues and their perturbations in tumors can help to identify the functional roles of oncogenes or tumor suppressors and identify potential new therapeutic targets. Here, gene expression correlation networks were derived from 92 normal human lung samples and patient-matched adenocarcinomas. The networks from normal lung show that NKX2-1 is linked to the alveolar type 2 lineage, and identify PEBP4 as a novel marker expressed in alveolar type 2 cells. Differential correlation analysis shows that the NKX2-1 network in tumors includes pathways associated with glutamate metabolism, and identifies Vaccinia-related kinase (VRK1) as a potential drug target in a tumor-specific mitotic network. We show that VRK1 inhibition cooperates with inhibition of PARP signaling to inhibit growth of lung tumor cells. Targeting of genes that are recruited into tumor mitotic networks may provide a wider therapeutic window than that seen by inhibition of known mitotic genes. PMID:23591868

  9. Cancer stem cells in lung cancer: Evidence and controversies.

    PubMed

    Alamgeer, Muhammad; Peacock, Craig D; Matsui, William; Ganju, Vinod; Watkins, D Neil

    2013-07-01

    The cancer stem cell (CSC) model is based on a myriad of experimental and clinical observations suggesting that the malignant phenotype is sustained by a subset of cells characterized by the capacity for self-renewal, differentiation and innate resistance to chemotherapy and radiation. CSC may be responsible for disease recurrence after definitive therapy and may therefore be functionally synonymous with minimal residual disease. Similar to other solid tumours, several putative surface markers for lung CSC have been identified, including CD133 and CD44. In addition, expression and/or activity of the cytoplasmic enzyme aldehyde dehydrogenase ALDH and capacity of cells to exclude membrane permeable dyes (known as the 'side population') correlate with stem-like function in vitro and in vivo. Embryonic stem cell pathways such as Hedgehog, Notch and WNT may also be active in lung cancers stem cells and therefore may be therapeutically targetable for maintenance therapy in patients achieving a complete response to surgery, radiotherapy or chemotherapy. This paper will review the evidence regarding the existence and function of lung CSC in the context of the experimental and clinical evidence and discuss some ongoing controversies regarding this model.

  10. Lung Cancer Cell Lines as Tools for Biomedical Discovery and Research

    PubMed Central

    Girard, Luc; Lockwood, William W.; Lam, Wan L.; Minna, John D.

    2010-01-01

    Lung cancer cell lines have made a substantial contribution to lung cancer translational research and biomedical discovery. A systematic approach to initiating and characterizing cell lines from small cell and non–small cell lung carcinomas has led to the current collection of more than 200 lung cancer cell lines, a number that exceeds those for other common epithelial cancers combined. The ready availability and widespread dissemination of the lines to investigators worldwide have resulted in more than 9000 citations, including multiple examples of important biomedical discoveries. The high (but not perfect) genomic similarities between lung cancer cell lines and the lung tumor type from which they were derived provide evidence of the relevance of their use. However, major problems including misidentification or cell line contamination remain. Ongoing studies and new approaches are expected to reveal the full potential of the lung cancer cell line panel. PMID:20679594

  11. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Lindsay M.; Sandri, Brian J.; Wagner, Darcy E.; Meyer, Carolyn M.; Price, Andrew P.; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J.; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases. PMID:26954258

  12. Decreased Laminin Expression by Human Lung Epithelial Cells and Fibroblasts Cultured in Acellular Lung Scaffolds from Aged Mice.

    PubMed

    Godin, Lindsay M; Sandri, Brian J; Wagner, Darcy E; Meyer, Carolyn M; Price, Andrew P; Akinnola, Ifeolu; Weiss, Daniel J; Panoskaltsis-Mortari, Angela

    2016-01-01

    The lung changes functionally and structurally with aging. However, age-related effects on the extracellular matrix (ECM) and corresponding effects on lung cell behavior are not well understood. We hypothesized that ECM from aged animals would induce aging-related phenotypic changes in healthy inoculated cells. Decellularized whole organ scaffolds provide a powerful model for examining how ECM cues affect cell phenotype. The effects of age on ECM composition in both native and decellularized mouse lungs were assessed as was the effect of young vs old acellular ECM on human bronchial epithelial cells (hBECs) and lung fibroblasts (hLFs). Native aged (1 year) lungs demonstrated decreased expression of laminins α3 and α4, elastin and fibronectin, and elevated collagen, compared to young (3 week) lungs. Proteomic analyses of decellularized ECM demonstrated similar findings, and decellularized aged lung ECM contained less diversity in structural proteins compared to young ECM. When seeded in old ECM, hBECs and hLFs demonstrated lower gene expression of laminins α3 and α4, respectively, as compared to young ECM, paralleling the laminin deficiency of aged ECM. ECM changes appear to be important factors in potentiating aging-related phenotypes and may provide clues to mechanisms that allow for aging-related lung diseases.

  13. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury.

    PubMed

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-02-12

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs.

  14. Fibroblast Growth Factor-10 (FGF-10) Mobilizes Lung-resident Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Protects Against Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Lin; Zhou, Jian; Rong, Linyi; Seeley, Eric J.; Pan, Jue; Zhu, Xiaodan; Liu, Jie; Wang, Qin; Tang, Xinjun; Qu, Jieming; Bai, Chunxue; Song, Yuanlin

    2016-01-01

    FGF-10 can prevent or reduce lung specific inflammation due to traumatic or infectious lung injury. However, the exact mechanisms are poorly characterized. Additionally, the effect of FGF-10 on lung-resident mesenchymal stem cells (LR-MSCs) has not been studied. To better characterize the effect of FGF-10 on LR-MSCs, FGF-10 was intratracheally delivered into the lungs of rats. Three days after instillation, bronchoalveolar lavage was performed and plastic-adherent cells were cultured, characterized and then delivered therapeutically to rats after LPS intratracheal instillation. Immunophenotyping analysis of FGF-10 mobilized and cultured cells revealed expression of the MSC markers CD29, CD73, CD90, and CD105, and the absence of the hematopoietic lineage markers CD34 and CD45. Multipotency of these cells was demonstrated by their capacity to differentiate into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. Delivery of LR-MSCs into the lungs after LPS injury reduced the inflammatory response as evidenced by decreased wet-to-dry ratio, reduced neutrophil and leukocyte recruitment and decreased inflammatory cytokines compared to control rats. Lastly, direct delivery of FGF-10 in the lungs of rats led to an increase of LR-MSCs in the treated lungs, suggesting that the protective effect of FGF-10 might be mediated, in part, by the mobilization of LR-MSCs in lungs. PMID:26869337

  15. The proliferative effects of asbestos-exposed peripheral blood mononuclear cells on mesothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    MAKI, YUHO; NISHIMURA, YASUMITSU; TOYOOKA, SHINICHI; SOH, JUNICHI; TSUKUDA, KAZUNORI; SHIEN, KAZUHIKO; FURUKAWA, MASASHI; MURAOKA, TAKAYUKI; UENO, TSUYOSHI; TANAKA, NORIMITSU; YAMAMOTO, HIROMASA; ASANO, HIROAKI; MAEDA, MEGUMI; KUMAGAI-TAKEI, NAOKO; LEE, SUNI; MATSUZAKI, HIDENORI; OTSUKI, TAKEMI; MIYOSHI, SHINICHIRO

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is thought to arise from the direct effect of asbestos on mesothelial cells. However, MM takes a long time to develop following exposure to asbestos, which suggests that the effects of asbestos are complex. The present study examined the effects of asbestos exposure on the cell growth of MeT-5A human mesothelial cells via cytokines produced by immune cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were stimulated with antibodies against cluster of differentiation (CD)3 and CD28 upon exposure to the asbestos chrysotile A (CA) or crocidolite (CR); the growth of MeT-5A cells in media supplemented with PBMC culture supernatants was subsequently examined. MeT-5A cells exhibited an increase in proliferation when grown in supernatant from the 7-day PBMC culture exposed to CA or CR. Analysis of cytokine production demonstrated increased levels of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), interleukin (IL)-1α, IL-1β, IL-3, IL-5, IL-13 and IL-17A in supernatants. Individual administration of these cytokines, excluding G-CSF and GM-CSF, led to an increase in cell growth of MeT-5A, whereas this effect was not observed following the combined administration of these cytokines. The results indicate that cytokines secreted by immune cells upon exposure to asbestos cause an increase in the growth activity of mesothelial cells, suggesting that alterations in the production of cytokines by immune cells may contribute to tumorigenesis in individuals exposed to asbestos. PMID:27123108

  16. Inhibitory effect of Disulfiram/copper complex on non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Duan, Lincan; Shen, Hongmei; Zhao, Guangqiang; Yang, Runxiang; Cai, Xinyi; Zhang, Lijuan; Jin, Congguo; Huang, Yunchao

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Disulfiram and copper synergistically inhibit lung cancer cell proliferation. • Lung cancer cell colony formation ability is inhibited by Disulfiram/copper. • Disulfiram/copper increases the sensitivity of cisplatin to lung cancer cells. • Lung cancer stem cells are specifically targeted by Disulfiram/copper complex. - Abstract: Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the most common cause of cancer-related death in both men and women worldwide. Recently, Disulfiram has been reported to be able to inhibit glioblastoma, prostate, or breast cancer cell proliferation. In this study, the synergistic effect of Disulfiram and copper on NSCLC cell growth was investigated. Inhibition of cancer cell proliferation was detected by 1-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-3,5-diphenylformazan (MTT) assay and cell cycle analysis. Liquid colony formation and tumor spheroid formation assays were used to evaluate their effect on cancer cell clonogenicity. Real-time PCR was performed to test the mRNA level of cancer stem cell related genes. We found that Disulfiram or copper alone did not potently inhibit NSCLC cell proliferation in vitro. However, the presence of copper significantly enhanced inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell growth, indicating a synergistic effect between Disulfiram and copper. Cell cycle analysis showed that Disulfiram/copper complex caused NSCLC cell cycle arrest in G2/M phase. Furthermore, Disulfiram/copper significantly increased the sensitivity of cisplatin in NSCLC cells tested by MTT assay. Liquid colony formation assay revealed that copper dramatically increased the inhibitory effect of Disulfiram on NSCLC cell colony forming ability. Disulfiram combined with copper significantly attenuated NSCLC cell spheroid formation and recuded the mRNA expression of lung cancer stem cell related genes. Our data suggest that Disulfiram/copper complex alone or combined with other chemotherapy is a potential therapeutic strategy for NSCLC patients.

  17. Human Lung Cancer Cell Line A-549 ATCC Is Differentially Affected by Supranutritional Organic and Inorganic Selenium

    PubMed Central

    Flores Villavicencio, Lérida Liss; Cruz-Jiménez, Gustavo; Barbosa-Sabanero, Gloria; Kornhauser-Araujo, Carlos; Mendoza-Garrido, M. Eugenia; de la Rosa, Guadalupe; Sabanero-López, Myrna

    2014-01-01

    The effects of organic and inorganic forms of selenium (Se) on human cells have been extensively studied for nutritional concentrations; however, to date, little is known about the potential toxicity at supranutritional levels. In the present study we determined the effects of sodium selenite (SSe) and selenomethionine (SeMet) on cell growth and intracellular structures in lung cancer cells exposed at Se concentrations between 0 and 3 mM. Our results showed that SSe affected cell growth more rapidly than SeMet (24 h and 48 h, resp.). After 24 h of cells exposure to 0.5, 1.5, and 3 mM SSe, cell growth was reduced by 10, 50, and 60%, as compared to controls. After 48 h, nuclear fragmentation was evident in cells exposed to SSe, suggesting an induction to cell death. In contrast, SeMet did not affect cell proliferation, and the cells were phenotypically similar to controls. Microtubules and microfilaments structures were also affected by both Se compounds, again SSe being more toxic than SeMet. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the differential effects of organic and inorganic Se in supranutritional levels in lung cancer cells. PMID:25477771

  18. Parathyroid hormone-related protein is a gravisensor in lung and bone cell biology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torday, J. S.

    2003-10-01

    Parathyroid Hormone-related Protein (PTHrP) has been shown to be essential for the development and homeostatic regulation of lung and bone. Since both lung and bone structure and function are affected by microgravity, we hypothesized that 0 × g down-regulates PTHrP signaling. To test this hypothesis, we suspended lung and bone cells in the simulated microgravity environment of a Rotating Wall Vessel Bioreactor, which simulates microgravity, for up to 72 hours. During the first 8 hours of exposure to simulated 0 × g, PTHrP expression fell precipitously, decreasing by 80-90%; during the subsequent 64 hours, PTHrP expression remained at this newly established level of expression. PTHrP production decreased from 12 pg/ml/hour to 1 pg/ml/hour in culture medium from microgravity-exposed cells. The cells were then recultured at unit gravity for 24hours, and PTHrP expression and production returned to normal levels. Based on these findings, we have obtained bones from rats flown in space for 2 weeks (Mission STS-58, SL-2). Analysis of PTHrP expression by femurs and tibias from these animals (n=5) revealed that PTHrP expression was 60% lower than in bones from control ground-based rats. Interestingly, there were no differences in PTHrP expression by parietal bone from space-exposed versus ground-based animals, indicating that the effect of weightlessness on PTHrP expression is due to the unweighting of weight-bearing bones. This finding is consistent with other studies of microgravity-induced osteoporosis. The loss of the PTHrP signaling mechanism may be corrected using chemical agents that up-regulate this pathway. In conclusion, PTHrP represents a stretch-sensitive paracrine signaling mechanism that may sense gravity.

  19. Effects of lipopolysaccharide, multiwalled carbon nanotubes, and the combination on lung alveolar epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Pacurari, M; May, I; Tchounwou, PB

    2016-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) have been shown to induce lung fibrosis in animal models, however the underlying molecular factors/mechanisms are still unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), MWCNT, and the combination of LPS and MWCNT on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9 and metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-9, MMP-12), collagen 3A1 (Col3A1), and transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) in alveolar epithelial A549 cells. MMPs are proteinases that degrade extracellular matrix and play a role in lung fibrosis. A549 cells were exposed to LPS (1 ng/ml), MWCNT (20 μg/ml), and the combination and analyzed for paracellular permeability, TGFβ, Col3A1, MMP-9, MMP-12, NF-κB activation, and cell migration by real-time PCR and immunofluorescence. LPS, the combination of LPS and MWCNT, and MWCNT only at the highest tested dose induced blue dextran extravation. LPS and MWCNT increased the expression of TGFβ and its downstream target gene Col3A, and MMP-9 and MMP-12 mRNA. MWCNT potently induced cell migration toward wound healing, whereas LPS slightly induced cell migration. Both, LPS and MWCNT, induced NF-κB nuclear translocation. Our results indicate that MWCNT activated alveolar epithelial cells to promote fibrogenesis, and that LPS differentially primes molecular factors involved in lung remodeling. These findings suggest a role of alveolar epithelial cells in fibrogenesis and also may aid in the design and development of tests for screening of fibrogenic agents. PMID:26880698

  20. Squamous cell lung cancer: from tumor genomics to cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Gandara, David R; Hammerman, Peter S; Sos, Martin L; Lara, Primo N; Hirsch, Fred R

    2015-05-15

    Squamous cell lung cancer (SCC) represents an area of unmet need in lung cancer research. For the past several years, therapeutic progress in SCC has lagged behind the now more common non-small cell lung cancer histologic subtype of adenocarcinoma. However, recent efforts to define the complex biology underlying SCC have begun to bear fruit in a multitude of ways, including characterization of previously unknown genomic and signaling pathways, delineation of new, potentially actionable molecular targets, and subsequent development of a large number of agents directed against unique SCC-associated molecular abnormalities. For the first time, SCC-specific prognostic gene signatures and predictive biomarkers of new therapeutic agents are emerging. In addition, recent and ongoing clinical trials, including the Lung-MAP master protocol, have been designed to facilitate approval of targeted therapy-biomarker combinations. In this comprehensive review, we describe the current status of SCC therapeutics, recent advances in the understanding of SCC biology and prognostic gene signatures, and the development of innovative new clinical trials, all of which offer new hope for patients with advanced SCC.

  1. The importance of lung function, non-malignant diseases associated with asbestos, and symptoms as predictors of ischaemic heart disease in shipyard workers exposed to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Sandén, A; Järvholm, B; Larsson, S

    1993-01-01

    The mortality from ischaemic heart disease was studied in a prospective cohort of 1725 shipyard workers exposed to asbestos. The analyses were stratified for age and smoking habits and restricted to men. In agreement with other findings, men with impaired lung function had a significantly higher risk (relative risk (RR) = 3.5) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men with normal lung function. Men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis had a significantly higher risk (RR = 3.1) of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without asbestosis. Thus asbestosis or suspected asbestosis also seemed to be a risk factor for ischaemic heart disease. This finding was independent of respiratory function. There was no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease in men with compared with men without pleural plaques. Men with production of phlegm or sputum and wheezing or whistling had no increased risk for ischaemic heart disease compared with men without these symptoms. In the group with normal lung function men with dyspnoea had a significantly higher risk of dying from ischaemic heart disease than men without dyspnoea. The findings for men with asbestosis or suspected asbestosis indicated a further risk factor besides impaired lung function, in persons exposed to asbestos. Perhaps this risk factor is due to lesions of the pericardium with consequences for heart function. PMID:8398871

  2. Reversine Induced Multinucleated Cells, Cell Apoptosis and Autophagy in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ching-Yen; Chen, Yih-Yuan; Chen, Ping-Tzu; Tseng, Ya-Shih

    2016-01-01

    Reversine, an A3 adenosine receptor antagonist, has been shown to induce differentiated myogenic-lineage committed cells to become multipotent mesenchymal progenitor cells. We and others have reported that reversine has an effect on human tumor suppression. This study revealed anti-tumor effects of reversine on proliferation, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human non-small cell lung cancer cells. Treatment of these cells with reversine suppressed cell growth in a time- and dosage-dependent manner. Moreover, polyploidy occurred after reversine treatment. In addition, caspase-dependent apoptosis and activation of autophagy by reversine in a dosage-dependent manner were also observed. We demonstrated in this study that reversine contributes to growth inhibition, apoptosis and autophagy induction in human lung cancer cells. Therefore, reversine used as a potential therapeutic agent for human lung cancer is worthy of further investigation. PMID:27385117

  3. Studies on quantitative analysis and automatic recognition of cell types of lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Chen; Hu, Kuang-Hu; Li, Fang-Zhen; Li, Shu-Yu; Su, Wan-Fang; Huang, Zhi-Ying; Hu, Ying-Xiong

    2006-01-01

    Recognition of lung cancer cells is very important to the clinical diagnosis of lung cancer. In this paper we present a novel method to extract the structure characteristics of lung cancer cells and automatically recognize their types. Firstly soft mathematical morphology methods are used to enhance the grayscale image, to improve the definition of images, and to eliminate most of disturbance, noise and information of subordinate images, so the contour of target lung cancer cell and biological shape characteristic parameters can be extracted accurately. Then the minimum distance classifier is introduced to realize the automatic recognition of different types of lung cancer cells. A software system named "CANCER.LUNG" is established to demonstrate the efficiency of this method. The clinical experiments show that this method can accurately and objectively recognize the type of lung cancer cells, which can significantly improve the pathology research on the pathological changes of lung cancer and clinical assistant diagnoses.

  4. Microenvironmental modulation of asymmetric cell division in human lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Pine, Sharon R; Ryan, Bríd M; Varticovski, Lyuba; Robles, Ana I; Harris, Curtis C

    2010-02-02

    Normal tissue homeostasis is maintained through asymmetric cell divisions that produce daughter cells with differing self-renewal and differentiation potentials. Certain tumor cell subfractions can self-renew and repopulate the heterogeneous tumor bulk, suggestive of asymmetric cell division, but an equally plausible explanation is that daughter cells of a symmetric division subsequently adopt differing cell fates. Cosegregation of template DNA during mitosis is one mechanism by which cellular components are segregated asymmetrically during cell division in fibroblast, muscle, mammary, intestinal, and neural cells. Asymmetric cell division of template DNA in tumor cells has remained elusive, however. Through pulse-chase experiments with halogenated thymidine analogs, we determined that a small population of cells within human lung cancer cell lines and primary tumor cell cultures asymmetrically divided their template DNA, which could be visualized in single cells and in real time. Template DNA cosegregation was enhanced by cell-cell contact. Its frequency was density-dependent and modulated by environmental changes, including serum deprivation and hypoxia. In addition, we found that isolated CD133(+) lung cancer cells were capable of tumor cell repopulation. Strikingly, during cell division, CD133 cosegregated with the template DNA, whereas the differentiation markers prosurfactant protein-C and pan-cytokeratins were passed to the opposing daughter cell, demonstrating that segregation of template DNA correlates with lung cancer cell fate. Our results demonstrate that human lung tumor cell fate decisions may be regulated during the cell division process. The characterization and modulation of asymmetric cell division in lung cancer can provide insight into tumor initiation, growth, and maintenance.

  5. Oxidative stress and inflammatory response to printer toner particles in human epithelial A549 lung cells.

    PubMed

    Könczöl, Mathias; Weiß, Adilka; Gminski, Richard; Merfort, Irmgard; Mersch-Sundermann, Volker

    2013-02-04

    Reports on adverse health effects related to occupational exposure to toner powder are still inconclusive. Therefore, we have previously conducted an in vitro-study to characterize the genotoxic potential of three commercially available black printer toner powders in A549 lung cells. In these cell-based assays it was clearly demonstrated that the tested toner powders damage DNA and induce micronucleus (MN) formation. Here, we have studied the cytotoxic and proinflammatory potential of these three types of printer toner particles and the influence of ROS and NF-κB induction in order to unravel the underlying mechanisms. A549 cells were exposed to various concentrations of printer toner particle suspensions for 24 h. The toner particles were observed to exert significant cytotoxic effects in the WST-1 and neutral red (NR)-assays, although to a varying extent. Caspase 3/7 activity increased, while the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) was not affected. Particles of all three printer toner powders induced concentration-dependent formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), as measured in the DCFH-DA assay. Furthermore, toner particle exposure enhanced interleukin-6 and interleukin-8 production, which is in agreement with activation of the transcription factor NF-κB in A549 cells shown by the electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Therefore, it can be concluded that exposure of A549 lung cells to three selected printer toner powders caused oxidative stress through induction of ROS. Increased ROS formation may trigger genotoxic effects and activate proinflammatory pathways.

  6. Oxidative DNA damage and inflammatory responses in cultured human cells and in humans exposed to traffic-related particles.

    PubMed

    Vattanasit, Udomratana; Navasumrit, Panida; Khadka, Man Bahadur; Kanitwithayanun, Jantamas; Promvijit, Jeerawan; Autrup, Herman; Ruchirawat, Mathuros

    2014-01-01

    Particulate pollution is a major public health concern because epidemiological studies have demonstrated that exposure to particles is associated with respiratory diseases and lung cancer. Diesel exhaust particles (DEP), which is classified as a human carcinogen (IARC, 2012), are considered a major contributor to traffic-related particulate matter (PM) in urban areas. DEP consists of various compounds, including PAHs and metals which are the principal components that contribute to the toxicity of PM. The present study aimed to investigate effects of PM on induction of oxidative DNA damage and inflammation by using lymphocytes in vitro and in human exposed to PM in the environment. Human lymphoblasts (RPMI 1788) were treated with DEP (SRM 2975) at various concentrations (25-100 μg/ml) to compare the extent of responses with alveolar epithelial cells (A549). ROS generation was determined in each cell cycle phase of DEP-treated cells in order to investigate the influence of the cell cycle stage on induction of oxidative stress. The oxidative DNA damage was determined by measurement of 8-hydroxy-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG) whereas the inflammatory responses were determined by mRNA expression of interleukin-6 and -8 (IL-6 and IL-8), Clara cell protein (CC16), and lung surfactant protein-A (SP-A). The results showed that RPMI 1788 and A549 cells had a similar pattern of dose-dependent responses to DEP in terms of particle uptake, ROS generation with highest level found in G2/M phase, 8-OHdG formation, and induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression. The human study was conducted in 51 healthy subjects residing in traffic-congested areas. The effects of exposure to PM2.5 and particle-bound PAHs and toxic metals on the levels of 8-OHdG in lymphocyte DNA, IL-8 expression in lymphocytes, and serum CC16 were evaluated. 8-OHdG levels correlated with the exposure levels of PM2.5 (P<0.01) and PAHs (P<0.05), but this was not the case with IL-8. Serum CC16 showed significantly negative

  7. MDSC and TGF-β are required for facilitation of tumor growth in the lungs of mice exposed to carbon nanotubes

    PubMed Central

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Kisin, Elena R.; Yanamala, Naveena; Tkach, Alexey V.; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Star, Alexander; Shurin, Galina V.; Kagan, Valerian E.; Shurin, Michael R.

    2015-01-01

    During last decades, changes have been observed in the frequency of different histological subtypes of lung cancer - one of the most common causes of morbidity and mortality - with a declining proportion of squamous cell carcinomas and an increasing proportion of adenocarcinomas, particularly in developed countries. This suggests the emergence of new etiological factors and mechanisms including those defining the lung microenvironment promoting tumor growth. Assuming that the lung is the main portal of entry for broadly used nanomaterials and their established pro-inflammatory propensities, we hypothesized that nanomaterials may contribute to changes facilitating tumor growth. Here we report that an acute exposure to single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) induces recruitment and accumulation of lung-associated myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSC) and MDSC-derived production of TGF-β resulting in up-regulated tumor burden in the lung. The production of TGF-β by MDSC requires their interaction with both SWCNT and tumor cells. We conclude that pulmonary exposure to SWCNT favors the formation of a niche that supports ingrowth of lung carcinoma in vivo via activation of TGF-β production by SWCNT-attracted and pre-sensitized MDSC. PMID:25744719

  8. S100A4 is frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells and promotes cell growth and cell motility

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Na; Sato, Daisuke; Saiki, Yuriko; Sunamura, Makoto; Fukushige, Shinichi; Horii, Akira

    2014-05-09

    Highlights: • We observed frequent overexpression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines. • Knockdown of S100A4 suppressed proliferation in lung cancer cells. • Forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility in lung cancer cells. • PRDM2 was found to be one of the downstream suppressed genes of S100A4. - Abstract: S100A4, a small calcium-binding protein belonging to the S100 protein family, is commonly overexpressed in a variety of tumor types and is widely accepted to associate with metastasis by regulating the motility and invasiveness of cancer cells. However, its biological role in lung carcinogenesis is largely unknown. In this study, we found that S100A4 was frequently overexpressed in lung cancer cells, irrespective of histological subtype. Then we performed knockdown and forced expression of S100A4 in lung cancer cell lines and found that specific knockdown of S100A4 effectively suppressed cell proliferation only in lung cancer cells with S100A4-overexpression; forced expression of S100A4 accelerated cell motility only in S100A4 low-expressing lung cancer cells. PRDM2 and VASH1, identified as novel upregulated genes by microarray after specific knockdown of S100A4 in pancreatic cancer, were also analyzed, and we found that PRDM2 was significantly upregulated after S100A4-knockdown in one of two analyzed S100A4-overexpressing lung cancer cells. Our present results suggest that S100A4 plays an important role in lung carcinogenesis by means of cell proliferation and motility by a pathway similar to that in pancreatic cancer.

  9. Inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes lung cancer cells to paclitaxel

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tonghai; Yang, Lin; Wang, Guangsuo; Ding, Guanggui; Peng, Bin; Wen, Yuxin; Wang, Zheng

    2017-01-01

    S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and plays an important role in the control of cell cycle progression. Skp2 is upregulated in several cancers, including lung cancers, but the role of Skp2 in the tumorigenesis and anticancer drug resistance in human lung cancer remains to be determined. We report here that Skp2 positively regulated mitotic arrest deficient 2 (MAD2) expression and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes human lung cancer cells to paclitaxel. Knockdown of Skp2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) decreased Mad2 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels in A549 and NCI-H1975 cells, accompanied with upregulation of p27 but decrease of the phosphorylation of retinoblastoma (Rb). In contrast, ectopic overexpression of Skp2 increased Mad2 mRNA and protein levels and phosphorylation of Rb, while it decreased p27. Pharmacological inhibition of CDK1/2 by flavopiridol or E2F1 with HLM006474 led to downregulation of Mad2 expression and prevented the increase of Mad2 expression by Skp2. Most importantly, pharmacological inhibition of Skp2 sensitized A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel. Our results demonstrated that SKP2 positively regulates the gene expression of MAD2 through p27-CDKs-E2F1 signaling pathway and that inhibition of Skp2 sensitizes A549 and NCI-H1299 cells to paclitaxel, suggesting that small molecule inhibitors of Skp2 are potential agents for the treatment of lung cancer with upregulation of Skp2. PMID:28176922

  10. Cell Selection as Driving Force in Lung and Colon Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Schöllnberger, Helmut; Beerenwinkel, Niko; Hoogenveen, Rudolf; Vineis, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is the result of mutations and subsequent clonal expansions of mutated, selectively advantageous cells. To investigate the relative contributions of mutation versus cell selection in tumorigenesis, we compared two mathematical models of carcinogenesis in two different cancer types: lung and colon. One approach is based on a population genetics model, the Wright-Fisher process, whereas the other approach is the two-stage clonal expansion model. We compared the dynamics of tumorigenesis predicted by the two models in terms of the time period until the first malignant cell appears, which will subsequently form a tumor. The mean waiting time to cancer has been calculated approximately for the evolutionary colon cancer model. Here, we derive new analytic approximations to the median waiting time for the two-stage lung cancer model and for a multistage approximation to the Wright-Fisher process. Both equations show that the waiting time to cancer is dominated by the selective advantage per mutation and the net clonal expansion rate, respectively, whereas the mutation rate has less effect. Our comparisons support the idea that the main driving force in lung and colon carcinogenesis is Darwinian cell selection. PMID:20656803

  11. Human lung small-cell carcinoma contains bombesin.

    PubMed Central

    Erisman, M D; Linnoila, R I; Hernandez, O; DiAugustine, R P; Lazarus, L H

    1982-01-01

    The presence of immunoreactive bombesin in a human lung small-cell carcinoma grown in nude mice was established by several criteria: (i) Radioimmunoassay of tissue extracts for bombesin revealed approximately 6.5 pmol/g of tissue; (ii) bombesin was found in 12-14% of the tumor cells by immunohistochemical localization; (iii) gel filtration of small-cell carcinoma extract on Sephadex G-75 and Bio-Gel P-4 gave only a single peak of immunoreactivity, which occurred at the elution volume of bombesin; and (iv) reverse-phase HPLC of acid-solubilized extracts separated the immunoreactive material into three discrete peaks, one of which eluted with a retention time identical to that of synthetic bombesin. The presence of bombesin may represent the ectopic expression of this peptide in small-cell carcinoma, because immunoreactive bombesin was found in human fetal and neonatal lung but apparently not in adult lung tissue [Wharton, J., Polak, J. M., Bloom, S. R., Ghatei, M. A., Solcia, E., Brown, M. R. & Pearse, A. G. E. (1978) Nature (London) 273, 769-770]. The immunoreactive bombesin previously found in mammalian tissues is considerably larger than amphibian bombesin; these data substantiate the presence of a mammalian form of bombesin in a human tumor that may have a structure similar to that of the amphibian peptide. Images PMID:6285381

  12. Preferential elevation of Prx I and Trx expression in lung cancer cells following hypoxia and in human lung cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Kim, H J; Chae, H Z; Kim, Y J; Kim, Y H; Hwangs, T S; Park, E M; Park, Y M

    2003-10-01

    Transient/chronic microenvironmental hypoxia that exists within a majority of solid tumors has been suggested to have a profound influence on tumor growth and therapeutic outcome. Since the functions of novel antioxidant proteins, peroxiredoxin I (Prx I) and II, have been implicated in regulating cell proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis, it was of our special interest to probe a possible role of Prx I and II in the context of hypoxic tumor microenvironment. Since both Prx I and II use thioredoxin (Trx) as an electron donor and Trx is a substrate for thioredoxin reductase (TrxR), we investigated the regulation of Trx and TrxR as well as Prx expression following hypoxia. Here we show a dynamic change of glutathione homeostasis in lung cancer A549 cells and an up-regulation of Prx I and Trx following hypoxia. Western blot analysis of 10 human lung cancer and paired normal lung tissues also revealed an elevated expression of Prx I and Trx proteins in lung cancer tissues. Immunohistochemical analysis of the lung cancer tissues confirmed an augmented Prx I and Trx expression in cancer cells with respect to the parenchymal cells in adjacent normal lung tissue. Based on these results, we suggest that the redox changes in lung tumor microenvironment could have acted as a trigger for the up-regulation of Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells. Although the clinical significance of our finding awaits more rigorous future study, preferential augmentation of the Prx I and Trx in lung cancer cells may well represent an attempt of cancer cells to manipulate a dynamic redox change in tumor microenvironment in a manner that is beneficial for their proliferation and malignant progression.

  13. Mesodesma mactroides Gill Cells Exposed to Copper: Does Hyposmotic Saline Increase Cytotoxicity or Cellular Defenses?

    PubMed

    Anjos, V A; Galvão, J S; Santos, V R S; Souza, M M

    2016-11-01

    Gill cells of filter feeding mollusks have cellular defense mechanisms, such as multixenobiotic resistance (MXR), that allow them to extrude possible contaminants. To analyze the cytotoxicity and cellular defenses of gills in the clam Mesodesma mactroides, gill cells were exposed to copper in both iso- and hyposmotic solutions. Analysis of MXR activity by fluorescence microscopy showed that hyposmotic saline activated defenses, whereas the presence of copper in isosmotic solution inhibited the activation of defenses. Cell viability was decreased in cells exposed to copper in isosmotic saline, but not in cells exposed to hyposmotic saline. We conclude that when cells cannot defend themselves due to decreased MXR, cell death occurs. In addition, gill cells under hyposmotic conditions have a greater capacity for defense and a lower rate of cellular mortality than when they are maintained under isosmotic conditions.

  14. Neutrophils dominate the immune cell composition in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kargl, Julia; Busch, Stephanie E.; Yang, Grace H. Y.; Kim, Kyoung-Hee; Hanke, Mark L.; Metz, Heather E.; Hubbard, Jesse J.; Lee, Sylvia M.; Madtes, David K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Houghton, A. McGarry

    2017-01-01

    The response rate to immune checkpoint inhibitor therapy for non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is just 20%. To improve this figure, several early phase clinical trials combining novel immunotherapeutics with immune checkpoint blockade have been initiated. Unfortunately, these trials have been designed without a strong foundational knowledge of the immune landscape present in NSCLC. Here, we use a flow cytometry panel capable of measuring 51 immune cell populations to comprehensively identify the immune cell composition and function in NSCLC. The results show that the immune cell composition is fundamentally different in lung adenocarcinoma as compared with lung squamous cell carcinoma, and that neutrophils are the most prevalent immune cell type. Using T-cell receptor-β sequencing and tumour reactivity assays, we predict that tumour reactive T cells are frequently present in NSCLC. These results should help to guide the design of clinical trials and the direction of future research in this area. PMID:28146145

  15. Monitoring of lung tumour cell growth in artificial membranes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Sulé-Suso, Josep; El Haj, Alicia J; Hoban, Paul R; Wang, Ruikang

    2004-10-15

    Morbidity of many tumour types is associated with invasion of tumour cells through the basement membrane and subsequent metastasis to vital organs. Tumour invasion is frequently detected late on as many patients present with advanced disease. The method of detecting invasion is through conventional histological staining techniques, which are time consuming and require processing of the sample. This can affect interpretation of the results. In this study, a new imaging technique, optical coherence tomography (OCT), was used to monitor lung tumour cell growth in two artificial membranes composed of either collagen type I or Matrigel. In parallel, standard histological section analysis was performed to validate the accuracy of the monitoring by OCT. Cross-sectional images from OCT revealed that lung tumour cells infiltrated only when low cell seeding density (5 x 10(5)) and low collagen concentration (1.5 mg/ml) were combined. The cells could be easily differentiated from the artificial membranes and appeared as either a brighter layer on the top of the membrane or brighter foci embedded within the darker membrane. These cell-membrane morphologies matched remarkably to the standard histological section images. Our results suggest that OCT has a great potential to become a useful tool for fast and robust imaging of cell growth in vivo and as a potential assessment of cell invasion.

  16. Stochastic models for cells exposed to ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, G.L.; Swenberg, C.E.

    1986-01-01

    The stochastic model for survivability of cells subjected to ionizing radiation initially formulated by Neyman and Puri is modified to include both the plating time to cell proliferation and dose saturation of potential lethal damage. This necessitates a reformulation of the cell survival and mutation probability. Based on the new model the authors derive the the probability of occurrence for several experimental end points. The predictions of the model compare favorably to data for diploid yeast cells irradiated with 30-MeV electrons.

  17. Cigarette side-stream smoke lung and bladder carcinogenesis: inducing mutagenic acrolein-DNA adducts, inhibiting DNA repair and enhancing anchorage-independent-growth cell transformation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyun-Wook; Wang, Hsiang-Tsui; Weng, Mao-wen; Chin, Chiu; Huang, William; Lepor, Herbert; Wu, Xue-Ru; Rom, William N; Chen, Lung-Chi; Tang, Moon-shong

    2015-10-20

    Second-hand smoke (SHS) is associated with 20-30% of cigarette-smoke related diseases, including cancer. Majority of SHS (>80%) originates from side-stream smoke (SSS). Compared to mainstream smoke, SSS contains more tumorigenic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and acrolein (Acr). We assessed SSS-induced benzo(a)pyrene diol epoxide (BPDE)- and cyclic propano-deoxyguanosine (PdG) adducts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL), lung, heart, liver, and bladder-mucosa from mice exposed to SSS for 16 weeks. In SSS exposed mice, Acr-dG adducts were the major type of PdG adducts formed in BAL (p < 0.001), lung (p < 0.05), and bladder mucosa (p < 0.001), with no significant accumulation of Acr-dG adducts in heart or liver. SSS exposure did not enhance BPDE-DNA adduct formation in any of these tissues. SSS exposure reduced nucleotide excision repair (p < 0.01) and base excision repair (p < 0.001) in lung tissue. The levels of DNA repair proteins, XPC and hOGG1, in lung tissues of exposed mice were significantly (p < 0.001 and p < 0.05) lower than the levels in lung tissues of control mice. We found that Acr can transform human bronchial epithelial and urothelial cells in vitro. We propose that induction of mutagenic Acr-DNA adducts, inhibition of DNA repair, and induction of cell transformation are three mechanisms by which SHS induces lung and bladder cancers.

  18. K-RAS MUTATIONS IN LUNG CARCINOMAS FROM NONSMOKING WOMEN EXPOSED TO UNVENTED COAL SMOKE IN CHINA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Abstract Lung cancer mortality rate in nonsmoking women in Xuan Wei (XW) County is the highest in China. The XW lung cancer rate is associated with exposure to coal smoke, containing high concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PARs), in unvented homes. Here we restig...

  19. Stem cells, cell therapies, and bioengineering in lung biology and diseases. Comprehensive review of the recent literature 2010-2012.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2013-10-01

    A conference, "Stem Cells and Cell Therapies in Lung Biology and Lung Diseases," was held July 25 to 28, 2011 at the University of Vermont to review the current understanding of the role of stem and progenitor cells in lung repair after injury and to review the current status of cell therapy and ex vivo bioengineering approaches for lung diseases. These are rapidly expanding areas of study that provide further insight into and challenge traditional views of mechanisms of lung repair after injury and pathogenesis of several lung diseases. The goals of the conference were to summarize the current state of the field, to discuss and debate current controversies, and to identify future research directions and opportunities for basic and translational research in cell-based therapies for lung diseases. The goal of this article, which accompanies the formal conference report, is to provide a comprehensive review of the published literature in lung regenerative medicine from the last conference report through December 2012.

  20. Changes in morphology, cell wall composition and soluble proteome in Rhodobacter sphaeroides cells exposed to chromate.

    PubMed

    Italiano, Francesca; Rinalducci, Sara; Agostiano, Angela; Zolla, Lello; De Leo, Francesca; Ceci, Luigi R; Trotta, Massimo

    2012-10-01

    The response of the carotenoidless Rhodobacter sphaeroides mutant R26 to chromate stress under photosynthetic conditions is investigated by biochemical and spectroscopic measurements, proteomic analysis and cell imaging. Cell cultures were found able to reduce chromate within 3-4 days. Chromate induces marked changes in the cellular dimension and morphology, as revealed by atomic force microscopy, along with compositional changes in the cell wall revealed by infrared spectroscopy. These effects are accompanied by significant changes in the level of several proteins: 15 proteins were found up-regulated and 15 down-regulated. The protein content found in chromate exposed cells is in good agreement with the biochemical, spectroscopic and microscopic results. Moreover at the present stage no specific chromate-reductase could be found in the soluble proteome, indicating that detoxification of the pollutant proceeds via aspecific reductants.

  1. Genetic polymorphisms and non-small-cell lung cancer: future paradigms

    PubMed Central

    de Mello, Ramon Andrade Bezerra

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses some current issues about genetic polymorphisms studied in the non-small-cell lung cancer translational field. Furthermore, it discusses about new potential biomarkers regarding lung cancer risk and prognosis. PMID:25628210

  2. Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0234 TITLE: Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Single-Cell RNA Sequencing of the Bronchial Epithelium in Smokers With Lung Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH...single cell RNA sequencing on airway epithelial cells obtained from smokers with and without lung cancer to identify cell-type dependent gene expression

  3. Lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations and MDM2.

    PubMed

    Gadepalli, Venkat Sundar; Deb, Swati Palit; Deb, Sumitra; Rao, Raj R

    2014-01-01

    Over the past few decades, advances in cancer research have enabled us to understand the different mechanisms that contribute to the aberrant proliferation of normal cells into abnormal cells that result in tumors. In the pursuit to find cures, researchers have primarily focused on various molecular level changes that are unique to cancerous cells. In humans, about 50 % or more cancers have a mutated tumor suppressor p53 gene thereby resulting in accumulation of p53 protein and losing its function to activate the target genes that regulate cell cycle and apoptosis. Extensive research conducted in murine cancer models with activated p53, loss of p53, or p53 missense mutations have facilitated researchers to understand the role of this key protein. Despite the identification of numerous triggers that causes lung cancer specific cure still remain elusive. One of the primary reasons attributed to this is due to the fact that the tumor tissue is heterogeneous and contains numerous sub-populations of cells. Studies have shown that a specific sub-population of cells termed as cancer stem cells (CSCs) drive the recurrence of cancer in response to standard chemotherapy. These CSCs are mutated cells with core properties similar to those of adult stem cells. They reside in a microenvironment within the tumor tissue that supports their growth and make them less susceptible to drug treatment. These cells possess properties of symmetric self-renewal and migration thus driving tumor formation and metastasis. Therefore, research specifically targeting these cells has gained prominence towards developing new therapeutic agents against cancer. This chapter focuses on lung cancer stem cells, p53 mutations noted in these cells, and importance of MDM2 interactions. Further, research approaches for better understanding of molecular mechanisms that drive CSC function and developing appropriate therapies are discussed.

  4. Changes in Functional Lung Regions During the Course of Radiation Therapy and Their Potential Impact on Lung Dosimetry for Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Meng, Xue; Frey, Kirk; Matuszak, Martha; Paul, Stanton; Ten Haken, Randall; Yu, Jinming; Kong, Feng-Ming

    2014-05-01

    Purpose: To study changes in functional activity on ventilation (V)/perfusion (Q) single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) during radiation therapy (RT) and explore the impact of such changes on lung dosimetry in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods and Materials: Fifteen NSCLC patients with centrally located tumors were enrolled. All patients were treated with definitive RT dose of ≥60 Gy. V/Q SPECT-CT scans were performed prior to and after delivery of 45 Gy of fractionated RT. SPECT images were used to define temporarily dysfunctional regions of lung caused by tumor or other potentially reversible conditions as B3. The functional lung (FL) was defined on SPECT by 2 separate approaches: FL1, a threshold of 30% of the maximum uptake of the patient's lung; and FL2, FL1 plus B3 region. The impact of changes in FL between initiation of RT and delivery of 45 Gy on lung dosimetry were analyzed. Results: Fourteen patients (93%) had larger FL2 volumes than FL1 pre-RT (P<.001). Dysfunctional lung became functional in 11 patients (73%) on V SPECT and in 10 patients (67%) on Q SPECT. The dosimetric parameters generated from CT-based anatomical lung had significantly lower values in FL1 than FL2, with a median reduction in the volume of lung receiving a dose of at least 20 Gy (V{sub 20}) of 3%, 5.6%, and mean lung dose of 0.95 and 1.55 on V and Q SPECT respectively. Conclusions: Regional ventilation and perfusion function improve significantly during RT in centrally located NSCLC. Lung dosimetry values vary notably between different definitions of functional lung.

  5. Particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium are cytotoxic and genotoxic to Steller sea lion lung cells.

    PubMed

    Wise, Sandra S; Shaffiey, Fariba; LaCerte, Carolyne; Goertz, Caroline E C; Dunn, J Lawrence; Gulland, Frances M D; Aboueissa, AbouEl-Makarim; Zheng, Tongzhang; Wise, John Pierce

    2009-03-09

    Hexavalent chromium is an environmental contaminant. Within the environment, marine waters are a common site for hexavalent chromium deposition. We have recently reported significantly high levels of chromium in skin tissue from North Atlantic right whales. These findings demonstrate that marine species are being exposed to chromium. It is possible that such exposures may be playing a role in population declines evident among certain marine mammals, such as the Steller sea lion. We developed a Steller sea lion lung cell line from Steller sea lion lung tissue. Hexavalent chromium was cytotoxic to these primary lung fibroblasts as 1, 2.5, 5, 10 and 25microM sodium chromate induced 104, 99, 92, 58 and 11% relative survival, respectively. It was also genotoxic as 0, 1, 2.5, 5 and 10microM sodium chromate damaged chromosomes in 6, 11, 21, 36, and 39% of metaphases and damaged 6, 12, 27, 49 and 57 total aberrations in 100 metaphases, respectively. We also considered the toxicity of particulate hexavalent chromium, as it is the more potent carcinogen in humans. We found that 0.1, 0.5, 1, 5 and 10microg/cm(2) particulate chromate induced 95, 88, 91, 70, and 52% relative cell survival, respectively. These concentrations were genotoxic and damaged chromosomes in 9, 13, 18, and 23% of metaphases and induced 9, 15, 20 and 30 total aberrations per 100 metaphases, respectively. These data indicate that if sufficiently exposed, chromium may adversely affect the struggling Steller sea lion population. It would be prudent to investigate the effects chromium has in other Steller sea lion organs in order to derive a better understanding of how chromium in the marine environment may be affecting the declining Steller sea lion population.

  6. Mast cells protect against Pseudomonas aeruginosa-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Junkins, Robert D; Carrigan, Svetlana O; Wu, Zhengli; Stadnyk, Andrew W; Cowley, Elizabeth; Issekutz, Thomas; Berman, Jason; Lin, Tong-Jun

    2014-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an opportunistic pathogen, is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in immune-compromised individuals. Maintaining the integrity of the respiratory epithelium is critical for an effective host response to P. aeruginosa. Given the close spatial relationship between mast cells and the respiratory epithelium, and the importance of tightly regulated epithelial permeability during lung infections, we examined whether mast cells influence airway epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa lung infection in a mouse model. We found that mast cell-deficient Kit(W-sh)/Kit(W-sh) mice displayed greatly increased epithelial permeability, bacterial dissemination, and neutrophil accumulation compared with wild-type animals after P. aeruginosa infection; these defects were corrected on reconstitution with mast cells. An in vitro Transwell co-culture model further demonstrated that a secreted mast cell factor decreased epithelial cell apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production after P. aeruginosa infection. Together, our data demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for mast cells in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during P. aeruginosa infection, through a mechanism that likely involves prevention of epithelial apoptosis and tumor necrosis factor production. Our understanding of mechanisms of the host response to P. aeruginosa will open new avenues for the development of successful preventative and treatment strategies.

  7. Asymmetric cell division of stem cells in the lung and other systems.

    PubMed

    Berika, Mohamed; Elgayyar, Marwa E; El-Hashash, Ahmed H K

    2014-01-01

    New insights have been added to identification, behavior and cellular properties of embryonic and tissue-specific stem cells over the last few years. The modes of stem cell division, asymmetric vs. symmetric, are tightly regulated during development and regeneration. The proper choice of a stem cell to divide asymmetrically or symmetrically has great consequences for development and disease because inappropriate asymmetric division disrupts organ morphogenesis, whereas uncontrolled symmetric division induces tumorigenesis. Therefore, understanding the behavior of lung stem cells could identify innovative solutions for restoring normal morphogenesis and/or regeneration of different organs. In this concise review, we describe recent studies in our laboratory about the mode of division of lung epithelial stem cells. We also compare asymmetric cell division (ACD) in the lung stem cells with other tissues in different organisms.

  8. The HSP90 Inhibitor Ganetespib Radiosensitizes Human Lung Adenocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gomez-Casal, Roberto; Bhattacharya, Chitralekha; Epperly, Michael W.; Basse, Per H.; Wang, Hong; Wang, Xinhui; Proia, David A.; Greenberger, Joel S.; Socinski, Mark A.; Levina, Vera

    2015-01-01

    The molecular chaperone HSP90 is involved in stabilization and function of multiple client proteins, many of which represent important oncogenic drivers in NSCLC. Utilization of HSP90 inhibitors as radiosensitizing agents is a promising approach. The antitumor activity of ganetespib, HSP90 inhibitor, was evaluated in human lung adenocarcinoma (AC) cells for its ability to potentiate the effects of IR treatment in both in vitro and in vivo. The cytotoxic effects of ganetespib included; G2/M cell cycle arrest, inhibition of DNA repair, apoptosis induction, and promotion of senescence. All of these antitumor effects were both concentration- and time-dependent. Both pretreatment and post-radiation treatment with ganetespib at low nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in lung AC cells in vitro. Ganetespib may impart radiosensitization through multiple mechanisms: such as down regulation of the PI3K/Akt pathway; diminished DNA repair capacity and promotion of cellular senescence. In vivo, ganetespib reduced growth of T2821 tumor xenografts in mice and sensitized tumors to IR. Tumor irradiation led to dramatic upregulation of β-catenin expression in tumor tissues, an effect that was mitigated in T2821 xenografts when ganetespib was combined with IR treatments. These data highlight the promise of combining ganetespib with IR therapies in the treatment of AC lung tumors. PMID:26010604

  9. Clarifying CB2 receptor-dependent and independent effects of THC on human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sarafian, Theodore Montes, Cindy; Harui, Airi; Beedanagari, Sudheer R.; Kiertscher, Sylvia; Stripecke, Renata; Hossepian, Derik; Kitchen, Christina; Kern, Rita; Belperio, John; Roth, Michael D.

    2008-09-15

    Marijuana smoking is associated with a number of abnormal findings in the lungs of habitual smokers. Previous studies revealed that {delta}{sup 9}-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) caused mitochondrial injury in primary lung epithelial cells and in the cell line, A549 [Sarafian, T. A., Kouyoumjian, S., Khoshaghideh, F., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2003). Delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol disrupts mitochondrial function and cell energetics. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284, L298-306; Sarafian, T., Habib, N., Mao, J. T., Tsu, I. H., Yamamoto, M. L., Hsu, E., Tashkin, D. P., and Roth, M. D. (2005). Gene expression changes in human small airway epithelial cells exposed to Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol. Toxicol Lett 158, 95-107]. The role of cannabinoid receptors in this injury was unclear, as was the potential impact on cell function. In order to investigate these questions, A549 cells were engineered to over-express the type 2 cannabinoid receptor (CB2R) using a self-inactivating lentiviral vector. This transduction resulted in a 60-fold increase in CB2R mRNA relative to cells transduced with a control vector. Transduced cell lines were used to study the effects of THC on chemotactic activity and mitochondrial function. Chemotaxis in response to a 10% serum gradient was suppressed in a concentration-dependent manner by exposure to THC. CB2R-transduced cells exhibited less intrinsic chemotactic activity (p < 0.05) and were 80- to 100-fold more sensitive to the inhibitory effects of THC. Studies using SR144528, a selective CB2R antagonist, verified that these effects were mediated by the CB2R. Marijuana smoke extract, but not smoke extracts from tobacco or placebo marijuana cigarettes, reproduced these effects (p < 0.05). THC decreased ATP level and mitochondrial membrane potential ({psi}{sub m}) in both control and CB2R-transduced cells. However, these decreases did not play a significant role in chemotaxis inhibition since cyclosporine A, which protected against ATP loss

  10. Genomic analysis of lung cell lines exposures to space radiation and the effect of lunar dust on selected fibrosis gene using RT2 PCR Array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeshitla, Samrawit

    In the United States (U.S.), lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death among men and women. Previous studies on human and animal epithelial lung cells showed that ionizing radiation and certain environmental pollutants are carcinogens. The surface area of the lungs and the slow turnover rate of the epithelial cells are suggested to play a role in the vulnerability of the cells, which lead to increase in the progenitor cell of the lung. It has been proposed that these progenitor cells, when exposed to radiation undergo multiple alterations that cause the cells to become cancerous. The current thought is that the lungs contain several facultative progenitor cells that are situated throughout the lung epithelium and are regionally restricted in their regenerative capacity. In this study, normal Human Bronchial Epithelial Cells (HBECs) were immortalized through the expression of Cdk4 and hTERT and evaluated for the effects radiation using in vitro study. The HBECs retained its novel multipotent capacity in vitro and represented unrestricted progenitor cells of the adult lungs, which resemble an embryonic progenitor. Analysis of the transformed clones of human bronchial epithelial cell line, HEBC3KT exposed to Fe ions and gamma rays revealed chromosomal abnormality, which was detected with the Multi-color Fluorescent In Situ Hybridization (mFish). In Part two of this study the F344 rats exposed to lunar dust, for 4 weeks (6h/d; 5d/wk.) in nose-only inhalation chambers at concentrations of 0 (control air), 2.1, 6.8, 20.8, and 61 mg/m3 of lunar dust, were used to determine the lunar dust toxicity on the lung tissues and total RNA were prepared from the tissues and used for gene expression. Analysis of gene expression data using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis tool identified multiple pathways of which fibrosis was one of the pathways. The Rat Fibrosis RT 2 Profile PCR Array was used to profile the expression of 84 genes that are relevant to fibrosis in the lung

  11. In vitro action of sho-seiryu-to on allergen-exposed mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, M; Inoue, K; Kitamura, Y; Shimada, A; Takano, H

    2014-01-01

    Although Sho-seiryu-to (SST), used as a traditional herbal (Kampo) medicine mainly in China and Korea, is shown to have immunomodulating potential, such as an anti-allergic one, its underlying mechanism has not been completely clarified. To partially address the issue, we explored its effects on allergen-exposed mononuclear cells. Male balb/c mice were intraperitoneally administered ovalbumin (OVA: 20 μg) plus alum or vehicle twice (Day 0 and Day 14). At Day 21, mice were sacrificed and splenocytes (mononuclear cells) were isolated and cultured in the presence or absence of OVA with or without SST. Thereafter, helper T-related cytokines in the culture supernatants were evaluated by means of ELISA. Protein level of interferon-γ was lower than 5.0 pg/mL in the supernatants from OVA– non-exposed or -exposed mononuclear cells in the presence or absence of OVA stimulation. On the other hand, SST induced the cytokine from both types of mononuclear cells in the presence (P < 0.05) or absence of OVA stimulation as compared to corresponding control. By contrast, interleukin (IL)-4 level tended to be decreased by SST in OVA-non-exposed mononuclear cells as did IL-13 in both non-exposed and exposed mononuclear cells as compared to vehicle. In conclusion, immunoregulating efficacy by SST on allergy-prone subjects may include, at least in part, restoring helper T balance mainly through hyperproduction of IFN-γ against mononuclear cells such as lymphocytes.

  12. K-ras cancer gene mutations in lung tumors from female Swiss (CD-1) mice exposed transplacentally to 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine.

    PubMed

    Koujitani, Takatoshi; Ton, Tai-Vu T; Lahousse, Stephanie A; Hong, Hue-Hua L; Wakamatsu, Nobuko; Sills, Robert C

    2008-12-01

    A transplacental carcinogenicity study was conducted by exposing pregnant Swiss (CD-1) mice to 0, 50, 100, 200, or 300 mg 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT)/kg body weight (BW) daily for the duration of gestation (18-19 days) [National Toxicology Program,2006]. The incidence of alveolar/bronchiolar adenomas and carcinomas in the 200 and 300 mg/kg groups was significantly higher (P = 0.027 and 0.007, respectively) in male offspring, but not in females (P = 0.338 and 0.315, respectively). The purpose of the present study was to evaluate K-ras mutation status in lung tumors from the female offspring in AZT exposed groups and to determine whether at the molecular level there were signature K-ras mutations in lung tumors that were different from spontaneous tumors. K-ras mutation was detected by cycle sequencing of polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-amplified DNA, isolated from formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded lung tumors. K-ras mutations were detected in 17 of 28 (61%) lung tumors from the female offspring in AZT exposed groups. No K-ras mutations were detected in the 8 tumors examined from the female control group. The predominant mutations were Codon 12 G-->T transversions in the 50, 100, and 300 mg/kg groups, and Codon 12 G-->C transversions in the 200 and 300 mg/kg groups. K-ras Codon 12 G-->T transversions (TGT mutations) may be induced by oxidative DNA damage and 8-oxoguanine (8-oxoG), while K-ras Codon 12 G-->C transversions (CGT mutations) may be due to further oxidative lesions of guanine and 8-oxoG.

  13. Distinct patterns of somatic genome alterations in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Joshua D.; Alexandrov, Anton; Kim, Jaegil; Wala, Jeremiah; Berger, Alice H.; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Shukla, Sachet A.; Guo, Guangwu; Brooks, Angela N.; Murray, Bradley A.; Imielinski, Marcin; Hu, Xin; Ling, Shiyun; Akbani, Rehan; Rosenberg, Mara; Cibulskis, Carrie; Ramachandran, Aruna; Collisson, Eric A.; Kwiatkowski, David J.; Lawrence, Michael S.; Weinstein, John N.; Verhaak, Roel G. W.; Wu, Catherine J.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Cherniack, Andrew D.; Getz, Gad; Artyomov, Maxim N.; Schreiber, Robert; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    To compare lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and to identify new drivers of lung carcinogenesis, we examined exome sequences and copy number profiles of 660 lung ADC and 484 lung SqCC tumor/normal pairs. Recurrent alterations in lung SqCCs were more similar to other squamous carcinomas than to lung ADCs. Novel significantly mutated genes included PPP3CA, DOT1L, and FTSJD1 in lung ADC, RASA1 in lung SqCC, and KLF5, EP300, and CREBBP in both tumor types. Novel amplification peaks encompassed MIR21 in lung ADC, MIR205 in lung SqCC, and MAPK1 in both. Lung ADCs lacking receptor tyrosine kinase/Ras/Raf alterations revealed mutations in SOS1, VAV1, RASA1, and ARHGAP35. Regarding neoantigens, 47% of the lung ADC and 53% of the lung SqCC tumors had at least 5 predicted neoepitopes. While targeted therapies for lung ADC and lung SqCC are largely distinct, immunotherapies may aid in treatment for both subtypes. PMID:27158780

  14. Tumor-Induced CD8+ T-Cell Dysfunction in Lung Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer. PMID:23118782

  15. Tumor-induced CD8+ T-cell dysfunction in lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Prado-Garcia, Heriberto; Romero-Garcia, Susana; Aguilar-Cazares, Dolores; Meneses-Flores, Manuel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Jose Sullivan

    2012-01-01

    Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide and one of the most common types of cancers. The limited success of chemotherapy and radiotherapy regimes have highlighted the need to develop new therapies like antitumor immunotherapy. CD8+ T-cells represent a major arm of the cell-mediated anti-tumor response and a promising target for developing T-cell-based immunotherapies against lung cancer. Lung tumors, however, have been considered to possess poor immunogenicity; even so, lung tumor-specific CD8+ T-cell clones can be established that possess cytotoxicity against autologous tumor cells. This paper will focus on the alterations induced in CD8+ T-cells by lung cancer. Although memory CD8+ T-cells infiltrate lung tumors, in both tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes (TILs) and malignant pleural effusions, these cells are dysfunctional and the effector subset is reduced. We propose that chronic presence of lung tumors induces dysfunctions in CD8+ T-cells and sensitizes them to activation-induced cell death, which may be associated with the poor clinical responses observed in immunotherapeutic trials. Getting a deeper knowledge of the evasion mechanisms lung cancer induce in CD8+ T-cells should lead to further understanding of lung cancer biology, overcome tumor evasion mechanisms, and design improved immunotherapeutic treatments for lung cancer.

  16. Vapors Produced by Electronic Cigarettes and E-Juices with Flavorings Induce Toxicity, Oxidative Stress, and Inflammatory Response in Lung Epithelial Cells and in Mouse Lung

    PubMed Central

    Lerner, Chad A.; Sundar, Isaac K.; Yao, Hongwei; Gerloff, Janice; Ossip, Deborah J.; McIntosh, Scott; Robinson, Risa; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-01-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammatory response are the key events in the pathogenesis of chronic airway diseases. The consumption of electronic cigarettes (e-cigs) with a variety of e-liquids/e-juices is alarmingly increasing without the unrealized potential harmful health effects. We hypothesized that electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS)/e-cigs pose health concerns due to oxidative toxicity and inflammatory response in lung cells exposed to their aerosols. The aerosols produced by vaporizing ENDS e-liquids exhibit oxidant reactivity suggesting oxidants or reactive oxygen species (OX/ROS) may be inhaled directly into the lung during a “vaping” session. These OX/ROS are generated through activation of the heating element which is affected by heating element status (new versus used), and occurs during the process of e-liquid vaporization. Unvaporized e-liquids were oxidative in a manner dependent on flavor additives, while flavors containing sweet or fruit flavors were stronger oxidizers than tobacco flavors. In light of OX/ROS generated in ENDS e-liquids and aerosols, the effects of ENDS aerosols on tissues and cells of the lung were measured. Exposure of human airway epithelial cells (H292) in an air-liquid interface to ENDS aerosols from a popular device resulted in increased secretion of inflammatory cytokines, such as IL-6 and IL-8. Furthermore, human lung fibroblasts exhibited stress and morphological change in response to treatment with ENDS/e-liquids. These cells also secrete increased IL-8 in response to a cinnamon flavored e-liquid and are susceptible to loss of cell viability by ENDS e-liquids. Finally, exposure of wild type C57BL/6J mice to aerosols produced from a popular e-cig increase pro-inflammatory cytokines and diminished lung glutathione levels which are critical in maintaining cellular redox balance. Thus, exposure to e-cig aerosols/juices incurs measurable oxidative and inflammatory responses in lung cells and tissues that could lead to

  17. CD133 is a temporary marker of cancer stem cells in small cell lung cancer, but not in non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Fei; Wang, Jian; Chen, Duan; Chen, Yi-Jiang

    2011-03-01

    Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. Current investigations in the field of cancer research have intensively focused on the 'cancer stem cell' or 'tumor-initiating cell'. While CD133 was initially considered as a stem cell marker only in the hematopoietic system and the nervous system, the membrane antigen also identifies tumorigenic cells in certain solid tumors. In this study, we investigated the human lung cancer cell lines A549, H157, H226, Calu-1, H292 and H446. The results of real-time PCR analysis after chemotherapy drug selection and the fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis showed that CD133 only functioned as a marker in the small cell lung cancer line H446. The sorted CD133+ subset presented stem cell-like features, including self-renewal, differentiation, proliferation and tumorigenic capacity in subsequent assays. Furthermore, a proportion of the CD133+ cells had a tendency to remain stable, which may explain the controversies arising from previous studies. Therefore, the CD133+ subset should provide an enriched source of tumor-initiating cells among H446 cells. Moreover, the antigen could be used as an investigative marker of the tumorigenic process and an effective treatment for small cell lung cancer.

  18. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration.

    PubMed

    Karki, Surya B; Yildirim-Ayan, Eda; Eisenmann, Kathryn M; Ayan, Halim

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy.

  19. Miniature Dielectric Barrier Discharge Nonthermal Plasma Induces Apoptosis in Lung Cancer Cells and Inhibits Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Eisenmann, Kathryn M.

    2017-01-01

    Traditional cancer treatments like radiotherapy and chemotherapy have drawbacks and are not selective for killing only cancer cells. Nonthermal atmospheric pressure plasmas with dielectric barrier discharge (DBD) can be applied to living cells and tissues and have emerged as novel tools for localized cancer therapy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the different effects caused by miniature DBD (mDBD) plasma to A549 lung cancer cells. In this study, A549 lung cancer cells cultured in 12 well plates were treated with mDBD plasma for specified treatment times to assess the changes in the size of the area of cell detachment, the viability of attached or detached cells, and cell migration. Furthermore, we investigated an innovative mDBD plasma-based therapy for localized treatment of lung cancer cells through apoptotic induction. Our results indicate that plasma treatment for 120 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 35.8% of cells, while mDBD plasma treatment for 60 sec, 30 sec, or 15 sec causes apoptotic cell death in 20.5%, 14.1%, and 6.3% of the cell population, respectively. Additionally, we observed reduced A549 cell migration in response to mDBD plasma treatment. Thus, mDBD plasma system can be a viable platform for localized lung cancer therapy. PMID:28243603

  20. Integrative radiogenomic profiling of squamous cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Adams, Drew J.; Hurov, Kristen E.; Tamayo, Pablo; Creighton, Chad J.; Sonkin, Dmitriy; Giacomelli, Andrew O.; Du, Charles; Fries, Daniel F.; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Mesirov, Jill P.; Loeffler, Jay S.; Schreiber, Stuart L.; Hammerman, Peter S.; Meyerson, Matthew

    2013-01-01

    Radiation therapy is one of the mainstays of anti-cancer treatment, but the relationship between the radiosensitivity of cancer cells and their genomic characteristics is still not well-defined. Here we report the development of a high-throughput platform for measuring radiation survival in vitro and its validation by comparison to conventional clonogenic radiation survival analysis. We combined results from this high-throughput assay with genomic parameters in cell lines from squamous cell lung carcinoma, which is standardly treated by radiation therapy, to identify parameters that predict radiation sensitivity. We showed that activation of NFE2L2, a frequent event in lung squamous cancers, confers radiation resistance. An expression-based, in silico screen nominated inhibitors of PI3K as NFE2L2 antagonists. We showed that the selective PI3K inhibitor, NVP-BKM120, both decreased NRF2 protein levels and sensitized NFE2L2 or KEAP1 mutant cells to radiation. We then combined results from this high-throughput assay with single-sample gene set enrichment analysis (ssGSEA) of gene expression data. The resulting analysis identified pathways implicated in cell survival, genotoxic stress, detoxification, and innate and adaptive immunity as key correlates of radiation sensitivity. The integrative, high-throughput methods shown here for large-scale profiling of radiation survival and genomic features of solid-tumor derived cell lines should facilitate tumor radiogenomics and the discovery of genotype-selective radiation sensitizers and protective agents. PMID:23980093

  1. β-catenin signaling pathway regulates cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cells by upregulating Bcl-xl

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, JIN; LIU, JIE; LI, HUI; WANG, JUN

    2016-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway has been reported to regulate cisplatin resistance in several types of cancer cell. The present study aimed to investigate the role and underlying mechanism of Wnt/β-catenin signaling in cisplatin resistance of lung adenocarcinoma cells. Wild-type and cisplatin-resistant A549 human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549/WT and A549/CDDP, respectively) were cultured in vitro and exposed to different cisplatin concentrations. Cells were incubated with 10 mM lithium chloride (LiCl) to activate β-catenin signaling. Cell proliferation was determined using the MTS assay. Cell apoptosis was evaluated using Annexin V/propidium iodide double staining, followed by flow cytometry. β-catenin was knocked down using small interfering RNA (siRNA). The intracellular distribution of β-catenin was determined by immunocytochemistry, and the mRNA and protein expressions of target genes were examined by reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and western zblotting, respectively. β-catenin and B-cell lymphoma-extra large (Bcl-xl) were significantly upregulated in A549/CDDP cells compared with A549/WT cells (P<0.05). LiCl reduced the sensitivity of A549/WT cells to cisplatin (P<0.01); and upregulated, increased phosphorylation (P<0.05) and enhanced nuclear translocation of β-catenin. LiCl also significantly elevated the mRNA and protein expression levels of Bcl-xl (P<0.05). Notably, silencing of β-catenin with siRNA decreased the mRNA and protein expression of Bcl-xl, and sensitized A549/WT cells to cisplatin (P<0.01). The findings of the current study suggest that upregulation of β-catenin signaling may contribute to cisplatin resistance in lung adenocarcinoma cells by upregulating Bcl-xl. Therefore, molecular targeting of Wnt/β-catenin signaling may sensitize lung cancer cells to cisplatin. PMID:26860078

  2. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  3. Lung function and radiographic signs of pulmonary fibrosis in oil exposed workers in a cable manufacturing company: a follow up study.

    PubMed Central

    Skyberg, K; Rønneberg, A; Christensen, C C; Naess-Andresen, C F; Borgersen, A; Refsum, H E

    1992-01-01

    Thirty seven workers employed for at least three years in oil impregnation of cables during 1963-83 were followed up in 1990 to study the development of pulmonary fibrosis and consequences for lung function. They had been exposed to concentrations of mineral oil vapours of 50-100 mg/m3, and concentrations of oil mist of 0.5-1.5 mg/m3. All 29 living persons were traced. For each person one control matched for age, height, and smoking habits was selected. Among 25 workers followed up with radiographic studies, 10 cases of pulmonary fibrosis were found, by contrast with one case in the control group (p less than 0.01). Chest radiographs from 1979-80 and 1989-90 were reviewed. The profusion of small opacities increased in seven of 16 persons during 10 years without exposure. Seventeen workers had lung function tests. The bellows function (VC, FEV1, MVV) and lung volumes (TLC, RV) did not differ from those in the matched controls (p greater than 0.05), but the carbon monoxide transfer factor (TLCO) was decreased. The largest reduction of TLCO (1.5 mmol/kPa/min) was found among workers exposed for 10 years or more (p less than 0.05). Arterial blood gases were not affected at rest, but during maximum tread mill exercise, PO2 and HbO2 were reduced in exposed workers compared with controls, particularly among those exposed for at least 10 years (p less than 0.05). Exposure to low viscosity oil mist and vapour is the most plausible cause of the fibrosis. Unaffected bellows function, reduced TLCO, and decreased arterial blood oxygen during exercise is compatible with peribronchiolar fibrosis. PMID:1599868

  4. Ultrastructural changes in tracheal epithelial cells exposed to oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Philpott, D. E.; Harrison, G. A.; Turnbill, C.; Black, S.

    1977-01-01

    White albino rats were sacrificed after 24, 36, 48, 72, and 96 h of exposure to 100% O2 at 1 atm. Tissue was prepared for the scanning electron microscope (SEM) by Critical Point Drying and for the transmission electron microscope (TEM) by plastic embedding. Scanning microscopy showed a loss of microvilli after 48 h of exposure. Cilia appeared relatively normal with SEM, but TEM revealed changes in the outer membrane. In TEM, nonciliated cells appeared swollen and often encroached on the ciliated cells. A heavy mucous blanket remained even after processing. All the changes observed that are induced by oxygen exposure contribute to mucostasis, reducing and/or halting mucociliary clearance.

  5. CYLD Promotes TNF-α-Induced Cell Necrosis Mediated by RIP-1 in Human Lung Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Xing; Chen, Qianshun; Huang, Chen

    2016-01-01

    Lung cancer is one of the most common cancers in the world. Cylindromatosis (CYLD) is a deubiquitination enzyme and contributes to the degradation of ubiquitin chains on RIP1. The aim of the present study is to investigate the levels of CYLD in lung cancer patients and explore the molecular mechanism of CYLD in the lung cancer pathogenesis. The levels of CYLD were detected in human lung cancer tissues and the paired paracarcinoma tissues by real-time PCR and western blotting analysis. The proliferation of human lung cancer cells was determined by MTT assay. Cell apoptosis and necrosis were determined by FACS assay. The results demonstrated that low levels of CYLD were detected in clinical lung carcinoma specimens. Three pairs of siRNA were used to knock down the endogenous CYLD in lung cancer cells. Knockdown of CYLD promoted cell proliferation of lung cancer cells. Otherwise overexpression of CYLD induced TNF-α-induced cell death in A549 cells and H460 cells. Moreover, CYLD-overexpressed lung cancer cells were treated with 10 μM of z-VAD-fmk for 12 hours and the result revealed that TNF-α-induced cell necrosis was significantly enhanced. Additionally, TNF-α-induced cell necrosis in CYLD-overexpressed H460 cells was mediated by receptor-interacting protein 1 (RIP-1) kinase. Our findings suggested that CYLD was a potential target for the therapy of human lung cancers. PMID:27738385

  6. Transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches to investigate the molecular responses of human cell lines exposed to the flame retardant hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jinkang; Williams, Timothy D; Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Harrad, Stuart; Chipman, James K; Viant, Mark R

    2015-12-01

    The potential for human exposure to the brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) has given rise to health concerns, yet there is relatively limited knowledge about its possible toxic effects and the underlying molecular mechanisms that may mediate any impacts on health. In this study, unbiased transcriptomic and metabolomic approaches were employed to investigate the potential molecular changes that could lead to the toxicity of HBCD under concentrations relevant to human exposure conditions using in vitro models. A concentration-dependent cytotoxic effect of HBCD to A549 and HepG2/C3A cells was observed based on MTT assays or CCK-8 assays with EC50 values of 27.4 μM and 63.0 μM, respectively. Microarray-based transcriptomics and mass spectrometry-based metabolomics revealed few molecular changes in A549 cells or HepG2/C3A cells following a 24-hour exposure to several sub-lethal concentrations (2 to 4000 nM) of HBCD. Quantification of the level of HBCD in the HepG2/C3A exposed cells suggested that the flame retardant was present at concentrations several orders of magnitude higher than those reported to occur in human tissues. We conclude that at the concentrations known to be achievable following exposure in humans, HBCD exhibits no detectable acute toxicity in A549 cells, representative of the lung, or in HepG2/C3A cells, that are hepatocytes with some xenobiotic metabolic capacity.

  7. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells in the lung.

    PubMed

    Drake, Li Yin; Kita, Hirohito

    2014-01-01

    As the first line of defense, innate immunity plays an important role in protecting the host against pathogens. Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are emerging as important effector cells in the innate immune system and the cell type that regulate immune and tissue homeostases. Group 2 ILCs (ILC2s) are a subset of ILCs and are characterized by their capacity to produce large quantities of type 2 cytokines and certain tissue growth factors. In animal models, lung ILC2s are involved in allergic airway inflammation induced by exposure to allergens even in the absence of CD4(+) T cells and are likely responsible for tissue repair and recovery after respiratory virus infection. ILC2s are also identified in various organs in humans, and the numbers are increased in mucosal tissues from patients with allergic disorders. Further investigations of this novel cell type will provide major conceptual advances in our understanding of the mechanisms of asthma and allergic diseases.

  8. Targeted drugs in small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Daffinà, Maria Grazia; Karachaliou, Niki; González-Cao, Maria; Lazzari, Chiara; Altavilla, Giuseppe; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    In contrast to non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), few advances have been made in systemic treatment of small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) in recent years. Most patients are diagnosed with extensive stage disease and are commonly treated with platinum-based chemotherapy which, although attaining high initial objective responses, has a limited impact on survival. Due to the dismal prognosis of SCLC, novel and more effective treatment strategies are urgently needed. A deeper characterization of the genomic landscape of SCLC has led to the development of rational and promising targeted agents. However, despite a large number of clinical trials, results have been disappointing and there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Recent comprehensive genomic studies suggest SCLC is a heterogeneous disease, characterized by genomic alterations targeting a broad variety of genes, including those involved in transcription regulation and chromatin modification which seem to be a hallmark of this specific lung cancer subtype. Current research efforts are focusing on further understanding of the cellular and molecular abnormalities underlying SCLC development, progression and resistance to chemotherapy. Unraveling the genomic complexity of SCLC could be the key to optimize existing treatments, including chemotherapy and radiotherapy, and for identifying those patients most likely to benefit from selected targeted therapeutic approaches. PMID:26958493

  9. Small cell lung cancer: where do we go from here?

    PubMed

    Byers, Lauren Averett; Rudin, Charles M

    2015-03-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is an aggressive disease that accounts for approximately 14% of all lung cancers. In the United States, approximately 31,000 patients are diagnosed annually with SCLC. Despite numerous clinical trials, including at least 40 phase 3 trials since the 1970s, systemic treatment for patients with SCLC has not changed significantly in the past several decades. Consequently, the 5-year survival rate remains low at <7% overall, and most patients survive for only 1 year or less after diagnosis. Unlike nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC), in which major advances have been made using targeted therapies, there are still no approved targeted drugs for SCLC. Significant barriers to progress in SCLC include 1) a lack of early detection modalities, 2) limited tumor tissue for translational research (eg, molecular profiling of DNA, RNA, and/or protein alterations) because of small diagnostic biopsies and the rare use of surgical resection in standard treatment, and 3) rapid disease progression with poor understanding of the mechanisms contributing to therapeutic resistance. In this report, the authors review the current state of SCLC treatment, recent advances in current understanding of the underlying disease biology, and opportunities to advance translational research and therapeutic approaches for patients with SCLC.

  10. Correlation between dielectric property by dielectrophoretic levitation and growth activity of cells exposed to electric field.

    PubMed

    Hakoda, Masaru; Hirota, Yusuke

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a system analyzing cell activity by the dielectrophoresis method. Our previous studies revealed a correlation between the growth activity and dielectric property (Re[K(ω)]) of mouse hybridoma 3-2H3 cells using dielectrophoretic levitation. Furthermore, it was clarified that the differentiation activity of many stem cells could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)] without differentiation induction. In this paper, 3-2H3 cells exposed to an alternating current (AC) electric field or a direct current (DC) electric field were cultivated, and the influence of damage by the electric field on the growth activity of the cells was examined. To evaluate the activity of the cells by measuring the Re[K(ω)], the correlation between the growth activity and the Re[K(ω)] of the cells exposed to the electric field was examined. The relations between the cell viability, growth activity, and Re[K(ω)] in the cells exposed to the AC electric field were obtained. The growth activity of the cells exposed to the AC electric field could be evaluated by the Re[K(ω)]. Furthermore, it was found that the adverse effects of the electric field on the cell viability and the growth activity were smaller in the AC electric field than the DC electric field.

  11. Pituitary sex hormones enhance the pro-metastatic potential of human lung cancer cells by downregulating the intracellular expression of heme oxygenase-1

    PubMed Central

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, Ahmed; Pedziwiatr, Daniel; Schneider, Gabriela; Niklinski, Jacek; Charkiewicz, Radoslaw; Moniuszko, Marcin; Kucia, Magda; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.

    2017-01-01

    We report that human lung cancer cell lines express functional receptors for pituitary sex hormones (SexHs) and respond to stimulation by follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), luteinizing hormone (LH), and prolactin (PRL). Expression of these receptors has also been confirmed in patient lung cancer samples at the mRNA level. Stimulation of human lung cancer cell lines with FSH, LH, or PRL stimulated migration and chemotaxis, and some cell lines responded by enhanced proliferation. Moreover, priming of human lung cancer cells by exposing them to pituitary SexHs resulted in enhanced seeding efficiency of injected human lung cancer cells into bone marrow, liver, and lungs in an immunodeficient mouse model. The chemotaxis of lung cancer cell lines corresponded with the activity of heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), as stimulation of these cells by FSH, LH, and PRL downregulated its expression in a p38 MAPK-dependent manner. Moreover, while downregulation of HO-1 by the small-molecule inhibitor tin protoporphyrin (SnPP) promoted migration, upregulation of HO-1 by the small-molecule activator cobalt protoporphyrin (CoPP) showed the opposite effect. Based on this finding, we propose that pituitary SexHs play a significant role in the pathogenesis of lung cancer, particularly when the blood level of FSH increases due to gonadal dysfunction with advanced age. Finally, we propose that upregulation of HO-1 expression by a small-molecule activator may be effective in controlling SexH-induced cell migration in lung cancer. PMID:27922667

  12. Hydroxysafflor yellow A of Carthamus tinctorius attenuates lung injury of aged rats exposed to gasoline engine exhaust by down-regulating platelet activation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chaoyun; Wang, Chunhua; Ma, Chunlei; Huang, Qingxian; Sun, Hongliu; Zhang, Xiaomin; Bai, Xianyong

    2014-02-15

    Long-term inhalation of gasoline engine exhaust (GEE) increases the risk of respiratory disease. Studies have suggested involvement of platelets in the development of some lung diseases. Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA), a flavonoid compound, prevents hemostasis. Therefore, we investigated its effects on GEE-induced lung injury, and role of platelets in injury. Sixty-week-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to GEE for 4h/day for 6 weeks, and then grouped as follows: control, GEE, GEE+HSYA, GEE+HSYA+GW9662, and GEE+GW9662. Arterial oxygen tension (PaO2), carbon dioxide tension (PaCO2), pH, and the PaO2/fraction of inspired oxygen ratio (PaO2/FiO2) in the blood were detected using a blood gas analyzer. Wet/dry lung weight ratio, total protein in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and cytokine concentrations in serum and BALF were determined. Furthermore, cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) level and expression levels of target proteins were analyzed. Platelets were counted and their state was evaluated. HSYA attenuated GEE-mediated decreases in PaO2, PaO2/FiO2, platelet cAMP level, protein kinase A (PKA) activity, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) expression. HSYA also attenuated GEE-mediated increases in lung permeability, cytokine levels in serum and BALF, plasma platelet count, and ADP-mediated platelet aggregation. Moreover, it suppressed GEE-induced increases in the expression of adhesion molecules and proinflammatory cytokines in platelets and lung tissue. Therefore, HSYA is therapeutically effective for GEE-mediated lung injury and acts by enhancing PKA activity and inhibiting platelet activation.

  13. Multifunctional fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles for lung cancer stem cells research.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuan; Chen, Lisha; Wang, Anxin; Ma, Yufei; Zhang, Hailu; Zhu, Yimin

    2015-10-01

    In this paper, a multifunctional peptide-fluorescent-magnetic nanocomposites (Fe₃O₄@PEI@Cy5.5@PEG@HCBP-1 NPs) was synthesized via a layer-by-layer approach for potential application to cancer diagnoses. The multifunctional nanocomposites have great dispersibility and homogeneous particle sizes in aqueous solution. Meanwhile, it has perfect hemocompatibility and satisfying cytocompatibility in a relatively high concentration. Data from in vitro cytotoxicity assay indicated that the nanocomposites could recognize the lung cancer stem cells (CSCs) specifically and enrich the HCBP-1 positive CSCs from H460 tumor xenografts effectively. Additionally, the results of in vivo live fluorescent imaging and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed that the nanocomposites could identify lung CSCs in tumor xenografts. These results suggested that the nanocomposites could be used as a potential cancer diagnostic agent through modifying diverse fluorescence dyes and targeting ligands on its surface.

  14. Liquid Biopsy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Vila, Miguel A.; Mayo-de-las-Casas, Clara; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Jordana-Ariza, Núria; Garzón, Mónica; Balada, Ariadna; Villatoro, Sergi; Teixidó, Cristina; García-Peláez, Beatriz; Aguado, Cristina; Catalán, María José; Campos, Raquel; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Martínez-Bueno, Alejandro; Gil, María-de-los-Llanos; González-Cao, María; González, Xavier; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Liquid biopsy analyses are already incorporated in the routine clinical practice in many hospitals and oncology departments worldwide, improving the selection of treatments and monitoring of lung cancer patients. Although they have not yet reached its full potential, liquid biopsy-based tests will soon be as widespread as “standard” biopsies and imaging techniques, offering invaluable diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. This review summarizes the techniques available for the isolation and analysis of circulating free DNA and RNA, exosomes, tumor-educated platelets, and circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients, presents the methodological challenges associated with each of these materials, and discusses the clinical applications of liquid biopsy testing in lung cancer. PMID:28066769

  15. Liquid Biopsy in Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    PubMed

    Molina-Vila, Miguel A; Mayo-de-Las-Casas, Clara; Giménez-Capitán, Ana; Jordana-Ariza, Núria; Garzón, Mónica; Balada, Ariadna; Villatoro, Sergi; Teixidó, Cristina; García-Peláez, Beatriz; Aguado, Cristina; Catalán, María José; Campos, Raquel; Pérez-Rosado, Ana; Bertran-Alamillo, Jordi; Martínez-Bueno, Alejandro; Gil, María-de-Los-Llanos; González-Cao, María; González, Xavier; Morales-Espinosa, Daniela; Viteri, Santiago; Karachaliou, Niki; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Liquid biopsy analyses are already incorporated in the routine clinical practice in many hospitals and oncology departments worldwide, improving the selection of treatments and monitoring of lung cancer patients. Although they have not yet reached its full potential, liquid biopsy-based tests will soon be as widespread as "standard" biopsies and imaging techniques, offering invaluable diagnostic, prognostic, and predictive information. This review summarizes the techniques available for the isolation and analysis of circulating free DNA and RNA, exosomes, tumor-educated platelets, and circulating tumor cells from the blood of cancer patients, presents the methodological challenges associated with each of these materials, and discusses the clinical applications of liquid biopsy testing in lung cancer.

  16. Arsenic promotes centrosome abnormalities and cell colony formation in p53 compromised human lung cells

    SciTech Connect

    Liao Weiting; Lin Pinpin; Cheng, T.-S.; Yu, H.-S.; Chang, Louis W.

    2007-12-01

    Epidemiological evidence indicated that residents, especially cigarette smokers, in arseniasis areas had significantly higher lung cancer risk than those living in non-arseniasis areas. Thus, an interaction between arsenic and cigarette smoking in lung carcinogenesis was suspected. p53 dysfunction or mutation in lung epithelial cells was frequently observed in cigarette smokers. Our present study was to explore the differential effects by arsenic on H1355 cells (human lung adenocarcinoma cell line with mutation in p53), BEAS-2B (immortalized lung epithelial cell with functional p53) and pifithrin-{alpha}-treated BEAS-2B cells (p53-inhibited cells). These cells were treated with different doses of sodium arsenite (0, 0.1, 1, 5 and 10 {mu}M) for 48 h. A greater reduction in cell viability was observed in the BEAS-2B cells vs. p53 compromised cells (H1355 or p53-inhibited BEAS-2B). Similar observation was also made on 7-day cell survival (growth) study. TUNEL analysis confirmed that there was indeed a significantly reduced arsenite-induced apoptosis found in p53-compromised cells. Centrosomal abnormality has been attributed to eventual chromosomal missegregation, aneuploidy and tumorigenesis. In our present study, reduced p21 and Gadd45a expressions and increased centrosomal abnormality (atopic and multiple centrosomes) were observed in both arsenite-treated H1355 and p53-inhibited BEAS-2B cells as compared with similarly treated BEAS-2B cells. Increased anchorage-independent growth (colony formation) of BEAS-2B cells co-treated with pifithrin-{alpha} and 5 {mu}M sodium arsenite was also observed in soft agar. Our present investigation demonstrated that arsenic would act specifically on p53 compromised cells (either with p53 dysfunction or inhibited) to induce centrosomal abnormality and colony formation. These findings provided strong evidence on the carcinogenic promotional role of arsenic, especially under the condition of p53 dysfunction.

  17. Regulation of c-jun by lung carcinogens in Clara cells of hamsters.

    PubMed

    Dolan, L R; Rutberg, S E; Amin, S; Emura, M; Mohr, U; Kraft, A; Yokoyama, K; Ronai, Z

    1994-12-01

    In vitro differentiated hamster Clara cells were used to study the effects of lung carcinogens on the regulation of the c-jun oncogene. Northern blot analysis revealed a decrease in the expression of jun transcripts 24 h following the exposure of Clara cells to the direct acting forms of benzo[a]pyrene (BPDE*) or 5-methylchrysene (5MeCDE). To determine whether this decrease was mediated at the transcriptional level, we have used CAT reporter constructs driven by nested deletions of the 5' non-coding regulatory region of the c-jun oncogene. While BPDE was capable of activating certain regulatory domains of the c-jun promoter, this activation was not observed with either 5MeCDE or the less active lung carcinogens BADE or 6MeCDE. Analysis of enhancer elements identified the SP1 target site as a strong silencer after BPDE treatment. While positive regulatory element(s) mediating activation of c-jun by BPDE were localized within the promoter region up to -1639, further upstream sequences reduced this transcriptional activation. Thus, when the complete promoter region, up to -4500, was tested, no transcriptional activation was noted following BPDE treatment. These observations suggest that the regulation of c-jun in Clara cells exposed to potent lung carcinogens is mediated at the post-transcriptional level, possibly by reducing the stability and, in turn, the half life of c-jun mRNA. Overall, in contrast to the response of c-jun to numerous carcinogens and stress inducing agents noted in various other cell systems, our findings suggest the existence of a tissue-specific regulatory response for c-jun.

  18. Lung dendritic cells facilitate extrapulmonary bacterial dissemination during pneumococcal pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Rosendahl, Alva; Bergmann, Simone; Hammerschmidt, Sven; Goldmann, Oliver; Medina, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is a leading cause of bacterial pneumonia worldwide. Given the critical role of dendritic cells (DCs) in regulating and modulating the immune response to pathogens, we investigated here the role of DCs in S. pneumoniae lung infections. Using a well-established transgenic mouse line which allows the conditional transient depletion of DCs, we showed that ablation of DCs resulted in enhanced resistance to intranasal challenge with S. pneumoniae. DCs-depleted mice exhibited delayed bacterial systemic dissemination, significantly reduced bacterial loads in the infected organs and lower levels of serum inflammatory mediators than non-depleted animals. The increased resistance of DCs-depleted mice to S. pneumoniae was associated with a better capacity to restrict pneumococci extrapulmonary dissemination. Furthermore, we demonstrated that S. pneumoniae disseminated from the lungs into the regional lymph nodes in a cell-independent manner and that this direct way of dissemination was much more efficient in the presence of DCs. We also provide evidence that S. pneumoniae induces expression and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in cultured bone marrow-derived DCs. MMP-9 is a protease involved in the breakdown of extracellular matrix proteins and is critical for DC trafficking across extracellular matrix and basement membranes during the migration from the periphery to the lymph nodes. MMP-9 was also significantly up-regulated in the lungs of mice after intranasal infection with S. pneumoniae. Notably, the expression levels of MMP-9 in the infected lungs were significantly decreased after depletion of DCs suggesting the involvement of DCs in MMP-9 production during pneumococcal pneumonia. Thus, we propose that S. pneumoniae can exploit the DC-derived proteolysis to open tissue barriers thereby facilitating its own dissemination from the local site of infection. PMID:23802100

  19. Distinct patterns of somatic genome alterations in lung adenocarcinomas and squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Joshua D; Alexandrov, Anton; Kim, Jaegil; Wala, Jeremiah; Berger, Alice H; Pedamallu, Chandra Sekhar; Shukla, Sachet A; Guo, Guangwu; Brooks, Angela N; Murray, Bradley A; Imielinski, Marcin; Hu, Xin; Ling, Shiyun; Akbani, Rehan; Rosenberg, Mara; Cibulskis, Carrie; Ramachandran, Aruna; Collisson, Eric A; Kwiatkowski, David J; Lawrence, Michael S; Weinstein, John N; Verhaak, Roel G W; Wu, Catherine J; Hammerman, Peter S; Cherniack, Andrew D; Getz, Gad; Artyomov, Maxim N; Schreiber, Robert; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Meyerson, Matthew

    2016-06-01

    To compare lung adenocarcinoma (ADC) and lung squamous cell carcinoma (SqCC) and to identify new drivers of lung carcinogenesis, we examined the exome sequences and copy number profiles of 660 lung ADC and 484 lung SqCC tumor-normal pairs. Recurrent alterations in lung SqCCs were more similar to those of other squamous carcinomas than to alterations in lung ADCs. New significantly mutated genes included PPP3CA, DOT1L, and FTSJD1 in lung ADC, RASA1 in lung SqCC, and KLF5, EP300, and CREBBP in both tumor types. New amplification peaks encompassed MIR21 in lung ADC, MIR205 in lung SqCC, and MAPK1 in both. Lung ADCs lacking receptor tyrosine kinase-Ras-Raf pathway alterations had mutations in SOS1, VAV1, RASA1, and ARHGAP35. Regarding neoantigens, 47% of the lung ADC and 53% of the lung SqCC tumors had at least five predicted neoepitopes. Although targeted therapies for lung ADC and SqCC are largely distinct, immunotherapies may aid in treatment for both subtypes.

  20. The Biological Effects of Dickkopf1 on Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells and Bone Metastasis.

    PubMed

    Pang, Hailin; Ma, Ningqiang; Jiao, Mi; Shen, Weiwei; Xin, Bo; Wang, Tongfei; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Lili; Zhang, Helong

    2017-01-02

    The bone is among the most common sites of metastasis in patients with lung cancer. Over 30%-40% of lung cancers can develop bone metastasis, and no effective therapeutic methods exist in clinic cases. Wnt/β-catenin signaling and Dickkopf1 (DKK1) play important roles in the progression of lung cancer, which preferentially metastasizes to the skeleton. However, the role of DKK1 in osteotropism of small cell lung cancer (SCLC) remains to be elucidated. This study aimed to define the role of DKK1 in SCLC bone metastasis and investigate the underlying mechanisms. Our results demonstrated that the expression level of DKK1 was dramatically higher in bone metastatic SCLC cells (SBC-5 cell line) compared with that in cells without bone metastatic ability (SBC-3 cell line). Therefore, we hypothesized that DKK1 was involved in the bone metastasis of SCLC. We then suppressed the DKK1 expression in SBC-5 cells by RNAi and found that downregulation of DKK1 can inhibit cell proliferation, colony formation, cell migration, and invasion, but increase the apoptosis rate. Downregulation of DKK1 did not affect the cell cycle progression of SBC-5 cells in vitro. In vivo, downregulated DKK1 in SBC-5 cells resulted in attenuated bone metastasis. These results indicated that DKK1 may be an important regulator in bone metastases of SCLC, and targeting DKK1 may be an effective method to prevent and treat skeleton metastases in SCLC cases.

  1. Erlotinib Hydrochloride With or Without Carboplatin and Paclitaxel in Treating Patients With Stage III-IV Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-04-04

    Adenosquamous Lung Carcinoma; Bronchioloalveolar Carcinoma; Lung Adenocarcinoma; Malignant Pericardial Effusion; Malignant Pleural Effusion; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  2. GENE EXPRESSION PROFILING OF NORMAL HUMAN BRONCHIAL EPITHELIAL CELLS EXPOSED TO TRIVALENT ARSENICALS AND DIMETHYLTHIOARSINIC ACID

    EPA Science Inventory

    Lung is a major target for arsenic carcinogenesis in humans. However, the carcinogenic mode of action of arsenicals is unknown. We investigated, in human bronchial epithelial (BEAS2B) cells, the effects of inorganic arsenic (iAsIII), monomethylarsonous acid (MMAIII), dimethylarsi...

  3. Autosomal mutants of proton-exposed kidney cells display frequent loss of heterozygosity on nonselected chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Grygoryev, Dmytro; Dan, Cristian; Gauny, Stacey; Eckelmann, Bradley; Ohlrich, Anna P; Connolly, Marissa; Lasarev, Michael; Grossi, Gianfranco; Kronenberg, Amy; Turker, Mitchell S

    2014-05-01

    High-energy protons found in the space environment can induce mutations and cancer, which are inextricably linked. We hypothesized that some mutants isolated from proton-exposed kidneys arose through a genome-wide incident that causes loss of heterozygosity (LOH)-generating mutations on multiple chromosomes (termed here genomic LOH). To test this hypothesis, we examined 11 pairs of nonselected chromosomes for LOH events in mutant cells isolated from the kidneys of mice exposed to 4 or 5 Gy of 1 GeV protons. The mutant kidney cells were selected for loss of expression of the chromosome 8-encoded Aprt gene. Genomic LOH events were also assessed in Aprt mutants isolated from isogenic cultured kidney epithelial cells exposed to 5 Gy of protons in vitro. Control groups were spontaneous Aprt mutants and clones isolated without selection from the proton-exposed kidneys or cultures. The in vivo results showed significant increases in genomic LOH events in the Aprt mutants from proton-exposed kidneys when compared with spontaneous Aprt mutants and when compared with nonmutant (i.e., nonselected) clones from the proton-exposed kidneys. A bias for LOH events affecting chromosome 14 was observed in the proton-induced Aprt mutants, though LOH for this chromosome did not confer increased radiation resistance. Genomic LOH events were observed in Aprt mutants isolated from proton-exposed cultured kidney cells; however the incidence was fivefold lower than in Aprt mutants isolated from exposed intact kidneys, suggesting a more permissive environment in the intact organ and/or the evolution of kidney clones prior to their isolation from the tissue. We conclude that proton exposure creates a subset of viable cells with LOH events on multiple chromosomes, that these cells form and persist in vivo, and that they can be isolated from an intact tissue by selection for a mutation on a single chromosome.

  4. Micro FT-IR Characterization Of Human Lung Tumor Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benedetti, Enzo; Teodori, L.; Vergamini, Piergiorgio; Trinca, M. L.; Mauro, F.; Salvati, F.; Spremolla, Giuliano

    1989-12-01

    FT-IR spectroscopy has opened up a new approach to the analytical study of cell transformation. Investigations carried out in normal and leukemic lymphocytes have evidenced an increase in DNA with respect to proteic components in neoplastic cells.(1) The evaluation of the ratio of the integrated areas(A) of the bands at 1080 cm-1 (mainly DNA) and at 1540 cm-1 (proteic components) has allowed us to establish a parameter which indicates, for values above 1.5, the neoplastic nature of cells. Recently, this approach has been applied to the study of human lung tumor cells. Several monocellular suspension procedures of the tissue fragment (mechanical and/or chemical) were tested to obtain reproducible and reliable spectra able to differentiate clearly between normal and patological cells. Chemical treatment (EDTA, Pepsin, Collagenase, etc.) produced additional bands in the spectra of the cells causing distortion of the profiles of some absorptions, and as a result, mechanical treatment was preferred. The normal and neoplastic cells homogeneously distributed by cytospin preparation on BaF2 windows were examined by means of FT-IR microscopy. An examination of several microareas of each sample yielded reproducible spectra, with values of the A 1080 cm-1 / A 1540 cm-1 parameter within a very narrow range for each sample, even if certain differences still remained among the different cases, in good agreement with the results obtained for leukemic cells.(1) The value of this parameter was found to be lower for cells isolated from the normal area of lung, than in the case of those corresponding to the tumoral area, meaning that an increase occurs in DNA with respect to the proteic components. These insights, which provide a basis to obtain indications at the molecular level, can open up new possibilities in clinical practice, in order to obtain diagnosis confirmation, to detect early stages of disease and to offer additional indications in cases of dubious interpretation.

  5. Contributions of TRPV1, endovanilloids, and endoplasmic reticulum stress in lung cell death in vitro and lung injury

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Karen C.; Roberts, Jessica K.; Deering-Rice, Cassandra E.; Romero, Erin G.; Dull, Randal O.; Lee, Jeewoo; Yost, Garold S.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous agonists of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) (endovanilloids) are implicated as mediators of lung injury during inflammation. This study tested the hypothesis that endovanilloids produced following lipopolysaccharide (LPS) treatment activate TRPV1 and cause endoplasmic reticulum stress/GADD153 expression in lung cells, representing a mechanistic component of lung injury. The TRPV1 agonist nonivamide induced GADD153 expression and caused cytotoxicity in immortalized and primary human bronchial, bronchiolar/alveolar, and microvascular endothelial cells, proportional to TRPV1 mRNA expression. In CF-1 mice, Trpv1 mRNA was most abundant in the alveoli, and intratracheal nonivamide treatment promoted Gadd153 expression in the alveolar region. Treatment of CF-1 mice with LPS increased Gadd153 in the lung, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, and lung wet-to-dry weight ratio. Cotreating mice with LPS and the TRPV1 antagonist LJO-328 reduced Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL but did not inhibit increases in lung wet-to-dry ratio. In Trpv1−/− mice treated with LPS, Gadd153 induction and LDH in BAL were reduced relative to wild-type mice, and the wet-to-dry weight ratios of lungs from both wild-type and Trpv1−/− mice decreased. Organic extracts of blood collected from LPS-treated mice were more cytotoxic to TRPV1-overexpressing cells compared with BEAS-2B cells and extracts from control mice, however, most pure endovanilloids did not produce cytotoxicity in a characteristic TRPV1-dependent manner. Collectively, these data indicate a role for TRPV1, and endogenous TRPV1 agonists, in ER stress and cytotoxicity in lung cells but demonstrate that ER stress and cytotoxicity are not essential for pulmonary edema. PMID:21949157

  6. Previous heat shock treatment inhibits Mayaro virus replication in human lung adenocarcinoma (A549) cells.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, P L; Godinho-Netto, M C; Carvalho Mda, G

    1997-01-01

    Human lung adenocarcinoma cells (A549) were submitted to mild or severe heat shock (42 degrees C or 44 degrees C) for 1 h, while another group of cells was double-heat-shocked (submitted to 42 degrees C for 1 h, returned to 37 degrees C for 3 h, then exposed to 44 degrees C for 1 h). After each heat treatment, the cells were infected with Mayaro virus for 24 h and incubated at 37 degrees C. The results showed that the double-heat-shocked thermotolerant cells exhibited a 10(4)-fold virus titre inhibition, despite the recovery of protein synthesis and original morphology 24 h post-infection. In contrast, cells submitted to mild or severe heat shock exhibited weaker inhibition of Mayaro virus titre (10(2)-fold). The mildly heat-shocked cells also presented a full recovery in protein synthesis, which was not observed in severely heat-shocked cells. These results indicate that exposure of A549 cells to a mild or to a double heat shock treatment before Mayaro virus infection induces an antiviral state.

  7. IL-1β expression in the distal lung epithelium disrupts lung morphogenesis and epithelial cell differentiation in fetal mice.

    PubMed

    Hogmalm, Anna; Bry, Maija; Strandvik, Birgitta; Bry, Kristina

    2014-01-01

    Perinatal inflammation and the inflammatory cytokine IL-1 can modify lung morphogenesis. To examine the effects of antenatal expression of IL-1β in the distal airway epithelium on fetal lung morphogenesis, we studied lung development and surfactant expression in fetal mice expressing human IL-1β under the control of the surfactant protein (SP)-C promoter. IL-1β-expressing pups suffered respiratory failure and died shortly after birth. IL-1β caused fetal lung inflammation and enhanced the expression of keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC/CXCL1) and monocyte chemoattractant protein 3 (MCP-3/CCL7), the calgranulins S100A8 and S100A9, the acute-phase protein serum amyloid A3, the chitinase-like proteins Ym1 and Ym2, and pendrin. IL-1β decreased the percentage of the total distal lung area made up of air saccules and the number of air saccules in the lungs of fetal mice. IL-1β inhibited the expression of VEGF-A and its receptors VEGFR-1 and VEGFR-2. The percentage of the cellular area of the distal lung made up of capillaries was decreased in IL-1β-expressing fetal mice. IL-1β suppressed the production of SP-B and pro-SP-C and decreased the amount of phosphatidylcholine and the percentage of palmitic acid in the phosphatidylcholine fraction of lung phospholipids, indicating that IL-1β prevented the differentiation of type II epithelial cells. The production of Clara cell secretory protein in the nonciliated bronchiolar (Clara) cells was likewise suppressed by IL-1β. In conclusion, expression of IL-1β in the epithelium of the distal airways disrupted the development of the airspaces and capillaries in the fetal lung and caused fatal respiratory failure at birth.

  8. Teroxirone inhibited growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells by activating p53

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jing-Ping; Lin, Kai-Han; Liu, Chun-Yen; Yu, Ya-Chu; Wu, Pei-Tsun; Chiu, Chien-Chih; Su, Chun-Li; Chen, Kwun-Min; Fang, Kang

    2013-11-15

    In this work, we demonstrated that the growth of human non-small-cell-lung-cancer cells H460 and A549 cells can be inhibited by low concentrations of an epoxide derivative, teroxirone, in both in vitro and in vivo models. The cytotoxicity was mediated by apoptotic cell death through DNA damage. The onset of ultimate apoptosis is dependent on the status of p53. Teroxirone caused transient elevation of p53 that activates downstream p21 and procaspase-3 cleavage. The presence of caspase-3 inhibitor reverted apoptotic phenotype. Furthermore, we showed the cytotoxicity of teroxirone in H1299 cells with stable ectopic expression of p53, but not those of mutant p53. A siRNA-mediated knockdown of p53 expression attenuated drug sensitivity. The in vivo experiments demonstrated that teroxirone suppressed growth of xenograft tumors in nude mice. Being a potential therapeutic agent by restraining cell growth through apoptotic death at low concentrations, teroxirone provides a feasible perspective in reversing tumorigenic phenotype of human lung cancer cells. - Highlights: • Teroxirone repressed tumor cell growth in nude mice of human lung cancer cells. • The apoptotic cell death reverted by caspase-3 inhibitor is related to p53 status. • Teroxirone provides a good candidate for lung cancer treatment.

  9. Bronchoalveolar lavage cell pattern from healthy human lung

    PubMed Central

    Heron, M; Grutters, J C; ten Dam-Molenkamp, K M; Hijdra, D; van Heugten-Roeling, A; Claessen, A M E; Ruven, H J T; van den Bosch, J M M; van Velzen-Blad, H

    2012-01-01

    Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) is widely accepted as a key diagnostic procedure in interstitial lung diseases (ILD). We performed a study to obtain reference intervals of differential cell patterns in BAL fluid with special attention to the origin of lavage fluid, e.g. bronchial/alveolar, to atopy and smoking status and to age of the healthy people. We performed bronchoalveolar lavage in 55 healthy subjects with known atopy status (age: 18–64 years, non-smokers/smokers: 34/21) and determined differential cell counts and lymphocyte subsets in BAL fluid and blood. Moreover, in a subgroup of non-smoking healthy individuals we measured the expression of the regulatory T cell marker forkhead box protein 3 (FoxP3) on blood and BAL fluid lymphocytes in addition to a comprehensive set of activation markers. Differential cell counts from the alveolar lavage fraction differed significantly from calculated pooled fractions (n = 11). In contrast, marginal differences were found between atopic and non-atopic subjects. Interestingly, the BAL fluid CD4+/CD8+ ratio correlated strongly with age (r2 = 0·50, P < 0·0001). We consider the bronchial and alveolar fraction to be lavage fluid from fundamentally different compartments and recommend analysis of the alveolar fraction in diagnostic work-up of ILD. In addition, our data suggest that age corrected BAL fluid CD4+/CD8+ ratios should be used in the clinical evaluation of patients with interstitial lung diseases. PMID:22288596

  10. Claudin-7 suppresses the cytotoxicity of TRAIL-expressing mesenchymal stem cells in H460 human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Xia, Pu; Wang, Wei; Bai, Yang

    2014-03-01

    Evidence suggests that the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) is a promising candidate for cancer therapeutics. Studies have also shown that claudin-7 (CLDN7) expression is variably dysregulated in various malignant neoplasms, with a role in lung cancer that has not been definitively decided. This work investigated the differential sensitivity of CLDN7-overexpressing human NSCLC H460 cells to TRAIL in vitro and in mouse xenografts, and explored the molecular mechanisms responsible for these effects. NCI-H460 cells were transfected or not with green fluorescent protein-tagged CLDN7. Each group was then exposed to mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) or red fluorescent protein-tagged MSCs transduced with lentivirus expressing membrane-bound TRAIL. The effects and related mechanisms of these treatments were evaluated in vitro, and in vivo in murine xenografts. Our results indicate that TRAIL induced apoptosis in H460 cells in vitro, and in established xenograft tumors TRAIL was associated with a decrease in tumor size, tumor weight, and circulating tumor cells. CLDN7 was found to inhibit the MEK/ERK signaling pathway, leading to inhibition of death receptor 5 (TNFRSF10B). The cytotoxicity of TRAIL was confirmed in H460 cells and in vivo, and CLDN7 suppressed the cytotoxicity of TRAIL in H460 cells. Our results indicate that TRAIL may be a useful therapy to enhance apoptosis in CLDN7-negative lung cancer cells.

  11. Retention of lung distension information in pump cell spike trains.

    PubMed

    Marchenko, Vitaliy; Rogers, Robert F

    2007-07-01

    Respiratory control requires feedback signals from the viscera, including mechanoreceptors and chemoreceptors. We previously showed that typical pulmonary stretch receptor (PSR) spike trains provide the central nervous system with approximately 31% of the theoretical maximum information regarding the amplitude of lung distension. However, it is unknown whether the spatiotemporal convergence of many PSR inputs onto second-order neurons (e.g., pump cells) results in more, or less, information about the stimulus carried by second-order cell spike trains. We recorded pump cell activity in adult, anesthetized, paralyzed, artificially ventilated rabbits during continuous manipulation of ventilator rate and volume to test the hypothesis that less information is carried by spike trains of individual pump cells than PSRs. Using previously developed analytic methods, we quantified the information carried by the pump cell spike trains and compared it with the same values derived from PSR data. Our results provide evidence that rejects our hypothesis: pump cells as a group did not carry significantly less information about the lung distension stimulus than PSRs, although that trend was implied by the data. By comparing the response variances with the theoretical minimum, we discovered that the trend toward information loss depends on response strength, with higher mean responses associated with larger response variances in pump cells than in PSRs. Thus spatiotemporal integration may result in information loss within certain analytic/stimulus parameters, but this is counterbalanced by the consistency of pump cell responses during brief integration times and/or low stimulus amplitudes, resulting in retention of total information.

  12. Down-regulation of survivin in nitric oxide-induced cell growth inhibition and apoptosis of the human lung carcinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Chao, Jui-I; Kuo, Pao-Chen; Hsu, Tzu-Sheng

    2004-05-07

    Survivin is expressed in most tumor cells and has been associated with both anti-apoptosis and mitotic progression. However, the mechanism of regulation of the survivin expression remains unclear. In this study we investigated the expression and regulation of survivin in the nitric oxide (NO)-exposed human lung carcinoma cells. The lung carcinoma cell lines CL3, H1299, and A549 but not normal lung fibroblast expressed high levels of survivin proteins. NO donors S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP) and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) decreased the survivin expression. SNAP (0.4 mm, 24h)and SNP (1 mm, 24 h) significantly induced cytotoxicity and apoptosis in lung carcinoma cells. Furthermore, SNAP inhibited the cell growth and increased the fractions of G(2)/M phase. The levels of cyclin B1 and phospho-cdc2-(Thr-161) proteins were inhibited in the NO-exposed cells. The cdc25 phosphatase inhibitors (Cpd 5 and NSC 663284) and the cdc2 kinase inhibitors (alsterpaullone and purvalanol A) enhanced SNP-induced cytotoxicity and the decrease in survivin expression. However, overexpression of survivin by a pOTB7-survivin vector reduced SNP-induced cell growth inhibition and cytotoxicity. In addition, SNP activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, SB202190, significantly decreased the cytotoxicity and increased the survivin levels in NO donor-treated and inducible NOS-transfected cells. Conversely, anticancer agents including quercetin, arsenite, and cisplatin but not genistein increased the levels of survivin protein. Our results indicated for the first time that NO inhibited the expression of survivin, which was down-regulated by the p38 MAP kinase pathway.

  13. AhR-dependent secretion of PDGF-BB by human classically activated macrophages exposed to DEP extracts stimulates lung fibroblast proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-06-15

    Lung diseases are aggravated by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) found in air pollution. Macrophages are thought to play a crucial role in lung immune response to these pollutants, even if the mechanisms involved remain incompletely characterized. In the present study, we demonstrated that classically and alternative human macrophages (MΦ) exhibited increased secretion of PDGF-B in response to DEP extract (DEPe). This occurred via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activation because DEPe-induced PDGF-B overexpression was abrogated after AhR expression knock-down by RNA interference, in both M1 and M2 polarizing MΦ. In addition, TCDD and benzo(a)pyrene, two potent AhR ligands, also significantly increased mRNA expression of PDGF-B in M1 MΦ, whereas some weak ligands of AhR did not. We next evaluated the impact of conditioned media (CM) from MΦ culture exposed to DEPe or of recombinant PDGF-B onto lung fibroblast proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG-1295, prevents phosphorylations of PDGF-Rβ, AKT and ERK1/2 and the proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts induced by recombinant PDGF-B and by CM from M1 polarizing MΦ, strongly suggesting that the PDGF-BB secreted by DEPe-exposed MΦ is sufficient to activate the PDGF-Rβ pathway of human lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that human MΦ, whatever their polarization status, secrete PDGF-B in response to DEPe and that PDGF-B is a target gene of AhR. Therefore, induction of PDGF-B by DEP may participate in the deleterious effects towards human health triggered by such environmental urban contaminants.

  14. Arginase inhibition enhances angiogenesis in endothelial cells exposed to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lin; Bhatta, Anil; Toque, Haroldo A; Rojas, Modesto; Yao, Lin; Xu, Zhimin; Patel, Chintan; Caldwell, Ruth B; Caldwell, R William

    2015-03-01

    Hypoxia-induced arginase elevation plays an essential role in several vascular diseases but influence of arginase on hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis is completely unknown. In this study, in vitro network formation in bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC) was examined after exposure to hypoxia for 24h with or without arginase inhibition. Arginase activity, protein levels of the two arginase isoforms, eNOS, and VEGF as well as production of NO and ROS were examined to determine the involvement of arginase in hypoxia-mediated angiogenesis. Hypoxia elevated arginase activity and arginase 2 expression but reduced active p-eNOS(Ser1177) and NO levels in BAEC. In addition, both VEGF protein levels and endothelial elongation and network formation were reduced with continued hypoxia, whereas ROS levels increased and NO levels decreased. Arginase inhibition limited ROS, restored NO formation and VEGF expression, and prevented the reduction of angiogenesis. These results suggest a fundamental role of arginase activity in regulating angiogenic function.

  15. DNA Fragmentation in mammalian cells exposed to various light ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belli, M.; Cherubini, R.; Dalla Vecchia, M.; Dini, V.; Esposito, G.; Moschini, G.; Sapora, O.; Signoretti, C.; Simone, G.; Sorrentino, E.; Tabocchini, M. A.

    Elucidation of how effects of densely ionizing radiation at cellular level are linked to DNA damage is fundamental for a better understanding of the mechanisms leading to genomic damage (especially chromosome aberrations) and developing biophysical models to predict space radiation effects. We have investigated the DNA fragmentation patterns induced in Chinese hamster V79 cells by 31 keV/μm protons, 123 keV/μm helium-4 ions and γ-rays in the size range 0.023-5.7 Mbp, using calibrated Pulsed Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE). The frequency distributions of fragments induced by the charged particles were shifted towards smaller sizes with respct to that induced by comparable doses of γ-rays. The DSB yields, evaluated from the fragments induced in the size range studied, were higher for protons and helium ions than for γ-rays by a factor of about 1.9 and 1.2, respectively. However, these ratios do not adequately reflect the RBE observed on the same cells for inactivation and mutation induced by these beams. This is a further indication for the lack of correlation between the effects exerted at cellular level and the initial yield of DSB. The dependence on radiation quality of the fragmentation pattern suggests that it may have a role in damage reparability. We have analyzed these patterns with a "random breakage" model generalized in order to consider the initial non-random distribution of the DNA molecules. Our results suggest that a random breakage mechanism can describe with a reasonable approximation the DNA fragmentation induced by γ-rays, while the approximation is not so good for light ions, likely due to the interplay between ion tracks and chromatin organization at the loop level.

  16. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6 month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. Highlights: ► Chronic As{sub 2}O

  17. Risk of Lung Cancer in Workers Exposed to Benzidine and/or Beta-Naphthylamine: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Kimiko; Saeki, Keigo; Obayashi, Kenji; Kurumatani, Norio

    2016-01-01

    Benzidine (BZ) and beta-naphthylamine (BNA) have been classified as definite human carcinogens for bladder cancer by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. However, the epidemiological evidence for an association between exposure to BZ and/or BNA and lung cancer has been inconclusive. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to determine the risk for lung cancer among workers exposed to BZ/BNA. A systematic literature search was conducted to identify studies that had reported occupational BZ/BNA exposure and the outcome of interest (lung cancer death and/or incidence). Meta-analyses were performed using random effects models to combine standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) or standardized incidence ratios (SIRs). We identified 23 retrospective cohort studies including 1745 cases of lung cancer; only one study reported smoking-adjusted lung cancer risk. A significantly increased lung cancer risk (pooled SMR/SIR 1.28; 95% CI, 1.14–1.43) was observed by combining all studies, with significant heterogeneity among studies (I2 = 64.1%, P < 0.001). Effect estimates were higher for studies with direct BZ/BNA exposure (ie, dyestuff and manufacturing industries) (pooled SMR/SIR 1.58; 95% CI, 1.31–1.89), and studies that identified BZ/BNA-associated bladder cancer with SMR/SIR ≥4.7 (pooled SMR/SIR 1.68; 95% CI, 1.35–2.09). Effect estimates were similar for studies with and without concomitant occupational exposure to chromium, asbestos, arsenic, or bis(chloromethyl) ether. The cumulative meta-analysis showed that the evidence of association between occupational BZ/BNA exposure and lung cancer has been stable since 1995. Although the results of this meta-analysis have the potential for confounding by smoking and heterogeneity, our findings suggest that a finding of lung cancer following occupational BZ/BNA exposure should be considered to be a potential occupational disease. PMID:26947956

  18. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; Wang, Qin; Wen, Mingxin; Wang, Yuli; Yuan, Hongtu; Mao, Jian-Hua; Wei, Guangwei

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpression of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.

  19. CUL4A overexpression enhances lung tumor growth and sensitizes lung cancer cells to Erlotinib via transcriptional regulation of EGFR

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yunshan; Zhang, Pengju; Liu, Ziming; ...

    2014-11-21

    CUL4A has been proposed as oncogene in several types of human cancer, but its clinical significance and functional role in human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remain unclear. Expression level of CUL4A was examined by RT-PCR and Western blot. Forced expression of CUL4A was mediated by retroviruses, and CUL4A silencing by shRNAs expressing lentiviruses. Growth capacity of lung cancer cells was measured by MTT in vitro and tumorigenesis in vivo, respectively. We found that CUL4A was highly expressed in human lung cancer tissues and lung cancer cell lines, and this elevated expression positively correlated with disease progression and prognosis. Overexpressionmore » of CUL4A in human lung cancer cell lines increased cell proliferation, inhibited apoptosis, and subsequently conferred resistance to chemotherapy. On other hand, silencing CUL4A expression in NSCLC cells reduced proliferation, promoted apoptosis and resulted in tumor growth inhibition in cancer xenograft model. Mechanistically, we revealed CUL4A regulated EGFR transcriptional expression and activation, and subsequently activated AKT. Targeted inhibition of EGFR activity blocked these CUL4A induced oncogenic activities. In conclusion, our results highlight the significance of CUL4A in NSCLC and suggest that CUL4A could be a promising therapy target and a potential biomarker for prognosis and EGFR target therapy in NSCLC patients.« less

  20. Inhibition of thromboxane synthase induces lung cancer cell death via increasing the nuclear p27

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, Kin Chung; Hsin, Michael K.Y.; Chan, Joey S.Y.; Yip, Johnson H.Y.; Li, Mingyue; Leung, Billy C.S.; Mok, Tony S.K.; Warner, Timothy D.; Underwood, Malcolm J.; Chen, George G.

    2009-10-15

    The role of thromboxane in lung carcinogenesis is not clearly known, though thromboxane B2 (TXB{sub 2}) level is increased and antagonists of thromboxane receptors or TXA2 can induce apoptosis of lung cancer cells. p27, an atypical tumor suppressor, is normally sequestered in the nucleus. The increased nuclear p27 may result in apoptosis of tumor cells. We hypothesize that the inhibition of thromboxane synthase (TXS) induces the death of lung cancer cells and that such inhibition is associated with the nuclear p27 level. Our experiment showed that the inhibition of TXS significantly induced the death or apoptosis in lung cancer cells. The activity of TXS was increased in lung cancer. The nuclear p27 was remarkably reduced in lung cancer tissues. The inhibition of TXS caused the cell death and apoptosis of lung cancer cells, likely via the elevation of the nuclear p27 since the TXS inhibition promoted the nuclear p27 level and the inhibition of p27 by its siRNA recovered the cell death induced by TXS inhibition. Collectively, lung cancer cells produce high levels of TXB{sub 2} but their nuclear p27 is markedly reduced. The inhibition of TXS results in the p27-related induction of cell death in lung cancer cells.

  1. Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-08-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0223 TITLE: Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: Adenocarcinoma to Small Cell Conversion...COVERED 1Aug2014 - 31Jul2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Genetic and Epigenetic Determinants of Lung Cancer Subtype: 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-14-1-0223...histologies of lung cancer is made difficult in part because of the extensive genetic and epigenetic changes that occur in lung carcinogenesis, the

  2. AhR-dependent secretion of PDGF-BB by human classically activated macrophages exposed to DEP extracts stimulates lung fibroblast proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Jaguin, Marie; Fardel, Olivier; Lecureur, Valérie

    2015-06-15

    Lung diseases are aggravated by exposure to diesel exhaust particles (DEPs) found in air pollution. Macrophages are thought to play a crucial role in lung immune response to these pollutants, even if the mechanisms involved remain incompletely characterized. In the present study, we demonstrated that classically and alternative human macrophages (MΦ) exhibited increased secretion of PDGF-B in response to DEP extract (DEPe). This occurred via aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR)-activation because DEPe-induced PDGF-B overexpression was abrogated after AhR expression knock-down by RNA interference, in both M1 and M2 polarizing MΦ. In addition, TCDD and benzo(a)pyrene, two potent AhR ligands, also significantly increased mRNA expression of PDGF-B in M1 MΦ, whereas some weak ligands of AhR did not. We next evaluated the impact of conditioned media (CM) from MΦ culture exposed to DEPe or of recombinant PDGF-B onto lung fibroblast proliferation. The tyrosine kinase inhibitor, AG-1295, prevents phosphorylations of PDGF-Rβ, AKT and ERK1/2 and the proliferation of MRC-5 fibroblasts induced by recombinant PDGF-B and by CM from M1 polarizing MΦ, strongly suggesting that the PDGF-BB secreted by DEPe-exposed MΦ is sufficient to activate the PDGF-Rβ pathway of human lung fibroblasts. In conclusion, we demonstrated that human MΦ, whatever their polarization status, secrete PDGF-B in response to DEPe and that PDGF-B is a target gene of AhR. Therefore, induction of PDGF-B by DEP may participate in the deleterious effects towards human health triggered by such environmental urban contaminants. - Highlights: • PDGF-B expression and secretion are increased by DEPe exposure in human M1 and M2 MΦ. • DEPe-induced PDGF-B expression is aryl-hydrocarbon-dependent. • DEPe-exposed M1 MΦ secrete sufficient PDGF-B to increase lung fibroblast proliferation.

  3. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Stueckle, Todd A.; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E.; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B.; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-01-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a six month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A ‘pro-cancer’ gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment. PMID:22521957

  4. Chronic occupational exposure to arsenic induces carcinogenic gene signaling networks and neoplastic transformation in human lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Stueckle, Todd A; Lu, Yongju; Davis, Mary E; Wang, Liying; Jiang, Bing-Hua; Holaskova, Ida; Schafer, Rosana; Barnett, John B; Rojanasakul, Yon

    2012-06-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure remains a human health risk; however a clear mode of action to understand gene signaling-driven arsenic carcinogenesis is currently lacking. This study chronically exposed human lung epithelial BEAS-2B cells to low-dose arsenic trioxide to elucidate cancer promoting gene signaling networks associated with arsenic-transformed (B-As) cells. Following a 6month exposure, exposed cells were assessed for enhanced cell proliferation, colony formation, invasion ability and in vivo tumor formation compared to control cell lines. Collected mRNA was subjected to whole genome expression microarray profiling followed by in silico Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) to identify lung carcinogenesis modes of action. B-As cells displayed significant increases in proliferation, colony formation and invasion ability compared to BEAS-2B cells. B-As injections into nude mice resulted in development of primary and secondary metastatic tumors. Arsenic exposure resulted in widespread up-regulation of genes associated with mitochondrial metabolism and increased reactive oxygen species protection suggesting mitochondrial dysfunction. Carcinogenic initiation via reactive oxygen species and epigenetic mechanisms was further supported by altered DNA repair, histone, and ROS-sensitive signaling. NF-κB, MAPK and NCOR1 signaling disrupted PPARα/δ-mediated lipid homeostasis. A 'pro-cancer' gene signaling network identified increased survival, proliferation, inflammation, metabolism, anti-apoptosis and mobility signaling. IPA-ranked signaling networks identified altered p21, EF1α, Akt, MAPK, and NF-κB signaling networks promoting genetic disorder, altered cell cycle, cancer and changes in nucleic acid and energy metabolism. In conclusion, transformed B-As cells with their whole genome expression profile provide an in vitro arsenic model for future lung cancer signaling research and data for chronic arsenic exposure risk assessment.

  5. Opioid and nicotine receptors affect growth regulation of human lung cancer cell lines

    SciTech Connect

    Maneckjee, R.; Minna, J.D. Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences, Bethesda, MD )

    1990-05-01

    Using specific radioactively-labeled ligands, the authors find that lung cancer cell lines of diverse histologic types express multiple, high-affinity membrane receptors for {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists and for nicotine and {alpha}-bungarotoxin. These receptors are biologically active because cAMP levels decreased in lung cancer cells after opioid and nicotine application. Nicotine at concentrations found in the blood of smokers had no effect on in vitro lung cancer cell growth, whereas {mu}, {delta}, and {kappa} opioid agonists at low concentrations inhibited lung cancer growth in vitro. They also found that lung cancer cells expressed various combinations of immunoreactive opioid peptides ({beta}-endorphin, enkephalin, or dynorphin), suggesting the participation of opioids in a negative autocrine loop or tumor-suppressing system. Due to the almost universal exposure of patients with lung cancer to nicotine, they tested whether nicotine affected the response of lung cancer cell growth to opioids and found that nicotine at concentrations of 100-200 nM partially or totally reversed opioid-induced growth inhibition in 9/14 lung cancer cell lines. These in vitro results for lung cancer cells suggest that opioids could function as part of a tumor suppressor system and that nicotine can function to circumvent this system in the pathogenesis of lung cancer.

  6. Whole exome sequencing of independent lung adenocarcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, and malignant peritoneal mesothelioma

    PubMed Central

    Vanni, Irene; Coco, Simona; Bonfiglio, Silvia; Cittaro, Davide; Genova, Carlo; Biello, Federica; Mora, Marco; Rossella, Valeria; Dal Bello, Maria Giovanna; Truini, Anna; Banelli, Barbara; Lazarevic, Dejan; Alama, Angela; Rijavec, Erika; Barletta, Giulia; Grossi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The presence of multiple primary tumors (MPT) in a single patient has been identified with an increasing frequency. A critical issue is to establish if the second tumor represents an independent primary cancer or a metastasis. Therefore, the assessment of MPT clonal origin might help understand the disease behavior and improve the management/prognosis of the patient. Herein, we report a 73-year-old male smoker who developed 2 primary lung cancers (adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma) and a malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (PM). Whole exome sequencing (WES) of the 3 tumors and of germline DNA was performed to determine the clonal origin and identify genetic cancer susceptibility. Both lung cancers were characterized by a high mutational rate with distinct mutational profiles and activation of tumor-specific pathways. Conversely, the PM harbored a relative low number of genetic variants and a novel mutation in the WT1 gene that might be involved in the carcinogenesis of nonasbestos-related mesothelioma. Finally, WES of the germinal DNA displayed several single nucleotide polymorphisms in DNA repair genes likely conferring higher cancer susceptibility. Overall, WES did not disclose any somatic genetic variant shared across the 3 tumors, suggesting their clonal independency; however, the carcinogenic effect of smoke combined with a deficiency in DNA repair genes and the patient advanced age might have been responsible for the MPT development. This case highlights the WES importance to define the clonal origin of MPT and susceptibility to cancer. PMID:27902597

  7. Cigarette Smoke Decreases the Maturation of Lung Myeloid Dendritic Cells

    PubMed Central

    Calero-Acuña, Carmen; Moreno-Mata, Nicolás; Gómez-Izquierdo, Lourdes; Sánchez-López, Verónica; López-Ramírez, Cecilia; Tobar, Daniela; López-Villalobos, José Luis; Gutiérrez, Cesar; Blanco-Orozco, Ana; López-Campos, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    Background Conflicting data exist on the role of pulmonary dendritic cells (DCs) and their maturation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Herein, we investigated whether disease severity and smoking status could affect the distribution and maturation of DCs in lung tissues of patients undergoing elective pneumectomy or lobectomy for suspected primary lung cancer. Materials and Methods A total of 75 consecutive patients were included. Spirometry testing was used to identify COPD. Lung parenchyma sections anatomically distant from the primary lesion were examined. We used flow cytometry to identify different DCs subtypes—including BDCA1-positive myeloid DCs (mDCs), BDCA3-positive mDCs, and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs)—and determine their maturation markers (CD40, CD80, CD83, and CD86) in all participants. We also identified follicular DCs (fDCs), Langerhans DCs (LDCs), and pDCs in 42 patients by immunohistochemistry. Results COPD was diagnosed in 43 patients (16 current smokers and 27 former smokers), whereas the remaining 32 subjects were classified as non-COPD (11 current smokers, 13 former smokers, and 8 never smokers). The number and maturation of DCs did not differ significantly between COPD and non-COPD patients. However, the results of flow cytometry indicated that maturation markers CD40 and CD83 of BDCA1-positive mDCs were significantly decreased in smokers than in non-smokers (P = 0.023 and 0.013, respectively). Immunohistochemistry also revealed a lower number of LDCs in COPD patients than in non-COPD subjects. Conclusions Cigarette smoke, rather than airflow limitation, is the main determinant of impaired DCs maturation in the lung. PMID:27058955

  8. Antagonism of phenanthrene cytotoxicity for human embryo lung fibroblast cell line HFL-I by green tea polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Mei, Xin; Wu, Yuan-Yuan; Mao, Xiao; Tu, You-Ying

    2011-01-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) have been detected in some commercial teas around the world and pose a threat to tea consumers. However, green tea polyphenols (GTP) possess remarkable antioxidant and anticancer effects. In this study, the potential of GTP to block the toxicity of the model PAH phenanthrene was examined in human embryo lung fibroblast cell line HFL-I. Both GTP and phenanthrene treatment individually caused dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth. A full factorial design experiment demonstrated that the interaction of phenanthrene and GTP significantly reduced growth inhibition. Using the median effect method showed that phenanthrene and GTP were antagonistic when the inhibitory levels were less than about 50%. Apoptosis and cell cycle detection suggested that only phenanthrene affected cell cycle significantly and caused cell death; GTP lowered the mortality of HFL-I cells exposed to phenanthrene; However, GTP did not affect modulation of the cell cycle by phenanthrene.

  9. DETAIL OF ZINC CLEANER CELL INTERIOR (EXPOSED AT F/45 FOR ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF ZINC CLEANER CELL INTERIOR (EXPOSED AT F/45 FOR DEPTH OF FIELD PURPOSES). NOTE GALIGHER STYLE BAFFLES AND TENDENCY OF ZINC TO BUILD UP ON CELL COMPONENTS. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  10. The Loss of Cellular Junctions in Epithelial Lung Cells Induced by Cigarette Smoke Is Attenuated by Corilagin

    PubMed Central

    Muresan, Ximena M.; Cervellati, Franco; Sticozzi, Claudia; Belmonte, Giuseppe; Chui, Chung Hin; Lampronti, Ilaria; Borgatti, Monica; Gambari, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke (CS) contains over 4700 compounds, many of which can affect cellular redox balance through free radicals production or through the modulation of antioxidant enzymes. The respiratory tract is one of the organs directly exposed to CS and it is known that CS can damage the integrity of lung epithelium by affecting cell junctions and increasing epithelium permeability. In this study, we have used a human lung epithelial cell line, Calu-3, to evaluate the effect of CS on lung epithelial cell junctions levels, with special focus on the expression of two proteins involved in intercellular communication: connexins (Cx) 40 and 43. CS exposure increased Cx40 gene expression but not of Cx43. CS also induced NFκB activation and the formation of 4HNE-Cxs adducts. Since corilagin, a natural polyphenol, is able to inhibit NFκB activation, we have determined whether corilagin could counteract the effect of CS on Cxs expression. Corilagin was able to diminish CS induced Cx40 gene expression, 4HNE-Cx40 adducts formation, and NFκB activation. The results of this study demonstrated that CS induced the loss of cellular junctions in lung epithelium, possibly as a consequence of Cx-4HNE adducts formation, and corilagin seems to be able to abolish these CS induced alterations. PMID:25802682

  11. Lentivirus-Mediated Silencing of Myosin VI Inhibits Proliferation and Cell Cycle Progression in Human Lung Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui; Zhu, Zhenghong; Chang, Jianhua; Wang, Jialei; Shen, Xiaoyong

    2015-10-01

    Myosin VI (MYO6) is a unique actin motor, which moves toward the pointed ends of actin filaments. In this study, we found that MYO6 is overexpressed in lung cancer tissues and associated with lung cancer progression, particularly lymph node metastasis. To investigate its functions in lung cancer cells, we generated recombinant lentivirus taking shRNA of MYO6. Using two lung cancer cell lines, A549 and 95D, we found that Lv-shMYO6 could infect lung cancer cells with high efficiency and downregulate MYO6 on both mRNA and protein levels. After knockdown of MYO6, the proliferation rates of lung cancer cells were decreased significantly. The colony-formation ability of MYO6-silenced lung cancer cells was also impaired with reduced colony numbers and fewer cells per colony. Flow cytometry showed that cell cycle progression was stuck at the G0 /G1 phase, especially at the sub-G1 phase, which represents apoptotic cells. Moreover, knockdown of MYO6 downregulated the phosphorylation of ERK1/2. Further experiments using another shRNA of MYO6 confirmed the above results. These results suggest that MYO6 is crucial in maintaining cell cycle and cell growth of lung cancer cells. MYO6 may serve as a potential therapeutic target for lung cancer treatment.

  12. [Adaptive radiation therapy for non-small cell lung cancer].

    PubMed

    Bibault, J-E; Arsène-Henry, A; Durdux, C; Mornex, F; Hamza, S; Trouette, R; Thureau, S; Faivre, J-C; Boisselier, P; Lerouge, D; Paragios, N; Giraud, P

    2015-10-01

    Anatomical changes and tumor regression during thoracic radiotherapy may alter the treatment volumes. These modifications are not taken into account into set-up or motion margins used for treatment planning. Their dosimetric impact could be significant and a better understanding of the changes occurring during the 6 to 7 weeks of treatment could be useful in order to define quantitative thresholds before a new treatment planning is needed. Margins could also be reduced in order to better spare organs at risk and perform targeted dose escalation. This review assesses the potential of morphologic and metabolic imaging during treatment for adaptive radiotherapy in non-small cell lung cancer.

  13. Immune checkpoint modulation for non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Soria, Jean-Charles; Marabelle, Aurélien; Brahmer, Julie R; Gettinger, Scott

    2015-05-15

    Therapies targeting immune checkpoints have recently shown encouraging activity in patients with heavily pretreated advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), independently of NSCLC histology or mutational status, with low toxicity profiles when used as monotherapy. Objective response rates of approximately 20% have been reported in patients with advanced NSCLC treated with antagonist antibodies targeting the immune checkpoint, programmed death 1 (PD-1) on activated T cells, or its primary ligand, programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) expressed within the tumor microenvironment. Response rates appear to be higher in patients with tumor PD-L1 expression documented by immunohistochemistry, although responses have been appreciated in patients with reportedly PD-L1-negative tumor specimens. Antibodies directed against cytotoxic T-lymphocyte-associated protein 4 (CTLA-4), another immunosuppressive T-cell signaling molecule, are also being evaluated in clinical trials, with one randomized phase II trial demonstrating improved immune-related progression-free survival in lung cancer patients when added to standard chemotherapy. Additional clinical trials are combining anti-CTLA-4 antibodies with either anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies. Combinations of other immune checkpoint antagonists or agonist antibodies with anti-PD-1 or anti-PD-L1 antibodies are also being pursued.

  14. Oncogenic mutation profiling in new lung cancer and mesothelioma cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Lam, David CL; Luo, Susan Y; Deng, Wen; Kwan, Johnny SH; Rodriguez-Canales, Jaime; Cheung, Annie LM; Cheng, Grace HW; Lin, Chi-Ho; Wistuba, Ignacio I; Sham, Pak C; Wan, Thomas SK; Tsao, Sai-Wah

    2015-01-01

    Background Thoracic tumor, especially lung cancer, ranks as the top cancer mortality in most parts of the world. Lung adenocarcinoma is the predominant subtype and there is increasing knowledge on therapeutic molecular targets, namely EGFR, ALK, KRAS, and ROS1, among lung cancers. Lung cancer cell lines established with known clinical characteristics and molecular profiling of oncogenic targets like ALK or KRAS could be useful tools for understanding the biology of known molecular targets as well as for drug testing and screening. Materials and methods Five new cancer cell lines were established from pleural fluid or biopsy tissues obtained from Chinese patients with primary lung adenocarcinomas or malignant pleural mesothelioma. They were characterized by immunohistochemistry, growth kinetics, tests for tumorigenicity, EGFR and KRAS gene mutations, ALK gene rearrangement and OncoSeq mutation profiling. Results These newly established lung adenocarcinoma and mesothelioma cell lines were maintained for over 100 passages and demonstrated morphological and immunohistochemical features as well as growth kinetics of tumor cell lines. One of these new cell lines bears EML4-ALK rearrangement variant 2, two lung cancer cell lines bear different KRAS mutations at codon 12, and known single nucleotide polymorphism variants were identified in these cell lines. Discussion Four new lung adenocarcinoma and one mesothelioma cell lines were established from patients with different clinical characteristics and oncogenic mutation profiles. These characterized cell lines and their mutation profiles will provide resources for exploration of lung cancer and mesothelioma biology with regard to the presence of known oncogenic mutations. PMID:25653542

  15. Leukemia-related chromosomal loss detected in hematopoietic progenitor cells of benzene-exposed workers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Luoping; Lan, Qing; Ji, Zhiying; Li, Guilan; Shen, Min; Vermeulen, Roel; Guo, Weihong; Hubbard, Alan E.; McHale, Cliona M.; Rappaport, Stephen M.; Hayes, Richard B.; Linet, Martha S.; Yin, Songnian; Smith, Martyn T.; Rothman, Nathaniel

    2012-01-01

    Benzene exposure causes acute myeloid leukemia, and hematotoxicity, shown as suppression of mature blood and myeloid progenitor cell numbers. As the leukemia-related aneuploidies monosomy 7 and trisomy 8 previously had been detected in the mature peripheral blood cells of exposed workers, we hypothesized that benzene could cause leukemia through the induction of these aneuploidies in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. We measured loss and gain of chromosomes 7 and 8 by fluorescence in situ hybridization in interphase colony-forming unit-granulocyte-macrophage (CFU-GM) cells cultured from otherwise healthy benzene-exposed (n=28) and unexposed (n=14) workers. CFU-GM monosomy 7 and 8 levels (but not trisomy) were significantly increased in subjects exposed to benzene overall, compared to levels in the control subjects (p=0.0055 and p=0.0034, respectively). Levels of monosomy 7 and 8 were significantly increased in subjects exposed to <10 ppm (20%, p=0.0419 and 28%, p=0.0056, respectively) and ≥10 ppm (48%, p=0.0045 and 32%, p=0.0354) benzene, compared with controls, and significant exposure-response trends were detected (ptrend=0.0033 and 0.0057). These data show that monosomies 7 and 8 are produced in a dose-dependent fashion in the blood progenitor cells of workers exposed to benzene and may be mechanistically relevant biomarkers of early effect for benzene and other leukemogens. PMID:22643707

  16. MicroRNA-221 promotes human non-small cell lung cancer cell H460 growth.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yiming; Zhong, Chongjun; Ding, Shengguang; Huang, Haitao; Shen, Zhenya

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNA (miRNA-221) has been reported to be a regulator of cell proliferation. Here we intended to investigate the role of miRNA-221 in regulating the growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cell line H460. H460 cells were transfected with miRNA-221 mimics/inhibitors or their respective negative controls. Real-time quantitative PCRs (qRT-PCRs) were used to confirm the effects of miRNA-221 mimics and inhibitors in H460 cells while Cell Counting Kit 8 (CCK-8) and 5-Ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) assay were used to access the cell viability and proliferation. P27 and P57, as putative targets of miRNA-221, were determined by qRT-PCRs in H460 cells. We found that overexpression of miRNA-221 led to increased proliferative rate and cell viability in H460 cells while down-regulation of miRNA-221 decreased those effects. P27 but not P57 was identified as a potential target gene of miRNA-221 in H460 as P27 was negatively regulated by miRNA-221 in the protein level. In conclusion, this study suggests that miRNA-221 controls human non-small cell lung cancer cell H460 growth potentially by targeting P57. Inhibition of miRNA-221 represents a novel potential treatment for human non-small cell lung cancer.

  17. Lung Cancer Stem Cell: New Insights on Experimental Models and Preclinical Data

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Caroline; Rivera, Sofia; Loriot, Yohann; Vozenin, Marie-Catherine; Deutsch, Eric

    2011-01-01

    Lung cancer remains the leading cause of cancer death. Understanding lung tumors physiopathology should provide opportunity to prevent tumor development or/and improve their therapeutic management. Cancer stem cell (CSC) theory refers to a subpopulation of cancer cells, also named tumor-initiating cells, that can drive cancer development. Cells presenting these characteristics have been identified and isolated from lung cancer. Exploring cell markers and signaling pathways specific to lung CSCs may lead to progress in therapy and improve the prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Continuous efforts in developing in vitro and in vivo models may yield reliable tools to better understand CSC abilities and to test new therapeutic targets. Preclinical data on putative CSC targets are emerging by now. These preliminary studies are critical for the next generation of lung cancer therapies. PMID:21209720

  18. Immunomodulatory Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Can Mitigate Oxidative Stress and Inflammation Process in Human Mustard Lung.

    PubMed

    Nejad-Moghaddam, Amir; Ajdary, Sohiela; Tahmasbpour, Eisa; Rad, Farhad Riazi; Panahi, Yunes; Ghanei, Mostafa

    2016-12-01

    Oxidative stress and inflammation are one of the main pathological consequences of sulfur mustard on human lungs. Unfortunately, there is no effective treatment to mitigate pathological effects of sulfur mustard in mustard lungs. Here, we aimed to evaluate potential efficacy of systemic mesenchymal stem cells administration on expression of oxidative stress- and inflammation-related genes in sulfur mustard-exposed patients. Our patient received 100 million cells per injection, which was continued for four injections within 2 months. Sputum samples were provided after each injection. Oxidative stress was evaluated by determining sputum levels of malondialdehyde and glutathione. Furthermore, changes in expression of several oxidative stress- (metallothionein 3, glutathione reductase, oxidative stress responsive 1, glutathione peroxidase 2, lacto peroxidase, forkhead box M1) and inflammation-related genes (matrix metallopeptidase 2, matrix metallopeptidase 9, transforming growth factor-β1, vascular endothelial growth factor, metallopeptidase inhibitor 1, metallopeptidase inhibitor 2) were also evaluated using real-time PCR after treatments. Two-lung epithelial-specific proteins including Clara cell protein 16 and Mucin-1 protein levels were measured using enzyme immunoassay method. No significant differences were found between serum levels of Clara cell protein 16 and serum Mucin-1 protein in patient before and after cell therapy. Most of the oxidative stress responsive genes, particularly oxidative stress responsive 1, were overexpressed after treatments. Expressions of antioxidants genes such as metallothionein 3, glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase 2 were increased after cell therapy. Upon comparison of inflammation-related genes, we observed upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor and matrix metallopeptidase 9 after mesenchymal stem cells therapy. Additionally, a trend for increased value of glutathione and decreased levels of

  19. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate. The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles. PMID:25242904

  20. Oxidative stress mediated cytotoxicity of biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Jae Woong; Gurunathan, Sangiliyandi; Jeong, Jae-Kyo; Choi, Yun-Jung; Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Jin-Ki; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2014-09-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the toxicity of biologically prepared small size of silver nanoparticles in human lung epithelial adenocarcinoma cells A549. Herein, we describe a facile method for the synthesis of silver nanoparticles by treating the supernatant from a culture of Escherichia coli with silver nitrate . The formation of silver nanoparticles was characterized using various analytical techniques. The results from UV-visible (UV-vis) spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis show a characteristic strong resonance centered at 420 nm and a single crystalline nature, respectively. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy confirmed the possible bio-molecules responsible for the reduction of silver from silver nitrate into nanoparticles. The particle size analyzer and transmission electron microscopy results suggest that silver nanoparticles are spherical in shape with an average diameter of 15 nm. The results derived from in vitro studies showed a concentration-dependent decrease in cell viability when A549 cells were exposed to silver nanoparticles. This decrease in cell viability corresponded to increased leakage of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation (ROS), and decreased mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP). Furthermore, uptake and intracellular localization of silver nanoparticles were observed and were accompanied by accumulation of autophagosomes and autolysosomes in A549 cells. The results indicate that silver nanoparticles play a significant role in apoptosis. Interestingly, biologically synthesized silver nanoparticles showed more potent cytotoxicity at the concentrations tested compared to that shown by chemically synthesized silver nanoparticles. Therefore, our results demonstrated that human lung epithelial A549 cells could provide a valuable model to assess the cytotoxicity of silver nanoparticles.

  1. Current Status of Stem Cells and Regenerative Medicine in Lung Biology and Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Weiss, Daniel J.

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the 3rd leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been utilized to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy based clinical trials in lung diseases. PMID:23959715

  2. Concise review: current status of stem cells and regenerative medicine in lung biology and diseases.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Daniel J

    2014-01-01

    Lung diseases remain a significant and devastating cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. In contrast to many other major diseases, lung diseases notably chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPDs), including both asthma and emphysema, are increasing in prevalence and COPD is expected to become the third leading cause of disease mortality worldwide by 2020. New therapeutic options are desperately needed. A rapidly growing number of investigations of stem cells and cell therapies in lung biology and diseases as well as in ex vivo lung bioengineering have offered exciting new avenues for advancing knowledge of lung biology as well as providing novel potential therapeutic approaches for lung diseases. These initial observations have led to a growing exploration of endothelial progenitor cells and mesenchymal stem (stromal) cells in clinical trials of pulmonary hypertension and COPD with other clinical investigations planned. Ex vivo bioengineering of the trachea, larynx, diaphragm, and the lung itself with both biosynthetic constructs as well as decellularized tissues have been used to explore engineering both airway and vascular systems of the lung. Lung is thus a ripe organ for a variety of cell therapy and regenerative medicine approaches. Current state-of-the-art progress for each of the above areas will be presented as will discussion of current considerations for cell therapy-based clinical trials in lung diseases.

  3. Pleiotrophin regulates lung epithelial cell proliferation and differentiation during fetal lung development via beta-catenin and Dlk1.

    PubMed

    Weng, Tingting; Gao, Li; Bhaskaran, Manoj; Guo, Yujie; Gou, Deming; Narayanaperumal, Jeyaparthasarathy; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Zhang, Kexiong; Liu, Lin

    2009-10-09

    The role of pleiotrophin in fetal lung development was investigated. We found that pleiotrophin and its receptor, protein-tyrosine phosphatase receptor beta/zeta, were highly expressed in mesenchymal and epithelial cells of the fetal lungs, respectively. Using isolated fetal alveolar epithelial type II cells, we demonstrated that pleiotrophin promoted fetal type II cell proliferation and arrested type II cell trans-differentiation into alveolar epithelial type I cells. Pleiotrophin also increased wound healing of injured type II cell monolayer. Knockdown of pleiotrophin influenced lung branching morphogenesis in a fetal lung organ culture model. Pleiotrophin increased the tyrosine phosphorylation of beta-catenin, promoted beta-catenin translocation into the nucleus, and activated T cell factor/lymphoid enhancer factor transcription factors. Dlk1, a membrane ligand that initiates the Notch signaling pathway, was identified as a downstream target of the pleiotrophin/beta-catenin pathway by endogenous dlk1 expression, promoter assay, and chromatin immunoprecipitation. These results provide evidence that pleiotrophin regulates fetal type II cell proliferation and differentiation via integration of multiple signaling pathways including pleiotrophin, beta-catenin, and Notch pathways.

  4. Osimertinib and Navitoclax in Treating Patients With EGFR-Positive Previously Treated Advanced or Metastatic Non-small Cell Lung Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-31

    EGFR Activating Mutation; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Stage III Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

  5. Carcinomas of ovary and lung with clear cell features: can immunohistochemistry help in differential diagnosis?

    PubMed

    Howell, Nicole R; Zheng, Wenxin; Cheng, Liang; Tornos, Carmen; Kane, Philip; Pearl, Michael; Chalas, Eva; Liang, Sharon X

    2007-04-01

    Metastatic lung carcinomas with clear cell morphology can be confused with primary ovarian clear cell carcinomas. We performed immunohistochemical stains in 14 cases of non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features and 14 cases of ovarian clear cell carcinomas using a panel of markers, including thyroid transcription factor 1 (TTF-1), carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), Wilms tumor gene 1, octamer-binding transcription factor 4 (OCT-4), cancer antigen 125 (CA-125), estrogen receptor, and progesterone receptor. Among non-small cell lung carcinomas with clear cell features, 87.5% of adenocarcinomas (or 50% overall frequency in lung carcinomas) were positive for TTF-1, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas were positive (P = 0.002). All 14 ovarian clear cell carcinomas stained for CA-125 as compared with 1 non-small cell lung carcinoma (P < 0.001). On the other hand, 85% of non-small cell lung carcinomas stained for CEA, whereas none of the ovarian clear cell carcinomas did (P < 0.001). Interestingly, 4 ovarian clear cell carcinomas (28%) showed positive staining for the germ cell marker OCT-4. Either lung or ovarian carcinomas stained for Wilms tumor gene 1, estrogen receptor, or progesterone receptor very infrequently; and the difference between the 2 groups was not statistically significant. Our results suggest that an immunohistochemical panel consisting of TTF-1, CEA, CA-125, and OCT-4 is helpful in distinguishing most pulmonary and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell features.

  6. FTIR characterization of animal lung cells: normal and precancerous modified e10 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zezell, D. M.; Pereira, T. M.; Mennecier, G.; Bachmann, L.; Govone, A. B.; Dagli, M. L. Z.

    2012-06-01

    The chemical carcinogens from tobacco are related to over 90% of lung cancers around the world. The risk of death of this kind of cancer is high because the diagnosis usually is made only in advanced stages. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new diagnostic methods for detecting the lung cancer in earlier stages. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) can offer high sensibility and accuracy to detect the minimal chemical changes into the biological sample. The aim of this study is to evaluate the differences on infrared spectra between normal lung cells and precancerous lung cells transformed by NNK. Non-cancerous lung cell line e10 (ATCC) and NNK-transformed e10 cell lines were maintained in complete culture medium (1:1 mixture of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium and Ham's F12 [DMEM/Ham's F12], supplemented with 100 ng/ml cholera enterotoxin, 10 lg/ml insulin, 0.5 lg/ml. hydrocortisol, 20 ng/ml epidermal growth factor, and 5% horse serum. The cultures were maintained in alcohol 70%. The infrared spectra were acquired on ATR-FTIR Nicolet 6700 spectrophotometer at 4 cm-1 resolution, 30 scans, in the 1800-900 cm-1 spectral range. Each sample had 3 spectra recorded, 30 infrared spectra were obtained from each cell line. The second derivate of spectra indicates that there are displacement in 1646 cm-1 (amine I) and 1255 cm-1(DNA), allowing the possibility to differentiate the two king of cells, with accuracy of 89,9%. These preliminary results indicate that ATR-FTIR is useful to differentiate normal e10 lung cells from precancerous e10 transformed by NNK.

  7. Recombinant Interleukin-15 in Treating Patients With Advanced Melanoma, Kidney Cancer, Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, or Squamous Cell Head and Neck Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-05

    Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Head and Neck Carcinoma; Recurrent Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Skin Carcinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIA Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIB Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IIIB Skin Melanoma; Stage IIIC Skin Melanoma; Stage IV Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IV Skin Melanoma

  8. High frequency of malaria-specific T cells in non-exposed humans.

    PubMed

    Zevering, Y; Amante, F; Smillie, A; Currier, J; Smith, G; Houghten, R A; Good, M F

    1992-03-01

    A major goal of current candidate malaria vaccines is to stimulate the expansion of clones of malaria-specific lymphocytes. We have examined the in vitro T cell responses of a group of malaria exposed and non-exposed adult Caucasian donors to recombinant circumsporozoite (CS) proteins, one of which is undergoing clinical trials, to blood-stage parasites, and to synthetic peptides copying the CS protein and defined blood-stage proteins. In nearly all individuals tested, CD4 T cell proliferation or lymphokine production occurred in response to whole parasite or CS protein stimulation, and T cells from many individuals responded to synthetic peptides. T cell responses were major histocompatibility complex-restricted, and stimulation of T cells with malaria parasites or CS protein did not appear to expand a population of T cell receptor gamma/delta cells. Malaria-specific responses were independent of prior malaria exposure, and in some cases exceeded the magnitude of response to tetanus toxoid. Specific T cells are present in high frequency in the peripheral blood of many donors who have never been exposed to malaria. Although malaria-specific CD4 T cells play an important role in immunity, these data question whether vaccines need to stimulate such cells, and focus attention on other aspects of malaria immunity which may be more critical to a successful vaccine.

  9. Inhibition of connective tissue growth factor attenuates paraquat-induced lung fibrosis in a human MRC-5 cell line.

    PubMed

    Huang, Min; Yang, Huifang; Zhu, Lingqin; Li, Honghui; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Zhijun

    2016-11-01

    Chronic exposure to Paraquat (PQ) may result in progressive pulmonary fibrosis and subsequent chronic obstructive pulmonary malfunction. Connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) has been proposed as a key determinant in the development of lung fibrosis. We investigated thus whether knock down of CTGF can prevent human lung fibroblasts (MRC-5) activation and proliferation with the subsequent inhibition of PQ-induced fibrosis. MRC-5 was transfected with CTGF-siRNAs and exposed to different concentrations of PQ. The siRNA-silencing efficacy was evaluated using western blotting analyses, qRT-PCR and flow cytometry. Next, the viability and migration of MRC-5 was determined. MMP-2, MMP-9, and TIMP-1 accumulation were quantified to evaluate the lung fibrosis exposure to PQ. Over expression of CTGF mRNA was